Science.gov

Sample records for airborne science laboratory

  1. DC-8 Airborne Laboratory in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's DC-8 Airborne Science platform shown against a background of a dark blue sky on February 20, 1998. The aircraft is shown from the right rear, slightly above its plane, with the right wing in the foreground and the left wing and horizontal tail in the background. The former airliner is a 'dash-72' model and has a range of 5,400 miles. The craft can stay airborne for 12 hours and has an operational speed range between 300 and 500 knots. The research flights are made at between 500 and 41,000 feet. The aircraft can carry up to 30,000 lbs of research/science payload equipment installed in 15 mission-definable spaces. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  2. Proceedings of the 11th JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.

    2002-01-01

    This publication contains the proceedings of the JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop forum held to report science research and applications results with spectral images measured by the NASA Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). These papers were presented at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory from March 5-8, 2001. Electronic versions of these papers may be found at the A VIRIS Web http://popo.jpl.nasa.gov/pub/docs/workshops/aviris.proceedings.html

  3. DC-8 Airborne Laboratory in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The NASA DC-8 in a right bank over the rugged Sierra Nevada Mountains. The former airliner is a 'dash-72' model and has a range of 5,500 miles. The craft can stay airborne for 12 hours and has an operational speed range between 300 and 500 knots. The research flights are made at between 500 and 41,000 feet. The aircraft can carry up to 30,000 lbs of research/science payload equipment installed in 15 mission-definable spaces. In this photo, the aircraft is shown in flight from below, with the DC-8 silhouetted against a blue sky. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  4. NASA's Coastal and Ocean Airborne Science Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, L. S.; Dungan, J. L.; Edwards, M.; Russell, P. B.; Morrow, J. H.; Hooker, S.; Myers, J.; Kudela, R. M.; Dunagan, S.; Soulage, M.; Ellis, T.; Clinton, N. E.; Lobitz, B.; Martin, K.; Zell, P.; Berthold, R. W.; Smith, C.; Andrew, D.; Gore, W.; Torres, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Coastal and Ocean Airborne Science Testbed (COAST) Project is a NASA Earth-science flight mission that will advance coastal ecosystems research by providing a unique airborne payload optimized for remote sensing in the optically complex coastal zone. Teaming NASA Ames scientists and engineers with Biospherical Instruments, Inc. (San Diego) and UC Santa Cruz, the airborne COAST instrument suite combines a customized imaging spectrometer, sunphotometer system, and a new bio-optical radiometer package to obtain ocean/coastal/atmosphere data simultaneously in flight for the first time. The imaging spectrometer (Headwall) is optimized in the blue region of the spectrum to emphasize remote sensing of marine and freshwater ecosystems. Simultaneous measurements supporting empirical atmospheric correction of image data will be accomplished using the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14). Based on optical detectors called microradiometers, the NASA Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry Calibration and Validation (cal/val) Office team has deployed advanced commercial off-the-shelf instrumentation that provides in situ measurements of the apparent optical properties at the land/ocean boundary including optically shallow aquatic ecosystems (e.g., lakes, estuaries, coral reefs). A complimentary microradiometer instrument package (Biospherical Instruments, Inc.), optimized for use above water, will be flown for the first time with the airborne instrument suite. Details of the October 2011 COAST airborne mission over Monterey Bay demonstrating this new airborne instrument suite capability will be presented, with associated preliminary data on coastal ocean color products, coincident spatial and temporal data on aerosol optical depth and water vapor column content, as well as derived exact water-leaving radiances.

  5. DC-8 Airborne Laboratory in flight over Palmdale, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The DC-8 Airborne Laboratory in a left banking turn above the airport at Palmdale, California. The right wing is silhouetted against the blue sky, while the left wing contrasts with the desert terrain. The former airliner is a 'dash-72' model and has a range of 5,400 miles. The craft can stay airborne for 12 hours and has an operational speed range between 300 and 500 knots. The research flights are made at between 500 and 41,000 feet. The aircraft can carry up to 30,000 lbs of research/science payload equipment installed in 15 mission-definable spaces. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  6. DC-8 Airborne Laboratory arrival at NASA Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    NASA's DC-8 Airborne Science platform landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California, to join the fleet of aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The white aircraft with a blue stripe running horizontally from the nose to the tail is shown with its main landing gear just above the runway. The former airliner is a 'dash-72' model and has a range of 5,400 miles. The craft can stay airborne for 12 hours and has an operational speed range between 300 and 500 knots. The research flights are made at between 500 and 41,000 feet. The aircraft can carry up to 30,000 lbs of research/science payload equipment installed in 15 mission-definable spaces. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  7. Airborne Synthetic Aperature Radar (AIRSAR) on left rear fuselage of DC-8 Airborne Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A view of the Airborne Synthetic Aperature Radar (AIRSAR) antenna on the left rear fuselage of the DC-8. The AIRSAR captures images of the ground from the side of the aircraft and can provide precision digital elevation mapping capabilities for a variety of studies. The AIRSAR is one of a number of research systems that have been added to the DC-8. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  8. Safety in Science Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Presents 12 amendments to the second edition of Safety in Science Laboratories. Covers topics such as regular inspection of equipment, wearing safety glasses, dating stock chemicals, and safe use of chemicals. (MA)

  9. Hoods for Science Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Harold; and others

    Detailed discussions are presented dealing with the selection and design of fume hoods for science laboratories. Areas covered include--(1) air flow design, (2) materials properties, (3) location in the laboratory, (4) testing and adjustment, (5) exhaust systems, and (6) hazards of fume discharges. (JT)

  10. Towards a Multi-Mission, Airborne Science Data System Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crichton, D. J.; Hardman, S.; Law, E.; Freeborn, D.; Kay-Im, E.; Lau, G.; Oswald, J.

    2011-12-01

    NASA earth science instruments are increasingly relying on airborne missions. However, traditionally, there has been limited common infrastructure support available to principal investigators in the area of science data systems. As a result, each investigator has been required to develop their own computing infrastructures for the science data system. Typically there is little software reuse and many projects lack sufficient resources to provide a robust infrastructure to capture, process, distribute and archive the observations acquired from airborne flights. At NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), we have been developing a multi-mission data system infrastructure for airborne instruments called the Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE). ACCE encompasses the end-to-end lifecycle covering planning, provisioning of data system capabilities, and support for scientific analysis in order to improve the quality, cost effectiveness, and capabilities to enable new scientific discovery and research in earth observation. This includes improving data system interoperability across each instrument. A principal characteristic is being able to provide an agile infrastructure that is architected to allow for a variety of configurations of the infrastructure from locally installed compute and storage services to provisioning those services via the "cloud" from cloud computer vendors such as Amazon.com. Investigators often have different needs that require a flexible configuration. The data system infrastructure is built on the Apache's Object Oriented Data Technology (OODT) suite of components which has been used for a number of spaceborne missions and provides a rich set of open source software components and services for constructing science processing and data management systems. In 2010, a partnership was formed between the ACCE team and the Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) mission to support the data processing and data management needs

  11. Challenges and Successes Managing Airborne Science Data for CARVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardman, S. H.; Dinardo, S. J.; Lee, E. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) mission collects detailed measurements of important greenhouse gases on local to regional scales in the Alaskan Arctic and demonstrates new remote sensing and improved modeling capabilities to quantify Arctic carbon fluxes and carbon cycle-climate processes. Airborne missions offer a number of challenges when it comes to collecting and processing the science data and CARVE is no different. The biggest challenge relates to the flexibility of the instrument payload. Within the life of the mission, instruments may be removed from or added to the payload, or even reconfigured on a yearly, monthly or daily basis. Although modification of the instrument payload provides a distinct advantage for airborne missions compared to spaceborne missions, it does tend to wreak havoc on the underlying data system when introducing changes to existing data inputs or new data inputs that require modifications to the pipeline for processing the data. In addition to payload flexibility, it is not uncommon to find unsupported files in the field data submission. In the case of CARVE, these include video files, photographs taken during the flight and screen shots from terminal displays. These need to captured, saved and somehow integrated into the data system. The CARVE data system was built on a multi-mission data system infrastructure for airborne instruments called the Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE). ACCE encompasses the end-to-end lifecycle covering planning, provisioning of data system capabilities, and support for scientific analysis in order to improve the quality, cost effectiveness, and capabilities to enable new scientific discovery and research in earth observation. This well-tested and proven infrastructure allows the CARVE data system to be easily adapted in order to handle the challenges posed by the CARVE mission and to successfully process, manage and distribute the mission's science data. This

  12. Airborne Science Program: Observing Platforms for Earth Science Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Airborne Science Program and the platforms used for conducting investigations for the Earth System Science. Included is a chart that shows some of the aircraft and the operational altitude and the endurance of the aircraft, views of the Dryden Aircraft Operation Facility, and some of the current aircraft that the facility operates, and the varieties of missions that are flown and the type of instrumentation. Also included is a chart showing the attributes of the various aircraft (i.e., duration, weight for a payload, maximum altitude, airspeed and range) for comparison

  13. NASA Airborne Science Program: NASA Stratospheric Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducts a wide variety of remote sensing projects using several unique aircraft platforms. These vehicles have been selected and modified to provide capabilities that are particularly important for geophysical research, in particular, routine access to very high altitudes, long range, long endurance, precise trajectory control, and the payload capacity to operate multiple, diverse instruments concurrently. While the NASA program has been in operation for over 30 years, new aircraft and technological advances that will expand the capabilities for airborne observation are continually being assessed and implemented. This presentation will review the current state of NASA's science platforms, recent improvements and new missions concepts as well as provide a survey of emerging technologies unmanned aerial vehicles for long duration observations (Global Hawk and Predator). Applications of information technology that allow more efficient use of flight time and the ability to rapidly reconfigure systems for different mission objectives are addressed.

  14. Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisaffe, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    A Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) has been planned, designed, and is being developed. This laboratory will support related efforts to define the requirements for the Microgravity and Materials Processing Laboratory (MMPF) and the MMPF Test Bed for the Space Station. The MMSL will serve as a check out and training facility for science mission specialists for STS, Spacelab and Space Station prior to the full operation of the MMPF Test Bed. The focus of the MMSL will be on experiments related to the understanding of metal/ceramic/glass solidification, high perfection crystal growth and fluid physics. This ground-based laboratory will be used by university/industry/government researchers to examine and become familiar with the potential of new microgravity materials science concepts and to conduct longer term studies aimed at fully developing a l-g understanding of materials and processing phenomena. Such research will help create new high quality concepts for space experiments and will provide the basis for modeling, theories, and hypotheses upon which key space experiments can be defined and developed.

  15. Materials Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Dionne

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) provides science and engineering services to NASA and Contractor customers at KSC, including those working for the Space Shuttle. International Space Station. and Launch Services Programs. These services include: (1) Independent/unbiased failure analysis (2) Support to Accident/Mishap Investigation Boards (3) Materials testing and evaluation (4) Materials and Processes (M&P) engineering consultation (5) Metrology (6) Chemical analysis (including ID of unknown materials) (7) Mechanical design and fabrication We provide unique solutions to unusual and urgent problems associated with aerospace flight hardware, ground support equipment and related facilities.

  16. Comparison between laboratory and airborne BRDF measurements for remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Georgi T.; Gatebe, Charles K.; Butler, James J.; King, Michael D.

    2006-08-01

    Samples from soil and leaf litter were obtained at a site located in the savanna biome of South Africa (Skukuza; 25.0°S, 31.5°E) and their bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDF) were measured using the out-of-plane scatterometer located in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Diffuser Calibration Facility (DCaF). BRDF was measured using P and S incident polarized light over a range of incident and scatter angles. A monochromator-based broadband light source was used in the ultraviolet (uv) and visible (vis) spectral ranges. The diffuse scattered light was collected using an uv-enhanced silicon photodiode detector with output fed to a computer-controlled lock-in amplifier. Typical measurement uncertainties of the reported laboratory BRDF measurements are found to be less than 1% (k=1). These laboratory results were compared with airborne measurements of BRDF from NASA's Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) instrument over the same general site where the samples were obtained. This study presents preliminary results of the comparison between these laboratory and airborne BRDF measurements and identifies areas for future laboratory and airborne BRDF measurements. This paper presents initial results in a study to try to understand BRDF measurements from laboratory, airborne, and satellite measurements in an attempt to improve the consistency of remote sensing models.

  17. DC-8 Airborne Laboratory in flight over Mt. Whitney

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The DC-8 banking over the jagged peak of Mount Whitney on a February 25, 1998 flight. The DC-8 and a pair of ER-2 aircraft are operated by the Airborne Science program at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. NASA, other governmental agencies, academia, and scientific and technical organizations employ the DC-8 for a variety of experiments.

  18. STATISTICAL MODEL OF LABORATORY DEATH RATE MEASUREMENTS FOR AIRBORNE BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    From 270 published laboratory airborne death rate measurements, two regression models relating the death rate constant for 15 bacterial species to aerosol age in the dark, Gram reaction, temperature, and an evaporation factor which is a function of RH and temperature were obtaine...

  19. Science and the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s newest Mars rover is, the Mars Science Laboratory or Curiosity. It is ready to roam the Red Planet with the biggest and most advanced set of science instruments ever! Follow the curious ro...

  20. Mars Science Laboratory Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okon, Avi B.

    2010-01-01

    The Drill for the Mars Science Laboratory mission is a rotary-percussive sample acquisition device with an emphasis on toughness and robustness to handle the harsh environment on Mars. The unique challenges associated with autonomous drilling from a mobile robot are addressed. A highly compressed development schedule dictated a modular design architecture that satisfies the functional and load requirements while allowing independent development and testing of the Drill subassemblies. The Drill consists of four actuated mechanisms: a spindle that rotates the bit, a chuck that releases and engages bits, a novel voice-coil-based percussion mechanism that hammers the bit, and a linear translation mechanism. The Drill has three passive mechanisms: a replaceable bit assembly that acquires and collects sample, a contact sensor / stabilizer mechanism, and, lastly a flex harness service loop. This paper describes the various mechanisms that makeup the Drill and discusses the solutions to their unique design and development challenges.

  1. The "Science in the Stratosphere" Program: Developing a Role for Airborne Astronomy in Elementary Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, D.; Hemenway, M.; Stryker, P.; Willis, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Science in the Stratosphere program on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) is an opportunity for selected elementary and middle school teachers from the central Texas area to participate in airborne astronomy, working with researchers on the ground and in the air. Through their experiences, the excitement of hands-on space astronomy can be conveyed to their colleagues and students. These experiences serve as a vehicle for introducing many scientific concepts, as well as the planning, instrument development, cooperation and teamwork that are essential components of scientific research. The airborne setting instills this vignette of modern astronomical research with a spirit of exploration and excitement that inspires even the youngest school children. The inaugural session of this program was held during the summer of 1992. Two school teachers with science specialization were chosen, at grade levels (K and 8) that spanned those targeted by the program. These teachers spent more than a week working with KAO visiting scientists and staff, learning about the research being done, and the operation of this remarkable observatory. Presentations based on their work were made at several science teacher workshops in the months following their trip, and curriculum development is in progress. More so than any other NASA space astronomy facility, airborne telescopes are tangible, accessible, and highly visible. As space astronomy laboratories that are highly fault tolerant, such telescopes (the KAO now, to be followed by SOFIA later) are equipped with instrumentation that is at the leading edge of technology, and thus serve well as educational flagships for modern astronomy. This program receives funds from the NASA Astrophysics AGSE program, and is sponsored by the McDonald Observatory of the University of Texas.

  2. CNR LARA project, Italy: Airborne laboratory for environmental research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianchi, R.; Cavalli, R. M.; Fiumi, L.; Marino, C. M.; Pignatti, S.

    1995-01-01

    The increasing interest for the environmental problems and the study of the impact on the environment due to antropic activity produced an enhancement of remote sensing applications. The Italian National Research Council (CNR) established a new laboratory for airborne hyperspectral imaging, the LARA Project (Laboratorio Aero per Ricerche Ambientali - Airborne Laboratory for Environmental Research), equipping its airborne laboratory, a CASA-212, mainly with the Daedalus AA5000 MIVIS (Multispectral Infrared and Visible Imaging Spectrometer) instrument. MIVIS's channels, spectral bandwidths, and locations are chosen to meet the needs of scientific research for advanced applications of remote sensing data. MIVIS can make significant contributions to solving problems in many diverse areas such as geologic exploration, land use studies, mineralogy, agricultural crop studies, energy loss analysis, pollution assessment, volcanology, forest fire management and others. The broad spectral range and the many discrete narrow channels of MIVIS provide a fine quantization of spectral information that permits accurate definition of absorption features from a variety of materials, allowing the extraction of chemical and physical information of our environment. The availability of such a hyperspectral imager, that will operate mainly in the Mediterranean area, at the present represents a unique opportunity for those who are involved in environmental studies and land-management to collect systematically large-scale and high spectral-spatial resolution data of this part of the world. Nevertheless, MIVIS deployments will touch other parts of the world, where a major interest from the international scientific community is present.

  3. Study of airborne science experiment management concepts for application to space shuttle, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, D. R.; Reller, J. O., Jr.; Neel, C. B.; Haughney, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    Airborne research management and shuttle sortie planning at the Ames Research Center are reported. Topics discussed include: basic criteria and procedures for the formulation and approval of airborne missions; ASO management structure and procedures; experiment design, development, and testing aircraft characteristics and experiment interfaces; information handling for airborne science missions; mission documentation requirements; and airborne science methods and shuttle sortie planning.

  4. NASA'S Coastal and Ocean Airborne Science Testbed (COAST): Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, L. S.; Dungan, J. L.; Edwards, M.; Russell, P. B.; Morrow, J. H.; Kudela, R. M.; Myers, J. S.; Livingston, J.; Lobitz, B.; Torres-Perez, J.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Coastal and Ocean Airborne Science Testbed (COAST) project advances coastal ecosystems research and ocean color calibration and validation capability by providing a unique airborne payload optimized for remote sensing in the optically complex coastal zone. The COAST instrument suite combines a customized imaging spectrometer, sunphotometer system, and a new bio-optical radiometer package to obtain ocean/coastal/atmosphere data simultaneously in flight for the first time. The imaging spectrometer (Headwall) is optimized in the blue region of the spectrum to emphasize remote sensing of marine and freshwater ecosystems. Simultaneous measurements supporting empirical atmospheric correction of image data is accomplished using the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14). Coastal Airborne In situ Radiometers (C-AIR, Biospherical Instruments, Inc.), developed for COAST for airborne campaigns from field-deployed microradiometer instrumentation, will provide measurements of apparent optical properties at the land/ocean boundary including optically shallow aquatic ecosystems. Ship-based measurements allowed validation of airborne measurements. Radiative transfer modeling on in-water measurements from the HyperPro and Compact-Optical Profiling System (C-OPS, the in-water companion to C-AIR) profiling systems allows for comparison of airborne and in-situ water leaving radiance measurements. Results of the October 2011 Monterey Bay COAST mission include preliminary data on coastal ocean color products, coincident spatial and temporal data on aerosol optical depth and water vapor column content, as well as derived exact water-leaving radiances.

  5. Environmental Science Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strobbe, Maurice A.

    The objective of this manual is to provide a set of basic analytical procedures commonly used to determine environmental quality. Procedures are designed to be used in an introductory course in environmental science and are explicit enough to allow them to be performed by both the non-science or beginning science student. Stressing ecology and…

  6. Mars Science Laboratory Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okon, Avi B.; Brown, Kyle M.; McGrath, Paul L.; Klein, Kerry J.; Cady, Ian W.; Lin, Justin Y.; Ramirez, Frank E.; Haberland, Matt

    2012-01-01

    This drill (see Figure 1) is the primary sample acquisition element of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) that collects powdered samples from various types of rock (from clays to massive basalts) at depths up to 50 mm below the surface. A rotary-percussive sample acquisition device was developed with an emphasis on toughness and robustness to handle the harsh environment on Mars. It is the first rover-based sample acquisition device to be flight-qualified (see Figure 2). This drill features an autonomous tool change-out on a mobile robot, and novel voice-coil-based percussion. The drill comprises seven subelements. Starting at the end of the drill, there is a bit assembly that cuts the rock and collects the sample. Supporting the bit is a subassembly comprising a chuck mechanism to engage and release the new and worn bits, respectively, and a spindle mechanism to rotate the bit. Just aft of that is a percussion mechanism, which generates hammer blows to break the rock and create the dynamic environment used to flow the powdered sample. These components are mounted to a translation mechanism, which provides linear motion and senses weight-on-bit with a force sensor. There is a passive-contact sensor/stabilizer mechanism that secures the drill fs position on the rock surface, and flex harness management hardware to provide the power and signals to the translating components. The drill housing serves as the primary structure of the turret, to which the additional tools and instruments are attached. The drill bit assembly (DBA) is a passive device that is rotated and hammered in order to cut rock (i.e. science targets) and collect the cuttings (powder) in a sample chamber until ready for transfer to the CHIMRA (Collection and Handling for Interior Martian Rock Analysis). The DBA consists of a 5/8-in. (.1.6- cm) commercial hammer drill bit whose shank has been turned down and machined with deep flutes designed for aggressive cutting removal. Surrounding the shank of the

  7. Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 2; AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yun-Jin (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on March 4-8, 1996, was divided into two smaller workshops:(1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, and The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop. This current paper, Volume 2 of the Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, presents the summaries for The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop.

  8. NASA's Earth Venture-1 (EV-1) Airborne Science Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillory, A.; Denkins, T.; Allen, B. Danette; Braun, Scott A.; Crawford, James H.; Jensen, Eric J.; Miller, Charles E.; Moghaddam, Mahta; Maring, Hal

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, NASA announced the first Earth Venture (EV-1) selections in response to a recommendation made by the National Research Council for low-cost investigations fostering innovation in Earth science. The five EV-1 investigations span the Earth science focus areas of atmosphere, weather, climate, water and energy and, carbon and represent earth science researchers from NASA as well as other government agencies, academia and industry from around the world. The EV-1 missions are: 1) Airborne Microwave Observatory of Subcanopy and Subsurface (AirMOSS), 2) Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment (ATTREX), 3) Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE), 4) Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ), and 5) Hurricane And Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3). The Earth Venture missions are managed out of the Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP) Program Office (Allen, et. al. 2010b)

  9. A laboratory animal science pioneer.

    PubMed

    Kostomitsopoulos, Nikolaos

    2014-11-01

    Nikolaos Kostomitsopoulos, DVM, PhD, is Head of Laboratory Animal Facilities and Designated Veterinarian, Center of Clinical, Experimental Surgery and Translational Research, Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. Dr. Kostomitsopoulos discusses his successes in implementing laboratory animal science legislation and fostering collaboration among scientists in Greece. PMID:25333597

  10. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 1999

    SciTech Connect

    DL Edwards; KD Shields; MJ Sula; MY Ballinger

    1999-09-28

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP--US Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H). In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the US Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (Pacific Northwest) on the Hanford Site. Two of the facilities evaluated, 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, and 331 Building Life Sciences Laboratory met state and federal criteria for continuous sampling of airborne radionuclide emissions. One other building, the 3720 Environmental Sciences Laboratory, was recognized as being in transition with the potential for meeting the continuous sampling criteria.

  11. AN INDIVIDUALIZED SCIENCE LABORATORY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LIPSON, JOSEPH I.

    THE LEARNING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER AT THE UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH IS WORKING ON AN EXPERIMENTAL PROJECT TO EXAMINE METHODS OF INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION IN SCIENCE AT THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL LEVEL. AT THIS TIME, THE EXPERIMENT IS FOCUSED UPON NON-READERS IN GRADES K-3. EACH STUDENT RECEIVES A TAPE CARTRIDGE AND A PLASTIC BOX CONTAINING…

  12. Mars Science Laboratory at Sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    December 2, 2003

    Sunset on Mars catches NASA's Mars Science Laboratory in the foreground in this artist's concept. The mission is under development for launch in 2009 and a precision landing on Mars in 2010.

    Once on the ground, the Mars Science Laboratory would analyze dozens of samples scooped up from the soil and cored from rocks as it explores with greater range than any previous Mars rover. It would investigate the past or present ability of Mars to support life. NASA is considering nuclear energy for powering the rover to give it a long operating lifespan.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is managing development of the Mars Smart Laboratory for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  13. Mars Science Laboratory at Canyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    December 2, 2003

    NASA's Mars Science Laboratory travels near a canyon on Mars in this artist's concept. The mission is under development for launch in 2009 and a precision landing on Mars in 2010.

    Once on the ground, the Mars Science Laboratory would analyze dozens of samples scooped up from the soil and cored from rocks as it explores with greater range than any previous Mars rover. It would investigate the past or present ability of Mars to support life. NASA is considering nuclear energy for powering the rover to give it a long operating lifespan.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is managing development of the Mars Smart Laboratory for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  14. DC-8 Airborne Laboratory in flight over Mint Canyon near the San Gabriel Mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA DC-8 airborne laboratory flying over Mint Canyon near the snow-covered San Gabriel Mountains of California. The mostly white aircraft is silhouetted against the darker mountains in the background. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  15. DC-8 Airborne Laboratory in flight over snow-capped Sierra Nevada mountain range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's DC-8 Airborne Laboratory during a flight over the snow-covered Sierra Nevada Mountains. Over the past several years the DC-8 has conducted research missions in such diverse places as the Pacific in spring and Sweden in winter. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  16. DC-8 Airborne Laboratory in flight during research mission - view from above

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The DC-8 Airborne Science Laboratroy is shown flying above a solid layer of clouds. The aircraft was transferred from the Ames Research Center to the Dryden Flight Research Center in late 1997. Over the past several years, it has undertaken a wide range of research in such fields as archeology, ecology, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, and other fields. In this photo, it is shown flying over a bank of clouds. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  17. Applications of airborne remote sensing in atmospheric sciences research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafin, R. J.; Szejwach, G.; Phillips, B. B.

    1984-01-01

    This paper explores the potential for airborne remote sensing for atmospheric sciences research. Passive and active techniques from the microwave to visible bands are discussed. It is concluded that technology has progressed sufficiently in several areas that the time is right to develop and operate new remote sensing instruments for use by the community of atmospheric scientists as general purpose tools. Promising candidates include Doppler radar and lidar, infrared short range radiometry, and microwave radiometry.

  18. Guide for Science Laboratory Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, John J.

    General and specific safety procedures and recommendations for secondary school science laboratories are provided in this guide. Areas of concern include: (1) chemicals (storage, disposal, toxicity, unstable and incompatible chemicals); (2) microorganisms; (3) plants; (4) animals; (5) electricity; (6) lasers; (7) rockets; (8) eye safety and…

  19. Aeroshell for Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image from July 2008 shows the aeroshell for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory while it was being worked on by spacecraft technicians at Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company near Denver.

    This hardware was delivered in early fall of 2008 to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., where the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft is being assembled and tested.

    The aeroshell encapsulates the mission's rover and descent stage during the journey from Earth to Mars and shields them from the intense heat of friction with that upper atmosphere during the initial portion of descent.

    The aeroshell has two main parts: the backshell, which is on top in this image and during the descent, and the heat shield, on the bottom. The heat shield in this image is an engineering unit for testing. The heat shield to be used in flight will be substituted later. The heat shield has a diameter of about 15 feet. For comparison, the heat shields for NASA's Mars Exploraton Rovers Spirit and Opportunity were 8.5 feet and the heat shields for the Apollo capsules that protected astronauts returning to Earth from the moon were just under 13 feet.

    In addition to protecting the Mars Science Laboratory rover, the backshell provides structural support for the descent stage's parachute and sky crane, a system that will lower the rover to a soft landing on the surface of Mars. The backshell for the Mars Science Laboratory is made of an aluminum honeycomb structure sandwiched between graphite-epoxy face sheets. It is covered with a thermal protection system composed of a cork/silicone super light ablator material that originated with the Viking landers of the 1970s. This ablator material has been used on the heat shields of all NASA Mars landers in the past, but this mission is the first Mars mission using it on the backshell.

    The heat shield for Mars Science Laboratory's flight will use tiles made of phenolic impregnated carbon ablator. The engineering unit in

  20. Thermal infrared spectral imager for airborne science applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, William R.; Hook, Simon J.; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Wilson, Daniel W.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Hill, Cory J.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Realmuto, Vincent; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2009-05-01

    An airborne thermal hyperspectral imager is underdevelopment which utilizes the compact Dyson optical configuration and quantum well infrared photo detector (QWIP) focal plane array. The Dyson configuration uses a single monolithic prism-like grating design which allows for a high throughput instrument (F/1.6) with minimal ghosting, stray-light and large swath width. The configuration has the potential to be the optimal imaging spectroscopy solution unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) due to its small form factor and relatively low power requirements. The planned instrument specifications are discussed as well as design trade-offs. Calibration testing results (noise equivalent temperature difference, spectral linearity and spectral bandwidth) and laboratory emissivity plots from samples are shown using an operational testbed unit which has similar specifications as the final airborne system. Field testing of the testbed unit was performed to acquire plots of emissivity for various known standard minerals (quartz). A comparison is made using data from the ASTER spectral library.

  1. A configurable information display environment for airborne science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gilst, D. P.

    2010-12-01

    With the introduction the multi-instrument, long duration Global Hawk UAV to the the airborne science community and increasing network connectivity on other airborne platforms, there is growing need for tools to provide real-time aircraft data to a wide range of personnel, many of whom may not e located on site. With the web based tools developed for the NASA Global Hawk and DC-8, we aimed to enhance awareness of engineering, science and aircraft operations to personnel both on-site and off over extended periods of time to allow for the effective management of 24+ hour flights. A system for building user-configurable displays was created based on web-based open standards to provide science, engineering and weather data to science and operations personnel, with off site personnel utilizing the same tools as those who were present in the control center. These tools have significantly improved the ability of teams to utilize personnel who would not otherwise be accessible to support mission activities through the monitoring of the instruments, data gathering and aircraft status.

  2. Microgravity Science Laboratory (MSL-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, M. B. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    The MSL-1 payload first flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-83) April 4-8, 1997. Due to a fuel cell problem, the mission was cut short, and the payload flew again on Columbia (STS-94) July 1-17, 1997. The MSL-1 investigations were performed in a pressurized Spacelab module and the Shuttle middeck. Twenty-nine experiments were performed and represented disciplines such as fluid physics, combustion, materials science, biotechnology, and plant growth. Four accelerometers were used to record and characterize the microgravity environment. The results demonstrate the range of quality science that can be conducted utilizing orbital laboratories in microgravity.

  3. Mars Science Laboratory Orbit Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruizinga, Gerhard L.; Gustafson, Eric D.; Thompson, Paul F.; Jefferson, David C.; Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; Mottinger, Neil A.; Pelletier, Frederic J.; Ryne, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the orbit determination process, results and filter strategies used by the Mars Science Laboratory Navigation Team during cruise from Earth to Mars. The new atmospheric entry guidance system resulted in an orbit determination paradigm shift during final approach when compared to previous Mars lander missions. The evolving orbit determination filter strategies during cruise are presented. Furthermore, results of calibration activities of dynamical models are presented. The atmospheric entry interface trajectory knowledge was significantly better than the original requirements, which enabled the very precise landing in Gale Crater.

  4. Undergraduate Laboratory for Surface Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Mitchio; Beauchamp, Jesse L.; Dickert, Jeffrey M.; Essy, Blair R.; Claypool, Christopher L.

    1996-02-01

    Surface science has developed into a multidisciplinary field of research with applications ranging from heterogeneous catalysis to semiconductor etching (1). Aspects of surface chemistry are now included in physical chemistry textbooks (2) and undergraduate curricula (3), but the perceived cost and complexity of equipment has deterred the introduction of surface science methods in undergraduate laboratories (4). Efforts to expose chemistry undergraduates to state-of-the-art surface instrumentation have just begun (5). To provide our undergraduates with hands-on experience in using standard techniques for characterizing surface morphology, adsorbates, kinetics, and reaction mechanisms, we have developed a set of surface science experiments for our physical chemistry laboratory sequence. The centerpiece of the laboratory is an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber for studies of single crystal surfaces. This instrument, shown in the figure, has surface analysis capabilities including low energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger spectroscopy, and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). The laboratory exercises involve experiments on the well-studied Pt(111) surface. Students prepare a previously mounted single crystal sample by sputtering it with an argon ion gun and heating it under O2. Electron diffraction patterns from the cleaned surface are then obtained with a reverse view LEED apparatus (Princeton Instruments). Images are captured by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera interfaced to a personal computer for easy downloading and subsequent analysis. Although the LEED images from a Pt(111) surface can be readily interpreted using simple diffraction arguments, this lab provides an excellent context for introducing Miller indices and reciprocal lattices (6). The surface chemical composition can be investigated by Auger spectroscopy, using the LEED apparatus as a simple energy analyzer. The temperature programmed desorption experiment, which is nearly complete, will be

  5. Thermal Infrared Spectral Imager for Airborne Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, William R.; Hook, Simon J.; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Wilson, Daniel W.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Hill, Cory J.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2009-01-01

    An airborne thermal hyperspectral imager is under development which utilizes the compact Dyson optical configuration and quantum well infrared photo detector (QWIP) focal plane array. The Dyson configuration uses a single monolithic prism-like grating design which allows for a high throughput instrument (F/1.6) with minimal ghosting, stray-light and large swath width. The configuration has the potential to be the optimal imaging spectroscopy solution for lighter-than-air (LTA) vehicles and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) due to its small form factor and relatively low power requirements. The planned instrument specifications are discussed as well as design trade-offs. Calibration testing results (noise equivalent temperature difference, spectral linearity and spectral bandwidth) and laboratory emissivity plots from samples are shown using an operational testbed unit which has similar specifications as the final airborne system. Field testing of the testbed unit was performed to acquire plots of apparent emissivity for various known standard minerals (such as quartz). A comparison is made using data from the ASTER spectral library.

  6. Mars Science Laboratory Mission and Science Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotzinger, John P.; Crisp, Joy; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Anderson, Robert C.; Baker, Charles J.; Barry, Robert; Blake, David F.; Conrad, Pamela; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Ferdowski, Bobak; Gellert, Ralf; Gilbert, John B.; Golombek, Matt; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Hassler, Donald M.; Jandura, Louise; Litvak, Maxim; Mahaffy, Paul; Maki, Justin; Meyer, Michael; Malin, Michael C.; Mitrofanov, Igor; Simmonds, John J.; Vaniman, David; Welch, Richard V.; Wiens, Roger C.

    2012-09-01

    Scheduled to land in August of 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission was initiated to explore the habitability of Mars. This includes both modern environments as well as ancient environments recorded by the stratigraphic rock record preserved at the Gale crater landing site. The Curiosity rover has a designed lifetime of at least one Mars year (˜23 months), and drive capability of at least 20 km. Curiosity's science payload was specifically assembled to assess habitability and includes a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer and gas analyzer that will search for organic carbon in rocks, regolith fines, and the atmosphere (SAM instrument); an x-ray diffractometer that will determine mineralogical diversity (CheMin instrument); focusable cameras that can image landscapes and rock/regolith textures in natural color (MAHLI, MARDI, and Mastcam instruments); an alpha-particle x-ray spectrometer for in situ determination of rock and soil chemistry (APXS instrument); a laser-induced breakdown spectrometer to remotely sense the chemical composition of rocks and minerals (ChemCam instrument); an active neutron spectrometer designed to search for water in rocks/regolith (DAN instrument); a weather station to measure modern-day environmental variables (REMS instrument); and a sensor designed for continuous monitoring of background solar and cosmic radiation (RAD instrument). The various payload elements will work together to detect and study potential sampling targets with remote and in situ measurements; to acquire samples of rock, soil, and atmosphere and analyze them in onboard analytical instruments; and to observe the environment around the rover. The 155-km diameter Gale crater was chosen as Curiosity's field site based on several attributes: an interior mountain of ancient flat-lying strata extending almost 5 km above the elevation of the landing site; the lower few hundred meters of the mountain show a progression with relative age from clay-bearing to sulfate

  7. Essential Laboratory Activities Guide. Secondary Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duval County Schools, Jacksonville, FL.

    This teacher's guide was developed for use in junior and senior high schools in Duval County, Jacksonville, Florida, for the purpose of identifying those secondary science laboratory experiences which are essential to the development of science content knowledge and competency in handling science laboratory equipment and consumables. The guide…

  8. Mars Science Laboratory Orbit Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruizinga, Gerhard; Gustafson, Eric; Jefferson, David; Martin-Mur, Tomas; Mottinger, Neil; Pelletier, Fred; Ryne, Mark; Thompson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Orbit Determination (OD) met all requirements with considerable margin, MSL OD team developed spin signature removal tool and successfully used the tool during cruise, A novel approach was used for the MSL solar radiation pressure model and resulted in a very accurate model during the approach phase, The change in velocity for Attitude Control System (ACS) turns was successfully calibrated and with appropriate scale factor resulted in improved change in velocity prediction for future turns, All Trajectory Correction Maneuvers were successfully reconstructed and execution errors were well below the assumed pre-fight execution errors, The official OD solutions were statistically consistent throughout cruise and for OD solutions with different arc lengths as well, Only EPU-1 was sent to MSL. All other Entry Parameter Updates were waived, EPU-1 solution was only 200 m separated from final trajectory reconstruction in the B-plane

  9. Laboratory Study of Airborne Fallout Particles and Their Time Distribution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, H. A., Jr.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Samples of filtered airborne particulate, collected daily for the first month after the September 18, 1977 Chinese nuclear detonation, showed fourteen fission products. Fluctuations in the daily fallout activity levels suggested a global fallout orbit time of approximately twenty days. (Author/BB)

  10. Undergraduate Laboratory for Surface Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Mitchio; Beauchamp, Jesse L.; Dickert, Jeffrey M.; Essy, Blair R.; Claypool, Christopher L.

    1996-02-01

    Surface science has developed into a multidisciplinary field of research with applications ranging from heterogeneous catalysis to semiconductor etching (1). Aspects of surface chemistry are now included in physical chemistry textbooks (2) and undergraduate curricula (3), but the perceived cost and complexity of equipment has deterred the introduction of surface science methods in undergraduate laboratories (4). Efforts to expose chemistry undergraduates to state-of-the-art surface instrumentation have just begun (5). To provide our undergraduates with hands-on experience in using standard techniques for characterizing surface morphology, adsorbates, kinetics, and reaction mechanisms, we have developed a set of surface science experiments for our physical chemistry laboratory sequence. The centerpiece of the laboratory is an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber for studies of single crystal surfaces. This instrument, shown in the figure, has surface analysis capabilities including low energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger spectroscopy, and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). The laboratory exercises involve experiments on the well-studied Pt(111) surface. Students prepare a previously mounted single crystal sample by sputtering it with an argon ion gun and heating it under O2. Electron diffraction patterns from the cleaned surface are then obtained with a reverse view LEED apparatus (Princeton Instruments). Images are captured by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera interfaced to a personal computer for easy downloading and subsequent analysis. Although the LEED images from a Pt(111) surface can be readily interpreted using simple diffraction arguments, this lab provides an excellent context for introducing Miller indices and reciprocal lattices (6). The surface chemical composition can be investigated by Auger spectroscopy, using the LEED apparatus as a simple energy analyzer. The temperature programmed desorption experiment, which is nearly complete, will be

  11. Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 1; AVIRIS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on March 4-8, 1996. The main workshop is divided into two smaller workshops as follows: (1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on March 4-6. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1; (2) The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on March 6-8. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2.

  12. Laboratory analysis and airborne detection of materials stimulated to luminesce by the sun

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemphill, W.R.; Theisen, A.F.; Tyson, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The Fraunhofer line discriminator (FLD) is an airborne electro-optical device used to image materials which have been stimulated to luminesce by the Sun. Such materials include uranium-bearing sandstone, sedimentary phosphate rock, marine oil seeps, and stressed vegetation. Prior to conducting an airborne survey, a fluorescence spectrometer may be used in the laboratory to determine the spectral region where samples of the target material exhibit maximum luminescence, and to select the optimum Fraunhofer line. ?? 1984.

  13. Mars Science Laboratory Mission and Science Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotzinger, John P.; Crisp, Joy; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Anderson, Robert C.; Baker, Charles J.; Barry, Robert; Blake, David F.; Conrad, Pamela; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Ferdowski, Bobak; Gellert, Ralf; Gilbert, John B.; Golombek, Matt; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Hassler, Donald M.; Jandura, Louise; Litvak, Maxim; Mahaffy, Paul; Maki, Justin; Meyer, Michael; Malin, Michael C.; Mitrofanov, Igor; Simmonds, John J.; Vaniman, David; Welch, Richard V.; Wiens, Roger C.

    2012-09-01

    Scheduled to land in August of 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission was initiated to explore the habitability of Mars. This includes both modern environments as well as ancient environments recorded by the stratigraphic rock record preserved at the Gale crater landing site. The Curiosity rover has a designed lifetime of at least one Mars year (˜23 months), and drive capability of at least 20 km. Curiosity's science payload was specifically assembled to assess habitability and includes a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer and gas analyzer that will search for organic carbon in rocks, regolith fines, and the atmosphere (SAM instrument); an x-ray diffractometer that will determine mineralogical diversity (CheMin instrument); focusable cameras that can image landscapes and rock/regolith textures in natural color (MAHLI, MARDI, and Mastcam instruments); an alpha-particle x-ray spectrometer for in situ determination of rock and soil chemistry (APXS instrument); a laser-induced breakdown spectrometer to remotely sense the chemical composition of rocks and minerals (ChemCam instrument); an active neutron spectrometer designed to search for water in rocks/regolith (DAN instrument); a weather station to measure modern-day environmental variables (REMS instrument); and a sensor designed for continuous monitoring of background solar and cosmic radiation (RAD instrument). The various payload elements will work together to detect and study potential sampling targets with remote and in situ measurements; to acquire samples of rock, soil, and atmosphere and analyze them in onboard analytical instruments; and to observe the environment around the rover. The 155-km diameter Gale crater was chosen as Curiosity's field site based on several attributes: an interior mountain of ancient flat-lying strata extending almost 5 km above the elevation of the landing site; the lower few hundred meters of the mountain show a progression with relative age from clay-bearing to sulfate

  14. Next Red Planet Rover: Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Video Gallery

    Did Mars once have an environment capable of supporting life? NASA's next rover -- the Mars Science Laboratory, or Curiosity, will further unravel that mystery. The rover carries a whole laboratory...

  15. Airborne Trailblazer: Two decades with NASA Langley's 737 flying laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Lane E.

    1994-01-01

    This book is the story of a very unique aircraft and the contributions it has made to the air transportation industry. NASA's Boeing 737-100 Transport Systems Research Vehicle started life as the prototype for Boeing's 737 series of aircraft. The airplane was acquired by LaRC in 1974 to conduct research into advanced transport aircraft technologies. In the twenty years that followed, the airplane participated in more than twenty different research projects, evolving from a research tool for a specific NASA program into a national airborne research facility. It played a critical role in developing and gaining acceptance for numerous significant transport technologies including 'glass cockpits,' airborne windshear detection systems, data links for air traffic control communications, the microwave landing system, and the satellite-based global positioning system (GPS).

  16. Study of airborne science experiment management concepts for application to space shuttle. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, D. R.; Reller, J. O., Jr.; Neel, C. B.; Haughney, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    The management concepts and operating procedures are documented as they apply to the planning of shuttle spacelab operations. Areas discussed include: airborne missions; formulation of missions; management procedures; experimenter involvement; experiment development and performance; data handling; safety procedures; and applications to shuttle spacelab planning. Characteristics of the airborne science experience are listed, and references and figures are included.

  17. Mars Science Laboratory Entry Guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendeck, Gavin F.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory will be the first Mars mission to attempt a guided entry with the objective of safely delivering the entry vehicle to a survivable parachute deploy state within 12.5 km of the pre-designated parachute deploy coordinates. The Entry Terminal Point Controller guidance algorithm is derived from the final phase Apollo Command Module guidance and, like Apollo, modulates the bank angle to control range based on deviations in range, altitude rate, and drag acceleration from a reference trajectory. For application to Mars landers which must make use of the tenuous Martian atmosphere, it is critical to balance the lift of the vehicle to minimize the range while still ensuring a safe deploy altitude. An overview of the process to generate optimized guidance settings is presented, discussing improvements made over the last nine years. Performance tradeoffs between ellipse size and deploy altitude will be presented, along with imposed constraints of entry acceleration and heating. Performance sensitivities to the bank reversal deadbands, heading alignment, attitude initialization error, and entry delivery errors are presented.

  18. Mars Science Laboratory Engineering Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Justin N.; Thiessen, David L.; Pourangi, Ali M.; Kobzeff, Peter A.; Lee, Steven W.; Dingizian, Arsham; Schwochert, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, which launched to Mars in 2011, is equipped with a set of 12 engineering cameras. These cameras are build-to-print copies of the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) cameras, which were sent to Mars in 2003. The engineering cameras weigh less than 300 grams each and use less than 3 W of power. Images returned from the engineering cameras are used to navigate the rover on the Martian surface, deploy the rover robotic arm, and ingest samples into the rover sample processing system. The navigation cameras (Navcams) are mounted to a pan/tilt mast and have a 45-degree square field of view (FOV) with a pixel scale of 0.82 mrad/pixel. The hazard avoidance cameras (Haz - cams) are body-mounted to the rover chassis in the front and rear of the vehicle and have a 124-degree square FOV with a pixel scale of 2.1 mrad/pixel. All of the cameras utilize a frame-transfer CCD (charge-coupled device) with a 1024x1024 imaging region and red/near IR bandpass filters centered at 650 nm. The MSL engineering cameras are grouped into two sets of six: one set of cameras is connected to rover computer A and the other set is connected to rover computer B. The MSL rover carries 8 Hazcams and 4 Navcams.

  19. Assessing Learning Environments in Senior Science Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, David; Fisher, Darrell

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of the Science Laboratory Environment Inventory (SLEI) which was designed for assessing senior science students' perceptions of aspects of their laboratory learning environment. Describes ways in which SLEI has been used in research studies and outlines ways educators could use the instrument for evaluating aspects of their own…

  20. Clinical Laboratory Sciences: The Next Twenty Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Frances J.

    The views of professionals concerning the future of the clinical laboratory sciences were assessed using a modification of the Delphi technique. The participating administrators, educators, and bench technologists were asked what they felt the clinical laboratory sciences would be like in 20 years, and their responses were used to develop…

  1. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements VI (ACME VI) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Biraud, S

    2015-12-01

    From October 1 through September 30, 2016, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility will deploy the Cessna 206 aircraft over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, collecting observations of trace-gas mixing ratios over the ARM’s SGP facility. The aircraft payload includes two Atmospheric Observing Systems, Inc., analyzers for continuous measurements of CO2 and a 12-flask sampler for analysis of carbon cycle gases (CO2, CO, CH4, N2O, 13CO2, 14CO2, carbonyl sulfide, and trace hydrocarbon species, including ethane). The aircraft payload also includes instrumentation for solar/infrared radiation measurements. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s ARM Climate Research Facility and Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Program and builds upon previous ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) missions. The goal of these measurements is to improve understanding of 1) the carbon exchange at the SGP site, 2) how CO2 and associated water and energy fluxes influence radiative forcing, convective processes and CO2 concentrations over the SGP site, and 3) how greenhouse gases are transported on continental scales.

  2. Physical Science Laboratory Manual, Experimental Version.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooperative General Science Project, Atlanta, GA.

    Provided are physical science laboratory experiments which have been developed and used as a part of an experimental one year undergraduate course in general science for non-science majors. The experiments cover a limited number of topics representative of the scientific enterprise. Some of the topics are pressure and buoyancy, heat, motion,…

  3. Emotional Intelligence in Medical Laboratory Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Travis

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of emotional intelligence (EI) in medical laboratory science, as perceived by laboratory administrators. To collect and evaluate these perceptions, a survey was developed and distributed to over 1,400 medical laboratory administrators throughout the U.S. during January and February of 2013. In…

  4. Laboratory experiments on membrane filter sampling of airborne mycotoxins produced by Stachybotrys atra corda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasanen, A.-L.; Nikulin, M.; Tuomainen, M.; Berg, S.; Parikka, P.; Hintikka, E.-L.

