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Sample records for airborne scanning radar

  1. Dual-Frequency Airborne Scanning Rain Radar Antenna System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussein, Ziad A.; Green, Ken

    2004-01-01

    A compact, dual-frequency, dual-polarization, wide-angle-scanning antenna system has been developed as part of an airborne instrument for measuring rainfall. This system is an upgraded version of a prior single-frequency airborne rain radar antenna system and was designed to satisfy stringent requirements. One particularly stringent combination of requirements is to generate two dual-polarization (horizontal and vertical polarizations) beams at both frequencies (13.405 and 35.605 GHz) in such a way that the beams radiated from the antenna point in the same direction, have 3-dB angular widths that match within 25 percent, and have low sidelobe levels over a wide scan angle at each polarization-and-frequency combination. In addition, the system is required to exhibit low voltage standing-wave ratios at both frequencies. The system (see figure) includes a flat elliptical scanning reflector and a stationary offset paraboloidal reflector illuminated by a common-aperture feed system that comprises a corrugated horn with four input ports one port for each of the four frequency-and-polarization combinations. The feed horn is designed to simultaneously (1) under-illuminate the reflectors 35.605 GHz and (2) illuminate the reflectors with a 15-dB edge taper at 13.405 GHz. The scanning mirror is rotated in azimuth to scan the antenna beam over an angular range of 20 in the cross-track direction for wide swath coverage, and in elevation to compensate for the motion of the aircraft. The design of common-aperture feed horn makes it possible to obtain the required absolute gain and low side-lobe levels in wide-angle beam scanning. The combination of the common-aperture feed horn with the small (0.3) focal-length-to-diameter ratio of the paraboloidal reflector makes it possible for the overall system to be compact enough that it can be mounted on a DC-8 airplane.

  2. Evaluation of meteorological airborne Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, P. H.; Mueller, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper will discuss the capabilities of airborne Doppler radar for atmospheric sciences research. The evaluation is based on airborne and ground based Doppler radar observations of convective storms. The capability of airborne Doppler radar to measure horizontal and vertical air motions is evaluated. Airborne Doppler radar is shown to be a viable tool for atmospheric sciences research.

  3. Airborne laser scan data: a valuable tool with which to infer weather radar partial beam blockage in urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremonini, Roberto; Moisseev, Dmitri; Chandrasekar, Venkatachalam

    2016-10-01

    High-spatial-resolution weather radar observations are of primary relevance for hydrological applications in urban areas. However, when weather radars are located within metropolitan areas, partial beam blockages and clutter by buildings can seriously affect the observations. Standard simulations with simple beam propagation models and digital elevation models (DEMs) are usually not able to evaluate buildings' contribution to partial beam blockages. In recent years airborne laser scanners (ALSs) have evolved to the state-of-the-art technique for topographic data acquisition. Providing small footprint diameters (10-30 cm), ALS data allow accurate reconstruction of buildings and forest canopy heights. Analyzing the three weather C-band radars located in the metropolitan area of Helsinki, Finland, the present study investigates the benefits of using ALS data for quantitative estimations of partial beam blockages. The results obtained applying beam standard propagation models are compared with stratiform 24 h rainfall accumulation to evaluate the effects of partial beam blockages due to constructions and trees. To provide a physical interpretation of the results, the detailed analysis of beam occultations is achieved by open spatial data sets and open-source geographic information systems.

  4. Airborne MIMO GMTI Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-31

    applications [1], [2], [3], [4]. [5]. [6]. [7]. [8]. [9]. [10]. [11]. [12]. Conventional phased array radars form a single coherent transmit beam and...intentionally left blank. 1. INTRODUCTION Conventional phased - array radars form a single coherent transmit beam and measure the backscattered response... steering vector for a SI MO array with nr"/? receiver phase centers located at positions xm + y„. This is how the MIMO virtual array arises. The waveforms

  5. Airborne Radar Interferometric Repeat-Pass Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Michel, Thierry R.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Chapman, Bruce D.; Fore, Alexander; Simard, Marc; Zebker, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    Earth science research often requires crustal deformation measurements at a variety of time scales, from seconds to decades. Although satellites have been used for repeat-track interferometric (RTI) synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) mapping for close to 20 years, RTI is much more difficult to implement from an airborne platform owing to the irregular trajectory of the aircraft compared with microwave imaging radar wavelengths. Two basic requirements for robust airborne repeat-pass radar interferometry include the ability to fly the platform to a desired trajectory within a narrow tube and the ability to have the radar beam pointed in a desired direction to a fraction of a beam width. Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is equipped with a precision auto pilot developed by NASA Dryden that allows the platform, a Gulfstream III, to nominally fly within a 5 m diameter tube and with an electronically scanned antenna to position the radar beam to a fraction of a beam width based on INU (inertial navigation unit) attitude angle measurements.

  6. The Next Generation Airborne Polarimetric Doppler Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Lee, Wen-Chau; Loew, Eric; Salazar, Jorge; Chandrasekar, V.

    2013-04-01

    NCAR's Electra Doppler radar (ELDORA) with a dual-beam slotted waveguide array using dual-transmitter, dual-beam, rapid scan and step-chirped waveform significantly improved the spatial scale to 300m (Hildebrand et al. 1996). However, ELDORA X-band radar's penetration into precipitation is limited by attenuation and is not designed to collect polarimetric measurements to remotely estimate microphysics. ELDORA has been placed on dormancy because its airborne platform (P3 587) was retired in January 2013. The US research community has strongly voiced the need to continue measurement capability similar to the ELDORA. A critical weather research area is quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting (QPE/QPF). In recent years, hurricane intensity change involving eye-eyewall interactions has drawn research attention (Montgomery et al., 2006; Bell and Montgomery, 2006). In the case of convective precipitation, two issues, namely, (1) when and where convection will be initiated, and (2) determining the organization and structure of ensuing convection, are key for QPF. Therefore collocated measurements of 3-D winds and precipitation microphysics are required for achieving significant skills in QPF and QPE. Multiple radars in dual-Doppler configuration with polarization capability estimate dynamical and microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation are mostly available over land. However, storms over complex terrain, the ocean and in forest regions are not observable by ground-based radars (Bluestein and Wakimoto, 2003). NCAR/EOL is investigating potential configurations for the next generation airborne radar that is capable of retrieving dynamic and microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation. ELDORA's slotted waveguide array radar is not compatible for dual-polarization measurements. Therefore, the new design has to address both dual-polarization capability and platform requirements to replace the ELDORA system. NCAR maintains a C-130

  7. 14 CFR 121.357 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... § 121.357 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate any transport... December 31, 1964, unless approved airborne weather radar equipment has been installed in the airplane....

  8. 14 CFR 121.357 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... § 121.357 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate any transport... December 31, 1964, unless approved airborne weather radar equipment has been installed in the airplane....

  9. 14 CFR 121.357 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... § 121.357 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate any transport... December 31, 1964, unless approved airborne weather radar equipment has been installed in the airplane....

  10. 14 CFR 121.357 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... § 121.357 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate any transport... December 31, 1964, unless approved airborne weather radar equipment has been installed in the airplane....

  11. 14 CFR 121.357 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... § 121.357 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate any transport... December 31, 1964, unless approved airborne weather radar equipment has been installed in the airplane....

  12. Scanning ARM Cloud Radar Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N; Johnson, K

    2012-06-18

    The scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) is a polarimetric Doppler radar consisting of three different radar designs based on operating frequency. These are designated as follows: (1) X-band SACR (X-SACR); (2) Ka-band SACR (Ka-SACR); and (3) W-band SACR (W-SACR). There are two SACRs on a single pedestal at each site where SACRs are deployed. The selection of the operating frequencies at each deployed site is predominantly determined by atmospheric attenuation at the site. Because RF attenuation increases with atmospheric water vapor content, ARM's Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites use the X-/Ka-band frequency pair. The Southern Great Plains (SGP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites field the Ka-/W-band frequency pair. One ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) has a Ka/W-SACR and the other (AMF2) has a X/Ka-SACR.

  13. Airborne Differential Doppler Weather Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, R.; Bidwell, S.; Liao, L.; Rincon, R.; Heymsfield, G.; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Precipitation Radar aboard the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM) Satellite has shown the potential for spaceborne sensing of snow and rain by means of an incoherent pulsed radar operating at 13.8 GHz. The primary advantage of radar relative to passive instruments arises from the fact that the radar can image the 3-dimensional structure of storms. As a consequence, the radar data can be used to determine the vertical rain structure, rain type (convective/stratiform) effective storm height, and location of the melting layer. The radar, moreover, can be used to detect snow and improve the estimation of rain rate over land. To move toward spaceborne weather radars that can be deployed routinely as part of an instrument set consisting of passive and active sensors will require the development of less expensive, lighter-weight radars that consume less power. At the same time, the addition of a second frequency and an upgrade to Doppler capability are features that are needed to retrieve information on the characteristics of the drop size distribution, vertical air motion and storm dynamics. One approach to the problem is to use a single broad-band transmitter-receiver and antenna where two narrow-band frequencies are spaced apart by 5% to 10% of the center frequency. Use of Ka-band frequencies (26.5 GHz - 40 GHz) affords two advantages: adequate spatial resolution can be attained with a relatively small antenna and the differential reflectivity and mean Doppler signals are directly related to the median mass diameter of the snow and raindrop size distributions. The differential mean Doppler signal has the additional property that this quantity depends only on that part of the radial speed of the hydrometeors that is drop-size dependent. In principle, the mean and differential mean Doppler from a near-nadir viewing radar can be used to retrieve vertical air motion as well as the total mean radial velocity. In the paper, we present theoretical calculations for the

  14. 14 CFR 135.175 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.175 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate a large, transport category aircraft in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne...

  15. 14 CFR 135.175 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.175 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate a large, transport category aircraft in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne...

  16. 14 CFR 125.223 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Equipment Requirements § 125.223 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate an airplane governed by this part in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne weather...

  17. 14 CFR 135.175 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.175 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate a large, transport category aircraft in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne...

  18. 14 CFR 135.175 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.175 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate a large, transport category aircraft in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne...

  19. 14 CFR 135.175 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.175 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate a large, transport category aircraft in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne...

  20. 14 CFR 125.223 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Equipment Requirements § 125.223 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate an airplane governed by this part in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne weather...

  1. 14 CFR 125.223 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Equipment Requirements § 125.223 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate an airplane governed by this part in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne weather...

  2. 14 CFR 125.223 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Equipment Requirements § 125.223 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate an airplane governed by this part in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne weather...

  3. 14 CFR 125.223 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Equipment Requirements § 125.223 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate an airplane governed by this part in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne weather...

  4. A wing pod-based millimeter wavelength airborne cloud radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Ellis, S.; Tsai, P.; Loew, E.; Lee, W. C.; Emmett, J.; Dixon, M.; Burghart, C.; Rauenbuehler, S.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a novel, airborne pod-based millimeter wavelength radar. Its frequency of operation is 94 GHz (3 mm wavelength). The radar has been designed to fly on the NCAR Gulfstream V HIAPER aircraft; however, it could be deployed on other similarly equipped aircraft. The pod-based configuration occupies minimum cabin space and maximizes scan coverage. The radar system is capable of collecting observations in a staring mode between zenith and nadir or in a scanning mode. Standard pulse-pair estimates of moments and raw time series of backscattered signals are recorded. The radar system design and characteristics, as well as techniques for calibrating reflectivity and correcting Doppler velocity for aircraft attitude and motion are described. The radar can alternatively be deployed in a ground-based configuration, housed in the 20 ft shipping container it shares with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). The radar was tested both on the ground and in flight. Preliminary measurements of Doppler and polarization measurements were collected and examples are presented.

  5. A wing pod-based millimeter wavelength airborne cloud radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Ellis, S.; Tsai, P.; Loew, E.; Lee, W.-C.; Emmett, J.; Dixon, M.; Burghart, C.; Rauenbuehler, S.

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes a novel, airborne pod-based millimeter (mm) wavelength radar. Its frequency of operation is 94 GHz (3 mm wavelength). The radar has been designed to fly on the NCAR Gulfstream V HIAPER aircraft; however, it could be deployed on other similarly equipped aircraft. The pod-based configuration occupies minimum cabin space and maximizes scan coverage. The radar system is capable of collecting observations in a staring mode between zenith and nadir or in a scanning mode. Standard pulse-pair estimates of moments and raw time series of backscattered signals are recorded. The radar system design and characteristics as well as techniques for calibrating reflectivity and correcting Doppler velocity for aircraft attitude and motion are described. The radar can alternatively be deployed in a ground-based configuration, housed in the 20 ft shipping container it shares with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). The radar was tested both on the ground and in flight. Preliminary measurements of Doppler and polarization measurements were collected and examples are presented.

  6. Range Corrections for Airborne Radar - A Joint STARS Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    ESD-TR-84-169 MTR-9055 RANGE CORRECTIONS FOR AIRBORNE RADAR - A JOINT STARS STUDY By • _,.G. A. ROBERTSHAW MAY 1984 - Prepared for DEPUTY COMMANDER...NO NO Hanscom AFB, MA 01731 6460 11. TITLE •Include securi,•,cleaficatton) Range Corrections Tor Airborne Radar - A Joint STARS Study 12. PERSONAL...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION 17 COSATI CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reuera if necemary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB GR. Airborne Radar

  7. Removing interfering clutter associated with radar pulses that an airborne radar receives from a radar transponder

    DOEpatents

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Axline, Robert M.

    2008-12-02

    Interfering clutter in radar pulses received by an airborne radar system from a radar transponder can be suppressed by developing a representation of the incoming echo-voltage time-series that permits the clutter associated with predetermined parts of the time-series to be estimated. These estimates can be used to estimate and suppress the clutter associated with other parts of the time-series.

  8. Tracking Theory for Airborne Surveillance Radars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    01803 _______________ _i- CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Naval Air System Command 13. NUMBER OF PAGES Wshntn DC 2036...Department of the Navy -Trr FRE _[LEASL, Naval Air System Command DSY ;0, Ui;UrALT£D Washington, D.C. 20360 Contract Number N00019-81-C-0182 SFor...snapshot" of detected target positions once per scan. In typical air - borne surveillance radars, each azimuth is revisited once per scan, but in a

  9. Phased-array radar for airborne systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahim, Raghbir S.; Foshee, James J.; Chang, Kai

    2003-09-01

    Phased array antenna systems, which support high pulse rates and high transmit power, are well suited for radar and large-scale surveillance. Sensors and communication systems can function as the eyes and ears for ballistic missile defense applications, providing early warning of attack, target detection and identification, target tracking, and countermeasure decision. In such applications, active array radar systems that contain solid-state transmitter sources and low-noise preamplifiers for transmission and reception are preferred over the conventional radar antennas, because the phased array radar offers the advantages of power management and efficiency, reliability, signal reception, beam steering target detection. The current phased array radar designs are very large, complex and expensive and less efficient because of high RF losses in the phase control circuits used for beam scan. Several thousands of phase shifters and drivers may be required for a single system thus making the system very complex and expensive. This paper describes the phased array radar system based on high power T/R modules, wide-band radiating planar antenna elements and very low loss wide-band phase control circuits (requiring reduced power levels) for beam scan. The phase shifter design is based on micro-strip feed lines perturbed by the proximity of voltage controlled piezoelectric transducer (PET). Measured results have shown an added insertion loss of less than 1 dB for a phase shift of 450 degrees from 2 to 20 GHz. The new wideband phased array radar design provides significant reduction in size cost and weight. Compared to the conventional phased array systems, the cost saving is more than 15 to 1.

  10. Scanning-Pencil-Beam Radar Scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, David G.; Freilich, Michael H.; Leotta, Daniel F.; Noon, Don E.

    1992-01-01

    SCANSCAT conceptual scanning radar scatterometer placed in nearly polar orbit around Earth at altitude of 705 km aboard Spacecraft B of NASA's Earth Observing System. Measures radar backscattering from surface of ocean. Data processed on ground into normalized radar-backscattering cross sections, then processed into velocities of winds near surface of ocean by use of empirical mathematical model of relationship between normalized backscattering cross section, wind vector at scanned spot, and angle of incidence and azimuth angle of radar beam. Accuracy and coverage exceeds those of fan-beam scatterometer. Modified versions of scanning plan useful in laser inspection of surface finishes on machined parts.

  11. Simulation of a weather radar display for over-water airborne radar approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clary, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne radar approach (ARA) concepts are being investigated as a part of NASA's Rotorcraft All-Weather Operations Research Program on advanced guidance and navigation methods. This research is being conducted using both piloted simulations and flight test evaluations. For the piloted simulations, a mathematical model of the airborne radar was developed for over-water ARAs to offshore platforms. This simulated flight scenario requires radar simulation of point targets, such as oil rigs and ships, distributed sea clutter, and transponder beacon replies. Radar theory, weather radar characteristics, and empirical data derived from in-flight radar photographs are combined to model a civil weather/mapping radar typical of those used in offshore rotorcraft operations. The resulting radar simulation is realistic and provides the needed simulation capability for ongoing ARA research.

  12. Navigator alignment using radar scan

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.; Marquette, Brandeis

    2016-04-05

    The various technologies presented herein relate to the determination of and correction of heading error of platform. Knowledge of at least one of a maximum Doppler frequency or a minimum Doppler bandwidth pertaining to a plurality of radar echoes can be utilized to facilitate correction of the heading error. Heading error can occur as a result of component drift. In an ideal situation, a boresight direction of an antenna or the front of an aircraft will have associated therewith at least one of a maximum Doppler frequency or a minimum Doppler bandwidth. As the boresight direction of the antenna strays from a direction of travel at least one of the maximum Doppler frequency or a minimum Doppler bandwidth will shift away, either left or right, from the ideal situation.

  13. 77 FR 21834 - Airborne Radar Altimeter Equipment (For Air Carrier Aircraft)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Airborne Radar Altimeter Equipment (For Air Carrier Aircraft) AGENCY..., Airborne Radar Altimeter Equipment (For Air Carrier Aircraft). SUMMARY: This is a confirmation notice of the cancellation of TSO-C67, Airborne Radar Altimeter Equipment (For Air Carrier Aircraft). The...

  14. Processing of High Resolution, Multiparametric Radar Data for the Airborne Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar APR-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanelli, Simone; Meagher, Jonathan P.; Durden, Stephen L.; Im, Eastwood

    2004-01-01

    Following the successful Precipitation Radar (PR) of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, a new airborne, 14/35 GHz rain profiling radar, known as Airborne Precipitation Radar - 2 (APR-2), has been developed as a prototype for an advanced, dual-frequency spaceborne radar for a future spaceborne precipitation measurement mission. . This airborne instrument is capable of making simultaneous measurements of rainfall parameters, including co-pol and cross-pol rain reflectivities and vertical Doppler velocities, at 14 and 35 GHz. furthermore, it also features several advanced technologies for performance improvement, including real-time data processing, low-sidelobe dual-frequency pulse compression, and dual-frequency scanning antenna. Since August 2001, APR-2 has been deployed on the NASA P3 and DC8 aircrafts in four experiments including CAMEX-4 and the Wakasa Bay Experiment. Raw radar data are first processed to obtain reflectivity, LDR (linear depolarization ratio), and Doppler velocity measurements. The dataset is then processed iteratively to accurately estimate the true aircraft navigation parameters and to classify the surface return. These intermediate products are then used to refine reflectivity and LDR calibrations (by analyzing clear air ocean surface returns), and to correct Doppler measurements for the aircraft motion. Finally, the the melting layer of precipitation is detected and its boundaries and characteristics are identifIed at the APR-2 range resolution of 30m. The resulting 3D dataset will be used for validation of other airborne and spaceborne instruments, development of multiparametric rain/snow retrieval algorithms and melting layer characterization and statistics.

  15. Comments on airborne ISR radar utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerry, A. W.

    2016-05-01

    A sensor/payload operator for modern multi-sensor multi-mode Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) platforms is often confronted with a plethora of options in sensors and sensor modes. This often leads an over-worked operator to down-select to favorite sensors and modes; for example a justifiably favorite Full Motion Video (FMV) sensor at the expense of radar modes, even if radar modes can offer unique and advantageous information. At best, sensors might be used in a serial monogamous fashion with some cross-cueing. The challenge is then to increase the utilization of the radar modes in a manner attractive to the sensor/payload operator. We propose that this is best accomplished by combining sensor modes and displays into `super-modes'.

  16. Crop classification using airborne radar and LANDSAT data. [Colby, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T. (Principal Investigator); Li, R. Y.; Shanmugam, K. S.

    1981-01-01

    Airborne radar data acquired with a 13.3 GHz scatterometer over a test-site near Colby, Kansas were used to investigate the statistical properties of the scattering coefficient of three types of vegetation cover and of bare soil. A statistical model for radar data was developed that incorporates signal-fading and natural within-field variabilities. Estimates of the within-field and between-field coefficients of variation were obtained for each cover-type and compared with similar quantities derived from LANDSAT images of the same fields. The classification accuracy provided by LANDSAT alone, radar alone, and both sensors combined was investigated. The results indicate that the addition of radar to LANDSAT improves the classification accuracy by about 10; percentage-points when the classification is performed on a pixel basis and by about 15 points when performed on a field-average basis.

  17. Radar Scans of the Saturn Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Richard D.; Janssen, Michael A.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Anderson, Yanhua; Hamilton, Gary; Cassini Radar Team

    2016-10-01

    The Cassini mission is now heading into its last year of observations. Part of the mission plan includes orbits that bring the spacecraft close to Saturn's rings prior to deorbiting into Saturn's atmosphere. These orbits are providing a unique opportunity to obtain backscatter measurements and relatively high-resolution brightness temperature measurements from the rings. We plan to scan the rings with the radar central beam and obtain backscatter measurements as a function of radial distance with some variation of incidence angle. Active mode radar scans are planned for four of the final high inclination orbits that bring the spacecraft close to the rings. These radar observations will be designed to sweep the A through C rings with varying bandwidth chirps selected to optimize the tradeoff between radial resolution and measurement variance. Pulse compression will deliver radial resolutions varying from about 200 m to around 4 km depending on the bandwidth used. These measurements will provide a 1-D profile of backscatter obtained at 2.2 cm wavelength that will complement similar passive profiles obtained at optical, infrared, and microwave wavelengths. This presentation will summarize the detailed designs and tradeoffs made for these observations. Such measurements will further constrain and inform models of the composition and structure of the ring particle distributions. This work is supported by the NASA Cassini Program at JPL - CalTech.

  18. Characterizing Englacial and Subglacial Temperature Structure Using Airborne Radar Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, D. M.; Seroussi, H. L.

    2015-12-01

    The temperature structure of ice sheet and glaciers is a fundamental control on ice flow, rheology, and stability. However, it is difficult to observationally constrain temperature structures at the catchment to ice-sheet scale. The englacial attenuation of radar sounding data is strongly dependent on the temperature structure of the ice sheets. Therefore, echo strength profiles from airborne radar sounding observation do contain temperature information. However, direct interpretation of englacial attenuation rates from radar sounding profiles is often difficult or impossible due to the ambiguous contribution the geometric and material properties of the bed to echo strength variations. To overcome this challenge, we presents techniques that treat radar sounding echo strength and ice thickness profiles as continuous signals, taking advantage of along-profile ice thickness and echo strength variations to constrain the spatial pattern of englacial attenuation and basal reflectivity. We then apply these techniques to an airborne radar sounding survey in order to characterize the englacial and subglacial temperature structure of the Thwaites Glacier catchment in West Antarctic. We then interpreted this structure in context of local ice sheet velocity, advection, force balance, and bed conditions using the ISSM ice sheet model.

  19. Hydrometeor discrimination in melting layer using multiparameter airborne radar measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumagai, H.; Meneghini, R.; Kozu, T.

    1992-01-01

    Results from a multiparameter airborne radar/radiometer experiment (the Typhoon experiment) are presented. The experiment was conducted in the western Pacific with the NASA DC-8 aircraft, in which a dual-wavelength at X-band and Ka-band and dual-polarization at X-band radar was installed. The signatures of dBZ(X), dBZ(Ka), LDR (linear depolarization ratio) at X-band and DZ=dBZ(X)-dBZ(Ka) are discussed for the data obtained in the penetration of the typhoon Flo. With emphasis on discrimination of hydrometeor particles, some statistical features of the brightband in stratiform rain are discussed.

  20. Proceedings of the Third Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The Third Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) Workshop was held on 23-24 May 1991 at JPL. Thirty oral presentations were made and 18 poster papers displayed during the workshop. Papers from these 25 presentations are presented which include analyses of AIRSAR operations and studies in SAR remote sensing, ecology, hydrology, soil science, geology, oceanography, volcanology, and SAR mapping and data handling. Results from these studies indicate the direction and emphasis of future orbital radar-sensor missions that will be launched during the 1990's.

  1. 77 FR 3323 - Airborne Radar Altimeter Equipment (For Air Carrier Aircraft)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ... Doc No: 2012-1243] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Airborne Radar...: Notice of intent to cancel Technical Standard Order (TSO)-C67, Airborne Radar Altimeter Equipment (For... Radar Altimeter Equipment (For Air Carrier Aircraft). The effect of the cancelled TSO will result in...

  2. Airborne Bistatic Radar Limitations and Sample Calculations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Any parameter which maximizes the viewing area of the receiver platform is a prime candidate for change if the transmitter wishes to deny or decrease...AES-19, NO. 4, 513-520 (July 1983) 4. Lorti , D. "Airborne Bistatic RadaL Operation With Non-Cooperative Transmitters," Aeronautical Systems Divi- ’V...nology Center. Contract DASG60-82-C-0014 with McDonnell Douglas Research Labs. Huntsville AL. July 1982. 7. Moreno, C, and D. Lorti . "Tactical

  3. Multifrequency and multipolarization radar scatterometry of sand dunes and comparison with spaceborne and airborne radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blom, Ronald; Elachi, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Airborne radar scatterometer data on sand dunes, acquired at multiple frequencies and polarizations, are reported. Radar backscatter from sand dunes is very sensitive to the imaging geometry. At small incidence angles the radar return is mainly due to quasi-specular reflection from dune slopes favorably oriented toward the radar. A peak return usually occurs at the incidence angle equal to the angle of repose for the dunes. The peak angle is the same at all frequencies as computed from specular reflection theory. At larger angles the return is significantly weaker. The scatterometer measurements verified observations made with airborne and spaceborne radar images acquired over a number of dune fields in the U.S., central Africa, and the Arabian peninsula. The imaging geometry constraints indicate that possible dunes on other planets, such as Venus, will probably not be detected in radar images unless the incidence angle is less than the angles of repose of such dunes and the radar look direction is approximately orthogonal to the dune trends.

  4. Airborne radar technology for windshear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibey, Joseph L.; Khalaf, Camille S.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives and accomplishments of the two-and-a-half year effort to describe how returns from on-board Doppler radar are to be used to detect the presence of a wind shear are reported. The problem is modeled as one of first passage in terms of state variables, the state estimates are generated by a bank of extended Kalman filters working in parallel, and the decision strategy involves the use of a voting algorithm for a series of likelihood ratio tests. The performance issue for filtering is addressed in terms of error-covariance reduction and filter divergence, and the performance issue for detection is addressed in terms of using a probability measure transformation to derive theoretical expressions for the error probabilities of a false alarm and a miss.

  5. Three-dimensional environment models from airborne laser radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderman, Ulf; Ahlberg, Simon; Elmqvist, Magnus; Persson, Asa

    2004-09-01

    Detailed 3D environment models for visualization and computer based analyses are important in many defence and homeland security applications, e.g. crisis management, mission planning and rehearsal, damage assessment, etc. The high resolution data from airborne laser radar systems for 3D sensing provide an excellent source of data for obtaining the information needed for many of these models. To utilise the 3D data provided by the laser radar systems however, efficient methods for data processing and environment model construction needs to be developed. In this paper we will present some results on the development of laser data processing methods, including methods for data classification, bare earth extraction, 3D-reconstruction of buildings, and identification of single trees and estimation of their position, height, canopy size and species. We will also show how the results can be used for the construction of detailed 3D environment models for military modelling and simulation applications. The methods use data from discrete return airborne laser radar systems and digital cameras.

  6. Localized Optimization and Effectiveness Analysis of Medium PRF Airborne Pulse Doppler Radars in the Turkish Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers ISAR Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar ITU International Telecommunications Union LOS Line of...Side-Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) • Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) • Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar ( ISAR ) • Weapon control radar 18...can be detected and tracked. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar ( ISAR ) pulse Doppler designs are capable of

  7. Airborne Radar Observations of Severe Hailstorms: Implications for Future Spaceborne Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, Lin; Li, Lihua; McLinden, Matthew; Cervantes, Jaime I.

    2013-01-01

    A new dual-frequency (Ku and Ka band) nadir-pointing Doppler radar on the high-altitude NASA ER-2 aircraft, called the High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP), has collected data over severe thunderstorms in Oklahoma and Kansas during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). The overarching motivation for this study is to understand the behavior of the dualwavelength airborne radar measurements in a global variety of thunderstorms and how these may relate to future spaceborne-radar measurements. HIWRAP is operated at frequencies that are similar to those of the precipitation radar on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (Ku band) and the upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement mission satellite's dual-frequency (Ku and Ka bands) precipitation radar. The aircraft measurements of strong hailstorms have been combined with ground-based polarimetric measurements to obtain a better understanding of the response of the Ku- and Ka-band radar to the vertical distribution of the hydrometeors, including hail. Data from two flight lines on 24 May 2011 are presented. Doppler velocities were approx. 39m/s2at 10.7-km altitude from the first flight line early on 24 May, and the lower value of approx. 25m/s on a second flight line later in the day. Vertical motions estimated using a fall speed estimate for large graupel and hail suggested that the first storm had an updraft that possibly exceeded 60m/s for the more intense part of the storm. This large updraft speed along with reports of 5-cm hail at the surface, reflectivities reaching 70 dBZ at S band in the storm cores, and hail signals from polarimetric data provide a highly challenging situation for spaceborne-radar measurements in intense convective systems. The Ku- and Ka-band reflectivities rarely exceed approx. 47 and approx. 37 dBZ, respectively, in these storms.

  8. Scanning ARM Cloud Radars Part I. Operational Sampling Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Kollias, Pavlos; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Widener, Kevin B.; Jo, Ieng; Johnson, Karen

    2013-12-03

    Probing clouds in three-dimensions has never been done with scanning millimeter-wavelength (cloud) radars in a continuous operating environment. The acquisition of scanning cloud radars by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program and research institutions around the world generate the need for developing operational scan strategies for cloud radars. Here, the first generation of sampling strategies for the Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACRs) is discussed. These scan strategies are designed to address the scientific objectives of the ARM program, however, they introduce an initial framework for operational scanning cloud radars. While the weather community uses scan strategies that are based on a sequence of scans at constant elevations, the SACRs scan strategies are based on a sequence of scans at constant azimuth. This is attributed to the cloud properties that are vastly different for rain and snow shafts that are the primary target of precipitation radars. A “cloud surveillance” scan strategy is introduced (HS-RHI) based on a sequence of horizon-to-horizon Range Height Indicator (RHI) scans that sample the hemispherical sky (HS). The HS-RHI scan strategy is repeated every 30 min to provide a static view of the cloud conditions around the SACR location. Between HS-RHI scan strategies other scan strategies are introduced depending on the cloud conditions. The SACRs are pointing vertically in the case of measurable precipitation at the ground. The radar reflectivities are corrected for water vapor attenuation and non-meteorological detection are removed. A hydrometeor detection mask is introduced based on the difference of cloud and noise statistics is discussed.

  9. Multibeam monopulse radar for airborne sense and avoid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorwara, Ashok; Molchanov, Pavlo

    2016-10-01

    The multibeam monopulse radar for Airborne Based Sense and Avoid (ABSAA) system concept is the next step in the development of passive monopulse direction finder proposed by Stephen E. Lipsky in the 80s. In the proposed system the multibeam monopulse radar with an array of directional antennas is positioned on a small aircaraft or Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS). Radar signals are simultaneously transmitted and received by multiple angle shifted directional antennas with overlapping antenna patterns and the entire sky, 360° for both horizontal and vertical coverage. Digitizing of amplitude and phase of signals in separate directional antennas relative to reference signals provides high-accuracy high-resolution range and azimuth measurement and allows to record real time amplitude and phase of reflected from non-cooperative aircraft signals. High resolution range and azimuth measurement provides minimal tracking errors in both position and velocity of non-cooperative aircraft and determined by sampling frequency of the digitizer. High speed sampling with high-accuracy processor clock provides high resolution phase/time domain measurement even for directional antennas with wide Field of View (FOV). Fourier transform (frequency domain processing) of received radar signals provides signatures and dramatically increases probability of detection for non-cooperative aircraft. Steering of transmitting power and integration, correlation period of received reflected signals for separate antennas (directions) allows dramatically decreased ground clutter for low altitude flights. An open architecture, modular construction allows the combination of a radar sensor with Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B), electro-optic, acoustic sensors.

  10. Probing Shallow Aquifers in Northern Kuwait Using Airborne Sounding Radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heggy, E.; Fadlelmawla, A.; Farr, T. G.; Al-Rashed, M.

    2011-12-01

    Most of the global warming observations, scientific interest and data analyses have concentrated on the earth Polar Regions and forested areas, as they provide direct measurable impacts of large scale environmental changes. Unfortunately, the arid environments, which represent ~20% of the earth surface, have remained poorly studied. Yet water rarity and freshness, drastic changes in rainfall, flash floods, high rates of aquifer discharge and an accelerated large-scale desertification process are all alarming signs that suggest a substantial large-scale climatic variation in those areas that can be correlated to the global change that is affecting the volatile dynamic in arid zones. Unfortunately the correlations, forcings and feedbacks between the relevant processes (precipitation, surface fresh water, aquifer discharge, sea water rise and desertification) in these zones remain poorly observed, modeled, let alone understood. Currently, local studies are often oriented toward understanding small-scale or regional water resources and neither benefit from nor feedback to the global monitoring of water vapor, precipitation and soil moisture in arid and semi-arid areas. Furthermore techniques to explore deep subsurface water on a large scale in desertic environments remain poorly developed making current understanding of earth paleo-environment, water assessment and exploration efforts poorly productive and out-phased with current and future needs to quantitatively understand the evolution of earth water balance. To address those deficiencies we performed a comprehensive test mapping of shallow subsurface hydro-geological structures in the western Arabic peninsula in Kuwait, using airborne low frequency sounding radars with the main objectives to characterize shallow fossil aquifers in term of depth, sizes and water freshness. In May 2011, an experimental airborne radar sounder operating at 50 MHz was deployed in Kuwait and demonstrated an ability to penetrate down to

  11. Characterizing Subglacial Interfaces With Airborne Radar Sounding Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, M. E.; Blankenship, D. D.; Morse, D. L.

    2004-12-01

    Ice sheets are sensitive indicators of global change including sea-level rise. An ice sheet's subglacial interface is an important factor controlling its dynamic behavior. In particular, the grounding zones of ice streams and subglacial lakes are complex systems involving the interaction of the moving ice mass with underlying materials such as liquid water, saturated lubricating tills, and rough or frozen bedrock sticky spots. Imaging and characterizing the subglacial environment of ice sheets is fundamental to understanding these complex systems. Airborne radar sounding is a powerful and well-known technique for studying ice sheets and glaciers and their contiguous underlying environments. We present results from data acquired in 2001 over the ice stream C grounding zone in West Antarctica, as well as over a hypothesized subglacial lake near the South Pole. These data were acquired using a uniquely configured coherent airborne radar system. Our focus has been to characterize the subglacial interface through radar echo analysis based on reflection and scattering theory. The radar system uses a programmable signal source linked to a 10 kW transmitter and a dual-channel coherent down-conversion receiver. The radar operates in chirped pulse mode at 60 MHz with 15 MHz bandwidth. High and low-gain channels allow for recording a wide dynamic range of echoes simultaneously and without range-dependent gain control. Data acquisition includes integrations of 16 returned radar signals about every 15 cm along-track. Pulse compression and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing were components of data analysis. Subglacial echoes are influenced by the physical properties of the interface such as the composition and roughness of the materials at the interface. Other important factors include dielectric losses and volumetric scattering losses from propagation through the ice as well as transmission and refraction at the air-ice interface. Unfocussed SAR narrows the along

  12. The Coplane Analysis Technique for Three-Dimensional Wind Retrieval Using the HIWRAP Airborne Doppler Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didlake, Anthony C., Jr.; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, Lin; Guimond, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    The coplane analysis technique for mapping the three-dimensional wind field of precipitating systems is applied to the NASA High Altitude Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP). HIWRAP is a dual-frequency Doppler radar system with two downward pointing and conically scanning beams. The coplane technique interpolates radar measurements to a natural coordinate frame, directly solves for two wind components, and integrates the mass continuity equation to retrieve the unobserved third wind component. This technique is tested using a model simulation of a hurricane and compared to a global optimization retrieval. The coplane method produced lower errors for the cross-track and vertical wind components, while the global optimization method produced lower errors for the along-track wind component. Cross-track and vertical wind errors were dependent upon the accuracy of the estimated boundary condition winds near the surface and at nadir, which were derived by making certain assumptions about the vertical velocity field. The coplane technique was then applied successfully to HIWRAP observations of Hurricane Ingrid (2013). Unlike the global optimization method, the coplane analysis allows for a transparent connection between the radar observations and specific analysis results. With this ability, small-scale features can be analyzed more adequately and erroneous radar measurements can be identified more easily.

  13. Conventional and synthetic aperture processing for airborne ground-penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Robert M.; Simkins, William L.; Brown, Russell D.

    1994-07-01

    For the past four years Airborne Environmental Surveys, a division of Era Aviation, Inc., has used unique and patented airborne frequency modulated, continuous wave radars and processes for detection and mapping subsurface phenomena. Primary application has focused on the detection of manmade objects in landfills, hazardous waste sites (some of which contain unexploded ordnance), and subsurface plumes of refined free- floating hydrocarbons. Recently, MSB Technologies, Inc. has developed a form of synthetic aperture radar processing, called GPSAR, that is tailored especially for the AES radars. Used as an adjunct to more conventional airborne ground-penetrating radar data processing techniques, GPSAR takes advantage of the radars' coherent transmission and produces imagery that is better focused and more accurate in determining an object's range and true depth. This paper describes the iterative stages of data processing and analysis used with the radars and shows the added advantages that GPSAR processing offers.

  14. The use of data turning in airborne radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightstone, L.; Faubert, D.

    Data turning is a digital signal processing method that achieves good signal-to-noise ratio and target/interference resolution while reducing the number of pulses processed in the discrete Fourier transform/fast Fourier transform operation. A mathematical description is provided of data turning, along with a mathematical example of the impact of data turning on a bank of discrete Fourier transform filters. Data turning is discussed from the frequency domain and time domain perspectives, and a simulated performance example is taken from an airborne pulse doppler radar system. It is shown that data turning can, with a proper choice of signal processing parameters, approximate the integration improvement of non-coherent integration. Data turning can be significantly faster than either full coherent processing or non-coherent processing.

  15. Charge-coupled device data processor for an airborne imaging radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, W. E. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Processing of raw analog echo data from synthetic aperture radar receiver into images on board an airborne radar platform is discussed. Processing is made feasible by utilizing charge-coupled devices (CCD). CCD circuits are utilized to perform input sampling, presumming, range correlation and azimuth correlation in the analog domain. These radar data processing functions are implemented for single-look or multiple-look imaging radar systems.

  16. On the Use of X-Band CW Nanosecond Airborne Radar for Terrain Profiling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    Report 5599 On the Use of X-Band CW Nanosecond Airborne Radar for Terrain Profiling (D. T. CHEN AND E. A. ULIANA00 00 Space Sensing Branch Space...Radar for Terrain Profiling 2 ERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Chen, D.T. and Uliana, E.A. - 𔄀 SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION Radar return waveform analysis Hfigh pass...filter. 79 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse of necessary and identify by block number) - ’ Terrain profile sensed by a 10 GHz X-band airborne nanosecond radar

  17. Visualisation of urban airborne laser scanning data with occlusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinks, Tommy; Carr, Hamish; Gharibi, Hamid; Laefer, Debra F.

    2015-06-01

    Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) was introduced to provide rapid, high resolution scans of landforms for computational processing. More recently, ALS has been adapted for scanning urban areas. The greater complexity of urban scenes necessitates the development of novel methods to exploit urban ALS to best advantage. This paper presents occlusion images: a novel technique that exploits the geometric complexity of the urban environment to improve visualisation of small details for better feature recognition. The algorithm is based on an inversion of traditional occlusion techniques.

  18. MARA (Multimode Airborne Radar Altimeter) system documentation. Volume 1: MARA system requirements document

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, C. L.

    1989-07-01

    The Multimode Airborne Radar Altimeter (MARA), a flexible airborne radar remote sensing facility developed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, is discussed. This volume describes the scientific justification for the development of the instrument and the translation of these scientific requirements into instrument design goals. Values for key instrument parameters are derived to accommodate these goals, and simulations and analytical models are used to estimate the developed system's performance.

  19. MARA (Multimode Airborne Radar Altimeter) system documentation. Volume 1: MARA system requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, C. L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The Multimode Airborne Radar Altimeter (MARA), a flexible airborne radar remote sensing facility developed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, is discussed. This volume describes the scientific justification for the development of the instrument and the translation of these scientific requirements into instrument design goals. Values for key instrument parameters are derived to accommodate these goals, and simulations and analytical models are used to estimate the developed system's performance.

  20. Comparison of Airborne Electromagnetic Induction and Subsurface Radar Sounding of Freshwater Bathymetry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    AD-A268 703 Comparison of Airborne * Electromagnetic Induction and Subsurface Radar Sounding of Freshwater Bathymetry Austin Kovacs and J , Scott Holladay...Laboratory Comparison of Airborne Electromagnefic Induction and Subsurface Radar Sounding of Freshwater Bcdhymetry Austin Kovacs and J . Scott Holladay May 1993...Engineer, of the Applied Research Branch, Experimental Engineering Division, U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, and J . Scott Holladay

  1. Design of an Airborne L-Band Cross-Track Scanning Scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilliard, Lawrence M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this report, we describe the design of an airborne L-band cross-track scanning scatterometer suitable for airborne operation aboard the NASA P-3 aircraft. The scatterometer is being designed for joint operation with existing L-band radiometers developed by NASA for soil moisture and ocean salinity remote sensing. In addition, design tradeoffs for a space-based radar system have been considered, with particular attention given to antenna architectures suitable for sharing the antenna between the radar and radiometer. During this study, we investigated a number of imaging techniques, including the use of real and synthetic aperture processing in both the along track and cross-track dimensions. The architecture selected will permit a variety of beamforming algorithms to be implemented, although real aperture processing, with hardware beamforming, provides better sidelobe suppression than synthetic array processing and superior signal-to-noise performance. In our discussions with the staff of NASA GSFC, we arrived at an architecture that employs complete transmit/receive modules for each subarray. Amplitude and phase control at each of the transmit modules will allow a low-sidelobe transmit pattern to be generated over scan angles of +/- 50 degrees. Each receiver module will include all electronics necessary to downconvert the received signal to an IF offset of 30 MHz where it will be digitized for further processing.

  2. Ice island detection and characterization with airborne synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, M.O.; Sackinger, W.M. )

    1990-04-15

    A 1:300,000 scale airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image of an area of the Arctic Ocean adjacent to the Queen Elizabeth Islands, Canadian High Arctic, is examined to determine the number and characteristics of ice islands in the image and to assess the capability of airborne and satellite SAR to detect ice islands. Twelve ice islands have been identified, and their dimensions range from as large as 5.7 km by 8.7 km to as small as 0.15 km by 0.25 km. A significant SAR characteristic of the shelf ice portions of ice islands is a return with a ribbed texture of alternating lighter and darker grey tones resulting from the indulating shelf ice surfaces of the ice islands. The appearance of the ribbed texture varies according to the ice islands' orientation relative to the illumination direction and consequently the incidence angle. Some ice islands also include extensive areas of textureless dark tone attached to the shelf ice. The weak returns correspond to (1) multiyear landfast sea ice that was attached to the front of the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf at the time of calving and which has remained attached since then and (2) multiyear pack ice that has become attached and consolidated since the calving, indicating that ice islands can increase their area and mass significantly as they drift. Ice islands are easily discernible in SAR images and for the future SAR represents a promising technique to obtain a census of ice islands in the Arctic Ocean. However, any SAR-based census probably will be conservative because ice islands smaller than 300-400 m across are likely to remain undetected, particularly in areas of heavy ice ridging which produces strong SAR clutter.

  3. Airborne Synthetic Aperature Radar (AIRSAR) on left rear fuselage of DC-8 Airborne Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A view of the Airborne Synthetic Aperature Radar (AIRSAR) antenna on the left rear fuselage of the DC-8. The AIRSAR captures images of the ground from the side of the aircraft and can provide precision digital elevation mapping capabilities for a variety of studies. The AIRSAR is one of a number of research systems that have been added to the DC-8. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  4. Wind Retrieval Algorithms for the IWRAP and HIWRAP Airborne Doppler Radars with Applications to Hurricanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guimond, Stephen Richard; Tian, Lin; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Frasier, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Algorithms for the retrieval of atmospheric winds in precipitating systems from downward-pointing, conically-scanning airborne Doppler radars are presented. The focus in the paper is on two radars: the Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler(IWRAP) and the High-altitude IWRAP (HIWRAP). The IWRAP is a dual-frequency (Cand Ku band), multi-beam (incidence angles of 30 50) system that flies on the NOAAWP-3D aircraft at altitudes of 2-4 km. The HIWRAP is a dual-frequency (Ku and Kaband), dual-beam (incidence angles of 30 and 40) system that flies on the NASA Global Hawk aircraft at altitudes of 18-20 km. Retrievals of the three Cartesian wind components over the entire radar sampling volume are described, which can be determined using either a traditional least squares or variational solution procedure. The random errors in the retrievals are evaluated using both an error propagation analysis and a numerical simulation of a hurricane. These analyses show that the vertical and along-track wind errors have strong across-track dependence with values of 0.25 m s-1 at nadir to 2.0 m s-1 and 1.0 m s-1 at the swath edges, respectively. The across-track wind errors also have across-track structure and are on average, 3.0 3.5 m s-1 or 10 of the hurricane wind speed. For typical rotated figure four flight patterns through hurricanes, the zonal and meridional wind speed errors are 2 3 m s-1.Examples of measured data retrievals from IWRAP during an eyewall replacement cycle in Hurricane Isabel (2003) and from HIWRAP during the development of Tropical Storm Matthew (2010) are shown.

  5. Reconstruction of cloud geometry using a scanning cloud radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewald, F.; Winkler, C.; Zinner, T.

    2015-06-01

    Clouds are one of the main reasons of uncertainties in the forecasts of weather and climate. In part, this is due to limitations of remote sensing of cloud microphysics. Present approaches often use passive spectral measurements for the remote sensing of cloud microphysical parameters. Large uncertainties are introduced by three-dimensional (3-D) radiative transfer effects and cloud inhomogeneities. Such effects are largely caused by unknown orientation of cloud sides or by shadowed areas on the cloud. Passive ground-based remote sensing of cloud properties at high spatial resolution could be crucially improved with this kind of additional knowledge of cloud geometry. To this end, a method for the accurate reconstruction of 3-D cloud geometry from cloud radar measurements is developed in this work. Using a radar simulator and simulated passive measurements of model clouds based on a large eddy simulation (LES), the effects of different radar scan resolutions and varying interpolation methods are evaluated. In reality, a trade-off between scan resolution and scan duration has to be found as clouds change quickly. A reasonable choice is a scan resolution of 1 to 2°. The most suitable interpolation procedure identified is the barycentric interpolation method. The 3-D reconstruction method is demonstrated using radar scans of convective cloud cases with the Munich miraMACS, a 35 GHz scanning cloud radar. As a successful proof of concept, camera imagery collected at the radar location is reproduced for the observed cloud cases via 3-D volume reconstruction and 3-D radiative transfer simulation. Data sets provided by the presented reconstruction method will aid passive spectral ground-based measurements of cloud sides to retrieve microphysical parameters.

  6. Wave-measurement capabilities of the surface contour radar and the airborne oceanographic lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Edward J.; Hancock, David W., III; Hines, Donald E.; Swift, Robert N.; Scott, John F.

    1987-01-01

    The 36-gigahertz surface contour radar and the airborne oceanographic lidar were used in the SIR-B underflight mission off the coast of Chile in October 1984. The two systems and some of their wave-measurement capabilities are described. The surface contour radar can determine the directional wave spectrum and eliminate the 180-degree ambiguity in wave propagation direction that is inherent in some other techniques such as stereophotography and the radar ocean wave spectrometer. The Airborne Oceanographic Lidar can acquire profile data on the waves and produce a spectrum that is close to the nondirectional ocean-wave spectrum for ground tracks parallel to the wave propagation direction.

  7. Applying RANSAC Algorithm for Fitting Scanning Strips from Airborne Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błaszczak-Bąk, Wioleta; Janicka, Joanna; Sobieraj-Żłobińska, Anna

    2016-12-01

    During the development of the data acquired by airborne laser scanning the important issue is the fitting and georeferencing of ALS point clouds by means of the tie surfaces and the reference planes. The process of scanning strips adjustment is based on mutual integration of point clouds (scanning strips) and their adaptation to the reference planes. In simultaneous adjustment all strips are combined into one geometrically coherent block, to which the coordinates are given. In the process of determining discrepancies between scanning strips it is important to determine the correct size of the shifts (offsets). Authors propose to do this by using RANSAC algorithm.

  8. Measurement of backscattering from sea with an airborne radar at L band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xianyun; Zhang, Zhongzhi; Yin, Zhiying; Sun, Fang; Kang, Shifeng; Wang, Laibu; Yu, Yunchao; Wen, Fangru

    1998-08-01

    Measurements of electromagnetic backscattering from sea surface at L band have been done with airborne side-looking radar system. Several flights are made for various sea states. Coherent radar data ta HH polarization and some truth data such as wave height, wind velocity and direction, temperature of sea water are recorded. Corner reflectors and active backscattering coefficient can be derived from the radar data and the cinematic data. The result presented in this paper include scattering coefficient and statistical analysis of radar echo with typical probability distribution functions such as Rayleigh, Weibull, Log-normal and K distribution.

  9. Radar Scan Strategies for the Patrick Air Force Base Weather Surveillance Radar, Model-74C, Replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David

    2008-01-01

    The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) is replacing the Weather Surveillance Radar, Model 74C (WSR-74C) at Patrick Air Force Base (PAFB), with a Doppler, dual polarization radar, the Radtec 43/250. A new scan strategy is needed for the Radtec 43/250, to provide high vertical resolution data over the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) launch pads, while taking advantage of the new radar's advanced capabilities for detecting severe weather phenomena associated with convection within the 45 WS area of responsibility. The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed several scan strategies customized for the operational needs of the 45 WS. The AMU also developed a plan for evaluating the scan strategies in the period prior to operational acceptance, currently scheduled for November 2008.

  10. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    SciTech Connect

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud field and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.

  11. Space Radar Image of West Texas - SAR scan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This radar image of the Midland/Odessa region of West Texas, demonstrates an experimental technique, called ScanSAR, that allows scientists to rapidly image large areas of the Earth's surface. The large image covers an area 245 kilometers by 225 kilometers (152 miles by 139 miles). It was obtained by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) flying aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 5, 1994. The smaller inset image is a standard SIR-C image showing a portion of the same area, 100 kilometers by 57 kilometers (62 miles by 35 miles) and was taken during the first flight of SIR-C on April 14, 1994. The bright spots on the right side of the image are the cities of Odessa (left) and Midland (right), Texas. The Pecos River runs from the top center to the bottom center of the image. Along the left side of the image are, from top to bottom, parts of the Guadalupe, Davis and Santiago Mountains. North is toward the upper right. Unlike conventional radar imaging, in which a radar continuously illuminates a single ground swath as the space shuttle passes over the terrain, a Scansar radar illuminates several adjacent ground swaths almost simultaneously, by 'scanning' the radar beam across a large area in a rapid sequence. The adjacent swaths, typically about 50 km (31 miles) wide, are then merged during ground processing to produce a single large scene. Illumination for this L-band scene is from the top of the image. The beams were scanned from the top of the scene to the bottom, as the shuttle flew from left to right. This scene was acquired in about 30 seconds. A normal SIR-C image is acquired in about 13 seconds. The ScanSAR mode will likely be used on future radar sensors to construct regional and possibly global radar images and topographic maps. The ScanSAR processor is being designed for 1996 implementation at NASA's Alaska SAR Facility, located at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and will produce digital images from the

  12. A model for forming airborne synthetic aperture radar images of underground targets

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, A.W.

    1994-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) from an airborne platform has been proposed for imaging targets beneath the earth`s surface. The propagation of the radar`s energy within the ground, however, is much different than in the earth`s atmosphere. The result is signal refraction, echo delay, propagation losses, dispersion, and volumetric scattering. These all combine to make SAR image formation from an airborne platform much more challenging than a surface imaging counterpart. This report treats the ground as a lossy dispersive half-space, and presents a model for the radar echo based on measurable parameters. The model is then used to explore various imaging schemes, and image properties. Dynamic range is discussed, as is the impact of loss on dynamic range. Modified window functions are proposed to mitigate effects of sidelobes of shallow targets overwhelming deeper targets.

  13. Users guide for an Airborne Windshear Doppler Radar Simulation (AWDRS) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Charles L.

    1990-01-01

    A description is provided of the Airborne Windshear Doppler Radar Simulation (AWDRS) program developed for NASA-Langley by the Research Triangle Institute. The radar simulation program is a comprehensive calculation of the signal characteristics and expected outputs of an airborne coherent pulsed Doppler radar system viewing a low level microburst along or near the approach path of the aircraft. The detailed nature of the simulation permits the quick evaluation of proposed trade-offs in radar system parameters and the evaluation of the performance of proposed configurations in various microburst/clutter environments. The simulation also provides a test bed for various proposed signal processing techniques for minimizing the effects of noise, phase jitter, and ground clutter and maximizing the useful information derived for avoidance of microburst windshear by aircraft.

  14. Performance of the NASA Airborne Radar with the Windshear Database for Forward-Looking Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Switzer, George F.; Britt, Charles L.

    1996-01-01

    This document describes the simulation approach used to test the performance of the NASA airborne windshear radar. An explanation of the actual radar hardware and processing algorithms provides an understanding of the parameters used in the simulation program. This report also contains a brief overview of the NASA airborne windshear radar experimental flight test results. A description of the radar simulation program shows the capabilities of the program and the techniques used for certification evaluation. Simulation of the NASA radar is comprised of three steps. First, the choice of the ground clutter data must be made. The ground clutter is the return from objects in or nearby an airport facility. The choice of the ground clutter also dictates the aircraft flight path since ground clutter is gathered while in flight. The second step is the choice of the radar parameters and the running of the simulation program which properly combines the ground clutter data with simulated windshear weather data. The simulated windshear weather data is comprised of a number of Terminal Area Simulation System (TASS) model results. The final step is the comparison of the radar simulation results to the known windshear data base. The final evaluation of the radar simulation is based on the ability to detect hazardous windshear with the aircraft at a safe distance while at the same time not displaying false alerts.

  15. Global digital topography mapping using a scanning radar altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Im, K. E.; Li, F.; Rodriguez, E.

    1987-01-01

    The conceptual design of a Scanning Radar Altimeter system capable of collecting less than 300-m spatial and less than 3-m height resolution digital topography data for the entire globe, from an orbital platform, is presented. A 37-GHz frequency SRA system is used to achieve the requisite resolution while reducing antenna length in the along-track dimension. Near-global coverage in a short time period is obtained by scanning the antenna beam cross-track, in a swath of about 100 km. Attention is given to the algorithm that will be used to retrieve pixel height from the return waveform.

  16. Pulse compression with very low sidelobes in an airborne rain mapping radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, A.; Durden, S. L.; Denning, R.; Im, E.; Li, F. K.; Ricketts, W.; Wilson, W.

    1994-01-01

    Pulse compression allows a substantial reduction in the peak transmitted power of a radar and is attractive for spaceborne remote sensing applications. In the case of a downward looking rain measuring radar, however, the range sidelobes associated with surface return can mask return from rain and must be kept to a minimum. Here, we describe the pulse compression system for the NASA/JPL Airborne Rain Mapping Radar. This system uses time-domain weighting of the transmitted pulse and is able to achieve a range sidelobe level of -55 dB or better in flight tests. This is significantly lower than other values reported in the open literature.

  17. Measurements of Ocean Surface Scattering Using an Airborne 94-GHz Cloud Radar: Implication for Calibration of Airborne and Spaceborne W-band Radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Li-Hua; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, Lin; Racette, Paul E.

    2004-01-01

    Scattering properties of the Ocean surface have been widely used as a calibration reference for airborne and spaceborne microwave sensors. However, at millimeter-wave frequencies, the ocean surface backscattering mechanism is still not well understood, in part, due to the lack of experimental measurements. During the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE), measurements of ocean surface backscattering were made using a 94-GHz (W-band) cloud radar onboard a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The measurement set includes the normalized Ocean surface cross section over a range of the incidence angles under a variety of wind conditions. Analysis of the radar measurements shows good agreement with a quasi-specular scattering model. This unprecedented dataset enhances our knowledge about the Ocean surface scattering mechanism at 94 GHz. The results of this work support the proposition of using the Ocean surface as a calibration reference for airborne millimeter-wave cloud radars and for the ongoing NASA CloudSat mission, which will use a 94-GHz spaceborne cloud radar for global cloud measurements.

  18. Mapping diverse forest cover with multipolarization airborne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, J. P.; Wickland, D. E.; Sharitz, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Imaging radar backscatter in continuously forested areas contains information about the forest canopy; it also contains data about topography, landforms, and terrain texture. For purposes of radar image interpretation and geologic mapping researchers were interested in identifying and separating forest canopy effects from geologic or geomorphic effects on radar images. The objectives of this investigation was to evaluate forest canopy variables in multipolarization radar images under conditions where geologic and topographic variables are at a minimum. A subsidiary objective was to compare the discriminatory capabilities of the radar images with corresponding optical images of similar spatial resolution. It appears that the multipolarization images discriminate variation in tree density, but no evidence was found for discrimination between evergreen and deciduous forest types.

  19. Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning for Automated Map Updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matikainen, Leena; Hyyppä, Juha; Litkey, Paula

    2016-06-01

    During the last 20 years, airborne laser scanning (ALS), often combined with multispectral information from aerial images, has shown its high feasibility for automated mapping processes. Recently, the first multispectral airborne laser scanners have been launched, and multispectral information is for the first time directly available for 3D ALS point clouds. This article discusses the potential of this new single-sensor technology in map updating, especially in automated object detection and change detection. For our study, Optech Titan multispectral ALS data over a suburban area in Finland were acquired. Results from a random forests analysis suggest that the multispectral intensity information is useful for land cover classification, also when considering ground surface objects and classes, such as roads. An out-of-bag estimate for classification error was about 3% for separating classes asphalt, gravel, rocky areas and low vegetation from each other. For buildings and trees, it was under 1%. According to feature importance analyses, multispectral features based on several channels were more useful that those based on one channel. Automatic change detection utilizing the new multispectral ALS data, an old digital surface model (DSM) and old building vectors was also demonstrated. Overall, our first analyses suggest that the new data are very promising for further increasing the automation level in mapping. The multispectral ALS technology is independent of external illumination conditions, and intensity images produced from the data do not include shadows. These are significant advantages when the development of automated classification and change detection procedures is considered.

  20. Feasibility of inter-comparing airborne and spaceborne observations of radar backscattering coefficients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper investigates the feasibility of using an airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) to validate spaceborne SAR data. This is directed at soil moisture sensing and the recently launched Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite. The value of this approach is related to the fact that vicar...

  1. Space-time adaptive processing with sum and multiple difference beams for airborne radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, John E.; Zhang, Yuhong; Wang, Hong

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes some new results on a signal processing approach for airborne surveillance radars. This is a space- time adaptive processing technique that simultaneously processes temporal data from sum and difference ((Sigma) (Delta) ) beams to suppress clutter returns. The approach also includes employing spatial adaptive pre- suppression to suppress wideband noise jammers in a two- stage processor.

  2. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    DOE PAGES

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud fieldmore » and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.« less

  3. Urban Tree Classification Using Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koma, Zs.; Koenig, K.; Höfle, B.

    2016-06-01

    Vegetation mapping in urban environments plays an important role in biological research and urban management. Airborne laser scanning provides detailed 3D geodata, which allows to classify single trees into different taxa. Until now, research dealing with tree classification focused on forest environments. This study investigates the object-based classification of urban trees at taxonomic family level, using full-waveform airborne laser scanning data captured in the city centre of Vienna (Austria). The data set is characterised by a variety of taxa, including deciduous trees (beeches, mallows, plane trees and soapberries) and the coniferous pine species. A workflow for tree object classification is presented using geometric and radiometric features. The derived features are related to point density, crown shape and radiometric characteristics. For the derivation of crown features, a prior detection of the crown base is performed. The effects of interfering objects (e.g. fences and cars which are typical in urban areas) on the feature characteristics and the subsequent classification accuracy are investigated. The applicability of the features is evaluated by Random Forest classification and exploratory analysis. The most reliable classification is achieved by using the combination of geometric and radiometric features, resulting in 87.5% overall accuracy. By using radiometric features only, a reliable classification with accuracy of 86.3% can be achieved. The influence of interfering objects on feature characteristics is identified, in particular for the radiometric features. The results indicate the potential of using radiometric features in urban tree classification and show its limitations due to anthropogenic influences at the same time.

  4. Validation of Airborne FMCW Radar Measurements of Snow Thickness Over Sea Ice in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galin, Natalia; Worby, Anthony; Markus, Thorsten; Leuschen, Carl; Gogineni, Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Antarctic sea ice and its snow cover are integral components of the global climate system, yet many aspects of their vertical dimensions are poorly understood, making their representation in global climate models poor. Remote sensing is the key to monitoring the dynamic nature of sea ice and its snow cover. Reliable and accurate snow thickness data are currently a highly sought after data product. Remotely sensed snow thickness measurements can provide an indication of precipitation levels, predicted to increase with effects of climate change in the polar regions. Airborne techniques provide a means for regional-scale estimation of snow depth and distribution. Accurate regional-scale snow thickness data will also facilitate an increase in the accuracy of sea ice thickness retrieval from satellite altimeter freeboard estimates. The airborne data sets are easier to validate with in situ measurements and are better suited to validating satellite algorithms when compared with in situ techniques. This is primarily due to two factors: better chance of getting coincident in situ and airborne data sets and the tractability of comparison between an in situ data set and the airborne data set averaged over the footprint of the antennas. A 28-GHz frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) radar loaned by the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets to the Australian Antarctic Division is used to measure snow thickness over sea ice in East Antarctica. Provided with the radar design parameters, the expected performance parameters of the radar are summarized. The necessary conditions for unambiguous identification of the airsnow and snowice layers for the radar are presented. Roughnesses of the snow and ice surfaces are found to be dominant determinants in the effectiveness of layer identification for this radar. Finally, this paper presents the first in situ validated snow thickness estimates over sea ice in Antarctica derived from an FMCW radar on a helicopterborne platform.

  5. Electromagnetic Model Reliably Predicts Radar Scattering Characteristics of Airborne Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkovic, Djordje; Stepanian, Phillip M.; Kelly, Jeffrey F.; Chilson, Phillip B.

    2016-10-01

    The radar scattering characteristics of aerial animals are typically obtained from controlled laboratory measurements of a freshly harvested specimen. These measurements are tedious to perform, difficult to replicate, and typically yield only a small subset of the full azimuthal, elevational, and polarimetric radio scattering data. As an alternative, biological applications of radar often assume that the radar cross sections of flying animals are isotropic, since sophisticated computer models are required to estimate the 3D scattering properties of objects having complex shapes. Using the method of moments implemented in the WIPL-D software package, we show for the first time that such electromagnetic modeling techniques (typically applied to man-made objects) can accurately predict organismal radio scattering characteristics from an anatomical model: here the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis). The simulated scattering properties of the bat agree with controlled measurements and radar observations made during a field study of bats in flight. This numerical technique can produce the full angular set of quantitative polarimetric scattering characteristics, while eliminating many practical difficulties associated with physical measurements. Such a modeling framework can be applied for bird, bat, and insect species, and will help drive a shift in radar biology from a largely qualitative and phenomenological science toward quantitative estimation of animal densities and taxonomic identification.

  6. Electromagnetic Model Reliably Predicts Radar Scattering Characteristics of Airborne Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Mirkovic, Djordje; Stepanian, Phillip M.; Kelly, Jeffrey F.; Chilson, Phillip B.

