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Sample records for airborne sounder testbed

  1. Sensor System Performance Evaluation and Benefits from the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, A.; Zhou, D.; Smith, W.

    2009-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global-scale measurements of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring, and environmental change detection. Validation of the entire measurement system is crucial to achieving this goal and thus maximizing research and operational utility of resultant data. Field campaigns employing satellite under-flights with well-calibrated FTS sensors aboard high-altitude aircraft are an essential part of this validation task. The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I) has been a fundamental contributor in this area by providing coincident high spectral/spatial resolution observations of infrared spectral radiances along with independently-retrieved geophysical products for comparison with like products from satellite sensors being validated. This paper focuses on some of the challenges associated with validating advanced atmospheric sounders and the benefits obtained from employing airborne interferometers such as the NAST-I. Select results from underflights of the Aqua Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) obtained during recent field campaigns will be presented.

  2. NASA's Coastal and Ocean Airborne Science Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, L. S.; Dungan, J. L.; Edwards, M.; Russell, P. B.; Morrow, J. H.; Hooker, S.; Myers, J.; Kudela, R. M.; Dunagan, S.; Soulage, M.; Ellis, T.; Clinton, N. E.; Lobitz, B.; Martin, K.; Zell, P.; Berthold, R. W.; Smith, C.; Andrew, D.; Gore, W.; Torres, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Coastal and Ocean Airborne Science Testbed (COAST) Project is a NASA Earth-science flight mission that will advance coastal ecosystems research by providing a unique airborne payload optimized for remote sensing in the optically complex coastal zone. Teaming NASA Ames scientists and engineers with Biospherical Instruments, Inc. (San Diego) and UC Santa Cruz, the airborne COAST instrument suite combines a customized imaging spectrometer, sunphotometer system, and a new bio-optical radiometer package to obtain ocean/coastal/atmosphere data simultaneously in flight for the first time. The imaging spectrometer (Headwall) is optimized in the blue region of the spectrum to emphasize remote sensing of marine and freshwater ecosystems. Simultaneous measurements supporting empirical atmospheric correction of image data will be accomplished using the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14). Based on optical detectors called microradiometers, the NASA Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry Calibration and Validation (cal/val) Office team has deployed advanced commercial off-the-shelf instrumentation that provides in situ measurements of the apparent optical properties at the land/ocean boundary including optically shallow aquatic ecosystems (e.g., lakes, estuaries, coral reefs). A complimentary microradiometer instrument package (Biospherical Instruments, Inc.), optimized for use above water, will be flown for the first time with the airborne instrument suite. Details of the October 2011 COAST airborne mission over Monterey Bay demonstrating this new airborne instrument suite capability will be presented, with associated preliminary data on coastal ocean color products, coincident spatial and temporal data on aerosol optical depth and water vapor column content, as well as derived exact water-leaving radiances.

  3. NASA'S Coastal and Ocean Airborne Science Testbed (COAST): Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, L. S.; Dungan, J. L.; Edwards, M.; Russell, P. B.; Morrow, J. H.; Kudela, R. M.; Myers, J. S.; Livingston, J.; Lobitz, B.; Torres-Perez, J.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Coastal and Ocean Airborne Science Testbed (COAST) project advances coastal ecosystems research and ocean color calibration and validation capability by providing a unique airborne payload optimized for remote sensing in the optically complex coastal zone. The COAST instrument suite combines a customized imaging spectrometer, sunphotometer system, and a new bio-optical radiometer package to obtain ocean/coastal/atmosphere data simultaneously in flight for the first time. The imaging spectrometer (Headwall) is optimized in the blue region of the spectrum to emphasize remote sensing of marine and freshwater ecosystems. Simultaneous measurements supporting empirical atmospheric correction of image data is accomplished using the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14). Coastal Airborne In situ Radiometers (C-AIR, Biospherical Instruments, Inc.), developed for COAST for airborne campaigns from field-deployed microradiometer instrumentation, will provide measurements of apparent optical properties at the land/ocean boundary including optically shallow aquatic ecosystems. Ship-based measurements allowed validation of airborne measurements. Radiative transfer modeling on in-water measurements from the HyperPro and Compact-Optical Profiling System (C-OPS, the in-water companion to C-AIR) profiling systems allows for comparison of airborne and in-situ water leaving radiance measurements. Results of the October 2011 Monterey Bay COAST mission include preliminary data on coastal ocean color products, coincident spatial and temporal data on aerosol optical depth and water vapor column content, as well as derived exact water-leaving radiances.

  4. A Simulation Testbed for Airborne Merging and Spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos, Michel; Manikonda, Vikram; Feinberg, Art; Lohr, Gary

    2008-01-01

    The key innovation in this effort is the development of a simulation testbed for airborne merging and spacing (AM&S). We focus on concepts related to airports with Super Dense Operations where new airport runway configurations (e.g. parallel runways), sequencing, merging, and spacing are some of the concepts considered. We focus on modeling and simulating a complementary airborne and ground system for AM&S to increase efficiency and capacity of these high density terminal areas. From a ground systems perspective, a scheduling decision support tool generates arrival sequences and spacing requirements that are fed to the AM&S system operating on the flight deck. We enhanced NASA's Airspace Concept Evaluation Systems (ACES) software to model and simulate AM&S concepts and algorithms.

  5. Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research Testbed: Aircraft Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Thomas L.; Langford, William M.; Hill, Jeffrey S.

    2005-01-01

    The Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) testbed being developed at NASA Langley Research Center is an experimental flight test capability for research experiments pertaining to dynamics modeling and control beyond the normal flight envelope. An integral part of that testbed is a 5.5% dynamically scaled, generic transport aircraft. This remotely piloted vehicle (RPV) is powered by twin turbine engines and includes a collection of sensors, actuators, navigation, and telemetry systems. The downlink for the plane includes over 70 data channels, plus video, at rates up to 250 Hz. Uplink commands for aircraft control include over 30 data channels. The dynamic scaling requirement, which includes dimensional, weight, inertial, actuator, and data rate scaling, presents distinctive challenges in both the mechanical and electrical design of the aircraft. Discussion of these requirements and their implications on the development of the aircraft along with risk mitigation strategies and training exercises are included here. Also described are the first training (non-research) flights of the airframe. Additional papers address the development of a mobile operations station and an emulation and integration laboratory.

  6. Comparison of airborne lidar measurements with 420 kHz echo-sounder measurements of zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Churnside, James H; Thorne, Richard E

    2005-09-10

    Airborne lidar has the potential to survey large areas quickly and at a low cost per kilometer along a survey line. For this reason, we investigated the performance of an airborne lidar for surveys of zooplankton. In particular, we compared the lidar returns with echo-sounder measurements of zooplankton in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Data from eight regions of the Sound were compared, and the correlation between the two methods was 0.78. To obtain this level of agreement, a threshold was applied to the lidar return to remove the effects of scattering from phytoplankton. PMID:16161666

  7. Laser Communications Airborne Testbed: Potential For An Air-To-Satellite Laser Communications Link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, Robert J.

    1988-05-01

    The Laser Communications Airborne Testbed (LCAT) offers an excellent opportunity for testing of an air-to-satellite laser communications link with the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The direct detection laser portion of the ACTS is suitable for examining the feasibility of an airborne terminal. Development of an airborne laser communications terminal is not currently part of the ACTS program; however, an air-to-satellite link is of interest. The Air Force performs airborne laser communications experiments to examine the potential usefulness of this technology to future aircraft. Lasers could be used, for example, by future airborne command posts and reconnaissance aircraft to communicate via satellite over long distances and transmit large quantities of data in the fastest way possible from one aircraft to another or to ground sites. Lasers are potentially secure, jam resistant and hard to detect and in this regard increase the survivability of the users. Under a contract awarded by Aeronautical Systems Division's Avionics Laboratory, a C-135E testbed aircraft belonging to ASD's 4950th Test Wing will be modified to create a Laser Communications Airborne Testbed. The contract is for development and fabrication of laser testbed equipment and support of the aircraft modification effort by the Test Wing. The plane to be modified is already in use as a testbed for other satellite communications projects and the LCAT effort will expand those capabilities. This analysis examines the characteristics of an LCAT to ACTS direct detection communications link. The link analysis provides a measure of the feasibility of developing an airborne laser terminal which will interface directly to the LCAT. Through the existence of the LCAT, the potential for development of an air-to-satellite laser communications terminal for the experimentation with the ACTS system is greatly enhanced.

  8. Preliminary results of the LLNL airborne experimental test-bed SAR system

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.G.; Mullenhoff, C.J.; Kiefer, R.D.; Brase, J.M.; Wieting, M.G.; Berry, G.L.; Jones, H.E.

    1996-01-16

    The Imaging and Detection Program (IDP) within Laser Programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in cooperation with the Hughes Aircraft Company has developed a versatile, high performance, airborne experimental test-bed (AETB) capability. The test-bed has been developed for a wide range of research and development experimental applications including radar and radiometry plus, with additional aircraft modifications, optical systems. The airborne test-bed capability has been developed within a Douglas EA-3B Skywarrior jet aircraft provided and flown by Hughes Aircraft Company. The current test-bed payload consists of an X-band radar system, a high-speed data acquisition, and a real-time processing capability. The medium power radar system is configured to operate in a high resolution, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) mode and is highly configurable in terms of waveforrns, PRF, bandwidth, etc. Antennas are mounted on a 2-axis gimbal in the belly radome of the aircraft which provides pointing and stabilization. Aircraft position and antenna attitude are derived from a dedicated navigational system and provided to the real-time SAR image processor for instant image reconstruction and analysis. This paper presents a further description of the test-bed and payload subsystems plus preliminary results of SAR imagery.

  9. Airborne Deployment and Calibration of Microwave Atmospheric Sounder on 6U CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, S.; Brown, S. T.; Lim, B.; Kangaslahti, P.; Russell, D.; Stachnik, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    To accurately predict how the distribution of extreme events may change in the future we need to understand the mechanisms that influence such events in our current climate. Our current observing system is not well-suited for observing extreme events globally due to the sparse sampling and in-homogeneity of ground-based in-situ observations and the infrequent revisit time of satellite observations. Observations of weather extremes, such as extreme precipitation events, temperature extremes, tropical and extra-tropical cyclones among others, with temporal resolution on the order of minutes and spatial resolution on the order of few kms (<10 kms), are required for improved forecasting of extreme weather events. We envision a suite of low-cost passive microwave sounding and imaging sensors on CubeSats that would work in concert with traditional flagship observational systems, such as those manifested on large environmental satellites (i.e. JPSS,WSF,GCOM-W), to monitor weather extremes. A 118/183 GHz sensor would enable observations of temperature and precipitation extremes over land and ocean as well as tropical and extra-tropical cyclones. This proposed project would enable low cost, compact radiometer instrumentation at 118 and 183 GHz that would fit in a 6U Cubesat with the objective of mass-producing this design to enable a suite of small satellites to image the key geophysical parameters needed to improve prediction of extreme weather events. We take advantage of past and current technology developments at JPL viz. HAMSR (High Altitude Microwave Scanning Radiometer), Advanced Component Technology (ACT'08) to enable low-mass, low-power high frequency airborne radiometers. In this paper, we will describe the design and implementation of the 118 GHz temperature sounder and 183 GHz humidity sounder on the 6U CubeSat. In addition, we will discuss the maiden airborne deployment of the instrument during the Plain Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) experiment. The

  10. The Orlando TDWR testbed and airborne wind shear date comparison results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Steven; Berke, Anthony; Matthews, Michael

    1992-01-01

    The focus of this talk is on comparing terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) and airborne wind shear data in computing a microburst hazard index called the F factor. The TDWR is a ground-based system for detecting wind shear hazards to aviation in the terminal area. The Federal Aviation Administration will begin deploying TDWR units near 45 airports in late 1992. As part of this development effort, M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory operates under F.A.A. support a TDWR testbed radar in Orlando, FL. During the past two years, a series of flight tests has been conducted with instrumented aircraft penetrating microburst events while under testbed radar surveillance. These tests were carried out with a Cessna Citation 2 aircraft operated by the University of North Dakota (UND) Center for Aerospace Sciences in 1990, and a Boeing 737 operated by NASA Langley Research Center in 1991. A large data base of approximately 60 instrumented microburst penetrations has been obtained from these flights.

  11. Real-time Data Processing and Visualization for the Airborne Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. K.; Revercomb, H. E.; Hoese, D.; Garcia, R. K.; Smith, W. L.; Weisz, E.; Tobin, D. C.; Best, F. A.; Knuteson, R. O.; Sullivan, D. V.; Barnes, C. M.; Van Gilst, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) is a five-year NASA mission targeted to enhance the understanding of the formation and evolution of hurricanes in the Atlantic basin. Measurements were made from two NASA Global Hawk Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) during the 2012 through 2014 hurricane seasons, with flights conducted from the NASA Wallops Flight Facility. The Global Hawk aircraft are capable of high altitude flights with durations of up to 30 hours, which allow extensive observations over distant storms, not typically possible with manned aircraft. The two NASA Global Hawks were equipped with instrument suites to study the storm environment, and inner core structure and processes, respectively. The Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS), designed and built by the University of Wisconsin (UW) Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC), measures emitted thermal radiation at high spectral resolution between 3.3 and 18 microns. The radiance measurements are used to obtain temperature and water vapor profiles of the Earth's atmosphere. The S-HIS spatial resolution is 2 km at nadir, across a 40 km ground swath from a nominal altitude of 20 kilometers. Since 1998, the S-HIS has participated in 33 field campaigns and has proven to be extremely dependable, effective, and highly accurate. It has flown on the NASA ER-2, DC-8, Proteus, WB-57, and Global Hawk airborne platforms. The UW S-HIS infrared sounder instrument is equipped with a real-time ground data processing system capable of delivering atmospheric profiles, radiance data, and engineering status to mission support scientists - all within less than one minute from the time of observation. This ground data processing system was assembled by a small team using existing software and proven practical techniques similar to a satellite ground system architecture. This summary outlines the design overview for the system and illustrates the data path, content, and outcomes.

  12. SAFIRE-A: An airborne far infra-red limb sounder

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, P.; Carli, B.; Ade, P.; Nolt, I.; Leotin, J.; Carlotti, M.

    1995-12-31

    The design and scientific objectives of the SAFIRE-A (Spectroscopy of the Atmosphere using Far Infra-Red Emissions-Airborne) instrument will be described. The instrument exploits technical developments achieved during the development of the SAFIRE concept for space. These include an interferometer of compact design with spectral resolution 0.004 cm{sup {minus}1}, and narrow-band filters (2 cm{sup {minus}1} wide) to reduce photon noise. The instrument is capable of detecting ozone and trace gases that affect ozone depletion, for example OH, HO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, HOCl, HCl, ClO, HF, HBr and also H{sub 2}O. The measurements will include column content above the aircraft (above 20 km) and height resolved abundances at lower altitudes.

  13. Lidar measurements of the column CO2 mixing ratio made by NASA Goddard's CO2 Sounder during the NASA ASCENDS 2014 Airborne campaign.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, A. K.; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Kawa, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing measurements of CO2 from space can help improve our understanding of the carbon cycle and help constrain the global carbon budget. However, such measurements need to be sufficiently accurate to detect small (1 ppm) changes in the CO2 mixing ratio (XCO2) against a large background (~ 400 ppm). Satellite measurements of XCO2 using passive spectrometers, such as those from the Japanese GOSAT (Greenhouse gas Observing Satellite) and the NASA OCO-2 (Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2) are limited to daytime sunlit portions of the Earth and are susceptible to biases from clouds and aerosols. For this reason, NASA commissioned the formulation study of ASCENDS a space-based lidar mission. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's CO2 Sounder lidar is one candidate approach for the ASCENDS mission. The NASA GSFC CO2 Sounder measures the CO2 mixing ratio using a pulsed multi-wavelength integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) approach. The CO2 Sounder has flown in the 2011, 2013 and 2014 ASCENDS airborne campaigns over the continental US, and has produced measurements in close agreement with in situ measurements of the CO2 column. In 2014, the CO2 Sounder upgraded its laser with a precision step-locked diode laser source to improve the lidar wavelength position accuracy. It also improved its optical receiver with a low-noise, high efficiency, HgCdTe avalanche photo diode detector. The combination of these two technologies enabled lidar XCO2 measurements with unprecedented accuracy. In this presentation, we show analysis from the ASCENDS 2014 field campaign, exploring: (1) Horizontal XCO2 gradients measured by the lidar, (2) Comparisons of lidar XCO2 measurements against the Parameterized Chemistry Transport Model (PCTM), and (3) Lidar column water vapor measurements using a HDO absorption line that occurs next to the CO2 absorption line. This can reduce the uncertainty in the dry air column used in XCO2 retrievals.

  14. Initial Retrieval Validation from the Joint Airborne IASI Validation Experiment (JAIVEx)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Smith, WIlliam L.; Larar, Allen M.; Taylor, Jonathan P.; Revercomb, Henry E.; Mango, Stephen A.; Schluessel, Peter; Calbet, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    The Joint Airborne IASI Validation Experiment (JAIVEx) was conducted during April 2007 mainly for validation of the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the MetOp satellite, but also included a strong component focusing on validation of the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) aboard the AQUA satellite. The cross validation of IASI and AIRS is important for the joint use of their data in the global Numerical Weather Prediction process. Initial inter-comparisons of geophysical products have been conducted from different aspects, such as using different measurements from airborne ultraspectral Fourier transform spectrometers (specifically, the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed Interferometer (NAST-I) and the Scanning-High resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS) aboard the NASA WB-57 aircraft), UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe146-301 aircraft insitu instruments, dedicated dropsondes, radiosondes, and ground based Raman Lidar. An overview of the JAIVEx retrieval validation plan and some initial results of this field campaign are presented.

  15. Airborne/Space-Based Doppler Lidar Wind Sounders Sampling the PBL and Other Regions of Significant Beta and U Inhomogeneities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmitt, Dave

    1998-01-01

    This final report covers the period from April 1994 through March 1998. The proposed research was organized under four main tasks. Those tasks were: (1) Investigate the vertical and horizontal velocity structures within and adjacent to thin and subvisual cirrus; (2) Investigate the lowest 1 km of the PBL and develop algorithms for processing pulsed Doppler lidar data obtained from single shots into regions of significant inhomogeneities in Beta and U; (3) Participate in OSSEs including those designed to establish shot density requirements for meso-gamma scale phenomena with quasi-persistent locations (e.g., jets, leewaves, tropical storms); and (4) Participate in the planning and execution of an airborne mission to measure winds with a pulsed CO2 Doppler lidar. Over the four year period of this research contract, work on all four tasks has yielded significant results which have led to 38 professional presentations (conferences and publications) and have been folded into the science justification for an approved NASA space mission, SPARCLE (SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment), in 2001. Also this research has, through Task 4, led to a funded proposal to work directly on a NASA field campaign, CAMEX III, in which an airborne Doppler wind lidar will be used to investigate the cloud-free circulations near tropical storms. Monthly progress reports required under this contract are on file. This final report will highlight major accomplishments, including some that were not foreseen in the original proposal. The presentation of this final report includes this written document as well as material that is better presented via the internet (web pages). There is heavy reference to appended papers and documents. Thus, the main body of the report will serve to summarize the key efforts and findings.

  16. First Airborne IPDA Lidar Measurements of Methane and Carbon Dioxide Applying the DLR Greenhouse Gas Sounder CHARM-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amediek, A.; Ehret, G.; Fix, A.; Wirth, M.; Quatrevalet, M.; Büdenbender, C.; Kiemle, C.; Loehring, J.; Gerbig, C.

    2015-12-01

    First airborne measurement using CHARM-F, the four-wavelengths lidar for simultaneous soundings of atmospheric CO2 and CH4, were performed in Spring 2015 onboard the German research aircraft HALO. The lidar is designed in the IPDA (integrated path differential absorption) configuration using short double pulses, which gives column averaged gas mixing ratios between aircraft and ground. HALO's maximum flight altitude of 15 km and special features of the lidar, such as a relatively large laser ground spot, enable the CHARM-F system to be an airborne demonstrator for future spaceborne greenhouse gas lidars. Due to a high technological conformity this applies in particular to the French-German satellite mission MERLIN, the spaceborne methane IPDA lidar. The successfully completed flight measurements provide a valuable dataset, which supports the retrieval algorithm development for MERLIN notably. The flights covered different ground cover types, different orography types as well as the sea. Additionally, we captured different cloud conditions, at which the broken cloud case is a matter of particular interest. This dataset allows detailed analyses of measurement sensitivities, general studies on the IPDA principle and on technical details of the system. These activities are supported by another instrument onboard: a cavity ring down spectrometer, providing in-situ data of carbon dioxide, methane and water vapor with high accuracy and precision, which is ideal for validation purposes of the lidar. Additionally the onboard instrumentation of HALO gives information about pressure and temperature for cross-checking the ECMWF data, which are intended to be used for calculating the weighting function, the key quantity for the retrieval of gas column mixing ratios from the measured gas optical depths. In combination with dedicated descents into the boundary layer and subsequent ascents, a self-contained dataset for characterizations of CHARM-F is available.

  17. An update on the NAST-I airborne FTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Smith, William L.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Noe, Anna; Oliver, Don; Flood, Michael; Rochette, Luc; Tian, Jialin

    2011-11-01

    The NPOESS / NASA Airborne Sounder Testbed - Interferometer (NAST-I) is a well-proven airborne remote sensing system, which has flown in 18 previous field campaigns aboard the high altitude NASA ER-2, Northrop Grumman / Scaled Composites Proteus, and NASA WB-57 aircraft since initially being flight qualified in 1998. While originally developed to provide experimental observations needed to finalize specifications and test proposed designs and data processing algorithms for the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) to fly on the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP) and the Joint Polar Satellite System, JPSS (formerly NPOESS, prior to recent program restructuring), its unprecedented data quality and system characteristics have contributed to a variety of atmospheric research and measurement validation objectives. This paper will provide a program overview and update, including a summary of measurement system capabilities, select scientific results, and recent refurbishment activities.

  18. Advanced algorithms and high-performance testbed for large-scale site characterization and subsurface target detection using airborne ground-penetrating SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fijany, Amir; Collier, James B.; Citak, Ari

    1999-08-01

    A team of US Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District and Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville, JPL, Stanford Research Institute (SRI), and Montgomery Watson is currently in the process of planning and conducting the largest ever survey at the Former Buckley Field, in Colorado, by using SRI airborne, ground penetrating, SAR. The purpose of this survey is the detection of surface and subsurface Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) and in a broader sense the site characterization for identification of contaminated as well as clear areas. In preparation for such a large-scale survey, JPL has been developing advanced algorithms and a high-performance testbed for processing of massive amount of expected SAR data from this site. Two key requirements of this project are the accuracy and speed of SAR data processing. The first key feature of this testbed is a large degree of automation and maximum degree of the need for human perception in the processing to achieve an acceptable processing rate of several hundred acres per day. For accuracy UXO detection, novel algorithms have been developed and implemented. These algorithms analyze dual polarized SAR data. They are based on the correlation of HH and VV SAR data and involve a rather large set of parameters for accurate detection of UXO. For each specific site, this set of parameters can be optimized by using ground truth data. In this paper, we discuss these algorithms and their successful application for detection of surface and subsurface anti-tank mines by using a data set from Yuma Proving Ground, AZ, acquired by SRI SAR.

  19. Advanced Algorithms and High-Performance Testbed for Large-Scale Site Characterization and Subsurface Target Detecting Using Airborne Ground Penetrating SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Collier, James B.; Citak, Ari

    1997-01-01

    A team of US Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District and Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville, let Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Stanford Research Institute (SRI), and Montgomery Watson is currently in the process of planning and conducting the largest ever survey at the Former Buckley Field (60,000 acres), in Colorado, by using SRI airborne, ground penetrating, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). The purpose of this survey is the detection of surface and subsurface Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) and in a broader sense the site characterization for identification of contaminated as well as clear areas. In preparation for such a large-scale survey, JPL has been developing advanced algorithms and a high-performance restbed for processing of massive amount of expected SAR data from this site. Two key requirements of this project are the accuracy (in terms of UXO detection) and speed of SAR data processing. The first key feature of this testbed is a large degree of automation and a minimum degree of the need for human perception in the processing to achieve an acceptable processing rate of several hundred acres per day. For accurate UXO detection, novel algorithms have been developed and implemented. These algorithms analyze dual polarized (HH and VV) SAR data. They are based on the correlation of HH and VV SAR data and involve a rather large set of parameters for accurate detection of UXO. For each specific site, this set of parameters can be optimized by using ground truth data (i.e., known surface and subsurface UXOs). In this paper, we discuss these algorithms and their successful application for detection of surface and subsurface anti-tank mines by using a data set from Yuma proving Ground, A7, acquired by SRI SAR.

  20. Subsurface sounders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Airborne or spaceborne electromagnetic systems used to detect subsurface features are discussed. Data are given as a function of resistivity of ground material, magnetic permeability of free space, and angular frequency. It was noted that resistivities vary with the water content and temperature.

  1. Suomi NPP/JPSS Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS): Calibration Validation With The Aircraft Based Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. K.; Revercomb, H. E.; Tobin, D.; Knuteson, R. O.; Best, F. A.; Adler, D. A.; Pettersen, C.; Garcia, R. K.; Gero, P.

    2013-12-01

    infrared Fourier transform spectrometer with 1305 spectral channels, and produces high-resolution, three-dimensional temperature, pressure, and moisture profiles. These profiles will be used to enhance weather forecasting models and they will facilitate improvements to both short and long-term weather forecasting. The first Suomi NPP dedicated airborne calibration validation campaign was conducted May 2013 with a primary objective of providing detailed validation of CrIS radiance observations and meteorological products. During this calibration validation campaign, the NASA ER-2 aircraft instrument payload included the UW-SSEC Scanning-High resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS), the NPOESS Atmospheric Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I), the NPOESS Atmospheric Sounder Testbed-Microwave Spectrometer (NAST-M), the NASA MODIS/ASTER airborne simulator (MASTER), and the NASA JPL Airborne Visible / Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). Eleven ER-2 under-flights of the Suomi NPP satellite were conducted during the campaign. Detailed results for the validation of the CrIS radiance observations with the S-HIS sensor are presented here.

  2. Validation of the GOSAT Thermal Infrared (TIR) Band using the University of Wisconsin airborne Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS) and ground-based Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) at Railroad Valley, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuteson, R.; kuze, A.; Shiomi, K.; Taylor, J. K.; Garms, E.; Roman, J.; Revercomb, H. E.; Tobin, D. C.; Gero, P.; Best, F. A.

    2011-12-01

    We provide a quantitative assessment of the calibration accuracy of the thermal infrared measurements from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT), which was launched on January 23, 2009. Results will be presented comparing the observed emission spectra from the TANSO-FTS sensor onboard GOSAT to coincident observations from high altitude aircraft and ground-based spectrometers during the June 2011 Railroad Valley Vicarious Calibration and Validation campaign. The 2011 campaign was the third in a series of joint Japan/U.S. field measurements to assess the calibration of the GOSAT sensors and validate derived products of carbon dioxide and methane. As part of the 2011 campaign, the University of Wisconsin Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS) successfully overflew Railroad Valley, Nevada onboard the high-altitude NASA ER-2 along with the Airborne Visible/InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and the MODIS/ASTER Airborne Simulator (MASTER). The ER-2 overpass of Railroad Valley on June 20, 2011 was timed to coincide with an overpass of the GOSAT satellite at 21:19 UTC. A joint JPL/UWisc team provided coincident upper air observations of pressure, temperature, and water vapor using Vaisala radiosondes released from the center of the Railroad Valley dry lakebed (playa) for six GOSAT daytime overpasses and three nighttime overpasses between 19-26 June 2011. The University of Wisconsin also made ground-based measurements from the center of the playa during each GOSAT overpass with an Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer. The AERI was operated from a research vehicle with the capability to measure the upwelling surface radiance at three view angles and the downwelling atmospheric emission at two angles. The ground-based AERI provided accurate surface emissivity and surface temperature for use in forward model calculations of the satellite observed infrared emission between 6 and 17 microns.

  3. Ground testing and campaign intercomparisons with the NAST-I airborne FTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.; Rochette, Luc; Noe, Anna; Oliver, Don; Tian, Jialin

    2014-10-01

    The NASA / JPSS Airborne Sounder Testbed - Interferometer (NAST-I) is a well-proven airborne remote sensing system, which has flown in 19 previous field campaigns aboard the high altitude NASA ER-2, Northrop Grumman / Scaled Composites Proteus, and NASA WB-57 aircraft since initially being flight qualified in 1998. While originally developed to provide experimental observations needed to finalize specifications and test proposed designs and data processing algorithms for the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) flying aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (SNPP) and the Joint Polar Satellite System, JPSS (formerly NPOESS, prior to program restructuring), its unprecedented data quality and system characteristics have contributed to a variety of atmospheric research and measurement validation objectives. This paper will provide a program overview and update, including a summary of measurement system capabilities, with a primary focus on postmission ground testing and characterization performed subsequent to the recently conducted Suomi NPP (SNPP) airborne field campaign.

  4. Quantum well earth science testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, William R.; Hook, Simon J.; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Wilson, Daniel W.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Hill, Cory J.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2009-11-01

    A thermal hyperspectral imager is underdevelopment which utilizes the compact Dyson optical configuration and the broadband (8-12 μm) quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) focal plane array technology. The Dyson configuration uses a single monolithic prism-like grating design which allows for a high throughput instrument (F/1.6) with minimal ghosting, stray light and large swath width. The configuration has the potential to be the optimal high resolution imaging spectroscopy solution for aerial and space remote sensing applications due to its small form factor and relatively low power requirements. The planned instrument specifications are discussed as well as thermal design trade-offs. The current design uses a single high power cryocooler which allows operation of the QWIP at 40 K with adequate temperature stability. Calibration testing results (noise equivalent temperature difference, spectral linearity and spectral bandwidth) and laboratory emissivity plots from samples are shown using an operational testbed unit which has similar specifications as the final airborne system. Field testing of the testbed unit was performed to acquire plots of emissivity for various known standard minerals (quartz, opal, alunite). A comparison is made using data from the ASTER spectral library. The current single band (8-9 μm) testbed utilizes the high uniformity and operability of the QWIP array and shows excellent laboratory and field spectroscopic results.

  5. Near infrared testbed sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, R. B.; McCalmont, J. F.; Montgomery, J. B.; Johnson, R. S.; McDermott, D. J.

    2007-04-01

    A new tactical airborne multicolor missile warning testbed was developed and fielded as part of an Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) initiative focusing on clutter and missile signature measurements for algorithm development. Multicolor discrimination is one of the most effective ways of improving the performance of infrared missile warning sensors, particularly for heavy clutter situations. Its utility has been demonstrated in multiple fielded sensors. Traditionally, multicolor discrimination has been performed in the mid-infrared, 3-5 μm band, where the molecular emission of CO and CO2 characteristic of a combustion process is readily distinguished from the continuum of a black body radiator. Current infrared warning sensor development is focused on near infrared (NIR) staring mosaic detector arrays that provide similar spectral discrimination in different bands to provide a cost effective and mechanically simpler system. This, in turn, has required that multicolor clutter data be collected for both analysis and algorithm development. The developed sensor test bed is a multi-camera system 1004x1004 FPA coupled with optimized filters integrated with the optics. The collection portion includes a ruggedized field-programmable gate array processor coupled with with an integrated controller/tracker and fast disk array capable of real-time processing and collection of up to 60 full frames per second. This configuration allowed the collection and real-time processing of temporally correlated, radiometrically calibrated data in multiple spectral bands that was then compared to background and target imagery taken previously

  6. Apollo lunar sounder experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, R.J.; Adams, G.F.; Brown, W.E., Jr.; Eggleton, R.E.; Jackson, P.; Jordan, R.; Linlor, W.I.; Peeples, W.J.; Porcello, L.J.; Ryu, J.; Schaber, G.; Sill, W.R.; Thompson, T.W.; Ward, S.H.; Zelenka, J.S.

    1973-01-01

    The scientific objectives of the Apollo lunar sounder experiment (ALSE) are (1) mapping of subsurface electrical conductivity structure to infer geological structure, (2) surface profiling to determine lunar topographic variations, (3) surface imaging, and (4) measuring galactic electromagnetic radiation in the lunar environment. The ALSE was a three-frequency, wide-band, coherent radar system operated from lunar orbit during the Apollo 17 mission.

  7. New generation topside sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Suman; Wickwar, Vincent; Goodman, John M.

    2001-09-01

    Having ionospheric electron density distributions as a function of height, latitude, longitude, and time under different conditions is essential for scientific, technical, and operational purposes. A satellite-based, swept-frequency, HF sounder can obtain electron density profiles on a global scale. We are developing a new generation HF sounder that employs recent developments in technology, electronics, and processing capabilities. It will provide global-scale electron density distributions, contours of fixed densities, maps of ƒoF2, hmax, etc. It will allow us to map irregularities, estimate anomalous propagation and conditions for ducting, determine angles of arrival, etc. It will also be able to perform various plasma diagnostics and, because of new flexibility, will be programmable from the ground to perform a variety of experiments in space. Need for such a system exists through the Department of Defense and several civilian agencies. Some of the novel features of the system include software-based design, direction of arrival estimation and synthetic aperture radar-type operation, onboard processing, and reconfigurable and flexible architecture with multimission capabilities.

  8. An Airborne Onboard Parallel Processing Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation provides information on the progress the Intelligent Payload Module (IPM) development effort. In addition, a vision is presented on integration of the IPM architecture with the GeoSocial Application Program Interface (API) architecture to enable efficient distribution of satellite data products.

  9. Spaceborne Infrared Atmospheric Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas; Macenka, Steven; Kampe, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    A report describes the development of the spaceborne infrared atmospheric sounder (SIRAS) - a spectral imaging instrument, suitable for observing the atmosphere of the Earth from a spacecraft, that utilizes four spectrometers to cover the wavelength range of 12 to 15.4 m with a spectral resolution that ranges between 1 part per 900 and 1 part per 1,200 in wavelength. The spectrometers are operated in low orders to minimize filtering requirements. Focal planes receive the dispersed energy and provide a spectrum of the scene. The design of the SIRAS combines advanced, wide-field refractive optics with high-dispersion gratings in a solid-state (no moving parts), diffraction-limited optical system that is the smallest such system that can be constructed for the specified wavelength range and resolution. The primary structure of the SIRAS has dimensions of 10 by 10 by 14 cm and has a mass of only 2.03 kg

  10. A Microwave Pressure Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    An instrument to measure atmospheric pressure at the earth's surface from an orbiting satellite would be a valuable addition to the expanding inventory of remote sensors. The subject of this report is such an instrument - the Microwave Pressure Sounder (MPS). It is shown that global-ocean coverage is attainable with sufficient accuracy, resolution and observational frequency for meteorological, oceanographic and climate research applications. Surface pressure can be deduced from a measurement of the absorption by an atmospheric column at a frequency in the wing of the oxygen band centered on 60 GHz. An active multifrequency instrument is needed to make this measurement with sufficient accuracy. The selection of optimum operating frequencies is based upon accepted models of surface reflection, oxygen, water vapor and cloud absorption. Numerical simulation using a range of real atmospheres defined by radiosonde observations were used to validate the frequency selection procedure. Analyses are presented of alternative system configurations that define the balance between accuracy and achievable resolution.

  11. The Fizeau Interferometer Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Lyon, Richard G,; Huet, Hubert; Marzouk, Joe; Solyar, Gregory

    2003-01-01

    The Fizeau Interferometer Testbed (FIT) is a collaborative effort between NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the Naval Research Laboratory, Sigma Space Corporation, and the University of Maryland. The testbed will be used to explore the principles of and the requirements for the full, as well as the pathfinder, Stellar Imager mission concept. It has a long term goal of demonstrating closed-loop control of a sparse array of numerous articulated mirrors to keep optical beams in phase and optimize interferometric synthesis imaging. In this paper we present the optical and data acquisition system design of the testbed, and discuss the wavefront sensing and control algorithms to be used. Currently we have completed the initial design and hardware procurement for the FIT. The assembly and testing of the Testbed will be underway at Goddard's Instrument Development Lab in the coming months.

  12. Satellite and airborne IR sensor validation by an airborne interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Gumley, L.E.; Delst, P.F. van; Moeller, C.C.

    1996-11-01

    The validation of in-orbit longwave IR radiances from the GOES-8 Sounder and inflight longwave IR radiances from the MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) is described. The reference used is the airborne University of Wisconsin High Resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS). The calibration of each sensor is described. Data collected during the Ocean Temperature Interferometric Survey (OTIS) experiment in January 1995 is used in the comparison between sensors. Detailed forward calculations of at-sensor radiance are used to account for the difference in GOES-8 and HIS altitude and viewing geometry. MAS radiances and spectrally averaged HIS radiances are compared directly. Differences between GOES-8 and HIS brightness temperatures, and GOES-8 and MAS brightness temperatures, are found to be with 1.0 K for the majority of longwave channels examined. The same validation approach will be used for future sensors such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). 11 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. AutoGNC Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John M., III; Vaughan, Andrew T.; Bayard, David S.; Riedel, Joseph E.; Balaram, J.

    2010-01-01

    A simulation testbed architecture was developed and implemented for the integration, test, and development of a TRL-6 flight software set called Auto- GNC. The AutoGNC software will combine the TRL-9 Deep Impact AutoNAV flight software suite, the TRL-9 Virtual Machine Language (VML) executive, and the TRL-3 G-REX guidance, estimation, and control algorithms. The Auto- GNC testbed was architected to provide software interface connections among the AutoNAV and VML flight code written in C, the G-REX algorithms in MATLAB and C, stand-alone image rendering algorithms in C, and other Fortran algorithms, such as the OBIRON landmark tracking suite. The testbed architecture incorporates software components for propagating a high-fidelity truth model of the environment and the spacecraft dynamics, along with the flight software components for onboard guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C). The interface allows for the rapid integration and testing of new algorithms prior to development of the C code for implementation in flight software. This testbed is designed to test autonomous spacecraft proximity operations around small celestial bodies, moons, or other spacecraft. The software is baselined for upcoming comet and asteroid sample return missions. This architecture and testbed will provide a direct improvement upon the onboard flight software utilized for missions such as Deep Impact, Stardust, and Deep Space 1.

  14. MIT's interferometer CST testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, Tupper; Kim, ED; Anderson, Eric; Blackwood, Gary; Lublin, Leonard

    1990-01-01

    The MIT Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) has developed a controlled structures technology (CST) testbed based on one design for a space-based optical interferometer. The role of the testbed is to provide a versatile platform for experimental investigation and discovery of CST approaches. In particular, it will serve as the focus for experimental verification of CSI methodologies and control strategies at SERC. The testbed program has an emphasis on experimental CST--incorporating a broad suite of actuators and sensors, active struts, system identification, passive damping, active mirror mounts, and precision component characterization. The SERC testbed represents a one-tenth scaled version of an optical interferometer concept based on an inherently rigid tetrahedral configuration with collecting apertures on one face. The testbed consists of six 3.5 meter long truss legs joined at four vertices and is suspended with attachment points at three vertices. Each aluminum leg has a 0.2 m by 0.2 m by 0.25 m triangular cross-section. The structure has a first flexible mode at 31 Hz and has over 50 global modes below 200 Hz. The stiff tetrahedral design differs from similar testbeds (such as the JPL Phase B) in that the structural topology is closed. The tetrahedral design minimizes structural deflections at the vertices (site of optical components for maximum baseline) resulting in reduced stroke requirements for isolation and pointing of optics. Typical total light path length stability goals are on the order of lambda/20, with a wavelength of light, lambda, of roughly 500 nanometers. It is expected that active structural control will be necessary to achieve this goal in the presence of disturbances.

  15. Telescience Testbed Pilot Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Maria L. (Editor); Leiner, Barry M. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Telescience Testbed Pilot Program is developing initial recommendations for requirements and design approaches for the information systems of the Space Station era. During this quarter, drafting of the final reports of the various participants was initiated. Several drafts are included in this report as the University technical reports.

  16. Aviation Communications Emulation Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheehe, Charles; Mulkerin, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Aviation related applications that rely upon datalink for information exchange are increasingly being developed and deployed. The increase in the quantity of applications and associated data communications will expose problems and issues to resolve. NASA Glenn Research Center has prepared to study the communications issues that will arise as datalink applications are employed within the National Airspace System (NAS) by developing a aviation communications emulation testbed. The Testbed is evolving and currently provides the hardware and software needed to study the communications impact of Air Traffic Control (ATC) and surveillance applications in a densely populated environment. The communications load associated with up to 160 aircraft transmitting and receiving ATC and surveillance data can be generated in real time in a sequence similar to what would occur in the NAS.

  17. The Palomar Testbed Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colavita, M. M.; Wallace, J. K.; Hines, B. E.; Gursel, Y.; Malbet, F.; Palmer, D. L.; Pan, X. P.; Shao, M.; Yu, J. W.; Boden, A. F.

    1999-01-01

    The Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI) is a long-baseline infrared interferometer located at Palomar Observatory, California. It was built as a testbed for interferometric techniques applicable to the Keck Interferometer. First fringes were obtained in 1995 July. PTI implements a dual-star architecture, tracking two stars simultaneously for phase referencing and narrow-angle astrometry. The three fixed 40 cm apertures can be combined pairwise to provide baselines to 110 m. The interferometer actively tracks the white-light fringe using an array detector at 2.2 microns and active delay lines with a range of +/-38 m. Laser metrology of the delay lines allows for servo control, and laser metrology of the complete optical path enables narrow-angle astrometric measurements. The instrument is highly automated, using a multiprocessing computer system for instrument control and sequencing.

  18. Testbed for LISA Photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzman, Felipe; Livas, Jeffrey; Silverberg, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a gravitational wave observatory consisting of three spacecraft separated by 5 million km in an equilateral triangle whose center follows the Earth in orbit around the Sun but offset in orbital phase by 20 degrees. LISA is designed to observe sources in the frequency range of 0.1 mHz-100 mHz by measuring fluctuations of the inter-spacecraft separation with laser interferometry. Quadrant photodetectors are used to measure both separation and angular orientation. Noise level, phase and amplitude inhomogeneities of the semiconductor response, and channel cross-talk between quadrant cells need to be assessed in order to ensure the 10 pm/Square root(Hz) sensitivity required for the interferometric length measurement in LISA. To this end, we are currently developing a testbed that allows us to evaluate photodetectors to the sensitivity levels required for LISA. A detailed description of the testbed and preliminary results will be presented.

  19. Robot graphic simulation testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, George E.; Sztipanovits, Janos; Biegl, Csaba; Karsai, Gabor; Springfield, James F.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this research was twofold. First, the basic capabilities of ROBOSIM (graphical simulation system) were improved and extended by taking advantage of advanced graphic workstation technology and artificial intelligence programming techniques. Second, the scope of the graphic simulation testbed was extended to include general problems of Space Station automation. Hardware support for 3-D graphics and high processing performance make high resolution solid modeling, collision detection, and simulation of structural dynamics computationally feasible. The Space Station is a complex system with many interacting subsystems. Design and testing of automation concepts demand modeling of the affected processes, their interactions, and that of the proposed control systems. The automation testbed was designed to facilitate studies in Space Station automation concepts.

  20. Telescience Testbed Pilot Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Maria L. (Editor); Leiner, Barry M. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Telescience Testbed Pilot Program (TTPP) is intended to develop initial recommendations for requirements and design approaches for the information system of the Space Station era. Multiple scientific experiments are being performed, each exploring advanced technologies and technical approaches and each emulating some aspect of Space Station era science. The aggregate results of the program will serve to guide the development of future NASA information systems.

  1. Telescience testbed pilot program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiner, Barry M.

    1988-01-01

    The Universities Space Research Association (USRA), under sponsorship from the NASA Office of Space Science and Applications, is conducting a Telescience Testbed Pilot Program. Fifteen universities, under subcontract to USRA, are conducting a variety of scientific experiments using advanced technology to determine the requirements and evaluate the tradeoffs for the information system of the Space Station era. An interim set of recommendations based on the experiences of the first six months of the pilot program is presented.

  2. Advanced turboprop testbed systems study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, I. M.

    1982-01-01

    The proof of concept, feasibility, and verification of the advanced prop fan and of the integrated advanced prop fan aircraft are established. The use of existing hardware is compatible with having a successfully expedited testbed ready for flight. A prop fan testbed aircraft is definitely feasible and necessary for verification of prop fan/prop fan aircraft integrity. The Allison T701 is most suitable as a propulsor and modification of existing engine and propeller controls are adequate for the testbed. The airframer is considered the logical overall systems integrator of the testbed program.

  3. Adjustable Autonomy Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Schrenkenghost, Debra K.

    2001-01-01

    The Adjustable Autonomy Testbed (AAT) is a simulation-based testbed located in the Intelligent Systems Laboratory in the Automation, Robotics and Simulation Division at NASA Johnson Space Center. The purpose of the testbed is to support evaluation and validation of prototypes of adjustable autonomous agent software for control and fault management for complex systems. The AA T project has developed prototype adjustable autonomous agent software and human interfaces for cooperative fault management. This software builds on current autonomous agent technology by altering the architecture, components and interfaces for effective teamwork between autonomous systems and human experts. Autonomous agents include a planner, flexible executive, low level control and deductive model-based fault isolation. Adjustable autonomy is intended to increase the flexibility and effectiveness of fault management with an autonomous system. The test domain for this work is control of advanced life support systems for habitats for planetary exploration. The CONFIG hybrid discrete event simulation environment provides flexible and dynamically reconfigurable models of the behavior of components and fluids in the life support systems. Both discrete event and continuous (discrete time) simulation are supported, and flows and pressures are computed globally. This provides fast dynamic simulations of interacting hardware systems in closed loops that can be reconfigured during operations scenarios, producing complex cascading effects of operations and failures. Current object-oriented model libraries support modeling of fluid systems, and models have been developed of physico-chemical and biological subsystems for processing advanced life support gases. In FY01, water recovery system models will be developed.