    A membrane filter method for sampling of airborne stachybotrystoxins was studied in the laboratory. Toxigenic strains of Stachybotrys atra on wallpaper, grain, hay and straw were used as toxin sources in the experiments. Air samples were collected on cellulose nitrate and polycarbonate membrane filters at air flow rates of 10-20 ℓ min -1. After the filter sampling, the air was passed through methanol. The results showed that stachybotrystoxins (trichothecenes) were concentrated in airborne fungal propagules, and thus can be collected on filters. Polycarbonate filters with a pore size of 0.2 μm collected the highest percentage of toxic samples. The laboratory experiments indicated that polycarbonate filter sampling for the collection of airborne mycotoxins is a promising method for extension to field measurements.

  5. Los Alamos National Laboratory A National Science Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, Mark B.

    2012-07-20

    Our mission as a DOE national security science laboratory is to develop and apply science, technology, and engineering solutions that: (1) Ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the US nuclear deterrent; (2) Protect against the nuclear threat; and (3) Solve Energy Security and other emerging national security challenges.

  6. 2011 Mars Science Laboratory Mission Design Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abilleira, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Scheduled to launch in the fall of 2011 with arrival at Mars occurring in the summer of 2012, NASA's Mars Science Laboratory will explore and assess whether Mars ever had conditions capable of supporting microbial life. In order to achieve its science objectives, the Mars Science Laboratory will be equipped with the most advanced suite of instruments ever sent to the surface of the Red Planet. Delivering the next mobile science laboratory safely to the surface of Mars has various key challenges derived from a strict set of requirements which include launch vehicle performance, spacecraft mass, communications coverage during Entry, Descent, and Landing, atmosphere-relative entry speeds, latitude accessibility, and dust storm season avoidance among others. The Mars Science Laboratory launch/arrival strategy selected after careful review satisfies all these mission requirements.

  7. Mars Science Laboratory at Work, Artist's Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mars Science Laboratory, a mobile robot for investigating Mars' past or present ability to sustain microbial life, is in development for a launch opportunity in 2009. This picture is an artist's concept portraying what the advanced rover would look like when examining a rock outcrop on Mars. The arm extending from the front of the rover is designed both to position some of the rover's instruments close to selected targets and also to collect samples for onboard analysis by other instruments.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

  8. Airborne sensor systems under development at the NASA/NSTL/Earth Resources Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James E.; Meeks, Gerald R.

    1988-01-01

    The operational characteristics of the Airborne Bathymetric System (ABS) MSS and the Airborne Multispectral Pushbroom Scanner (AMPS), which are currently being developed at NASA's Earth Resources Laboratory (ERL), are described. The ABS MSS system scans through a swath width of + or - 40 deg from nadir and the sensor incorporates onboard calibration references for the visible and short-wavelength IR channels. The AMPS uses five separate f/1.8 refractive telecentric lens systems, each incorporating nine optical elements, and a replaceable fixed bandwidth filter.

  9. Mars Science Laboratory Navigation Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; Kruizingas, Gerhard L.; Burkhart, P. Daniel; Wong, Mau C.; Abilleira, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), carrying the Curiosity rover to Mars, was launched on November 26, 2011, from Cape Canaveral, Florida. The target for MSL was selected to be Gale Crater, near the equator of Mars, with an arrival date in early August 2012. The two main interplanetary navigation tasks for the mission were to deliver the spacecraft to an entry interface point that would allow the rover to safely reach the landing area, and to tell the spacecraft where it entered the atmosphere of Mars, so it could guide itself accurately to close proximity of the landing target. MSL used entry guidance as it slowed down from the entry speed to a speed low enough to allow for a successful parachute deployment, and this guidance allowed shrinking the landing ellipse to a 99% conservative estimate of 7 by 20 kilometers. Since there is no global positioning system in Mars, achieving this accuracy was predicated on flying a trajectory that closely matched the reference trajectory used to design the guidance algorithm, and on initializing the guidance system with an accurate Mars-relative entry state that could be used as the starting point to integrate the inertial measurement unit data during entry and descent. The pre-launch entry flight path angle (EFPA) delivery requirement was +/- 0.20 deg, but after launch a smaller threshold of +/- 0.05 deg was used as the criteria for late trajectory correction maneuver (TCM) decisions. The pre-launch requirement for entry state knowledge was 2.8 kilometers in position error and 2 meters per second in velocity error, but also smaller thresholds were defined after launch to evaluate entry state update opportunities. The biggest challenge for the navigation team was to accurately predict the trajectory of the spacecraft, so the estimates of the entry conditions could be stable, and late trajectory correction maneuvers or entry parameter updates could be waved off. As a matter of fact, the prediction accuracy was such that the last

  10. Mars Science Laboratory Spacecraft Assembled for Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The major components of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft cruise stage atop the aeroshell, which has the descent stage and rover inside were connected together in October 2008 for several weeks of system testing, including simulation of launch vibrations and deep-space environmental conditions.

    These components will be taken apart again, for further work on each of them, after the environmental testing. The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft is being assembled and tested for launch in 2011.

    This image was taken inside the Spacecraft Assembly Facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., which manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  11. Mars Science Laboratory Rover Taking Shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image taken in August 2008 in a clean room at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., shows NASA's next Mars rover, the Mars Science Laboratory, in the course of its assembly, before additions of its arm, mast, laboratory instruments and other equipment.

    The rover is about 9 feet wide and 10 feet long.

    Viewing progress on the assembly are, from left: NASA Associate Administrator for Science Ed Weiler, California Institute of Technology President Jean-Lou Chameau, JPL Director Charles Elachi, and JPL Associate Director for Flight Projects and Mission Success Tom Gavin.

    JPL, a division of Caltech, manages the Mars Science Laboratory project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

  12. The Mars Science Laboratory Touchdown Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Christopher; Frankovich, John; Yates, Phillip; Wells Jr, George H.; Losey, Robert

    2009-01-01

    In the Touchdown Test Program for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, a facility was developed to use a full-scale rover vehicle and an overhead winch system to replicate the Skycrane landing event.

  13. Engineering of the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Video Gallery

    The biggest, "baddest," newest Mars rover is the Mars Science Laboratory. It's the size of a small sport-utility vehicle and has 10 instruments, the most ever, all to find clues of life on the Red ...

  14. Summaries of the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 1: AVIRIS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This publication is the first of three containing summaries for the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on January 23-26, 1995. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: (1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on January 23-24. The summaries for this workshop appear in this volume; (2) The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on January 25-26. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 3; and (3) The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on January 26. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2.

  15. Summaries of the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 2: TIMS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Realmuto, Vincent J. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This publication is the second volume of the summaries for the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on January 23-26, 1995. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: (1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop on January 23-24. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1; (2) The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop on January 25-26. The summaries for this workshop appear in volume 3; and (3) The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop on January 26. The summaries for this workshop appear in this volume.

  16. Summaries of the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 3: AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This publication is the third containing summaries for the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on January 23-26, 1995. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: (1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on January 23-24. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1; (2) The Airborne synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on January 25-26. The summaries for this workshop appear in this volume; and (3) The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on January 26. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2.

  17. NASA UAV Airborne Science Capabilities in Support of Water Resource Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fladeland, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    This workshop presentation focuses on potential uses of unmanned aircraft observations in support of water resource management and agriculture. The presentation will provide an overview of NASA Airborne Science capabilities with an emphasis on past UAV missions to provide context on accomplishments as well as technical challenges. I will also focus on recent NASA Ames efforts to assist in irrigation management and invasive species management using airborne and satellite datasets.

  18. Safety in the Science Laboratory, A Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, Floyd T.

    The bulletin was prepared as a general guide to encourage the use of safe practices in science laboratories in Florida schools. The guide begins with an outline of recommended emergency procedures. Chapter I discusses the importance of safety in the science program. Chapter II discusses handling and storage of equipment, and designing laboratory…

  19. An Overview of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Michael A.; Cardell, Greg

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a high level overview of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory. Topics to be explored are the Mission's science goals and objectives, a discussion of the mission phases, an overview of the flight system architecture and the payload, and a discussion of the MSL power system.

  20. Science Laboratory Environment and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aladejana, Francisca; Aderibigbe, Oluyemisi

    2007-01-01

    The study determined how students assess the various components of their science laboratory environment. It also identified how the laboratory environment affects students' learning outcomes. The modified ex-post facto design was used. A sample of 328 randomly selected students was taken from a population of all Senior Secondary School chemistry…

  1. Distractions in the School Science Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamza, Karim M.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, I make a case for the potential educative worth of distractions for learning science in the school laboratory. Distractions are operationalized as experiences lying outside the main purpose of the laboratory activity, thereby diverting students' attention from that purpose. Through a practical epistemology analysis, I…

  2. An Overview of the NASA P-3B Airborne Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillory, Anthony R.; Postell, George W.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) P-3B Orion is a medium-lift, four engine turbo-prop aircraft that has been reconfigured from a military aircraft to an Earth Science research platform. The aircraft has a long history of supporting science missions, flying on average over 200 hours per year. Examples of research missions that have been flown aboard the aircraft are remote sensing flights to study geophysical parameters including ice-sheet topography and periodic change, soil moisture content, atmospheric aerosol constituents, and beach erosion. Missions are conducted for the purposes of calibration/validation of various NASA and international satellites that monitor climate change as well as process studies and the test of new prototype remote sensing instruments. In recent y ears the focus has been on ice surveys of the Arctic and Antarctic, soil moisture research, and measurements of atmospheric chemistry and radiation sciences. The aircraft has been conducting ice surveys of Greenland since 1993 for the purposes of topographic mapping of both the surface and basal topography. Another application of the aircraft has been for soil moisture research. Research has also been conducted using microwave radiometers and radars over various agricultural and forest lands. Recently, a mission was flown in the spring over the High-Arctic to collect air samples of haze and boreal forest fires in an effort to determine anthropogenic amounts and sources of pollution. This pa per will provide an overview of the P-3B platform and highlight recent science missions.

  3. Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). A description of the sensor, ground data processing facility, laboratory calibration, and first results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vane, Gregg (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The papers in this document were presented at the Imaging Spectroscopy 2 Conference of the 31st International Symposium on Optical and Optoelectronic Applied Science and Engineering, in San Diego, California, on 20 and 21 August 1987. They describe the design and performance of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) sensor and its subsystems, the ground data processing facility, laboratory calibration, and first results.

  4. Science Laboratory Environment and Academic Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aladejana, Francisca; Aderibigbe, Oluyemisi

    2007-12-01

    The study determined how students assess the various components of their science laboratory environment. It also identified how the laboratory environment affects students' learning outcomes. The modified ex-post facto design was used. A sample of 328 randomly selected students was taken from a population of all Senior Secondary School chemistry students in a state in Nigeria. The research instrument, Science Laboratory Environment Inventory (SLEI) designed and validated by Fraser et al. (Sci Educ 77:1-24, 1993) was administered on the selected students. Data analysis was done using descriptive statistics and Product Moment Correlation. Findings revealed that students could assess the five components (Student cohesiveness, Open-endedness, Integration, Rule clarity, and Material Environment) of the laboratory environment. Student cohesiveness has the highest assessment while material environment has the least. The results also showed that the five components of the science laboratory environment are positively correlated with students' academic performance. The findings are discussed with a view to improving the quality of the laboratory environment, subsequent academic performance in science and ultimately the enrolment and retaining of learners in science.

  5. Emotional intelligence in medical laboratory science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Travis

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of emotional intelligence (EI) in medical laboratory science, as perceived by laboratory administrators. To collect and evaluate these perceptions, a survey was developed and distributed to over 1,400 medical laboratory administrators throughout the U.S. during January and February of 2013. In addition to demographic-based questions, the survey contained a list of 16 items, three skills traditionally considered important for successful work in the medical laboratory as well as 13 EI-related items. Laboratory administrators were asked to rate each item for its importance for job performance, their satisfaction with the item's demonstration among currently working medical laboratory scientists (MLS) and the amount of responsibility college-based medical laboratory science programs should assume for the development of each skill or attribute. Participants were also asked about EI training in their laboratories and were given the opportunity to express any thoughts or opinions about EI as it related to medical laboratory science. This study revealed that each EI item, as well as each of the three other items, was considered to be very or extremely important for successful job performance. Administrators conveyed that they were satisfied overall, but indicated room for improvement in all areas, especially those related to EI. Those surveyed emphasized that medical laboratory science programs should continue to carry the bulk of the responsibility for the development of technical skills and theoretical knowledge and expressed support for increased attention to EI concepts at the individual, laboratory, and program levels.

  6. Life sciences: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    Life Sciences Research at LBL has both a long history and a new visibility. The physics technologies pioneered in the days of Ernest O. Lawrence found almost immediate application in the medical research conducted by Ernest's brother, John Lawrence. And the tradition of nuclear medicine continues today, largely uninterrupted for more than 50 years. Until recently, though, life sciences research has been a secondary force at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Today, a true multi-program laboratory has emerged, in which the life sciences participate as a full partner. The LBL Human Genome Center is a contribution to the growing international effort to map the human genome. Its achievements represent LBL divisions, including Engineering, Materials and Chemical Sciences, and Information and Computing Sciences, along with Cell and Molecular Biology and Chemical Biodynamics. The Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center will comprise not only beamlines and experimental end stations, but also supporting laboratories and office space for scientists from across the US. This effort reflects a confluence of scientific disciplines --- this time represented by individuals from the life sciences divisions and by engineers and physicists associated with the Advanced Light Source project. And finally, this report itself, the first summarizing the efforts of all four life sciences divisions, suggests a new spirit of cooperation. 30 figs.

  7. Correlation between predicted and observed levels of airborne tritium at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory site boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Lindeken, C.L.; Silver, W.J.; Toy, A.J.; White, J.H.

    1980-02-19

    At the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, a computer code based on the Gaussian plume model is used to estimate radiation doses from routine or accidental release of airborne radioactive material. Routine releases of tritium have been used as a test of the overall uncertainty associated with these estimates. The ration of concentration to release rate at distances from the two principal release points to each of six site boundary sampling locations has been calcuated using local meteorological data. The concentration of airborne tritiated water vapor is continuously measured at the six sampling stations as part of the Laboratory's environmental monitoring program. Comparison of predicted with observed annual tritiated water concentrations in 1978 showed an average ratio of 2.6 with a range of from 0.97 to 5.8.

  8. 16 CFR 1000.30 - Directorate for Laboratory Sciences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Directorate for Laboratory Sciences. 1000.30... AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.30 Directorate for Laboratory Sciences. The Directorate for Laboratory Sciences, which is managed by the Associate Executive Director for Laboratory Sciences, is responsible...

  9. 16 CFR 1000.30 - Directorate for Laboratory Sciences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Directorate for Laboratory Sciences. 1000.30... AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.30 Directorate for Laboratory Sciences. The Directorate for Laboratory Sciences, which is managed by the Associate Executive Director for Laboratory Sciences, is responsible...

  10. 16 CFR 1000.30 - Directorate for Laboratory Sciences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Directorate for Laboratory Sciences. 1000.30... AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.30 Directorate for Laboratory Sciences. The Directorate for Laboratory Sciences, which is managed by the Associate Executive Director for Laboratory Sciences, is responsible...

  11. 16 CFR 1000.30 - Directorate for Laboratory Sciences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Directorate for Laboratory Sciences. 1000.30... AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.30 Directorate for Laboratory Sciences. The Directorate for Laboratory Sciences, which is managed by the Associate Executive Director for Laboratory Sciences, is responsible...

  12. 16 CFR 1000.30 - Directorate for Laboratory Sciences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Directorate for Laboratory Sciences. 1000.30... AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.30 Directorate for Laboratory Sciences. The Directorate for Laboratory Sciences, which is managed by the Associate Executive Director for Laboratory Sciences, is responsible...

  13. Concentration and Emission of Airborne Contaminants in a Laboratory Animal Facility Housing Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Ooms, Tara G; Artwohl, James E; Conroy, Lorraine M; Schoonover, Todd M; Fortman, Jeffrey D

    2008-01-01

    Characterization of animal housing conditions can determine the frequency of bedding and cage changes, which are not standardized from facility to facility. Rabbits produce noticeable odors, and their excreta can scald and stain cages. Our facility wanted to document measurable airborne contaminants in a laboratory rabbit room in which excreta pans were changed weekly and cages changed biweekly. Contaminants included particulate, endotoxin, ammonia, carbon dioxide, and a rabbit salivary protein as a marker for rabbit allergen. Concentrations were measured daily over a 2-wk period in a laboratory animal facility to determine whether they increased over time and on days considered to be the dirtiest. Except for ammonia, concentrations of all airborne contaminants did not differ between clean and dirty days. Concentrations were lower than occupational health exposure guidelines for all contaminants studied, including ammonia. After measurement of concentration, a model was applied to calculate mean emission factors in this rabbit room. Examples of emission factor utilization to determine airborne contaminant concentration in rabbit rooms under various environmental conditions and housing densities are provided. PMID:18351721

  14. Changing the Way NASA Airborne Science Data Are Managed: Challenges and Benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, J.; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2011-12-01

    For many years NASA has supported the collection of in-situ and remotely sensed science data through the use of airborne platforms. The Airborne Science Program, as part of NASA's Earth Science Division (ESD), currently supports and manages these investigations. The data collected under this program have many uses including, but certainly not limited to, calibration and validation of satellite based measurements and retrieval algorithms, testing new sensor technologies, and measuring the vertical and horizontal distribution of atmospheric constituents. In the past, management of the data was typically the responsibility of the individual principal investigators. Along the way many highly customized strategies for dealing with data discovery, access, distribution, formatting, and preservation issues were developed. In an effort to assure that airborne science data are managed in a more coherent and uniform manner across the program, airborne missions are now being required to adhere to the NASA Earth science data policy and a specific set of Level 1 data management requirements derived from that policy. These requirements include use of NASA ESD-approved data formats and metadata specifications, elimination of periods of exclusive access, and the transfer of data products to a NASA ESD-assigned Data Center. In addition, the manner in which each mission plans to meet these requirements must be documented in a data management plan. The good news is that there is a significant Earth science data management infrastructure in place that can be leveraged to help meet these requirements. However, much of this infrastructure was developed to support satellite missions. Since airborne data are different than satellite data in many ways, this presents some challenges. This presentation will describe the challenges as well as the benefits of this new data management policy.

  15. Laboratory Lessons for Writing and Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Neal

    2007-01-01

    The history of writing to learn college science is tied to the development of laboratory methods. Such student-centered learning was widely hailed in the 1890s as student enrollments increased dramatically and a backlash grew against lecture and recitation methods. However, as the author shows using archival examples from Dartmouth College,…

  16. Mars Science Laboratory Workstation Test Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriquez, David A.; Canham, Timothy K.; Chang, Johnny T.; Villaume, Nathaniel

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory developed the Workstation TestSet (WSTS) is a computer program that enables flight software development on virtual MSL avionics. The WSTS is the non-real-time flight avionics simulator that is designed to be completely software-based and run on a workstation class Linux PC.

  17. Mars Science Laboratory thermal control architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Birur, Gajanana; Pauken, Michael; Paris, Anthony; Novak, Keith; Prina, Mauro; Ramirez, Brenda; Bame, David

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission to land a large rover on Mars is being planned for launch in 2009. This paper will describe the basic architecture of the thermal control system, the challenges and the methods used to overcome them by the use of an innovative architecture to maximize the use of heritage from past projects while meeting the requirements for the design.

  18. NASA Airborne Science: Studying Earth From the Air

    NASA Video Gallery

    Journalists and social media followers were briefed on the goals of NASA's Earth science program and a half-dozen current or near-term Earth science missions, and learned about how a small fleet of...

  19. NASA SMD Airborne Science Capabilities for Development and Testing of New Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fladeland, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The SMD NASA Airborne Science Program operates and maintains a fleet of highly modified aircraft to support instrument development, satellite instrument calibration, data product validation and earth science process studies. This poster will provide an overview of aircraft available to NASA researchers including performance specifications and modifications for instrument support, processes for requesting aircraft time and developing cost estimates for proposals, and policies and procedures required to ensure safety of flight.

  20. UAVSAR: A New NASA Airborne SAR System for Science and Technology Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Hensley, Scott; Wheeler, Kevin; Sadowy, Greg; Miller, Tim; Shaffer, Scott; Muellerschoen, Ron; Jones, Cathleen; Zebker, Howard; Madsen, Soren

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is currently building a reconfigurable, polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR), specifically designed to acquire airborne repeat track SAR data for differential interferometric measurements. Differentian interferometry can provide key deformation measurements, important for studies of earthquakes, volcanoes and other dynamically changing phenomena. Using precision real-time GPS and a sensor controlled flight management system, the system will be able to fly predefined paths with great precision. The expected performance of the flight control system will constrain the flight path to be within a 10 m diameter tube about the desired flight track. The radar will be designed to be operable on a UAV (Unpiloted Aria1 Vehicle) but will initially be demonstrated on a NASA Gulfstream III. The radar will be fully polarimetric, with a range bandwidth of 80 MHz (2 m range resolution), and will support a 16 km range swath. The antenna will be electronically steered along track to assure that the antenna beam can be directed independently, regardless of the wind direction and speed. Other features supported by the antenna include elevation monopulse and pulse-to-pulse re-steering capabilities that will enable some novel modes of operation. The system will nominally operate at 45,000 ft (13800 m). The program began as an Instrument Incubator Project (IIP) funded by NASA Earth Science and Technology Office (ESTO).

  1. Summaries of the Seventh JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop January 12-16, 1998. Volume 1; AVIRIS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Seventh JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on January 12-16, 1998. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops, and each workshop has a volume as follows: (1) Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) Workshop; (2) Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) Workshop; and (3) Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) Workshop. This Volume 1 publication contains 58 papers taken from the AVIRIS workshop.

  2. Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, March 4-8, 1996. Volume 2; AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yunjin (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on March 4-8, 1996. The main workshop is divided into two smaller workshops as follows: The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on March 4-6. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1. The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on March 6-8. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2.

  3. Turbulent dispersivity under conditions relevant to airborne disease transmission between laboratory animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halloran, Siobhan; Wexler, Anthony; Ristenpart, William

    2014-11-01

    Virologists and other researchers who test pathogens for airborne disease transmissibility often place a test animal downstream from an inoculated animal and later determine whether the test animal became infected. Despite the crucial role of the airflow in modulating the pathogen transmission, to date the infectious disease community has paid little attention to the effect of airspeed or turbulence intensity on the probability of transmission. Here we present measurements of the turbulent dispersivity under conditions relevant to experimental tests of airborne disease transmissibility between laboratory animals. We used time lapse photography to visualize the downstream transport and turbulent dispersion of smoke particulates released from a point source downstream of a standard axial fan, thus mimicking the release and transport of expiratory aerosols exhaled by an inoculated animal. We demonstrate that the fan speed counterintuitively has no effect on the downstream plume width, a result replicated with a variety of different fan types and configurations. The results point toward a useful simplification in modeling of airborne disease transmission via fan-generated flows.

  4. Mars Science Laboratory Cruise Propulsion Maneuvering Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Raymond S.; Mizukami, Masahi; Barber, Todd J.

    2013-01-01

    Mars Science Laboratory "Curiosity" is NASA's most recent mission to Mars, launched in November 2011, and landed in August 2012. It is a subcompact car-sized nuclear powered rover designed for a long duration mission, with an extensive suite of science instruments. Entry, descent and landing used a unique "skycrane" concept. This report describes the propulsive maneuvering operations during cruise from Earth to Mars, to control attitudes and to target the vehicle for entry. The propulsion subsystem, mission operations, and flight performance are discussed. All trajectory control maneuvers were well within accuracy requirements, and all turns and spin corrections were nominal.

  5. Laboratory and Airborne BRDF Analysis of Vegetation Leaves and Soil Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiev, Georgi T.; Gatebe, Charles K.; Butler, James J.; King, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory-based Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) analysis of vegetation leaves, soil, and leaf litter samples is presented. The leaf litter and soil samples, numbered 1 and 2, were obtained from a site located in the savanna biome of South Africa (Skukuza: 25.0degS, 31.5degE). A third soil sample, number 3, was obtained from Etosha Pan, Namibia (19.20degS, 15.93degE, alt. 1100 m). In addition, BRDF of local fresh and dry leaves from tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera) and acacia tree (Acacia greggii) were studied. It is shown how the BRDF depends on the incident and scatter angles, sample size (i.e. crushed versus whole leaf,) soil samples fraction size, sample status (i.e. fresh versus dry leaves), vegetation species (poplar versus acacia), and vegetation s biochemical composition. As a demonstration of the application of the results of this study, airborne BRDF measurements acquired with NASA's Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) over the same general site where the soil and leaf litter samples were obtained are compared to the laboratory results. Good agreement between laboratory and airborne measured BRDF is reported.

  6. Robotic Manufacturing Science and Engineering Laboratory (RMSEL)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed Robotic Manufacturing Science and Engineering Laboratory (RMSEL) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL). This facility is needed to integrate, consolidate, and enhance the robotics research and testing currently in progress at SNL. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  7. Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory 2004 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    White, Julia C.

    2005-04-17

    This 2004 Annual Report describes the research and accomplishments of staff and users of the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), located in Richland, Washington. EMSL is a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization, operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The resources and opportunities within the facility are an outgrowth of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to fundamental research for understanding and resolving environmental and other critical scientific issues.

  8. Life sciences laboratory breadboard simulations for shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taketa, S. T.; Simmonds, R. C.; Callahan, P. X.

    1975-01-01

    Breadboard simulations of life sciences laboratory concepts for conducting bioresearch in space were undertaken as part of the concept verification testing program. Breadboard simulations were conducted to test concepts of and scope problems associated with bioresearch support equipment and facility requirements and their operational integration for conducting manned research in earth orbital missions. It emphasized requirements, functions, and procedures for candidate research on crew members (simulated) and subhuman primates and on typical radioisotope studies in rats, a rooster, and plants.

  9. Parachute Testing for Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The team developing the landing system for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory tested the deployment of an early parachute design in mid-October 2007 inside the world's largest wind tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California.

    In this image, an engineer is dwarfed by the parachute, which holds more air than a 280-square-meter (3,000-square-foot) house and is designed to survive loads in excess of 36,000 kilograms (80,000 pounds).

    The parachute, built by Pioneer Aerospace, South Windsor, Connecticut, has 80 suspension lines, measures more than 50 meters (165 feet) in length, and opens to a diameter of nearly 17 meters (55 feet). It is the largest disk-gap-band parachute ever built and is shown here inflated in the test section with only about 3.8 meters (12.5 feet) of clearance to both the floor and ceiling.

    The wind tunnel, which is 24 meters (80 feet) tall and 37 meters (120 feet) wide and big enough to house a Boeing 737, is part of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex, operated by the U.S. Air Force, Arnold Engineering Development Center.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is building and testing the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft for launch in 2009. The mission will land a roving analytical laboratory on the surface of Mars in 2010. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  10. Challenges in the Management and Stewardship of Airborne Observational Data at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino, J.; Daniels, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) provides the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) funding for the operation, maintenance and upgrade of two research aircraft: the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) Gulfstream V and the NSF/NCAR Hercules C-130. A suite of in-situ and remote sensing airborne instruments housed at the EOL Research Aviation Facility (RAF) provide a basic set of measurements that are typically deployed on most airborne field campaigns. In addition, instruments to address more specific research requirements are provided by collaborating participants from universities, industry, NASA, NOAA or other agencies (referred to as Principal Investigator, or PI, instruments). At the 2014 AGU Fall Meeting, a poster (IN13B-3639) was presented outlining the components of Airborne Data Management included field phase data collection, formats, data archival and documentation, version control, storage practices, stewardship and obsolete data formats, and public data access. This talk will cover lessons learned, challenges associated with the above components, and current developments to address these challenges, including: tracking data workflows for aircraft instrumentation to facilitate identification, and correction, of gaps in these workflows; implementation of dataset versioning guidelines; and assignment of Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) to data and instrumentation to facilitate tracking data and facility use in publications.

  11. Visit to the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2010-01-08

    U.S. Department of Energy scientists and administrators join members of the National Science Foundation and South Dakotas Sanford Underground Laboratory for the deepest journey yet to the proposed site of the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL).

  12. Visit to the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-31

    U.S. Department of Energy scientists and administrators join members of the National Science Foundation and South Dakotas Sanford Underground Laboratory for the deepest journey yet to the proposed site of the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL).

  13. Visit to the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    U.S. Department of Energy scientists and administrators join members of the National Science Foundation and South Dakotas Sanford Underground Laboratory for the deepest journey yet to the proposed site of the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL).

  14. Flight Test Safety Considerations for Airborne Science Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Randolph S.

    1997-01-01

    Most of the scientific community that require scientific data or scientific measurements from aircraft do not understand the full implications of putting certain equipment on board high performance aircraft. It is the duty of the NASA Flight Operations personnel to ensure that all Principal Investigators who are given space on NASA flight research aircraft, comply with stringent safety requirements. The attitude of the experienced Flight operations personnel given this duty has been and remains one of insuring that the PI's experiment is allowed to be placed on the aircraft (facility) and can be operated in a manner that will obtain the expected data. This is sometimes a challenge. The success that NASA has in this regard is due to the fact that it is its own authority under public law, to certify its aircraft as airworthy. Airworthiness, fitness for flight, is a complex issue which pulls together all aspects of configuration management, engineering, quality, and flight safety. It is often the case at each NASA Center that is conducting airborne research, that unique solutions to some challenging safety issues are required. These solutions permit NASA to do things that would not be permitted by the Department of Transportation. This paper will use examples of various flight research configurations to show the necessity of a disciplined process leading up to flight test and mission implementation. All new configurations required engineering flight test but many, as noted in this paper, require that the modifications be flight tested to insure that they do not negatively impact on any part of the aircraft operational profiles. The success of these processes has been demonstrated over many years and NASA has accommodated experimental packages that cannot be flown on any other aircraft.

  15. Experimenter's laboratory for visualized interactive science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Elaine R.; Klemp, Marjorie K.; Lasater, Sally W.; Szczur, Marti R.; Klemp, Joseph B.

    1992-01-01

    The science activities of the 1990's will require the analysis of complex phenomena and large diverse sets of data. In order to meet these needs, we must take advantage of advanced user interaction techniques: modern user interface tools; visualization capabilities; affordable, high performance graphics workstations; and interoperable data standards and translator. To meet these needs, we propose to adopt and upgrade several existing tools and systems to create an experimenter's laboratory for visualized interactive science. Intuitive human-computer interaction techniques have already been developed and demonstrated at the University of Colorado. A Transportable Applications Executive (TAE+), developed at GSFC, is a powerful user interface tool for general purpose applications. A 3D visualization package developed by NCAR provides both color shaded surface displays and volumetric rendering in either index or true color. The Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) data access library developed by Unidata supports creation, access and sharing of scientific data in a form that is self-describing and network transparent. The combination and enhancement of these packages constitutes a powerful experimenter's laboratory capable of meeting key science needs of the 1990's. This proposal encompasses the work required to build and demonstrate this capability.

  16. Experimenter's laboratory for visualized interactive science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Elaine R.; Klemp, Marjorie K.; Lasater, Sally W.; Szczur, Marti R.; Klemp, Joseph B.

    1993-01-01

    The science activities of the 1990's will require the analysis of complex phenomena and large diverse sets of data. In order to meet these needs, we must take advantage of advanced user interaction techniques: modern user interface tools; visualization capabilities; affordable, high performance graphics workstations; and interoperatable data standards and translator. To meet these needs, we propose to adopt and upgrade several existing tools and systems to create an experimenter's laboratory for visualized interactive science. Intuitive human-computer interaction techniques have already been developed and demonstrated at the University of Colorado. A Transportable Applications Executive (TAE+), developed at GSFC, is a powerful user interface tool for general purpose applications. A 3D visualization package developed by NCAR provides both color-shaded surface displays and volumetric rendering in either index or true color. The Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) data access library developed by Unidata supports creation, access and sharing of scientific data in a form that is self-describing and network transparent. The combination and enhancement of these packages constitutes a powerful experimenter's laboratory capable of meeting key science needs of the 1990's. This proposal encompasses the work required to build and demonstrate this capability.

  17. House of Science: A University Laboratory for Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. Erik

    2004-01-01

    The House of Science in Stockholm is a university science laboratory for physics, astronomy and biotechnology, entirely devoted to schools. The laboratory makes modern science accessible to teachers, school classes and individual students. It could serve as a model for universities and science centres that want to bridge the gap between school and…

  18. Airborne Laser Laboratory departure from Kirtland Air Force Base and a brief history of aero-optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrazis, Demos T.

    2013-07-01

    We discuss aspects of the development of the Airborne Laser Laboratory. Our discussion is historical in nature and consists of the text from a speech given on the occasion of the Airborne Laser Laboratory leaving Kirtland Air Force Base (AFB) to fly to Wright-Patterson AFB to become an exhibit at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. The last part of the discussion concerns the inception of the study of aero-optics as an area of research and some of the milestones in the understanding of the causes and prediction of aero-optical effects.

  19. Space Sciences Laboratory Publications and Presentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorehead, T. W. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This document lists the significant publications and presentations of the Space Sciences Laboratory during the period Jan. 1 - Dec. 31, 1994. Entries in the main part of the document are categorized according to NASA Reports (arranged by report number), Open Literature, and Presentations (arranged alphabetically by title). Also included for completeness is an appendix (arranged by report number) listing preprints issued by the laboratory during this reporting period. Some of the preprints have not been published; those already published are so indicated. Most of the articles listed under Open Literature have appeared in referenced professional journals, books, monographs, or conference proceedings. Although many published abstracts are eventually expanded into full papers for publications in scientific and technical journals, they are often sufficiently comprehensive to include the significant results of the research reported. Therefore, published abstracts are listed separately in a subsection under Open Literature. The organizational code of the cognizant SSL branch or office is given at the end of each entry.

  20. Space Sciences Laboratory Publications and Presentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, F. G. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    This document lists the significant publications and presentations of the Space Sciences Laboratory during the period January 1 - December 31, 1997. Entries in the main part of the document are categorized according to NASA Reports (arranged by report number), Open Literature, and Presentations (arranged alphabetically by title). Also included for completeness is an Appendix (arranged by page number) listing preprints issued by the Laboratory during this reporting period. Some of the preprints have not been published; those already published are so indicated. Most of the articles listed under Open Literature have appeared in refereed professional journals, books, monographs, or conference proceedings. Although many published abstracts are eventually expanded into full papers for publication in scientific and technical journals, they are often sufficiently comprehensive to include the significant results of the research reported. Therefore, published abstracts are listed separately in a subsection under Open Literature.

  1. Space Science Laboratory Publications and Presentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorehead, T. W. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This document lists the significant publications and presentations of the Space Science Laboratory during the period January 1 - December 31, 1992. Entries in the main part of the document are categorized according to NASA Reports (arranged by report number), Open Literature, and Presentations (arranged alphabetically by title). Also included for completeness is an Appendix (arranged by report number) listing preprints issued by the Laboratory during this reporting period. Some of the preprints have not been published; those already published are so indicated. Most of the articles listed under Open Literature have appeared in refereed professional journals, books, monographs, or conference proceedings. Although many published abstracts are eventually expanded into full papers for publications in scientific and technical journals, they are often sufficiently comprehensive to include the significant results of the research reported. Therefore, published abstracts are listed separately in a subsection under Open Literature. The organizational code of the cognizant SSL branch or office is given at the end of each entry.

  2. Mars Science Laboratory Interplanetary Navigation Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; Kruizinga, Gerhard; Wong, Mau

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, carrying the Curiosity rover to Mars, hit the top of the Martian atmosphere just 200 meters from where it had been predicted more than six days earlier, and 2.6 million kilometers away. This un-expected level of accuracy was achieved by a combination of factors including: spacecraft performance, tracking data processing, dynamical modeling choices, and navigation filter setup. This paper will describe our best understanding of what were the factors that contributed to this excellent interplanetary trajectory prediction performance. The accurate interplanetary navigation contributed to the very precise landing performance, and to the overall success of the mission.

  3. Experimenter's Laboratory for Visualized Interactive Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Elaine R.; Rodier, Daniel R.; Klemp, Marjorie K.

    1994-01-01

    ELVIS (Experimenter's Laboratory for Visualized Interactive Science) is an interactive visualization environment that enables scientists, students, and educators to visualize and analyze large, complex, and diverse sets of scientific data. It accomplishes this by presenting the data sets as 2-D, 3-D, color, stereo, and graphic images with movable and multiple light sources combined with displays of solid-surface, contours, wire-frame, and transparency. By simultaneously rendering diverse data sets acquired from multiple sources, formats, and resolutions and by interacting with the data through an intuitive, direct-manipulation interface, ELVIS provides an interactive and responsive environment for exploratory data analysis.

  4. Social Networks in the Virtual Science Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, George; Myers, James D.; Hoyt, David W.

    2002-08-01

    Located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility (HFMRF) houses 11 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers. Additionally, the Virtual Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Facility (VNMRF) provides on-line Internet access to these HFMRF spectrometers. Through the VNMRF and its suite of computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) tools, researchers may collaboratively set the controls of an NMR spectrometer, execute an NMR experiment, acquire data, analyze results, and communicate with other researchers all from the comforts of their home institutions and their own offices. Virtual science laboratories like the VNMRF promote a compelling vision. Consistent with Wulf's notion of a "collaboratory," a virtual science laboratory is a "'center without walls', in which the nation's researchers can perform their research without regard to geographical location." Such a laboratory strives to provide an open research environment in which scientists from different disciplines may collaborate on advanced research using leading-edge instruments and tools, while reducing the physical, organizational, and political boundaries that confront researchers as they amass their collective skills, capabilities, and brainpower to solve the world's most challenging scientific problems. In this article, we describe the social networks that have emerged from the VNMRF and the impacts and influences that CSCW technologies have had upon those networks. The development of social networks depends on various factors including personal and professional objectives, work functions, organizational roles, and afforded collaborative capabilities. As such, our results serve as a useful point of comparison and contrast in the analysis of social networks and CSCW impacts that evolve from scientific contexts as well as from other collaborative settings such as in business and education.

  5. Mars Science Laboratory relative humidity observations: Initial results

    PubMed Central

    Harri, A-M; Genzer, M; Kemppinen, O; Gomez-Elvira, J; Haberle, R; Polkko, J; Savijärvi, H; Rennó, N; Rodriguez-Manfredi, JA; Schmidt, W; Richardson, M; Siili, T; Paton, M; Torre-Juarez, M De La; Mäkinen, T; Newman, C; Rafkin, S; Mischna, M; Merikallio, S; Haukka, H; Martin-Torres, J; Komu, M; Zorzano, M-P; Peinado, V; Vazquez, L; Urqui, R

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) made a successful landing at Gale crater early August 2012. MSL has an environmental instrument package called the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) as a part of its scientific payload. REMS comprises instrumentation for the observation of atmospheric pressure, temperature of the air, ground temperature, wind speed and direction, relative humidity (REMS-H), and UV measurements. We concentrate on describing the REMS-H measurement performance and initial observations during the first 100 MSL sols as well as constraining the REMS-H results by comparing them with earlier observations and modeling results. The REMS-H device is based on polymeric capacitive humidity sensors developed by Vaisala Inc., and it makes use of transducer electronics section placed in the vicinity of the three humidity sensor heads. The humidity device is mounted on the REMS boom providing ventilation with the ambient atmosphere through a filter protecting the device from airborne dust. The final relative humidity results appear to be convincing and are aligned with earlier indirect observations of the total atmospheric precipitable water content. The water mixing ratio in the atmospheric surface layer appears to vary between 30 and 75 ppm. When assuming uniform mixing, the precipitable water content of the atmosphere is ranging from a few to six precipitable micrometers. Key Points Atmospheric water mixing ratio at Gale crater varies from 30 to 140 ppm MSL relative humidity observation provides good data Highest detected relative humidity reading during first MSL 100 sols is RH75% PMID:26213667

  6. Mars Science Laboratory Planetary Protection Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukol, Robert; Morales, Fabian; Benardini, James Nick; Schubert, Wayne

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Project is a Mars rover project now scheduled for a 2011 launch. The MSL flight system consists of a cruise stage; an entry, descent and landing system (EDL); and a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) powered roving science vehicle that will land on the surface and perform geological science. None of the instruments in the Rover payload are life detection experiments for the purposes of planetary protection (PP). Nevertheless, a goal of the mission is to access areas of interest, including possible subsurface special regions, and to obtain and scientifically examine samples. Therefore the project has been categorized by NASA as COSPAR PP Category IVc. The entire flight system is subject to microbial reduction requirements, with additional specific emphasis on the sample acquisition and handling chain. Prior to the final design of the flight system, MSL performed analyses to show that the elements of the flight system will not cause a high probability of inadvertent biological contamination to Mars. The project is using a pinpoint landing system and will land in a non-special region on Mars, agreed to by the NASA Planetary Protection Officer. MSL has completed an approved Planetary Protection Plan and a PP Implementation Document. Planetary protection activities have begun with the start of flight system fabrication and assembly. The status of the PP activities will be reported.

  7. Distractions in the School Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, Karim M.

    2013-08-01

    In this article, I make a case for the potential educative worth of distractions for learning science in the school laboratory. Distractions are operationalized as experiences lying outside the main purpose of the laboratory activity, thereby diverting students' attention from that purpose. Through a practical epistemology analysis, I examined in close detail the conversations of three groups of high school students trying to explain how a real galvanic cell works. The three groups experienced the same two distractions, (1) a nonworking light-emitting diode and (2) negative readings on a voltmeter. The analysis reveals how one of the groups, through a series of contingencies, successively made the two distractions continuous with the main purpose of the activity. In the remaining two groups, no such continuity was established. The results show that (a) experiences initially being distracting, perplexing, and confusing may indeed acquire significance for the students' possibilities of coping with the main purpose of the activity but that (b) the outcome is highly contingent on the particular experiences drawn upon by the students to cope with the distractions. Consequently, I discuss ways in which teachers may turn distractions encountered in laboratory activities into educative experiences for more than a few lucky students.

  8. Educating Laboratory Science Learners at a Distance Using Interactive Television

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory science classes offered to students learning at a distance require a methodology that allows for the completion of tactile activities. Literature describes three different methods of solving the distance laboratory dilemma: kit-based laboratory experience, computer-based laboratory experience, and campus-based laboratory experience,…

  9. Management approach for NASA's Earth Venture-1 (EV-1) airborne science investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillory, Anthony R.; Denkins, Todd C.; Allen, B. Danette

    2013-09-01

    The Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP) Program Office (PO) is responsible for programmatic management of National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Science Mission Directorate's (SMD) Earth Venture (EV) missions. EV is composed of both orbital and suborbital Earth science missions. The first of the Earth Venture missions is EV-1, which are Principal Investigator-led, temporally-sustained, suborbital (airborne) science investigations costcapped at $30M each over five years. Traditional orbital procedures, processes and standards used to manage previous ESSP missions, while effective, are disproportionally comprehensive for suborbital missions. Conversely, existing airborne practices are primarily intended for smaller, temporally shorter investigations, and traditionally managed directly by a program scientist as opposed to a program office such as ESSP. In 2010, ESSP crafted a management approach for the successful implementation of the EV-1 missions within the constructs of current governance models. NASA Research and Technology Program and Project Management Requirements form the foundation of the approach for EV-1. Additionally, requirements from other existing NASA Procedural Requirements (NPRs), systems engineering guidance and management handbooks were adapted to manage programmatic, technical, schedule, cost elements and risk. As the EV-1 missions are nearly at the end of their successful execution and project lifecycle and the submission deadline of the next mission proposals near, the ESSP PO is taking the lessons learned and updated the programmatic management approach for all future Earth Venture Suborbital (EVS) missions for an even more flexible and streamlined management approach.

  10. Management Approach for NASA's Earth Venture-1 (EV-1) Airborne Science Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillory, Anthony R.; Denkins, Todd C.; Allen, B. Danette

    2013-01-01

    The Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP) Program Office (PO) is responsible for programmatic management of National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Science Mission Directorate's (SMD) Earth Venture (EV) missions. EV is composed of both orbital and suborbital Earth science missions. The first of the Earth Venture missions is EV-1, which are Principal Investigator-led, temporally-sustained, suborbital (airborne) science investigations costcapped at $30M each over five years. Traditional orbital procedures, processes and standards used to manage previous ESSP missions, while effective, are disproportionally comprehensive for suborbital missions. Conversely, existing airborne practices are primarily intended for smaller, temporally shorter investigations, and traditionally managed directly by a program scientist as opposed to a program office such as ESSP. In 2010, ESSP crafted a management approach for the successful implementation of the EV-1 missions within the constructs of current governance models. NASA Research and Technology Program and Project Management Requirements form the foundation of the approach for EV-1. Additionally, requirements from other existing NASA Procedural Requirements (NPRs), systems engineering guidance and management handbooks were adapted to manage programmatic, technical, schedule, cost elements and risk. As the EV-1 missions are nearly at the end of their successful execution and project lifecycle and the submission deadline of the next mission proposals near, the ESSP PO is taking the lessons learned and updated the programmatic management approach for all future Earth Venture Suborbital (EVS) missions for an even more flexible and streamlined management approach.

  11. Methods for Testing the Mars Science Laboratory's Landing Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapin, Elaine; Grando, Maurio B.; Hamilton, Gary A.; Pak, Kyung S.; Pollard, Brian D.; Shaffer, Scott J.; Wu, Chialin

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory's rover named Curiosity successfully landed on Mars on August 6, 2012. One component of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) system was the Terminal Descent Sensor (TDS) landing radar. In this paper we describe laboratory testing of this radar performed before launch.

  12. The Mars Science Laboratory Organic Check Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, Pamela G.; Eigenbrode, J. E.; Mogensen, C. T.; VonderHeydt, M. O.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. M.; Johnson, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Organic Check Material (OCM) has been developed for use on the Mars Science Laboratory mission to serve as a sample standard for verification of organic cleanliness and characterization of potential sample alteration as a function of the sample acquisition and portioning process on the Curiosity rover. OCM samples will be acquired using the same procedures for drilling, portioning and delivery as are used to study martian samples with The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite during MSL surface operations. Because the SAM suite is highly sensitive to organic molecules, the mission can better verify the cleanliness of Curiosity's sample acquisition hardware if a known material can be processed through SAM and compared with the results obtained from martian samples.

  13. 2011 Mars Science Laboratory Launch Period Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abilleira, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory mission, set to launch in the fall of 2011, has the primary objective of landing the most advanced rover to date to the surface of Mars to assess whether Mars ever was, or still is today, able to sustain carbon-based life. Arriving at Mars in August 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory will also demonstrate the ability to deliver large payloads to the surface of Mars, land more accurately (than previous missions) in a 20-km by 25-km ellipse, and traverse up to 20 km. Following guided entry and parachute deployment, the spacecraft will descend on a parachute and a Powered Descent Vehicle to safely land the rover on the surface of Mars. The launch/arrival strategy is driven by several key requirements, which include: launch vehicle capability, atmosphere-relative entry speed, communications coverage during Entry, Descent and Landing, latitude accessibility, and dust storm season avoidance. Notable among these requirements is maintaining a telecommunications link from atmospheric entry to landing plus one minute, via a Direct-To-Earth X-band link and via orbital assets using an UHF link, to ensure that any failure during Entry, Descent and Landing can be reconstructed in case of a mission anomaly. Due to concerns related to the lifetime of the relay orbiters, two additional launch/arrival strategies have been developed to improve Entry, Descent, and Landing communications. This paper discusses the final launch/arrival strategy selected prior to the launch period down-selection that is scheduled to occur in August 2011. It is also important to note that this paper is an update to Ref. 1 in that it includes two new Type 1 launch periods and drops the Type 2 launch period that is no longer considered.

  14. Mars Science Laboratory Rover Actuator Thermal Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Keith S.; Liu, Yuanming; Lee, Chern-Jiin; Hendricks, Steven

    2010-01-01

    NASA will launch a 900 kg rover, part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, to Mars in October of 2011. The MSL rover is scheduled to land on Mars in August of 2012. The rover employs 31, electric-motor driven actuators to perform a variety of engineering and science functions including: mobility, camera pointing, telecommunications antenna steering, soil and rock sample acquisition and sample processing. This paper describes the MSL rover actuator thermal design. The actuators have stainless steel housings and planetary gearboxes that are lubricated with a "wet" lubricant. The lubricant viscosity increases with decreasing temperature. Warm-up heaters are required to bring the actuators up to temperature (above -55 C) prior to use in the cold wintertime environment of Mars (when ambient atmosphere temperatures are as cold as -113 C). Analytical thermal models of all 31 MSL actuators have been developed. The actuators have been analyzed and warm-up heaters have been designed to improve actuator performance in cold environments. Thermal hardware for the actuators has been specified, procured and installed. This paper presents actuator thermal analysis predicts, and describes the actuator thermal hardware and its operation. In addition, warm-up heater testing and thermal model correlation efforts for the Remote Sensing Mast (RSM) elevation actuator are discussed.