    2016-01-01

    The radar scattering characteristics of aerial animals are typically obtained from controlled laboratory measurements of a freshly harvested specimen. These measurements are tedious to perform, difficult to replicate, and typically yield only a small subset of the full azimuthal, elevational, and polarimetric radio scattering data. As an alternative, biological applications of radar often assume that the radar cross sections of flying animals are isotropic, since sophisticated computer models are required to estimate the 3D scattering properties of objects having complex shapes. Using the method of moments implemented in the WIPL-D software package, we show for the first time that such electromagnetic modeling techniques (typically applied to man-made objects) can accurately predict organismal radio scattering characteristics from an anatomical model: here the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis). The simulated scattering properties of the bat agree with controlled measurements and radar observations made during a field study of bats in flight. This numerical technique can produce the full angular set of quantitative polarimetric scattering characteristics, while eliminating many practical difficulties associated with physical measurements. Such a modeling framework can be applied for bird, bat, and insect species, and will help drive a shift in radar biology from a largely qualitative and phenomenological science toward quantitative estimation of animal densities and taxonomic identification. PMID:27762292

  7. Electromagnetic Model Reliably Predicts Radar Scattering Characteristics of Airborne Organisms.

    PubMed

    Mirkovic, Djordje; Stepanian, Phillip M; Kelly, Jeffrey F; Chilson, Phillip B

    2016-10-20

    The radar scattering characteristics of aerial animals are typically obtained from controlled laboratory measurements of a freshly harvested specimen. These measurements are tedious to perform, difficult to replicate, and typically yield only a small subset of the full azimuthal, elevational, and polarimetric radio scattering data. As an alternative, biological applications of radar often assume that the radar cross sections of flying animals are isotropic, since sophisticated computer models are required to estimate the 3D scattering properties of objects having complex shapes. Using the method of moments implemented in the WIPL-D software package, we show for the first time that such electromagnetic modeling techniques (typically applied to man-made objects) can accurately predict organismal radio scattering characteristics from an anatomical model: here the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis). The simulated scattering properties of the bat agree with controlled measurements and radar observations made during a field study of bats in flight. This numerical technique can produce the full angular set of quantitative polarimetric scattering characteristics, while eliminating many practical difficulties associated with physical measurements. Such a modeling framework can be applied for bird, bat, and insect species, and will help drive a shift in radar biology from a largely qualitative and phenomenological science toward quantitative estimation of animal densities and taxonomic identification.

  8. Description, characteristics and testing of the NASA airborne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R.; Altiz, O.; Schaffner, P.; Schrader, J. H.; Blume, H. J. C.

    1991-01-01

    Presented here is a description of a coherent radar scattermeter and its associated signal processing hardware, which have been specifically designed to detect microbursts and record their radar characteristics. Radar parameters, signal processing techniques and detection algorithms, all under computer control, combine to sense and process reflectivity, clutter, and microburst data. Also presented is the system's high density, high data rate recording system. This digital system is capable of recording many minutes of the in-phase and quadrature components and corresponding receiver gains of the scattered returns for selected spatial regions, as well as other aircraft and hardware related parameters of interest for post-flight analysis. Information is given in viewgraph form.

  9. Flight investigation of helicopter IFR approaches to oil rigs using airborne weather and mapping radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, J. S.; Hegarty, D. M.; Phillips, J. D.; Sturgeon, W. R.; Hunting, A. W.; Pate, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    Airborne weather and mapping radar is a near-term, economical method of providing 'self-contained' navigation information for approaches to offshore oil rigs and its use has been rapidly expanding in recent years. A joint NASA/FAA flight test investigation of helicopter IFR approaches to offshore oil rigs in the Gulf of Mexico was initiated in June 1978 and conducted under contract to Air Logistics. Approximately 120 approaches were flown in a Bell 212 helicopter by 15 operational pilots during the months of August and September 1978. The purpose of the tests was to collect data to (1) support development of advanced radar flight director concepts by NASA and (2) aid the establishment of Terminal Instrument Procedures (TERPS) criteria by the FAA. The flight test objectives were to develop airborne radar approach procedures, measure tracking errors, determine accpetable weather minimums, and determine pilot acceptability. Data obtained will contribute significantly to improved helicopter airborne radar approach capability and to the support of exploration, development, and utilization of the Nation's offshore oil supplies.

  10. UAVSAR: Airborne L-band Radar for Repeat Pass Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    The primary objectives of the UAVSAR Project were to: a) develop a miniaturized polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for use on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) or piloted vehicle. b) develop the associated processing algorithms for repeat-pass differential interferometric measurements using a single antenna. c) conduct measurements of geophysical interest, particularly changes of rapidly deforming surfaces such as volcanoes or earthquakes. Two complete systems were developed. Operational Science Missions began on February 18, 2009 ... concurrent development and testing of the radar system continues.

  11. Range profiling of the rain rate by an airborne weather radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, Robert; Nakamura, Kenji

    1990-01-01

    A class of methods based on a measure of path attenuation that is used to constrain the Hitschfeld-Bordan solution is investigated. Such methods are investigated for lidar, radar, and combined radar-radiometer applications. Their function is to allocate the attenuation in proportion to the strength of the measured reflectivity. A description is provided of four estimates of rain rate that have been tested using data from a dual-wavelength airborne radar at 10 GHz and 35 GHz. It is concluded, that when attenuation is significant, the estimates are generally more accurate than those without attenuation correction. Thus, such methodologies can be utilized to extend the effective dynamic range of the radar to higher rain rates.

  12. AquiferEx: Results of the Optical and Radar Airborne Campaign in Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiber, R.; Hajnsek, I.; Horn, R.; Oppelt, N.; Mauser, W.; Baccar, B. B.; Bianchi, R.

    2007-03-01

    In November 2005 an ESA funded airborne campaign was conducted in Southern Tunisia to generate a data base of high resolution optical and radar data in support of science product development with respect to water management applications in semi-arid areas. Both the optical (AVIS of LMU) and radar sensor (E-SAR of DLR) were operated quasi-simultaneously from the same aircraft. In parallel a ground measurement campaign was conducted with the support of the Tunisian organisations CRDA (Commissariat Regional des Development Agricole) and IRA (Institut des Regiones Arides). This paper describes the acquired optical, radar, and ground reference data, the adopted processing methodologies as well as the results obtained in the frame of this project from the radar data.

  13. Characterization of wetland, forest, and agricultural ecosystems in Belize with airborne radar (AIRSAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, Kevin O.; Rey-Benayas, Jose Maria; Paris, Jack F.

    1992-01-01

    The Shuttle Imaging Radar-C/X-SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) Experiment includes the study of wetland dynamics in the seasonal tropics. In preparation for these wetland studies, airborne P, L, and C band radar (AIRSAR) data of Belize, Guatemala, and Mexico acquired by NASA and JPL in March 1990 were analyzed. The first phase of our study focuses on AIRSAR data from the Gallon Jug test site in northwestern Belize, for which ground data were also collected during the three days prior to the overflight. One of the main objectives of the Gallon Jug study is to develop a method for characterizing wetland vegetation types and their flooding status with multifrequency polarimetric radar data.

  14. Polarization differences in airborne ground penetrating radar performance for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogaru, Traian; Le, Calvin

    2016-05-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has investigated the ultra-wideband (UWB) radar technology for detection of landmines, improvised explosive devices and unexploded ordnance, for over two decades. This paper presents a phenomenological study of the radar signature of buried landmines in realistic environments and the performance of airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in detecting these targets as a function of multiple parameters: polarization, depression angle, soil type and burial depth. The investigation is based on advanced computer models developed at ARL. The analysis includes both the signature of the targets of interest and the clutter produced by rough surface ground. Based on our numerical simulations, we conclude that low depression angles and H-H polarization offer the highest target-to-clutter ratio in the SAR images and therefore the best radar performance of all the scenarios investigated.

  15. Definition and fabrication of an airborne scatterometer radar signal processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A hardware/software system which incorporates a microprocessor design and software for the calculation of normalized radar cross section in real time was developed. Interface is provided to decommutate the NASA ADAS data stream for aircraft parameters used in processing and to provide output in the form of strip chart and pcm compatible data recording.

  16. Scan patterns and accuracy of a Radar Wind Sensor (RAWS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Shuxian; Beh, Beng; Moore, Richard K.

    1995-01-01

    The Radar Wind Sensor (RAWS) was proposed as a complement to laser wind sensors, allowing coverage in cloudy regions excluded from laser coverage. Previous University of Kansas studies showed the feasibility of the wind measurement at various levels in the atmosphere and indicated that RAWS can also measure rain rates and ocean-surface winds. Here we discuss measurement of the wind vector in terms of the scan patterns for a conically scanned antenna. By using many measurements from cells about 66 km square and 132 km square, a least-squares algorithm gives results that are reasonable for insertion into global atmospheric models. For RAWS to be used successfully as a complement to a laser wind sensor, the design of the two sensors should be integrated and radial velocity measurements in a given atmospheric cell should be combined to get the most accurate results.

  17. Hurricane Wind Field Measurements with Scanning Airborne Doppler Lidar During CAMEX-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, D. R.; Howell, J. N.; Darby, L. S.; Hardesty, R. M.; Traff, D. M.; Menzies, R. T.

    2000-01-01

    During the 1998 Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3), the first hurricane wind field measurements with Doppler lidar were achieved. Wind fields were mapped within the eye, along the eyewall, in the central dense overcast, and in the marine boundary layer encompassing the inflow region. Spatial coverage was determined primarily by cloud distribution and opacity. Within optically-thin cirrus slant range of 20- 25 km was achieved, whereas no propagation was obtained during penetration of dense cloud. Measurements were obtained with the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. MACAWS was developed and operated cooperatively by the atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A pseudo-dual Doppler technique ("co-planar scanning") is used to map the horizontal component of the wind at several vertical levels. Pulses from the laser are directed out the left side of the aircraft in the desired directions using computer-controlled rotating prisms. Upon exiting the aircraft, the beam is completely eyesafe. Aircraft attitude and speed are taken into account during real-time signal processing, resulting in determination of the ground-relative wind to an accuracy of about 1 m/s magnitude and about 10 deg direction. Beam pointing angle errors are about 0.1 deg, equivalent to about 17 m at 10 km. Horizontal resolution is about 1 km (along-track) for typical signal processor and scanner settings; vertical resolution varies with range. Results from CAMEX-3 suggest that scanning Doppler wind lidar can complement airborne Doppler radar by providing wind field measurements in regions that are devoid of hydrometeors. At present MACAWS observations are being assimilated into experimental forecast models and satellite Doppler wind lidar simulations to evaluate the relative impact.

  18. Demonstration of radar reflector detection and ground clutter suppression using airborne weather and mapping radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. J.; Bull, J. S.; Chisholm, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    A navigation system which utilizes minimum ground-based equipment is especially advantageous to helicopters, which can make off-airport landings. Research has been conducted in the use of weather and mapping radar to detect large radar reflectors overland for navigation purposes. As initial studies have not been successful, investigations were conducted regarding a new concept for the detection of ground-based radar reflectors and eliminating ground clutter, using a device called an echo processor (EP). A description is presented of the problems associated with detecting radar reflectors overland, taking into account the EP concept and the results of ground- and flight-test investigations. The echo processor concept was successfully demonstrated in detecting radar reflectors overland in a high-clutter environment. A radar reflector target size of 55 dBsm was found to be adequate for detection in an urban environment.

  19. Detection of windthrown trees using airborne laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyström, Mattias; Holmgren, Johan; Fransson, Johan E. S.; Olsson, Håkan

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a method has been developed for the detection of windthrown trees under a forest canopy, using the difference between two elevation models created from the same high density (65 points/m2) airborne laser scanning data. The difference image showing objects near the ground was created by subtracting a standard digital elevation model (DEM) from a more detailed DEM created using an active surface algorithm. Template matching was used to automatically detect windthrown trees in the difference image. The 54 ha study area is located in hemi-boreal forest in southern Sweden (Lat. 58°29‧ N, Long. 13°38‧ E) and is dominated by Norway spruce (Picea abies) with 3.5% deciduous species (mostly birch) and 1.7% Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). The result was evaluated using 651 field measured windthrown trees. At individual tree level, the detection rate was 38% with a commission error of 36%. Much higher detection rates were obtained for taller trees; 89% of the trees taller than 27 m were detected. For pine the individual tree detection rate was 82%, most likely due to the more easily visible stem and lack of branches. When aggregating the results to 40 m square grid cells, at least one tree was detected in 77% of the grid cells which according to the field measurements contained one or more windthrown trees.

  20. Footprint Map Partitioning Using Airborne Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, B.; Oude Elberink, S.; Vosselman, G.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays many cities and countries are creating their 3D building models for a better daily management and smarter decision making. The newly created 3D models are required to be consistent with existing 2D footprint maps. Thereby the 2D maps are usually combined with height data for the task of 3D reconstruction. Many buildings are often composed by parts that are discontinuous over height. Building parts can be reconstructed independently and combined into a complete building. Therefore, most of the state-of-the-art work on 3D building reconstruction first decomposes a footprint map into parts. However, those works usually change the footprint maps for easier partitioning and cannot detect building parts that are fully inside the footprint polygon. In order to solve those problems, we introduce two methodologies, one more dependent on height data, and the other one more dependent on footprints. We also experimentally evaluate the two methodologies and compare their advantages and disadvantages. The experiments use Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) data and two vector maps, one with 1:10,000 scale and another one with 1:500 scale.

  1. Test field for airborne laser scanning in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahokas, E.; Kaartinen, H.; Kukko, A.; Litkey, P.

    2014-11-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a widely spread operational measurement tool for obtaining 3D coordinates of the ground surface. There is a need for calibrating the ALS system and a test field for ALS was established at the end of 2013. The test field is situated in the city of Lahti, about 100 km to the north of Helsinki. The size of the area is approximately 3.5 km × 3.2 km. Reference data was collected with a mobile laser scanning (MLS) system assembled on a car roof. Some streets were measured both ways and most of them in one driving direction only. The MLS system of the Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI) consists of a navigation system (NovAtel SPAN GNSS-IMU) and a laser scanner (FARO Focus3D 120). In addition to the MLS measurements more than 800 reference points were measured using a Trimble R8 VRS-GNSS system. Reference points are along the streets, on parking lots, and white pedestrian crossing line corners which can be used as reference targets. The National Land Survey of Finland has already used this test field this spring for calibrating their Leica ALS-70 scanner. Especially it was easier to determine the encoder scale factor parameter using this test field. Accuracy analysis of the MLS points showed that the point height RMSE is 2.8 cm and standard deviation is 2.6 cm. Our purpose is to measure both more MLS data and more reference points in the test field area to get a better spatial coverage. Calibration flight heights are planned to be 1000 m and 2500 m above ground level. A cross pattern, southwest-northeast and northwest-southeast, will be flown both in opposite directions.

  2. 77 FR 37470 - Technical Standard Order (TSO)-C65a, Airborne Doppler Radar Ground Speed and/or Drift Angle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Technical Standard Order (TSO)-C65a, Airborne Doppler Radar Ground Speed... Doppler radar ground speed and/or drift angle measuring equipment (for air carrier aircraft). SUMMARY: This notice announces the FAA's intent to cancel TSO-C65a, Airborne Doppler radar ground speed...

  3. Characteristics of Deep Tropical and Subtropical Convection from Nadir-Viewing High-Altitude Airborne Doppler Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, Lin; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Li, Lihua; Guimond, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents observations of deep convection characteristics in the tropics and subtropics that have been classified into four categories: tropical cyclone, oceanic, land, and sea breeze. Vertical velocities in the convection were derived from Doppler radar measurements collected during several NASA field experiments from the nadir-viewing high-altitude ER-2 Doppler radar (EDOP). Emphasis is placed on the vertical structure of the convection from the surface to cloud top (sometimes reaching 18-km altitude). This unique look at convection is not possible from other approaches such as ground-based or lower-altitude airborne scanning radars. The vertical motions from the radar measurements are derived using new relationships between radar reflectivity and hydrometeor fall speed. Various convective properties, such as the peak updraft and downdraft velocities and their corresponding altitude, heights of reflectivity levels, and widths of reflectivity cores, are estimated. The most significant findings are the following: 1) strong updrafts that mostly exceed 15 m/s, with a few exceeding 30 m/s, are found in all the deep convection cases, whether over land or ocean; 2) peak updrafts were almost always above the 10-km level and, in the case of tropical cyclones, were closer to the 12-km level; and 3) land-based and sea-breeze convection had higher reflectivities and wider convective cores than oceanic and tropical cyclone convection. In addition, the high-resolution EDOP data were used to examine the connection between reflectivity and vertical velocity, for which only weak linear relationships were found. The results are discussed in terms of dynamical and microphysical implications for numerical models and future remote sensors.

  4. Greenland snow accumulation rates estimated by the retracking of percolation facies from airborne radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Pena, S.; Howat, I. M.

    2012-12-01

    The margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet are experiencing substantial thinning due to warming in the arctic regions, and there is a growing concern about the effects that mass imbalance of the ice sheet could have on climate and sea level rise. Although volume changes of the ice sheet may be inferred by remote sensing methods, mass gain and accumulation fluctuations are not easily distinguished and are poorly resolved. Recent advances in airborne radar techniques have resulted in systems capable of resolving snow accumulation by retracking internal layers formed by refreezing of surface meltwater that percolates through the snowpack, a phenomenon increasingly common in Greenland. We present accumulation rates for the catchment areas of the Jakobshavn, Helheim, and Rusell glaciers derived from snow depth resolved by snow and Ku-band airborne radar, flown as part of NASA's Operation IceBridge.

  5. Estimation of terracing characteristics from airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokalj, Žiga

    2015-04-01

    Agricultural terraces are a fundamental morphological form of the Slovenian landscape. They are present in all of its diverse geographical regions, from Mediterranean and Dinaric hills and plateaus, Alpine mountains and plains, to Pannonian hills. New systematic research based on mapping aerial orthophotos and historical maps revealed previously unrecorded distribution and extent of terracing. However, the extensive overgrowing of the Slovenian countryside in the past century, when forest cover has grown from 40% to more than 60%, hid many of the terraces under a thick forest canopy. This is especially true for the higher and more remote areas where unfavourable natural conditions have coupled with depopulation processes. In such conditions, the only reasonable technique to observe cultural terraces and other remains of past human activities over large areas is airborne laser scanning. With the country-wide airborne lidar data becoming available, many new possibilities for discovery as well as quantitative analyses are becoming available. We explored manual and semiautomatic approaches to obtain terracing characteristics around representative villages of diverse landscape types. Individual terraces can be described with several attributes, such as riser slope gradient, riser height, tread area, length and width, ratio of length and width, altitude, location of the terrace in the thermal band, distance to the settlement, number and type of trees, distance between trees, and number of vineyard rows. Such characteristics can be derived manually, which can be painstakingly slow, but with relative precisions reaching the order of centimetres and decimetres, or semiautomatically, which is much faster, but with worse precision levels, mainly due to various outliers and errors in processing. The success of attribute derivation is highly dependent on raw lidar data acquisition parameters and processing. Manual interpretation has a distinct advantage of the possibility to

  6. ER-2 Airborne Radars Data during Iphex - a New 4-Frequency Look at Precipitation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymsfield, G. M.; Tian, L.; McLinden, M.; Li, L.; Cervantes, J.; Venkatesh, V.; Coon, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEx) field campaign was conducted in the Southeast U.S. from 15 May to 30 June 2014 in support of Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) ground validation. The NASA ER-2 flew in this campaign as a GPM simulator with radars and radiometers that covered the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) frequencies. The main goal for the ER-2 high spatial and temporal resolution data sets to be used for GPM algorithm validation and improvement. Goddard Space Flight Center provided 3 nadir-pointing radars that covered X- through W-band. The High-altitude Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP) provided Ku and Ka-band measurements that are similar to GPM's DPR. In addition, the W-band Cloud Radar System (CRS) and ER-2 X-band Radar (EXRAD) were on board. The 4 frequencies provide opportunity for developing consistent retrieval algorithms as well as to expand the dynamic range (i.e., particle size) of the retrievals. There were a total of 15 science flights during IPHEx that measured a variety of land-based and oceanic precipitation, with may convective, stratiform, and cloud targets. This presentation will provide preliminary observations and analyses from the IPHEx ER-2 radars. It will discuss planned retrieval algorithms and data analyses.

  7. Annual Greenland accumulation rates (2009-2012) from airborne snow radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Lora S.; Ivanoff, Alvaro; Alexander, Patrick M.; MacGregor, Joseph A.; Fettweis, Xavier; Panzer, Ben; Paden, John D.; Forster, Richard R.; Das, Indrani; McConnell, Joesph R.; Tedesco, Marco; Leuschen, Carl; Gogineni, Prasad

    2016-08-01

    Contemporary climate warming over the Arctic is accelerating mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet through increasing surface melt, emphasizing the need to closely monitor its surface mass balance in order to improve sea-level rise predictions. Snow accumulation is the largest component of the ice sheet's surface mass balance, but in situ observations thereof are inherently sparse and models are difficult to evaluate at large scales. Here, we quantify recent Greenland accumulation rates using ultra-wideband (2-6.5 GHz) airborne snow radar data collected as part of NASA's Operation IceBridge between 2009 and 2012. We use a semiautomated method to trace the observed radiostratigraphy and then derive annual net accumulation rates for 2009-2012. The uncertainty in these radar-derived accumulation rates is on average 14 %. A comparison of the radar-derived accumulation rates and contemporaneous ice cores shows that snow radar captures both the annual and long-term mean accumulation rate accurately. A comparison with outputs from a regional climate model (MAR) shows that this model matches radar-derived accumulation rates in the ice sheet interior but produces higher values over southeastern Greenland. Our results demonstrate that snow radar can efficiently and accurately map patterns of snow accumulation across an ice sheet and that it is valuable for evaluating the accuracy of surface mass balance models.

  8. The relationship between aboveground biomass and radar backscatter as observed on airborne SAR imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasischke, Eric S.; Bourgeau-Chavez, Laura L.; Christensen, Norman L., Jr.; Dobson, M. Craig

    1991-01-01

    The initial results of an experiment to examine the dependence of radar image intensity on total above-ground biomass in a southern US pine forest ecosystem are presented. Two sets of data are discussed. First, we examine two L-band (VV-polarization) data sets which were collected 5 years apart. These data sets clearly illustrate the change in backscatter resulting from the growth of a young pine stand. Second, we examine the dependence between radar backscatter and biomass as a function of radar frequency using data from the JPL Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) and ERIM/NADC P-3 SAR systems. These results show that there is a positive correlation between above-ground biomass and radar backscatter and at C-, L-, and P-bands, but very little correlation at C-band. The biomass level for which this positive correlation holds decreases as radar frequency increases. This positive correlation is stronger at HH and HV polarizations that VV polarization at L- and P-bands, but strongest at VV polarization for C-band.

  9. Remote Sensing of Snow-covered Sea Ice with Ultra-wideband Airborne Radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, S.; Gogineni, P. S.; Gomez-Garcia, D.; Leuschen, C.; Hale, R.; Rodriguez-Morales, F.; Paden, J. D.; Li, J.

    2015-12-01

    The extent and thickness of sea ice and snow play a critical role in the Earth's climate system. Both sea ice and snow have high albedo and control the heat exchange between the atmosphere and ocean and atmosphere and land. In terms of hydrology, the presence of sea ice and snow modulates the flow and the salinity of ocean water. This in turn can modify the weather patterns around the globe. Understanding the formation, coverage and the properties of sea ice and snow are important for both short-term and long-term climate modeling. The advancements in high-frequency electronics and digital signal processing enabled the development of ultra-wideband radars by the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) for airborne measurements of snow and ice properties over large areas. CReSIS recently developed and deployed two ultra-wideband airborne radars, namely the Multichannel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder/Imager (MCoRDS/I) and the Snow Radar. The MCoRDS/I is designed to operate over the frequency range of 180-450 MHz for sounding land ice and imaging its ice-bed interface. We also took advantage of the deployment to explore the potential of UWB MCoRDS/I in sounding sea ice and collected data on flight lines flown as part of NASA Operation IceBridge mission during Spring 2015. Preliminary results show we sounded sea ice under favorable conditions. We will perform detailed processing and analysis of data over the next few months and we will compare results obtained are compared with existing altimetry-derived data products. The new snow radar, on the other hand, operating from 2 to 18 GHz, was deployed on the NRL Twin Otter aircraft in Barrow, AK. It was shown to have a vertical resolution of down to 1.5 cm which opens up the potential for thin snow measurement on both sea ice and land. Both of these new radars will be further optimized for future airborne missions to demonstrate their capabilities for sea ice and snow measurements. We will also show new technical

  10. 2nd Generation Airborne Precipitation Radar (APR-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, S.; Tanelli, S.; Haddad, Z.; Im, E.

    2012-01-01

    Dual-frequency operation with Ku-band (13.4 GHz) and Ka-band (35.6 GHz). Geometry and frequencies chosen to simulate GPM radar. Measures reflectivity at co- and cross-polarizations, and Doppler. Range resolution is approx. 60 m. Horizontal resolution at surface is approx. 1 km. Reflectivity calibration is within 1.5 dB, based on 10 deg sigmaO at Ku-band and Mie scattering calculations in light rain at Ka-band. LDR measurements are OK to near -20 dB; LDR lower than this is likely contaminated by system cross-polarization isolation. Velocity is motion-corrected total Doppler, including particle fall speed. Aliasing can be seen in some places; can usually be dealiased with an algorithm. .

  11. Annual Greenland Accumulation Rates (2009-2012) from Airborne Snow Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Lora S.; Ivanoff, Alvaro; Alexander, Patrick M.; MacGregor, Joseph A.; Fettweis, Xavier; Panzer, Ben; Paden, John D.; Forster, Richard R.; Das, Indrani; McConnell, Joseph R.; Tedesco, Marco; Leuschen, Carl; Gogineni, Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary climate warming over the Arctic is accelerating mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet through increasing surface melt, emphasizing the need to closely monitor its surface mass balance in order to improve sea-level rise predictions. Snow accumulation is the largest component of the ice sheet's surface mass balance, but in situ observations thereof are inherently sparse and models are difficult to evaluate at large scales. Here, we quantify recent Greenland accumulation rates using ultra-wideband (2-6.5 gigahertz) airborne snow radar data collected as part of NASA's Operation IceBridge between 2009 and 2012. We use a semi-automated method to trace the observed radiostratigraphy and then derive annual net accumulation rates for 2009-2012. The uncertainty in these radar-derived accumulation rates is on average 14 percent. A comparison of the radarderived accumulation rates and contemporaneous ice cores shows that snow radar captures both the annual and longterm mean accumulation rate accurately. A comparison with outputs from a regional climate model (MAR - Modele Atmospherique Regional for Greenland and vicinity) shows that this model matches radar-derived accumulation rates in the ice sheet interior but produces higher values over southeastern Greenland. Our results demonstrate that snow radar can efficiently and accurately map patterns of snow accumulation across an ice sheet and that it is valuable for evaluating the accuracy of surface mass balance models.

  12. A comparison of airborne and ground-based radar observations with rain gages during the CaPE experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satake, Makoto; Short, David A.; Iguchi, Toshio

    1992-01-01

    The vicinity of KSC, where the primary ground truth site of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) program is located, was the focal point of the Convection and Precipitation/Electrification (CaPE) experiment in Jul. and Aug. 1991. In addition to several specialized radars, local coverage was provided by the C-band (5 cm) radar at Patrick AFB. Point measurements of rain rate were provided by tipping bucket rain gage networks. Besides these ground-based activities, airborne radar measurements with X- and Ka-band nadir-looking radars on board an aircraft were also recorded. A unique combination data set of airborne radar observations with ground-based observations was obtained in the summer convective rain regime of central Florida. We present a comparison of these data intending a preliminary validation. A convective rain event was observed simultaneously by all three instrument types on the evening of 27 Jul. 1991. The high resolution aircraft radar was flown over convective cells with tops exceeding 10 km and observed reflectivities of 40 to 50 dBZ at 4 to 5 km altitude, while the low resolution surface radar observed 35 to 55 dBZ echoes and a rain gage indicated maximum surface rain rates exceeding 100 mm/hr. The height profile of reflectivity measured with the airborne radar show an attenuation of 6.5 dB/km (two way) for X-band, corresponding to a rainfall rate of 95 mm/hr.

  13. Investigation of Advanced Radar Techniques for Atmospheric Hazard Detection with Airborne Weather Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pazmany, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    In 2013 ProSensing Inc. conducted a study to investigate the hazard detection potential of aircraft weather radars with new measurement capabilities, such as multi-frequency, polarimetric and radiometric modes. Various radar designs and features were evaluated for sensitivity, measurement range and for detecting and quantifying atmospheric hazards in wide range of weather conditions. Projected size, weight, power consumption and cost of the various designs were also considered. Various cloud and precipitation conditions were modeled and used to conduct an analytic evaluation of the design options. This report provides an overview of the study and summarizes the conclusions and recommendations.

  14. Analysis of Airborne Radar Altimetry Measurements of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferraro, Ellen J.

    1994-01-01

    This dissertation presents an analysis of airborne altimetry measurements taken over the Greenland ice sheet with the 13.9 GHz Advanced Application Flight Experiment (AAFE) pulse compression radar altimeter. This Ku-band instrument was refurbished in 1990 by the Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory at the University of Massachusetts to obtain high-resolution altitude measurements and to improve the tracking, speed, storage and display capabilities of the radar. In 1991 and 1993, the AAFE altimeter took part in the NASA Multisensor Airborne Altimetry Experiments over Greenland, along with two NASA laser altimeters. Altitude results from both experiments are presented along with comparisons to the laser altimeter and calibration passes over the Sondrestroem runway in Greenland. Although it is too early to make a conclusion about the growth or decay of the ice sheet, these results show that the instrument is capable of measuring small-scale surface changes to within 14 centimeters. In addition, results from these experiments reveal that the radar is sensitive to the different diagenetic regions of the ice sheet. Return waveforms from the wet- snow, percolation and dry-snow zones show varying effects of both surface scattering and sub-surface or volume scattering. Models of each of the diagenetic regions of Greenland are presented along with parameters such as rms surface roughness, rms surface slope and attenuation coefficient of the snow pack obtained by fitting the models to actual return waveforms.

  15. Signal processing for airborne doppler radar detection of hazardous wind shear as applied to NASA 1991 radar flight experiment data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Radar data collected during the 1991 NASA flight tests have been selectively analyzed to support research directed at developing both improved as well as new algorithms for detecting hazardous low-altitude windshear. Analysis of aircraft attitude data from several flights indicated that platform stability bandwidths were small compared to the data rate bandwidths which should support an assumption that radar returns can be treated as short time stationary. Various approaches at detection of weather returns in the presence of ground clutter are being investigated. Non-coventional clutter rejection through spectrum mode tracking and classification algorithms is a subject of continuing research. Based upon autoregressive modeling of the radar return time sequence, this approach may offer an alternative to overcome errors in conventional pulse-pair estimates. Adaptive filtering is being evaluated as a means of rejecting clutter with emphasis on low signal-to-clutter ratio situations, particularly in the presence of discrete clutter interference. An analysis of out-of-range clutter returns is included to illustrate effects of ground clutter interference due to range aliasing for aircraft on final approach. Data are presented to indicate how aircraft groundspeed might be corrected from the radar data as well as point to an observed problem of groundspeed estimate bias variation with radar antenna scan angle. A description of how recorded clutter return data are mixed with simulated weather returns is included. This enables the researcher to run controlled experiments to test signal processing algorithms. In the summary research efforts involving improved modelling of radar ground clutter returns and a Bayesian approach at hazard factor estimation are mentioned.

  16. Comparison of Retracking Algorithms Using Airborne Radar and Laser Altimeter Measurements of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferraro, Ellen J.; Swift, Calvin T.

    1995-01-01

    This paper compares four continental ice sheet radar altimeter retracking algorithms using airborne radar and laser altimeter data taken over the Greenland ice sheet in 1991. The refurbished Advanced Application Flight Experiment (AAFE) airborne radar altimeter has a large range window and stores the entire return waveform during flight. Once the return waveforms are retracked, or post-processed to obtain the most accurate altitude measurement possible, they are compared with the high-precision Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) altimeter measurements. The AAFE waveforms show evidence of varying degrees of both surface and volume scattering from different regions of the Greenland ice sheet. The AOL laser altimeter, however, obtains a return only from the surface of the ice sheet. Retracking altimeter waveforms with a surface scattering model results in a good correlation with the laser measurements in the wet and dry-snow zones, but in the percolation region of the ice sheet, the deviation between the two data sets is large due to the effects of subsurface and volume scattering. The Martin et al model results in a lower bias than the surface scattering model, but still shows an increase in the noise level in the percolation zone. Using an Offset Center of Gravity algorithm to retrack altimeter waveforms results in measurements that are only slightly affected by subsurface and volume scattering and, despite a higher bias, this algorithm works well in all regions of the ice sheet. A cubic spline provides retracked altitudes that agree with AOL measurements over all regions of Greenland. This method is not sensitive to changes in the scattering mechanisms of the ice sheet and it has the lowest noise level and bias of all the retracking methods presented.

  17. Radar sensitivity and antenna scan pattern study for a satellite-based Radar Wind Sounder (RAWS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Modeling global atmospheric circulations and forecasting the weather would improve greatly if worldwide information on winds aloft were available. Recognition of this led to the inclusion of the LAser Wind Sounder (LAWS) system to measure Doppler shifts from aerosols in the planned for Earth Observation System (EOS). However, gaps will exist in LAWS coverage where heavy clouds are present. The RAdar Wind Sensor (RAWS) is an instrument that could fill these gaps by measuring Doppler shifts from clouds and rain. Previous studies conducted at the University of Kansas show RAWS as a feasible instrument. This thesis pertains to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) sensitivity, transmit waveform, and limitations to the antenna scan pattern of the RAWS system. A dop-size distribution model is selected and applied to the radar range equation for the sensitivity analysis. Six frequencies are used in computing the SNR for several cloud types to determine the optimal transmit frequency. the results show the use of two frequencies, one higher (94 GHz) to obtain sensitivity for thinner cloud, and a lower frequency (24 GHz) to obtain sensitivity for thinner cloud, and a lower frequency (24 GHz) for better penetration in rain, provide ample SNR. The waveform design supports covariance estimation processing. This estimator eliminates the Doppler ambiguities compounded by the selection of such high transmit frequencies, while providing an estimate of the mean frequency. the unambiguous range and velocity computation shows them to be within acceptable limits. The design goal for the RAWS system is to limit the wind-speed error to less than 1 ms(exp -1). Due to linear dependence between vectors for a three-vector scan pattern, a reasonable wind-speed error is unattainable. Only the two-vector scan pattern falls within the wind-error limits for azimuth angles between 16 deg to 70 deg. However, this scan only allows two components of the wind to be determined. As a result, a technique is

  18. Indoor experimental facility for airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) configurations - rail-SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirose, Getachew; Phelan, Brian R.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Koenig, Francois; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2014-05-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is developing an indoor experimental facility to evaluate and assess airborne synthetic-aperture-radar-(SAR)-based detection capabilities. The rail-SAR is located in a multi-use facility that also provides a base for research and development in the area of autonomous robotic navigation. Radar explosive hazard detection is one key sensordevelopment area to be investigated at this indoor facility. In particular, the mostly wooden, multi-story building houses a two (2) story housing structure and an open area built over a large sandbox. The housing structure includes reconfigurable indoor walls which enable the realization of multiple See-Through-The-Wall (STTW) scenarios. The open sandbox, on the other hand, allows for surface and buried explosive hazard scenarios. The indoor facility is not rated for true explosive hazard materials so all targets will need to be inert and contain surrogate explosive fills. In this paper we discuss the current system status and describe data collection exercises conducted using canonical targets and frequencies that may be of interest to designers of ultra-wideband (UWB) airborne, ground penetrating SAR systems. A bi-static antenna configuration will be used to investigate the effects of varying airborne SAR parameters such as depression angle, bandwidth, and integration angle, for various target types and deployment scenarios. Canonical targets data were used to evaluate overall facility capabilities and limitations. These data is analyzed and summarized for future evaluations. Finally, processing techniques for dealing with RF multi-path and RFI due to operating inside the indoor facility are described in detail. Discussion of this facility and its capabilities and limitations will provide the explosive hazard community with a great airborne platform asset for sensor to target assessment.

  19. A comparison of in situ and airborne radar observations of ocean wave directionality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.; Walton, W. T.; Peng, C. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The directional spectrum of a fully arisen, about 3 m sea as measured by an experimental airborne radar, the NASA K(u)-band radar ocean wave spectrometer (ROWS), is compared to reference pitch-roll buoy data and to the classical SWOP (stereo wave observations project) spectrum for fully developed conditions. The ROWS spectrum, inferred indirectly from backscattered power measurements at 5-km altitude, is shown to be in excellent agreement with the buoy spectrum. Specifically, excellent agreement is found between the two nondirectional height spectra, and mean wave directions and directional spreads as functions of frequency. A comparison of the ROWS and SWOP spectra shows the two spectra to be very similar, in detailed shape as well as in terms of the gross spreading characteristics. Both spectra are seen to exhibit bimodal structures which accord with the Phillips' (1958) resonance mechanism. This observation is thus seen to support Phillips' contention that the SWOP modes were indeed resonance modes, not statistical artifacts.

  20. Retrieval of Snow and Rain From Combined X- and W-B and Airborne Radar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Liang; Meneghini, Robert; Tian, Lin; Heymsfield, Gerald M.

    2008-01-01

    Two independent airborne dual-wavelength techniques, based on nadir measurements of radar reflectivity factors and Doppler velocities, respectively, are investigated with respect to their capability of estimating microphysical properties of hydrometeors. The data used to investigate the methods are taken from the ER-2 Doppler radar (X-band) and Cloud Radar System (W-band) airborne Doppler radars during the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment campaign in 2002. Validity is assessed by the degree to which the methods produce consistent retrievals of the microphysics. For deriving snow parameters, the reflectivity-based technique has a clear advantage over the Doppler-velocity-based approach because of the large dynamic range in the dual-frequency ratio (DFR) with respect to the median diameter Do and the fact that the difference in mean Doppler velocity at the two frequencies, i.e., the differential Doppler velocity (DDV), in snow is small relative to the measurement errors and is often not uniquely related to Do. The DFR and DDV can also be used to independently derive Do in rain. At W-band, the DFR-based algorithms are highly sensitive to attenuation from rain, cloud water, and water vapor. Thus, the retrieval algorithms depend on various assumptions regarding these components, whereas the DDV-based approach is unaffected by attenuation. In view of the difficulties and ambiguities associated with the attenuation correction at W-band, the DDV approach in rain is more straightforward and potentially more accurate than the DFR method.

  1. Surface Clutter Removal in Airborne Radar Sounding Data from the Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, J. W.; Blankenship, D. D.; Morse, D. L.; Peters, M. E.; Kempf, S. D.

    2005-01-01

    We have collected roughly 1,000 line-km of airborne radar sounding data over glaciers, rock/ice glaciers, permafrost, subsurface ice bodies, ice-covered saline lakes, and glacial deposits in Taylor and Beacon Valley. These data are being analyzed in order to develop techniques for discriminating between subsurface and off-nadir echoes and for detecting and characterizing subsurface interfaces. The identification of features on Mars exhibiting morphologies consistent with ice/rock mixtures, near-surface ice bodies and near-surface liquid water, and the importance of such features to the search for water on Mars, highlights the need for appropriate terrestrial analogs and analysis techniques in order to prepare for radar sounder missions to Mars. Climatic, hydrological, and geological conditions in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica are analogous in many ways to those on Mars. A crucial first step in the data analysis process is the discrimination of echo sources in the radar data. The goal is to identify all returns from the surface of off-nadir topography in order to positively identify subsurface echoes. This process will also be critical for radar data that will be collected in areas of Mars exhibiting significant topography, so that subsurface echoes are identified unambiguously. The positive detection and characterization of subsurface (including sub-ice) water is a primary goal of NASA's Mars exploration program. Our data over the Dry Valleys provides an opportunity to implement techniques we are developing to accomplish these goals.

  2. Airborne and spaceborne radar images for geologic and environmental mapping in the Amazon rain forest, Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, John P.; Hurtak, James J.

    1986-01-01

    Spaceborne and airborne radar image of portions of the Middle and Upper Amazon basin in the state of Amazonas and the Territory of Roraima are compared for purposes of geological and environmental mapping. The contrasted illumination geometries and imaging parameters are related to terrain slope and surface roughness characteristics for corresponding areas that were covered by each of the radar imaging systems. Landforms range from deeply dissected mountain and plateau with relief up to 500 m in Roraima, revealing ancient layered rocks through folded residual mountains to deeply beveled pediplain in Amazonas. Geomorphic features provide distinct textural signatures that are characteristic of different rock associations. The principle drainages in the areas covered are the Rio Negro, Rio Branco, and the Rio Japura. Shadowing effects and low radar sensitivity to subtle linear fractures that are aligned parallel or nearly parallel to the direction of radar illumination illustrate the need to obtain multiple coverage with viewing directions about 90 degrees. Perception of standing water and alluvial forest in floodplains varies with incident angle and with season. Multitemporal data sets acquired over periods of years provide an ideal method of monitoring environmental changes.

  3. STORM: A New Airborne Polarimetric Real-Aperture Radar for Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podvin, D. Hauser. T.; Dechambre, M.; Valentin, R.; Caudal, G.; Daloze, J.-F.

    2003-04-01

    The successful launch of the Envisat in March 2002 offers new possibilities for estimating geophysical quantities characterizing continental or sea surface using the multi-polarization ASAR. In addition, in the context of the preparation of future missions which will embark polarimetric SAR (e.g. RADARSAT2) it is important to better assess the benefit of multi-polarization or polarimetric SAR systems. Airborne radar systems remain a very useful way to validate satellite measurements and to develop or validate algorithms needed to retrieve geophysical quantities from the radar measurements. CETP has designed and developed a new airborne radar called STORM] , which has a full polarimetric capability. STORM is derived from two previous versions of airborne radars developed at CETP, namely RESSAC (Hauser et al, JGR 1992) and RENE (Leloch-Duplex et al, Annales of Telecommunications, 1996). STORM is a real-aperture, C-Band system with a FM/CW transmission and with a rotating antenna to explore in azimuth. It offers a polarization diversity, receiving the complex signal in amplitude and phase simultaneously in H and V polarizations, which makes it possible to analyze the radar cross-section in HH, VV, HV, and other cross-polarized terms related to the scattering matrix. The antenna are pointed towards the surface with a mean incidence angle of 20° and a 3-dB aperture of about 30° in elevation and 8° in azimuth. The backscattered signal is analyzed from nadir to about 35° along the look-direction in 1012 range gates every 1.53m. The first tests with this system have been carried out in October 2001 over corner reflectors , over grass and ocean. In this workshop, we will present a validation of this system based on the results obtained with this first data set. In particular, we will present the calibration method of the complex signal (amplitude, phase), and distribution of phase differences (HH/VV, HV/VH) obtained over the different scatters (corner reflectors, grass

  4. Aircraft and satellite measurement of ocean wave directional spectra using scanning-beam microwave radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.; Walton, W. T.; Baker, P. L.

    1982-01-01

    A microwave radar technique for remotely measuring the vector wave number spectrum of the ocean surface is described. The technique, which employs short-pulse, noncoherent radars in a conical scan mode near vertical incidence, is shown to be suitable for both aircraft and satellite application, the technique was validated at 10 km aircraft altitude, where we have found excellent agreement between buoy and radar-inferred absolute wave height spectra.

  5. Ground validation of Dual Precipitation Radar (DPR) on GPM by rapid scan Phased Array weahter Radar (PAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Y.; Mega, T.; Shimamura, S.; Wu, T.; Kikuchi, H.; Ushio, T.; Yoshikawa, E.; Chandra, C. V.

    2014-12-01

    The core observatory satellite of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission was launched on February 27th 2014. The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on the GPM core observatory is the succession of the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR). The DPR consists of a Ku-band precipitation radar and a Ka-band precipitation radar. The DPR is expected to be more sensitive than the PR especially in the measurement of light rainfall and snowfall in high latitude regions. Because of the difference of spatial and temporal resolutions, Space Radar (SR) and conventional type of Ground Radar (GR) are hard to compare.The SR observes each point of earth in short time, for example one footprint is an observation in some microseconds. Rain-gauge measurements have accurate rainfall rate, but rain-gage observes small area and accumulated rainfall in some minutes. The conventional GR can cover a wide area, however, a volume scan requires several minutes. The Phased Array weather Radar (PAR) is developed by Osaka University, Toshiba, and NICT. The PAR is a weather-radar on X-band within 100m range sampling. High spatial and temporal resolution is achieved by the PAR with pulse compression and the digital beam-forming technique. The PAR transmits a wide beam and receives narrow beams by using digital beam forming. Then, the PAR observes many elevation angles from a single pulse. The time of each volume scan is 10-30 seconds in operation, typically 30 seconds. The study shows comparisons between the DPR and the PAR by more similar spatial and temporal resolution. The rainfall region of DPR is similar to the one of PAR. Correlation coefficient of both radar reflectivity suggests more than 0.8 in the 20km range of PAR. As a result, it is considered that DPR can observe with high accuracy. We present the case study which DPR overpassed the PAR observation region in detail.

  6. Temporal and spatial variability of the Greenland firn aquifer revealed by ground and airborne radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miège, C.; Forster, R. R.; Koenig, L.; Brucker, L.; Box, J. E.; Burgess, E. W.; Solomon, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    During the last two decades, the Greenland ice sheet has been losing mass, significantly contributing to sea level rise (0.33±0.08 mm yr-1). In the meantime, summer surface melt has been increasing in both duration and extent, and subsequent runoff represents about half of the total mass lost. However, small-scale heterogeneous physical processes and residence times associated with meltwater formation, infiltration in the firn, refreezing and/or runoff remain unconstrained in coarser resolution numerical models, leading to significant error bars while estimating total runoff. In Southeast and South Greenland, widespread aquifers have been observed in relative high accumulation and melt regions, persisting throughout the year, storing a significant mass of water within the firn. The presence of a persistent water table within the firn aquifer is observed using a 400 MHz ground-penetrating radar and the 750 MHz airborne Accumulation Radar over the same location. In both radar echograms, a strong reflection is present, illustrating the important dielectric contrast between dry firn and water-saturated firn. Since 2011, NASA's Operation IceBridge mission allows us to produce an ice-sheet-wide map of the location and depth of the firn aquifer using the Accumulation Radar echograms. Over the last four years, from one spring to the next, repeated flight lines demonstrate a relatively steady short-term behavior of water in the aquifer with constant lateral boundaries (with a few exceptions) and water table surface. An earlier radar survey (1993) implies the aquifer presence by lack of bed return, but the study area was limited to the Helheim Glacier region. Within the aquifer, a relatively slow flow of water is inferred from 2-D hydrological flow modeling, while assuming a constant hydraulic conductivity in the aquifer. On the aquifer low-elevation lateral boundary, connection with crevasses are observed in the airborne radar echograms and documented in this study. More

  7. Scanning Radar Investigations to Characterize Cloud and Precipitation Processes for ASR

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatachalam, Chandrasekar

    2016-12-17

    The project conducted investigations in the following areas related to scanning radar retrievals: a) Development for Cloud drizzle separation studies for the ENA site based on Doppler Spectra b) Advanced radar retrieval for the SGP site c) Characterizing falling snow using multifrequency dual-polarization measurements d) BAECC field experiment. More details about these investigations can be found within each subtopic within the report.

  8. Ice-sheet elevations from across-track processing of airborne interferometric radar altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, R. L.; Shepherd, A.; Cullen, R.; Helm, V.; Wingham, D. J.

    2009-11-01

    Interferometric Radar Altimeters (IRA's) use dual receive antennas to overcome one of the spatial limitations of pulse-limited altimeters. In a conventional IRA measurement, the range and across-track direction of a scatterer are determined using the phase difference between the antennas. We demonstrate a method of determining multiple elevation points across a swath orthogonal to the instrument ground track in regions of steep terrain, such as ice-sheet margins. We use data from an airborne IRA (a prototype of the CryoSat-2 instrument), and compare the results to simultaneous Airborne Laser Scanner (ALS) observations. This application results in a 75-fold increase in measurement density compared to conventional radar altimetry. Along a ˜2.5 km ground track, the RMS departure between the IRA- and ALS-derived measurements was 1.67 m. Based on our result, although our approach is limited to areas of relatively steep slope, a 25- to 75-fold increase in elevation measurements could be achieved in coastal regions of Antarctica and Greenland with similar processing of CryoSat-2 data.

  9. Airborne laser scanning of forested landslides characterization: Terrain model quality and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razak, K. A.; Straatsma, M. W.; van Westen, C. J.; Malet, J.-P.; de Jong, S. M.

    2011-03-01

    Mapping complex landslides under forested terrain requires an appropriate quality of digital terrain models (DTMs), which preserve small diagnostic features for landslide classification such as primary and secondary scarps, cracks, and displacement structures (flow-type and rigid-type). Optical satellite imagery, aerial photographs and synthetic aperture radar images are less effective to create reliable DTMs under tree coverage. Here, we utilized a very high density airborne laser scanning (ALS) data, with a point density of 140 points m - 2 for generating a high quality DTM for mapping landslides in forested terrain in the Barcelonnette region, the Southern French Alps. We quantitatively evaluated the preservation of morphological features and qualitatively assessed the visualization of ALS-derived DTMs. We presented a filter parameterization method suitable for landslide mapping and compared it with two default filters from the hierarchical robust interpolation (HRI) and one default filter from the progressive TIN densification (PTD) method. The results indicate that the vertical accuracy of the DTM derived from the landslide filter is about 0.04 m less accurate than that from the PTD filter. However, the landslide filter yields a better quality of the image for the recognition of small diagnostic features as depicted by expert image interpreters. Several DTM visualization techniques were compared for visual interpretation. The openness map visualized in a stereoscopic model reveals more morphologically relevant features for landslide mapping than the other filter products. We also analyzed the minimal point density in ALS data for landslide mapping and found that a point density of more than 6 points m - 2 is considered suitable for a detailed analysis of morphological features. This study illustrates the suitability of high density ALS data with an appropriate parameterization for the bare-earth extraction used for landslide identification and characterization

  10. CBSIT 2009: Airborne Validation of Envisat Radar Altimetry and In Situ Ice Camp Measurements Over Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connor, Laurence; Farrell, Sinead; McAdoo, David; Krabill, William; Laxon, Seymour; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline; Markus, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    The past few years have seen the emergence of satellite altimetry as valuable tool for taking quantitative sea ice monitoring beyond the traditional surface extent measurements and into estimates of sea ice thickness and volume, parameters that arc fundamental to improved understanding of polar dynamics and climate modeling. Several studies have now demonstrated the use of both microwave (ERS, Envisat/RA-2) and laser (ICESat/GLAS) satellite altimeters for determining sea ice thickness. The complexity of polar environments, however, continues to make sea ice thickness determination a complicated remote sensing task and validation studies remain essential for successful monitoring of sea ice hy satellites. One such validation effort, the Arctic Aircraft Altimeter (AAA) campaign of2006. included underflights of Envisat and ICESat north of the Canadian Archipelago using NASA's P-3 aircraft. This campaign compared Envisat and ICESat sea ice elevation measurements with high-resolution airborne elevation measurements, revealing the impact of refrozen leads on radar altimetry and ice drift on laser altimetry. Continuing this research and validation effort, the Canada Basin Sea Ice Thickness (CBSIT) experiment was completed in April 2009. CBSIT was conducted by NOAA. and NASA as part of NASA's Operation Ice Bridge, a gap-filling mission intended to supplement sea and land ice monitoring until the launch of NASA's ICESat-2 mission. CBIST was flown on the NASA P-3, which was equipped with a scanning laser altimeter, a Ku-band snow radar, and un updated nadir looking photo-imaging system. The CB5IT campaign consisted of two flights: an under flight of Envisat along a 1000 km track similar to that flown in 2006, and a flight through the Nares Strait up to the Lincoln Sea that included an overflight of the Danish GreenArc Ice Camp off the coast of northern Greenland. We present an examination of data collected during this campaign, comparing airborne laser altimeter measurements

  11. Extension of the MUSIC algorithm to millimeter-wave (MMW) real-beam radar scanning antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Canh; Dropkin, Herbert; Manitius, Andrzej Z.

    2002-07-01

    Step-scanned radar antennas represent a new application of radar technology for detection of targets and estimation of their locations. In this paper we describe a new development called Scan-MUSIC (SMUSIC), which extends the application of the MUSIC algorithm to improve the cross-range resolution of closely spaced point targets with a step-scanned radar. This paper also demonstrates that SMUSIC can be used with radar data obtained with an experimental Millimeter Wave (MMW) coherent scanning radar. While a mathematical proof of resolvability has not yet been established for the scanning antenna, we have shown that we can apply the spatial smoothing method to the SMUSIC algorithm to estimate the closely spaced point targets that are within the beamwidth of the radar antenna. The results show that the targets that are spaced less than 1/4 of the antenna beamwidth and are interfering can be resolved with SMUSIC in constructive interference case. This paper also presents the performance of the SMUSIC superresolution algorithm for the scanning antenna in terms of probability of successful resolution and the total average mean-squared error of target locations, based on the simulated data generated by using an experimental antenna pattern.

  12. Measuring Geophysical Parameters of the Greenland Ice Sheet using Airborne Radar Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferraro, Ellen J.; Swift. Calvin T.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents radar-altimeter scattering models for each of the diagenetic zones of the Greenland ice sheet. AAFE radar- altimeter waveforms obtained during the 1991 and 1993 NASA multi-sensor airborne altimetry experiments over Greenland reveal that the Ku-band return pulse changes significantly with the different diagenetic zones. These changes are due to varying amounts of surface and volume scattering in the return waveform. In the ablation and soaked zones, where surface scattering dominates the AAFE return, geophysical parameters such as rms surface height and rms surface slope are obtained by fitting the waveforms to a surface-scattering model. Waveforms from the percolation zone show that the sub-surface ice features have a much more significant effect on the return pulse than the surrounding snowpack. Model percolation waveforms, created using a combined surface- and volume-scattering model and an ice-feature distribution obtained during the 1993 field season, agree well with actual AAFE waveforms taken in the same time period. Using a combined surface- and volume-scattering model for the dry-snow-zone return waveforms, the rms surface height and slope and the attenuation coefficient of the snowpack are obtained. These scattering models not only allow geophysical parameters of the ice sheet to be measured but also help in the understanding of satellite radar-altimeter data.

  13. Estimation of cloud fraction profile in shallow convection using a scanning cloud radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oue, Mariko; Kollias, Pavlos; North, Kirk W.; Tatarevic, Aleksandra; Endo, Satoshi; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Gustafson, William I.

    2016-10-01

    Large spatial heterogeneities in shallow convection result in uncertainties in estimations of domain-averaged cloud fraction profiles (CFP). This issue is addressed by using large eddy simulations of shallow convection over land coupled with a radar simulator. Results indicate that zenith profiling observations are inadequate to provide reliable CFP estimates. Use of scanning cloud radar (SCR), performing a sequence of cross-wind horizon-to-horizon scans, is not straightforward due to the strong dependence of radar sensitivity to target distance. An objective method for estimating domain-averaged CFP is proposed that uses observed statistics of SCR hydrometeor detection with height to estimate optimum sampling regions. This method shows good agreement with the model CFP. Results indicate that CFP estimates require more than 35 min of SCR scans to converge on the model domain average. The proposed technique is expected to improve our ability to compare model output with cloud radar observations in shallow cumulus cloud conditions.

  14. Estimation of Cloud Fraction Profile in Shallow Convection Using a Scanning Cloud Radar

    SciTech Connect

    Oue, Mariko; Kollias, Pavlos; North, Kirk W.; Tatarevic, Aleksandra; Endo, Satoshi; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Gustafson, Jr., William I.

    2016-10-18

    Large spatial heterogeneities in shallow convection result in uncertainties in estimations of domain-averaged cloud fraction profiles (CFP). This issue is addressed using large eddy simulations of shallow convection over land coupled with a radar simulator. Results indicate that zenith profiling observations are inadequate to provide reliable CFP estimates. Use of Scanning Cloud Radar (SCR), performing a sequence of cross-wind horizon-to-horizon scans, is not straightforward due to the strong dependence of radar sensitivity to target distance. An objective method for estimating domain-averaged CFP is proposed that uses observed statistics of SCR hydrometeor detection with height to estimate optimum sampling regions. This method shows good agreement with the model CFP. Results indicate that CFP estimates require more than 35 min of SCR scans to converge on the model domain average. Lastly, the proposed technique is expected to improve our ability to compare model output with cloud radar observations in shallow cumulus cloud conditions.

  15. An application of space-time adaptive processing to airborne and spaceborne monostatic and bistatic radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernik, Richard James

    A challenging problem faced by Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radars on both airborne and spaceborne platforms is the ability to detect slow moving targets due the presence of non-stationary and heterogeneous ground clutter returns. Space-Time Adaptive Processing techniques process both the spatial signals from an antenna array as well as radar pulses simultaneously to aid in mitigating this clutter which has an inherent Doppler shift due to radar platform motion, as well as spreading across Angle-Doppler space attributable to a variety of factors. Additional problems such as clutter aliasing, widening of the clutter notch, and range dependency add additional complexity when the radar is bistatic in nature, and vary significantly as the bistatic radar geometry changes with respect to the targeted location. The most difficult situation is that of a spaceborne radar system due to its high velocity and altitude with respect to the earth. A spaceborne system does however offer several advantages over an airborne system, such as the ability to cover wide areas and to provide access to areas denied to airborne platforms. This dissertation examines both monostatic and bistatic radar performance based upon a computer simulation developed by the author, and explores the use of both optimal STAP and reduced dimension STAP architectures to mitigate the modeled clutter returns. Factors such as broadband jamming, wind, and earth rotation are considered, along with their impact on the interference covariance matrix, constructed from sample training data. Calculation of the covariance matrix in near real time based upon extracted training data is computer processor intensive and reduced dimension STAP architectures relieve some of the computation burden. The problems resulting from extending both monostatic and bistatic radar systems to space are also simulated and studied.

  16. NASA DC-8 Airborne Scanning Lidar Cloud and Contrail Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uthe, Edward E.; Oseberg, Terje E.; Nielsen, Norman B.

    1997-01-01

    An angular scanning backscatter lidar has been developed and operated from the NASA DC-8 aircraft; the lidar viewing direction could be scanned from vertically upward to forward in the direction of aircraft travel to vertically downward. The scanning lidar was used to generate real-time video displays of clouds and contrails above, below, and ahead of the aircraft to aid in positioning the aircraft for achieving optimum cloud/contrail sampling by onboard in situ samplers. Data examples show that the lidar provides unique information for the interpretation of the other data records and that combined data analyses provides enhanced evaluations of contrail/cloud structure, dynamics, composition, and optical/radiative properties.

  17. Recent ice sheet snow accumulation and firn storage of meltwater inferred by ground and airborne radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miege, Clement

    Recent surface mass balance changes in space and time over the polar ice sheets need to be better constrained in order to estimate the ice-sheet contribution to sea-level rise. The mass balance of any ice body is obtained by subtracting mass losses from mass gains. In response to climate changes of the recent decades, ice-sheet mass losses have increased, making ice-sheet mass balance negative and raising sea level. In this work, I better quantify the mass gained by snowfall across the polar ice sheets; I target specific regions over both Greenland and West Antarctica where snow accumulation changes are occurring due to rising air temperature. Southeast Greenland receives 30% of the total snow accumulation of the Greenland ice sheet. In this work, I combine internal layers observed in ice-penetrating radar data with firn cores to derive the last 30 years of accumulation and to measure the spatial pattern of accumulation toward the southeast coastline. Below 1800 m elevation, in the percolation zone, significant surface melt is observed in the summer, which challenges both firn-core dating and internal-layer tracing. While firn-core drilling at 1500 m elevation, liquid water was found at ˜20-m depth in a firn aquifer that persisted over the winter. The presence of this water filling deeper pore space in the firn was unexpected, and has a significant impact on the ice sheet thermal state and the estimate of mass balance made using satellite altimeters. Using a 400-MHz ice-penetrating radar, the extent of this widespread aquifer was mapped on the ground, and also more extensively from the air with a 750-MHz airborne radar as part of the NASA Operation IceBridge mission. Over three IceBridge flight campaigns (2011-2013), based on radar data, the firn aquifer is estimated to cover ˜30,000 km2 area within the wet-snow zone of the ice sheet. I use repeated flightlines to understand the temporal variability of the water trapped in the firn aquifer and to simulate its

  18. Airborne radar surveys of snow depth over Antarctic sea ice during Operation IceBridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzer, B.; Gomez-Garcia, D.; Leuschen, C.; Paden, J. D.; Gogineni, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    Over the last decade, multiple satellite-based laser and radar altimeters, optimized for polar observations, have been launched with one of the major objectives being the determination of global sea ice thickness and distribution [5, 6]. Estimation of sea-ice thickness from these altimeters relies on freeboard measurements and the presence of snow cover on sea ice affects this estimate. Current means of estimating the snow depth rely on daily precipitation products and/or data from passive microwave sensors [2, 7]. Even a small uncertainty in the snow depth leads to a large uncertainty in the sea-ice thickness estimate. To improve the accuracy of the sea-ice thickness estimates and provide validation for measurements from satellite-based sensors, the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets deploys the Snow Radar as a part of NASA Operation IceBridge. The Snow Radar is an ultra-wideband, frequency-modulated, continuous-wave radar capable of resolving snow depth on sea ice from 5 cm to more than 2 meters from long-range, airborne platforms [4]. This paper will discuss the algorithm used to directly extract snow depth estimates exclusively using the Snow Radar data set by tracking both the air-snow and snow-ice interfaces. Prior work in this regard used data from a laser altimeter for tracking the air-snow interface or worked under the assumption that the return from the snow-ice interface was greater than that from the air-snow interface due to a larger dielectric contrast, which is not true for thick or higher loss snow cover [1, 3]. This paper will also present snow depth estimates from Snow Radar data during the NASA Operation IceBridge 2010-2011 Antarctic campaigns. In 2010, three sea ice flights were flown, two in the Weddell Sea and one in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas. All three flight lines were repeated in 2011, allowing an annual comparison of snow depth. In 2011, a repeat pass of an earlier flight in the Weddell Sea was flown, allowing for a

  19. Operations Manager Tim Miller checks out software for the Airborne Synthetic Aperature Radar (AIRSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Tim Miller checks out software for the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR). He was the AIRSAR operations manager for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The AIRSAR produces imaging data for a range of studies conducted by the DC-8. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  20. DATA ACQUISITION AND APPLICATIONS OF SIDE-LOOKING AIRBORNE RADAR IN THE U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, John Edwin; Kover, Allan N.

    1985-01-01

    The Side-Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) program encompasses a multi-discipline effort involving geologists, hydrologists, engineers, geographers, and cartographers of the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS). Since the program began in 1980, more than 520,000 square miles of aerial coverage of SLAR data in the conterminous United States and Alaska have been acquired or contracted for acquisition. The Geological Survey has supported more than 60 research and applications projects addressing the use of this technology in the earth sciences since 1980. These projects have included preparation of lithographic reproductions of SLAR mosaics, research to improve the cartographic uses of SLAR, research for use of SLAR in assessing earth hazards, and studies using SLAR for energy and mineral exploration through improved geologic mapping.

  1. Evaluation of airborne radar-lidar retrieval of ice water content using in-situ probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Sujan

    Cloud water content and how that water is distributed across hydrometeors are fundamental cloud microphysical properties that influence cloud dynamical and radiative properties. This study utilizes in-situ and remote sensing data collected by the University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft during the Colorado Airborne Multi-phase Cloud Study, 2010-2011 (CAMPS) field campaign to study the reliability of different cloud water content measuring instruments. It has been shown in several previous studies and again demonstrated here from the CAMPS dataset that Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP) measurements are subject to contamination by shattering artifacts in ice and mixed phase clouds. Contaminated measurements from CAMPS show a significant overestimation of large (D > 28 microm) particles and derived liquid water content (LWC). A new approach is developed to characterize, quantify and correct the shattering contribution in FSSP measurements using ice particle information measured by an OAP cloud probe (2D-C). Comparisons with cloud droplet probe (CDP) measurements show that this new approach adequately corrects for ice shattering effects. This new approach can also be applied to standard FSSP historical datasets. These studies may have erroneous conclusions that can be re-evaluated based on this new correction. University of Colorado closed-path tunable diode laser hygrometer (CLH) total water measurements are used to develop a mass-length relationship for CAMPS dataset to calculate ice water content (IWC) from 2D-C size distribution. Then, these well characterized in-situ instruments are used to evaluate IWC retrievals from combined radar and lidar measurements. Comparison of near flight level remote sensing IWC retrievals with in-situ measurements indicates statistically reasonable agreements (difference in mean values about 33%) providing confidence on the retrieved vertical IWC profile. The collocated airborne radar-lidar measurements combined

  2. Airborne Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) for peat analyses in the Canadian Northern wetlands study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelletier-Travis, Ramona E.

    1991-01-01

    The study was conducted as part of the NASA Biospherics Research on Emissions from Wetlands (BREW) program. An important aspect of the program is to investigate the terrestrial production and atmospheric distribution of methane and other gases contributing to global warming. Multi-kilometer transects of airborne (helicopter) Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) data were collected periodically along the 100 km distance from the coast inland so as to obtain a regional trend in peat depth and related parameters. Global Positioning System (GPS) data were simultaneously collected from the helicopter to properly georeference the GPR data. Additional 50 m ground-based transects of GPR data were also collected as a source of ground truthing, as a calibration aid for the airborne data sets, and as a source of higher resolution data for characterizing the strata within the peat. In situ peat depth probing and soil characterizations from excavated soil pits were used to verify GPR findings. Results from the ground-based data are presented.