  4. Optical interferometer testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwood, Gary H.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on optical interferometer testbed presented at the MIT Space Research Engineering Center 3rd Annual Symposium are included. Topics covered include: space-based optical interferometer; optical metrology; sensors and actuators; real time control hardware; controlled structures technology (CST) design methodology; identification for MIMO control; FEM/ID correlation for the naked truss; disturbance modeling; disturbance source implementation; structure design: passive damping; low authority control; active isolation of lightweight mirrors on flexible structures; open loop transfer function of mirror; and global/high authority control.

  5. LISA Optical Bench Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieser, M.; d'Arcio, L.; Barke, S.; Bogenstahl, J.; Diekmann, C.; Diepholz, I.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Gerberding, O.; Henning, J.-S.; Hewitson, M.; Hey, F. G.; Hogenhuis, H.; Killow, C. J.; Lucarelli, S.; Nikolov, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Pijnenburg, J.; Robertson, D. I.; Sohmer, A.; Taylor, A.; Tröbs, M.; Ward, H.; Weise, D.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2013-01-01

    The optical bench (OB) is a part of the LISA spacecraft, situated between the telescope and the testmass. For measuring the inter-spacecraft distances there are several interferometers on the OB. The elegant breadboard of the OB for LISA is developed for the European Space Agency (ESA) by EADS Astrium, TNO Science & Industry, University of Glasgow and the Albert Einstein Intitute (AEI), the performance tests then will be done at the AEI. Here we present the testbed that will be used for the performance tests with the focus on the thermal environment and the laser infrastructure.

  6. Aviation Communications Emulation Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheehe, Charles; Mulkerin, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Aviation related applications that rely upon datalink for information exchange are increasingly being developed and deployed. The increase in the quantity of applications and associated data communications will expose problems and issues to resolve. NASA s Glenn Research Center has prepared to study the communications issues that will arise as datalink applications are employed within the National Airspace System (NAS) by developing an aviation communications emulation testbed. The Testbed is evolving and currently provides the hardware and software needed to study the communications impact of Air Traffic Control (ATC) and surveillance applications in a densely populated environment. The communications load associated with up to 160 aircraft transmitting and receiving ATC and surveillance data can be generated in realtime in a sequence similar to what would occur in the NAS. The ATC applications that can be studied are the Aeronautical Telecommunications Network s (ATN) Context Management (CM) and Controller Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC). The Surveillance applications are Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) and Traffic Information Services - Broadcast (TIS-B).

  7. Near infrared missile warning testbed sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, D. J.; Johnson, R. S.; Montgomery, J. B.; Sanderson, R. B.; McCalmont, J. F.; Taylor, M. J.

    2008-04-01

    Multicolor discrimination is one of the most effective ways of improving the performance of infrared missile warning sensors, particularly for heavy clutter situations. A new tactical airborne multicolor missile warning testbed was developed and fielded as part of a continuing Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) initiative focusing on clutter and missile signature measurements for effective missile warning algorithms. The developed sensor test bed is a multi-camera system 1004x1004 FPA coupled with optimized spectral filters integrated with the optics; a reduced form factor microprocessor-based video data recording system operating at 48 Hz; and a real time field programmable gate array processor for algorithm and video data processing capable of 800B Multiply/Accumulates operations per second. A detailed radiometric calibration procedure was developed to overcome severe photon-limited operating conditions due to the sub-nanometer bandwidth of the spectral filters. This configuration allows the collection and real-time processing of temporally correlated, radiometrically calibrated video data in multiple spectral bands. The testbed was utilized to collect false alarm sources spectra and Man-Portable Air Defense System (MANPADS) signatures under a variety of atmospheric and solar illuminating conditions. Signatures of approximately 100 missiles have been recorded.

  8. Space Environments Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leucht, David K.; Koslosky, Marie J.; Kobe, David L.; Wu, Jya-Chang C.; Vavra, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The Space Environments Testbed (SET) is a flight controller data system for the Common Carrier Assembly. The SET-1 flight software provides the command, telemetry, and experiment control to ground operators for the SET-1 mission. Modes of operation (see dia gram) include: a) Boot Mode that is initiated at application of power to the processor card, and runs memory diagnostics. It may be entered via ground command or autonomously based upon fault detection. b) Maintenance Mode that allows for limited carrier health monitoring, including power telemetry monitoring on a non-interference basis. c) Safe Mode is a predefined, minimum power safehold configuration with power to experiments removed and carrier functionality minimized. It is used to troubleshoot problems that occur during flight. d) Operations Mode is used for normal experiment carrier operations. It may be entered only via ground command from Safe Mode.

  9. Holodeck Testbed Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arias, Adriel (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the Holodeck Testbed is to create a cost effective, realistic, and highly immersive environment that can be used to train astronauts, carry out engineering analysis, develop procedures, and support various operations tasks. Currently, the Holodeck testbed allows to step into a simulated ISS (International Space Station) and interact with objects; as well as, perform Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA) on the surface of the Moon or Mars. The Holodeck Testbed is using the products being developed in the Hybrid Reality Lab (HRL). The HRL is combining technologies related to merging physical models with photo-realistic visuals to create a realistic and highly immersive environment. The lab also investigates technologies and concepts that are needed to allow it to be integrated with other testbeds; such as, the gravity offload capability provided by the Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS). My main two duties were to develop and animate models for use in the HRL environments and work on a new way to interface with computers using Brain Computer Interface (BCI) technology. On my first task, I was able to create precise computer virtual tool models (accurate down to the thousandths or hundredths of an inch). To make these tools even more realistic, I produced animations for these tools so they would have the same mechanical features as the tools in real life. The computer models were also used to create 3D printed replicas that will be outfitted with tracking sensors. The sensor will allow the 3D printed models to align precisely with the computer models in the physical world and provide people with haptic/tactile feedback while wearing a VR (Virtual Reality) headset and interacting with the tools. Getting close to the end of my internship the lab bought a professional grade 3D Scanner. With this, I was able to replicate more intricate tools at a much more time-effective rate. The second task was to investigate the use of BCI to control

  10. Optical Network Testbeds Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Mambretti

    2007-06-01

    This is the summary report of the third annual Optical Networking Testbed Workshop (ONT3), which brought together leading members of the international advanced research community to address major challenges in creating next generation communication services and technologies. Networking research and development (R&D) communities throughout the world continue to discover new methods and technologies that are enabling breakthroughs in advanced communications. These discoveries are keystones for building the foundation of the future economy, which requires the sophisticated management of extremely large qualities of digital information through high performance communications. This innovation is made possible by basic research and experiments within laboratories and on specialized testbeds. Initial network research and development initiatives are driven by diverse motives, including attempts to solve existing complex problems, the desire to create powerful new technologies that do not exist using traditional methods, and the need to create tools to address specific challenges, including those mandated by large scale science or government agency mission agendas. Many new discoveries related to communications technologies transition to wide-spread deployment through standards organizations and commercialization. These transition paths allow for new communications capabilities that drive many sectors of the digital economy. In the last few years, networking R&D has increasingly focused on advancing multiple new capabilities enabled by next generation optical networking. Both US Federal networking R&D and other national R&D initiatives, such as those organized by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) of Japan are creating optical networking technologies that allow for new, powerful communication services. Among the most promising services are those based on new types of multi-service or hybrid networks, which use new optical networking

  11. Autonomous Flying Controls Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motter, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    The Flying Controls Testbed (FLiC) is a relatively small and inexpensive unmanned aerial vehicle developed specifically to test highly experimental flight control approaches. The most recent version of the FLiC is configured with 16 independent aileron segments, supports the implementation of C-coded experimental controllers, and is capable of fully autonomous flight from takeoff roll to landing, including flight test maneuvers. The test vehicle is basically a modified Army target drone, AN/FQM-117B, developed as part of a collaboration between the Aviation Applied Technology Directorate (AATD) at Fort Eustis,Virginia and NASA Langley Research Center. Several vehicles have been constructed and collectively have flown over 600 successful test flights.

  12. Long Duration Sorbent Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David F.; Knox, James C.; Long, David A.; Miller, Lee; Cmaric, Gregory; Thomas, John

    2016-01-01

    The Long Duration Sorbent Testbed (LDST) is a flight experiment demonstration designed to expose current and future candidate carbon dioxide removal system sorbents to an actual crewed space cabin environment to assess and compare sorption working capacity degradation resulting from long term operation. An analysis of sorbent materials returned to Earth after approximately one year of operation in the International Space Station's (ISS) Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) indicated as much as a 70% loss of working capacity of the silica gel desiccant material at the extreme system inlet location, with a gradient of capacity loss down the bed. The primary science objective is to assess the degradation of potential sorbents for exploration class missions and ISS upgrades when operated in a true crewed space cabin environment. A secondary objective is to compare degradation of flight test to a ground test unit with contaminant dosing to determine applicability of ground testing.

  13. AIRS - the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambrigsten, Bjorn H.; Fetzer, Eric; Fishbein, Evan; Lee, Sung-Yung; Paganao, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) was launched in 2002, along with two companion microwave sounders. This AIRS sounding suite is the most advanced atmospheric sounding system to date, with measurement accuracies far surpassing those of current weather satellites. From its sun synchronous polar orbit, the AIRS system provides more than 90% of the globe every 24 hours. Much of the post-launch period has been devoted to optimizing the 'retrieval' system used to derive atmospheric and other parameters from the observations and to validate those parameters. The geophysical parameters have been produced since the beginning of 2003 - the first data were released to the public in mid-2003, and future improved versions will be released periodically. The ongoing calibration/validation effort has confirmed that the system is very accurate and stable. There are a number of applications for the AIRS products, ranging from numerical weather prediction - where positive impact on forecast accuracy has already been demonstrated, to atmospheric research - where the AIRS water vapor products near the surface and in the mid and upper troposphere as well as in the stratosphere promise to make it possible to characterize and model phenomena that are key for short-term atmospheric processes, from weather patterns to long-term processes, such as interannual variability and climate change.

  14. Updated Electronic Testbed System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Kevin L.

    2001-01-01

    As we continue to advance in exploring space frontiers, technology must also advance. The need for faster data recovery and data processing is crucial. In this, the less equipment used, and lighter that equipment is, the better. Because integrated circuits become more sensitive in high altitude, experimental verification and quantification is required. The Center for Applied Radiation Research (CARR) at Prairie View A&M University was awarded a grant by NASA to participate in the NASA ER-2 Flight Program, the APEX balloon flight program, and the Student Launch Program. These programs are to test anomalous errors in integrated circuits due to single event effects (SEE). CARR had already begun experiments characterizing the SEE behavior of high speed and high density SRAM's. The research center built a error testing system using a PC-104 computer unit, an Iomega Zip drive for storage, a test board with the components under test, and a latchup detection and reset unit. A test program was written to continuously monitor a stored data pattern in the SRAM chip and record errors. The devices under test were eight 4Mbit memory chips totaling 4Mbytes of memory. CARR was successful at obtaining data using the Electronic TestBed System (EBS) in various NASA ER-2 test flights. These series of high altitude flights of up to 70,000 feet, were effective at yielding the conditions which single event effects usually occur. However, the data received from the series of flights indicated one error per twenty-four hours. Because flight test time is very expensive, the initial design proved not to be cost effective. The need for orders of magnitude with more memory became essential. Therefore, a project which could test more memory within a given time was created. The goal of this project was not only to test more memory within a given time, but also to have a system with a faster processing speed, and which used less peripherals. This paper will describe procedures used to build an

  15. An automation simulation testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, George E.; Sztipanovits, Janos; Biegl, Csaba; Karsai, Gabor; Springfield, James F.; Mutammara, Atheel

    1988-01-01

    The work being done in porting ROBOSIM (a graphical simulation system developed jointly by NASA-MSFC and Vanderbilt University) to the HP350SRX graphics workstation is described. New additional ROBOSIM features, like collision detection and new kinematics simulation methods are also discussed. Based on the experiences of the work on ROBOSIM, a new graphics structural modeling environment is suggested which is intended to be a part of a new knowledge-based multiple aspect modeling testbed. The knowledge-based modeling methodologies and tools already available are described. Three case studies in the area of Space Station automation are also reported. First a geometrical structural model of the station is presented. This model was developed using the ROBOSIM package. Next the possible application areas of an integrated modeling environment in the testing of different Space Station operations are discussed. One of these possible application areas is the modeling of the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS), which is one of the most complex subsystems of the station. Using the multiple aspect modeling methodology, a fault propagation model of this system is being built and is described.

  16. PREMIER's imaging IR limb sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Stefan; Caron, Jerome; Bézy, Jean-Loup; Meynart, Roland; Langen, Jörg; Carnicero Dominguez, Bernardo; Bensi, Paolo; Silvestrin, Pierluigi

    2011-11-01

    The Imaging IR Limb Sounder (IRLS) is one of the two instruments planned on board of the candidate Earth Explorer Core Mission PREMIER. PREMIER stands for PRocess Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and Millimetrewave Emitted Radiation and is presently under feasibility study by ESA. Emerging from recent enhanced detector and processing technologies IRLS shall, next to a millimetre-wave limb sounder, explore the benefits of three-dimensional limb sounding with embedded cloud imaging capability. Such 3d imaging technology is expected to open a new era of limb sounding that will allow detailed studies of the link between atmospheric composition and climate, since it will map simultaneously fields of temperature and many trace gases in the mid/upper troposphere and stratosphere across a large vertical and horizontal field of view and with relatively high vertical and horizontal resolution. PREMIER shall fly in tandem formation looking backwards to METOP's swath and thereby explore the benefit of 3-dimensional information for meteorological/environmental analyses and climate forcing investigations. As currently planned and if implemented, IRLS will cover a total horizontal field of about 360 km and observe the limb at altitudes between 4 and 52 km. The vertical spatial sampling distance (SSD) will be well below 1 km. It will be run in two different exclusive modes to address scientific questions about atmospheric dynamics and chemistry at spectral samplings of ~1.2 cm-1 and ~0.2 cm-1, respectively. In such configuration IRLS will be composed of an imaging array with about 1800 macro pixels or sub-samples, thereby allowing cloud imaging and rejection at sufficient spatial resolution. We will present an overview of the instrument requirements as derived from the scientific requirements, the present status of the mission, and we will give an overview of the currently identified technology needs and instrument predevelopments.

  17. NASA Robotic Neurosurgery Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The detection of tissue interface (e.g., normal tissue, cancer, tumor) has been limited clinically to tactile feedback, temperature monitoring, and the use of a miniature ultrasound probe for tissue differentiation during surgical operations, In neurosurgery, the needle used in the standard stereotactic CT or MRI guided brain biopsy provides no information about the tissue being sampled. The tissue sampled depends entirely upon the accuracy with which the localization provided by the preoperative CT or MRI scan is translated to the intracranial biopsy site. In addition, no information about the tissue being traversed by the needle (e.g., a blood vessel) is provided. Hemorrhage due to the biopsy needle tearing a blood vessel within the brain is the most devastating complication of stereotactic CT/MRI guided brain biopsy. A robotic neurosurgery testbed has been developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a spin-off of technologies from space, aeronautics and medical programs. The invention entitled "Robotic Neurosurgery Leading to Multimodality Devices for Tissue Identification" is nearing a state ready for commercialization. The devices will: 1) improve diagnostic accuracy and precision of general surgery, with near term emphasis on stereotactic brain biopsy, 2) automate tissue identification, with near term emphasis on stereotactic brain biopsy, to permit remote control of the procedure, and 3) reduce morbidity for stereotactic brain biopsy. The commercial impact from this work is the potential development of a whole new generation of smart surgical tools to increase the safety, accuracy and efficiency of surgical procedures. Other potential markets include smart surgical tools for tumor ablation in neurosurgery, general exploratory surgery, prostate cancer surgery, and breast cancer surgery.

  18. NASA Robotic Neurosurgery Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The detection of tissue interface (e.g., normal tissue, cancer, tumor) has been limited clinically to tactile feedback, temperature monitoring, and the use of a miniature ultrasound probe for tissue differentiation during surgical operations. In neurosurgery, the needle used in the standard stereotactic CT (Computational Tomography) or MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) guided brain biopsy provides no information about the tissue being sampled. The tissue sampled depends entirely upon the accuracy with which the localization provided by the preoperative CT or MRI scan is translated to the intracranial biopsy site. In addition, no information about the tissue being traversed by the needle (e.g., a blood vessel) is provided. Hemorrhage due to the biopsy needle tearing a blood vessel within the brain is the most devastating complication of stereotactic CT/MRI guided brain biopsy. A robotic neurosurgery testbed has been developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a spin-off of technologies from space, aeronautics and medical programs. The invention entitled 'Robotic Neurosurgery Leading to Multimodality Devices for Tissue Identification' is nearing a state ready for commercialization. The devices will: 1) improve diagnostic accuracy and precision of general surgery, with near term emphasis on stereotactic brain biopsy, 2) automate tissue identification, with near term emphasis on stereotactic brain biopsy, to permit remote control of the procedure, and 3) reduce morbidity for stereotactic brain biopsy. The commercial impact from this work is the potential development of a whole new generation of smart surgical tools to increase the safety, accuracy and efficiency of surgical procedures. Other potential markets include smart surgical tools for tumor ablation in neurosurgery, general exploratory surgery, prostate cancer surgery, and breast cancer surgery.

  19. The ac power system testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildice, J.; Sundberg, R.

    1987-01-01

    The object of this program was to design, build, test, and deliver a high frequency (20 kHz) Power System Testbed which would electrically approximate a single, separable power channel of an IOC Space Station. That program is described, including the technical background, and the results are discussed showing that the major assumptions about the characteristics of this class of hardware (size, mass, efficiency, control, etc.) were substantially correct. This testbed equipment was completed and delivered and is being operated as part of the Space Station Power System Test Facility.

  20. Advanced Artificial Intelligence Technology Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anken, Craig S.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Artificial Intelligence Technology Testbed (AAITT) is a laboratory testbed for the design, analysis, integration, evaluation, and exercising of large-scale, complex, software systems, composed of both knowledge-based and conventional components. The AAITT assists its users in the following ways: configuring various problem-solving application suites; observing and measuring the behavior of these applications and the interactions between their constituent modules; gathering and analyzing statistics about the occurrence of key events; and flexibly and quickly altering the interaction of modules within the applications for further study.

  1. Topside sounders as mobile ionospheric heaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, R. F.

    2006-01-01

    There is evidence that satellite-borne RF sounders can act as mobile ionospheric heaters in addition to performing topside sounding. The main objective of topside sounding is to use sounder-generated electromagnetic (em) waves to obtain ionospheric topside vertical electron-density (N(sub e) profiles. These profiles are obtained from mathematical inversions of the frequency vs. delay-time ionospheric reflection traces. In addition to these em reflection traces, a number of narrowband intense signals are observed starting at zero delay times after the transmitted pulses. Some of these signals, termed plasma resonances, appear at characteristic frequencies of the ambient medium such as at the electron cyclotron frequency f(sub ce), the harmonics nf(sub ce), the electron plasma frequency f(sub pe) and the upper-hybrid frequency f(sub uh), where (f(sub uh))(exp 2) = (f(sub ce))(exp 2) + (f(sub pe))(exp 2) . These signals have been attributed to the oblique echoes of sounder-generated electrostatic (es) waves. These resonances provide accurate in situ f(sub pe) and f(sub ce) values which, in turn, lead to accurate N(sub e) and [B] values where B is the ambient magnetic field. Resonances are also observed between the nf(sub ce) harmonics both above and below f(sub uh). The former, known as the Qn plasma resonances, are mainly attributed to the matching of the wave group velocity of sounder-generated (Bernstein-mode) es waves to the satellite velocity. The frequency spectrum of these waves in the magnetosphere can be used to detect non-Maxwellian electron velocity-distributions. In addition, these resonances also exhibit components that appear to be the result of plasma emissions stimulated by the sounder pulses. The plasma resonances observed between the nf(sub ce) harmonics and below f(sub uh), known as the Dn plasma resonances, are entirely attributed to such sounder-stimulated plasma emissions. There are other sounder-stimulated plasma phenomena that also fall into

  2. High-contrast imaging testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K; Silva, D; Poyneer, L; Macintosh, B; Bauman, B; Palmer, D; Remington, T; Delgadillo-Lariz, M

    2008-01-23

    Several high-contrast imaging systems are currently under construction to enable the detection of extra-solar planets. In order for these systems to achieve their objectives, however, there is considerable developmental work and testing which must take place. Given the need to perform these tests, a spatially-filtered Shack-Hartmann adaptive optics system has been assembled to evaluate new algorithms and hardware configurations which will be implemented in these future high-contrast imaging systems. In this article, construction and phase measurements of a membrane 'woofer' mirror are presented. In addition, results from closed-loop operation of the assembled testbed with static phase plates are presented. The testbed is currently being upgraded to enable operation at speeds approaching 500 hz and to enable studies of the interactions between the woofer and tweeter deformable mirrors.

  3. Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Chad R.; Sorgenfrei, Matthew C.; Nehrenz, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed (G-NAT) lab at NASA Ames Research Center provides a flexible, easily accessible platform for developing hardware and software for advanced small spacecraft. A collaboration between the Mission Design Division and the Intelligent Systems Division, the objective of the lab is to provide testing data and general test protocols for advanced sensors, actuators, and processors for CubeSat-class spacecraft. By developing test schemes for advanced components outside of the standard mission lifecycle, the lab is able to help reduce the risk carried by advanced nanosatellite or CubeSat missions. Such missions are often allocated very little time for testing, and too often the test facilities must be custom-built for the needs of the mission at hand. The G-NAT lab helps to eliminate these problems by providing an existing suite of testbeds that combines easily accessible, commercial-offthe- shelf (COTS) processors with a collection of existing sensors and actuators.

  4. Optical Coating Thermal Noise Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Michael T.; Eichholz, Johannes; Tanner, David B.; Mueller, Guido

    2015-04-01

    Interferometric gravitational-wave detectors measure the length strain of a passing gravitational-wave as differential arm length changes in kilometer-long Michelson interferometers. The second-generation detectors, such as Advanced LIGO (aLIGO), will achieve strain sensitivities which are limited by Brownian thermal noise in the optical coatings of the interferometers' arm-cavity mirror test masses. Brownian coating thermal noise (CTN) is the apparent motion on the mirror surface on the order of 10-17 -10-20 m resulting from thermal fluctuations in the coating and the coating's internal friction. The result is a source of length noise in optical resonators that is a function of the coating temperature and the coating material's mechanical loss. At the University of Florida we are constructing the THermal noise Optical Resonator (THOR), a testbed for the direct measurement of CTN in the aLIGO test mass coating as well as future coating candidates. The material properties of the coating (namely mechanical loss) are temperature dependent, making cryogenic mirrors a prospect for future gravitational-wave detectors. To explore this option we are simultaneously building a cryogenic CTN testbed, CryoTHOR. This is a presentation on the status of these testbeds. This work is supported by NSF Grants PHY-0969935 and PHY-1306594.

  5. Advanced Atmospheric Sounder and Imaging Radiometer (AASIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Design information for the Advanced Atmospheric Sounder and Imaging Radiometer is reported, which was developed to determine the configuration of a sensor for IR and visible imaging. The areas of technology reported include: systems design, optics, mechanics, electronics, detectors, radiative cooler, and radiometric calibration.

  6. Advanced Wavefront Sensing and Control Testbed (AWCT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Fang; Basinger, Scott A.; Diaz, Rosemary T.; Gappinger, Robert O.; Tang, Hong; Lam, Raymond K.; Sidick, Erkin; Hein, Randall C.; Rud, Mayer; Troy, Mitchell

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Wavefront Sensing and Control Testbed (AWCT) is built as a versatile facility for developing and demonstrating, in hardware, the future technologies of wave front sensing and control algorithms for active optical systems. The testbed includes a source projector for a broadband point-source and a suite of extended scene targets, a dispersed fringe sensor, a Shack-Hartmann camera, and an imaging camera capable of phase retrieval wavefront sensing. The testbed also provides two easily accessible conjugated pupil planes which can accommodate the active optical devices such as fast steering mirror, deformable mirror, and segmented mirrors. In this paper, we describe the testbed optical design, testbed configurations and capabilities, as well as the initial results from the testbed hardware integrations and tests.

  7. The computational structural mechanics testbed procedures manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Caroline B. (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to document the standard high level command language procedures of the Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) Testbed software system. A description of each procedure including its function, commands, data interface, and use is presented. This manual is designed to assist users in defining and using command procedures to perform structural analysis in the CSM Testbed User's Manual and the CSM Testbed Data Library Description.

  8. Lessons Learned from Previous Space-Borne Sounders as a Guide to Future Sounder Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Farrell,William M.; Fung, Shing F.; Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Pfaff, Rovert E.; Rowland, Douglas E.; Adrian, Mark L.

    2008-01-01

    Space-borne radio sounding is considered to be the gold standard for electron-density (N(sub e)) measurements compared to other techniques even under low-density conditions, such as N(sub e) < 1/cu cm, when other techniques are known to experience difficulties. These reliable measurements are not restricted to in-situ N(sub e) determinations since a spaceborne sounder can provide vertical N(sub e) profiles (N(sub e)(h)) from the spacecraft altitude to the altitude of maximum N(sub e). Near-conjunction studies involving the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) satellites in the topside ionosphere and Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) near the altitude of the F-region peak density have verified that, even at the greatest distance from the sounder, the ISIS-derived N(sub e)(h) profiles agree with the DE-2 Langmuir-probe measurements to within about 30% over a density range of more than two decades. Space-borne sounders can also provide N(sub e) profiles along the magnetic-field B, by inverting echoes that are ducted along field-aligned irregularities (FAI), and can provide information about the terrain beneath the satellite by examining surface reflections in the frequency range above the ionospheric penetration frequency. Many nations have launched rocket and satellite radio sounders in geospace over more than 4 decades and there have been sounders on space-probes and in orbit around other planets. Here we will summarize some of the lessons learned from these accomplishments by analyzing data from radio sounders on the Alouette and ISIS satellites and the OEDIPUS and other rockets in the terrestrial ionosphere, the IMAGE satellite in the terrestrial magnetosphere, the Ulysses space probe in Jupiter's 10 plasma torus and the MARSIS satellite in orbit around Mars. The emphasis will be on information deduced concerning (1) fundamental plasma processes and gradients in N, and B in the vicinity of the sounders from sounder-stimulated plasma resonances and

  9. NASA's telemedicine testbeds: Commercial benefit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doarn, Charles R.; Whitten, Raymond

    1998-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been developing and applying telemedicine to support space flight since the Agency's beginning. Telemetry of physiological parameters from spacecraft to ground controllers is critical to assess the health status of humans in extreme and remote environments. Requisite systems to support medical care and maintain readiness will evolve as mission duration and complexity increase. Developing appropriate protocols and procedures to support multinational, multicultural missions is a key objective of this activity. NASA has created an Agency-wide strategic plan that focuses on the development and integration of technology into the health care delivery systems for space flight to meet these challenges. In order to evaluate technology and systems that can enhance inflight medical care and medical education, NASA has established and conducted several testbeds. Additionally, in June of 1997, NASA established a Commercial Space Center (CSC) for Medical Informatics and Technology Applications at Yale University School of Medicine. These testbeds and the CSC foster the leveraging of technology and resources between government, academia and industry to enhance health care. This commercial endeavor will influence both the delivery of health care in space and on the ground. To date, NASA's activities in telemedicine have provided new ideas in the application of telecommunications and information systems to health care. NASA's Spacebridge to Russia, an Internet-based telemedicine testbed, is one example of how telemedicine and medical education can be conducted using the Internet and its associated tools. Other NASA activities, including the development of a portable telemedicine workstation, which has been demonstrated on the Crow Indian Reservation and in the Texas Prison System, show promise in serving as significant adjuncts to the delivery of health care. As NASA continues to meet the challenges of space flight, the

  10. Control design for the SERC experimental testbeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacques, Robert; Blackwood, Gary; Macmartin, Douglas G.; How, Jonathan; Anderson, Eric

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on control design for the Space Engineering Research Center experimental testbeds are presented. Topics covered include: SISO control design and results; sensor and actuator location; model identification; control design; experimental results; preliminary LAC experimental results; active vibration isolation problem statement; base flexibility coupling into isolation feedback loop; cantilever beam testbed; and closed loop results.

  11. Fast Physics Testbed for the FASTER Project

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.; Liu, Y.; Hogan, R.; Neggers, R.; Jensen, M.; Fridlind, A.; Lin, Y.; Wolf, A.

    2010-03-15

    This poster describes the Fast Physics Testbed for the new FAst-physics System Testbed and Research (FASTER) project. The overall objective is to provide a convenient and comprehensive platform for fast turn-around model evaluation against ARM observations and to facilitate development of parameterizations for cloud-related fast processes represented in global climate models. The testbed features three major components: a single column model (SCM) testbed, an NWP-Testbed, and high-resolution modeling (HRM). The web-based SCM-Testbed features multiple SCMs from major climate modeling centers and aims to maximize the potential of SCM approach to enhance and accelerate the evaluation and improvement of fast physics parameterizations through continuous evaluation of existing and evolving models against historical as well as new/improved ARM and other complementary measurements. The NWP-Testbed aims to capitalize on the large pool of operational numerical weather prediction products. Continuous evaluations of NWP forecasts against observations at ARM sites are carried out to systematically identify the biases and skills of physical parameterizations under all weather conditions. The highresolution modeling (HRM) activities aim to simulate the fast processes at high resolution to aid in the understanding of the fast processes and their parameterizations. A four-tier HRM framework is established to augment the SCM- and NWP-Testbeds towards eventual improvement of the parameterizations.

  12. Formation Algorithms and Simulation Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wette, Matthew; Sohl, Garett; Scharf, Daniel; Benowitz, Edward

    2004-01-01

    Formation flying for spacecraft is a rapidly developing field that will enable a new era of space science. For one of its missions, the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) project has selected a formation flying interferometer design to detect earth-like planets orbiting distant stars. In order to advance technology needed for the TPF formation flying interferometer, the TPF project has been developing a distributed real-time testbed to demonstrate end-to-end operation of formation flying with TPF-like functionality and precision. This is the Formation Algorithms and Simulation Testbed (FAST) . This FAST was conceived to bring out issues in timing, data fusion, inter-spacecraft communication, inter-spacecraft sensing and system-wide formation robustness. In this paper we describe the FAST and show results from a two-spacecraft formation scenario. The two-spacecraft simulation is the first time that precision end-to-end formation flying operation has been demonstrated in a distributed real-time simulation environment.

  13. CRYOTE (Cryogenic Orbital Testbed) Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gravlee, Mari; Kutter, Bernard; Wollen, Mark; Rhys, Noah; Walls, Laurie

    2009-01-01

    Demonstrating cryo-fluid management (CFM) technologies in space is critical for advances in long duration space missions. Current space-based cryogenic propulsion is viable for hours, not the weeks to years needed by space exploration and space science. CRYogenic Orbital TEstbed (CRYOTE) provides an affordable low-risk environment to demonstrate a broad array of critical CFM technologies that cannot be tested in Earth's gravity. These technologies include system chilldown, transfer, handling, health management, mixing, pressure control, active cooling, and long-term storage. United Launch Alliance is partnering with Innovative Engineering Solutions, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and others to develop CRYOTE to fly as an auxiliary payload between the primary payload and the Centaur upper stage on an Atlas V rocket. Because satellites are expensive, the space industry is largely risk averse to incorporating unproven systems or conducting experiments using flight hardware that is supporting a primary mission. To minimize launch risk, the CRYOTE system will only activate after the primary payload is separated from the rocket. Flying the testbed as an auxiliary payload utilizes Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle performance excess to cost-effectively demonstrate enhanced CFM.

  14. Space View Issues for Hyperspectral Sounders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Evan M.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Broberg, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    The expectation for climate quality measurements from hyperspectral sounders is absolute calibration accuracy at the 100 mK level and stability at the < 40 mK/decade level. The Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS)1, Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) hyperspectral sounders currently in orbit have been shown to agree well over most of their brightness temperature range. Some larger discrepancies are seen, however, at the coldest scene temperatures, such as those seen in Antarctic winter and deep convective clouds. A key limiting factor for the calibrated scene radiance accuracy for cold scenes is how well the effective radiance of the cold space view pertains to the scene views. The space view signal is composed of external sources and instrument thermal emission at about 270 K from the scan mirror, external baffles, etc. Any difference in any of these contributions between space views and scene views will impact the absolute calibration accuracy, and the impact can be critical for cold scenes. Any change over time in these will show up as an apparent trend in calibrated radiances. We use AIRS data to investigate the validity of the space view assumption in view of the 100 mK accuracy and 40 mK/decade trend expectations. We show that the space views used for the cold calibration point for AIRS v5 Level-1B products meet these standards except under special circumstances and that AIRS v6 Level-1B products will meet them under all circumstances. This analysis also shows the value of having multiple distinct space views to give operational redundancy and analytic data, and that reaching climate quality requires continuing monitoring of aging instruments and adjustment of calibration.

  15. Radiometric consistency assessment of hyperspectral infrared sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Han, Y.; Jin, X.; Chen, Y.; Tremblay, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    The radiometric and spectral consistency among the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) is fundamental for the creation of long-term infrared (IR) hyperspectral radiance benchmark datasets for both inter-calibration and climate-related studies. In this study, the CrIS radiance measurements on Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite are directly compared with IASI on MetOp-A and -B at the finest spectral scale and with AIRS on Aqua in 25 selected spectral regions through one year of simultaneous nadir overpass (SNO) observations to evaluate radiometric consistency of these four hyperspectral IR sounders. The spectra from different sounders are paired together through strict spatial and temporal collocation. The uniform scenes are selected by examining the collocated Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) pixels. Their brightness temperature (BT) differences are then calculated by converting the spectra onto common spectral grids. The results indicate that CrIS agrees well with IASI on MetOp-A and IASI on MetOp-B at the longwave IR (LWIR) and middle-wave IR (MWIR) bands with 0.1-0.2 K differences. There are no apparent scene-dependent patterns for BT differences between CrIS and IASI for individual spectral channels. CrIS and AIRS are compared at the 25 spectral regions for both Polar and Tropical SNOs. The combined global SNO datasets indicate that, the CrIS-AIRS BT differences are less than or around 0.1 K among 21 of 25 comparison spectral regions and they range from 0.15 to 0.21 K in the remaining 4 spectral regions. CrIS-AIRS BT differences in some comparison spectral regions show weak scene-dependent features.

  16. Radiometric consistency assessment of hyperspectral infrared sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Han, Y.; Jin, X.; Chen, Y.; Tremblay, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    The radiometric and spectral consistency among the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) is fundamental for the creation of long-term infrared (IR) hyperspectral radiance benchmark data sets for both intercalibration and climate-related studies. In this study, the CrIS radiance measurements on Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite are directly compared with IASI on MetOp-A and MetOp-B at the finest spectral scale and with AIRS on Aqua in 25 selected spectral regions through simultaneous nadir overpass (SNO) observations in 2013, to evaluate radiometric consistency of these four hyperspectral IR sounders. The spectra from different sounders are paired together through strict spatial and temporal collocation. The uniform scenes are selected by examining the collocated Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) pixels. Their brightness temperature (BT) differences are then calculated by converting the spectra onto common spectral grids. The results indicate that CrIS agrees well with IASI on MetOp-A and IASI on MetOp-B at the long-wave IR (LWIR) and middle-wave IR (MWIR) bands with 0.1-0.2 K differences. There are no apparent scene-dependent patterns for BT differences between CrIS and IASI for individual spectral channels. CrIS and AIRS are compared at the 25 spectral regions for both polar and tropical SNOs. The combined global SNO data sets indicate that the CrIS-AIRS BT differences are less than or around 0.1 K among 21 of 25 spectral regions and they range from 0.15 to 0.21 K in the remaining four spectral regions. CrIS-AIRS BT differences in some comparison spectral regions show weak scene-dependent features.

  17. VAS demonstration: (VISSR Atmospheric Sounder) description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, H. E.; Uccellini, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    The VAS Demonstration (VISSR Atmospheric Sounder) is a project designed to evaluate the VAS instrument as a remote sensor of the Earth's atmosphere and surface. This report describes the instrument and ground processing system, the instrument performance, the valiation as a temperature and moisture profiler compared with ground truth and other satellites, and assesses its performance as a valuable meteorological tool. The report also addresses the availability of data for scientific research.

  18. Topside Ionospheric Sounder for CubeSats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, C.; Pratt, J.; Fish, C. S.; Winkler, C.; Pilinski, M.; Azeem, I.; Crowley, G.; Jeppesen, M.; Martineau, R.

    2014-12-01

    This presentation will outline the design of a Topside Ionospheric Sounder (TIS) for CubeSats. In the same way that an ionosonde measures the ionospheric profile from the ground, a Topside Sounder measures the ionospheric profile from a location above the F-region peak. The TIS will address the need for increased space situational awareness and environmental monitoring by estimating electron density profiles in the topside of the ionosphere. The TIS will measure topside electron density profiles for plasma frequencies ranging from 0.89 MHz to 28.4 MHz below the satellite altitude. The precision of the measurement will be 5% or 10,000 p/cm^3. The TIS average power consumption will be below 10 W and a mass of less than 10 kg, so it is appropriate for a 6U Cubesat (or multiple of that size). The sounder will operate via a transmitted frequency sweep across the desired plasma frequencies which, upon reception, can be differenced to determine range and density information of the topside ionosphere. The velocity of the spacecraft necessitates careful balancing of range resolution and frequency knowledge requirements as well as novel processing techniques to correctly associate the return signal with the correct plasma frequency. TIS is being designed to provide a low cost, low mass spacecraft that can provide accurate topside profiles of the ionospheric electron density in order to further understanding of ionospheric structure and dynamic processes in the ionosphere.

  19. Testbed for an autonomous system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dikshit, Piyush; Guimaraes, Katia; Ramamurthy, Maya; Agrawala, Ashok K.; Larsen, Ronald L.

    1989-01-01

    In previous works we have defined a general architectural model for autonomous systems, which can easily be mapped to describe the functions of any automated system (SDAG-86-01), and we illustrated that model by applying it to the thermal management system of a space station (SDAG-87-01). In this note, we will further develop that application and design the detail of the implementation of such a model. First we present the environment of our application by describing the thermal management problem and an abstraction, which was called TESTBED, that includes a specific function for each module in the architecture, and the nature of the interfaces between each pair of blocks.

  20. A Space Testbed for Photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.

    1998-01-01

    The Ohio Aerospace Institute and the NASA Lewis Research Center are designing and building a solar-cell calibration facility, the Photovoltaic Engineering Testbed (PET) to fly on the International Space Station to test advanced solar cell types in the space environment. A wide variety of advanced solar cell types have become available in the last decade. Some of these solar cells offer more than twice the power per unit area of the silicon cells used for the space station power system. They also offer the possibilities of lower cost, lighter weight, and longer lifetime. The purpose of the PET facility is to reduce the cost of validating new technologies and bringing them to spaceflight readiness. The facility will be used for three primary functions: calibration, measurement, and qualification. It is scheduled to be launched in June of 2002.

  1. Experiments Program for NASA's Space Communications Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelmins, David; Reinhart, Richard

    2012-01-01

    NASA developed a testbed for communications and navigation that was launched to the International Space Station in 2012. The testbed promotes new software defined radio (SDR) technologies and addresses associated operational concepts for space-based SDRs, enabled by this first flight of NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standard. The experiments program consists of a mix of in-house and external experiments from partners in industry, academia, and government. The experiments will investigate key challenges in communications, networking, and global positioning system navigation both on the ground and on orbit. This presentation will discuss some of the key opportunities and challenges for the testbed experiments program.

  2. INFORM Lab: a testbed for high-level information fusion and resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valin, Pierre; Guitouni, Adel; Bossé, Eloi; Wehn, Hans; Happe, Jens

    2011-05-01

    DRDC Valcartier and MDA have created an advanced simulation testbed for the purpose of evaluating the effectiveness of Network Enabled Operations in a Coastal Wide Area Surveillance situation, with algorithms provided by several universities. This INFORM Lab testbed allows experimenting with high-level distributed information fusion, dynamic resource management and configuration management, given multiple constraints on the resources and their communications networks. This paper describes the architecture of INFORM Lab, the essential concepts of goals and situation evidence, a selected set of algorithms for distributed information fusion and dynamic resource management, as well as auto-configurable information fusion architectures. The testbed provides general services which include a multilayer plug-and-play architecture, and a general multi-agent framework based on John Boyd's OODA loop. The testbed's performance is demonstrated on 2 types of scenarios/vignettes for 1) cooperative search-and-rescue efforts, and 2) a noncooperative smuggling scenario involving many target ships and various methods of deceit. For each mission, an appropriate subset of Canadian airborne and naval platforms are dispatched to collect situation evidence, which is fused, and then used to modify the platform trajectories for the most efficient collection of further situation evidence. These platforms are fusion nodes which obey a Command and Control node hierarchy.

  3. Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) performance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, D.; Petheram, J.

    1991-01-01

    The science objectives of the NASA's Laser Atmospheric Sounder (LAWS) are discussed, and results of the performance analysis of the LAWS system are presented together with the instrument configuration used for these performance analyses. The results of analyses show that the science requirements for the wind-velocity accuracies of m/sec in the lower troposphere and 5 m/sec in the upper troposphere will be met by the present design of the LAWS system. The paper presents the performance estimates of the LAWS in terms of the global coverage, spatial resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, line-of-sight velocity error, and horizontal inversion accuracy.

  4. A Reconfigurable Testbed Environment for Spacecraft Autonomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesiadecki, Jeffrey; Jain, Abhinandan

    1996-01-01

    A key goal of NASA's New Millennium Program is the development of technology for increased spacecraft on-board autonomy. Achievement of this objective requires the development of a new class of ground-based automony testbeds that can enable the low-cost and rapid design, test, and integration of the spacecraft autonomy software. This paper describes the development of an Autonomy Testbed Environment (ATBE) for the NMP Deep Space I comet/asteroid rendezvous mission.

  5. Testbed for Satellite and Terrestrial Interoperability (TSTI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, J. Patrick

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with the "Testbed for Satellite and Terrestrial Interoperability (TSTI)" are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) General and specific scientific technical objectives; 2) ACTS experiment No. 118: 622 Mbps network tests between ATDNet and MAGIC via ACTS; 3) ATDNet SONET/ATM gigabit network; 4) Testbed infrastructure, collaborations and end sites in TSTI based evaluations; 5) the Trans-Pacific digital library experiment; and 6) ESDCD on-going network projects.

  6. Eye/Brain/Task Testbed And Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janiszewski, Thomas; Mainland, Nora; Roden, Joseph C.; Rothenheber, Edward H.; Ryan, Arthur M.; Stokes, James M.

    1994-01-01

    Eye/brain/task (EBT) testbed records electroencephalograms, movements of eyes, and structures of tasks to provide comprehensive data on neurophysiological experiments. Intended to serve continuing effort to develop means for interactions between human brain waves and computers. Software library associated with testbed provides capabilities to recall collected data, to process data on movements of eyes, to correlate eye-movement data with electroencephalographic data, and to present data graphically. Cognitive processes investigated in ways not previously possible.

  7. View to the south with the Two Sounder Antennas on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View to the south with the Two Sounder Antennas on the left - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Four Sounder Antennas, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  8. Topside sounder observations of equatorial bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, P. L.; Benson, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    Large scale regions of depleted equatorial ionospheric plasma, called equatorial bubbles, are investigated using topside sounder data. The sounder's unique remote measuring capability enables the magnetic field-aligned nature of the bubbles to be investigated. A search of all available Alouette 2 and ISIS 1 ionograms during nighttime perigee passes near the magnetic equator has revealed a variety of echo signatures associated with bubbles. In addition to a sudden drop in electron density, these signatures usually include in situ spread F and ducted traces. The ducted traces have been used to determine the electron density distribution and to infer changes in ion composition along the magnetic field line within the duct associated with the bubble. In some cases it can be determined that the bubble is asymmetric with respect to the magnetic equator. Even though such features require 3 dimensional models for their explanation, the great field-aligned extent of the bubbles (relative to their cross section) suggests that current theories, which ignore variations along the magnetic field, are still applicable.

  9. Visible Nulling Coronagraph Testbed Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker; Woodruff, Robert; Vasudevan, Gopal; Rizzo, Maxime; Thompson, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) is a NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept study and a proposed NASA Discovery mission to image and characterize extrasolar giant planets in orbits with semi-major axes between 2 and 10 AU. EPIC would provide insights into the physical nature of a variety of planets in other solar systems complimenting radial velocity (RV) and astrometric planet searches. It will detect and characterize the atmospheres of planets identified by radial velocity surveys, determine orbital inclinations and masses, characterize the atmospheres around A and F stars, observed the inner spatial structure and colors of inner Spitzer selected debris disks. EPIC would be launched to heliocentric Earth trailing drift-away orbit, with a 5-year mission lifetime. The starlight suppression approach consists of a visible nulling coronagraph (VNC) that enables starlight suppression in broadband light from 480-960 nm. To demonstrate the VNC approach and advance it's technology readiness we have developed a laboratory VNC and have demonstrated white light nulling. We will discuss our ongoing VNC work and show the latest results from the VNC testbed.