  15. Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an STS-66 mission onboard photo of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis showing the payload of the third Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS-3) mission. During the ATLAS missions, international teams of scientists representing many disciplines combined their expertise to seek answers to complex questions about the atmospheric and solar conditions that sustain life on Earth. The ATLAS program specifically investigated how Earth's middle and upper atmospheres and climate are affected by by the sun and by products of industrial and agricultural activities on Earth. Thirteen ATLAS instruments supported experiments in atmospheric sciences, solar physics, space plasma physics, and astronomy. The instruments were mounted on two Spacelab pallets in the Space Shuttle payload bay. The ATLAS-3 mission continued a variety of atmospheric and solar studies to improve understanding of the Earth's atmosphere and its energy input from the sun. A key scientific objective was to refine existing data on variations in the fragile ozone layer of the atmosphere. The Orbiter Atlantis was launched on November 3, 1994 for the ATLAS-3 mission (STS-66).

  16. Mars Science Laboratory Rover System Thermal Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Keith S.; Kempenaar, Joshua E.; Liu, Yuanming; Bhandari, Pradeep; Dudik, Brenda A.

    2012-01-01

    On November 26, 2011, NASA launched a large (900 kg) rover as part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission to Mars. The MSL rover is scheduled to land on Mars on August 5, 2012. Prior to launch, the Rover was successfully operated in simulated mission extreme environments during a 16-day long Rover System Thermal Test (STT). This paper describes the MSL Rover STT, test planning, test execution, test results, thermal model correlation and flight predictions. The rover was tested in the JPL 25-Foot Diameter Space Simulator Facility at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The Rover operated in simulated Cruise (vacuum) and Mars Surface environments (8 Torr nitrogen gas) with mission extreme hot and cold boundary conditions. A Xenon lamp solar simulator was used to impose simulated solar loads on the rover during a bounding hot case and during a simulated Mars diurnal test case. All thermal hardware was exercised and performed nominally. The Rover Heat Rejection System, a liquid-phase fluid loop used to transport heat in and out of the electronics boxes inside the rover chassis, performed better than predicted. Steady state and transient data were collected to allow correlation of analytical thermal models. These thermal models were subsequently used to predict rover thermal performance for the MSL Gale Crater landing site. Models predict that critical hardware temperatures will be maintained within allowable flight limits over the entire 669 Sol surface mission.

  17. Integrated line-of-sight Modeling of the Airborne Aero-Optics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, S.; Blackburn, J.; Thordahl, J.; Wittich, D.; Gordeyev, S.; Jumper, E.

    2013-09-01

    The Airborne Aero-Optics Laboratory (AAOL) is a recently completed research effort to measure the effects of turbulent flow on the wavefront of a laser projected from an airplane in flight. The flight-test system consists of two Cessna Citation Bravo aircraft flying in formation at a distance of approximately 50 m. One aircraft projects a laser beam to the other aircraft which receives the beam using an inertially stabilized turret with a high bandwidth track loop. In addition to its benefit in providing a means for understanding and correcting optical wavefront distortion due to turbulence, AAOL also provides an ideal platform for predicting line-of-sight jitter and comparing it to measured results. AAOL has the essential elements of an airborne optical beam control system and is subject to relevant aero-loading, but operates at low power and provides a relatively inexpensive platform for collecting flight data. This paper presents the integrated AAOL line-of-sight model for prediction of optical jitter due to flight disturbances. To accomplish this, a dynamic simulation model was derived from a finite element model of the system, optical sensitivities and control loops for calculation of closed loop, line-of-sight jitter. Disturbance inputs include measured in-flight base loading and pressure loading on the turret generated from an unsteady computational fluid dynamics model. The influence of model uncertainty was also addressed by considering two separate models. The first model was based on the initial hardware design before hardware assembly. The second model was updated based on modal tests performed on the assembled flight hardware. Frequency-varying model uncertainty factors for both models required to accurately predict the measured flight data were calculated. Predicted results with and without model uncertainty factors will be compared with measured flight data from AAOL.

  18. Briefing to University of Porto on NASA Airborne Science Program and Ames UAVs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fladeland, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    NASA Ames is exploring a partnership with the University of Portugal to jointly develop and test new autonomous vehicle technologies. As part of the discussions I will be briefing the University of Portugal faculty on the NASA Airborne Science Program (ASP) and associated activities at NASA Ames Research Center. The presentation will communicate the requirements that drive the program, the assets available to NASA researchers, and discuss research projects that have used unmanned aircraft systems including MIZOPEX, Surprise Valley, and Florida Keys Coral Reef assessment. Other topics will include the SIERRA and Dragon Eye UAV projects operated at Ames.

  19. 'Dry Laboratories' in Science Education; Computer-Based Practical Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschner, Paul; Huisman, Willibrord

    1998-01-01

    Identifies the problems associated with the use of dry laboratories in science education, presents design considerations for the use of such practicals in science education, and presents examples of innovative nontraditional practicals. Contains 23 references. (DDR)

  20. Science and Technology at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    ORNL Director Thom Mason explains the groundbreaking work in neutron sciences, supercomputing, clean energy, advanced materials, nuclear research, and global security taking place at the Department of Energy's Office of Science laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tenn.

  1. Science and Technology at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    Mason, Thomas

    2013-02-25

    ORNL Director Thom Mason explains the groundbreaking work in neutron sciences, supercomputing, clean energy, advanced materials, nuclear research, and global security taking place at the Department of Energy's Office of Science laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tenn.

  2. Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory Annual Report: Fiscal Year 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Nancy S.; Showalter, Mary Ann

    2007-03-23

    This report describes the activities and research performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a Department of Energy national scientific user facility at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, during Fiscal Year 2006.

  3. Measurement of airborne gunshot particles in a ballistics laboratory by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Ernesto; Sarkis, Jorge E Souza; Viebig, Sônia; Saldiva, Paulo

    2012-01-10

    The present study aimed determines lead (Pb), antimony (Sb) and barium (Ba) as the major elements present in GSR in the environmental air of the Ballistics Laboratory of the São Paulo Criminalistics Institute (I.C.-S.P.), São Paulo, SP, Brazil. Micro environmental monitors (mini samplers) were located at selected places. The PM(2.5) fraction of this airborne was collected in, previously weighted filters, and analyzed by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (SF-HR-ICP-MS). The higher values of the airborne lead, antimony and barium, were found at the firing range (lead (Pb): 58.9 μg/m(3); barium (Ba): 6.9 μg/m(3); antimony (Sb): 7.3 μg/m(3)). The mean value of the airborne in this room during 6 monitored days was Pb: 23.1 μg/m(3); Ba: 2.2 μg/m(3); Sb: 1.5 μg/m(3). In the water tank room, the air did not show levels above the limits of concern. In general the airborne lead changed from day to day, but the barium and antimony remained constant. Despite of that, the obtained values suggest that the workers may be exposed to airborne lead concentration that can result in an unhealthy environment and could increase the risk of chronic intoxication. PMID:21831549

  4. MSLICE Science Activity Planner for the Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Wallick, Michael N.; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Fox, Jason M.; Torres, Recaredo J.; Kurien, James A.; McCurdy, Michael P.; Pyrzak, Guy; Aghevli, Arash; Bachmann, Andrew G.

    2009-01-01

    MSLICE (Mars Science Laboratory InterfaCE) is the tool used by scientists and engineers on the Mars Science Laboratory rover mission to visualize the data returned by the rover and collaboratively plan its activities. It enables users to efficiently and effectively search all mission data to find applicable products (e.g., images, targets, activity plans, sequences, etc.), view and plan the traverse of the rover in HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) images, visualize data acquired by the rover, and develop, model, and validate the activities the rover will perform. MSLICE enables users to securely contribute to the mission s activity planning process from their home institutions using off-the-shelf laptop computers. This software has made use of several plug-ins (software components) developed for previous missions [e.g., Mars Exploration Rover (MER), Phoenix Mars Lander (PHX)] and other technology tasks. It has a simple, intuitive, and powerful search capability. For any given mission, there is a huge amount of data and associated metadata that is generated. To help users sort through this information, MSLICE s search interface is provided in a similar fashion as major Internet search engines. With regard to the HiRISE visualization of the rover s traverse, this view is a map of the mission that allows scientists to easily gauge where the rover has been and where it is likely to go. The map also provides the ability to correct or adjust the known position of the rover through the overlaying of images acquired from the rover on top of the HiRISE image. A user can then correct the rover s position by collocating the visible features in the overlays with the same features in the underlying HiRISE image. MSLICE users can also rapidly search all mission data for images that contain a point specified by the user in another image or panoramic mosaic. MSLICE allows the creation of targets, which provides a way for scientists to collaboratively name

  5. Life Sciences Laboratories for the Shuttle/Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte, L. O.; Kelly, H. B.; Secord, T. C.

    1976-01-01

    Space Shuttle and Spacelab missions will provide scientists with their first opportunity to participate directly in research in space for all scientific disciplines, particularly the Life Sciences. Preparations are already underway to ensure the success of these missions. The paper summarizes the results of the 1975 NASA-funded Life Sciences Laboratories definition study which defined several long-range life sciences research options and the laboratory designs necessary to accomplish high-priority life sciences research. The implications and impacts of Spacelab design and development on the life sciences missions are discussed. An approach is presented based upon the development of a general-purposs laboratory capability and an inventory of common operational research equipment for conducting life sciences research. Several life sciences laboratories and their capabilities are described to demonstrate the systems potentially available to the experimenter for conducting biological and medical research.

  6. Mars Science Laboratory Boot Robustness Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banazadeh, Payam; Lam, Danny

    2011-01-01

    Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is one of the most complex spacecrafts in the history of mankind. Due to the nature of its complexity, a large number of flight software (FSW) requirements have been written for implementation. In practice, these requirements necessitate very complex and very precise flight software with no room for error. One of flight software's responsibilities is to be able to boot up and check the state of all devices on the spacecraft after the wake up process. This boot up and initialization is crucial to the mission success since any misbehavior of different devices needs to be handled through the flight software. I have created a test toolkit that allows the FSW team to exhaustively test the flight software under variety of different unexpected scenarios and validate that flight software can handle any situation after booting up. The test includes initializing different devices on spacecraft to different configurations and validate at the end of the flight software boot up that the flight software has initialized those devices to what they are suppose to be in that particular scenario.

  7. Mars Science Laboratory Rover Mobility Bushing Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggs, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    NASA s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Project will send a six-wheeled rover to Mars in 2009. The rover will carry a scientific payload designed to search for organic molecules on the Martian surface during its primary mission. This paper describes the development and testing of a bonded film lubricated bushing system to be used in the mobility system of the rover. The MSL Rover Mobility System contains several pivots that are tightly constrained with respect to mass and volume. These pivots are also exposed to relatively low temperatures (-135 C) during operation. The combination of these constraints led the mobility team to consider the use of solid film lubricated metallic bushings and dry running polymeric bushings in several flight pivot applications. A test program was developed to mitigate the risk associated with using these materials in critical pivots on the MSL vehicle. The program was designed to characterize bushing friction and wear performance over the expected operational temperature range (-135 C to +70 C). Seven different bushing material / lubricant combinations were evaluated to aid in the selection of the final flight pivot bushing material / lubricant combination.

  8. Mars Science Laboratory Flight Software Internal Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Justin D.; Lam, Danny

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) team is sending the rover, Curiosity, to Mars, and therefore is physically and technically complex. During my stay, I have assisted the MSL Flight Software (FSW) team in implementing functional test scripts to ensure that the FSW performs to the best of its abilities. There are a large number of FSW requirements that have been written up for implementation; however I have only been assigned a few sections of these requirements. There are many stages within testing; one of the early stages is FSW Internal Testing (FIT). The FIT team can accomplish this with simulation software and the MSL Test Automation Kit (MTAK). MTAK has the ability to integrate with the Software Simulation Equipment (SSE) and the Mission Processing and Control System (MPCS) software which makes it a powerful tool within the MSL FSW development process. The MSL team must ensure that the rover accomplishes all stages of the mission successfully. Due to the natural complexity of this project there is a strong emphasis on testing, as failure is not an option. The entire mission could be jeopardized if something is overlooked.

  9. A Science Librarian in the Laboratory: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomaszewski, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A science librarian in the laboratory can become a "point of access" for database instruction and provide a learning opportunity for students to develop their information literacy skills. A case study describes how a librarian in an organic chemistry laboratory helps the class run smoothly and identifies the science librarian as an ally and a…

  10. Science Laboratory Learning Environments in Junior Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwok, Ping Wai

    2015-01-01

    A Chinese version of the Science Laboratory Environment Inventory (SLEI) was used to study the students' perceptions of the actual and preferred laboratory learning environments in Hong Kong junior secondary science lessons. Valid responses of the SLEI from 1932 students of grade 7 to grade 9 indicated that an open-ended inquiry approach seldom…

  11. The Way Point Planning Tool: Real Time Flight Planning for Airborne Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Yubin; Blakeslee, Richard; Goodman, Michael; Hall, John

    2012-01-01

    Airborne real time observation are a major component of NASA's Earth Science research and satellite ground validation studies. For mission scientist, planning a research aircraft mission within the context of meeting the science objective is a complex task because it requires real time situational awareness of the weather conditions that affect the aircraft track. Multiple aircraft are often involved in the NASA field campaigns the coordination of the aircraft with satellite overpasses, other airplanes and the constantly evolving dynamic weather conditions often determine the success of the campaign. A flight planning tool is needed to provide situational awareness information to the mission scientist and help them plan and modify the flight tracks successfully. Scientists at the University of Alabama Huntsville and the NASA Marshal Space Flight Center developed the Waypoint Planning Tool (WPT), an interactive software tool that enables scientist to develop their own flight plans (also known as waypoints), with point and click mouse capabilities on a digital map filled with time raster and vector data. The development of this Waypoint Planning Tool demonstrates the significance of mission support in responding to the challenges presented during NASA field campaigns. Analyses during and after each campaign helped identify both issues and new requirements, initiating the next wave of development. Currently the Waypoint Planning Tool has gone through three rounds of development and analysis processes. The development of this waypoint tool is directly affected by the technology advances on GIS/Mapping technologies. From the standalone Google Earth application and simple KML functionalities to the Google Earth Plugin and Java Web Start/Applet on web platform, as well as to the rising open source GIS tools with new JavaScript frameworks, the Waypoint planning Tool has entered its third phase of technology advancement. The newly innovated, cross-platform, modular designed

  12. The Waypoint Planning Tool: Real Time Flight Planning for Airborne Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Yubin; Blakeslee, Richard; Goodman, Michael; Hall, John

    2010-01-01

    NASA Earth science research utilizes both spaceborne and airborne real time observations in the planning and operations of its field campaigns. The coordination of air and space components is critical to achieve the goals and objectives and ensure the success of an experiment. Spaceborne imagery provides regular and continual coverage of the Earth and it is a significant component in all NASA field experiments. Real time visible and infrared geostationary images from GOES satellites and multi-spectral data from the many elements of the NASA suite of instruments aboard the TRMM, Terra, Aqua, Aura, and other NASA satellites have become norm. Similarly, the NASA Airborne Science Program draws upon a rich pool of instrumented aircraft. The NASA McDonnell Douglas DC-8, Lockheed P3 Orion, DeHavilland Twin Otter, King Air B200, Gulfstream-III are all staples of a NASA's well-stocked, versatile hangar. A key component in many field campaigns is coordinating the aircraft with satellite overpasses, other airplanes and the constantly evolving, dynamic weather conditions. Given the variables involved, developing a good flight plan that meets the objectives of the field experiment can be a challenging and time consuming task. Planning a research aircraft mission within the context of meeting the science objectives is complex task because it is much more than flying from point A to B. Flight plans typically consist of flying a series of transects or involve dynamic path changes when "chasing" a hurricane or forest fire. These aircraft flight plans are typically designed by the mission scientists then verified and implemented by the navigator or pilot. Flight planning can be an arduous task requiring frequent sanity checks by the flight crew. This requires real time situational awareness of the weather conditions that affect the aircraft track. Scientists at the University of Alabama-Huntsville and the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center developed the Waypoint Planning Tool, an

  13. Carcinogenicity of airborne combustion products observed in subcutaneous tissue and lungs of laboratory rodents.

    PubMed Central

    Pott, F; Stöber, W

    1983-01-01

    Most air pollution in West Germany is caused by combustion products. Particulate organic matter released by incomplete combustion is suspected to contribute to the "urban factor" of lung cancer frequency in urban-industrial centers. The carcinogenic potential of single components, groups of compounds and total source emissions of combustion processes was investigated in laboratory animals by subcutaneous injection, intratracheal instillation or inhalation. Tests by subcutaneous injection of condensates of automobile exhaust, extracts of coal furnace emissions and of airborne particles and different fractions of these extracts showed that the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) with four to six benzene rings have the strongest experimental carcinogenicity. However, polar compounds (heterocyclic nitrogen-containing PAH, phenols, and others) also show remarkable carcinogenic potency. There were large differences between the dose-response relationships of several PAHs. In the subcutaneous tissue, benzo(a)pyrene and dibenz(a,h)anthracene are the most carcinogenic of the tested airborne PAHs. Furthermore, they can induce high tumor rates in the lung after subcutaneous injection in newborn mice and after intratracheal instillation of mice or hamsters. The tumor rate of benzo(a)pyrene did not further increase after simultaneous instillation of carbon black, but lead chloride may have a promoting effect. Far more than 100 PAHs are found in the urban atmosphere. However, because of the remarkable similarity of the PAH profiles in the examined samples, it may be sufficient to measure just a few stable PAHs in the urban air in order to facilitate an assessment of the carcinogenic potency of the PAH content in the atmosphere. To examine the carcinogenic or cocarcinogenic effects of gas and vapor emissions, studies with a two-phase model were carried out: phase 1 relates to the induction of a basic tumor rate in the lung by a well known carcinogen, while phase 2 is

  14. STAO Science Laboratory Facilities Design Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackellar, Ian, Ed.

    This design guide offers guidance to science educators, architects, and others concerned with the provision of science accommodations in Ontario, Canada, either through new construction or the adaptation of existing buildings. The publication is not a blueprint for facilities nor an attempt to standardize all science programs and facilities; it is…

  15. Laboratory Notebooks in the Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Christine; Lankford, Deanna

    2010-01-01

    Lab notebooks provide students with authentic science experiences as they become active, practicing scientists. Teachers gain insight into students' understanding of science content and processes, while students create a lasting personal resource. This article provides high school science teachers with guidelines for implementing lab notebooks in…

  16. Curiosity: the Mars Science Laboratory Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    The Curiosity rover landed successfully in Gale Crater, Mars on August 5, 2012. This event was a dramatic high point in the decade long effort to design, build, test and fly the most sophisticated scientific vehicle ever sent to Mars. The real achievements of the mission have only just begun, however, as Curiosity is now searching for signs that Mars once possessed habitable environments. The Mars Science Laboratory Project has been one of the most ambitious and challenging planetary projects that NASA has undertaken. It started in the successful aftermath of the 2003 Mars Exploration Rover project and was designed to take significant steps forward in both engineering and scientific capabilities. This included a new landing system capable of emplacing a large mobile vehicle over a wide range of potential landing sites, advanced sample acquisition and handling capabilities that can retrieve samples from both rocks and soil, and a high reliability avionics suite that is designed to permit long duration surface operations. It also includes a set of ten sophisticated scientific instruments that will investigate both the geological context of the landing site plus analyze samples to understand the chemical & organic composition of rocks & soil found there. The Gale Crater site has been specifically selected as a promising location where ancient habitable environments may have existed and for which evidence may be preserved. Curiosity will spend a minimum of one Mars year (about two Earth years) looking for this evidence. This paper will report on the progress of the mission over the first few months of surface operations, plus look retrospectively at lessons learned during both the development and cruise operations phase of the mission..

  17. Scanning Web-based ICARTT File Tool (SWIFT): an online tool used to validate ICARTT-formatted airborne science data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucker, P. L.; Mangosing, D. C.; Chen, G.; Rinsland, P.; Brennan, J. H.; Clodius, B. F.

    2011-12-01

    The ICARTT (International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation) file format was recently endorsed by the NASA Earth Science Data Systems Standards Process Group (ESDS SPG) as a standard (ESDS-RFC-019) for specifying airborne-based Earth System Data Records (ESDR). In order to accelerate adoption of the new standard in the airborne science data community, SWIFT (Scanning Web-based ICARTT File Tool) was developed to provide a means for data providers to validate their own originated ICARTT-formatted file before submission to data archival facilities provided by NASA Langley's Atmospheric Science Data Center and the NASA Langley Airborne Science Data for Atmospheric Composition group. SWIFT builds upon a predecessor, a software utility named: FSCAN (File Scan). A major upgrade to FSCAN, the objective of SWIFT is to support all valid ICARTT files and to extract and store the file metadata in an ESDR relational database. The SWIFT-validated search metadata make it possible for COTS software and web applications to leverage the built-in spatial and temporal query capabilities of the relational database and to enable file and parameter sub-setting capabilities, as well as facilitating the generation of airborne science data merge products. These enhancements help to minimize development time of other related web applications and open up opportunities for robust data queries.

  18. OLES : Online Laboratory for Environmental Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anquetin, Sandrine; Beaufil, Xavier; Chaffard, Véronique; Juen, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    One of the major scientific challenges in the 21st century is to improve our understanding on the evolution of the water cycle associated with the climate variability. Main issues concern the prediction of i) the water resource and the access to drinkable water and ii) the extreme events, both droughts and floods. Observation strategies covering a wide range of space and time scales must therefore be set up, while continuing advanced research on the involved mechanisms and developing integrated modeling approaches. Within this general context, the present work relies on three natural observatories, located in West Africa, Worldwide Glaciers, and in Mediterranean region, managed at LTHE (Laboratoire d'étude des Transferts en Hydrologie et Environnement; Grenoble, France) and gathered at OSUG (Observatoire des Sciences de l'Univers; Grenoble, France). Their scientific objectives aim at improving the understanding of the water cycle functioning, providing water and mass balances for multi-scale basin sizes, and evaluating the hydrological impacts of the evolving climate. Water cycle variables (precipitation; soil moisture; snow cover; discharge; air and river temperatures; suspended material; etc …) are observed and recorded in 3 different databases built under specific technical constraints linked to the respective partnerships of the natural observatories. Each of the observatories has its own database, and modeling tools were developed separately leading to important efforts often duplicated. Therefore, there was a need to build an integrated cyber-infrastructure to provide access to data, and to shared tools and models that enable the understanding of the water cycle. This is the project called OLES, for Online Laboratory for Environmental Sciences. Focused on the understanding of the water cycle under contrasted climates, OLES facilitates the work of the scientific community and then, help interactions between the research community and water agencies or

  19. BASIC STEPS IN DESIGNING SCIENCE LABORATORIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WHITNEY, FRANK L.

    PLANNERS OF CURRENT UNIVERSITY LABORATORIES OFTEN MAKE THE SAME MISTAKES MADE BY INDUSTRIAL LABORATORIES 20 YEARS AGO. THIS CAN BE REMEDIED BY INCREASED COMMUNICATION BETWEEN SCIENTISTS AND DESIGNERS IN SEMINARS DEFINING THE BASIC NEEDS OF A PARTICULAR LABORATORY SITUATION. ELECTRONIC AND MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT ACCOUNT FOR OVER 50 PER CENT OF TOTAL…

  20. From Laboratories to Classrooms: Involving Scientists in Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, E. K.

    2001-12-01

    Scientists play a key role in science education: the adventure of making new discoveries excites and motivates students. Yet, American science education test scores lag behind those of other industrial countries, and the call for better science, math and technology education is widespread. Thus, improving American science, math and technological literacy is a major educational goal for the NSF and NASA. Today, funding for research often carries a requirement that the scientist be actively involved in education and public outreach (E/PO) to enhance the science literacy of students, teachers and citizens. How can scientists contribute effectively to E/PO? What roles can scientists take in E/PO? And, how can this be balanced with research requirements and timelines? This talk will focus on these questions, with examples drawn from the author's projects that involve scientists in working with K-12 teacher professional development and with K-12 curriculum development and implementation. Experiences and strategies for teacher professional development in the research environment will be discussed in the context of NASA's airborne astronomy education and outreach projects: the Flight Opportunities for Science Teacher EnRichment project and the future Airborne Ambassadors Program for NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). Effective partnerships with scientists as content experts in the development of new classroom materials will be described with examples from the SETI Institute's Life in the Universe curriculum series for grades 3-9, and Voyages Through Time, an integrated high school science course. The author and the SETI Institute wish to acknowledge funding as well as scientific and technical support from the National Science Foundation, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Hewlett Packard Company, the Foundation for Microbiology, and the Combined Federated Charities.

  1. Biotechniques Laboratory: An Enabling Course in the Biological Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Trapani, Giovanna; Clarke, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Practical skills and competencies are critical to student engagement and effective learning in laboratory courses. This article describes the design of a yearlong, stand-alone laboratory course--the Biotechniques Laboratory--a common core course in the second year of all our degree programs in the biological sciences. It is an enabling,…

  2. SAFETY IN THE DESIGN OF SCIENCE LABORATORIES AND BUILDING CODES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HOROWITZ, HAROLD

    THE DESIGN OF COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS USED FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND EDUCATION IS DISCUSSED IN TERMS OF LABORATORY SAFETY AND BUILDING CODES AND REGULATIONS. MAJOR TOPIC AREAS ARE--(1) SAFETY RELATED DESIGN FEATURES OF SCIENCE LABORATORIES, (2) LABORATORY SAFETY AND BUILDING CODES, AND (3) EVIDENCE OF UNSAFE DESIGN. EXAMPLES EMPHASIZE…

  3. Evaluation of historical beryllium abundance in soils, airborne particulates and facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Mark; Bibby, Richard K; Eppich, Gary R; Lee, Steven; Lindvall, Rachel E; Wilson, Kent; Esser, Bradley K

    2012-10-15

    Beryllium has been historically machined, handled and stored in facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) since the 1950s. Additionally, outdoor testing of beryllium-containing components has been performed at LLNL's Site 300 facility. Beryllium levels in local soils and atmospheric particulates have been measured over three decades and are comparable to those found elsewhere in the natural environment. While localized areas of beryllium contamination have been identified, laboratory operations do not appear to have increased the concentration of beryllium in local air or water. Variation in airborne beryllium correlates to local weather patterns, PM10 levels, normal sources (such as resuspension of soil and emissions from coal power stations) but not to LLNL activities. Regional and national atmospheric beryllium levels have decreased since the implementation of the EPA's 1990 Clean-Air-Act. Multi-element analysis of local soil and air samples allowed for the determination of comparative ratios for beryllium with over 50 other metals to distinguish between natural beryllium and process-induced contamination. Ten comparative elemental markers (Al, Cs, Eu, Gd, La, Nd, Pr, Sm, Th and Tl) that were selected to ensure background variations in other metals did not collectively interfere with the determination of beryllium sources in work-place samples at LLNL. Multi-element analysis and comparative evaluation are recommended for all workplace and environmental samples suspected of beryllium contamination. The multi-element analyses of soils and surface dusts were helpful in differentiating between beryllium of environmental origin and beryllium from laboratory operations. Some surfaces can act as "sinks" for particulate matter, including carpet, which retains entrained insoluble material even after liquid based cleaning. At LLNL, most facility carpets had beryllium concentrations at or below the upper tolerance limit determined by sampling facilities

  4. Pointing stability and image quality of the SOFIA Airborne Telescope during initial science missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampater, Ulrich; Keas, Paul; Brewster, Rick; Herter, Terry; Wolf, Juergen; Pfueller, Enrico; Wiedemann, Manuel; Teufel, Stefan; Harms, Franziska; Jakob, Holger; Roser, Hans-Peter

    2011-09-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is an airborne observatory for astronomical observations at wavelengths ranging from 0.3-1600 µm. It consists of a telescope with an effective aperture of 2.5 m, which is mounted in a heavily modified Boeing 747SP. The aircraft features an open port cavity that gives the telescope an unobstructed view of the sky. Hence the optical system is subject to both aerodynamic loads from airflow entering the cavity, and to inertial loads introduced by motion of the airborne platform. A complex suspension assembly was designed to stabilize the telescope. Detailed end-to-end simulations were performed to estimate image stability based on the mechatronic design, the expected loads, and optical influence parameters. In December 2010 SOFIA entered its operational phase with a series of Early Science flights, which have relaxed image quality requirements compared to the full operations capability. At the same time, those flights are used to characterize image quality and image stability in order to validate models and to optimize systems. Optimization of systems is not based on analytical models, but on models derived from system identification measurements that are performed on the actual hardware both under controlled conditions and operational conditions. This paper discusses recent results from system identification measurements, improvements to image stability, and plans for the further enhancement of the system.

  5. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. Matthew

    2011-05-13

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants ([NESHAP]; U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated off-site doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2010.

  6. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barfuss, Brad C.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2008-01-01

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP – U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection – Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2007.

  7. Making Carbon Emissions Remotely Sensible: Flux Observations of Carbon from an Airborne Laboratory (FOCAL), its Near-Surface Survey of Carbon Gases and Isotopologues on Alaska's North Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobosy, R.; Dumas, E. J.; Sayres, D. S.; Healy, C. E.; Munster, J. B.; Baker, B.; Anderson, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed process-oriented study of the mechanisms of conversion in the Arctic of fossil carbon to atmospheric gas is progressing, but necessarily limited to a few point locations and requiring detailed subsurface measurements inaccessible to remote sensing. Airborne measurements of concentration, transport and flux of these carbon gases at sufficiently low altitude to reflect surface variations can tie such local measurements to remotely observable features of the landscape. Carbon dioxide and water vapor have been observable for over 20 years from low-altitude small aircraft in the Arctic and elsewhere. Methane has been more difficult, requiring large powerful aircraft or limited flask samples. Recent developments in spectroscopy, however, have reduced the power and weight required to measure methane at rates suitable for eddy-covariance flux estimates. The Flux Observations of Carbon from an Airborne Laboratory (FOCAL) takes advantage of Integrated Cavity-Output Spectroscopy (ICOS) to measure CH4, CO2, and water vapor in a new airborne system. The system, moreover, measures these gases' stable isotopologues every two seconds or faster helping to separate thermogenic from biogenic emissions. Paired with the Best Airborne Turbulence (BAT) probe developed for small aircraft by NOAA's Air Resources Laboratory and a light twin-engine aircraft adapted by Aurora Flight Sciences Inc., the FOCAL measures at 6 m spacing, covering 100 km in less than 30 minutes. It flies between 10 m and 50 m above ground interspersed with profiles to the top of the boundary layer and beyond. This presentation gives an overview of the magnitude and variation in fluxes and concentrations of CH4, CO2, and H2O with space, time, and time of day in a spatially extensive survey, more than 7500 km total in 15 flights over roughly a 100 km square during the month of August 2013. An extensive data set such as this at low altitude with high-rate sampling addresses features that repeat on 1 km scale

  8. Comparison of Continuous Wave CO2 Doppler Lidar Calibration Using Earth Surface Targets in Laboratory and Airborne Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana

    1999-01-01

    Routine backscatter, beta, measurements by an airborne or space-based lidar from designated earth surfaces with known and fairly uniform beta properties can potentially offer lidar calibration opportunities. This can in turn be used to obtain accurate atmospheric aerosol and cloud beta measurements on large spatial scales. This is important because achieving a precise calibration factor for large pulsed lidars then need not rest solely on using a standard hard target procedure. Furthermore, calibration from designated earth surfaces would provide an inflight performance evaluation of the lidar. Hence, with active remote sensing using lasers with high resolution data, calibration of a space-based lidar using earth's surfaces will be extremely useful. The calibration methodology using the earth's surface initially requires measuring beta of various earth surfaces simulated in the laboratory using a focused continuous wave (CW) CO2 Doppler lidar and then use these beta measurements as standards for the earth surface signal from airborne or space-based lidars. Since beta from the earth's surface may be retrieved at different angles of incidence, beta would also need to be measured at various angles of incidences of the different surfaces. In general, Earth-surface reflectance measurements have been made in the infrared, but the use of lidars to characterize them and in turn use of the Earth's surface to calibrate lidars has not been made. The feasibility of this calibration methodology is demonstrated through a comparison of these laboratory measurements with actual earth surface beta retrieved from the same lidar during the NASA/Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission on NASA's DC8 aircraft from 13 - 26 September, 1995. For the selected earth surface from the airborne lidar data, an average beta for the surface was established and the statistics of lidar efficiency was determined. This was compared with the actual lidar efficiency

  9. The NASA Airborne Earth Science Microwave Imaging Radiometer (AESMIR): A New Sensor for Earth Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward

    2003-01-01

    The Airborne Earth Science Microwave Imaging Radiometer (AESMIR) is a versatile new airborne imaging radiometer recently developed by NASA. The AESMIR design is unique in that it performs dual-polarized imaging at all standard passive microwave frequency bands (6-89 GHz) using only one sensor headscanner package, providing an efficient solution for Earth remote sensing applications (snow, soil moisture/land parameters, precipitation, ocean winds, sea surface temperature, water vapor, sea ice, etc.). The microwave radiometers themselves will incorporate state-of-the-art receivers, with particular attention given to instrument calibration for the best possible accuracy and sensitivity. The single-package design of AESMIR makes it compatible with high-altitude aircraft platforms such as the NASA ER-2s. The arbitrary 2-axis gimbal can perform conical and cross-track scanning, as well as fixed-beam staring. This compatibility with high-altitude platforms coupled with the flexible scanning configuration, opens up previously unavailable science opportunities for convection/precip/cloud science and co-flying with complementary instruments, as well as providing wider swath coverage for all science applications. By designing AESMIR to be compatible with these high-altitude platforms, we are also compatible with the NASA P-3, the NASA DC-8, C-130s and ground-based deployments. Thus AESMIR can provide low-, mid-, and high- altitude microwave imaging. Parallel filter banks allow AESMIR to simultaneously simulate the exact passbands of multiple satellite radiometers: SSM/I, TMI, AMSR, Windsat, SSMI/S, and the upcoming GPM/GMI and NPOESS/CMIS instruments --a unique capability among aircraft radiometers. An L-band option is also under development, again using the same scanner. With this option, simultaneous imaging from 1.4 to 89 GHz will be feasible. And, all receivers except the sounding channels will be configured for 4-Stokes polarimetric operation using high-speed digital

  10. Mars Science Laboratory Overview and MSL EDL Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umland, Jeffrey W.

    2005-01-01

    An overview of Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) challenges is presented. The topics include: 1) MSL Project Overview; 2) Mars Science Laboratory Top Level Schedule (Single Launch); 3) EDL Challenges; 4) MSL Surface System; 5) Mars Rover Wheel Family Tree; 6) Gusev Comparisons; 7) Mars Surface Accessibility; 8) Atlas V 401 Launch Performance; 9) Parachute Deployment Altitude Variation with Time of Year and Latitude; 10) Dust Storms and Winds; 11) Nominal MSL EDL Timeline; and 12) Specific EDL Challenges.

  11. Global Geospace Science/Polar Plasma Laboratory: POLAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science (GGS) Project is discussed as part of the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. The objectives of Polar Plasma Laboratory (POLAR), one of the two spacecraft to be used by the Project to fill critical gaps in the scientific understanding of solar and plasma physics, are outlined. POLAR Laboratory is described, along with POLAR instrumentation, support subsystems, and orbits. Launch vehicle and injection into orbit are also addressed.

  12. Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) - First Results of Relative Humidity Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; Kemppinen, Osku; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Renno, Nilton; Savijärvi, Hannu; Schmidt, Walter; Polkko, Jouni; Rodríquez-Manfredi, Jose Antonio; de la Torre Juárez, Manuel; Mischna, Michael; Martín-Torres, Javier; Haukka, Harri; Paz Zorzano-Mier, Maria; Rafkin, Scott; Paton, Mark; MSL Science Team

    2013-04-01

    The Mars Science laboratory (MSL) called Curiosity made a successful landing at Gale crater early August 2012. MSL has an environmental instrument package called the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) as a part of its scientific payload. REMS comprises instrumentation for the observation of atmospheric pressure, temperature of the air, ground temperature, wind speed and direction, relative humidity, and UV measurements. The REMS instrument suite is described at length in [1]. We concentrate on describing the first results from the REMS relative humidity observations and comparison of the measurements with modeling results. The REMS humidity device is provided by the Finnish Meteorological Institute. It is based on polymeric capacitive humidity sensors developed by Vaisala Inc. The humidity device makes use of one transducer electronics section placed in the vicinity of the three (3) humidity sensor heads. The humidity device is mounted on the REMS boom 2 providing ventilation with the ambient atmosphere through a filter protecting the device from airborne dust. The absolute accuracy of the humidity device is temperature dependent, and is of the order of 2% at the temperature range of -30 to -10 °C, and of the order of 10% at the temperature range of -80 to -60 °C. This enables the investigations of atmospheric humidity variations of both diurnal and seasonal scale. The humidity device measurements will have a lag, when a step-wise change in humidity is taking place. This lag effect is increasing with decreasing temperature, and it is of the order of a few hours at the temperature of -75 °C. To compensate for the lag effect we used an algorithm developed by Mäkinen [2]. The humidity observations were validated after tedious efforts. This was needed to compensate for the artifacts of the transducer electronics. The compensation process includes an assumption that the relative humidity at Mars in the temperature range of 0 to -30 °C is about zero. The

  13. Science teachers' perceptions of the effectiveness of technology in the laboratories: Implications for science education leadership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Niveen K.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify science teachers' perceptions concerning the use of technology in science laboratories and identify teachers' concerns and recommendations for improving students' learning. Survey methodology with electronic delivery was used to gather data from 164 science teachers representing Texas public schools. The data confirmed that weaknesses identified in the 1990s still exist. Lack of equipment, classroom space, and technology access, as well as large numbers of students, were reported as major barriers to the implementation of technology in science laboratories. Significant differences were found based on gender, grade level, certification type, years of experience, and technology proficiency. Females, elementary teachers, traditionally trained teachers, and less experienced teachers revealed a more positive attitude toward the use of technology in science laboratories. Participants in this study preferred using science software simulations to support rather than replace traditional science laboratories. Teachers in this study recommended professional development programs that focused on strategies for a technology integrated classroom.

  14. Implementing the Science Writing Heuristic in the Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, K. A.; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Hand, Brian M.

    2006-01-01

    The Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) is an instructional technique that combines inquiry, collaborative learning, and writing to change the nature of the chemistry laboratory for students and instructors. The SWH provides a format for students to guide their discussions, their thinking, and writing about how science activities relate to their own…

  15. Inquiry-Related Tasks in High School Science Laboratory Handbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamir, Pinchas; Lunetta, Vincent N.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews and compares results of content analysis studies of selected high school science laboratory handbooks using the Laboratory Structure and Task Analysis Inventory (LAI). Findings from two biology, two chemistry, and two physics handbooks indicate highly structured investigations where students perform manipulative and observational…

  16. Chemistry Students' Challenges in Using MBL's in Science Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atar, Hakan Yavuz

    Understanding students' challenges about using microcomputer based laboratories (MBLs) would provide important data in understanding the appropriateness of using MBLs in high school chemistry laboratories. Identifying students' concerns about this technology will in part help educators identify the obstacles to science learning when using this…

  17. Computer Data Acquisition Applications in the Materials Science Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Eugene E., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Described are applications of computer data acquisition to three laboratories in materials science at the United States Naval Academy. In each laboratory, data are input to a minicomputer, scaled using previously obtained and stored calibration factors to convert the transducer signals to load, displacement, temperature, etc., and then stored on…

  18. Science Laboratory Exercises for Vocational Agriculture Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Dale E.

    This manual provides learning activities for use in two vocational agriculture courses--ornamental horticulture I and agricultural technology I. These activities are intended as aids in the teaching of application of science principles. An introductory chart gives a summary of how vocational agriculture objectives match objectives of specific…

  19. Dual channel photoacoustic hygrometer for airborne measurements: background, calibration, laboratory and in-flight inter-comparison tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tátrai, D.; Bozóki, Z.; Smit, H.; Rolf, C.; Spelten, N.; Krämer, M.; Filges, A.; Gerbig, C.; Gulyás, G.; Szabó, G.

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes a tunable diode laser based dual channel photoacoustic (PA) humidity measuring system called WaSul-Hygro primarily designed for aircraft based environment research. It is calibrated for total pressures and water vapor (WV) volume mixing ratios (VMRs) possible during airborne applications. WV VMR is calculated by using pressure dependent calibration curves and a cubic spline interpolation method. Coverage of the entire atmospheric humidity concentration range which might be encountered during airborne measurements is facilitated by applying an automated sensitivity mode switching algorithm. The calibrated PA system was validated through laboratory and airborne inter-comparisons, which proved that the repeatability, the estimated accuracy and the response time of the system is 0.5 ppmV or 0.5% of the actual reading (whichever value is the greater), 5% of the actual reading within the VMR range of 1-12 000 ppmV and 2 s, respectively. The upper detection limit of the system is about 85 000 ppmV, limited only by condensation of water vapor on the walls of the 318 K heated PA cells and inlet lines. The unique advantage of the presented system is its applicability for simultaneous water vapor and total water volume mixing ratio measurements.

  20. Dual-channel photoacoustic hygrometer for airborne measurements: background, calibration, laboratory and in-flight intercomparison tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tátrai, D.; Bozóki, Z.; Smit, H.; Rolf, C.; Spelten, N.; Krämer, M.; Filges, A.; Gerbig, C.; Gulyás, G.; Szabó, G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a tunable diode laser-based dual-channel photoacoustic (PA) humidity measuring system primarily designed for aircraft-based environment research. It is calibrated for total pressure and water vapor (WV) volume mixing ratios (VMRs) possible during airborne applications. WV VMR is calculated by using pressure-dependent calibration curves and a cubic spline interpolation method. Coverage of the entire atmospheric humidity concentration range that might be encountered during airborne measurements is facilitated by applying an automated sensitivity mode switching algorithm. The calibrated PA system was validated through laboratory and airborne intercomparisons, which proved that the repeatability, the estimated accuracy and the response time of the system are 0.5 ppmV or 0.5% of the actual reading (whichever value is the greater), 5% of the actual reading within the VMR range of 1-12 000 ppmV and 2 s, respectively. The upper detection limit of the system is theoretically about 85 000 ppmV, limited only by condensation of water vapor on the walls of the 318 K heated PA cells and inlet lines, and was experimentally verified up to 20 000 ppmV. The unique advantage of the presented system is its applicability for simultaneous water vapor and total water volume mixing ratio measurements.

  1. DC-8 Airborne Laboratory in flight over snow-capped Sierra Nevada mountain range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The DC-8 in flight near Lone Pine, Calif. In the foreground are the Sierra Nevada Mountains, covered with winter snow. In the distance are the White Mountains. The DC-8's fuselage is painted white with a dark blue stripe down the side. The wings are silver, while the engine pods are white. In this view of the airplane's right-hand side, only a few of its antennas are visible. The experimental payload can be as great as 30,000 pounds of equipment for gathering data of various sorts. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  2. Chemistry Is Not a Laboratory Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkes, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    Chemistry is considered to be a combination of principles and facts that causes the formation of the earth and its layering that governs the ecosystem, which underlie the properties of materials and of living organisms. Laboratory classes do not help students to understand the way in which chemical principles affect their universe.

  3. Busting the Limits of Science Laboratory Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the trend facing today's scientific laboratories: that the more specialized the lab, the more expensive it is, and the less accessible it becomes. Or conversely, the more accessible a lab needs to be, the fewer resources can be dedicated per capita, and the less specialized it becomes. From a numerical standpoint, "real"…

  4. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Edwards, Daniel L.

    2003-12-05

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the assessment performed in 2003.

  5. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Shields, Keith D.; Edwards, Daniel R.

    2001-09-28

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods, and provides the results, for the assessment performed in 2001.

  6. Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory 2002 Science Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A. (Editor); Robinson, M. B. (Editor); Murphy, K. L. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    With the International Space Station Program approaching core complete, our NASA Headquarters sponsor, the new Code U Enterprise, Biological and Physical Research, is shifting its research emphasis from purely fundamental microgravity and biological sciences to strategic research aimed at enabling human missions beyond Earth orbit. Although we anticipate supporting microgravity research on the ISS for some time to come, our laboratory has been vigorously engaged in developing these new strategic research areas.This Technical Memorandum documents the internal science research at our laboratory as presented in a review to Dr. Ann Whitaker, MSFC Science Director, in July 2002. These presentations have been revised and updated as appropriate for this report. It provides a snapshot of the internal science capability of our laboratory as an aid to other NASA organizations and the external scientific community.

  7. Mars Science Laboratory Using Laser Instrument, Artist's Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This artist's conception of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory portrays use of the rover's ChemCam instrument to identify the chemical composition of a rock sample on the surface of Mars.

    ChemCam is innovative for planetary exploration in using a technique referred to as laser breakdown spectroscopy to determine the chemical composition of samples from distances of up to about 8 meters (25 feet) away. ChemCam is led by a team at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements in Toulouse, France.

    Mars Science Laboratory, a mobile robot for investigating Mars' past or present ability to sustain microbial life, is in development at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory for a launch opportunity in 2009. The mission is managed by JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif., for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

  8. Collection, Storage and Real-Time Transmission of Housekeeping and Instrument Data Aboard Manned NASA Airborne Science Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gilst, D. P.; Sorenson, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    Multi-instrument aircraft-based science campaigns require a baseline level of housekeeping service to record and distribute real time data, including timing signals, aircraft state and air data. As campaigns have become more sophisticated with greater integration between aircraft, ground instrumentation, satellites and forecasters in locations around the world, the scope of the services provided by the facility data systems on NASA's airborne science aircraft have increased to include situational awareness displays, real-time interchange of data between instruments and aircraft, and ingest of data to assist in real-time targeting of flights. As the scope of services has expanded, it has become increasingly important to provide standardized interfaces to experimenters to minimize integration complexity, and to make services sufficiently reliable for mission operations to depend upon them. Within the NASA airborne science program in recent years this has been provided by systems based around the core of the REVEAL/NASDAT system, with additional services including satellite communications, data display and ingest of outside data being provided by a mix of custom and COTS hardware and software. With a strong emphasis on transmission of data over industry standard IP and ethernet based networks, this system has been proven on numerous highly diverse missions on the DC-8 over the last 4 years and is being replicated on other NASA Airborne Science Platforms.

  9. Science Teachers' Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Technology in the Laboratories: Implications for Science Education Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaseen, Niveen K.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify science teachers' perceptions concerning the use of technology in science laboratories and identify teachers' concerns and recommendations for improving students' learning. Survey methodology with electronic delivery was used to gather data from 164 science teachers representing Texas public schools. The…

  10. Analytical Laboratory Science on the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.

    2005-01-01

    The Odyssey Missions orbital maps of near surface ice abundance using neutron spectroscopy (Boynton et al., 2002), the Mars Exploration Rover s confirmation of aqueous processing (Squyres et al., 2004), and the Mars Express detailed infrared maps of specific mineral types that were likely formed in aqueous environments (Bibring et al., 2005) have dramatically expanded our tool set for understanding of aqueous processes on Mars. The 2009 Mars Science Laboratory is designed to extend the "follow the water" crosscutting theme of the Mars Exploration Program toward an even more detailed exploration of habitability - the potential of the Mars environment to support life. The next steps in understanding the habitability of Mars are a more detailed in situ analysis of the chemical state of elements such as C, H, O, N, S, P, Ca, and Fe that are essential for terrestrial life. Of particular interest are experiments that establish definitive mineralogy for a wider range of compounds and those that implement a more comprehensive and sensitive search for organic molecules both in the atmosphere and in surface or near surface rocks, soils, and fines. The recent reports of atmospheric methane in the Martian atmosphere make the organics exploration even more compelling. The substantial mass and power resources of MSL combined with its mobility and powerful sample acquisition and processing tools will enable it to locate a variety of near-surface samples and analyze these in some detail. NASA is presently considering the possibility of landing a second MSL rover in 2011.