  3. Enhanced Feature Based Mosaicing Technique for Visually and Geometrically Degraded Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, S.; Vardhini, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    In airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR), there was a major problem encountered in the area of image mosaic in the absence of platform information and sensor information (geocoding), when SAR is applied in large-scale scene and the platform faces large changes. In order to enhance real-time performance and robustness of image mosaic, enhancement based Speeded-Up Robust Features (SURF) mosaic method for airborne SAR is proposed in this paper. SURF is a novel scale-invariant and rotation-invariant feature. It is perfect in its high computation, speed and robustness. In this paper, When the SAR image is acquired, initially the image is enhanced by using local statistic techniques and SURF is applied for SAR image matching accord to its characteristic, and then acquires its invariant feature for matching. In the process of image matching, the nearest neighbor rule for initial matching is used, and the wrong points of the matches are removed through RANSAC fitting algorithm. The proposed algorithm is implemented in different SAR images with difference in scale change, rotation change and noise. The proposed algorithm is compared with other existing algorithms and the quantitative and qualitative measures are calculated and tabulated. The proposed algorithm is robust to changes and the threshold is varied accordingly to increase the matching rate more than 95 %.

  4. Disaster phenomena of Wenchuan earthquake in high resolution airborne synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Hong; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Bo; Tang, Yixian; Wu, Hongan; Wen, Xiaoyang; Yan, Dongmei

    2009-05-01

    The devastating Wenchuan Earthquake occurred in Sichuan Province, Southwestern China, with a magnitude of 8.0 on May 12, 2008. Most buildings along the seismic zone were ruined, resulting in infrastructure damage to factories, traffic facilities and power supplies. The earthquake also triggered geological disasters, such as landslides, debris flow, landslide lakes, etc. During the rescue campaign the remote sensing aircrafts of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), equipped with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and optical sensors, flew over the disaster area and acquired many high resolution airborne SAR images. We first describe the basic characteristics of SAR imagery. The SAR images of buildings are simulated, and the backscattering mechanism of the buildings is analyzed. Finally, the various disaster phenomena are described and analyzed in the high resolution airborne SAR images. It is shown that certain phenomena of ruins could be identified clearly in high resolution SAR images in proper imaging conditions, while the functional destruction is quite difficult to detect. With calibrated data, the polarmetric SAR interferometry could be used to analyze the scattering mechanism and 3D distribution of the scattering center, which are redound to earthquake damage assessment.

  5. EcoSAR: NASA's P-band fully polarimetric single pass interferometric airborne radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmanoglu, B.; Rincon, R. F.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.; Lee, S. K.; Sun, G.; Daniyan, O.; Harcum, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    EcoSAR is a new airborne synthetic aperture radar imaging system, developed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. It is a P-band sensor that employs a non-conventional and innovative design. The EcoSAR system was designed as a multi-disciplinary instrument to image the 3-dimensional surface of the earth from a single pass platform with two antennas. EcoSAR's principal mission is to penetrate the forest canopy to return vital information about the canopy structure and estimate biomass. With a maximum bandwidth of 200 MHz in H and 120 MHz in V polarizations it can provide sub-meter resolution imagery of the study area. EcoSAR's dual antenna, 32 transmit and receive channel architecture provides a test-bed for developing new algorithms in InSAR data processing such as single pass interferometry, full polarimetry, post-processing synthesis of multiple beams, simultaneous measurement over both sides of the flight track, selectable resolution and variable incidence angle. The flexible architecture of EcoSAR will create new opportunities in radar remote sensing of forest biomass, permafrost active layer thickness, and topography mapping. EcoSAR's first test flight occurred between March 27th and April 1st, 2014 over the Andros Island in Bahamas and Corcovado and La Selva National Parks in Costa Rica. The 32 channel radar system collected about 6 TB of radar data in about 12 hours of data collection. Due to the existence of radio and TV communications in the operational frequency band, acquired data contains strong radar frequency interference, which had to be removed prior to beamforming and focusing. Precise locations of the antennas are tracked using high-rate GPS and inertial navigation units, which provide necessary information for accurate processing of the imagery. In this presentation we will present preliminary imagery collected during the test campaign, show examples of simultaneous dual track imaging, as well as a single pass interferogram. The

  6. Analysis of airborne Doppler lidar, Doppler radar and tall tower measurements of atmospheric flows in quiescent and stormy weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluestein, H. B.; Doviak, R. J.; Eilts, M. D.; Mccaul, E. W.; Rabin, R.; Sundara-Rajan, A.; Zrnic, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    The first experiment to combine airborne Doppler Lidar and ground-based dual Doppler Radar measurements of wind to detail the lower tropospheric flows in quiescent and stormy weather was conducted in central Oklahoma during four days in June-July 1981. Data from these unique remote sensing instruments, coupled with data from conventional in-situ facilities, i.e., 500-m meteorological tower, rawinsonde, and surface based sensors, were analyzed to enhance understanding of wind, waves and turbulence. The purposes of the study were to: (1) compare winds mapped by ground-based dual Doppler radars, airborne Doppler lidar, and anemometers on a tower; (2) compare measured atmospheric boundary layer flow with flows predicted by theoretical models; (3) investigate the kinematic structure of air mass boundaries that precede the development of severe storms; and (4) study the kinematic structure of thunderstorm phenomena (downdrafts, gust fronts, etc.) that produce wind shear and turbulence hazardous to aircraft operations. The report consists of three parts: Part 1, Intercomparison of Wind Data from Airborne Lidar, Ground-Based Radars and Instrumented 444 m Tower; Part 2, The Structure of the Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer as Revealed by Lidar and Doppler Radars; and Part 3, Doppler Lidar Observations in Thunderstorm Environments.

  7. Airborne-radar and ice-core observations of snow accumulation in West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medley, Brooke

    The world's ice sheets store enough water to raise global eustatic sea level by several tens of meters, and therefore, any fluctuations in their size will cause sea level to rise or fall. The net mass exchanged with the ocean - defined as the mass balance - determines the glacial contribution to sea level and is the difference in snow accumulated in the interior and ice discharged into the ocean at the ice sheet periphery. While new techniques in remotely acquired surface velocities lead to improved discharge measurements, snow accumulation remains unmeasured over much of the of the ice sheet. This work aims to improve our understanding of snow accumulation over two of the most rapidly evolving glaciers in Antarctica: Pine Island and Thwaites. Specifically, we use two airborne radar systems to image and track the near-surface internal stratigraphy to measure snow accumulation rates over both glaciers. This method allows for investigation of the spatial and temporal variations in accumulation at the catchment-scale, which is essential for determining glacier mass balance. Examination of the radar-derived accumulation rates over Pine Island and Thwaites glaciers revealed several results including: (1) accumulation exhibited no significant trend between 1980 and 2009, (2) the sea-level contribution from Pine Island and Thwaites tripled from +0.09 mm yr-1 in the mid-1990s to +0.27 mm yr-1 by 2010, (3) a shift towards higher accumulation occurred between 1944-1984 and 1985-2009, observed in both ice core and radar records, and (4) atmospheric models are an adequate replacement for accumulation measurements in areas with few observations. These findings indicate that accumulation is not concurrently compensating the enhanced ice discharge from the region, and as a result, the sea-level contribution from these glaciers is increasing. Furthermore, a recent shift towards higher mean accumulation suggests these glaciers might have been out of balance earlier than originally

  8. Airborne derivation of microburst alerts from ground-based Terminal Doppler Weather Radar information: A flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, David A.

    1993-01-01

    An element of the NASA/FAA windshear program is the integration of ground-based microburst information on the flight deck, to support airborne windshear alerting and microburst avoidance. NASA conducted a windshear flight test program in the summer of 1991 during which airborne processing of Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) data was used to derive microburst alerts. Microburst information was extracted from TDWR, transmitted to a NASA Boeing 737 in flight via data link, and processed to estimate the windshear hazard level (F-factor) that would be experienced by the aircraft in each microburst. The microburst location and F-factor were used to derive a situation display and alerts. The situation display was successfully used to maneuver the aircraft for microburst penetrations, during which atmospheric 'truth' measurements were made. A total of 19 penetrations were made of TDWR-reported microburst locations, resulting in 18 airborne microburst alerts from the TDWR data and two microburst alerts from the airborne reactive windshear detection system. The primary factors affecting alerting performance were spatial offset of the flight path from the region of strongest shear, differences in TDWR measurement altitude and airplane penetration altitude, and variations in microburst outflow profiles. Predicted and measured F-factors agreed well in penetrations near microburst cores. Although improvements in airborne and ground processing of the TDWR measurements would be required to support an airborne executive-level alerting protocol, the practicality of airborne utilization of TDWR data link data has been demonstrated.

  9. Orientation of airborne laser scanning point clouds with multi-view, multi-scale image blocks.

    PubMed

    Rönnholm, Petri; Hyyppä, Hannu; Hyyppä, Juha; Haggrén, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive 3D modeling of our environment requires integration of terrestrial and airborne data, which is collected, preferably, using laser scanning and photogrammetric methods. However, integration of these multi-source data requires accurate relative orientations. In this article, two methods for solving relative orientation problems are presented. The first method includes registration by minimizing the distances between of an airborne laser point cloud and a 3D model. The 3D model was derived from photogrammetric measurements and terrestrial laser scanning points. The first method was used as a reference and for validation. Having completed registration in the object space, the relative orientation between images and laser point cloud is known. The second method utilizes an interactive orientation method between a multi-scale image block and a laser point cloud. The multi-scale image block includes both aerial and terrestrial images. Experiments with the multi-scale image block revealed that the accuracy of a relative orientation increased when more images were included in the block. The orientations of the first and second methods were compared. The comparison showed that correct rotations were the most difficult to detect accurately by using the interactive method. Because the interactive method forces laser scanning data to fit with the images, inaccurate rotations cause corresponding shifts to image positions. However, in a test case, in which the orientation differences included only shifts, the interactive method could solve the relative orientation of an aerial image and airborne laser scanning data repeatedly within a couple of centimeters.

  10. Orientation of Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds with Multi-View, Multi-Scale Image Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Rönnholm, Petri; Hyyppä, Hannu; Hyyppä, Juha; Haggrén, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive 3D modeling of our environment requires integration of terrestrial and airborne data, which is collected, preferably, using laser scanning and photogrammetric methods. However, integration of these multi-source data requires accurate relative orientations. In this article, two methods for solving relative orientation problems are presented. The first method includes registration by minimizing the distances between of an airborne laser point cloud and a 3D model. The 3D model was derived from photogrammetric measurements and terrestrial laser scanning points. The first method was used as a reference and for validation. Having completed registration in the object space, the relative orientation between images and laser point cloud is known. The second method utilizes an interactive orientation method between a multi-scale image block and a laser point cloud. The multi-scale image block includes both aerial and terrestrial images. Experiments with the multi-scale image block revealed that the accuracy of a relative orientation increased when more images were included in the block. The orientations of the first and second methods were compared. The comparison showed that correct rotations were the most difficult to detect accurately by using the interactive method. Because the interactive method forces laser scanning data to fit with the images, inaccurate rotations cause corresponding shifts to image positions. However, in a test case, in which the orientation differences included only shifts, the interactive method could solve the relative orientation of an aerial image and airborne laser scanning data repeatedly within a couple of centimeters. PMID:22454569

  11. Remote Measurements of Snowfalls in Wakasa Bay, Japan with Airborne Millimeter- wave Imaging Radiometer and Cloud Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Austin, R.; Liu, G. S.; Racette, P. E.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we explore the application of combined millimeter-wave radar and radiometry to remotely measure snowfall. During January-February of 2003, a field campaign was conducted with the NASA P-3 aircraft in Wakasa Bay, Japan for the validation of the AMSRE microwave radiometer on board the Aqua satellite. Among the suite of instruments-on board the P-3 aircraft were the Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (MIR) from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the 94 GHz Airborne Cloud Radar (ACR) which is co-owned and operated by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory/University of Massachusetts. MIR is a total power, across-track scanning radiometer that measures radiation at the frequencies of 89, 150, 183.3 +/- 1, 183.3 +/- 3, 183.3 +/-7, 220, and 340 GHz. The MIR has flown many successful missions since its completion in May 1992. ACR is a newer instrument and flew only a few times prior to the Wakasa Bay deployment. These two instruments which are particularly well suited for the detection of snowfall functioned normally during flights over snowfall and excellent data sets were acquired. On January 14, 28, and 29 flights were conducted over snowfall events. The MIR and ACR detected strong signals during periods of snowfall over ocean and land. Results from the analysis of these concurrent data sets show that (1) the scattering of millimeter-wave radiation as detected by the MIR is strongly correlated with ACR radar reflectivity profiles, and (2) the scattering is highly frequency-dependent, the higher the frequency the stronger the scattering. Additionally, the more transparent channels of the MIR (e.g., 89, 150, and 220 GHz) are found to display ambiguous signatures of snowfall because of their exposure to surface features. Thus, the snowfall detection and retrievals of snowfall parameters, such as the ice water path (IWP) and median mass diameter (D(me)) are best conducted at the more opaque channels near 183.3 GHz and 340 GHz. Retrievals of IWP and D(me) using

  12. The pulse-pair algorithm as a robust estimator of turbulent weather spectral parameters using airborne pulse Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.; Lee, Jonggil

    1991-01-01

    The pulse pair method for spectrum parameter estimation is commonly used in pulse Doppler weather radar signal processing since it is economical to implement and can be shown to be a maximum likelihood estimator. With the use of airborne weather radar for windshear detection, the turbulent weather and strong ground clutter return spectrum differs from that assumed in its derivation, so the performance robustness of the pulse pair technique must be understood. Here, the effect of radar system pulse to pulse phase jitter and signal spectrum skew on the pulse pair algorithm performance is discussed. Phase jitter effect may be significant when the weather return signal to clutter ratio is very low and clutter rejection filtering is attempted. The analysis can be used to develop design specifications for airborne radar system phase stability. It is also shown that the weather return spectrum skew can cause a significant bias in the pulse pair mean windspeed estimates, and that the poly pulse pair algorithm can reduce this bias. It is suggested that use of a spectrum mode estimator may be more appropriate in characterizing the windspeed within a radar range resolution cell for detection of hazardous windspeed gradients.

  13. Reconstruction of 3-D cloud geometry using a scanning cloud radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewald, F.; Winkler, C.; Zinner, T.

    2014-11-01

    Clouds are one of the main reasons of uncertainties in the forecasts of weather and climate. In part, this is due to limitations of remote sensing of cloud microphysics. Present approaches often use passive spectral measurements for the remote sensing of cloud microphysical parameters. Large uncertainties are introduced by three dimensional (3-D) radiative transfer effects and cloud inhomogeneities. Such effects are largely caused by unknown orientation of cloud sides or by shadowed areas on the cloud. Passive ground based remote sensing of cloud properties at high spatial resolution could be improved crucially with this kind of additional knowledge of cloud geometry. To this end, a method for the accurate reconstruction of 3-D cloud geometry from cloud radar measurements is developed in this work. Using a radar simulator and simulated passive measurements of static LES model clouds, the effects of different radar scan resolutions and varying interpolation methods are evaluated. In reality a trade-off between scan resolution and scan duration has to be found as clouds are changing quickly. A reasonable choice is a scan resolution of 1 to 2°. The most suitable interpolation procedure identified is the barycentric interpolation method. The 3-D reconstruction method is demonstrated using radar scans of convective cloud cases with the Munich miraMACS, a 35 GHz scanning cloud radar. As a successful proof of concept, camera imagery collected at the radar location is reproduced for the observed cloud cases via 3-D volume reconstruction and 3-D radiative transfer simulation. Data sets provided by the presented reconstruction method will aid passive spectral ground-based measurements of cloud sides to retrieve microphysical parameters.

  14. X-band Scanning ARM Precipitation Radar (X-SAPR) Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N

    2012-10-29

    The X-band scanning ARM cloud radar (X-SAPR) is a full-hemispherical scanning polarimetric Doppler radar transmitting simultaneously in both H and V polarizations. With a 200 kW magnetron transmitter, this puts 100 kW of transmitted power for each polarization. The receiver for the X-SAPR is a Vaisala Sigmet RVP-900 operating in a coherent-on-receive mode. Three X-SAPRs are deployed around the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility in a triangular array. A fourth X-SAPR is deployed near Barrow, Alaska on top of the Barrow Arctic Research Center.

  15. Remote Sensing of Wind Fields and Aerosol Distribution with Airborne Scanning Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, Dean R.; Johnson, Steven C.; Jazembski, Maurice; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The coherent Doppler laser radar (lidar), when operated from an airborne platform, is a unique tool for the study of atmospheric and surface processes and features. This is especially true for scientific objectives requiring measurements in optically-clear air, where other remote sensing technologies such as Doppler radar are typically at a disadvantage. The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of several US institutions, led by Marshall Space Flight Center, have developed an airborne coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping the wind field and aerosol structure in three dimensions. The instrument consists of an eye-safe approx. 1 Joule/pulse lidar transceiver, telescope, scanner, inertial measurement unit, and flight computer system to orchestrate all subsystem functions and tasks. The scanner is capable of directing the expanded lidar beam in a variety of ways, in order to extract vertically-resolved wind fields. Horizontal resolution is approx. 1 km; vertical resolution is even finer. Winds are obtained by measuring backscattered, Doppler-shifted laser radiation from naturally-occurring aerosol particles (of order 1 micron diameter). Measurement coverage depends on aerosol spatial distribution and composition. Velocity accuracy has been verified to be approx. 1 meter per second. A variety of applications have been demonstrated during the three flight campaigns conducted during 1995-1998. Examples will be shown during the presentation. In 1995, boundary layer winds over the ocean were mapped with unprecedented resolution. In 1996, unique measurements were made of. flow over the complex terrain of the Aleutian Islands; interaction of the marine boundary layer jet with the California coastal mountain range; a weak dry line in Texas - New Mexico; the angular dependence of sea surface scattering; and in-flight radiometric calibration using the surface of White Sands National Monument. In 1998, the first measurements of eyewall and boundary layer winds within a

  16. ARM Value-Added Products for New Scanning and Zenith-pointing Cloud Radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. L.; Troyan, D.; Kollias, P.; Kalesse, H.; Luke, E. P.; Giangrande, S. E.; Jensen, M. P.

    2012-12-01

    The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility has extended and improved its cloud observing capabilities with the addition of the dual-frequency Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACRs) and the upgrade of the vertically pointing 35GHz cloud radars to become the Ka-band ARM Zenith-pointing Radars (KAZRs). These radars are now installed at each of the facility's existing fixed sites and as part of both ARM mobile facilities. While these radars are capable of producing unprecedented continuous long-term cloud property data sets, the measurements will be most utilized if scientists can readily incorporate the observations into their research, without the need for extensive radar analysis and expertise. For this reason, value-added products (VAPs) are being developed to provide quality-controlled gridded radar moments (reflectivity, radial velocity, spectrum width) as well as derived products, such as hydrometeor masks and cloud boundaries. The Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL) VAP has been producing a first generation of these products for over 10 years. The VAP combines zenith-pointing cloud radar data with micropulse lidar, ceilometer and rain gauge data to produce best-estimate quality-controlled radar moments and cloud boundaries. ARSCL has been rewritten and improved to take advantage of the upgraded KAZR radars. In addition, a new product is being developed for the polarization-diverse scanning Ka/W-band and X/Ka-band cloud radars. Initially, moments from each individual radar will be corrected for water vapor attenuation as well as range and velocity folding. Next, three-dimensional gridded moments will be produced, followed by combined-frequency, synergistic products. The new products will be described and examples of available and anticipated data products will be shown. Example of best-estimate reflectivity produced by ARSCL-KAZR product. Image is for date 2011.05.20, using measurements from the KAZR radar at the

  17. An Airborne Conical Scanning Millimeter-Wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, J.; Racette, P.; Wang, J.; Crites, A.; Doiron, T.; Engler, C.; Lecha, J.; Powers, M.; Simon, E.; Triesky, M.; Krebs, Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An airborne Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) for high-altitude observations from the NASA Research Aircraft (ER-2) is discussed. The primary application of the CoSMIR is water vapor profile remote sensing. Four radiometers operating at 50 (three channels), 92, 150, and 183 (three channels) GHz provide spectral coverage identical to nine of the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) high-frequency channels. Constant polarization-basis conical and cross-track scanning capabilities are achieved using an elevation-under-azimuth two-axis gimbals.

  18. The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) Mission Radar: A Novel Conically Scanning SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Michael; Chan, Samuel; Veilleux, Louise; Wheeler, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission is a NASA mission identified by the NRC "decadal survey" to measure both soil moisture and freeze/thaw state from space. The mission will use both active radar and passive radiometer instruments at L-Band. In order to achieve a wide swath at sufficiently high resolution for both active and passive chan-nels, an instrument architecture that uses a large rotating reflector is employed. The active radar will further utilize SAR processing in order to obtain the sub-footprint resolution necessary for the geophysical retrievals. The SMAP radar has a unique geometry where the antenna footprint is continuously rotated about nadir in a conical fashion, as opposed to the more common side-looking SAR design. In additional to the unconventional scan geometry, the SMAP radar must address the effects of Faraday rotation and radio frequency interference (RFI), both consequences of the L-Band frequency of operation.

  19. 77 FR 53962 - Technical Standard Order (TSO)-C65a, Airborne Doppler Radar Ground Speed and/or Drift Angle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Technical Standard Order (TSO)-C65a, Airborne Doppler Radar Ground... Doppler Radar Ground Speed and/or Drift Angle Measuring Equipment (For Air Carrier Aircraft). SUMMARY: This notice announces the FAA's cancellation of TSO-C65a. The effect of the cancelled TSO will...

  20. Progress report on the NASA/JPL airborne synthetic aperture radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, Y.; Imel, D.; Chu, A.; Miller, T.; Moller, D.; Skotnicki, W.

    2001-01-01

    AIRSAR has served as a test-bed for both imaging radar techniques and radar technologies for over a decade. In fact, the polarimetric, cross-track interferometric, and along-track introferometric radar techniques were all developed using AIRSAR.

  1. Design and Development of a Scanning Airborne Direct Detection Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce; McGill, Matthew; Schwemmer, Geary; Hardesty, Michael; Brewer, Alan; Wilkerson, Thomas; Atlas, Robert; Sirota, Marcos; Lindemann, Scott

    2006-01-01

    In the fall of 2005 we began developing an airborne scanning direct detection molecular Doppler lidar. The instrument is being built as part of the Tropospheric Wind Lidar Technology Experiment (TWiLiTE), a three year project selected by the NASA Earth Sun Technology Office under the Instrument Incubator Program. The TWiLiTE project is a collaboration involving scientists and engineers from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, NOAA ESRL, Utah State University Space Dynamics Lab, Michigan Aerospace Corporation and Sigma Space Corporation. The TWiLiTE instrument will leverage significant research and development investments made by NASA Goddard and it's partners in the past several years in key lidar technologies and sub-systems (lasers, telescopes, scanning systems, detectors and receivers) required to enable spaceborne global wind lidar measurement. These sub-systems will be integrated into a complete molecular direct detection Doppler wind lidar system designed for autonomous operation on a high altitude aircraft, such as the NASA WB57. The WB57 flies at an altitude of 18 km and from this vantage point the nadir viewing Doppler lidar will be able to profile winds through the full troposphere. The TWiLiTE integrated airborne Doppler lidar instrument will be the first demonstration of a airborne scanning direct detection Doppler lidar and will serve as a critical milestone on the path to a future spaceborne tropospheric wind system. In addition to being a technology testbed for space based tropospheric wind lidar, when completed the TWiLiTE high altitude airborne lidar will be used for studying mesoscale dynamics and storm research (e.g. winter storms, hurricanes) and could be used for calibration and validation of satellite based wind systems such as ESA's Aeolus Atmospheric Dynamics Mission. The TWiLiTE Doppler lidar will have the capability to profile winds in clear air from the aircraft altitude of 18 km to the surface with 250 m vertical resolution and < 2mls

  2. Tree-centric mapping of forest carbon density from airborne laser scanning and hyperspectral data.

    PubMed

    Dalponte, Michele; Coomes, David A

    2016-10-01

    Forests are a major component of the global carbon cycle, and accurate estimation of forest carbon stocks and fluxes is important in the context of anthropogenic global change. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) data sets are increasingly recognized as outstanding data sources for high-fidelity mapping of carbon stocks at regional scales.We develop a tree-centric approach to carbon mapping, based on identifying individual tree crowns (ITCs) and species from airborne remote sensing data, from which individual tree carbon stocks are calculated. We identify ITCs from the laser scanning point cloud using a region-growing algorithm and identifying species from airborne hyperspectral data by machine learning. For each detected tree, we predict stem diameter from its height and crown-width estimate. From that point on, we use well-established approaches developed for field-based inventories: above-ground biomasses of trees are estimated using published allometries and summed within plots to estimate carbon density.We show this approach is highly reliable: tests in the Italian Alps demonstrated a close relationship between field- and ALS-based estimates of carbon stocks (r(2) = 0·98). Small trees are invisible from the air, and a correction factor is required to accommodate this effect.An advantage of the tree-centric approach over existing area-based methods is that it can produce maps at any scale and is fundamentally based on field-based inventory methods, making it intuitive and transparent. Airborne laser scanning, hyperspectral sensing and computational power are all advancing rapidly, making it increasingly feasible to use ITC approaches for effective mapping of forest carbon density also inside wider carbon mapping programs like REDD++.

  3. Analysis and improved design considerations for airborne pulse Doppler radar signal processing in the detection of hazardous windshear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonggil

    1990-01-01

    High resolution windspeed profile measurements are needed to provide reliable detection of hazardous low altitude windshear with an airborne pulse Doppler radar. The system phase noise in a Doppler weather radar may degrade the spectrum moment estimation quality and the clutter cancellation capability which are important in windshear detection. Also the bias due to weather return Doppler spectrum skewness may cause large errors in pulse pair spectral parameter estimates. These effects are analyzed for the improvement of an airborne Doppler weather radar signal processing design. A method is presented for the direct measurement of windspeed gradient using low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) radar. This spatial gradient is essential in obtaining the windshear hazard index. As an alternative, the modified Prony method is suggested as a spectrum mode estimator for both the clutter and weather signal. Estimation of Doppler spectrum modes may provide the desired windshear hazard information without the need of any preliminary processing requirement such as clutter filtering. The results obtained by processing a NASA simulation model output support consideration of mode identification as one component of a windshear detection algorithm.

  4. On Utilization of NEXRAD Scan Strategy Information to Infer Discrepancies Associated With Radar and Rain Gauge Surface Volumetric Rainfall Accumulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Biswadev; Datta, Saswati; Jones, W. Linwood; Kasparis, Takis; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) monthly Ground Validation (GV) rain map, 42 quality controlled tipping bucket rain gauge data (1 minute interpolated rain rates) were utilized. We have compared the gauge data to the surface volumetric rainfall accumulation of NEXRAD reflectivity field, (converting to rain rates using a 0.5 dB resolution smooth Z-R table). The comparison was carried out from data collected at Melbourne, Florida during the month of July 98. GV operational level 3 (L3 monthly) accumulation algorithm was used to obtain surface volumetric accumulations for the radar. The gauge records were accumulated using the 1 minute interpolated rain rates while the radar Volume Scan (VOS) intervals remain less than or equal to 75 minutes. The correlation coefficient for the radar and gauge totals for the monthly time-scale remain at 0.93, however, a large difference was noted between the gauge and radar derived rain accumulation when the radar data interval is either 9 minute, or 10 minute. This difference in radar and gauge accumulation is being explained in terms of the radar scan strategy information. The discrepancy in terms of the Volume Coverage Pattern (VCP) of the NEXRAD is being reported where VCP mode is ascertained using the radar tilt angle information. Hourly radar and gauge accumulations have been computed using the present operational L3 method supplemented with a threshold period of +/- 5 minutes (based on a sensitivity analysis). These radar and gauge accumulations are subsequently improved using a radar hourly scan weighting factor (taking ratio of the radar scan frequency within a time bin to the 7436 total radar scans for the month). This GV procedure is further being improved by introducing a spatial smoothing method to yield reasonable bulk radar to gauge ratio for the hourly and daily scales.

  5. Air-Sea Spray Airborne Radar Profiler Characterizes Energy Fluxes in Hurricanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, Stephen L.; Esteban-Fermandez, D.

    2010-01-01

    A report discusses ASAP (Air-sea Spray Airborne Profiler), a dual-wavelength radar profiler that provides measurement information about the droplet size distribution (DSD) of sea-spray, which can be used to estimate heat and moisture fluxes for hurricane research. Researchers have recently determined that sea spray can have a large effect on the magnitude and distribution of the air-sea energy flux at hurricane -force wind speeds. To obtain information about the DSD, two parameters of the DSD are required; for example, overall DSD amplitude and DSD mean diameter. This requires two measurements. Two frequencies are used, with a large enough separation that the differential frequency provides size information. One frequency is 94 GHz; the other is 220 GHz. These correspond to the Rayleigh and Mie regions. Above a surface wind speed of 10 m/ s, production of sea spray grows exponentially. Both the number of large droplets and the altitude they reach are a function of the surface wind speed.

  6. Designing clutter rejection filters with complex coefficients for airborne pulsed Doppler weather radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamora, Dennis A.

    1993-01-01

    Ground clutter interference is a major problem for airborne pulse Doppler radar operating at low altitudes in a look-down mode. With Doppler zero set at the aircraft ground speed, ground clutter rejection filtering is typically accomplished using a high-pass filter with real valued coefficients and a stopband notch centered at zero Doppler. Clutter spectra from the NASA Wind Shear Flight Experiments of l991-1992 show that the dominant clutter mode can be located away from zero Doppler, particularly at short ranges dominated by sidelobe returns. Use of digital notch filters with complex valued coefficients so that the stopband notch can be located at any Doppler frequency is investigated. Several clutter mode tracking algorithms are considered to estimate the Doppler frequency location of the dominant clutter mode. From the examination of night data, when a dominant clutter mode away from zero Doppler is present, complex filtering is able to significantly increase clutter rejection over use of a notch filter centered at zero Doppler.

  7. UAVSAR - A New Airborne L-Band Radar for Repeat Pass Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Thomas H.; Lou, Yunling

    2009-01-01

    NASA/JPL has developed a new airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) which has become available for use by the scientific community in January, 2009. Pod mounted, the UAVSAR was designed to be portable among a variety of aircraft, including unmanned aerial systems (UAS). The instrument operates in the L-Band, has a resolution under 2m from a GPS altitude of 12Km and a swath width of approximately 20Km. UAVSAR currently flies on a modified Gulfstream-III aircraft, operated by NASA s Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California. The G-III platform enables repeat-pass interferometric measurements, by using a modified autopilot and precise kinematic differential GPS to repeatedly fly the aircraft within a specified 10m tube. The antenna is electronically steered along track to assure that the antenna beam can be directed independently, regardless of speed and wind direction. The instrument can be controlled remotely, AS AN OPTION, using the Research Environment for Vehicle Embedded Analysis on Linux (REVEAL). This allows simulation of the telepresence environment necessary for flight on UAS. Potential earth science research and applications include surface deformation, volcano studies, ice sheet dynamics, and vegetation structure.

  8. Spectrum Modal Analysis for the Detection of Low-Altitude Windshear with Airborne Doppler Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunkel, Matthew W.

    1992-01-01

    A major obstacle in the estimation of windspeed patterns associated with low-altitude windshear with an airborne pulsed Doppler radar system is the presence of strong levels of ground clutter which can strongly bias a windspeed estimate. Typical solutions attempt to remove the clutter energy from the return through clutter rejection filtering. Proposed is a method whereby both the weather and clutter modes present in a return spectrum can be identified to yield an unbiased estimate of the weather mode without the need for clutter rejection filtering. An attempt will be made to show that modeling through a second order extended Prony approach is sufficient for the identification of the weather mode. A pattern recognition approach to windspeed estimation from the identified modes is derived and applied to both simulated and actual flight data. Comparisons between windspeed estimates derived from modal analysis and the pulse-pair estimator are included as well as associated hazard factors. Also included is a computationally attractive method for estimating windspeeds directly from the coefficients of a second-order autoregressive model. Extensions and recommendations for further study are included.

  9. Estimation of Cloud Fraction Profile in Shallow Convection Using a Scanning Cloud Radar

    DOE PAGES

    Oue, Mariko; Kollias, Pavlos; North, Kirk W.; ...

    2016-10-18

    Large spatial heterogeneities in shallow convection result in uncertainties in estimations of domain-averaged cloud fraction profiles (CFP). This issue is addressed using large eddy simulations of shallow convection over land coupled with a radar simulator. Results indicate that zenith profiling observations are inadequate to provide reliable CFP estimates. Use of Scanning Cloud Radar (SCR), performing a sequence of cross-wind horizon-to-horizon scans, is not straightforward due to the strong dependence of radar sensitivity to target distance. An objective method for estimating domain-averaged CFP is proposed that uses observed statistics of SCR hydrometeor detection with height to estimate optimum sampling regions. Thismore » method shows good agreement with the model CFP. Results indicate that CFP estimates require more than 35 min of SCR scans to converge on the model domain average. Lastly, the proposed technique is expected to improve our ability to compare model output with cloud radar observations in shallow cumulus cloud conditions.« less

  10. Bayesian Deconvolution for Angular Super-Resolution in Forward-Looking Scanning Radar

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Yuebo; Huang, Yulin; Sun, Zhichao; Wang, Yue; Yang, Jianyu

    2015-01-01

    Scanning radar is of notable importance for ground surveillance, terrain mapping and disaster rescue. However, the angular resolution of a scanning radar image is poor compared to the achievable range resolution. This paper presents a deconvolution algorithm for angular super-resolution in scanning radar based on Bayesian theory, which states that the angular super-resolution can be realized by solving the corresponding deconvolution problem with the maximum a posteriori (MAP) criterion. The algorithm considers that the noise is composed of two mutually independent parts, i.e., a Gaussian signal-independent component and a Poisson signal-dependent component. In addition, the Laplace distribution is used to represent the prior information about the targets under the assumption that the radar image of interest can be represented by the dominant scatters in the scene. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed deconvolution algorithm has higher precision for angular super-resolution compared with the conventional algorithms, such as the Tikhonov regularization algorithm, the Wiener filter and the Richardson–Lucy algorithm. PMID:25806871

  11. Scanning ARM Cloud Radars. Part II: Data Quality Control and Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kollias, Pavlos; Jo, Ieng; Borque, Paloma; Tatarevic, Aleksandra; Lamer, Katia; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Widener, Kevin B.; Johnson, Karen L.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2014-03-01

    The Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACR’s) are the primary instruments for documenting the four-dimensional structure and evolution of clouds within a 20-30 km radius from the ARM fixed and mobile sites. Here, the post-processing of the calibrated SACR measurements is discussed. First, a feature mask algorithm that objectively determines the presence of significant radar returns is described. The feature mask algorithm is based on the statistical properties of radar receiver noise. It accounts for atmospheric emission and is applicable even for SACR profiles with few or no signal-free range gates. Using the nearest-in-time atmospheric sounding, the SACR radar reflectivities are corrected for gaseous attenuation (water vapor and oxygen) using a line-by-line absorption model. Despite having a high pulse repetition frequency, the SACR has a narrow Nyquist velocity limit and thus Doppler velocity folding is commonly observed. An unfolding algorithm that makes use of a first guess for the true Doppler velocity using horizontal wind measurements from the nearest sounding is described. The retrieval of the horizontal wind profile from the HS-RHI SACR scan observations and/or nearest sounding is described. The retrieved horizontal wind profile can be used to adaptively configure SACR scan strategies that depend on wind direction. Several remaining challenges are discussed, including the removal of insect and second-trip echoes. The described algorithms significantly enhance SACR data quality and constitute an important step towards the utilization of SACR measurements for cloud research.

  12. A planar near-field scanning technique for bistatic radar cross section measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuhela-Reuning, S.; Walton, E. K.

    1990-01-01

    A progress report on the development of a bistatic radar cross section (RCS) measurement range is presented. A technique using one parabolic reflector and a planar scanning probe antenna is analyzed. The field pattern in the test zone is computed using a spatial array of signal sources. It achieved an illumination pattern with 1 dB amplitude and 15 degree phase ripple over the target zone. The required scan plane size is found to be proportional to the size of the desired test target. Scan plane probe sample spacing can be increased beyond the Nyquist lambda/2 limit permitting constant probe sample spacing over a range of frequencies.

  13. Greenland annual accumulation along the EGIG line, 1959-2004, from ASIRAS airborne radar and neutron-probe density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overly, Thomas B.; Hawley, Robert L.; Helm, Veit; Morris, Elizabeth M.; Chaudhary, Rohan N.

    2016-08-01

    We report annual snow accumulation rates from 1959 to 2004 along a 250 km segment of the Expéditions Glaciologiques Internationales au Groenland (EGIG) line across central Greenland using Airborne SAR/Interferometric Radar Altimeter System (ASIRAS) radar layers and high resolution neutron-probe (NP) density profiles. ASIRAS-NP-derived accumulation rates are not statistically different (95 % confidence interval) from in situ EGIG accumulation measurements from 1985 to 2004. ASIRAS-NP-derived accumulation increases by 20 % below 3000 m elevation, and increases by 13 % above 3000 m elevation for the period 1995 to 2004 compared to 1985 to 1994. Three Regional Climate Models (PolarMM5, RACMO2.3, MAR) underestimate snow accumulation below 3000 m by 16-20 % compared to ASIRAS-NP from 1985 to 2004. We test radar-derived accumulation rates sensitivity to density using modeled density profiles in place of NP densities. ASIRAS radar layers combined with Herron and Langway (1980) model density profiles (ASIRAS-HL) produce accumulation rates within 3.5 % of ASIRAS-NP estimates in the dry snow region. We suggest using Herron and Langway (1980) density profiles to calibrate radar layers detected in dry snow regions of ice sheets lacking detailed in situ density measurements, such as those observed by the Operation IceBridge campaign.

  14. The design and development of signal-processing algorithms for an airborne x-band Doppler weather radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Shaun R.

    1994-01-01

    Improved measurements of precipitation will aid our understanding of the role of latent heating on global circulations. Spaceborne meteorological sensors such as the planned precipitation radar and microwave radiometers on the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) provide for the first time a comprehensive means of making these global measurements. Pre-TRMM activities include development of precipitation algorithms using existing satellite data, computer simulations, and measurements from limited aircraft campaigns. Since the TRMM radar will be the first spaceborne precipitation radar, there is limited experience with such measurements, and only recently have airborne radars become available that can attempt to address the issue of the limitations of a spaceborne radar. There are many questions regarding how much attenuation occurs in various cloud types and the effect of cloud vertical motions on the estimation of precipitation rates. The EDOP program being developed by NASA GSFC will provide data useful for testing both rain-retrieval algorithms and the importance of vertical motions on the rain measurements. The purpose of this report is to describe the design and development of real-time embedded parallel algorithms used by EDOP to extract reflectivity and Doppler products (velocity, spectrum width, and signal-to-noise ratio) as the first step in the aforementioned goals.

  15. Volumetric evolution of Surtsey, Iceland, from topographic maps and scanning airborne laser altimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garvin, J.B.; Williams, R.S.; Frawley, J.J.; Krabill, W.B.

    2000-01-01

    The volumetric evolution of Surtsey has been estimated on the basis of digital elevation models derived from NASA scanning airborne laser altimeter surveys (20 July 1998), as well as digitized 1:5,000-scale topographic maps produced by the National Land Survey of Iceland and by Norrman. Subaerial volumes have been computed from co-registered digital elevation models (DEM's) from 6 July 1968, 11 July 1975, 16 July 1993, and 20 July 1998 (scanning airborne laser altimetry), as well as true surface area (above mean sea level). Our analysis suggests that the subaerial volume of Surtsey has been reduced from nearly 0.100 km3 on 6 July 1968 to 0.075 km3 on 20 July 1998. Linear regression analysis of the temporal evolution of Surtsey's subaerial volume indicates that most of its subaerial surface will be at or below mean sea-level by approximately 2100. This assumes a conservative estimate of continuation of the current pace of marine erosion and mass-wasting on the island, including the indurated core of the conduits of the Surtur I and Surtur II eruptive vents. If the conduits are relatively resistant to marine erosion they will become sea stacks after the rest of the island has become a submarine shoal, and some portions of the island could survive for centuries. The 20 July 1998 scanning laser altimeter surveys further indicate rapid enlargement of erosional canyons in the northeastern portion of the partial tephra ring associated with Surtur I. Continued airborne and eventually spaceborne topographic surveys of Surtsey are planned to refine the inter-annual change of its subaerial volume.

  16. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  17. The Utility and Validity of Kinematic GPS Positioning for the Geosar Airborne Terrain Mapping Radar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Adam; Hensley, Scott; Chapin, Elaine; Kroger, Peter; Hussain, Mushtaq; Allred, Bruce

    1999-01-01

    GeoSAR is an airborne, interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) system for terrain mapping, currently under development by a consortium including NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Calgis, Inc., a California mapping sciences company, and the California Department of Conservation (CaIDOC), with funding provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Topographic Engineering Center (TEC) and the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). IFSAR data processing requires high-accuracy platform position and attitude knowledge. On 9 GeoSAR, these are provided by one or two Honeywell Embedded GPS Inertial Navigation Units (EGI) and an Ashtech Z12 GPS receiver. The EGIs provide real-time high-accuracy attitude and moderate-accuracy position data, while the Ashtech data, post-processed differentially with data from a nearby ground station using Ashtech PNAV software, provide high-accuracy differential GPS positions. These data are optimally combined using a Kalman filter within the GeoSAR motion measurement software, and the resultant position and orientation information are used to process the dual frequency (X-band and P-band) radar data to generate high-accuracy, high -resolution terrain imagery and digital elevation models (DEMs). GeoSAR requirements specify sub-meter level planimetric and vertical accuracies for the resultant DEMS. To achieve this, platform positioning errors well below one meter are needed. The goal of GeoSAR is to obtain 25 cm or better 3-D positions from the GPS systems on board the aircraft. By imaging a set of known point target corner-cube reflectors, the GeoSAR system can be calibrated. This calibration process yields the true position of the aircraft with an uncertainty of 20- 50 cm. This process thus allows an independent assessment of the accuracy of our GPS-based positioning systems. We will present an overview of the GeoSAR motion measurement system, focusing on the use of GPS and the blending of position data from the

  18. Airborne In Situ and Ground-based Polarimetric Radar Measurements of Tropical Convection in Support of CRYSTAL-FACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poellot, Michael R.; Kucera, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the work performed by the University of North Dakota (UND) under NASA Grant NAG5-11509, titled Airborne In Situ and Ground-based Polarimetric Radar Measurements of Tropical Convection in Support of CRYSTAL-FACE. This work focused on the collection of data by two key platforms: the UND Citation II research aircraft and the NASA NPOL radar system. The CRYSTAL-FACE (C-F) mission addresses several key issues from the NASA Earth System Enterprise, including the variability of water in the atmosphere, the forcing provided by tropical cirrus and the response of the Earth system to this forcing. In situ measurements and radar observations of tropical convection, cirrus clouds and their environment are core elements of C-F. One of the primary issues that C-F is addressing is the relationship of tropical cirrus anvils to precipitating deep convection. The in situ measurements from C-F are being used to validate remote sensing of Earth-Atmosphere properties, increase our knowledge of upper tropospheric water vapor and its distribution, and increase our knowledge of tropical cirrus cloud morphology and composition. Radar measurements, especially polarimetric diversity observations available fiom the NASA NPOL radar, are providing essential information about the initiation, modulation, and dissipation of convective cores and the generation of associated anvils in tropical convection. Specifically, NPOL radar measurements contain information about convective intensity and its vertical structure for comparison with thermodynamic and kinematic environmental measurements observed from soundings. Because of the polarimetric diversity of MOL, statistics on bulk microphysical properties can be retrieved and compared to the other characteristics of convection and associated cirrus anvils. In summary, the central objectives of this proposal were to deploy the UND Citation research aircraft as an in situ sensing platform for this mission and to provide collaborative

  19. Velocity profiles inside volcanic clouds from three-dimensional scanning microwave dual-polarization Doppler radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, Mario

    2016-07-01

    In this work, velocity profiles within a volcanic tephra cloud obtained by dual-polarization Doppler radar acquisitions with three-dimensional (3-D) mechanical scanning capability are analyzed. A method for segmenting the radar volumes into three velocity regimes: vertical updraft, vertical fallout, and horizontal wind advection within a volcanic tephra cloud using dual-polarization Doppler radar moments is proposed. The horizontal and vertical velocity components within the regimes are retrieved using a novel procedure that makes assumptions concerning the characteristics of the winds inside these regimes. The vertical velocities retrieved are combined with 1-D simulations to derive additional parameters including particle fallout, mass flux, and particle sizes. The explosive event occurred on 23 November 2013 at the Mount Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy), is considered a demonstrative case in which to analyze the radar Doppler signal inside the tephra column. The X-band radar (3 cm wavelength) in the Catania, Italy, airport observed the 3-D scenes of the Etna tephra cloud ~32 km from the volcano vent every 10 min. From the radar-derived vertical velocity profiles of updraft, particle fallout, and horizontal transportation, an exit velocity of 150 m/s, mass flux rate of 1.37 • 107 kg/s, particle fallout velocity of 18 m/s, and diameters of precipitating tephra particles equal to 0.8 cm are estimated on average. These numbers are shown to be consistent with theoretical 1-D simulations of plume dynamics and local reports at the ground, respectively. A thickness of 3 ± 0.36 km for the downwind ash cloud is also inferred by differentiating the radar-derived cloud top and the height of transition between the convective and buoyancy regions, the latter being inferred by the estimated vertical updraft velocity profile. The unique nature of the case study as well as the novelty of the segmentation and retrieval methods presented potentially give new insights into the

  20. A fast 3D image simulation algorithm of moving target for scanning laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jicheng; Shi, Zhiguang; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Dong

    2014-10-01

    Scanning Laser Radar has been widely used in many military and civil areas. Usually there are relative movements between the target and the radar, so the moving target image modeling and simulation is an important research content in the field of signal processing and system design of scan-imaging laser radar. In order to improve the simulation speed and hold the accuracy of the image simulation simultaneously, a novel fast simulation algorithm is proposed in this paper. Firstly, for moving target or varying scene, an inequation that can judge the intersection relations between the pixel and target bins is obtained by deriving the projection of target motion trajectories on the image plane. Then, by utilizing the time subdivision and approximate treatments, the potential intersection relations of pixel and target bins are determined. Finally, the goal of reducing the number of intersection operations could be achieved by testing all the potential relations and finding which of them is real intersection. To test the method's performance, we perform computer simulations of both the new proposed algorithm and a literature's algorithm for six targets. The simulation results show that the two algorithm yield the same imaging result, whereas the number of intersection operations of former is equivalent to only 1% of the latter, and the calculation efficiency increases a hundredfold. The novel simulation acceleration idea can be applied extensively in other more complex application environments and provide equally acceleration effect. It is very suitable for the case to produce a great large number of laser radar images.

  1. The New Weather Radar for America's Space Program in Florida: A Temperature Profile Adaptive Scan Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, L. D.; Petersen, W. A.; Deierling, W.; Roeder, W. P.

    2009-01-01

    A new weather radar is being acquired for use in support of America s space program at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, NASA Kennedy Space Center, and Patrick AFB on the east coast of central Florida. This new radar replaces the modified WSR-74C at Patrick AFB that has been in use since 1984. The new radar is a Radtec TDR 43-250, which has Doppler and dual polarization capability. A new fixed scan strategy was designed to best support the space program. The fixed scan strategy represents a complex compromise between many competing factors and relies on climatological heights of various temperatures that are important for improved lightning forecasting and evaluation of Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), which are the weather rules to avoid lightning strikes to in-flight rockets. The 0 C to -20 C layer is vital since most generation of electric charge occurs within it and so it is critical in evaluating Lightning LCC and in forecasting lightning. These are two of the most important duties of 45 WS. While the fixed scan strategy that covers most of the climatological variation of the 0 C to -20 C levels with high resolution ensures that these critical temperatures are well covered most of the time, it also means that on any particular day the radar is spending precious time scanning at angles covering less important heights. The goal of this project is to develop a user-friendly, Interactive Data Language (IDL) computer program that will automatically generate optimized radar scan strategies that adapt to user input of the temperature profile and other important parameters. By using only the required scan angles output by the temperature profile adaptive scan strategy program, faster update times for volume scans and/or collection of more samples per gate for better data quality is possible, while maintaining high resolution at the critical temperature levels. The temperature profile adaptive technique will also take into account earth curvature and refraction

  2. Scanning Cloud Radar Observations at Azores: Preliminary 3D Cloud Products

    SciTech Connect

    Kollias, P.; Johnson, K.; Jo, I.; Tatarevic, A.; Giangrande, S.; Widener, K.; Bharadwaj, N.; Mead, J.

    2010-03-15

    The deployment of the Scanning W-Band ARM Cloud Radar (SWACR) during the AMF campaign at Azores signals the first deployment of an ARM Facility-owned scanning cloud radar and offers a prelude for the type of 3D cloud observations that ARM will have the capability to provide at all the ARM Climate Research Facility sites by the end of 2010. The primary objective of the deployment of Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACRs) at the ARM Facility sites is to map continuously (operationally) the 3D structure of clouds and shallow precipitation and to provide 3D microphysical and dynamical retrievals for cloud life cycle and cloud-scale process studies. This is a challenging task, never attempted before, and requires significant research and development efforts in order to understand the radar's capabilities and limitations. At the same time, we need to look beyond the radar meteorology aspects of the challenge and ensure that the hardware and software capabilities of the new systems are utilized for the development of 3D data products that address the scientific needs of the new Atmospheric System Research (ASR) program. The SWACR observations at Azores provide a first look at such observations and the challenges associated with their analysis and interpretation. The set of scan strategies applied during the SWACR deployment and their merit is discussed. The scan strategies were adjusted for the detection of marine stratocumulus and shallow cumulus that were frequently observed at the Azores deployment. Quality control procedures for the radar reflectivity and Doppler products are presented. Finally, preliminary 3D-Active Remote Sensing of Cloud Locations (3D-ARSCL) products on a regular grid will be presented, and the challenges associated with their development discussed. In addition to data from the Azores deployment, limited data from the follow-up deployment of the SWACR at the ARM SGP site will be presented. This effort provides a blueprint for the effort required for the

  3. C-Band Scanning ARM Precipitation Radar (C-SAPR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N

    2012-11-13

    The C-band scanning ARM precipitation radar (C-SAPR) is a scanning polarimetric Doppler radar transmitting simultaneously in both H and V polarizations. With a 350-kW magnetron transmitter, this puts 125 kW of transmitted power for each polarization. The receiver for the C-SAPR is a National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) -developed Hi-Q system operating in a coherent-on-receive mode. The ARM Climate Research Facility operates two C-SAPRs; one of them is deployed near the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility near the triangular array of X-SAPRs, and the second C-SAPR is deployed at ARM’s Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea.

  4. Automated planimetric quality control in high accuracy airborne laser scanning surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosselman, George

    2012-11-01

    With the increasing point densities of airborne laser scanning surveys, the applications of the generated point clouds have evolved from the production of digital terrain models to 3D modelling of a wide variety of objects. Likewise in quality control procedures criteria for height accuracy are extended with measures to describe the planimetric accuracy. This paper introduces a measure for the potential accuracy of outlining objects in a point cloud. It describes how this accuracy can be verified with the use of ridge lines of gable roofs in strip overlaps. Because of the high accuracy of modern laser scanning surveys, the influence of roof tiles onto the estimation of ridge lines is explicitly modelled. New selection criteria are introduced that allow an automated, reliable and accurate extraction of ridge lines from point clouds. The applicability of the procedure is demonstrated in a pilot project in an area covering 100,000 ha with around 20 billion points.

  5. An entropy-based filtering approach for airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhe; Wan, Jiaxin; Liu, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Parameter-tuning is a challenging task when generating digital terrain models from airborne laser scanning (light detection and ranging, LiDAR) data. To address this issue, this paper presents a filtering method for near-infrared laser scanning data that exploits the principle of entropy maximization as the optimization objective. The proposed approach generates ground elevation of point cloud by constructing a triangulated irregular network, calculates the entropy of the elevation from different parts, and automatically separates ground and non-ground points by the principle of entropy maximization. Experimental results from different ground surfaces show that the proposed entropy-based filtering method can effectively extract bare-earth points from the point cloud without adjusting thresholds.

  6. Global digital topography mapping with a synthetic aperture scanning radar altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Im, K. E.; Rodriguez, E.

    1990-01-01

    Global digital topography data of the land surface is of importance in a variety of geoscientific and application disciplines. Such a database, with a spatial resolution of 150 to 500 m and height accuracy of 5 m or better can be acquired from an orbiting platform using a synthetic aperture scanning radar altimeter. Near-global coverage can be achieved within 14 days from an orbiting platform in a polar or near-polar orbit.

  7. 108. Back side technical facilities S.R. (scanning radar), scanner building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    108. Back side technical facilities S.R. (scanning radar), scanner building no. 104, "first floor & mezzanine plan" - architectural, AS-BLT AW 35-03-89, sheet 1 of 40, dated November, 1960. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  8. Multiple target tracking and target attitude determination with a scanning laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, T.; Coombes, D.

    1974-01-01

    A scanning laser radar that can acquire and track single or multiple targets has recently been developed. Scan patterns have been designed for acquisition and tracking of one or more targets using a narrow laser beam. A synchronously scanned transmitter-receiver is used to acquire and track targets anywhere in a 376 x 376 element raster covering a 30 x 30 deg field. All scan patterns are electronically programmed, and the system automatically acquires and tracks the target or targets without the aid of an operator. The maximum tracking rate is 1.0 deg/sec (10.0 deg/sec) when used with a 1 kHz (10 kHz) scan rate. The estimated free space range against passive cooperative targets (corner cube reflectors) is 30 nautical miles. The laser radar has an accuracy of 10 cm (range) and 0.05 deg (angle). The developmental system is relatively small (1.5 cu ft), lightweight (60 lbs) and low-power-consuming (60 W).

  9. Evolving subglacial water systems in East Antarctica from airborne radar sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Sasha Peter

    The cold, lightless, and high pressure aquatic environment at the base of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet is of interest to a wide range of disciplines. Stable subglacial lakes and their connecting channels remain perennially liquid three kilometers below some of the coldest places on Earth. The presence of subglacial water impacts flow of the overlying ice and provides clues to the geologic properties of the bedrock below, and may harbor unique life forms which have evolved out of contact with the atmosphere for millions of years. Periodic release of water from this system may impact ocean circulation at the margins of the ice sheet. This research uses airborne radar sounding, with its unique ability to infer properties within and at the base of the ice sheet over large spatial scales, to locate and characterize this unique environment. Subglacial lakes, the primary storage mechanism for subglacial water, have been located and classified into four categories on the basis of the radar reflection properties from the sub-ice interface: Definite lakes are brighter than their surroundings by at least two decibels (relatively bright), and are both consistently reflective (specular) and have a reflection coefficient greater than -10 decibels (absolutely bright). Dim lakes are relatively bright and specular but not absolutely bright, possibly indicating non-steady dynamics in the overlying ice. Fuzzy lakes are both relatively and absolutely bright, but not specular, and may indicate saturated sediments or high frequency spatially heterogeneous distributions of sediment and liquid water (i.e. a braided steam). Indistinct lakes are absolutely bright and specular but no brighter than their surroundings. Lakes themselves and the different classes of lakes are not arranged randomly throughout Antarctica but are clustered around ice divides, ice stream onsets and prominent bedrock troughs, with each cluster demonstrating a different characteristic lake classification distribution

  10. Coupling airborne laser scanning and acoustic Doppler current profiler data to model stream rating curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, N.; Lyon, S. W.; Kean, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The rating curve enables the translation of water depth into discharge through a reference cross section. Errors in estimating stream channel geometry can therefore result in increased discharge uncertainty. This study investigates coupling national-scale airborne laser scanning (ALS) and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) bathymetric survey data for generating stream rating curves. Specifically, stream channel geometries were generated from coupled ALS and ADCP scanning data collected for a well-monitored site located in northern Sweden. These data were used to define the hydraulic geometry required by a physically-based 1-D hydraulic model. The results of our study demonstrate that the effects of potential scanning data errors on the model generated rating curve were less than the uncertainties due to stream gauging measurements and empirical rating curve fitting. Further analysis of the ALS data showed that an overestimation of the streambank elevation (the main scanning data error) was primarily due to vegetation that could be adjusted for through a root-mean-square-error bias correction. We consider these findings encouraging as hydrometric agencies can potentially leverage national-scale ALS and ADCP instrumentation to reduce the cost and effort required for maintaining and establish rating curves at gauging stations.

  11. Scanning ARM Cloud Radars Part II. Data Quality Control and Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kollias, Pavlos; Jo, Ieng; Borque, Paloma; Tatarevic, Aleksandra; Lamer, Katia; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Widener, Kevin B.; Johnson, Karen; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2013-10-04

    The Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACR’s) are the primary instruments for documenting the four-dimensional structure and evolution of clouds within a 20-30 km radius from the ARM fixed and mobile sites. Here, the post-processing of the calibrated SACR measurements is discussed. First, a feature mask algorithm that objectively determines the presence of significant radar returns is described. The feature mask algorithm is based on the statistical properties of radar receiver noise. It accounts for atmospheric emission and is applicable even for SACR profiles with few or no signal-free range gates. Using the nearest-in-time atmospheric sounding, the SACR radar reflectivities are corrected for gaseous attenuation (water vapor and oxygen) using a line-by-line absorption model. Despite having a high pulse repetition frequency, the SACR has a narrow Nyquist velocity limit and thus Doppler velocity folding is commonly observed. An unfolding algorithm that makes use of a first guess for the true Doppler velocity using horizontal wind measurements from the nearest sounding is described. The retrieval of the horizontal wind profile from the Hemispherical Sky – Range Height Indicator SACR scan observations and/or nearest sounding is described. The retrieved horizontal wind profile can be used to adaptively configure SACR scan strategies that depend on wind direction. Several remaining challenges are discussed, including the removal of insect and second-trip echoes. The described algorithms significantly enhance SACR data quality and constitute an important step towards the utilization of SACR measurements for cloud research.

  12. Evaluation of gridded scanning ARM cloud radar reflectivity observations and vertical doppler velocity retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamer, K.; Tatarevic, A.; Jo, I.; Kollias, P.

    2014-04-01

    The scanning Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) cloud radars (SACRs) provide continuous atmospheric observations aspiring to capture the 3-D cloud-scale structure. Sampling clouds in 3-D is challenging due to their temporal-spatial scales, the need to sample the sky at high elevations and cloud radar limitations. Thus, a suggested scan strategy is to repetitively slice the atmosphere from horizon to horizon as clouds advect over the radar (Cross-Wind Range-Height Indicator - CW-RHI). Here, the processing and gridding of the SACR CW-RHI scans are presented. First, the SACR sample observations from the ARM Southern Great Plains and Cape Cod sites are post-processed (detection mask, gaseous attenuation correction, insect filtering and velocity de-aliasing). The resulting radial Doppler moment fields are then mapped to Cartesian coordinates with time as one of the dimensions. Next the Cartesian-gridded Doppler velocity fields are decomposed into the horizontal wind velocity contribution and the vertical Doppler velocity component. For validation purposes, all gridded and retrieved fields are compared to collocated zenith-pointing ARM cloud radar measurements. We consider that the SACR sensitivity loss with range, the cloud type observed and the research purpose should be considered in determining the gridded domain size. Our results also demonstrate that the gridded SACR observations resolve the main features of low and high stratiform clouds. It is established that the CW-RHI observations complemented with processing techniques could lead to robust 3-D cloud dynamical representations up to 25-30 degrees off zenith. The proposed gridded products are expected to advance our understanding of 3-D cloud morphology, dynamics and anisotropy and lead to more realistic 3-D radiative transfer calculations.

  13. TRMM Precipitation Radar Reflectivity Profiles Compared to High-Resolution Airborne and Ground-Based Radar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, G. M.; Geerts, B.; Tian, L.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Satellite) Precipitation Radar (PR) products are evaluated by means of simultaneous comparisons with data from the high-altitude ER-2 Doppler Radar (EDOP), as well as ground-based radars. The comparison is aimed primarily at the vertical reflectivity structure, which is of key importance in TRMM rain type classification and latent heating estimation. The radars used in this study have considerably different viewing geometries and resolutions, demanding non-trivial mapping procedures in common earth-relative coordinates. Mapped vertical cross sections and mean profiles of reflectivity from the PR, EDOP, and ground-based radars are compared for six cases. These cases cover a stratiform frontal rainband, convective cells of various sizes and stages, and a hurricane. For precipitating systems that are large relative to the PR footprint size, PR reflectivity profiles compare very well to high-resolution measurements thresholded to the PR minimum reflectivity, and derived variables such as bright band height and rain types are accurate, even at high PR incidence angles. It was found that for, the PR reflectivity of convective cells small relative to the PR footprint is weaker than in reality. Some of these differences can be explained by non-uniform beam filling. For other cases where strong reflectivity gradients occur within a PR footprint, the reflectivity distribution is spread out due to filtering by the PR antenna illumination pattern. In these cases, rain type classification may err and be biased towards the stratiform type, and the average reflectivity tends to be underestimated. The limited sensitivity of the PR implies that the upper regions of precipitation systems remain undetected and that the PR storm top height estimate is unreliable, usually underestimating the actual storm top height. This applies to all cases but the discrepancy is larger for smaller cells where limited sensitivity is compounded

  14. Measuring Directional Wave Spectra and Wind Speed with a Scanning Radar Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.; Vandemark, D.; Wright, C. W.; Swift, R. N.; Scott, J. F.; Hines, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    The geometry for the NASA Scanning Radar Altimeter (SRA) is shown. It transmits a 8-ns duration pulse at Ka-band (8.3 mm) and measures time of flight as it scans a 1 degree (two-way) beam from left to right across the aircraft ground track. The most recent configuration determines the surface elevation at 64 points spaced at uniform angular intervals of about 0.7 across a swath whose width is about 0.8 times the aircraft altitude. The system generates these raster lines of the surface topography beneath the aircraft at about a 10 Hz rate. In postflight processing the SRA wave topographic data are transformed with a two-dimensional Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) and Doppler corrected to produce directional wave spectra. The SRA is not absolutely calibrated in power, but by measuring the relative fall-off of backscatter with increasing incidence angle, the SRA can also determine the mean square slope (mss) of the sea surface, a surrogate for wind speed. For the slope-dependent specular point model of radar sea surface scattering, an expression approximated by a geometric optics form, for the relative variation with incidence angle of the normalized backscatter radar cross section would be sigma (sup 0) (sub rel) = sec (exp 4) theta exp (-tan squared theta/mss) where theta is the off-nadir incidence angle.

  15. Towards Automatic Single-Sensor Mapping by Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahokas, E.; Hyyppä, J.; Yu, X.; Liang, X.; Matikainen, L.; Karila, K.; Litkey, P.; Kukko, A.; Jaakkola, A.; Kaartinen, H.; Holopainen, M.; Vastaranta, M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the possibilities of the Optech Titan multispectral airborne laser scanner in the fields of mapping and forestry. Investigation was targeted to six land cover classes. Multispectral laser scanner data can be used to distinguish land cover classes of the ground surface, including the roads and separate road surface classes. For forest inventory using point cloud metrics and intensity features combined, total accuracy of 93.5% was achieved for classification of three main boreal tree species (pine, spruce and birch).When using intensity features - without point height metrics - a classification accuracy of 91% was achieved for these three tree species. It was also shown that deciduous trees can be further classified into more species. We propose that intensity-related features and waveform-type features are combined with point height metrics for forest attribute derivation in area-based prediction, which is an operatively applied forest inventory process in Scandinavia. It is expected that multispectral airborne laser scanning can provide highly valuable data for city and forest mapping and is a highly relevant data asset for national and local mapping agencies in the near future.

  16. An Airborne Scanning LiDAR System for Ocean and Coastal Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reineman, B. D.; Lenain, L.; Castel, D.; Melville, W. K.

    2008-12-01

    We have developed an airborne scanning LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) system and demonstrated its functionality for terrestrial and oceanographic measurements. Differential GPS (DGPS) and an Inertial Navigation System (INS) are synchronized with the LiDAR, providing end result vertical rms errors of approximately 6~cm. Flying 170~m above the surface, we achieve a point density of ~ 0.7 m-2 and a swath width of 90 to 120~m over ocean and 200~m over land. Georeferencing algorithms were developed in-house and earth-referenced data are available several hours after acquisition. Surveys from the system are compared with ground DGPS surveys and existing airborne surveys of fixed targets. Twelve research flights in a Piper Twin Comanche from August 2007 to July 2008 have provided topography of the Southern California coastline and sea surface wave fields in the nearshore ocean environment. Two of the flights also documented the results of the October 2007 landslide on Mt.~Soledad in La Jolla, California. Eight research flights aboard a Cessna Caravan surveyed the topography, lagoon, reef, and surrounding seas of Lady Elliot Island (LEI) in Australia's Great Barrier Reef in April 2008. We describe applications for the system, including coastal topographic surveys, wave measurements, reef research, and ship wake studies.

  17. Derivation of Cumulus Cloud Dimensions and Shape from the Airborne Measurements by the Research Scanning Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Emde, Claudia; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Ottaviani, Matteo; Wasilewski, Andrzej P.