  10. The CMS integration grid testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Gregory E.

    2004-08-26

    The CMS Integration Grid Testbed (IGT) comprises USCMS Tier-1 and Tier-2 hardware at the following sites: the California Institute of Technology, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the University of California at San Diego, and the University of Florida at Gainesville. The IGT runs jobs using the Globus Toolkit with a DAGMan and Condor-G front end. The virtual organization (VO) is managed using VO management scripts from the European Data Grid (EDG). Gridwide monitoring is accomplished using local tools such as Ganglia interfaced into the Globus Metadata Directory Service (MDS) and the agent based Mona Lisa. Domain specific software is packaged and installed using the Distribution After Release (DAR) tool of CMS, while middleware under the auspices of the Virtual Data Toolkit (VDT) is distributed using Pacman. During a continuous two month span in Fall of 2002, over 1 million official CMS GEANT based Monte Carlo events were generated and returned to CERN for analysis while being demonstrated at SC2002. In this paper, we describe the process that led to one of the world's first continuously available, functioning grids.

  11. RAWS: The spaceborne radar wind sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Richard K.

    1991-09-01

    The concept of the Radar Wind Sounder (RAWS) is discussed. The goals of the RAWS is to estimate the following three qualities: the echo power, to determine rain rate and surface wind velocity; the mean Doppler frequency, to determine the wind velocity in hydrometers; and the spread of the Doppler frequency, to determine the turbulent spread of the wind velocity. Researchers made significant progress during the first year. The feasibility of the concept seems certain. Studies indicate that a reasonably sized system can measure in the presence of ice clouds and dense water clouds. No sensitivity problems exist in rainy environments. More research is needed on the application of the radar to the measurement of rain rates and winds at the sea surface.

  12. Microwave limb sounder for stratospheric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, J. W.; Hardy, J. C.; Jarnot, R. F.; Pickett, H. M.; Zimmerman, P.

    1985-06-01

    The balloon-borne Microwave Limb Sounder (BMLS) measures atmospheric thermal emission from millimeter wavelength spectral lines to determine vertical profiles of stratospheric species. The instrument flown to data operates at 205 BHz to measure ClO, O3, and H2O2. A 63 GHz radiometer is added to test the technique for determining tangent point pressure from the MLS experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Many additional species is also measured by the BLMS. A radiometer at 270 GHz would provide measurements of HO2, NO2, HNO3, N2O, 16O18O16O, and HCN. With this addition the BMLS can test the current theory of O3 heavy ozone photochemical balance in the upper stratosphere.

  13. EOS Laser Atmosphere Wind Sounder (LAWS) investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In this final report, the set of tasks that evolved from the Laser Atmosphere Wind Sounder (LAWS) Science Team are reviewed, the major accomplishments are summarized, and a complete set of resulting references provided. The tasks included preparation of a plan for the LAWS Algorithm Development and Evolution Laboratory (LADEL); participation in the preparation of a joint CNES/NASA proposal to build a space-based DWL; involvement in the Global Backscatter Experiments (GLOBE); evaluation of several DWL concepts including 'Quick-LAWS', SPNDL and several direct detection technologies; and an extensive series of system trade studies and Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE's). In this report, some of the key accomplishments are briefly summarized with reference to interim reports, special reports, conference/workshop presentations, and publications.

  14. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Project Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the status of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). These instruments are on board the EOS Aqua Spacecraft that was launched May 4, 2002. The instruments are working normally. The objectives of the mission were to improve weather forecasting, assist in climate studies, and provide information as to the composition of Earth's atmosphere. The Aqua spacecraft is operating normally, the the primary life-limiting resource is fuel for maneuvers. The presentation also contains charts indicating who are using the data. There is information on the type of data available, and the propsal process. Also there is a few views of some of the planned instruments that were made possible in part due to the success of AIRS.

  15. Climate Change and Sounder Radiometric Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Manning, Evan

    2009-01-01

    Satellite instrument radiometric stability is critical for climate studies. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances are of sufficient stability and accuracy to serve as a climate data record as evidenced by comparisons with the global network of buoys. In this paper we examine the sensitivity of derived geophysical products to potential instrument radiometric stability issues due to diurnal, orbital and seasonal variations. Our method is to perturb the AIRS radiances and examine the impact to retrieved parameters. Results show that instability in retrieved temperature products will be on the same order of the brightness temperature error in the radiances and follow the same time dependences. AIRS excellent stability makes it ideal for examining impacts of instabilities of future systems on geophysical parameter performance.

  16. RAWS: The spaceborne radar wind sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Richard K.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of the Radar Wind Sounder (RAWS) is discussed. The goals of the RAWS is to estimate the following three qualities: the echo power, to determine rain rate and surface wind velocity; the mean Doppler frequency, to determine the wind velocity in hydrometers; and the spread of the Doppler frequency, to determine the turbulent spread of the wind velocity. Researchers made significant progress during the first year. The feasibility of the concept seems certain. Studies indicate that a reasonably sized system can measure in the presence of ice clouds and dense water clouds. No sensitivity problems exist in rainy environments. More research is needed on the application of the radar to the measurement of rain rates and winds at the sea surface.

  17. Assimilation of the Microwave Limb Sounder Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargan, K.; Read, W.; Livesey, N.; Wagner, P.; Nguyen. H.; Pawson, S.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the assimilation of limb-sounder data can significantly improve the representation of ozone in NASA's GEOS Data Assimilation Systems (GEOS-DAS), particularly in the stratosphere. The studies conducted so far utilized retrieved data from the MIPAS, POAM, ILAS and EOS Microwave Limb Sounder (EOS MLS) instruments. Direct assimilation of the radiance data can be seen as the natural next step to those studies. The motivation behind working with radiances is twofold. First, retrieval algorithms use a priori data which are either climatological or are obtained from previous analyses. This introduces additional uncertainty and, in some cases, may lead to "self-contamination"- when the a priori is taken from the same assimilation system in which subsequently ingests the retrieved observations. Second, radiances can be available in near real time thus providing an opportunity for operational assimilation, which could help improve the use of infrared radiance instruments from operational satellite instruments. In this presentation we summarize our ongoing work on an implementation of the assimilation of EOS MLS radiances into the GEOS-5 DAS. This work focuses on assimilation of band 7 brightness temperatures which are sensitive to ozone. Our implementation uses the MLS Callable Forward Model developed by the MLS team at NASA JPL as the observation operator. We will describe our approach and recent results which are not yet final. In particular, we will demonstrate that this approach has a potential to improve the vertical structure of ozone in the lower tropical stratosphere as compared with the retrieved MLS product. We will discuss the computational efficiency of this implementation.

  18. First Data from Mars Climate Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The Mars Climate Sounder, an instrument on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter designed to monitor daily changes in the global atmosphere of Mars, made its first observations of Mars on March 24, 2006.

    These tests were conducted to demonstrate that the instrument could, if needed, support the mission's aerobraking maneuvers (dips into the atmosphere to change the shape of the orbit) by providing hemisphere-scale coverage of atmospheric activity. The instrument scanned nine arrays of detectors four times across the entire disc of the planet, including the north pole, from an altitude of about 45,000 kilometers (28,000 miles). This is about 150 times farther away than the spacecraft will be during its main science phase. At this great range, the planet appears only 40 pixels wide, as suggested by the pixilation of the images. However, this is sufficient to identify regional dust storms in the lower atmosphere. Regional dust storms could perturb atmospheric densities at the higher altitudes (about 100 kilometers or 60 miles) where the orbiter will conduct more than 500 aerobraking passes during the next six months. Such storms are rare in the current season on Mars, early northern spring, and no large storms are present as the orbiter prepares for the start of aerobraking.

    Each of the Mars Climate Sounder's arrays looks in a different wavelength band, and three of the resulting images are shown here. The view on the left is from data collected in a broad spectral band (wavelengths of 0.3 microns to 3 microns) for reflected sunlight. The view in the center is from data collected in the 12-micron thermal-infrared band. This band was chosen to sense infrared radiation from the surface when the atmosphere is clear and from dust clouds when it is not. The view on the right is from data collected at 15 microns, a longer-wavelength band still in the thermal-infrared part of the spectrum. At this wavelength, carbon dioxide, the main ingredient in Mars

  19. Navigation Signal Disturbances by Multipath Propagation - Scaled Measurements with a Universal Channel Sounder Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geise, Robert; Neubauer, Bjoern; Zimmer, Georg

    2015-11-01

    The performance of navigation systems is always reduced by unwanted multipath propagation. This is especially of practical importance for airborne navigation systems like the instrument landing system (ILS) or the VHF omni directional radio range (VOR). Nevertheless, the quantitative analysis of corresponding, potentially harmful multipath propagation disturbances is very difficult due to the large parameter space. Experimentally difficulties arise due to very expensive, real scale measurement campaigns and numerical simulation techniques still have shortcomings which are briefly discussed. In this contribution a new universal approach is introduced on how to measure very flexibly multipath propagation effects for arbitrary navigation systems using a channel sounder architecture in a scaled measurement environment. Two relevant scenarios of multipath propagation and the impact on navigation signals are presented. The first describes disturbances of the ILS due to large taxiing aircraft. The other example shows the influence of rotating wind turbines on the VOR.

  20. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on the Earth Observing System

    SciTech Connect

    Aumann, H.H.; Pagano, R.J. . Jet Propulsion Lab.)

    1994-03-01

    Recent breakthroughs in IR detector array and cryocooler technology have made it possible to convert the concepts of optimum, passive, IR sounding to a practical satellite-borne instrument: the Atmospheric infrared Sounder (AIRS), a grating array IR spectrometer temperature sounder. AIRS, together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit and the Microwave Humidity Sounder, will form a complementary sounding system for the Earth Observing System to be launched in the year 2000. The three instruments are expected to become the new operational sounding system for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

  1. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  2. Airborne laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberson, Steven E.

    2002-06-01

    The US Air Force Airborne Laser (ABL) is an airborne, megawatt-class laser system with a state-of-the-art atmospheric compensation system to destroy enemy ballistic missiles at long ranges. This system will provide both deterrence and defense against the use of such weapons during conflicts. This paper provides an overview of the ABL weapon system including: the notional operational concept, the development approach and schedule, the overall aircraft configuration, the technologies being incorporated in the ABL, and the risk reduction approach being utilized to ensure program success.

  3. A Laboratory-Based Microwave Radio-Interferometry Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriarity, M.; Simon, N.; Leach, K.; Piepmeier, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Radio lnterferometry Testbed (GRIT) is an adaptable platform for laboratory testing of Synthetic Thinned Array Radiometers (STAR). Using this testbed, we demonstrate that the Doppler radiometer can image a point source in an observed scene.

  4. A Multi-Mission Testbed for Advanced Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chau, S. N.; Lang, M.

    2001-01-01

    The mission of the Center for Space Integrated Microsystem (CSIM) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is to develop advanced avionics systems for future deep space missions. The Advanced Micro Spacecraft (AMS) task is building a multi-mission testbed facility to enable the infusion of CSIM technologies into future missions. The testbed facility will also perform experimentation for advanced avionics technologies and architectures to meet challenging power, performance, mass, volume, reliability, and fault tolerance of future missions. The testbed facility has two levels of testbeds: (1) a Proof-of-Concept (POC) Testbed and (2) an Engineering Model Testbed. The methodology of the testbed development and the process of technology infusion are presented in a separate paper in this conference. This paper focuses only on the design, implementation, and application of the POC testbed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Continuation: The EOSDIS testbed data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Bill; Kelley, Timothy D.

    1995-01-01

    The continuation of the EOSDIS testbed ('Testbed') has materialized from a multi-task system to a fully functional stand-alone data archive distribution center that once was only X-Windows driven to a system that is accessible by all types of users and computers via the World Wide Web. Throughout the past months, the Testbed has evolved into a completely new system. The current system is now accessible through Netscape, Mosaic, and all other servers that can contact the World Wide Web. On October 1, 1995 we will open to the public and we expect that the statistics of the type of user, where they are located, and what they are looking for will drastically change. What is the most important change in the Testbed has been the Web interface. This interface will allow more users access to the system and walk them through the data types with more ease than before. All of the callbacks are written in such a way that icons can be used to easily move around in the programs interface. The homepage offers the user the opportunity to go and get more information about each satellite data type and also information on free programs. These programs are grouped into categories for types of computers that the programs are compiled for, along with information on how to FTP the programs back to the end users computer. The heart of the Testbed is still the acquisition of satellite data. From the Testbed homepage, the user selects the 'access to data system' icon, which will take them to the world map and allow them to select an area that they would like coverage on by simply clicking that area of the map. This creates a new map where other similar choices can be made to get the latitude and longitude of the region the satellite data will cover. Once a selection has been made the search parameters page will appear to be filled out. Afterwards, the browse image will be called for once the search is completed and the images for viewing can be selected. There are several other option pages

  6. Design of testbed and emulation tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundstrom, S. F.; Flynn, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The research summarized was concerned with the design of testbed and emulation tools suitable to assist in projecting, with reasonable accuracy, the expected performance of highly concurrent computing systems on large, complete applications. Such testbed and emulation tools are intended for the eventual use of those exploring new concurrent system architectures and organizations, either as users or as designers of such systems. While a range of alternatives was considered, a software based set of hierarchical tools was chosen to provide maximum flexibility, to ease in moving to new computers as technology improves and to take advantage of the inherent reliability and availability of commercially available computing systems.

  7. A thermal spectral-spatial interferometric testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savini, G.; Juanola-Parramon, R.; Stabbins, R.; Baccichet, N.; Donohoe, A.; Murphy, A.; O'Sullivan, C.

    2014-07-01

    We present an ongoing effort to achieve a Double Fourier Modulating (DFM) interferometer in the thermal infrared wavelength range. We describe a testbed designed to combine a sky simulator in the form of a miniaturized complex calibration source at the focus of a parabolic collimator with an interferometer baseline consisting of two parallel telescopes each mounted on a motorized linear stage. The two input arms are combined after one of them is modulated via a fast-scanning piezoelectric roof-top mirror. The optical design and layout of the testbed, the choice of interferometer parameters as well as the calibration scene adopted as source are described.

  8. Towards a testbed for malicious code detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, R.; Kerchen, P.; Crawford, R.; Ho, W.; Crossley, J.; Fink, G.; Levitt, K.; Olsson, R.; Archer, M. . Div. of Computer Science)

    1991-01-01

    This paper proposes an environment for detecting many types of malicious code, including computer viruses, Trojan horses, and time/logic bombs. This malicious code testbed (MCT) is based upon both static and dynamic analysis tools developed at the University of California, Davis, which have been shown to be effective against certain types of malicious code. The testbed extends the usefulness of these tools by using them in a complementary fashion to detect more general cases of malicious code. Perhaps more importantly, the MCT allows administrators and security analysts to check a program before installation, thereby avoiding any damage a malicious program might inflict. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) High Spectral Resolution Radiance Climate-Quality Dataset for Validating Climate Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, M.; Zhou, L.; Liu, X.; Cheng, Z.

    2009-12-01

    There is growing consensus that persistent and increasing anthropogenic emissions, since the beginning of the industrial revolution in the 19th century, are increasing atmospheric temperatures, increasing sea levels, melting ice caps and glaciers, increasing the occurrence of severe weather, and causing regional shifts in precipitation patterns. Changes in these parameters or occurrences are responses to changes in climate forcing terms, notably greenhouse gases. The NASA Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS), launched in May of 2002, is the first high spectral resolution infrared sounder with nearly complete global coverage on a daily basis. High spectral resolution in the infrared provides sensitivity to nearly all climate forcings, responses and feedbacks. The AIRS radiances are sensitive to changes in carbon dioxide, methane, carbon monoxide, ozone, water vapor, temperature, clouds, aerosols, and surface characteristics, and also have been demonstrated through intercomparisons with airborne interferometers and with the EUMETSAT Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer(IASI) to have excellent accuracy, stability and precision. Such "benchmark" attributes are important for validating climate models and analyses. The AIRS data are applied to generate the first ever spectrally resolved infrared radiance (SRIR) dataset (2002- 2006) for monitoring changes in atmospheric temperature and constituents and for assessing the accuracy of climate and weather model analyses and forecasts. The SRIR dataset is a very powerful climate application. Spectral signatures derived from the dataset confirmed the largest depletion of ozone over the Arctic in 2005, and also verified that the European Center for Medium Range Weather (ECMWF) model analysis water vapor fields are significantly more accurate than the analyses of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The NCEP moisture fields are generally 20% more moist than those from ECMWF. Applications included

  10. The design and implementation of the LLNL gigabit testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, D.

    1994-12-01

    This paper will look at the design and implementation of the LLNL Gigabit testbed (LGTB), where various high speed networking products, can be tested in one environment. The paper will discuss the philosophy behind the design of and the need for the testbed, the tests that are performed in the testbed, and the tools used to implement those tests.

  11. Thermal infrared spectral imager for airborne science applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, William R.; Hook, Simon J.; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Wilson, Daniel W.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Hill, Cory J.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Realmuto, Vincent; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2009-05-01

    An airborne thermal hyperspectral imager is underdevelopment which utilizes the compact Dyson optical configuration and quantum well infrared photo detector (QWIP) focal plane array. The Dyson configuration uses a single monolithic prism-like grating design which allows for a high throughput instrument (F/1.6) with minimal ghosting, stray-light and large swath width. The configuration has the potential to be the optimal imaging spectroscopy solution unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) due to its small form factor and relatively low power requirements. The planned instrument specifications are discussed as well as design trade-offs. Calibration testing results (noise equivalent temperature difference, spectral linearity and spectral bandwidth) and laboratory emissivity plots from samples are shown using an operational testbed unit which has similar specifications as the final airborne system. Field testing of the testbed unit was performed to acquire plots of emissivity for various known standard minerals (quartz). A comparison is made using data from the ASTER spectral library.

  12. Towards HyTES: an airborne thermal imaging spectroscopy instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, William R.; Hook, Simon J.; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Wilson, Daniel W.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Hill, Cory J.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Realmuto, Vincent; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2009-08-01

    An airborne thermal hyperspectral imager is underdevelopment which utilizes the compact Dyson optical configuration and quantum well infrared photo detector (QWIP) focal plane array. The Dyson configuration uses a single monolithic prism-like grating design which allows for a high throughput instrument (F/1.6) with minimal ghosting, stray-light and large swath width. The configuration has the potential to be the optimal imaging spectroscopy solution unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) due to its small form factor and relatively low power requirements. The planned instrument specifications are discussed as well as design trade-offs. Calibration testing results (noise equivalent temperature difference, spectral linearity and spectral bandwidth) and laboratory emissivity plots from samples are shown using an operational testbed unit which has similar specifications as the final airborne system. Field testing of the testbed unit was performed to acquire plots of emissivity for various known standard minerals (quartz). A comparison is made using data from the ASTER spectral library.

  13. Cross-track infrared sounder FPAA performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterjohn, Stacy A.; D'Souza, Arvind I.; Dawson, Larry C.; Dolan, Peter N.; Jefferson, Genae; Stapelbroek, Maryn G.; Willis, Richard W.; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S.; Boehmer, Ellen; Ehlert, John C.; Andrews, James E.

    2005-01-01

    The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), an interferometric sounder, is one of the instruments within the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) suite. CrIS measures earth radiances at high spectral resolution providing accurate and high-resolution pressure, temperature and moisture profiles of the atmosphere. These profiles are used in weather prediction models to track storms, predict levels of precipitation etc. Each CrIS instrument contains three Focal Plane Array Assemblies (FPAAs): SWIR [λc(98 K) ~ 5 mm], MWIR [λc(98 K) ~ 9 mm], and LWIR [λc(81 K) ~ 16 mm]. Each FPAA consists of nine large (850-mm-diameter) photovoltaic detectors arranged in a 3 x 3 pattern, with each detector having an accompanying cold preamplifier. This paper describes the selection methodology of the detectors that constitute the FPAAs and the performance of the CrIS SWIR, MWIR and LWIR proto-flight FPAAs. The appropriate bandgap n-type Hg1-xCdxTe was grown on lattice-matched CdZnTe. 850-mm-diameter photodiodes were manufactured using a Lateral Collection Diode (LCD) architecture. Custom pre-amplifiers were designed and built to interface with these large photodiodes. The LWIR, MWIR and SWIR detectors are operated at 81 K, 98 K and 98 K respectively. These relatively high operating temperatures permit the use of passive radiators on the instrument to cool the detectors. Performance goals are D* = 5.0 x 1010 cm-Hz1/2/W at 14.0 mm, 9.3 x 1010 cm-Hz1/2/W at 8.0 mm and 3.0 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W at 4.64 mm. Measured mean values for the nine photodiodes in each of the LWIR, MWIR and SWIR FPAAs are D* = 5.3 x 1010 cm-Hz1/2/W at 14.0 mm, 1.0 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W at 8.0 mm and 3.1 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W at 4.64 mm. These compare favorably with the following BLIP D* values calculated at the nominal flux condition: D* = 8.36 x 1010 cm Hz1/2/W at 14.0 mm, 1.4 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W at 8.0 mm and 4.1 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W at 4.64 mm.

  14. Work of PZT ceramics sounder for sound source artificial larynx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugio, Yuuichi; Kanetake, Ryota; Tanaka, Akimitsu; Ooe, Katsutoshi

    2007-04-01

    We aim to develop the easy-to-use artificial larynx with high tone quality. We focus on using a PZT ceramics sounder as its sound source, because it is small size, low power consumption, and harmless to humans. But conventional PZT ceramics sounder have the problem that it cannot generate an enough sound in the low frequency range, thus they cannot be used for artificial larynx. Then, we aim to develop the PZT ceramics sounder which can generate enough volume in the low frequency range. If we can lower the resonance frequency of the sounder, it can generate low pitch sound easily. Therefore I created the new diaphragm with low resonance frequency. In addition, we could obtain the high amplitude by changing method of driving. This time, we report on the characteristic comparison of this new PZT ceramics sounder and conventional one. Furthermore, for this new one, we analyzed the best alignment of PZT ceramics and the shape of the diaphragm to obtain low resonance frequency and big amplitude. In fact we analyzed the optimization of the structure. The analysis is done by computer simulation of ANSYS and Laser Doppler Vibrometer. In the future, we will add intonation to the generated sound by input wave form which is developed concurrently, and implant the sounder inside of the body by the method of fixing metal to biomolecule which is done too. And so high tone quality and convenient artificial larynx will be completed.

  15. Flight Projects Office Information Systems Testbed (FIST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liggett, Patricia

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Flight Projects Office Information Systems Testbed (FIST) are presented. The goal is to perform technology evaluation and prototyping of information systems to support SFOC and JPL flight projects in order to reduce risk in the development of operational data systems for such projects.

  16. Space Interferometry System Testbed-3: architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez-Salazar, Oscar S.; Renaud, Goullioud; Azizi, Ali

    2004-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission's System testbed-3 has recently integrated its Precision Support Structure and spacecraft backpack on a pseudo free-free 0.5 Hz passive isolation system. The Precision Support Structure holds a 3-baseline stellar interferometer instrument.

  17. A Laboratory Testbed for Embedded Fuzzy Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srivastava, S.; Sukumar, V.; Bhasin, P. S.; Arun Kumar, D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel scheme called "Laboratory Testbed for Embedded Fuzzy Control of a Real Time Nonlinear System." The idea is based upon the fact that project-based learning motivates students to learn actively and to use their engineering skills acquired in their previous years of study. It also fosters initiative and focuses students'…

  18. GRIPS - The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Ryan; Dickerson, Russell; Schoeberl, Mark; Bloom, Hal; Gordley, Larry; McHugh, Martin; Thompson, Anne; Burrows, John; Zeng, Ning; Marshall, Tom; Fish, Chad; Kim, Jhoon; Park, Rokjin; Warner, Juying; Bhartia, Pawan; Kollonige, Debra

    2013-04-01

    Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century for America and for the world as a whole. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases and other pollutants remain highly uncertain making atmospheric composition predictions difficult. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) will measure carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and methane (CH4). By using measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) and the O2 A-band to help correct for clouds and aerosols, GRIPS will achieve unprecedented precision. Together these gases account for about 85% of all climate forcing and they impact atmospheric ozone (O3). GRIPS, employing gas-filter correlation radiometry, uses the target gases themselves in place of dispersive elements to achieve outstanding throughput, sensitivity, and specificity. Because it uses a combination of reflected and thermal IR, GRIPS will detect trace gas concentrations right down to the Earth's surface. When flown in parallel to a UV/VIS sensor such as GEMS on GEO-KOMPSAT-2B over East Asia or the Sentinel 4 on MTG over Europe/Africa, the combination offers powerful finger-printing capabilities to distinguish and quantify diverse pollution sources such as electricity generation, biomass burning, and motor vehicles. From geostationary orbit, GRIPS will be able to focus on important targets to quantify sources, net flux, diurnal cycles, and long-range transport of these key components in the Earth's radiative balance and air quality.

  19. GRIPS - The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, R. R.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Gordley, L. L.; McHugh, M. J.; Thompson, A. M.; Burrows, J. P.; Zeng, N.; Marshall, B. T.; Fish, C. S.; Spackman, J. R.; Kim, J.; Park, R.; Warner, J. X.; Bhartia, P. K.; Kollonige, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century - for America and for the world as a whole. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases and other pollutants remain highly uncertain making atmospheric composition predictions difficult. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) will measure carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and methane (CH4). By using measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) and the O2 A-band to help correct for clouds and aerosols, GRIPS will achieve unprecedented precision. Together these gases account for about 85% of all climate forcing and they impact atmospheric ozone (O3). GRIPS, employing gas-filter correlation radiometry, uses the target gases themselves in place of dispersive elements to achieve outstanding throughput, sensitivity, and specificity. Because it uses a combination of reflected and thermal IR, GRIPS will detect trace gas concentrations right down to the Earth's surface. When flown in parallel to a UV/VIS sensor such as GEMS on GEO-KOMPSAT-2B over East Asia or the Sentinel 4 on MTG over Europe/Africa, the combination offers powerful finger-printing capabilities to distinguish and quantify diverse pollution sources such as electricity generation, biomass burning, and motor vehicles. From geostationary orbit, GRIPS will be able to focus on important targets to quantify sources, net flux, diurnal cycles, and long-range transport of these key components in the Earth's radiative balance and air quality.

  20. Submillimeter Planetary Atmospheric Chemistry Exploration Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlecht, Erich T.; Allen, Mark A.; Gill, John J.; Choonsup, Lee; Lin, Robert H.; Sin, Seth; Mehdi, Imran; Siegel, Peter H.; Maestrini, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Planetary Atmospheric Chemistry Exploration Sounder (SPACES), a high-sensitivity laboratory breadboard for a spectrometer targeted at orbital planetary atmospheric analysis. The frequency range is 520 to 590 GHz, with a target noise temperature sensitivity of 2,500 K for detecting water, sulfur compounds, carbon compounds, and other atmospheric constituents. SPACES is a prototype for a powerful tool for the exploration of the chemistry and dynamics of any planetary atmosphere. It is fundamentally a single-pixel receiver for spectral signals emitted by the relevant constituents, intended to be fed by a fixed or movable telescope/antenna. Its front-end sensor translates the received signal down to the 100-MHz range where it can be digitized and the data transferred to a spectrum analyzer for processing, spectrum generation, and accumulation. The individual microwave and submillimeter wave components (mixers, LO high-powered amplifiers, and multipliers) of SPACES were developed in cooperation with other programs, although with this type of instrument in mind. Compared to previous planetary and Earth science instruments, its broad bandwidth (approx. =.13%) and rapid tunability (approx. =.10 ms) are new developments only made possible recently by the advancement in submillimeter circuit design and processing at JPL.

  1. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder- An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larnbrigtsen, Bjorn; Fetzer, Eric; Lee, Sung-Yung; Irion, Fredrick; Hearty, Thomas; Gaiser, Steve; Pagano, Thomas; Aumann, Hartmut; Chahine, Moustafa

    2004-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) was launched in May 2002. Along with two companion microwave sensors, it forms the AIRS Sounding Suite. This system is the most advanced atmospheric sounding system to date, with measurement accuracies far surpassing those available on current weather satellites. The data products are calibrated radiances from all three sensors and a number of derived geophysical parameters, including vertical temperature and humidity profiles, surface temperature, cloud fraction, cIoud top pressure, and profiles of ozone. These products are generated under cloudy as well as clear conditions. An ongoing calibration validation effort has confirmed that the system is very accurate and stable, and many of the geophysical parameters have been validated. AIRS is in some cases more accurate than any other source and can therefore be difficult to validate, but this offers interesting new research opportunities. The applications for the AIRS products range from numerical weather prediction to atmospheric research - where the AIRS water vapor products near the surface and in the mid to upper troposphere will make it possible to characterize and model phenomena that are key for short-term atmospheric processes, such as weather patterns, to long-term processes, such as interannual cycles (e.g., El Nino) and climate change.

  2. Planetary protection for Europa radar sounder antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, Kim M.; Moussessian, Alina; Newlin, Laura E.; Willis, Paul B.; Chen, Fei; Harcke, Leif J.; Chapin, Elaine; Jun, Insoo; Gim, Yonggyu; McEachen, Michael; Allen, Scotty; Kirchner, Donald; Blankenship, Donald

    2016-05-01

    The potential for habitability puts stringent requirements on planetary protection for a mission to Europa. A long-wavelength radar sounder with a large antenna is one of the proposed instruments for a future Europa mission. The size and construction of radar sounding antennas make the usual methods of meeting planetary protection requirements challenging. This paper discusses a viable planetary protection scheme for an antenna optimized for Europa radar sounding. The preferred methodology for this antenna is exposure to 100 kGy (10 Mrad) in water of gamma radiation using a Cobalt-60 source for both bulk and surface sterilization and exposure to vapor hydrogen peroxide for surface treatment for possible recontamination due to subsequent handling. For the boom-supported antenna design, selected tests were performed to confirm the suitability of these treatment methods. A portion of a coilable boom residual from an earlier mission was irradiated and its deployment repeatability confirmed with no degradation. Elasticity was measured of several fiberglass samples using a four-point bending test to confirm that there was no degradation due to radiation exposure. Vapor hydrogen peroxide treatment was applied to the silver-coated braid used as the antenna radiating element as it was the material most likely to be susceptible to oxidative attack under the treatment conditions. There was no discernable effect. These tests confirm that the radar sounding antenna for a Europa mission should be able tolerate the proposed sterilization methods.

  3. DUst Sounder and Temperature Imager Experiment (DUSTIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, M. J.; Fish, C. S.; Taylor, M. J.; Gordley, L. L.; Hervig, M. E.; Summers, M. E.; Siskind, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Dust Sounder and Temperature Imager Experiment (DUSTIE) is a proposed CubeSat mission to determine the global distribution of cosmic smoke in the atmosphere. The Earth is under continual bombardment by comets and meteoroids. Over the last 5 billion years they have brought water and the basics of life to our planet. Today they are vaporized during atmospheric entry and deposited as microscopic smoke particles in the upper atmosphere. These cosmic particles are known to be important in a host of atmospheric processes, including nucleation of ice particles, ion chemistry in the thermosphere and heterogeneous chemistry in the mesosphere. Despite this, our current understanding is based on scant observations and theory. The successful deployment of DUSTIE will offer a major advance in this important emerging area of research. DUSTIE will use a digital camera to image the Sun at 0.420 µm during spacecraft sunrise and sunset. This will provide measurements to characterize the smoke distribution over the altitude range of ~40 to 90 km. A high-inclination orbit will provide near-global coverage monthly. Simultaneous refraction measurements will yield atmospheric density profiles up to 75 km. Measured smoke extinctions will be used to derive smoke particle volume and surface area densities. DUSTIE will utilize a 3U form factor CubeSat and rely heavily upon commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components and proven technologies.

  4. Pioneer Venus Sounder Probe Solar Flux Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomasko, M. G.; Doose, L. R.; Palmer, J. M.; Holmes, A.; Wolfe, W. L.; Debell, A. G.; Brod, L. G.; Sholes, R. R.

    1980-01-01

    The Solar Flux Radiometer aboard the Pioneer Venus Sounder Probe operated successfully during its descent through the atmosphere of Venus. The instrument measured atmospheric radiance over the spectral range from 400 to 1800 nm as a function of altitude. Elevation and azimuthal measurements on the radiation field were made with five optical channels. Twelve filtered Si and Ge photovoltaic detectors were maintained near 30 C with a phase-change material. The detector output currents were processed with logarithmic transimpedance converters and digitized with an 11-bit A/D converter. Atmospheric sampling in both elevation and azimuth was done according to a Gaussian integration scheme. The serial output data averaged 20 bits/sec, including housekeeping (sync, spin period, sample timing and mode). The data were used to determine the deposition of solar energy in the atmosphere of Venus between 67 km and the surface along with upward and downward fluxes and radiances with an altitude resolution of several hundred meters. The results allow for more accurate modeling of the radiation balance of the atmosphere than previously possible.

  5. Rover Attitude and Pointing System Simulation Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanelli, Charles A.; Grinblat, Jonathan F.; Sirlin, Samuel W.; Pfister, Sam

    2009-01-01

    The MER (Mars Exploration Rover) Attitude and Pointing System Simulation Testbed Environment (RAPSSTER) provides a simulation platform used for the development and test of GNC (guidance, navigation, and control) flight algorithm designs for the Mars rovers, which was specifically tailored to the MERs, but has since been used in the development of rover algorithms for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) as well. The software provides an integrated simulation and software testbed environment for the development of Mars rover attitude and pointing flight software. It provides an environment that is able to run the MER GNC flight software directly (as opposed to running an algorithmic model of the MER GNC flight code). This improves simulation fidelity and confidence in the results. Further more, the simulation environment allows the user to single step through its execution, pausing, and restarting at will. The system also provides for the introduction of simulated faults specific to Mars rover environments that cannot be replicated in other testbed platforms, to stress test the GNC flight algorithms under examination. The software provides facilities to do these stress tests in ways that cannot be done in the real-time flight system testbeds, such as time-jumping (both forwards and backwards), and introduction of simulated actuator faults that would be difficult, expensive, and/or destructive to implement in the real-time testbeds. Actual flight-quality codes can be incorporated back into the development-test suite of GNC developers, closing the loop between the GNC developers and the flight software developers. The software provides fully automated scripting, allowing multiple tests to be run with varying parameters, without human supervision.

  6. A Business-to-Business Interoperability Testbed: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Kulvatunyou, Boonserm; Ivezic, Nenad; Monica, Martin; Jones, Albert

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, we describe a business-to-business (B2B) testbed co-sponsored by the Open Applications Group, Inc. (OAGI) and the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST) to advance enterprise e-commerce standards. We describe the business and technical objectives and initial activities within the B2B Testbed. We summarize our initial lessons learned to form the requirements that drive the next generation testbed development. We also give an overview of a promising testing framework architecture in which to drive the testbed developments. We outline the future plans for the testbed development.

  7. Embedded Data Processor and Portable Computer Technology testbeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alena, Richard; Liu, Yuan-Kwei; Goforth, Andre; Fernquist, Alan R.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to current activities in the Embedded Data Processor and Portable Computer Technology testbed configurations that are part of the Advanced Data Systems Architectures Testbed at the Information Sciences Division at NASA Ames Research Center. The Embedded Data Processor Testbed evaluates advanced microprocessors for potential use in mission and payload applications within the Space Station Freedom Program. The Portable Computer Technology (PCT) Testbed integrates and demonstrates advanced portable computing devices and data system architectures. The PCT Testbed uses both commercial and custom-developed devices to demonstrate the feasibility of functional expansion and networking for portable computers in flight missions.

  8. Clutter and signatures from near infrared testbed sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, R. B.; McCalmont, J. F.; Montgomery, J. B.; Johnson, R. S.; McDermott, D. J.

    2008-04-01

    A new tactical airborne multicolor missile warning testbed was developed as part of an Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) initiative focusing on the development of sensors operating in the near infrared where commercially available silicon detectors can be used. At these wavelengths, the rejection of solar induced false alarms is a critical issue. Multicolor discrimination provides one of the most promising techniques for improving the performance of missile warning sensors, particularly for heavy clutter situations. This, in turn, requires that multicolor clutter data be collected for both analysis and algorithm development. The developed sensor test bed, as described in previous papers1, is a two-camera system with 1004x1004 FPA coupled with optimized filters integrated with the optics. The collection portion includes a high speed processor coupled with a high capacity disk array capable of collecting up to 48 full frames per second. This configuration allows the collection of temporally correlated, radiometrically calibrated data in two spectral bands that provide a basis for evaluating the performance of spectral discrimination algorithms. The presentation will describe background and clutter data collected from ground and flight locations in both detection and guard bands and the statistical analysis to provide a basis for evaluation of sensor performance. In addition, measurements have been made of discrete targets, both threats and false alarms. The results of these measurements have shown the capability of these sensors to provide a useful discrimination capability to distinguish threats from false alarms.

  9. Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) Architecture and Design Accommodations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilliard, Lawrence; Racette, Paul; Blackwell, William; Galbraith, Christopher; Thompson, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) is being developed at Lincoln Laboratories and accommodated by the Goddard Space Flight Center for a flight opportunity on a NASA research aircraft. The term "hyperspectral microwave" is used to indicate an all-weather sounding that performs equivalent to hyperspectral infrared sounders in clear air with vertical resolution of approximately 1 km. Deploying the HyMAS equipped scanhead with the existing Conical Scanning Microwave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) shortens the path to a flight demonstration. Hyperspectral microwave is achieved through the use of independent RF antennas that sample the volume of the Earth s atmosphere through various levels of frequencies, thereby producing a set of dense, spaced vertical weighting functions. The simulations proposed for HyMAS 118/183-GHz system should yield surface precipitation rate and water path retrievals for small hail, soft hail, or snow pellets, snow, rainwater, etc. with accuracies comparable to those of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder. Further improvements in retrieval methodology (for example, polarization exploitation) are expected. The CoSMIR instrument is a packaging concept re-used on HyMAS to ease the integration features of the scanhead. The HyMAS scanhead will include an ultra-compact Intermediate Frequency Processor (IFP) module that is mounted inside the door to improve thermal management. The IFP is fabricated with materials made of Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) technology integrated with detectors, amplifiers, A/D conversion and data aggregation. The IFP will put out 52 channels of 16 bit data comprised of 4-9 channel data streams for temperature profiles and 2-8 channel streams for water vapor. With the limited volume of the existing CoSMIR scanhead and new HyMAS front end components, the HyMAS team at Goddard began preliminary layout work inside the new drum. Importing and re-using models of the shell, the scan head computer

  10. Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) architecture and design accommodations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilliard, L.; Racette, P.; Blackwell, W.; Galbraith, C.; Thompson, E.

    The Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) is being developed at Lincoln Laboratories and accommodated by the Goddard Space Flight Center for a flight opportunity on a NASA research aircraft. The term “ hyperspectral microwave” is used to indicate an all-weather sounding that performs equivalent to hyperspectral infrared sounders in clear air with vertical resolution of approximately 1 km. Deploying the HyMAS equipped scanhead with the existing Conical Scanning Microwave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) shortens the path to a flight demonstration. Hyperspectral microwave is achieved through the use of independent RF antennas that sample the volume of the Earth's atmosphere through various levels of frequencies, thereby producing a set of dense, spaced vertical weighting functions. The simulations proposed for HyMAS 118/183-GHz system should yield surface precipitation rate and water path retrievals for small hail, soft hail, or snow pellets, snow, rainwater, etc. with accuracies comparable to those of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder. Further improvements in retrieval methodology (for example, polarization exploitation) are expected. The CoSMIR instrument is a packaging concept re-used on HyMAS to ease the integration features of the scanhead. The HyMAS scanhead will include an ultra-compact Intermediate Frequency Processor (IFP) module that is mounted inside the door to improve thermal management. The IFP is fabricated with materials made of Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) technology integrated with detectors, amplifiers, A/D conversion and data aggregation. The IFP will put out 52 channels of 16 bit data comprised of 4 - 9 channel data streams for temperature profiles and 2-8 channel streams for water vapor. With the limited volume of the existing CoSMIR scanhead and new HyMAS front end components, the HyMAS team at Goddard began preliminary layout work inside the new drum. Importing and re-using models of the shell, the s- an head

  11. Sparse matrix methods research using the CSM testbed software system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Eleanor; George, J. Alan

    1989-01-01

    Research is described on sparse matrix techniques for the Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) Testbed. The primary objective was to compare the performance of state-of-the-art techniques for solving sparse systems with those that are currently available in the CSM Testbed. Thus, one of the first tasks was to become familiar with the structure of the testbed, and to install some or all of the SPARSPAK package in the testbed. A suite of subroutines to extract from the data base the relevant structural and numerical information about the matrix equations was written, and all the demonstration problems distributed with the testbed were successfully solved. These codes were documented, and performance studies comparing the SPARSPAK technology to the methods currently in the testbed were completed. In addition, some preliminary studies were done comparing some recently developed out-of-core techniques with the performance of the testbed processor INV.

  12. Cross-track infrared sounder FPAA performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterjohn, Stacy A.; D'Souza, Arvind I.; Dawson, Larry C.; Dolan, Peter N.; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S.; Ehlert, John C.

    2003-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) is one of many instruments that comprise the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). The CrIS instrument is a Michelson interferometer-based sensor that is sensitive to wavelengths between 3.5 and 16 microns. Three separate Focal Plane Array Assemblies (FPAAs) referred to as the Short Wave Infrared Assembly, the Mid Wave Infrared assembly, and the Long Wave Infrared assembly are used to span the spectral range. The CrIS instrument measures the earth radiance at high spectral resolution using the data to provide pressure, temperature and moisture profiles of the atmosphere. The CrIS instrument will help improve both global and regional predictions of weather patterns, storm tracks, and precipitation. The CrIS program selected photovoltaic (PV) detectors for use in all three spectral bands. PV technology outperforms photoconductive detectors in terms of high sensitivity and linearity. Each FPAA consists of a 3×3 detector-matrix that are used to form 9 fields of view (FOV). Each detector has a 1,000 mm active area diameter and has its own cold preamplifier, warm post amplifier and independent high pass filter. This paper describes the performance for all three assemblies that together form the basis of the CrIS Engineering Development Unit 2 (EDU2) Detector Preamp Module (DPM). Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) is used to grow the appropriate bandgap n-type Hg1-xCdxTe on lattice matched CdZnTe. SWIR, MWIR and LWIR 1000 mm diameter detectors have been manufactured using the Lateral Collection Diode (LCD) architecture. Custom pre-amplifiers have been designed to interface with the large SWIR, MWIR and LWIR detectors. The operating temperature is above 78 K, permitting the use of passive radiators in spacecraft to cool the detectors. Recently, all three FPAAs were completed and tested. The tests performed on each assembly are listed.

  13. The Exomars Climate Sounder (EMCS) Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forget, F.; Schofield, J. T.; Kass, D. M.; Kleinböhl, A.; McCleese, D. J.; Allen, M. A.; Foote, M. C.; Millour, E.; Spiga, A.; Talagrand, O.; Calcutt, S. B.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Read, P. L.; Lewis, S. R.; Fouchet, T.; Lefèvre, F.; Määttänen, A.; Barnes, J. R.; Bougher, S. W.; Haberle, R. M.; Jeganathan, M.; Bowles, N.

    2011-10-01

    The ExoMars Climate Sounder (EMCS) investigation is developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Principal Investigator J. T. Schofield) in collaboration with an international scientific team from France, the United Kingdom and the USA. EMCS plans to map daily, global, pole-to-pole profiles of temperature, dust, water and CO2 ices, and water vapor from the proposed 2016 ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (EMTGO). These profiles are to be assimilated into Mars General Circulation Models (MGCMs) to generate global, interpolated fields of measured and derived parameters such as wind. Sciences objectives of EMCS are to: Enhance understanding of Mars photochemistry by providing daily, global, high vertical resolution fields of atmospheric state, aerosol distribution, and water vapor concentration. EMCS atmospheric state measurements, combined with data assimilation, characterize the transport, sources and sinks of trace gases measured by the proposed EMTGO. The aerosol measurements reveal the heterogeneous photochemical pathways of trace gases. EMCS plans to map water vapor, the key source gas for odd hydrogen, known to be important in Martian photochemistry. Extend the MRO/MCS climatology of high vertical resolution measurements of the lower and middle atmosphere of Mars, with the improved coverage of local time provided by the proposed EMTGO. EMCS will determine the diurnal, seasonal & long-term variability of temperature and aerosol, and its impact on photochemistry. EMCS climatology, combined with earlier data, would relate EMTGO observations to earlier trace gas measurements. Support future Mars missions with measured climatology and near real-time density profile retrievals for landing and aerocapture, in the same way that MRO/MCS supported the Phoenix landing and is supporting the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) landing. EMCS could be the only instrument in orbit able to support Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) for the proposed ExoMars 2018 Rover Mission.