  11. The SOFIA Airborne Infrared Observatory - first science highlights and future science potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinnecker, H.

    2014-10-01

    SOFIA, short for Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, is a Boeing 747SP aircraft with a 2.7m telescope flying as high as 45000 ft in the stratosphere above 99 percent of the precipitable water vapor. SOFIA normally operates from its base in Palmdale, California, and a typical observing flight lasts for 10 hours before returning to base. SOFIA has started astronomical observations in Dec 2010 and has completed some 30 early science flights in 2011, delivering a number of exciting results and discoveries, both in mid-infrared imaging (5-40mu) and in far-infrared (THz) heterodyne high-resolution spectroscopy which were published in mid-2012 in special issues of ApJ Letters and A & A, respectively. Meanwhile, in July 2013, as part of Cycle 1, SOFIA has deployed to New Zealand for a total of 9 flights (all of them successful) and has observed key targets in the southern hemisphere at THz frequencies, including star forming regions in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. In this talk, I will present a few highlights of SOFIA early science and its future potential, when the full suite of 7 instruments will be implemented by the time of full operations in 2015. As Herschel ran out of cryogens in April 2013, SOFIA will be the premier FIR-astronomical facility for many years to come. Synergies with ALMA and CCAT must be explored. SOFIA is a major bilateral project between NASA and the German Space Agency (DLR), however as an international observatory it offers observing time to the whole astronomical community world-wide, not only to the US and German primary partners.

  12. Laboratory Logistics: Strategies for Integrating Information Literacy Instruction into Science Laboratory Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Active learning is a hallmark of the traditional science laboratory class, making it a natural place for librarians to integrate active information literacy instruction. The course structure of science lab classes, particularly large entry-level undergraduate classes, can make the logistics of such integration a challenge. This paper presents two…

  13. Diversity in laboratory animal science: issues and initiatives.

    PubMed

    Alworth, Leanne; Ardayfio, Krystal L; Blickman, Andrew; Greenhill, Lisa; Hill, William; Sharp, Patrick; Talmage, Roberta; Plaut, Victoria C; Goren, Matt

    2010-03-01

    Since diversity in the workplace began receiving scholarly attention in the late 1980s, many corporations and institutions have invested in programs to address and manage diversity. We encourage laboratory animal science to address the challenges and to build on the strengths that personal diversity brings to our field and workplaces. Diversity is already becoming increasingly relevant in the workplace and the laboratory animal science field. By addressing issues related to diversity, laboratory animal science could benefit and potentially fulfill its goals more successfully. To date, diversity has received minimal attention from the field as a whole. However, many individuals, workplaces, and institutions in industry, academia, and the uniformed services that are intimately involved with the field of laboratory animal science are actively addressing issues concerning diversity. This article describes some of these programs and activities in industry and academia. Our intention is that this article will provide useful examples of inclusion-promoting activities and prompt further initiatives to address diversity awareness and inclusion in laboratory animal science. PMID:20353686

  14. Diversity in Laboratory Animal Science: Issues and Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Alworth, Leanne; Ardayfio, Krystal L; Blickman, Andrew; Greenhill, Lisa; Hill, William; Sharp, Patrick; Talmage, Roberta; Plaut, Victoria C; Goren, Matt J

    2010-01-01

    Since diversity in the workplace began receiving scholarly attention in the late 1980s, many corporations and institutions have invested in programs to address and manage diversity. We encourage laboratory animal science to address the challenges and to build on the strengths that personal diversity brings to our field and workplaces. Diversity is already becoming increasingly relevant in the workplace and the laboratory animal science field. By addressing issues related to diversity, laboratory animal science could benefit and potentially fulfill its goals more successfully. To date, diversity has received minimal attention from the field as a whole. However, many individuals, workplaces, and institutions in industry, academia, and the uniformed services that are intimately involved with the field of laboratory animal science are actively addressing issues concerning diversity. This article describes some of these programs and activities in industry and academia. Our intention is that this article will provide useful examples of inclusion-promoting activities and prompt further initiatives to address diversity awareness and inclusion in laboratory animal science. PMID:20353686

  15. Flux Of Carbon from an Airborne Laboratory (FOCAL): Synergy of airborne and surface measures of carbon emission and isotopologue content from tundra landscape in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobosy, R.; Dumas, E.; Sayres, D. S.; Kochendorfer, J.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic tundra, recognized as a potential major source of new atmospheric carbon, is characterized by low topographic relief and small-scale heterogeneity consisting of small lakes and intervening tundra vegetation. This fits well the flux-fragment method (FFM) of analysis of data from low-flying aircraft. The FFM draws on 1)airborne eddy-covariance flux measurements, 2)a classified surface-characteristics map (e.g. open water vs tundra), 3)a footprint model, and 4)companion surface-based eddy-covariance flux measurements. The FOCAL, a collaboration among Harvard University's Anderson Group, NOAA's Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD), and Aurora Flight Sciences, Inc., made coordinated flights in 2013 August with a collaborating surface site. The FOCAL gathers not only flux data for CH4 and CO2 but also the corresponding carbon-isotopologue content of these gases. The surface site provides a continuous sample of carbon flux from interstitial tundra over time throughout the period of the campaign. The FFM draws samples from the aircraft data over many instances of tundra and also open water. From this we will determine how representative the surface site is of the larger area (100 km linear scale), and how much the open water differs from the tundra as a source of carbon.

  16. Spectrometers for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) Upgrade to Full Sun-Sky-Cloud-Trace Gas Spectrometry Capability for Airborne Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunagan, S. E.; Flynn, C. J.; Johnson, R. R.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; LeBlanc, S. E.; Livingston, J. M.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Shinozuka, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Spectrometers for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) instrument has been developed at NASA Ames in collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and NASA Goddard, supported substantially since 2009 by NASA's Radiation Science Program and Earth Science Technology Office. It combines grating spectrometers with fiber optic links to a tracking, scanning head to enable sun tracking, sky scanning, and zenith viewing. 4STAR builds on the long and productive heritage of the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometers (AATS-6 and -14), which have yielded more than 100 peer-reviewed publications and extensive archived data sets in many NASA Airborne Science campaigns from 1986 to the present. The baseline 4STAR instrument has provided extensive data supporting the TCAP (Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013), SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys, 2013), and ARISE (Arctic Radiation - IceBridge Sea and Ice Experiment, 2014), field campaigns.This poster presents plans and progress for an upgrade to the 4STAR instrument to achieve full science capability, including (1) direct-beam sun tracking measurements to derive aerosol optical depth spectra, (2) sky radiance measurements to retrieve aerosol absorption and type (via complex refractive index and mode-resolved size distribution), (3) cloud properties via zenith radiance, and (4) trace gas spectrometry. Technical progress in context with the governing physics is reported on several upgrades directed at improved light collection and usage, particularly as related to spectrally and radiometrically stable propagation through the collection light path. In addition, improvements to field calibration and verification, and flight operability and reliability are addressed.

  17. Enabling Data Intensive Science through Service Oriented Science: Virtual Laboratories and Science Gateways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lescinsky, D. T.; Wyborn, L. A.; Evans, B. J. K.; Allen, C.; Fraser, R.; Rankine, T.

    2014-12-01

    We present collaborative work on a generic, modular infrastructure for virtual laboratories (VLs, similar to science gateways) that combine online access to data, scientific code, and computing resources as services that support multiple data intensive scientific computing needs across a wide range of science disciplines. We are leveraging access to 10+ PB of earth science data on Lustre filesystems at Australia's National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) Research Data Storage Infrastructure (RDSI) node, co-located with NCI's 1.2 PFlop Raijin supercomputer and a 3000 CPU core research cloud. The development, maintenance and sustainability of VLs is best accomplished through modularisation and standardisation of interfaces between components. Our approach has been to break up tightly-coupled, specialised application packages into modules, with identified best techniques and algorithms repackaged either as data services or scientific tools that are accessible across domains. The data services can be used to manipulate, visualise and transform multiple data types whilst the scientific tools can be used in concert with multiple scientific codes. We are currently designing a scalable generic infrastructure that will handle scientific code as modularised services and thereby enable the rapid/easy deployment of new codes or versions of codes. The goal is to build open source libraries/collections of scientific tools, scripts and modelling codes that can be combined in specially designed deployments. Additional services in development include: provenance, publication of results, monitoring, workflow tools, etc. The generic VL infrastructure will be hosted at NCI, but can access alternative computing infrastructures (i.e., public/private cloud, HPC).The Virtual Geophysics Laboratory (VGL) was developed as a pilot project to demonstrate the underlying technology. This base is now being redesigned and generalised to develop a Virtual Hazards Impact and Risk Laboratory

  18. Progress Report on the ASCII for Science Data, Airborne and Geospatial Working Groups of the 2014 ESDSWG for MEaSUREs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, K. D.; Krotkov, N. A.; Mattmann, C. A.; Boustani, M.; Law, E.; Conover, H.; Chen, G.; Olding, S. W.; Walter, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth Science Data Systems Working Groups (ESDSWG) were setup by NASA HQ 10 years ago. The role of the ESDSWG is to make recommendations relevant to NASA's Earth science data systems from users experiences. Each group works independently focussing on a unique topic. Participation in ESDSWG groups comes from a variety of NASA-funded science and technology projects, NASA information technology experts, affiliated contractor staff and other interested community members from academia and industry. Recommendations from the ESDSWG groups will enhance NASA's efforts to develop long term data products. The ASCII for Science Data Working Group (WG) will define a minimum set of information that should be included in ASCII file headers so that the users will be able to access the data using only the header information. After reviewing various use cases, such as field data and ASCII data exported from software tools, and reviewing ASCII data guidelines documentation, this WG will deliver guidelines for creating ASCII files that contain enough header information to allow the user to access the science data. The Airborne WG's goal is to improve airborne data access and use for NASA science. The first step is to evaluate the state of airborne data and make recommendations focusing on data delivery to the DAACs (data centers). The long term goal is to improve airborne data use for Earth Science research. Many data aircraft observations are reported in ASCII format. The ASCII and Airborne WGs seem like the same group, but the Airborne WG is concerned with maintaining and using airborne for science research, not just the data format. The Geospatial WG focus is on the interoperability issues of Geospatial Information System (GIS) and remotely sensed data, in particular, focusing on DAAC(s) data from NASA's Earth Science Enterprise. This WG will provide a set of tools (GIS libraries) to use with training and/or cookbooks through the use of Open Source technologies. A progress

  19. Comparison of Continuous-Wave CO2 Lidar Calibration by use of Earth-Surface Targets in Laboratory and Airborne Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana

    1998-01-01

    Backscatter of several Earth surfaces was characterized in the laboratory as a function of incidence angle with a focused continuous-wave 9.1 micro meter CO2 Doppler lidar for use as possible calibration targets. Some targets showed negligible angular dependence, while others showed a slight increase with decreasing angle. The Earth-surface signal measured over the complex Californian terrain during a 1995 NASA airborne mission compared well with laboratory data. Distributions of the Earth's surface signal shows that the lidar efficiency can be estimated with a fair degree of accuracy, preferably with uniform Earth-surface targets during flight for airborne or space-based lidar.

  20. The Effect of Guided-Inquiry Laboratory Experiments on Science Education Students' Chemistry Laboratory Attitudes, Anxiety and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ural, Evrim

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to search the effect of guided inquiry laboratory experiments on students' attitudes towards chemistry laboratory, chemistry laboratory anxiety and their academic achievement in the laboratory. The study has been carried out with 37 third-year, undergraduate science education students, as a part of their Science Education Laboratory…

  1. Medical Laboratory Science: An International Comparison for Credentials Evaluators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Solveig M.; Karlsson, Britta

    Information is presented to help medical technology schools abroad evaluate their credentials in comparison to U.S. requirements. After defining the subfields of medical technology, also called medical laboratory science, a summary is provided of the educational requirements, the professional titles, and the certification recognition of medical…

  2. Chemistry on Camera: Integrating Technology into the Science Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargis, Jace; Stehr, Jim

    2001-01-01

    Describes a relevant, innovative laboratory exercise that promotes the construction of ideas that can be used to further science processing. Integrates technology in the form of digital photography, a portable computer, and a projection device. This activity fits well in a high school chemistry class. (SAH)

  3. The Nature of Laboratory Learning Experiences in Secondary Science Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crippen, Kent J.; Archambault, Leanna M.; Kern, Cindy L.

    2013-01-01

    Teaching science to secondary students in an online environment is a growing international trend. Despite this trend, reports of empirical studies of this phenomenon are noticeably missing. With a survey concerning the nature of laboratory activities, this study describes the perspective of 35-secondary teachers from 15-different U.S. states who…

  4. Gap Filler Induced Transition on the Mars Science Laboratory Heatshield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Barnhardt, Michael D.; Tang, Chun Y.; Sozer, Emre; Candler, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Detached Eddy Simulations have been performed to investigate the effects of high-fidelity turbulence modeling on roughness-induced transition to turbulence during Mars entry. Chemically reacting flow solutions will be obtained for a gap filler of Mars Science Laboratory at the peak heating condition.

  5. Mars Science Laboratory Orbit Determination Data Pre-Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafson, Eric D.; Kruizinga, Gerhard L.; Martin-Mur, Tomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) was spin-stabilized during its cruise to Mars. We discuss the effects of spin on the radiometric data and how the orbit determination team dealt with them. Additionally, we will discuss the unplanned benefits of detailed spin modeling including attitude estimation and spacecraft clock correlation.

  6. Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent and Landing System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steltzner, Adam D.; San Martin, A. Miguel; Rivellini, Tomasso P.; Chen, Allen

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory project recently places the Curiosity rove on the surface of Mars. With the success of the landing system, the performance envelope of entry, descent and landing capabilities has been extended over the previous state of the art. This paper will present an overview to the MSL entry, descent and landing system design and preliminary flight performance results.

  7. Structural Science Laboratory Supplement. High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luthens, Roger

    This module, a laboratory supplement on the theory of bending and properties of sections, is part of a first-year, postsecondary structural science technical support course for architectural drafting and design. The first part of this two-part supplement is directed at the instructor and includes the following sections: program objectives; course…

  8. Survey of gunshot residue analysis in forensic science laboratories.

    PubMed

    DeGaetano, D; Siegel, J A

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of this survey was to determine the methods of analysis being used on gunshot residue (GSR) samples in forensic science laboratories across the United States. In addition, the two general techniques of GSR analysis are compared and contrasted. Problems encountered by analysts using scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX) are discussed. PMID:2230684

  9. Mentoring New Adjunct Faculty to Teach Science Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Delia Castro

    2007-01-01

    The author discusses mentoring and training strategies that enhance adjunct faculty members' teaching effectiveness in undergraduate science laboratories and foster a sense of common enterprise within the institutional environment. These strategies include the preparation of an "Adjunct Faculty Handbook", mentoring and peer-support programs, and…

  10. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY: THREE SELECTED TOPICS.

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT,J.W.DENG,Y.GLIMM,J.SAMULYAK,R.

    2003-09-15

    We present an overview of computational science at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), with selections from three areas: fluids, nanoscience, and biology. The work at BNL in each of these areas is itself very broad, and we select a few topics for presentation within each of them.

  11. Scientific data management in the environmental molecular sciences laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, P.R.; Keller, T.L.

    1995-09-01

    The Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) is currently under construction at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This laboratory will be used for molecular and environmental sciences research to identify comprehensive solutions to DOE`s environmental problems. Major facilities within the EMSL include the Molecular Sciences Computing Facility (MSCF), a laser-surface dynamics laboratory, a high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) laboratory, and a mass spectrometry laboratory. The EMSL is scheduled to open early in 1997 and will house about 260 resident and visiting scientists. It is anticipated that at least six (6) terabytes of data will be archived in the first year of operation. An object-oriented database management system (OODBMS) and a mass storage system will be integrated to provide an intelligent, automated mechanism to manage data. The resulting system, called the DataBase Computer System (DBCS), will provide total scientific data management capabilities to EMSL users. A prototype mass storage system based on the National Storage Laboratory`s (NSL) UniTree has been procured and is in limited use. This system consists of two independent hierarchies of storage devices. One hierarchy of lower capacity, slower speed devices provides support for smaller files transferred over the Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) network. Also part of the system is a second hierarchy of higher capacity, higher speed devices that will be used to support high performance clients (e.g., a large scale parallel processor). The ObjectStore OODBMS will be used to manage metadata for archived datasets, maintain relationships between archived datasets, and -hold small, duplicate subsets of archived datasets (i.e., derivative data). The interim system is called DBCS, Phase 0 (DBCS-0). The production system for the EMSL, DBCS Phase 1 (DBCS-1), will be procured and installed in the summer of 1996.

  12. The NASA Airborne Astronomy Program: A perspective on its contributions to science, technology, and education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Harold P.

    1995-01-01

    The scientific, educational, and instrumental contributions from NASA's airborne observatories are deduced from the program's publication record (789 citations, excluding abstracts, involving 580 authors at 128 institutions in the United States and abroad between 1967-1990).

  13. The International Space Station: A National Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giblin, Timothy W.

    2011-01-01

    After more than a decade of assembly missions and on the heels of the final voyage of Space Shuttle Discovery, the International Space Station (ISS) has reached assembly completion. With visiting spacecraft now docking with the ISS on a regular basis, the Station now serves as a National Laboratory to scientists back on Earth. ISS strengthens relationships among NASA, other Federal entities, higher educational institutions, and the private sector in the pursuit of national priorities for the advancement of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. In this lecture we will explore the various areas of research onboard ISS to promote this advancement: (1) Human Research, (2) Biology & Biotechnology, (3) Physical & Material Sciences, (4) Technology, and (5) Earth & Space Science. The ISS National Laboratory will also open new paths for the exploration and economic development of space.

  14. The Moon as a 'real-time' life sciences laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garshnek, V.

    1994-06-01

    A lunar life sciences laboratory would be an ideal learning center to develop science capabilities to extend humans to Mars. It could be initiated without a large amount of preparatory human research due to previous lunar experience, short flight time (3 days), and the ability to gather 'real time' life sciences data. Human studies can go beyond previous zero-g research providing information on lunar 1/6 gravity effects (an early data point in determining whether long-term fractional gravity can assist in maintaining health and performance) and insight into whether a Mars transfer vehicle should be designed for artificial-g (and, if so, whether fractional-g might be adequate). Insights into human behavior/performance can also be gained. A lunar biological laboratory could provide a means of conducting long-duration experiments on the biological effects of radiation and fractional gravity (in animals and plants).

  15. PROJECT SUCCESS: Marine Science. (Introductory Packet, Basic Marine Science Laboratory Techniques, Oceanographic Instruments, Individual Projects, Bibliography).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demaray, Bryan

    Five packets comprise the marine science component of an enrichment program for gifted elementary students. Considered in the introductory section are identification (pre/post measure) procedures. Remaining packets address the following topics (subtopics in parentheses): basic marine science laboratory techniques (microscope techniques and metric…

  16. The Nature of Laboratory Learning Experiences in Secondary Science Online

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crippen, Kent J.; Archambault, Leanna M.; Kern, Cindy L.

    2013-06-01

    Teaching science to secondary students in an online environment is a growing international trend. Despite this trend, reports of empirical studies of this phenomenon are noticeably missing. With a survey concerning the nature of laboratory activities, this study describes the perspective of 35-secondary teachers from 15-different U.S. states who are teaching science online. The type and frequency of reported laboratory activities are consistent with the tradition of face-to-face instruction, using hands-on and simulated experiments. While provided examples were student-centered and required the collection of data, they failed to illustrate key components of the nature of science. The features of student-teacher interactions, student engagement, and nonverbal communications were found to be lacking and likely constitute barriers to the enactment of inquiry. These results serve as a call for research and development focused on using existing communication tools to better align with the activity of science such that the nature of science is more clearly addressed, the work of students becomes more collaborative and authentic, and the formative elements of a scientific inquiry are more accessible to all participants.

  17. CaTs Lab (CHAOS and Thermal Sciences Laboratory)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teate, Anthony A.

    2002-01-01

    The CHAOS and Thermal Sciences Laboratory (CaTs) at James Madison University evolved into a noteworthy effort to increase minority representation in the sciences and mathematics. Serving ten students and faculty directly, and nearly 50 students indirectly, CaTs, through recruitment efforts, workshops, mentoring programs, tutorial services and research and computational laboratories, fulfilled its intent to initiate an academically enriched research program aimed at strengthening the academic and self-actualization skills of undergraduate students with potential to pursue doctoral study in the sciences. The stated goal of the program was to increase by 5% the number of enrolled mathematics and science students into the program. Success far exceeded the program goals by producing 100% graduation rate of all supported recipients during its tenure, with 30% of the students subsequently in pursuit of graduate degrees. Student retention in the program exceeded 90% and faculty participation exceeded the three members involved in mentoring and tutoring, gaining multi-disciplinary support. Aggressive marketing of the program resulted in several paid summer internships and commitments from NASA and an ongoing relationship with CHROME, a nationally recognized organization which focuses on developing minority students in the sciences and mathematics. Success of the program was only limited by the limited fiscal resources at NASA which resulted in phasing out of the program.

  18. Definitive Mineralogy from the Mars Science Laboratory Chemin Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, A. S.; Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Treiman, A. H.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, Richard V.; Farmer, J. D.; Downs, R. T.; Chipera, S. J.; DesMarais, D. J.; Chen, C. W.

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover will land in Gale Crater on Mars in August 2012. The planned landing site is an alluvial fan near the base of the crater's central mound. Orbital remote sensing of this 5 km high mound indicates the presence of hydrated sulfates, interstratified with smectite and hematite-bearing layers. Minerals formed in an aqueous environment are of particular interest given that water is a fundamental ingredient of living systems and that MSL's prime science objective is to investigate martian habitability.

  19. The NASA airborne astronomy program - A perspective on its contributions to science, technology, and education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Harold P.

    1992-01-01

    The publication records from NASA's airborne observatories are examined to evaluate the contribution of the airborne astronomy program to technological development and scientific/educational progress. The breadth and continuity of program is detailed with reference to its publication history, discipline representation, literature citations, and to the ability of such a program to address nonrecurring and unexpected astronomical phenomena. Community involvement in the airborne-observation program is described in terms of the number of participants, institutional affiliation, and geographic distribution. The program utilizes instruments including heterodyne and grating spectrometers, high-speed photometers, and Fabry-Perot spectrometers with wide total spectral ranges, resolutions, and numbers of channels. The potential of the program for both astronomical training and further scientific, theoretical, and applied development is underscored.

  20. Hyperspectral laboratory and airborne measurements as tools for local mapping of swelling soils in Orléans area (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandjean, Gilles; Dufrechou, Gregory; Hohmann, Audrey

    2013-04-01

    Swelling soils contain clay minerals that change volume with water content and cause extensive and expensive damage on infrastructures. Based on spatial distribution of infrastructure damages and existing geological maps, the Bureau de Recherches Géologiques et Minières (BRGM, the French Geological Survey) published in 2010 a 1:50 000 swelling hazard map of France. This map indexes the territory to low, intermediate, or high swell susceptibility, but does not display smallest and isolated clays lithologies. At local scale, identification of clay minerals and characterization of swell potential of soils using conventional soil analysis (DRX, chemical, and geotechnical analysis) are slow, expensive, and does not permit integrated measurements. Shortwave infrared (SWIR: 1100-2500 nm) spectral domains are characterized by significant spectral absorption bands that provide an underused tool for estimate the swell potential of soils. Reflectance spectroscopy, using an ASD Fieldspec Pro spectrometer, permits a rapid and less expensive measurement of soil reflectance spectra in the field and laboratory. In order to produce high precision map of expansive soils, the BRGM aims to optimize laboratory reflectance spectroscopy for mapping swelling soils. Geotechnical use of laboratory reflectance spectroscopy for local characterization of swell potential of soils could be assessable from an economical point of view. A new high resolution airborne hyperspectral survey (covering ca. 280 km², 380 channels ranging from 400 to 2500 nm) located at the W of Orléans (Loiret, France) will also be combined with field and laboratory measurements to detect and map swelling soils.

  1. Design and Laboratory Evaluation of a Sequential Spot Sampler for Time-Resolved Measurement of Airborne Particle Composition

    PubMed Central

    Eiguren Fernandez, Arantzazu; Lewis, Gregory S.; Hering, Susanne V.

    2014-01-01

    A new sampling approach has been developed to enable affordable, time-resolved monitoring of particulate chemical compositions, and more generally to provide concentrated samples of airborne particles. Using a newly developed, moderated water-based condensational growth technology, individual particle samples are deposited in a 1-mm diameter dry “spot”. The moderated condensation technology enables this collection with minimal temperature rise, providing robust collection for volatile constituents. Measured collection efficiencies are above 95% for particles in the size range from 0.010 μm to 2.5 μm. A set of 20 or more time-resolved samples, plus blanks, may be collected onto a multiwell collection plate. For chemical analysis the plate is returned to the laboratory, and placed directly into a modified autosampler, without extraction or preparation. The autosampler handles the addition of eluent, extraction, and sample injection without user manipulation. This paper presents the design and laboratory evaluation of a 1.5 L/min sampling rate version of this system. PMID:25045199

  2. Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science, Mission 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, Paul D. (Editor); Torr, Marsha R. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The first Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission, planned for late 1990, includes experiments in four areas: Atmospheric Science, Solar Physics, Space Plasma Physics, and Astronomy. The atmospheric science investigations will study the composition of the atmosphere in the stratosphere, mesosphere, and thermosphere. The solar physics investigations will measure the total energy output of the sun. The space plasma physics investigations will study the charged particle and plasma environment of the earth. The astronomy investigation will study astronomical sources of radiation in the ultraviolet wavelengths that are inaccessible to observers on earth. Most of the experimental equipment has been flown before on one of the Spacelab missions. Brief descriptions of the experiments are given.

  3. Test and Validation of the Mars Science Laboratory Robotic Arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, M.; Collins, C.; Leger, P.; Kim, W.; Carsten, J.; Tompkins, V.; Trebi-Ollennu, A.; Florow, B.

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Robotic Arm (RA) is a key component for achieving the primary scientific goals of the mission. The RA supports sample acquisition by precisely positioning a scoop above loose regolith or accurately preloading a percussive drill on Martian rocks or rover-mounted organic check materials. It assists sample processing by orienting a sample processing unit called CHIMRA through a series of gravity-relative orientations and sample delivery by positioning the sample portion door above an instrument inlet or the observation tray. In addition the RA facilitates contact science by accurately positioning the dust removal tool, Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) and the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) relative to surface targets. In order to fulfill these seemingly disparate science objectives the RA must satisfy a variety of accuracy and performance requirements. This paper describes the necessary arm requirement specification and the test campaign to demonstrate these requirements were satisfied.

  4. Study of airborne science experiment management concepts for application to space shuttle. Volume 3: Appendixes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, D. R.; Reller, J. O., Jr.; Neel, C. B.; Haughney, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    Detailed information is presented concerning specific airborne missions in support of the ASSESS program. These missions are the AIDJEX expeditions, meteor shower expeditions, CAT and atmospheric sampling missions, ocean color expeditions, and the Lear Jet missions. For Vol. 2, see N73-31729.

  5. A New Center for Science Education at UC Berkeley's Space Sciences Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, I.

    1998-01-01

    The Space Sciences Laboratory at UC Berkeley has established a new Center for Science Education through the Laboratory's Senior Fellow program. The Center has a two-fold mission: (1) science education research through collaborations with UCB Graduate School of Education faculty, and (2) education and outreach projects that bring NASA research to the K-14 and general public communities. The Center is the host of two major education and outreach programs funded by NASA - The Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum (SECEF) and the Science Education Gateway (SEGway) Project. The SECEF - a collaborative between UC Berkeley and NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center - is one of four Forums that have been funded through the Office of Space Science as part of their Education Ecosystem. SEGway is a partnership between science research centers, science museums, and teachers, for the purpose of developing Internet-based, inquiry activities for the K-12 classroom that tap NASA remote sensing data. We will describe the Center for Science Education's history and vision, as well as summarize our core programs.

  6. 76 FR 63615 - Environmental Science Center Microbiology Laboratory; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Environmental Science Center Microbiology Laboratory; Notice of Public Meeting AGENCY... discussions which will be held at the EPA Environmental Science Center Microbiology Laboratory. DATES:...

  7. 75 FR 57833 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit..., 2010......... Crowne Plaza Neurobiology-D November 19, 2010......... Crowne Plaza Pulmonary...

  8. 76 FR 66367 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... Medicine. City. Surgery November 22, 2011... The Sheraton Crystal City. Endocrinology-A November...

  9. 77 FR 64598 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services..., 2012...... *VA Central Office. Cellular and Molecular Medicine...... November 19, 2012.........

  10. 75 FR 23847 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and ] Development Services Scientific Merit... & Molecular Medicine........ June 7, 2010 Hotel Palomar. Surgery June 7, 2010 Crowne Plaza....

  11. CheMin: A Definitive Mineralogy Instrument in the Analytical Laboratory of the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.; Sarrazin, P.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S. J.; Vaniman, D. T.; Feldman, S.; Collins, S.

    2005-01-01

    An important goal of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL '09) mission is the determination of definitive mineralogy and chemical composition. CheMin is a miniature X-ray diffraction/X-ray fluorescence (XRD/XRF) instrument that has been chosen for the analytical laboratory of MSL. CheMin utilizes a miniature microfocus source cobalt X-ray tube, a transmission sample cell and an energy-discriminating X-ray sensitive CCD to produce simultaneous 2-D X-ray diffraction patterns and X-ray fluorescence spectra from powdered or crushed samples. A diagrammatic view of the instrument is shown. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  12. Evaluation of meteorological airborne Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, P. H.; Mueller, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper will discuss the capabilities of airborne Doppler radar for atmospheric sciences research. The evaluation is based on airborne and ground based Doppler radar observations of convective storms. The capability of airborne Doppler radar to measure horizontal and vertical air motions is evaluated. Airborne Doppler radar is shown to be a viable tool for atmospheric sciences research.

  13. An outbreak of Brucella melitensis infection by airborne transmission among laboratory workers.

    PubMed Central

    Ollé-Goig, J E; Canela-Soler, J

    1987-01-01

    An outbreak of acute brucellosis infection was detected among the employees of a biologicals manufacturing laboratory located in Girona, Spain. The first cases appeared six weeks after a vaccine with attenuated Brucella melitensis, Rev-1 had been produced for one week. A clinical and epidemiologic investigation conducted among the 164 employees found 22 patients with clinical symptoms and positive serology, and six patients detected by serology only (attack rate: 17.1 per cent). Blood cultures were obtained from two patients and Brucella melitensis was isolated. Employees working in areas with open windows above the laboratory air extracting system had an attack rate of 39.5 per cent, substantially higher than those working in other locations. When vaccine was manufactured again, an electric oven reaching 300 degrees C had been installed in the air extracting system just before its exit to the exterior. Appropriate culture medium plates were exposed to the laboratory air before and after passing through the oven. Brucellae were isolated from the plates exposed to the air before passing through the oven but not after doing so. PMID:3812841

  14. Advancing Materials Science using Neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    Carpenter, John

    2014-06-03

    Jack Carpenter, pioneer of accelerator-based pulsed spallation neutron sources, talks about neutron science at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and a need for a second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). ORNL is the Department of Energy's largest multiprogram science and energy laboratory, and is home to two scientific user facilities serving the neutron science research community: the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and SNS. HFIR and SNS provide researchers with unmatched capabilities for understanding the structure and properties of materials, macromolecular and biological systems, and the fundamental physics of the neutron. Neutrons provide a window through which to view materials at a microscopic level that allow researchers to develop better materials and better products. Neutrons enable us to understand materials we use in everyday life. Carpenter explains the need for another station to produce long wavelength neutrons, or cold neutrons, to answer questions that are addressed only with cold neutrons. The second target station is optimized for that purpose. Modern technology depends more and more upon intimate atomic knowledge of materials, and neutrons are an ideal probe.

  15. Advancing Materials Science using Neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, John

    2014-04-24

    Jack Carpenter, pioneer of accelerator-based pulsed spallation neutron sources, talks about neutron science at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and a need for a second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). ORNL is the Department of Energy's largest multiprogram science and energy laboratory, and is home to two scientific user facilities serving the neutron science research community: the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and SNS. HFIR and SNS provide researchers with unmatched capabilities for understanding the structure and properties of materials, macromolecular and biological systems, and the fundamental physics of the neutron. Neutrons provide a window through which to view materials at a microscopic level that allow researchers to develop better materials and better products. Neutrons enable us to understand materials we use in everyday life. Carpenter explains the need for another station to produce long wavelength neutrons, or cold neutrons, to answer questions that are addressed only with cold neutrons. The second target station is optimized for that purpose. Modern technology depends more and more upon intimate atomic knowledge of materials, and neutrons are an ideal probe.

  16. ChemCam rock laser for Mars Science Laboratory "Curiosity"

    ScienceCinema

    Wiens, Roger

    2014-08-12

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. The Flight Model was shipped in August, 2010 for installation on the rover at JPL. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components were concurrently assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2011. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  17. ChemCam Rock Laser for the Mars Science Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    LANL

    2009-09-01

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instr... Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components are concurrently being assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France, and will be delivered to JPL in July. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2009. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  18. ChemCam Rock Laser for the Mars Science Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    LANL

    2008-03-24

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instr... Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components are concurrently being assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France, and will be delivered to JPL in July. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2009. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  19. ChemCam rock laser for Mars Science Laboratory "Curiosity"

    SciTech Connect

    Wiens, Roger

    2010-09-03

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. The Flight Model was shipped in August, 2010 for installation on the rover at JPL. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components were concurrently assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2011. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  20. Improvement of Social Science Education via the Development of a Social Science Laboratory. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Jerry W.

    A 3-year project to establish a college-level interdisciplinary computer center/scientific laboratory for the social sciences is described. The purpose of the project was to improve education in empirical and behavioral research methods. The center consists of computing facilities, a survey research facility, a simulation/gaming facility, and a…

  1. A New Species of Science Education: Harnessing the Power of Interactive Technology to Teach Laboratory Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Interactive television is a type of distance education that uses streaming audio and video technology for real-time student-teacher interaction. Here, I discuss the design and logistics for developing a high school laboratory-based science course taught to students at a distance using interactive technologies. The goal is to share a successful…

  2. Coding and Analysing Behaviour Strategies of Instructors in University Science Laboratories to Improve Science Teachers Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ajaja, Patrick Osawaru

    2013-01-01

    The intention of this study was to determine how science instructors in the university laboratories spend time on instruction. The study, was guided by three research questions and two hypotheses tested at 0.05 level of significance. The study employed a non-participant observation case study design. 48 instructors teaching lower and higher levels…

  3. NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center Toolsets for Airborne Data (TAD): User Interface Design and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, A. L., III; Early, A. B.; Chen, G.; Parker, L.

    2014-12-01

    NASA has conducted airborne tropospheric chemistry studies for about three decades. These field campaigns have generated a great wealth of observations, which are characterized by a wide range of trace gases and aerosol properties. The airborne observational data have often been used in assessment and validation of models and satellite instruments. The ASDC Toolset for Airborne Data (TAD) is being designed to meet the user community needs for manipulating aircraft data for scientific research on climate change and air quality relevant issues. Given the sheer volume of data variables across field campaigns and instruments reporting data on different time scales, this data is often difficult and time-intensive for researchers to analyze. The TAD web application is designed to provide an intuitive user interface (UI) to facilitate quick and efficient discovery from a vast number of airborne variables and data. Users are given the option to search based on high-level parameter groups, individual common names, mission and platform, as well as date ranges. Experienced users can immediately filter by keyword using the global search option. Once the user has chosen their required variables, they are given the option to either request PI data files based on their search criteria or create merged data, i.e. geo-located data from one or more measurement PIs. The purpose of the merged data feature is to allow users to compare data from one flight, as not all data from each flight is taken on the same time scale. Time bases can be continuous or based on the time base from one of the measurement time scales and intervals. After an order is submitted and processed, an ASDC email is sent to the user with a link for data download. The TAD user interface design, application architecture, and proposed future enhancements will be presented.

  4. NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center Toolsets for Airborne Data (TAD): Common Variable Naming Schema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Early, A. B.; Peeters, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    NASA has conducted airborne tropospheric chemistry studies for about three decades. These field campaigns have generated a great wealth of observations, which are characterized by a wide range of trace gases and aerosol properties. The airborne observational data have often been used in assessment and validation of models and satellite instruments. One particular issue is a lack of consistent variable naming across field campaigns, which makes cross-mission data discovery difficult. The ASDC Toolset for Airborne Data (TAD) is being designed to meet the user community needs for manipulating aircraft data for scientific research on climate change and air quality relevant issues. As part of this effort, a common naming system was developed to provide a link between variables from different aircraft field studies. This system covers all current and past airborne in-situ measurements housed at the ASDC, as well as select NOAA missions. The TAD common variable naming system consists of 6 categories and 3 sub-levels. The top-level category is primarily defined by the physical characteristics of the measurement: e.g., aerosol, cloud, trace gases. The sub-levels were designed to organize the variables according to nature of measurement (e.g., aerosol microphysical and optical properties) or chemical structures (e.g., carbon compound). The development of the TAD common variable naming system was in consultation with staff from the Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) and referenced/expanded the existing Climate and Forecast (CF) variable naming conventions. The detailed structure of the TAD common variable naming convention and its application in TAD development will be presented.

  5. Environmental Sciences Laboratory dedication, February 26-27, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, S.I.; Millemann, N.T.

    1980-09-01

    The dedication of the new Environmental Sciences Laboratory coincided with the 25th year of the establishment of the science of ecology at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. That quarter century witnessed the evolution of ecology from an obscure, backwater discipline of biology to a broadly used, everyday household word. The transition reflected broad and basic changes in our social and cultural view of the world. This was brought about as a result of the awareness developed in our society of the importance of the environment, coupled with efforts of ecologists and other environmental scientists who identified, clarified, and formulated the issues and challenges of environmental protection for both the lay public and the scientific community. In many respects, the activities in ecology at ORNL were a microcosm of the broader social scene; the particular problems of the environment associated with atomic energy needed to be defined in scientific terms and articulated in both the specific and general sense for a larger audience which was unfamiliar with the field and somewhat alien to its concepts and philosophy. The success of this effort is reflected in the existence of the new Environmental Sciences Laboratory. This dedication volume brings together the thoughts and reflections of many of these scientists whose efforts contributed in a unique and individualistic fashion not only to ORNL but also to the national identification of ecology and its importance to the achievement of our national goals. Their remarks and presentations are not only a pleasant and personally gratifying recapitulation of the past and of ORNL's contributions to ecology but also portend some of the challenges to ecology in the future.

  6. Bridle Device in Mars Science Laboratory Descent Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This view of a portion of the descent stage of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory shows two of the stage's three spherical fuel tanks flanking the bridle device assembly. The photograph was taken in early October 2008 from the center of the descent stage looking outward. The top of the descent stage is toward the top of the image.

    The bridle device assembly is about two-thirds of a meter, or 2 feet, from top to bottom, and has two main parts. The cylinder on the top is the descent brake. The conical-shaped mechanism below that is the bridle assembly, including a spool of nylon and Vectran cords that will be attached to the rover.

    When pyrotechnic bolts fire to sever the rigid connection between the rover and the descent stage, gravity will pull the tethered rover away from the descent stage. The bridle or tether, attached to three points on the rover, will unspool from the bridle assembly, beginning from the larger-diameter portion. The rotation rate of the assembly, hence the descent rate of the rover, will be governed by the descent brake. Inside the housing of that brake are gear boxes and banks of mechanical resistors engineered to prevent the bridle from spooling out too quickly or too slowly. The length of the bridle will allow the rover to be lowered about 7.5 meters (25 feet) while still tethered to the descent stage.

    The Starsys division of SpaceDev Inc., Poway, Calif., provided the descent brake. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., built the bridle assembly. Vectran is a product of Kuraray Co. Ltd., Tokyo. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

  7. Device for Lowering Mars Science Laboratory Rover to the Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is hardware for controlling the final lowering of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory rover to the surface of Mars from the spacecraft's hovering, rocket-powered descent stage.

    The photo shows the bridle device assembly, which is about two-thirds of a meter, or 2 feet, from end to end, and has two main parts. The cylinder on the left is the descent brake. On the right is the bridle assembly, including a spool of nylon and Vectran cords that will be attached to the rover.

    When pyrotechnic bolts fire to sever the rigid connection between the rover and the descent stage, gravity will pull the tethered rover away from the descent stage. The bridle or tether, attached to three points on the rover, will unspool from the bridle assembly, beginning from the larger-diameter portion of the spool at far right. The rotation rate of the assembly, hence the descent rate of the rover, will be governed by the descent brake. Inside the housing of that brake are gear boxes and banks of mechanical resistors engineered to prevent the bridle from spooling out too quickly or too slowly. The length of the bridle will allow the rover to be lowered about 7.5 meters (25 feet) while still tethered to the descent stage.

    The Starsys division of SpaceDev Inc., Poway, Calif., provided the descent brake. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., built the bridle assembly. Vectran is a product of Kuraray Co. Ltd., Tokyo. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

  8. A Review of Research on Technology-Assisted School Science Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chia-Yu; Wu, Hsin-Ka; Lee, Silvia Wen-Yu; Hwang, Fu-Kwun; Chang, Hsin-Yi; Wu, Ying-Tien; Chiou, Guo-Li; Chen, Sufen; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Lin, Jing-Wen; Lo, Hao-Chang; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Studies that incorporate technologies into school science laboratories have proliferated in the recent two decades. A total of 42 studies published from 1990 to 2011 that incorporated technologies to support school science laboratories are reviewed here. Simulations, microcomputer-based laboratories (MBLs), and virtual laboratories are commonly…

  9. Mars Science Laboratory; A Model for Event-Based EPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Louis; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.; Stephenson, B.; Erickson, K.; Ng, C.

    2012-10-01

    The NASA Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and its Curiosity Rover, a part of NASA's Mars Exploration Program, represent the most ambitious undertaking to date to explore the red planet. MSL/Curiosity was designed primarily to determine whether Mars ever had an environment capable of supporting microbial life. NASA's MSL education program was designed to take advantage of existing, highly successful event based education programs to communicate Mars science and education themes to worldwide audiences through live webcasts, video interviews with scientists, TV broadcasts, professional development for teachers, and the latest social media frameworks. We report here on the success of the MSL education program and discuss how this methodological framework can be used to enhance other event based education programs.

  10. The deep underground science and engineering laboratory at Homestake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesko, Kevin T.

    2009-06-01

    The US National Science Foundation and the US underground science community are well into the campaign to establish a world-class, multi-disciplinary deep underground science and engineering laboratory — DUSEL. The NSF's review committee, following the first two NSF solicitations, selected Homestake as the prime site to be developed into an international, multidisciplinary, world-class research facility. Homestake DUSEL will provide much needed underground research space to help relieve the worldwide shortage, particularly at great depth, and will develop research campuses at different depths to satisfy the research requirements for the coming decades. The State of South Dakota has demonstrated remarkable support for the project and has secured the site with the transfer of the former Homestake Gold Mine and has initiated re-entry and rehabilitation of the facility to host a modest interim science program with state funds and those from a substantial philanthropic donor. I review the scientific case for DUSEL and the progress in developing the preliminary design of DUSEL in Homestake and the initial suite of experiments to be funded along with the facility.

  11. The Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory at Homestake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesko, Kevin T.

    2008-11-01

    The National Science Foundation and the international underground science community are well into establishing a world-class, multidisciplinary Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) at the former Homestake mine in Lead South Dakota. The NSF's review committee, following the first two NSF solicitations, selected the Homestake Proposal and site as the prime location to be developed into an international research facility. Homestake DUSEL will provide much needed underground research space to help relieve the worldwide shortage, particularly at great depth, and will develop research campuses at several different depths to satisfy the research requirements for the coming decades. The State of South Dakota has demonstrated remarkable support for the project and has secured the site with the transfer from the Homestake Mining Corp. The State, through its Science and Technology Authority with state funds and those of a philanthropic donor has initiated rehabilitation of the surface and underground infrastructure including the Ross and Yates hoists accessing the 4850 Level (feet below ground, 4100 to 4200 mwe). The scientific case for DUSEL and the progress in establishing the preliminary design of the facility and the associated suite of experiments to be funded along with the facility by the NSF are presented.

  12. The Science on Saturday Program at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, N.; Lamarche, P.; Lagin, L.; Ritter, C.; Carroll, D. L.

    1996-11-01

    The Science on Saturday Program at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory consists of a series of Saturday morning lectures on various topics in science by scientists, engineers, educators, and others with an interesting story. This program has been in existence for over twelve years and has been advertised to and primarily aimed at the high school level. Topics ranging from superconductivity to computer animation and gorilla conservation to pharmaceutical design have been covered. Lecturers from the staff of Princeton, Rutgers, AT and T, Bristol Meyers Squibb, and many others have participated. Speakers have ranged from Nobel prize winners, astronauts, industrialists, educators, engineers, and science writers. Typically, there are eight to ten lectures starting in January. A mailing list has been compiled for schools, science teachers, libraries, and museums in the Princeton area. For the past two years AT and T has sponsored buses for Trenton area students to come to these lectures and an effort has been made to publicize the program to these students. The series has been very popular, frequently overfilling the 300 seat PPPL auditorium. As a result, the lectures are videotaped and broadcast to a large screen TV for remote viewing. Lecturers are encouraged to interact with the audience and ample time is provided for questions.

  13. Filter Strategies for Mars Science Laboratory Orbit Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Paul F.; Gustafson, Eric D.; Kruizinga, Gerhard L.; Martin-Mur, Tomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft had ambitious navigation delivery and knowledge accuracy requirements for landing inside Gale Crater. Confidence in the orbit determination (OD) solutions was increased by investigating numerous filter strategies for solving the orbit determination problem. We will discuss the strategy for the different types of variations: for example, data types, data weights, solar pressure model covariance, and estimating versus considering model parameters. This process generated a set of plausible OD solutions that were compared to the baseline OD strategy. Even implausible or unrealistic results were helpful in isolating sensitivities in the OD solutions to certain model parameterizations or data types.

  14. Mass Property Measurements of the Mars Science Laboratory Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Keith

    2012-01-01

    The NASA/JPL Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft mass properties were measured on a spin balance table prior to launch. This paper discusses the requirements and issues encountered with the setup, qualification, and testing using the spin balance table, and the idiosyncrasies encountered with the test system. The final mass measurements were made in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF) at Kennedy Space Center on the fully assembled and fueled spacecraft. This set of environmental tests required that the control system for the spin balance machine be at a remote location, which posed additional challenges to the operation of the machine

  15. Entry Attitude Controller for the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul B.; SanMartin, A. Miguel; Wong, Edward C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary concept for the RCS 3-axis attitude controller for the exo-atmospheric and guided entry phases of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descend and Landing. The entry controller is formulated as three independent channels in the control frame, which is nominally aligned with the stability frame. Each channel has a feedfoward and a feedback. The feedforward path enables fast response to large bank commands. The feedback path stabilizes the vehicle angle of attack and sideslip around its trim position, and tracks bank commands. The feedback path has a PD/D structure with deadbands that minimizes fuel usage. The performance of this design is demonstrated via simulation.