    2016-01-01

    The Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) is an airborne instrument, whose measurements have been extensively used for retrievals of microphysical properties of clouds. In this study we show that for cumulus clouds the information content of the RSP data can be extended by adding the macroscopic parameters of the cloud, such as its geometric shape, dimensions, and height above the ground. This extension is possible by virtue of the high angular resolution and high frequency of the RSP measurements, which allow for geometric constraint of the cloud's 2D cross section between a number of tangent lines of view. The retrieval method is tested on realistic 3D radiative transfer simulations and applied to actual RSP data.

  18. An automated method to register airborne and terrestrial laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bisheng; Zang, Yufu; Dong, Zhen; Huang, Ronggang

    2015-11-01

    Laser scanning techniques have been widely used to capture three-dimensional (3D) point clouds of various scenes (e.g. urban scenes). In particular, airborne laser scanning (ALS) and mobile laser scanning (MLS), terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) are effective to capture point clouds from top or side view. Registering the complimentary point clouds captured by ALS and MLS/TLS provides an aligned data source for many purposes (e.g. 3D reconstruction). Among these MLS can be directly geo-referenced to ALS according to the equipped position systems. For small scanning areas or dense building areas, TLS is used instead of MLS. However, registering ALS and TLS datasets suffers from poor automation and robustness because of few overlapping areas and sparse corresponding geometric features. A robust method for the registration of TLS and ALS datasets is proposed, which has four key steps. (1) extracts building outlines from TLS and ALS data sets independently; (2) obtains the potential matching pairs of outlines according to the geometric constraints between building outlines; (3) constructs the Laplacian matrices of the extracted building outlines to model the topology between the geometric features; (4) calculates the correlation coefficients of the extracted geometric features by decomposing the Laplacian matrices into the spectral space, providing correspondences between the extracted features for coarse registration. Finally, the multi-line adjustment strategy is employed for the fine registration. The robustness and accuracy of the proposed method are verified using field data, demonstrating a reliable and stable solution to accurately register ALS and TLS datasets.

  19. Echo Source Discrimination in Airborne Radar Sounding Data From the Dry Valleys, Antarctica, for Mars Analog Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, J. W.; Blankenship, D. D.; Peters, M. E.; Kempf, S. D.; Williams, B. J.

    2003-12-01

    The identification of features on Mars exhibiting morphologies consistent with ice/rock mixtures, near-surface ice bodies and near-surface liquid water, and the importance of such features to the search for water on Mars highlights the need for appropriate terrestrial analogs in order to prepare for upcoming radar missions targeting these and other water-related features. Climatic, hydrological, and geological conditions in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are analogous in many ways to those on Mars, and a number of ice-related features in the Dry Valleys may have direct morphologic and compositional counterparts on Mars. We have collected roughly 1,000 line-km of airborne radar sounding data in the Dry Valleys for Mars analog studies. A crucial first step in the data analysis process is the discrimination of echo sources in the radar data. The goal is to identify all returns from the surface of surrounding topography in order to positively identify subsurface echoes. This process will also be critical for radar data that will be collected in areas of Mars exhibiting significant topography, so that subsurface echoes are identified unambiguously. Using a Twin Otter airborne platform, data were collected in three separate flights during the austral summers of 1999-2000 and 2001-2002 using multiple systems, including a chirped 52.5 - 67.5 MHz coherent radar operating at 750 W and 8 kW peak power (with multiple receivers) and 1 - 2 microsecond pulse width, and a 60 MHz pulsed, incoherent radar operating at 8 kW peak power with 60 ns and 250 ns pulse width. The chirped, coherent data are suitable for the implementation of advanced pulse compression algorithms and SAR focusing. Flight elevation was nominally 500 m above the surface. Targets included permafrost, subsurface ice bodies, rock/ice glaciers, ice-covered saline lakes, and glacial deposits in Taylor and Beacon Valleys. A laser altimeter (fixed relative to the aircraft frame) was also used during both

  20. Ice shelf snow accumulation rates from the Amundsen-Bellingshausen Sea sector of West Antarctica derived from airborne radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medley, B.; Kurtz, N. T.; Brunt, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    The large ice shelves surrounding the Antarctic continent buttress inland ice, limiting the grounded ice-sheet flow. Many, but not all, of the thick ice shelves located along the Amundsen-Bellingshausen Seas are experiencing rapid thinning due to enhanced basal melting driven by the intrusion of warm circumpolar deep water. Determination of their mass balance provides an indicator as to the future of the shelves buttressing capability; however, measurements of surface accumulation are few, limiting the precision of the mass balance estimates. Here, we present new radar-derived measurements of snow accumulation primarily over the Getz and Abbott Ice Shelves, as well as the Dotson and Crosson, which have been the focus of several of NASA's Operation IceBridge airborne surveys between 2009 and 2014. Specifically, we use the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) snow radar to map the near-surface (< 30 m) internal stratigraphy to measure snow accumulation. Due to the complexities of the local topography (e.g., ice rises and rumples) and their relative proximity to the ocean, the spatial pattern of accumulation can be equally varied. Therefore, atmospheric models might not be able to reproduce these small-scale features because of their limited spatial resolution. To evaluate whether this is the case over these narrow shelves, we will compare the radar-derived accumulation rates with those from atmospheric models.

  1. Geodetic Imaging for Rapid Assessment of Earthquakes: Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, W. E.; Shrestha, R. L.; Glennie, C. L.; Sartori, M.; Fernandez-Diaz, J.; National CenterAirborne Laser Mapping Operational Center

    2010-12-01

    To the residents of an area struck by a strong earthquake quantitative information on damage to the infrastructure, and its attendant impact on relief and recovery efforts, is urgent and of primary concern. To earth scientists a strong earthquake offers an opportunity to learn more about earthquake mechanisms, and to compare their models with the real world, in hopes of one day being able to accurately predict the precise locations, magnitudes, and times of large (and potentially disastrous) earthquakes. Airborne laser scanning (also referred to as airborne LiDAR or Airborne Laser Swath Mapping) is particularly well suited for rapid assessment of earthquakes, both for immediately estimating the damage to infrastructure and for providing information for the scientific study of earthquakes. ALS observations collected at low altitude (500—1000m) from a relatively slow (70—100m/sec) aircraft can provide dense (5—15 points/m2) sets of surface features (buildings, vegetation, ground), extending over hundreds of square kilometers with turn around times of several hours to a few days. The actual response time to any given event depends on several factors, including such bureaucratic issues as approval of funds, export license formalities, and clearance to fly over the area to be mapped, and operational factors such as the deployment of the aircraft and ground teams may also take a number of days for remote locations. Of course the need for immediate mapping of earthquake damage generally is not as urgent in remote regions with less infrastructure and few inhabitants. During August 16-19, 2010 the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) mapped the area affected by the magnitude 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake (Northern Baja California Earthquake), which occurred on April 4, 2010, and was felt throughout southern California, Arizona, Nevada, and Baja California North, Mexico. From initial ground observations the fault rupture appeared to extend 75 km

  2. Retrieve Optically Thick Ice Cloud Microphysical Properties by Using Airborne Dual-Wavelength Radar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Li, Lihua; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    An algorithm to retrieve optically thick ice cloud microphysical property profiles is developed by using the GSFC 9.6 GHz ER-2 Doppler Radar (EDOP) and the 94 GHz Cloud Radar System (CRS) measurements aboard the high-altitude ER-2 aircraft. In situ size distribution and total water content data from the CRYSTAL-FACE field campaign are used for the algorithm development. To reduce uncertainty in calculated radar reflectivity factors (Ze) at these wavelengths, coincident radar measurements and size distribution data are used to guide the selection of mass-length relationships and to deal with the density and non-spherical effects of ice crystals on the Ze calculations. The algorithm is able to retrieve microphysical property profiles of optically thick ice clouds, such as, deep convective and anvil clouds, which are very challenging for single frequency radar and lidar. Examples of retrieved microphysical properties for a deep convective clouds are presented, which show that EDOP and CRS measurements provide rich information to study cloud structure and evolution. Good agreement between IWPs derived from an independent submillimeter-wave radiometer, CoSSIR, and dual-wavelength radar measurements indicates accuracy of the IWC retrieved from the two-frequency radar algorithm.

  3. A survey of airborne radar systems for deployment on a High Altitude Powered Platform (HAPP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Leung, K. C.

    1979-01-01

    A survey was conducted to find out the system characteristics of commercially available and unclassified military radars suitable for deployment on a stationary platform. A total of ten domestic and eight foreign manufacturers of the radar systems were identified. Questionnaires were sent to manufacturers requesting information concerning the system characteristics: frequency, power used, weight, volume, power radiated, antenna pattern, resolution, display capabilities, pulse repetition frequency, and sensitivity. A literature search was also made to gather the system characteristics information. Results of the survey are documented and comparisons are made among available radar systems.

  4. Processing of airborne laser scanning data to generate accurate DTM for floodplain wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szporak-Wasilewska, Sylwia; Mirosław-Świątek, Dorota; Grygoruk, Mateusz; Michałowski, Robert; Kardel, Ignacy

    2015-10-01

    Structure of the floodplain, especially its topography and vegetation, influences the overland flow and dynamics of floods which are key factors shaping ecosystems in surface water-fed wetlands. Therefore elaboration of the digital terrain model (DTM) of a high spatial accuracy is crucial in hydrodynamic flow modelling in river valleys. In this study the research was conducted in the unique Central European complex of fens and marshes - the Lower Biebrza river valley. The area is represented mainly by peat ecosystems which according to EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) are called "water-dependent ecosystems". Development of accurate DTM in these areas which are overgrown by dense wetland vegetation consisting of alder forest, willow shrubs, reed, sedges and grass is very difficult, therefore to represent terrain in high accuracy the airborne laser scanning data (ALS) with scanning density of 4 points/m2 was used and the correction of the "vegetation effect" on DTM was executed. This correction was performed utilizing remotely sensed images, topographical survey using the Real Time Kinematic positioning and vegetation height measurements. In order to classify different types of vegetation within research area the object based image analysis (OBIA) was used. OBIA allowed partitioning remotely sensed imagery into meaningful image-objects, and assessing their characteristics through spatial and spectral scale. The final maps of vegetation patches that include attributes of vegetation height and vegetation spectral properties, utilized both the laser scanning data and the vegetation indices developed on the basis of airborne and satellite imagery. This data was used in process of segmentation, attribution and classification. Several different vegetation indices were tested to distinguish different types of vegetation in wetland area. The OBIA classification allowed correction of the "vegetation effect" on DTM. The final digital terrain model was compared and examined

  5. Turbulence in breaking mountain waves and atmospheric rotors estimated from airborne in situ and Doppler radar measurements.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Lukas; Serafin, Stefano; Haimov, Samuel; Grubišić, Vanda

    2015-10-01

    Atmospheric turbulence generated in flow over mountainous terrain is studied using airborne in situ and cloud radar measurements over the Medicine Bow Mountains in southeast Wyoming, USA. During the NASA Orographic Clouds Experiment (NASA06) in 2006, two complex mountain flow cases were documented by the University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft carrying the Wyoming Cloud Radar. The structure of turbulence and its intensity across the mountain range are described using the variance of vertical velocity σw2 and the cube root of the energy dissipation rate ɛ(1/3) (EDR). For a quantitative analysis of turbulence from the cloud radar, the uncertainties in the Doppler wind retrieval have to be taken into account, such as the variance of hydrometeor fall speed and the contamination of vertical Doppler velocity by the horizontal wind. A thorough analysis of the uncertainties shows that 25% accuracy or better can be achieved in regions of moderate to severe turbulence in the lee of the mountains, while only qualitative estimates of turbulence intensity can be obtained outside the most turbulent regions. Two NASA06 events exhibiting large-amplitude mountain waves, mid-tropospheric wave breaking, and rotor circulations are examined. Moderate turbulence is found in a wave-breaking region with σw2 and EDR reaching 4.8 m(2) s(-2) and 0.25 m(2/3) s(-1), respectively. Severe turbulence is measured within the rotor circulations with σw2 and EDR respectively in the ranges of 7.8-16.4 m(2) s(-2) and 0.50-0.77 m(2/3) s(-1). A unique result of this study is the quantitative estimation of the intensity of turbulence and its spatial distribution in the interior of atmospheric rotors, provided by the radar-derived turbulence fields.

  6. A wavelet based algorithm for DTM extraction from airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang; Yang, Yan; Tian, Qingjiu

    2007-06-01

    The automatic extraction of Digital Terrain Model (DTM) from point clouds acquired by airborne laser scanning (ALS) equipment remains a problem in ALS data filtering nowadays. Many filter algorithms have been developed to remove object points and outliers, and to extract DTM automatically. However, it is difficult to filter in areas where few points have identical morphological or geological features that can present the bare earth. Especially in sloped terrain covered by dense vegetation, points representing bare earth are often identified as noisy data below ground. To extract terrain surface in these areas, a new algorithm is proposed. First, the point clouds are cut into profiles based on a scan line segmentation algorithm. In each profile, a 1D filtering procedure is determined from the wavelet theory, which is superior in detecting high frequency discontinuities. After combining profiles from different directions, an interpolated grid data representing DTM is generated. In order to evaluate the performance of this new approach, we applied it to the data set used in the ISPRS filter test in 2003. 2 samples containing mostly vegetation on slopes have been processed by the proposed algorithm. It can be seen that it filtered most of the objects like vegetation and buildings in sloped area, and smoothed the hilly mountain to be more close to its real terrain surface.

  7. High Resolution Airborne Laser Scanning and Hyperspectral Imaging with a Small Uav Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallay, Michal; Eck, Christoph; Zgraggen, Carlo; Kaňuk, Ján; Dvorný, Eduard

    2016-06-01

    The capabilities of unmanned airborne systems (UAS) have become diverse with the recent development of lightweight remote sensing instruments. In this paper, we demonstrate our custom integration of the state-of-the-art technologies within an unmanned aerial platform capable of high-resolution and high-accuracy laser scanning, hyperspectral imaging, and photographic imaging. The technological solution comprises the latest development of a completely autonomous, unmanned helicopter by Aeroscout, the Scout B1-100 UAV helicopter. The helicopter is powered by a gasoline two-stroke engine and it allows for integrating 18 kg of a customized payload unit. The whole system is modular providing flexibility of payload options, which comprises the main advantage of the UAS. The UAS integrates two kinds of payloads which can be altered. Both payloads integrate a GPS/IMU with a dual GPS antenna configuration provided by OXTS for accurate navigation and position measurements during the data acquisition. The first payload comprises a VUX-1 laser scanner by RIEGL and a Sony A6000 E-Mount photo camera. The second payload for hyperspectral scanning integrates a push-broom imager AISA KESTREL 10 by SPECIM. The UAS was designed for research of various aspects of landscape dynamics (landslides, erosion, flooding, or phenology) in high spectral and spatial resolution.

  8. Point-based and model-based geolocation analysis of airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefercik, Umut Gunes; Buyuksalih, Gurcan; Jacobsen, Karsten; Alkan, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is one of the most effective remote sensing technologies providing precise three-dimensional (3-D) dense point clouds. A large-size ALS digital surface model (DSM) covering the whole Istanbul province was analyzed by point-based and model-based comprehensive statistical approaches. Point-based analysis was performed using checkpoints on flat areas. Model-based approaches were implemented in two steps as strip to strip comparing overlapping ALS DSMs individually in three subareas and comparing the merged ALS DSMs with terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) DSMs in four other subareas. In the model-based approach, the standard deviation of height and normalized median absolute deviation were used as the accuracy indicators combined with the dependency of terrain inclination. The results demonstrate that terrain roughness has a strong impact on the vertical accuracy of ALS DSMs. From the relative horizontal shifts determined and partially improved by merging the overlapping strips and comparison of the ALS, and the TLS, data were found not to be negligible. The analysis of ALS DSM in relation to TLS DSM allowed us to determine the characteristics of the DSM in detail.

  9. Testing of Land Cover Classification from Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakuła, K.; Kupidura, P.; Jełowicki, Ł.

    2016-06-01

    Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning provides a new opportunity for airborne data collection. It provides high-density topographic surveying and is also a useful tool for land cover mapping. Use of a minimum of three intensity images from a multiwavelength laser scanner and 3D information included in the digital surface model has the potential for land cover/use classification and a discussion about the application of this type of data in land cover/use mapping has recently begun. In the test study, three laser reflectance intensity images (orthogonalized point cloud) acquired in green, near-infrared and short-wave infrared bands, together with a digital surface model, were used in land cover/use classification where six classes were distinguished: water, sand and gravel, concrete and asphalt, low vegetation, trees and buildings. In the tested methods, different approaches for classification were applied: spectral (based only on laser reflectance intensity images), spectral with elevation data as additional input data, and spectro-textural, using morphological granulometry as a method of texture analysis of both types of data: spectral images and the digital surface model. The method of generating the intensity raster was also tested in the experiment. Reference data were created based on visual interpretation of ALS data and traditional optical aerial and satellite images. The results have shown that multispectral ALS data are unlike typical multispectral optical images, and they have a major potential for land cover/use classification. An overall accuracy of classification over 90% was achieved. The fusion of multi-wavelength laser intensity images and elevation data, with the additional use of textural information derived from granulometric analysis of images, helped to improve the accuracy of classification significantly. The method of interpolation for the intensity raster was not very helpful, and using intensity rasters with both first and last return

  10. Azimuthal Signature of Coincidental Brightness Temperature and Normalized Radar Cross-Section Obtained Using Airborne PALS Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colliander, Andreas; Kim, Seungbum; Yueh, Simon; Cosh, Mike; Jackson, Tom; Njoku, Eni

    2010-01-01

    Coincidental airborne brightness temperature (TB) and normalized radar-cross section (NRCS) measurements were carried out with the PALS (Passive and Active L- and S-band) instrument in the SMAPVEX08 (SMAP Validation Experiment 2008) field campaign. This paper describes results obtained from a set of flights which measured a field in 45(sup o) steps over the azimuth angle. The field contained mature soy beans with distinct row structure. The measurement shows that both TB and NRCS experience modulation effects over the azimuth as expected based on the theory. The result is useful in development and validation of land surface parameter forward models and retrieval algorithms, such as the soil moisture algorithm for NASA's SMAP (Soil Moisture Active and Passive) mission. Although the footprint of the SMAP will not be sensitive to the small resolution scale effects as the one presented in this paper, it is nevertheless important to understand the effects at smaller scale.

  11. The development of a power spectral density processor for C and L band airborne radar scatterometer sensor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. A., III; Chladek, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    A real-time signal processor was developed for the NASA/JSC L-and C-band airborne radar scatterometer sensor systems. The purpose of the effort was to reduce ground data processing costs. Conversion of two quadrature channels of data (like and cross polarized) was made to obtain Power Spectral Density (PSD) values. A chirp-z transform (CZT) approach was used to filter the Doppler return signal and improved high frequency and angular resolution was realized. The processors have been tested with record signals and excellent results were obtained. CZT filtering can be readily applied to scatterometers operating at other wavelengths by altering the sample frequency. The design of the hardware and software and the results of the performance tests are described in detail.

  12. Combined VHF Dopplar radar and airborne (CV-990) measurements of atmospheric winds on the mesoscale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairall, Christopher W.; Thomson, Dennis W.

    1989-01-01

    Hourly measurements of wind speed and direction obtained using two wind profiling Doppler radars during two prolonged jet stream occurrences over western Pennsylvania were analyzed. In particular, the time-variant characteristics of derived shear profiles were examined. To prevent a potential loss of structural detail and retain statistical significance, data from both radars were stratified into categories based on the location data from the Penn State radar were also compared to data from Pittsburgh radiosondes. Profiler data dropouts were studied in an attempt to determine possible reasons for the apparently reduced performance of profiling radars operating beneath a jet stream. Temperature profiles for the radar site were obtained using an interpolated temperature and dewpoint temperature sounding procedure developed at Penn State. The combination of measured wind and interpolated temperature profiles allowed Richardson number profiles to be generated for the profiler sounding volume. Both Richardson number and wind shear statistics were then examined along with pilot reports of turbulence in the vicinity of the profiler.

  13. Analysis of volcanic surface morphology on Venus from comparison of Arecibo, Magellan, and terrestrial airborne radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bruce A.; Campbell, Donald B.

    1992-01-01

    The paper compares Arecibo Observatory and Magellan radar data for Venus to airborne radar images for potential terrestrial analog surfaces. Volcanic deposits in western Eistla Regio and northern Sedna Planitia are characterized. It is shown that the expected-sense circularly polarized echoes in the 'dark plains' and broad flow aprons of Eistla Regio decrease rapidly with incidence angle. This angular scattering behavior implies surfaces no rougher than terrestrial pahoehoe flows. Polarization ratio comparisons show that the extensive lava flows in Western Eistla Regio and Sedna Planitia are generally consistent with the properties of terrestrial pahoehoe flows, with only limited occurrences of a'a morphology. Three scenarios are suggested. Many of the large flow units in the two study regions were emplaced as complexes of low-effusion rate pahoehoe flows, rather than as higher eruption rate events which might be expected to produce a'a surface textures; the long lava flows were originally emplaced as a'a but have since weathered to a smoother texture; or a combination of atmospheric and magma compositional effects combine to inhibit a'a formation even at high volume eruption rates.

  14. Adaptive clutter rejection filters for airborne Doppler weather radar applied to the detection of low altitude windshear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, Byron M.

    1989-01-01

    An optimum adaptive clutter rejection filter for use with airborne Doppler weather radar is presented. The radar system is being designed to operate at low-altitudes for the detection of windshear in an airport terminal area where ground clutter returns may mask the weather return. The coefficients of the adaptive clutter rejection filter are obtained using a complex form of a square root normalized recursive least squares lattice estimation algorithm which models the clutter return data as an autoregressive process. The normalized lattice structure implementation of the adaptive modeling process for determining the filter coefficients assures that the resulting coefficients will yield a stable filter and offers possible fixed point implementation. A 10th order FIR clutter rejection filter indexed by geographical location is designed through autoregressive modeling of simulated clutter data. Filtered data, containing simulated dry microburst and clutter return, are analyzed using pulse-pair estimation techniques. To measure the ability of the clutter rejection filters to remove the clutter, results are compared to pulse-pair estimates of windspeed within a simulated dry microburst without clutter. In the filter evaluation process, post-filtered pulse-pair width estimates and power levels are also used to measure the effectiveness of the filters. The results support the use of an adaptive clutter rejection filter for reducing the clutter induced bias in pulse-pair estimates of windspeed.

  15. Measurement of Attenuation with Airborne and Ground-Based Radar in Convective Storms Over Land and Its Microphysical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Lin; Heymsfield, G. M.; Srivastava, R. C.; Starr, D. OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observations by the airborne X-band Doppler radar (EDOP) and the NCAR S-band polarimetric (S-POL) radar from two field experiments are used to evaluate the Surface ref'ercnce technique (SRT) for measuring the path integrated attenuation (PIA) and to study attenuation in deep convective storms. The EDOP, flying at an altitude of 20 km, uses a nadir beam and a forward pointing beam. It is found that over land, the surface scattering cross-section is highly variable at nadir incidence but relatively stable at forward incidence. It is concluded that measurement by the forward beam provides a viable technique for measuring PIA using the SRT. Vertical profiles of peak attenuation coefficient are derived in vxo deep convective storms by the dual-wavelength method. Using the measured Doppler velocity, the reflectivities at. the two wavelengths, the differential reflectivity and the estimated attenuation coefficients, it is shown that: supercooled drops and dry ice particles probably co-existed above the melting level in regions of updraft, that water-coated partially melted ice particles probably contributed to high attenuation below the melting level, and that the data are not readil explained in terms of a gamma function raindrop size distribution.

  16. Measurement of Attenuation with Airborne and Ground-Based Radar in Convective Storms Over Land Its Microphysical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Lin; Heymsfield, G. M.; Srivastava, R. C.; O'C.Starr, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observations by the airborne X-band Doppler radar (EDOP) and the NCAR S-band polarimetric (S-Pol) radar from two field experiments are used to evaluate the surface reference technique (SRT) for measuring the path integrated attenuation (PIA) and to study attenuation in deep convective storms. The EDOP, flying at an altitude of 20 km, uses a nadir beam and a forward pointing beam. It is found that over land, the surface scattering cross-section is highly variable at nadir incidence but relatively stable at forward incidence. It is concluded that measurement by the forward beam provides a viable technique for measuring PIA using the SRT. Vertical profiles of peak attenuation coefficient are derived in two deep convective storms by the dual-wavelength method. Using the measured Doppler velocity, the reflectivities at the two wavelengths, the differential reflectivity and the estimated attenuation coefficients, it is shown that: supercooled drops and (dry) ice particles probably co-existed above the melting level in regions of updraft, that water-coated partially melted ice particles probably contributed to high attenuation below the melting level.

  17. Airborne Warning and Control Radar Career Ladder, AFSC 328X2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    difficulty, the simulator approach is appropriate for both ground and airborne personnel. Electronics principles instruction may be an area of training where...interrogation systems. The course includes 18 weeks of electronics principles training. Basic resident training is conducted without the benefit of actual mission...training in electronics principles . The Occupational Measurement Center recently completed a survey of electronics principles required across several

  18. Spatial extent and temporal variability of Greenland firn aquifers detected by ground and airborne radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miège, Clément; Forster, Richard R.; Brucker, Ludovic; Koenig, Lora S.; Solomon, D. Kip; Paden, John D.; Box, Jason E.; Burgess, Evan W.; Miller, Julie Z.; McNerney, Laura; Brautigam, Noah; Fausto, Robert S.; Gogineni, Sivaprasad

    2016-12-01

    We document the existence of widespread firn aquifers in an elevation range of 1200-2000 m, in the high snow-accumulation regions of the Greenland ice sheet. We use NASA Operation IceBridge accumulation radar data from five campaigns (2010-2014) to estimate a firn-aquifer total extent of 21,900 km2. We investigate two locations in Southeast Greenland, where repeated radar profiles allow mapping of aquifer-extent and water table variations. In the upper part of Helheim Glacier the water table rises in spring following above-average summer melt, showing the direct firn-aquifer response to surface meltwater production changes. After spring 2012, a drainage of the firn-aquifer lower margin (5 km) is inferred from both 750 MHz accumulation radar and 195 MHz multicoherent radar depth sounder data. For 2011-2014, we use a ground-penetrating radar profile located at our Ridgeline field site and find a spatially stable aquifer with a water table fluctuating less than 2.5 m vertically. When combining radar data with surface topography, we find that the upper elevation edge of firn aquifers is located directly downstream of locally high surface slopes. Using a steady state 2-D groundwater flow model, water is simulated to flow laterally in an unconfined aquifer, topographically driven by ice sheet surface undulations until the water encounters crevasses. Simulations suggest that local flow cells form within the Helheim aquifer, allowing water to discharge in the firn at the steep-to-flat transitions of surface topography. Supported by visible imagery, we infer that water drains into crevasses, but its volume and rate remain unconstrained.

  19. Use of naturally available reference targets to calibrate airborne laser scanning intensity data.

    PubMed

    Vain, Ants; Kaasalainen, Sanna; Pyysalo, Ulla; Krooks, Anssi; Litkey, Paula

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the possibility of calibrating airborne laser scanning (ALS) intensity data, using land targets typically available in urban areas. For this purpose, a test area around Espoonlahti Harbor, Espoo, Finland, for which a long time series of ALS campaigns is available, was selected. Different target samples (beach sand, concrete, asphalt, different types of gravel) were collected and measured in the laboratory. Using tarps, which have certain backscattering properties, the natural samples were calibrated and studied, taking into account the atmospheric effect, incidence angle and flying height. Using data from different flights and altitudes, a time series for the natural samples was generated. Studying the stability of the samples, we could obtain information on the most ideal types of natural targets for ALS radiometric calibration. Using the selected natural samples as reference, the ALS points of typical land targets were calibrated again and examined. Results showed the need for more accurate ground reference data, before using natural samples in ALS intensity data calibration. Also, the NIR camera-based field system was used for collecting ground reference data. This system proved to be a good means for collecting in situ reference data, especially for targets with inhomogeneous surface reflection properties.

  20. Use of Naturally Available Reference Targets to Calibrate Airborne Laser Scanning Intensity Data

    PubMed Central

    Vain, Ants; Kaasalainen, Sanna; Pyysalo, Ulla; Krooks, Anssi; Litkey, Paula

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the possibility of calibrating airborne laser scanning (ALS) intensity data, using land targets typically available in urban areas. For this purpose, a test area around Espoonlahti Harbor, Espoo, Finland, for which a long time series of ALS campaigns is available, was selected. Different target samples (beach sand, concrete, asphalt, different types of gravel) were collected and measured in the laboratory. Using tarps, which have certain backscattering properties, the natural samples were calibrated and studied, taking into account the atmospheric effect, incidence angle and flying height. Using data from different flights and altitudes, a time series for the natural samples was generated. Studying the stability of the samples, we could obtain information on the most ideal types of natural targets for ALS radiometric calibration. Using the selected natural samples as reference, the ALS points of typical land targets were calibrated again and examined. Results showed the need for more accurate ground reference data, before using natural samples in ALS intensity data calibration. Also, the NIR camera-based field system was used for collecting ground reference data. This system proved to be a good means for collecting in situ reference data, especially for targets with inhomogeneous surface reflection properties. PMID:22574045

  1. Parallel Processing Method for Airborne Laser Scanning Data Using a PC Cluster and a Virtual Grid.

    PubMed

    Han, Soo Hee; Heo, Joon; Sohn, Hong Gyoo; Yu, Kiyun

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a parallel processing method using a PC cluster and a virtual grid is proposed for the fast processing of enormous amounts of airborne laser scanning (ALS) data. The method creates a raster digital surface model (DSM) by interpolating point data with inverse distance weighting (IDW), and produces a digital terrain model (DTM) by local minimum filtering of the DSM. To make a consistent comparison of performance between sequential and parallel processing approaches, the means of dealing with boundary data and of selecting interpolation centers were controlled for each processing node in parallel approach. To test the speedup, efficiency and linearity of the proposed algorithm, actual ALS data up to 134 million points were processed with a PC cluster consisting of one master node and eight slave nodes. The results showed that parallel processing provides better performance when the computational overhead, the number of processors, and the data size become large. It was verified that the proposed algorithm is a linear time operation and that the products obtained by parallel processing are identical to those produced by sequential processing.

  2. Assessing and modeling moose (Alces alces) habitats with airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melin, M.; Packalén, P.; Matala, J.; Mehtätalo, L.; Pusenius, J.

    2013-08-01

    In the analysis of forest resources, the use of ALS (airborne laser scanning) enables detailed three dimensional (3D) descriptions of forests and their vegetation. Simultaneously, ecologists have recognized that 3D information on vegetation is highly important in analyzing the habitat suitability of a given site. Recently, animals’ habitat preferences have been analyzed, for example, with GPS-collared animals. This has resulted in detailed knowledge about the animals’ movements both spatially and temporally. This study combines 3D information on vegetation obtained from ALS data with information about animal locations from GPS data. The aim was to map and analyze the habitat preferences of moose. The study area was located on the west coast of Finland. The data consisted of 18 GPS-collared moose (monitored from 2009 to 2010) and ALS data collected in 2010. We investigated how habitat structure changes as a function of distance to observed moose locations and how observed moose locations differ from randomly selected locations in terms of 3D structure. We also created a model-based habitat suitability map and tested it against moose occurrences. The results suggested that there are clear differences between the areas occupied and not occupied by moose and that these differences can be detected from ALS data. More importantly, ALS proved its potential in linking 3D descriptions of vegetation directly to observed moose locations without any proxy variables. These observations strongly support future studies.

  3. Performance analysis of freeware filtering algorithms for determining ground surface from airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julge, Kalev; Ellmann, Artu; Gruno, Anti

    2014-01-01

    Numerous filtering algorithms have been developed in order to distinguish the ground surface from nonground points acquired by airborne laser scanning. These algorithms automatically attempt to determine the ground points using various features such as predefined parameters and statistical analysis. Their efficiency also depends on landscape characteristics. The aim of this contribution is to test the performance of six common filtering algorithms embedded in three freeware programs. The algorithms' adaptive TIN, elevation threshold with expand window, maximum local slope, progressive morphology, multiscale curvature, and linear prediction were tested on four relatively large (4 to 8 km2) and diverse landscape areas, which included steep sloped hills, urban areas, ridge-like eskers, and a river valley. The results show that in diverse test areas each algorithm yields various commission and omission errors. It appears that adaptive TIN is suitable in urban areas while the multiscale curvature algorithm is best suited in wooded areas. The multiscale curvature algorithm yielded the overall best results with average root-mean-square error values of 0.35 m.

  4. Parallel Processing Method for Airborne Laser Scanning Data Using a PC Cluster and a Virtual Grid

    PubMed Central

    Han, Soo Hee; Heo, Joon; Sohn, Hong Gyoo; Yu, Kiyun

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a parallel processing method using a PC cluster and a virtual grid is proposed for the fast processing of enormous amounts of airborne laser scanning (ALS) data. The method creates a raster digital surface model (DSM) by interpolating point data with inverse distance weighting (IDW), and produces a digital terrain model (DTM) by local minimum filtering of the DSM. To make a consistent comparison of performance between sequential and parallel processing approaches, the means of dealing with boundary data and of selecting interpolation centers were controlled for each processing node in parallel approach. To test the speedup, efficiency and linearity of the proposed algorithm, actual ALS data up to 134 million points were processed with a PC cluster consisting of one master node and eight slave nodes. The results showed that parallel processing provides better performance when the computational overhead, the number of processors, and the data size become large. It was verified that the proposed algorithm is a linear time operation and that the products obtained by parallel processing are identical to those produced by sequential processing. PMID:22574032

  5. Integrating optical satellite data and airborne laser scanning in habitat classification for wildlife management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijland, W.; Coops, N. C.; Nielsen, S. E.; Stenhouse, G.

    2015-06-01

    Wildlife habitat selection is determined by a wide range of factors including food availability, shelter, security and landscape heterogeneity all of which are closely related to the more readily mapped landcover types and disturbance regimes. Regional wildlife habitat studies often used moderate resolution multispectral satellite imagery for wall to wall mapping, because it offers a favourable mix of availability, cost and resolution. However, certain habitat characteristics such as canopy structure and topographic factors are not well discriminated with these passive, optical datasets. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) provides highly accurate three dimensional data on canopy structure and the underlying terrain, thereby offers significant enhancements to wildlife habitat mapping. In this paper, we introduce an approach to integrate ALS data and multispectral images to develop a new heuristic wildlife habitat classifier for western Alberta. Our method combines ALS direct measures of canopy height, and cover with optical estimates of species (conifer vs. deciduous) composition into a decision tree classifier for habitat - or landcover types. We believe this new approach is highly versatile and transferable, because class rules can be easily adapted for other species or functional groups. We discuss the implications of increased ALS availability for habitat mapping and wildlife management and provide recommendations for integrating multispectral and ALS data into wildlife management.

  6. Landslides Identification Using Airborne Laser Scanning Data Derived Topographic Terrain Attributes and Support Vector Machine Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawłuszek, Kamila; Borkowski, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    Since the availability of high-resolution Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) data, substantial progress in geomorphological research, especially in landslide analysis, has been carried out. First and second order derivatives of Digital Terrain Model (DTM) have become a popular and powerful tool in landslide inventory mapping. Nevertheless, an automatic landslide mapping based on sophisticated classifiers including Support Vector Machine (SVM), Artificial Neural Network or Random Forests is often computationally time consuming. The objective of this research is to deeply explore topographic information provided by ALS data and overcome computational time limitation. For this reason, an extended set of topographic features and the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were used to reduce redundant information. The proposed novel approach was tested on a susceptible area affected by more than 50 landslides located on Rożnów Lake in Carpathian Mountains, Poland. The initial seven PCA components with 90% of the total variability in the original topographic attributes were used for SVM classification. Comparing results with landslide inventory map, the average user's accuracy (UA), producer's accuracy (PA), and overall accuracy (OA) were calculated for two models according to the classification results. Thereby, for the PCA-feature-reduced model UA, PA, and OA were found to be 72%, 76%, and 72%, respectively. Similarly, UA, PA, and OA in the non-reduced original topographic model, was 74%, 77% and 74%, respectively. Using the initial seven PCA components instead of the twenty original topographic attributes does not significantly change identification accuracy but reduce computational time.

  7. Wide-Area Mapping of Forest with National Airborne Laser Scanning and Field Inventory Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnet, J.-M.; Ginzler, C.; Clivaz, J.-C.

    2016-06-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) remote sensing data are now available for entire countries such as Switzerland. Methods for the estimation of forest parameters from ALS have been intensively investigated in the past years. However, the implementation of a forest mapping workflow based on available data at a regional level still remains challenging. A case study was implemented in the Canton of Valais (Switzerland). The national ALS dataset and field data of the Swiss National Forest Inventory were used to calibrate estimation models for mean and maximum height, basal area, stem density, mean diameter and stem volume. When stratification was performed based on ALS acquisition settings and geographical criteria, satisfactory prediction models were obtained for volume (R2 = 0.61 with a root mean square error of 47 %) and basal area (respectively 0.51 and 45 %) while height variables had an error lower than 19%. This case study shows that the use of nationwide ALS and field datasets for forest resources mapping is cost efficient, but additional investigations are required to handle the limitations of the input data and optimize the accuracy.

  8. Calibration Design and Assessment of the Airborne Conical Scanning Millimeterwave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, J. R.; Racette, P.; Walker, D. K.; Randa, J.; Krebs, Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The airborne Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) will provide measurements useful for atmospheric studies and satellite calibration and validation (cal/val). Designed to match the tropospheric sounding channels of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program QMSP) Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS), the CoSMIR consists of four radiometers operating at 50-54 (3 channels - 50.3, 52.8, and 53.6), 91.655 (dual polarization), 150.0, and 193.31 (3 channels 11, 13, and 16.6) GHz. The design of CoSMIR was primarily driven by its intended initial use as an SSMIS cal/val sensor. In particular, three design features were directly affected by this requirement: frequency planning, calibration target design, and the mechanical gimbals. An initial calibration assessment of CoSMIR was performed to determine any needed improvements. We used a combination of laboratory and field measurements to do this. Laboratory measurements included comparisons to a liquid nitrogen standard, IF amplifier and diode linearity tests, LO leakage and reflection testing, and antenna to calibration target coupling tests. Results of these tests will be reported. We also performed a satellite underflight under DM SP F-15 and have compared CoSMIR imagery to SSM/T-2 and SSM/I imagery. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  9. Scanning infrared remote sensing system for identification, visualization, and quantification of airborne pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harig, Roland; Matz, Gerhard; Rusch, Peter

    2002-02-01

    Remote sensing by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry allows detection, identification, and quantification of airborne pollutants. In the case of leaks in pipelines or leaks in chemical plants, chemical accidents, terrorism, or war, hazardous compounds are often released into the atmosphere. Various Fourier-transform infrared spectrometers have been developed for the remote detection and identification of hazardous clouds. However, for the localization of a leak and a complete assessment of the situation in the case of the release of a hazardous cloud, information about the position and the size of a cloud is essential. Therefore, an imaging passive remote sensing system comprised of an interferometer (Bruker OPAG 22), a data acquisition, processing, and control system with a digital signal processor (FTIR DSP), an azimuth-elevation-scanning mirror, a video system with a DSP, and a personal computer has been developed. The FTIR DSP system controls the scanning mirror, collects the interferograms, and performs the Fourier transformation. The spectra are transferred to a personal computer and analyzed by a real-time identification algorithm that does not require background spectra for the analysis. The results are visualized by a video image, overlaid by false color images. For each target compound of a spectral library, images of the coefficient of correlation, the signal to noise ratio, the brightness temperature of the background, the difference between the temperature of the ambient air and the brightness temperature of the background, and the noise equivalent column density are produced. The column densities of all directions in which a target compound has been identified may be retrieved by a nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm and an additional false color image is displayed. The system has a high selectivity, low noise equivalent spectral radiance, and it allows identification, visualization, and quantification of pollutant clouds.

  10. Ice-volcano interactions during the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption, as revealed by airborne imaging radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnússon, E.; Gudmundsson, M. T.; Roberts, M. J.; Sigurã°Sson, G.; HöSkuldsson, F.; Oddsson, B.

    2012-07-01

    During the eruption of the ice-covered Eyjafjallajökull volcano, a series of images from an airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) were obtained by the Icelandic Coast Guard. Cloud obscured the summit from view during the first three days of the eruption, making the weather-independent SAR a valuable monitoring resource. Radar images revealed the development of ice cauldrons in a 200 m thick ice cover within the summit caldera, as well as the formation of cauldrons to the immediate south of the caldera. Additionally, radar images were used to document the subglacial and supraglacial passage of floodwater to the north and south of the eruption site. The eruption breached the ice surface about four hours after its onset at about 01:30 UTC on 14 April 2010. The first SAR images, obtained between 08:55 and 10:42 UTC, show signs of limited supraglacial drainage from the eruption site. Floodwater began to drain from the ice cap almost 5.5 h after the beginning of the eruption, implying storage of meltwater at the eruption site due to initially constricted subglacial drainage from the caldera. Heat transfer rates from magma to ice during early stages of cauldron formation were about 1 MW m-2 in the radial direction and about 4 MW m-2 vertically. Meltwater release was characterized by accumulation and drainage with most of the volcanic material in the ice cauldrons being drained in hyperconcentrated floods. After the third day of the eruption, meltwater generation at the eruption site diminished due to an insulating lag of tephra.

  11. Scanning Web-based ICARTT File Tool (SWIFT): an online tool used to validate ICARTT-formatted airborne science data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucker, P. L.; Mangosing, D. C.; Chen, G.; Rinsland, P.; Brennan, J. H.; Clodius, B. F.

    2011-12-01

    The ICARTT (International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation) file format was recently endorsed by the NASA Earth Science Data Systems Standards Process Group (ESDS SPG) as a standard (ESDS-RFC-019) for specifying airborne-based Earth System Data Records (ESDR). In order to accelerate adoption of the new standard in the airborne science data community, SWIFT (Scanning Web-based ICARTT File Tool) was developed to provide a means for data providers to validate their own originated ICARTT-formatted file before submission to data archival facilities provided by NASA Langley's Atmospheric Science Data Center and the NASA Langley Airborne Science Data for Atmospheric Composition group. SWIFT builds upon a predecessor, a software utility named: FSCAN (File Scan). A major upgrade to FSCAN, the objective of SWIFT is to support all valid ICARTT files and to extract and store the file metadata in an ESDR relational database. The SWIFT-validated search metadata make it possible for COTS software and web applications to leverage the built-in spatial and temporal query capabilities of the relational database and to enable file and parameter sub-setting capabilities, as well as facilitating the generation of airborne science data merge products. These enhancements help to minimize development time of other related web applications and open up opportunities for robust data queries.

  12. Impacts of 4D-VAR Assimilation of Airborne Doppler Radar Observations on Numerical Simulations of the Genesis of Typhoon Nuri (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Z.; Li, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model and its four-dimensional variational data assimilation system are employed to examine the impact of airborne Doppler radar observations on predicting the genesis of Typhoon Nuri (2008). The ELDORA airborne radar data, collected during the Office of Naval Research-sponsored Tropical Cyclone Structure 2008 field experiment, are used for data assimilation experiments. Two assimilation methods are evaluated and compared, namely, the direct assimilation of radar-measured radial velocity and the assimilation of three-dimensional wind analysis derived from the radar radial velocity. Results show that direct assimilation of radar radial velocity leads to better intensity forecasts, as it enhances the development of convective systems and improves the inner core structure of Nuri, whereas assimilation of the radar-retrieved wind analysis is more beneficial for tracking forecasts, as it results in improved environmental flows. The assimilation of both the radar-retrieved wind and the radial velocity can lead to better forecasts in both intensity and tracking, if the radial velocity observations are assimilated first and the retrieved winds are then assimilated in the same data assimilation window. In addition, experiments with and without radar data assimilation lead to developing and nondeveloping disturbances for Nuri's genesis in the numerical simulations. The improved initial conditions and forecasts from the data assimilation imply that the enhanced midlevel vortex and moisture conditions are favorable for the development of deep convection in the center of the pouch and eventually contribute to Nuri's genesis. The improved simulations of the convection and associated environmental conditions produce enhanced upper-level warming in the core region and lead to the drop in sea-level pressure.

  13. Feasibility of inter-comparing airborne and spaceborne obsevations of radar backscattering coefficients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will provide global soil moisture products that will facilitate new science and application areas. The SMAP mission, scheduled for launch in November 2014, will offer synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements of backscattering coefficients for the re...

  14. Research of the coastal zone by the airborne laser scanning data (Verbyanaya bay-bar, sea of Azov)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelov, Anatoliy V.; Antonenko, Mihail; Boyko, Evgeniy

    2015-06-01

    In the area Verbyanaya bay-bar (Sea of Azov) in an attempt to create large-scale cartographic base and subsequent thematic mapping of the geographical environment components airborne laser scanning and aerial photography were conducted. Airborne laser scanning data formed the basis of a comprehensive study of the coastal zone components. Methodical research apparatus includes receiving and processing technology of laser reflection points, constructing highprecision digital elevation model and raster surfaces. Mosaic of aerial photography is converted into a format mosaic - a geometrically correct image of the terrain. Set of high-precision digital surface models and thematic raster images obtained for specific dates, allows to analyze the dynamic adjustment of components of the coastal zone (shoreline, beach, shore dam with surge prism).

  15. Remote sensing of land scenarios with an airborne 94-GHz synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essen, Helmut; Makaruschka, R.; Baars, E. Peter

    1996-06-01

    The scattering process of electromagnetic waves is dominated by the match between wavelength and the geometric dimensions of surface structures. With respect to the microwave radar bands millimeter-waves are better matched to small surface features of terrain. Therefore this frequency band is able to gain additional information on the terrain of interest. For high resolution imaging SAR is the favorite solution also for millimeter-wave frequencies. Compared to more classical radar bands millimeter-waves offer advantages in the SAR processing, because due to the higher primary resolution at a given antenna aperture sources of image distortions such as range migration or depth of focus can be neglected at these frequencies. Moreover the inherently short aperture time for a given resolution improves the relation to the time constant of flight instabilities and makes motion compensation a simple process. A coherent, polarimetric, high range resolution radar, operating at a nominal frequency of 94 GHz, has been installed onboard an aircraft to allow remote sensing measurements in a side looking synthetic aperture approach. The radar-raw-data were registered together with time code and inertial data of the aircraft and later on evaluated by an off-line SAR-processor. The resulting images then had to undergo an automatic recognition process to extract certain complex targets using a knowledge based production system. The paper describes the measurement system and discusses the evaluation procedures with emphasis on the applied SAR algorithm. Examples of radar images at 94 GHz are shown and samples of pattern recognition derived from the SAR images are shown.

  16. A Methodology for Determining Statistical Performance Compliance for Airborne Doppler Radar with Forward-Looking Turbulence Detection Capability. Second Corrected Copy Issued May 23, 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Roland L.; Buck, Bill K.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the research developed and presented in this document was to statistically assess turbulence hazard detection performance employing airborne pulse Doppler radar systems. The FAA certification methodology for forward looking airborne turbulence radars will require estimating the probabilities of missed and false hazard indications under operational conditions. Analytical approaches must be used due to the near impossibility of obtaining sufficient statistics experimentally. This report describes an end-to-end analytical technique for estimating these probabilities for Enhanced Turbulence (E-Turb) Radar systems under noise-limited conditions, for a variety of aircraft types, as defined in FAA TSO-C134. This technique provides for one means, but not the only means, by which an applicant can demonstrate compliance to the FAA directed ATDS Working Group performance requirements. Turbulence hazard algorithms were developed that derived predictive estimates of aircraft hazards from basic radar observables. These algorithms were designed to prevent false turbulence indications while accurately predicting areas of elevated turbulence risks to aircraft, passengers, and crew; and were successfully flight tested on a NASA B757-200 and a Delta Air Lines B737-800. Application of this defined methodology for calculating the probability of missed and false hazard indications taking into account the effect of the various algorithms used, is demonstrated for representative transport aircraft and radar performance characteristics.

  17. Airborne and scanning lidar results obtained during Pacific 2001 in lhe Lower Fraser Valley of British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawbridge, Kevin B.

    2004-02-01

    Two different lidar platforms were employed in the Pacific 2001 field study. A simultaneous upward/downward airborne lidar system called AERIAL (AERosol Imaging Airborne Lidar) was flown aboard the National Research Council of Canada Convair 580(CV580). The primary task of this platform was to establish a regional picture of particulate matter (PM) concentrations in the Lower Fraser Valley (LFV). The high temporal and spatial resolution of the lidar provided images of PM stratification and boundary layer structure along predetermined flight lines. The flight lines were divided into a series of north-south and east-west lines to provide a snapshot of the LFV as well as provide aerial support for four ground sites. The airborne lidar system also including a cross-polarization channel that is sensitive to particle shape (non-sphericity), for example smoke plumes from forest fires. There were 9 flights flown over a 3 week period including 2 night flights. The primary purpose of the night flights was to map PM transport in the lake valleys along the north range of the LFV. A scanning lidar facility called RASCAL (Rapid Acquisition SCanning Aerosol Lidar) was part of a suite of instruments making longer term measurements at the Langley Lochiel ground site. The lidar system was programmed to take three elevation scans (west, north and east) of the troposphere from the horizon to near zenith. Measurements were conducting for approximately 16 hours per day except longer during aircraft night flights. Results from both the airborne and scanning lidar facilities will be presented.

  18. Doppler Compensation for Airborne Non-Side-Looking Phased-Array Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    looking airborne arrays. The depression angle is a function of the ratio of platform height h to range r , resulting in, )cos(1 2 max aaa r...is operated in the forward-looking mode, is, 2 0 1 2cos2      −== r hvvf aaa λ θ λ (8) Equation (8) clearly shows the range-dependency of

  19. Martian CAT scan: Three-dimensional imaging of Planum Boreum with Shallow Radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putzig, N. E.; Foss, F. J., II; Campbell, B. A.; Phillips, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    We present a preliminary three-dimensional (3-D) subsurface volume created from Shallow Radar (SHARAD) observations of Planum Boreum, the 3-km-high mound of icy layered deposits in the north polar region of Mars. Our goal is to achieve a better understanding of the nature and timing of the layered deposits and their relationship to climatological cycles by enabling the mapping of subsurface radar returns in regions presently obfuscated by highly variable surface topography and complex subsurface structures. In the medical field, computed axial tomography (CAT scan) involves taking a series of 2-D X-ray images around an axis of rotation and applying geometric processing to generate a 3-D image of a body's interior. Similarly, SHARAD has taken over 2500 2-D radar images (radargrams) on passes of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) across the north polar region of Mars, and we have used a subset of those radargrams to develop a means of generating 3-D images of the polar layered deposits. While the sets of radargrams over both polar regions have been very fruitful scientifically (e.g., Putzig et al., 2009, Icarus 204, 443-457; Holt et al., 2010, Nature 465, 450-453; Phillips et al., 2011, Science 332, 838-841), examination of 3-D subsurface structures has been restricted to identifying and tracing those structures on the radargrams and then "connecting the dots" by interpolation. Identification and tracing of structures is limited to the trajectories of MRO's nadir track and is hampered by "clutter," or signals returned from off-nadir surface or subsurface features that often interfere with signals returned from nadir. Clutter becomes a severe impediment to structure interpretation in areas of high topographic variability, such as the trough-rich regions of Planum Boreum. Given a sufficient number of observations from a range of lateral offsets, radar signals from nadir and off-nadir can be distinguished within a 3-D volume, and off-nadir clutter can be repositioned

  20. Improving crop classification through attention to the timing of airborne radar acquisitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brisco, B.; Ulaby, F. T.; Protz, R.

    1984-01-01

    Radar remote sensors may provide valuable input to crop classification procedures because of (1) their independence of weather conditions and solar illumination, and (2) their ability to respond to differences in crop type. Manual classification of multidate synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery resulted in an overall accuracy of 83 percent for corn, forest, grain, and 'other' cover types. Forests and corn fields were identified with accuracies approaching or exceeding 90 percent. Grain fields and 'other' fields were often confused with each other, resulting in classification accuracies of 51 and 66 percent, respectively. The 83 percent correct classification represents a 10 percent improvement when compared to similar SAR data for the same area collected at alternate time periods in 1978. These results demonstrate that improvements in crop classification accuracy can be achieved with SAR data by synchronizing data collection times with crop growth stages in order to maximize differences in the geometric and dielectric properties of the cover types of interest.

  1. Airborne radar imaging of subaqueous channel evolution in Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, John B.; Ayoub, Francois; Jones, Cathleen E.; Lamb, Michael P.; Holt, Benjamin; Wagner, R. Wayne; Coffey, Thomas S.; Chadwick, J. Austin; Mohrig, David

    2016-05-01

    Shallow coastal regions are among the fastest evolving landscapes but are notoriously difficult to measure with high spatiotemporal resolution. Using Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) data, we demonstrate that high signal-to-noise L band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can reveal subaqueous channel networks at the distal ends of river deltas. Using 27 UAVSAR images collected between 2009 and 2015 from the Wax Lake Delta in coastal Louisiana, USA, we show that under normal tidal conditions, planform geometry of the distributary channel network is frequently resolved in the UAVSAR images, including ~700 m of seaward network extension over 5 years for one channel. UAVSAR also reveals regions of subaerial and subaqueous vegetation, streaklines of biogenic surfactants, and what appear to be small distributary channels aliased by the survey grid, all illustrating the value of fine resolution, low noise, L band SAR for mapping the nearshore subaqueous delta channel network.

  2. Airborne Ku-Band Polarimetric Radar Remote Sensing of Terrestrial Snow Cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon; Cline, Donald; Elder, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary analyses of the POLSCAT data acquired from the CLPX-II in winter 2006-2007 are described in this paper. The data showed the response of the Ku-band radarechoes to snowpack changes for various types of background vegetation. We observed about 0.2 to 0.4 dB increases in backscatter for every 1 cm SWE accumulation for sage brush and agricultural fields. The co-polarized VV and HH radar resposnes are similar, while the corss-polarized (VH or HV) echoes showedgreater resposne to the change of SWE. The data also showed the impact of surface hoar growth and freeze/thaw cycles, whichcreated large snow grain sizes and ice lenses, respectively, and consequently increased the radar signals by a few dBs.

  3. An observation of sea-spray microphysics by airborne Doppler radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairall, C. W.; Pezoa, S.; Moran, K.; Wolfe, D.

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes observations and analysis of Doppler radar data from a down-looking 94 GHz (W-Band) system operated from a NOAA WP-3 Orion research aircraft in Tropical Storm (TS) Karen. The flight took place on 5 October 2013; Karen had weakened with maximum winds around 20 m s-1. Doppler spectral moments from the radar were processed to retrieve sea-spray microphysical properties (drop size and liquid water mass concentration) profiles in the height range 75-300 m above the sea surface. In the high wind speed regions of TS Karen (U10 > 15 m s-1), sea spray was observed with a nominal mass-mode radius of about 40 µm, a radar-weighted gravitational fall velocity of about 1 m s-1, and a mass concentration of about 10-3 gm-3 at 75 m. Spray-drop mass concentration declined with height to values of about 10-4 gm-3 at 300 m. Drop mass decreased slightly more slowly with increasing height than predicted by surface-layer similarity theory for a balance of turbulent diffusion vs fall velocity.

  4. Mapping the Risk of Forest Wind Damage Using Airborne Scanning LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarinen, N.; Vastaranta, M.; Honkavaara, E.; Wulder, M. A.; White, J. C.; Litkey, P.; Holopainen, M.; Hyyppä, J.

    2015-03-01

    Wind damage is known for causing threats to sustainable forest management and yield value in boreal forests. Information about wind damage risk can aid forest managers in understanding and possibly mitigating damage impacts. The objective of this research was to better understand and quantify drivers of wind damage, and to map the probability of wind damage. To accomplish this, we used open-access airborne scanning light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data. The probability of wind-induced forest damage (PDAM) in southern Finland (61°N, 23°E) was modelled for a 173 km2 study area of mainly managed boreal forests (dominated by Norway spruce and Scots pine) and agricultural fields. Wind damage occurred in the study area in December 2011. LiDAR data were acquired prior to the damage in 2008. High spatial resolution aerial imagery, acquired after the damage event (January, 2012) provided a source of model calibration via expert interpretation. A systematic grid (16 m x 16 m) was established and 430 sample grid cells were identified systematically and classified as damaged or undamaged based on visual interpretation using the aerial images. Potential drivers associated with PDAM were examined using a multivariate logistic regression model. Risk model predictors were extracted from the LiDAR-derived surface models. Geographic information systems (GIS) supported spatial mapping and identification of areas of high PDAM across the study area. The risk model based on LiDAR data provided good agreement with detected risk areas (73 % with kappa-value 0,47). The strongest predictors in the risk model were mean canopy height and mean elevation. Our results indicate that open-access LiDAR data sets can be used to map the probability of wind damage risk without field data, providing valuable information for forest management planning.

  5. Evaluation of Vertical Lacunarity Profiles in Forested Areas Using Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Székely, B.; Kania, A.; Standovár, T.; Heilmeier, H.

    2016-06-01

    The horizontal variation and vertical layering of the vegetation are important properties of the canopy structure determining the habitat; three-dimensional (3D) distribution of objects (shrub layers, understory vegetation, etc.) is related to the environmental factors (e.g., illumination, visibility). It has been shown that gaps in forests, mosaic-like structures are essential to biodiversity; various methods have been introduced to quantify this property. As the distribution of gaps in the vegetation is a multi-scale phenomenon, in order to capture it in its entirety, scale-independent methods are preferred; one of these is the calculation of lacunarity. We used Airborne Laser Scanning point clouds measured over a forest plantation situated in a former floodplain. The flat topographic relief ensured that the tree growth is independent of the topographic effects. The tree pattern in the plantation crops provided various quasi-regular and irregular patterns, as well as various ages of the stands. The point clouds were voxelized and layers of voxels were considered as images for two-dimensional input. These images calculated for a certain vicinity of reference points were taken as images for the computation of lacunarity curves, providing a stack of lacunarity curves for each reference points. These sets of curves have been compared to reveal spatial changes of this property. As the dynamic range of the lacunarity values is very large, the natural logarithms of the values were considered. Logarithms of lacunarity functions show canopy-related variations, we analysed these variations along transects. The spatial variation can be related to forest properties and ecology-specific aspects.

  6. Airborne Laser Scanning of Forest Stem Volume in a Mountainous Environment

    PubMed Central

    Hollaus, Markus; Wagner, Wolfgang; Maier, Bernhard; Schadauer, Klemens

    2007-01-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is an active remote sensing technique that uses the time-of-flight measurement principle to capture the three-dimensional structure of the earth's surface with pulsed lasers that transmit nanosecond-long laser pulses with a high pulse repetition frequency. Over forested areas most of the laser pulses are reflected by the leaves and branches of the trees, but a certain fraction of the laser pulses reaches the forest floor through small gaps in the canopy. Thus it is possible to reconstruct both the three-dimensional structure of the forest canopy and the terrain surface. For the retrieval of quantitative forest parameters such as stem volume or biomass it is necessary to use models that combine ALS with inventory data. One approach is to use multiplicative regression models that are trained with local inventory data. This method has been widely applied over boreal forest regions, but so far little experience exists with applying this method for mapping alpine forest. In this study the transferability of this approach to a 128 km2 large mountainous region in Vorarlberg, Austria, was evaluated. For the calibration of the model, inventory data as operationally collected by Austrian foresters were used. Despite these inventory data are based on variable sample plot sizes, they could be used for mapping stem volume for the entire alpine study area. The coefficient of determination R2 was 0.85 and the root mean square error (RMSE) 90.9 m3ha−1 (relative error of 21.4%) which is comparable to results of ALS studies conducted over topographically less complex environments. Due to the increasing availability, ALS data could become an operational part of Austrian's forest inventories.

  7. Algorithm for the Automatic Estimation of Agricultural Tree Geometric Parameters Using Airborne Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadaś, E.; Borkowski, A.; Estornell, J.

    2016-06-01

    The estimation of dendrometric parameters has become an important issue for the agricultural planning and management. Since the classical field measurements are time consuming and inefficient, Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) data can be used for this purpose. Point clouds acquired for orchard areas allow to determine orchard structures and geometric parameters of individual trees. In this research we propose an automatic method that allows to determine geometric parameters of individual olive trees using ALS data. The method is based on the α-shape algorithm applied for normalized point clouds. The algorithm returns polygons representing crown shapes. For points located inside each polygon, we select the maximum height and the minimum height and then we estimate the tree height and the crown base height. We use the first two components of the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) as the estimators for crown diameters. The α-shape algorithm requires to define the radius parameter R. In this study we investigated how sensitive are the results to the radius size, by comparing the results obtained with various settings of the R with reference values of estimated parameters from field measurements. Our study area was the olive orchard located in the Castellon Province, Spain. We used a set of ALS data with an average density of 4 points m-2. We noticed, that there was a narrow range of the R parameter, from 0.48 m to 0.80 m, for which all trees were detected and for which we obtained a high correlation coefficient (> 0.9) between estimated and measured values. We compared our estimates with field measurements. The RMSE of differences was 0.8 m for the tree height, 0.5 m for the crown base height, 0.6 m and 0.4 m for the longest and shorter crown diameter, respectively. The accuracy obtained with the method is thus sufficient for agricultural applications.

  8. A History of U.S. Navy Airborne and Shipboard Periscope Detection Radar Design and Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    JH U/ AP L, NR L, TI SH AR EM 12 5 a nd ot he r t es ts in Me dit er ra ne an 19 99 Fle et de mo – air (fir st air te st on N RL...transmitter and a more sensitive receiver, which enabled improved detection ranges against surfaced U-boats.6 By far the most notable and exciting ...the ONR investigations into using SAR for periscope detection were discontinued. Airborne ARPDD By far the most exciting and technically challenging

  9. Seasonal Thickness Changes Revealed by Airborne Radar Interferometry, Pi-SAR2, at Two Glaciers Near Mt. Tsurugi, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, M.; Fukui, K.; Kojima, S.; Matsuoka, T.

    2015-12-01

    Based on ice radar and high-preicision GPS measurements, Fukui and Iida (2012) have reported the presence of "glaciers" near Mt. Tsurugi, central Japan, which had been previously regarded as perenial snowy gorges. While their discovery was brought out by the modern geodetic techniques, there used to be a wrong idea that the equilibrium line altitude in central Japanese Alps is about 4000 meter, causing the actual glaciers to be overlooked; the elevation of Mt Tsurugi is 2999 meter. The presence of glaciers in central Japan is due to the very high seasonal accmulation; the snow fall in the mountainous regions can reach several tens of meters or more. There are, however, few snow-depth measurement data due to the logistic problems. The equilibrium line altitude also remains uncertain. We have performed airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements near the two glaciers in August, October 2013, August 2014, and March 2015. The Pi-SAR2 system used in this study consists of X-band SAR antennas, and allows us to perform single-pass interferometry and full polarimetry with the maximum spatial resolution of 0.3 m. Taking advantage of the single-pass interferometry, we have generated digital elevation models (DEM) at each measurement epoch to derive the temporal changes in the thickness by differecing the DEMs of multiple epochs. Snow melt season starts in May at the analyzed area, and the first snow fall usually occurs in late October. As such, the minimum thickness is expected in October, when the glacier ice appears on the surface. Preliminary analyses indicate that the differences between August and October 2013 reaches ~10 to 20 meters with errors of 5-10 meters.

  10. A Portable Airborne Scanning Lidar System for Ocean and Coastal Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-26

    has been quantified in many studies with several different airborne lidar systems. Robertson et al. (2007) measured beach erosion caused by Hurricane...Mech., 156, 505–531. Robertson , W., K. Zhang, and D. Whitman, 2007: Hurricane- induced beach change derived from airborne laser mea- surements near...level changes on Southern California beaches. Ph.D. thesis, University of California, San Diego, 155 pp. ——, R. Guza, R. Gutierrez, and R. Seymour

  11. Echo Source Discrimination in Airborne Radar Sounding Data for Mars Analog Studies, Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, J. W.; Blankenship, D. D.; Peters, M. E.; Kempf, S. D.; Morse, D. L.; Williams, B. J.

    2003-01-01

    The recent identification of features on Mars exhibiting morphologies consistent with ice/rock mixtures, near-surface ice bodies and near-surface liquid water [1,2], and the importance of such features to the search for water on Mars, highlights the need for appropriate terrestrial analogs in order to prepare for upcoming radar missions targeting these and other water-related features. Climatic, hydrological, and geological conditions in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are analogous in many ways to those on Mars, and a number of ice-related features in the Dry Valleys may have direct morphologic and compositional counterparts on Mars.

  12. Accuracy in estimation of timber assortments and stem distribution - A comparison of airborne and terrestrial laser scanning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankare, Ville; Vauhkonen, Jari; Tanhuanpää, Topi; Holopainen, Markus; Vastaranta, Mikko; Joensuu, Marianna; Krooks, Anssi; Hyyppä, Juha; Hyyppä, Hannu; Alho, Petteri; Viitala, Risto

    2014-11-01

    Detailed information about timber assortments and diameter distributions is required in forest management. Forest owners can make better decisions concerning the timing of timber sales and forest companies can utilize more detailed information to optimize their wood supply chain from forest to factory. The objective here was to compare the accuracies of high-density laser scanning techniques for the estimation of tree-level diameter distribution and timber assortments. We also introduce a method that utilizes a combination of airborne and terrestrial laser scanning in timber assortment estimation. The study was conducted in Evo, Finland. Harvester measurements were used as a reference for 144 trees within a single clear-cut stand. The results showed that accurate tree-level timber assortments and diameter distributions can be obtained, using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) or a combination of TLS and airborne laser scanning (ALS). Saw log volumes were estimated with higher accuracy than pulpwood volumes. The saw log volumes were estimated with relative root-mean-squared errors of 17.5% and 16.8% with TLS and a combination of TLS and ALS, respectively. The respective accuracies for pulpwood were 60.1% and 59.3%. The differences in the bucking method used also caused some large errors. In addition, tree quality factors highly affected the bucking accuracy, especially with pulpwood volume.