  14. Field Tests of a Gas-Filter Imaging Radiometer for Methane, CH4,: A Prototype for Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder, GRIPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, R. R.; Fish, C. S.; Brent, L. C.; Burrows, J. P.; Fuentes, J. D.; Gordley, L. L.; Jacob, D. J.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Salawitch, R. J.; Ren, X.; Thompson, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Gas filter radiometry is a powerful tool for measuring infrared active trace gases. Methane (CH4) is the second most important greenhouse gas and is more potent molecule for molecule than carbon dioxide (CO2). Unconventional natural gas recovery has the potential to show great environmental benefits relative to coal, but only if fugitive leakage is held below 3% and leak rates remain highly uncertain. We present design specifications and initial field/aircraft test results for an imaging remote sensing device to measure column content of methane. The instrument is compared to in situ altitude profiles measured with cavity ring-down. This device is an airborne prototype for the Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder, GRIPS, a satellite instrument designed to monitor CH4, CO2, CO, N2O and AOD from geostationary orbit, with capabilities for great advances in air quality and climate research. GRIPS: The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder

  15. Latest developments of geostationary microwave sounder technologies for NOAA's mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajpai, Shyam; Madden, Michael; Chu, Donald; Yapur, Martin

    2006-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have been flying microwave sounders since 1975 on Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). Microwave observations have made significant contributions to the understanding of the atmosphere and earth surface. This has helped in improving weather and storm tracking forecasts. However, NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) have microwave requirements that can not be met due to the unavailability of proven technologies. Several studies of a Geostationary Microwave Sounder (GMS) have been conducted. Among those, are the Geostationary Microwave Sounder (GEM) that uses a mechanically steered solid dish antenna and the Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR) that utilizes a sparse aperture array. Both designs take advantage of the latest developments in sensor technology. NASA/Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) has recently successfully built and tested a prototype ground-based GeoSTAR at 50 GHz frequency with promising test results. Current GOES IR Sounders are limited to cloud top observations. Therefore, a sounding suite of IR and Microwave should be able to provide observations under clear as well as cloudy conditions all the time. This paper presents the results of the Geostationary Microwave Sounder studies, user requirements, frequencies, technologies, limitations, and implementation strategies.

  16. Overview of the Telescience Testbed Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Daryl N.; Mian, Arshad; Leiner, Barry M.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA's Telescience Testbed Program (TTP) conducted by the Ames Research Center is described with particular attention to the objectives, the approach used to achieve these objectives, and the expected benefits of the program. The goal of the TTP is to gain operational experience for the Space Station Freedom and the Earth Observing System programs, using ground testbeds, and to define the information and communication systems requirements for the development and operation of these programs. The results of TTP are expected to include the requirements for the remote coaching, command and control, monitoring and maintenance, payload design, and operations management. In addition, requirements for technologies such as workstations, software, video, automation, data management, and networking will be defined.

  17. Mini-mast CSI testbed user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Sharon E.; Pappa, Richard S.; Sulla, Jeffrey L.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Miserentino, Robert; Bailey, James P.; Cooper, Paul A.; Williams, Boyd L., Jr.; Bruner, Anne M.

    1992-01-01

    The Mini-Mast testbed is a 20 m generic truss highly representative of future deployable trusses for space applications. It is fully instrumented for system identification and active vibrations control experiments and is used as a ground testbed at NASA-Langley. The facility has actuators and feedback sensors linked via fiber optic cables to the Advanced Real Time Simulation (ARTS) system, where user defined control laws are incorporated into generic controls software. The object of the facility is to conduct comprehensive active vibration control experiments on a dynamically realistic large space structure. A primary goal is to understand the practical effects of simplifying theoretical assumptions. This User's Guide describes the hardware and its primary components, the dynamic characteristics of the test article, the control law implementation process, and the necessary safeguards employed to protect the test article. Suggestions for a strawman controls experiment are also included.

  18. Single link flexible beam testbed project. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Declan

    1992-01-01

    This thesis describes the single link flexible beam testbed at the CLaMS laboratory in terms of its hardware, software, and linear model, and presents two controllers, each including a hub angle proportional-derivative (PD) feedback compensator and one augmented by a second static gain full state feedback loop, based upon a synthesized strictly positive real (SPR) output, that increases specific flexible mode pole damping ratios w.r.t the PD only case and hence reduces unwanted residual oscillation effects. Restricting full state feedback gains so as to produce a SPR open loop transfer function ensures that the associated compensator has an infinite gain margin and a phase margin of at least (-90, 90) degrees. Both experimental and simulation data are evaluated in order to compare some different observer performance when applied to the real testbed and to the linear model when uncompensated flexible modes are included.

  19. VCE testbed program planning and definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westmoreland, J. S.; Godston, J.

    1978-01-01

    The flight definition of the Variable Stream Control Engine (VSCE) was updated to reflect design improvements in the two key components: (1) the low emissions duct burner, and (2) the coannular exhaust nozzle. The testbed design was defined and plans for the overall program were formulated. The effect of these improvements was evaluated for performance, emissions, noise, weight, and length. For experimental large scale testing of the duct burner and coannular nozzle, a design definition of the VCE testbed configuration was made. This included selecting the core engine, determining instrumentation requirements, and selecting the test facilities, in addition to defining control system and assembly requirements. Plans for a comprehensive test program to demonstrate the duct burner and nozzle technologies were formulated. The plans include both aeroacoustic and emissions testing.

  20. Developments at the Advanced Design Technologies Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDalsem, William R.; Livingston, Mary E.; Melton, John E.; Torres, Francisco J.; Stremel, Paul M.

    2003-01-01

    A report presents background and historical information, as of August 1998, on the Advanced Design Technologies Testbed (ADTT) at Ames Research Center. The ADTT is characterized as an activity initiated to facilitate improvements in aerospace design processes; provide a proving ground for product-development methods and computational software and hardware; develop bridging methods, software, and hardware that can facilitate integrated solutions to design problems; and disseminate lessons learned to the aerospace and information technology communities.

  1. Advanced data management system architectures testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Terry

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the Architecture and Tools Testbed is to provide a working, experimental focus to the evolving automation applications for the Space Station Freedom data management system. Emphasis is on defining and refining real-world applications including the following: the validation of user needs; understanding system requirements and capabilities; and extending capabilities. The approach is to provide an open, distributed system of high performance workstations representing both the standard data processors and networks and advanced RISC-based processors and multiprocessor systems. The system provides a base from which to develop and evaluate new performance and risk management concepts and for sharing the results. Participants are given a common view of requirements and capability via: remote login to the testbed; standard, natural user interfaces to simulations and emulations; special attention to user manuals for all software tools; and E-mail communication. The testbed elements which instantiate the approach are briefly described including the workstations, the software simulation and monitoring tools, and performance and fault tolerance experiments.

  2. Spectral Resolution and Coverage Impact on Advanced Sounder Information Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global measurements of the Earth s atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Achieving such measurement improvements requires instrument system advancements. This presentation focuses on the impact of spectral resolution and coverage changes on remote sensing system information content, with a specific emphasis on thermodynamic state and trace species variables obtainable from advanced atmospheric sounders such as the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) systems on the MetOp and NPP/NPOESS series of satellites. Key words: remote sensing, advanced sounders, information content, IASI, CrIS

  3. View to the eastnortheast of the Sounder Antenna OvertheHorizon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View to the east-northeast of the Sounder Antenna - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Five Sounder Antennas, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  4. View to the northeast of the Sounder Antenna OvertheHorizon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View to the northeast of the Sounder Antenna - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Five Sounder Antennas, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  5. The Micro-Arcsecond Metrology Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goullioud, Renaud; Hines, Braden; Bell, Charles; Shen, Tsae-Pyng; Bloemhof, Eric; Zhao, Feng; Regehr, Martin; Holmes, Howard; Irigoyen, Robert; Neat, Gregory

    2003-01-01

    The Micro-Arcsecond Metrology (MAM) testbed is a ground-based system of optical and electronic equipment for testing components, systems, and engineering concepts for the Space Interferometer Mission (SIM) and similar future missions, in which optical interferometers will be operated in outer space. In addition, the MAM testbed is of interest in its own right as a highly precise metrological system. The designs of the SIM interferometer and the MAM testbed reflect a requirement to measure both the position of the starlight central fringe and the change in the internal optical path of the interferometer with sufficient spatial resolution to generate astrometric data with angular resolution at the microarcsecond level. The internal path is to be measured by use of a small metrological laser beam of 1,319-nm wavelength, whereas the position of the starlight fringe is to be estimated by use of a charge-coupled-device (CCD) image detector sampling a large concentric annular beam. For the SIM to succeed, the optical path length determined from the interferometer fringes must be tracked by the metrological subsystem to within tens of picometers, through all operational motions of an interferometer delay line and siderostats. The purpose of the experiments performed on the MAM testbed is to demonstrate this agreement in a large-scale simulation that includes a substantial portion of the system in the planned configuration for operation in outer space. A major challenge in this endeavor is to align the metrological beam with the starlight beam in order to maintain consistency between the metrological and starlight subsystems at the system level. The MAM testbed includes an optical interferometer with a white light source, all major optical components of a stellar interferometer, and heterodyne metrological sensors. The aforementioned subsystems are installed in a large vacuum chamber in order to suppress atmospheric and thermal disturbances. The MAM is divided into two

  6. The spaceborne infrared atmospheric sounder for geosynchronous earth orbit (SIRAS-G): pathfinder to space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampe, Thomas U.; Chase, Holden

    2007-09-01

    The Spaceborne Infrared Sounder for Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (SIRAS-G) was developed by Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp (BATC) under NASA's 2002 Instrument Incubator Program. SIRAS-G is a technology development program focused on next-generation IR imaging spectrometers for sounding of the atmosphere. SIRAS-G is ideally suited for measuring atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles, trace gases concentrations, land and ocean surface temperatures and the IR mineral dust aerosol signature from satellite, providing high-spectral resolution imaging spectroscopy over a broad IR spectral range and extended field of view. Instrument concepts for future mission in LEO and GEO are discussed, including an instrument concept to be flown in low earth orbit having the potential to provide high spatial resolution, comparable to that of MODIS, along with the high spectral resolution currently being demonstrated by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). This capability would dramatically improve the yield of cloud-free pixels scenes that can be assimilated into Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models. The SIRAS-G dispersive spectrometer module is readily adaptable for missions in LEO, GEO and MEO orbits and can be optimized for spectral resolution over subsets of the total spectral range. We have completed the 3-year SIRAS-G IIP development effort, including successful testing of the SIRAS-G laboratory demonstration spectrometer that utilized the Hawaii 1RG MWIR FPA. Performance testing was conducted at cryogenic temperatures and the performance of the demo instrument has been quantified including measurement of keystone distortion, spectral smile, MTF, and the spectral response function (SRF) to high accuracy. We present the results of the laboratory instrument development including characterization of the demonstration instrument performance. We discuss instrument concepts utilizing SIRAS-G technology for potential future missions including an anticipated

  7. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on the Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, H. H.

    1995-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a high spectral resolution IR spectrometer. AIRS, together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), is designed to meet the operational weather prediction requirements of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the global change research objectives of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The three instruments will be launched in the year 2000 on the EOS-PM spacecraft. Testing of the AIRS engineering model will start in 1996.

  8. Overview on In-Space Internet Node Testbed (ISINT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Alan M.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Fabian, Theodore; Kerczewski, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    The Satellite Networks and Architecture Branch has developed the In-Space Internet Node Technology testbed (ISINT) for investigating the use of commercial Internet products for NASA missions. The testbed connects two closed subnets over a tabletop Ka-band transponder by using commercial routers and modems. Since many NASA assets are in low Earth orbits (LEO's), the testbed simulates the varying signal strength, changing propagation delay, and varying connection times that are normally experienced when communicating to the Earth via a geosynchronous orbiting (GEO) communications satellite. Research results from using this testbed will be used to determine which Internet technologies are appropriate for NASA's future communication needs.

  9. ISS Update: ISTAR -- International Space Station Testbed for Analog Research

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries interviews Sandra Fletcher, EVA Systems Flight Controller. They discuss the International Space Station Testbed for Analog Research (ISTAR) activity that...

  10. Film handling procedures for Apollo 17 lunar sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. S.

    1972-01-01

    Film handling procedures for the Apollo 17 Lunar Sounder are itemized, including purchase of flight film, establishment of processing standards, transportation of flight films, flight film certification, application of pre- and post-sensitometry, film loading and downloading, film processing, titling, and duplication.

  11. Results of the international ionospheric Doppler sounder network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lastovicka, Jan; Chum, Jaroslav

    2016-07-01

    This paper summarizes main recent results reached by the Czech-lead international network of ionospheric Doppler sounders. The network consists of Doppler sounders in the western half of Czechia (5 measuring paths, 3 frequencies with central receivers in Prague), northern Taiwan (3 transmitters, two separated receivers, 1 frequency), and three similar systems (3 measuring paths with 1 receiver and 1 frequency) in Tucuman (north-western Argentina), Hermanus (the southernmost South Africa) and Luisville (northern South Africa). Three main areas of research have been (1) statistical properties of gravity waves, (2) ionospheric effects of earthquakes, and (3) low latitude/equatorial phenomena. Some results: (1) the theoretically expected dominance of gravity wave propagation against wind has been confirmed; (2) impact of the Tohoku 2001 M9.0 earthquake was registered in the ionosphere over the Czech Republic as long-period infrasound on the distance of about 9000 km from epicenter; analysis of ionospheric infrasound excited by the Nepal 2015 M7.8 earthquake observed by the Czech and Taiwan Doppler sounders showed that the intensity of ionospheric signal is significantly height dependent and that the Doppler shift depends not only on the advection (up and down motion) of the reflecting layer but also on the compression/rarefaction of the electron gas; (3) spread F structures observed by Doppler sounders in Tucuman and Taiwan (both under the crest of equatorial ionization anomaly) provide results consistent with S4 scintillation data and with previous optical, GPS and satellite measurements.

  12. Earthbound Unmanned Autonomous Vehicles (UAVS) As Planetary Science Testbeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieri, D. C.; Bland, G.; Diaz, J. A.; Fladeland, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the technology of unmanned vehicles have greatly expanded the range of contemplated terrestrial operational environments for their use, including aerial, surface, and submarine. The advances have been most pronounced in the areas of autonomy, miniaturization, durability, standardization, and ease of operation, most notably (especially in the popular press) for airborne vehicles. Of course, for a wide range of planetary venues, autonomy at high cost of both money and risk, has always been a requirement. Most recently, missions to Mars have also featured an unprecedented degree of mobility. Combining the traditional planetary surface deployment operational and science imperatives with emerging, very accessible, and relatively economical small UAV platforms on Earth can provide flexible, rugged, self-directed, test-bed platforms for landed instruments and strategies that will ultimately be directed elsewhere, and, in the process, provide valuable earth science data. While the most direct transfer of technology from terrestrial to planetary venues is perhaps for bodies with atmospheres (and oceans), with appropriate technology and strategy accommodations, single and networked UAVs can be designed to operate on even airless bodies, under a variety of gravities. In this presentation, we present and use results and lessons learned from our recent earth-bound UAV volcano deployments, as well as our future plans for such, to conceptualize a range of planetary and small-body missions. We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of students and colleagues at our home institutions, and the government of Costa Rica, without which our UAV deployments would not have been possible. This work was carried out, in part, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology under contract to NASA.

  13. Estimation of planetary surface roughness by HF sounder observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Ono, T.

    Japanese Martian exploration project "Nozomi" was to carry out several science missions. Plasma Wave Sounder, one of those onboard missions, was an HF sounder to study Martian plasma environment, and Martian surface with the altimetry mode (Oya and Ono, 1998) as well. The altimetry mode observation was studied by means of computer simulations utilizing the KiSS code which had been originally designed to simulate the SELENE Lunar Radar Sounder, a spaceborne HF GPR, based on Kirchhoff approximation theory (Kobayashi, Oya and Ono, 2002). We found an empirical power law for the standard deviation of observed altitudes over Gaussian random rough surfaces: it varies in proportion to the square of the RMS gradient of the surface √{2} hRMS{λ_0, where hRMS and λ_0 are the RMS height of the surface and the correlation distance of the surface, respectively. We applied Geometrical optics to understand this empirical power law, and derived a square power law for the standard deviation of the observed altitude. Our Geometrical optics model assumed the followings: 1) the observed surface is a Gaussian random rough surface, 2) the mean surface is a flat horizontal plane, 3) the observed surface echo is the back scattering echoes, 4) the observed altitude is the mean value of the apparent range of those back scattering echoes. These results imply that HF sounder may be utilized to measure the surface roughness of planetary bodies in terms of the RMS gradient of the surface. Refrence: H. Oya and T. Ono, A new altimeter for Mars land shape observations utilizing the ionospheric sounder system onboard the Planet-B spacecraft, Earth Planets Space, Vol. 50, pp.229-234, 1998 T. Kobayashi, H. Oya, and T. Ono, A-scope analysis of subsurface radar sounding of lunar mare region, Earth Planets Space, Vol. 54, pp.973-982, 2002

  14. Application developer's tutorial for the CSM testbed architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Phillip; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1988-01-01

    This tutorial serves as an illustration of the use of the programmer interface on the CSM Testbed Architecture (NICE). It presents a complete, but simple, introduction to using both the GAL-DBM (Global Access Library-Database Manager) and CLIP (Command Language Interface Program) to write a NICE processor. Familiarity with the CSM Testbed architecture is required.

  15. A Turbine-powered UAV Controls Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motter, Mark A.; High, James W.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.; Chambers, Ryan S.; Howard, Keith D.

    2007-01-01

    The latest version of the NASA Flying Controls Testbed (FLiC) integrates commercial-off-the-shelf components including airframe, autopilot, and a small turbine engine to provide a low cost experimental flight controls testbed capable of sustained speeds up to 200 mph. The series of flight tests leading up to the demonstrated performance of the vehicle in sustained, autopiloted 200 mph flight at NASA Wallops Flight Facility's UAV runway in August 2006 will be described. Earlier versions of the FLiC were based on a modified Army target drone, AN/FQM-117B, developed as part of a collaboration between the Aviation Applied Technology Directorate at Fort Eustis, Virginia and NASA Langley Research Center. The newer turbine powered platform (J-FLiC) builds on the successes using the relatively smaller, slower and less expensive unmanned aerial vehicle developed specifically to test highly experimental flight control approaches with the implementation of C-coded experimental controllers. Tracking video was taken during the test flights at Wallops and will be available for presentation at the conference. Analysis of flight data from both remotely piloted and autopiloted flights will be presented. Candidate experimental controllers for implementation will be discussed. It is anticipated that flight testing will resume in Spring 2007 and those results will be included, if possible.

  16. Gemini Planet Imager coronagraph testbed results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Soummer, Rémi; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Carr, G. Lawrence; Mey, Jacob L.; Brenner, Doug; Mandeville, Charles W.; Zimmerman, Neil; Macintosh, Bruce A.; Graham, James R.; Saddlemyer, Les; Bauman, Brian; Carlotti, Alexis; Pueyo, Laurent; Tuthill, Peter G.; Dorrer, Christophe; Roberts, Robin; Greenbaum, Alexandra

    2010-07-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is an extreme AO coronagraphic integral field unit YJHK spectrograph destined for first light on the 8m Gemini South telescope in 2011. GPI fields a 1500 channel AO system feeding an apodized pupil Lyot coronagraph, and a nIR non-common-path slow wavefront sensor. It targets detection and characterizion of relatively young (<2GYr), self luminous planets up to 10 million times as faint as their primary star. We present the coronagraph subsystem's in-lab performance, and describe the studies required to specify and fabricate the coronagraph. Coronagraphic pupil apodization is implemented with metallic half-tone screens on glass, and the focal plane occulters are deep reactive ion etched holes in optically polished silicon mirrors. Our JH testbed achieves H-band contrast below a million at separations above 5 resolution elements, without using an AO system. We present an overview of the coronagraphic masks and our testbed coronagraphic data. We also demonstrate the performance of an astrometric and photometric grid that enables coronagraphic astrometry relative to the primary star in every exposure, a proven technique that has yielded on-sky precision of the order of a milliarsecond.

  17. Telescience testbed in human space physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoru; Seo, Hisao; Iwase, Satoshi; Tanaka, Masafumi; Kaneko, Sayumi; Mano, Tadaaki; Matsui, Nobuo; Foldager, Niels; Bondepetersen, Flemming; Yamashita, Masamichi; Shoji, Takatoshi; Sudoh, Hideo

    The present telescience testbed study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of physiological experimentation under restricted conditions such as during simulated weightlessness induced by using a water immersion facility, a reduced capacity of laboratory facilities, a delay and desynchronization of communication between investigator and operator, restrictions of different kinds of experiments practiced by only one operator following a limited time line and so on. The three day's experiments were carried out following the same protocols. The operators were changed every day, but was the same the first and the third day. The operators were both medical doctors but not all round experts in the physiological experimentation. The experimental objectives were: 1) ECG changes by changing water immersion levels, 2) blood pressure changes, 3) ultrasonic Echo-cardiographic changes, 4) laser Doppler skin blood flowmetry in a finger, 5) blood sampling to examine blood electrolytic and humoral changes. The effectiveness of the testbed experiment was assessed by evaluating the quality of the obtained data and estimating the friendliness of the operation of the telescience to investigators and operators.

  18. Testbed for the development of intelligent robot control

    SciTech Connect

    Harrigan, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Sensor Driven Robot Systems Testbed has been constructed to provide a working environment to aid in the development of intelligent robot control software. The Testbed employs vision and force as the robot's means of interrogating its environment. The Testbed, which has been operational for approximately 24 months, consists of a PUMA-560 robot manipulator coupled to a 2-dimensional vision system and force and torque sensing wrist. Recent work within the Testbed environment has led to a highly modularized control software concept with emphasis on detection and resolution of error situations. The objective of the Testbed is to develop intelligent robot control concepts incorporating planning and error recovery which are transportable to a wide variety of robot applications. This project is an ongoing, longterm development project and, as such, this paper represents a status report of the development work.

  19. Nuclear Instrumentation and Control Cyber Testbed Considerations – Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan Gray; Robert Anderson; Julio G. Rodriguez; Cheol-Kwon Lee

    2014-08-01

    Abstract: Identifying and understanding digital instrumentation and control (I&C) cyber vulnerabilities within nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities, is critical if nation states desire to operate nuclear facilities safely, reliably, and securely. In order to demonstrate objective evidence that cyber vulnerabilities have been adequately identified and mitigated, a testbed representing a facility’s critical nuclear equipment must be replicated. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has built and operated similar testbeds for common critical infrastructure I&C for over ten years. This experience developing, operating, and maintaining an I&C testbed in support of research identifying cyber vulnerabilities has led the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute of the Republic of Korea to solicit the experiences of INL to help mitigate problems early in the design, development, operation, and maintenance of a similar testbed. The following information will discuss I&C testbed lessons learned and the impact of these experiences to KAERI.

  20. Development of a Dynamically Scaled Generic Transport Model Testbed for Flight Research Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Thomas; Langford, William; Belcastro, Christine; Foster, John; Shah, Gautam; Howland, Gregory; Kidd, Reggie

    2004-01-01

    This paper details the design and development of the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) test-bed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The aircraft is a 5.5% dynamically scaled, remotely piloted, twin-turbine, swept wing, Generic Transport Model (GTM) which will be used to provide an experimental flight test capability for research experiments pertaining to dynamics modeling and control beyond the normal flight envelope. The unique design challenges arising from the dimensional, weight, dynamic (inertial), and actuator scaling requirements necessitated by the research community are described along with the specific telemetry and control issues associated with a remotely piloted subscale research aircraft. Development of the necessary operational infrastructure, including operational and safety procedures, test site identification, and research pilots is also discussed. The GTM is a unique vehicle that provides significant research capacity due to its scaling, data gathering, and control characteristics. By combining data from this testbed with full-scale flight and accident data, wind tunnel data, and simulation results, NASA will advance and validate control upset prevention and recovery technologies for transport aircraft, thereby reducing vehicle loss-of-control accidents resulting from adverse and upset conditions.

  1. Expediting Experiments across Testbeds with AnyBed: A Testbed-Independent Topology Configuration System and Its Tool Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Mio; Hazeyama, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Daisuke; Miwa, Shinsuke; Kadobayashi, Youki

    Building an experimental network within a testbed has been a tiresome process for experimenters, due to the complexity of the physical resource assignment and the configuration overhead. Also, the process could not be expedited across testbeds, because the syntax of a configuration file varies depending on specific hardware and software. Re-configuration of an experimental topology for each testbed wastes time, an experimenter could not carry out his/her experiments during the limited lease time of a testbed at worst. In this paper, we propose the AnyBed: the experimental network-building system. The conceptual idea of AnyBed is “If experimental network topologies can be portable across any kinds of testbed, then, it would expedite building an experimental network on a testbed while manipulating experiments by each testbed support tool”. To achieve this concept, AnyBed divide an experimental network configuration into the logical and physical network topologies. Mapping these two topologies, AnyBed can build intended logical network topology on any PC clusters. We have evaluated the AnyBed implementation using two distinct clusters. The evaluation result shows a BGP topology with 150 nodes can be constructed on a large scale testbed in less than 113 seconds.

  2. The DST group ionospheric sounder replacement for JORN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, T. J.; Quinn, A. D.; Pederick, L. H.

    2016-06-01

    The Jindalee Over-the-horizon Radar Network (JORN) is an integral part of Australia's national defense capability. JORN uses a real-time ionospheric model as part of its operations. The primary source of data for this model is a set of 13 vertical-incidence sounders (VIS) scattered around the Australian coast and inland locations. These sounders are a mix of Lowell digisonde portable sounder (DPS)-1 and DPS-4. Both of these sounders, the DPS-1 in particular, are near the end of their maintainable life. A replacement for these aging sounders was required as part of the ongoing sustainment program for JORN. Over the last few years the High-Frequency Radar Branch (HFRB) of the Defence Science and Technology (DST) Group, Australian Department of Defence, has been developing its own sounders based on its successful radar hardware technology. The DST Group VIS solution known as PRIME (Portable Remote Ionospheric Monitoring Equipment) is a 100% duty cycle, continuous wave system that receives the returned ionospheric signal while it is still transmitting and operates the receiver in the near field of the transmitter. Of considerable importance to a successful VIS is the autoscaling software, which takes the ionogram data and produces an ionogram trace (group delay as a function of frequency), and from that produces a set of ionospheric parameters that represent the (bottomside) overhead electron density profile. HFRB has developed its own robust autoscaling software. The performance of DST Group's PRIME under a multitude of challenging ionospheric conditions has been studied. In December 2014, PRIME was trialed at a JORN VIS site collocated with the existing Lowell Digisonde DPS-1. This side-by-side testing determined that PRIME was fit for purpose. A summary of the results of this comparison and example PRIME output will be discussed. Note that this paper compares PRIME with the 25 year old Lowell Digisonde DPS-1, which is planned to be replaced. Our future plans include

  3. Design and Implementation of a Mechanical Control System for the Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, William

    2011-01-01

    The Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder (SMLS) will use technological improvements in low noise mixers to provide precise data on the Earth's atmospheric composition with high spatial resolution. This project focuses on the design and implementation of a real time control system needed for airborne engineering tests of the SMLS. The system must coordinate the actuation of optical components using four motors with encoder readback, while collecting synchronized telemetric data from a GPS receiver and 3-axis gyrometric system. A graphical user interface for testing the control system was also designed using Python. Although the system could have been implemented with a FPGA-based setup, we chose to use a low cost processor development kit manufactured by XMOS. The XMOS architecture allows parallel execution of multiple tasks on separate threads-making it ideal for this application and is easily programmed using XC (a subset of C). The necessary communication interfaces were implemented in software, including Ethernet, with significant cost and time reduction compared to an FPGA-based approach. For these reasons, the XMOS technology is an attractive, cost effective, alternative to FPGA-based technologies for this design and similar rapid prototyping projects.

  4. Airborne GPS kinematic positioning and its application to oceanographic mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shaowei; Rizos, Chris

    2000-10-01

    Precise, long-range, airborne GPS kinematic positioning requires the use of carrier phase measurements, the data processing of which suffers from the technical challenges of "on-the-fly" ambiguity resolution and cycle slip repair. In this paper the authors describe how the combination of an `ambiguity recovery' technique and a `linear bias correction' method has been used to support oceanographic mapping in Australian waters, together with the augmentation from the Laser Airborne Depth Sounder (LADS) system. Two experiments, carried out on the 4th December 1997 in the Torres Strait between Papua New Guinea and Australia, and on the 20 May 1998 at Lake Argyle in Australia, were analysed. The results indicate that the topography of the water surface can be obtained with sub-decimetre accuracy, with a spatial resolution of a few metres. The main errors are attributable to multipath interference of the GPS signals at the antennas from the aircraft surface.

  5. Next Generation Grating Spectrometer Sounders for LEO and GEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.

    2011-01-01

    AIRS and MODIS are widely used for weather, climate, composition, carbon cycle, cross-calibration, and applications. The community asking for new capability in the 2020 timeframe, capabilities desired: (1) Hyperspectral UV to LWIR, High Spatial ?1km IFOV (2) Maximize Synergies of Solar Reflected and IR. Synergies with OCO-2. We expect more users and applications of next gen LEO IR Sounder than GEO. These include: weather, climate, GHG monitoring, aviation, disaster response. There is a new direction for imagers and sounders: (1) Separate Vis/NIR/SWIR from MWIR/LWIR instruments reduces technology risk and complexity. (2) Expect Costs to be lower than CrIS & VIIRS Some additional ideas to reduce costs include: (1) minimum set of requirements (2) mini-grating spectrometers. supports constellation for higher revisit (3) new technology to reduce instrument size (large format fpa's) (4) hosted payloads

  6. Ultraspectral sounder data compression using the Tunstall coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Bormin; Gu, Lingjia

    2007-09-01

    In an error-prone environment the compression of ultraspectral sounder data is vulnerable to error propagation. The Tungstall coding is a variable-to-fixed length code which compresses data by mapping a variable number of source symbols to a fixed number of codewords. It avoids the resynchronization difficulty encountered in fixed-to-variable length codes such as Huffman coding and arithmetic coding. This paper explores the use of the Tungstall coding in reducing the error propagation for ultraspectral sounder data compression. The results show that our Tunstall approach has a favorable compression ratio compared with JPEG-2000, 3D SPIHT, JPEG-LS, CALIC and CCSDS IDC 5/3. It also has less error propagation compared with JPEG-2000.

  7. SAR/InSAR observation by an HF sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Ono, T.

    2007-03-01

    Application of SAR imaging algorithm to spaceborne HF sounder observation was studied. Two types of image ambiguity problems were addressed in the application. One is surface/subsurface image ambiguity arising from deep penetration of HF wave, and another is mirror image ambiguity that is inherent to dipole antenna SAR. A numerical model demonstrated that the surface/subsurface ambiguity can be mitigated by taking a synthetic aperture large enough to defocus subsurface objects. In order to resolve the mirror image ambiguity problem, an image superposition technique was proposed. The performance of the technique was demonstrated by using simulation data of the HF sounder observation to confirm the feasibility of HF SAR and HF InSAR observation.

  8. The topside sounder database - Data screening and systematic biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhulst, Tobias; Stankov, Stanimir M.

    2013-06-01

    The ionospheric topside sounder measurement database developed at the US National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) is a valuable source of information when investigating the composition and complex dynamics of the upper ionosphere. The database is increasingly used by many scientists around the world for both research and development of empirical models. However, there is always a danger of indiscriminately using the data without properly assessing the data quality and applicability for a given purpose. This paper is concerned with the issue of data screening and pre-processing of the Alouette/ISIS topside sounder database. An overview of the original database availability and formatting is given and the use of solar and geomagnetic indices is discussed. Data screening procedures, concerning detection and handling of erroneous profiles, are also presented. Special attention is drawn to the systematic biases observed in the database and the possibilities for their removal.

  9. Supersonic combustion engine testbed, heat lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoying, D.; Kelble, C.; Langenbahn, A.; Stahl, M.; Tincher, M.; Walsh, M.; Wisler, S.

    1990-01-01

    The design of a supersonic combustion engine testbed (SCET) aircraft is presented. The hypersonic waverider will utilize both supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRAMjet) and turbofan-ramjet engines. The waverider concept, system integration, electrical power, weight analysis, cockpit, landing skids, and configuration modeling are addressed in the configuration considerations. The subsonic, supersonic and hypersonic aerodynamics are presented along with the aerodynamic stability and landing analysis of the aircraft. The propulsion design considerations include: engine selection, turbofan ramjet inlets, SCRAMjet inlets and the SCRAMjet diffuser. The cooling requirements and system are covered along with the topics of materials and the hydrogen fuel tanks and insulation system. A cost analysis is presented and the appendices include: information about the subsonic wind tunnel test, shock expansion calculations, and an aerodynamic heat flux program.

  10. Introduction to the computational structural mechanics testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lotts, C. G.; Greene, W. H.; Mccleary, S. L.; Knight, N. F., Jr.; Paulson, S. S.; Gillian, R. E.

    1987-01-01

    The Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) testbed software system based on the SPAR finite element code and the NICE system is described. This software is denoted NICE/SPAR. NICE was developed at Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory and contains data management utilities, a command language interpreter, and a command language definition for integrating engineering computational modules. SPAR is a system of programs used for finite element structural analysis developed for NASA by Lockheed and Engineering Information Systems, Inc. It includes many complementary structural analysis, thermal analysis, utility functions which communicate through a common database. The work on NICE/SPAR was motivated by requirements for a highly modular and flexible structural analysis system to use as a tool in carrying out research in computational methods and exploring computer hardware. Analysis examples are presented which demonstrate the benefits gained from a combination of the NICE command language with a SPAR computational modules.

  11. The NULLTIMATE Testbed: A Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, P.

    2010-10-01

    Nulling interferometry has been suggested as the underlying principle for an instrument which could provide direct detection and spectroscopy of Earth-like exoplanets, including searches for potential biomarkers (Darwin/TPF-I). Several aspects of this method require further research and development. The NULLTIMATE testbed at the Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale in Orsay, France, is a new instrument, built in late 2008. It is designed to test different achromatic phase shifters (focus crossing, field reversal, dielectric plates) at 300 K using various sources ranging from 2 to 10 μm, with special attention to stabilization (optical path difference and beam intensity balance). Its operational parameters (null depth and stability) were tested with a monochromatic laser sources at 2.32 and 3.39 μm and with a supercontinuum source in the K band. This poster presents a progress report on its performance with a focus crossing achromatic phase shifter.

  12. Construction and Modeling of a Controls Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagle, James C.; Homaifar, Abdollah; Nasser, Ahmed A.; Bikdash, Marwan

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the construction and modeling of a control system testbed to be used for the comparison of various control methodologies. We specifically wish to test fuzzy logic control and compare performance of various fuzzy controllers, including Hybrid Fuzzy-PID (HFPID) and Hierarchical Hybrid Fuzzy-PID (HHFPID) to other controllers including localized rate feedback, LQR/LTR, and H2/H(sub infinity). The control problem is that of vibration suppression in a thin plate with inputs coming from accelerometers and outputs going to piezoelectric actuators or 'patches'. A model based on experimental modal analysis of the plate is conducted and compared with an analytical model. The analytical model uses a boundary condition which is a mix of clamped and simply supported.

  13. A land-surface Testbed for EOSDIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, William; Kelley, Tim

    1994-01-01

    The main objective of the Testbed project was to deliver satellite images via the Internet to scientific and educational users free of charge. The main method of operations was to store satellite images on a low cost tape library system, visually browse the raw satellite data, access the raw data filed, navigate the imagery through 'C' programming and X-Windows interface software, and deliver the finished image to the end user over the Internet by means of file transfer protocol methods. The conclusion is that the distribution of satellite imagery by means of the Internet is feasible, and the archiving of large data sets can be accomplished with low cost storage systems allowing multiple users.

  14. HIS analyses of mesoscale phenomena. [High resolution Interferometer Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, John T.; Fuelberg, Henry E.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from two sets of measurements made by the High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS) during two aircraft flights over the Cooperative-Huntsville-Meteorological-Experiment region on June 15 and 19, 1986. It is shown that the temperature and the dew-point field retrieved from HIS spectra contain distinct mesoscale structures. The features in the HIS dew-point fields agreed well with the cloud and moisture structures observed in visible and 6.7 micron GOES imagery.

  15. High resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS), volume 1, book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The following topics are presented with respect to the high resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS) that is to be used as an instrument for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): (1) an instrument overview; (2) an instrument description; (3) the instrument's conceptual design; (4) technical risks and offsets; (5) instrument reliability; (6) commands and telemetry; (7) mass and power budgets; (8) integration and test program; (9) program implementation; and (10) phase CD schedule.

  16. The Apollo 17 Lunar Sounder. [lunar orbit coherent radar experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.; Brown, W. E., Jr.; Jordan, R.; Adams, G. F.; Jackson, P.; Peeples, W. J.; Porcello, L. J.; Ryu, J.; Eggleton, R. E.; Schaber, G.

    1973-01-01

    The Apollo Lunar Sounder Experiment, a coherent radar operated from lunar orbit during the Apollo 17 mission, has scientific objectives of mapping lunar subsurface structure, surface profiling, surface imaging, and galactic noise measurement. Representative results from each of the four disciplines are presented. Subsurface reflections have been interpreted in both optically and digitally processed data. Images and profiles yield detailed selenomorphological information. The preliminary galactic noise results are consistent with earlier measurements by other workers.

  17. On Cirrus Cloud Fields Measured by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Brian H.; Eldering, Annmarie; Liou, Kuo Nan

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation showing trends in clouds measured by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is given. The topics include: 1) Trends in clouds measured by AIRS: Are they reasonable? 2) Single and multilayered cloud trends; 3) Retrievals of thin cirrus D(sub e) and tau: Single-layered cloud only; 4) Relationships between ECF, D(sub e), tau, and T(sub CLD); and 5) MODIS vs. AIRS retrievals.

  18. High resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS), volume 1, book 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The following topics are presented with respect to the high resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS) that is to be used as an instrument for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): (1) preliminary program plans; (2) contract end item (CEI) specification; and (3) the instrument interface description document. Under the preliminary program plans section, plans dealing with the following subject areas are discussed: spares, performance assurance, configuration management, software implementation, contamination, calibration management, and verification.

  19. Development of a Scalable Testbed for Mobile Olfaction Verification.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Syed Muhammad Mamduh Syed; Visvanathan, Retnam; Kamarudin, Kamarulzaman; Yeon, Ahmad Shakaff Ali; Md Shakaff, Ali Yeon; Zakaria, Ammar; Kamarudin, Latifah Munirah

    2015-01-01

    The lack of information on ground truth gas dispersion and experiment verification information has impeded the development of mobile olfaction systems, especially for real-world conditions. In this paper, an integrated testbed for mobile gas sensing experiments is presented. The integrated 3 m × 6 m testbed was built to provide real-time ground truth information for mobile olfaction system development. The testbed consists of a 72-gas-sensor array, namely Large Gas Sensor Array (LGSA), a localization system based on cameras and a wireless communication backbone for robot communication and integration into the testbed system. Furthermore, the data collected from the testbed may be streamed into a simulation environment to expedite development. Calibration results using ethanol have shown that using a large number of gas sensor in the LGSA is feasible and can produce coherent signals when exposed to the same concentrations. The results have shown that the testbed was able to capture the time varying characteristics and the variability of gas plume in a 2 h experiment thus providing time dependent ground truth concentration maps. The authors have demonstrated the ability of the mobile olfaction testbed to monitor, verify and thus, provide insight to gas distribution mapping experiment. PMID:26690175

  20. Technology Developments Integrating a Space Network Communications Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, Winston; Jennings, Esther; Clare, Loren; Leang, Dee

    2006-01-01

    As future manned and robotic space explorations missions involve more complex systems, it is essential to verify, validate, and optimize such systems through simulation and emulation in a low cost testbed environment. The goal of such a testbed is to perform detailed testing of advanced space and ground communications networks, technologies, and client applications that are essential for future space exploration missions. We describe the development of new technologies enhancing our Multi-mission Advanced Communications Hybrid Environment for Test and Evaluation (MACHETE) that enable its integration in a distributed space communications testbed. MACHETE combines orbital modeling, link analysis, and protocol and service modeling to quantify system performance based on comprehensive considerations of different aspects of space missions. It can simulate entire networks and can interface with external (testbed) systems. The key technology developments enabling the integration of MACHETE into a distributed testbed are the Monitor and Control module and the QualNet IP Network Emulator module. Specifically, the Monitor and Control module establishes a standard interface mechanism to centralize the management of each testbed component. The QualNet IP Network Emulator module allows externally generated network traffic to be passed through MACHETE to experience simulated network behaviors such as propagation delay, data loss, orbital effects and other communications characteristics, including entire network behaviors. We report a successful integration of MACHETE with a space communication testbed modeling a lunar exploration scenario. This document is the viewgraph slides of the presentation.

  1. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) robotics technology testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnurr, Rick; Obrien, Maureen; Cofer, Sue

    1989-01-01

    Much of the technology planned for use in NASA's Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) and the Demonstration Test Flight (DTF) is relatively new and untested. To provide the answers needed to design safe, reliable, and fully functional robotics for flight, NASA/GSFC is developing a robotics technology testbed for research of issues such as zero-g robot control, dual arm teleoperation, simulations, and hierarchical control using a high level programming language. The testbed will be used to investigate these high risk technologies required for the FTS and DTF projects. The robotics technology testbed is centered around the dual arm teleoperation of a pair of 7 degree-of-freedom (DOF) manipulators, each with their own 6-DOF mini-master hand controllers. Several levels of safety are implemented using the control processor, a separate watchdog computer, and other low level features. High speed input/output ports allow the control processor to interface to a simulation workstation: all or part of the testbed hardware can be used in real time dynamic simulation of the testbed operations, allowing a quick and safe means for testing new control strategies. The NASA/National Bureau of Standards Standard Reference Model for Telerobot Control System Architecture (NASREM) hierarchical control scheme, is being used as the reference standard for system design. All software developed for the testbed, excluding some of simulation workstation software, is being developed in Ada. The testbed is being developed in phases. The first phase, which is nearing completion, and highlights future developments is described.

  2. Development of a Scalable Testbed for Mobile Olfaction Verification

    PubMed Central

    Syed Zakaria, Syed Muhammad Mamduh; Visvanathan, Retnam; Kamarudin, Kamarulzaman; Ali Yeon, Ahmad Shakaff; Md. Shakaff, Ali Yeon; Zakaria, Ammar; Kamarudin, Latifah Munirah

    2015-01-01

    The lack of information on ground truth gas dispersion and experiment verification information has impeded the development of mobile olfaction systems, especially for real-world conditions. In this paper, an integrated testbed for mobile gas sensing experiments is presented. The integrated 3 m × 6 m testbed was built to provide real-time ground truth information for mobile olfaction system development. The testbed consists of a 72-gas-sensor array, namely Large Gas Sensor Array (LGSA), a localization system based on cameras and a wireless communication backbone for robot communication and integration into the testbed system. Furthermore, the data collected from the testbed may be streamed into a simulation environment to expedite development. Calibration results using ethanol have shown that using a large number of gas sensor in the LGSA is feasible and can produce coherent signals when exposed to the same concentrations. The results have shown that the testbed was able to capture the time varying characteristics and the variability of gas plume in a 2 h experiment thus providing time dependent ground truth concentration maps. The authors have demonstrated the ability of the mobile olfaction testbed to monitor, verify and thus, provide insight to gas distribution mapping experiment. PMID:26690175

  3. Satellite Sounder Data Assimilation for Improving Alaska Region Weather Forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Stevens, E.; Zhang, X.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Heinrichs, T.; Broderson, D.

    2014-01-01

    A case study and monthly statistical analysis using sounder data assimilation to improve the Alaska regional weather forecast model are presented. Weather forecast in Alaska faces challenges as well as opportunities. Alaska has a large land with multiple types of topography and coastal area. Weather forecast models must be finely tuned in order to accurately predict weather in Alaska. Being in the high-latitudes provides Alaska greater coverage of polar orbiting satellites for integration into forecasting models than the lower 48. Forecasting marine low stratus clouds is critical to the Alaska aviation and oil industry and is the current focus of the case study. NASA AIRS/CrIS sounder profiles data are used to do data assimilation for the Alaska regional weather forecast model to improve Arctic marine stratus clouds forecast. Choosing physical options for the WRF model is discussed. Preprocess of AIRS/CrIS sounder data for data assimilation is described. Local observation data, satellite data, and global data assimilation data are used to verify and/or evaluate the forecast results by the MET tools Model Evaluation Tools (MET).

  4. Geophysical Information from Advanced Sounder Infrared Spectral Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Satisfying this type of improvement for inferred geophysical information from these observations requires optimal usage of data from current systems as well as enhancements to future sensors. This presentation addresses the information content present in infrared spectral radiance from advanced atmospheric sounders with an emphasis on knowledge of thermodynamic state and trace species. Results of trade-off studies conducted to evaluate the impact of spectral resolution, spectral coverage, instrument noise, and a priori knowledge on remote sensing system information content will be discussed. A focus is placed on information achievable from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) on the NASA EOS Aqua satellite in orbit since 2002, the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) aboard MetOp-A since 2006, and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) instrument aboard the NPP and JPSS series of satellites which began 28 October 2011.