  16. Twenty years on--changes in laboratory animal science.

    PubMed

    Seamer, J

    1994-10-01

    Changes in laboratory animal science in the 20 years since George Porter's death are reviewed, with particular emphasis on animal welfare. The need for a generally acceptable definition of animal welfare is emphasized and a new definition is propounded. The concept of stewardship as a basis for human-animal relationships is explored. This involves Man accepting his responsibility for his relationship with, and care of, animals while simultaneously accepting a moral responsibility to God, or others, for that care and relationship. PMID:7830369

  17. Autonomy and Privacy in Clinical Laboratory Science Policy and Practice.

    PubMed

    Leibach, Elizabeth Kenimer

    2014-01-01

    Rapid advancements in diagnostic technologies coupled with growth in testing options and choices mandate the development of evidence-based testing algorithms linked to the care paths of the major chronic diseases and health challenges encountered most frequently. As care paths are evaluated, patient/consumers become partners in healthcare delivery. Clinical laboratory scientists find themselves firmly embedded in both quality improvement and clinical research with an urgent need to translate clinical laboratory information into knowledge required by practitioners and patient/consumers alike. To implement this patient-centered care approach in clinical laboratory science, practitioners must understand their roles in (1) protecting patient/consumer autonomy in the healthcare informed consent process and (2) assuring patient/consumer privacy and confidentiality while blending quality improvement study findings with protected health information. A literature review, describing the current ethical environment, supports a consultative role for clinical laboratory scientists in the clinical decision-making process and suggests guidance for policy and practice regarding the principle of autonomy and its associated operational characteristics: informed consent and privacy. PMID:26084151

  18. Overview of Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Environmental Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forgave, John C.; Man, Kin F.; Hoffman, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation is an overview of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) program. The engineering objectives of the program are to create a Mobile Science Laboratory capable of one Mars Year surface operational lifetime (670 Martian sols = 687 Earth days). It will be able to land and operation over wide range of latitudes, altitudes and seasons It must have controlled propulsive landing and demonstrate improved landing precision via guided entry The general science objectives are to perform science that will focus on Mars habitability, perform next generation analytical laboratory science investigations, perform remote sensing/contact investigations and carry a suite of environmental monitoring instruments. Specific scientific objectives of the MSL are: (1) Characterization of geological features, contributing to deciphering geological history and the processes that have modified rocks and regolith, including the role of water. (2) Determination of the mineralogy and chemical composition (including an inventory of elements such as C, H, N, O, P, S, etc. known to be building blocks for life) of surface and near-surface materials. (3) Determination of energy sources that could be used to sustain biological processes. (4) Characterization of organic compounds and potential biomarkers in representative regolith, rocks, and ices. (5) Determination the stable isotopic and noble gas composition of the present-day bulk atmosphere. (6) Identification potential bio-signatures (chemical, textural, isotopic) in rocks and regolith. (7) Characterization of the broad spectrum of surface radiation, including galactic cosmic radiation, solar proton events, and secondary neutrons. (8) Characterization of the local environment, including basic meteorology, the state and cycling of water and C02, and the near-surface distribution of hydrogen. Several views of the planned MSL and the rover are shown. The MSL environmental program is to: (1) Ensure the flight hardware design is

  19. Airborne mass spectrometers: four decades of atmospheric and space research at the Air Force research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, A A; Hunton, D E

    1999-11-01

    Mass spectrometry is a versatile research tool that has proved to be extremely useful for exploring the fundamental nature of the earth's atmosphere and ionosphere and in helping to solve operational problems facing the Air Force and the Department of Defense. In the past 40 years, our research group at the Air Force Research Laboratory has flown quadrupole mass spectrometers of many designs on nearly 100 sounding rockets, nine satellites, three Space Shuttles and many missions of high-altitude research aircraft and balloons. We have also used our instruments in ground-based investigations of rocket and jet engine exhaust, combustion chemistry and microwave breakdown chemistry. This paper is a review of the instrumentation and techniques needed for space research, a summary of the results from many of the experiments, and an introduction to the broad field of atmospheric and space mass spectrometry in general. PMID:10548806

  20. Selection of the Mars Science Laboratory Landing Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombek, M.; Grant, J.; Kipp, D.; Vasavada, A.; Kirk, R.; Fergason, R.; Bellutta, P.; Calef, F.; Larsen, K.; Katayama, Y.; Huertas, A.; Beyer, R.; Chen, A.; Parker, T.; Pollard, B.; Lee, S.; Sun, Y.; Hoover, R.; Sladek, H.; Grotzinger, J.; Welch, R.; Noe Dobrea, E.; Michalski, J.; Watkins, M.

    2012-09-01

    The selection of Gale crater as the Mars Science Laboratory landing site took over five years, involved broad participation of the science community via five open workshops, and narrowed an initial >50 sites (25 by 20 km) to four finalists (Eberswalde, Gale, Holden and Mawrth) based on science and safety. Engineering constraints important to the selection included: (1) latitude (±30°) for thermal management of the rover and instruments, (2) elevation (<-1 km) for sufficient atmosphere to slow the spacecraft, (3) relief of <100-130 m at baselines of 1-1000 m for control authority and sufficient fuel during powered descent, (4) slopes of <30° at baselines of 2-5 m for rover stability at touchdown, (5) moderate rock abundance to avoid impacting the belly pan during touchdown, and (6) a radar-reflective, load-bearing, and trafficable surface that is safe for landing and roving and not dominated by fine-grained dust. Science criteria important for the selection include the ability to assess past habitable environments, which include diversity, context, and biosignature (including organics) preservation. Sites were evaluated in detail using targeted data from instruments on all active orbiters, and especially Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. All of the final four sites have layered sedimentary rocks with spectral evidence for phyllosilicates that clearly address the science objectives of the mission. Sophisticated entry, descent and landing simulations that include detailed information on all of the engineering constraints indicate all of the final four sites are safe for landing. Evaluation of the traversabilty of the landing sites and target "go to" areas outside of the ellipse using slope and material properties information indicates that all are trafficable and "go to" sites can be accessed within the lifetime of the mission. In the final selection, Gale crater was favored over Eberswalde based on its greater diversity and potential habitability.

  1. Selection of the Mars Science Laboratory landing site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golombek, M.; Grant, J.; Kipp, D.; Vasavada, A.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Fergason, Robin L.; Bellutta, P.; Calef, F.; Larsen, K.; Katayama, Y.; Huertas, A.; Beyer, R.; Chen, A.; Parker, T.; Pollard, B.; Lee, S.; Hoover, R.; Sladek, H.; Grotzinger, J.; Welch, R.; Dobrea, E. Noe; Michalski, J.; Watkins, M.

    2012-01-01

    The selection of Gale crater as the Mars Science Laboratory landing site took over five years, involved broad participation of the science community via five open workshops, and narrowed an initial >50 sites (25 by 20 km) to four finalists (Eberswalde, Gale, Holden and Mawrth) based on science and safety. Engineering constraints important to the selection included: (1) latitude (±30°) for thermal management of the rover and instruments, (2) elevation (<-1 km) for sufficient atmosphere to slow the spacecraft, (3) relief of <100-130 m at baselines of 1-1000 m for control authority and sufficient fuel during powered descent, (4) slopes of <30° at baselines of 2-5 m for rover stability at touchdown, (5) moderate rock abundance to avoid impacting the belly pan during touchdown, and (6) a radar-reflective, load-bearing, and trafficable surface that is safe for landing and roving and not dominated by fine-grained dust. Science criteria important for the selection include the ability to assess past habitable environments, which include diversity, context, and biosignature (including organics) preservation. Sites were evaluated in detail using targeted data from instruments on all active orbiters, and especially Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. All of the final four sites have layered sedimentary rocks with spectral evidence for phyllosilicates that clearly address the science objectives of the mission. Sophisticated entry, descent and landing simulations that include detailed information on all of the engineering constraints indicate all of the final four sites are safe for landing. Evaluation of the traversabilty of the landing sites and target “go to” areas outside of the ellipse using slope and material properties information indicates that all are trafficable and “go to” sites can be accessed within the lifetime of the mission. In the final selection, Gale crater was favored over Eberswalde based on its greater diversity and potential habitability.

  2. European methodology for testing the airborne sound insulation characteristics of noise barriers in situ: experimental verification and comparison with laboratory data

    PubMed

    Garai; Guidorzi

    2000-09-01

    In the frame of the 1994-1997 Standard, Measurement and Testing program, the European Commission funded a research project, named Adrienne, to define new test methods for measuring the intrinsic characteristics of road traffic noise reducing devices in situ. The research team produced innovative methods for testing the sound reflection/absorption and the airborne sound insulation characteristics of noise barriers. These methods are now under consideration at CEN (European Committee for Standardization), to become European standards. The present work reports a detailed verification of the test method for airborne sound insulation over a selection of 17 noise barriers, representative of the Italian and European production. The samples were tested both outdoors, using the new Adrienne method, and in laboratory, following the European standard EN 1793-2. In both cases the single number rating for airborne sound insulation recommended by the European standard was calculated. The new method proved to be easy to use and reliable for all kinds of barriers. It has been found sensitive to quality of mounting, presence of seals, and other details typical of outdoor installations. The comparison between field and laboratory results shows a good correlation, while existing differences can be explained with the different sound fields and mounting conditions between the outdoor and laboratory tests. It is concluded that the Adrienne method is adequate for its intended use. PMID:11008808

  3. Laboratory evaluation of an airborne ozone instrument that compensates for altitude/sensitivity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Hudgins, C. H.; Edahl, R. A., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    One problem encountered in the use of air-quality instrumentation on aircraft is the variation of instrument sensitivity with pressure as the result of altitude changes of the aircraft. Many instruments experience sensitivity changes of as much as a factor of 2 at altitudes of 6 km. Discussed are recent modifications to a chemiluminescent (ethylene) ozone detector that allow the instrument to automatically compensate for pressure/sensitivity effects. The modification provides automated mass flow rate control for both the sample and ethylene gas flows. The flow control systems maintain flow rate to within 15 percent for a 100-torr instantaneous pressure change, and flow rates are returned to the desired set points within 10 s after the pressure change. During simulated altitude changes (300 m/min from mean sea level to 3-km altitude), flow rates were controlled to within 3 percent of the set point. Laboratory data are summarized verifying the operation of the instrument for a pressure range of 760 torr (sea level) to 350 torr (approximately 20,000 ft) and an ozone concentration range from 20 to approximately 700 ppb.

  4. Ford Research Laboratory high school science and technology program (HSSTP)

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, K.C.

    1994-12-31

    Since 1984, the Ford Motor Company Research Laboratory has offered a series of Saturday morning enrichment experiences and summer work opportunities for high school students and teachers. The goal is to increase awareness of technical careers and the importance of science and mathematics in industry. The Saturday sessions are run entirely by volunteers and are organized around current topics ranging from fundamental science (e.g., atmospheric chemistry) to advanced engineering and manufacturing (e.g., glass production). A typical session includes a lecture, laboratory tours and demonstrations, a refreshment/social break and a hands-on activity whenever possible. Over 500 students and teachers participate annually from over 120 area high schools. Nearly one third of the students are minorities from the city of Detroit. Session quality is monitored through feedback from participants and volunteers. Juniors and seniors who attend at least three sessions are eligible to compete for four-week summer internships. Typically, about twenty-five to thirty interns (out of forty to fifty applicants) are selected on the basis of a transcript, teacher recommendation and a 2500-word report on a technical topic. Ford also generally hosts about eight summer teacher fellows through a statewide program that began as an HSSTP initiative. The HSSTP was recently recognized by the industrial Research Institute as one of eleven {open_quotes}Winning [Pre-College Education] Programs{close_quotes} nationwide. Keys to success include strong grassroots and managerial support and extensive networking in the community.

  5. Mars Science Laboratory Entry Descent and Landing Simulation Using DSENDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, P. Daniel; Casoliva, Jordi; Balaram, Bob

    2013-01-01

    The most recent planetary science mission to Mars is Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) with the Curiosity rover, launched November 26, 2011 and landed at Gale Crater on August 6, 2012. This spacecraft was the first use at Mars of a complete closed-loop Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) system, including guided entry with a lifting body that greatly reduces dispersions during the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) phase to achieve a 25 km x 20 km landing error relative to the selected Gale Crater landing target. In order to confirm meeting the above landing criteria, high-fidelity simulation of the EDL phase is required. The tool used for 6DOF EDL trajectory verification analysis is Dynamics Simulator for Entry, Descent and Surface landing (DSENDS), which is a high-fidelity simulation tool from JPLs Dynamics and Real-Time Simulation Laboratory for the development, test and operations of aero-flight vehicles. DSENDS inherent capability is augmented for MSL with project-specific models of atmosphere, aerodynamics, sensors and thrusters along with GN&C flight software to enable high-fidelity trajectory simulation. This paper will present the model integration and independent verification experience of the JPL EDL trajectory analysis team.

  6. Mars Science Laboratory Entry Descent and Landing Simulation Using DSENDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, P. Daniel; Casoliva, Jordi; Balaram, Bob

    2013-01-01

    The most recent planetary science mission to Mars was Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) with the Curiosity rover, launched November 26, 2011 and landed at Gale Crater on August 6, 2012. This spacecraft was the first use at Mars of a complete closed-loop Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) system, including guided entry with a lifting body that greatly reduces dispersions during the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) phase to achieve a 25 km X 20 km landing error relative to the selected Gale Crater landing target. In order to confirm meeting the above landing criteria, high-fidelity simulation of the EDL phase is required. The tool used for 6DOF EDL trajectory verification analysis is Dynamics Simulator for Entry, Descent and Surface landing (DSENDS), which is a high-fidelity simulation tool from JPLs Dynamics and Real-Time Simulation Laboratory for the development, test and operations of aero-flight vehicles. DSENDS inherent capability is augmented for MSL with project-specific models of atmosphere, aerodynamics, sensors and thrusters along with GN&C flight software to enable high-fidelity trajectory simulation. This paper will present the model integration and independent verification experience of the JPL EDL trajectory analysis team.

  7. A Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) at Kimballton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelaar, R. Bruce

    2004-11-01

    The National Academy of Science, as well as several long-range plans from the physics communities, have endorsed the need to create a large, multi-disciplinary underground laboratory in the US. Several potential sites have been identified, and the National Science Foundation has begun a solicitation process to help formulate the science program as well as to identify and develop candidate sites. The only site on the East Coast is at Kimballton, near Blacksburg, in western Virginia. Of all the sites, it is the only one located in sedimentary rocks. This makes it an IDEAL and unique location for both physics, geoscience, and engineering studies. Kimballton is also only half an hour from Virginia Tech, the largest university in the state of Virginia. A multi-institution group has been developing this possibility, and will be competing on the national scale to have DUSEL located at Kimballton. One of the assets of this location is a large limestone mine, already at a depth of 2300 ft (1850 mwe), with true drive-in access and extremely large caverns. The DUSEL facility at this location will try to take advantage of the existing infrastructure, while at the same time develop complementary and adjacent facilities down to 7000 ft (6000 mwe) to allow independent operation of the future facility. Since 2003, Virginia Tech and the Naval Research Laboratory have been working to also develop a general low-level facility at this location. The initial program is to help develop extremely low-background germanium and gas proportional counters, and a single super-module of the Low-Energy Neutrino Spectroscopy (LENS) detector -- designed to measure the real-time low-energy neutrino spectrum from the Sun, including the pp-flux. Progress in this program (including seismic imaging), and the proposed overall extensive science program (Phys, Geo, Eng, Bio) which can be addressed at Kimballton will be presented. For further information, see our webpage http://www.phys.vt.edu/ kimballton

  8. Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Guss

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provides technical support to the requesting federal agency such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of Defense, the National Space and Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), or a state agency to address the radiological consequences of an event. These activities include measures to alleviate damage, loss, hardship, or suffering caused by the incident; protect public health and safety; restore essential government services; and provide emergency assistance to those affected. Scheduled to launch in the fall of 2009, Mars Science Laboratory is part of NASA's Mars Exploration Program, a long-term effort of robotic exploration of the red planet. Mars Science Laboratory is a rover that will assess whether Mars ever was, or is still today, an environment able to support microbial life. In other words, its mission is to determine the planet's "habitability." The Mars Science Laboratory rover will carry a radioisotope power system that generates electricity from the heat of plutonium's radioactive decay. This power source gives the mission an operating lifespan on Mars' surface of a full Martian year (687 Earth days) or more, while also providing significantly greater mobility and operational flexibility, enhanced science payload capability, and exploration of a much larger range of latitudes and altitudes than was possible on previous missions to Mars. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the DOE in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. NSTec is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment

  9. Designing Web-Based Science Lesson Plans That Use Problem-Based Learning To Inspire Middle School Kids: KaAMS (Kids as Airborne Mission Scientists).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koszalka, Tiffany A.; Grabowski, Barbara; Kim, Younghoon

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has great potential for inspiring K-12 learning. KaAMS (Kids as Airborne Mission Scientists), an example of PBL, was designed to help teachers inspire middle school students to learning science, math, technology, and geography. The children participate as scientists investigating environmental problems using NASA…

  10. Exposure of laboratory animal care workers to airborne mouse and rat allergens.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Joshua T; Huneke, Richard B; Perez, Hernando; Burstyn, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Urine of rats and mice is the main source of allergenic proteins that can enter the respiratory tract of laboratory animal care workers. Little is known about the levels and determinants of these exposures in the United States. We investigated the relationship between activities in animal facilities and levels of personal exposure to allergen by collecting personal breathing zone dust samples from 7 caretakers during full workdays for 1 wk. Mice and rat urinary allergens in inhalable dust were quantified via immunoassay. The activities of the sampled workers were observed, and the methods of preventing exposure to allergens were recorded. Mouse urinary allergen was detected in 20 of 39 measurements, yielding a geometric mean of 0.8 ng/m(3) with a maximum of 24 ng/m(3). Washing and cleaning cages and the number of mice handled daily were the most important determinants of personal exposure to mouse urinary allergen, as identified by using multiple linear regressions that explained 51% of total variance. Personal exposures to mouse urinary allergen were associated with day-to-day variation of tasks rather than characteristics of workers. Where potential for personal exposure is the highest, protective measures (N95 masks and cage dumping stations) appeared to be used, as is appropriate. Rat urinary allergen was detected in 4 of 39 measurements; detectable concentrations were between 0.8 and 39 ng/m(3). Only persons who handled rats were exposed to rat urinary allergen. The current findings are valuable for establishing exposure levels against which comparisons of improvement or deterioration of personal exposures can be made. PMID:23312083

  11. Impact of Biology Laboratory Courses on Students' Science Performance and Views about Laboratory Courses in General: Innovative Measurements and Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Silvia Wen-Yu; Lai, Yung-Chih; Yu, Hon-Tsen Alex; Lin, Yu-Teh Kirk

    2012-01-01

    Despite the fact that some educational researchers believe that laboratory courses promote outcomes in cognitive and affective domains in science learning, others have argued that laboratory courses are costly in relation to their value. Moreover, effective measurement of student learning in the laboratory is an area requiring further…

  12. Open Science Grid: Linking Universities and Laboratories In National Cyberinfrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, Paul

    2011-10-01

    Open Science Grid is a consortium of researchers from universities and national laboratories that operates a national computing infrastructure serving large-scale scientific and engineering research. While OSG's scale has been primarily driven by the demands of the LHC experiments, it currently serves particle and nuclear physics, gravitational wave searches, digital astronomy, genomic science, weather forecasting, molecular modeling, structural biology and nanoscience. The OSG distributed computing facility links campus and regional computing resources and is a major component of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) that handles the massive computing and storage needs of experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. This collaborative work has provided a wealth of results, including powerful new software tools and services; a uniform packaging scheme (the Virtual Data Toolkit) that simplifies software deployment across many sites in the US and Europe; integration of complex tools and services in large science applications; multiple education and outreach projects; and new approaches to integrating advanced network infrastructure in scientific computing applications. More importantly, OSG has provided unique collaborative opportunities between researchers in a variety of research disciplines.

  13. Increasing Scientific Literacy about Global Climate Change through a Laboratory-Based Feminist Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Linda A.; Brenner, Johanna

    2010-01-01

    The authors have developed and implemented a novel general education science course that examines scientific knowledge, laboratory experimentation, and science-related public policy through the lens of feminist science studies. They argue that this approach to teaching general science education is useful for improving science literacy. Goals for…

  14. Environmental Sciences Division Toxicology Laboratory standard operating procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Kszos, L.A.; Stewart, A.J.; Wicker, L.F.; Logsdon, G.M.

    1989-09-01

    This document was developed to provide the personnel working in the Environmental Sciences Division's Toxicology Laboratory with documented methods for conducting toxicity tests. The document consists of two parts. The first part includes the standard operating procedures (SOPs) that are used by the laboratory in conducting toxicity tests. The second part includes reference procedures from the US Environmental Protection Agency document entitled Short-Term Methods for Estimating the Chronic Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Freshwater Organisms, upon which the Toxicology Laboratory's SOPs are based. Five of the SOPs include procedures for preparing Ceriodaphnia survival and reproduction test. These SOPs include procedures for preparing Ceriodaphnia food (SOP-3), maintaining Ceriodaphnia cultures (SOP-4), conducting the toxicity test (SOP-13), analyzing the test data (SOP-13), and conducting a Ceriodaphnia reference test (SOP-15). Five additional SOPs relate specifically to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larval survival and growth test: methods for preparing fathead minnow larvae food (SOP-5), maintaining fathead minnow cultures (SOP-6), conducting the toxicity test (SOP-9), analyzing the test data (SOP-12), and conducting a fathead minnow reference test (DOP-14). The six remaining SOPs describe methods that are used with either or both tests: preparation of control/dilution water (SOP-1), washing of glassware (SOP-2), collection and handling of samples (SOP-7), preparation of samples (SOP-8), performance of chemical analyses (SOP-11), and data logging and care of technical notebooks (SOP-16).

  15. Four Finalist Landing Site Candidates for Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Out of more than 30 sites considered as possible landing targets for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, by November 2008 four of the most intriguing places on Mars rose to the final round of the site-selection process.

    The four finalists are, alphabetically: Eberswalde, where an ancient river deposited a delta in a possible lake; Gale, with a mountain of stacked layers including clays and sulfates; Holden, a crater containing alluvial fans, flood deposits, possible lake beds and clay-rich deposits; and Mawrth, which shows exposed layers containing at least two types of clay.

    The locations of these four candidates are indicated here on a background map of color-coded topographical data from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor. Red is higher elevation; blue is lower elevation. In latitude, the map extends from 70 degrees (north) to minus 70 degrees (south). The east-west axis is labeled at the top in degrees of east longitude, with the zero meridian at the center.

    The Mars Science Laboratory mission's capabilities for landing more precisely and at higher elevation than ever before, for driving farther, and for generating electricity without reliance on sunshine have enabled consideration of a wider range of possible landing sites than for any previous Mars mission. During the past two years, multiple observations of dozens of candidate sites by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have augmented data from earlier orbiters for evaluating sites' scientific attractions and engineering risks.

    More than 100 Mars scientists have participated in a series of open workshops presenting and assessing data that the orbiters have provided about the candidate sites. The four sites rated highest by researchers at a September 2008 workshop were the same ones chosen by mission leaders after a subsequent round of safety evaluations and analysis of terrain for rover driving.

    As a clay-bearing site where a river once flowed

  16. The Vanderbilt University nanoscale science and engineering fabrication laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hmelo, Anthony B.; Belbusti, Edward F.; Smith, Mark L.; Brice, Sean J.; Wheaton, Robert F.

    2005-08-01

    Vanderbilt University has realized the design and construction of a 1635 sq. ft. Class 10,000 cleanroom facility to support the wide-ranging research mission associated with the Vanderbilt Institute for Nanoscale Science and Engineering (VINSE). By design we have brought together disparate technologies and researchers formerly dispersed across the campus to work together in a small contiguous space intended to foster interaction and synergy of nano-technologies not often found in close proximity. The space hosts a variety of tools for lithographic patterning of substrates, the deposition of thin films, the synthesis of diamond nanostructures and carbon nanotubes, and a variety of reactive ion etchers for the fabrication of nanostructures on silicon substrates. In addition, a separate 911 sq. ft. chemistry laboratory supports nanocrystal synthesis and the investigation of biomolecular films. The design criteria required an integrated space that would support the scientific agenda of the laboratory while satisfying all applicable code and safety concerns. This project required the renovation of pre-existing laboratory space with minimal disruption to ongoing activities in a mixed-use building, while meeting the requirements of the 2000 edition of the International Building Code for the variety of potentially hazardous processes that have been programmed for the space. In this paper we describe how architectural and engineering challenges were met in the areas of mitigating floor vibration issues, shielding our facility against EMI emanations, design of the contamination control facility itself, chemical storage and handling, toxic gas use and management, as well as mechanical, electrical, plumbing, lab security, fire and laboratory safety issues.

  17. Laboratory animal science: a resource to improve the quality of science.

    PubMed

    Forni, M

    2007-08-01

    The contribution of animal experimentation to biomedical research is of undoubted value, nevertheless the real usefulness of animal models is still being hotly debated. Laboratory Animal Science is a multidisciplinary approach to humane animal experimentation that allows the choice of the correct animal model and the collection of unbiased data. Refinement, Reduction and Replacement, the "3Rs rule", are now widely accepted and have a major influence on animal experimentation procedures. Refinement, namely any decrease in the incidence or severity of inhumane procedures applied to animals, has been today extended to the entire lives of the experimental animals. Reduction of the number of animals used to obtain statistically significant data may be achieved by improving experimental design and statistical analysis of data. Replacement refers to the development of validated alternative methods. A Laboratory Animal Science training program in biomedical degrees can promote the 3Rs and improve the welfare of laboratory animals as well as the quality of science with ethical, scientific and economic advantages complying with the European requirement that "persons who carry out, take part in, or supervise procedures on animals, or take care of animals used in procedures, shall have had appropriate education and training". PMID:17682845

  18. Integration of a Communicating Science Module into an Advanced Chemistry Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renaud, Jessica; Squier, Christopher; Larsen, Sarah C.

    2006-01-01

    A communicating science module was introduced into an advanced undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. The module was integrated into the course such that students received formal instruction in communicating science interwoven with the chemistry laboratory curriculum. The content of the communicating science module included three…

  19. 75 FR 55109 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Personnel Management Demonstration Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ... Defense Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Personnel Management Demonstration Project..., September 9, 2010 / Notices#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Science and Technology... Defense to conduct personnel demonstration projects at DoD laboratories designated as Science...

  20. Factors Influencing Student Perceptions of High-School Science Laboratory Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luketic, Christine D.; Dolan, Erin L.

    2013-01-01

    Science laboratory learning has been lauded for decades for its role in fostering positive student attitudes about science and developing students' interest in science and ability to use equipment. An expanding body of research has demonstrated the significant influence of laboratory environment on student learning. Further research has…

  1. 76 FR 1212 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Eligibility of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and... areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research. The panel meeting will be open to...

  2. 76 FR 79273 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Eligibility of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and... biomedical, behavioral, and clinical science research. The panel meeting will be open to the public...

  3. Laboratory Practices of Beginning Secondary Science Teachers: A Five-Year Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Sissy S.; Firestone, Jonah B.; Luft, Julie A.; Weeks, Charles B.

    2013-01-01

    During the beginning years of teaching, science teachers develop the knowledge and skills needed to design and implement science laboratories. In this regard, this quantitative study focused on the reported laboratory practices of 61 beginning secondary science teachers who participated in four different induction programs. The results…

  4. 77 FR 20489 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services... May 24, 2012..... Sheraton Suites--Old Science-B. Town Alexandria. Neurobiology-D May 24-25,...

  5. 77 FR 23810 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services... May 24, 2012........ Sheraton Suites--Old Town Alexandria. Science-B Neurobiology-D May 24-25,...

  6. Development of a More Flexible Physical Science Laboratory Program for Non-Science Majors with Superior High School Science Backgrounds. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stekel, Frank D.

    The effects of two different approaches for teaching the physical science laboratory for non-science majors were compared. The control group had a traditional laboratory with assigned, structured laboratory exercises; the experimental group was subjected to a situation where there was more student involvement in choice of experiment, experimental…

  7. The Availability and Use of Science Laboratories at Secondary Education Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raju, T. J. M. S.; Suryanarayana, N. V. S.

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the availability and use of Science Laboratories at the secondary education level in Visakhapatnam District of Andhra Pradesh, India. It is commented that most of the schools do not possess well equipped laboratories and even when equipment is available some science teachers are not utilizing the laboratory facilities.…

  8. Development, Evaluation and Use of a Student Experience Survey in Undergraduate Science Laboratories: The Advancing Science by Enhancing Learning in the Laboratory Student Laboratory Learning Experience Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrie, Simon C.; Bucat, Robert B.; Buntine, Mark A.; Burke da Silva, Karen; Crisp, Geoffrey T.; George, Adrian V.; Jamie, Ian M.; Kable, Scott H.; Lim, Kieran F.; Pyke, Simon M.; Read, Justin R.; Sharma, Manjula D.; Yeung, Alexandra

    2015-07-01

    Student experience surveys have become increasingly popular to probe various aspects of processes and outcomes in higher education, such as measuring student perceptions of the learning environment and identifying aspects that could be improved. This paper reports on a particular survey for evaluating individual experiments that has been developed over some 15 years as part of a large national Australian study pertaining to the area of undergraduate laboratories-Advancing Science by Enhancing Learning in the Laboratory. This paper reports on the development of the survey instrument and the evaluation of the survey using student responses to experiments from different institutions in Australia, New Zealand and the USA. A total of 3153 student responses have been analysed using factor analysis. Three factors, motivation, assessment and resources, have been identified as contributing to improved student attitudes to laboratory activities. A central focus of the survey is to provide feedback to practitioners to iteratively improve experiments. Implications for practitioners and researchers are also discussed.

  9. Entry Guidance for the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendeck, Gavin F.; Craig, Lynn E.

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Mars Science Laboratory will be the first Mars mission to attempt a guided entry to safely deliver the rover to a touchdown ellipse of 25 km x 20 km. The Entry Terminal Point Controller guidance algorithm is derived from the final phase Apollo Command Module guidance and, like Apollo, modulates the bank angle to control the range flown. For application to Mars landers which must make use of the tenuous Martian atmosphere, it is critical to balance the lift of the vehicle to minimize the range error while still ensuring a safe deploy altitude. An overview of the process to generate optimized guidance settings is presented, discussing improvements made over the last nine years. Key dispersions driving deploy ellipse and altitude performance are identified. Performance sensitivities including attitude initialization error and the velocity of transition from range control to heading alignment are presented.

  10. Mars Science Laboratory Entry Guidance Improvements for Mars 2018 (DRAFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Llama, Eduardo; Winski, Richard G.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Ivanov, Mark C.; Grover, Myron R.; Prakash, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    In 2011, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) will be launched in a mission to deliver the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. A follow on MSL-derived mission, referred to as Mars 2018, is planned for 2018. Mars 2018 goals include performance enhancements of the Entry, Descent and Landing over that of its predecessor MSL mission of 2011. This paper will discuss the main elements of the modified 2018 EDL preliminary design that will increase performance on the entry phase of the mission. In particular, these elements will increase the parachute deploy altitude to allow for more time margin during the subsequent descent and landing phases and reduce the delivery ellipse size at parachute deploy through modifications in the entry reference trajectory design, guidance trigger logic design, and the effect of additional navigation hardware.

  11. Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) : the US 2009 Mars rover mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palluconi, Frank; Tampari, Leslie; Steltzner, Adam; Umland, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory mission is the 2009 United States Mars Exploration Program rover mission. The MSL Project expects to complete its pre-Phase A definition activity this fiscal year (FY2003), investigations in mid-March 2004, launch in 2009, arrive at Mars in 2010 during Northern hemisphere summer and then complete a full 687 day Mars year of surface exploration. MSL will assess the potential for habitability (past and present) of a carefully selected landing region on Mars by exploring for the chemical building blocks of life, and seeking to understand quantitatively the chemical and physical environment with which these components have interacted over the geologic history of the planet. Thus, MSL will advance substantially our understanding of the history of Mars and potentially, its capacity to sustain life.

  12. NASA ER-2: Flying Laboratory for Earth Science Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the NASA ER-2 aircraft. The contents include: 1) ER-2 Specifications; 2) ER-2 Basic Configuration; 3) ER-2 Payload Areas: Nose Area; 4) ER-2 Payload Areas: SuperPod Fore and Aftbody; 5) ER-2 Payload Areas: SuperPod Midbody; 6) ER-2 Payload Areas: Q-Bay; 7) ER-2 Payload Areas: Q-Bay Hatch Designs; 8) ER-2 Payload Areas: External Pods; 9) ER-2 Electrical/Control Interface; 10) ER-2 Typical Flight Profile; 11) Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling TC-4; 12) TC-4 Timeline; 13) TC4 Area of Interest; 14) ER-2 TC4 Payload; 15) A/C ready for fuel; 16) ER-2 Pilot being suited; 17) ER-2 Taxing; 18) ER-2 Pilot post flight debrief; and 19) NASA ER-2: Flying Laboratory for Earth Science Studies and Remote Sensing.

  13. Pre-Service Science Teachers' Views on Laboratory Applications in Science Education: The Effect of a Two-Semester Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harman, Gonca; Cokelez, Aytekin; Dal, Burckin; Alper, Umut

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine pre-service science teachers' views about laboratory applications in science education and how their views changed through laboratory applications that were carried out for two semesters. 63 (52 females, 11 males) pre-service teachers participated in the study. The study was carried out by using pre-test and…

  14. Communications Blackout Predictions for Atmospheric Entry of Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morabito, David D.; Edquist, Karl T.

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is expected to be a long-range, long-duration science laboratory rover on the Martian surface. MSL will provide a significant milestone that paves the way for future landed missions to Mars. NASA is studying options to launch MSL as early as 2009. There are three elements to the spacecraft; carrier (cruise stage), entry vehicle, and rover. The rover will have a UHF proximity link as the primary path for EDL communications and may have an X-band direct-to-Earth link as a back-up. Given the importance of collecting critical event telemetry data during atmospheric entry, it is important to understand the ability of a signal link to be maintained, especially during the period near peak convective heating. The received telemetry during entry (or played back later) will allow for the performance of the Entry-Descent-Landing technologies to be assessed. These technologies include guided entry for precision landing, a new sky-crane landing system and powered descent. MSL will undergo an entry profile that may result in a potential communications blackout caused by ionized particles for short periods near peak heating. The vehicle will use UHF and possibly X-band during the entry phase. The purpose of this rep0rt is to quantify or bound the likelihood of any such blackout at UHF frequencies (401 MHz) and X-band frequencies (8.4 GHz). Two entry trajectory scenarios were evaluated: a stressful entry trajectory to quantify an upper-bound for any possible blackout period, and a nominal trajectory to quantify likelihood of blackout for such cases.

  15. Communications Blackout Predictions for Atmospheric Entry of Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morabito, David D.; Edquist, Karl

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is expected to be a long-range, long-duration science laboratory rover on the Martian surface. MSL will provide a significant milestone that paves the way for future landed missions to Mars. NASA is studying options to launch MSL as early as 2009. MSL will be the first mission to demonstrate the new technology of 'smart landers', which include precision landing and hazard avoidance in order to -land at scientifically interesting sites that would otherwise be unreachable. There are three elements to the spacecraft; carrier (cruise stage), entry vehicle, and rover. The rover will have an X-band direct-to-Earth (DTE) link as well as a UHF proximity link. There is also a possibility of an X-band proximity link. Given the importance of collecting critical event telemetry data during atmospheric entry, it is important to understand the ability of a signal link to be maintained, especially during the period near peak convective heating. The received telemetry during entry (or played back later) will allow for the performance of the Entry-Descent-Landing technologies to be assessed. These technologies include guided entry for precision landing, hazard avoidance, a new sky-crane landing system and powered descent. MSL will undergo an entry profile that may result in a potential communications blackout caused by ionized plasma for short periods near peak heating. The vehicle will use UHF and possibly X-band during the entry phase. The purpose of this report is to quantify or bound the likelihood of any such blackout at UHF frequencies (401 MHz) and X-band frequencies (8.4 GHz). Two entry trajectory scenarios were evaluated: a stressful entry trajectory to quantify an upper-bound for any possible blackout period, and a nominal likely trajectory to quantify likelihood of blackout for such cases.

  16. The effects of mentoring upon first year Missouri secondary science teachers` stages of concern with respect to science laboratory utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Sode, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    This study tested the hypothesis that {open_quotes}There is no statistically significant mentoring variable, or linear combination of mentoring variables, affecting Missouri beginning secondary science teachers` SOC (Stages of Concern) with respect to science laboratory utilization. Demographic data analysis, SOC maximum peak score analysis, item analysis, Pearson r correlation analysis, and factor analysis techniques were applied to data collected from three survey instruments-Science Laboratory Concerns. Mentoring Perceptions, and Demographic-designed for this study. All potential respondents were included in the original mailings. A total of eighty-seven (51.1%) usable responses were obtained. The findings of the study were that four mentoring factors-Professional Assistance, Science Laboratory Assistance, Mentor Availability, and Classroom Instructional Assistance-were used to determine mentoring affects upon Missouri beginning secondary science teachers. Also, the most prevalent stage of concern was Stage 4 (Consequences). This indicated that Missouri beginning secondary science teachers were primarily concerned with the impact of science laboratory utilization upon student learning. Mentoring Factor Four (Classroom Instructional Assistance) was found to be significantly related to Missouri beginning secondary science teachers` stages of concern with respect to science laboratory utilization. Individual mentoring items also were found to be significantly related to science laboratory utilization stages of concern. These relationships were both positive and negative.

  17. Relay Support for the Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Charles D. Jr,; Bell, David J.; Gladden, Roy E.; Ilott, Peter A.; Jedrey, Thomas C.; Johnston, M. Daniel; Maxwell, Jennifer L.; Mendoza, Ricardo; McSmith, Gaylon W.; Potts, Christopher L.; Schratz, Brian C.; Shihabi, Mazen M.; Srinivasan, Jeffrey M.; Varghese, Phillip; Sanders, Stephen S.; Denis, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission landed the Curiosity Rover on the surface of Mars on August 6, 2012, beginning a one-Martian-year primary science mission. An international network of Mars relay orbiters, including NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter (ODY) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), and ESA's Mars Express Orbiter (MEX), were positioned to provide critical event coverage of MSL's Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL). The EDL communication plan took advantage of unique and complementary capabilities of each orbiter to provide robust information capture during this critical event while also providing low-latency information during the landing. Once on the surface, ODY and MRO have provided effectively all of Curiosity's data return from the Martian surface. The link from Curiosity to MRO incorporates a number of new features enabled by the Electra and Electra-Lite software-defined radios on MRO and Curiosity, respectively. Specifically, the Curiosity-MRO link has for the first time on Mars relay links utilized frequency-agile operations, data rates up to 2.048 Mb/s, suppressed carrier modulation, and a new Adaptive Data Rate algorithm in which the return link data rate is optimally varied throughout the relay pass based on the actual observed link channel characteristics. In addition to the baseline surface relay support by ODY and MRO, the MEX relay service has been verified in several successful surface relay passes, and MEX now stands ready to provide backup relay support should NASA's orbiters become unavailable for some period of time.

  18. Implementing planetary protection measures on the Mars Science Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Benardini, James N; La Duc, Myron T; Beaudet, Robert A; Koukol, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), comprising a cruise stage; an aeroshell; an entry, descent, and landing system; and the radioisotope thermoelectric generator-powered Curiosity rover, made history with its unprecedented sky crane landing on Mars on August 6, 2012. The mission's primary science objective has been to explore the area surrounding Gale Crater and assess its habitability for past life. Because microbial contamination could profoundly impact the integrity of the mission and compliance with international treaty was required, planetary protection measures were implemented on MSL hardware to verify that bioburden levels complied with NASA regulations. By applying the proper antimicrobial countermeasures throughout all phases of assembly, the total bacterial endospore burden of MSL at the time of launch was kept to 2.78×10⁵ spores, well within the required specification of less than 5.0×10⁵ spores. The total spore burden of the exposed surfaces of the landed MSL hardware was 5.64×10⁴, well below the allowed limit of 3.0×10⁵ spores. At the time of launch, the MSL spacecraft was burdened with an average of 22 spores/m², which included both planned landed and planned impacted hardware. Here, we report the results of a campaign to implement and verify planetary protection measures on the MSL flight system. PMID:24432776

  19. Recent Science Education Initiatives at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicker, Andrew; Dominguez, Arturo; Gershman, Sophia; Guilbert, Nick; Merali, Aliya; Ortiz, Deedee

    2013-10-01

    An integrated approach to program development and implementation has significantly enhanced a variety of Science Education initiatives for students and teachers. This approach involves combining the efforts of PPPL scientists, educators, research and education fellows, and collaborating non-profit organizations to provide meaningful educational experiences for students and teachers. Our undergraduate internship program continues to have outstanding success, with 72% of our participants going to graduate school and 45% concentrating in plasma physics. New partnerships have allowed us to increase the number of underrepresented students participating in mentored research opportunities. The number of participants in our Young Women's Conference increases significantly each year. Our Plasma Camp workshop, now in its 15th year, recruits outstanding teachers from around the country to create new plasma-centered curricula. Student research in the Science Education Laboratory concentrates on the development of a high-fidelity plasma speaker, a particle dropper for a dusty plasma experiment, microplasmas along liquid surfaces for a variety of applications, an Internet-controlled DC glow discharge source for students, and a Planeterrella for demonstrating the aurora and other space weather phenomenon for the general public.

  20. Wake Cycle Robustness of the Mars Science Laboratory Flight Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehill, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is a spacecraft being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the purpose of in-situ exploration on the surface of Mars. The objective of MSL is to explore and quantitatively assess a local region on the Martian surface as a habitat for microbial life, past or present. This objective will be accomplished through the assessment of the biological potential of at least one target environment, the characterization of the geology and geochemistry of the landing region, an investigation of the planetary process relevant to past habitability, and a characterization of surface radiation. For this purpose, MSL incorporates a total of ten scientific instruments for which functions are to include, among others, atmospheric and descent imaging, chemical composition analysis, and radiation measurement. The Flight Software (FSW) system is responsible for all mission phases, including launch, cruise, entry-descent-landing, and surface operation of the rover. Because of the essential nature of flight software to project success, each of the software modules is undergoing extensive testing to identify and correct errors.

  1. Website for the Astrochemistry Laboratory, Astrophysics Branch, Space Sciences Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Astrochemistry Laboratory in the Astrophysics Branch (SSA) of the Space Sciences Division at NASA's Ames Research Center specializes in the study of extraterrestrial materials and their analogs. The staff has pioneered laboratory studies of space environments including interstellar, cometary, and planetary ices, simulations of the so-called 'Unidentified' Infrared Emission Bands and Diffuse Interstellar Bands using PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons) and PAH-related materials, and has extensive experience with low-temperature spectroscopy and astronomical observation. Important discoveries made by the Astrochemistry Group include: (1) The recognition that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their ions are common in space; (2) The identification of a major fraction of the known molecular species frozen in interstellar/pre-cometary ices; (3) The recognition that a significant fraction of the carbon in the interstellar medium is carried by both microdiamonds and organic materials; (4) The expansion of the types of molecules expected to be synthesized in interstellar/pre-cometary ices. These could be delivered to the early Earth (or other body) and influence the origin or early evolution of life.

  2. Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Guss, Robert Augdahl, Bill Nickels, Cassandra Zellers

    2008-04-16

    This paper describes the contingency planning for the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory scheduled for the 21-day window beginning on September 15, 2009. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec’s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. RSL is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools RSL has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform RSL will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

  3. Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch

    SciTech Connect

    Paul P. Guss

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes the contingency planning for the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory scheduled for the 21-day window beginning on September 15, 2009. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec’s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. RSL is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools RSL has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform RSL will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, National Space and Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

  4. Management and Stewardship of Airborne Observational Data for the NSF/NCAR HIAPER (GV) and NSF/NCAR C-130 at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino, J.

    2014-12-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) provides the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) funding for the operation, maintenance and upgrade of two research aircraft: the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) Gulfstream V and the NSF/NCAR Hercules C-130. A suite of in-situ and remote sensing airborne instruments housed at the EOL Research Aviation Facility (RAF) provide a basic set of measurements that are typically deployed on most airborne field campaigns. In addition, instruments to address more specific research requirements are provided by collaborating participants from universities, industry, NASA, NOAA or other agencies. The data collected are an important legacy of these field campaigns. A comprehensive metadata database and integrated cyber-infrastructure, along with a robust data workflow that begins during the field phase and extends to long-term archival (current aircraft data holdings go back to 1967), assures that: all data and associated software are safeguarded throughout the data handling process; community standards of practice for data stewardship and software version control are followed; simple and timely community access to collected data and associated software tools are provided; and the quality of the collected data is preserved, with the ultimate goal of supporting research and the reproducibility of published results. The components of this data system to be presented include: robust, searchable web access to data holdings; reliable, redundant data storage; web-based tools and scripts for efficient creation, maintenance and update of data holdings; access to supplemental data and documentation; storage of data in standardized data formats; comprehensive metadata collection; mature version control; human-discernable storage practices; and procedures to inform users of changes. In addition, lessons learned, shortcomings, and desired upgrades

  5. Calibration Of Airborne Visible/IR Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vane, G. A.; Chrien, T. G.; Miller, E. A.; Reimer, J. H.

    1990-01-01

    Paper describes laboratory spectral and radiometric calibration of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) applied to all AVIRIS science data collected in 1987. Describes instrumentation and procedures used and demonstrates that calibration accuracy achieved exceeds design requirements. Developed for use in remote-sensing studies in such disciplines as botany, geology, hydrology, and oceanography.

  6. North Carolina school-based administrator's knowledge and perceptions concerning science laboratory safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbusieski, Todd J.

    The purpose of this research study is to examine the perceptions that principals have concerning school safety, particularly science laboratory classroom safety and to identify generalized safety equipment deficiencies as they pertain to public schools in North Carolina. Four questions were addressed in this study: First, are principals aware of specific laboratory safety equipment and policies that may create safer conditions in schools and science laboratory classrooms? Second, does an administrator's assignment (elementary, middle, or high school) have an affect on that person's level of science laboratory safety knowledge? Third, to what extent do principals perceive that it is important to ensure a safe science laboratory classroom? Fourth, what percentage of principals has had any formal training in science laboratory safety instruction? Descriptive research methodology was chosen using an electronic questionnaire. The questionnaire was e-mailed to all principals of public schools in the state of North Carolina. Four concerns were addressed in this questionnaire: (a) demographics including grade level, enrollment of school, years of experience, and area of teaching certificate; (b) administrator's background knowledge of science safety; (c) administrator's responsibilities concerning science laboratory safety; and (d) knowledge and availability of science safety devices. Principals in general felt their knowledge of science laboratory safety was minimal. Statistical analysis showed that high school principals did report more knowledge of science safety than their middle and elementary school counterparts. Also elementary principals perceived science laboratory safety as less important than their middle and high school counterparts. Only 1/3 of all principals reported that they had any formal science laboratory training either as teachers or as administrators. There is a wide difference in the perceived importance of safety knowledge and the actual knowledge

  7. Discourse in science communities: Issues of language, authority, and gender in a life sciences laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conefrey, Theresa Catherine

    Government-sponsored and private research initiatives continue to document the underrepresentation of women in the sciences. Despite policy initiatives, women's attrition rates each stage of their scientific careers remain higher than those of their male colleagues. In order to improve retention rates more information is needed about why many drop out or do not succeed as well as they could. While broad sociological studies and statistical surveys offer a valuable overview of institutional practices, in-depth qualitative analyses are needed to complement these large-scale studies. This present study goes behind statistical generalizations about the situation of women in science to explore the actual experience of scientific socialization and professionalization. Beginning with one reason often cited by women who have dropped out of science: "a bad lab experience," I explore through detailed observation in a naturalistic setting what this phrase might actually mean. Using ethnographic and discourse analytic methods, I present a detailed analysis of the discourse patterns in a life sciences laboratory group at a large research university. I show how language accomplishes the work of indexing and constituting social constraints, of maintaining or undermining the hierarchical power dynamics of the laboratory, of shaping members' presentation of self, and of modeling social and professional skills required to "do science." Despite the widespread conviction among scientists that "the mind has no sex," my study details how gender marks many routine interactions in the lab, including an emphasis on competition, a reinforcement of sex-role stereotypes, and a conversational style that is in several respects more compatible with men's than women's forms of talk.

  8. ISS Update: Mars Science Laboratory – 07.31.12

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update commentator Pat Ryan interviews Dr. Doug Archer of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Science Team about the MSL mission, the Curiosity Rover and the SAM ins...

  9. Using the Science Writing Heuristic in the General Chemistry Laboratory to Improve Students' Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poock, Jason R.; Burke, K. A.; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Hand, Brian M.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis describes the effects of using the science writing heuristic (SWH) in the general chemistry laboratory on the students' academic performance. The technique has found to be extremely important factor in a student's learning process and achievement in science.

  10. Mars Science Laboratory: Entry, Descent, and Landing System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, David W.; Powell, Richard W.; Chen, Allen; Steltzner, Adam D.; San Martin, Alejandro M.; Burkhart, Paul D.; mendeck, Gavin F.