  13. Using Airborne Radar Stratigraphy to Model Surface Accumulation Anomaly and Basal Control over Deformed Basal Ice in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, I.; Bell, R. E.; Creyts, T. T.; Wolovick, M.

    2013-12-01

    Large deformed ice structures have been imaged at the base of northern Greenland ice sheet by IceBridge airborne radar. Numerous deformed structures lie along the base of both Petermann Glacier and Northeast Ice stream catchments covering 10-13% of the catchment area. These structures may be combinations of basal freeze-on and folded ice that overturns and inverts stratigraphy. In the interior, where the ice velocity is low, the radar imaged height of the deformed structures are frequently a significant fraction of the ice thickness. They are related to basal freeze on and stick-slip at the base of the ice sheet and may be triggered by subglacial water, sediments or local geological conditions. The larger ones (at times up to 700 m thick and 140 km long) perturb the ice stratigraphy and create prominent undulations on the ice surface and modify the local surface mass balance. Here, we investigate the relationship between the deformed structures and surface processes using shallow and deep ice radar stratigraphy. The surface undulations caused by the deformed structures modulate the pattern of local surface snow accumulation. Using normalized differences of several near-surface stratigraphic layers, we have calculated the accumulation anomaly over these deformed structures. The accumulation anomalies can be as high as 20% of the local surface accumulation over some of the larger surface depressions caused by these deformed structures. We observe distinct differences in the phases of the near-surface internal layers on the Petermann and Northeast catchments. These differences indicate that the deformed bodies over Petermann are controlled by conditions at the bed different from the Northeast Ice stream. The distinctly different near-surface stratigraphy over the deformed structures in the Petermann and Northeast catchments have opened up a number of questions including their formation and how they influence the ice dynamics, ice stratigraphy and surface mass balance

  14. A data assimilation experiment of RASTA airborne cloud radar data during HyMeX IOP16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saussereau, Gaël; Caumont, Olivier; Delanoë, Julien

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of HyMeX first special observing period (SOP1), which took place from 5 September to 5 November 2012, was to document the heavy precipitation events and flash floods that regularly affect the north-western Mediterranean coastal areas. In the two-month campaign, around twenty rainfall events were documented in France, Italy, and Spain. Among the instrumental platforms that were deployed during SOP1, the Falcon 20 of the Safire unit (http://www.safire.fr/) made numerous flights in storm systems so as to document their thermodynamic, microphysical, and dynamical properties. In particular, the RASTA cloud radar (http://rali.projet.latmos.ipsl.fr/) was aboard this aircraft. This radar measures vertical profiles of reflectivity and Doppler velocity above and below the aircraft. This unique instrument thus allows us to document the microphysical properties and the speed of wind and hydrometeors in the clouds, quasi-continuously in time and at a 60-m vertical resolution. For this field campaign, a special version of the numerical weather prediction (NWP) Arome system was developed to cover the whole north-western Mediterranean basin. This version, called Arome-WMed, ran in real time during the SOP in order to, notably, schedule the airborne operations, especially in storm systems. Like the operational version, Arome-WMed delivers forecasts at a horizontal resolution of 2.5 km with a one-moment microphysical scheme that predicts the evolution of six water species: water vapour, cloud liquid water, rainwater, pristine ice, snow, and graupel. Its three-dimensional variational (3DVar) data assimilation (DA) system ingests every three hours (at 00 UTC, 03 UTC, etc.) numerous observations (radiosoundings, ground automatic weather stations, radar, satellite, GPS, etc.). In order to provide improved initial conditions to Arome-WMed, especially for heavy precipitation events, RASTA data were assimilated in Arome-WMed 3DVar DA system for IOP16 (26 October 2012), to

  15. Airborne Laser Scanning - based vegetation classification in grasslands: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlinszky, András; Vári, Ágnes; Deák, Balázs; Mücke, Werner; Székely, Balázs

    2013-04-01

    Airborne Laser Scanning is traditionally used for topography mapping, exploiting its ability to map terrain elevation under vegetation cover. Parallel to this, the application of ALS for vegetation classification and mapping of ecological variables is rapidly emerging. Point clouds surveyed by ALS provide accurate representations of vegetation structure and are therefore considered suitable for mapping vegetation classes as long as their vertical structure is characteristic. For this reason, most ALS-based vegetation mapping studies have been carried out in forests, with some rare applications for shrublands or tall grass vegetation such as reeds. The use of remote-sensing derived vegetation maps is widespread in ecological research and is also gaining importance in practical conservation. There is an increasing demand for reliable, high-resolution datasets covering large protected areas. ALS can provide both the coverage and the high resolution, and can prove to be an economical solution due to the potential for automatic processing and the wide range of uses that allows spreading costs. Grasslands have a high importance in nature conservation as due to the drastical land use changes (arable lands, afforestation, fragmentation by linear structures) in the last centuries the extent of these habitats have been considerably reduced. Among the habitat types protected by the Habitat Directive of the Natura 2000 system, several grassland habitat types (e.g. hay meadows, dry grasslands harbouring rare Orchid species) have special priority for conservation. For preserving these habitat types application of a proper management - including mowing or grazing - has a crucial role. Therefore not only the mapping of the locations of habitats but the way of management is needed for representing the natural processes. The objective of this study was to test the applicability of airborne laser scanning for ecological vegetation mapping in and around grasslands. The study site is

  16. Ka-band Digitally Beamformed Airborne Radar Using SweepSAR Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory A.; Chuang, Chung-Lun; Ghaemi, Hirad; Heavey, Brandon A.; Lin, Lung-Sheng S.; Quaddus, Momin

    2012-01-01

    A paper describes a frequency-scaled SweepSAR demonstration that operates at Ka-Band (35.6 GHz), and closely approximates the DESDynl mission antenna geometry, scaled by 28. The concept relies on the SweepSAR measurement technique. An array of digital receivers captures waveforms from a multiplicity of elements. These are combined using digital beamforming in elevation and SAR processing to produce imagery. Ka-band (35.6 GHz) airborne SweepSAR using array-fed reflector and digital beamforming features eight simultaneous receive beams generated by a 40-cm offset-fed reflector and eight-element active array feed, and eight digital receiver channels with all raw data recorded and later used for beamforming. Illumination of the swath is accomplished using a slotted-waveguide antenna radiating 250 W peak power. This experiment has been used to demonstrate digital beamforming SweepSAR systems.

  17. Mapping of local-scale flooding on vegetated floodplains from radiometrically calibrated airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Radosław; Höfle, Bernhard; König, Kristina; Groom, Geoffrey; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Heckrath, Goswin

    2014-05-01

    The agricultural use of riverine lowlands is often dependent on complex hydrological regimes including localized flooding. Knowledge about spatio-temporal inundation patterns enables a better understanding of the state of agricultural areas in lowlands and provides valuable and objective information on land suitability for land use administration and environmental planning. Data from Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS), also referred to as LiDAR, have become one of the most important sources of elevation data during the last two decades. Recently, geometric and radiometric attributes of ALS have also been explored for analysing the extent of water surfaces. Thus, the main objective of this work is to develop a method for mapping the spatial extent of floodplain inundation by means of remote sensing data. Our study focusses on analysing floodwaters partly covered by some vegetation, which is a major challenge in flood mapping. We hypothesize that ALS data due to its high sampling density and high rate of canopy penetration can effectively be used for floodwater detection in such areas. This research utilizes full-waveform ALS data with an average point density of 20 points/m2 obtained for an area of ca. 8 km2 of the Nørreå River valley in Jutland, Denmark. The study area is characterised by the presence of improved or semi-improved grasslands (meadows and pasture), few arable fields, irregularly scattered group of trees and bushes, and an extensive ditch network. Our approach is based on an inspection of properties of single laser points with regard to water vs. vegetation coverage within the laser footprint, which is compared with very detailed field reference data. Exploratory analysis and classification of ALS data were preceded by radiometric calibration of point cloud data, utilizing in situ measurements of reference targets reflectance. The resulting calibration derivatives provide very stable estimates of surface characteristics and are used as the main input in

  18. Integration of Airborne Laser Scanning Altimetry Data in Alpine Geomorphological and Hazard Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seijmonsbergen, A. C.

    2007-12-01

    A digital terrain and surface model derived from an airborne laser scanning (ALS) altimetry dataset was used in the Austrian Alps for the preparation, improvement and the evaluation of a digital geomorphological hazard map. The geomorphology in the study area consists of a wide variety of landforms, which include glacial landforms such as cirques, hanging valleys, and moraine deposits, of pre- and postglacial mass movement landforms and processes, such as deep seated slope failures, rock fall, debris flows and solifluction. The area includes naked and covered gypsum karst, collapse dolines and fluvial landforms and deposits such as river terraces, incisions, alluvial fans and gullies. A detailed symbol based paper geomorphological map served as a basis for the digitalization of basic morphogenetic landform and process units. These units were assigned a `geomorphological unit type`, `hazard type` and `activity` code in the attribute table, according to a morphogenetic classification scheme. Selected zonal statistical attributes - mean height, aspect and slope angle - were calculated in a GIS using the vector based morphogenetic landform and process units and the underlying 1m resolution laser altimetry raster dataset. This statistical information was added to the attribute table of the `geomorphological hazard map`. Interpretation of the zonal statistical information shows that indicative topographic signatures exist for the various geomorphological and hazard units in this region of the Alps. Based on this experience a further step is made towards semi-automated geomorphological hazard classification of segmented laser altimetry data using expert knowledge rules. The first results indicate a classification accuracy of 50-70 percent for most landform associations. Areas affected by slide processes resulted in less accurate classification, probably because of their polygenetic history in this area. It is concluded that the use of lidar data improves visual

  19. High-power pulsed diode laser for automotive scanning radar sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yuji; Matsushita, Noriyuki; Kato, Hisaya; Abe, Katsunori; Atsumi, Kinya

    2000-02-01

    High performance pulsed AlGaAs/GaAs wide stripe diode laser has been developed for the automotive distance-measuring scanning radar sensor. The laser diode is required high output power of 15 W and a long time reliability in spite of being used in a harsh environment such as wide temperature range, mechanical vibrations at the front bumper and so on. The device is designed by employing a multiple quantum well structure as an active layer for high output power with low drive current and high temperature operations. Moreover we reduce catastrophic optical damage power level and control the beam divergence angle by introducing optimized optical waveguide layers. In the chips bonding part, we developed a new thin film Au-Sn-Ni solder system. The bonding temperature can be lowered by using this system, whereby the thermal damage to the laser diode can be reduced. Furthermore, highly stable bonding is carried out by improving wetting ability in this system. We have achieved more than 22 W light output power at 20A pulse current under room temperature and more than 16 W light output power under 90 degrees Celsius. High reliability over 10,000 hours is performed for automotive use under pulsed operation at 90 degrees Celsius, 50 ns pulse width, 8 kHz frequency and 15 W light output power.

  20. Quantification of Shear-Relative Asymmetries in Eyewall Slope Using Airborne Doppler Radar Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazelton, A.; Rogers, R.; Hart, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, it has become apparent that typical methods for analyzing tropical cyclones (TCs), such as track and intensity, are insufficient for evaluating TC structural evolution and numerical model forecasts of that evolution. Many studies have analyzed different metrics related to TC inner-core structure in an attempt to better understand the processes that drive changes in core structure. One important metric related to vertical TC structure is the slope of the eyewall. Hazelton and Hart (2013) discussed azimuthal mean eyewall slope based on radar reflectivity data, and its relationship with TC intensity and core structure. That study also noted significant azimuthal variation in slopes, but did not significantly explore reasons for this variation. Accordingly, in this study, we attempt to quantify the role of vertical wind shear in causing azimuthal variance of slope, using research quality Doppler radar composites from the NOAA Hurricane Research Division (HRD). We analyze the slope of the 20 dBZ surface as in Hazelton and Hart (2013), and also look at azimuthal variation in other measures of eyewall slope, such as the slope of the radius of maximum winds (RMW), which has been analyzed in an azimuthal mean sense by Stern and Nolan (2009), and an angular momentum surface. The shear-relative slopes are quantified by separating the radar data into four quadrants relative to the vertical shear vector: Downshear Left (DSL), Upshear Left (USL), Upshear Right (USR), and Downshear Right (DSR). This follows the method employed in shear-relative analyses of other aspects of TC core structure, such as Rogers et al. (2013) and Reasor et al. (2013). The data suitable for use in this study consist of 36 flights into 15 different TCs (14 Atlantic, 1 Eastern Pacific) between 1997 and 2010. Preliminary results show apparent shear-induced asymmetries in eyewall slope. The slope of the RMW shows an asymmetry due to the tilt of the vortex approximately along the shear vector, with

  1. New Airborne Radar Sounding Approaches for Quantifying Basal Reflection and Scattering, With Application to Ice Stream C (and Whillans Ice Stream), West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankenship, D. D.; Peters, M. E.; Morse, D. L.

    2003-12-01

    The grounding zones of ice streams are a sensitive indicator of ice sheet variability and sea-level change. These dynamic systems involve the interaction of the moving ice mass with the underlying materials, including liquid water, saturated lubricating tills, and rough or frozen bedrock sticky spots. In addition, bottom crevasses result from tidal flexure. Imaging and characterizing the subglacial environment of grounding zones is fundamental to understanding these complex systems. Airborne radar sounding is an increasingly valuable tool for investigations of polar ice sheets and glaciers, especially when studying the basal interface. We present results from airborne radar data acquired over ice stream C, West Antarctica, in 2001 using a uniquely configured airborne radar system. Our focus was on characterizing the basal interface within the grounding zone of this ice stream through radar reflection and scattering analyses. These new results are also used to extend the interpretation of data from regional surveys flown in 1988 over the downstream portions of both ice streams C and Whillans ice stream. The newly integrated radar system uses a programmable signal source with a dual-channel coherent down-conversion receiver linked to a 10 kW transmitter. The radar operates in chirped pulse mode at 60 MHz and 15 MHz bandwidth. High and low-gain channels allow for recording both weak bed echoes and strong surface echoes simultaneously and without range-dependent gain control. Data acquisition includes integrations of 16 returned radar signals about every 15 cm along-track. Pulse compression and unfocussed synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing using additional along-track integration were significant components of data analysis. The radar system used for the 1988 surveys operated in pulsed mode at 50 MHz and recorded both SAR (along-track integrated) and individual signal observations every second, or about every 60 m along-track. Echoes from the basal interface

  2. Extracting Roof Parameters and Heat Bridges Over the City of Oldenburg from Hyperspectral, Thermal, and Airborne Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannehr, L.; Luhmann, Th.; Piechel, J.; Roelfs, T.; Schmidt, An.

    2011-09-01

    Remote sensing methods are used to obtain different kinds of information about the state of the environment. Within the cooperative research project HiReSens, funded by the German BMBF, a hyperspectral scanner, an airborne laser scanner, a thermal camera, and a RGB-camera are employed on a small aircraft to determine roof material parameters and heat bridges of house tops over the city Oldenburg, Lower Saxony. HiReSens aims to combine various geometrical highly resolved data in order to achieve relevant evidence about the state of the city buildings. Thermal data are used to obtain the energy distribution of single buildings. The use of hyperspectral data yields information about material consistence of roofs. From airborne laser scanning data (ALS) digital surface models are inferred. They build the basis to locate the best orientations for solar panels of the city buildings. The combination of the different data sets offers the opportunity to capitalize synergies between differently working systems. Central goals are the development of tools for the collection of heat bridges by means of thermal data, spectral collection of roofs parameters on basis of hyperspectral data as well as 3D-capture of buildings from airborne lasers scanner data. Collecting, analyzing and merging of the data are not trivial especially not when the resolution and accuracy is aimed in the domain of a few decimetre. The results achieved need to be regarded as preliminary. Further investigations are still required to prove the accuracy in detail.

  3. Greenland annual accumulation along the EGIG line, 1959-2004, from ASIRAS airborne radar and detailed neutron-probe density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overly, T. B.; Hawley, R. L.; Helm, V.; Morris, E. M.; Chaudhary, R. N.

    2015-12-01

    We report annual snow accumulation rates from 1959 to 2004 along a 250 km segment of the Expéditions Glaciologiques Internationales au Groenland (EGIG) line across central Greenland using Airborne SAR/Interferometric Radar Altimeter System (ASIRAS) radar layers and detailed neutron-probe (NP) density profiles. ASIRAS-NP accumulation rates are not statistically different (C.I. 95 %) from in situ EGIG accumulation measurements from 1985 to 2004. Below 3000 m elevation, ASIRAS-NP increases by 20 % for the period 1995 to 2004 compared to 1985 to 1994. Above 3000 m elevation, accumulation increases by 13 % for 1995-2004 compared to 1985-1994. Model snow accumulation results from the calibrated Fifth Generation Mesoscale Model modified for polar climates (Polar MM5) underestimate mean annual accumulation by 16 % compared to ASIRAS-NP from 1985 to 2004. We test radar-derived accumulation rates sensitivity to density using modelled density profiles in place of detailed NP data. ASIRAS radar layers combined with Herron and Langway (1980) model density profiles (ASIRAS-HL) produce accumulation rates within 3.5 % of ASIRAS-NP estimates. We suggest using Herron and Langway (1980) density profiles to calibrate radar layers detected in dry snow regions of ice sheets lacking detailed in situ density measurements, such as those observed by the IceBridge campaign.

  4. Antarctic Firn Compaction Rates from Repeat-Track Airborne Radar Data: I. Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medley, B.; Ligtenberg, S. R. M.; Joughin, I.; Van Den Broeke, M. R.; Gogineni, S.; Nowicki, S.

    2015-01-01

    While measurements of ice-sheet surface elevation change are increasingly used to assess mass change, the processes that control the elevation fluctuations not related to ice-flow dynamics (e.g. firn compaction and accumulation) remain difficult to measure. Here we use radar data from the Thwaites Glacier (West Antarctica) catchment to measure the rate of thickness change between horizons of constant age over different time intervals: 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2009-11. The average compaction rate to approximately 25m depth is 0.33ma(exp -1), with largest compaction rates near the surface. Our measurements indicate that the accumulation rate controls much of the spatio-temporal variations in the compaction rate while the role of temperature is unclear due to a lack of measurements. Based on a semi-empirical, steady-state densification model, we find that surveying older firn horizons minimizes the potential bias resulting from the variable depth of the constant age horizon. Our results suggest that the spatiotemporal variations in the firn compaction rate are an important consideration when converting surface elevation change to ice mass change. Compaction rates varied by up to 0.12ma(exp -1) over distances less than 6km and were on average greater than 20% larger during the 2010-11 interval than during 2009-10.

  5. Study of Shortwave Spectra in Fully 3D Environment: Synergy Between Scanning Radars and Spectral Radiation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2012-01-01

    The main theme for our research is the understanding and closure of the surface spectral shortwave radiation problem in fully 3D cloud situations by combining the new ARM scanning radars, shortwave spectrometers, and microwave radiometers with the arsenal of radiative transfer tools developed by our group. In particular, we define first a large number of cloudy test cases spanning all 3D possibilities not just the customary uniform-overcast ones. Second, for each case, we define a "Best Estimate of Clouds That Affect Shortwave Radiation" using all relevant ARM instruments, notably the new scanning radars, and contribute this to the ARM Archive. Third, we test the ASR-signature radiative transfer model RRTMG_SW for those cases, focusing on the near-IR because of long-standing problems in this spectral region, and work with the developers to improve RRTMG_SW in order to increase its penetration into the modeling community.

  6. Extraction of Forest Roads from Full-waveform Airborne Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djuricic, Ana; Hollaus, Markus

    2013-04-01

    The knowledge about the position of forest roads is important for the management and protection of forests. Most often this information is not available on a digital form so that it can be integrated into a GIS to use it e.g. for routing applications or to plan harvesting activities. Furthermore, the available information about forest roads is often not up-to-date. The extraction of forest roads from remote sensing data i.e. aerial photographs is often limited due to the visibility of the terrain within a forest. The increasing availability of airborne laser scanning (ALS) data has changed this situation during the last years. As an active measurement system ALS provide geometric information from the forest floor as well as the forest canopy. Additionally, the new generation of ALS sensors, the so-called full-waveform sensors provide in addition to the geometric information (i.e. 3D position, echo width) radiometric information (i.e. backscatter cross section) about the backscattering objects, which are excellent data sources to describe the terrain surface within a forest. Thus the aim of this study is to develop a semi-automatic method to extract the position of forest roads from full-waveform ALS data. Based on the 3D point cloud different raster layers were derived such as the digital terrain model (DTM), the slope, the backscatter cross section, different roughness parameters (i.e. echo width, standard deviation of plane fitting residuals of terrain points), the vertical component of the surface normals and the normalized digital surface model (nDSM), which represents the object height above the natural ground. The developed workflow classifies each input raster separately into the classes roads and non-roads. Morphological operations were applied on the classified raster datasets to smooth the outline of the extracted roads and to remove any small gaps in the detected roads. Several raster outputs were combined and used further for additional GIS analysis and

  7. Semi-automatic mapping of cultural heritage from airborne laser scanning using deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Due Trier, Øivind; Salberg, Arnt-Børre; Holger Pilø, Lars; Tonning, Christer; Marius Johansen, Hans; Aarsten, Dagrun

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes to use deep learning to improve semi-automatic mapping of cultural heritage from airborne laser scanning (ALS) data. Automatic detection methods, based on traditional pattern recognition, have been applied in a number of cultural heritage mapping projects in Norway for the past five years. Automatic detection of pits and heaps have been combined with visual interpretation of the ALS data for the mapping of deer hunting systems, iron production sites, grave mounds and charcoal kilns. However, the performance of the automatic detection methods varies substantially between ALS datasets. For the mapping of deer hunting systems on flat gravel and sand sediment deposits, the automatic detection results were almost perfect. However, some false detections appeared in the terrain outside of the sediment deposits. These could be explained by other pit-like landscape features, like parts of river courses, spaces between boulders, and modern terrain modifications. However, these were easy to spot during visual interpretation, and the number of missed individual pitfall traps was still low. For the mapping of grave mounds, the automatic method produced a large number of false detections, reducing the usefulness of the semi-automatic approach. The mound structure is a very common natural terrain feature, and the grave mounds are less distinct in shape than the pitfall traps. Still, applying automatic mound detection on an entire municipality did lead to a new discovery of an Iron Age grave field with more than 15 individual mounds. Automatic mound detection also proved to be useful for a detailed re-mapping of Norway's largest Iron Age grave yard, which contains almost 1000 individual graves. Combined pit and mound detection has been applied to the mapping of more than 1000 charcoal kilns that were used by an iron work 350-200 years ago. The majority of charcoal kilns were indirectly detected as either pits on the circumference, a central mound, or both

  8. Airborne laser scanning based quantification of dead-ice melting in recently deglaciated terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, C.; Sailer, R.; Schümberg, M.; Stötter, J.

    2012-04-01

    Dead-ice is explained as stagnant glacial ice, not influenced by glacier flow anymore. Whenever glaciers have negative mass balances and an accumulation of debris-cover on the surface, dead-ice may form. Although, there are numerous conceptual process-sediment-landform models for the melt-out of dead-ice bodies and areas of dead-ice environments at glacier margins are easily accessible, just a few quantitative studies of dead-ice melting have been carried out so far. Processes and rates of dead-ice melting are commonly believed to be controlled by climate and debris-cover properties, but there is still a lack of knowledge about this fact. This study has a focus on the quantification of process induced volumetric changes caused by dead-ice melting. The research for this project was conducted at Hintereisferner (Ötztal Alps, Austria), Gepatschferner (Ötztal Alps, Austria) and Schrankar (Stubai Alps, Austria), areas for which a good data basis of ALS (Airborne Laser Scanning) measurements is available. 'Hintereisferner' can be characterized as a typical high alpine environment in mid-latitudes, which ranges between approximately 2250 m and 3740 m a.s.l.. The Hintereisferner region has been investigated intensively since many decades. Two dead ice bodies at the orographic right side and one at the orographic left side of the Hintereisferner glacier terminus (approx. at 2500 m to 2550 m a.s.l.) were identified. Since 2001, ALS measurements have been carried out regularly at Hintereisferner resulting in a unique data record of 21 ALS flight campaigns, allowing long-term explorations of the two dead-ice areas. The second study area of 'Gepatschferner' in the Kaunertal ranges between 2060 m and 3520 m a.s.l. and is the second largest glacier of Austria. Near the glacier tongue at the orographic right side a significant dead ice body has formed. The ALS data used for quantification include a period of time of 4 years (2006 - 2010). 'Schrankar' is located in the Western

  9. Marsh dieback, loss, and recovery mapped with satellite optical, airborne polarimetric radar, and field data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Rangoonwala, Amina; Chi, Zhaohui; Jones, Cathleen E.; Bannister, Terri

    2014-01-01

    Landsat Thematic Mapper and Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) satellite based optical sensors, NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle synthetic aperture radar (UAVSAR) polarimetric SAR (PolSAR), and field data captured the occurrence and the recovery of an undetected dieback that occurred between the summers of 2010, 2011, and 2012 in the Spartina alterniflora marshes of coastal Louisiana. Field measurements recorded the dramatic biomass decrease from 2010 to 2011 and a biomass recovery in 2012 dominated by a decrease of live biomass, and the loss of marsh as part of the dieback event. Based on an established relationship, the near-infrared/red vegetation index (VI) and site-specific measurements delineated a contiguous expanse of marsh dieback encompassing 6649.9 ha of 18,292.3 ha of S. alterniflora marshes within the study region. PolSAR data were transformed to variables used in biophysical mapping, and of this variable suite, the cross-polarization HV (horizontal send and vertical receive) backscatter was the best single indicator of marsh dieback and recovery. HV backscatter exhibited substantial and significant changes over the dieback and recovery period, tracked measured biomass changes, and significantly correlated with the live/dead biomass ratio. Within the context of regional trends, both HV and VI indicators started higher in pre-dieback marshes and exhibited substantially and statistically higher variability from year to year than that exhibited in the non-dieback marshes. That distinct difference allowed the capturing of the S. alterniflora marsh dieback and recovery; however, these changes were incorporated in a regional trend exhibiting similar but more subtle biomass composition changes.

  10. Power line characterization from an airborne data collection with a millimeter wave radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goshi, Darren S.; Bui, Long Q.

    2014-05-01

    Enhancing the operational safety of small, maneuverable rotorcraft has been a critical consideration in the development of next generation situational awareness sensor suites. From landing assistance to target detection and obstacle avoidance, millimeter wave radars have become the leading candidate for such solutions due to their ability to operate in degraded visual environments, whether it is weather, induced debris, or night conditions that must be dealt with. Power lines pose arguably the largest safety risk for helicopter operation due to their difficulty in detection and proper identification to support avoidance maneuvering, where even under perfect conditions they can be nearly invisible to the naked eye. The backscatter phenomenology from braided power lines has been well-studied and formulated in previous literature, albeit mainly in controlled laboratory settings or limited field trials. Subsequently, the ability to simply detect power lines at operational distances up to around 2 km has been demonstrated. In this work, an analysis is performed on the measureable characteristics of power lines captured in a representative operational environment for helicopters. The test location included a diverse set of power line configurations with surrounding ground and tower clutter, representing a realistic scenario. A radiometrically calibrated w-band real-beam FMCW sensor allows the study and estimation of target RCS, as well as evaluation against the developed theory. All analysis is performed on dynamically captured data from a helicopter, where platform dynamics and system stability also play a significant role in a processed result. Results from this work will aid the effective development of next generation situational awareness systems.

  11. Spectrometers for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Airborne Concepts and Ground Prototype Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Flynn, C.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J.

    2007-12-01

    A collaboration between NASA Ames Research Center and Battelle Pacific Northwest Division is exploring new instrument concepts that combine sky scanning and spectroscopy with the direct sun transmission measurement capabilities of previous instruments like the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometers (AATS). Additional technical goals are to reduce instrument size, weight, and power requirements while increasing autonomy, so as to permit operation on a wider range of aircraft, including unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The overall science goal for the new instruments is to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to climate using a variety of airborne measurement approaches including satellite validation. The sky scanning capability will enable retrievals of aerosol type (via complex refractive index and shape) and aerosol size distribution extending to larger sizes than attainable by direct-beam sunphotometry alone. The spectroscopic capability will improve measurements of gas constituents (e.g., H2O, O3, NO2, SO2) . Concepts explored to date for an airborne Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR-Air) include using fiber optics to link a spectrometer inside the aircraft to optical entrance ports in a relatively small tracking/scanning head outside the aircraft. 4STAR feasibility depends on overcoming three technological hurdles: 1. Maintaining calibration to 1% stability over a period of months. 2. Demonstrating stray light rejection to permit measuring skylight within a few degrees of the sun. 3. Devising a fiber optic coupling that maintains 1% calibration stability with as many as possible of the following desirable characteristics: detachable during assembly before calibration; detachable between calibration and scientific measurements; rotatable during measurements. To investigate ways to overcome these hurdles we have developed a ground-based prototype, 4STAR-Ground. To date 4STAR-Ground has been

  12. Airborne synthetic aperture radar observations of “spiral eddy” slick patterns in the Southern California Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmorino, George O.; Holt, Benjamin; Molemaker, M. Jeroen; Digiacomo, Paul M.; Sletten, Mark A.

    2010-05-01

    Repeat sampling on hourly time scales using an airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is used to investigate the occurrence and evolving characteristics of spiral-shaped slick patterns, commonly presumed to be indicators of submesoscale ocean eddies, in the area around Santa Catalina Island, California (˜33.4°N, 118.4°W). Simultaneous SAR imagery and boat survey data are examined over two ˜5 h long periods spaced 3 days apart in April 2003. The SAR imagery reveals several spiral-like patterns, roughly 5 km in diameter, occurring downstream of the western end of Catalina. We believe that the most likely formation mechanism for these patterns is current-wake instability related to the flow of the Southern California Countercurrent along the north shore of Catalina. In one case, there is an observed cold-core eddy and vortex sheet attached to the tip of the island, similar to island-wake simulations done by Dong and McWilliams (2007). In another case, the SAR imagery shows a series of slick patterns that, at least initially, resemble spiral eddies, but the data show no clear evidence of actual ocean eddies being present either at depth or through a rotating surface expression. A speculation is that such features signify island-wake eddies that are relatively weak and dissipate quickly. An unexpected finding was how quickly a spiral slick pattern could deteriorate, suggesting a time scale for the surface feature of the order of only several hours. An implication of this result is that care is needed when interpreting a single satellite SAR imagery for evidence of active submesoscale eddies. Recommendations are made for future field studies.

  13. Planar near-field scanning for compact range bistatic radar cross-section measurement. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuhela-Reuning, S. R.; Walton, E. K.

    1991-01-01

    The design, construction, and testing of a low cost, planar scanning system to be used in a compact range environment for bistatic radar cross-section (bistatic RCS) measurement data are discussed. This scanning system is similar to structures used for measuring near-field antenna patterns. A synthetic aperture technique is used for plane wave reception. System testing entailed comparison of measured and theoretical bistatic RCS of a sphere and a right circular cylinder. Bistatic scattering analysis of the ogival target support, target and pedestal interactions, and compact range room was necessary to determine measurement validity.

  14. Recovery giant subglacial lakes: new assessments using IceGRAV airborne radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, K.; Forsberg, R.; Ferraccioli, F.; Jordan, T. A.; Kohler, J.; Corr, H. F. J.; Olesen, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    Recovery Glacier penetrates deep into the interior of East Antarctica. The subglacial hydraulic system beneath this glacier includes active lakes aligned along the glacier trunk and four giant lakes near the onset of the fast flow. The characteristics of this subglacial system and its impacts on ice flow are therefore central questions for the dynamics of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. The existence of these lakes is hypothesized to explain satellite-measured ice-surface motion and smoothness. However, direct evidence of the existence of the giant Recovery lakes has until recently been limited to ground-based radar measurements during IPY, showing that the lakes A and B were not distinct lakes at the time of the measurement (January, 2009) and may have drained recently. In order to fill the significant data gap over the Recovery catchment identified by the BEDMAP2 project, over 29,000 line km of new radio-echo sounding, laser altimetry, gravity and magnetic data were acquired using a British Antarctic Survey Twin Otter during the IceGRAV 2012-13 field season. Here, we present a subset of this Recovery Frontier dataset in the vicinity of the giant Recovery lakes A and B to assess their current conditions. Bed reflectivity derived for a range of englacial attenuation rates indicates that the lake surface has larger reflectivity than the adjacent grounded areas, by more than 10 dB. Bed reflectivity varies little over short distances (< 1 km), both around the lakes and adjacent areas. Hydraulic potential varies little over the lakes as well as their downstream sides but increases in the upstream directions. These recent characteristics are clearly distinct from the previous ground-based measurements taken in 2009. We hypothesize that these differences indicate that lakes A and B may be filling. The existence of a major active hydrological system in the interior of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet could influence ice streaming also further downstream, where smaller

  15. Quantitative investigations of geologic surfaces utilizing airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) and polarimetric radar (AIRSAR) data for Death Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierein-Young, Kathryn S.; Kruse, Fred A.

    1991-01-01

    Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and polarimetric radar (AIRSAR) data were collected over Death Valley, California, USA, in September 1989. These two data sets were used to quantitatively characterize both the mineralogy and surface structure of the valley floor. Field mapping and characterization of the salt flats across the valley identified 16 separate units. The AVIRIS data were calibrated using the 'empirical line' method, and spectra extracted for the 16 units. A water vapor map was generated from the AVIRIS data and showed spatial variations in its distribution due to evaporation of surface water. Unmixing of the 16 spectral units produced maps of endmember abundance.

  16. Report on the comparison of the scan strategies employed by the Patrick Air Force Base WSR-74C/McGill radar and the NWS Melbourne WSR-88D radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Gregory; Evans, Randolph; Manobianco, John; Schumann, Robin; Wheeler, Mark; Yersavich, Ann

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to determine whether the current standard WSR-88D radar (NEXRAD) scan strategies permit the use of the Melbourne WSR-88D to perform the essential functions now performed by the Patrick Air Force Base (PAFB) WSR-74C/McGill radar for evaluating shuttle weather flight rules (FR) and launch commit criteria (LCC). To meet this objective, the investigation compared the beam coverage patterns of the WSR-74C/McGill radar located at PAFB and the WSR-88D radar located at the Melbourne National Weather Service (NWS) Office over the area of concern for weather FR and LCC evaluations. The analysis focused on beam coverage within four vertical 74 km radius cylinders (1 to 4 km above ground level (AGL), 4 to 8 km AGL, 8 to 12 km AGL, and 1 to 12 km AGL) centered on Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex 39A. The PAFB WSR-74C/McGill radar is approximately 17 km north-northeast of the Melbourne WSR-88D radar. The beam coverage of the WSR-88D using VCP 11 located at the Melbourne NWS Office is comparable (difference in percent of the atmosphere sampled between the two radars is 10 percent or less) within the area of concern to the beam coverage of the WSR-74C/McGill radar located at PAFB. Both radars provide good beam coverage over much of the atmospheric region of concern. In addition, both radars provide poor beam coverage (coverage less than 50 percent) over limited regions near the radars due to the radars' cone of silence and gaps in coverage within the higher elevation scans. Based on scan strategy alone, the WSR-88D radar could be used to perform the essential functions now performed by the PAFB WSR-74C/McGill radar for evaluating shuttle weather FR and LCC. Other radar characteristics may, however, affect the decision as to which radar to use in a given case.

  17. Mapping tree health using airborne full-waveform laser scans and hyperspectral imagery: a case study for floodplain eucalypt forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shendryk, I.; Tulbure, M. G.; Broich, M.

    2014-12-01

    Barmah-Millewa Forest (BMF), the largest River Red Gum forest in the world, located in south-eastern Australia is suffering from severe dieback, thus diminishing its ecological and economical value. Previous research showed that dieback is a good predictor of the forest health and stressed the need for BMF health mapping and change monitoring. In this respect, airborne laser scanning and hyperspectral imaging offer extensive spatial and spectral coverage of measurements and represent an ideal tool for forest health mapping at individual tree scale. The aim of this project is to quantify the health of individual, structurally complex floodplain eucalypt trees by integrating airborne hyperspectral imagery, full-waveform laser scans and field measurements. An aerial survey, conducted in May 2014, was designed to provide a representative sample of BMF tree health. The positioning of 17 flight lines aimed to capture the heterogeneity of the forest health and flood frequency. Preliminary analysis of the aerial remote sensing data with regards to chlorophyll concentrations, dieback levels and canopy densities allowed us to target our field campaign (conducted in June 2014). Field measurements included accurate position measurements, LAI, visual assessment, spectral measurement and mensuration of individual trees in 30 m2 plots. For detection of individual tree trunks from airborne laser scans we used a novel approach based on Euclidean distance clustering, taking advantage of the intensity and pulse width difference between woody and leaf tree compartments. The detected trunks were used to seed a minimum cut algorithm for tree crown delineation. In situ measurements confirmed the high structural diversity of the forest and allowed the calibration of the tree detection algorithm. An overall accuracy of the tree detection of 54% and 67% was achieved for trees with circumference over 40 cm and over 100 cm respectively. As a further step, 3D point clusters representing

  18. UAVSAR Active Electronically Scanned Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory, A.; Chamberlain, Neil F.; Zawadzki, Mark S.; Brown, Kyle M.; Fisher, Charles D.; Figueroa, Harry S.; Hamilton, Gary A.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Vorperian, Vatche; Grando, Maurio B.

    2011-01-01

    The Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is a pod-based, L-band (1.26 GHz), repeatpass, interferometric, synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) used for Earth science applications. Repeat-pass interferometric radar measurements from an airborne platform require an antenna that can be steered to maintain the same angle with respect to the flight track over a wide range of aircraft yaw angles. In order to be able to collect repeat-pass InSAR data over a wide range of wind conditions, UAVSAR employs an active electronically scanned array (AESA). During data collection, the UAVSAR flight software continuously reads the aircraft attitude state measured by the Embedded GPS/INS system (EGI) and electronically steers the beam so that it remains perpendicular to the flight track throughout the data collection

  19. Airborne laser scanning for forest health status assessment and radiative transfer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, Jan; Zemek, Frantisek; Pikl, Miroslav; Janoutova, Ruzena

    2013-04-01

    Structural parameters of forest stands/ecosystems are an important complementary source of information to spectral signatures obtained from airborne imaging spectroscopy when quantitative assessment of forest stands are in the focus, such as estimation of forest biomass, biochemical properties (e.g. chlorophyll /water content), etc. The parameterization of radiative transfer (RT) models used in latter case requires three-dimensional spatial distribution of green foliage and woody biomass. Airborne LiDAR data acquired over forest sites bears these kinds of 3D information. The main objective of the study was to compare the results from several approaches to interpolation of digital elevation model (DEM) and digital surface model (DSM). We worked with airborne LiDAR data with different density (TopEye Mk II 1,064nm instrument, 1-5 points/m2) acquired over the Norway spruce forests situated in the Beskydy Mountains, the Czech Republic. Three different interpolation algorithms with increasing complexity were tested: i/Nearest neighbour approach implemented in the BCAL software package (Idaho Univ.); ii/Averaging and linear interpolation techniques used in the OPALS software (Vienna Univ. of Technology); iii/Active contour technique implemented in the TreeVis software (Univ. of Freiburg). We defined two spatial resolutions for the resulting coupled raster DEMs and DSMs outputs: 0.4 m and 1 m, calculated by each algorithm. The grids correspond to the same spatial resolutions of hyperspectral imagery data for which the DEMs were used in a/geometrical correction and b/building a complex tree models for radiative transfer modelling. We applied two types of analyses when comparing between results from the different interpolations/raster resolution: 1/calculated DEM or DSM between themselves; 2/comparison with field data: DEM with measurements from referential GPS, DSM - field tree alometric measurements, where tree height was calculated as DSM-DEM. The results of the analyses

  20. development of a medium repetition rate (10 Hz - 500 Hz) diode pumped laser transmitter for airborne scanning altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, D. Barry; Lindauer, Steven J., II; Kay, Richard B.

    1998-01-01

    Since the late 1980's, NASA has developed several small, all-solid state lasers of low repetition rates for use as transmitters in prototype LIDAR and raster scanned altimetry retrieval systems. Our early laser transmitters were developed for high resolution airborne altimetry which employed cavity dumping techniques to produce a pulse shape with a 1 ns rise time. The first such laser was the SUMR (Sub-millimeter resolution) transmitter which used a side pumped, D-shaped half-rod of Nd:YAG for the oscillator active media and produced approximately 3 ns pulses of 100 micro-J energy at a 40 Hz repetition rate. (Coyle and Blair, 1993; Coyle et al., 1995) After several upgrades to improve rep rate and pulse energy, the final version produced 1.2 mJ pulses at 120 Hz with a 3.7 ns pulse width. The laser has become known as SPLT (Sharp Pulsed Laser Transmitter), and has flown successfully on a variety of airborne altimetry missions. (Coyle and Blair, 1995; Blair et al., 1994) From building these systems, we have accrued valuable experience in delivering field-deployable lasers and have become aware of the advantages and disadvantages of employing new technologies. For example, even though the laser's main operating environment is in a "cold" aircraft during flight, the laser must still operate in very warm temperatures. This is important if the mission is based in the desert or a tropical climate since ground calibration data from stationary targets must be gathered before and after each data flight. Because conductive cooling is much more convenient than closed loop water flow, achieving the highest possible laser efficiency is becoming a high priority when designing a flight laser. This is especially true for lasers with higher pulse energies and repetition rates which are needed for high altitude scanning altimeters and LIDARs.

  1. Firn and percolation conditions in the vicinity of recently formed high elevation supra-glacial lakes on the Greenland Ice Sheet assessed by airborne radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Peña, S.; Howat, I. M.; Chen, C.; Price, S. F.

    2014-12-01

    The western region of the Greenland Ice Sheet around and above the equilibrium line is characterized by relatively high accumulation rates with short-lasting melt events of variable intensity during the summer months. During melt season, supra-glacial lakes are formed at least temporarily in depressions found in the topography of the ice. These ponds can form and drain rapidly, affecting the dynamics of the ice below. Recent warming trends have gradually increased the amount of meltwater found every summer over the ice sheet, with melt regimes migrating to higher altitudes. Consequentially, supra-glacial lakes are being found at higher elevations, yet it is unclear what mechanisms control their formation over firn. We used data from different radar systems acquired by Operation Icebridge around and over lakes formed above the equilibrium line of the Greenland Ice Sheet to study internal features of identified frozen/drained supra-glacial lakes, and to investigate near-surface snow and firn conditions in the vicinity of the ponds by radar-mapping internal snowpack structure. Airborne radar and additional field observations revealed extensive and impermeable ice layers 20-70 cm thick formed at elevations between 1500 m and 2200 m. Buried by winter accumulation, these ice layers prevent further meltwater to percolate deeper during melt season, limiting firn capacity to absorb meltwater and causing near-surface snowpack saturation, thus facilitating the transport of meltwater to newly-formed basins above the equilibrium line. Ice penetrating capabilities from the different radar systems allow the survey of different firn layers and internal features created by refrozen meltwater. IceBridge data is acquired in early spring, when no liquid water content is found over this region ensuring adequate radar response.

  2. Partly cloudy with a chance of migration: Weather, radars, and aeroecology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chilson, Phillip B.; Frick, Winifred F.; Kelly, Jeffrey F.; Howard, Kenneth W.; Larkin, Ronald P.; Diehl, Robert H.; Westbrook, John K.; Kelly, T. Adam; Kunz, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    Aeroecology is an emerging scientific discipline that integrates atmospheric science, Earth science, geography, ecology, computer science, computational biology, and engineering to further the understanding of biological patterns and processes. The unifying concept underlying this new transdisciplinary field of study is a focus on the planetary boundary layer and lower free atmosphere (i.e., the aerosphere), and the diversity of airborne organisms that inhabit and depend on the aerosphere for their existence. Here, we focus on the role of radars and radar networks in aeroecological studies. Radar systems scanning the atmosphere are primarily used to monitor weather conditions and track the location and movements of aircraft. However, radar echoes regularly contain signals from other sources, such as airborne birds, bats, and arthropods. We briefly discuss how radar observations can be and have been used to study a variety of airborne organisms and examine some of the many potential benefits likely to arise from radar aeroecology for meteorological and biological research over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Radar systems are becoming increasingly sophisticated with the advent of innovative signal processing and dual-polarimetric capabilities. These capabilities should be better harnessed to promote both meteorological and aeroecological research and to explore the interface between these two broad disciplines. We strongly encourage close collaboration among meteorologists, radar scientists, biologists, and others toward developing radar products that will contribute to a better understanding of airborne fauna.

  3. Fly eye radar or micro-radar sensor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanov, Pavlo; Asmolova, Olga

    2014-05-01

    To compensate for its eye's inability to point its eye at a target, the fly's eye consists of multiple angularly spaced sensors giving the fly the wide-area visual coverage it needs to detect and avoid the threats around him. Based on a similar concept a revolutionary new micro-radar sensor technology is proposed for detecting and tracking ground and/or airborne low profile low altitude targets in harsh urban environments. Distributed along a border or around a protected object (military facility and buildings, camp, stadium) small size, low power unattended radar sensors can be used for target detection and tracking, threat warning, pre-shot sniper protection and provides effective support for homeland security. In addition it can provide 3D recognition and targets classification due to its use of five orders more pulses than any scanning radar to each space point, by using few points of view, diversity signals and intelligent processing. The application of an array of directional antennas eliminates the need for a mechanical scanning antenna or phase processor. It radically decreases radar size and increases bearing accuracy several folds. The proposed micro-radar sensors can be easy connected to one or several operators by point-to-point invisible protected communication. The directional antennas have higher gain, can be multi-frequency and connected to a multi-functional network. Fly eye micro-radars are inexpensive, can be expendable and will reduce cost of defense.

  4. Airborne Radar Systems (AFSC 1A5X3, formerly AFSC 118X2) and the Airborne Warning and Control Radar (AFSC 2A1X4, formerly AFSC 455X4)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    or coaxial cables 68 G179 Inspect card slots 68 L418 Interpret on-line RCMP display messages 66 L428 Operate magnetic tape transport (MIT) radar...control 93 M473 Connect or disconnect SF-6 ground service carts 93 L428 Operate magnetic tape transport (M’T) radar programs, including 93 surveillance...ISLS) switches 60 A4 TABLE A5 FIELD TRAINING DETACHMENT JOB (STG20) PERCENT MEMBERS PERFORMING TASKS (N=5) L450 Recycle radar programs 100 L428

  5. Detection of harvested trees in forests from repeated high density airborne laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzyk, P. J.; Lindenbergh, R. C.

    2014-05-01

    Identification of harvested and fallen trees is a prerequisite for the detection and measurement of changes in forests. This paper presents a three step approach to monitor harvested and fallen trees based on direct comparison of repeated high density airborne LIDAR data. In a first step differences between data sets are obtained from a point to point comparison, such that the data can be reduced to the deviating points only. Secondly, the resulting points are clustered into spatially connected regions using region growing. Finally, individual trees are extracted from the clusters by analysing their relative proximity and by analysing geometric properties of points in the clusters. Two data sets, acquired at a four year interval and covering a forest with mainly deciduous trees, are compared. First results show that most points relating to a change can be extracted and that clustering of these with region growing enables us to efficiently separate harvested and fallen trees from the remaining trees. Grouped harvested trees could not be separated using the region growing approach due to touching crowns. Segmentation of these using spectral clustering however identified individual regions well, but the results depend mainly on the pre-defined number of clusters. Crowns of grouped trees can be therefore separated if the number of trees is known.

  6. Estimation of regeneration coverage in a temperate forest by 3D segmentation using airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Nina; Yao, Wei; Heurich, Marco; Krzystek, Peter; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    2016-10-01

    Forest understory and regeneration are important factors in sustainable forest management. However, understanding their spatial distribution in multilayered forests requires accurate and continuously updated field data, which are difficult and time-consuming to obtain. Therefore, cost-efficient inventory methods are required, and airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a promising tool for obtaining such information. In this study, we examine a clustering-based 3D segmentation in combination with ALS data for regeneration coverage estimation in a multilayered temperate forest. The core of our method is a two-tiered segmentation of the 3D point clouds into segments associated with regeneration trees. First, small parts of trees (super-voxels) are constructed through mean shift clustering, a nonparametric procedure for finding the local maxima of a density function. In the second step, we form a graph based on the mean shift clusters and merge them into larger segments using the normalized cut algorithm. These segments are used to obtain regeneration coverage of the target plot. Results show that, based on validation data from field inventory and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), our approach correctly estimates up to 70% of regeneration coverage across the plots with different properties, such as tree height and tree species. The proposed method is negatively impacted by the density of the overstory because of decreasing ground point density. In addition, the estimated coverage has a strong relationship with the overstory tree species composition.

  7. Estimation of cloud fraction profile in shallow convection using a scanning cloud radar: Cloud Fraction of Shallow Cumuli

    SciTech Connect

    Oue, Mariko; Kollias, Pavlos; North, Kirk W.; Tatarevic, Aleksandra; Endo, Satoshi; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Gustafson, William I.

    2016-10-18

    Large spatial inhomogeneity in shallow convection raises uncertainties in estimation of the domain-averaged cloud fraction profile (CFP). Here, numerical model simulations of shallow convection over land, coupled with a sophisticated radar simulator, are used to address this issue, and an objective method for estimating domain-averaged CFP is proposed. The analysis clearly indicates that profiling observations are inadequate to provide reliable CFP estimates. The use of Scanning Cloud Radar (SCR) performing a sequence of cross-wind horizon-to-horizon scans is not straightforward due to the strong dependency of its sensitivity with range. The retrieved CFP by a novel methodology that uses the observed statistics of SCR hydrometeor detections with height to estimate optimum ranges shows very good agreement with the model CFP. On average of CFP estimates more than 40 min of SCR observations are required to converge on the model domain average. The proposed technique is expected to improve our ability to compare model and observations in broken cloud conditions.

  8. A simulation analysis of space-based and airborne moving platform radars in look-down clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repak, P. L.

    1983-05-01

    A simulation technique has been developed to provide the radar engineer with a tool for comparative examination of radar systems and target detection in the presence of look-down clutter. Using a plotting interface such as the Dedicated User Interface System (DUIS), an engineer can evaluate proposed radar designs against one another for target detection performance in a precise graphical format. The user is able to select an antenna function from either measured data or derived data under the existing Parametric Antenna Analysis Software (PAAS). The antenna platform may be at any designated altitude and velocity with respect to ground clutter scatterers. Entry of an exoatmospheric altitude automatically computes the proper circular satellite orbit velocity and introduces Earth rotation. Target radar echoes at specified ground locations are compared to clutter echoes in the sidelobes as well as the radar mainbeam. Analysis of output date serves as a measure of moving target minimum detectable velocity (MDV) for the total radar system. Written for analysts with some technical Doppler radar and clutter understanding this report leads the engineer through the theory and equations which develop the simulation computer program. Example cases and analyses are given to show program utility and output results.

  9. A comprehensive uncertainty analysis and method of geometric calibration for a circular scanning airborne lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsalves, Michael Oliver

    This dissertation describes an automated technique for ascertaining the values of the geometric calibration parameters of an airborne lidar. A least squares approach is employed that adjusts the point cloud to a single planar surface which could be either a narrow airport runway or a dynamic sea surface. Going beyond the customary three boresight angles, the proposed adjustment can determine up to eleven calibration parameters to a precision that renders a negligible contribution to the point cloud's positional uncertainty. Presently under development is the Coastal Zone Mapping and Imaging Lidar (CZMIL), which, unlike most contemporary systems that use oscillating mirrors to reflect the beam, will use a circular spinning prism to refract the laser in the desired direction. This departure from the traditional scanner presents the potential for internal geometric misalignments not previously experienced. Rather than relying on past calibration practices (like requiring data be acquired over a pitched-roof), a more robust method of calibration is established which does not depend on the presence of any cultural features. To develop this new method of calibration, the laser point positioning equation for this lidar was developed first. The system was then simulated in the MATLAB environment. Using these artificial datasets, the behavior of each geometric parameter iii was systematically manipulated, understood and calibrated, while an optimal flight strategy for the calibration acquisition was simultaneously developed. Finally, the total propagated uncertainty (TPU) of the point cloud was determined using a propagation of variances. Using this TPU module, the strength of the calibration solution was assessed. For example, four flight lines each of 20 seconds in duration contained sufficient information to determine the calibration parameters to such a degree of confidence that their contribution to the final point cloud uncertainty was only 0.012m in the horizontal

  10. Comparison of field and airborne laser scanning based crown cover estimates across land cover types in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiskanen, J.; Korhonen, L.; Hietanen, J.; Heikinheimo, V.; Schafer, E.; Pellikka, P. K. E.

    2015-04-01

    Tree crown cover (CC) provides means for the continuous land cover characterization of complex tropical landscapes with multiple land uses and variable degrees of degradation. It is also a key parameter in the international forest definitions that are basis for monitoring global forest cover changes. Recently, airborne laser scanning (ALS) has emerged as a practical method for accurate CC mapping, but ALS derived CC estimates have rarely been assessed with field data in the tropics. Here, our objective was to compare the various field and ALS based CC estimates across multiple land cover types in the Taita Hills, Kenya. The field data was measured from a total of 178 sample plots (0.1 ha) in 2013 and 2014. The most accurate field measurement method, line intersect sampling using Cajanus tube, was used in 37 plots. Other methods included CC estimate based on the tree inventory data (144 plots), crown relascope (43 plots) and hemispherical photography (30 plots). Three ALS data sets, including two scanners and flying heights, were acquired concurrently with the field data collection. According to the results, the first echo cover index (FCI) from ALS data had good agreement with the most accurate field based CC estimates (RMSD 7.1% and 2.7% depending on the area and scan). The agreement with other field based methods was considerably worse. Furthermore, we observed that ALS cover indices were robust between the different scans in the overlapping area. In conclusion, our results suggest that ALS provides a reliable method for continuous CC mapping across tropical land cover types although dense shrub layer and tree-like herbaceous plants can cause overestimation of CC.

  11. Kinematic and Hydrometer Data Products from Scanning Radars during MC3E

    DOE Data Explorer

    matthews, Alyssa; Dolan, Brenda; Rutledge, Steven

    2016-02-29

    Recently the Radar Meteorology Group at Colorado State University has completed major case studies of some top cases from MC3E including 25 April, 20 May and 23 May 2011. A discussion on the analysis methods as well as radar quality control methods is included. For each case, a brief overview is first provided. Then, multiple Doppler (using available X-SAPR and C-SAPR data) analyses are presented including statistics on vertical air motions, sub-divided by convective and stratiform precipitation. Mean profiles and CFAD's of vertical motion are included to facilitate comparison with ASR model simulations. Retrieved vertical motion has also been verified with vertically pointing profiler data. Finally for each case, hydrometeor types are included derived from polarimetric radar observations. The latter can be used to provide comparisons to model-generated hydrometeor fields. Instructions for accessing all the data fields are also included. The web page can be found at: http://radarmet.atmos.colostate.edu/mc3e/research/

  12. Antarctica X-band MiniSAR crevasse detection radar : final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, Grant J.; Bickel, Douglas Lloyd

    2007-09-01

    This document is the final report for the Antarctica Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Project. The project involved the modification of a Sandia National Laboratories MiniSAR system to operate at X-band in order to assess the feasibility of an airborne radar to detect crevasses in Antarctica. This radar successfully detected known crevasses at various geometries. The best results were obtained for synthetic aperture radar resolutions of at most one foot and finer. In addition to the main goal of detecting crevasses, the radar was used to assess conops for a future operational radar. The radar scanned large areas to identify potential safe landing zones. In addition, the radar was used to investigate looking at objects on the surface and below the surface of the ice. This document includes discussion of the hardware development, system capabilities, and results from data collections in Antarctica.

  13. A comparison of airborne GEMS/SAR with satellite-borne Seasat/SAR radar imagery - The value of archived multiple data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Bradford C.; Dellwig, Louis F.

    1988-01-01

    In a study concerning the value of using radar imagery from systems with diverse parameters, X-band images of the Northern Louisiana Salt dome area generated by the airborne Goodyear electronic mapping system (GEMS) are analyzed in conjunction with imagery generated by the satelliteborne Seasat/SAR. The GEMS operated with an incidence angle of 75 to 85 deg and a resolution of 12 m, whereas the Seasat/SAR operated with an incidence angle of 23 deg and a resolution of 25 m. It is found that otherwise unattainable data on land management activities, improved delineation of the drainage net, better definition of surface roughness in cleared areas, and swamp identification, became accessible when adjustments for the time lapse between the two missions were made and supporting ground data concerning the physical and vegetative characteristics of the terrain were acquired.

  14. Fusing enhanced radar precipitation, in-situ hydrometeorological measurements and airborne LIDAR snowpack estimates in a hyper-resolution hydrologic model to improve seasonal water supply forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gochis, D. J.; Busto, J.; Howard, K.; Mickey, J.; Deems, J. S.; Painter, T. H.; Richardson, M.; Dugger, A. L.; Karsten, L. R.; Tang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Scarcity of spatially- and temporally-continuous observations of precipitation and snowpack conditions in remote mountain watersheds results in fundamental limitations in water supply forecasting. These limitationsin observational capabilities can result in strong biases in total snowmelt-driven runoff amount, the elevational distribution of runoff, river basin tributary contributions to total basin runoff and, equally important for water management, the timing of runoff. The Upper Rio Grande River basin in Colorado and New Mexico is one basin where observational deficiencies are hypothesized to have significant adverse impacts on estimates of snowpack melt-out rates and on water supply forecasts. We present findings from a coordinated observational-modeling study within Upper Rio Grande River basin whose aim was to quanitfy the impact enhanced precipitation, meteorological and snowpack measurements on the simulation and prediction of snowmelt driven streamflow. The Rio Grande SNOwpack and streamFLOW (RIO-SNO-FLOW) Prediction Project conducted enhanced observing activities during the 2014-2015 water year. Measurements from a gap-filling, polarimetric radar (NOXP) and in-situ meteorological and snowpack measurement stations were assimilated into the WRF-Hydro modeling framework to provide continuous analyses of snowpack and streamflow conditions. Airborne lidar estimates of snowpack conditions from the NASA Airborne Snow Observatory during mid-April and mid-May were used as additional independent validations against the various model simulations and forecasts of snowpack conditions during the melt-out season. Uncalibrated WRF-Hydro model performance from simulations and forecasts driven by enhanced observational analyses were compared against results driven by currently operational data inputs. Precipitation estimates from the NOXP research radar validate significantly better against independent in situ observations of precipitation and snow-pack increases

  15. Using object-based analysis to derive surface complexity information for improved filtering of airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Menglong; Blaschke, Thomas; Tang, Hongzhao; Xiao, Chenchao; Sun, Xian; Zhang, Daobing; Fu, Kun

    2017-03-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a technique used to obtain Digital Surface Models (DSM) and Digital Terrain Models (DTM) efficiently, and filtering is the key procedure used to derive DTM from point clouds. Generating seed points is an initial step for most filtering algorithms, whereas existing algorithms usually define a regular window size to generate seed points. This may lead to an inadequate density of seed points, and further introduce error type I, especially in steep terrain and forested areas. In this study, we propose the use of objectbased analysis to derive surface complexity information from ALS datasets, which can then be used to improve seed point generation.We assume that an area is complex if it is composed of many small objects, with no buildings within the area. Using these assumptions, we propose and implement a new segmentation algorithm based on a grid index, which we call the Edge and Slope Restricted Region Growing (ESRGG) algorithm. Surface complexity information is obtained by statistical analysis of the number of objects derived by segmentation in each area. Then, for complex areas, a smaller window size is defined to generate seed points. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm could greatly improve the filtering results in complex areas, especially in steep terrain and forested areas.

  16. Stochastic gradient boosting classification trees for forest fuel types mapping through airborne laser scanning and IRS LISS-III imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirici, G.; Scotti, R.; Montaghi, A.; Barbati, A.; Cartisano, R.; Lopez, G.; Marchetti, M.; McRoberts, R. E.; Olsson, H.; Corona, P.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents an application of Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) data in conjunction with an IRS LISS-III image for mapping forest fuel types. For two study areas of 165 km2 and 487 km2 in Sicily (Italy), 16,761 plots of size 30-m × 30-m were distributed using a tessellation-based stratified sampling scheme. ALS metrics and spectral signatures from IRS extracted for each plot were used as predictors to classify forest fuel types observed and identified by photointerpretation and fieldwork. Following use of traditional parametric methods that produced unsatisfactory results, three non-parametric classification approaches were tested: (i) classification and regression tree (CART), (ii) the CART bagging method called Random Forests, and (iii) the CART bagging/boosting stochastic gradient boosting (SGB) approach. This contribution summarizes previous experiences using ALS data for estimating forest variables useful for fire management in general and for fuel type mapping, in particular. It summarizes characteristics of classification and regression trees, presents the pre-processing operation, the classification algorithms, and the achieved results. The results demonstrated superiority of the SGB method with overall accuracy of 84%. The most relevant ALS metric was canopy cover, defined as the percent of non-ground returns. Other relevant metrics included the spectral information from IRS and several other ALS metrics such as percentiles of the height distribution, the mean height of all returns, and the number of returns.

  17. The use of airborne laser scanning to develop a pixel-based stratification for a verified carbon offset project

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The voluntary carbon market is a new and growing market that is increasingly important to consider in managing forestland. Monitoring, reporting, and verifying carbon stocks and fluxes at a project level is the single largest direct cost of a forest carbon offset project. There are now many methods for estimating forest stocks with high accuracy that use both Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) and high-resolution optical remote sensing data. However, many of these methods are not appropriate for use under existing carbon offset standards and most have not been field tested. Results This paper presents a pixel-based forest stratification method that uses both ALS and optical remote sensing data to optimally partition the variability across an ~10,000 ha forest ownership in Mendocino County, CA, USA. This new stratification approach improved the accuracy of the forest inventory, reduced the cost of field-based inventory, and provides a powerful tool for future management planning. This approach also details a method of determining the optimum pixel size to best partition a forest. Conclusions The use of ALS and optical remote sensing data can help reduce the cost of field inventory and can help to locate areas that need the most intensive inventory effort. This pixel-based stratification method may provide a cost-effective approach to reducing inventory costs over larger areas when the remote sensing data acquisition costs can be kept low on a per acre basis. PMID:22004847

  18. Evolution of a highly dilatant fault zone in the grabens of Canyonlands National Park, Utah/USA - integrating field work, ground penetrating radar and airborne imagery analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, M.; Grützner, C.; van Gent, H. W.; Urai, J. L.; Reicherter, K.; Mertens, J.

    2015-03-01

    The grabens of the Canyonlands National Park are a young and active system of sub-parallel, arcuate grabens, whose evolution is the result of salt movement in the subsurface and a slight regional tilt of the faulted strata. We present results of ground penetrating radar surveys in combination with field observations and analysis of high resolution airborne imagery. GPR data show intense faulting of the Quaternary sediments at the flat graben floors, implying a more complex fault structure than visible at the surface. Direct measurements of heave and throw at several locations to infer fault dips at depth, combined with observations of primary joint surfaces in the upper 100 m suggest a model of the highly dilatant fault geometry in profile. Sinkholes observed in the field as well as in airborne imagery give insights in local massive dilatancy and show where water and sediments are transported underground. Based on correlations of paleosols observed in outcrops and GPR profiles, we argue that the grabens in Canyonlands National Park are either older than previously assumed, or that sedimentation rates were much higher in the Pleistocene.

  19. Evolution of a highly dilatant fault zone in the grabens of Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA - integrating fieldwork, ground-penetrating radar and airborne imagery analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, M.; Grützner, C.; van Gent, H. W.; Urai, J. L.; Reicherter, K.; Mertens, J.

    2015-07-01

    The grabens of Canyonlands National Park are a young and active system of sub-parallel, arcuate grabens, whose evolution is the result of salt movement in the subsurface and a slight regional tilt of the faulted strata. We present results of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys in combination with field observations and analysis of high-resolution airborne imagery. GPR data show intense faulting of the Quaternary sediments at the flat graben floors, implying a more complex fault structure than visible at the surface. Direct measurements of heave and throw at several locations to infer fault dips at depth, combined with observations of primary joint surfaces in the upper 100 m, suggest a highly dilatant fault geometry. Sinkholes observed in the field as well as in airborne imagery give insights in local dilatancy and show where water and sediments are transported underground. Based on correlations of paleosols observed in outcrops and GPR profiles, we argue that either the grabens in Canyonlands National Park are older than previously assumed or that sedimentation rates were much higher in the Pleistocene.