  5. GEO/SAMS - The Geostationary Synthetic Aperture Microwave Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.

    2008-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has for many years operated two weather satellite systems, the Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite system (POES), using low-earth orbiting (LEO) satellites, and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite system (GOES), using geostationary earth orbiting (GEO) satellites. (Similar systems are also operated by other nations.) The POES satellites have been equipped with both infrared (IR) and microwave (MW) atmospheric sounders, which makes it possible to determine the vertical distribution of temperature and humidity in the troposphere even under cloudy conditions. Such satellite observations have had a significant impact on weather forecasting accuracy, especially in regions where in situ observations are sparse. In contrast, the GOES satellites have only been equipped with IR sounders, since it has not been feasible to build a large enough antenna to achieve sufficient spatial resolution for a MW sounder in GEO. As a result, GOES soundings can only be obtained in cloud free areas and in the less important upper atmosphere, above the cloud tops. This has hindered the effective use of GOES data in numerical weather prediction. Full sounding capabilities with the GOES system is highly desirable because of the advantageous spatial and temporal coverage that is possible from GEO. While POES satellites provide coverage in relatively narrow swaths, and with a revisit time of 12-24 hours or more, GOES satellites can provide continuous hemispheric coverage, making it possible to monitor highly dynamic phenomena such as hurricanes.

  6. Application of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Data to Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Gregorich, David; Gaiser, Steve; Chahine, Moustafa T.

    2004-01-01

    The application of hyper spectral radiometric data to climate research requires very high absolute radiometric accuracy and stability. We use cloud-free tropical ocean data from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIR) Calibration Data Subset (ADCS) to show that the radiometric precision and stability required climate applications has been achieved. The sea surface skin temperatures derived from the AIRS 2616cm-1 super window channel are stable relative to the RTG.SST at the better than 8 mK/year level, and the spectral calibration is stable at the 1 ppm/year level. The excellent stability and accuracy are the result of the implementation of AIRS as a grating array spectrometer, which is cooled and stabilized within 10 mK at 155 K. Analysis of daily measurements of the temperature gradient between the surface and 7 km altitude show that the AIRS Calibration Data Subset has applications which extend its original intent for calibration support to climate research. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua satellite was launched into polar orbit in May 2002. AIRS covers the spectral region from 640 to 2700 cm-1 with 2378 independent channels and represents the first of a new generation of hyper spectral resolution sounders in support of global sounding data for weather forecasting and climate research.

  7. Development of a space-systems network testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan; Alger, Linda; Adams, Stuart; Burkhardt, Laura; Nagle, Gail; Murray, Nicholas

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a communications network testbed which has been designed to allow the development of architectures and algorithms that meet the functional requirements of future NASA communication systems. The central hardware components of the Network Testbed are programmable circuit switching communication nodes which can be adapted by software or firmware changes to customize the testbed to particular architectures and algorithms. Fault detection, isolation, and reconfiguration has been implemented in the Network with a hybrid approach which utilizes features of both centralized and distributed techniques to provide efficient handling of faults within the Network.

  8. Development of a space-systems network testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan; Alger, Linda; Adams, Stuart; Burkhardt, Laura; Nagle, Gail; Murray, Nicholas

    This paper describes a communications network testbed which has been designed to allow the development of architectures and algorithms that meet the functional requirements of future NASA communication systems. The central hardware components of the Network Testbed are programmable circuit switching communication nodes which can be adapted by software or firmware changes to customize the testbed to particular architectures and algorithms. Fault detection, isolation, and reconfiguration has been implemented in the Network with a hybrid approach which utilizes features of both centralized and distributed techniques to provide efficient handling of faults within the Network.

  9. Development of Hardware-in-the-loop Microgrid Testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Bailu; Prabakar, Kumaraguru; Starke, Michael R; Liu, Guodong; Dowling, Kevin; Ollis, T Ben; Irminger, Philip; Xu, Yan; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D

    2015-01-01

    A hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) microgrid testbed for the evaluation and assessment of microgrid operation and control system has been presented in this paper. The HIL testbed is composed of a real-time digital simulator (RTDS) for modeling of the microgrid, multiple NI CompactRIOs for device level control, a prototype microgrid energy management system (MicroEMS), and a relay protection system. The applied communication-assisted hybrid control system has been also discussed. Results of function testing of HIL controller, communication, and the relay protection system are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed HIL microgrid testbed.

  10. Sounder updates for statistical model predictions of maximum usable frequencies on HF sky wave paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Michael H.; Daehler, Mark

    1986-12-01

    A method is presented for the short-term prediction of maximum usable frequencies (MUFs) in a large communications region. It is shown how ionospheric measurements from a network of ionospheric sounders can be used to update sunspot number or solar 10.7 cm flux inputs to a climatological MUF prediction model. MINIMUF in this case, which is then used to predict MUFs on paths throughout the region. Analysis of mid-latitude oblique-incidence sounder data sets indicates the advantage gained from single-path sounder updates of flux for MUF predictions on adjacent paths. Under specified conditions a further dramatic improvement in MUF prediction accuracy is found from spatial interpolation of sounder-updated flux values. MUF prediction accuracies within 0.5 MHz are obtained for fairly modest sounder network deployments, in which the sounder midpath point distributions and updating frequency satisfy particular requirements.

  11. Analysis of test data film generated by the lunar sounder (S-209)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, N.

    1973-01-01

    The analysis of test films pertaining to the readiness of the Apollo 17 radar equipment is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation of the lunar sounder equipment. The lunar sounder experiment was to examine the lunar surface at three different radar frequencies of 2 meters, 60 meters, and 20 meters. Test films were made on the lunar sounder system to describe the purpose of the test, to describe the experiments used for analysis, and to provide conclusions reached after analysis.

  12. Southern Great Plains cloud and radiation testbed site

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This document presents information about the Cloud and Radiation Testbed Site and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program. Topics include; measuring methods, general circulation methods, milestones, instrumentation, meteorological observations, and computing facilities.

  13. Situational descriptions of behavioral procedures: the in situ testbed.

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, S M; Eckerman, D A

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate the In Situ testbed, a system that aids in evaluating computational models of learning, including artificial neural networks. The testbed models contingencies of reinforcement rising an extension of Mechner's (1959) notational system for the description of behavioral procedures. These contingencies are input to the model under test. The model's output is displayed as cumulative records. The cumulative record can then be compared to one produced by a pigeon exposed to the same contingencies. The testbed is tried with three published models of learning. Each model is exposed to up to three reinforcement schedules (testing ends when the model does not produce acceptable cumulative records): continuous reinforcement and extinction, fixed ratio, and fixed interval. The In Sitt testbed appears to be a reliable and valid testing procedure for comparing models of learning. PMID:11394484

  14. The computational structural mechanics testbed data library description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Caroline B. (Compiler)

    1988-01-01

    The datasets created and used by the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed software system is documented by this manual. A description of each dataset including its form, contents, and organization is presented.

  15. The computational structural mechanics testbed data library description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Caroline B. (Compiler)

    1988-01-01

    The datasets created and used by the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed software system are documented by this manual. A description of each dataset including its form, contents, and organization is presented.

  16. Atmospheric infrared sounder on AIRS with emphasis on level 2 products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sung-Yung; Fetzer, Eric; Granger, Stephanie; Hearty, Thomas; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Manning, Evan M.; Olsen, Edward; Pagano, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) was launched aboard EOS Aqua in May of 2002. AIRS is a grating spectrometer with almost 2400 channels covering the 3.74 to 15.40 micron spectral region with a nominal spectral resolution ((nu)/(delta)(nu)) of 1200, with some gaps. In addition, AIRS has 4 channels in the NIR/VIS region. The AIRS operates in conjunction with the microwave sounders Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A) and Humidity Sounder of Brazil (HSB). The microwave sounders are mainly used for cloud clearing of IR radiances, or to remove the effect of cloud on the IR radiances.

  17. Phoenix Missile Hypersonic Testbed (PMHT): System Concept Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Thomas P.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation of the Phoenix Missile Hypersonic Testbed (PMHT) is shown. The contents include: 1) Need and Goals; 2) Phoenix Missile Hypersonic Testbed; 3) PMHT Concept; 4) Development Objectives; 5) Possible Research Payloads; 6) Possible Research Program Participants; 7) PMHT Configuration; 8) AIM-54 Internal Hardware Schematic; 9) PMHT Configuration; 10) New Guidance and Armament Section Profiles; 11) Nomenclature; 12) PMHT Stack; 13) Systems Concept; 14) PMHT Preflight Activities; 15) Notional Ground Path; and 16) Sample Theoretical Trajectories.

  18. Evaluation testbed for ATD performance prediction (ETAPP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralph, Scott K.; Eaton, Ross; Snorrason, Magnús; Irvine, John; Vanstone, Steve

    2007-04-01

    Automatic target detection (ATD) systems process imagery to detect and locate targets in imagery in support of a variety of military missions. Accurate prediction of ATD performance would assist in system design and trade studies, collection management, and mission planning. A need exists for ATD performance prediction based exclusively on information available from the imagery and its associated metadata. We present a predictor based on image measures quantifying the intrinsic ATD difficulty on an image. The modeling effort consists of two phases: a learning phase, where image measures are computed for a set of test images, the ATD performance is measured, and a prediction model is developed; and a second phase to test and validate performance prediction. The learning phase produces a mapping, valid across various ATR algorithms, which is even applicable when no image truth is available (e.g., when evaluating denied area imagery). The testbed has plug-in capability to allow rapid evaluation of new ATR algorithms. The image measures employed in the model include: statistics derived from a constant false alarm rate (CFAR) processor, the Power Spectrum Signature, and others. We present performance predictors for two trained ATD classifiers, one constructed using using GENIE Pro TM, a tool developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the other eCognition TM, developed by Definiens (http://www.definiens.com/products). We present analyses of the two performance predictions, and compare the underlying prediction models. The paper concludes with a discussion of future research.

  19. Ames life science telescience testbed evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.; Johnson, Vicki; Vogelsong, Kristofer H.; Froloff, Walt

    1989-01-01

    Eight surrogate spaceflight mission specialists participated in a real-time evaluation of remote coaching using the Ames Life Science Telescience Testbed facility. This facility consisted of three remotely located nodes: (1) a prototype Space Station glovebox; (2) a ground control station; and (3) a principal investigator's (PI) work area. The major objective of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of telescience techniques and hardware to support three realistic remote coaching science procedures: plant seed germinator charging, plant sample acquisition and preservation, and remote plant observation with ground coaching. Each scenario was performed by a subject acting as flight mission specialist, interacting with a payload operations manager and a principal investigator expert. All three groups were physically isolated from each other yet linked by duplex audio and color video communication channels and networked computer workstations. Workload ratings were made by the flight and ground crewpersons immediately after completing their assigned tasks. Time to complete each scientific procedural step was recorded automatically. Two expert observers also made performance ratings and various error assessments. The results are presented and discussed.

  20. Further progress in watermark evaluation testbed (WET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung C.; Lin, Eugene T.; Guitart, Oriol; Delp, Edward J., III

    2005-03-01

    While Digital Watermarking has received much attention in recent years, it is still a relatively young technology. There are few accepted tools/metrics that can be used to evaluate the suitability of a watermarking technique for a specific application. This lack of a universally adopted set of metrics/methods has motivated us to develop a web-based digital watermark evaluation system called the Watermark Evaluation Testbed or WET. There have been more improvements over the first version of WET. We implemented batch mode with a queue that allows for user submitted jobs. In addition to StirMark 3.1 as an attack module, we added attack modules based on StirMark 4.0. For a new image fidelity measure, we evaluate conditional entropy as an image fidelity measure for different watermarking algorithms and different attacks. Also, we show the results of curve fitting the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis data using the Parzen window density estimation. The curve fits the data closely while having only two parameters to estimate.

  1. Optical testbed for the LISA phasemeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarze, T. S.; Fernández Barranco, G.; Penkert, D.; Gerberding, O.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2016-05-01

    The planned spaceborne gravitational wave detector LISA will allow the detection of gravitational waves at frequencies between 0.1 mHz and 1 Hz. A breadboard model for the metrology system aka the phasemeter was developed in the scope of an ESA technology development project by a collaboration between the Albert Einstein Institute, the Technical University of Denmark and the Danish industry partner Axcon Aps. It in particular provides the electronic readout of the main interferometer phases besides auxiliary functions. These include clock noise transfer, ADC pilot tone correction, inter-satellite ranging and data transfer. Besides in LISA, the phasemeter can also be applied in future satellite geodesy missions. Here we show the planning and advances in the implementation of an optical testbed for the full metrology chain. It is based on an ultra-stable hexagonal optical bench. This bench allows the generation of three unequal heterodyne beatnotes with a zero phase combination, thus providing the possibility to probe the phase readout for non-linearities in an optical three signal test. Additionally, the utilization of three independent phasemeters will allow the testing of the auxiliary functions. Once working, components can individually be replaced with flight-qualified hardware in this setup.

  2. A Hydrometeorological Testbed For Western Water Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralph, F. M.; Reynolds, D.; Martner, B. E.; Kingsmill, D. E.; White, A. B.; Whitaker, J. S.

    2002-12-01

    Based on experience gained between 1997 and 2002 in a series of three West Coast experiments focused on improved prediction of precipitation in land-falling Pacific winter storms, NOAA is leading the creation of a regional Hydrometeorological Testbed (HMT). The goal of this effort is to advance both the understanding of fundamental physical processes influencing primarily winter-season precipitation (rain and snow) in mountainous regions, and to improve quantitative precipitation forecasting, main-stem river flood warnings and flash-flood warning lead time in such regions. The focus will be on processes spanning the weather-climate connection, from the mesoscale to tropical-extratropical connections that modulate regional short-term climate anomalies influencing precipitation. The geographic area covered by the initial HMT encompasses the flood-prone Russian River and Sacramento River watersheds in northern California. While these watersheds represent some of the greatest flood risks in the nation, the scientific and operational results developed there will have bearing on winter season hydrometeorological prediction in many other locations. These goals will be addressed through a joint effort between scientists, weather forecasters, hydrologists and forecast users that will define both the needs and methodologies to tackle this important problem. Annual field activities will begin in the winter of 2002/03, building on results from earlier studies in the region. Priorities and leveraging opportunities for wider participation in the winter 2003/04 season will be explored in upcoming planning meetings where broad input is encouraged.

  3. A knowledge based software engineering environment testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, C.; Reedy, A.; Baker, L.

    1985-01-01

    The Carnegie Group Incorporated and Boeing Computer Services Company are developing a testbed which will provide a framework for integrating conventional software engineering tools with Artifical Intelligence (AI) tools to promote automation and productivity. The emphasis is on the transfer of AI technology to the software development process. Experiments relate to AI issues such as scaling up, inference, and knowledge representation. In its first year, the project has created a model of software development by representing software activities; developed a module representation formalism to specify the behavior and structure of software objects; integrated the model with the formalism to identify shared representation and inheritance mechanisms; demonstrated object programming by writing procedures and applying them to software objects; used data-directed and goal-directed reasoning to, respectively, infer the cause of bugs and evaluate the appropriateness of a configuration; and demonstrated knowledge-based graphics. Future plans include introduction of knowledge-based systems for rapid prototyping or rescheduling; natural language interfaces; blackboard architecture; and distributed processing

  4. Observations and trends of clouds based on GOES sounder data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, Anthony J.; Schmit, Timothy J.; Menzel, W. Paul

    2001-01-01

    A 26 month (November 1997 through December 1999) data set of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) sounder-derived cloud parameters has been analyzed to discern annual and monthly trends. An important outcome of this study is the identification of diurnal trends made possible by the geostationary satellite frequent observations over specific locations. The area of coverage is 20°N to 50°N and 60°W to 160°W, which corresponds to the continental United States and the surrounding waters. The satellite cloud observations were compared to manually observed Pilot Reports (PIREPs) and were found to be, on average, 35 hPa lower. Comparing the frequency of GOES sounder observations of high cloudiness with observations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) series of polar orbiting weather satellites reveals a correlation coefficient of 0.79 and a bias of 3.4% for the frequency of occurrence (GOES with a mean higher height). The frequency of occurrence and distribution of clouds, cloud top pressure (CTOP), and effective cloud amount are based on a spatial resolution of ˜40 km (3×3 field of view box) and are shown for eight regions. High clouds (CTOP ≤300 hPa) are found to be more prevalent during the Northern Hemisphere summer than winter for all regions. High clouds for 1998 comprise 8.5% of all observations. Also, in 1998 clear conditions are observed ˜34% of the time. Focusing on the strength of the hourly GOES sounder data, it is found that thin high clouds are most prevalent during the summer and fall seasons, occurring most frequently in the late morning and early afternoon.

  5. Impact of Measurement System Characteristics on Advanced Sounder Information Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Achieving such an improvement in geophysical information inferred from these observations requires optimal usage of data from current systems as well as instrument system enhancements for future sensors. This presentation addresses results of tradeoff studies evaluating the impact of spectral resolution, spectral coverage, instrument noise, and a priori knowledge on remote sensing system information content, with a specific emphasis on thermodynamic state and trace species information obtainable from advanced atmospheric sounders. Particular attention will be devoted toward information achievable from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) on the NASA EOS Aqua satellite in orbit since 2002, the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) aboard MetOp-A since 2006, and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) instrument to fly aboard the NPP and JPSS series of satellites expected to begin in late 2011. While all of these systems cover nearly the same infrared spectral extent, they have very different number of channels, instrument line shapes, coverage continuity, and instrument noise. AIRS is a grating spectrometer having 2378 discrete spectral channels ranging from about 0.4 to 2.2/cm resolution; IASI is a Michelson interferometer with 8461 uniformly-spaced spectral channels of 0.5/cm (apodized) resolution; and CrIS is a Michelson interferometer having 1305 spectral channels of 0.625, 1.250, and 2.50/cm (unapodized) spectral resolution, respectively, over its three continuous but non-overlapping bands. Results of tradeoff studies showing information content sensitivity to assumed measurement system characteristics will be presented.

  6. Broadband infrared beam splitter for spaceborne interferometric infrared sounder.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tianyan; Liu, Dingquan; Qin, Yang

    2014-10-01

    A broadband infrared beam splitter (BS) on ZnSe substrate used for the spaceborne interferometric infrared sounder (SIIRS) is studied in the spectral range of 4.44-15 μm. Both broadband antireflection coating and broadband beam-splitter coating in this BS are designed and tested. To optimize the optical properties and the stability of the BS, suitable infrared materials were selected, and improved deposition techniques were applied. The designed structures matched experimental data well, and the properties of the BS met the application specification of SIIRS. PMID:25322240

  7. GEOSTAR - a microwave sounder for GOES-R

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Wilson, William; Tanner, Alan

    2005-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has for many years operated two weather satellite systems, the Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite system (POES), using low-earth orbiting (LEO) satellites, and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite system (GOES), using geostationary earth orbiting (GEO) satellites. Similar systems are also operated by other nations. The POES satellites have been equipped with both infrared (IR) and microwave (MW) atmospheric sounders, which together make it possible to determine the vertical distribution of temperature and humidity in the troposphere even under cloudy conditions.

  8. Advanced atmospheric sounder and imaging radiometer /AASIR/ for STORMSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    The principal mission of the three-axis stabilized STORMSAT spacecraft is to provide the necessary meteorological data for tracking, studying the detailed structure, and modeling mesoscale weather phenomena. In the area of mesoscale events, the following meteorological objectives are indicated: high-quality imagery, visible and infrared; wind velocity from cloud tracers (1 m/sec), atmospheric temperature profiles (1 K), and atmospheric humidity sounding. These objectives are reflected in the functional characteristics of the AASIR, which is a second generation meteorological sensor based on the Visible Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer (VISSR) and the Atmospheric Sounder (VAS). The AASIR design and interface constraints with the STORMSAT spacecraft is discussed.

  9. Multiorder etalon sounder (MOES) development and test for balloon experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.; Wnag, Jinxue; Wu, Jian

    1993-01-01

    The Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI), with its high throughput and high spectral resolution has been used in the remote-sensing measurements of the earth's atmospheric composition, winds, and temperatures. The most recent satellite instruments include the Fabry-Perot interferometer flown on the Dynamics Explorer-2 (DE-2), the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI), and the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) flown on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). These instruments measure the Doppler line profiles of the emission and absorption of certain atmospheric species (such as atomic oxygen) in the visible and infrared spectral region. The successful space flight of DE-FPI, HRDI, and CLAES on UARS demonstrated the extremely high spectral resolution and ruggedness of the etalon system for the remote sensing of earth and planetary atmospheres. Recently, an innovative FPI focal plane detection technique called the Circle-to-Line Interferometer Optical (CLIO) system was invented at the Space Physics Research Laboratory. The CLIO simplifies the FPI focal plane detection process by converting the circular rings or fringes into a linear pattern similar to that produced by a conventional spectrometer, while retaining the throughput advantage of the etalon interferometer. The combination of FPI and CLIO allows the development of more sensitive Fabry-Perot interferometers in the infrared for the remote sensing of the lower atmospheres of Earth and possibly other planets. The Multiorder Etalon Sounder (MOES), a combination of the rugged etalon and the CLIO, compares very favorably to other space-borne optical instruments in terms of performance versus complexity. The new instrument is expected to be rugged, compact, and very suitable for an operational temperature and moisture sounder. With this technique, the contamination of radiance measurements by emissions of other gases is also minimized. At the Space Physics Research Laboratory (SPRL), the MOES

  10. Airborne system for testing multispectral reconnaissance technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Dirk-Roger; Doergeloh, Heinrich; Keil, Heiko; Wetjen, Wilfried

    1999-07-01

    There is an increasing demand for future airborne reconnaissance systems to obtain aerial images for tactical or peacekeeping operations. Especially Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) equipped with multispectral sensor system and with real time jam resistant data transmission capabilities are of high interest. An airborne experimental platform has been developed as testbed to investigate different concepts of reconnaissance systems before their application in UAVs. It is based on a Dornier DO 228 aircraft, which is used as flying platform. Great care has been taken to achieve the possibility to test different kinds of multispectral sensors. Hence basically it is capable to be equipped with an IR sensor head, high resolution aerial cameras of the whole optical spectrum and radar systems. The onboard equipment further includes system for digital image processing, compression, coding, and storage. The data are RF transmitted to the ground station using technologies with high jam resistance. The images, after merging with enhanced vision components, are delivered to the observer who has an uplink data channel available to control flight and imaging parameters.

  11. Airborne oceanographic lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The characteristics of an Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) are given. The AOL system is described and its potential for various measurement applications including bathymetry and fluorosensing is discussed.

  12. The Behm Acoustic Sounder for Airplanes with Reference to Its Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Ernest

    1930-01-01

    Relative altimetry is of great importance for increasing the safety in aerial transportation, because it makes possible safe flying at night, by poor visibility, and when landing. Among the instruments of this type is the Behm sounder, which operates on an acoustic principle. Acoustic altimetry in general and the Behn sounder, in particular, are covered in this report.

  13. Advanced turboprop testbed systems study. Volume 1: Testbed program objectives and priorities, drive system and aircraft design studies, evaluation and recommendations and wind tunnel test plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, E. S.; Little, B. H.; Warnock, W.; Jenness, C. M.; Wilson, J. M.; Powell, C. W.; Shoaf, L.

    1982-01-01

    The establishment of propfan technology readiness was determined and candidate drive systems for propfan application were identified. Candidate testbed aircraft were investigated for testbed aircraft suitability and four aircraft selected as possible propfan testbed vehicles. An evaluation of the four candidates was performed and the Boeing KC-135A and the Gulfstream American Gulfstream II recommended as the most suitable aircraft for test application. Conceptual designs of the two recommended aircraft were performed and cost and schedule data for the entire testbed program were generated. The program total cost was estimated and a wind tunnel program cost and schedule is generated in support of the testbed program.

  14. LAWS (Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder) earth observing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Wind profiles can be measured from space using current technology. These wind profiles are essential for answering many of the interdisciplinary scientific questions to be addressed by EOS, the Earth Observing System. This report provides guidance for the development of a spaceborne wind sounder, the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS), discussing the current state of the technology and reviewing the scientific rationale for the instrument. Whether obtained globally from the EOS polar platform or in the tropics and subtropics from the Space Station, wind profiles from space will provide essential information for advancing the skill of numerical weather prediction, furthering knowledge of large-scale atmospheric circulation and climate dynamics, and improving understanding of the global biogeochemical and hydrologic cycles. The LAWS Instrument Panel recommends that it be given high priority for new instrument development because of the pressing scientific need and the availability of the necessary technology. LAWS is to measure wind profiles with an accuracy of a few meters per second and to sample at intervals of 100 km horizontally for layers km thick.

  15. Channel alignment and radiometry in hyperspectral atmospheric infrared sounders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Denis A.; Aumanna, H. H.; Pagano, Thomas S.; Overoye, Kenneth R.; Schindler, Rudolf A.

    2005-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a hyper-spectral infrared sounder which covers the 3.7 to 15,4 micron region with 2378 spectral channels. The AIRS instrument specification called for spatial co-registration of all channels to better than 2% of the field of view. Pre-launch testing confirmed that this requirement was met, since the standard deviations in the centroids was about 1% of the 13.5 km IFOV in scan and 3% in track. Detailed analysis of global AIRS data show that the typical scene gradient in 10 micron window channels is about I .3K/km rms. The way these gradients, which are predominantly caused by clouds, manifest themselves in the data depends on the details of the instrument design and the way the spectral channels are used in the data analysis, AIRS temperature and moisture retrievals use 328 of the 2378 channels from 17 independent arrays. As a result, the effect of the boresight misalignment averages to zero mean. Any increase in the effective noise is less than 0.2K. Also, there is no discernable performance degradation of products at the 45 km spatial resolution in the presence of partially cloudy scenes with up to 80% cloudiness. Single pixel radiometric differences between channels with boresight alignment differences can be appreciable and can affect scientific investigations on a single 15km footprint scale, particularly near coastlines, thunderstorms and surface emissivity inhomogeneities.

  16. Requirements for a Moderate-Resolution Infrared Imaging Sounder (MIRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Gerber, Andrew J.; Kuai, Le; Gontijo, I.; DeLeon, Berta; Susskind, Joel; Iredell, Lena; Bajpai, Shyam

    2013-01-01

    The high cost of imaging and sounding from space warrants exploration of new methods for obtaining the required information, including changing the spectral band sets, employing new technologies and merging instruments. In some cases we must consider relaxation of the current capability. In others, we expect higher performance. In general our goal is to meet the VIIRS and CrIS requirements while providing the enhanced next generation capabilities: 1) Hyperspectral Imaging in the Vis/NIR bands, 2) High Spatial Resolution Sounding in the Infrared bands. The former will improve the accuracy of ocean color products, aerosols and water vapor, surface vegetation and geology. The latter will enable the high-impact achieved by the current suite of hyperspectral infrared sounders to be achieved by the next generation high resolution forecast models. We examine the spectral, spatial and radiometric requirements for a next generation system and technologies that can be applied from the available inventory within government and industry. A two-band grating spectrometer instrument called the Moderate-resolution Infrared Imaging Sounder (MIRIS) is conceived that, when used with the planned NASA PACE Ocean Color Instrument (OCI) will meet the vast majority of CrIS and VIIRS requirements in the all bands and provide the next generation capabilities desired. MIRIS resource requirements are modest and the Technology Readiness Level is high leading to the expectation that the cost and risk of MIRIS will be reasonable.

  17. Requirements for a Moderate-resolution Infrared Imaging Sounder (MIRIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Gerber, Andrew J.; Kuai, Le; Gontijo, I.; DeLeon, Berta; Susskind, Joel; Iredell, Lena; Bajpai, Shyam

    2013-09-01

    The high cost of imaging and sounding from space warrants exploration of new methods for obtaining the required information, including changing the spectral band sets, employing new technologies and merging instruments. In some cases we must consider relaxation of the current capability. In others, we expect higher performance. In general our goal is to meet the VIIRS and CrIS requirements while providing the enhanced next generation capabilities: 1) Hyperspectral Imaging in the Vis/NIR bands, 2) High Spatial Resolution Sounding in the Infrared bands. The former will improve the accuracy of ocean color products, aerosols and water vapor, surface vegetation and geology. The latter will enable the high-impact achieved by the current suite of hyperspectral infrared sounders to be achieved by the next generation high resolution forecast models. We examine the spectral, spatial and radiometric requirements for a next generation system and technologies that can be applied from the available inventory within government and industry. A two-band grating spectrometer instrument called the Moderate-resolution Infrared Imaging Sounder (MIRIS) is conceived that, when used with the planned NASA PACE Ocean Color Instrument (OCI) will meet the vast majority of CrIS and VIIRS requirements in the all bands and provide the next generation capabilities desired. MIRIS resource requirements are modest and the Technology Readiness Level is high leading to the expectation that the cost and risk of MIRIS will be reasonable.

  18. Optimization Testbed Cometboards Extended into Stochastic Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Pai, Shantaram S.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Patnaik, Surya N.

    2010-01-01

    COMparative Evaluation Testbed of Optimization and Analysis Routines for the Design of Structures (CometBoards) is a multidisciplinary design optimization software. It was originally developed for deterministic calculation. It has now been extended into the stochastic domain for structural design problems. For deterministic problems, CometBoards is introduced through its subproblem solution strategy as well as the approximation concept in optimization. In the stochastic domain, a design is formulated as a function of the risk or reliability. Optimum solution including the weight of a structure, is also obtained as a function of reliability. Weight versus reliability traced out an inverted-S-shaped graph. The center of the graph corresponded to 50 percent probability of success, or one failure in two samples. A heavy design with weight approaching infinity could be produced for a near-zero rate of failure that corresponded to unity for reliability. Weight can be reduced to a small value for the most failure-prone design with a compromised reliability approaching zero. The stochastic design optimization (SDO) capability for an industrial problem was obtained by combining three codes: MSC/Nastran code was the deterministic analysis tool, fast probabilistic integrator, or the FPI module of the NESSUS software, was the probabilistic calculator, and CometBoards became the optimizer. The SDO capability requires a finite element structural model, a material model, a load model, and a design model. The stochastic optimization concept is illustrated considering an academic example and a real-life airframe component made of metallic and composite materials.

  19. Development and characterization of the superconducting integrated receiver channel of the TELIS atmospheric sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lange, Gert; Birk, Manfred; Boersma, Dick; Dercksen, Johannes; Dmitriev, Pavel; Ermakov, Andrey B.; Filippenko, Lyudmila V.; Golstein, Hans; Hoogeveen, Ruud W. M.; de Jong, Leo; Khudchenko, Andrey V.; Kinev, Nickolay V.; Kiselev, Oleg S.; van Kuik, Bart; de Lange, Arno; van Rantwijk, Joris; Selig, Avri M.; Sobolev, Alexander S.; Torgashin, Mikhail Yu; de Vries, Ed; Wagner, Georg; Yagoubov, Pavel A.; Koshelets, Valery P.

    2010-04-01

    The balloon-borne instrument TELIS (TErahertz and submillimetre LImb Sounder) is a three-channel superconducting heterodyne spectrometer for atmospheric research use. It detects spectral emission lines of stratospheric trace gases that have their rotational transitions at THz frequencies. One of the channels is based on the superconducting integrated receiver (SIR) technology. We demonstrate for the first time the capabilities of the SIR technology for heterodyne spectroscopy in general, and atmospheric limb sounding in particular. We also show that the application of SIR technology is not limited to laboratory environments, but that it is well suited for remote operation under harsh environmental conditions. Within a SIR the main components needed for a superconducting heterodyne receiver such as a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer with a quasi-optical antenna, a flux-flow oscillator (FFO) as the local oscillator, and a harmonic mixer to phase lock the FFO are integrated on a single chip. Light weight and low power consumption combined with broadband operation and nearly quantum limited sensitivity make the SIR a perfect candidate for use in future airborne and space-borne missions. The noise temperature of the SIR was measured to be as low as 120 K, with an intermediate frequency band of 4-8 GHz in double-sideband operation. The spectral resolution is well below 1 MHz, confirmed by our measurements. Remote control of the SIR under flight conditions has been demonstrated in a successful balloon flight in Kiruna, Sweden. The sensor and instrument design are presented, as well as the preliminary science results from the first flight.

  20. Thermal Infrared Spectral Imager for Airborne Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, William R.; Hook, Simon J.; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Wilson, Daniel W.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Hill, Cory J.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2009-01-01

    An airborne thermal hyperspectral imager is under development which utilizes the compact Dyson optical configuration and quantum well infrared photo detector (QWIP) focal plane array. The Dyson configuration uses a single monolithic prism-like grating design which allows for a high throughput instrument (F/1.6) with minimal ghosting, stray-light and large swath width. The configuration has the potential to be the optimal imaging spectroscopy solution for lighter-than-air (LTA) vehicles and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) due to its small form factor and relatively low power requirements. The planned instrument specifications are discussed as well as design trade-offs. Calibration testing results (noise equivalent temperature difference, spectral linearity and spectral bandwidth) and laboratory emissivity plots from samples are shown using an operational testbed unit which has similar specifications as the final airborne system. Field testing of the testbed unit was performed to acquire plots of apparent emissivity for various known standard minerals (such as quartz). A comparison is made using data from the ASTER spectral library.

  1. The Evolution of Spaceborne Microwave Sounders for the U.S. Polar-Orbiting Weather Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiue, James C.; Krimschansky, Sergey; Patel, Probodh; Hildebrand, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is the next generation space-borne microwave sounder. It is the latest and most advanced version of a series of satellite-based microwave sounders, currently under development by NASA for the future U.S. operational polar-orbiting weather satellite system, called the NPOESS (National Polar-orbiting Operational Environment Satellite System), slated to begin orbiting around the end of this decade. This paper will present a brief history of the evolution of the space-borne microwave sounders, from its early-day scientific experiments, through the operational sounder aboard today's polar orbiting weather satellites, and ending in the ATMS development. It will also describe the evolution of microwave radiometer technology that enabled the space-borne microwave radiometry, from its early versions with simple, nadir-viewing, fixed-horn antennas to the present-day scanning reflector antennas with broad-band MMIC Low Noise Amplifiers, plus on-board calibrations.

  2. Systems Engineering Management Plan NASA Traffic Aware Planner Integration Into P-180 Airborne Test-Bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maris, John

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Traffic Aware Planner (TAP) is a cockpit decision support tool that provides aircrew with vertical and lateral flight-path optimizations with the intent of achieving significant fuel and time savings, while automatically avoiding traffic, weather, and restricted airspace conflicts. A key step towards the maturation and deployment of TAP concerned its operational evaluation in a representative flight environment. This Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) addresses the test-vehicle design, systems integration, and flight-test planning for the first TAP operational flight evaluations, which were successfully completed in November 2013. The trial outcomes are documented in the Traffic Aware Planner (TAP) flight evaluation paper presented at the 14th AIAA Aviation Technology, Integration, and Operations Conference, Atlanta, GA. (AIAA-2014-2166, Maris, J. M., Haynes, M. A., Wing, D. J., Burke, K. A., Henderson, J., & Woods, S. E., 2014).

  3. Kite: Status of the External Metrology Testbed for SIM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekens, Frank G.; Alvarez-Salazar, Oscar; Azizi, Alireza; Moser, Steven; Nemati, Bijan; Negron, John; Neville, Timothy; Ryan, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Kite is a system level testbed for the External Metrology system of the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM). The External Metrology System is used to track the fiducial that are located at the centers of the interferometer's siderostats. The relative changes in their positions needs to be tracked to tens of picometers in order to correct for thermal measurements, the Kite testbed was build to test both the metrology gauges and out ability to optically model the system at these levels. The Kite testbed is an over-constraint system where 6 lengths are measured, but only 5 are needed to determine the system. The agreement in the over-constrained length needs to be on the order of 140 pm for the SIM Wide-Angle observing scenario and 8 pm for the Narrow-Angle observing scenario. We demonstrate that we have met the Wide-Angle goal with our current setup. For the Narrow-Angle case, we have only reached the goal for on-axis observations. We describe the testbed improvements that have been made since our initial results, and outline the future Kite changes that will add further effects that SIM faces in order to make the testbed more SIM like.

  4. Development of the CSI phase-3 evolutionary model testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gronet, M. J.; Davis, D. A.; Tan, M. K.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the development effort for the reconfiguration of the Controls-Structures Integration (CSI) Evolutionary Model (CEM) Phase-2 testbed into the CEM Phase-3 configuration. This step responds to the need to develop and test CSI technologies associated with typical planned earth science and remote sensing platforms. The primary objective of the CEM Phase-3 ground testbed is to simulate the overall on-orbit dynamic behavior of the EOS AM-1 spacecraft. Key elements of the objective include approximating the low-frequency appendage dynamic interaction of EOS AM-1, allowing for the changeout of components, and simulating the free-free on-orbit environment using an advanced suspension system. The fundamentals of appendage dynamic interaction are reviewed. A new version of the multiple scaling method is used to design the testbed to have the full-scale geometry and dynamics of the EOS AM-1 spacecraft, but at one-tenth the weight. The testbed design is discussed, along with the testing of the solar array, high gain antenna, and strut components. Analytical performance comparisons show that the CEM Phase-3 testbed simulates the EOS AM-1 spacecraft with good fidelity for the important parameters of interest.

  5. A Testbed for Evaluating Lunar Habitat Autonomy Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortenkamp, David; Izygon, Michel; Lawler, Dennis; Schreckenghost, Debra; Bonasso, R. Peter; Wang, Lui; Kennedy, Kriss

    2008-01-01

    A lunar outpost will involve a habitat with an integrated set of hardware and software that will maintain a safe environment for human activities. There is a desire for a paradigm shift whereby crew will be the primary mission operators, not ground controllers. There will also be significant periods when the outpost is uncrewed. This will require that significant automation software be resident in the habitat to maintain all system functions and respond to faults. JSC is developing a testbed to allow for early testing and evaluation of different autonomy architectures. This will allow evaluation of different software configurations in order to: 1) understand different operational concepts; 2) assess the impact of failures and perturbations on the system; and 3) mitigate software and hardware integration risks. The testbed will provide an environment in which habitat hardware simulations can interact with autonomous control software. Faults can be injected into the simulations and different mission scenarios can be scripted. The testbed allows for logging, replaying and re-initializing mission scenarios. An initial testbed configuration has been developed by combining an existing life support simulation and an existing simulation of the space station power distribution system. Results from this initial configuration will be presented along with suggested requirements and designs for the incremental development of a more sophisticated lunar habitat testbed.

  6. Evidence of Convective Redistribution of Carbon Monoxide in Aura Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manyin, Michael; Douglass, Anne; Schoeberl, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Vertical convective transport is a key element of the tropospheric circulation. Convection lofts air from the boundary layer into the free troposphere, allowing surface emissions to travel much further, and altering the rate of chemical processes such as ozone production. This study uses satellite observations to focus on the convective transport of CO from the boundary layer to the mid and upper troposphere. Our hypothesis is that strong convection associated with high rain rate regions leads to a correlation between mid level and upper level CO amounts. We first test this hypothesis using the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemistry and transport model. We find the correlation is robust and increases as the precipitation rate (the strength of convection) increases. We next examine three years of CO profiles from the Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instruments aboard EOS Aura. Rain rates are taken from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B-42 multi-satellite product. Again we find a correlation between mid-level and upper tropospheric CO, which increases with rain rate. Our result shows the critical importance of tropical convection in coupling vertical levels of the troposphere in the transport of trace gases. The effect is seen most clearly in strong convective regions such as the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone.

  7. Laser Metrology in the Micro-Arcsecond Metrology Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, Xin; Marx, D.; Goullioud, Renaud; Zhao, Feng

    2004-01-01

    The Space Interferometer Mission (SIM), scheduled for launch in 2009, is a space-born visible light stellar interferometer capable of micro-arcsecond-level astrometry. The Micro-Arcsecond Metrology testbed (MAM) is the ground-based testbed that incorporates all the functionalities of SIM minus the telescope, for mission-enabling technology development and verification. MAM employs a laser heterodyne metrology system using the Sub-Aperture Vertex-to-Vertex (SAVV) concept. In this paper, we describe the development and modification of the SAVV metrology launchers and the metrology instrument electronics, precision alignments and pointing control, locating cyclic error sources in the MAM testbed and methods to mitigate the cyclic errors, as well as the performance under the MAM performance metrics.

  8. Experimental Test-Bed for Intelligent Passive Array Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solano, Wanda M.; Torres, Miguel; David, Sunil; Isom, Adam; Cotto, Jose; Sharaiha, Samer

    2004-01-01

    This document describes the test-bed designed for the investigation of passive direction finding, recognition, and classification of speech and sound sources using sensor arrays. The test-bed forms the experimental basis of the Intelligent Small-Scale Spatial Direction Finder (ISS-SDF) project, aimed at furthering digital signal processing and intelligent sensor capabilities of sensor array technology in applications such as rocket engine diagnostics, sensor health prognostics, and structural anomaly detection. This form of intelligent sensor technology has potential for significant impact on NASA exploration, earth science and propulsion test capabilities. The test-bed consists of microphone arrays, power and signal distribution modules, web-based data acquisition, wireless Ethernet, modeling, simulation and visualization software tools. The Acoustic Sensor Array Modeler I (ASAM I) is used for studying steering capabilities of acoustic arrays and testing DSP techniques. Spatial sound distribution visualization is modeled using the Acoustic Sphere Analysis and Visualization (ASAV-I) tool.

  9. Establishment of an NWP testbed using ARM data

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, E.; Liu, Y.; Hogan, R.

    2010-03-15

    The aim of the FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research (FASTER) project is to evaluate and improve the parameterizations of fast physics (involving clouds, precipitation, aerosol) in numerical models using ARM measurements. One objective within FASTER is to evaluate model representations of fast physics with long-term continuous cloud observations by use of an 'NWP testbed'. This approach was successful in the European Cloudnet project. NWP model data (NCEP, ECMWF, etc.) is routinely output at ARM sites, and model evaluation can potentially be achieved in quasi-real time. In this poster, we will outline our progress in the development of the NWP testbed and discuss the successful integration of ARM algorithms, such as ARSCL, with algorithms and lessons learned from Cloudnet. Preliminary results will be presented of the evaluation of the ECMWF, NCEP, and UK Met Office models over the SGP site using this approach.

  10. A Testbed for Deploying Distributed State Estimation in Power Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Shuangshuang; Chen, Yousu; Rice, Mark J.; Liu, Yan; Gorton, Ian

    2012-07-22

    Abstract—With the increasing demand, scale and data information of power systems, fast distributed applications are becoming more important in power system operation and control. This paper proposes a testbed for evaluating power system distributed applications, considering data exchange among distributed areas. A high-performance computing (HPC) version of distributed state estimation is implemented and used as a distributed application example. The IEEE 118-bus system is used to deploy the parallel distributed state estimation, and the MeDICi middleware is used for data communication. The performance of the testbed demonstrates its capability to evaluate parallel distributed state estimation by leveraging the HPC paradigm. This testbed can also be applied to evaluate other distributed applications.

  11. Telescience testbed pilot program, volume 2: Program results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiner, Barry M.

    1989-01-01

    Space Station Freedom and its associated labs, coupled with the availability of new computing and communications technologies, have the potential for significantly enhancing scientific research. A Telescience Testbed Pilot Program (TTPP), aimed at developing the experience base to deal with issues in the design of the future information system of the Space Station era. The testbeds represented four scientific disciplines (astronomy and astrophysics, earth sciences, life sciences, and microgravity sciences) and studied issues in payload design, operation, and data analysis. This volume, of a 3 volume set, which all contain the results of the TTPP, contains the integrated results. Background is provided of the program and highlights of the program results. The various testbed experiments and the programmatic approach is summarized. The results are summarized on a discipline by discipline basis, highlighting the lessons learned for each discipline. Then the results are integrated across each discipline, summarizing the lessons learned overall.

  12. High Contrast Imaging Testbed for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowmman, Andrew E.; Trauger, John T.; Gordon, Brian; Green, Joseph J.; Moody, Dwight; Niessner, Albert F.; Shi, Fang

    2004-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission is planning to launch a visible coronagraphic space telescope in 2014. To achieve TPF science goals, the coronagraph must have extreme levels of wavefront correction (less than 1 Angstrom rms over controllable spatial frequencies) and stability to get the necessary suppression of diffracted starlight (approximately l0(exp -10)) contrast at an angular separation approximately 4 (lamda)/D). TPF Coronagraph's primary platform for experimentation is the High Contrast Imaging Testbed, which will provide laboratory validation of key technologies as well as demonstration of a flight-traceable approach to implementation. Precision wavefront control in the testbed is provided by a high actuator density deformable mirror. Diffracted light control is achieved through use of occulting or apodizing masks and stops. Contrast measurements will establish the technical feasibility of TPF requirements, while model and error budget validation will demonstrate implementation viability. This paper describes the current testbed design, development approach, and recent experimental results.

  13. Design optimization of the JPL Phase B testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milman, Mark H.; Salama, M.; Wette, M.; Chu, Cheng-Chih

    1993-01-01

    Increasingly complex spacecraft will benefit from integrated design and optimization of structural, optical, and control subsystems. Integrated design optimization will allow designers to make tradeoffs in objectives and constraints across these subsystems. The location, number, and types of passive and active devices distributed along the structure can have a dramatic impact on overall system performance. In addition, the manner in which structural mass is distributed can also serve as an effective mechanism for attenuating disturbance transmission between source and sensitive system components. This paper presents recent experience using optimization tools that have been developed for addressing some of these issues on a challenging testbed design problem. This particular testbed is one of a series of testbeds at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under the sponsorship of the NASA Control Structure Interaction (CSI) Program to demonstrate nanometer level optical pathlength control on a flexible truss structure that emulates a spaceborne interferometer.