    2006-01-01

    In 2010, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems, by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. To do so, MSL will fly a guided lifting entry at a lift-to-drag ratio in excess of that ever flown at Mars, deploy the largest parachute ever at Mars, and perform a novel Sky Crane maneuver. Through improved altitude capability, increased latitude coverage, and more accurate payload delivery, MSL is allowing the science community to consider the exploration of previously inaccessible regions of the planet. The MSL EDL system is a new EDL architecture based on Viking heritage technologies and designed to meet the challenges of landing increasing massive payloads on Mars. In accordance with level-1 requirements, the MSL EDL system is being designed to land an 850 kg rover to altitudes as high as 1 km above the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter defined areoid within 10 km of the desired landing site. Accordingly, MSL will enter the largest entry mass, fly the largest 70 degree sphere-cone aeroshell, generate the largest hypersonic lift-to-drag ratio, and deploy the largest Disk-Gap-Band supersonic parachute of any previous mission to Mars. Major EDL events include a hypersonic guided entry, supersonic parachute deploy and inflation, subsonic heatshield jettison, terminal descent sensor acquisition, powered descent initiation, sky crane terminal descent, rover touchdown detection, and descent stage flyaway. Key performance metrics, derived from level-1 requirements and tracked by the EDL design team to indicate performance capability and timeline margins, include altitude and range at parachute deploy, time on radar, and propellant use. The MSL EDL system, which will continue to develop over the next three years, will enable a notable extension in the advancement of Mars surface science by delivering more science capability than ever before to the surface of

  11. Mars Science Laboratory: Entry, Descent, and Landing System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, David W.; Powell, Richard W.; Chen, Allen; SanMartin, A. Miguel; Burkhart, P. Daniel; Mendeck, Gavin F.

    2007-01-01

    In 2010, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems, by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. To do so, MSL will fly a guided lifting entry at a lift-to-drag ratio in excess of that ever flown at Mars, deploy the largest parachute ever at Mars, and perform a novel Sky Crane maneuver. Through improved altitude capability, increased latitude coverage, and more accurate payload delivery, MSL is allowing the science community to consider the exploration of previously inaccessible regions of the planet. The MSL EDL system is a new EDL architecture based on Viking heritage technologies and designed to meet the challenges of landing increasing massive payloads on Mars. In accordance with level-1 requirements, the MSL EDL system is being designed to land an 850 kg rover to altitudes as high as 1 km above the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter defined areoid within 10 km of the desired landing site. Accordingly, MSL will enter the largest entry mass, fly the largest 70 degree sphere-cone aeroshell, generate the largest hypersonic lift-to-drag ratio, and deploy the largest Disk-Gap-Band supersonic parachute of any previous mission to Mars. Major EDL events include a hypersonic guided entry, supersonic parachute deploy and inflation, subsonic heatshield jettison, terminal descent sensor acquisition, powered descent initiation, sky crane terminal descent, rover touchdown detection, and descent stage flyaway. Key performance metrics, derived from level-1 requirements and tracked by the EDL design team to indicate performance capability and timeline margins, include altitude and range at parachute deploy, time on radar, and propellant use. The MSL EDL system, which will continue to develop over the next three years, will enable a notable extension in the advancement of Mars surface science by delivering more science capability than ever before to the surface of

  12. Pre-Service Teachers' Use of Improvised and Virtual Laboratory Experimentation in Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhukuvhani, Crispen; Kusure, Lovemore; Munodawafa, Violet; Sana, Abel; Gwizangwe, Isaac

    2010-01-01

    This research surveyed 11 purposely sampled Bindura University of Science Education (Zimbabwe) Bachelor of Science Education Honours Part III pre-service science teachers' use of improvised and virtual laboratory experimentation in science teaching. A self-designed four-point Likert scale twenty-item questionnaire was used. SPSS Version 10 was…

  13. Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL) ecological and physical science study center: A hands-on science program for K-12 students

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, S.P.

    1994-12-31

    In our tenth year of educational service and outreach, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Ecological and Physical Science Study Center (EPSSC) provides hands-on, inquiry-based science activities for area students and teachers. Established in 1984, the EPSSC now hosts over 20,000 student visits. Designed to foster a positive attitude towards science, each unit includes activities which reinforce the science concept being explored. Outdoor science units provide field experience at the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park and outreach programs are offered on-site in area schools. Other programs are offered as extensions of the EPSSC core programs, including on-site student science camps, all-girl programs, outreach science camps, student competitions, teacher in-service presentations and teacher workshops.

  14. Helmet-Mounted Display Research Capabilities of the NASA/Army Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobsen, R. A.; Bivens, C. C.; Rediess, N. A.; Hindson, W. S.; Aiken, E. W.; Aiken, Edwin W. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) is a UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter that is being modified by the US Army and NASA for flight systems research. The principal systems that are being installed in the aircraft are a Helmet Mounted Display (HMD) and imaging system, and a programmable full authority Research Flight Control System (RFCS). In addition, comprehensive instrumentation of both the rigid body of the helicopter and the rotor system is provided. The paper will describe the capabilities of these systems and their current state of development. A brief description of initial research applications is included. The wide (40 X 60 degree) field-of-view HMD system has been provided by Kaiser Electronics. It can be configured as a monochromatic system for use in bright daylight conditions, a two color system for darker ambients, or a full color system for use in night viewing conditions. Color imagery is achieved using field sequential video and a mechanical color wheel. In addition to the color symbology, high resolution computer-gene rated imagery from an onboard Silicon Graphics Reality Engine Onyx processor is available for research in virtual reality applications. This synthetic imagery can also be merged with real world video from a variety of imaging systems that can be installed easily on the front of the helicopter. These sensors include infrared or tv cameras, or potentially small millimeter wave radars. The Research Flight Control System is being developed for the aircraft by a team of contractors led by Boeing Helicopters. It consists of a full authority high bandwidth fly-by-wire actuators that drive the main rotor swashplate actuators and the tail rotor actuator in parallel. This arrangement allows the basic mechanical flight control system of the Black Hawk to be retained so that the safety pilot can monitor the operation of the system through the action of his own controls. The evaluation pilot will signal the fly

  15. Roles of the International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS) and International Association of Colleges of Laboratory Animal Medicine (IACLAM) in the Global Organization and Support of 3Rs Advances in Laboratory Animal Science

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Patricia V; Pekow, Cynthia; Clark, Judy MacArthur; Vergara, Patri; Bayne, Kathryn; White, William J; Kurosawa, Tsutomu Miki; Seok, Seung-Hyeok; Baneux, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Practical implementation of the 3Rs at national and regional levels around the world requires long-term commitment, backing, and coordinated efforts by international associations for laboratory animal medicine and science, including the International Association of Colleges of Laboratory Animal Medicine (IACLAM) and the International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS). Together these organizations support the efforts of regional organization and communities of laboratory animal science professionals as well as the development of local associations and professional colleges that promote the training and continuing education of research facility personnel and veterinary specialists. The recent formation of a World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) Collaborating Center for Laboratory Animal Science and Welfare emphasizes the need for research into initiatives promoting laboratory animal welfare, particularly in emerging economies and regions with nascent associations of laboratory animal science. PMID:25836964

  16. Roles of the International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS) and International Association of Colleges of Laboratory Animal Medicine (IACLAM) in the Global Organization and Support of 3Rs Advances in Laboratory Animal Science.

    PubMed

    Turner, Patricia V; Pekow, Cynthia; Clark, Judy MacArthur; Vergara, Patri; Bayne, Kathryn; White, William J; Kurosawa, Tsutomu Miki; Seok, Seung-Hyeok; Baneux, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    Practical implementation of the 3Rs at national and regional levels around the world requires long-term commitment, backing, and coordinated efforts by international associations for laboratory animal medicine and science, including the International Association of Colleges of Laboratory Animal Medicine (IACLAM) and the International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS). Together these organizations support the efforts of regional organization and communities of laboratory animal science professionals as well as the development of local associations and professional colleges that promote the training and continuing education of research facility personnel and veterinary specialists. The recent formation of a World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) Collaborating Center for Laboratory Animal Science and Welfare emphasizes the need for research into initiatives promoting laboratory animal welfare, particularly in emerging economies and regions with nascent associations of laboratory animal science. PMID:25836964

  17. Opinions of Pre-Service Classroom Teachers towards Laboratory Using in Science Instruction and Their Preferences Towards Laboratory Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildirim, Nagihan

    2016-01-01

    This study is a descriptive study that adopts relational screening model with the aim of determining pre-service classroom teachers' opinions about laboratory use in science teaching their preferences among laboratory approaches and identifying the reasons of the answers given by the pre-service teachers. The sample of the study is 236 pre-service…

  18. An evaluation of community college student perceptions of the science laboratory and attitudes towards science in an introductory biology course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Nakia Rae

    The science laboratory is an integral component of science education. However, the academic value of student participation in the laboratory is not clearly understood. One way to discern student perceptions of the science laboratory is by exploring their views of the classroom environment. The classroom environment is one determinant that can directly influence student learning and affective outcomes. Therefore, this study sought to examine community college students' perceptions of the laboratory classroom environment and their attitudes toward science. Quantitative methods using two survey instruments, the Science Laboratory Environment Instrument (SLEI) and the Test of Science Related Attitudes (TORSA) were administered to measure laboratory perceptions and attitudes, respectively. A determination of differences among males and females as well as three academic streams were examined. Findings indicated that overall community college students had positive views of the laboratory environment regardless of gender of academic major. However, the results indicated that the opportunity to pursue open-ended activities in the laboratory was not prevalent. Additionally, females viewed the laboratory material environment more favorably than their male classmates did. Students' attitudes toward science ranged from favorable to undecided and no significant gender differences were present. However, there were significantly statistical differences between the attitudes of nonscience majors compared to both allied health and STEM majors. Nonscience majors had less positive attitudes toward scientific inquiry, adoption of scientific attitudes, and enjoyment of science lessons. Results also indicated that collectively, students' experiences in the laboratory were positive predicators of their attitudes toward science. However, no laboratory environment scale was a significant independent predictor of student attitudes. .A students' academic streams was the only significant

  19. Environmental Remediation Sciences Program at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bargar, John R.

    2006-11-15

    Synchrotron radiation (SR)-based techniques provide unique capabilities to address scientific issues underpinning environmental remediation science and have emerged as major research tools in this field. The high intensity of SR sources and x-ray photon-in/photon-out detection allow noninvasive in-situ analysis of dilute, hydrated, and chemically/structurally complex natural samples. SR x-rays can be focused to beams of micron and sub-micron dimension, which allows the study of microstructures, chemical microgradients, and microenvironments such as in biofilms, pore spaces, and around plant roots, that may control the transformation of contaminants in the environment. The utilization of SR techniques in environmental remediation sciences is often frustrated, however, by an ''activation energy barrier'', which is associated with the need to become familiar with an array of data acquisition and analysis techniques, a new technical vocabulary, beam lines, experimental instrumentation, and user facility administrative procedures. Many investigators find it challenging to become sufficiently expert in all of these areas or to maintain their training as techniques evolve. Another challenge is the dearth of facilities for hard x-ray micro-spectroscopy, particularly in the 15 to 23 KeV range, which includes x-ray absorption edges of the priority DOE contaminants Sr, U, Np, Pu, and Tc. Prior to the current program, there were only two (heavily oversubscribed) microprobe facilities in the U.S. that could fully address this energy range (one at each of APS and NSLS); none existed in the Western U.S., in spite of the relatively large number of DOE laboratories in this region.

  20. Grounded theory in medical laboratory science expert practice development.

    PubMed

    Leibach, Elizabeth Kenimer

    2011-01-01

    Grounded theory and methods related to expert practice development in medical laboratory science were described using data from a large national survey of medical laboratory scientists (MLS) overlaid on findings from analysis of expert practice domains reported in nursing literature. An extensive focus group/expert review iterative process followed by a survey of MLS practitioners produced 25 critical thinking (CT) behaviors important in expert practice. Factor analysis was applied to discern common threads or themes linking the CT behaviors. The 25 important CT behaviors were reduced to a 7-factor structure representing constructs underlying the individual, observable CT behaviors. This 7-factor structure in MLS was compared to the 7 practice domains identified in expert nursing practice. The comparison yielded commonality between MLS and nursing in CT behaviors observed in the 7 expert practice domains of both professions: professional techniques, caring communication, growing professionally, setting priorities, practicing with judgment, anticipating/revising, and creating unique meaning. Emergent grounded theory is that (1) critical thinking is a metaprocess that facilitates learning by interlinking the more basic processes associated with different learning orientations: cognitivist, behaviorist, humanist (affective), and situated/contextual learning, (2) CT behaviors are observable events following from the CT metaprocess, and (3) observations of CT behaviors increase as practice advances from novice to expert. Identification and definition of CT behaviors, i.e., practice competencies, along the continuum of novice to expert can serve as the foundation for MLS curriculum and instructional design as well as measurement and evaluation in both formal and continuing education settings. PMID:22420229

  1. Mars Science Laboratory: An Integrated Platform for Exploration and Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasavada, A. R.; Mars Science Laboratory Science Team

    2011-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory mission delivers the Curiosity rover to the surface of Mars in August 2012 to assess whether its Gale Crater field site ever was capable of supporting microbial life and preserving a record of life and past environmental conditions. The 150-km crater is one of many near Mars' dichotomy boundary in various states of exhumation as a result of massive regional deposition and erosion. The primary target for Curiosity is the 5-km high mound of stratified materials in the crater's center. Systematic variations in mineralogy and morphology through the section indicate that the sediments have witnessed major changes in regional, if not planetary processes, as far back as the Noachian. The Curiosity rover was conceived as both a robotic field geologist, as previous rovers, and a mobile geochemical laboratory. It is an integrated platform for exploration (via landing site accessibility and mobility), for monitoring (via meteorological and high-energy radiation sensors), for survey (via panoramic cameras and remote elemental analysis), for close inspection (via a hand-lens imager and contact spectrometer), and for geochemical sample analysis. The latter capability drives the size and complexity of the rover by requiring a sample acquisition, processing, and analysis system consisting of a 2-m robot arm, rotary percussion drill, sieves and portioning tools, and the analytical instruments themselves. Upon acquisition and processing, samples of powdered rock are delivered to instruments located inside the rover body for mineralogical identification using X-ray diffraction, and analysis of elemental, molecular, and isotopic composition (including organic compounds) using a combined mass spectrometer, gas chromatograph, and tunable-laser spectrometer suite. To ensure the quality and accuracy of measurements from these instruments, and their interpretation, the mission has met many challenges in areas such as organic cleanliness, control blanks, tool and

  2. Initiating the 2002 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Focused Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffrey, Robert T.; Udomkesmalee, Gabriel; Hayati, Samad A.

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Project is an aggressive mission launching in 2009 to deliver a new generation of rover safely to the surface of Mars and conduct comprehensive in situ investigations using a new generation of instruments. This system will be designed to land with precision and be capable of operating over a large percentage on the surface of Mars. It will have capabilities that will support NASA's scientific goals into the next decade of exphation. The MSL Technology program is developing a wide-range of technologies needed for this Mission and potentially other space missions. The MSL Technology Program reports to both the MSL Project and the Mars Technology Program (MTP). The dual reporting process creates a challenging management situation, but ensures the new technology meets both the specific MSL requirements and the broader Mars Program requirements. MTP is a NASA-wide technology development program managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and is divided into a Focused Program and a Base Program. The Focused Technology Program addresses technologies that are specific and critical to near-term missions, while the Base Technology Program addresses those technologies that are applicable to multiple missions and which can be characterized as longer term, higher risk, and high payoff technologies. The MSL Technology Program is under the Focused Program and is tightly coupled to MSL's mission milestones and deliverables. The technology budget is separate from the flight Project budget, but the technology s requirements and the development process are tightly coordinated with the Project. The Technology Program combines proven management techniques of flight projects with commercial and academic technology management strategies, to create a technology management program that meets the near-term requirements of MSL and the long-term requirements of MTP. This paper examines the initiation of 2002 MSL Technology program. Some of the areas

  3. Design and fabrication of lenses for the color science cameras aboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaemi, F. Tony

    2009-10-01

    The NASA Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover is the third-generation robotic vehicle planned for Mars exploration, scheduled to land on Mars in 2012. There are 15 cameras on board the rover, 10 of which have engineering functions and 5 of which are designed for scientific investigations. Four of the five science cameras are built by Malin Space Science Systems to acquire color images via an RGB Bayer pattern 1600×1200 pixel charge-coupled device. These cameras are categorized into three types: Mast Camera (Mastcam), of which two different versions will be flown; Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI); and Mars Descent Imager (MARDI). These cameras will investigate Martian geology and geomorphology and provide the first color views of the Martian surface that are identical to the natural color provided by typical consumer digital cameras. The author designed and built the lenses for these MSL science cameras, Mastcam utilizes a 34-mm focal length F/8 and a 100-mm focal length F/10 lens; MAHLI utilizes a lens that varies from a 18.4-mm focal length F/9.8 (close focus) to 21.4-mm focal length F/8.5 (infinity focus); and MARDI utilizes a 9.7-mm focal length F/3 lens. The requirements, design, and performance of these lenses are described.

  4. Laboratory testing of airborne brake wear particle emissions using a dynamometer system under urban city driving cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagino, Hiroyuki; Oyama, Motoaki; Sasaki, Sousuke

    2016-04-01

    To measure driving-distance-based mass emission factors for airborne brake wear particulate matter (PM; i.e., brake wear particles) related to the non-asbestos organic friction of brake assembly materials (pads and lining), and to characterize the components of brake wear particles, a brake wear dynamometer with a constant-volume sampling system was developed. Only a limited number of studies have investigated brake emissions under urban city driving cycles that correspond to the tailpipe emission test (i.e., JC08 or JE05 mode of Japanese tailpipe emission test cycles). The tests were performed using two passenger cars and one middle-class truck. The observed airborne brake wear particle emissions ranged from 0.04 to 1.4 mg/km/vehicle for PM10 (particles up to 10 μm (in size), and from 0.04 to 1.2 mg/km/vehicle for PM2.5. The proportion of brake wear debris emitted as airborne brake wear particles was 2-21% of the mass of wear. Oxygenated carbonaceous components were included in the airborne PM but not in the original friction material, which indicates that changes in carbon composition occurred during the abrasion process. Furthermore, this study identified the key tracers of brake wear particles (e.g., Fe, Cu, Ba, and Sb) at emission levels comparable to traffic-related atmospheric environments.

  5. Early Earth Science Activities in the Sanford Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory at Homestake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. S.; Glaser, S. D.; Moore, J. R.; Hart, K.; King, G.; Regan, T.; Bang, S. S.; Sani, R. K.; Roggenthen, W. M.

    2007-12-01

    On July 10, 2007, the former Homestake Mine, Lead, South Dakota, was selected as the development site for the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory, to become the Sanford Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory at Homestake. Work on refurbishment and certification of the Ross Shaft began in August 2007 to effect pumping of water that had reached the 5000 level in late July. Completion of this work will allow a physics and geosciences laboratory to be constructed on the 4,850 ft level (1,478 m from the surface). Concurrent with reentry operations, several earth science research activities have been initiated. These early activities are as follows: (1) Seismic monitoring system: Accelerometers will be installed in surface boreholes and underground drifts as they become available as a result of the reentry work. (2) Evaluation of the 300 level (91 m), which has multiple locations for horizontal access, is ongoing. This near- surface level, with varying overburden thicknesses, offers excellent opportunities to investigate the "critical zone" in terms of hydrology, ecology, and geochemistry, yielding measurements of both moisture and carbon fluxes to evaluate fluid exchanges with the atmosphere. (3) Water and soil samples were collected in the Ross Shaft as part of the first reentry work. Molecular survey of microbial diversity showed the presence of mesophilic and thermophilic cellulose-degrading microorganisms. (4) Supercritical carbon dioxide injection experiments are being planned that will take advantage of three pairs of existing, nearly vertical, open 8-inch (0.2 m) boreholes that are easily accessible from the Ross Shaft. The candidate holes are located between the 1550 and the 2900 levels and are between 90 to 180 m in length (5) Monitoring of the response of the water during the dewatering operations will be facilitated by the use of existing boreholes. Ultimately, the dewatering operation provide access to the 8000 level (depth of 2,438 m

  6. Afterbody Heating Predictions for a Mars Science Laboratory Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory mission intends to deliver a large rover to the Martian surface within 10 km of its target site. One candidate entry vehicle aeroshell consists of a 3.75-m diameter, 70-deg sphere-cone forebody and a biconic afterbody similar to that of Viking. This paper presents computational fluid dynamics predictions of laminar afterbody heating rates for this configuration and a 2010 arrival at Mars. Computational solutions at flight conditions used an 8-species Mars gas model in chemical and thermal non-equilibrium. A grid resolution study examined the effects of mesh spacing on afterbody heating rates and resulted in grids used for heating predictions on a reference entry trajectory. Afterbody heating rate reaches its maximum value near 0.6 W/sq cm on the first windward afterbody cone at the time of peak freestream dynamic pressure. Predicted afterbody heating rates generally are below 3% of the forebody laminar nose cap heating rate throughout the design trajectory. The heating rates integrated over time provide total heat load during entry, which drives thermal protection material thickness.

  7. Ground Contact Model for Mars Science Laboratory Mission Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Way, David

    2012-01-01

    The Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST 2) has been successful in simulating the flight of launch vehicles and entry bodies on earth and other planets. POST 2 has been the primary simulation tool for the Entry Descent, and Landing (EDL) phase of numerous Mars lander missions such as Mars Pathfinder in 1997, the twin Mars Exploration Rovers (MER-A and MER-B) in 2004, Mars Phoenix lander in 2007, and it is now the main trajectory simulation tool for Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) in 2012. In all previous missions, the POST 2 simulation ended before ground impact, and a tool other than POST 2 simulated landing dynamics. It would be ideal for one tool to simulate the entire EDL sequence, thus avoiding errors that could be introduced by handing off position, velocity, or other fight parameters from one simulation to the other. The desire to have one continuous end-to-end simulation was the motivation for developing the ground interaction model in POST 2. Rover landing, including the detection of the postlanding state, is a very critical part of the MSL mission, as the EDL landing sequence continues for a few seconds after landing. The method explained in this paper illustrates how a simple ground force interaction model has been added to POST 2, which allows simulation of the entire EDL from atmospheric entry through touchdown.

  8. Transition Analysis for the Mars Science Laboratory Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Hollis, Brian R.; Li, Fei

    2009-01-01

    Viscous Laminar-turbulent transition plays an important role in the design of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry vehicle. The lift-to-drag ratio required for the precision landing trajectory will be achieved via an angle of attack equal to 16 degrees. At this relatively high angle of attack, the boundary layer flow near the leeward meridian is expected to transition early in the trajectory, resulting in substantially increased heating loads. This paper presents stability calculations and transition correlations for a series of wind tunnel models of the MSL vehicle. Experimentally measured transition onset locations are used to correlate with the N-factor calculations for various wind tunnel conditions. Due to relatively low post-shock Mach numbers near the edge of the boundary layer, the dominant instability waves are found to be of the first mode type. The N-factor values correlating with measured transition onset at selected test points from the Mach 6 conventional facility experiments fall between 3.5 and 4.5 and apparently vary linearly with the wind tunnel unit Reynolds number, indicating strong receptivity effect. The small transition N value is consistent with previous correlations for second-mode dominant transition in the same wind tunnel facility. Stability calculations for stationary and traveling crossflow instability waves in selected configurations indicate that an N value of 4 and 6, respectively, correlates reasonably well with transition onset discerned from one experimentally measured thermographic image.

  9. Laboratory for Nuclear Science. High Energy Physics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Milner, Richard

    2014-07-30

    High energy and nuclear physics research at MIT is conducted within the Laboratory for Nuclear Science (LNS). Almost half of the faculty in the MIT Physics Department carry out research in LNS at the theoretical and experimental frontiers of subatomic physics. Since 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy has funded the high energy physics research program through grant DE-FG02-05ER41360 (other grants and cooperative agreements provided decades of support prior to 2004). The Director of LNS serves as PI. The grant supports the research of four groups within LNS as “tasks” within the umbrella grant. Brief descriptions of each group are given here. A more detailed report from each task follows in later sections. Although grant DE-FG02-05ER41360 has ended, DOE continues to fund LNS high energy physics research through five separate grants (a research grant for each of the four groups, as well as a grant for AMS Operations). We are pleased to continue this longstanding partnership.

  10. Mars Science Laboratory diurnal moisture observations and column simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savijärvi, H. I.; Harri, A.-M.; Kemppinen, O.

    2015-05-01

    Hourly observations of air temperature and relative humidity at 1.6 m height from the surface (T 1.6 m, RH 1.6 m) measured by the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover Environmental Monitoring Station relative humidity (REMS-H) device are shown for MSL solar days 15-17 and 80-82, augmented with column model simulations. The diurnal range of T 1.6 m was 197-268 K in the first period, RH 1.6 m being small (<1%) in daytime but increasing to 45-49% by sunrise. During the warmer second period the T 1.6 m range was 201-275 K with RH 1.6 m only up to 16% in the morning. The modeled temperatures were quite close to those observed when the local albedo was set to 0.15 and thermal inertia to 300 tiu. The modeled RH 1.6 m was close to that observed when the well-mixed boundary layer values (0-4 km) of the mass mixing ratio q were 28-30 ppmm (suggesting a precipitable water content (PWC) of ~5.5 µm) during the first period and 12 ppmm (PWC of ~2 µm) during the second period. The REMS-H observations indicate systematic diurnal variation in the near-surface mixing ratio.

  11. Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS), mission 1: Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The first Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) is a NASA mission with an international payload, with the European Space Agency providing operational support for the European investigations. The ATLAS 1 represents the first of a series of shuttle-borne payloads which are intended to study the composition of the middle atmosphere and its possible variations due to solar changes over the course of an 11-year solar cycle. One of the ATLAS missions will coincide with NASA's Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) mission and will provide crucial parameters not measured by the instrument complement on the satellite. A first in this evolutionary program, the ATLAS 1 will carry a payload of instruments originally flown on the Spacelab 1 and Spacelab 3 missions. The ATLAS mission therefore exploits the shuttle capability to return sophisticated instruments to the ground for refurbishment and updating, and the multi-mission reflight of the instruments at intervals required by the scientific goals. In addition to the investigations specific to the ATLAS objectives, the first mission payload includes others that are intended to study or use the near earth environment.

  12. Mars Science Laboratory Flight Software Boot Robustness Testing Project Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Brian

    2011-01-01

    On the surface of Mars, the Mars Science Laboratory will boot up its flight computers every morning, having charged the batteries through the night. This boot process is complicated, critical, and affected by numerous hardware states that can be difficult to test. The hardware test beds do not facilitate testing a long duration of back-to-back unmanned automated tests, and although the software simulation has provided the necessary functionality and fidelity for this boot testing, there has not been support for the full flexibility necessary for this task. Therefore to perform this testing a framework has been build around the software simulation that supports running automated tests loading a variety of starting configurations for software and hardware states. This implementation has been tested against the nominal cases to validate the methodology, and support for configuring off-nominal cases is ongoing. The implication of this testing is that the introduction of input configurations that have yet proved difficult to test may reveal boot scenarios worth higher fidelity investigation, and in other cases increase confidence in the robustness of the flight software boot process.

  13. Aerothermodynamic Environments Definition for the Mars Science Laboratory Entry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.; Dyakonov, Artem A.; Wright, Michael J.; Tang, Chun Y.

    2007-01-01

    An overview of the aerothermodynamic environments definition status is presented for the Mars Science Laboratory entry vehicle. The environments are based on Navier-Stokes flowfield simulations on a candidate aeroshell geometry and worst-case entry heating trajectories. Uncertainties for the flowfield predictions are based primarily on available ground data since Mars flight data are scarce. The forebody aerothermodynamics analysis focuses on boundary layer transition and turbulent heating augmentation. Turbulent transition is expected prior to peak heating, a first for Mars entry, resulting in augmented heat flux and shear stress at the same heatshield location. Afterbody computations are also shown with and without interference effects of reaction control system thruster plumes. Including uncertainties, analysis predicts that the heatshield may experience peaks of 225 W/sq cm for turbulent heat flux, 0.32 atm for stagnation pressure, and 400 Pa for turbulent shear stress. The afterbody heat flux without thruster plume interference is predicted to be 7 W/sq cm on the backshell and 10 W/sq cm on the parachute cover. If the reaction control jets are fired near peak dynamic pressure, the heat flux at localized areas could reach as high as 76 W/sq cm on the backshell and 38 W/sq cm on the parachute cover, including uncertainties. The final flight environments used for hardware design will be updated for any changes in the aeroshell configuration, heating design trajectories, or uncertainties.

  14. Mars Science Laboratory Entry Capsule Aerothermodynamics and Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.; Hollis, Brian R.; Dyakonov, Artem A.; Laub, Bernard; Wright, Michael J.; Rivellini, Tomasso P.; Slimko, Eric M.; Willcockson, William H.

    2007-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft is being designed to carry a large rover (greater than 800 kg) to the surface of Mars using a blunt-body entry capsule as the primary decelerator. The spacecraft is being designed for launch in 2009 and arrival at Mars in 2010. The combination of large mass and diameter with non-zero angle-of-attack for MSL will result in unprecedented convective heating environments caused by turbulence prior to peak heating. Navier-Stokes computations predict a large turbulent heating augmentation for which there are no supporting flight data1 and little ground data for validation. Consequently, an extensive experimental program has been established specifically for MSL to understand the level of turbulent augmentation expected in flight. The experimental data support the prediction of turbulent transition and have also uncovered phenomena that cannot be replicated with available computational methods. The result is that the flight aeroheating environments predictions must include larger uncertainties than are typically used for a Mars entry capsule. Finally, the thermal protection system (TPS) being used for MSL has not been flown at the heat flux, pressure, and shear stress combinations expected in flight, so a test program has been established to obtain conditions relevant to flight. This paper summarizes the aerothermodynamic definition analysis and TPS development, focusing on the challenges that are unique to MSL.

  15. Mars Science Laboratory with Arm Extended, Artist's Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mars Science Laboratory, a mobile robot for investigating Mars' past or present ability to sustain microbial life, is in development for a launch opportunity in 2009. This picture is an artist's concept portraying what the advanced rover would look like in Martian terrain, from a side aft angle.

    The arm extending from the front of the rover is designed both to position some of the rover's instruments onto selected rocks or soil targets and also to collect samples for analysis by other instruments. Near the base of the arm is a sample preparation and handling system designed to grind samples, such as rock cores or small pebbles, and distribute the material to analytical instruments.

    The mast, rising to about 2.1 meters (6.9 feet) above ground level, supports two remote-sensing instruments: the Mast Camera for stereo color viewing of surrounding terrain and material collected by the arm, and the ChemCam for analyzing the types of atoms in material that laser pulses have vaporized from rocks or soil targets up to about 9 meters (30 feet) away.

  16. Dynamic Stability Testing of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroenenberger, Mark; Yates, Leslie; Hathaway, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    Results from a 26 shot ballistic range test of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry capsule are presented. The supersonic pitch damping properties of the MSL capsule were characterized between Mach 1.35 and Mach 3.5 and total angles-of-attack from 0 to 30 degrees. In flight, the MSL entry capsule will utilize a radial center-of-gravity offset to produce a non-zero trim angle-of-attack. This offset trim angle will produce lift, enabling the capsule to fly a guided entry and reducing the landing footprint dimensions to within 10 km of the desired landing site. A lifting configuration could not be tested at the ballistic range used for this test as the models would swerve into the range walls, possibly damaging cameras, the coordinate reference system or other facility assets. Ballistic (non-lifting) data was extracted and will be implemented in a conservative fashion to ensure that the dynamic stability characteristics of the flight vehicle are bounded. A comparison between the MSL pitch damping results and the dynamic model of the Mars Exploration Rover capsule shows generally close agreement with no significant differences in damping characteristics due to the change in backshell geometry. Dynamic moments are also compared to the MSL reaction control system (RCS) control authority to show the controller has sufficient margin to easily damp any dynamic stability effects.

  17. Initiating the 2002 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffrey, Robert T.; Udomkesmalee, Gabriel; Hayati, Samad A.; Henderson, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Project is an aggressive mission launching in 2009 to investigate the Martian environment and requires new capabilities that are currently are not available. The MSL Technology Program is developing a wide-range of technologies needed for this Mission and potentially other space missions. The MSL Technology Program reports to both the MSL Project and the Mars Technology Program (MTP). The dual reporting process creates a challenging management situation, but ensures the new technology meets both the specific MSL requirements and the broader Mars Program requirements. MTP is a NASA-wide technology development program managed by JPL and is divided into a Focused Program and a Base Program. The MSL Technology Program is under the focused program and is tightly coupled to MSL's mission milestones and deliverables. The technology budget is separate from the flight Project budget, but the technology's requirements and the development process are tightly coordinated with the Project. The MSL Technology Program combines the proven management techniques of flight projects with the commercial technology management strategies of industry and academia, to create a technology management program that meets the short-term requirements of MSL and the long-term requirements of MTP. This paper examines the initiation of 2002 MSL Technology program. Some of the areas discussed in this paper include technology definition, task selection, technology management, and technology assessment. This paper also provides an update of the 2003 MSL technology program and examines some of the drivers that changed the program from its initiation.

  18. Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steltzner, Adam D.; Burkhart, P. Dan; Chen, Allen; Comeaux, Keith A.; Guernsey, Carl S.; Kipp, Devin M.; Lorenzoni, Leila V.; Mendeck, Gavin F.; Powell, Richard W.; Rivellini, Tommaso P.; San Martin, A. Miguel; Sell, Steven W.; Prakash, Ravi; Way, David W.

    2010-01-01

    In 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. In addition to landing more mass than prior missions to Mars, MSL will offer access to regions of Mars that have been previously unreachable. The MSL EDL sequence is a result of a more stringent requirement set than any of its predecessors. Notable among these requirements is landing a 900 kg rover in a landing ellipse much smaller than that of any previous Mars lander. In meeting these requirements, MSL is extending the limits of the EDL technologies qualified by the Mars Viking, Mars Pathfinder, and Mars Exploration Rover missions. Thus, there are many design challenges that must be solved for the mission to be successful. Several pieces of the EDL design are technological firsts, such as guided entry and precision landing on another planet, as well as the entire Sky Crane maneuver. This paper discusses the MSL EDL architecture and discusses some of the challenges faced in delivering an unprecedented rover payload to the surface of Mars.

  19. Overview of the Mars Science Laboratory Parachute Decelerator Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, Anita; Steltzner, Adam; Witkowski, Al; Rowan, Jerry; Cruz, Juan

    2007-01-01

    In 2010 the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will deliver NASA's largest and most capable rover to the surface of Mars. MSL will explore previously unattainable landing sites due to the implementation of a high precision Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) system. The parachute decelerator subsystem (PDS) is an integral prat of the EDL system, providing a mass and volume efficient some of aerodynamic drag to decelerate the entry vehicle from Mach 2 to subsonic speeds prior to final propulsive descent to the sutface. The PDS for MSL is a mortar deployed 19.7m Viking type Disk-Gap-Band (DGB) parachute; chosen to meet the EDL timeline requirements and to utilize the heritage parachute systems from Viking, Mars Pathfinder, Mars Exploration Rover, and Phoenix NASA Mars Lander Programs. The preliminary design of the parachute soft goods including materials selection, stress analysis, fabrication approach, and development testing will be discussed. The preliminary design of mortar deployment system including mortar system sizing and performance predictions, gas generator design, and development mortar testing will also be presented.

  20. Aerothermodynamic Design of the Mars Science Laboratory Heatshield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.; Dyakonov, Artem A.; Wright, Michael J.; Tang, Chun Y.

    2009-01-01

    Aerothermodynamic design environments are presented for the Mars Science Laboratory entry capsule heatshield. The design conditions are based on Navier-Stokes flowfield simulations on shallow (maximum total heat load) and steep (maximum heat flux, shear stress, and pressure) entry trajectories from a 2009 launch. Boundary layer transition is expected prior to peak heat flux, a first for Mars entry, and the heatshield environments were defined for a fully-turbulent heat pulse. The effects of distributed surface roughness on turbulent heat flux and shear stress peaks are included using empirical correlations. Additional biases and uncertainties are based on computational model comparisons with experimental data and sensitivity studies. The peak design conditions are 197 W/sq cm for heat flux, 471 Pa for shear stress, 0.371 Earth atm for pressure, and 5477 J/sq cm for total heat load. Time-varying conditions at fixed heatshield locations were generated for thermal protection system analysis and flight instrumentation development. Finally, the aerothermodynamic effects of delaying launch until 2011 are previewed.

  1. ER-2: Flying Laboratory for Earth Science Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC), (Edwards, California, USA) has two Lockheed Martin Corporation (Bethesda, Maryland) Earth Research-2 (ER-2) aircraft that serve as high-altitude and long-range flying laboratories. The ER-2 has been utilized to conduct scientific studies of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry, land-use mapping, disaster assessment, preliminary testing and calibration and validation of satellite sensors. The ER-2 aircraft provides experimenters with a wide array of payload accommodation areas with suitable environment control with required electrical and mechanical interfaces. Missions may be flown out of DFRC or from remote bases worldwide. The NASA ER-2 is utilized by a variety of customers, including U.S. Government agencies, civilian organizations, universities, and state governments. The combination of the ER-2 s range, endurance, altitude, payload power, payload volume and payload weight capabilities complemented by a trained maintenance and operations team provides an excellent and unique platform system to the science community.

  2. Communications Blackout Prediction for Atmospheric Entry of Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morabito, David; Edquist, Karl

    2005-01-01

    When a supersonic spacecraft enters a planetary atmosphere with v >> v(sub sound), a shock layer forms in the front of the body. An ionized sheath of plasma develops around the spacecraft, which results from the ionization of the atmospheric constituents as they are compressed and heated by the shock or heated within the boundary layer next to the surface. When the electron density surrounding the spacecraft becomes sufficiently high, communications can be disrupted (attenuation/blackout). During Mars Science Laboratory's (MSL's) atmospheric entry there will likely be a communication outage due to charged particles on the order of 60 to 100 seconds using a UHF link frequency looking out the shoulders of the wake region to orbiting relay asset. A UHF link looking out the base region would experience a shorter duration blackout, about 35 seconds for the stressed trajectory and possibly no blackout for the nominal trajectory. There is very little likelihood of a communications outage using X-band (however, X-band is not currently planned to be used during peak electron density phase of EDL).

  3. A Sparse Hierarchical Map Representation for Mars Science Laboratory Science Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefian, A. V.; Edwards, L. J.; Keely, L.; Lees, D. S.; Fluckinger, L.; Malin, M. C.; Parker, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    We describe a solution for multi-scale Mars terrain modeling and mapping with Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) and co-registered orthogonally projected imagery (ortho-images). High resolution DEMs and ortho-images derived from Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover science and navigation cameras are represented in context with lower resolution, wide coverage DEMs and ortho-images derived from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) HiRISE and CTX camera images and Mars Express (MEX) mission HRSC images. Merging MSL rover image derived terrain models with those from orbital images at a uniform high resolution would require super-sampling of the orbital data across a large area to maintain significant context. This solution is not practical, and would result in a mapping product of enormous size. Instead, we choose a sparse hierarchical map representation. Each level in this hierarchical representation is a map described by a set of tiles with fixed number of samples and fixed resolution. The number of samples in a tile is fixed for all levels and each level is associated with a specific resolution. In this work, the resolution ratio between two adjacent levels is set to two. The map at each level is sparse and it contains only the tiles for which data is available at the resolution of the given level. For example, at the highest resolution level only MSL science camera models are available and only a small set of tiles are generated in a sparse map. At the lowest resolution, the map contains the complete set of tiles. The reference level of the representation is chosen to be the HiRISE terrain model and CTX, HRSC and MSL data are projected onto this model before being mapped. While our terrain representation was developed for use in "Antares", a visual planning and sequencing tool for MSL science cameras developed at NASA Ames Research Center, it is general purpose and has a number of potential geo-science visualization applications.

  4. 76 FR 12507 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Personnel Management Demonstration Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... 2011. On September 9, 2010, DoD published the proposed STRL Demonstration Project for TARDEC in 75 FR... March 7, 2011 Part III Department of Defense Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Personnel... Secretary Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Personnel Management Demonstration...

  5. Use and Acceptance of Information and Communication Technology among Laboratory Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Brenda C.

    2013-01-01

    Online and blended learning platforms are being promoted within laboratory science education under the assumption that students have the necessary skills to navigate online and blended learning environments. Yet little research has examined the use of information and communication technology (ICT) among the laboratory science student population.…

  6. A Systematic Planning for Science Laboratory Instruction: Research-Based Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balta, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop an instructional design model for science laboratory instruction. Well-known ID models were analysed and Dick and Carey model was imitated to produce a science laboratory instructional design (SLID) model. In order to validate the usability of the designed model, the views of 34 high school teachers related to…

  7. E-Laboratory Design and Implementation for Enhanced Science, Technology and Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, William; Uhomoibhi, James

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to report on the design and implementation of an e-laboratory for enhanced science, technology and engineering education studies. Design/methodology/approach: The paper assesses a computer-based e-laboratory, designed for new entrants to science, technology and engineering programmes of study in further and higher…

  8. 77 FR 26069 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

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    2012-05-02

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... following three panels of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science... Medicine will meet on June 4, 2012, at the ] Sheraton Suites Old Town Alexandria and not at VA...

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    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit..., 2013......... U.S. Access Board. Pulmonary Medicine May 30-31, 2013......... Sheraton Crystal...

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    2011-05-03

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... following four panels of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science... 5, 2011..... 6 p.m.-10 p.m.... Crowne Plaza DC/Silver Spring. Medicine. June 6, 2011..... 8 a.m.-5...

  11. 76 FR 19188 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... Crowne Plaza DC/Silver Spring. Pulmonary Medicine June 3, 2011 Crowne Plaza DC/Silver Spring....

  12. 78 FR 66992 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... Medicine........ November 25, 2013 *VA Central Office. Neurobiology-F November 26, 2013 *VA Central...

  13. The laboratory in science education: Foundations for the twenty-first century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstein, Avi; Lunetta, Vincent N.

    2004-01-01

    The laboratory has been given a central and distinctive role in science education, and science educators have suggested that rich benefits in learning accrue from using laboratory activities. Twenty years have been elapsed since we published a frequently cited, critical review of the research on the school science laboratory (Hofstein & Lunetta, Rev. Educ. Res. 52(2), 201-217, 1982). Twenty years later, we are living in an era of dramatic new technology resources and new standards in science education in which learning by inquiry has been given renewed central status. Methodologies for research and assessment that have developed in the last 20 years can help researchers seeking to understand how science laboratory resources are used, how students' work in the laboratory is assessed, and how science laboratory activities can be used by teachers to enhance intended learning outcomes. In that context, we take another look at the school laboratory in the light of contemporary practices and scholarship. This analysis examines scholarship that has emerged in the past 20 years in the context of earlier scholarship, contemporary goals for science learning, current models of how students construct knowledge, and information about how teachers and students engage in science laboratory activities.

  14. Earth Science Research in DUSEL; a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairhurst, C.; Onstott, T. C.; Tiedje, J. M.; McPherson, B.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Wang, J. S.

    2004-12-01

    A summary of efforts to create one or more Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratories (DUSEL) in the United States is presented. A workshop in Berkeley, August 11-14, 2004, explored the technical requirements of DUSEL for research in basic and applied geological and microbiological sciences, together with elementary particle physics and integrated education and public outreach. The workshop was organized by Bernard Sadoulet, an astrophysicist and the principal investigator (PI) of a community-wide DUSEL program evolving in coordination with the National Science Foundation. The PI team has three physicists (in nuclear science, high-energy physics, and astrophysics) and three earth scientists (in geoscience, biology and engineering). Presentations, working group reports, links to previous workshop/meeting talks, and information about DUSEL candidate sites, are presented in http://neutrino.lbl.gov/DUSELS-1. The Berkeley workshop is a continuation of decades of efforts, the most recent including the 2001 Underground Science Conference's earth science and geomicrobiology workshops, the 2002 International Workshop on Neutrino and Subterranean Science, and the 2003 EarthLab Report. This perspective (from three earth science co-PIs, the lead author of EarthLab report, the lead scientist of education/outreach, and the local earth science organizer) is to inform the community on the status of this national initiative, and to invite their active support. Having a dedicated facility with decades-long, extensive three-dimensional underground access was recognized as the most important single attribute of DUSEL. Many research initiatives were identified and more are expected as the broader community becomes aware of DUSEL. Working groups were organized to evaluate hydrology and coupled processes; geochemistry; rock mechanics/seismology; applications (e.g., homeland security, environment assessment, petroleum recovery, and carbon sequestration); geomicrobiology and

  15. Organic cleanliness of the Mars Science Laboratory sample transfer chain.

    PubMed

    Blakkolb, B; Logan, C; Jandura, L; Okon, A; Anderson, M; Katz, I; Aveni, G; Brown, K; Chung, S; Ferraro, N; Limonadi, D; Melko, J; Mennella, J; Yavrouian, A

    2014-07-01

    One of the primary science goals of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, Curiosity, is the detection of organics in Mars rock and regolith. To achieve this, the Curiosity rover includes a robotic sampling system that acquires rock and regolith samples and delivers it to the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on board the rover. In order to provide confidence that any significant organics detection result was Martian and not terrestrial in origin, a requirement was levied on the flight system (i.e., all sources minus the SAM instrument) to impart no more than 36 parts per billion (ppb by weight) of total reduced carbon terrestrial contamination to any sample transferred to the SAM instrument. This very clean level was achieved by a combination of a rigorous contamination control program on the project, and then using the first collected samples for a "dilution cleaning" campaign of the sample chain prior to delivering a sample to the SAM instrument. Direct cleanliness assays of the sample-contacting and other Flight System surfaces during pre-launch processing were used as inputs to determine the number of dilution cleaning samples needed once on Mars, to enable delivery of suitably clean samples to the SAM experiment. Taking into account contaminant redistribution during launch thorough landing of the MSL on Mars, the amount of residue present on the sampling hardware prior to the time of first dilution cleaning sample acquisition was estimated to be 60 ng/cm(2) on exposed outer surfaces of the sampling hardware and 20 ng/cm(2) on internal sample contacting surfaces; residues consisting mainly of aliphatic hydrocarbons and esters. After three dilution cleaning samples, estimated in-sample contamination level for the first regolith sample delivered to the SAM instrument at the Gale Crater "Rocknest" site was bounded at ≤10 ppb total organic carbon. A Project decision to forego ejecting the dilution cleaning sample and instead transfer the first drill

  16. Organic cleanliness of the Mars Science Laboratory sample transfer chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakkolb, B.; Logan, C.; Jandura, L.; Okon, A.; Anderson, M.; Katz, I.; Aveni, G.; Brown, K.; Chung, S.; Ferraro, N.; Limonadi, D.; Melko, J.; Mennella, J.; Yavrouian, A.

    2014-07-01

    One of the primary science goals of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, Curiosity, is the detection of organics in Mars rock and regolith. To achieve this, the Curiosity rover includes a robotic sampling system that acquires rock and regolith samples and delivers it to the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on board the rover. In order to provide confidence that any significant organics detection result was Martian and not terrestrial in origin, a requirement was levied on the flight system (i.e., all sources minus the SAM instrument) to impart no more than 36 parts per billion (ppb by weight) of total reduced carbon terrestrial contamination to any sample transferred to the SAM instrument. This very clean level was achieved by a combination of a rigorous contamination control program on the project, and then using the first collected samples for a "dilution cleaning" campaign of the sample chain prior to delivering a sample to the SAM instrument. Direct cleanliness assays of the sample-contacting and other Flight System surfaces during pre-launch processing were used as inputs to determine the number of dilution cleaning samples needed once on Mars, to enable delivery of suitably clean samples to the SAM experiment. Taking into account contaminant redistribution during launch thorough landing of the MSL on Mars, the amount of residue present on the sampling hardware prior to the time of first dilution cleaning sample acquisition was estimated to be 60 ng/cm2 on exposed outer surfaces of the sampling hardware and 20 ng/cm2 on internal sample contacting surfaces; residues consisting mainly of aliphatic hydrocarbons and esters. After three dilution cleaning samples, estimated in-sample contamination level for the first regolith sample delivered to the SAM instrument at the Gale Crater "Rocknest" site was bounded at ≤10 ppb total organic carbon. A Project decision to forego ejecting the dilution cleaning sample and instead transfer the first drill

  17. Mars Science Laboratory Heatshield Aerothermodynamics: Design and Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.; Hollis, Brian R.; Johnston, Christopher O.; Bose, Deepak; White, Todd R.; Mahzari, Milad

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory heatshield was designed to withstand a fully turbulent heat pulse based on test results and computational analysis on a pre-flight design trajectory. Instrumentation on the flight heatshield measured in-depth temperatures in the thermal protection system. The data indicate that boundary layer transition occurred at 5 of 7 thermocouple locations prior to peak heating. Data oscillations at 3 pressure measurement locations may also indicate transition. This paper presents the heatshield temperature and pressure data, possible explanations for the timing of boundary layer transition, and a qualitative comparison of reconstructed and computational heating on the as-flown trajectory. Boundary layer Reynolds numbers that are typically used to predict transition are compared to observed transition at various heatshield locations. A uniform smooth-wall transition Reynolds number does not explain the timing of boundary layer transition observed during flight. A roughness-based Reynolds number supports the possibility of transition due to discrete or distributed roughness elements on the heatshield. However, the distributed roughness height would have needed to be larger than the pre-flight assumption. The instrumentation confirmed the predicted location of maximum turbulent heat flux near the leeside shoulder. The reconstructed heat flux at that location is bounded by smooth-wall turbulent calculations on the reconstructed trajectory, indicating that augmentation due to surface roughness probably did not occur. Turbulent heating on the downstream side of the heatshield nose exceeded smooth-wall computations, indicating that roughness may have augmented heating. The stagnation region also experienced heating that exceeded computational levels, but shock layer radiation does not fully explain the differences.