  20. Identification-While-Scanning of a Multi-Aircraft Formation Based on Sparse Recovery for Narrowband Radar.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuan; Xu, Jia; Peng, Shi-Bao; Mao, Er-Ke; Long, Teng; Peng, Ying-Ning

    2016-11-23

    It is known that the identification performance of a multi-aircraft formation (MAF) of narrowband radar mainly depends on the time on target (TOT). To realize the identification task in one rotated scan with limited TOT, the paper proposes a novel identification-while-scanning (IWS) method based on sparse recovery to maintain high rotating speed and super-resolution for MAF identification, simultaneously. First, a multiple chirp signal model is established for MAF in a single scan, where different aircraft may have different Doppler centers and Doppler rates. Second, based on the sparsity of MAF in the Doppler parameter space, a novel hierarchical basis pursuit (HBP) method is proposed to obtain satisfactory sparse recovery performance as well as high computational efficiency. Furthermore, the parameter estimation performance of the proposed IWS identification method is analyzed with respect to recovery condition, signal-to-noise ratio and TOT. It is shown that an MAF can be effectively identified via HBP with a TOT of only about one hundred microseconds for IWS applications. Finally, some numerical experiment results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method based on both simulated and real measured data.

  1. Identification-While-Scanning of a Multi-Aircraft Formation Based on Sparse Recovery for Narrowband Radar

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan; Xu, Jia; Peng, Shi-Bao; Mao, Er-Ke; Long, Teng; Peng, Ying-Ning

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the identification performance of a multi-aircraft formation (MAF) of narrowband radar mainly depends on the time on target (TOT). To realize the identification task in one rotated scan with limited TOT, the paper proposes a novel identification-while-scanning (IWS) method based on sparse recovery to maintain high rotating speed and super-resolution for MAF identification, simultaneously. First, a multiple chirp signal model is established for MAF in a single scan, where different aircraft may have different Doppler centers and Doppler rates. Second, based on the sparsity of MAF in the Doppler parameter space, a novel hierarchical basis pursuit (HBP) method is proposed to obtain satisfactory sparse recovery performance as well as high computational efficiency. Furthermore, the parameter estimation performance of the proposed IWS identification method is analyzed with respect to recovery condition, signal-to-noise ratio and TOT. It is shown that an MAF can be effectively identified via HBP with a TOT of only about one hundred microseconds for IWS applications. Finally, some numerical experiment results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method based on both simulated and real measured data. PMID:27886055

  2. Estimating lava volume by precision combination of multiple baseline spaceborne and airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar: The 1997 eruption of Okmok Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Fielding, E.; Patrick, M.R.; Trautwein, C.M.

    2003-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques are used to calculate the volume of extrusion at Okmok volcano, Alaska by constructing precise digital elevation models (DEMs) that represent volcano topography before and after the 1997 eruption. The posteruption DEM is generated using airborne topographic synthetic aperture radar (TOPSAR) data where a three-dimensional affine transformation is used to account for the misalignments between different DEM patches. The preeruption DEM is produced using repeat-pass European Remote Sensing satellite data; multiple interferograms are combined to reduce errors due to atmospheric variations, and deformation rates are estimated independently and removed from the interferograms used for DEM generation. The extrusive flow volume associated with the 1997 eruption of Okmok volcano is 0.154 ?? 0.025 km3. The thickest portion is approximately 50 m, although field measurements of the flow margin's height do not exceed 20 m. The in situ measurements at lava edges are not representative of the total thickness, and precise DEM data are absolutely essential to calculate eruption volume based on lava thickness estimations. This study is an example that demonstrates how InSAR will play a significant role in studying volcanoes in remote areas.

  3. Lacustrine flow (divers, side scan sonar, hydrogeology, water penetrating radar) used to understand the location of a drowned person

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffell, Alastair

    2014-05-01

    An unusual application of hydrological understanding to a police search is described. The lacustrine search for a missing person provided reports of bottom-water currents in the lake and contradictory indications from cadaver dogs. A hydrological model of the area was developed using pre-existing information from side scan sonar, a desktop hydrogeological study and deployment of water penetrating radar (WPR). These provided a hydrological theory for the initial search involving subaqueous groundwater flow, focused on an area of bedrock surrounded by sediment, on the lake floor. The work shows the value a hydrological explanation has to a police search operation (equally to search and rescue). With hindsight, the desktop study should have preceded the search, allowing better understanding of water conditions. The ultimate reason for lacustrine flow in this location is still not proven, but the hydrological model explained the problems encountered in the initial search.

  4. Mapping tree health using airborne laser scans and hyperspectral imagery: a case study for a floodplain eucalypt forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shendryk, Iurii; Tulbure, Mirela; Broich, Mark; McGrath, Andrew; Alexandrov, Sergey; Keith, David

    2016-04-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) and hyperspectral imaging (HSI) are two complementary remote sensing technologies that provide comprehensive structural and spectral characteristics of forests over large areas. In this study we developed two algorithms: one for individual tree delineation utilizing ALS and the other utilizing ALS and HSI to characterize health of delineated trees in a structurally complex floodplain eucalypt forest. We conducted experiments in the largest eucalypt, river red gum forest in the world, located in the south-east of Australia that experienced severe dieback over the past six decades. For detection of individual trees from ALS we developed a novel bottom-up approach based on Euclidean distance clustering to detect tree trunks and random walks segmentation to further delineate tree crowns. Overall, our algorithm was able to detect 67% of tree trunks with diameter larger than 13 cm. We assessed the accuracy of tree delineations in terms of crown height and width, with correct delineation of 68% of tree crowns. The increase in ALS point density from ~12 to ~24 points/m2 resulted in tree trunk detection and crown delineation increase of 11% and 13%, respectively. Trees with incorrectly delineated crowns were generally attributed to areas with high tree density along water courses. The accurate delineation of trees allowed us to classify the health of this forest using machine learning and field-measured tree crown dieback and transparency ratios, which were good predictors of tree health in this forest. ALS and HSI derived indices were used as predictor variables to train and test object-oriented random forest classifier. Returned pulse width, intensity and density related ALS indices were the most important predictors in the tree health classifications. At the forest level in terms of tree crown dieback, 77% of trees were classified as healthy, 14% as declining and 9% as dying or dead with 81% mapping accuracy. Similarly, in terms of tree

  5. Microwave backscatter and emission observed from Shuttle Imaging Radar B and an airborne 1.4 GHz radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Schiue, J. C.; Schmugge, T. J.; Engman, E. T.; Mo, T.; Lawrence, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    A soil moisture experiment conducted with the Shuttle Imaging Radar B (SIR-B) is reported. SIR-B operated at 1.28 GHz provided the active microwave measurements, while a 4-beam pushbroom 1.4 GHz radiometer gave the complementary passive microwave measurements. The aircraft measurements were made at an altitude of 330 m, resulting in a ground resolution cell of about 100 m diameter. SIR-B ground resolution from 225 km was about 35 m. More than 150 agricultural fields in the San Joaquin Valley of California were examined in the experiment. The effect of surface roughness height on radar backscatter and radiometric measurements was studied.

  6. Integration of airborne altimetry and in situ radar measurements to estimate marine ice thickness beneath the Larsen C ice shelf, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, D.; Steffen, K.; Rodriguez Lagos, J.

    2010-12-01

    Observed atmospheric and oceanic warming is driving significant retreat and / or collapse of ice shelves along the Antarctic Peninsula totaling over 25,000 km2 in the past five decades. Basal melting of meteoric ice can occur near the grounding line of deep glacier inflows if the ocean water is above the pressure melting point. Buoyant meltwater will develop thermohaline circulation, rising beneath the ice shelf, where it may become supercooled and subsequently refreeze in ice draft minima. Marine ice, due to its warm and thus relatively viscous nature, is hypothesized to suture parallel flow bands, increasing ice shelf stability by arresting fracture propagation and controlling iceberg calving dimensions. Thus efforts to model ice shelf stability require accurate estimates of marine ice location and thickness. Ice thickness of a floating ice shelf can be determined in two manners: (1) from measurements of ice elevation above sea level and the calculation of ice thickness from assumptions of hydrostatic equilibrium, and (2) from radar echo measurements of the ice-water interface. Marine ice can confound the latter because its high dielectric constant and strong absorptive properties attenuate the radar energy, often preventing a return signal from the bottom of the ice shelf. These two methods are complementary for determining the marine ice component though because positive anomalies in (1) relative to (2) suggest regions of marine ice accretion. Nearly 350 km of ice penetrating radar (25 MHz) surveys were collected on the Larsen C ice shelf, in conjunction with kinematic GPS measurements and collocated with surface elevation data from the NASA Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) as part of the ICE Bridge mission in 2009. Basal ice topography and total ice thickness is accurately mapped along the survey lines and compared with calculated ice thickness from both the kinematic GPS and ATM elevation data. Positive anomalies are discussed in light of visible imagery and

  7. Final Report – Study of Shortwave Spectra in Fully 3D Environment. Synergy Between Scanning Radars and Spectral Radiation Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Jui-Yuan

    2015-09-14

    ARM set out 20 years ago to “close” the radiation problem, that is, to improve radiation models to the point where they could routinely predict the observed spectral radiation fluxes knowing the optical properties of the surface and of gases, clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere. Only then could such radiation models form a proper springboard for global climate model (GCM) parameterizations of spectral radiation. Sustained efforts have more or less achieved that goal with regard to longwave radiation; ASR models now routinely predict ARM spectral longwave radiances to 1–2%. Similar efforts in the shortwave have achieved far less; the successes are mainly for carefully selected 1D stratiform cloud cases. Such cases amount, even with the most optimistic interpretation, to no more than 30% of all cases at SGP. The problem has not been lack of effort but lack of appropriate instruments.The new ARM stimulus-funded instruments, with their new capabilities, will dramatically improve this situation and once again make progress possible on the shortwave problem. The new shortwave spectrometers will provide a reliable, calibrated record including the near infrared – and for other climatic regimes than SGP. The new scanning radars will provide the 3D cloud view, making it possible to tackle fully 3D situations. Thus, our main theme for the project is the understanding and closure of the surface spectral shortwave radiation problem in fully 3D cloud situations by combining the new ARM scanning radars and shortwave spectrometers with the arsenal of radiative transfer tools.

  8. The use of airborne radar reflectometry to characterize near-surface snow/firn stratigraphy on Devon Ice Cap, Canadian Arctic: A path to identifying refrozen melt layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutishauser, A.; Grima, C.; Sharp, M. J.; Blankenship, D. D.; Young, D. A.; Dowdeswell, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Under present warming conditions, summer surface melt has been observed to intensify and shift towards higher elevations in the accumulation zones of Canadian Arctic ice caps. Consequently, more meltwater percolates into the near surface snow and firn, and refreezes as ice layers. This process can lead to a significant increase in firn densification rates. Knowledge of spatiotemporal variations of the near-surface firn density, especially the distribution of ice layer formation is of great importance when assessing mass change estimates from repeat altimetry measurements. Here, we present an approach for characterizing the near-surface firn stratigraphy and determining the spatial distribution of refrozen melt layers on Devon Ice Cap, using the surface echo from airborne radio-echo sounding (RES) measurements. The RES surface echo is affected by the upper few meters of snow/firn/ice and thus contains information about the near-surface properties. More specifically, the radar surface return is a combination of a coherent (Pc) and a scattering signal component (Pn). Pc is related to the dielectric constant of the probed surface, whereas Pn is related to the near surface roughness. Hence, different near-surface snow/firn properties can be investigated by analyzing the signal components Pc and Pn and their spatial variability. The Radar Statistical Reconnaissance (RSR) methodology [1] allows the extraction of Pc and Pn from the surface radar return, which then can be used to compute near-surface roughness and firn density estimates. We apply the RSR method to RES data collected on Devon Ice Cap and determine Pc and Pn values. We then compare the results to ground based RES measurements and shallow firn cores (~11 m deep) collected along the airborne RES flight lines. This comparison shows that variations in the scattering coefficient Pn correlate to changes in the pattern of near-surface firn stratigraphy revealed by the ground based RES data and firn cores. Based on

  9. The use of airborne radar reflectometry to establish snow/firn density distribution on Devon Ice Cap, Canadian Arctic: A path to understanding complex heterogeneous internal layering patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutishauser, A.; Grima, C.; Sharp, M. J.; Blankenship, D. D.; Young, D. A.; Dowdeswell, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The internal layer stratigraphy of polar ice sheets revealed by airborne radio-echo sounding (RES) contains valuable information about past ice sheet mass balance and dynamics. Internal layers in the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets are considered to be isochrones and are continuous over several hundreds of kilometres. In contrast, internal layers in Canadian Arctic ice caps appear to be very heterogeneous and fragmentary, consisting of highly discontinuous layers that can be traced over only a few to several tens of kilometres. Internal layers most likely relate to former ice surfaces (the upper few meters of snow/firn), the properties which are directly influenced by atmospheric conditions including the air temperature, precipitation rate, and prevailing wind pattern. We hypothesize that the heterogeneous and complex nature of layers in the Canadian Arctic results from highly variable snow and firn conditions at the surface. Characterizing surface properties such as variations in the snow/firn density from dry to wet snow/firn, as well as high-density shallow ice layers and lenses of refrozen water can help to elucidate the complex internal layer pattern in the Canadian Arctic ice caps. Estimates of the snow/firn surface density and roughness can be derived from reflectance and scattering information using the surface radar returns from RES measurements. Here we present estimates of the surface snow/firn density distribution over Devon Ice Cap in the Canadian Arctic derived by the Radar Statistical Reconnaissance (RSR) methodology (Grima et al., 2014, Planetary & Space Sciences) using data collected by recent airborne radar sounding programs. The RSR generates estimates of the statistical distribution of surface echo amplitudes over defined areas along a survey transect. The derived distributions are best-fitted with a theoretical stochastic envelope, parameterized with the signal reflectance and scattering, in order to separate those two components. Finally

  10. NASA airborne radar wind shear detection algorithm and the detection of wet microbursts in the vicinity of Orlando, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Charles L.; Bracalente, Emedio M.

    1992-01-01

    The algorithms used in the NASA experimental wind shear radar system for detection, characterization, and determination of windshear hazard are discussed. The performance of the algorithms in the detection of wet microbursts near Orlando is presented. Various suggested algorithms that are currently being evaluated using the flight test results from Denver and Orlando are reviewed.

  11. Mapping Land Cover in the Taita Hills, se Kenya, Using Airborne Laser Scanning and Imaging Spectroscopy Data Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piiroinen, R.; Heiskanen, J.; Maeda, E.; Hurskainen, P.; Hietanen, J.; Pellikka, P.

    2015-04-01

    The Taita Hills, located in south-eastern Kenya, is one of the world's biodiversity hotspots. Despite the recognized ecological importance of this region, the landscape has been heavily fragmented due to hundreds of years of human activity. Most of the natural vegetation has been converted for agroforestry, croplands and exotic forest plantations, resulting in a very heterogeneous landscape. Given this complex agro-ecological context, characterizing land cover using traditional remote sensing methods is extremely challenging. The objective of this study was to map land cover in a selected area of the Taita Hills using data fusion of airborne laser scanning (ALS) and imaging spectroscopy (IS) data. Land Cover Classification System (LCCS) was used to derive land cover nomenclature, while the height and percentage cover classifiers were used to create objective definitions for the classes. Simultaneous ALS and IS data were acquired over a 10 km x 10 km area in February 2013 of which 1 km x 8 km test site was selected. The ALS data had mean pulse density of 9.6 pulses/m2, while the IS data had spatial resolution of 1 m and spectral resolution of 4.5-5 nm in the 400-1000 nm spectral range. Both IS and ALS data were geometrically co-registered and IS data processed to at-surface reflectance. While IS data is suitable for determining land cover types based on their spectral properties, the advantage of ALS data is the derivation of vegetation structural parameters, such as tree height and crown cover, which are crucial in the LCCS nomenclature. Geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA) was used for segmentation and classification at two scales. The benefits of GEOBIA and ALS/IS data fusion for characterizing heterogeneous landscape were assessed, and ALS and IS data were considered complementary. GEOBIA was found useful in implementing the LCCS based classification, which would be difficult to map using pixel-based methods.

  12. Airborne and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Activities at UNAVCO: From GeoEarthScope to INTERFACE and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D. A.; Jackson, M. E.; Meertens, C. M.; Miller, M. M.

    2009-05-01

    UNAVCO leads and supports airborne and terrestrial laser scanning (ALS and TLS) activities in support of a wide range of earth science applications. UNAVCO acquired nearly 6,000 km2 of high resolution ALS data as part of GeoEarthScope, a component of the EarthScope Facility construction project funded by the National Science Foundation. GeoEarthScope ALS targets in most cases were 1- to 2-km wide corridors centered along active faults including the San Andreas, Hayward, Calaveras, Maacama, Green Valley, Little Salmon, Elsinore, San Cayetano, Garlock, Calico, Lenwood, Blackwater, Helendale, Panamint Valley, Ash Hill, Owens Valley, Death Valley-Fish Lake Valley, Wasatch, Teton, Denali and Totschunda faults. Acquisitions were planned and conducted based on community recommendations with respect to target identification and data collection practices. Particular care was taken to ensure the highest data quality possible within scope and budget, with special considerations given to effective ground point density and geodetic control. Data products are freely available from http://opentopography.org. TLS projects include numerous investigations in polar regions, such as the first TLS survey of the lava lake at Mount Erebus, Antarctica, in January 2009, and activities related to INTERFACE (INTERdisciplinary alliance for digital Field data ACquisition and Exploration), a Collaborative project currently funded by NSF and managed at UNAVCO which includes specialized TLS data processing and visualization software tools developed specifically for geoscience applications. We will present an overview of ALS and TLS project highlights; resources for data collection, accessibility and analysis; and potential use of these data for scientific research and as a framework for future endeavors.

  13. Generating an optimal DTM from airborne laser scanning data for landslide mapping in a tropical forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razak, Khamarrul Azahari; Santangelo, Michele; Van Westen, Cees J.; Straatsma, Menno W.; de Jong, Steven M.

    2013-05-01

    Landslide inventory maps are fundamental for assessing landslide susceptibility, hazard, and risk. In tropical mountainous environments, mapping landslides is difficult as rapid and dense vegetation growth obscures landslides soon after their occurrence. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) data have been used to construct the digital terrain model (DTM) under dense vegetation, but its reliability for landslide recognition in the tropics remains surprisingly unknown. This study evaluates the suitability of ALS for generating an optimal DTM for mapping landslides in the Cameron Highlands, Malaysia. For the bare-earth extraction, we used hierarchical robust filtering algorithm and a parameterization with three sequential filtering steps. After each filtering step, four interpolations techniques were applied, namely: (i) the linear prediction derived from the SCOP++ (SCP), (ii) the inverse distance weighting (IDW), (iii) the natural neighbor (NEN) and (iv) the topo-to-raster (T2R). We assessed the quality of 12 DTMs in two ways: (1) with respect to 448 field-measured terrain heights and (2) based on the interpretability of landslides. The lowest root-mean-square error (RMSE) was 0.89 m across the landscape using three filtering steps and linear prediction as interpolation method. However, we found that a less stringent DTM filtering unveiled more diagnostic micro-morphological features, but also retained some of vegetation. Hence, a combination of filtering steps is required for optimal landslide interpretation, especially in forested mountainous areas. IDW was favored as the interpolation technique because it combined computational times more reasonably without adding artifacts to the DTM than T2R and NEN, which performed relatively well in the first and second filtering steps, respectively. The laser point density and the resulting ground point density after filtering are key parameters for producing a DTM applicable to landslide identification. The results showed that the

  14. Real-time Data Processing and Visualization for the Airborne Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. K.; Revercomb, H. E.; Hoese, D.; Garcia, R. K.; Smith, W. L.; Weisz, E.; Tobin, D. C.; Best, F. A.; Knuteson, R. O.; Sullivan, D. V.; Barnes, C. M.; Van Gilst, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) is a five-year NASA mission targeted to enhance the understanding of the formation and evolution of hurricanes in the Atlantic basin. Measurements were made from two NASA Global Hawk Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) during the 2012 through 2014 hurricane seasons, with flights conducted from the NASA Wallops Flight Facility. The Global Hawk aircraft are capable of high altitude flights with durations of up to 30 hours, which allow extensive observations over distant storms, not typically possible with manned aircraft. The two NASA Global Hawks were equipped with instrument suites to study the storm environment, and inner core structure and processes, respectively. The Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS), designed and built by the University of Wisconsin (UW) Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC), measures emitted thermal radiation at high spectral resolution between 3.3 and 18 microns. The radiance measurements are used to obtain temperature and water vapor profiles of the Earth's atmosphere. The S-HIS spatial resolution is 2 km at nadir, across a 40 km ground swath from a nominal altitude of 20 kilometers. Since 1998, the S-HIS has participated in 33 field campaigns and has proven to be extremely dependable, effective, and highly accurate. It has flown on the NASA ER-2, DC-8, Proteus, WB-57, and Global Hawk airborne platforms. The UW S-HIS infrared sounder instrument is equipped with a real-time ground data processing system capable of delivering atmospheric profiles, radiance data, and engineering status to mission support scientists - all within less than one minute from the time of observation. This ground data processing system was assembled by a small team using existing software and proven practical techniques similar to a satellite ground system architecture. This summary outlines the design overview for the system and illustrates the data path, content, and outcomes.

  15. Black-backed woodpecker habitat suitability mapping using conifer snag basal area estimated from airborne laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas Planes, Á.; Garcia, M.; Siegel, R.; Koltunov, A.; Ramirez, C.; Ustin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Occupancy and habitat suitability models for snag-dependent wildlife species are commonly defined as a function of snag basal area. Although critical for predicting or assessing habitat suitability, spatially distributed estimates of snag basal area are not generally available across landscapes at spatial scales relevant for conservation planning. This study evaluates the use of airborne laser scanning (ALS) to 1) identify individual conifer snags and map their basal area across a recently burned forest, and 2) map habitat suitability for a wildlife species known to be dependent on snag basal area, specifically the black-backed woodpecker (Picoides arcticus). This study focuses on the Rim Fire, a megafire that took place in 2013 in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, creating large patches of medium- and high-severity burned forest. We use forest inventory plots, single-tree ALS-derived metrics and Gaussian processes classification and regression to identify conifer snags and estimate their stem diameter and basal area. Then, we use the results to map habitat suitability for the black-backed woodpecker using thresholds for conifer basal area from a previously published habitat suitability model. Local maxima detection and watershed segmentation algorithms resulted in 75% detection of trees with stem diameter larger than 30 cm. Snags are identified with an overall accuracy of 91.8 % and conifer snags are identified with an overall accuracy of 84.8 %. Finally, Gaussian process regression reliably estimated stem diameter (R2 = 0.8) using height and crown area. This work provides a fast and efficient methodology to characterize the extent of a burned forest at the tree level and a critical tool for early wildlife assessment in post-fire forest management and biodiversity conservation.

  16. Novel eye-safe line scanning 3D laser-radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, B.; Kern, Tobias; Hammer, Marcus; Schwanke, Ullrich; Nowak, Heinrich

    2014-10-01

    Today, the civil market provides quite a number of different 3D-Sensors covering ranges up to 1 km. Typically these sensors are based on single element detectors which suffer from the drawback of spatial resolution at larger distances. Tasks demanding reliable object classification at long ranges can be fulfilled only by sensors consisting of detector arrays. They ensure sufficient frame rates and high spatial resolution. Worldwide there are many efforts in developing 3D-detectors, based on two-dimensional arrays. This paper presents first results on the performance of a recently developed 3D imaging laser radar sensor, working in the short wave infrared (SWIR) at 1.5 μm. It consists of a novel Cadmium Mercury Telluride (CMT) linear array APD detector with 384x1 elements at a pitch of 25 μm, developed by AIM Infrarot Module GmbH. The APD elements are designed to work in the linear (non-Geiger) mode. Each pixel will provide the time of flight measurement, and, due to the linear detection mode, allowing the detection of three successive echoes. The resolution in depth is 15 cm, the maximum repetition rate is 4 kHz. We discuss various sensor concepts regarding possible applications and their dependence on system parameters like field of view, frame rate, spatial resolution and range of operation.

  17. A Cross-Track Cloud-Scanning Dual-Frequency Doppler (C2D2) Radar for the Proposed ACE Mission and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory; Tanelli, Simone; Chamberlain, Neil; Durden, Stephen; Fung, Andy; Sanchez-Barbetty, Mauricio; Thrivikraman, Tushar

    2013-01-01

    The National Resource Council’s Earth Science Decadal Survey” (NRCDS) has identified the Aerosol/Climate/Ecosystems (ACE) Mission as a priority mission for NASA Earth science. The NRC recommended the inclusion of "a cross-track scanning cloud radar with channels at 94 GHz and possibly 34 GHz for measurement of cloud droplet size, glaciation height, and cloud height". Several radar concepts have been proposed that meet some of the requirements of the proposed ACE mission but none have provided scanning capability at both 34 and 94 GHz due to the challenge of constructing scanning antennas at 94 GHz. In this paper, we will describe a radar design that leverages new developments in microwave monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs) and micro-machining to enable an electronically-scanned radar with both Ka-band (35 GHz) and W-band (94-GHz) channels. This system uses a dual-frequency linear active electronically-steered array (AESA) combined with a parabolic cylindrical reflector. This configuration provides a large aperture (3m x 5m) with electronic-steering but is much simpler than a two-dimension AESA of similar size. Still, the W-band frequency requires element spacing of approximately 2.5 mm, presenting significant challenges for signal routing and incorporation of MMICs. By combining (Gallium Nitride) GaN MMIC technology with micro-machined radiators and interconnects and silicon-germanium (SiGe) beamforming MMICs, we are able to meet all the performance and packaging requirements of the linear array feed and enable simultaneous scanning of Ka-band and W-band radars over swath of up to 100 km.

  18. Processor architecture for airborne SAR systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Digital processors for spaceborne imaging radars and application of the technology developed for airborne SAR systems are considered. Transferring algorithms and implementation techniques from airborne to spaceborne SAR processors offers obvious advantages. The following topics are discussed: (1) a quantification of the differences in processing algorithms for airborne and spaceborne SARs; and (2) an overview of three processors for airborne SAR systems.

  19. Investigation of image enhancement techniques for the development of a self-contained airborne radar navigation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phatak, A. V.; Karmali, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    This study was devoted to an investigation of the feasibility of applying advanced image processing techniques to enhance radar image characteristics that are pertinent to the pilot's navigation and guidance task. Millimeter (95 GHz) wave radar images for the overwater (i.e., offshore oil rigs) and overland (Heliport) scenario were used as a data base. The purpose of the study was to determine the applicability of image enhancement and scene analysis algorithms to detect and improve target characteristics (i.e., manmade objects such as buildings, parking lots, cars, roads, helicopters, towers, landing pads, etc.) that would be helpful to the pilot in determining his own position/orientation with respect to the outside world and assist him in the navigation task. Results of this study show that significant improvements in the raw radar image may be obtained using two dimensional image processing algorithms. In the overwater case, it is possible to remove the ocean clutter by thresholding the image data, and furthermore to extract the target boundary as well as the tower and catwalk locations using noise cleaning (e.g., median filter) and edge detection (e.g., Sobel operator) algorithms.

  20. Accumulation rates during 1311-2011 CE in North Central Greenland derived from air-borne radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Nanna; Eisen, Olaf; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Freitag, Johannes; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Lewis, Cameron; Nielsen, Lisbeth; Paden, John; Winter, Anna; Wilhelms, Frank

    2016-11-01

    Radar-detected internal layering contains information on past accumulation rates and patterns. In this study, we assume that the radar layers are isochrones, and use the layer stratigraphy in combination with ice-core measurements and numerical methods to retrieve accumulation information for the northern part of central Greenland. Measurements of the dielectric properties of an ice core from the NEEM (North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling) site, allow for correlation of the radar layers with volcanic horizons to obtain an accurate age of the layers. We obtain accumulation patterns averaged over 100 a for the period 1311-2011. Our results show a clear trend of high accumulation rates west of the ice divide and low accumulation rates east of the ice divide. At the NEEM site the accumulation pattern is persistent during our study period and only small temporal variations occur in the accumulation rate. However, from approximately 200 km south of the NEEM drill site, the accumulation rate shows temporal variations based on our centennial averages. We attribute this variation to shifts in the location of the high-low accumulation boundary that usually is aligned with the ice divide, but appears to have moved across the divide in the past.

  1. SCAN+

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Krebs, John Svoboda

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determine the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.

  2. An Evaluation of the Observational Capabilities of A Scanning 95-GHz Radar in Studying the 3D Structures of Marine Stratocumulus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowley, Kevin

    Marine stratocumulus clouds play a critical role in Earth's radiative balance primarily due to the role of their high albedo reflecting incoming solar radiation, causing a cooling effect, while weakly reflecting outgoing infrared radiation. Characterization of the 3-Dimensional (3D) structure of these cloud systems over scales of 20-40 km is required to accurately account for the role of cloud inhomogeneity and structure on their shortwave forcing and lifetime, which has important applications for Global Climate Models. For first time, such 3D measurements in clouds were made available from a scanning cloud radar during the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) field campaign in the Azores Islands. The scanning radar observations were complemented by a suite of zenith-pointing active and passive remote sensors that were deployed to provide a detailed description of marine stratus over a long-term observation period in the ideal marine environment commonly found at the Azores. The scanning cloud radar observations present a shift from a multi-instrument, vertically pointing 'soda-straw' observation technique to a radar-only, 'radar-centric' observation technique. The scanning radar observations were gridded using a nearest-neighbor type scheme devised to take the natural variability of the observed field into account. The ability of the scheme to capture primary cloud properties (cloud fraction, cloud boundaries, drizzle detection) was assessed using measurements from the vertically pointing sensors. Despite the great sensitivity of the scanning cloud radar (-42.5 dBZ at 1 km range), the drop in sensitivity with range resulted in an artificial thinning of clouds with range from the radar. Drizzle-free cloud structures were undetectable beyond 5 km from the radar. Cloud fields containing drizzle were generally detectable to ranges exceeding 10 km from

  3. Monitoring gully change: A comparison of airborne and terrestrial laser scanning using a case study from Aratula, Queensland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Nicholas R.; Armston, John D.; Muir, Jasmine; Stiller, Issac

    2017-04-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) technologies capture spatially detailed estimates of surface topography and when collected multi-temporally can be used to assess geomorphic change. The sensitivity and repeatability of ALS measurements to characterise geomorphic change in topographically complex environments such as gullies; however, remains an area lacking quantitative research. In this study, we captured coincident ALS and TLS datasets to assess their ability and synergies to detect geomorphic change for a gully located in Aratula, southeast Queensland, Australia. We initially used the higher spatial density and ranging accuracy of TLS to provide an assessment of the Digital Elevation Models (DEM) derived from ALS within a gully environment. Results indicated mean residual errors of 0.13 and 0.09 m along with standard deviation (SD) of residual errors of 0.20 and 0.16 m using pixel sizes of 0.5 and 1.0 m, respectively. The positive mean residual errors confirm that TLS data consistently detected deeper sections of the gully than ALS. We also compared the repeatability of ALS and TLS for characterising gully morphology. This indicated that the sensitivity to detect change using ALS is substantially lower than TLS, as expected, and that the ALS survey characteristics influence the ability to detect change. Notably, we found that using one ALS transect (mean density of 5 points / m2) as opposed to three transects increased the SD of residual error by approximately 30%. The supplied classification of ALS ground points was also demonstrated to misclassify gully features as non-ground, with minimum elevation filtering found to provide a more accurate DEM of the gully. The number and placement of terrestrial laser scans were also found to influence the derived DEMs. Furthermore, we applied change detection using two ALS data captures over a four year period and four TLS field surveys over an eight month period. This demonstrated that

  4. News and Views: Take the long view; Postgraduate degrees produce employable people - it's official; Airborne radar reveals fault rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-08-01

    Academics in the field have long thought that postgraduate degrees in astronomy, astrophysics and planetary science and particle physics are a good bet for careers. But now a survey has confirmed that they bring excellent long-term employment prospects and above-average salaries, within sciences and elsewhere, boosting the case for funding studentships in order to support science and industry. Satellite synthetic aperture radar is a valuable tool for understanding the deformation of the surface of the Earth at earthquake faults; now NASA scientists have used SAR on planes to get an altogether closer look at quake effects.

  5. Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) point cloud ground filtering for area of an active landslide (Doren, Western Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodić, Nenad; Cvijetinović, Željko; Milenković, Milutin; Dorninger, Peter; Mitrović, Momir

    2014-05-01

    Ground filtering of point cloud is the primary step required for Digital Terrain Model (DTM) generation. The procedure is especially interesting for forested areas, since LiDAR systems can measure terrain elevation under vegetation cover with a high level of penetration. This work analyzes the potential of ALS data ground filtering for area of an active landslide. The results of ALS filtering, for example, may improve geomorphological and motion-detection studies. ALS data was collected during flight campaign 2011 under leaf-off conditions for Doren region, Vorarlberg, Western Austria. In this area, non-ground objects are mostly low vegetation such as shrubs, small trees etc. The vegetation is more dense in lower part of the landslide where erosion is smaller. Vegetation points can be removed based on the hypothesis that these are significantly higher than their neighboring points. However, in case of steep terrain, ground points may have the same heights as vegetation points, and thus, local slope should be considered. Also, if terrain roughness increases, the classification may become even more complex. Software system OPALS (Orientation and Processing of Airborne Laser Scanning data, Vienna University of Technology) was used for processing the ALS data. Labeling ground points has been made using physical and geometrical attributes (parameters) of ALS points. Also additional attributes were calculated in order to improve extraction. Since bare ground surface is usually smooth and continuous unlike vegetation, standard deviation of local elevations was used as roughness measure to differentiate these surfaces. EchoRatio (ER) was adopted as a measure of surface penetrability, while number of echoes and differentiation between echoes (EchoNumber) were also deployed in filtering. Since the ground points are measurements from bare-earth that are usually the lowest surface features in a local area, normalized height was defined as a rank of neighboring points

  6. Object-Based Point Cloud Analysis of Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanning Data for Urban Vegetation Classification.

    PubMed

    Rutzinger, Martin; Höfle, Bernhard; Hollaus, Markus; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2008-08-04

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a remote sensing technique well-suited for 3D vegetation mapping and structure characterization because the emitted laser pulses are able to penetrate small gaps in the vegetation canopy. The backscattered echoes from the foliage, woody vegetation, the terrain, and other objects are detected, leading to a cloud of points. Higher echo densities (> 20 echoes/m2) and additional classification variables from full-waveform (FWF) ALS data, namely echo amplitude, echo width and information on multiple echoes from one shot, offer new possibilities in classifying the ALS point cloud. Currently FWF sensor information is hardly used for classification purposes. This contribution presents an object-based point cloud analysis (OBPA) approach, combining segmentation and classification of the 3D FWF ALS points designed to detect tall vegetation in urban environments. The definition tall vegetation includes trees and shrubs, but excludes grassland and herbage. In the applied procedure FWF ALS echoes are segmented by a seeded region growing procedure. All echoes sorted descending by their surface roughness are used as seed points. Segments are grown based on echo width homogeneity. Next, segment statistics (mean, standard deviation, and coefficient of variation) are calculated by aggregating echo features such as amplitude and surface roughness. For classification a rule base is derived automatically from a training area using a statistical classification tree. To demonstrate our method we present data of three sites with around 500,000 echoes each. The accuracy of the classified vegetation segments is evaluated for two independent validation sites. In a point-wise error assessment, where the classification is compared with manually classified 3D points, completeness and correctness better than 90% are reached for the validation sites. In comparison to many other algorithms the proposed 3D point classification works on the original measurements

  7. Object-Based Point Cloud Analysis of Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanning Data for Urban Vegetation Classification

    PubMed Central

    Rutzinger, Martin; Höfle, Bernhard; Hollaus, Markus; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a remote sensing technique well-suited for 3D vegetation mapping and structure characterization because the emitted laser pulses are able to penetrate small gaps in the vegetation canopy. The backscattered echoes from the foliage, woody vegetation, the terrain, and other objects are detected, leading to a cloud of points. Higher echo densities (>20 echoes/m2) and additional classification variables from full-waveform (FWF) ALS data, namely echo amplitude, echo width and information on multiple echoes from one shot, offer new possibilities in classifying the ALS point cloud. Currently FWF sensor information is hardly used for classification purposes. This contribution presents an object-based point cloud analysis (OBPA) approach, combining segmentation and classification of the 3D FWF ALS points designed to detect tall vegetation in urban environments. The definition tall vegetation includes trees and shrubs, but excludes grassland and herbage. In the applied procedure FWF ALS echoes are segmented by a seeded region growing procedure. All echoes sorted descending by their surface roughness are used as seed points. Segments are grown based on echo width homogeneity. Next, segment statistics (mean, standard deviation, and coefficient of variation) are calculated by aggregating echo features such as amplitude and surface roughness. For classification a rule base is derived automatically from a training area using a statistical classification tree. To demonstrate our method we present data of three sites with around 500,000 echoes each. The accuracy of the classified vegetation segments is evaluated for two independent validation sites. In a point-wise error assessment, where the classification is compared with manually classified 3D points, completeness and correctness better than 90% are reached for the validation sites. In comparison to many other algorithms the proposed 3D point classification works on the original measurements

  8. Estimation of lava flow field volumes and volumetric effusion rates from airborne radar profiling and other data: Monitoring of the Nornahraun (Holuhraun) 2014/15 eruption in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürig, Tobias; Gudmundsson, Magnús; Högnadóttir, Thordís; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg; Gudbjörnsson, Snaebjörn; Lárusson, Örnólfur; Höskuldsson, Ármann; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Riishuus, Morten; Magnússon, Eyjólfur

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring of lava-producing eruptions involves systematic measurement of flow field volumes, which in turn can be used to obtain average magma discharge over the period of observation. However, given inaccessibility to the interior parts of active lava fields, remote sensing techniques must be applied. Several satellite platforms provide data that can be geo-referenced, allowing area estimation. However, unless sterographic or tandem satellite data are available, the determination of thicknesses is non-trivial. The ongoing eruption ('Nornaeldar')at Dyngjusandurin the Icelandic highlands offers an opportunity to monitor the temporal and spatial evolution of a typical Icelandic lava flow field. The mode of emplacementis complex and includesboth horizontal and vertical stacking, inflation of lobes and topographic inversions. Due to the large extent of the flow field (>83 km2 on 5 Jan 2015, and still growing) and its considerable local variation in thickness (30 m) and surface roughness, obtaining robust quantification of lava thicknesses is very challenging,despite the lava is being emplaced onto a low-relief sandur plain. Creative methods have been implemented to obtain as reliable observation as possible into the third dimension: Next to areal extent measurements from satellites and maps generated with airborne synthetic-aperture radar (SAR), lava thickness profiles are regularly obtained by low-level flights with a fixed-wing aircraft that is equipped with a ground clearance radar coupled witha submeter DGPS,a system originally designed for monitoring surface changes of glaciers above geothermally active areas.The resulting radar profile data are supplemented by analyses of aerial photos and complemented by results from an array of ground based thickness measurement methods. The initial results indicate that average effusion ratewas ~200 m3/s in the first weeks of the eruption (end August, early September) but declined to 50-100 m3/s in November to December period

  9. A New Display Format Relating Azimuth-Scanning Radar Data and All-Sky Images in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Wesley E.; Seker, Ilgin; Mathews, John D.; Aponte, Nestor

    2010-01-01

    Here we correlate features in a sequence of all-sky images of 630 nm airglow with the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of electron densities in the F region above Arecibo. Pairs of 180 azimuth scans (using the Gregorian and line feeds) of the two-beam incoherent scatter radar (ISR) have been plotted in cone pictorials of the line-of-sight electron densities. The plots include projections of the 630 nm airglow onto the ground using the same spatial scaling as for the ISR data. Selected sequential images from the night of 16-17 June 2004 correlate ionospheric plasma features with scales comparable to the ISR density-cone diameter. The entire set of over 100 images spanning about eight hours is available as a movie. The correlation between the airglow and the electron densities is not unexpected, but the new display format shows the 3-D structures better than separate 2-D plots in latitude and longitude for the airglow and in height and time for the electron densities. Furthermore, the animations help separate the bands of airglow from obscuring clouds and the star field.

  10. Flood disaster monitoring in Thailand by using a airborne L-band SAR: Polarimetric and interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar with L-band(Pi-SAR-L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, N.; Sobue, S.; Shimada, M.; Ohyoshi, K.

    2012-04-01

    It was heavy rainfall around the northern region of Thailand from July to September 2011, which caused flood disaster to quite wide region of Thailand, it finally reached to the Bangkok central in the end of October 2011. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) conducted an emergency observation by using a airborne L-band SAR: Polarimetric and interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar with L-band(Pi-SAR-L) from 5th to 27th November to monitor flood area. Pi-SAR-L has a center frequency of 1271.5 MHz, a band width of 50 MHz, a slant range resolution of 3 m, and an acquisition swath of 15 km on the ground. Pi-SAR-L is boarded on an aircraft of the Gulfstream-II operated by the Diamond Air Service(DAS), Japan, and the Gulfstream-II was ferried to the Chieng-Mai airport in the North Thailand, from Japan. In our presentation, we will show flood area around Bangkok and its variations detected by Pi-SAR-L

  11. Maximum-likelihood spectral estimation and adaptive filtering techniques with application to airborne Doppler weather radar. Thesis Technical Report No. 20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Jonathan Y.

    1994-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the signal processing problems associated with the detection of hazardous windshears using airborne Doppler radar when weak weather returns are in the presence of strong clutter returns. In light of the frequent inadequacy of spectral-processing oriented clutter suppression methods, we model a clutter signal as multiple sinusoids plus Gaussian noise, and propose adaptive filtering approaches that better capture the temporal characteristics of the signal process. This idea leads to two research topics in signal processing: (1) signal modeling and parameter estimation, and (2) adaptive filtering in this particular signal environment. A high-resolution, low SNR threshold maximum likelihood (ML) frequency estimation and signal modeling algorithm is devised and proves capable of delineating both the spectral and temporal nature of the clutter return. Furthermore, the Least Mean Square (LMS) -based adaptive filter's performance for the proposed signal model is investigated, and promising simulation results have testified to its potential for clutter rejection leading to more accurate estimation of windspeed thus obtaining a better assessment of the windshear hazard.

  12. Use of high resolution Airborne Laser Scanning data for landslide interpretation under mixed forest and tropical rainforest: case study in Barcelonnette, France and Cameron Highlands, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azahari Razak, Khamarrul; Straatsma, Menno; van Westen, Cees; Malet, Jean-Philippe; de Jong, Steven M.

    2010-05-01

    Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) is the state of the art technology for topographic mapping over a wide variety of spatial and temporal scales. It is also a promising technique for identification and mapping of landslides in a forested mountainous landscape. This technology demonstrates the ability to pass through the gaps between forest foliage and record the terrain height under vegetation cover. To date, most of the images either derived from satellite imagery, aerial-photograph or synthetic aperture radar are not appropriate for visual interpretation of landslide features that are covered by dense vegetation. However, it is a necessity to carefully map the landslides in order to understand its processes. This is essential for landslide hazard and risk assessment. This research demonstrates the capabilities of high resolution ALS data to recognize and identify different types of landslides in mixed forest in Barcelonnette, France and tropical rainforest in Cameron Highlands, Malaysia. ALS measurements over the 100-years old forest in Bois Noir catchment were carried out in 2007 and 2009. Both ALS dataset were captured using a Riegl laser scanner. First and last pulse with density of one point per meter square was derived from 2007 ALS dataset, whereas multiple return (of up to five returns) pulse was derived from July 2009 ALS dataset, which consists of 60 points per meter square over forested terrain. Generally, this catchment is highly affected by shallow landslides which mostly occur beneath dense vegetation. It is located in the dry intra-Alpine zone and represented by the climatic of the South French Alps. In the Cameron Highlands, first and last pulse data was captured in 2004 which covers an area of up to 300 kilometres square. Here, the Optech laser scanner was used under the Malaysian national pilot study which has slightly low point density. With precipitation intensity of up to 3000 mm per year over rugged topography and elevations up to 2800 m a

  13. An Integrated Navigation System using GPS Carrier Phase for Real-Time Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Fellerhoff, J. Rick; Kim, Theodore J.; Kohler, Stewart M.

    1999-06-24

    A Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) requires accu- rate measurement of the motion of the imaging plat- form to produce well-focused images with minimal absolute position error. The motion measurement (MoMeas) system consists of a inertial measurement unit (IMU) and a P-code GPS receiver that outputs corrected ephemeris, L1 & L2 pseudoranges, and L1 & L2 carrier phase measurements. The unknown initial carrier phase biases to the GPS satellites are modeled as states in an extended Kalman filter and the resulting integrated navigation solution has po- sition errors that change slowly with time. Position error drifts less than 1- cm/sec have been measured from the SAR imagery for various length apertures.

  14. Comparing the above-ground component biomass estimates of western junipers using airborne and full-waveform terrestrial laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, R.; Glenn, N. F.; Spaete, L.; Hardegree, S. P.

    2012-12-01

    With the rapid expansion into shrub steppe and grassland ecosystems over the last century, western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis var. occidentalis Hook) is becoming a major component of the regional carbon pool in the Intermountain West. Understanding how biomass is allocated across individual tree components is necessary to understand the uncertainties in biomass estimates and more accurately quantify biomass and carbon dynamics in these ecosystems. Estimates of component biomass are also important for canopy fuel load assessment and predicting rangeland fire behavior. Airborne LiDAR can capture vegetation structure over larger scales, but the high crown penetration and sampling density of terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) instruments can better capture tree components. In this study, we assessed the ability of airborne LiDAR to estimate biomass of tree components of western juniper with validation data from field measured tees and a full-waveform TLS. Sixteen juniper trees (height range 1.5-10 m) were randomly selected using a double sampling strategy from different height classes in the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in the Owyhee Mountains, southwestern Idaho, USA. Each tree was scanned with a full-waveform TLS, and the dry biomass of each component (foliage, branches and main stem) were measured by destructive harvesting of the trees. We compare the allometric relationships of biomass estimates of the tree components obtained from field-measured trees and TLS-based estimates with the estimates from discrete-return airborne-LiDAR based estimates.

  15. Side looking radar calibration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    Calibration of an airborne sidelooking radar is accomplished by the use of a model that relates the radar parameters to the physical mapping situation. Topics discussed include: characteristics of the transmitters; the antennas; target absorption and reradiation; the receiver and map making or radar data processing; and the calibration process.

  16. Airborne radar evidence for tributary flow switching in Institute Ice Stream, West Antarctica: Implications for ice sheet configuration and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Kate; Woodward, John; Ross, Neil; Dunning, Stuart A.; Bingham, Robert G.; Corr, Hugh F. J.; Siegert, Martin J.

    2015-09-01

    Despite the importance of ice streaming to the evaluation of West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) stability we know little about mid- to long-term dynamic changes within the Institute Ice Stream (IIS) catchment. Here we use airborne radio echo sounding to investigate the subglacial topography, internal stratigraphy, and Holocene flow regime of the upper IIS catchment near the Ellsworth Mountains. Internal layer buckling within three discrete, topographically confined tributaries, through Ellsworth, Independence, and Horseshoe Valley Troughs, provides evidence for former enhanced ice sheet flow. We suggest that enhanced ice flow through Independence and Ellsworth Troughs, during the mid-Holocene to late Holocene, was the source of ice streaming over the region now occupied by the slow-flowing Bungenstock Ice Rise. Although buckled layers also exist within the slow-flowing ice of Horseshoe Valley Trough, a thicker sequence of surface-conformable layers in the upper ice column suggests slowdown more than ~4000 years ago, so we do not attribute enhanced flow switch-off here, to the late Holocene ice-flow reorganization. Intensely buckled englacial layers within Horseshoe Valley and Independence Troughs cannot be accounted for under present-day flow speeds. The dynamic nature of ice flow in IIS and its tributaries suggests that recent ice stream switching and mass changes in the Siple Coast and Amundsen Sea sectors are not unique to these sectors, that they may have been regular during the Holocene and may characterize the decline of the WAIS.

  17. Radar applications overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenspan, Marshall

    1996-06-01

    During the fifty years since its initial development as a means of providing early warning of airborne attacks against allied countries during World War II, radar systems have developed to the point of being highly mobile and versatile systems capable of supporting a wide variety of remote sensing applications. Instead of being tied to stationary land-based sites, radar systems have found their way into highly mobile land vehicles as well as into aircraft, missiles, and ships of all sizes. Of all these applications, however, the most exciting revolution has occurred in the airborne platform arena where advanced technology radars can be found in all shapes and sizes...ranging from the large AWACS and Joint STARS long range surveillance and targeting systems to small millimeter wave multi-spectral sensors on smart weapons that can detect and identify their targets through the use of highly sophisticated digital signal processing hardware and software. This paper presents an overview of these radar applications with the emphasis on modern airborne sensors that span the RF spectrum. It will identify and describe the factors that influence the parameters of low frequency and ultra wide band radars designed to penetrate ground and dense foliage environments and locate within them buried mines, enemy armor, and other concealed or camouflaged weapons of war. It will similarly examine the factors that lead to the development of airborne radar systems that support long range extended endurance airborne surveillance platforms designed to detect and precision-located both small high speed airborne threats as well as highly mobile time critical moving and stationary surface vehicles. The mission needs and associated radar design impacts will be contrasted with those of radar systems designed for high maneuverability rapid acquisition tactical strike warfare platforms, and shorter range cued air-to-surface weapons with integral smart radar sensors.

  18. GLACIER MONITORING SYSTEM IN COLOMBIA - complementing glaciological measurements with laser-scanning and ground-penetrating radar surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, Jorge; Micheletti, Natan; Rabatel, Antoine; Mölg, Nico; Zemp, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Colombia (South America) has six small glaciers (total glacierized area of 45 Km2); their geographical location, close to zero latitude, makes them very sensitive to climate changes. An extensive monitoring program is being performed since 2006 on two glaciers, with international cooperation supports. This presentation summarizes the results of glacier changes in Colombia and includes the latest results obtained within the CATCOS Project - Phase 1 (Capacity Building and Twinning for Climate Observing Systems) signed between Colombia and Switzerland, and within the Joint Mixte Laboratory GREAT-ICE (IRD - France), with the application of LiDAR technology and GPR-based ice thickness measurements at Conejeras Glacier. Conejeras Glacier (Lat. N. 4° 48' 56"; Long. W. 75° 22' 22"; Alt. Max. 4915m.; Alt. Min. 4730m. Area 0.2 Km2) is located on the north-western side of Santa Isabel Volcano. This glacier belongs to global glacier monitoring network of the World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS-ID: 2721). The surface mass balance is calculated monthly using the direct glaciological method. Between April 2006 and May 2014, Conejeras Glacier showed a cumulative loss of -21 m w.e. The CATCOS Project allowed to improve the glacier monitoring system in Colombia with two main actions: (1) a terrestrial laser scanner survey (RIEGL VZ-6000 terrestrial laser scanner, property of Universities of Lausanne and Fribourg); and (2) ice thickness measurements (Blue System Integration Ltd. Ice Penetrating Radar of property of IRD). The terrestrial laser-scanning survey allowed to realize an accurate digital terrain model of the glacier surface with 13 million points and a decimetric resolution. Ice thickness measurements showed an average glacier thickness of 22 meters and a maximum of 52 meters.

  19. Cross-hole radar scanning of two vertical, permeable, reactive-iron walls at the Massachusetts Military Reservation, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, J.W.; Joesten, P.K.; Savoie, J.G.

    2001-01-01

    A pilot-scale study was conducted by the U.S. Army National Guard (USANG) at the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to assess the use of a hydraulic-fracturing method to create vertical, permeable walls of zero-valent iron to passively remediate ground water contaminated with chlorinated solvents. The study was conducted near the source area of the Chemical Spill-10 (CS-10) plume, a plume containing chlorinated solvents that underlies the MMR. Ground-water contamination near the source area extends from about 24 m (meters) to 35 m below land surface. The USANG designed two reactive-iron walls to be 12 m long and positioned 24 to 37 m below land surface to intersect and remediate part of the CS-10 plume.Because iron, as an electrical conductor, absorbs electromagnetic energy, the US Geological Survey used a cross-hole common-depth, radar scanning method to assess the continuity and to estimate the lateral and vertical extent of the two reactive-iron walls. The cross-hole radar surveys were conducted in boreholes on opposite sides of the iron injection zones using electric-dipole antennas with dominant center frequencies of 100 and 250 MHz. Significant decreases in the radar-pulse amplitudes observed in scans that traversed the injection zones were interpreted by comparing field data to results of two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain numerical models and laboratory-scale physical models.The numerical and physical models simulate a wall of perfectly conducting material embedded in saturated sand. Results from the numerical and physical models show that the amplitude of the radar pulse transmitted across the edge of a conductive wall is about 43 percent of the amplitude of a radar pulse transmitted across background material. The amplitude of a radar pulse transmitted through a hole in a conductive wall increases as the aperture of the hole increases. The modeling results indicate that holes with an aperture of less than 40

  20. Prediction and uncertainty of Hurricane Sandy (2012) explored through a real-time cloud-permitting ensemble analysis and forecast system assimilating airborne Doppler radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munsell, Erin B.; Zhang, Fuqing

    2014-03-01

    the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) real-time convection-permitting hurricane analysis and forecasting system (WRF-EnKF) that assimilates airborne Doppler radar observations, the sensitivity and uncertainty of forecasts initialized several days prior to landfall of Hurricane Sandy (2012) are assessed. The performance of the track and intensity forecasts of both the deterministic and ensemble forecasts by the PSU WRF-EnKF system show significant skill and are comparable to or better than forecasts produced by operational dynamical models, even at lead times of 4-5 days prior to landfall. Many of the ensemble members correctly capture the interaction of Sandy with an approaching midlatitude trough, which precedes Sandy's forecasted landfall in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. However, the ensemble reveals considerable forecast uncertainties in the prediction of Sandy. For example, in the ensemble forecast initialized at 0000 UTC 26 October 2012, 10 of the 60 members do not predict a United States landfall. Using ensemble composite and sensitivity analyses, the essential dynamics and initial condition uncertainties that lead to forecast divergence among the members in tracks and precipitation are examined. It is observed that uncertainties in the environmental steering flow are the most impactful factor on the divergence of Sandy's track forecasts, and its subsequent interaction with the approaching midlatitude trough. Though the midlatitude system does not strongly influence the final position of Sandy, differences in the timing and location of its interactions with Sandy lead to considerable differences in rainfall forecasts, especially with respect to heavy precipitation over land.

  1. Dynamics and predictability of tropical cyclones evaluated through convection-permitting ensemble analyses and forecasts with airborne radar and sounding observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munsell, Erin B.

    The dynamics and predictability of various aspects of tropical cyclone track and intensity forecasting are explored through the use of real-time convection-permitting ensemble forecasts generated by a regional-scale model that employs advanced data assimilation techniques. Airborne Doppler radar observations, as well as sounding observations gathered during NASA's Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) are assimilated and the resulting sensitivity and uncertainty of divergent track and intensity forecasts for three Atlantic tropical cyclones (TCs; Hurricane Sandy (2012), Hurricane Nadine (2012), and Hurricane Edouard (2014)) are explored. Ensemble members are separated into groups according to their performance and composite analyses and ensemble sensitivity techniques are employed to diagnose the sources of greatest sensitivity and uncertainty, as well as to dynamically explain the divergent behavior observed in the forecasts. The analysis of the Hurricane Sandy (2012) ensemble reveals that the divergent track forecasts result from differences in the location of Sandy that develop over the first 48-h of the simulation as a result of variance in the strength of the environmental winds that Sandy is embedded in throughout this period. Disparities in the strength and position of an approaching mid-latitude trough yield divergence in track forecasts of Hurricane Nadine (2012); an increased interaction between the mid-latitude system and the TC steers Nadine eastward, while a reduced interaction allows the TC to be steered westward ahead of the approaching trough. In addition, the inclusion of 6-h sea surface temperature (SST) updates considerably improves Nadine's intensity forecasts, highlighting the importance of accurate SST fields when simulating TCs embedded in marginally favorable environmental conditions. Finally, considerable variance in the rapid intensification (RI) onset time in the Hurricane Edouard (2014) ensemble results from small distinctions in the

  2. Spectrometers for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) Upgrade to Full Sun-Sky-Cloud-Trace Gas Spectrometry Capability for Airborne Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunagan, S. E.; Flynn, C. J.; Johnson, R. R.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; LeBlanc, S. E.; Livingston, J. M.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Shinozuka, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Spectrometers for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) instrument has been developed at NASA Ames in collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and NASA Goddard, supported substantially since 2009 by NASA's Radiation Science Program and Earth Science Technology Office. It combines grating spectrometers with fiber optic links to a tracking, scanning head to enable sun tracking, sky scanning, and zenith viewing. 4STAR builds on the long and productive heritage of the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometers (AATS-6 and -14), which have yielded more than 100 peer-reviewed publications and extensive archived data sets in many NASA Airborne Science campaigns from 1986 to the present. The baseline 4STAR instrument has provided extensive data supporting the TCAP (Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013), SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys, 2013), and ARISE (Arctic Radiation - IceBridge Sea and Ice Experiment, 2014), field campaigns.This poster presents plans and progress for an upgrade to the 4STAR instrument to achieve full science capability, including (1) direct-beam sun tracking measurements to derive aerosol optical depth spectra, (2) sky radiance measurements to retrieve aerosol absorption and type (via complex refractive index and mode-resolved size distribution), (3) cloud properties via zenith radiance, and (4) trace gas spectrometry. Technical progress in context with the governing physics is reported on several upgrades directed at improved light collection and usage, particularly as related to spectrally and radiometrically stable propagation through the collection light path. In addition, improvements to field calibration and verification, and flight operability and reliability are addressed.

  3. Frequency Diverse Array Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    the methods for electronic scanning of antenna systems. Techniques that have been studied in this connection include frequency variation, phase shift...an array antenna instantaneously into a desired direction where no mechanical mechanism is involved in the scanning process. Electronic scanning... methods including phase scanning, time delay scanning, and frequency scanning have been used in various radar applications; however new and cheaper

  4. Application of Airborne Hydrographic Laser Scanning for Mapping Shallow Water Riverine Environments in the Pacific Northwest, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C.; Nayegandhi, A.; Faux, R.

    2013-12-01

    Small-footprint, green wavelength airborne LiDAR systems can provide seamless topography across the land-water interface at very high spatial resolution. These data have the potential to improve floodplain modeling, fisheries habitat assessments, stream restoration efforts, and other applications by continuously mapping shallow water depths that are difficult or impossible to measure using traditional ground-based or water-borne survey techniques. WSI (Corvallis, Oregon) in collaboration with Dewberry, (Tampa, Florida) and Riegl (Orlando, Florida), deployed the Riegl VQ-820-G hydrographic airborne laser scanner to map riverine and lacustrine environments from Oregon to Minnesota. Discussion will focus on the ability to accurately map depth and underwater structure, as well as riparian vegetation and terrain under different conditions. Results indicate that depth penetration varies with both water (i.e. clarity and surface conditions) and bottom conditions (i.e. substrate, depth, and landform). Depth penetration was typically limited to 1 Secchi depth or less across selected project areas. As an example, the green LiDAR system effectively mapped 83% of a shallow water river system, the Sandy River, with typical depths ranging from 0-2.5 meters. WSI will show quantitative comparisons of Green LiDAR surveys against more traditional methods such as rod or sonar surveys. WSI will also discuss advantages and limitations of Green LiDAR surveys for bathymetric modeling including survey accuracy, density, and efficiency along with data processing challenges not inherent with traditional NIR LiDAR processing.

  5. A feasibility study of rain radar for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission. IV - A discussion of pulse compression and adaptive scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Toshio; Nakamura, Kenji

    1988-07-01

    The possible use of a pulse compression system on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission to meet the requirement on the number of independent samples for the rain radar under the constraint on allowable power consumption. The applicability of a pulse compression system to the mission depends on the technological feasibility of reducing the range sidelobe levels of the strong surface echo down to at least -60 dB. It is found that applying the pulse compression technique to the mission is risky. The concept of adaptive scanning is examined, and its power saving efficiency is numerically evaluated for four kinds of rain searching schemes. It is shown that the power saving efficiency of adaptive scanning is considerably high for all the rain searching schemes evaluated.

  6. Potential of Full Waveform Airborne Laser Scanning Data for Urban Area Classification - Transfer of Classification Approaches Between Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, G.; Nguyen, D.; Milenkovic, M.; Pfeifer, N.

    2015-04-01

    Full-waveform (FWF) LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) systems have their advantage in recording the entire backscattered signal of each emitted laser pulse compared to conventional airborne discrete-return laser scanner systems. The FWF systems can provide point clouds which contain extra attributes like amplitude and echo width, etc. In this study, a FWF data collected in 2010 for Eisenstadt, a city in the eastern part of Austria was used to classify four main classes: buildings, trees, waterbody and ground by employing a decision tree. Point density, echo ratio, echo width, normalised digital surface model and point cloud roughness are the main inputs for classification. The accuracy of the final results, correctness and completeness measures, were assessed by comparison of the classified output to a knowledge-based labelling of the points. Completeness and correctness between 90% and 97% was reached, depending on the class. While such results and methods were presented before, we are investigating additionally the transferability of the classification method (features, thresholds ...) to another urban FWF lidar point cloud. Our conclusions are that from the features used, only echo width requires new thresholds. A data-driven adaptation of thresholds is suggested.

  7. A Comprehensive Automated 3D Approach for Building Extraction, Reconstruction, and Regularization from Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Dorninger, Peter; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Three dimensional city models are necessary for supporting numerous management applications. For the determination of city models for visualization purposes, several standardized workflows do exist. They are either based on photogrammetry or on LiDAR or on a combination of both data acquisition techniques. However, the automated determination of reliable and highly accurate city models is still a challenging task, requiring a workflow comprising several processing steps. The most relevant are building detection, building outline generation, building modeling, and finally, building quality analysis. Commercial software tools for building modeling require, generally, a high degree of human interaction and most automated approaches described in literature stress the steps of such a workflow individually. In this article, we propose a comprehensive approach for automated determination of 3D city models from airborne acquired point cloud data. It is based on the assumption that individual buildings can be modeled properly by a composition of a set of planar faces. Hence, it is based on a reliable 3D segmentation algorithm, detecting planar faces in a point cloud. This segmentation is of crucial importance for the outline detection and for the modeling approach. We describe the theoretical background, the segmentation algorithm, the outline detection, and the modeling approach, and we present and discuss several actual projects. PMID:27873931

  8. A Comprehensive Automated 3D Approach for Building Extraction, Reconstruction, and Regularization from Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds.

    PubMed

    Dorninger, Peter; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2008-11-17

    Three dimensional city models are necessary for supporting numerous management applications. For the determination of city models for visualization purposes, several standardized workflows do exist. They are either based on photogrammetry or on LiDAR or on a combination of both data acquisition techniques. However, the automated determination of reliable and highly accurate city models is still a challenging task, requiring a workflow comprising several processing steps. The most relevant are building detection, building outline generation, building modeling, and finally, building quality analysis. Commercial software tools for building modeling require, generally, a high degree of human interaction and most automated approaches described in literature stress the steps of such a workflow individually. In this article, we propose a comprehensive approach for automated determination of 3D city models from airborne acquired point cloud data. It is based on the assumption that individual buildings can be modeled properly by a composition of a set of planar faces. Hence, it is based on a reliable 3D segmentation algorithm, detecting planar faces in a point cloud. This segmentation is of crucial importance for the outline detection and for the modeling approach. We describe the theoretical background, the segmentation algorithm, the outline detection, and the modeling approach, and we present and discuss several actual projects.

  9. Multifunction Radar for Airborne Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    shown o Fiso of A1 %uba t array elements is selected for adaptation elements k n k nd k3 i iI. > apa - receivers are required for the main array output and...Tiefeunyproduct - 0. Time-frequenlcy product - 0. Time-frequency Product too,0 Iomlie repetitio tim - . Nrai eeiion time I Norma loa reptit.I. tme I Oftus...Iiton time - I Norma lie reeito tim i Nomlie reeito tme - # of pulse repeti tioms " of pulse repetitions IS 0 ofepulse rspetitiont Conmtdnt delay - 0

  10. The Airborne Snow Observatory: fusion of imaging spectrometer and scanning lidar for studies of mountain snow cover (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, T. H.; Andreadis, K.; Berisford, D. F.; Goodale, C. E.; Hart, A. F.; Heneghan, C.; Deems, J. S.; Gehrke, F.; Marks, D. G.; Mattmann, C. A.; McGurk, B. J.; Ramirez, P.; Seidel, F. C.; Skiles, M.; Trangsrud, A.; Winstral, A. H.; Kirchner, P.; Zimdars, P. A.; Yaghoobi, R.; Boustani, M.; Khudikyan, S.; Richardson, M.; Atwater, R.; Horn, J.; Goods, D.; Verma, R.; Boardman, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Snow cover and its melt dominate regional climate and water resources in many of the world's mountainous regions. However, we face significant water resource challenges due to the intersection of increasing demand from population growth and changes in runoff total and timing due to climate change. Moreover, increasing temperatures in desert systems will increase dust loading to mountain snow cover, thus reducing the snow cover albedo and accelerating snowmelt runoff. The two most critical properties for understanding snowmelt runoff and timing are the spatial and temporal distributions of snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow albedo. Despite their importance in controlling volume and timing of runoff, snowpack albedo and SWE are still poorly quantified in the US and not at all in most of the globe, leaving runoff models poorly constrained. Recognizing this need, JPL developed the Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO), an imaging spectrometer and imaging LiDAR system, to quantify snow water equivalent and snow albedo, provide unprecedented knowledge of snow properties, and provide complete, robust inputs to snowmelt runoff models, water management models, and systems of the future. Critical in the design of the ASO system is the availability of snow water equivalent and albedo products within 24 hours of acquisition for timely constraint of snowmelt runoff forecast models. In spring 2013, ASO was deployed for its first year of a multi-year Demonstration Mission of weekly acquisitions in the Tuolumne River Basin (Sierra Nevada) and monthly acquisitions in the Uncompahgre River Basin (Colorado). The ASO data were used to constrain spatially distributed models of varying complexities and integrated into the operations of the O'Shaughnessy Dam on the Hetch Hetchy reservoir on the Tuolumne River. Here we present the first results from the ASO Demonstration Mission 1 along with modeling results with and without the constraint by the ASO's high spatial resolution and spatially

  11. Airborne Laser Scanning Quantification of Disturbances from Hurricanes and Lightning Strikes to Mangrove Forests in Everglades National Park, USA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Keqi; Simard, Marc; Ross, Michael; Rivera-Monroy, Victor H.; Houle, Patricia; Ruiz, Pablo; Twilley, Robert R.; Whelan, Kevin R. T.