  14. Technology developments integrating a space network communications testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, Winston; Jennings, Esther; Clare, Loren; Leang, Dee

    2006-01-01

    As future manned and robotic space explorations missions involve more complex systems, it is essential to verify, validate, and optimize such systems through simulation and emulation in a low cost testbed environment. The goal of such a testbed is to perform detailed testing of advanced space and ground communications networks, technologies, and client applications that are essential for future space exploration missions. We describe the development of new technologies enhancing our Multi-mission Advanced Communications Hybrid Environment for Test and Evaluation (MACHETE) that enables its integration in a distributed space communications testbed. MACHETE combines orbital modeling, link analysis, and protocol and service modeling to quantify system performance based on comprehensive considerations of different aspects of space missions.

  15. Progress on an external occulter testbed at flight Fresnel numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yunjong; Sirbu, Dan; Galvin, Michael; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Vanderbei, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    An external occulter is a spacecraft flown along the line-of-sight of a space telescope to suppress starlight and enable high-contrast direct imaging of exoplanets. Laboratory verification of occulter designs is necessary to validate the optical models used to design and predict occulter performance. At Princeton, we have designed and built a testbed that allows verification of scaled occulter designs whose suppressed shadow is mathematically identical to that of space occulters. The occulter testbed uses 78 m optical propagation distance to realize the flight Fresnel numbers. We will use an etched silicon mask as the occulter. The occulter is illuminated by a diverging laser beam to reduce the aberrations from the optics before the occulter. Here, we present first light result of a sample design operating at a flight Fresnel number and the mechanical design of the testbed. We compare the experimental results with simulations that predict the ultimate contrast performance.

  16. GeoSTAR: a geostationary microwave sounder for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrigtsen, B. H.; Brown, S. T.; Dinardo, S. J.; Gaier, T. C.; Kangaslahti, P. P.; Tanner, A. B.

    2007-09-01

    The Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR) is a new Earth remote sensing instrument concept that has been under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. First conceived in 1998 as a NASA New Millennium Program mission and subsequently developed in 2003-2006 as a proof-of-concept prototype under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program, it is intended to fill a serious gap in our Earth remote sensing capabilities - namely the lack of a microwave atmospheric sounder in geostationary orbit. The importance of such observations have been recognized by the National Academy of Sciences National Research Council, which recently released its report on a "Decadal Survey" of NASA Earth Science activities. One of the recommended missions for the next decade is a geostationary microwave sounder. GeoSTAR is well positioned to meet the requirements of such a mission, and because of the substantial investment NASA has already made in GeoSTAR technology development, this concept is fast approaching the necessary maturity for implementation in the next decade. NOAA is also keenly interested in GeoSTAR as a potential payload on its next series of geostationary weather satellites, the GOES-R series. GeoSTAR, with its ability to map out the three-dimensional structure of temperature, water vapor, clouds, precipitation and convective parameters on a continual basis, will significantly enhance our ability to observe hurricanes and other severe storms. In addition, with performance matching that of current and next generation of low-earth-orbiting microwave sounders, GeoSTAR will also provide observations important to the study of the hydrologic cycle, atmospheric processes and climate variability and trends. In particular, with GeoSTAR it will be possible to fully resolve the diurnal cycle. We discuss the GeoSTAR concept and basic design, the performance of the prototype, and a number of science applications that will be possible with GeoSTAR. The work reported

  17. Geo-STAR: A Geostationary Microwave Sounder for the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Brown, S. T.; Dinardo, S. J.; Gaier, T. C.; Kangaslahti, P. P.; Tanner, A. B.

    2007-01-01

    The Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR) is a new Earth remote sensing instrument concept that has been under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. First conceived in 1998 as a NASA New Millennium Program mission and subsequently developed in 2003-2006 as a proof-of-concept prototype under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program, it is intended to fill a serious gap in our Earth remote sensing capabilities - namely the lack of a microwave atmospheric sounder in geostationary orbit. The importance of such observations have been recognized by the National Academy of Sciences National Research Council, which recently released its report on a 'Decadal Survey' of NASA Earth Science activities1. One of the recommended missions for the next decade is a geostationary microwave sounder. GeoSTAR is well positioned to meet the requirements of such a mission, and because of the substantial investment NASA has already made in GeoSTAR technology development, this concept is fast approaching the necessary maturity for implementation in the next decade. NOAA is also keenly interested in GeoSTAR as a potential payload on its next series of geostationary weather satellites, the GOES-R series. GeoSTAR, with its ability to map out the three-dimensional structure of temperature, water vapor, clouds, precipitation and convective parameters on a continual basis, will significantly enhance our ability to observe hurricanes and other severe storms. In addition, with performance matching that of current and next generation of low-earth-orbiting microwave sounders, GeoSTAR will also provide observations important to the study of the hydrologic cycle, atmospheric processes and climate variability and trends. In particular, with GeoSTAR it will be possible to fully resolve the diurnal cycle. We discuss the GeoSTAR concept and basic design, the performance of the prototype, and a number of science applications that will be possible with GeoSTAR. The work reported

  18. Experiences with the JPL telerobot testbed: Issues and insights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Henry W.; Balaram, Bob; Beahan, John

    1989-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Telerobot Testbed is an integrated robotic testbed used to develop, implement, and evaluate the performance of advanced concepts in autonomous, tele-autonomous, and tele-operated control of robotic manipulators. Using the Telerobot Testbed, researchers demonstrated several of the capabilities and technological advances in the control and integration of robotic systems which have been under development at JPL for several years. In particular, the Telerobot Testbed was recently employed to perform a near completely automated, end-to-end, satellite grapple and repair sequence. The task of integrating existing as well as new concepts in robot control into the Telerobot Testbed has been a very difficult and timely one. Now that researchers have completed the first major milestone (i.e., the end-to-end demonstration) it is important to reflect back upon experiences and to collect the knowledge that has been gained so that improvements can be made to the existing system. It is also believed that the experiences are of value to the others in the robotics community. Therefore, the primary objective here will be to use the Telerobot Testbed as a case study to identify real problems and technological gaps which exist in the areas of robotics and in particular systems integration. Such problems have surely hindered the development of what could be reasonably called an intelligent robot. In addition to identifying such problems, researchers briefly discuss what approaches have been taken to resolve them or, in several cases, to circumvent them until better approaches can be developed.

  19. Telescience testbed pilot program, volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiner, Barry M.

    1989-01-01

    Space Station Freedom and its associated labs, coupled with the availability of new computing and communications technologies, have the potential for significantly enhancing scientific research. A Telescience Testbed Pilot Program (TTPP), aimed at developing the experience base to deal with issues in the design of the future information system of the Space Station era. The testbeds represented four scientific disciplines (astronomy and astrophysics, earth sciences, life sciences, and microgravity sciences) and studied issues in payload design, operation, and data analysis. This volume, of a 3 volume set, which all contain the results of the TTPP, is the executive summary.

  20. The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed: Recent Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center was designed to demonstrate the practicality and application of techniques for wide-field spatial-spectral ("double Fourier") interferometry. WIIT is an automated system, and it is now producing substantial amounts of high-quality data from its state-of-the-art operating environment, Goddard's Advanced Interferometry and Metrology Lab. In this paper, we discuss the characterization and operation of the testbed and present the most recent results. We also outline future research directions. A companion paper within this conference discusses the development of new wide-field double Fourier data analysis algorithms.

  1. The Living With a Star Space Environment Testbed Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet; LaBel, Kenneth; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA has initiated the Living with a Star (LWS) Program to develop the scientific understanding to address the aspects of the Connected Sun-Earth system that affects life and society. The Program Architecture includes science missions, theory and modeling and Space Environment Testbeds (SET). This current paper discusses the Space Environment Testbeds. The goal of the SET program is to improve the engineering approach to accomodate and/or mitigate the effects of solar variability on spacecraft design and operations. The SET Program will infuse new technologies into the space programs through collection of data in space and subsequent design and validation of technologies. Examples of these technologies are cited and discussed.

  2. Telescience Testbed Pilot Project - Evaluation environment for Space Station operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiskerchen, Michael J.; Leiner, Barry M.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives of the Telescience Testbed Pilot Program (TTPP) are discussed. The purpose of the TTPP, which involves 15 universities in cooperation with various NASA centers, is to demonstrate the utility of a user-oriented rapid prototyping testbed approach to developing and refining science requirements and validation concepts and approaches for the information systems of the Space Station era and beyond. It is maintained that the TTPP provides an excellent environment, with low programmatic schedule and budget risk, for testing and evaluating new operations concepts and technologies.

  3. CSM Testbed Development and Large-Scale Structural Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Gillian, R. E.; Mccleary, Susan L.; Lotts, C. G.; Poole, E. L.; Overman, A. L.; Macy, S. C.

    1989-01-01

    A research activity called Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center is described. This activity is developing advanced structural analysis and computational methods that exploit high-performance computers. Methods are developed in the framework of the CSM Testbed software system and applied to representative complex structural analysis problems from the aerospace industry. An overview of the CSM Testbed methods development environment is presented and some new numerical methods developed on a CRAY-2 are described. Selected application studies performed on the NAS CRAY-2 are also summarized.

  4. Testbeds for Assessing Critical Scenarios in Power Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dondossola, Giovanna; Deconinck, Geert; Garrone, Fabrizio; Beitollahi, Hakem

    The paper presents a set of control system scenarios implemented in two testbeds developed in the context of the European Project CRUTIAL - CRitical UTility InfrastructurAL Resilience. The selected scenarios refer to power control systems encompassing information and communication security of SCADA systems for grid teleoperation, impact of attacks on inter-operator communications in power emergency conditions, impact of intentional faults on the secondary and tertiary control in power grids with distributed generators. Two testbeds have been developed for assessing the effect of the attacks and prototyping resilient architectures.

  5. Assimilation of thermodynamic information from advanced infrared sounders under partially cloudy skies for regional NWP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pei; Li, Jun; Goldberg, Mitchell D.; Schmit, Timothy J.; Lim, Agnes H. N.; Li, Zhenglong; Han, Hyojin; Li, Jinlong; Ackerman, Steve A.

    2015-06-01

    Generally, only clear-infrared spectral radiances (not affected by clouds) are assimilated in weather analysis systems. This is due to difficulties in modeling cloudy radiances as well as in observing their vertical structure from space. To take full advantage of the thermodynamic information in advanced infrared (IR) sounder observations requires assimilating radiances from cloud-contaminated regions. An optimal imager/sounder cloud-clearing technique has been developed by the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. This technique can be used to retrieve clear column radiances through combining collocated multiband imager IR clear radiances and the sounder cloudy radiances; no background information is needed in this method. The imager/sounder cloud-clearing technique is similar to that of the microwave/IR cloud clearing in the derivation of the clear-sky equivalent radiances. However, it retains the original IR sounder resolution, which is critical for regional numerical weather prediction applications. In this study, we have investigated the assimilation of cloud-cleared IR sounder radiances using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer for three hurricanes, Sandy (2012), Irene (2011), and Ike (2008). Results show that assimilating additional cloud-cleared AIRS radiances reduces the 48 and 72 h temperature forecast root-mean-square error by 0.1-0.3 K between 300 and 850 hPa. Substantial improvement in reducing track forecasts errors in the range of 10 km to 50 km was achieved.

  6. Satellite Sounder Data Assimilation for Improving Alaska Region Weather Forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Stevens, E.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Zhang, X.; Heinrichs, T.; Broderson, D.

    2014-01-01

    Data assimilation has been demonstrated very useful in improving both global and regional numerical weather prediction. Alaska has very coarser surface observation sites. On the other hand, it gets much more satellite overpass than lower 48 states. How to utilize satellite data to improve numerical prediction is one of hot topics among weather forecast community in Alaska. The Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at University of Alaska is conducting study on satellite data assimilation for WRF model. AIRS/CRIS sounder profile data are used to assimilate the initial condition for the customized regional WRF model (GINA-WRF model). Normalized standard deviation, RMSE, and correlation statistic analysis methods are applied to analyze one case of 48 hours forecasts and one month of 24-hour forecasts in order to evaluate the improvement of regional numerical model from Data assimilation. The final goal of the research is to provide improved real-time short-time forecast for Alaska regions.

  7. Determination of cloud parameters from infrared sounder data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H.-Y. M.

    1984-01-01

    The World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) plan is concerned with the need to develop a uniform global cloud climatology as part of a broad research program on climate processes. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) has been approved as the first project of the WCRP. The ISCCP has the basic objective to collect and analyze satellite radiance data to infer the global distribution of cloud radiative properties in order to improve the modeling of cloud effects on climate. Research is conducted to explore an algorithm for retrieving cloud properties by utilizing the available infrared sounder data from polar-orbiting satellites. A numerical method is developed for computing cloud top heights, amount, and emissivity on the basis of a parameterized infrared radiative transfer equation for cloudy atmospheres. Theoretical studies were carried out by considering a synthetic atmosphere.

  8. Mechanical Description of the Mars Climate Sounder Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) Instrument of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft. The instrument scans the Martian atmosphere almost continuously to systematically acquire weather and climate observations over time. Its primary components are an optical bench that houses dual telescopes with a total of nine channels for visible and infrared sensing, and a two axis gimbal that provides pointing capabilities. Both rotating joints consist of an integrated actuator with a hybrid planetary/harmonic transmission and a twist cap section that enables the electrical wiring to pass through the rotating joint. Micro stepping is used to reduce spacecraft disturbance torques to acceptable levels while driving the stepper motors. To ensure survivability over its four year life span, suitable mechanical components, lubrication, and an active temperature control system were incorporated. Some life test results and lessons learned are provided to serve as design guidelines for actuator parts and flex cables.

  9. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Pagano, Thomas S.; Strow, Larrabee

    2001-01-01

    AIRS, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on the EOS-Aqua, produces global high precision spectra from 3.7 - 15.4 micron with spectral resolving power mu/delta mu = 1200 twice each day from 708 km orbital altitude. AIRS is the first hyperspectral infrared spectrometer designed to support NOAA/NCEP's operational requirements for medium range weather forecasting during its nominal 7 year lifetime. AIRS, together with the AMSU and HSB microwave radiometers, will achieve global retrieval accuracy of better then 1K rms in the lower troposphere under clear and partly cloudy condition. Based on the excellent radiometric and spectral performance demonstrated during the pre-launch testing, the assimilation of AIRS data into the forecast model is expected to result in major forecast improvements. Launch of AIRS on the EOS AQUA is scheduled for May 2001.

  10. Global Daily Atmospheric State Profiles from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Chahine, Moustafa T.

    2008-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a hyperspectral infrared instrument on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft, launched on May 4, 2002. AIRS has 2378 infrared channels ranging from 3.7 (micro)m to 15.4 (micro)m and a 13.5 km footprint. AIRS, in conjunction with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), produces temperature profiles with 1K/km accuracy on a global scale, as well as water vapor profiles, clouds, dust and trace gas amounts for CO2, CO, SO2, O3 and CH4.[1] AIRS data are used for weather forecasting and studies of global climate change. The AIRS is a 'facility' instrument developed by NASA as an experimental demonstration of advanced technology for remote sensing and the benefits of high resolution infrared spectra to science investigations.

  11. A submillimeter sounder for the Titan Saturn System Mission (TSSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lellouch, E.; Vinatier, S.; Moreno, R.; Allen, M.; Gulkis, S.; Hartogh, P.; Mehdi, I.; Maestrini, A.; Krieg, J.-M.

    2008-09-01

    A submillimeter sounder (SMS) onboard the TSSM mission and operating mostly in limb viewing is a powerful instrument to study Titan's atmosphere from ~50 to 1200 km, and especially the largely unexplored "agnostophere" from 500 to 1000 km. Unique capabilities of such an instrument include (i) measurement of temperature field up to 1200 km, using rotational lines of CH4, CO, and HCN (ii) direct, absolute and accurate wind measurements from Doppler shifts (iii) high sensitivity to trace minor compounds, particularly nitriles and rare isotope species. Altogether, SMS can provide a new characterization of the couplings between stratospheric/mesospheric chemistry and dynamics, and of their relationships with the complex thermospheric chemistry observed by Cassini. At Enceladus, SMS can provide detailed measurements of temperature, composition and gas plume dynamics.

  12. Stratospheric CH3CN from the UARS Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Waters, Joe W.; Khosravi, Rashid; Brasseur, Guy P.; Tyndall, Geoffrey S.; Read, William G.

    CH3CN in the stratosphere has been measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), providing the first global CH3CN dataset. The MLS observations are in broad agreement with past high and midlatitude observations of CH3CN, although concentrations are a little larger than previously observed. In the tropics, where CH3CN has not up to now been measured, a persistent ‘peak’ in the profiles is seen around 22 hPa, which may be evidence of a tropical stratospheric CH3CN source. Comparisons are made with the NCAR SOCRATES model, including runs having an artificial tropical stratospheric CH3CN source.

  13. Full-Scaled Advanced Systems Testbed: Ensuring Success of Adaptive Control Research Through Project Lifecycle Risk Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlock, Kate M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Dryden Flight Research Center completed flight testing of adaptive controls research on the Full-Scale Advance Systems Testbed (FAST) in January of 2011. The research addressed technical challenges involved with reducing risk in an increasingly complex and dynamic national airspace. Specific challenges lie with the development of validated, multidisciplinary, integrated aircraft control design tools and techniques to enable safe flight in the presence of adverse conditions such as structural damage, control surface failures, or aerodynamic upsets. The testbed is an F-18 aircraft serving as a full-scale vehicle to test and validate adaptive flight control research and lends a significant confidence to the development, maturation, and acceptance process of incorporating adaptive control laws into follow-on research and the operational environment. The experimental systems integrated into FAST were designed to allow for flexible yet safe flight test evaluation and validation of modern adaptive control technologies and revolve around two major hardware upgrades: the modification of Production Support Flight Control Computers (PSFCC) and integration of two, fourth-generation Airborne Research Test Systems (ARTS). Post-hardware integration verification and validation provided the foundation for safe flight test of Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion and Model Reference Aircraft Control adaptive control law experiments. To ensure success of flight in terms of cost, schedule, and test results, emphasis on risk management was incorporated into early stages of design and flight test planning and continued through the execution of each flight test mission. Specific consideration was made to incorporate safety features within the hardware and software to alleviate user demands as well as into test processes and training to reduce human factor impacts to safe and successful flight test. This paper describes the research configuration

  14. How Strong is the Case for Geostationary Hyperspectral Sounders?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk-Davidoff, D. B.; Liu, Z.; Jensen, S.; Housley, E.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA GIFTS program designed and constructed a flight-ready hyperspectral infrared sounder for geostationary orbit. Efforts are now underway to launch a constellation of similar instruments. Salient characteristics included 4 km spatial resolution at nadir and 0.6 cm-1 spectral resolution in two infrared bands. Observing system experiments have demonstrated the success of assimilated hyperspectral infrared radiances from IASI and AIRS in improving weather forecast skill. These results provide circumstantial evidence that additional observations at higher spatial and temporal resolution would likely improve forecast skill further. However, there is only limited work investigating the magnitude of this skill improvement in the literature. Here we present a systematic program to quantify the additional skill of a constellation of geostationary hyperspectral sounders through observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) using the WRF model and the WRFDA data assimilation system. The OSSEs will focus first on high-impact events, such as the forecast for Typhoon Haiyun, but will also address quotidian synoptic forecast skill. The focus will be on short-term forecast skill (<24 hours lead time), in accord with WRF's mesoscale design, and with the view that high time frequency observations are likely to make the biggest impact on the skill of short-range forecasts. The experiments will use as their starting point the full existing observational suite, so that additionality can be addressed, but will also consider contingencies, such as the loss of particular elements of the existing system, as well as the degree to which a stand-alone system of hyperspectral sounds would be able to successfully initialize a regional forecast model. A variety of settings, tropical and extratropical, marine and continental will be considered.

  15. Capability Description for NASA's F/A-18 TN 853 as a Testbed for the Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt

    2009-01-01

    The NASA F/A-18 tail number (TN) 853 full-scale Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) testbed has been designed with a full array of capabilities in support of the Aviation Safety Program. Highlights of the system's capabilities include: 1) a quad-redundant research flight control system for safely interfacing controls experiments to the aircraft's control surfaces; 2) a dual-redundant airborne research test system for hosting multi-disciplinary state-of-the-art adaptive control experiments; 3) a robust reversionary configuration for recovery from unusual attitudes and configurations; 4) significant research instrumentation, particularly in the area of static loads; 5) extensive facilities for experiment simulation, data logging, real-time monitoring and post-flight analysis capabilities; and 6) significant growth capability in terms of interfaces and processing power.

  16. Airborne gravity is here

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, S.

    1982-01-11

    After 20 years of development efforts, the airborne gravity survey has finally become a practical exploration method. Besides gravity data, the airborne survey can also collect simultaneous, continuous records of high-precision magneticfield data as well as terrain clearance; these provide a topographic contour map useful in calculating terrain conditions and in subsequent planning and engineering. Compared with a seismic survey, the airborne gravity method can cover the same area much more quickly and cheaply; a seismograph could then detail the interesting spots.

  17. A Portable MIMO Testbed and Selected Channel Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goud, Paul, Jr.; Hang, Robert; Truhachev, Dmitri; Schlegel, Christian

    2006-12-01

    A portable[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) testbed that is based on field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and which operates in the 902-928 MHz industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) band has been developed by the High Capacity Digital Communications (HCDC) Laboratory at the University of Alberta. We present a description of the HCDC testbed along with MIMO channel capacities that were derived from measurements taken with the HCDC testbed for three special locations: a narrow corridor, an athletics field that is surrounded by a metal fence, and a parkade. These locations are special because the channel capacities are different from what is expected for a typical indoor or outdoor channel. For two of the cases, a ray-tracing analysis has been performed and the simulated channel capacity values closely match the values calculated from the measured data. A ray-tracing analysis, however, requires accurate geometrical measurements and sophisticated modeling for each specific location. A MIMO testbed is ideal for quickly obtaining accurate channel capacity information.

  18. Operation Duties on the F-15B Research Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Samson S.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation entails what I have done this past summer for my Co-op tour in the Operations Engineering Branch. Activities included supporting the F-15B Research Testbed, supporting the incoming F-15D models, design work, and other operations engineering duties.

  19. Human Centered Autonomous and Assistant Systems Testbed for Exploration Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Mount, Frances; Carreon, Patricia; Torney, Susan E.

    2001-01-01

    The Engineering and Mission Operations Directorates at NASA Johnson Space Center are combining laboratories and expertise to establish the Human Centered Autonomous and Assistant Systems Testbed for Exploration Operations. This is a testbed for human centered design, development and evaluation of intelligent autonomous and assistant systems that will be needed for human exploration and development of space. This project will improve human-centered analysis, design and evaluation methods for developing intelligent software. This software will support human-machine cognitive and collaborative activities in future interplanetary work environments where distributed computer and human agents cooperate. We are developing and evaluating prototype intelligent systems for distributed multi-agent mixed-initiative operations. The primary target domain is control of life support systems in a planetary base. Technical approaches will be evaluated for use during extended manned tests in the target domain, the Bioregenerative Advanced Life Support Systems Test Complex (BIO-Plex). A spinoff target domain is the International Space Station (ISS) Mission Control Center (MCC). Prodl}cts of this project include human-centered intelligent software technology, innovative human interface designs, and human-centered software development processes, methods and products. The testbed uses adjustable autonomy software and life support systems simulation models from the Adjustable Autonomy Testbed, to represent operations on the remote planet. Ground operations prototypes and concepts will be evaluated in the Exploration Planning and Operations Center (ExPOC) and Jupiter Facility.

  20. Extending the Information Commons: From Instructional Testbed to Internet2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beagle, Donald

    2002-01-01

    The author's conceptualization of an Information Commons (IC) is revisited and elaborated in reaction to Bailey and Tierney's article. The IC's role as testbed for instructional support and knowledge discovery is explored, and progress on pertinent research is reviewed. Prospects for media-rich learning environments relate the IC to the…

  1. Smart Antenna UKM Testbed for Digital Beamforming System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Misran, Norbahiah; Yatim, Baharudin

    2009-12-01

    A new design of smart antenna testbed developed at UKM for digital beamforming purpose is proposed. The smart antenna UKM testbed developed based on modular design employing two novel designs of L-probe fed inverted hybrid E-H (LIEH) array antenna and software reconfigurable digital beamforming system (DBS). The antenna is developed based on using the novel LIEH microstrip patch element design arranged into [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] uniform linear array antenna. An interface board is designed to interface to the ADC board with the RF front-end receiver. The modular concept of the system provides the capability to test the antenna hardware, beamforming unit, and beamforming algorithm in an independent manner, thus allowing the smart antenna system to be developed and tested in parallel, hence reduces the design time. The DBS was developed using a high-performance [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] floating-point DSP board and a 4-channel RF front-end receiver developed in-house. An interface board is designed to interface to the ADC board with the RF front-end receiver. A four-element receiving array testbed at 1.88-2.22 GHz frequency is constructed, and digital beamforming on this testbed is successfully demonstrated.

  2. Temperate Ice Depth-Sounder: A proved concept for temperate ice sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara-Olivares, V. A.; Rodriguez-Morales, F.; Leuschen, C.; Ayyangar, H.; Gogineni, P. S.

    2010-12-01

    Observations of glaciers and snow cover are important to the understanding and prediction of both ablation ratio and the overall impact reductions in ice formation will have on the cryosphere. The extent of the coverage of these observations still remains limited in some regions due to natural geographic accidents that make it problematic for human in-situ exploration. Instruments with the capability to estimate the composition and thickness of ice formations are a suitable compliment to enhance the quality and extent of the data currently available. Radar instruments can be used to provide information on the internal and basal conditions of ice masses. For temperate ice, the high water content produces volume scattering and attenuation in propagating radar waves. The volume scattering appears as clutter masking weak bedrock echoes. At the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) we have developed an HF dual-frequency Temperate-Ice Depth Sounder radar (TIDSoR) for systematic surveys of the thickness and sub-glacial topography of temperate-ice. This radar has successfully sounded 1-km thick ice near Jakobshavn, Greenlad glacier and 2-km thick cold ice near Byrd camp, Antarctica. TIDSoR operates at two different center frequencies: 7.5 MHz and 14 MHz, with a maximum peak output power of 20 W. It also can be programmed to operate at other frequencies in the HF spectrum. The transmitted waveform is a digitally generated pulse with a programmable repetition frequency of up to 20 kHz. The frequencies of operation were selected based on three main criteria: (a) the ability to overcome volume scattering produced by the ice inclusions, such as water pockets, with at least 10 dB power of a backscattered signal and up to 3 km depth; (b) compatibility with high frequency aviation radio systems, which are mostly used for voice communications; and (c) portability, lower power consumption, and interface with a portable computer. The radar consists of three functional

  3. An Airborne Conical Scanning Millimeter-Wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, J.; Racette, P.; Wang, J.; Crites, A.; Doiron, T.; Engler, C.; Lecha, J.; Powers, M.; Simon, E.; Triesky, M.; Krebs, Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An airborne Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) for high-altitude observations from the NASA Research Aircraft (ER-2) is discussed. The primary application of the CoSMIR is water vapor profile remote sensing. Four radiometers operating at 50 (three channels), 92, 150, and 183 (three channels) GHz provide spectral coverage identical to nine of the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) high-frequency channels. Constant polarization-basis conical and cross-track scanning capabilities are achieved using an elevation-under-azimuth two-axis gimbals.

  4. Toolsets for Airborne Data

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-04-02

    article title:  Toolsets for Airborne Data     View larger image The ... limit of detection values. Prior to accessing the TAD Web Application ( https://tad.larc.nasa.gov ) for the first time, users must ...

  5. The airborne laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberson, Steven; Schall, Harold; Shattuck, Paul

    2007-05-01

    The Airborne Laser (ABL) is an airborne, megawatt-class laser system with a state-of-the-art atmospheric compensation system to destroy enemy ballistic missiles at long ranges. This system will provide both deterrence and defense against the use of such weapons during conflicts. This paper provides an overview of the ABL weapon system including: the notional operational concept, the development approach and schedule, the overall aircraft configuration, the technologies being incorporated in the ABL, and the current program status.

  6. HIRS-AMTS satellite sounding system test - Theoretical and empirical vertical resolving power. [High resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder - Advanced Moisture and Temperature Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, O. E.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the vertical resolving power of satellite-borne temperature sounding instruments. Information is presented on the capabilities of the High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) and a proposed sounding instrument called the Advanced Moisture and Temperature Sounder (AMTS). Two quite different methods for assessing the vertical resolving power of satellite sounders are discussed. The first is the theoretical method of Conrath (1972) which was patterned after the work of Backus and Gilbert (1968) The Backus-Gilbert-Conrath (BGC) approach includes a formalism for deriving a retrieval algorithm for optimizing the vertical resolving power. However, a retrieval algorithm constructed in the BGC optimal fashion is not necessarily optimal as far as actual temperature retrievals are concerned. Thus, an independent criterion for vertical resolving power is discussed. The criterion is based on actual retrievals of signal structure in the temperature field.

  7. Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Climate Parameters from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Tian, Baijun; Lee, Sung-Yung; Olsen, Ed; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Fetzer, Eric; Irion, F. W.; McMillan, Wallace; Strow, Larrabee; Fu, Xiouhua; Barnet, Chris; Goldberg, Mitch; Susskind, Joel; Blaisdell, John

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the standard and research products from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and their current accuracies as demonstrated through validation efforts. It also summarizes ongoing research using AIRS data for weather prediction and improving climate models.

  8. Progress in developing GeoSTAR - Microwave Sounder for GOES-R

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Brown, S. T.; Dinardo, S. J.; Kangaslahti, P. P.; Tanner, A. B.; Wilson, W. J.

    2005-01-01

    The Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR)is a new concept for a microwave sounder, intended to be deployed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under NASA Instrument Incubator Program sponsorship, and is currently undergoing tests and performance characterization.

  9. Developmental Cryogenic Active Telescope Testbed, a Wavefront Sensing and Control Testbed for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboeuf, Claudia M.; Davila, Pamela S.; Redding, David C.; Morell, Armando; Lowman, Andrew E.; Wilson, Mark E.; Young, Eric W.; Pacini, Linda K.; Coulter, Dan R.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the technology validation strategy of the next generation space telescope (NGST), a system testbed is being developed at GSFC, in partnership with JPL and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), which will include all of the component functions envisioned in an NGST active optical system. The system will include an actively controlled, segmented primary mirror, actively controlled secondary, deformable, and fast steering mirrors, wavefront sensing optics, wavefront control algorithms, a telescope simulator module, and an interferometric wavefront sensor for use in comparing final obtained wavefronts from different tests. The developmental. cryogenic active telescope testbed (DCATT) will be implemented in three phases. Phase 1 will focus on operating the testbed at ambient temperature. During Phase 2, a cryocapable segmented telescope will be developed and cooled to cryogenic temperature to investigate the impact on the ability to correct the wavefront and stabilize the image. In Phase 3, it is planned to incorporate industry developed flight-like components, such as figure controlled mirror segments, cryogenic, low hold power actuators, or different wavefront sensing and control hardware or software. A very important element of the program is the development and subsequent validation of the integrated multidisciplinary models. The Phase 1 testbed objectives, plans, configuration, and design will be discussed.

  10. NASA Langley's AirSTAR Testbed: A Subscale Flight Test Capability for Flight Dynamics and Control System Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Thomas L.; Bailey, Roger M.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) project, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has developed a subscaled flying testbed in order to conduct research experiments in support of the goals of NASA s Aviation Safety Program. This research capability consists of three distinct components. The first of these is the research aircraft, of which there are several in the AirSTAR stable. These aircraft range from a dynamically-scaled, twin turbine vehicle to a propeller driven, off-the-shelf airframe. Each of these airframes carves out its own niche in the research test program. All of the airplanes have sophisticated on-board data acquisition and actuation systems, recording, telemetering, processing, and/or receiving data from research control systems. The second piece of the testbed is the ground facilities, which encompass the hardware and software infrastructure necessary to provide comprehensive support services for conducting flight research using the subscale aircraft, including: subsystem development, integrated testing, remote piloting of the subscale aircraft, telemetry processing, experimental flight control law implementation and evaluation, flight simulation, data recording/archiving, and communications. The ground facilities are comprised of two major components: (1) The Base Research Station (BRS), a LaRC laboratory facility for system development, testing and data analysis, and (2) The Mobile Operations Station (MOS), a self-contained, motorized vehicle serving as a mobile research command/operations center, functionally equivalent to the BRS, capable of deployment to remote sites for supporting flight tests. The third piece of the testbed is the test facility itself. Research flights carried out by the AirSTAR team are conducted at NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. The UAV Island runway is a 50 x 1500 paved runway that lies within restricted airspace at Wallops Flight Facility. The

  11. Validation of the Radiometric Stability of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, H. H.; Elliott, D.; Strow, L. L.

    2012-01-01

    It has been widely accepted that an infrared sounder in low polar orbit is capable of producing climate quality data, if the spectral brightness temperatures have instrumental trends of less than 10 mK/yr. Achieving measurement stability at this level is not only very demanding of the design of the instrument, it is also pushes the state of art of measuring on orbit what stability is actually achieved. We discuss this using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) L1B data collected between 2002 and 2011. We compare the L1B brightness temperature observed in cloud filtered night tropical ocean spectra (obs) to the brightness temperature calculated based on the known surface emissivity, temperature and water vapor profiles from the ECMWF ReAnalysis (ERA) and the growth rates of CO2, N2O and Ozone. The trend in (obs-calc) is a powerful tool for the evaluation of the stability of the 2378 AIRS channels. We divided the channels into seven classes: All channels which sound in the stratosphere (at pressure levels below 150 hPa), 14 micron CO2 sounding, 4 micron CO2 P-branch sounding, 4 micron CO2 R-branch sounding, water vapor sounding, shortwave surface sounding and longwave surface sounding. The peak in the weighting function at 1050 hPa separates sounding and surface channels. The boundary between shortwave and longwave is 5 microns. Except for the stratosphere sounding channels, the remaining six groups have (obs-calc) trends of less than 20 mK/yr. The longwave surface channels have trends of 2 mK/yr, significantly less than the 8 mK/yr trend seem in the shortwave window channels. Based on the design of the instrument, trends within a group of channels should be the same. While the longwave and shortwave trends are less than the canonical 10 mK/yr, the larger trend in the shortwave channels could be an artifact of using the pre-launch determined calibration coefficients. This is currently under evaluation. The trend in (obs-calc) for the non-surface sounding channels, in

  12. Validation of the radiometric stability of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumann, H. H.; Elliott, D.; Strow, L. L.

    2012-09-01

    It has been widely accepted that an infrared sounder in low polar orbit is capable of producing climate quality data, if the spectral brightness temperatures have instrumental trends of less than 10 mK/yr. Achieving measurement stability at this level is not only very demanding of the design of the instrument, it is also pushes the state of art of measuring on orbit what stability is actually achieved. We discuss this using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) L1B data collected between 2002 and 2011. We compare the L1B brightness temperature observed in cloud filtered night tropical ocean spectra (obs) to the brightness temperature calculated based on the known surface emissivity, temperature and water vapor profiles from the ECMWF ReAnalysis (ERA) and the growth rates of CO2 , N2O and Ozone. The trend in (obscalc) is a powerful tool for the evaluation of the stability of the 2378 AIRS channels. We divided the channels into seven classes: All channels which sound in the stratosphere (at pressure levels below 150 hPa), 14 um CO2 sounding, 4 um CO2 P-branch sounding, 4um CO2 R-branch sounding, water vapor sounding, shortwave surface sounding and longwave surface sounding. The peak in the weighting function at 1050 hPa separates sounding and surface channels. The boundary between shortwave and longwave is 5 μm. Except for the stratosphere sounding channels, the remaining six groups have (obs-calc) trends of less than 20 mK/yr. The longwave surface channels have trends of 2 mK/yr, significantly less than the 8 mK/yr trend seem in the shortwave window channels. Based on the design of the instrument, trends within a group of channels should be the same. While the longwave and shortwave trends are less than the canonical 10 mK/yr, the larger trend in the shortwave channels could be an artifact of using the pre-launch determined calibration coefficients. This is currently under evaluation. The trend in (obs-calc) for the non-surface sounding channels, in particular for

  13. IBuoy: Expendable Echo Sounder Buoy with Satellite Data Telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenspan, D. G.; Porter, D. L.; Chayes, D. N.

    2012-12-01

    The IBuoy is a small expendable buoy platform with satellite data telemetry that can be deployed for different measurements, such as a wave spectrum (Porter and Keller, 2012). The IBuoy in its wave measuring version allows a user to deploy a small float, (25 cm high, 30 cm in diameter, 2.8 kg), which measures the instrument's motion for 20 minutes, processes the data for 5 minutes, and telemeters the processed data via Iridium modem to the user. In the spring of 2012 this system was modified by replacing the internal motion sensor with a connection to the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory's (LDEO) prototype Seafloor Sounding in Polar and Remote (SSPARR) echo sounder (Anderson et. al, 2005). From May 3 through May 19, 2012, this prototype was deployed nine times during the NSF-funded Switchyard field program at thin hole rosette sites (Smethie et. al, 2011). At three sites it was deployed in the beacon-mode, and at six other sites in the SSPARR mode with one of the sites being within ~400 km of the North Pole. In beacon-mode the IBuoy reports positions over time allowing accurate estimates of true ice motion. When it is in the beacon- and depth-mode, an acoustic transducer is deployed through a 12 inch hole in the ice and connected to the SSPARR sounder with the IBuoy on the ice surface. In this configuration it measures the water depth from the submerged transducer to the ocean floor below. Now that the concept has successfully been tested, the goal is to deploy similar IBuoy/SSPARRs at a number of sites for a season and collect positional data and depth soundings as the ice moves. The IBuoy concept provides a highly capable inexpensive platform that can be configured for a variety of measurements. References: Porter, D. L. and K. H. Keller, "IBuoy: Expendable Short Time Duration Wave Buoy with Satellite Data Telemetry," OCEANS '12, Hampton Roads, VA, 14-19 October, 2012. Smethie, W.M. Jr., D. Chayes, R. Perry, and P. Schlosser. 2011. A lightweight vertical rosette

  14. Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhothermel, Jeffry; Jones, W. D.; Dunkin, J. A.; McCaul, E. W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This effort involves development of a calibrated, pulsed coherent CO2 Doppler lidar, followed by a carefully-planned and -executed program of multi-dimensional wind velocity and aerosol backscatter measurements from the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. The lidar, designated as the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS), will be applicable to two research areas. First, MACAWS will enable specialized measurements of atmospheric dynamical processes in the planetary boundary layer and free troposphere in geographic locations and over scales of motion not routinely or easily accessible to conventional sensors. The proposed observations will contribute fundamentally to a greater understanding of the role of the mesoscale, helping to improve predictive capabilities for mesoscale phenomena and to provide insights into improving model parameterizations of sub-grid scale processes within large-scale circulation models. As such, it has the potential to contribute uniquely to major, multi-institutional field programs planned for the mid 1990's. Second, MACAWS measurements can be used to reduce the degree of uncertainty in performance assessments and algorithm development for NASA's prospective Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS), which has no space-based instrument heritage. Ground-based lidar measurements alone are insufficient to address all of the key issues. To minimize costs, MACAWS is being developed cooperatively by the lidar remote sensing groups of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NOAA Wave Propagation Laboratory, and MSFC using existing lidar hardware and manpower resources. Several lidar components have already been exercised in previous airborne lidar programs (for example, MSFC Airborne Doppler Lidar System (ADLS) used in 1981,4 Severe Storms Wind Measurement Program; JPL Airborne Backscatter Lidar Experiment (ABLE) used in 1989,90 Global Backscatter Experiment Survey Missions). MSFC has been given responsibility for directing the overall

  15. Development and test of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Paul G.; Bates, Jerry C.; Miller, Christopher R.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; O'Callaghan, Fred; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Karnik, Avinash R.

    1999-12-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) has been developed for the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) program for a scheduled launch on the EOS PM-1 spacecraft in December 2000. AIRS, working in concert with complementary microwave instrumentation on EOS PM-1 is designed to provide both new and more accurate data about the atmosphere, land and oceans for application to NASA climate studies and NOAA and DOD weather prediction. Among the important parameters to be derived from AIRS observations are atmospheric temperature profiles with an average accuracy of 1 K in 1 kilometer (km) layers in the troposphere, humidity profiles to 10% accuracy and surface temperatures with an average accuracy of 0.5 K. The AIRS measurement technique is based on passive IR remote sensing using a precisely calibrated, high spectral resolution grating spectrometer operating in the 3.7 - 15.4 micrometer region. The instrument concept uses a passively cooled multi- aperture echelle array spectrometer approach in combination with advanced state of the art focal plane and cryogenic refrigerator technology to achieve unparalleled performance capability in a practical long life configuration. The AIRS instrument, which has been under development since 1991, has been fully integrated and has completed successfully a comprehensive performance verification program. Performance verification included thermal vacuum testing, environmental qualification and a full range of spatial, spectral and radiometric calibrations, which have demonstrated outstanding spectrometric performance. This paper provides a brief overview of the AIRS mission and instrument design along with key results from the test program.

  16. Thermal Inertia Mapping Using Mars Climate Sounder Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqueux, S.; Kleinboehl, A.; Golombek, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Previous work has shown inter-seasonal variations of the apparent thermal inertia at virtually all Martian latitudes. Because thermal inertia is mainly controlled by low variability parameters (e.g., grain sizes, degree of induration, rock abundance), these variations are usually interpreted in terms of subsurface layering and atmospheric contributions. Using atmospherically corrected surface temperatures at 32 μm wavelength (channel B1) from the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) onboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, we analyze the inter-seasonal variations of the apparent thermal inertia. We show that most of the previously observed inertia variations are eliminated, indicating that a simple homogeneous regolith structure is sufficient to explain most of the measurements. Also, as expected, a fraction of the observed variations remain, especially at high latitudes. This is consistent with subsurface layering involving water ice below dry regolith inferred from other measurement techniques and modeling. This work strengthens our ability to identify and characterize surface/subsurface material thermal inertias, layering and physical heterogeneities in the Martian surface layer, and will help eliminate seasonal striping on high-resolution inertia maps. In addition to a global scale analysis, we will discuss observations in western Elysium Planitia where the Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) lander is planned to land in September 2016. We will provide predictions of the surface layer thermophysical properties, which are required for safe landing and successful scientific operations on the ground.

  17. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Version 6 Cloud Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, B. H.; Irion, F. W.; Dang, V. T.; Manning, E. M.; Nasiri, S. L.; Naud, C. M.; Blaisdell, J. M.; Schreier, M. M..; Yue, Q.; Bowman, K. W.; Fetzer, E. J.; Hulley, G. C.; Liou, K. N.; Lubin, D.; Ou, S. C.; Susskind, J.; Takano, Y.; Tian, B.; Worden, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    The version 6 cloud products of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) instrument suite are described. The cloud top temperature, pressure, and height and effective cloud fraction are now reported at the AIRS field-of-view (FOV) resolution. Significant improvements in cloud height assignment over version 5 are shown with FOV-scale comparisons to cloud vertical structure observed by the CloudSat 94 GHz radar and the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). Cloud thermodynamic phase (ice, liquid, and unknown phase), ice cloud effective diameter D(sub e), and ice cloud optical thickness (t) are derived using an optimal estimation methodology for AIRS FOVs, and global distributions for 2007 are presented. The largest values of tau are found in the storm tracks and near convection in the tropics, while D(sub e) is largest on the equatorial side of the midlatitude storm tracks in both hemispheres, and lowest in tropical thin cirrus and the winter polar atmosphere. Over the Maritime Continent the diurnal variability of tau is significantly larger than for the total cloud fraction, ice cloud frequency, and D(sub e), and is anchored to the island archipelago morphology. Important differences are described between northern and southern hemispheric midlatitude cyclones using storm center composites. The infrared-based cloud retrievals of AIRS provide unique, decadal-scale and global observations of clouds over portions of the diurnal and annual cycles, and capture variability within the mesoscale and synoptic scales at all latitudes.

  18. Sensitivity Analysis for Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) CO2 Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, Ilana

    2012-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a thermal infrared sensor able to retrieve the daily atmospheric state globally for clear as well as partially cloudy field-of-views. The AIRS spectrometer has 2378 channels sensing from 15.4 micrometers to 3.7 micrometers, of which a small subset in the 15 micrometers region has been selected, to date, for CO2 retrieval. To improve upon the current retrieval method, we extended the retrieval calculations to include a prior estimate component and developed a channel ranking system to optimize the channels and number of channels used. The channel ranking system uses a mathematical formalism to rapidly process and assess the retrieval potential of large numbers of channels. Implementing this system, we identifed a larger optimized subset of AIRS channels that can decrease retrieval errors and minimize the overall sensitivity to other iridescent contributors, such as water vapor, ozone, and atmospheric temperature. This methodology selects channels globally by accounting for the latitudinal, longitudinal, and seasonal dependencies of the subset. The new methodology increases accuracy in AIRS CO2 as well as other retrievals and enables the extension of retrieved CO2 vertical profiles to altitudes ranging from the lower troposphere to upper stratosphere. The extended retrieval method for CO2 vertical profile estimation using a maximum-likelihood estimation method. We use model data to demonstrate the beneficial impact of the extended retrieval method using the new channel ranking system on CO2 retrieval.