  18. Turbulent Aeroheating Testing of Mars Science Laboratory Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Collier, Arnold S.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental investigation of turbulent aeroheating on the Mars Science Laboratory entry vehicle heat shield has been conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel No. 9. Testing was performed on a 6-in. (0.1524 m) diameter MSL model in pure N2 gas in the tunnel's Mach 8 and Mach 10 nozzles at free stream Reynolds numbers of 4.1 x 10(exp 6)/ft to 49 x 10(exp 6)/ft (1.3 x 10(exp 7)/m to 19 x 10(exp 6/ft) and 1.2 x 10(exp 6)/ft to 19 x 10(exp 6)/ft (0.39 x 10(exp 7)/m to 62 x 10(exp 7)/m), respectively. These conditions were sufficient to span the regime of boundary-layer flow from completely laminar to fully-developed turbulent flow over the entire forebody. A supporting aeroheating test was also conducted in the Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel at free stream Reynolds number of 1 x 10(exp 6)/ft to 7 x 10(exp 6)/ft (0.36 x 10(exp 7)/m to 2.2 x 10(exp 7)/m) in order to help corroborate the Tunnel 9 results. A complementary computational fluid dynamics study was conducted in parallel to the wind tunnel testing. Laminar and turbulent predictions were generated for the wind tunnel test conditions and comparisons were performed with the data for the purpose of helping to define uncertainty margins on predictions for aeroheating environments during entry into the Martian atmosphere. Data from both wind tunnel tests and comparisons with the predictions are presented herein. It was concluded from these comparisons that for perfect-gas conditions, the computational tools could predict fully-laminar or fully-turbulent heating conditions to within 12% or better of the experimental data.

  19. Mars Science Laboratory Rover Integrated Pump Assembly Bellows Jamming Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Michael R.; Johnson, Joel; Birur, Gajanana; Bhandari, Pradeep; Karlmann, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover and spacecraft utilize two mechanically pumped fluid loops for heat transfer to and from the internal electronics assemblies and the Radioisotope Thermo-Electric Generator (RTG). The heat transfer fluid is Freon R-11 (CFC-11) which has a large coefficient of thermal expansion. The Freon within the heat transfer system must have a volume for safe expansion of the fluid as the system temperature rises. The device used for this function is a gas-over-liquid accumulator. The accumulator uses a metal bellows to separate the fluid and gas sections. During expansion and contraction of the fluid in the system, the bellows extends and retracts to provide the needed volume change. During final testing of a spare unit, the bellows would not extend the full distance required to provide the needed expansion volume. Increasing the fluid pressure did not loosen the jammed bellows either. No amount of stroking the bellows back and forth would get it to pass the jamming point. This type of failure, if it occurred during flight, would result in significant overpressure of the heat transfer system leading to a burst failure at some point in the system piping. A loss of the Freon fluid would soon result in a loss of the mission. The determination of the source of the jamming of the bellows was quite elusive, leading to an extensive series of tests and analyses. The testing and analyses did indicate the root cause of the failure, qualitatively. The results did not provide a set of dimensional limits for the existing hardware design that would guarantee proper operation of the accumulator. In the end, a new design was developed that relied on good engineering judgment combined with the test results to select a reliable enough solution that still met other physical constraints of the hardware, the schedule, and the rover system.

  20. A Laboratory Data Collection Microcomputer for Handicapped Science Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunney, David; Morrison, Robert C.

    1982-01-01

    A microcomputer-based Universal Laboratory Training and Research Aid (ULTRA) provides meaningful laboratory access to blind students and students with upper limb disabilities. Using ULTRA, blind students can perform chemical experiments independently. (CL)

  1. Definition of Life Sciences laboratories for shuttle/Spacelab. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Research requirements and the laboratories needed to support a Life Sciences research program during the shuttle/Spacelab era were investigated. A common operational research equipment inventory was developed to support a comprehensive but flexible Life Sciences program. Candidate laboratories and operational schedules were defined and evaluated in terms of accomodation with the Spacelab and overall program planning. Results provide a firm foundation for the initiation of a life science program for the shuttle era.

  2. The Role Biomedical Science Laboratories Can Play in Improving Science Knowledge and Promoting First-Year Nursing Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arneson, Pam

    2011-01-01

    The need for additional nursing and health care professionals is expected to increase dramatically over the next 20 years. With this in mind, students must have strong biomedical science knowledge to be competent in their field. Some studies have shown that participation in bioscience laboratories can enhance science knowledge. If this is true, an…

  3. Effect of Using Separate Laboratory and Lecture Courses for Introductory Crop Science on Student Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiebold, W. J.; Slaughter, Leon

    1986-01-01

    Reviews a study that examined the effects of laboratories on the grade performance of undergraduates in an introductory crop science course. Results indicated that students enrolled in lecture and laboratory concurrently did not receive higher lecture grades than students enrolled solely in lecture, but did have higher laboratory grades. (ML)

  4. International Council for Laboratory Animal Science: International activities. Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources annual report, 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    In late 1987, the Interagency Research Animal Committee (IRAC) requested that the Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources (ILAR), National Research Council (NRC), National Academy of Sciences, reestablish US national membership in the International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS). The ICLAS is the only worldwide organization whose goal is to foster the humane use of animals in medical research and testing. ILAR`s Mission Statement reflects its commitment to producing highly respected documents covering a wide range of scientific issues, including databases in genetic stocks, species specific management guides, guidelines for humane care of animals, and position papers on issues affecting the future of the biological sciences. As such, ILAR is recognized nationally and internationally as an independent, scientific authority in the development of animal sciences in biomedical research.

  5. Science To Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards

    SciTech Connect

    Bredt, Paul R. ); Brockman, Fred J. ); Camaioni, Donald M. ); Felmy, Andrew R. ); Grate, Jay W. ); Hay, Benjamin P.; Hess, Nancy J. ); Meyer, Philip D. ); Murray, Christopher J. ); Pfund, David M. ); Su, Yali ); Thornton, Edward C. ); Weber, William J. ); Zachara, John M. )

    2001-06-19

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, nine in fiscal year 1998, seven in fiscal year 1999, and five in fiscal year 2000. All of the fiscal year 1996 award projects have published final reports. The 1997 and 1998 award projects have been completed or are nearing completion. Final reports for these awards will be published, so their annual updates will not be included in this document. This section summarizes how each of the 1999 and 2000 grants address significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. The 1999 and 2000 EMSP awards at PNNL are focused primarily in two areas: Tank Waste Remediation, and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

  6. The impact of longer term intervention on reforming physical science teachers' approaches to laboratory instruction: Seeking a more effective role for the laboratory in science instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priestley, William Joseph

    This study is one of six companion studies investigating ways of improving the overall role of laboratory experiences in science instruction. The primary purpose of the study was to explore the extent to which longer term inservice experiences with modeled inquiry-based instruction caused immediate reform in the approach that inservice teachers of physical science use in pre- and post-laboratory instruction, as well as their ability to restructure their physical science courses to give greater emphasis to the inquiry approach. A secondary purpose was to compare the findings of this study with those of the companion study by H. Priestley (1996) which studied life science teachers (LSTs). A full semester graduate level science education course entitled Science Education 716, The Teaching of Chemistry, developed by two experienced Temple University professors, provided the necessary modeled inquiry-oriented pedagogical approach. Pre- and post-laboratory sessions were videotaped and analyzed using the Modified Revised Science Teacher Behavioral Inventory to determine the frequency of occurrence of the teaching behaviors used. Inservice teacher behavior profiles were compared to the profiles of traditional and model teaching. Eleven of the 14 PSTs presented post-laboratory sessions that used student laboratory data and/or observations to provide a foundation for the follow-up discussion. Eight of these 11, demonstrated, to a considerable degree, the model approach to instruction. Within this group of 8, four indicated that they utilized the modeled approach prior to the inservice treatment while the remaining 4 showed that they could restructure their courses and reform their teaching behaviors to approach the model profile. While the exploration reported herein did not reveal statistical significance in the teaching behaviors between the PST and LST groups of teachers, these teachers did show significant differences in the amount of time used in conducting post-laboratory

  7. The science of laboratory and project management in regulated bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Unger, Steve; Lloyd, Thomas; Tan, Melvin; Hou, Jingguo; Wells, Edward

    2014-05-01

    Pharmaceutical drug development is a complex and lengthy process, requiring excellent project and laboratory management skills. Bioanalysis anchors drug safety and efficacy with systemic and site of action exposures. Development of scientific talent and a willingness to innovate or adopt new technology is essential. Taking unnecessary risks, however, should be avoided. Scientists must strategically assess all risks and find means to minimize or negate them. Laboratory Managers must keep abreast of ever-changing technology. Investments in instrumentation and laboratory design are critical catalysts to efficiency and safety. Matrix management requires regular communication between Project Managers and Laboratory Managers. When properly executed, it aligns the best resources at the right times for a successful outcome. Attention to detail is a critical aspect that separates excellent laboratories. Each assay is unique and requires attention in its development, validation and execution. Methods, training and facilities are the foundation of a bioanalytical laboratory. PMID:24958120

  8. Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) - First Results of Pressure Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harri, Ari-Matti; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kemppinen, Osku; Genzer, Maria; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Haberle, Robert M.; Schmidt, Walter; Savijärvi, Hannu; Rodríquez-Manfredi, Jose Antonio; Rafkin, Scott; Polkko, Jouni; Richardson, Mark; Newman, Claire; de la Torre Juárez, Manuel; Martín-Torres, Javier; Paz Zorzano-Mier, Maria; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Kauhanen, Janne; Paton, Mark; Haukka, Harri

    2013-04-01

    The Mars Science laboratory (MSL) called Curiosity made a successful landing at Gale crater early August 2012. MSL has an environmental instrument package called the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) as a part of its scientific payload. REMS comprises instrumentation for the observation of atmospheric pressure, temperature of the air, ground temperature, wind speed and direction, relative humidity, and UV measurements. The REMS instrument suite is described at length in [1]. We concentrate on describing the first results from the REMS pressure observations and comparison of the measurements with modeling results. The REMS pressure device is provided by the Finnish Meteorological Institute. It is based on silicon micro-machined capacitive pressure sensors developed by Vaisala Inc. The pressure device makes use of two transducer electronics sections placed on a single multi-layer PCB inside the REMS Instrument Control Unit (ICU) with a filter-protected ventilation inlet to the ambient atmosphere. The absolute accuracy of the pressure device (< 3 Pa) and zero-drift (< 1 Pa/year) enables the investigations of long term and seasonal cycles of the Martian atmosphere. The relative accuracy, or repeatability, in the diurnal time scale is < 1.5 Pa, less than 2 % of the observed diurnal pressure variation at the landing site. The pressure device has special sensors with very high precision (less than 0.2 Pa) that makes it a good tool to study short-term atmospheric phenomena, e.g., dust devils and other convective vortices. The observed MSL pressure data enable us to study both the long term and short-term phenomena of the Martian atmosphere. This would add knowledge of these phenomena to that gathered by earlier Mars missions and modeling experiments [2,3]. Pressure observations are revealing new information on the local atmosphere and climate at Gale crater, and will shed light on the mesoscale and micrometeorological phenomena. Pressure observations show also

  9. The Mars Science Laboratory Mars Hand Lens Imager (MSL MAHLI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minitti, Michelle E.; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Msl Mastcam/Mahli/Mardi Team

    2007-10-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover mission, slated to begin Martian surface operations in 2010, seeks to explore the past and present habitability of a yet-to-be-selected site on Mars. Armed with a suite of instruments capable of spectral, chemical, mineralogical, organic and isotopic analyses, MSL will comprehensively study the Martian atmosphere and rocks and soils on the Martian surface. The Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), the "geologist's handlens" for MSL, supports habitability studies through aiding the selection of samples for in-depth analysis and placing such samples in a geologic and geomorphic context. More broadly, the goal of MAHLI is to examine the texture, morphology, structure, mineralogy, and stratigraphy of rocks, soils, frost and ice at the microscale. MAHLI will achieve this objective using capabilities new to Martian cameras including a CCD with a Bayer Pattern Filter coupled with a focusable lens. The Bayer Pattern Filter produces RGB color images akin to those taken by the standard commercial digital camera. Placement of MAHLI by the MSL Robotic Arm (RA) at a particular distance from the sample of interest and MAHLI's internal focus mechanism combine to achieve a desired image resolution. At its closest placement (22.5 mm), MAHLI has 9 µm/pixel resolution. In practice, RA placement may be sufficiently uncertain that 9 µm/pixel will not be achieved regularly; however, resolutions in the 12-15 µm/pixel range are expected for typical high resolution images. Depending on the target distance and its surface relief, the target may not be in focus over the entire image. For those cases, MAHLI acquires a series of images taken at a range of focus positions that bracket the location of best focus. MAHLI's onboard software is capable of merging this stack of images, into a single best-focus image. MAHLI can image in natural illumination but it also possesses four, white light emitting diodes (LED) for illumination of samples in shadow or at

  10. Integrated Earth Science Research in Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. S.; Hazen, T. C.; Conrad, M. E.; Johnson, L. R.; Salve, R.

    2004-12-01

    There are three types of sites being considered for deep-underground earth science and physics experiments: (1) abandoned mines (e.g., the Homestake Gold Mine, South Dakota; the Soudan Iron Mine, Minnesota), (2) active mines/facilities (e.g., the Henderson Molybdenum Mine, Colorado; the Kimballton Limestone Mine, Virginia; the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant [in salt], New Mexico), and (3) new tunnels (e.g., Icicle Creek in the Cascades, Washington; Mt. San Jacinto, California). Additional sites have been considered in the geologically unique region of southeastern California and southwestern Nevada, which has both very high mountain peaks and the lowest point in the United States (Death Valley). Telescope Peak (along the western border of Death Valley), Boundary Peak (along the California-Nevada border), Mt. Charleston (outside Las Vegas), and Mt. Tom (along the Pine Creek Valley) all have favorable characteristics for consideration. Telescope Peak can site the deepest laboratory in the United States. The Mt. Charleston tunnel can be a highway extension connecting Las Vegas to Pahrump. The Pine Creek Mine next to Mt. Tom is an abandoned tungsten mine. The lowest levels of the mine are accessible by nearly horizontal tunnels from portals in the mining base camp. Drainage (most noticeable in the springs resulting from snow melt) flows (from the mountain top through upper tunnel complex) out of the access tunnel without the need for pumping. While the underground drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, have not yet been considered (since they are relatively shallow for physics experiments), they have undergone extensive earth science research for nearly 10 years, as the site for future storage of nation's spent nuclear fuels. All these underground sites could accommodate different earth science and physics experiments. Most underground physics experiments require depth to reduce the cosmic-ray-induced muon flux from atmospheric sources. Earth science experiments can be

  11. Research into the environment of science laboratory classes in australian schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McRobbie, Campbell J.; Giddings, Geoffrey J.; Fraser, Barry J.

    1990-01-01

    Existing instruments for assessing student or teacher perceptions of characteristics of actual or preferred classroom psychosocial environment are unsuitable for one of the most important settings in science teaching, namely, the science laboratory class. Consequently, the Science Laboratory Environment Inventory (SLEI), was designed to assess student or teacher perceptions of seven scales: Teacher Supportiveness, Student Cohesiveness, Open-Endedness, Integration, Organization, Rule Clarity and Material Environment. An important feature of the design of the study was that the new instrument was field tested simultaneously in six countries: Australia, USA, Canada, England, Nigeria and Israel. This paper is based on a sample of 4643 students in 225 individual laboratory classes, together with the teachers of most of these classes. Preliminary analyses were used to shed light on various important research questions including the differences between Actual and Preferred environments, gender differences in perceptions of Actual and Preferred environment, the relationship between the science laboratory environment and attitude towards science laboratory work, differences between school and university laboratory classes, differences between teachers’ and students’ perceptions of the same laboratory classes, and differences between laboratory classes in different science subjects (Physics, Chemistry, Biology).

  12. Pre-Math/Science Training for Chemical Laboratory Technologist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Njie, Valerie

    This document contains a project report and curriculum materials from a project that developed a model for basic math, reading, and science instruction to prepare educationally disadvantaged adults for entry into science-related training programs. The 15-week curriculum consists of reading instruction, applied basic mathematics, universal…

  13. Exploring the Development of Preservice Science Teachers' Views on the Nature of Science in Inquiry-Based Laboratory Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozgelen, Sinan; Yilmaz-Tuzun, Ozgul; Hanuscin, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of the inquiry-based and explicit-reflective laboratory instruction on preservice science teachers' (PSTs) conceptions of the nature of science (NOS) aspects. This study was carried out during the Laboratory Application in Science II course. All 52 preservice elementary science teachers…

  14. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Science and Technology Facility, Golden, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-03-01

    This publication is one in series of case studies for "Laboratories for the 21st Century," a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program. It is intended for those who plan to design and construct public and private-sector laboratory buildings. This case study describes the Science and Technology Facility, a new laboratory at NREL that incorporated energy-efficient and sustainable design features including underfloor air distribution in offices, daylighting, and process cooling.

  15. 60 Years of Great Science (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    2003-01-01

    This issue of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Review (vol. 36, issue 1) highlights Oak Ridge National Laboratory's contributions in more than 30 areas of research and related activities during the past 60 years and provides glimpses of current activities that are carrying on this heritage.

  16. Handbook of Science Laboratory Practices and Safety. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredrickson, Clifford T.

    This handbook, written specially for the San Diego Public School System, contains detailed discussions on first aid, good laboratory practices, safety in the laboratory, and laws regulating the care and use of animals. The section on "First Aid" presents, in addition to standard first aid information, a discussion of first-aid kits for field trips…

  17. Identification of airborne bacterial and fungal species in the clinical microbiology laboratory of a university teaching hospital employing ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR and gene sequencing techniques.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Yuriko; Walker, Jim; Loughrey, Anne; Millar, Cherie; Goldsmith, Colin; Rooney, Paul; Elborn, Stuart; Moore, John

    2009-06-01

    Universal or "broad-range" PCR-based ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was performed on a collection of 58 isolates (n = 30 bacteria + 28 fungi), originating from environmental air from several locations within a busy clinical microbiology laboratory, supporting a university teaching hospital. A total of 10 bacterial genera were identified including both Gram-positive and Gram-negative genera. Gram-positive organisms accounted for 27/30 (90%) of total bacterial species, consisting of seven genera and included (in descending order of frequency) Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, Corynebacterium, Paenibacillus, Arthrobacter, Janibacter and Rothia. Gram-negative organisms were less frequently isolated 3/30 (10%) and comprised three genera, including Moraxella, Psychrobacter and Haloanella. Eight fungal genera were identified among the 28 fungal organisms isolated, including (in descending order of frequency) Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus, Thanatephorus, Absidia, Eurotium, Paraphaeosphaeria and Tritirachium, with Cladosporium accounting for 10/28 (35.7%) of the total fungal isolates. In conclusion, this study identified the presence of 10 bacterial and eight fungal genera in the air within the laboratory sampled. Although this reflected diversity of the microorganisms present, none of these organisms have been described previously as having an inhalational route of laboratory-acquired infection. Therefore, we believe that the species of organisms identified and the concentration levels of these airborne contaminants determined, do not pose a significant health and safety threat for immunocompotent laboratory personnel and visitors. PMID:20183192

  18. Geologic Mapping of the Mars Science Laboratory Landing Ellipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calef, F. J.; Dietrich, W. E.; Edgar, L.; Farmer, J.; Fraeman, A.; Grotzinger, J.; Palucis, M. C.; Parker, T.; Rice, M.; Rowland, S.; Stack, K. M.; Sumner, D.; Williams, J.

    2016-06-01

    The MSL project "crowd sourced" a geologic mapping effort of the nominal landing ellipse in preparation for tactical and strategic mission operations. This map was used as a strategic guide for identifying science locales during the nominal mission.

  19. Earth Science Research at the Homestake Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggenthen, W.; Wang, J.

    2004-12-01

    The Homestake Mine in South Dakota ceased gold production in 2002 and was sealed for entry in 2003. The announcement of mine closure triggered the revival of a national initiative to establish a deep underground facility, currently known as the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). The National Science Foundation announced that solicitations were to be issued in 2004 and 2005, with the first one (known as S-1) issued in June, 2004. The focus of S-1 is on site non-specific technical requirements to define the scientific program at DUSEL. Earth scientists and physicists participated in an S-1 workshop at Berkeley in August, 2004. This abstract presents the prospects of the Homestake Mine to accommodate the earth science scientific programs defined at the S-1 workshop. The Homestake Mine has hundreds of kilometers of drifts over fifty levels accessible (upon mine reopening) for water evaluation, seepage quantification, seismic monitoring, geophysical imaging, geological mapping, mineral sampling, ecology and geo-microbiology. The extensive network of drifts, ramps, and vertical shafts allows installation of 10-kilometer-scale seismograph and electromagnetic networks. Ramps connecting different levels, typically separated by 150 ft, could be instrumented for flow and transport studies, prior to implementation of coupled thermal-hydro-chemical-mechanical-biological processes testing. Numerous large rooms are available for ecological and introduced-material evaluations. Ideas for installing instruments in cubic kilometers of rock mass can be realized over multiple levels. Environmental assessment, petroleum recovery, carbon sequestration were among the applications discussed in the S-1 workshop. If the Homestake Mine can be expediently reopened, earth scientists are ready to perform important tests with a phased approach. The drifts and ramps directly below the large open pit could be the first area for shallow testing. The 4,850 ft level is the

  20. Audiotutorial Teaching of Laboratory Animal Medicine and Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, J. D.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This audiotutorial course consists of 35 minicourses including biology, husbandry, and diseases of the common laboratory animals. Each minicourse includes an audiocassette tape recording and visual and written materials. The course is available for distribution. (Author/LBH)

  1. 60 years of great science [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    2003-01-01

    This issue highlights Oak Ridge National Laboratory's contributions in more than 30 areas of research and related activities during the past 60 years and provides glimpses of current activities that are carrying on this heritage.

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, D.

    1995-09-01

    This report is quarterly progress report on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Included in the report are dicussions on teacher and faculty enhancement, curriculum improvement, student support, educational technology, and institutional improvement.

  3. The Decline of Clinical Laboratory Science Programs in Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Janet Brown

    2000-01-01

    Enrollment in clinical laboratory science has declined over 50% since 1980. Reasons include lagging salaries, limited advancement opportunities, lack of doctoral-level faculty, and the expense of operating programs. Strategic organizational changes are needed to revive the field. (SK)

  4. Chemical Analysis of Soils: An Environmental Chemistry Laboratory for Undergraduate Science Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Joan D.; Avery, G. Brooks, Jr.; Manock, John J.; Skrabal, Stephen A.; Stehman, Charles F.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise for undergraduate science students in which they evaluate soil samples for various parameters related to suitability for crop production and capability for retention of contaminants. (Contains 18 references.) (WRM)

  5. Atmospheric Properties Reconstruction from the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent and Landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holstein-Rathlou, C.; Withers, P.

    2014-07-01

    Data acquired during the entry, descent and landing of the Mars Science Laboratory were used to reconstruct the atmospheric profiles for density, pressure and temperature with excellent vertical resolution and extent.

  6. NASA ER-2: Flying Laboratory for Earth Science Studies and Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation shows views of the ER-2, NASA's Flying Laboratory for Earth Science Studies and Remote Sensing. The presentation briefly reviews the successes of the ER-2, and what the facility provides.

  7. Behavioural science at work for Canada: National Research Council laboratories.

    PubMed

    Veitch, Jennifer A

    2007-03-01

    The National Research Council is Canada's principal research and development agency. Its 20 institutes are structured to address interdisciplinary problems for industrial sectors, and to provide the necessary scientific infrastructure, such as the national science library. Behavioural scientists are active in five institutes: Biological Sciences, Biodiagnostics, Aerospace, Information Technology, and Construction. Research topics include basic cellular neuroscience, brain function, human factors in the cockpit, human-computer interaction, emergency evacuation, and indoor environment effects on occupants. Working in collaboration with NRC colleagues and with researchers from universities and industry, NRC behavioural scientists develop knowledge, designs, and applications that put technology to work for people, designed with people in mind. PMID:17479744

  8. Welcome to Los Alamos National Laboratory: A premier national security science laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Terry

    2012-06-25

    Dr Wallace presents visitors with an overview of LANL's national security science mission: stockpile stewardship, protecting against the nuclear threat, and energy security & emerging threats, which are underpinned by excellence in science/technology/engineering capabilities. He shows visitors a general Lab overview of budget, staff, and facilities before providing a more in-depth look at recent Global Security accomplishments and current programs.

  9. Planning for the V&V of infused software technologies for the Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Fesq, Lorraine M.; Ingham, Michel D.; Klein, Suzanne L.; Nelson, Stacy D.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover mission is planning to make use of advanced software technologies in order to support fulfillment of its ambitious science objectives. The mission plans to adopt the Mission Data System (MDS) as the mission software architecture, and plans to make significant use of on-board autonomous capabilities for the rover software.

  10. Preparation of Pre-Service Science Teachers in the Use of Alternate Laboratory Teacher Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezba, Richard James

    An attempt was made to develop an appropriate teaching model to aid perspective science teachers acquire teaching skills and behavioral patterns appropriate for inquiry-oriented laboratory activities and experiments. Data were collected from two groups of secondary science methods students on their verbal behavior while in the role of laboratory…

  11. Science Simulations: Do They Make a Difference in Student Achievement and Attitude in the Physics Laboratory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Janet; Bradley, Curtis; Gratch, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare and contrast laboratory simulations with traditional (equipment) explorations in physics to determine differences, if any, in student achievement and changes in attitude toward science. Based upon the investigations conducted in undergraduate physics classes with 96 students who were non-science majors, it…

  12. Scientific involvement in Skylab by the Space Sciences Laboratory of the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, C. E. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The involvement of the Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Sciences Laboratory in the Skylab program from the early feasibility studies through the analysis and publication of flight scientific and technical results is described. This includes mission operations support, the Apollo telescope mount, materials science/manufacturing in space, optical contamination, environmental and thermal criteria, and several corollary measurements and experiments.

  13. Evaluation of the Use of Remote Laboratories for Secondary School Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, David; Newcombe, Peter; Stumpers, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory experimentation is generally considered central to science-based education. Allowing students to "experience" science through various forms of carefully designed practical work, including experimentation, is often claimed to support their learning and motivate their engagement while fulfilling specific curriculum requirements. However,…

  14. Science and Technology Teachers' Views about the Causes of Laboratory Accidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydogdu, Cemil

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine science and technology teachers' views about the causes of the problems encountered in laboratories. In this research, phenomenology, a qualitative research design, was used. 21 science and technology teachers who were working in elementary schools in Eskisehir during the 2010-2011 spring semester were the…

  15. 78 FR 28292 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit Review..., 2013; Pulmonary Medicine will meet on May 30, 2013, at the Sheraton Crystal City Hotel and not on...

  16. Retrieval of Atmospheric CO2 Concentration above Clouds and Cloud Top Pressure from Airborne Lidar Measurements during ASCENDS Science Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Ramanathan, A. K.; Rodriguez, M.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Kawa, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    NASA Goddard is developing an integrated-path, differential absorption (IPDA) lidar approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations from space as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons) mission. The approach uses pulsed lasers to measure both CO2 and O2 absorption simultaneously in the vertical path to the surface at a number of wavelengths across a CO2 line at 1572.335 nm and an O2 line doublet near 764.7 nm. Measurements of time-resolved laser backscatter profiles from the atmosphere allow the technique to estimate column CO2 and O2 number density and range to cloud tops in addition to those to the ground. This allows retrievals of CO2 column above clouds and cloud top pressure, and all-sky measurement capability from space. This additional information can be used to evaluate atmospheric transport processes and other remote sensing carbon data in the free atmosphere, improve carbon data assimilation in models and help global and regional carbon flux estimates. We show some preliminary results of this capability using airborne lidar measurements from the summers of 2011 and 2014 ASCENDS science campaigns. These show simultaneous retrievals of CO2 and O2 column densities for laser returns from low-level marine stratus clouds in the west coast of California. This demonstrates the supplemental capability of the future space carbon mission to measure CO2 above clouds, which is valuable particularly for the areas with persistent cloud covers, e.g, tropical ITCZ, west coasts of continents with marine layered clouds and southern ocean with highest occurrence of low-level clouds, where underneath carbon cycles are active but passive remote sensing techniques using the reflected short wave sunlight are unable to measure accurately due to cloud scattering effect. We exercise cloud top pressure retrieval from O2 absorption measurements during the flights over the low-level marine stratus cloud decks, which is one of

  17. Overview of Theory and Simulations in the Heavy Ion Fusion ScienceVirtual National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Alex

    2006-07-09

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL) is a collaboration of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. These laboratories, in cooperation with researchers at other institutions, are carrying out a coordinated effort to apply intense ion beams as drivers for studies of the physics of matter at extreme conditions, and ultimately for inertial fusion energy. Progress on this endeavor depends upon coordinated application of experiments, theory, and simulations. This paper describes the state of the art, with an emphasis on the coordination of modeling and experiment; developments in the simulation tools, and in the methods that underly them, are also treated.

  18. Overview of Theory and Simulations in the Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A

    2006-07-03

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL) is a collaboration of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. These laboratories, in cooperation with researchers at other institutions, are carrying out a coordinated effort to apply intense ion beams as drivers for studies of the physics of matter at extreme conditions, and ultimately for inertial fusion energy. Progress on this endeavor depends upon coordinated application of experiments, theory, and simulations. This paper describes the state of the art, with an emphasis on the coordination of modeling and experiment; developments in the simulation tools, and in the methods that underly them, are also treated.

  19. Assessing and Analyzing Behavior Strategies of Instructors in College Science Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyle, William C., Jr.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Analyzed are university instructor behaviors in introductory and advanced level laboratories of botany, chemistry, geology, physics and zoology. Science Laboratory Interaction Categories--Teacher (SLIC) was used to assess 15 individual categories of teacher behaviors in the areas of questioning, giving directions, transmitting information,…

  20. Common Covert Chemical and Physical Hazards in School Science Laboratories. Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2000-01-01

    Explains that mercury is a dangerous substance to use in school science laboratories and gives several examples of mercury poisoning. Lists some precautions that should be taken in case of mercury spillage in the lab. Advocates using non-mercury laboratory equipment and limiting student access to mercury to prevent dangerous situations. (YDS)

  1. Seeking More Effective Outcomes from Science Laboratory Experiences (Grades 7-14): Six Companion Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutman, Frank X.; And Others

    The series of three sets of companion studies reported in this presentation addresses the need for seeking more effective outcomes from science laboratory experiences, which is indicated by conflicting outcomes of earlier reported research related to laboratory instruction at two different academic levels--grades 7-12 and beginning college. Four…

  2. Incorporating Chemical Information Instruction and Environmental Science into the First-Year Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landolt, R. G.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical information instruction and environmental science which is incorporated into a first-year organic chemistry laboratory is presented. The students are charged with devised search strategies, conducting online searches and limiting the project scope to ocean systems. The laboratory serves to provide for search strategy development…

  3. Space Science Laboratory publications and presentations, 1 January - 31 December 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorehead, Tauna W.

    1992-01-01

    Listed here are significant publications and presentations of the Space Science Laboratory during the period January 1 to December 31, 1991. Entries are categorized according to NASA Reports (arranged by report number), Open Literature, and Presentations (arranged alphabetically by title). Also included is an appendix listing preprints issued by the laboratory during this reporting period.

  4. Simulated and Virtual Science Laboratory Experiments: Improving Critical Thinking and Higher-Order Learning Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Nicole A.

    2013-01-01

    Virtual laboratory experiments using interactive computer simulations are not being employed as viable alternatives to laboratory science curriculum at extensive enough rates within higher education. Rote traditional lab experiments are currently the norm and are not addressing inquiry, Critical Thinking, and cognition throughout the laboratory…

  5. Tools for Scientific Thinking: Microcomputer-Based Laboratories for the Naive Science Learner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Ronald K.

    A promising new development in science education is the use of microcomputer-based laboratory tools that allow for student-directed data acquisition, display, and analysis. Microcomputer-based laboratories (MBL) make use of inexpensive microcomputer-connected probes to measure such physical quantities as temperature, position, and various…

  6. Combustion and Energy Transfer Experiments: A Laboratory Model for Linking Core Concepts across the Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barreto, Jose C.; Dubetz, Terry A.; Schmidt, Diane L.; Isern, Sharon; Beatty, Thomas; Brown, David W.; Gillman, Edward; Alberte, Randall S.; Egiebor, Nosa O.

    2007-01-01

    Core concepts can be integrated throughout lower-division science and engineering courses by using a series of related, cross-referenced laboratory experiments. Starting with butane combustion in chemistry, the authors expanded the underlying core concepts of energy transfer into laboratories designed for biology, physics, and engineering. This…

  7. Non-Stop Lab Week: A Real Laboratory Experience for Life Sciences Postgraduate Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freitas, Maria João; Silva, Joana Vieira; Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Fardilha, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    At the Portuguese universities, practical classes of life sciences are usually professor-centered 2-hour classes. This approach results in students underprepared for a real work environment in a research/clinical laboratory. To provide students with a real-life laboratory environment, the Non-Stop Lab Week (NSLW) was created in the Molecular…

  8. General Science, Ninth Grade: Theme III and Theme IV. Student Laboratory Manual. Experimental.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    This document is the student laboratory manual that was designed to accompany some of the experimental activities found in the teacher's guide to this general science course for ninth graders. It contains laboratory worksheets for lessons on such topics as: (1) soil; (2) hazardous waste; (3) wildlife refuges; (4) the water cycle; (5) water…

  9. A Place for Materials Science: Laboratory Buildings and Interdisciplinary Research at the University of Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Hyungsub; Shields, Brit

    2015-01-01

    The Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM), University of Pennsylvania, was built in 1965 as part of the Advanced Research Projects Agency's (ARPA) Interdisciplinary Laboratories (IDL) program intended to foster interdisciplinary research and training in materials science. The process that led to the construction of the…

  10. The Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) for the 209 Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgett, K. S.; Bell, J. F., III; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Heydari, E.; Kah, L. C.; Minitti, M. E.; Olson, T. S.; Rowland, S. K.; Schieber, J.; Sullivan, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    The MArs Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) is a small, RGB-color camera designed to examine geologic material at 12.5-75 microns/pixel resolution at the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) landing site. MAHLI is a PI-led investigation competitively selected by NASA in December 2004 as part of the science payload for the MSL rover launching in 2009. The instrument is being fabricated by, and will be operated by, Malin Space Science Systems of San Diego, California.

  11. Science Laboratories and Indoor Air Quality in Schools. Technical Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Bruce W.

    Some of the issues surrounding the indoor air quality (IAQ) problems presented by science labs are discussed. Described are possible contaminants in labs, such as chemicals and biological organisms, and ways to lessen accidents arising from these sources are suggested. Some of the factors contributing to comfort, such as temperature levels, are…

  12. The Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory at Homestake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesko, Kevin T.

    2009-12-01

    The US National Science Foundation and the US underground science community are well into the campaign to establish a world-class, multi-disciplinary deep underground science and engineering laboratory—DUSEL. The NSF's review committee, following the first two NSF solicitations, selected Homestake as the prime site to be developed into an international, multidisciplinary, world-class research facility. Homestake DUSEL will provide much needed underground research space to help relieve the worldwide shortage, particularly at great depth, and will develop research campuses at different depths to satisfy the research requirements for the coming decades. The State of South Dakota demonstrates remarkable support for the project and has secured the site with the transfer of the former Homestake Gold Mine and has initiated re-entry and rehabilitation of the facility to host a modest interim science program with state funds and those from a substantial philanthropic donor. I review the scientific case for DUSEL and the progress in developing the preliminary design of DUSEL in Homestake and the integrated suite of experiments to be funded along with the facility.

  13. A Model Marine Science Laboratory, North Kitsap Marine Environmental Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Andrew L.; And Others

    The project had two overall goals: (1) to establish and maintain a model marine science facility to be used as a teaching station and a base for research; and (2) to increase student and public awareness about the oceans and the important role they will play in man's future. The project served all the school districts in Kitsap County (Washington)…

  14. Herbicide Leaching Column for a Weed Science Teaching Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahrens, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an experiment which enables weed science students to observe first-hand the process of herbicide leaching in soils. Features of this technique which demonstrate the movement of herbicide within a column of soil are outlined. Diagrams are provided of the apparatus employed in the exercise. (ML)

  15. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (DEC VAX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junkin, B. G.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  16. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (SUN VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  17. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (CONCURRENT VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  18. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (MASSCOMP VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  19. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (SILICON GRAPHICS VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  20. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (MASSCOMP VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  1. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (DEC VAX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junkin, B. G.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  2. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (SUN VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  3. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (SILICON GRAPHICS VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  4. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (CONCURRENT VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  5. Space Station life science research facility - The vivarium/laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilchey, J. D.; Arno, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research opportunities possible with the Space Station are discussed. The objective of the research program will be study gravity relationships for animal and plant species. The equipment necessary for space experiments including vivarium facilities are described. The cost of the development of research facilities such as the vivarium/laboratory and a bioresearch centrifuge is examined.

  6. Evaluation of Audiotutorial Lessons in Laboratory Animal Medicine and Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; McPherson, Charles W.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-five audiotutorial lessons in laboratory animal medicine were evaluated by students enrolled in courses at six schools of veterinary medicine. Results indicate that the lessons are an effective learning resource, that prior knowledge did not significantly influence final test scores, and that subjective qualities did not affect learning.…

  7. Laboratory Experiences in an Introduction to Natural Science Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Sister Marquita

    1984-01-01

    Describes a two-semester course designed to meet the needs of future elementary teachers, home economists, and occupational therapists. Laboratory work includes homemade calorimeters, inclined planes, and computing. Content areas of the course include measurement, physics, chemistry, astronomy, biology, geology, and meteorology. (JN)

  8. Use of Vee Maps in a College Science Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lebowitz, Stacy J.

    Students (n=45) in an introductory course in hydrology used a Vee map to guide their laboratory investigation. The Vee mapping technique was utilized by groups of students working together during the investigation and was graded with a scoring rubric developed by the instructor. At the end of the investigation, students completed a survey…

  9. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Clinical Laboratory Science/Biotechnology Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended to serve as a guide for workforce preparation program providers, details the Illinois Occupational Skill Standards for clinical laboratory occupations programs. The document begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards and credentialing, the process used to develop the…

  10. ChemCam for Mars Science Laboratory rover, undergoing pre-flight testing

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-08-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory and partners developed a laser instrument, ChemCam, that will ride on the elevated mast of the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity. The system allows Curiosity to "zap" rocks from a distance, reading their chemical composition through spectroscopic analysis. In this video, laboratory shaker-table testing of the instrument ensures that all of its components are solidly attached and resistant to damage from the rigors of launch, travel and landing.

  11. ChemCam for Mars Science Laboratory rover, undergoing pre-flight testing

    SciTech Connect

    2011-10-20

    Los Alamos National Laboratory and partners developed a laser instrument, ChemCam, that will ride on the elevated mast of the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity. The system allows Curiosity to "zap" rocks from a distance, reading their chemical composition through spectroscopic analysis. In this video, laboratory shaker-table testing of the instrument ensures that all of its components are solidly attached and resistant to damage from the rigors of launch, travel and landing.

  12. Developing a Collaborative Agenda for Humanities and Social Scientific Research on Laboratory Animal Science and Welfare.

    PubMed

    Davies, Gail F; Greenhough, Beth J; Hobson-West, Pru; Kirk, Robert G W; Applebee, Ken; Bellingan, Laura C; Berdoy, Manuel; Buller, Henry; Cassaday, Helen J; Davies, Keith; Diefenbacher, Daniela; Druglitrø, Tone; Escobar, Maria Paula; Friese, Carrie; Herrmann, Kathrin; Hinterberger, Amy; Jarrett, Wendy J; Jayne, Kimberley; Johnson, Adam M; Johnson, Elizabeth R; Konold, Timm; Leach, Matthew C; Leonelli, Sabina; Lewis, David I; Lilley, Elliot J; Longridge, Emma R; McLeod, Carmen M; Miele, Mara; Nelson, Nicole C; Ormandy, Elisabeth H; Pallett, Helen; Poort, Lonneke; Pound, Pandora; Ramsden, Edmund; Roe, Emma; Scalway, Helen; Schrader, Astrid; Scotton, Chris J; Scudamore, Cheryl L; Smith, Jane A; Whitfield, Lucy; Wolfensohn, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Improving laboratory animal science and welfare requires both new scientific research and insights from research in the humanities and social sciences. Whilst scientific research provides evidence to replace, reduce and refine procedures involving laboratory animals (the '3Rs'), work in the humanities and social sciences can help understand the social, economic and cultural processes that enhance or impede humane ways of knowing and working with laboratory animals. However, communication across these disciplinary perspectives is currently limited, and they design research programmes, generate results, engage users, and seek to influence policy in different ways. To facilitate dialogue and future research at this interface, we convened an interdisciplinary group of 45 life scientists, social scientists, humanities scholars, non-governmental organisations and policy-makers to generate a collaborative research agenda. This drew on methods employed by other agenda-setting exercises in science policy, using a collaborative and deliberative approach for the identification of research priorities. Participants were recruited from across the community, invited to submit research questions and vote on their priorities. They then met at an interactive workshop in the UK, discussed all 136 questions submitted, and collectively defined the 30 most important issues for the group. The output is a collaborative future agenda for research in the humanities and social sciences on laboratory animal science and welfare. The questions indicate a demand for new research in the humanities and social sciences to inform emerging discussions and priorities on the governance and practice of laboratory animal research, including on issues around: international harmonisation, openness and public engagement, 'cultures of care', harm-benefit analysis and the future of the 3Rs. The process outlined below underlines the value of interdisciplinary exchange for improving communication across

  13. Developing a Collaborative Agenda for Humanities and Social Scientific Research on Laboratory Animal Science and Welfare

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Gail F.; Greenhough, Beth J; Hobson-West, Pru; Kirk, Robert G. W.; Applebee, Ken; Bellingan, Laura C.; Berdoy, Manuel; Buller, Henry; Cassaday, Helen J.; Davies, Keith; Diefenbacher, Daniela; Druglitrø, Tone; Escobar, Maria Paula; Friese, Carrie; Herrmann, Kathrin; Hinterberger, Amy; Jarrett, Wendy J.; Jayne, Kimberley; Johnson, Adam M.; Johnson, Elizabeth R.; Konold, Timm; Leach, Matthew C.; Leonelli, Sabina; Lewis, David I.; Lilley, Elliot J.; Longridge, Emma R.; McLeod, Carmen M.; Miele, Mara; Nelson, Nicole C.; Ormandy, Elisabeth H.; Pallett, Helen; Poort, Lonneke; Pound, Pandora; Ramsden, Edmund; Roe, Emma; Scalway, Helen; Schrader, Astrid; Scotton, Chris J.; Scudamore, Cheryl L.; Smith, Jane A.; Whitfield, Lucy; Wolfensohn, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Improving laboratory animal science and welfare requires both new scientific research and insights from research in the humanities and social sciences. Whilst scientific research provides evidence to replace, reduce and refine procedures involving laboratory animals (the ‘3Rs’), work in the humanities and social sciences can help understand the social, economic and cultural processes that enhance or impede humane ways of knowing and working with laboratory animals. However, communication across these disciplinary perspectives is currently limited, and they design research programmes, generate results, engage users, and seek to influence policy in different ways. To facilitate dialogue and future research at this interface, we convened an interdisciplinary group of 45 life scientists, social scientists, humanities scholars, non-governmental organisations and policy-makers to generate a collaborative research agenda. This drew on methods employed by other agenda-setting exercises in science policy, using a collaborative and deliberative approach for the identification of research priorities. Participants were recruited from across the community, invited to submit research questions and vote on their priorities. They then met at an interactive workshop in the UK, discussed all 136 questions submitted, and collectively defined the 30 most important issues for the group. The output is a collaborative future agenda for research in the humanities and social sciences on laboratory animal science and welfare. The questions indicate a demand for new research in the humanities and social sciences to inform emerging discussions and priorities on the governance and practice of laboratory animal research, including on issues around: international harmonisation, openness and public engagement, ‘cultures of care’, harm-benefit analysis and the future of the 3Rs. The process outlined below underlines the value of interdisciplinary exchange for improving communication across

  14. Environmental Analytical Sciences: An automation analysis and description of current laboratory procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Stuckemeyer, S.R.

    1990-05-07

    Environmental Analytical Sciences (EAS) is a state certified laboratory that analyzes potentially hazardous waste, generated by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory programs. State laws require that hazardous waste be disposed of within 90 days. Chemistry and Materials Science expects the number of incoming samples to increase rapidly and EAS must be prepared to analyze them in a timely fashion. This report documents an analysis of Environmental Analytical Sciences, which is located in Buildings 222 and 226. It describes pertinent EAS procedures and recommends ways of automating EAS sample preparation, sample analysis, raw data acquisition and test results archiving. 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. CheMin: A Definitive Mineralogy Instrument in the Analytical Laboratory of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL '09)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, D. F.; Sarrazin, P.; Bish, D. L.; Chiprera, S. J.; Vaniman, D. T.

    2005-01-01

    An important goal of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL 09) mission is the determination of definitive mineralogy and chemical composition. CheMin is a miniature X-ray diffraction/X-ray fluorescence (XRD/XRF) instrument that has been chosen for the analytical laboratory of MSL. CheMin utilizes a miniature microfocus source cobalt X-ray tube, a transmission sample cell and an energy-discriminating X-ray sensitive CCD to produce simultaneous 2-D X-ray diffraction patterns and X-ray fluorescence spectra from powdered or crushed samples. A diagrammatic view of the instrument is shown.

  16. A Plasma Science Education Laboratory for K-16 Students and Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post Zwicker, Andrew; Hulse, R. A.; Gershman, Sophia

    2002-11-01

    In the Summer 2002, a major new science education laboratory was created at PPPL. The new laboratory significantly increasing our educational opportunities for teachers and students at all levels, both locally and nationally, especially for those that are underrepresented in math, science, and technology. Recent collaborations include partnerships with The Lewis School, a private school of grades 6-12 for "learning different" students (redesigning their physics and physical science curricula), Douglass College (programs designed for undergraduate and high school women interested in math, science, or engineering) and the science museum The Franklin Institute (creating teacher and student plasma workshops for their educational programs). The Plasma Science Education Laboratory is more than 3600 sq. ft. and is designed as a laboratory and a classroom, with the general lab space easily changed depending upon the type of use. The flexible layout allows for a unique combination of curricula design and direct plasma education. Small rooms are set aside for advanced projects. Other activities in the laboratory include research with small plasma sources, typically a DC glow discharge, that pairs an advanced high school student with an undergraduate physics major. Research topics include high speed video imagery and analysis of classroom plasmas (Jacob's ladder, plasma ball), investigations of plasmas that mimic biological systems, creation of new plasma sources for classroom use.