    2008-01-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR) measurements derived before and after Hurricanes Katrina and Wilma (2005) were used to quantify the impact of hurricanes and lightning strikes on the mangrove forest at two sites in Everglades National Park (ENP). Analysis of LIDAR measurements covering 61 and 68 ha areas of mangrove forest at the Shark River and Broad River sites showed that the proportion of high tree canopy detected by the LIDAR after the 2005 hurricane season decreased significantly due to defoliation and breakage of branches and trunks, while the proportion of low canopy and the ground increased drastically. Tall mangrove forests distant from tidal creeks suffered more damage than lower mangrove forests adjacent to the tidal creeks. The hurricanes created numerous canopy gaps, and the number of gaps per square kilometer increased from about 400∼500 to 4000 after Katrina and Wilma. The total area of gaps in the forest increased from about 1∼2% of the total forest area to 12%. The relative contribution of hurricanes to mangrove forest disturbance in ENP is at least 2 times more than that from lightning strikes. However, hurricanes and lightning strikes disturb the mangrove forest in a related way. Most seedlings in lightning gaps survived the hurricane impact due to the protection of trees surrounding the gaps, and therefore provide an important resource for forest recovery after the hurricane. This research demonstrated that LIDAR is an effective remote sensing tool to quantify the effects of disturbances such as hurricanes and lightning strikes in the mangrove forest. PMID:27879821

  12. Airborne Laser Scanning Quantification of Disturbances from Hurricanes and Lightning Strikes to Mangrove Forests in Everglades National Park, USA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keqi; Simard, Marc; Ross, Michael; Rivera-Monroy, Victor H; Houle, Patricia; Ruiz, Pablo; Twilley, Robert R; Whelan, Kevin

    2008-04-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR) measurements derived before and after Hurricanes Katrina and Wilma (2005) were used to quantify the impact of hurricanes and lightning strikes on the mangrove forest at two sites in Everglades National Park (ENP). Analysis of LIDAR measurements covering 61 and 68 ha areas of mangrove forest at the Shark River and Broad River sites showed that the proportion of high tree canopy detected by the LIDAR after the 2005 hurricane season decreased significantly due to defoliation and breakage of branches and trunks, while the proportion of low canopy and the ground increased drastically. Tall mangrove forests distant from tidal creeks suffered more damage than lower mangrove forests adjacent to the tidal creeks. The hurricanes created numerous canopy gaps, and the number of gaps per square kilometer increased from about 400~500 to 4000 after Katrina and Wilma. The total area of gaps in the forest increased from about 1~2% of the total forest area to 12%. The relative contribution of hurricanes to mangrove forest disturbance in ENP is at least 2 times more than that from lightning strikes. However, hurricanes and lightning strikes disturb the mangrove forest in a related way. Most seedlings in lightning gaps survived the hurricane impact due to the protection of trees surrounding the gaps, and therefore provide an important resource for forest recovery after the hurricane. This research demonstrated that LIDAR is an effective remote sensing tool to quantify the effects of disturbances such as hurricanes and lightning strikes in the mangrove forest.

  13. Remote Sensing of Multi-Level Wind Fields with High-Energy Airborne Scanning Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Olivier, Lisa D.; Banta, Robert M.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Howell, James N.; Cutten, Dean R.; Johnson, Steven C.; Menzies, Robert T.; Tratt, David M.

    1997-01-01

    The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory have developed and flown a scanning, 1 Joule per pulse, CO2 coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping a three-dimensional volume of atmospheric winds and aerosol backscatter in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. Applications include the study of severe and non-severe atmospheric flows, intercomparisons with other sensors, and the simulation of prospective satellite Doppler lidar wind profilers. Examples of wind measurements are given for the marine boundary layer and near the coastline of the western United States.

  14. Remote sensing of multi-level wind fields with high-energy airborne scanning coherent Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Rothermel, J; Olivier, L; Banta, R; Hardesty, R M; Howell, J; Cutten, D; Johnson, S; Menzies, R; Tratt, D M

    1998-01-19

    The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory have developed and flown a scanning, 1 Joule per pulse, CO2 coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping a three-dimensional volume of atmospheric winds and aerosol backscatter in the planetary boundary layer, free troposphere, and lower stratosphere. Applications include the study of severe and non-severe atmospheric flows, intercomparisons with other sensors, and the simulation of prospective satellite Doppler lidar wind profilers. Examples of wind measurements are given for the marine boundary layer and near the coastline of the western United States.

  15. Quantification of Barchan Dune Evolution over Monthly to Interannual Time Scales Using Airborne LIDAR and Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoose, M.; Pelletier, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Barchan dunes are among the most rapidly evolving landforms on Earth, with migration rates of up to 100 m/yr. Despite the central importance of barchan dunes in aeolian geomorphology and the relative ease of quantifying changes in their shape and position, basic questions remain about barchan dune evolution. For example, how does the position of a dune relative to its neighbors affect the evolution of a dune? The presence of a dune influences the air flow around the dune, potentially modifying the evolution of neighboring dunes. Also, a dune may grow in size more rapidly if neighboring dunes are located immediately upwind of the dune, thus providing additional sources of sand for the dune relative to the case of an isolated dune. To address these questions, we quantified the change in the position of 14 dunes, and the sand flux among them, in the Salton Sea dune field over two time scales: 1 month and 3 years. The 1-month change map was created using two TLS surveys completed in the summer of 2013, and the 3-year change map was created using the results of a TLS survey in 2013 and an airborne LIDAR survey from 2010. The PHOENICS Computational Fluid Dynamics solver was used to predict the change in the positions of the dunes and the flux of sand among them. PHOENICS was used to model the shear stress over the dune field using DEM data from the beginning of each interval of study, together with data on the wind profile collected at the study site using a wind tower. The output of PHOENICS was used as input to a shear-stress-dependent aeolian transport formula with the effect of slope on the threshold of entrainment included. Preliminary analyses of the ALSM- and TLS-derived change maps indicate that clustered dunes interact via boundary layer effects to alter the migration and growth rates of their downwind neighbors. Additionally, the effects of subdominant, southeasterly winds were observed in the 1-month change map in the form of sand wedges deposited along the

  16. Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 2; AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yun-Jin (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on March 4-8, 1996, was divided into two smaller workshops:(1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, and The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop. This current paper, Volume 2 of the Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, presents the summaries for The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop.

  17. Aerial Orthophoto and Airborne Laser Scanning as Monitoring Tools for Land Cover Dynamics: A Case Study from the Milicz Forest District (Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szostak, Marta; Wezyk, Piotr; Tompalski, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    The paper presents the results from the study concerning the application of airborne laser scanning (ALS) data and derived raster products like the digital surface model (DSM) and the digital terrain model (DTM) for the assessment of the degree of change of the land use based on the forest succession example. Simultaneously, an automated method of ALS data processing was developed based on the normalized (nDSM) and cadastral GIS information. Besides delivering precise information on forest succession, ALS technology is an excellent tool for time-changes spatial analyses. Usage of the ALS data can support the image interpretation process decreasing the subjectivity of the operator. In parallel, a manual vectorization and object classification (object-based image analysis—OBIA) were performed; both based on aerial orthophoto and ALS data. By using integrated ALS point clouds and digital aerial images, one can obtain fast OBIA processing and the determination of areas where the land cover has changed. The Milicz District (central west part of Poland) was chosen as the test site where ALS was to be performed in 2007, together with the digital aerial photos (Vexcel camera; pixel 0.15 m; CIR). The aerial photos were then processed to a CIR orthophoto. The area of study consisted of 68 private parcels (some of them were abandoned; 68.57 ha; scanned cadastral maps from the local survey office; land use information) in the direct neighbourhood of the State Forest, on which a forest succession could often be observed. The operator vectorized forest (trees and shrubs) succession areas on the 2D CIR orthophoto. They were then compared with the results from the OBIA and GIS analysis, based on the normalized digital surface model. The results showed that areas with high vegetation cover were three times larger than the official land cover database (cadastral maps).

  18. Aerial Orthophoto and Airborne Laser Scanning as Monitoring Tools for Land Cover Dynamics: A Case Study from the Milicz Forest District (Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szostak, Marta; Wezyk, Piotr; Tompalski, Piotr

    2014-06-01

    The paper presents the results from the study concerning the application of airborne laser scanning (ALS) data and derived raster products like the digital surface model (DSM) and the digital terrain model (DTM) for the assessment of the degree of change of the land use based on the forest succession example. Simultaneously, an automated method of ALS data processing was developed based on the normalized (nDSM) and cadastral GIS information. Besides delivering precise information on forest succession, ALS technology is an excellent tool for time-changes spatial analyses. Usage of the ALS data can support the image interpretation process decreasing the subjectivity of the operator. In parallel, a manual vectorization and object classification (object-based image analysis—OBIA) were performed; both based on aerial orthophoto and ALS data. By using integrated ALS point clouds and digital aerial images, one can obtain fast OBIA processing and the determination of areas where the land cover has changed. The Milicz District (central west part of Poland) was chosen as the test site where ALS was to be performed in 2007, together with the digital aerial photos (Vexcel camera; pixel 0.15 m; CIR). The aerial photos were then processed to a CIR orthophoto. The area of study consisted of 68 private parcels (some of them were abandoned; 68.57 ha; scanned cadastral maps from the local survey office; land use information) in the direct neighbourhood of the State Forest, on which a forest succession could often be observed. The operator vectorized forest (trees and shrubs) succession areas on the 2D CIR orthophoto. They were then compared with the results from the OBIA and GIS analysis, based on the normalized digital surface model. The results showed that areas with high vegetation cover were three times larger than the official land cover database (cadastral maps).

  19. Combined scanning electron microscopy and image analysis to investigate airborne submicron particles: a comparison between personal samplers.

    PubMed

    Zamengo, L; Barbiero, N; Gregio, M; Orrù, G

    2009-07-01

    The main objectives of this study were: (i) to compare commonly used personal samplers and verify their collection efficiency with regards to submicron particles; (ii) to investigate how the submicron particles deposit onto the filter surface in order to assess the homogeneity of the deposition; (iii) to estimate the biases which could affect results when number concentration values have to be determined by particle counting. A method based on image analysis (IA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is developed and adopted to investigate a large numbers of particles. Four different personal samplers were tested: the IOM sampler, the Button sampler and the German GSP for the inhalable aerosol fraction; the PEM sampler for the thoracic aerosol fraction. In order to investigate how particles distribute on the filters surface, the area of each filter was virtually divided into circular concentric areas or deposition zones (DZ). Results from different DZ of the same filter were compared. Uniformity of deposition was mostly observed for three of the four tested samplers. A significant radial distribution was observed only for the GSP sampler. The major homogeneity was found for the Button sampler. In order to estimate the relative collection efficiency between samplers, particles number concentrations determined by particle counting were compared. The GSP sampler provided the greatest concentrations but also the greatest variability. The PEM sampler provided the lowest concentrations. The homogeneity of particle deposition on the filter surface mostly affected results when counting is performed on localized areas of the filter.

  20. Spaceborne meteorological radar studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, R.

    1988-01-01

    Various radar designs and methods are studied for the estimation of rainfall parameters from space. An immediate goal is to support the development of the spaceborne radar that has been proposed for the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM). The effort is divided into two activities: a cooperative airborne rain measuring experiment with the Radio Research Laboratory of Japan (RRL), and the modelling of spaceborne weather radars. An airborne rain measuring experiment was conducted at Wallops Flight Facility in 1985 to 1986 using the dual-wavelength radar/radiometer developed by RRL. The data are presently being used to test a number of methods that are relevant to spaceborne weather radars. An example is shown of path-averaged rain rates as estimated from three methods: the standard reflectivity rain rate method (Z-R), a dual-wavelength method, and a surface reference method. The results from the experiment shows for the first time the feasibility of using attenuation methods from space. The purposes of the modelling are twofold: to understand in a quantitative manner the relationships between a particular radar design and its capability for estimating precipitation parameters and to help devise and test new methods. The models are being used to study the impact of various TRMM radar designs on the accuracy of rain rate estimation as well as to test the performance of range-profiling algorithms, the mirror-image method, and some recently devised graphical methods for the estimation of the drop size distribution.

  1. A Wing Pod-based Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar on HIAPER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, Jothiram; Tsai, Peisang; Ellis, Scott; Loew, Eric; Lee, Wen-Chau; Emmett, Joanthan

    2014-05-01

    One of the attractive features of a millimeter wave radar system is its ability to detect micron-sized particles that constitute clouds with lower than 0.1 g m-3 liquid or ice water content. Scanning or vertically-pointing ground-based millimeter wavelength radars are used to study stratocumulus (Vali et al. 1998; Kollias and Albrecht 2000) and fair-weather cumulus (Kollias et al. 2001). Airborne millimeter wavelength radars have been used for atmospheric remote sensing since the early 1990s (Pazmany et al. 1995). Airborne millimeter wavelength radar systems, such as the University of Wyoming King Air Cloud Radar (WCR) and the NASA ER-2 Cloud Radar System (CRS), have added mobility to observe clouds in remote regions and over oceans. Scientific requirements of millimeter wavelength radar are mainly driven by climate and cloud initiation studies. Survey results from the cloud radar user community indicated a common preference for a narrow beam W-band radar with polarimetric and Doppler capabilities for airborne remote sensing of clouds. For detecting small amounts of liquid and ice, it is desired to have -30 dBZ sensitivity at a 10 km range. Additional desired capabilities included a second wavelength and/or dual-Doppler winds. Modern radar technology offers various options (e.g., dual-polarization and dual-wavelength). Even though a basic fixed beam Doppler radar system with a sensitivity of -30 dBZ at 10 km is capable of satisfying cloud detection requirements, the above-mentioned additional options, namely dual-wavelength, and dual-polarization, significantly extend the measurement capabilities to further reduce any uncertainty in radar-based retrievals of cloud properties. This paper describes a novel, airborne pod-based millimeter wave radar, preliminary radar measurements and corresponding derived scientific products. Since some of the primary engineering requirements of this millimeter wave radar are that it should be deployable on an airborne platform

  2. Performance of a scanning mobility particle sizer in measuring diverse types of airborne nanoparticles: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes, welding fumes, and titanium dioxide spray.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared; Friend, Sherri; Stone, Samuel; Keane, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Direct-reading instruments have been widely used for characterizing airborne nanoparticles in inhalation toxicology and industrial hygiene studies for exposure/risk assessments. Instruments using electrical mobility sizing followed by optical counting, e.g., scanning or sequential mobility particle spectrometers (SMPS), have been considered as the "gold standard" for characterizing nanoparticles. An SMPS has the advantage of rapid response and has been widely used, but there is little information on its performance in assessing the full spectrum of nanoparticles encountered in the workplace. In this study, an SMPS was evaluated for its effectiveness in producing "monodisperse" aerosol and its adequacy in characterizing overall particle size distribution using three test aerosols, each mimicking a unique class of real-life nanoparticles: singlets of nearly spherical titanium dioxide (TiO2), agglomerates of fiber-like multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT), and aggregates that constitutes welding fume (WF). These aerosols were analyzed by SMPS, cascade impactor, and by counting and sizing of discrete particles by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The effectiveness of the SMPS to produce classified particles (fixed voltage mode) was assessed by examination of the resulting geometric standard deviation (GSD) from the impactor measurement. Results indicated that SMPS performed reasonably well for TiO2 (GSD = 1.3), but not for MWCNT and WF as evidenced by the large GSD values of 1.8 and 1.5, respectively. For overall characterization, results from SMPS (scanning voltage mode) exhibited particle-dependent discrepancies in the size distribution and total number concentration compared to those from microscopic analysis. Further investigation showed that use of a single-stage impactor at the SMPS inlet could distort the size distribution and underestimate the concentration as shown by the SMPS, whereas the presence of vapor molecules or atom clusters in some test

  3. Performance of a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer in Measuring Diverse Types of Airborne Nanoparticles: Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes, Welding Fumes, and Titanium Dioxide Spray

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bean T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared; Friend, Sherri; Stone, Samuel; Keane, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Direct-reading instruments have been widely used for characterizing airborne nanoparticles in inhalation toxicology and industrial hygiene studies for exposure/risk assessments. Instruments using electrical mobility sizing followed by optical counting, e.g., scanning or sequential mobility particle spectrometers (SMPS), have been considered as the “gold standard” for characterizing nanoparticles. An SMPS has the advantage of rapid response and has been widely used, but there is little information on its performance in assessing the full spectrum of nanoparticles encountered in the workplace. In this study, an SMPS was evaluated for its effectiveness in producing “monodisperse” aerosol and its adequacy in characterizing overall particle size distribution using three test aerosols, each mimicking a unique class of real-life nanoparticles: singlets of nearly spherical titanium dioxide (TiO2), agglomerates of fiber-like multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT), and aggregates that constitutes welding fume (WF). These aerosols were analyzed by SMPS, cascade impactor, and by counting and sizing of discrete particles by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The effectiveness of the SMPS to produce classified particles (fixed voltage mode) was assessed by examination of the resulting geometric standard deviation (GSD) from the impactor measurement. Results indicated that SMPS performed reasonably well for TiO2 (GSD = 1.3), but not for MWCNT and WF as evidenced by the large GSD values of 1.8 and 1.5, respectively. For overall characterization, results from SMPS (scanning voltage mode) exhibited particle-dependent discrepancies in the size distribution and total number concentration compared to those from microscopic analysis. Further investigation showed that use of a single-stage impactor at the SMPS inlet could distort the size distribution and underestimate the concentration as shown by the SMPS, whereas the presence of vapor molecules or atom clusters in

  4. SLAPex Freeze/Thaw 2015: The First Dedicated Soil Freeze/Thaw Airborne Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward; Wu, Albert; DeMarco, Eugenia; Powers, Jarrett; Berg, Aaron; Rowlandson, Tracy; Freeman, Jacqueline; Gottfried, Kurt; Toose, Peter; Roy, Alexandre; Derksen, Chris; Royer, Alain; Belair, Stephane; Houser, Paul; McDonald, Kyle; Entin, Jared; Lewis, Kristen

    2016-01-01

    Soil freezing and thawing is an important process in the terrestrial water, energy, and carbon cycles, marking the change between two very different hydraulic, thermal, and biological regimes. NASA's Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission includes a binary freeze/thaw data product. While there have been ground-based remote sensing field measurements observing soil freeze/thaw at the point scale, and airborne campaigns that observed some frozen soil areas (e.g., BOREAS), the recently-completed SLAPex Freeze/Thaw (F/T) campaign is the first airborne campaign dedicated solely to observing frozen/thawed soil with both passive and active microwave sensors and dedicated ground truth, in order to enable detailed process-level exploration of the remote sensing signatures and in situ soil conditions. SLAPex F/T utilized the Scanning L-band Active/Passive (SLAP) instrument, an airborne simulator of SMAP developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, and was conducted near Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, in October/November, 2015. Future soil moisture missions are also expected to include soil freeze/thaw products, and the loss of the radar on SMAP means that airborne radar-radiometer observations like those that SLAP provides are unique assets for freeze/thaw algorithm development. This paper will present an overview of SLAPex F/T, including descriptions of the site, airborne and ground-based remote sensing, ground truth, as well as preliminary results.

  5. Simultaneous observations of structure function parameter of refractive index using a high-resolution radar and the DataHawk small airborne measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scipión, Danny E.; Lawrence, Dale A.; Milla, Marco A.; Woodman, Ronald F.; Lume, Diego A.; Balsley, Ben B.

    2016-09-01

    The SOUSY (SOUnding SYstem) radar was relocated to the Jicamarca Radio Observatory (JRO) near Lima, Peru, in 2000, where the radar controller and acquisition system were upgraded with state-of-the-art parts to take full advantage of its potential for high-resolution atmospheric sounding. Due to its broad bandwidth (4 MHz), it is able to characterize clear-air backscattering with high range resolution (37.5 m). A campaign conducted at JRO in July 2014 aimed to characterize the lower troposphere with a high temporal resolution (8.1 Hz) using the DataHawk (DH) small unmanned aircraft system, which provides in situ atmospheric measurements at scales as small as 1 m in the lower troposphere and can be GPS-guided to obtain measurements within the beam of the radar. This was a unique opportunity to make coincident observations by both systems and to directly compare their in situ and remotely sensed parameters. Because SOUSY only points vertically, it is only possible to retrieve vertical radar profiles caused by changes in the refractive index within the resolution volume. Turbulent variations due to scattering are described by the structure function parameter of refractive index Cn2. Profiles of Cn2 from the DH are obtained by combining pressure, temperature, and relative humidity measurements along the helical trajectory and integrated at the same scale as the radar range resolution. Excellent agreement is observed between the Cn2 estimates obtained from the DH and SOUSY in the overlapping measurement regime from 1200 m up to 4200 m above sea level, and this correspondence provides the first accurate calibration of the SOUSY radar for measuring Cn2.

  6. Determination of the spatial structure of vegetation on the repository of the mine "Fryderyk" in Tarnowskie Góry, based on airborne laser scanning from the ISOK project and digital orthophotomaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szostak, Marta; Wężyk, Piotr; Pająk, Marek; Haryło, Paweł; Lisańczuk, Marek

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the spatial structure of vegetation on the repository of the mine "Fryderyk" in Tarnowskie Góry. Tested area was located in the Upper Silesian Industrial Region (a large industrial region in Poland). It was a unique refuge habitat - Natura2000; PLH240008. The main aspect of this elaboration was to investigate the possible use of geotechniques and generally available geodata for mapping LULC changes and determining the spatial structure of vegetation. The presented study focuses on the analysis of a spatial structure of vegetation in the research area. This exploration was based on aerial images and orthophotomaps from 1947, 1998, 2003, 2009, 2011 and airborne laser scanning data (2011, ISOK project). Forest succession changes which occurred between 1947 and 2011 were analysed. The selected features of vegetation overgrowing spoil heap "Fryderyk" was determined. The results demonstrated a gradual succession of greenery on soil heap. In 1947, 84% of this area was covered by low vegetation. Tree expansion was proceeding in the westerly and northwest direction. In 2011 this canopy layer covered almost 50% of the research area. Parameters such as height of vegetation, crowns length and cover density were calculated by an airborne laser scanning data. These analyses indicated significant diversity in vertical and horizontal structures of vegetation. The study presents some capacities to use airborne laser scanning for an impartial evaluation of the structure of vegetation.

  7. Radar Sounder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    over the shorter time period (resulting in a multilook SAR ) with the result that spatial resolution, the usual r~ason for using SAR techniques, degrades...Field - - - ALT 21. Sea Surface Topography - - - SAR , ALT 22. Ocean Waves (sea, swell, surf) V. Good Some V. Good SAR , ALT * with additional lower freq...OLS - Operational Line-scan System radiometer (4-6 GHz?) ALT - Altimeter •* good at low microwave SAR - Synthetic Aperture frequencies Radar + over

  8. Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communications Program (AVLOC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The design, development, and operation of airborne and ground-based laser communications and laser radar hardware is described in support of the Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communication program. The major emphasis is placed on the development of a highly flexible test bed for the evaluation of laser communications systems techniques and components in an operational environment.

  9. The relation between Arctic sea ice surface elevation and draft: A case study using coincident AUV sonar and airborne scanning laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doble, Martin J.; Skourup, Henriette; Wadhams, Peter; Geiger, Cathleen A.

    2011-08-01

    Data are presented from a survey by airborne scanning laser profilometer and an AUV-mounted, upward looking swath sonar in the spring Beaufort Sea. The air-snow (surface elevation) and water-ice (draft) surfaces were mapped at 1 × 1 m resolution over a 300 × 300 m area. Data were separated into level and deformed ice fractions using the surface roughness of the sonar data. The relation (R = d/f) between draft, d, and surface elevation, f, was then examined. Correlation between top and bottom surfaces was essentially zero at full resolution, requiring averaging over patches of at least 11 m diameter to constrain the relation largely because of the significant error (˜15 cm) of the laser instrument. Level ice points were concentrated in two core regions, corresponding to level FY ice and refrozen leads, with variations in R attributed primarily to positive snow thickness variability. Deformed ice displayed a more diffuse "cloud," with draft having a more important role in determining R because of wider deformed features underwater. Averaging over footprints similar to satellite altimeters showed the mean surface elevation (typical of ICESat) to be stable with averaging scale, with R = 3.4 (level) and R = 4.2 (deformed). The "minimum elevation within a footprint" characteristic reported for CryoSat was less stable, significantly overestimating R for level ice (R > 5) and deformed ice (R > 6). The mean draft difference between measurements and isostasy suggests 70 m as an isostatic length scale for level ice. The isostatic scale for deformed ice appears to be longer than accessible with these data (>300 m).

  10. Under-canopy snow accumulation and ablation measured with airborne scanning LiDAR altimetry and in-situ instrumental measurements, southern Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, P. B.; Bales, R. C.; Musselman, K. N.; Molotch, N. P.

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the influence of canopy on snow accumulation and melt in a mountain forest using paired snow on and snow off scanning LiDAR altimetry, synoptic measurement campaigns and in-situ time series data of snow depth, SWE, and radiation collected from the Kaweah River watershed, Sierra Nevada, California. Our analysis of forest cover classified by dominant species and 1 m2 grided mean under canopy snow accumulation calculated from airborne scanning LiDAR, demonstrate distinct relationships between forest class and under-canopy snow depth. The five forest types were selected from carefully prepared 1 m vegetation classifications and named for their dominant tree species, Giant Sequoia, Jeffrey Pine, White Fir, Red Fir, Sierra Lodgepole, Western White Pine, and Foxtail Pine. Sufficient LiDAR returns for calculating mean snow depth per m2 were available for 31 - 44% of the canopy covered area and demonstrate a reduction in snow depth of 12 - 24% from adjacent open areas. The coefficient of variation in snow depth under canopies ranged from 0.2 - 0.42 and generally decreased as elevation increased. Our analysis of snow density snows no statistical significance between snow under canopies and in the open at higher elevations with a weak significance for snow under canopies at lower elevations. Incident radiation measurements made at 15 minute intervals under forest canopies show an input of up to 150 w/m2 of thermal radiation from vegetation to the snow surface on forest plots. Snow accumulated on the mid to high elevation forested slopes of the Sierra Nevada represents the majority of winter snow storage. However snow estimates in forested environments demonstrate a high level of uncertainty due to the limited number of in-situ observations and the inability of most remote sensing platforms to retrieve reflectance under dense vegetation. Snow under forest canopies is strongly mediated by forest cover and decoupled from the processes that dictate accumulation

  11. Analysis of remote sensing data collected for detection and mapping of oil spills: Reduction and analysis of multi-sensor airborne data of the NASA Wallops oil spill exercise of November 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Airborne, remotely sensed data of the NASA Wallops controlled oil spill were corrected, reduced and analysed. Sensor performance comparisons were made by registering data sets from different sensors, which were near-coincident in time and location. Multispectral scanner images were, in turn, overlayed with profiles of correlation between airborne and laboratory-acquired fluorosensor spectra of oil; oil-thickness contours derived (by NASA) from a scanning fluorosensor and also from a two-channel scanning microwave radiometer; and synthetic aperture radar X-HH images. Microwave scatterometer data were correlated with dual-channel (UV and TIR) line scanner images of the oil slick.

  12. Airborne Turbulence Detection System Certification Tool Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, David W.; Proctor, Fred H.

    2006-01-01

    A methodology and a corresponding set of simulation tools for testing and evaluating turbulence detection sensors has been presented. The tool set is available to industry and the FAA for certification of radar based airborne turbulence detection systems. The tool set consists of simulated data sets representing convectively induced turbulence, an airborne radar simulation system, hazard tables to convert the radar observable to an aircraft load, documentation, a hazard metric "truth" algorithm, and criteria for scoring the predictions. Analysis indicates that flight test data supports spatial buffers for scoring detections. Also, flight data and demonstrations with the tool set suggest the need for a magnitude buffer.

  13. Contour-Mapping Synthetic-Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R. M.; Caro, E. R.; Wu, C.

    1985-01-01

    Airborne two-antenna synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) interferometric system provides data processed to yield terrain elevation as well as reflectedintensity information. Relative altitudes of terrain points measured to within error of approximately 25 m.

  14. TRMM radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okamoto, Kenichi

    1993-01-01

    The results of a conceptual design study and the performance of key components of the Bread Board Model (BBM) of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) radar are presented. The radar, which operates at 13.8 GHz and is designed to meet TRMM mission objectives, has a minimum measurable rain rate of 0.5 mm/h with a range resolution of 250 m, a horizontal resolution of about 4 km, and a swath width of 220 km. A 128-element active phased array system is adopted to achieve contiguous scanning within the swath. The basic characteristics of BBM were confirmed by experiments. The development of EM started with the cooperation of NASDA and CRL.

  15. Knowledge Based Systems and Metacognition in Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capraro, Gerard T.; Wicks, Michael C.

    An airborne ground looking radar sensor's performance may be enhanced by selecting algorithms adaptively as the environment changes. A short description of an airborne intelligent radar system (AIRS) is presented with a description of the knowledge based filter and detection portions. A second level of artificial intelligence (AI) processing is presented that monitors, tests, and learns how to improve and control the first level. This approach is based upon metacognition, a way forward for developing knowledge based systems.

  16. Spaceborne laser radar.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, T.

    1972-01-01

    Development of laser systems to acquire and track targets in applications such as the rendezvous and docking of two spacecraft. A scan technique is described whereby a narrow laser beam is simultaneously scanned with an equally narrow receiver field-of-view without the aid of mechanical gimbals. Equations are developed in order to examine the maximum acquisition and tracking rates, and the maximum target range for a scanning laser radar system. A recently built prototype of a small, lightweight, low-power-consuming scanning laser radar is described.

  17. Upgrade of the NASA 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) to its Full Science Capability of Sun-Sky-Cloud-Trace Gas Spectrometry in Airborne Science Deployments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Roy R.; Russell, P.; Dunagan, S.; Redemann, J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; LeBlanc, S.; Flynn, C.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this task in the AITT (Airborne Instrument Technology Transition) Program are to (1) upgrade the NASA 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument to its full science capability of measuring (a) direct-beam sun transmission to derive aerosol optical depth spectra, (b) sky radiance vs scattering angle to retrieve aerosol absorption and type (via complex refractive index spectra, shape, and mode-resolved size distribution), (c) zenith radiance for cloud properties, and (d) hyperspectral signals for trace gas retrievals, and (2) demonstrate its suitability for deployment in challenging NASA airborne multiinstrument campaigns. 4STAR combines airborne sun tracking, sky scanning, and zenith pointing with diffraction spectroscopy to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air pollution, radiant energy budgets (hence climate), and remote measurements of Earth's surfaces. Direct beam hyperspectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements are intended to tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. 4STAR test flights, as well as science flights in the 2012-13 TCAP (Two-Column Aerosol Project) and 2013 SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) have demonstrated that the following are essential for 4STAR to achieve its full science potential: (1) Calibration stability for both direct-beam irradiance and sky radiance, (2) Improved light collection and usage, and (3) Improved flight operability and reliability. A particular challenge

  18. Identification of central Kenyan Rift Valley Fever virus vector habitats with Landsat TM and evaluation of their flooding status with airborne imaging radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, K. O.; Sheffner, E. J.; Linthicum, K. J.; Bailey, C. L.; Logan, T. M.; Kasischke, E. S.; Birney, K.; Njogu, A. R.; Roberts, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne virus that affects livestock and humans in Africa. Landsat TM data are shown to be effective in identifying dambos, intermittently flooded areas that are potential mosquite breeding sites, in an area north of Nairobi, Kenya. Positive results were obtained from a limited test of flood detection in dambos with airborne high resolution L, C, and X band multipolarization SAR imagery. L and C bands were effective in detecting flooded dambos, but LHH was by far the best channel for discrimination between flooded and nonflooded sites in both sedge and short-grass environments. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a combined passive and active remote sensing program for monitoring the location and condition of RVF vector habitats, thus making future control of the disease more promising.

  19. 94 GHz doppler wind radar satellite mission concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chung-Chi; Rommen, Björn; Buck, Christopher; Schüttemeyer, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    Extreme weather such as storms, hurricanes and typhoons, also called `high impact weather', is a high priority area of research for the atmospheric dynamics and meteorological science communities. 94 GHz Doppler wind radar satellite mission concepts have been elaborated, which use cloud and precipitation droplets/particles as tracers to measure 3-D wind fields. The so-called polarisation-diversity pulse-pair (PDPP) technique enables to derive line-of-sight wind speed with good accuracy (< 2-3 m/s) and large unambiguous dynamic range (e.g. 75 m/s). Two distinct system concepts have been elaborated: (1) a conically scanning radar concept with large coverage (> 800 km) and ˜50 km along-track sampling, and; (2) a stereo viewing concept with high sampling resolution (< 4 km) within an inclined cut through the atmosphere. The former concept is adequate for studying large-scale severe/extreme weather systems, whereas the latter would be more suitable for understanding of small-scale convective phenomena. For demonstrating the potential of the FDPP technique for deriving accurate Doppler observations, ground-based and airborne Doppler radar campaigns are in preparation. The Galileo 94 GHz radar, upgraded recently to include a FDPP capability, at Chilbolton in the UK, will be used for an extended ground-based campaign (6 months). For the airborne campaign, the dual-frequency (9.4 + 94 GHz) NAWX radar on board a Convair-580 aircraft of the National Science Council of Canada will be upgraded and flown. This paper describes the observation requirements, preliminary satellite mission concepts, associated wind retrieval aspects and the planned demonstration campaigns.

  20. Integrated Airborne and In-Situ Measurements over Land-Fast Ice near Barrow, AK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozena, J. M.; Gardner, J. M.; Liang, R.; Ball, D.; Richter-Menge, J.; Claffey, K. J.; Abelev, A.; Hebert, D. A.; Jones, K.

    2014-12-01

    During March of 2014, the Naval Research Laboratory and the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory collected an integrated set of airborne and in-situ measurements over two areas of floating, but land-fast ice near the coast of Barrow, AK. The near-shore site was just north of Point Barrow, and the "offshore" site was ~ 20 km east of Point Barrow. The in-situ data provided ground-truth for airborne measurements from a scanning LiDAR (Riegl Q 560i), digital photogrammetry (Applanix DSS-439) and a snow radar procured from the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets of the University of Kansas. The objective of the survey was to aid our understanding of the use of the airborne data to calibrate/validate Cryosat-2 data. Sampling size or "footprint" plays a critical role in the attempt to compare in-situ measurements with airborne (or satellite) measurements. Thus the in-situ data were arranged to minimize aliasing. Ground measurements were collected along transects at both sites consisting of a 2 km long profile of snow depth and ice thickness measurements with periodic boreholes. A 60 m x 400 m swath of snow depth measurements was centered on this profile. Airborne data were collected on five overflights of the two transect areas. The LiDAR measured total freeboard (ice + snow) referenced to leads in the ice, and produced swaths 200-300 m wide. The radar measured snow thickness. The freeboard and snow thickness measurements are used to estimate ice thickness via isostasy and density estimates. The central swath of in situ snow depth data allows examination of the effects of cross-track variations considering the relatively large footprint of the snow radar. Assuming a smooth, flat surface the radar range resolution in air is < 4 cm, but the along-track sampling distance is ~ 3 m after unfocussed SAR processing. The width of the footprint varies from ~ 9 m up to about 40 m (beam-limited) for uneven surfaces. However, the radar could not resolve snow thickness

  1. Synthetic aperture radar capabilities in development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.

    1994-11-15

    The Imaging and Detection Program (IDP) within the Laser Program is currently developing an X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to support the Joint US/UK Radar Ocean Imaging Program. The radar system will be mounted in the program`s Airborne Experimental Test-Bed (AETB), where the initial mission is to image ocean surfaces and better understand the physics of low grazing angle backscatter. The Synthetic Aperture Radar presentation will discuss its overall functionality and a brief discussion on the AETB`s capabilities. Vital subsystems including radar, computer, navigation, antenna stabilization, and SAR focusing algorithms will be examined in more detail.

  2. 78 FR 19063 - Airworthiness Approval for Aircraft Forward-Looking Windshear and Turbulence Radar Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ..., Airborne Weather Radar Equipment. The objective is to leverage the installation specific guidance from the... previously addressed as additional functionality added to TSO-C63c, Airborne Weather and Ground...

  3. On the integration of Airborne full-waveform laser scanning and optical imagery for Site Detection and Mapping: Monteserico study case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coluzzi, R.; Guariglia, A.; Lacovara, B.; Lasaponara, R.; Masini, N.

    2009-04-01

    This paper analyses the capability of airborne LiDAR derived data in the recognition of archaeological marks. It also evaluates the benefits to integrate them with aerial photos and very high resolution satellite imagery. The selected test site is Monteserico, a medieval village located on a pastureland hill in the North East of Basilicata (Southern Italy). The site, attested by documentary sources beginning from the 12th century, was discovered by aerial survey in 1996 [1] and investigated in 2005 by using QuickBird imagery [2]. The only architectural evidence is a castle, built on the western top of the hill; whereas on the southern side, earthenware, pottery and crumbling building materials, related to the medieval settlement, could be observed. From a geological point of view, the stratigraphic sequence is composed of Subappennine Clays, Monte Marano sands and Irsina conglomerates. Sporadic herbaceous plants grow over the investigated area. For the purpose of this study, a full-waveform laser scanning with a 240.000 Hz frequency was used. The average point density value of dataset is about 30 points/m2. The final product is a 0.30 m Digital Surface Models (DSMs) accurately modelled. To derive the DSM the point cloud of the ALS was filtered and then classified by applying appropriate algorithms. In this way surface relief and archaeological features were surveyed with great detail. The DSM was compared with other remote sensing data source such as oblique and nadiral aerial photos and QuickBird imagery, acquired in different time. In this way it was possible to evaluate, compare each other and overlay the archaeological features recorded from each data source (aerial, satellite and lidar). Lidar data showed some interesting results. In particular, they allowed for identifying and recording differences in height on the ground produced by surface and shallow archaeological remains (the so-called shadow marks). Most of these features are visible also by the optical

  4. Spaceborne weather radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, Robert; Kozu, Toshiaki

    1990-01-01

    The present work on the development status of spaceborne weather radar systems and services discusses radar instrument complementarities, the current forms of equations for the characterization of such aspects of weather radar performance as surface and mirror-image returns, polarimetry, and Doppler considerations, and such essential factors in spaceborne weather radar design as frequency selection, scanning modes, and the application of SAR to rain detection. Attention is then given to radar signal absorption by the various atmospheric gases, rain drop size distribution and wind velocity determinations, and the characteristics of clouds, as well as the range of available estimation methods for backscattering, single- and dual-wavelength attenuation, and polarimetric and climatological characteristics.

  5. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  6. CloudSat as a Global Radar Calibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Protat, Alain; Bouniol, Dominique; O'Connor, E. J.; Baltink, Henk K.; Verlinde, J.; Widener, Kevin B.

    2011-03-01

    The calibration of the CloudSat spaceborne cloud radar has been thoroughly assessed using very accurate internal link budgets before launch, comparisons with predicted ocean surface backscatter at 94 GHz, direct comparisons with airborne cloud radars, and statistical comparisons with ground-based cloud radars at different locations of the world. It is believed that the calibration of CloudSat is accurate to within 0.5 to 1 dB. In the present paper it is shown that an approach similar to that used for the statistical comparisons with ground-based radars can now be adopted the other way around to calibrate other ground-based or airborne radars against CloudSat and / or detect anomalies in long time series of ground-based radar measurements, provided that the calibration of CloudSat is followed up closely (which is the case). The power of using CloudSat as a Global Radar Calibrator is demonstrated using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement cloud radar data taken at Barrow, Alaska, the cloud radar data from the Cabauw site, The Netherlands, and airborne Doppler cloud radar measurements taken along the CloudSat track in the Arctic by the RASTA (Radar SysTem Airborne) cloud radar installed in the French ATR-42 aircraft for the first time. It is found that the Barrow radar data in 2008 are calibrated too high by 9.8 dB, while the Cabauw radar data in 2008 are calibrated too low by 8.0 dB. The calibration of the RASTA airborne cloud radar using direct comparisons with CloudSat agrees well with the expected gains and losses due to the change in configuration which required verification of the RASTA calibration.

  7. Reconfigurable L-Band Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael F.

    2008-01-01

    The reconfigurable L-Band radar is an ongoing development at NASA/GSFC that exploits the capability inherently in phased array radar systems with a state-of-the-art data acquisition and real-time processor in order to enable multi-mode measurement techniques in a single radar architecture. The development leverages on the L-Band Imaging Scatterometer, a radar system designed for the development and testing of new radar techniques; and the custom-built DBSAR processor, a highly reconfigurable, high speed data acquisition and processing system. The radar modes currently implemented include scatterometer, synthetic aperture radar, and altimetry; and plans to add new modes such as radiometry and bi-static GNSS signals are being formulated. This development is aimed at enhancing the radar remote sensing capabilities for airborne and spaceborne applications in support of Earth Science and planetary exploration This paper describes the design of the radar and processor systems, explains the operational modes, and discusses preliminary measurements and future plans.

  8. Multiple-wavelength radar perspectives of mixed-phase convective precipitation in MC3E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesbitt, S. W.; Gleicher, K. J.; Petersen, W. A.; Schwaller, M.

    2011-12-01

    During the NASA/DOE Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), conducted in April-June 2011 near the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in northern Oklahoma, multiple wavelength aircraft radar observations of a spectra of convective events were collected from ground based scanning and vertically pointing radars and airborne radars. Ground based radars ranged from W to S band (NASA NPOL dual-polarization (S), NASA D3R dual-polarization (Ku/Ka, DOE C-SAPR dual-polarization (C), DOE dual-polarization (X), DOE Ka/W-SACR dual polarization), while the NASA HIWRAP Ku/Ka band Doppler radar flew aboard the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft. In-situ microphysics were provided in weak convection from the University of North Dakota Citation aircraft. From an incoherent spaceborne radar perspective, in order to accurately attenuation-correct the profile of radar reflectivity and rainfall rate, it is important to distinguish amongst ice-phase, mixed-phase, and liquid precipitation in convection. In this study, we will investigate whether height (as is done for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission precipitation radar), temperature, reflectivity, dual-frequency ratio, or other assumptions are best at delineating mixed phase precipitation in convection for application in TRMM and GPM measurements. Using D3R and HIWRAP measurements as a test bed, validation data in the form of spatiotemporally matched data sets from dual-polarization radar variables and hydrometeor identification at longer wavelengths, as well as in situ microphysics data will be used to discriminate mixed phase precipitation zones and as an attenuation reference to examine dual-frequency ratio methods for identification of mixed precipitation and attenuation correction in such zones. Statistical methods for evaluating and correcting single-frequency methods and assumptions in identifying mixed precipitation for TRMM applications will also be discussed.

  9. Monitoring of topographic changes in glacier ice and lava during the 2014-2015 Bárðarbunga unrest with airborne radar profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Högnadóttir, Thórdís; Gudmundsson, Magnús T.; Gudbjörnsson, Snæbjörn; Lárusson, Örnólfur; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Pálsson, Finnur; Reynolds, Hannah I.; Oddsson, Björn

    2015-04-01

    The subsidence of the ice covered Bárðarbunga caldera, creation and evolution of ice cauldrons over the subglacial path of the lateral dyke, and the formation of a large lava to the north of the Vatnajökull glacier has called for repeated survey of the evolving ice and lava topography. For these measurements a system is used that was designed to monitor glacier surfaces, principally with the aim of detecting changes in subglacial geothermal activity, particularly at the ice-covered Katla and Grímsvötn calderas. The system is composed of ground clearance radar and a sub-meter differential GPS system aboard a Beech B200 Super King Air, two-engine survey aircraft. The system measures the aircraft position, elevation and air clearance four times a second, yielding surface elevation point readings at 15-20 m intervals. The absolute accuracy of the system is estimated 2-3 meters while the relative accuracy is 1-2 m along the profiles that are usually flown at an altitude of 80-120 m over the measured surface. During the ongoing unrest since August 2014, tasks that have been carried out using the aircraft profiling platform include: Survey of the: (i) shape, depth and volume of the subsidence bowl formed in the ice surface in the Bárðarbunga caldera since late August; (ii) shape, depth and volume of small cauldrons considered to have formed in minor, short-lived subglacial eruptions to the SE of the Bárðarbunga caldera and on three locations in the outlet glacier overlying the path of the dyke formed in the second part of August; (iii) evolution of three geothermal ice cauldrons located over the topographic rims of the Bárðarbunga caldera, (iv) mapping of the graben formed to the south of the volcanic fissure in Holuhraun, and (v) the topography of the new lava field. Many of the above tasks could possibly be carried out using satellite data, but the limited repeat rate, interfering cloud cover and short winter days, and timing of satellite overpasses restricts

  10. ESTIMATION OF TROPICAL FOREST STRUCTURE AND BIOMASS FROM FUSION OF RADAR AND LIDAR MEASUREMENTS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saatchi, S. S.; Dubayah, R.; Clark, D. B.; Chazdon, R.

    2009-12-01

    Radar and Lidar instruments are active remote sensing sensors with the potential of measuring forest vertical and horizontal structure and the aboveground biomass (AGB). In this paper, we present the analysis of radar and lidar data acquired over the La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. Radar polarimetry at L-band (25 cm wavelength), P-band (70 cm wavelength) and interferometry at C-band (6 cm wavelength) and VV polarization were acquired by the NASA/JPL airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) system. Lidar images were provided by a large footprint airborne scanning Lidar known as the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS). By including field measurements of structure and biomass over a variety of forest types, we examined: 1) sensitivity of radar and lidar measurements to forest structure and biomass, 2) accuracy of individual sensors for AGB estimation, and 3) synergism of radar imaging measurements with lidar imaging and sampling measurements for improving the estimation of 3-dimensional forest structure and AGB. The results showed that P-band radar combined with any interformteric measurement of forest height can capture approximately 85% of the variation of biomass in La Selva at spatial scales larger than 1 hectare. Similar analysis at L-band frequency captured only 70% of the variation. However, combination of lidar and radar measurements improved estimates of forest three-dimensional structure and biomass to above 90% for all forest types. We present a novel data fusion approach based on a Baysian estimation model with the capability of incorporating lidar samples and radar imagery. The model was used to simulate the potential of data fusion in future satellite mission scenarios as in BIOMASS (planned by ESA) at P-band and DESDynl (planned by NASA) at L-band. The estimation model was also able to quantify errors and uncertainties associated with the scale of measurements, spatial variability of forest structure, and differences in radar and lidar

  11. Mapping Slumgullion Landslide in Colorado, USA Using Airborne Repeat-Pass InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Shrestha, R. L.; Carter, W. E.; Glennie, C. L.; Wang, G.; Lu, Z.; Fernandez-Diaz, J. C.; Cao, N.; Zaugg, E.

    2015-12-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) uses two or more SAR images over the same area to determine landscape topography or ground deformation. An interferogram, generated by the phase components of two coherent SAR images, depicts range changes between the radar and the ground resolution elements, and can be used to derive both landscape topography and subtle changes in surface elevation. However, spaceborne repeat-pass interferometry has two main drawbacks: effects due to differences in atmospheric temperature, pressure, and water vapour at two observation times, and loss of coherence due to long spatial and temporal baselines between observations. Airborne repeat-pass interferometry does not suffer from these drawbacks. The atmospheric effect in case of airborne DInSAR becomes negligible due to smaller swath coverage, and the coherence can be maintained by using smaller spatial and temporal baselines. However, the main technical limitation concerning airborne DInSAR is the need of precise motion compensation with an accurate navigation system to correct for the significant phase errors due to typical flight instability from air turbulence. Here, we present results from a pilot study conducted on July 2015 using both X-band and L-band SlimSAR airborne system over the Slumgullion landslide in Colorado in order to (1) acquire the differential interferograms from the airborne platform, (2) understand their source of errors, and (3) pave a way to improve the precision of the derived surface deformation. The landslide movement estimated from airborne DInSAR is also compared with coincident GPS, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), airborne LiDAR, and spaceborne DInSAR measurements using COSMO-SkyMed images. The airborne DInSAR system has a potential to provide time-transient variability in land surface topography with high-precision and high-resolution, and provide researchers with greater flexibility in selecting the temporal and spatial baselines of the data

  12. Integrated Airborne and In-Situ Measurements Over Land-Fast Ice Near Barrow, AK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, J. M.; Brozena, J. M.; Richter-Menge, J.; Abelev, A.; Liang, R.; Ball, D.; Claffey, K. J.; Hebert, D. A.; Jones, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory has collected two field seasons of integrated airborne and in-situ measurements over multiple sites of floating, but land-fast ice north of Barrow, AK. During the first season in March of 2014 the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory led the on-ice group including NRL personnel and Naval Academy midshipmen. The second season (March 2015) included only NRL scientists and midshipmen. The in-situ data provided ground-truth for airborne measurements from a scanning LiDAR (Riegl Q 560i), digital photogrammetry (Applanix DSS-439), a low-frequency SAR (P-band in 2014 and P and L bands in 2015) and a snow/Ku radar procured from the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets of the University of Kansas. The CReSIS radar was updated in 2015 to integrate the snow and Ku radars into a single continuous chirp, thus improving resolution. The objective of the survey was to aid our understanding of the use of the airborne data to calibrate/validate Cryosat-2 data. Sampling size or "footprint" plays a critical role in the attempt to compare in-situ measurements with airborne (or satellite) measurements. Thus the in-situ data were arranged to minimize aliasing. Ground measurements were collected along transects a sites generally consisting of a 2 km long profile of Magnaprobe and EM31 measurements with periodic boreholes. A 60 m x 400 m swath of Magnaprobe measurements was centered on this profile. Airborne data were collected on multiple overflights of the transect areas. The LiDAR measured total freeboard (ice + snow) referenced to leads in the ice, and produced swaths 200-300 m wide. The SAR imaged the ice beneath the snow and the snow/Ku radar measured snow thickness. The freeboard measurements and snow thickness are used to estimate ice thickness via isostasy and density estimates. Comparisons and processing methodology will be shown. The results of this ground-truth experiment will inform our analysis of grids of airborne data collected

  13. Radar Studies of Aviation Hazards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-31

    4. TITLE AND SURTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS RADAR STUDIES OF AVIATION HAZARDS F1 9628-93- C -0054 _____________ __PE63707F 6. AUTHOR(S) PR278 1...foilowing processing steps have been adopted: a. acquire single scan radar data, b. distinguish individual storms, c . eliminate spurious data for...occurred only with radar reflectivities above 40 dBZ at the -10° C level and cloud tops above the -200C level. Lightning occurred only when tops extended

  14. The Multi-Center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor: Recent Measurements and Future Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, Dean R.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Howell, James N.; Darby, Lisa S.; Tratt, David M.; Menzies, Robert T.

    1999-01-01

    The coherent Doppler lidar, when operated from an airborne platform, offers a unique measurement capability for study of atmospheric dynamical and physical properties. This is especially true for scientific objectives requiring measurements in optically-clear air, where other remote sensing technologies such as Doppler radar are at a disadvantage in terms of spatial resolution and coverage. Recent experience suggests airborne coherent Doppler lidar can yield unique wind measurements of--and during operation within--extreme weather phenomena. This paper presents the first airborne coherent Doppler lidar measurements of hurricane wind fields. The lidar atmospheric remote sensing groups of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory jointly developed an airborne lidar system, the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS). The centerpiece of MACAWS is the lidar transmitter from the highly successful NOAA Windvan. Other field-tested lidar components have also been used, when feasible, to reduce costs and development time. The methodology for remotely sensing atmospheric wind fields with scanning coherent Doppler lidar was demonstrated in 1981; enhancements were made and the system was reflown in 1984. MACAWS has potentially greater scientific utility, compared to the original airborne scanning lidar system, owing to a factor of approx. 60 greater energy-per-pulse from the NOAA transmitter. MACAWS development was completed and the system was first flown in 1995. Following enhancements to improve performance, the system was re-flown in 1996 and 1998. The scientific motivation for MACAWS is three-fold: obtain fundamental measurements of subgrid scale (i.e., approx. 2-200 km) processes and features which may be used to improve parameterizations in hydrological, climate, and general

  15. A barrier radar concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J.; Ball, C.; Weissman, I.

    A description is given of a low power, light-weight radar that can be quickly set up and operated on batteries for extended periods of time to detect airborne intruders. With low equipment and operating costs, it becomes practical to employ a multiplicity of such radars to provide an unbroken intrusion fence over the desired perimeter. Each radar establishes a single transmitted fan beam extending vertically from horizon to horizon. The beam is generated by a two-face array antenna built in an A-frame configuration and is shaped, through phasing of the array elements, to concentrate the transmitter power in a manner consistent with the expected operating altitude ceiling of the targets of interest. The angular width of this beam in the dimension transverse to the fan depends on the radar transmission frequency and the antenna aperture dimension, but is typically wide enough so that a target at the maximum altitude or range will require tens of seconds to pass through the beam. A large number of independent samples of radar data will thus be available to provide many opportunities for target detection.

  16. UAVSAR: An Airborne Window on Earth Surface Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrates that UAVSAR's precision autopilot and electronic steering have allowed for the reliable collection of airborne repeat pass radar interferometric data for deformation mapping. Deformation maps from temporal scales ranging from hours to months over a variety of signals of geophysical interest illustrate the utility of UAVSAR airborne repeat pass interferometry to these studies.

  17. Helios: a Multi-Purpose LIDAR Simulation Framework for Research, Planning and Training of Laser Scanning Operations with Airborne, Ground-Based Mobile and Stationary Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtold, S.; Höfle, B.

    2016-06-01

    In many technical domains of modern society, there is a growing demand for fast, precise and automatic acquisition of digital 3D models of a wide variety of physical objects and environments. Laser scanning is a popular and widely used technology to cover this demand, but it is also expensive and complex to use to its full potential. However, there might exist scenarios where the operation of a real laser scanner could be replaced by a computer simulation, in order to save time and costs. This includes scenarios like teaching and training of laser scanning, development of new scanner hardware and scanning methods, or generation of artificial scan data sets to support the development of point cloud processing and analysis algorithms. To test the feasibility of this idea, we have developed a highly flexible laser scanning simulation framework named Heidelberg LiDAR Operations Simulator (HELIOS). HELIOS is implemented as a Java library and split up into a core component and multiple extension modules. Extensible Markup Language (XML) is used to define scanner, platform and scene models and to configure the behaviour of modules. Modules were developed and implemented for (1) loading of simulation assets and configuration (i.e. 3D scene models, scanner definitions, survey descriptions etc.), (2) playback of XML survey descriptions, (3) TLS survey planning (i.e. automatic computation of recommended scanning positions) and (4) interactive real-time 3D visualization of simulated surveys. As a proof of concept, we show the results of two experiments: First, a survey planning test in a scene that was specifically created to evaluate the quality of the survey planning algorithm. Second, a simulated TLS scan of a crop field in a precision farming scenario. The results show that HELIOS fulfills its design goals.

  18. Airborne remote sensing applications to coastal wave research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Paul A.; Walsh, Edward J.; Krabill, William B.; Swift, Robert N.; Manizade, Serdar S.; Scott, John F.; Earle, Marshall D.

    1998-08-01

    Airborne sensors provide effective coverage of a broad region and are suitable for large-scale experiments. In this paper, two scanning sensors that use the direct ranging technique to measure surface wave displacement are described. On a NASA P-3 aircraft the sensors can complete one run across a 100-km continental shelf in 17 min. A case study is presented using radar-measured, two-dimensional surface topography to derive wave damping due to bottom friction. The results are in good agreement with an analytical model based on a quadratic formulation of bottom shear stress. This study demonstrates that remote sensing measurements can be used for rapid characterization of surface waves on the continental shelf and in coastal regions. Examples illustrated in this paper include the derivation of wavenumber spectra and estimation of the dissipation rate of shoaling ocean swell.

  19. The NASA Polarimetric Radar (NPOL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Walter A.; Wolff, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of the NASA NPOL S-band dual-polarimetric radar are presented including its operating characteristics, field configuration, scanning capabilities and calibration approaches. Examples of precipitation science data collections conducted using various scan types, and associated products, are presented for different convective system types and previous field campaign deployments. Finally, the NASA NPOL radar location is depicted in its home base configuration within the greater Wallops Flight Facility precipitation research array supporting NASA Global Precipitation Measurement Mission ground validation.

  20. Gulf stream ground truth project - Results of the NRL airborne sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, C. R.; Chen, D. T.; Hammond, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Results of an airborne study of the waves in the Gulf Stream are presented. These results show that the active microwave sensors (high-flight radar and wind-wave radar) provide consistent and accurate estimates of significant wave height and surface wind speed, respectively. The correlation between the wave height measurements of the high-flight radar and a laser profilometer is excellent.

  1. Netted LPI RADARs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Characteristics ALQ-172 B-52G/H Self- protection Track/search radar jamming, steerable jam beams , software programmable, phased array antenna ...bore sight: knowing the pattern of the antenna’s gain, two or more intercepts within the antenna main beam are sufficient to determine the...14 a. Low Level Antenna Sidelobes .............14 b. Antenna Scan Patterns ...................18 4. Carrier Frequency Selection

  2. Radar SLAM using visual features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callmer, Jonas; Törnqvist, David; Gustafsson, Fredrik; Svensson, Henrik; Carlbom, Pelle

    2011-12-01

    A vessel navigating in a critical environment such as an archipelago requires very accurate movement estimates. Intentional or unintentional jamming makes GPS unreliable as the only source of information and an additional independent supporting navigation system should be used. In this paper, we suggest estimating the vessel movements using a sequence of radar images from the preexisting body-fixed radar. Island landmarks in the radar scans are tracked between multiple scans using visual features. This provides information not only about the position of the vessel but also of its course and velocity. We present here a navigation framework that requires no additional hardware than the already existing naval radar sensor. Experiments show that visual radar features can be used to accurately estimate the vessel trajectory over an extensive data set.

  3. Radar principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Toru

    1989-01-01

    Discussed here is a kind of radar called atmospheric radar, which has as its target clear air echoes from the earth's atmosphere produced by fluctuations of the atmospheric index of refraction. Topics reviewed include the vertical structure of the atmosphere, the radio refractive index and its fluctuations, the radar equation (a relation between transmitted and received power), radar equations for distributed targets and spectral echoes, near field correction, pulsed waveforms, the Doppler principle, and velocity field measurements.

  4. Linear models for airborne-laser-scanning-based operational forest inventory with small field sample size and highly correlated LiDAR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Junttila, Virpi; Kauranne, Tuomo; Finley, Andrew O.; Bradford, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Modern operational forest inventory often uses remotely sensed data that cover the whole inventory area to produce spatially explicit estimates of forest properties through statistical models. The data obtained by airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) correlate well with many forest inventory variables, such as the tree height, the timber volume, and the biomass. To construct an accurate model over thousands of hectares, LiDAR data must be supplemented with several hundred field sample measurements of forest inventory variables. This can be costly and time consuming. Different LiDAR-data-based and spatial-data-based sampling designs can reduce the number of field sample plots needed. However, problems arising from the features of the LiDAR data, such as a large number of predictors compared with the sample size (overfitting) or a strong correlation among predictors (multicollinearity), may decrease the accuracy and precision of the estimates and predictions. To overcome these problems, a Bayesian linear model with the singular value decomposition of predictors, combined with regularization, is proposed. The model performance in predicting different forest inventory variables is verified in ten inventory areas from two continents, where the number of field sample plots is reduced using different sampling designs. The results show that, with an appropriate field plot selection strategy and the proposed linear model, the total relative error of the predicted forest inventory variables is only 5%–15% larger using 50 field sample plots than the error of a linear model estimated with several hundred field sample plots when we sum up the error due to both the model noise variance and the model’s lack of fit.

  5. Large phased-array radars

    SciTech Connect

    Brookner, D.E.

    1988-12-15

    Large phased-array radars can play a very important part in arms control. They can be used to determine the number of RVs being deployed, the type of targeting of the RVs (the same or different targets), the shape of the deployed objects, and possibly the weight and yields of the deployed RVs. They can provide this information at night as well as during the day and during rain and cloud covered conditions. The radar can be on the ground, on a ship, in an airplane, or space-borne. Airborne and space-borne radars can provide high resolution map images of the ground for reconnaissance, of anti-ballistic missile (ABM) ground radar installations, missile launch sites, and tactical targets such as trucks and tanks. The large ground based radars can have microwave carrier frequencies or be at HF (high frequency). For a ground-based HF radar the signal is reflected off the ionosphere so as to provide over-the-horizon (OTH) viewing of targets. OTH radars can potentially be used to monitor stealth targets and missile traffic.

  6. Enhanced Weather Radar (EWxR) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronfeld, Kevin M. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    An airborne weather radar system, the Enhanced Weather Radar (EWxR), with enhanced on-board weather radar data processing was developed and tested. The system features additional weather data that is uplinked from ground-based sources, specialized data processing, and limited automatic radar control to search for hazardous weather. National Weather Service (NWS) ground-based Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD) information is used by the EWxR system to augment the on-board weather radar information. The system will simultaneously display NEXRAD and on-board weather radar information in a split-view format. The on-board weather radar includes an automated or hands-free storm-finding feature that optimizes the radar returns by automatically adjusting the tilt and range settings for the current altitude above the terrain and searches for storm cells near the atmospheric 0-degree isotherm. A rule-based decision aid was developed to automatically characterize cells as hazardous, possibly-hazardous, or non-hazardous based upon attributes of that cell. Cell attributes are determined based on data from the on-board radar and from ground-based radars. A flight path impact prediction algorithm was developed to help pilots to avoid hazardous weather along their flight plan and their mission. During development the system was tested on the NASA B757 aircraft and final tests were conducted on the Rockwell Collins Sabreliner.

  7. Alternative analysis of airborne laser data collected within conventional multi-parameter airborne geophysical surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahl, Andreas; Supper, R.; Motschka, K.; Schattauer, I.

    2010-05-01

    For the interpretation of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry as well as airborne electromagnetics it is of great importance to determine the distance between the geophysical sensor and the ground surface. Since radar altimeters do not penetrate vegetation, laser altimeters became popular in airborne geophysics over the past years. Currently the airborne geophysical platform of the Geological Survey of Austria (GBA) is equipped with a Riegl LD90-3800VHS-FLP high resolution laser altimeter, measuring the distances according to the first and the last reflected pulse. The goal of the presented study was to explore the possibilities of deriving additional information about the survey area from the laser data and to determine the accuracy of such results. On one hand the difference between the arrival time of the first and the last reflected pulse can be used to determine the height of the vegetation. This parameter is for example important for the correction of damping effects on airborne gamma-ray measurements caused by vegetation. Moreover especially for groundwater studies at catchment scale, this parameter can also be applied to support the spatial assessment of evapotranspiration. In combination with the altitude above geoid, determined by a GPS receiver, a rough digital elevation model of the survey area can be derived from the laser altimetry. Based on a data set from a survey area in the northern part of Austria, close to the border with the Czech Republic, the reliability of such a digital elevation model and the calculated vegetation height was tested. In this study a mean deviation of -1.4m, with a standard deviation of ±3.4m, between the digital elevation model from Upper Austria (25m spatial resolution) and the determined elevation model was determined. We also found an obvious correlation between the calculated vegetation heights greater 15m and the mapped forest published by the ‘Department of Forest Inventory' of the ‘Federal Forest Office' of Austria

  8. Short pulse radar used to measure sea surface wind speed and SWH. [Significant Wave Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, D. L.; Mennella, R. A.; Walsh, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    A joint airborne measurement program is being pursued by NRL and NASA Wallops Flight Center to determine the extent to which wind speed and sea surface significant wave height (SWH) can be measured quantitatively and remotely with a short pulse (2 ns), wide-beam (60 deg), nadir-looking 3-cm radar. The concept involves relative power measurements only and does not need a scanning antenna, Doppler filters, or absolute power calibration. The slopes of the leading and trailing edges of the averaged received power for the pulse limited altimeter are used to infer SWH and surface wind speed. The interpretation is based on theoretical models of the effects of SWH on the leading edge shape and rms sea-surface slope on the trailing-edge shape. The models include the radar system parameters of antenna beam width and pulsewidth.