  19. Regional Assimilation of NASA Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Lapenta, William; Jediovec, Gary J.; McCarty, William; Mecikalski, John R.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPORT) Center seeks to accelerate the infusion of NASA Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) observations, data assimilation and modeling research into NW S forecast operations and decision-making. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), is expected to advance climate research and weather prediction into the 21 st century. It is one of six instruments onboard Aqua, a satellite that is part of NASA s Earth Observing System. AIRS, along with two partner microwave sounding instruments, represents the most advanced atmospheric sounding system ever deployed in space. The system is capable of measuring the atmospheric temperature in the troposphere with radiosonde accuracies of 1 K over 1 km-thick layers under both clear and cloudy conditions, while the accuracy of the derived moisture profiles will exceed that obtained by radiosondes. It is imperative that the scientific community is prepared to take full advantage of next-generation satellite data that will become available within the next decade. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure designed to optimally assimilate AIRS data at high spatial resolution over both land and ocean. The assimilation system used in this study is the Local Analysis and Prediction System (LAPS) developed at the Forecast System Laboratory used extensively around the globe. Results will focus on quality control issues associated with AIRS, optimal assimilation strategies, and the impact of the AIRS data on subsequent numerical forecasts at 12 km produced by the next generation Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model.

  20. Microwave Limb Sounder/El Nino Watch - December, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This image shows differences in atmospheric water vapor relative to a normal (average) year in the Earth's upper troposphere about 10 kilometers (6 miles) above the surface. The measurements were taken by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument aboard NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). These data, collected in late December 1997, show higher than normal levels of water vapor (red) over the central and eastern Pacific which indicates the presence of an El Nino condition. At the same time, the western Pacific (blue) is much drier than normal. The unusually moist air above the central and eastern Pacific is a consequence of the much warmer-than-normal ocean waters which occur during El Nino. Warmer water evaporates at a higher rate and the resulting warm moist air rises and forms tall cloud towers. In the tropics, the warm water and the resulting tall cloud towers typically produce large amounts of rain. These data show significant increases in the amount of atmospheric moisture off the coast of Peru and Ecuador since measurements were made in November 1997. The maximum water temperature in the eastern tropical Pacific, as measured by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is still higher than normal and these high ocean temperatures are likely responsible for an increase in evaporation and the subsequent rise in humidity.

  1. Coherent launch-site atmospheric wind sounder: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Hawley, J G; Targ, R; Henderson, S W; Hale, C P; Kavaya, M J; Moerder, D

    1993-08-20

    The coherent launch-site atmospheric wind sounder (CLAWS) is a lidar atmospheric wind sensor designed to measure the winds above space launch facilities to an altitude of 20 km. In our development studies, lidar sensor requirements are defined, a system to meet those requirements is defined and built, and the concept is evaluated, with recommendations for the most feasible and cost-effective lidar system for use as an input to a guidance and control system for missile or spacecraft launches. The ability of CLAWS to meet NASA goals for increased safety and launch/mission flexibility is evaluated in a field test program at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in which we investigate maximum detection range, refractive turbulence, and aerosol backscattering efficiency. The Nd:YAG coherent lidar operating at 1.06 µm with 1-J energy per pulse is able to make real-time measurements of the three-dimensional wind field at KSC to an altitude of 26 km, in good agreement with our performance simulations. It also shows the height and thickness of the volcanic layer caused by the volcanic eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines. PMID:20830118

  2. Cloud retrieval using infrared sounder data - Error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, B. A.; Coakley, J. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An error analysis is presented for cloud-top pressure and cloud-amount retrieval using infrared sounder data. Rms and bias errors are determined for instrument noise (typical of the HIRS-2 instrument on Tiros-N) and for uncertainties in the temperature profiles and water vapor profiles used to estimate clear-sky radiances. Errors are determined for a range of test cloud amounts (0.1-1.0) and cloud-top pressures (920-100 mb). Rms errors vary by an order of magnitude depending on the cloud height and cloud amount within the satellite's field of view. Large bias errors are found for low-altitude clouds. These bias errors are shown to result from physical constraints placed on retrieved cloud properties, i.e., cloud amounts between 0.0 and 1.0 and cloud-top pressures between the ground and tropopause levels. Middle-level and high-level clouds (above 3-4 km) are retrieved with low bias and rms errors.

  3. Middle Atmosphere Sounder and Thermal Emission Radiometer - Master

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, M. G.; Scott, D. K.; Esplin, R. W.; Bailey, S. M.; Randall, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Sounder and Thermal Emission Radiometer (MASTER) instrument is an advanced infrared limb-scanning instrument designed to measure the thermal structure, chemical composition, and energy balance from the stratosphere to the lower thermosphere. MASTER builds on NASA's long and successful heritage of infrared limb scanners including the LIMS, HIRDLS, and SABER instruments. MASTER has exceptional radiometric sensitivity with a more efficient, compact, and lightweight design. An updated focal plane enables critical new science in the areas of the carbon budget closure, geomagnetically-driven ozone destruction, and auroral energy deposition, while virtually eliminating out of band contributions via dual filtering. MASTER will continue the SABER-TIMED and EOS-Aura records of temperature, lower stratospheric water vapor, ozone, methane, and thermospheric cooling by nitric oxide and carbon dioxide. MASTER's size and mass are specifically designed to allow flexibility in the choice of small satellite buses and low cost launch vehicles. The expanded focal plane enables a choice of channels applicable to science objectives in NASA's Earth Science and Heliophysics enterprises. Due to the long and successful heritage the MASTER instrument is at an exceptionally high technology readiness level. No new technologies are required to build the MASTER flight instrument.

  4. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder ClO Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, J. W.; Read, W. G.; Froidevaux, L.; Lungu, T. A.; Perun, V. S.; Stachnik, R. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Fishbein, E. F.; Flower, D. A.; Burke, J. R.; Hardy, J. C.; Nakamura, L. L.; Ridenoure, B. P.; Shippony, Z.; Thurstans, R. P.; Thurstans, R. P.; Avallone, L. M.; Toohey, D. W.; deZafra, R. L.; Shindell, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    Validation of stratospheric ClO measurements by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) is described. Credibility of the measurements is established by (1) the consistency of the measured ClO spectral emission line with the retrieved ClO profiles and (2) comparisons of ClO from MLS with that from correlative measurements by balloon-based, ground-based, and aircraft-based instruments. Values of "noise" (random), "scaling" (multiplicative), and "bias" (additive) uncertainties are determined for the Version 3 data, in the first version public release of the known artifacts in these data are identified. Comparisons with correlative measurements indicate agreement to within the combined uncertainties expected for MLS and the other measurements being compared. It is concluded that MLS Version 3 ClO data, with proper consideration of the uncertainties and "quality" parameters produced with these data, can be used for scientific analyses at retrieval surfaces between 46 and 1 hPa (approximately 20-50 km in height). Future work is planned to correct known problems in the data and improve their quality.

  5. The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite microwave limb sounder instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barath, F. T.; Chavez, M. C.; Cofield, R. E.; Flower, D. A.; Frerking, M. A.; Gram, M. B.; Harris, W. M.; Holden, J. R.; Jarnot, R. F.; Kloezeman, W. G.

    1993-01-01

    The microwave limb sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) is the first satellite experiment using limb sounding techniques at microwave frequencies. Primary measurement objectives are stratospheric ClO, O3, H2O, temperature, and pressure. Measurements are of thermal emission: all are performed simultaneously and continuously and are not degraded by ice clouds or volcanic aerosols. The instrument has a 1.6-m mechanically scanning antenna system and contains heterodyne radiometers in spectral bands centred near 63, 183, and 205 GHz. The radiometers operate at ambient temperature and use Schottky-diode mixers with local oscillators derived from phase-locked Gunn oscillators. Frequency tripling by varactor multipliers generates the 183- and 205-GHz local oscillators, and quasi-optical techniques inject these into the mixers. Six 15-channel filter banks spectrally resolve stratospheric thermal emission lines and produce an output spectrum every 2 s. Thermal stability is sufficient for 'total power' measurements which do not require fast chopping. Radiometric calibration, consisting of measurements of cold space and an internal target, is performed every 65-s limb scan. Instrument in-orbit performance has been excellent, and all objectives are being met.

  6. The TIROS-N high resolution infrared radiation sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, E. W.

    1979-01-01

    The high-resolution infrared radiation sounder (HIRS/2) was developed and flown on the Television and Infrared Observation Satellite, N Series (TIROS-N) as one means of obtaining atmospheric vertical profile information. The HIRS/2 receives visible and infrared spectrum radiation through a single telescope and selects 20 narrow spectral channels by means of a rotating filter wheel. A passive radiant cooler provides an operating temperature of 106.7K for the HgCdTe and InSb detectors while the visible detector operates at instrument frame temperature. Low noise amplifiers and digital processing provide 13 bit data for spacecraft data multiplexing and transmission. The qualities of system performance that determine sounding capability are the dynamic range of data collection, the noise equivalent radiance of the system, the registration of the air columns sampled in each channel, and the ability to upgrade the calibration of the instrument to maintain the performance standard throughout life. The basic performance of the instrument in test is described. Early orbital information from the TIROS-N launched on October 13, 1978 are given and some observations on system quality are made.

  7. Scanning Mechanism of the FY-3 Microwave Humidity Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Manfred; Jing, Li; Hehr, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Astrium GmbH Germany, developed the scanning equipment for the instrument package of the MicroWave Humidity Sounder (MWHS) flying on the FY-3 meteorological satellite (FY means Feng Yun, Wind and Cloud) in a sun-synchronized orbit of 850-km altitude and at an inclination of 98.8 . The scanning mechanism rotates at variable velocity comprising several acceleration / deceleration phases during each revolution. The Scanning Mechanism contains two output shafts, each rotating a parabolic offset Antenna Reflector. The mechanism is operated in closed loop by means of redundant control electronics. MWHS is a sounding radiometer for measurement of global atmospheric water vapour profiles. An Engineering Qualification Model was developed and qualified and a first Flight Model was launched early 2008. The system is now working for more than two years successful in orbit. A second Flight Model of the Antenna Scanning Mechanism and of its associated control electronics was built and delivered to the customer for application on the follow-on spacecraft that will be launched by the end of 2010.

  8. The Mars Climate Sounder In-Flight Positioning Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.; Kass, David

    2008-01-01

    The paper discusses the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) instrument s in-flight positioning errors and presents background material about it. A short overview of the instrument s science objectives and data acquisition techniques is provided. The brief mechanical description familiarizes the reader with the MCS instrument. Several key items of the flight qualification program, which had a rigorous joint drive test program but some limitations in overall system testing, are discussed. Implications this might have had for the flight anomaly, which began after several months of flawless space operation, are mentioned. The detection, interpretation, and instrument response to the errors is discussed. The anomaly prompted engineering reviews, renewed ground, and some in-flight testing. A summary of these events, including a timeline, is included. Several items of concern were uncovered during the anomaly investigation, the root cause, however, was never found. The instrument is now used with two operational constraints that work around the anomaly. It continues science gathering at an only slightly diminished pace that will yield approximately 90% of the originally intended science.

  9. Hyperspectral Observations of Land Surfaces Using Ground-based, Airborne, and Satellite Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuteson, R. O.; Best, F. A.; Revercomb, H. E.; Tobin, D. C.

    2006-12-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science and Engineering Center (UW-SSEC) has helped pioneer the use of high spectral resolution infrared spectrometers for application to atmospheric and surface remote sensing. This paper is focused on observations of land surface infrared emission from high spectral resolution measurements collected over the past 15 years using airborne, ground-based, and satellite platforms. The earliest data was collected by the High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS), an instrument designed in the 1980s for operation on the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft. The HIS was replaced in the late 1990s by the Scanning-HIS instrument which has flown on the NASA ER-2, WB-57, DC-8, and Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft and continues to support field campaigns, such as those for EOS Terra, Aqua, and Aura validation. Since 1995 the UW-SSEC has fielded a ground-based Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) in a research vehicle (the AERIBAGO) which has allowed for direct field measurements of land surface emission from a height of about 16 ft above the ground. Several ground-based and aircraft campaigns were conducted to survey the region surrounding the ARM Southern Great Plains site in north central Oklahoma. The ground- based AERIBAGO has also participated in surface emissivity campaigns in the Western U.S.. Since 2002, the NASA Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) has provided similar measurements from the Aqua platform in an afternoon sun-synchronous polar orbit. Ground-based and airborne observations are being used to validate the land surface products derived from the AIRS observations. These cal/val activities are in preparation for similar measurements anticipated from the operational Cross-track InfraRed Sounder (CrIS) on the NPOESS Preparatory Platform (NPP), expected to be launched in 2008. Moreover, high spectral infrared observations will soon be made by the Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer (IASI) on the

  10. The International SubMillimetre Airborne Radiometer (ISMAR) - First results from the STICCS and COSMIC campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendrok, Jana; Eriksson, Patrick; Fox, Stuart; Brath, Manfred; Buehler, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Multispectral millimeter- and submillimeter-wave observations bear the potential to measure properties of non-thin ice clouds like mass content and mean particle size. The next generation of European meteorological satellites, the MetOp-SG series, will carry the first satellite-borne submillimeter sounder, the Ice Cloud Imager (ICI). An airborne demonstrator, the International SubMillimetre Airborne Radiometer (ISMAR), is operated together with other remote sensing instruments and in-situ probes on the FAAM aircraft. Scientific measurements from two campaings in the North Atlantic region, STICCS and COSMIC, are available so far. Here we will introduce the ISMAR instrument, present the acquired measurements from the STICCS and COSMIC campaigns and show some first results. This will include estimation of instrument performance, first analysis of clear-sky and cloudy cases and discussion of selected features observed in the measurements (e.g. polarisation signatures).

  11. The advanced orbiting systems testbed program: Results to date

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsome, Penny A.; Otranto, John F.

    1993-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems Recommendations for Packet Telemetry and Advanced Orbiting Systems (AOS) propose standard solutions to data handling problems common to many types of space missions. The Recommendations address only space/ground and space/space data handling systems. Goddard Space Flight Center's AOS Testbed (AOST) Program was initiated to better understand the Recommendations and their impact on real-world systems, and to examine the extended domain of ground/ground data handling systems. Central to the AOST Program are the development of an end-to-end Testbed and its use in a comprehensive testing program. Other Program activities include flight-qualifiable component development, supporting studies, and knowledge dissemination. The results and products of the Program will reduce the uncertainties associated with the development of operational space and ground systems that implement the Recommendations. The results presented in this paper include architectural issues, a draft proposed standardized test suite and flight-qualifiable components.

  12. Telescience testbed pilot program, volume 3: Experiment summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiner, Barry M.

    1989-01-01

    Space Station Freedom and its associated labs, coupled with the availability of new computing and communications technologies, have the potential for significantly enhancing scientific research. A Telescience Testbed Pilot Program (TTPP), aimed at developing the experience base to deal with issues in the design of the future information system of the Space Station era. The testbeds represented four scientific disciplines (astronomy and astrophysics, earth science, life sciences, and microgravity sciences) and studied issues in payload design, operation, and data analysis. This volume, of a 3 volume set, which all contain the results of the TTPP, presents summaries of the experiments. This experiment involves the evaluation of the current Internet for the use of file and image transfer between SIRTF instrument teams. The main issue addressed was current network response times.

  13. Amplitude variations on the Extreme Adaptive Optics testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J; Thomas, S; Dillon, D; Gavel, D; Phillion, D; Macintosh, B

    2007-08-14

    High-contrast adaptive optics systems, such as those needed to image extrasolar planets, are known to require excellent wavefront control and diffraction suppression. At the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics on the Extreme Adaptive Optics testbed, we have already demonstrated wavefront control of better than 1 nm rms within controllable spatial frequencies. Corresponding contrast measurements, however, are limited by amplitude variations, including those introduced by the micro-electrical-mechanical-systems (MEMS) deformable mirror. Results from experimental measurements and wave optic simulations of amplitude variations on the ExAO testbed are presented. We find systematic intensity variations of about 2% rms, and intensity variations with the MEMS to be 6%. Some errors are introduced by phase and amplitude mixing because the MEMS is not conjugate to the pupil, but independent measurements of MEMS reflectivity suggest that some error is introduced by small non-uniformities in the reflectivity.

  14. Development of a FDIR Validation Test-Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Jan; Cederman, Daniel; Habinc, Sandi; Dellandrea, Brice; Nodet, Jean-Christian; Guettache, Farid; Furano, Gianluca

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes work being performed by Aeroflex Gaisler and Thales Alenia Space France for the European Space Agency to develop an extension of the existing avionics system testbed facility in ESTEC's Avionics Lab. The work is funded by the European Space Agency under contract 4000109928/13/NL/AK. The resulting FDIR (Fault Detection, Isolation and Recovery) testbed will allow to test concepts, strategy mechanisms and tools related to FDIR. The resulting facility will have the capabilities to support nominal and off-nominal test cases and to support tools for post testing and post simulation analysis. Ultimately the purpose of the output of this activity is to provide a tool for assessment and validation at laboratory level. This paper describes an on-going development; at the time of writing the activity is in the preliminary design phase.

  15. FDIR Validation Test-Bed Development and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Alexander; Sakthivel, Anandhavel; Aberg, Martin; Andersson, Jan; Habinc, Sandi; Dellandrea, Brice; Nodet, Jean-Christian; Guettache, Farid; Furano, Gianluca

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes work being performed by Cobham Gaisler and Thales Alenia Space France for the European Space Agency to develop an extension of the existing avionics system testbed facility in ESTEC's Avionics Lab. The work is funded by the European Space Agency under contract 4000109928/13/NL/AK. The resulting FDIR (Fault Detection, Isolation and Recovery) testbed will allow to test concepts, strategy mechanisms and tools related to FDIR. The resulting facility will have the capabilities to support nominal and off-nominal test cases and to support tools for post testing and post simulation analysis. Ultimately the purpose of the output of this activity is to provide a tool for assessment and validation at laboratory level. This paper describes an on-going development; at the time of writing the activity is in the validation phase.

  16. A single-axis testbed for slewing control experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Jonathan; Lee, Gordon K. F.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1990-01-01

    A simple single-axis testbed is described, and initial experimental results are presented to illustrate collocated and noncollocated control for this structure. The testbed is made up of a pair of single-axis flexible beams attached to a DC servo motor. An optical encoder and strain gauges provide hub and beam position information, respectively. The system is driven by an IBM PC system; with a motor controller, a programmable digital filter processes position error information through user-selected gains and pole-zero configurations. A 25-kHz data acquisition system provides the necessary interface between processor and motor. The control approaches currently being investigated include collocated PD control and noncollocated phase compensation.

  17. System integration of a Telerobotic Demonstration System (TDS) testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, John K.

    1987-01-01

    The concept for and status of a telerobotic demonstration system testbed that integrates teleoperation and robotics is described. The components of the telerobotic system are described and the ongoing projects are discussed. The system can be divided into two sections: the autonomous subsystems, and the additional interface and support subsystems including teleoperations. The workings of each subsystem by itself and how the subsystems integrate into a complete system is discussed.

  18. Optical modeling in Testbed Environment for Space Situational Awareness (TESSA).

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Sergei

    2011-08-01

    We describe optical systems modeling in the Testbed Environment for Space Situational Awareness (TESSA) simulator. We begin by presenting a brief outline of the overall TESSA architecture and focus on components for modeling optical sensors. Both image generation and image processing stages are described in detail, highlighting the differences in modeling ground- and space-based sensors. We conclude by outlining the applicability domains for the TESSA simulator, including potential real-life scenarios. PMID:21833092

  19. High energy laser testbed for accurate beam pointing control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dojong; Kim, Jae Jun; Frist, Duane; Nagashima, Masaki; Agrawal, Brij

    2010-02-01

    Precision laser beam pointing is a key technology in High Energy Laser systems. In this paper, a laboratory High Energy Laser testbed developed at the Naval Postgraduate School is introduced. System identification is performed and a mathematical model is constructed to estimate system performance. New beam pointing control algorithms are designed based on this mathematical model. It is shown in both computer simulation and experiment that the adaptive filter algorithm can improve the pointing performance of the system.

  20. Remotely Accessible Testbed for Software Defined Radio Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lux, James P.; Lang, Minh; Peters, Kenneth J.; Taylor, Gregory H.

    2012-01-01

    Previous development testbeds have assumed that the developer was physically present in front of the hardware being used. No provision for remote operation of basic functions (power on/off or reset) was made, because the developer/operator was sitting in front of the hardware, and could just push the button manually. In this innovation, a completely remotely accessible testbed has been created, with all diagnostic equipment and tools set up for remote access, and using standardized interfaces so that failed equipment can be quickly replaced. In this testbed, over 95% of the operating hours were used for testing without the developer being physically present. The testbed includes a pair of personal computers, one running Linux and one running Windows. A variety of peripherals is connected via Ethernet and USB (universal serial bus) interfaces. A private internal Ethernet is used to connect to test instruments and other devices, so that the sole connection to the outside world is via the two PCs. An important design consideration was that all of the instruments and interfaces used stable, long-lived industry standards, such as Ethernet, USB, and GPIB (general purpose interface bus). There are no plug-in cards for the two PCs, so there are no problems with finding replacement computers with matching interfaces, device drivers, and installation. The only thing unique to the two PCs is the locally developed software, which is not specific to computer or operating system version. If a device (including one of the computers) were to fail or become unavailable (e.g., a test instrument needed to be recalibrated), replacing it is a straightforward process with a standard, off-the-shelf device.

  1. Testbed for ROADM and WXC Based Metro WDM Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Lei; Ji, Philip; Xu, Lei; Wang, Ting; Matsuda, Osamu; Cvijetic, Milorad

    2005-11-01

    A testbed for metro wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) network is realized and tested. The testbed contains a reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexer (ROADM) node, a 2x2 wavelength cross-connect (WXC) node, and two interconnected two-fiber bidirectional path protected switching ring networks (TF-BPSR). Both the ROADM and WXC node are bidirectional nodes, so they can select channels from the working and the protection ring networks simultaneously, and they support both protected and unprotected services. The ROADM node uses a flexible band tunable filter (FBTF) to drop a waveband from the input WDM signals and send the express channels directly to the output port. As a result, the physical impairment accumulated on the express channels can be minimized. It also has a modular structure, so additional modules can be cascaded to expand the capacity and functionality of the node without any interruption to current services. The WXC node is realized with interconnected ROADM modules that are comprised of wavelength selective switches (WSSes). Arbitrary wavelength or wavelength sets can be either dropped in the node or cross-connected in a non-blocking manner. Multiple services, such as OC-48 and OC-192 SONET signals, gigabit Ethernet streams carrying interactive movie signals, and live video broadcasting services, are carried in the network, dropped in the ROADM and WXC node, and switched between the two ring networks. The testbed is controlled by a websever based network management system that facilitates remote control and monitoring. Experiments demonstrate that the performance of the nodes and the testbed meets the requirement of the services.

  2. Planning and reasoning in the JPL telerobot testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Stephen; Mittman, David; Collins, Carol; Omeara, Jacquie; Rokey, Mark

    1990-01-01

    The Telerobot Interactive Planning System is developed to serve as the highest autonomous-control level of the Telerobot Testbed. A recent prototype is described which integrates an operator interface for supervisory control, a task planner supporting disassembly and re-assembly operations, and a spatial planner for collision-free manipulator motion through the workspace. Each of these components is described in detail. Descriptions of the technical problem, approach, and lessons learned are included.

  3. The Photovoltaic Engineering Testbed: Design options and trade-offs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Sexton, Andrew; Abramczyk, Richard; Francz, Joseph; Johnson, D. B.; Yang, Liu; Minjares, Daniel; Myers, James

    2000-01-01

    The Photovoltaic Engineering Testbed (PET) is a space-exposure test facility to fly on the International Space Station to calibrate, test, and qualify advanced solar cell types in the space environment. The purpose is to reduce the cost of validating new technologies and bringing them to spaceflight readiness by measuring them in the in-space environment. This paper reviews engineering options considered for flying PET on the International Space Station, and presents the current status of development. .

  4. Development and experimentation of an eye/brain/task testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Nora; Villarreal, James

    1987-01-01

    The principal objective is to develop a laboratory testbed that will provide a unique capability to elicit, control, record, and analyze the relationship of operator task loading, operator eye movement, and operator brain wave data in a computer system environment. The ramifications of an integrated eye/brain monitor to the man machine interface are staggering. The success of such a system would benefit users of space and defense, paraplegics, and the monitoring of boring screens (nuclear power plants, air defense, etc.)

  5. Cyber security analysis testbed : combining real, emulation, and simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Villamarin, Charles H.; Eldridge, John M.; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.; Urias, Vincent E.

    2010-07-01

    Cyber security analysis tools are necessary to evaluate the security, reliability, and resilience of networked information systems against cyber attack. It is common practice in modern cyber security analysis to separately utilize real systems of computers, routers, switches, firewalls, computer emulations (e.g., virtual machines) and simulation models to analyze the interplay between cyber threats and safeguards. In contrast, Sandia National Laboratories has developed novel methods to combine these evaluation platforms into a hybrid testbed that combines real, emulated, and simulated components. The combination of real, emulated, and simulated components enables the analysis of security features and components of a networked information system. When performing cyber security analysis on a system of interest, it is critical to realistically represent the subject security components in high fidelity. In some experiments, the security component may be the actual hardware and software with all the surrounding components represented in simulation or with surrogate devices. Sandia National Laboratories has developed a cyber testbed that combines modeling and simulation capabilities with virtual machines and real devices to represent, in varying fidelity, secure networked information system architectures and devices. Using this capability, secure networked information system architectures can be represented in our testbed on a single, unified computing platform. This provides an 'experiment-in-a-box' capability. The result is rapidly-produced, large-scale, relatively low-cost, multi-fidelity representations of networked information systems. These representations enable analysts to quickly investigate cyber threats and test protection approaches and configurations.

  6. Visually guided grasping to study teleprogrammation within the BAROCO testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devy, M.; Garric, V.; Delpech, M.; Proy, C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes vision functionalities required in future orbital laboratories; in such systems, robots will be needed in order to execute the on-board scientific experiments or servicing and maintenance tasks under the remote control of ground operators. For this sake, ESA has proposed a robotic configuration called EMATS; a testbed has been developed by ESTEC in order to evaluate the potentialities of EMATS-like robot to execute scientific tasks in automatic mode. For the same context, CNES develops the BAROCO testbed to investigate remote control and teleprogrammation, in which high level primitives like 'Pick Object A' are provided as basic primitives. In nominal situations, the system has an a priori knowledge about the position of all objects. These positions are not very accurate, but this knowledge is sufficient in order to predict the position of the object which must be grasped, with respect to the manipulator frame. Vision is required in order to insure a correct grasping and to guarantee a good accuracy for the following operations. We describe our results about a visually guided grasping of static objects. It seems to be a very classical problem, and a lot of results are available. But, in many cases, it lacks a realistic evaluation of the accuracy, because such an evaluation requires tedious experiments. We propose several results about calibration of the experimental testbed, recognition algorithms required to locate a 3D polyhedral object, and the grasping itself.

  7. Visible Nulling Coronagraphy Testbed Development for Exoplanet Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert A.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Thompson, Patrick; Chen, Andrew; Petrone, Peter; Booth, Andrew; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew; Noecker, M. Charley; Kendrick, Stephen; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Three of the recently completed NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept (ASMC) studies addressed the feasibility of using a Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) as the prime instrument for exoplanet science. The VNC approach is one of the few approaches that works with filled, segmented and sparse or diluted aperture telescope systems and thus spans the space of potential ASMC exoplanet missions. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has a well-established effort to develop VNC technologies and has developed an incremental sequence of VNC testbeds to advance the this approach and the technologies associated with it. Herein we report on the continued development of the vacuum Visible Nulling Coronagraph testbed (VNT). The VNT is an ultra-stable vibration isolated testbed that operates under high bandwidth closed-loop control within a vacuum chamber. It will be used to achieve an incremental sequence of three visible light nulling milestones of sequentially higher contrasts of 10(exp 8) , 10(exp 9) and 10(exp 10) at an inner working angle of 2*lambda/D and ultimately culminate in spectrally broadband (>20%) high contrast imaging. Each of the milestones, one per year, is traceable to one or more of the ASMC studies. The VNT uses a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, modified with a modified "W" configuration to accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. Discussed will be the optical configuration laboratory results, critical technologies and the null sensing and control approach.

  8. The Mini-Mast CSI testbed: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Sharon E.; Belvin, W. Keith; Horta, Lucas G.; Pappa, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    The Mini-Mast testbed was one of the first large scale Controls-Structure-Interaction (CSI) systems used to evaluate state-of-the-art methodology in flexible structure control. Now that all the testing at Langley Research Center has been completed, a look back is warranted to evaluate the program. This paper describes some of the experiences and technology development studies by NASA, university, and industry investigators. Lessons learned are presented from three categories: the testbed development, control methods, and the operation of a guest investigator program. It is shown how structural safety margins provided a realistic environment to simulate on-orbit CSI research, even though they also reduced the research flexibility afforded to investigators. The limited dynamic coupling between the bending and torsion modes of the cantilevered test article resulted in highly successful SISO and MIMO controllers. However, until accurate models were obtained for the torque wheel actuators, sensors, filters, and the structure itself, most controllers were unstable. Controls research from this testbed should be applicable to cantilevered appendages of future large space structures.

  9. The Airborne Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberson, Steven E.

    2002-09-01

    The US Air Force Airborne Laser (ABL) is an airborne, megawatt-class laser system with a state-of-the-art atmospheric compensation system to destroy enemy ballistic missiles at long ranges. This system will provide both deterrence and defense against the use of such weapons during conflicts. This paper provides an overview of the ABL weapon system including: the notional operational concept, the development approach and schedule, the overall aircraft configuration, the technologies being incorporated in the ABL, and the risk reduction approach being utilized to ensure program success.

  10. Airborne oceanographic lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Specifications and preliminary design of an Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) system, which is to be constructed for installation and used on a NASA Wallops Flight Center (WFC) C-54 research aircraft, are reported. The AOL system is to provide an airborne facility for use by various government agencies to demonstrate the utility and practicality of hardware of this type in the wide area collection of oceanographic data on an operational basis. System measurement and performance requirements are presented, followed by a description of the conceptual system approach and the considerations attendant to its development. System performance calculations are addressed, and the system specifications and preliminary design are presented and discussed.

  11. NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991 Data from the 1991 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of Pinatubo in July ... and Osborn [1992a, 1992b]. Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  12. NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992 An airborne Nd:YAG (532 nm) lidar was operated by the NASA Langley Research Center about a year following the June 1991 eruption of ... Osborn [1992a, 1992b].  Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  13. Small particle cirrus observed by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, B. H.; Eldering, A.; Fishbein, E. F.

    2003-04-01

    The high-resolution spectra of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) have provided an opportunity to globally observe small particle-dominated cirrus clouds. The shape of the radiance spectra in the atmospheric windows is uniquely influenced by small ice crystals with an effective radius (reff) of a few 10s of microns and smaller. In some rare instances, minima in the AIRS brightness temperature (BT) spectra between 800 to 850 cm-1 are seen, consistent with the existence of ice particles with an reff smaller than 3 microns. Much more frequent occurences of small ice particle clouds with reff larger than 3 microns are observed through the large 998 to 811 cm-1 BT differences without minima. The small particle events are occasionally found in orographic cirrus clouds, in and around cumulonimbus towers, and in cirrus bands far removed from convection and orography. Several cases spanning the variety of small particle-dominated cirrus events will be presented. AIRS, located on the EOS-Aqua platform, is a high-resolution grating spectrometer that scans at angles 49.5 degrees on either side of nadir view, at both visible and infrared wavelengths. The surface footprint is 13.5 km at the nadir view, and coverage in the infrared is in three bandpasses (649-1136, 1265-1629, and 2169-2674 cm-1). Comparisons of observed spectra are made with simulated spectra generated by a plane-parallel scattering radiative transfer model using ice particle shapes and sizes calculated by the T-matrix method. These comparisons yield information on small particle cirrus cloud reff and optical depth. Aumann, H.H., and R.J. Pagano, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on the Earth Observing System. Opt. Eng. 33, 776-784, 1994. Mishchenko, M.I., and L.D. Travis, Capabilities and limitations of a current Fortran implementation of the T-matrix method for randomly oriented, rotationally symmetric scatterers. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer, 60, 309-324, 1998. Moncet, J.L., and S.A. Clough

  14. Validation of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder HCl Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Jiang, Y. B.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N. J.; Read, W. G.; Waters, J. W.; Fuller, R. A.; Marcy, T. P.; Popp, P. J.; Gao, R. S.; Fahey, D. W.; Jucks, K. W.; Stachnik, R. A.; Toon, G. C.; Christensen, L. E.; Webster, C. R.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C. D.; Walker, K. A.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Harwood, R. S.; Manney, G. L.; Schwartz, M. J.; Daffer, W. H.; Drouin, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Aura satellite has provided daily global HCl profiles since August 2004. We provide a characterization of the resolution, random and systematic uncertainties, and known issues for the version 2.2 MLS HCl data. The MLS sampling allows for comparisons with many (1500 to more than 3000) closely matched profiles from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). These data sets provide HCl latitudinal distributions that are, overall, very similar to those from (coincident) MLS profiles, although there are some discrepancies in the upper stratosphere between the MLS and HALOE gradients. As found in previous work, MLS and ACE HCl profiles agree very well (within approximately 5%, on average), but the MLS HCl abundances are generally larger (by 10-20%) than HALOE HCl. The bias versus HALOE is unlikely to arise mostly from MLS, as a similar systematic bias (of order 15%) is not observed between average MLS and balloon-borne measurements of HCl, obtained over Fort Sumner, New Mexico, in 2004 and 2005. At the largest pressure (147 hPa) for MLS HCl, a high bias (approximately 0.2 ppbv) is apparent in analyses of low to midlatitude data versus in situ aircraft chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) HCl measurements from the Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) campaigns in 2004, 2005, and 2006; this bias is also observed in comparisons of MLS and aircraftHCl/O3 correlations. Good agreement between MLS and CIMS HCl is obtained at 100 to 68 hPa. The recommended pressure range for MLS HCl is from 100 to 0.15 hPa.

  15. Global dust infrared aerosol properties retrieved using hyperspectral sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelle, Virginie; Chédin, alain; Pondrom, Marc; Pierangelo, Clémence; Armante, Raymond; Crevoisier, Cyril; Crépeau, Laurent; Scott, Noëlle

    2015-04-01

    Observations from infrared hyperspectral sounders, here IASI and AIRS, are interpreted in terms of dust aerosol properties (AOD and mean altitude). The method is based on a "Look-Up-Table" (LUT) approach, where all radiative transfer computation is performed once for all and "off-line", for a large selection of atmospheric situations, of observing conditions, of surface characteristics (in particular the surface emissivity and temperature), and different aerosol refractive index models. The inversion scheme follows two main steps: first, determination of the observed atmospheric thermodynamic situation, second, simultaneous retrieval of the 10µm coarse-mode AOD and of the mean altitude. The method is here applied over sea and over land, at daily scale daytime and nighttime, and at the satellite pixel resolution (12 km at nadir). The geographical study area studied includes the northern tropics from west Atlantic to the Arabian peninsula and Indian ocean, and the Mediterranean basin, all of them characterized by strong, regular dust events. A special focus is given to the hourly variation of aerosol properties within a day. In this context, both IASI overpasses are processed, providing two measurements at 9:30AM and 9:30PM (equator local time) each day. First results obtained from AIRS observations, made at 1:30 AM and PM, open the way to the analysis of the aerosol diurnal cycle. For the AOD, comparisons are made with AERONET ground-based data , when available, in order to 1) evaluate our results, and 2) show the importance of a better knowledge of the aerosol diurnal cycle, especially close to the sources. Mean aerosol layer altitude obtained from IASI is compared at local scale with the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP/CALIPSO) aerosol altitude.

  16. The UARS and EOS Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, J. W.; Read, W. G.; Froidevaux, L.; Jarnot, R. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Flower, D. A.; Lau, G. K.; Pickett, H. M.; Santee, M. L.; Wu, D. L.; Boyles, M. A.; Burke, J. R.; Lay, R. R.; Loo, M. S.; Livesey, N. J.; Lungu, T. A.; Manney, G. L.; Nakamura, L. L.;  Perun, V. S.;  Ridenoure, B. P.;  Shippony, Z.;  Siegel, P. H.;  Thurstans, R. P.;  Harwood, R. S.;  Pumphrey, H. C.;  Filipiak, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) experiments obtain measurements of atmospheric composition, temperature, and pressure by observations of millimeter- and submillimeter-wavelength thermal emission as the instrument field of view is scanned through the atmospheric limb. Features of the measurement technique include the ability to measure many atmospheric gases as well as temperature and pressure, to obtain measurements even in the presence of dense aerosol and cirrus, and to provide near-global coverage on a daily basis at all times of day and night from an orbiting platform. The composition measurements are relatively insensitive to uncertainties in atmospheric temperature. An accurate spectroscopic database is available, and the instrument calibration is also very accurate and stable. The first MLS experiment in space, launched on the (NASA) Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) in September 1991, was designed primarily to measure stratospheric profiles of ClO, O3, H2O, and atmospheric pressure as a vertical reference. Global measurement of ClO, the predominant radical in chlorine destruction of ozone, was an especially important objective of UARS MLS. All objectives of UARS MLS have been accomplished and additional geophysical products beyond those for which the experiment was designed have been obtained, including measurement of upper-tropospheric water vapor, which is important for climate change studies. A follow-on MLS experiment is being developed for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) and is scheduled to be launched on the EOS CHEMISTRY platform in late 2002. EOS MLS is designed for many stratospheric measurements, including HOx radicals, which could not be measured by UARS because adequate technology was not available, and better and more extensive upper-tropospheric and lower-stratospheric measurements.

  17. Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) phase 1. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This report summarizes and documents the results of the 12-month phase 1 work effort. The objective of phase 1 was to establish the conceptional definition of the laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS) sensor system, including accommodations analyses to ensure compatibility with the Space Station Freedom (SSF) and the Earth Observing System (EOS) Polar Orbiting Platform (POP). Various concepts were investigated with trade studies performed to select the configuration to be carried forward to the phase 2 Preliminary Design Definition. A summary of the LAWS system and subsystem trade studies that were performed leading to the baseline design configuration is presented in the appendix. The overall objective of the LAWS Project is to define, design, and implement an operational space based facility, LAWS, for accurate measurement of Earth wind profiles. Phase 1 addressed three major areas: (1) requirements definition; (2) instrument concepts and configurations; and (3) performance analysis. For the LAWS instrument concepts and configurations, the issues which press the technological state of the art are reliable detector lifetime and laser performance and lifetime. Lag angle compensation, pointing accuracy, satellite navigation, and telescope design are significant technical issues, but they are considered to be currently state of the art. The primary issues for performance analysis concern interaction with the atmosphere in terms of backscatter and attenuation, wind variance, and cloud blockage. The phase 1 tasks were formulated to address these significant technical issues and demonstrate the technical feasibility of the LAWS concept. Primary emphasis was placed on analysis/trade and identification of candidate concepts. Promising configurations were evaluated for performance, sensitivities, risks, and budgetary costs. Lockheed's baseline LAWS configuration is presented.

  18. Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) phase 1. Volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-04-01

    This report summarizes and documents the results of the 12-month phase 1 work effort. The objective of phase 1 was to establish the conceptional definition of the laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS) sensor system, including accommodations analyses to ensure compatibility with the Space Station Freedom (SSF) and the Earth Observing System (EOS) Polar Orbiting Platform (POP). Various concepts were investigated with trade studies performed to select the configuration to be carried forward to the phase 2 Preliminary Design Definition. A summary of the LAWS system and subsystem trade studies that were performed leading to the baseline design configuration is presented in the appendix. The overall objective of the LAWS Project is to define, design, and implement an operational space based facility, LAWS, for accurate measurement of Earth wind profiles. Phase 1 addressed three major areas: (1) requirements definition; (2) instrument concepts and configurations; and (3) performance analysis. For the LAWS instrument concepts and configurations, the issues which press the technological state of the art are reliable detector lifetime and laser performance and lifetime. Lag angle compensation, pointing accuracy, satellite navigation, and telescope design are significant technical issues, but they are considered to be currently state of the art. The primary issues for performance analysis concern interaction with the atmosphere in terms of backscatter and attenuation, wind variance, and cloud blockage. The phase 1 tasks were formulated to address these significant technical issues and demonstrate the technical feasibility of the LAWS concept. Primary emphasis was placed on analysis/trade and identification of candidate concepts. Promising configurations were evaluated for performance, sensitivities, risks, and budgetary costs. Lockheed's baseline LAWS configuration is presented.

  19. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder Ozone Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Read, W. G.; Lungu, T. A.; Cofield, R. E.; Fishbein, E. F.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Ridenoure, B. P.; Shippony, Z.; Waters, J. W.; Margitan, J. J.; McDermid, I. S.; Stachnik, R. A.; Peckham, G. E.; Braathen, G.; Deshler, T.; Fishman, J.; Hofmann, D. J.; Oltmans, S. J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the validation of ozone data from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). The MLS ozone retrievals are obtained from the calibrated microwave radiances (emission spectra) in two separate bands, at frequencies near 205 and 183 GHz. Analyses described here focus on the MLS Version 3 data (the first set of files made publicly available). We describe results of simulations performed to assess the quality of the retrieval algorithms, in terms of both mixing ratio and radiance closure. From actual MLS observations, the 205-GHz ozone retrievals give better closure (smaller radiance residuals) than that from the 183-GHz measurements and should be considered more accurate from the calibration aspects. However, the 183-GHz data are less noise limited in the mesosphere and can provide the most useful scientific results in that region. We compare the retrieved 205-GHz ozone profiles in the middle-to lower stratosphere to ozonesonde measurements at a wide range of latitudes and seasons. Ground-based lidar data from Table Mountain, California, provide a good reference for comparisons at higher altitudes. Based on these analyses, comparisons with balloon-borne measurements and others, as well as a detailed budget of estimated uncertainties, MLS results appear to be generally of high quality, with some biases worth mentioning. Results for the lowermost stratosphere (approx. 50 to 100 bPa) are still in need of improvement. A set of estimated precision and accuracy values is derived for the MLS ozone data sets. We also comment on recent updates in the retrieval algorithms and their impact on ozone values.

  20. Mare volcanism: Reinterpretation based on Kaguya Lunar Radar Sounder data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshigami, Shoko; Watanabe, Shiho; Yamaguchi, Yasushi; Yamaji, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Takao; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Ishiyama, Ken; Ono, Takayuki

    2014-05-01

    The Lunar Radar Sounder (LRS) onboard Kaguya (SELENE) detected widespread horizontal reflectors under some nearside maria. Previous studies estimated that the depths of the subsurface reflectors were up to several hundreds of meters and suggested that the reflectors were interfaces between mare basalt units. The comparison between the reflectors detected in the LRS data and surface age maps indicating the formation age of each basalt unit allows us to discuss the lower limit volume of each basalt unit and its space and time variation. We estimated volumes of basalt units in the ages of 2.7 Ga to 3.8 Ga in the nearside maria including Mare Crisium, Mare Humorum, Mare Imbrium, Mare Nectaris, Mare Serenitatis, Mare Smythii, and Oceanus Procellarum. The lower limit volumes of the geologic units estimated in this study were on the order of 103 to 104 km3. This volume range is consistent with the total amount of erupted lava flows derived from numerical simulations of thermal erosion models of lunar sinuous rille formation and is also comparable to the average flow volumes of continental flood basalt units formed after the Paleozoic and calculated flow volumes of Archean komatiite flows on the Earth. The lower limits of average eruption rates estimated from the unit volumes were on the order of 10-5 to 10-3 km3/yr. The estimated volumes of the geologic mare units and average eruption rate showed clear positive correlations with their ages within the same mare basin, while they vary among different maria compared within the same age range.