  17. Science-based stockpile stewardship at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Immele, J.

    1995-10-01

    I would like to start by working from Vic Reis`s total quality management diagram in which he began with the strategy and then worked through the customer requirements-what the Department of Defense (DoD) is hoping for from the science-based stockpile stewardship program. Maybe our customer`s requirements will help guide some of the issues that we should be working on. ONe quick answer to {open_quotes}why have we adopted a science-based strategy{close_quotes} is that nuclear weapons are a 50-year responsibility, not just a 5-year responsibility, and stewardship without testing is a grand challenge. While we can do engineering maintenance and turn over and remake a few things on the short time scale, without nuclear testing, without new weapons development, and without much of the manufacturing base that we had in the past, we need to learn better just how these weapons are actually working.

  18. Report on Computing and Networking in the Space Science Laboratory by the SSL Computer Committee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The Space Science Laboratory (SSL) at Marshall Space Flight Center is a multiprogram facility. Scientific research is conducted in four discipline areas: earth science and applications, solar-terrestrial physics, astrophysics, and microgravity science and applications. Representatives from each of these discipline areas participate in a Laboratory computer requirements committee, which developed this document. The purpose is to establish and discuss Laboratory objectives for computing and networking in support of science. The purpose is also to lay the foundation for a collective, multiprogram approach to providing these services. Special recognition is given to the importance of the national and international efforts of our research communities toward the development of interoperable, network-based computer applications.

  19. Center for Materials Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Status report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Parkin, D.M.; Boring, A.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Center for Materials Science (CMS) from October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991, and is the nineth such annual report. It has been a year of remarkable progress in building the programs of the Center. The extent of this progress is described in detail. The CMS was established to enhance the contribution of materials science and technology to the Laboratory`s defense, energy and scientific missions, and the Laboratory. In carrying out these responsibilities it has accepted four demanding missions: (1) Build a core group of highly rated, established materials scientists and solid state physicists. (2) Promote and support top quality, interdisciplinary materials research programs at Los Alamos. (3) Strengthen the interactions of materials science and Los Alamos with the external materials science community. and (4) Establish and maintain modern materials research facilities in a readily accessible, central location.

  20. The laboratory report: A pedagogical tool in college science courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferzli, Miriam

    When viewed as a product rather than a process that aids in student learning, the lab report may become rote, busywork for both students and instructors. Students fail to see the purpose of the lab report, and instructors see them as a heavy grading load. If lab reports are taught as part of a process rather than a product that aims to "get the right answer," they may serve as pedagogical tools in college science courses. In response to these issues, an in-depth, web-based tutorial named LabWrite (www.ncsu.edu/labwrite) was developed to help students and instructors (www.ncsu.edu/labwrite/instructors) understand the purpose of the lab report as grounded in the written discourse and processes of science. The objective of this post-test only quasi-experimental study was to examine the role that in-depth instruction such as LabWrite plays in helping students to develop skills characteristic of scientifically literate individuals. Student lab reports from an introductory-level biology course at NC State University were scored for overall understanding of scientific concepts and scientific ways of thinking. The study also looked at students' attitudes toward science and lab report writing, as well as students' perceptions of lab reports in general. Significant statistical findings from this study show that students using LabWrite were able to write lab reports that showed a greater understanding of scientific investigations (p < .003) and scientific ways of thinking (p < .0001) than students receiving traditional lab report writing instruction. LabWrite also helped students develop positive attitudes toward lab reports as compared to non-LabWrite users (p < .01). Students using LabWrite seemed to perceive the lab report as a valuable tool for determining learning objectives, understanding science concepts, revisiting the lab experience, and documenting their learning.

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    The National Teacher Enhancement program (NTEP) is a three-year, multi-laboratory effort funded by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy to improve elementary school science programs. The Los Alamos National Laboratory targets teachers in northern New Mexico. FY96, the third year of the program, involved 11 teams of elementary school teachers (grades 4-6) in a three-week summer session, four two-day workshops during the school year and an on-going planning and implementation process. The teams included twenty-one teachers from 11 schools. Participants earned a possible six semester hours of graduate credit for the summer institute and two hours for the academic year workshops from the University of New Mexico. The Laboratory expertise in the earth and environmental science provided the tie between the Laboratory initiatives and program content, and allowed for the design of real world problems.

  2. Validity and Worth in the Science Curriculum: Learning School Science Outside the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braund, Martin; Reiss, Michael

    2006-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that there are problems with school science in many developed countries of the world. Such problems manifest themselves in a progressive decline in pupil enthusiasm for school science across the secondary age range and by the fact that fewer students are choosing to study the physical sciences at higher levels and as…

  3. Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, Sean; Freeborn, Dana; Crichton, Dan; Law, Emily; Kay-Im, Liz

    2011-01-01

    Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE) is JPL's internal investment to improve the return on airborne missions. Improve development performance of the data system. Improve return on the captured science data. The investment is to develop a common science data system capability for airborne instruments that encompasses the end-to-end lifecycle covering planning, provisioning of data system capabilities, and support for scientific analysis in order to improve the quality, cost effectiveness, and capabilities to enable new scientific discovery and research in earth observation.

  4. Comparison of laboratory calibrations of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) at the beginning and end of the first flight season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vane, Gregg; Chrien, Thomas G.; Reimer, John H.; Green, Robert O.; Conel, James E.

    1988-01-01

    Spectral and radiometric calibrations of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) were performed in the laboratory in June and November, 1987, at the beginning and end of the first flight season. Those calibrations are described along with changes in instrument characteristics that occurred during the flight season as a result of factors such as detachment of the optical fibers to two of the four AVIRIS spectrometers, degradation in the optical alignment of the spectrometers due to thermally-induced and mechanical warpage, and breakage of a thermal blocking filter in one of the spectrometers. These factors caused loss of signal in three spectrometers, loss of spectral resolution in two spectrometers, and added uncertainty in the radiometry of AVIRIS. Results from in-flight assessment of the laboratory calibrations are presented. A discussion is presented of improvements made to the instrument since the end of the first flight season and plans for the future. Improvements include: (1) a new thermal control system for stabilizing spectrometer temperatures, (2) kinematic mounting of the spectrometers to the instrument rack, and (3) new epoxy for attaching the optical fibers inside their mounting tubes.

  5. A Mobile Service Robot for Life Science Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulenburg, Erik; Elkmann, Norbert; Fritzsche, Markus; Teutsch, Christian

    In this paper we presents a project that is developing a mobile service robot to assist users in biological and pharmaceutical laboratories by executing routine jobs such as filling and transporting microplates. A preliminary overview of the design of the mobile platform with a robotic arm is provided. Safety aspects are one focus of the project since the robot and humans will share a common environment. Hence, several safety sensors such as laser scanners, thermographie components and artificial skin are employed. These are described along with the approaches to object recognition.

  6. Evaluation of the Use of Remote Laboratories for Secondary School Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, David; Newcombe, Peter; Stumpers, Ben

    2013-06-01

    Laboratory experimentation is generally considered central to science-based education. Allowing students to "experience" science through various forms of carefully designed practical work, including experimentation, is often claimed to support their learning and motivate their engagement while fulfilling specific curriculum requirements. However, logistical constraints (most especially related to funding) place significant limitations on the ability of schools to provide and maintain high-quality science laboratory experiences and equipment. One potential solution that has recently been the subject of growing interest is the use of remotely accessible laboratories to either supplant, or more commonly to supplement, conventional hands-on laboratories. Remote laboratories allow students and teachers to use high-speed networks, coupled with cameras, sensors, and controllers, to carry out experiments on real physical laboratory apparatus that is located remotely from the student. Research has shown that when used appropriately this can bring a range of potential benefits, including the ability to share resources across multiple institutions, support access to facilities that would otherwise be inaccessible for cost or technical reasons, and provide augmentation of the experimental experience. Whilst there has been considerable work on evaluating the use of remote laboratories within tertiary education, consideration of their role within secondary school science education is much more limited. This paper describes trials of the use of remote laboratories within secondary schools, reporting on the student and teacher reactions to their interactions with the laboratories. The paper concludes that remote laboratories can be highly beneficial, but considerable care must be taken to ensure that their design and delivery address a number of critical issues identified in this paper.

  7. Stressed detector arrays for airborne astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, G. J.; Beeman, J. W.; Haller, E. E.; Geis, N.; Poglitsch, A.; Rumitz, M.

    1989-01-01

    The development of stressed Ge:Ga detector arrays for far-infrared astronomy from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) is discussed. Researchers successfully constructed and used a three channel detector array on five flights from the KAO, and have conducted laboratory tests of a two-dimensional, 25 elements (5x5) detector array. Each element of the three element array performs as well as the researchers' best single channel detector, as do the tested elements of the 25 channel system. Some of the exciting new science possible with far-infrared detector arrays is also discussed.

  8. Use and Acceptance of Information and Communication Technology Among Laboratory Science Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Brenda C.

    Online and blended learning platforms are being promoted within laboratory science education under the assumption that students have the necessary skills to navigate online and blended learning environments. Yet little research has examined the use of information and communication technology (ICT) among the laboratory science student population. The purpose of this correlational, survey research study was to explore factors that affect use and acceptance of ICT among laboratory science students through the theoretical lens of the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model. An electronically delivered survey drew upon current students and recent graduates (within 2 years) of accredited laboratory science training programs. During the 4 week data collection period, 168 responses were received. Results showed that the UTAUT model did not perform well within this study, explaining 25.2% of the variance in use behavior. A new model incorporating attitudes toward technology and computer anxiety as two of the top variables, a model significantly different from the original UTAUT model, was developed that explained 37.0% of the variance in use behavior. The significance of this study may affect curriculum design of laboratory science training programs wanting to incorporate more teaching techniques that use ICT-based educational delivery, and provide more options for potential students who may not currently have access to this type of training.

  9. Building Transnational Bodies: Norway and the International Development of Laboratory Animal Science, ca. 1956–1980

    PubMed Central

    Druglitrø, Tone; Kirk, Robert G. W.

    2015-01-01

    Argument This article adopts a historical perspective to examine the development of Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine, an auxiliary field which formed to facilitate the work of the biomedical sciences by systematically improving laboratory animal production, provision, and maintenance in the post Second World War period. We investigate how Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine co-developed at the local level (responding to national needs and concerns) yet was simultaneously transnational in orientation (responding to the scientific need that knowledge, practices, objects and animals circulate freely). Adapting the work of Tsing (2004), we argue that national differences provided the creative “friction” that helped drive the formation of Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine as a transnational endeavor. Our analysis engages with the themes of this special issue by focusing on the development of Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine in Norway, which both informed wider transnational developments and was formed by them. We show that Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine can only be properly understood from a spatial perspective; whilst it developed and was structured through national “centers,” its orientation was transnational necessitating international networks through which knowledge, practice, technologies, and animals circulated. More and better laboratory animals are today required than ever before, and this demand will continue to rise if it is to keep pace with the quickening tempo of biological and veterinary research. The provision of this living experimental material is no longer a local problem; local, that is, to the research institute. It has become a national concern, and, in some of its aspects . . . even international. (William Lane-Petter 1957, 240) PMID:24941794

  10. Aeronautics Learning Laboratory for Science, Technology, and Research (ALLSTAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Cesar; Ebadian, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    We finished the material development of Level 1, Level 2 and most of Level 3. We created three new galleries, one of streaming videos enabling the user to select his/her appropriate speed of Internet connectivity for better performance. The second gallery on NASA's X-series aircraft and the third is on F-series aircraft. We also completed the placement and activation of all thirteen kiosks. We added one more kiosk over the number suggested in the proposal at Baker Aviation High School - a Dade County Public School for special aviation programs. We felt that the goals of this school matched ALLSTAR's goals and that the placement of the kiosk would better help the local students become interested in the Aviation and Aeronautics field. We continue to work on the development of our "Teacher Resource Guide to ALLSTAR material" in which we tied our material into the national and Florida State standards. We finished the Florida Sunshine State standards, getting positive feedback from local and other educators who use the material on a regular basis. We had another successful workshop on October 29 th, 1997. We introduced the ALLSTAR website and kiosk to about twenty science and history teachers from Dade County Public Schools (DCPS). Most teachers were from middle schools, although we had some from elementary schools also. We provided several demonstrations of the ALLSTAR material to local schools in the Dade County Public Schools (DCPS) system. We used the ALLSTAR material with FIU's summer immersion program for FLAME students. This program includes a high number of minority students interested in science and engineering. We also presented the material at National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and National Congress on Aviation and Space Education (NCASE) conferences and will be presenting the material at the Southeast Florida Aviation Consortium (SEFAC). We provided two on-site workshops in the NSTA conference with total attended of about 70 teachers. The BBS was

  11. Open Source Software Reuse in the Airborne Cloud Computing Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudikyan, S. E.; Hart, A. F.; Hardman, S.; Freeborn, D.; Davoodi, F.; Resneck, G.; Mattmann, C. A.; Crichton, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    Earth science airborne missions play an important role in helping humans understand our climate. A challenge for airborne campaigns in contrast to larger NASA missions is that their relatively modest budgets do not permit the ground-up development of data management tools. These smaller missions generally consist of scientists whose primary focus is on the algorithmic and scientific aspects of the mission, which often leaves data management software and systems to be addressed as an afterthought. The Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE), developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to support Earth Science Airborne Program, is a reusable, multi-mission data system environment for NASA airborne missions. ACCE provides missions with a cloud-enabled platform for managing their data. The platform consists of a comprehensive set of robust data management capabilities that cover everything from data ingestion and archiving, to algorithmic processing, and to data delivery. Missions interact with this system programmatically as well as via browser-based user interfaces. The core components of ACCE are largely based on Apache Object Oriented Data Technology (OODT), an open source information integration framework at the Apache Software Foundation (ASF). Apache OODT is designed around a component-based architecture that allows for selective combination of components to create highly configurable data management systems. The diverse and growing community that currently contributes to Apache OODT fosters on-going growth and maturation of the software. ACCE's key objective is to reduce cost and risks associated with developing data management systems for airborne missions. Software reuse plays a prominent role in mitigating these problems. By providing a reusable platform based on open source software, ACCE enables airborne missions to allocate more resources to their scientific goals, thereby opening the doors to increased scientific discovery.

  12. A Guided-Inquiry pH Laboratory Exercise for Introductory Biological Science Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snodgrass, Meagan A.; Lux, Nicholas; Metz, Anneke M.

    2011-01-01

    There is a continuing need for engaging inquiry-based laboratory experiences for advanced high school and undergraduate biology courses. The authors describe a guided-inquiry exercise investigating the pH-dependence of lactase enzyme that uses an inexpensive, wide-range buffering system, lactase dietary supplement, over-the-counter glucose test…

  13. Computer-simulated laboratory explorations for middle school life, earth, and physical Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Blum, Ruth

    1992-06-01

    Explorations in Middle School Science is a set of 72 computer-simulated laboratory lessons in life, earth, and physical Science for grades 6 9 developed by Jostens Learning Corporation with grants from the California State Department of Education and the National Science Foundation.3 At the heart of each lesson is a computer-simulated laboratory that actively involves students in doing science improving their: (1) understanding of science concepts by applying critical thinking to solve real problems; (2) skills in scientific processes and communications; and (3) attitudes about science. Students use on-line tools (notebook, calculator, word processor) to undertake in-depth investigations of phenomena (like motion in outer space, disease transmission, volcanic eruptions, or the structure of the atom) that would be too difficult, dangerous, or outright impossible to do in a “live” laboratory. Suggested extension activities lead students to hands-on investigations, away from the computer. This article presents the underlying rationale, instructional model, and process by which Explorations was designed and developed. It also describes the general courseware structure and three lesson's in detail, as well as presenting preliminary data from the evaluation. Finally, it suggests a model for incorporating technology into the science classroom.

  14. Comparison of student achievement among two science laboratory types: traditional and virtual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Mary Celeste

    Technology has changed almost every aspect of our daily lives. It is not surprising then that technology has made its way into the classroom. More and more educators are utilizing technological resources in creative ways with the intent to enhance learning, including using virtual laboratories in the sciences in place of the "traditional" science laboratories. This has generated much discussion as to the influence on student achievement when online learning replaces the face-to-face contact between instructor and student. The purpose of this study was to discern differences in achievement of two laboratory instruction types: virtual laboratory and a traditional laboratory. Results of this study indicate statistical significant differences in student achievement defined by averages on quiz scores in virtual labs compared with traditional face-to-face laboratories and traditional laboratories result in greater student learning gains than virtual labs. Lecture exam averages were also greater for students enrolled in the traditional laboratories compared to students enrolled in the virtual laboratories. To account for possible differences in ability among students, a potential extraneous variable, GPA and ACT scores were used as covariates.

  15. ARM-ACME V: ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements V on the North Slope of Alaska Science and Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Biraud, S

    2015-05-01

    Atmospheric temperatures are warming faster in the Arctic than predicted by climate models. The impact of this warming on permafrost degradation is not well understood, but it is projected to increase carbon decomposition and greenhouse gas production (CO₂ and/or CH₄) by arctic ecosystems. Airborne observations of atmospheric trace gases, aerosols, and cloud properties at the North Slope of Alaska are improving our understanding of global climate, with the goal of reducing the uncertainty in global and regional climate simulations and projections.

  16. Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory Operations System: Version 4.0 - system requirements specification

    SciTech Connect

    Kashporenko, D.

    1996-07-01

    This document is intended to provide an operations standard for the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory OPerations System (EMSL OPS). It is directed toward three primary audiences: (1) Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) facility and operations personnel; (2) laboratory line managers and staff; and (3) researchers, equipment operators, and laboratory users. It is also a statement of system requirements for software developers of EMSL OPS. The need for a finely tuned, superior research environment as provided by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory has never been greater. The abrupt end of the Cold War and the realignment of national priorities caused major US and competing overseas laboratories to reposition themselves in a highly competitive research marketplace. For a new laboratory such as the EMSL, this means coming into existence in a rapidly changing external environment. For any major laboratory, these changes create funding uncertainties and increasing global competition along with concomitant demands for higher standards of research product quality and innovation. While more laboratories are chasing fewer funding dollars, research ideas and proposals, especially for molecular-level research in the materials and biological sciences, are burgeoning. In such an economically constrained atmosphere, reduced costs, improved productivity, and strategic research project portfolio building become essential to establish and maintain any distinct competitive advantage. For EMSL, this environment and these demands require clear operational objectives, specific goals, and a well-crafted strategy. Specific goals will evolve and change with the evolution of the nature and definition of DOE`s environmental research needs. Hence, EMSL OPS is designed to facilitate migration of these changes with ease into every pertinent job function, creating a facile {open_quotes}learning organization.{close_quotes}

  17. A laboratory course for teaching laboratory techniques, experimental design, statistical analysis, and peer review process to undergraduate science students.

    PubMed

    Gliddon, C M; J Rosengren, R

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a 13-week laboratory course called Human Toxicology taught at the University of Otago, New Zealand. This course used a guided inquiry based laboratory coupled with formative assessment and collaborative learning to develop in undergraduate students the skills of problem solving/critical thinking, data interpretation and written discussion of results. The laboratory practices were a guided inquiry based around retinol's ability to potentiate acetaminophen-mediated hepatotoxicity. To induce critical thinking, students were given a choice as to which assay they could use to determine how retinol affected acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. Short summaries were handed in following each assay and formed the bases of the formative assessment. To complete the feedback loop, a summative assessment that consisted of all the graphs and concepts from the short summaries were combined into a manuscript. To give the students exposure to science communication, the manuscript had to be written in accordance to the submission guidelines for Toxicological Sciences. Evaluation of this course was determined by a student questionnaire using a Likert scale and students' responses were very favorable. While the subject matter was toxicological centric, the content could be easily modified to suit another subject matter in biochemistry and molecular biology. PMID:23166024

  18. Upgrade of the NASA 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) to its Full Science Capability of Sun-Sky-Cloud-Trace Gas Spectrometry in Airborne Science Deployments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Roy R.; Russell, P.; Dunagan, S.; Redemann, J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; LeBlanc, S.; Flynn, C.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this task in the AITT (Airborne Instrument Technology Transition) Program are to (1) upgrade the NASA 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument to its full science capability of measuring (a) direct-beam sun transmission to derive aerosol optical depth spectra, (b) sky radiance vs scattering angle to retrieve aerosol absorption and type (via complex refractive index spectra, shape, and mode-resolved size distribution), (c) zenith radiance for cloud properties, and (d) hyperspectral signals for trace gas retrievals, and (2) demonstrate its suitability for deployment in challenging NASA airborne multiinstrument campaigns. 4STAR combines airborne sun tracking, sky scanning, and zenith pointing with diffraction spectroscopy to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air pollution, radiant energy budgets (hence climate), and remote measurements of Earth's surfaces. Direct beam hyperspectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements are intended to tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. 4STAR test flights, as well as science flights in the 2012-13 TCAP (Two-Column Aerosol Project) and 2013 SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) have demonstrated that the following are essential for 4STAR to achieve its full science potential: (1) Calibration stability for both direct-beam irradiance and sky radiance, (2) Improved light collection and usage, and (3) Improved flight operability and reliability. A particular challenge

  19. A pocket guide to electronic laboratory notebooks in the academic life sciences.

    PubMed

    Dirnagl, Ulrich; Przesdzing, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Every professional doing active research in the life sciences is required to keep a laboratory notebook. However, while science has changed dramatically over the last centuries, laboratory notebooks have remained essentially unchanged since pre-modern science. We argue that the implementation of electronic laboratory notebooks (eLN) in academic research is overdue, and we provide researchers and their institutions with the background and practical knowledge to select and initiate the implementation of an eLN in their laboratories. In addition, we present data from surveying biomedical researchers and technicians regarding which hypothetical features and functionalities they hope to see implemented in an eLN, and which ones they regard as less important. We also present data on acceptance and satisfaction of those who have recently switched from paper laboratory notebook to an eLN.  We thus provide answers to the following questions: What does an electronic laboratory notebook afford a biomedical researcher, what does it require, and how should one go about implementing it? PMID:26835004

  20. A pocket guide to electronic laboratory notebooks in the academic life sciences

    PubMed Central

    Dirnagl, Ulrich; Przesdzing, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Every professional doing active research in the life sciences is required to keep a laboratory notebook. However, while science has changed dramatically over the last centuries, laboratory notebooks have remained essentially unchanged since pre-modern science. We argue that the implementation of electronic laboratory notebooks (eLN) in academic research is overdue, and we provide researchers and their institutions with the background and practical knowledge to select and initiate the implementation of an eLN in their laboratories. In addition, we present data from surveying biomedical researchers and technicians regarding which hypothetical features and functionalities they hope to see implemented in an eLN, and which ones they regard as less important. We also present data on acceptance and satisfaction of those who have recently switched from paper laboratory notebook to an eLN.  We thus provide answers to the following questions: What does an electronic laboratory notebook afford a biomedical researcher, what does it require, and how should one go about implementing it? PMID:26835004

  1. Flight Evaluation of the Army/NASA Variable Stability Fly-by-Wire Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concept Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) JUH-60A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arterburn, Dave

    2002-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center and the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate (AFDD) have performed initial flight evaluations of the Research Flight Control System (RFCS) integrated into the Army/NASA Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) JUH-60A. The highly modified JUH-6OA Black Hawk helicopter is a full authority, high bandwidth, variable stability, in-flight simulator designed to support development of advanced flight control, sensor, and integrated display and control technologies in a fail safe environment. Preparation for flight test required an extensive hazard analysis and ground testing to ensure proper system operation. A hardware in the loop development facility was utilized to evaluate control law stability following software changes, assess servo hardover upset conditions during manual and monitor disengagements and provide pilot familiarization of test techniques and software changes prior to flight. First engagement of the RFCS was conducted on 31 Aug 2001. RFCS transfer system operation, envelope expansion and a limited rate monitor evaluation have been completed with low bandwidth and model following control laws.

  2. Science Laboratory Classes for Freshmen in Tohoku University: Introductory Science Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suto, Shozo; Sekine, Tsutomu

    We report here the instructional design of introductory science experiments for freshmen and the effectiveness of the designed classes in Tohoku University. These classes are intended to aid students in thinking logically, willingness to challenge and understanding the fundamental concepts of natural phenomena through writing reports. We combined physics, chemistry, biology and earth science and set up five themed course entitled Life, Energy, Earth and Environment, Materials, and Science and Culture. In every year, about 1,650 students of all the science-related freshmen have attended since we started in 2004. Of the students taking the classes, 62% were favorable to them in 2004, 72% in 2009 and 69% in 2012, whilst only 50% of the students were positive about the old classes in 2001.

  3. Use of laboratory spectrometry to predict the detection of phytoplankton luminescence by an airborne Fraunhofer line discriminator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, Robert D.; Theisen, Arnold F.; Prezelin, Barbara B.

    1981-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of the excitation spectra of 13 species of phytoplankton (six diatoms, five dinoflagellates and two chrysophytes) were obtained with the emission wavelength held constant at 656.3 nm and the excitation wavelength scanned from 320 to 640 nm. Integrated excitation intensities were normalized to a standard concentration of rhodamine wt dye and the resulting luminescence compared to the minimum detectable FLD level of 0.12 parts per billion (p.p.b.) rhodamine wt. Results demonstrated that all 13 species would be detectable with an FLD at concentrations of 10.0 and 5.0 μg/1 of chlorophyll a and that only one would not be detectable at a chlorophyll a concentration of 1.0 μg/1.

  4. Partnerships between secondary/elementary science teachers and laboratory-based scientists: Delineating best practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Sandra

    Given the high probability of national and federal research laboratories continuing to sponsor science education partnerships between their staff and classroom science teachers and the dearth of research in this area, this study set out to delineate best practices associated with such partnerships for the purpose of increasing the effectiveness of future partnerships. This investigation critically examined two science education partnerships at selected federal research laboratories over the course of summer workshops and the subsequent academic year. Sources of data included interviews, workshop observations, electronic mail communication, written program evaluations, and casual conversation. A unique feature of this research was the inclusion of all representative groups including program administrators, laboratory scientists, and the participating classroom teachers. By capturing the perspectives of all participant groups, this research was able to present a complete portrayal of science education partnerships at two national research laboratories. The longitudinal nature of this investigation allowed for all components of each program (e.g. planning, organization, implementation, evaluation, and follow-up) to be included in the research. The determination of best practices in science education partnerships provided the framework for this research which clearly showed the underlying importance of the need for all participants to understand the goals and what is expected of them before the program gets underway. To be achievable, individual and programmatic expectations must be in alignment with the overall goals of a program. To be attainable, the goals must be understood by all and provide a framework for the expectations. Without a clear and shared vision of a programs direction, goals and expectations are not likely to be fulfilled. The common thread for each of these components is communication and its importance during all stages of a program cannot be

  5. Quality knowledge of science through virtual laboratory as an element of visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizman Herga, Natasa

    Doctoral dissertation discusses the use of virtual laboratory for learning and teaching chemical concepts at science classes in the seventh grade of primary school. The dissertation has got a two-part structure. In the first theoretical part presents a general platform of teaching science in elementary school, teaching forms and methods of teaching and among modern approaches we highlight experimental work. Particular emphasis was placed on the use of new technologies in education and virtual laboratories. Scientific findings on the importance of visualization of science concepts and their triple nature of their understanding are presented. These findings represent a fundamental foundation of empirical research presented in the second part of the doctoral dissertation, whose basic purpose was to examine the effectiveness of using virtual laboratory for teaching and learning chemical contents at science from students' point of view on knowledge and interest. We designed a didactic experiment in which 225 pupils participated. The work was conducted in the experimental and control group. Prior to its execution, the existing school practice among science and chemistry teachers was analysed in terms of: (1) inclusion of experimental work as a fundamental method of active learning chemical contents, (2) the use of visualization methods in the classroom and (3) the use of a virtual laboratory. The main findings of the empirical research, carried out in the school year 2012/2013, in which 48 science and chemistry participated, are that teachers often include experimental work when teaching chemical contents. Interviewed science teachers use a variety of visualization methods when presenting science concepts, in particular computer animation and simulation. Using virtual laboratory as a new strategy for teaching and learning chemical contents is not common because teachers lack special-didactic skills, enabling them to use virtual reality technology. Based on the didactic

  6. Mineralogy by X-ray Diffraction on Mars: The Chemin Instrument on Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Bristow, T. F.; Bish, D. L.; Ming, D. W.; Blake, D. F.; Morris, R. V.; Rampe, E. B.; Chipera, S. J.; Treiman, A. H.; Morrison, S. M.; Achilles, C. N.; Downs, R. T.; Farmer, J. D.; Crisp, J. A.; Morookian, J. M.; Des Marais, D. J.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Sarrazin, P.; Yen, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    To obtain detailed mineralogy information, the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity carries CheMin, the first X-ray diffraction (XRD) instrument used on a planet other than Earth. CheMin has provided the first in situ XRD analyses of full phase assemblages on another planet.

  7. Cognitive Research and Elementary Science Instruction: From the Laboratory, to the Classroom, and Back

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klahr, David; Li, Junlei

    2005-01-01

    Can cognitive research generate usable knowledge for elementary science instruction? Can issues raised by classroom practice drive the agenda of laboratory cognitive research? Answering yes to both questions, we advocate building a reciprocal interface between basic and applied research. We discuss five studies of the teaching, learning, and…

  8. The Examination of Elementary Preservice Teachers' Reflective Diaries and Epistemological Beliefs in Science Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Güven, Gökhan; Sülün, Yusuf; Çam, Aylin

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated the reflective dairies and epistemological beliefs of sophomore elementary preservice teachers (PTs) who were taking a "science laboratory" course. Twenty volunteers were participated in the study. The data were collected through the reflective dairies and open-ended questions about their epistemological beliefs.…

  9. The Impact of Federal Legislation on Education in the Clinical Laboratory Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Brenta G.

    Educational programs in the clinical laboratory sciences are responsible for producing professionals who can function in new environments. In addition, it is the responsibility of all individuals in the profession, regardless of professional role/function to assume the role of educator to prepare students in a way that is appropriate and useful to…

  10. Gamification in Science Education: Gamifying Learning of Microscopic Processes in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleischmann, Katja; Ariel, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and trouble-shooting microscopic processes involved in laboratory tests are often challenging for students in science education because of the inability to visualize the different steps and the various errors that may influence test outcome. The effectiveness of gamification or the use of game design elements and game-mechanics were…

  11. Sociology of Scientific Knowledge and Science Education Part 2: Laboratory Life under the Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slezak, Peter

    1994-01-01

    The second of two articles that examine some of the claims of contemporary sociology of scientific knowledge and the bearing of these claims upon the rationale and practice of science teaching. The celebrated work "Laboratory Life" by Latour and Woolgar is critically examined. (LZ)

  12. Promoting Science Outdoor Activities for Elementary School Children: Contributions from a Research Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boaventura, Diana; Faria, Claudia; Chagas, Isabel; Galvao, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to analyse the promotion of scientific literacy through practical research activities and to identify children's conceptions about scientists and how they do science. Elementary school children were engaged in two scientific experiments in a marine biology research laboratory. A total of 136 students answered a…

  13. Use of a Laboratory Field Project in an Introductory Crop Science Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Robert A.

    1986-01-01

    Assesses the benefits resulting from a laboratory field project and report for agricultural students in an introductory crop science course. Student responses to evaluation statements indicated that the project helped them identify crops, understand cultural and management practices, and recognize environmental influences that affect crop…

  14. Cross-Disciplinary Thermoregulation and Sweat Analysis Laboratory Experiences for Undergraduate Chemistry and Exercise Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Gregory; Taylor, Nichole; Glen, Mary; Tomlin, Dona; Gaul, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Cross-disciplinary (CD) learning experiences benefit student understanding of concepts and curriculum by offering opportunities to explore topics from the perspectives of alternate fields of study. This report involves a qualitative evaluation of CD health sciences undergraduate laboratory experiences in which concepts and students from two…

  15. Using Self-Reflection to Increase Science Process Skills in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veal, William R.; Taylor, Dawne; Rogers, Amy L.

    2009-01-01

    Self-reflection is a tool of instruction that has been used in the science classroom. Research has shown great promise in using video as a learning tool in the classroom. However, the integration of self-reflective practice using video in the general chemistry laboratory to help students develop process skills has not been done. Immediate video…

  16. Biomedical and environmental sciences programs at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, C.R.; Johnson, C.A.

    1988-02-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences Programs of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the major organizational units. Following the accounts of research programs, is a list of publications and awards to its members. 6 figs., 14 tabs.

  17. 78 FR 64204 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Personnel Management Demonstration Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... Project (75 FR 77380-77447, December 10, 2010). SUMMARY: On December 10, 2010 (75 FR 77380-77447), DoD... administrative corrections (78 FR 34655-34656) was published for a 30-day comment period. No comments were... of the Secretary Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Personnel Management...

  18. Comparison of Student Achievement among Two Science Laboratory Types: Traditional and Virtual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Mary Celeste

    2013-01-01

    Technology has changed almost every aspect of our daily lives. It is not surprising then that technology has made its way into the classroom. More and more educators are utilizing technological resources in creative ways with the intent to enhance learning, including using virtual laboratories in the sciences in place of the…

  19. Examining the Effects of Reflective Journals on Pre-Service Science Teachers' General Chemistry Laboratory Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cengiz, Canan; Karatas, Faik Özgür

    2015-01-01

    The general chemistry laboratory is an appropriate place for learning chemistry well. It is also effective for stimulating higher-order thinking skills, including reflective thinking, a skill that is crucial for science teaching as well as learning. This study aims to examine the effects of feedback-supported reflective journal-keeping activities…

  20. Virtual Laboratory as an Element of Visualization When Teaching Chemical Contents in Science Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herga, Nataša Rizman; Grmek, Milena Ivanuš; Dinevski, Dejan

    2014-01-01

    Using a variety of visualization tools for teaching and learning science and chemistry is necessary because pupils better understand chemical phenomena and formulate appropriate mental models. The purpose of the presented study was to determine the importance of a virtual laboratory as a visualization element when addressing chemical contents…

  1. Developing Critical Thinking Skills Using the Science Writing Heuristic in the Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, N. S.; Sadler-McKnight, N. P.

    2016-01-01

    The Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) laboratory approach is a teaching and learning tool which combines writing, inquiry, collaboration and reflection, and provides scaffolding for the development of critical thinking skills. In this study, the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST) was used to measure the critical thinking skills of…

  2. Clinical Laboratory Sciences Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Education in the clinical laboratory sciences in Kentucky and articulation within the field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and…

  3. A Comparative Study of Two Laboratory Approaches in a General Education College Physical Science Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellenberg, John Patrick

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative effectiveness of two laboratory approaches in a general education physical science course: (1) the experimental method called the contemporary topics, and (2) the control method called the standard topics. The criterion instruments were an investigator-constructed subject content test, the…

  4. Practicing biology: Undergraduate laboratory research, persistence in science, and the impact of self-efficacy beliefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkes, Elizabeth

    As undergraduate laboratory research internships become more popular and universities devote considerable resources towards promoting them, it is important to clarify what students specifically gain through involvement in these experiences and it is important to understand their impact on the science pipeline. By examining recent findings describing the primary benefits of undergraduate research participation, along with self-efficacy theory, this study aims to provide more explanatory power to the anecdotal and descriptive accounts regarding the relationship between undergraduate research experiences and interest in continuing in science. Furthermore, this study characterizes practices that foster students' confidence in doing scientific work with detailed description and analysis of the interactions of researchers in a laboratory. Phase 1 of the study, a survey of undergraduate biology majors (n=71) at a major research university, investigates the relationships among participation in biology laboratory research internships, biology laboratory self-efficacy strength, and interest in persisting in science. Phase 2 of the study, a two-year investigation of a university biology research laboratory, investigates how scientific communities of practice develop self-efficacy beliefs. The findings suggest that participation in lab internships results in increased interest in continuing in life science/biology graduate school and careers. They also suggest that a significant proportion of that interest is related to the students' biology laboratory self-efficacy. The findings of this study point to two primary ways that undergraduate research participation might work to raise self-efficacy strength. First, university research laboratory communities can provide students with a variety of resources that scaffold them into biology laboratory mastery experiences. Second, university research laboratory communities can provide students with coping and mastery Discourse models

  5. Laboratory, ground-based, and airborne tunable diode laser systems: performance characteristics and applications in atmospheric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, A.; Henry, B.; Wert, B.; Sewell, S.; Drummond, J. R.

    1998-09-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy has been employed by our group at the National Center for Atmospheric Research to study a number of important trace atmospheric gases and processes over the past 10 years. This paper presents an overview of these studies along with details on instrument hardware and software features implemented for high sensitivity. The merits of four different approaches in assessing instrument performance are presented with formaldehyde (CH2O) used as the target gas. One method utilizes the Allan variance. When our present aircraft system is operated in the laboratory, the Allan variance indicates a CH2O detection limit of 0.031 ppbv for integration times of 25 s. This sensitivity corresponds to a minimum detectable absorbance of 1.0᎒-6, and this is within a factor of two of that reported by Werle et al. who used high-frequency modulation spectroscopy. The present instrument utilizes conventional low-frequency (2f=100 kHz) wavelength modulation. Instrument performance, obtained from replicate measurements of CH2O standards acquired over time periods as long as 1.5 hours, on average resulted in a factor of two poorer precision than indicated by the Allan variance. Since replicate measurements precisely simulate the acquisition procedures employed, including the acquisition of sample and background spectra, they present a more meaningful measure of instrument performance. Preliminary evidence suggests that slow drifts in the laser wavelength control during acquisition of replicate measurements may play an important role in the above disparity. The resultant laser wavelength correction voltage, which is applied to counter such drifts, may also be a factor in this disparity. A limited number of replicate measurements with minimal drift in the laser wavelength yield much closer agreement between replicate and Allan variance precisions.

  6. Engaging Students Through Classroom Connection Webinars to Improve Their Understanding of the Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, Paige V.; Achilles, Cherie

    2013-01-01

    Planetary exploration missions to other worlds, like Mars, can generate a lot of excitement and wonder for the public. The Mars Science Laboratory Mission is one of the latest planetary missions that has intrigued the public perhaps more than most. How can scientists and educational specialists capitalize on the allure of this mission and involve students and teachers in a way that not only shares the story of the mission, but actively engages classrooms with scientists and improves their understanding of the science? The Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program [1], facilitated by the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate Education Program at the NASA Johnson Space Center achieves this by facilitating MSL mission focused classroom connection webinars. Five MSL-focused webinars facilitated through EEAB during the 2012 fall semester engaged almost 3000 students and teachers. Involved STEM experts/role models helped translate the science behind the Mars Science Laboratory mission in a comprehensive, exciting, and engaging manner. These virtual events captured participants attention while increasing their science awareness and understanding of the MSL mission.

  7. Airborne Passive Microwave Measurements from the AMISA 2008 Science Campaign for Modeling of Arctic Sea Ice Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucker, M. L.; Gasiewski, A. J.; CenterEnvironmental Technology

    2011-12-01

    While climate changes in the Arctic are occurring more rapidly than anywhere else on Earth model-based predictions of sea ice extent are at once both more optimistic than the data suggest and exhibit a high degree of variability. It is believed that this high level of uncertainty is the result of an inadequate quantitative understanding of surface heating mechanisms, which in large part is due to a lack of high spatial resolution data on boundary layer and surface energy processes during melt and freezeup. In August 2008 the NASA Arctic Mechanisms of Interactions between the Surface and Atmosphere (AMISA) campaign, in conjunction with the Swedish-led Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study (ASCOS) conducted coordinated high spatial resolution measurements of geophysical parameters in the Arctic relevant to atmospheric-sea ice interaction. The IPY-approved AMISA campaign used airborne radiometers, including the Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR) system, a suite of L-band to V-band fixed-beam radiometers for cloud liquid and water vapor measurement, short and longwave radiation sensors, meteorological parameters from cloud size distribution probes, GPS dropsondes, and aerosol sensors. Calibration of the PSR is achieved through periodic observations of stable references such as thermal blackbody targets and noise diodes. A combination of methods using both infrequent external thermal blackbody views and brief frequent internal noise sources has proven practical for airborne systems such as the PSR and is proposed for spaceborne systems such as GeoMAS. Once radiometric data is calibrated it is then rasterized into brightness temperature images which are then geo-located and imported into Google EarthTM. An example brightness temperature map from the AMISA 2008 campaign is included in this abstract. The analysis of this data provides a basis for the development of a heat flux model needed to decrease the uncertainly in weather and climate predictions within the Arctic. In

  8. An Inquiry-Based Contextual Approach as the Primary Mode of Learning Science with Microcomputer-Based Laboratory Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Fernando; Quarless, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    Science instruction can be designed to be laboratory-data driven. We report on an investigation of the use of thematic inquiry-based tasks with active incorporation of mathematics, science, and microcomputer-based laboratory technology in standards-correlated activities that enhanced learning experiences. Activities involved students in two major…

  9. Preparation for microgravity: The role of the microgravity materials science laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, J. Christopher; Rosenthal, Bruce N.; Meyer, Maryjo B.; Glasgow, Thomas K.

    1988-01-01

    A laboratory dedicated to ground based materials processing in preparation for space flight was established at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Experiments are performed to delineate the effects of gravity on processes of both scientific and commercial interest. Processes are modeled physically and mathematically. Transport model systems are used where possible to visually track convection, settling, crystal growth, phase separation, agglomeration, vapor transport, diffusive flow, and polymers reactions. The laboratory contains apparatus which functionally duplicates apparatus available for flight experiments and other pieces instrumented specifically to allow process characterization. Materials addressed include metals, alloys, salts, glasses, ceramics, and polymers. The Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory is staffed by engineers and technicians from a variety of disciplines and is open to users from industry and academia as well as the government. Examples will be given of the laboratory apparatus typical experiments and results.

  10. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  11. Promoting Science Outdoor Activities for Elementary School Children: Contributions from a research laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaventura, Diana; Faria, Cláudia; Chagas, Isabel; Galvão, Cecília

    2013-03-01

    The purposes of the study were to analyse the promotion of scientific literacy through practical research activities and to identify children's conceptions about scientists and how they do science. Elementary school children were engaged in two scientific experiments in a marine biology research laboratory. A total of 136 students answered a questionnaire about their previous habits towards science and carried out the following actions: (1) a guided visit to the laboratory, (2) a brief presentation of the research theme, (3) the development of two experiments, and (4) a questionnaire about the experiments and science conceptions. The research methods included observation, document analysis, and content analysis of the answers to the questionnaires. Additionally, each visit was video recorded in order to design learning materials. The results revealed that most of the pupils were able to follow every stage of experimentation. However, some of them misinterpreted results and conclusions. One implication of the study is that this type of outdoor activity is extremely important to promote meaningful science learning in children, but more care should be taken in practical science activities so that children can overcome some common difficulties when performing scientific inquiry.

  12. An Overview of Science Education and Outreach Activities at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delooper, J.

    2005-10-01

    As a Department of Energy Laboratory, the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has an energetic science education program and outreach effort. This overview describes the components of the programs and evaluates this effort during the last several years. The primary goal is to inform the public regarding the fusion and plasma research at PPPL and to excite students so that they can appreciate science and technology. The public's interest in science can be raised by news media publicity, tours, summer research experiences, in-classroom presentations, plasma expos, teacher workshops, printed and web-based materials. The ultimate result of this effort is a better-informed public, as well as an increase in the number of women and minorities who choose science as a vocation. Measuring the results is difficult, but current metrics are reviewed. The science education and outreach programs are supported by a dedicated core group of individuals and supplemented by PPPL staff, friends and family members who help with various outreach and educational activities. Supported by U. S. DOE Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073/ab

  13. Airborne laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberson, Steven E.

    2002-06-01

    The US Air Force Airborne Laser (ABL) is an airborne, megawatt-class laser system with a state-of-the-art atmospheric compensation system to destroy enemy ballistic missiles at long ranges. This system will provide both deterrence and defense against the use of such weapons during conflicts. This paper provides an overview of the ABL weapon system including: the notional operational concept, the development approach and schedule, the overall aircraft configuration, the technologies being incorporated in the ABL, and the risk reduction approach being utilized to ensure program success.

  14. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Navigation Strategy for Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent and Landing Telecommunication Relay Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jessica L.; Menon, Premkumar R.; Demcak, Stuart W.

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) is an orbiting asset that performs remote sensing observations in order to characterize the surface, subsurface and atmosphere of Mars. To support upcoming NASA Mars Exploration Program Office objectives, MRO will be used as a relay communication link for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission during the MSL Entry, Descent and Landing sequence. To do so, MRO Navigation must synchronize the MRO Primary Science Orbit (PSO) with a set of target conditions requested by the MSL Navigation Team; this may be accomplished via propulsive maneuvers. This paper describes the MRO Navigation strategy for and operational performance of MSL EDL relay telecommunication support.

  15. Effect of Cooperative Learning and Traditional Methods on Students' Achievements and Identifications of Laboratory Equipments in Science-Technology Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Suleyman

    2011-01-01

    Science lessons taught via experiments motivate the students, and make them more insistent on learning science. This study aims to examine the effects of cooperative learning on students' academic achievements and their skills in identifying laboratory equipments. The sample for the study consisted of a total of 43 sophomore students in primary…

  16. Chemistry as the defining science: discipline and training in nineteenth-century chemical laboratories.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Catherine M

    2011-06-01

    The institutional revolution has become a major landmark of late-nineteenth century science, marking the rapid construction of large, institutional laboratories which transformed scientific training and practice. Although it has served historians of physics well, the institutional revolution has proved much more contentious in the case of chemistry. I use published sources, mainly written by chemists and largely focused on laboratories built in German-speaking lands between about 1865 and 1900, to show that chemical laboratory design was inextricably linked to productive practice, large-scale pedagogy and disciplinary management. I argue that effective management of the novel risks inherent in teaching and doing organic synthesis was significant in driving and shaping the construction of late-nineteenth century institutional chemical laboratories, and that these laboratories were essential to the disciplinary development of chemistry. Seen in this way, the laboratory necessarily becomes part of the material culture of late-nineteenth century chemistry, and I show how this view leads not only to a revision of what is usually known as the laboratory revolution in chemistry but also to a new interpretation of the institutional revolution in physics. PMID:21722963

  17. Preparation for microgravity - The role of the Microgravity Material Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, J. Christopher; Rosenthal, Bruce N.; Meyer, Maryjo B.; Glasgow, Thomas K.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments at the NASA Lewis Research Center's Microgravity Material Science Laboratory using physical and mathematical models to delineate the effects of gravity on processes of scientific and commercial interest are discussed. Where possible, transparent model systems are used to visually track convection, settling, crystal growth, phase separation, agglomeration, vapor transport, diffusive flow, and polymer reactions. Materials studied include metals, alloys, salts, glasses, ceramics, and polymers. Specific technologies discussed include the General Purpose furnace used in the study of metals and crystal growth, the isothermal dendrite growth apparatus, the electromagnetic levitator/instrumented drop tube, the high temperature directional solidification furnace, the ceramics and polymer laboratories and the center's computing facilities.

  18. The Effect of Simulation-Assisted Laboratory Applications on Pre-Service Teachers' Attitudes towards Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulukök, Seyma; Sari, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effects of computer-assisted laboratory applications on pre-service science teachers' attitudes towards science teaching were investigated and the opinions of the pre-service teachers about the application were also determined. The study sample consisted of 46 students studying science teaching Faculty of Education. The study…

  19. The Design of Multi-Purpose Science Laboratories for Lower Second Level Schools in Asia. Study No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderberg, B. H.

    The small size of many schools in the Asian Region would cause separate laboratories for chemistry and biology to be underutilized. In many larger schools the curricula include "general science," with contents from biology, physics, and chemistry. This paper describes multipurpose spaces for science activities sufficient for science teaching and…

  20. Detection Limit of Smectite by Chemin IV Laboratory Instrument: Preliminary Implications for Chemin on the Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archilles, Cherie; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Blake, D. F.

    2011-01-01

    The CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is an miniature X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument capable of detecting the mineralogical and elemental compositions of rocks, outcrops and soils on the surface of Mars. CheMin uses a microfocus-source Co X-ray tube, a transmission sample cell, and an energy-discriminating X-ray sensitive CCD to produce simultaneous 2-D XRD patterns and energy-dispersive X-ray histograms from powdered samples. CRISM and OMEGA have identified the presence of phyllosilicates at several locations on Mars including the four candidate MSL landing sites. The objective of this study was to conduct preliminary studies to determine the CheMin detection limit of smectite in a smectite/olivine mixed mineral system.