  9. Airborne Radar Search for Diesel Submarines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-15

    Agency, 1995. CASA, Flight Manual to Operators CASA 212 S43 Aircraft, Spain. Comando Naval de Operaciones , Venezuelan Navy, Manual de Doctrina de...Empleo del Comando de la Aviaci6n Naval (MAN-DC-CNAOP-0004), 2001. Comando Naval de Operaciones Venezuelan Navy. Observatorio Naval Cajigal, Aguas Marinas

  10. Enhanced Capabilities of Advanced Airborne Radar Simulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    RCF UNIX-Based Machine 65 BAUHAUS A-l Illustrations to Understand How GTD Files are Read 78 C-l Input File for Sidelobe Jammer Nulling...on the UNIX-based machine BAUHAUS are provided to illustrate the enhancements in run time, as compared to the original version of the simulation [1...Figure 27 presents some CPU run times for executing the enhanced simulation on the RCF UNIX-based machine BAUHAUS . The run times are shown only for

  11. Airborne Sense and Avoid Radar Panel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    land and crop surveys, aerial photography , and critical infrastructure protection—their widespread usage within the National Airspace System is...RFIC) developed for the ABSAA panel enable state-of-the- art performance by providing two indepen- dent channels for the amplification, the phase

  12. Airborne Particles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojala, Carl F.; Ojala, Eric J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students collect airborne particles using a common vacuum cleaner. Suggests ways for the students to convert their data into information related to air pollution and human health. Urges consideration of weather patterns when analyzing the results of the investigation. (TW)

  13. Airborne Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    ATM (Airborne Thematic Mapper) was developed for NSTL (National Space Technology Companies) by Daedalus Company. It offers expanded capabilities for timely, accurate and cost effective identification of areas with prospecting potential. A related system is TIMS, Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner. Originating from Landsat 4, it is also used for agricultural studies, etc.

  14. Airborne LIDAR point cloud tower inclination judgment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    liang, Chen; zhengjun, Liu; jianguo, Qian

    2016-11-01

    Inclined transmission line towers for the safe operation of the line caused a great threat, how to effectively, quickly and accurately perform inclined judgment tower of power supply company safety and security of supply has played a key role. In recent years, with the development of unmanned aerial vehicles, unmanned aerial vehicles equipped with a laser scanner, GPS, inertial navigation is one of the high-precision 3D Remote Sensing System in the electricity sector more and more. By airborne radar scan point cloud to visually show the whole picture of the three-dimensional spatial information of the power line corridors, such as the line facilities and equipment, terrain and trees. Currently, LIDAR point cloud research in the field has not yet formed an algorithm to determine tower inclination, the paper through the existing power line corridor on the tower base extraction, through their own tower shape characteristic analysis, a vertical stratification the method of combining convex hull algorithm for point cloud tower scarce two cases using two different methods for the tower was Inclined to judge, and the results with high reliability.

  15. New law enforcement applications of millimeter-wave radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Nicholas C.; Ferris, David D., Jr.; McMillan, Robert W.; Wicks, Michael C.

    1997-06-01

    Recent advances in millimeter-wave (MMW) radar technologies provide new applications for law enforcement use over-and- above the venerable speed timing radar. These applications include the potential to detect weapons under clothing and to conduct surveillance through walls. Concealed Weapon Detection and covert surveillance are of high interest to both the Department of Defense in support of Small Unit Operations and the Justice Department for civilian law enforcement applications. MMW sensors are under development which should provide the needed capabilities including radiometric sensors at 95 GHz, active 95 GHz real aperture radars, active focal plane array (FPA) radars, and holographic radars. Radiometric sensors include 2D FPA systems, 1D FPA, scanned systems, and single element scanned sensors. Active FPA radars include illuminated radiometric systems and coherent radar systems. Real aperture MMW radar systems include raster scanned and conical scanned sensors. Holographic systems ruse mechanical scanners to collect coherent data over a significant solid angular sector.

  16. Simultaneous dual-band radar development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liskow, C. L.

    1974-01-01

    Efforts to design and construct an airborne imaging radar operating simultaneously at L band and X band with an all-inertial navigation system in order to form a dual-band radar system are described. The areas of development include duplex transmitters, receivers, and recorders, a control module, motion compensation for both bands, and adaptation of a commercial inertial navigation system. Installation of the system in the aircraft and flight tests are described. Circuit diagrams, performance figures, and some radar images are presented.

  17. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL), a spatially scanning range-gated device installed on board a NASA C-54 aircraft, is described. The AOL system is capable of measuring topographical relief or water depth (bathymetry) with a range resolution of plus or minus 0.3 m in the vertical dimension. The system may also be used to measure fluorescent spectral signatures from 3500 to 8000 A with a resolution of 100 A. Potential applications of the AOL, including sea state measurements, water transparency assessments, oil spill identification, effluent identification and crop cover assessment are also mentioned.

  18. Planetary Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  19. Detecting and Mitigating Wind Turbine Clutter for Airspace Radar Systems

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    It is well recognized that a wind turbine has a large radar cross-section (RCS) and, due to the movement of the blades, the wind turbine will generate a Doppler frequency shift. This scattering behavior may cause severe interferences on existing radar systems including static ground-based radars and spaceborne or airborne radars. To resolve this problem, efficient techniques or algorithms should be developed to mitigate the effects of wind farms on radars. Herein, one transponder-based mitigation technique is presented. The transponder is not a new concept, which has been proposed for calibrating high-resolution imaging radars. It modulates the radar signal in a manner that the retransmitted signals can be separated from the scene echoes. As wind farms often occupy only a small area, mitigation processing in the whole radar operation will be redundant and cost inefficient. Hence, this paper uses a transponder to determine whether the radar is impacted by the wind farms. If so, the effects of wind farms are then mitigated with subsequent Kalman filtering or plot target extraction algorithms. Taking airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and pulse Doppler radar as the examples, this paper provides the corresponding system configuration and processing algorithms. The effectiveness of the mitigation technique is validated by numerical simulation results. PMID:24385880

  20. Detecting and mitigating wind turbine clutter for airspace radar systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Qin

    2013-01-01

    It is well recognized that a wind turbine has a large radar cross-section (RCS) and, due to the movement of the blades, the wind turbine will generate a Doppler frequency shift. This scattering behavior may cause severe interferences on existing radar systems including static ground-based radars and spaceborne or airborne radars. To resolve this problem, efficient techniques or algorithms should be developed to mitigate the effects of wind farms on radars. Herein, one transponder-based mitigation technique is presented. The transponder is not a new concept, which has been proposed for calibrating high-resolution imaging radars. It modulates the radar signal in a manner that the retransmitted signals can be separated from the scene echoes. As wind farms often occupy only a small area, mitigation processing in the whole radar operation will be redundant and cost inefficient. Hence, this paper uses a transponder to determine whether the radar is impacted by the wind farms. If so, the effects of wind farms are then mitigated with subsequent Kalman filtering or plot target extraction algorithms. Taking airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and pulse Doppler radar as the examples, this paper provides the corresponding system configuration and processing algorithms. The effectiveness of the mitigation technique is validated by numerical simulation results.

  1. The NRL 2011 Airborne Sea-Ice Thickness Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozena, J. M.; Gardner, J. M.; Liang, R.; Ball, D.; Richter-Menge, J.

    2011-12-01

    In March of 2011, the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) performed a study focused on the estimation of sea-ice thickness from airborne radar, laser and photogrammetric sensors. The study was funded by ONR to take advantage of the Navy's ICEX2011 ice-camp /submarine exercise, and to serve as a lead-in year for NRL's five year basic research program on the measurement and modeling of sea-ice scheduled to take place from 2012-2017. Researchers from the Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) and NRL worked with the Navy Arctic Submarine Lab (ASL) to emplace a 9 km-long ground-truth line near the ice-camp (see Richter-Menge et al., this session) along which ice and snow thickness were directly measured. Additionally, US Navy submarines collected ice draft measurements under the groundtruth line. Repeat passes directly over the ground-truth line were flown and a grid surrounding the line was also flown to collect altimeter, LiDAR and Photogrammetry data. Five CRYOSAT-2 satellite tracks were underflown, as well, coincident with satellite passage. Estimates of sea ice thickness are calculated assuming local hydrostatic balance, and require the densities of water, ice and snow, snow depth, and freeboard (defined as the elevation of sea ice, plus accumulated snow, above local sea level). Snow thickness is estimated from the difference between LiDAR and radar altimeter profiles, the latter of which is assumed to penetrate any snow cover. The concepts we used to estimate ice thickness are similar to those employed in NASA ICEBRIDGE sea-ice thickness estimation. Airborne sensors used for our experiment were a Reigl Q-560 scanning topographic LiDAR, a pulse-limited (2 nS), 10 GHz radar altimeter and an Applanix DSS-439 digital photogrammetric camera (for lead identification). Flights were conducted on a Twin Otter aircraft from Pt. Barrow, AK, and averaged ~ 5 hours in duration. It is challenging to directly compare results from the swath LiDAR with the

  2. Remote sensing with laser spectrum radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianhe; Zhou, Tao; Jia, Xiaodong

    2016-10-01

    The unmanned airborne (UAV) laser spectrum radar has played a leading role in remote sensing because the transmitter and the receiver are together at laser spectrum radar. The advantages of the integrated transceiver laser spectrum radar is that it can be used in the oil and gas pipeline leak detection patrol line which needs the non-contact reflective detection. The UAV laser spectrum radar can patrol the line and specially detect the swept the area are now in no man's land because most of the oil and gas pipelines are in no man's land. It can save labor costs compared to the manned aircraft and ensure the safety of the pilots. The UAV laser spectrum radar can be also applied in the post disaster relief which detects the gas composition before the firefighters entering the scene of the rescue.

  3. Characterising Vegetation Structural and Functional Differences Across Australian Ecosystems From a Network of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Survey Sites and Airborne and Satellite Image Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phinn, S. R.; Armston, J.; Scarth, P.; Johansen, K.; Schaefer, M.; Suarez, L.; Soto-Berelov, M.; Muir, J.; Woodgate, W.; Jones, S.; Held, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Vegetation structural information is critical for environmental monitoring, management and compliance assessment. In this context we refer to vegetation structural properties as vertical, horizontal and volumetric dimensions, including: canopy height; amount and distribution of vegetation by height; foliage projective cover (FPC); leaf area index (LAI); and above ground biomass. Our aim was to determine if there were significant differences between vegetation structural properties across 11 ecosystem types in Australia as measured by terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) structure metrics. The ecosystems sampled included: mesophyll vineforest, wet-dry tropical savannah, mallee woodland, subtropical eucalypt forest, mulga woodland/grassland, wet eucalypt forest, dry eucalypt forest, tall and wet eucalypt forest, and desert grassland/shrublands. Canopy height, plant area-height profiles and LAI were calculated from consistently processed TLS data using Australia's Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network's (TERN) Supersites by the TERN AusCover remote sensing field teams from 2012-2015. The Supersites were sampled using standardised field protocols within a core set of 1 ha plots as part of a 5 km x 5 km uniform area using a RIEGL-VZ400 waveform recording TLS. Four to seven scans were completed per plot, with one centre point and then at 25 m away from the centre point along transect lines at 0o, 60o and 240o. Individual foliage profiles were sensitive to spatial variation in the distribution of plant materials. Significant differences were visible between each of the vegetation communities assessed when aggregated to plot and ecosystem type scales. Several of the communities exhibited simple profiles with either grass and shrubs (e.g. desert grassland) or grass and trees (e.g. mallee woodland). Others had multiple vegetation forms at different heights, contributing to the profile (e.g. wet eucalypt forest). The TLS data provide significantly more detail about the relative

  4. Understanding heavy lake-effect snowfall: The vertical structure of radar reflectivity in a deep snowband over and downwind of Lake Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Daniel James

    The distribution of radar-estimated precipitation from lake-effect snow bands over and downwind of Lake Ontario shows more snowfall in downwind areas than over the lake itself. Here we examine two non-exclusive processes contributing to this: the collapse of convection that lofts hydrometeors over the lake and allows then to settle them downwind, and stratiform ascent over land, due to surface cooling, frictional convergence, and terrain, leading to more uniformly distributed precipitation there. The main data sources for this study are vertical profiles of radar reflectivity and hydrometeor vertical velocity in a well-defined, deep long-lake-axis-parallel band, observed on 11 December, 2013 during the Ontario Winter Lake-effect Systems (OWLeS) project. The profiles are derived from an airborne W-band Doppler radar, as well as an array of four Ka-band radars, a X-band profiling radar, a scanning X-band radar, and a scanning S-band radar. The presence of convection offshore is evident from deep, strong (up to 10 m s-1) updrafts producing bounded weak-echo regions and locally heavily rimed snow particles. The decrease of the standard deviation, skewness, and peak values of Doppler vertical velocity during the downwind shore crossing is consistent with the convection collapse hypothesis. Consistent with the stratiform ascent hypothesis are (a) an increase in mean vertical velocity over land; and (b) an increasing abundance of large snowflakes at low levels and over land, due to depositional growth and aggregation, evident from flight-level and surface particle size distribution data, and from differences in reflectivity profiles from S, X, Ka, and W-band radars at nearly the same time and location.

  5. Synthetic Aperture Radar Simulation Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    multilook are discussed. A chapter is devoted to elevation and planimetric data bases. In addition, six- teen pictures of SAR images from Hughes Aircraft, as...scans. Figure 5.4-1 is a photograph ot two SAR displays. The tirst display is made up ot six subscans and has a multilook ot one. Note that tading is...dentfi by block number) * Synthetic Aperture Radar ( SAR ) Simulation Study Radar Simulation Data Bases 5/~t. 4th.- Computer Image Generation Display 20

  6. Shuttle Imaging Radar B (SIR-B) Weddell Sea ice observations - A comparison of SIR-B and scanning multichannel microwave radiometer ice concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Seelye; Holt, Benjamin; Cavalieri, Donald J.; Squire, Vernon

    1987-01-01

    Ice concentrations over the Weddell Sea were studied using SIR-B data obtained during the October 1984 mission, with special attention given to the effect of ocean waves on the radar return at the ice edge. Sea ice concentrations were derived from the SIR-B data using two image processing methods: the classification scheme at JPL and the manual classification method at Scott Polar Research Institute (SPRI), England. The SIR ice concentrations were compared with coincident concentrations from the Nimbus-7 SMMR. For concentrations greater than 40 percent, which was the smallest concentration observed jointly by SIR-B and the SMMR, the mean difference between the two data sets for 12 points was 2 percent. A comparison between the JPL and the SPRI SIR-B algorithms showed that the algorithms agree to within 1 percent in the interior ice pack, but the JPL algorithm gives slightly greater concentrations at the ice edge (due to the fact that the algorithm is affected by the wind waves in these areas).

  7. Spaceborne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Eckerman, J.; Meneghini, R.; Atlas, D.; Boerner, W. M.; Cherry, S.; Clark, J. F.; Doviak, R. J.; Goldhirsh, J.; Lhermitte, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    The spaceborne radar panel considered how radar could be used to measure precipitation from satellites. The emphasis was on how radar could be used with radiometry (at microwave, visible (VIS), and infrared (IR) wavelengths) to reduce the uncertainties of measuring precipitation with radiometry alone. In addition, the fundamental electromagnetic interactions involved in the measurements were discussed to determine the key work areas for research and development to produce effective instruments. Various approaches to implementing radar systems on satellites were considered for both shared and dedicated instruments. Finally, a research and development strategy was proposed for establishing the parametric relations and retrieval algorithms required for extracting precipitation information from the radar and associated radiometric data.

  8. Moose (Alces alces) reacts to high summer temperatures by utilizing thermal shelters in boreal forests - an analysis based on airborne laser scanning of the canopy structure at moose locations.

    PubMed

    Melin, Markus; Matala, Juho; Mehtätalo, Lauri; Tiilikainen, Raisa; Tikkanen, Olli-Pekka; Maltamo, Matti; Pusenius, Jyrki; Packalen, Petteri

    2014-04-01

    The adaptation of different species to warming temperatures has been increasingly studied. Moose (Alces alces) is the largest of the ungulate species occupying the northern latitudes across the globe, and in Finland it is the most important game species. It is very well adapted to severe cold temperatures, but has a relatively low tolerance to warm temperatures. Previous studies have documented changes in habitat use by moose due to high temperatures. In many of these studies, the used areas have been classified according to how much thermal cover they were assumed to offer based on satellite/aerial imagery data. Here, we identified the vegetation structure in the areas used by moose under different thermal conditions. For this purpose, we used airborne laser scanning (ALS) data extracted from the locations of GPS-collared moose. This provided us with detailed information about the relationships between moose and the structure of forests it uses in different thermal conditions and we were therefore able to determine and differentiate between the canopy structures at locations occupied by moose during different thermal conditions. We also discovered a threshold beyond which moose behaviour began to change significantly: as day temperatures began to reach 20 °C and higher, the search for areas with higher and denser canopies during daytime became evident. The difference was clear when compared to habitat use at lower temperatures, and was so strong that it provides supporting evidence to previous studies, suggesting that moose are able to modify their behaviour to cope with high temperatures, but also that the species is likely to be affected by warming climate.

  9. Airborne Microwave Imaging of River Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plant, William J.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project was to determine whether airborne microwave remote sensing systems can measure river surface currents with sufficient accuracy to make them prospective instruments with which to monitor river flow from space. The approach was to fly a coherent airborne microwave Doppler radar, developed by APL/UW, on a light airplane along several rivers in western Washington state over an extended period of time. The fundamental quantity obtained by this system to measure river currents is the mean offset of the Doppler spectrum. Since this scatter can be obtained from interferometric synthetic aperture radars (INSARs), which can be flown in space, this project provided a cost effective means for determining the suitability of spaceborne INSAR for measuring river flow.

  10. Progress in coherent laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Considerable progress with coherent laser radar has been made over the last few years, most notably perhaps in the available range of high performance devices and components and the confidence with which systems may now be taken into the field for prolonged periods of operation. Some of this increasing maturity was evident at the 3rd Topical Meeting on Coherent Laser Radar: Technology and Applications. Topics included in discussions were: mesoscale wind fields, nocturnal valley drainage and clear air down bursts; airborne Doppler lidar studies and comparison of ground and airborne wind measurement; wind measurement over the sea for comparison with satellite borne microwave sensors; transport of wake vortices at airfield; coherent DIAL methods; a newly assembled Nd-YAG coherent lidar system; backscatter profiles in the atmosphere and wavelength dependence over the 9 to 11 micrometer region; beam propagation; rock and soil classification with an airborne 4-laser system; technology of a global wind profiling system; target calibration; ranging and imaging with coherent pulsed and CW system; signal fluctuations and speckle. Some of these activities are briefly reviewed.

  11. RADAR WARNING SYSTEM,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    RADAR TRACKING, *AIRCRAFT DEFENSE SYSTEMS, RADAR EQUIPMENT, AIR TO AIR, SEARCH RADAR, GUIDED MISSILES, HIGH SPEED BOMBING, EARLY WARNING SYSTEMS, FIRE CONTROL SYSTEM COMPONENTS, AIRCRAFT, TIME, CHINA.

  12. X-Band Radar for Studies of Tropical Storms from High Altitude UAV Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Shannon; Heymsfield, Gerald; Li, Lihua; Bradley, Damon

    2007-01-01

    The increased role of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) in NASA's suborbital program has created a strong interest in the development of instruments with new capabilities, more compact sizes and reduced weights than the instruments currently operated on manned aircrafts. There is a strong demand and tremendous potential for using high altitude UAV (HUAV) to carry weather radars for measurements of reflectivity and wind fields from tropical storms. Tropical storm genesis frequently occurs in ocean regions that are inaccessible to piloted aircraft due to the long off shore range and the required periods of time to gather significant data. Important factors of interest for the study of hurricane genesis include surface winds, profiled winds, sea surface temperatures, precipitation, and boundary layer conditions. Current satellite precipitation and surface wind sensors have resolutions that are too large and revisit times that are too infrequent to study this problem. Furthermore, none of the spaceborne sensors measure winds within the storm itself. A dual beam X-band Doppler radar, UAV Radar (URAD), is under development at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for the study of tropical storms from HUAV platforms, such as a Global Hawk. X-band is the most desirable frequency for airborne weather radars since these can be built in a relatively compact size using off-the-shelf components which cost significantly less than other higher frequency radars. Furthermore, X-band radars provide good sensitivity with tolerable attenuation in storms. The low-cost and light-weight URAD will provide new capabilities for studying hurricane genesis by analyzing the vertical structure of tropical cyclones as well as 3D reflectivity and wind fields in clouds. It will enable us to measure both the 3D precipitation structure and surface winds by using two antenna beams: fixed nadir and conical scanning each produced by its associated subsystem. The nadir subsystem is a magnetron based radar

  13. Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 1; AVIRIS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on March 4-8, 1996. The main workshop is divided into two smaller workshops as follows: (1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on March 4-6. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1; (2) The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on March 6-8. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2.

  14. External calibration technique of millimeter-wave cloud radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Tao; Zhao, Zeng-Liang; Yao, Zhi-Gang; Han, Zhi-Gang; Guo, Lin-Da

    2016-10-01

    The millimeter-wave cloud radar can provide a large number of fine and reliable information for the inversion of cloud macro and micro parameters. A key link of using the millimeter-wave cloud radar to detect the cloud is that the radar must be calibrated. Due to the precision components and severe environment of millimeter-wave cloud radar, subtle changes may take place in the operation process of cloud radar, unless the cloud radar is calibrated regularly. Although the calibration system inside the cloud radar can track and monitor the main working parameters and correct the detection results, it fails to consider the characteristics of the antenna and the mutual influence among different components of cloud radar. Therefore, the external calibration for cloud radar system is very important. Combined with the actual situation of cloud radar under domestic onboard platform, this paper builds a complete external calibration technique process of cloud radar based on the calm sea, providing the theoretical support for the external calibration experiments of the airborne and even satellite-borne millimeter-wave cloud radar developed by our country.

  15. Study on analysis from sources of error for Airborne LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, H. C.; Yan, Q.; Liu, Z. J.; Zuo, Z. Q.; Xu, Q. Q.; Li, F. F.; Song, C.

    2016-11-01

    With the advancement of Aerial Photogrammetry, it appears that to obtain geo-spatial information of high spatial and temporal resolution provides a new technical means for Airborne LIDAR measurement techniques, with unique advantages and broad application prospects. Airborne LIDAR is increasingly becoming a new kind of space for earth observation technology, which is mounted by launching platform for aviation, accepting laser pulses to get high-precision, high-density three-dimensional coordinate point cloud data and intensity information. In this paper, we briefly demonstrates Airborne laser radar systems, and that some errors about Airborne LIDAR data sources are analyzed in detail, so the corresponding methods is put forwarded to avoid or eliminate it. Taking into account the practical application of engineering, some recommendations were developed for these designs, which has crucial theoretical and practical significance in Airborne LIDAR data processing fields.

  16. Sense and avoid radar for micro/nano robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanov, Pavlo A.; Asmolova, Olha

    2014-10-01

    Revolutionary new fly eye radar sensor technologies based on an array of directional antennas is eliminating the need for a mechanical scanning antenna or complicated phase processor. Proposed sense and avoid radar based on fly eye radar technology can be very small, provides continuous surveillance of entire sky (360 degree by azimuth and elevation) and can be applied for separate or swarm of micro/nano UAS or UGS. Monopulse technology increases bearing accuracy several folds and radar can be multi-functional, multi-frequency. Fly eye micro-radars are inexpensive, can be expendable. Prototype of sense and avoid radar with two directional antennas has been designed and bench tested.

  17. Final Technical Report for Interagency Agreement No. DE-SC0005453 “Characterizing Aerosol Distributions, Types, and Optical and Microphysical Properties using the NASA Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP)”

    SciTech Connect

    Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2015-01-13

    Measurements of the vertical profile of atmospheric aerosols and aerosol optical and microphysical characteristics are required to: 1) determine aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcing, 2) compute radiative flux and heating rate profiles, 3) assess model simulations of aerosol distributions and types, and 4) establish the ability of surface and space-based remote sensors to measure the indirect effect. Consequently the ASR program calls for a combination of remote sensing and in situ measurements to determine aerosol properties and aerosol influences on clouds and radiation. As part of our previous DOE ASP project, we deployed the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) on the NASA B200 King Air aircraft during major field experiments in 2006 (MILAGRO and MaxTEX), 2007 (CHAPS), 2009 (RACORO), and 2010 (CalNex and CARES). The HSRL provided measurements of aerosol extinction (532 nm), backscatter (532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064 nm). These measurements were typically made in close temporal and spatial coincidence with measurements made from DOE-funded and other participating aircraft and ground sites. On the RACORO, CARES, and CalNEX missions, we also deployed the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). RSP provided intensity and degree of linear polarization over a broad spectral and angular range enabling column-average retrievals of aerosol optical and microphysical properties. Under this project, we analyzed observations and model results from RACORO, CARES, and CalNex and accomplished the following objectives. 1. Identified aerosol types, characterize the vertical distribution of the aerosol types, and partition aerosol optical depth by type, for CARES and CalNex using HSRL data as we have done for previous missions. 2. Investigated aerosol microphysical and macrophysical properties using the RSP. 3. Used the aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles measured by the HSRL

  18. Can we estimate precipitation rate during snowfall using a scanning terrestrial LiDAR?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeWinter, A. L.; Bair, E. H.; Davis, R. E.; Finnegan, D. C.; Gutmann, E. D.; Dozier, J.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate snowfall measurements in windy areas have proven difficult. To examine a new approach, we have installed an automatic scanning terrestrial LiDAR at Mammoth Mountain, CA. With this LiDAR, we have demonstrated effective snow depth mapping over a small study area of several hundred m2. The LiDAR also produces dense point clouds by detecting falling and blowing hydrometeors during storms. Daily counts of airborne detections from the LiDAR show excellent agreement with automated and manual snow water equivalent measurements, suggesting that LiDAR observations have the potential to directly estimate precipitation rate. Thus, we suggest LiDAR scanners offer advantages over precipitation radars, which could lead to more accurate precipitation rate estimates. For instance, uncertainties in mass-diameter and mass-fall speed relationships used in precipitation radar, combined with low reflectivity of snow in the microwave spectrum, produce errors of up to 3X in snowfall rates measured by radar. Since snow has more backscatter in the near-infrared wavelengths used by LiDAR compared to the wavelengths used by radar, and the LiDAR detects individual hydrometeors, our approach has more potential for directly estimating precipitation rate. A key uncertainty is hydrometeor mass. At our study site, we have also installed a Multi Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) to measure size, fallspeed, and mass of individual hydrometeors. By combining simultaneous MASC and LiDAR measurements, we can estimate precipitation density and rate.

  19. Validation of Rain Rate Retrievals for the Airborne Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Maria; Salemirad, Matin; Jones, Linwood; Biswas, Sayak; Cecil, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Global Hawk aircraft (AV1)has two microwave sensors: the passive Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD), and the active High-altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler(HIWRAP). Results are presented for a rain measurement validation opportunity that occurred in 2013, when the AV1 flew over a tropical squall-line that was simultaneously observed by the Tampa NEXRAD radar. During this experiment, Global Hawk made 3 passes over the rapidly propagating thunderstorm, while the TAMPA NEXRAD performed volume scans every 5 minutes. In this poster, the three-way inter-comparison of HIRAD Tb (base temperature), HIWRAP dbZ (decibels relative to equivalent reflectivity) and NEXRAD rain rate imagery are presented. Also, observed HIRAD Tbs are compared with theoretical radiative transfer model results using HIWRAP Rain Rates.

  20. Validation of Rain Rate Retrievals for the Airborne Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Maria; Salemirad, Matin; Jones, W. Linwood; Biswas, Sayak; Cecil, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    On board of the NASA's Global Hawk (AV1) aircraft there are two microwave, namely: the passive microwave Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD), and the active microwave High-altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP). This paper presents results from an unplanned rain rate measurement validation opportunity that occurred in 2013, when the Global Hawk aircraft flew over an intense tropical squall-line that was simultaneously observed, by the Tampa NEXRAD meteorological radar. During this experiment, Global Hawk flying at an altitude of 18 km made 3 passes over the rapidly propagating thunderstorm, while the TAMPA NEXRAD perform volume scans on a 5-minute interval. NEXRAD 2D images of rain rate (mm/hr) were obtained at two altitudes (3 km & 6 km), which serve as surface truth for the HIRAD rain rate retrievals. In this paper, results are presented of the three-way inter-comparison of HIRAD Tb, HIWRAP dbZ and NEXRAD rain rate imagery.

  1. GeoSAR: A Radar Terrain Mapping System for the New Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas; vanZyl, Jakob; Hensley, Scott; Reis, James; Munjy, Riadh; Burton, John; Yoha, Robert

    2000-01-01

    GeoSAR Geographic Synthetic Aperture Radar) is a new 3 year effort to build a unique, dual-frequency, airborne Interferometric SAR for mapping of terrain. This is being pursued via a Consortium of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Calgis, Inc., and the California Department of Conservation. The airborne portion of this system will operate on a Calgis Gulfstream-II aircraft outfitted with P- and X-band Interferometric SARs. The ground portions of this system will be a suite of Flight Planning Software, an IFSAR Processor and a Radar-GIS Workstation. The airborne P-band and X-band radars will be constructed by JPL with the goal of obtaining foliage penetration at the longer P-band wavelengths. The P-band and X-band radar will operate at frequencies of 350 Mhz and 9.71 Ghz with bandwidths of either 80 or 160 Mhz. The airborne radars will be complemented with airborne laser system for measuring antenna positions. Aircraft flight lines and radar operating instructions will be computed with the Flight Planning Software The ground processing will be a two-step step process. First, the raw radar data will be processed into radar images and interferometer derived Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). Second, these radar images and DEMs will be processed with a Radar GIS Workstation which performs processes such as Projection Transformations, Registration, Geometric Adjustment, Mosaicking, Merging and Database Management. JPL will construct the IFSAR Processor and Calgis, Inc. will construct the Radar GIS Workstation. The GeoSAR Project was underway in November 1996 with a goal of having the radars and laser systems fully integrated onto the Calgis Gulfstream-II aircraft in early 1999. Then, Engineering Checkout and Calibration-Characterization Flights will be conducted through November 1999. The system will be completed at the end of 1999 and ready for routine operations in the year 2000.

  2. Combined synthetic aperture radar/Landsat imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marque, R. E.; Maurer, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations into merging synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) images using optical and digital merging techniques. The unique characteristics of airborne and orbital SAR and Landsat MSS imagery are discussed. The case for merging the imagery is presented and tradeoffs between optical and digital merging techniques explored. Examples of Landsat and airborne SAR imagery are used to illustrate optical and digital merging. Analysis of the merged digital imagery illustrates the improved interpretability resulting from combining the outputs from the two sensor systems.

  3. Radar monitoring of oil pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinard, N. W.

    1970-01-01

    Radar is currently used for detecting and monitoring oil slicks on the sea surface. The four-frequency radar system is used to acquire synthetic aperature imagery of the sea surface on which the oil slicks appear as a nonreflecting area on the surface surrounded by the usual sea return. The value of this technique was demonstrated, when the four-frequency radar system was used to image the oil spill of tanker which has wrecked. Imagery was acquired on both linear polarization (horizontal, vertical) for frequencies of 428, 1228, and 8910 megahertz. Vertical returns strongly indicated the presence of oil while horizontal returns failed to detect the slicks. Such a result is characteristic of the return from the sea and cannot presently be interpreted as characteristics of oil spills. Because an airborne imaging radar is capable of providing a wide-swath coverage under almost all weather conditions, it offers promise in the development of a pollution-monitoring system that can provide a coastal watch for oil slicks.

  4. Radar Range Sidelobe Reduction Using Adaptive Pulse Compression Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Lihua; Coon, Michael; McLinden, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Pulse compression has been widely used in radars so that low-power, long RF pulses can be transmitted, rather than a highpower short pulse. Pulse compression radars offer a number of advantages over high-power short pulsed radars, such as no need of high-power RF circuitry, no need of high-voltage electronics, compact size and light weight, better range resolution, and better reliability. However, range sidelobe associated with pulse compression has prevented the use of this technique on spaceborne radars since surface returns detected by range sidelobes may mask the returns from a nearby weak cloud or precipitation particles. Research on adaptive pulse compression was carried out utilizing a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) waveform generation board and a radar transceiver simulator. The results have shown significant improvements in pulse compression sidelobe performance. Microwave and millimeter-wave radars present many technological challenges for Earth and planetary science applications. The traditional tube-based radars use high-voltage power supply/modulators and high-power RF transmitters; therefore, these radars usually have large size, heavy weight, and reliability issues for space and airborne platforms. Pulse compression technology has provided a path toward meeting many of these radar challenges. Recent advances in digital waveform generation, digital receivers, and solid-state power amplifiers have opened a new era for applying pulse compression to the development of compact and high-performance airborne and spaceborne remote sensing radars. The primary objective of this innovative effort is to develop and test a new pulse compression technique to achieve ultrarange sidelobes so that this technique can be applied to spaceborne, airborne, and ground-based remote sensing radars to meet future science requirements. By using digital waveform generation, digital receiver, and solid-state power amplifier technologies, this improved pulse compression

  5. First Results from an Airborne Ka-Band SAR Using SweepSAR and Digital Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory A.; Ghaemi, Hirad; Hensley, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    SweepSAR is a wide-swath synthetic aperture radar technique that is being studied for application on the future Earth science radar missions. This paper describes the design of an airborne radar demonstration that simulates an 11-m L-band (1.2-1.3 GHz) reflector geometry at Ka-band (35.6 GHz) using a 40-cm reflector. The Ka-band SweepSAR Demonstration system was flown on the NASA DC-8 airborne laboratory and used to study engineering performance trades and array calibration for SweepSAR configurations. We present an instrument and experiment overview, instrument calibration and first results.

  6. Radar systems for a polar mission, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Claassen, J. P.; Erickson, R. L.; Fong, R. K. T.; Komen, M. J.; Mccauley, J.; Mcmillan, S. B.; Parashar, S. K.

    1977-01-01

    The application of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in monitoring and managing earth resources is examined. Synthetic aperture radars form a class of side-looking airborne radar, often referred to as coherent SLAR, which permits fine-resolution radar imagery to be generated at long operating ranges by the use of signal processing techniques. By orienting the antenna beam orthogonal to the motion of the spacecraft carrying the radar, a one-dimensional imagery ray system is converted into a two-dimensional or terrain imaging system. The radar's ability to distinguish - or resolve - closely spaced transverse objects is determined by the length of the pulse. The transmitter components receivers, and the mixer are described in details.

  7. High Resolution Displacement Monitoring for Urban Environments in Seattle, Washington using Terrestrial Radar Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, B. W.; Schrock, G.; Werner, C. L.; Zhou, W.; Pugh, N.

    2015-12-01

    Displacement monitoring using Terrestrial Radar Interferometry (TRI) over an urban environment was conducted to monitor for potential movement of buildings, roadways, and urban infrastructure in Seattle, Washington for a 6 week deployment in March and April of 2015. A Gamma Portable Radar Interferometer was deployed on a the lower roof of the Smith Tower at an elevation of about 100 m, overlooking the historical district of Pioneer Square. Radar monitoring in this context provides wide area coverage, sub millimeter precision, near real time alarming, and reflectorless measurement. Image georectification was established using a previously collected airborne lidar scan which was used to map the radar image onto a 3D 1st return elevation model of downtown Seattle. Platform stability concerns were monitored using high rate GPS and a 3-axis accelerometer to monitor for building movement or platform instability. Displacements were imaged at 2 minute intervals and stacked into 2 hour averages to aid in noise characterization. Changes in coherence are characterized based on diurnal fluctuations of temperature, cultural noise, and target continuity. These informed atmospheric and image selection filters for optimizing interferogram generation and displacement measurement quality control. An urban monitoring workflow was established using point target interferometric analysis to create a monitoring set of approximately 100,000 stable monitoring points measured at 2 minute to 3 hour intervals over the 6 week deployment. Radar displacement measurements were verified using ongoing survey and GPS monitoring program and with corner reflector tests to verify look angle corrections to settlement motion. Insights from this monitoring program can be used to design TRI monitoring programs for underground tunneling, urban subsidence, and earthquake damage assessment applications.

  8. Structural geologic interpretations from radar imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeves, Robert G.

    1969-01-01

    Certain structural geologic features may be more readily recognized on sidelooking airborne radar (SLAR) images than on conventional aerial photographs, other remote sensor imagery, or by ground observations. SLAR systems look obliquely to one or both sides and their images resemble aerial photographs taken at low sun angle with the sun directly behind the camera. They differ from air photos in geometry, resolution, and information content. Radar operates at much lower frequencies than the human eye, camera, or infrared sensors, and thus "sees" differently. The lower frequency enables it to penetrate most clouds and some precipitation, haze, dust, and some vegetation. Radar provides its own illumination, which can be closely controlled in intensity and frequency. It is narrow band, or essentially monochromatic. Low relief and subdued features are accentuated when viewed from the proper direction. Runs over the same area in significantly different directions (more than 45° from each other), show that images taken in one direction may emphasize features that are not emphasized on those taken in the other direction; optimum direction is determined by those features which need to be emphasized for study purposes. Lineaments interpreted as faults stand out on radar imagery of central and western Nevada; folded sedimentary rocks cut by faults can be clearly seen on radar imagery of northern Alabama. In these areas, certain structural and stratigraphic features are more pronounced on radar images than on conventional photographs; thus radar imagery materially aids structural interpretation.

  9. Radar Observations of Convective Systems from a High-Altitude Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, G.; Geerts, B.; Tian, L.

    1999-01-01

    Reflectivity data collected by the precipitation radar on board the tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, orbiting at 350 km altitude, are compared to reflectivity data collected nearly simultaneously by a doppler radar aboard the NASA ER-2 flying at 19-20 km altitude, i.e. above even the deepest convection. The TRMM precipitation radar is a scanning device with a ground swath width of 215 km, and has a resolution of about a4.4 km in the horizontal and 250 m in the vertical (125 m in the core swath 48 km wide). The TRMM radar has a wavelength of 217 cm (13.8 GHz) and the Nadir mirror echo below the surface is used to correct reflectivity for loss by attenuation. The ER-2 Doppler radar (EDOP) has two antennas, one pointing to the nadir, 34 degrees forward. The forward pointing beam receives both the normal and the cross-polarized echos, so the linear polarization ratio field can be monitored. EDOP has a wavelength of 3.12 cm (9.6 GHz), a vertical resolution of 37.5 m and a horizontal along-track resolution of about 100 m. The 2-D along track airflow field can be synthesized from the radial velocities of both beams, if a reflectivity-based hydrometer fall speed relation can be assumed. It is primarily the superb vertical resolution that distinguishes EDOP from other ground-based or airborne radars. Two experiments were conducted during 1998 into validate TRMM reflectivity data over convection and convectively-generated stratiform precipitation regions. The Teflun-A (TEXAS-Florida Underflight) experiment, was conducted in April and May and focused on mesoscale convective systems mainly in southeast Texas. TEFLUN-B was conducted in August-September in central Florida, in coordination with CAMEX-3 (Convection and Moisture Experiment). The latter was focused on hurricanes, especially during landfall, whereas TEFLUN-B concentrated on central; Florida convection, which is largely driven and organized by surface heating and ensuing sea breeze circulations

  10. Planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The radar astronomy activities supported by the Deep Space Network during June, July, and August 1980 are reported. The planetary bodies observed were Venus, Mercury, and the asteroid Toro. Data were obtained at both S and X band, and the observations were considered successful.

  11. Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment (HARLIE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.

    1998-01-01

    Scanning holographic lidar receivers are currently in use in two operational lidar systems, PHASERS (Prototype Holographic Atmospheric Scanner for Environmental Remote Sensing) and now HARLIE (Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment). These systems are based on volume phase holograms made in dichromated gelatin (DCG) sandwiched between 2 layers of high quality float glass. They have demonstrated the practical application of this technology to compact scanning lidar systems at 532 and 1064 nm wavelengths, the ability to withstand moderately high laser power and energy loading, sufficient optical quality for most direct detection systems, overall efficiencies rivaling conventional receivers, and the stability to last several years under typical lidar system environments. Their size and weight are approximately half of similar performing scanning systems using reflective optics. The cost of holographic systems will eventually be lower than the reflective optical systems depending on their degree of commercialization. There are a number of applications that require or can greatly benefit from a scanning capability. Several of these are airborne systems, which either use focal plane scanning, as in the Laser Vegetation Imaging System or use primary aperture scanning, as in the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar or the Large Aperture Scanning Airborne Lidar. The latter class requires a large clear aperture opening or window in the aircraft. This type of system can greatly benefit from the use of scanning transmission holograms of the HARLIE type because the clear aperture required is only about 25% larger than the collecting aperture as opposed to 200-300% larger for scan angles of 45 degrees off nadir.

  12. Laboratory demonstration of an effective range sidelobe suppression technique for spaceborne rain radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, E.; Tanner, A.; Wilson, W.; Denning, R.; Durden, S.; Li, F.

    A 13.8 GHz linear frequency-modulated pulse compression radar electronics system for spaceborne and airborne radar rain mapping applications has been built and tested. Preliminary test results indicate that the far range sidelobes can be suppressed to the desired -60 B level in the laboratory environment.

  13. Radar measurement of L-band signal fluctuations caused by propagation through trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, Stephen L.; Klein, Jeffrey D.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1991-01-01

    Fluctuations of an L-band, horizontally polarized signal that was transmitted from the ground through a coniferous forest canopy to an airborne radar are examined. The azimuth synthetic aperture radar (SAR) impulse response in the presence of the measured magnitude fluctuations shows increased sidelobes over the case with no trees. Statistics of the observed fluctuations are similar to other observations.

  14. Laboratory demonstration of an effective range sidelobe suppression technique for spaceborne rain radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, E.; Tanner, A.; Wilson, W.; Denning, R.; Durden, S.; Li, F.

    1991-01-01

    A 13.8 GHz linear frequency-modulated pulse compression radar electronics system for spaceborne and airborne radar rain mapping applications has been built and tested. Preliminary test results indicate that the far range sidelobes can be suppressed to the desired -60 B level in the laboratory environment.

  15. NASA's DC-8 With Rain Mapping Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In a joint venture between NASA and Japan's NASDA, scientists have been using satellites, airplanes, and boats to measure rain physics in and under thunderstorms over open water. This Quick Time movie shows NASA's DC-8 jet with the instruments like the airborne rain mapping radar, i.e., the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) and a lightening imaging sensor. Earth science and weather studies are an important ongoing function of NASA and its affiliates.

  16. Windshear detection radar signal processing studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This final report briefly summarizes research work at Clemson in the Radar Systems Laboratory under the NASA Langley Research Grant NAG-1-928 in support of the Antenna and Microwave Branch, Guidance and Control Division, program to develop airborne sensor technology for the detection of low altitude windshear. A bibliography of all publications generated by Clemson personnel is included. An appendix provides abstracts of all publications.

  17. Nordic Snow Radar Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmetyinen, Juha; Kontu, Anna; Pulliainen, Jouni; Vehviläinen, Juho; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Wiesmann, Andreas; Mätzler, Christian; Werner, Charles; Rott, Helmut; Nagler, Thomas; Schneebeli, Martin; Proksch, Martin; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Kern, Michael; Davidson, Malcolm W. J.

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the Nordic Snow Radar Experiment (NoSREx) campaign was to provide a continuous time series of active and passive microwave observations of snow cover at a representative location of the Arctic boreal forest area, covering a whole winter season. The activity was a part of Phase A studies for the ESA Earth Explorer 7 candidate mission CoReH2O (Cold Regions Hydrology High-resolution Observatory). The NoSREx campaign, conducted at the Finnish Meteorological Institute Arctic Research Centre (FMI-ARC) in Sodankylä, Finland, hosted a frequency scanning scatterometer operating at frequencies from X- to Ku-band. The radar observations were complemented by a microwave dual-polarization radiometer system operating from X- to W-bands. In situ measurements consisted of manual snow pit measurements at the main test site as well as extensive automated measurements on snow, ground and meteorological parameters. This study provides a summary of the obtained data, detailing measurement protocols for each microwave instrument and in situ reference data. A first analysis of the microwave signatures against snow parameters is given, also comparing observed radar backscattering and microwave emission to predictions of an active/passive forward model. All data, including the raw data observations, are available for research purposes through the European Space Agency and the Finnish Meteorological Institute. A consolidated dataset of observations, comprising the key microwave and in situ observations, is provided through the ESA campaign data portal to enable easy access to the data.

  18. The National Research Council of Canada`s flight facilities for airborne research

    SciTech Connect

    Marcotte, D.L.; MacPherson, J.I.; Douglas, C.

    1996-10-01

    The NRC maintains a fleet of research aircraft in support of programs in Flight Mechanics and Airborne Research Experiments. Two of these, a Convair-580 and a deHavilland DHC-6 Twin Otter, are equipped for a diverse program in Airborne Research including studies in atmospheric geoscience, airborne system development in resource geoscience and airborne radar development. While both aircraft share some common instrumentation, they have distinct capabilities and have developed different specializations. These capabilities are outlined and current and recent developments are reviewed. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Use of Dual-wavelength Radar for Snow Parameter Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Liang; Meneghini, Robert; Iguchi, Toshio; Detwiler, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Use of dual-wavelength radar, with properly chosen wavelengths, will significantly lessen the ambiguities in the retrieval of microphysical properties of hydrometeors. In this paper, a dual-wavelength algorithm is described to estimate the characteristic parameters of the snow size distributions. An analysis of the computational results, made at X and Ka bands (T-39 airborne radar) and at S and X bands (CP-2 ground-based radar), indicates that valid estimates of the median volume diameter of snow particles, D(sub 0), should be possible if one of the two wavelengths of the radar operates in the non-Rayleigh scattering region. However, the accuracy may be affected to some extent if the shape factors of the Gamma function used for describing the particle distribution are chosen far from the true values or if cloud water attenuation is significant. To examine the validity and accuracy of the dual-wavelength radar algorithms, the algorithms are applied to the data taken from the Convective and Precipitation-Electrification Experiment (CaPE) in 1991, in which the dual-wavelength airborne radar was coordinated with in situ aircraft particle observations and ground-based radar measurements. Having carefully co-registered the data obtained from the different platforms, the airborne radar-derived size distributions are then compared with the in-situ measurements and ground-based radar. Good agreement is found for these comparisons despite the uncertainties resulting from mismatches of the sample volumes among the different sensors as well as spatial and temporal offsets.

  20. Radars in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delnore, Victor E.

    1990-01-01

    The capabilities of active microwave devices operating from space (typically, radar, scatterometers, interferometers, and altimeters) are discussed. General radar parameters and basic radar principles are explained. Applications of these parameters and principles are also explained. Trends in space radar technology, and where space radars and active microwave sensors in orbit are going are discussed.

  1. Validation of the Electromagnetic Code FACETS for Numerical Simulation of Radar Target Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    In particular, radar target images in the X -band region around 10 GHz are of considerable interest; most military maritime and air-borne radar systems...image simulation of targets in the X -band radar frequency. This numerical method permits computation of a complex-target image to be done within a...reasonable amount of computational time. Measured X -band image data of a canonical target known as SLICY (Sandia Laboratory Implementation of Cylinders

  2. Radar Thickness Measurements over the Southern Part of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuah, Teong Sek; Gogineni, Siva Prasad; Allen, Christopher; Wohletz, Brad; Wong, Y. C.; Ng, P. Y.; Ajayi, E.

    1996-01-01

    We performed ice thickness measurements over the southern part of the Greenland ice sheet during June and July 1993. We used an airborne coherent radar depth sounder for these measurements. The radar was operated from a NASA P-3 aircraft equipped with GPS receivers. Radar data were collected in conjunction with laser altimeter and microwave altimeter measurements of ice surface elevation. This report provides radio echograms and thickness profiles from data collected during 1993.

  3. Radar attenuation and temperature within the Greenland Ice Sheet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacGregor, Joseph A; Li, Jilu; Paden, John D; Catania, Ginny A; Clow, Gary D.; Fahnestock, Mark A; Gogineni, Prasad S.; Grimm, Robert E.; Morlighem, Mathieu; Nandi, Soumyaroop; Seroussi, Helene; Stillman, David E

    2015-01-01

    The flow of ice is temperature-dependent, but direct measurements of englacial temperature are sparse. The dielectric attenuation of radio waves through ice is also temperature-dependent, and radar sounding of ice sheets is sensitive to this attenuation. Here we estimate depth-averaged radar-attenuation rates within the Greenland Ice Sheet from airborne radar-sounding data and its associated radiostratigraphy. Using existing empirical relationships between temperature, chemistry, and radar attenuation, we then infer the depth-averaged englacial temperature. The dated radiostratigraphy permits a correction for the confounding effect of spatially varying ice chemistry. Where radar transects intersect boreholes, radar-inferred temperature is consistently higher than that measured directly. We attribute this discrepancy to the poorly recognized frequency dependence of the radar-attenuation rate and correct for this effect empirically, resulting in a robust relationship between radar-inferred and borehole-measured depth-averaged temperature. Radar-inferred englacial temperature is often lower than modern surface temperature and that of a steady state ice-sheet model, particularly in southern Greenland. This pattern suggests that past changes in surface boundary conditions (temperature and accumulation rate) affect the ice sheet's present temperature structure over a much larger area than previously recognized. This radar-inferred temperature structure provides a new constraint for thermomechanical models of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  4. A satellite-based radar wind sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xin, Weizhuang

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to investigate the application of Doppler radar systems for global wind measurement. A model of the satellite-based radar wind sounder (RAWS) is discussed, and many critical problems in the designing process, such as the antenna scan pattern, tracking the Doppler shift caused by satellite motion, and backscattering of radar signals from different types of clouds, are discussed along with their computer simulations. In addition, algorithms for measuring mean frequency of radar echoes, such as the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) estimator, the covariance estimator, and the estimators based on autoregressive models, are discussed. Monte Carlo computer simulations were used to compare the performance of these algorithms. Anti-alias methods are discussed for the FFT and the autoregressive methods. Several algorithms for reducing radar ambiguity were studied, such as random phase coding methods and staggered pulse repitition frequncy (PRF) methods. Computer simulations showed that these methods are not applicable to the RAWS because of the broad spectral widths of the radar echoes from clouds. A waveform modulation method using the concept of spread spectrum and correlation detection was developed to solve the radar ambiguity. Radar ambiguity functions were used to analyze the effective signal-to-noise ratios for the waveform modulation method. The results showed that, with suitable bandwidth product and modulation of the waveform, this method can achieve the desired maximum range and maximum frequency of the radar system.

  5. Bistatic synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Gillian

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) allows all-weather, day and night, surface surveillance and has the ability to detect, classify and geolocate objects at long stand-off ranges. Bistatic SAR, where the transmitter and the receiver are on separate platforms, is seen as a potential means of countering the vulnerability of conventional monostatic SAR to electronic countermeasures, particularly directional jamming, and avoiding physical attack of the imaging platform. As the receiving platform can be totally passive, it does not advertise its position by RF emissions. The transmitter is not susceptible to jamming and can, for example, operate at long stand-off ranges to reduce its vulnerability to physical attack. This thesis examines some of the complications involved in producing high-resolution bistatic SAR imagery. The effect of bistatic operation on resolution is examined from a theoretical viewpoint and analytical expressions for resolution are developed. These expressions are verified by simulation work using a simple 'point by point' processor. This work is extended to look at using modern practical processing engines for bistatic geometries. Adaptations of the polar format algorithm and range migration algorithm are considered. The principal achievement of this work is a fully airborne demonstration of bistatic SAR. The route taken in reaching this is given, along with some results. The bistatic SAR imagery is analysed and compared to the monostatic imagery collected at the same time. Demonstrating high-resolution bistatic SAR imagery using two airborne platforms represents what I believe to be a European first and is likely to be the first time that this has been achieved outside the US (the UK has very little insight into US work on this topic). Bistatic target characteristics are examined through the use of simulations. This also compares bistatic imagery with monostatic and gives further insight into the utility of bistatic SAR.

  6. Partitioning Ocean Wave Spectra Obtained from Radar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaye, Lauriane; Vergely, Jean-Luc; Hauser, Daniele; Guitton, Gilles; Mouche, Alexis; Tison, Celine

    2016-08-01

    2D wave spectra of ocean waves can be partitioned into several wave components to better characterize the scene. We present here two methods of component detection: one based on watershed algorithm and the other based on a Bayesian approach. We tested both methods on a set of simulated SWIM data, the Ku-band real aperture radar embarked on the CFOSAT (China- France Oceanography Satellite) mission which launch is planned mid-2018. We present the results and the limits of both approaches and show that Bayesian method can also be applied to other kind of wave spectra observations as those obtained with the radar KuROS, an airborne radar wave spectrometer.

  7. Operation of a Radar Altimeter over the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grund, Matthew D.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis presents documentation for the Advanced Application Flight Experiment (AAFE) pulse compression radar altimeter and its role in the NASA Multisensor Airborne Altimetry Experiment over Greenland in 1993. The AAFE Altimeter is a Ku-band microwave radar which has demonstrated 14 centimeter range precision in operation over arctic ice. Recent repairs and improvements were required to make the Greenland missions possible. Transmitter, receiver and software modifications, as well as the integration of a GPS receiver are thoroughly documented. Procedures for installation, and operation of the radar are described. Finally, suggestions are made for further system improvements.

  8. Coherent Doppler Laser Radar: Technology Development and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has been investigating, developing, and applying coherent Doppler laser radar technology for over 30 years. These efforts have included the first wind measurement in 1967, the first airborne flights in 1972, the first airborne wind field mapping in 1981, and the first measurement of hurricane eyewall winds in 1998. A parallel effort at MSFC since 1982 has been the study, modeling and technology development for a space-based global wind measurement system. These endeavors to date have resulted in compact, robust, eyesafe lidars at 2 micron wavelength based on solid-state laser technology; in a factor of 6 volume reduction in near diffraction limited, space-qualifiable telescopes; in sophisticated airborne scanners with full platform motion subtraction; in local oscillator lasers capable of rapid tuning of 25 GHz for removal of relative laser radar to target velocities over a 25 km/s range; in performance prediction theory and simulations that have been validated experimentally; and in extensive field campaign experience. We have also begun efforts to dramatically improve the fundamental photon efficiency of the laser radar, to demonstrate advanced lower mass laser radar telescopes and scanners; to develop laser and laser radar system alignment maintenance technologies; and to greatly improve the electrical efficiency, cooling technique, and robustness of the pulsed laser. This coherent Doppler laser radar technology is suitable for high resolution, high accuracy wind mapping; for aerosol and cloud measurement; for Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric and trace gases; for hard target range and velocity measurement; and for hard target vibration spectra measurement. It is also suitable for a number of aircraft operations applications such as clear air turbulence (CAT) detection; dangerous wind shear (microburst) detection; airspeed, angle of attack, and sideslip measurement; and fuel savings through

  9. Comparison of various enhanced radar imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Inder J.; Gandhe, Avinash

    1998-09-01

    Recently, many techniques have been proposed to enhance the quality of radar images obtained using SAR and/or ISAR. These techniques include spatially variant apodization (SVA), adaptive sidelobe reduction (ASR), the Capon method, amplitude and phase estimation of sinusoids (APES) and data extrapolation. SVA is a special case of ASR; whereas the APES algorithm is similar to the Capon method except that it provides a better amplitude estimate. In this paper, the ASR technique, the APES algorithm and data extrapolation are used to generate radar images of two experimental targets and an airborne target. It is shown that although for ideal situations (point targets) the APES algorithm provides the best radar images (reduced sidelobe level and sharp main lobe), its performance degrades quickly for real world targets. The ASR algorithm gives radar images with low sidelobes but at the cost of some loss of information about the target. Also, there is not much improvement in radar image resolution. Data extrapolation, on the other hand, improves image resolution. In this case one can reduce the sidelobes by using non-uniform weights. Any loss in the radar image resolution due to non-uniform weights can be compensated by further extrapolating the scattered field data.

  10. Study to investigate and evaluate means of optimizing the radar function for the space shuttle. [(pulse radar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Results are discussed of a study to define a radar and antenna system which best suits the space shuttle rendezvous requirements. Topics considered include antenna characteristics and antenna size tradeoffs, fundamental sources of measurement errors inherent in the target itself, backscattering crosssection models of the target and three basic candidate radar types. Antennas up to 1.5 meters in diameter are within specified installation constraints, however, a 1 meter diameter paraboloid and a folding, four slot backfeed on a two gimbal mount implemented for a spiral acquisition scan is recommended. The candidate radar types discussed are: (1) noncoherent pulse radar (2) coherent pulse radar and (3) pulse Doppler radar with linear FM ranging. The radar type recommended is a pulse Doppler with linear FM ranging. Block diagrams of each radar system are shown.

  11. Summaries of the Seventh JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop January 12-16, 1998. Volume 1; AVIRIS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Seventh JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on January 12-16, 1998. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops, and each workshop has a volume as follows: (1) Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) Workshop; (2) Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) Workshop; and (3) Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) Workshop. This Volume 1 publication contains 58 papers taken from the AVIRIS workshop.

  12. Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, March 4-8, 1996. Volume 2; AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yunjin (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on March 4-8, 1996. The main workshop is divided into two smaller workshops as follows: The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on March 4-6. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1. The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on March 6-8. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2.

  13. Phase calibration of polarimetric radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheen, Dan R.; Kasischke, Eric S.; Freeman, Anthony

    1989-01-01

    The problem of phase calibration between polarization channels of an imaging radar is studied. The causes of various types of phase errors due to the radar system architecture and system imperfections are examined. A simple model is introduced to explain the spatial variation in phase error as being due to a displacement between the phase centers of the vertical and horizontal antennas. It is also shown that channel leakage can cause a spatial variation in phase error. Phase calibration using both point and distributed ground targets is discussed and a method for calibrating phase using only distributed target is verified, subject to certain constraints. Experimental measurements using the NADC/ERIM P-3 synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) system and NASA/JPL DC-8 SAR, which operates at C-, L-, and P-bands, are presented. Both of these systems are multifrequency, polarimetric, airborne, SAR systems.

  14. Multispectral microwave imaging radar for remote sensing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. W.; Rawson, R.; Ausherman, D.; Bryan, L.; Porcello, L.

    1974-01-01

    A multispectral airborne microwave radar imaging system, capable of obtaining four images simultaneously is described. The system has been successfully demonstrated in several experiments and one example of results obtained, fresh water ice, is given. Consideration of the digitization of the imagery is given and an image digitizing system described briefly. Preliminary results of digitization experiments are included.

  15. Buried mine detection using ground-penetrating impulse radar

    SciTech Connect

    Sargis, P.D.

    1995-03-01

    LLNL is developing a side-looking, ground-penetrating impulse radar system that can eventually be mounted on a robotic vehicle or an airborne platform to locate buried land mines. The system is described and results from field experiments are presented.

  16. A Radar/Radiometer Instrument for Mapping Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, Peter H.; Hilliard, Laurence; Rincon, Rafael; LeVine, David; Mead, James

    2003-01-01

    The RadSTAR instrument combines an L-band, digital beam-forming radar with an L-band synthetic aperture, thinned array (STAR) radiometer. The RadSTAR development will support NASA Earth science goals by developing a novel, L-band scatterometer/ radiometer that measures Earth surface bulk material properties (surface emissions and backscatter) as well as surface characteristics (backscatter). Present, real aperture airborne L-Band active/passive measurement systems such as the JPUPALS (Wilson, et al, 2000) provide excellent sampling characteristics, but have no scanning capabilities, and are extremely large; the huge JPUPALS horn requires a the C-130 airborne platform, operated with the aft loading door open during flight operation. The approach used for the upcoming Aquarius ocean salinity mission or the proposed Hydros soil mission use real apertures with multiple fixed beams or scanning beams. For real aperture instruments, there is no upgrade path to scanning over a broad swath, except rotation of the whole aperture, which is an approach with obvious difficulties as aperture size increases. RadSTAR will provide polarimetric scatterometer and radiometer measurements over a wide swath, in a highly space-efficient configuration. The electronic scanning approaches provided through STAR technology and digital beam forming will enable the large L-band aperture to scan efficiently over a very wide swath. RadSTAR technology development, which merges an interferometric radiometer with a digital beam forming scatterometer, is an important step in the path to space for an L-band scatterometer/radiometer. RadSTAR couples a patch array antenna with a 1.26 GHz digital beam forming radar scatterometer and a 1.4 GHz STAR radiometer to provide Earth surface backscatter and emission measurements in a compact, cross-track scanning instrument with no moving parts. This technology will provide the first L-band, emission and backscatter measurements in a compact aircraft instrument

  17. Advances and perspectives in bathymetry by airborne lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guoqing; Wang, Chenxi; Li, Mingyan; Wang, Yuefeng; Ye, Siqi; Han, Caiyun

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the history of the airborne lidar and the development stages of the technology are reviewed. The basic principle of airborne lidar and the method of processing point-cloud data were discussed. At present, single point laser scanning method is widely used in bathymetric survey. Although the method has high ranging accuracy, the data processing and hardware system is too much complicated and expensive. For this reason, this paper present a kind of improved dual-frequency method for bathymetric and sea surface survey, in this method 176 units of 1064nm wavelength laser has been used by push-broom scanning and due to the airborne power limits still use 532nm wavelength single point for bathymetric survey by zigzag scanning. We establish a spatial coordinates for obtaining the WGS-84 of point cloud by using airborne POS system.

  18. All-digital radar architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanov, Pavlo A.

    2014-10-01

    All digital radar architecture requires exclude mechanical scan system. The phase antenna array is necessarily large because the array elements must be co-located with very precise dimensions and will need high accuracy phase processing system for aggregate and distribute T/R modules data to/from antenna elements. Even phase array cannot provide wide field of view. New nature inspired all digital radar architecture proposed. The fly's eye consists of multiple angularly spaced sensors giving the fly simultaneously thee wide-area visual coverage it needs to detect and avoid the threats around him. Fly eye radar antenna array consist multiple directional antennas loose distributed along perimeter of ground vehicle or aircraft and coupled with receiving/transmitting front end modules connected by digital interface to central processor. Non-steering antenna array allows creating all-digital radar with extreme flexible architecture. Fly eye radar architecture provides wide possibility of digital modulation and different waveform generation. Simultaneous correlation and integration of thousands signals per second from each point of surveillance area allows not only detecting of low level signals ((low profile targets), but help to recognize and classify signals (targets) by using diversity signals, polarization modulation and intelligent processing. Proposed all digital radar architecture with distributed directional antenna array can provide a 3D space vector to the jammer by verification direction of arrival for signals sources and as result jam/spoof protection not only for radar systems, but for communication systems and any navigation constellation system, for both encrypted or unencrypted signals, for not limited number or close positioned jammers.

  19. Detection of tropical landslides using airborne lidar data and multi imagery: A case study in genting highland, pahang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamsin, I.; Zulkarnain, M.; Razak, K. A.; Rizal, S.

    2014-02-01

    The landslide geomorphological system in a tropical region is complex, and its understanding often depends on the completeness and correctness of landslide inventorization. In mountainous regions, landslides pose a significant impact and are known as an important geomorphic process in shaping major landscape in the tropics. A modern remote sensing based approach has revolutionized the landslide investigation in a forested terrain. Optical satellite imagery, aerial photographs and synthetic aperture radar images are less effective to create reliable tropical DTMs for landslide recognition, and even so in the forested equatorial regions. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) data have been used to construct the digital terrain model (DTM) under dense vegetation, but its reliability for landslide recognition in the tropics remains surprisingly unknown. The present study aims at providing better insight into the use of airborne laser scanning (ALS) data. For the bare-earth extraction, several prominent filtering algorithms and surface interpolation methods, i.e. progressive TIN densitification, morphological, and command prompt from Lastool are evaluated in a qualitative analysis, aiming at removing non-ground points while preserving important landslide features. As a result, a large landslide can be detected using OOA. Small landslides remain unrecognized. Three out of five landslides can be detected, with a 60 percent overall accuracy.

  20. Improved Hurricane Boundary Layer Observations with the Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esteban-Fernandez, Daniel; Changy, P.; Carswell, J.; Contreras, R.; Chu, T.

    2006-01-01

    During the NOAA/NESDIS 2005 Hurricane Season (HS2005) and the 2006 Winter Experiment, the University of Massachusetts (UMass) installed two instruments on the NOAA N42RF WP-3D research aircraft: the Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (IWRAP) and the Simultaneous Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR). IWRAP is a dual-band (C- and Ku), dual-polarized pencil-beam airborne radar that profiles the volume backscatter and Doppler velocity from rain and that also measures the ocean backscatter response. It simultaneously profiles along four separate incidence angles while conically scanning at 60 RPM. SFMR is a C-band nadir viewing radiometer that measures the emission from the ocean surface and intervening atmosphere simultaneously at six frequencies. It is designed to obtain the surface wind speed and the column average rain rate. Both instruments have previously been flown during the 2002, 2003 and 2004 hurricane seasons. For the HS2005, the IWRAP system was modified to implement a raw data acquisition system. The importance of the raw data system arises when trying to profile the atmosphere all the way down to the surface with a non-nadir looking radar system. With this particular geometry, problems arise mainly from the fact that both rain and ocean provide a return echo coincident in time through the antenna s main lobe. This paper shows how this limitation has been removed and presents initial results demonstrating its new capabilities to derive the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) wind field within the inner core of hurricanes to much lower altitudes than the ones the original system was capable of, and to analyze the spectral response of the ocean backscatter and the rain under different wind and rain conditions.

  1. Development of the NASA High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Lihua; Heymsfield, Gerald; Carswell, James; Schaubert, Dan; McLinden, Matthew; Vega, Manuel; Perrine, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The scope of this paper is the development and recent field deployments of the High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP), which was funded under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) [1]. HIWRAP is a dual-frequency (Ka- and Ku-band), dual-beam (300 and 400 incidence a