  1. Development of Liquid Propulsion Systems Testbed at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Reginald; Nelson, Graham

    2016-01-01

    As NASA, the Department of Defense and the aerospace industry in general strive to develop capabilities to explore near-Earth, Cis-lunar and deep space, the need to create more cost effective techniques of propulsion system design, manufacturing and test is imperative in the current budget constrained environment. The physics of space exploration have not changed, but the manner in which systems are developed and certified needs to change if there is going to be any hope of designing and building the high performance liquid propulsion systems necessary to deliver crew and cargo to the further reaches of space. To further the objective of developing these systems, the Marshall Space Flight Center is currently in the process of formulating a Liquid Propulsion Systems testbed, which will enable rapid integration of components to be tested and assessed for performance in integrated systems. The manifestation of this testbed is a breadboard engine configuration (BBE) with facility support for consumables and/or other components as needed. The goal of the facility is to test NASA developed elements, but can be used to test articles developed by other government agencies, industry or academia. Joint government/private partnership is likely the approach that will be required to enable efficient propulsion system development. MSFC has recently tested its own additively manufactured liquid hydrogen pump, injector, and valves in a BBE hot firing. It is rapidly building toward testing the pump and a new CH4 injector in the BBE configuration to demonstrate a 22,000 lbf, pump-fed LO2/LCH4 engine for the Mars lander or in-space transportation. The value of having this BBE testbed is that as components are developed they may be easily integrated in the testbed and tested. MSFC is striving to enhance its liquid propulsion system development capability. Rapid design, analysis, build and test will be critical to fielding the next high thrust rocket engine. With the maturity of the

  2. Assessment of error propagation in ultraspectral sounder data via JPEG2000 compression and turbo coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Donald P.; Wang, Charles C.; Sklar, Dean; Huang, Bormin; Ahuja, Alok

    2005-08-01

    Research has been undertaken to examine the robustness of JPEG2000 when corrupted by transmission bit errors in a satellite data stream. Contemporary and future ultraspectral sounders such as Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS), and Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) generate a large volume of three-dimensional data. Hence, compression of ultraspectral sounder data will facilitate data transmission and archiving. There is a need for lossless or near-lossless compression of ultraspectral sounder data to avoid potential retrieval degradation of geophysical parameters due to lossy compression. This paper investigates the simulated error propagation in AIRS ultraspectral sounder data with advanced source and channel coding in a satellite data stream. The source coding is done via JPEG2000, the latest International Organization for Standardization (ISO)/International Telecommunication Union (ITU) standard for image compression. After JPEG2000 compression the AIRS ultraspectral sounder data is then error correction encoded using a rate 0.954 turbo product code (TPC) for channel error control. Experimental results of error patterns on both channel and source decoding are presented. The error propagation effects are curbed via the block-based protection mechanism in the JPEG2000 codec as well as memory characteristics of the forward error correction (FEC) scheme to contain decoding errors within received blocks. A single nonheader bit error in a source code block tends to contaminate the bits until the end of the source code block before the inverse discrete wavelet transform (IDWT), and those erroneous bits propagate even further after the IDWT. Furthermore, a single header bit error may result in the corruption of almost the entire decompressed granule. JPEG2000 appears vulnerable to bit errors in a noisy channel of

  3. How Well Can Infrared Sounders Observe the Atmosphere and Surface Through Clouds?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.; Strow, L. Larrabee; Yang, Ping

    2010-01-01

    Infrared sounders, such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared sounder (CrIS), have a cloud-impenetrable disadvantage in observing the atmosphere and surface under opaque cloudy conditions. However, recent studies indicate that hyperspectral, infrared sounders have the ability to detect cloud effective-optical and microphysical properties and to penetrate optically thin clouds in observing the atmosphere and surface to a certain degree. We have developed a retrieval scheme dealing with atmospheric conditions with cloud presence. This scheme can be used to analyze the retrieval accuracy of atmospheric and surface parameters under clear and cloudy conditions. In this paper, we present the surface emissivity results derived from IASI global measurements under both clear and cloudy conditions. The accuracy of surface emissivity derived under cloudy conditions is statistically estimated in comparison with those derived under clear sky conditions. The retrieval error caused by the clouds is shown as a function of cloud optical depth, which helps us to understand how well infrared sounders can observe the atmosphere and surface through clouds.

  4. Field-aligned electron density irregularities near 500 km Equator to polar cap topside sounder observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    In addition to spread F, evidence for field-aligned electron density irregularities is commonly observed on Alouette 2 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee (500 km). This evidence is provided by distinctive signal returns from sounder-generated Z mode waves. At low latitudes these waves become guided in wave ducts caused by field-aligned electron density irregularities and give rise to strong long-duration echoes. At high latitudes, extending well into the polar cap, these Z mode waves (and stimulated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency) produce a series of vertical bars on the ionogram display as the satellite traverses discrete field-aligned density structures. The radio frequency (RF) noise environment to be expected in the 400 to 500 km altitude region from low to high latitudes was examined by analyzing perigee Alouette 2 topside sounder data. All observed noise bands were scaled on nearly 200 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee at low, mid, and high latitude telemetry stations. The minimum and maximum frequencies of each noise band were entered into a data base or computer analysis. The signals of primary interest in the perigee study were found to be sounder-generated.

  5. Sounder-updated statistical model predictions of maximum usable frequency for HF sky wave predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, M. H.; Daehler, M.

    1985-10-01

    Measured solar parameters, such as sunspot number or 10.7 cm flux, have traditionally been used as inputs to drive statistical model predictions of maximum usable frequencies (MUFs) on HF radio sky wave paths of interest. Much greater accuracy can be obtained by using ionospheric sounder inputs to drive or update statistical model predictions, and this is demonstrated here using oblique-incidence sounder data from the DoD Solid Shield exercises on May 12-14, 1981. From analysis of ionograms collected for several paths every fifteen minutes, it is found that deployment of a reasonable number of sounders in a large area, in order to update the simple statistical model, MINIMUF, yields MUF prediction capability on unsounded communication paths in the area within 0.4 MHz rms error. This value is obtained from real-time updating and a spatial interpolation process developed here, whereby data at sounder control points is interpolated to ionospheric reflection points for communication paths of interest. The results from the interpolation are found to be at least 20-30% more accurate than updating at any one of the nearby sounder control points. The updating procedure applies under day and night conditions, and also works well in a forecasting mode (not real-time), where it is found to work better in this case than a statistical trend line approach for daytime forecasting.

  6. TIDDBIT HF Doppler Sounder Measurements of TIDs During the Wallops Island Rocket Launch of October 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, A.; Crowley, G.; Rodrigues, F.; Earle, G.; Bullett, T.; Bishop, R.

    2008-12-01

    The TID Detector Built In Texas (TIDDBIT) sounder was deployed on the East Coast near Wallops Island to support a rocket launch in October 2007. The purpose of the rocket experiment was to study mid-latitude spread-F (MSF), and TIDDBIT provided information on the TID characteristics during the launch and for several days surrounding the launch. The sounder data confirm that waves were present during the rocket launch. This presentation reviews the TIDDBIT results from the experiment, contrasting data collected on different days, and from the same dates a year earlier. HF Doppler sounders represent a low-cost and low- maintenance solution for monitoring acoustic and gravity wave activity in the F-region ionosphere. HF Doppler sounders together with modern data analysis techniques provide both horizontal and vertical phase trace velocities across the entire TID spectrum from periods of 30-s to several hours. ASTRA has extensive experience with HF systems, and is currently building TIDDBIT sounders in New Mexico, and Peru.

  7. Role of the advanced IR sounder in land surface remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuteson, Robert O.

    2005-09-01

    A new era of Earth remote sensing began with the launch of the NASA EOS Aqua platform with the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) in May 2002. The EOS AIRS instrument is the first in a series of high spectral resolution infrared spectrometers that will allow improved characterization of the global atmospheric temperature and water vapor structure. Follow-on operational sensors with similar sounding capability include the Cross-track InfraRed Sounder (CrIS) on the NPP/NPOESS satellites and the Infrared Advanced Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the European METOP series. These so-called advanced infrared sounders will have a vital role to play in the remote sensing of land ecosystems. This paper describes how the use of Advanced IR Sounder data can be used to improve the accuracy of atmospheric corrections in the thermal IR and provide detailed information on the spectral dependence of the infrared land surface emissivity. Radiance observations from AIRS have been obtained over a large, uniform sandy desert region in the Libyan Desert suitable for evaluation of the 15-km footprints of the NASA AIRS advanced sounder. Analysis of this data indicates a spectral contrast of more than 30% between 12 mm and 9 mm in the surface infrared emissivity due to the presence of the mineral quartz with somewhat smaller contrast at 4 mm. Results of a method for separation of infrared surface emissivity and effective surface skin temperature are presented also.

  8. Satellite-based Hyperspectral Sounder Retrievals in Real-time Weather Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, E.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    Real-time weather monitoring and forecasting abilities have significantly improved by the new generation of weather satellites, which provide routine access to observations and atmospheric data. In addition of providing visual images, satellite-based instrumentation also provide spectral radiance data that allow the computation of atmospheric temperature, moisture and trace gas profiles and other geophysical variables including cloud parameters. Hyperspectral sounders, AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder), IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) and CrIS (Cross-track Infrared Sounder) on low-Earth orbiting satellites, provide atmospheric profiles on a global scale with the spatial and temporal resolution needed to complement traditional profile data sources such as that obtained by radiosondes. The goal of this paper is to describe the information that hyperspectral sounders are capable of adding to weather monitoring and short-term forecasting systems. Retrievals derived from all four operational sounders are used in time-series to describe the pre-convective environment (including moisture advection and stability tendencies) antecedent to the initiation of severe weather. Temporal and spatial consistency and continuity is achieved among different instruments on different platforms through the use of a single atmospheric profile retrieval algorithm. Our results demonstrate the utility of using hyperspectral sounding products from multiple satellites for the real-time weather monitoring/prediction operation.

  9. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knerr, T. J.; Schaffner, P. R.; Mielke, R. R.; Gilreath, M. C.

    1980-01-01

    A procedure for numerically calculating radiation patterns of fuselage-mounted airborne antennas using the Volumetric Pattern Analysis Program is presented. Special attention is given to aircraft modeling. An actual case study involving a large commercial aircraft is included to illustrate the analysis procedure.

  10. Recognizing Airborne Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Christian M.

    1990-01-01

    The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in older buildings often do not adequately handle air-borne contaminants. Outlines a three-stage Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) assessment and describes a case in point at a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, school. (MLF)

  11. Airborne Fraunhofer Line Discriminator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, F. C.; Markle, D. A.

    1969-01-01

    Airborne Fraunhofer Line Discriminator enables prospecting for fluorescent materials, hydrography with fluorescent dyes, and plant studies based on fluorescence of chlorophyll. Optical unit design is the coincidence of Fraunhofer lines in the solar spectrum occurring at the characteristic wavelengths of some fluorescent materials.

  12. Airborne Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA imaging technology has provided the basis for a commercial agricultural reconnaissance service. AG-RECON furnishes information from airborne sensors, aerial photographs and satellite and ground databases to farmers, foresters, geologists, etc. This service produces color "maps" of Earth conditions, which enable clients to detect crop color changes or temperature changes that may indicate fire damage or pest stress problems.

  13. The computational structural mechanics testbed generic structural-element processor manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Gary M.; Nour-Omid, Shahram

    1990-01-01

    The usage and development of structural finite element processors based on the CSM Testbed's Generic Element Processor (GEP) template is documented. By convention, such processors have names of the form ESi, where i is an integer. This manual is therefore intended for both Testbed users who wish to invoke ES processors during the course of a structural analysis, and Testbed developers who wish to construct new element processors (or modify existing ones).

  14. Sensor Networking Testbed with IEEE 1451 Compatibility and Network Performance Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurkan, Deniz; Yuan, X.; Benhaddou, D.; Figueroa, F.; Morris, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Design and implementation of a testbed for testing and verifying IEEE 1451-compatible sensor systems with network performance monitoring is of significant importance. The performance parameters measurement as well as decision support systems implementation will enhance the understanding of sensor systems with plug-and-play capabilities. The paper will present the design aspects for such a testbed environment under development at University of Houston in collaboration with NASA Stennis Space Center - SSST (Smart Sensor System Testbed).

  15. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  16. Spacelab system analysis: A study of the Marshall Avionics System Testbed (MAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingels, Frank M.; Owens, John K.; Daniel, Steven P.; Ahmad, F.; Couvillion, W.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of the Marshall Avionics Systems Testbed (MAST) communications requirements is presented. The average offered load for typical nodes is estimated. Suitable local area networks are determined.

  17. Communications, Navigation, and Network Reconfigurable Test-bed Flight Hardware Compatibility Test S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Communications, Navigation, and Network Reconfigurable Test-bed Flight Hardware Compatibility Test Sets and Networks Integration Management Office Testing for the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System

  18. Wavefront Amplitude Variation of TPF's High Contrast Imaging Testbed: Modeling and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Fang; Lowman, Andrew E.; Moody, Dwight C.; Niessner, Albert F.; Trauger, John T.

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of wavefront amplitude is as important as the knowledge of phase for a coronagraphic high contrast imaging system. Efforts have been made to understand various contributions of the amplitude variation in Terrestrial Planet Finder's (TPF) High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT). Modeling of HCIT with as-built mirror surfaces has shown an amplitude variation of 1.3% due to the phase-amplitude mixing for the testbed's front-end optics. Experimental measurements on the testbed have shown the amplitude variation is about 2.5% with the testbed's illumination pattern has a major contribution as the low order amplitude variation.

  19. FMCW channel sounder with digital processing for measuring the coherence of wideband HF radio links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salous, S.

    1986-08-01

    Multipath propagation, and in particular, the interference between the ordinary and the extraordinary waves, places a fundamental constraint on the performance of wideband HF skywave radio links. Furthermore, the dispersive nature of ionospheric propagation causes phase nonlinearity and hence distortion of narrow pulses. In this paper, an FMCW wideband sounder built for the purposes of characterizing the channel is described. Spectral analysis of the audio output of the sounder via the FFT algorithm is shown to permit measurement of thef amplitude/frequency function, the polarization bandwidth, the fade rate, the fade depth and the distortion of a narrow pulse, all for a desired isolated ionospheric propagation mode. The sounder was used to collect data over an oblique path in the UK. The results of applying the FFT processing technique to the experimental data are presented.

  20. COLUMBUS as Engineering Testbed for Communications and Multimedia Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bank, C.; Anspach von Broecker, G. O.; Kolloge, H.-G.; Richters, M.; Rauer, D.; Urban, G.; Canovai, G.; Oesterle, E.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents ongoing activities to prepare COLUMBUS for communications and multimedia technology experiments. For this purpose, Astrium SI, Bremen, has studied several options how to best combine the given system architecture with flexible and state-of-the-art interface avionics and software. These activities have been conducted in coordination with, and partially under contract of, DLR and ESA/ESTEC. Moreover, Astrium SI has realized three testbeds for multimedia software and hardware testing under own funding. The experimental core avionics unit - about a half double rack - establishes the core of a new multi-user experiment facility for this type of investigation onboard COLUMBUS, which shall be available to all users of COLUMBUS. It allows for the connection of 2nd generation payload, that is payload requiring broadband data transfer and near-real-time access by the Principal Investigator on ground, to test highly interactive and near-realtime payload operation. The facility is also foreseen to test new equipment to provide the astronauts onboard the ISS/COLUMBUS with bi- directional hi-fi voice and video connectivity to ground, private voice coms and e-mail, and a multimedia workstation for ops training and recreation. Connection to an appropriate Wide Area Network (WAN) on Earth is possible. The facility will include a broadband data transmission front-end terminal, which is mounted externally on the COLUMBUS module. This Equipment provides high flexibility due to the complete transparent transmit and receive chains, the steerable multi-frequency antenna system and its own thermal and power control and distribution. The Equipment is monitored and controlled via the COLUMBUS internal facility. It combines several new hardware items, which are newly developed for the next generation of broadband communication satellites and operates in Ka -Band with the experimental ESA data relay satellite ARTEMIS. The equipment is also TDRSS compatible; the open loop

  1. Ultraspectral Infrared Measurements from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Aqua measures the Earth's water cycle, energy fluxes, vegetation and temperatures. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB) were launched on the EOS Aqua spacecraft in May 2002. AIRS has had good radiometric and spectral sensitivity, stability, and accuracy and is suitable for climate studies. Temperature products compare well with radiosondes and models over the limited test range (|LAT| less than 40 degrees). Early trace gas products demonstrate the potential of AIRS. NASA is developing the next generation of hyperspectral IR imagers. JPL is ready to participate with US government agencies and US industry to transfer AIRS technology and science experience.

  2. Automatic Integration Testbeds validation on Open Science Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, J.; Thapa, S.; Gardner, R.; Potekhin, M.

    2011-12-01

    A recurring challenge in deploying high quality production middleware is the extent to which realistic testing occurs before release of the software into the production environment. We describe here an automated system for validating releases of the Open Science Grid software stack that leverages the (pilot-based) PanDA job management system developed and used by the ATLAS experiment. The system was motivated by a desire to subject the OSG Integration Testbed to more realistic validation tests. In particular those which resemble to every extent possible actual job workflows used by the experiments thus utilizing job scheduling at the compute element (CE), use of the worker node execution environment, transfer of data to/from the local storage element (SE), etc. The context is that candidate releases of OSG compute and storage elements can be tested by injecting large numbers of synthetic jobs varying in complexity and coverage of services tested. The native capabilities of the PanDA system can thus be used to define jobs, monitor their execution, and archive the resulting run statistics including success and failure modes. A repository of generic workflows and job types to measure various metrics of interest has been created. A command-line toolset has been developed so that testbed managers can quickly submit "VO-like" jobs into the system when newly deployed services are ready for testing. A system for automatic submission has been crafted to send jobs to integration testbed sites, collecting the results in a central service and generating regular reports for performance and reliability.

  3. EXPERT: An atmospheric re-entry test-bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massobrio, F.; Viotto, R.; Serpico, M.; Sansone, A.; Caporicci, M.; Muylaert, J.-M.

    2007-06-01

    In recognition of the importance of an independent European access to the International Space Station (ISS) and in preparation for the future needs of exploration missions, ESA is conducting parallel activities to generate flight data using atmospheric re-entry test-beds and to identify vehicle design solutions for human and cargo transportation vehicles serving the ISS and beyond. The EXPERT (European eXPErimental Re-entry Test-bed) vehicle represents the major on-going development in the first class of activities. Its results may also benefit in due time scientific missions to planets with an atmosphere and future reusable launcher programmes. The objective of EXPERT is to provide a test-bed for the validation of aerothermodynamics models, codes and ground test facilities in a representative flight environment, to improve the understanding of issues related to analysis, testing and extrapolation to flight. The vehicle will be launched on a sub-orbital trajectory using a Volna missile. The EXPERT concept is based on a symmetrical re-entry capsule whose shape is composed of simple geometrical elements. The suborbital trajectory will reach 120 km altitude and a re-entry velocity of 5 6km/s. The dimensions of the capsule are 1.6 m high and 1.3 m diameter; the overall mass is in the range of 250 350kg, depending upon the mission parameters and the payload/instrumentation complement. A consistent number of scientific experiments are foreseen on-board, from innovative air data system to shock wave/boundary layer interaction, from sharp hot structures characterisation to natural and induced regime transition. Currently the project is approaching completion of the phase B, with Alenia Spazio leading the industrial team and CIRA coordinating the scientific payload development under ESA contract.

  4. The Living With a Star Space Environment Testbed Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The focus of the Living With a Star (LWS) Space Environment Testbed (SET) program is to improve the performance of hardware in the space radiation environment. The program has developed a payload for the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Demonstration and Science Experiments (DSX) spacecraft that is scheduled for launch in August 2015 on the SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket. The primary structure of DSX is an Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) Secondary Payload Adapter (ESPA) ring. DSX will be in a Medium Earth Orbit (MEO). This oral presentation will describe the SET payload.

  5. CCPP-ARM Parameterization Testbed Model Forecast Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Klein, Stephen

    2008-01-15

    Dataset contains the NCAR CAM3 (Collins et al., 2004) and GFDL AM2 (GFDL GAMDT, 2004) forecast data at locations close to the ARM research sites. These data are generated from a series of multi-day forecasts in which both CAM3 and AM2 are initialized at 00Z every day with the ECMWF reanalysis data (ERA-40), for the year 1997 and 2000 and initialized with both the NASA DAO Reanalyses and the NCEP GDAS data for the year 2004. The DOE CCPP-ARM Parameterization Testbed (CAPT) project assesses climate models using numerical weather prediction techniques in conjunction with high quality field measurements (e.g. ARM data).

  6. The CSM testbed matrix processors internal logic and dataflow descriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regelbrugge, Marc E.; Wright, Mary A.

    1988-01-01

    This report constitutes the final report for subtask 1 of Task 5 of NASA Contract NAS1-18444, Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) Research. This report contains a detailed description of the coded workings of selected CSM Testbed matrix processors (i.e., TOPO, K, INV, SSOL) and of the arithmetic utility processor AUS. These processors and the current sparse matrix data structures are studied and documented. Items examined include: details of the data structures, interdependence of data structures, data-blocking logic in the data structures, processor data flow and architecture, and processor algorithmic logic flow.

  7. EMERGE - ESnet/MREN Regional Science Grid Experimental NGI Testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Mambretti, Joe; DeFanti, Tom; Brown, Maxine

    2001-07-31

    This document is the final report on the EMERGE Science Grid testbed research project from the perspective of the International Center for Advanced Internet Research (iCAIR) at Northwestern University, which was a subcontractor to this UIC project. This report is a compilation of information gathered from a variety of materials related to this project produced by multiple EMERGE participants, especially those at Electronic Visualization Lab (EVL) at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), Argonne National Lab and iCAIR. The EMERGE Science Grid project was managed by Tom DeFanti, PI from EVL at UIC.

  8. The Advanced Orbiting Systems Testbed Program: Results to date

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otranto, John F.; Newsome, Penny A.

    1994-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Recommendations for Packet Telemetry (PT) and Advanced Orbiting Systems (AOS) propose standard solutions to data handling problems common to many types of space missions. The Recommendations address only space/ground and space/space data handling systems. Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC's) AOS Testbed (AOST) Program was initiated to better understand the Recommendations and their impact on real-world systems, and to examine the extended domain of ground/ground data handling systems. The results and products of the Program will reduce the uncertainties associated with the development of operational space and ground systems that implement the Recommendations.

  9. Experimental validation of docking and capture using space robotics testbeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spofford, John

    Docking concepts include capture, berthing, and docking. The definitions of these terms, consistent with AIAA, are as follows: (1) capture (grasping)--the use of a manipulator to make initial contact and attachment between transfer vehicle and a platform; (2) berthing--positioning of a transfer vehicle or payload into platform restraints using a manipulator; and (3) docking--propulsive mechanical connection between vehicle and platform. The combination of the capture and berthing operations is effectively the same as docking; i.e., capture (grasping) + berthing = docking. These concepts are discussed in terms of Martin Marietta's ability to develop validation methods using robotics testbeds.

  10. The Living With a Star Program Space Environment Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the objective, approach, and scope of the Living With a Star (LWS) program at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Scientists involved in the project seek to refine the understanding of space weather and the role of solar variability in terrestrial climate change. Research and the development of improved analytic methods have led to increased predictive capabilities and the improvement of environment specification models. Specifically, the Space Environment Testbed (SET) project of LWS is responsible for the implementation of improved engineering approaches to observing solar effects on climate change. This responsibility includes technology development, ground test protocol development, and the development of a technology application model/engineering tool.

  11. Software Testbed for Developing and Evaluating Integrated Autonomous Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, James; Remolina, Emilio; Prompt, Axel; Robinson, Peter; Sweet, Adam; Nishikawa, David

    2015-01-01

    To implement fault tolerant autonomy in future space systems, it will be necessary to integrate planning, adaptive control, and state estimation subsystems. However, integrating these subsystems is difficult, time-consuming, and error-prone. This paper describes Intelliface/ADAPT, a software testbed that helps researchers develop and test alternative strategies for integrating planning, execution, and diagnosis subsystems more quickly and easily. The testbed's architecture, graphical data displays, and implementations of the integrated subsystems support easy plug and play of alternate components to support research and development in fault-tolerant control of autonomous vehicles and operations support systems. Intelliface/ADAPT controls NASA's Advanced Diagnostics and Prognostics Testbed (ADAPT), which comprises batteries, electrical loads (fans, pumps, and lights), relays, circuit breakers, invertors, and sensors. During plan execution, an experimentor can inject faults into the ADAPT testbed by tripping circuit breakers, changing fan speed settings, and closing valves to restrict fluid flow. The diagnostic subsystem, based on NASA's Hybrid Diagnosis Engine (HyDE), detects and isolates these faults to determine the new state of the plant, ADAPT. Intelliface/ADAPT then updates its model of the ADAPT system's resources and determines whether the current plan can be executed using the reduced resources. If not, the planning subsystem generates a new plan that reschedules tasks, reconfigures ADAPT, and reassigns the use of ADAPT resources as needed to work around the fault. The resource model, planning domain model, and planning goals are expressed using NASA's Action Notation Modeling Language (ANML). Parts of the ANML model are generated automatically, and other parts are constructed by hand using the Planning Model Integrated Development Environment, a visual Eclipse-based IDE that accelerates ANML model development. Because native ANML planners are currently

  12. Phoenix Missile Hypersonic Testbed (PMHT): Project Concept Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Thomas P.

    2007-01-01

    An over view of research into a low cost hypersonic research flight test capability to increase the amount of hypersonic flight data to help bridge the large developmental gap between ground testing/analysis and major flight demonstrator Xplanes is provided. The major objectives included: develop an air launched missile booster research testbed; accurately deliver research payloads through programmable guidance to hypersonic test conditions; low cost; a high flight rate minimum of two flights per year and utilize surplus air launched missiles and NASA aircraft.

  13. Experimental validation of docking and capture using space robotics testbeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spofford, John

    1991-01-01

    Docking concepts include capture, berthing, and docking. The definitions of these terms, consistent with AIAA, are as follows: (1) capture (grasping)--the use of a manipulator to make initial contact and attachment between transfer vehicle and a platform; (2) berthing--positioning of a transfer vehicle or payload into platform restraints using a manipulator; and (3) docking--propulsive mechanical connection between vehicle and platform. The combination of the capture and berthing operations is effectively the same as docking; i.e., capture (grasping) + berthing = docking. These concepts are discussed in terms of Martin Marietta's ability to develop validation methods using robotics testbeds.

  14. SCaN Testbed Software Development and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacpura, Thomas J.; Varga, Denise M.

    2012-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed an on-orbit, adaptable, Software Defined Radio (SDR)Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS)-based testbed facility to conduct a suite of experiments to advance technologies, reduce risk, and enable future mission capabilities on the International Space Station (ISS). The SCAN Testbed Project will provide NASA, industry, other Government agencies, and academic partners the opportunity to develop and field communications, navigation, and networking technologies in the laboratory and space environment based on reconfigurable, SDR platforms and the STRS Architecture.The SDRs are a new technology for NASA, and the support infrastructure they require is different from legacy, fixed function radios. SDRs offer the ability to reconfigure on-orbit communications by changing software for new waveforms and operating systems to enable new capabilities or fix any anomalies, which was not a previous option. They are not stand alone devices, but required a new approach to effectively control them and flow data. This requires extensive software to be developed to utilize the full potential of these reconfigurable platforms. The paper focuses on development, integration and testing as related to the avionics processor system, and the software required to command, control, monitor, and interact with the SDRs, as well as the other communication payload elements. An extensive effort was required to develop the flight software and meet the NASA requirements for software quality and safety. The flight avionics must be radiation tolerant, and these processors have limited capability in comparison to terrestrial counterparts. A big challenge was that there are three SDRs onboard, and interfacing with multiple SDRs simultaneously complicatesd the effort. The effort also includes ground software, which is a key element for both the command of the payload, and displaying data created by the payload. The verification of

  15. Performance of the PARCS Testbed Cesium Fountain Frequency Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enzer, Daphna G.; Klipstein, William M.

    2004-01-01

    A cesium fountain frequency standard has been developed as a ground testbed for the PARCS (Primary Atomic Reference Clock in Space) experiment, an experiment intended to fly on the International Space Station. We report on the performance of the fountain and describe some of the implementations motivated in large part by flight considerations, but of relevance for ground fountains. In particular, we report on a new technique for delivering cooling and trapping laser beams to the atom collection region, in which a given beam is recirculated three times effectively providing much more optical power than traditional configurations. Allan deviations down to 10 have been achieved with this method.

  16. The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed: Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    We present recent results from the Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT). The data acquired with the WIIT is "double Fourier" data, including both spatial and spectral information within each data cube. We have been working with this data, and starting to develop algorithms, implementations, and techniques for reducing this data. Such algorithms and tools are of great importance for a number of proposed future missions, including the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT), the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS), and the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPF-I)/Darwin. Recent results are discussed and future study directions are described.

  17. [Air-borne disease].

    PubMed

    Lameiro Vilariño, Carmen; del Campo Pérez, Victor M; Alonso Bürger, Susana; Felpeto Nodar, Irene; Guimarey Pérez, Rosa; Pérez Alvarellos, Alberto

    2003-11-01

    Respiratory protection is a factor which worries nursing professionals who take care of patients susceptible of transmitting microorganisms through the air more as every day passes. This type of protection covers the use of surgical or hygienic masks against the transmission of infection by airborne drops to the use of highly effective masks or respirators against the transmission of airborne diseases such as tuberculosis or SARS, a recently discovered disease. The adequate choice of this protective device and its correct use are fundamental in order to have an effective protection for exposed personnel. The authors summarize the main protective respiratory devices used by health workers, their characteristics and degree of effectiveness, as well as the circumstances under which each device is indicated for use. PMID:14705591

  18. Airborne forest fire research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattingly, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research relating to airborne fire fighting systems is reviewed to provide NASA/Langley Research Center with current information on the use of aircraft in forest fire operations, and to identify research requirements for future operations. A literature survey, interview of forest fire service personnel, analysis and synthesis of data from research reports and independent conclusions, and recommendations for future NASA-LRC programs are included.

  19. MLS airborne antenna research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C. L.; Burnside, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The geometrical theory of diffraction was used to analyze the elevation plane pattern of on-aircraft antennas. The radiation patterns for basic elements (infinitesimal dipole, circumferential and axial slot) mounted on fuselage of various aircrafts with or without radome included were calculated and compared well with experimental results. Error phase plots were also presented. The effects of radiation patterns and error phase plots on the polarization selection for the MLS airborne antenna are discussed.

  20. Recent Airborne Radar Depth Sounding of Recovery Glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jilu; Gogineni, Sivaprasad; Yan, Stephen; Mahmood, Ali; Awasthi, Abhishek; Rodriguez-Morales, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    Recovery Glacier in East Antarctica drains a large volume of ice into Filchner Ice Shelf towards Weddell Sea. The existence of several subglacial lakes beneath the channel has been speculated based on satellite observations of elevation changes on the ice surface. Because of its important role in East Antarctic ice mass balance and its unique function in the ice-flow dynamics of Recovery Ice Stream, two NASA Operation IceBridge (OIB) missions have been flown over Recovery Glacier, the first in October 2012 and the second in October 2014. The airborne radar depth sounder (RDS) data collected during these two missions by the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) Multi-channel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder/Imager (MCoRDS/I) have revealed both the presence of a very deep channel and its complex shape, data that contribute to the study of the ice-flow dynamics of the glacier and estimations of its mass balance. In this paper, we will report the results of measurements collected during the 2014 Antarctica DC-8 mission for OIB. Data were collected using an improved version of the CReSIS MCoRDS/I. We increased transmit power to each element of the transmit-array from about 200 W to 1000 W and increased the chirp bandwidth to 50 MHz, compared to 9.5 MHz used in earlier OIB missions. These improvements have led to a more complete mapping of the deepest part of the channel, which is more than 3.7 km deep, and fine-resolution mapping of internal layers. Our preliminary analysis of radar echoes does not indicate the presence of water or a wet surface in subglacier lakes. This paper presents an overview of the radar system, results from our recent measurements, and analysis of these results.

  1. Airborne field strength monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredemeyer, J.; Kleine-Ostmann, T.; Schrader, T.; Münter, K.; Ritter, J.

    2007-06-01

    In civil and military aviation, ground based navigation aids (NAVAIDS) are still crucial for flight guidance even though the acceptance of satellite based systems (GNSS) increases. Part of the calibration process for NAVAIDS (ILS, DME, VOR) is to perform a flight inspection according to specified methods as stated in a document (DOC8071, 2000) by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). One major task is to determine the coverage, or, in other words, the true signal-in-space field strength of a ground transmitter. This has always been a challenge to flight inspection up to now, since, especially in the L-band (DME, 1GHz), the antenna installed performance was known with an uncertainty of 10 dB or even more. In order to meet ICAO's required accuracy of ±3 dB it is necessary to have a precise 3-D antenna factor of the receiving antenna operating on the airborne platform including all losses and impedance mismatching. Introducing precise, effective antenna factors to flight inspection to achieve the required accuracy is new and not published in relevant papers yet. The authors try to establish a new balanced procedure between simulation and validation by airborne and ground measurements. This involves the interpretation of measured scattering parameters gained both on the ground and airborne in comparison with numerical results obtained by the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) accelerated method of moments (MoM) using a complex geometric model of the aircraft. First results will be presented in this paper.

  2. Mutagenicity of airborne particles.

    PubMed

    Chrisp, C E; Fisher, G L

    1980-09-01

    The physical and chemical properties of airborne particles are important for the interpretation of their potential biologic significance as genotoxic hazards. For polydisperse particle size distributions, the smallest, most respirable particles are generally the most mutagenic. Particulate collection for testing purposes should be designed to reduce artifact formation and allow condensation of mutagenic compounds. Other critical factors such as UV irradiation, wind direction, chemical reactivity, humidity, sample storage, and temperature of combustion are important. Application of chemical extraction methods and subsequent class fractionation techniques influence the observed mutagenic activity. Particles from urban air, coal fly ash, automobile and diesel exhaust, agricultural burning and welding fumes contain primarily direct-acting mutagens. Cigarette smoke condensate, smoke from charred meat and protein pyrolysates, kerosene soot and cigarette smoke condensates contain primarily mutagens which require metabolic activation. Fractionation coupled with mutagenicity testing indicates that the most potent mutagens are found in the acidic fractions of urban air, coal fly ash, and automobile diesel exhaust, whereas mutagens in rice straw smoke and cigarette smoke condensate are found primarily in the basic fractions. The interaction of the many chemical compounds in complex mixtures from airborne particles is likely to be important in determining mutagenic or comutagenic potentials. Because the mode of exposure is generally frequent and prolonged, the presence of tumor-promoting agents in complex mixtures may be a major factor in evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of airborne particles. PMID:7005667

  3. Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods

    DOEpatents

    Deaton, Juan D.; Schmitt, Michael J.; Jones, Warren F.

    2011-12-13

    An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

  4. PORT: A Testbed Paradigm for On-line Digital Archive Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Mary; Kloesel, Christian

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the Peirce On-line Resource Testbed (PORT), a digital archive of primary data. Highlights include knowledge processing testbeds for digital resource development; Peirce's pragmatism in operation; PORT and knowledge processing; obstacles to archive access; and PORT as a paradigm for critical control in knowledge processing. (AEF)

  5. 77 FR 18793 - Spectrum Sharing Innovation Test-Bed Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... Pilot Program, 73 FR 76,002 (Dec. 15, 2008). \\3\\ The final Phase I test plan and additional information... National Telecommunications and Information Administration Spectrum Sharing Innovation Test-Bed Pilot... conduct in Phase II/III of the Spectrum Sharing Innovation Test-Bed pilot program to assess...

  6. Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final technical report for NASA-Ames grant NAG2-1068 to Caltech, entitled "Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy", which extended over the period May 1, 1996 through January 31, 1998. The grant was funded by the NASA airborne astronomy program, during a period of time after the Kuiper Airborne Observatory was no longer operational. Instead. this funding program was intended to help develop instrument concepts and technology for the upcoming SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) project. SOFIA, which is funded by NASA and is now being carried out by a consortium lead by USRA (Universities Space Research Association), will be a 747 aircraft carrying a 2.5 meter diameter telescope. The purpose of our grant was to fund the ongoing development of sensitive heterodyne receivers for the submillimeter band (500-1200 GHz), using sensitive superconducting (SIS) detectors. In 1997 July we submitted a proposal to USRA to construct a heterodyne instrument for SOFIA. Our proposal was successful [1], and we are now continuing our airborne astronomy effort with funding from USRA. A secondary purpose of the NAG2-1068 grant was to continue the anaIN'sis of astronomical data collected with an earlier instrument which was flown on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The KAO instrument and the astronomical studies which were carried out with it were supported primarily under another grant, NAG2-744, which extended over October 1, 1991 through Januarv 31, 1997. For a complete description of the astronomical data and its anailysis, we refer the reader to the final technical report for NAG2-744, which was submitted to NASA on December 1. 1997. Here we report on the SIS detector development effort for SOFIA carried out under NAG2-1068. The main result of this effort has been the demonstration of SIS mixers using a new superconducting material niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN), which promises to deliver dramatic improvements in sensitivity in the 700

  7. Development of optical packet and circuit integrated ring network testbed.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hideaki; Harai, Hiroaki; Miyazawa, Takaya; Shinada, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Wataru; Wada, Naoya

    2011-12-12

    We developed novel integrated optical packet and circuit switch-node equipment. Compared with our previous equipment, a polarization-independent 4 × 4 semiconductor optical amplifier switch subsystem, gain-controlled optical amplifiers, and one 100 Gbps optical packet transponder and seven 10 Gbps optical path transponders with 10 Gigabit Ethernet (10GbE) client-interfaces were newly installed in the present system. The switch and amplifiers can provide more stable operation without equipment adjustments for the frequent polarization-rotations and dynamic packet-rate changes of optical packets. We constructed an optical packet and circuit integrated ring network testbed consisting of two switch nodes for accelerating network development, and we demonstrated 66 km fiber transmission and switching operation of multiplexed 14-wavelength 10 Gbps optical paths and 100 Gbps optical packets encapsulating 10GbE frames. Error-free (frame error rate < 1×10(-4)) operation was achieved with optical packets of various packet lengths and packet rates, and stable operation of the network testbed was confirmed. In addition, 4K uncompressed video streaming over OPS links was successfully demonstrated. PMID:22274025

  8. Off-road perception testbed vehicle design and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spofford, John R.; Herron, Jennifer B.; Anhalt, David J.; Morgenthaler, Matthew K.; DeHerrera, Clinton

    2003-09-01

    Off-road robotics efforts such as DARPA"s PerceptOR program have motivated the development of testbed vehicles capable of sustained operation in a variety of terrain and environments. This paper describes the retrofitting of a minimally-modified ATV chassis into such a testbed which has been used by multiple programs for autonomous mobility development and sensor characterization. Modular mechanical interfaces for sensors and equipment enclosures enabled integration of multiple payload configurations. The electric power subsystem was capable of short-term operation on batteries with refueled generation for continuous operation. Processing subsystems were mounted in sealed, shock-dampened enclosures with heat exchangers for internal cooling to protect against external dust and moisture. The computational architecture was divided into a real-time vehicle control layer and an expandable high level processing and perception layer. The navigation subsystem integrated real time kinematic GPS with a three-axis IMU for accurate vehicle localization and sensor registration. The vehicle software system was based on the MarsScape architecture developed under DARPA"s MARS program. Vehicle mobility software capabilities included route planning, waypoint navigation, teleoperation, and obstacle detection and avoidance. The paper describes the vehicle design in detail and summarizes its performance during field testing.

  9. Benchmarking Diagnostic Algorithms on an Electrical Power System Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtoglu, Tolga; Narasimhan, Sriram; Poll, Scott; Garcia, David; Wright, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Diagnostic algorithms (DAs) are key to enabling automated health management. These algorithms are designed to detect and isolate anomalies of either a component or the whole system based on observations received from sensors. In recent years a wide range of algorithms, both model-based and data-driven, have been developed to increase autonomy and improve system reliability and affordability. However, the lack of support to perform systematic benchmarking of these algorithms continues to create barriers for effective development and deployment of diagnostic technologies. In this paper, we present our efforts to benchmark a set of DAs on a common platform using a framework that was developed to evaluate and compare various performance metrics for diagnostic technologies. The diagnosed system is an electrical power system, namely the Advanced Diagnostics and Prognostics Testbed (ADAPT) developed and located at the NASA Ames Research Center. The paper presents the fundamentals of the benchmarking framework, the ADAPT system, description of faults and data sets, the metrics used for evaluation, and an in-depth analysis of benchmarking results obtained from testing ten diagnostic algorithms on the ADAPT electrical power system testbed.

  10. Extreme Adaptive Optics Testbed: Results and Future Work

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J W; Sommargren, G; Poyneer, L; Macintosh, B; Severson, S; Dillon, D; Sheinis, A; Palmer, D; Kasdin, J; Olivier, S

    2004-07-15

    'Extreme' adaptive optics systems are optimized for ultra-high-contrast applications, such as ground-based extrasolar planet detection. The Extreme Adaptive Optics Testbed at UC Santa Cruz is being used to investigate and develop technologies for high-contrast imaging, especially wavefront control. A simple optical design allows us to minimize wavefront error and maximize the experimentally achievable contrast before progressing to a more complex set-up. A phase shifting diffraction interferometer is used to measure wavefront errors with sub-nm precision and accuracy. We have demonstrated RMS wavefront errors of <1.3 nm and a contrast of >10{sup -7} over a substantial region using a shaped pupil. Current work includes the installation and characterization of a 1024-actuator Micro-Electro-Mechanical- Systems (MEMS) deformable mirror, manufactured by Boston Micro-Machines, which will be used for wavefront control. In our initial experiments we can flatten the deformable mirror to 1.8-nm RMS wavefront error within a control radius of 5-13 cycles per aperture. Ultimately this testbed will be used to test all aspects of the system architecture for an extrasolar planet-finding AO system.

  11. Characterization of Vegetation using the UC Davis Remote Sensing Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, M.; Hart, Q. J.; Bowen, K. S.; Ustin, S. L.

    2006-12-01

    Remote sensing provides information about the dynamics of the terrestrial biosphere with continuous spatial and temporal coverage on many different scales. We present the design and construction of a suite of instrument modules and network infrastructure with size, weight and power constraints suitable for small scale vehicles, anticipating vigorous growth in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and other mobile platforms. Our approach provides the rapid deployment and low cost acquisition of high aerial imagery for applications requiring high spatial resolution and revisits. The testbed supports a wide range of applications, encourages remote sensing solutions in new disciplines and demonstrates the complete range of engineering knowledge required for the successful deployment of remote sensing instruments. The initial testbed is deployed on a Sig Kadet Senior remote controlled plane. It includes an onboard computer with wireless radio, GPS, inertia measurement unit, 3-axis electronic compass and digital cameras. The onboard camera is either a RGB digital camera or a modified digital camera with red and NIR channels. Cameras were calibrated using selective light sources, an integrating spheres and a spectrometer, allowing for the computation of vegetation indices such as the NDVI. Field tests to date have investigated technical challenges in wireless communication bandwidth limits, automated image geolocation, and user interfaces; as well as image applications such as environmental landscape mapping focusing on Sudden Oak Death and invasive species detection, studies on the impact of bird colonies on tree canopies, and precision agriculture.

  12. Function-based integration strategy for an agile manufacturing testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hisup

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an integration strategy for plug-and- play software based on functional descriptions of the software modules. The functional descriptions identify explicitly the role of each module with respect to the overall systems. They define the critical dependencies that affect the individual modules and thus affect the behavior of the system. The specified roles, dependencies and behavioral constraints are then incorporated in a group of shared objects that are distributed over a network. These objects may be interchanged with others without disrupting the system so long as the replacements meet the interface and functional requirements. In this paper, we propose a framework for modeling the behavior of plug-and-play software modules that will be used to (1) design and predict the outcome of the integration, (2) generate the interface and functional requirements of individual modules, and (3) form a dynamic foundation for applying interchangeable software modules. I describe this strategy in the context of the development of an agile manufacturing testbed. The testbed represents a collection of production cells for machining operations, supported by a network of software modules or agents for planning, fabrication, and inspection. A process definition layer holds the functional description of the software modules. A network of distributed objects interact with one another over the Internet and comprise the plug-compatible software nodes that execute these functions. This paper will explore the technical and operational ramifications of using the functional description framework to organize and coordinate the distributed object modules.

  13. STRS Radio Service Software for NASA's SCaN Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortensen, Dale J.; Bishop, Daniel Wayne; Chelmins, David T.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Space Communication and Navigation(SCaN) Testbed was launched to the International Space Station in 2012. The objective is to promote new software defined radio technologies and associated software application reuse, enabled by this first flight of NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standard. Pre-launch testing with the testbed's software defined radios was performed as part of system integration. Radio services for the JPL SDR were developed during system integration to allow the waveform application to operate properly in the space environment, especially considering thermal effects. These services include receiver gain control, frequency offset, IQ modulator balance, and transmit level control. Development, integration, and environmental testing of the radio services will be described. The added software allows the waveform application to operate properly in the space environment, and can be reused by future experimenters testing different waveform applications. Integrating such services with the platform provided STRS operating environment will attract more users, and these services are candidates for interface standardization via STRS.

  14. A Battery Certification Testbed for Small Satellite Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Zachary; Kulkarni, Chetan S.; Luna, Ali Guarneros; Goebel, Kai; Poll, Scott

    2015-01-01

    A battery pack consisting of standard cylindrical 18650 lithium-ion cells has been chosen for small satellite missions based on previous flight heritage and compliance with NASA battery safety requirements. However, for batteries that transit through the International Space Station (ISS), additional certification tests are required for individual cells as well as the battery packs. In this manuscript, we discuss the development of generalized testbeds for testing and certifying different types of batteries critical to small satellite missions. Test procedures developed and executed for this certification effort include: a detailed physical inspection before and after experiments; electrical cycling characterization at the cell and pack levels; battery-pack overcharge, over-discharge, external short testing; battery-pack vacuum leak and vibration testing. The overall goals of these certification procedures are to conform to requirements set forth by the agency and identify unique safety hazards. The testbeds, procedures, and experimental results are discussed for batteries chosen for small satellite missions to be launched from the ISS.

  15. Arc Detection With GUIDAR: First Experimental Tests On MXP Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, S. M.; Maggiora, R.; D'Inca, R.; Fuenfgelder, H.

    2011-12-01

    The GUIDAR technology has been proposed for the detection of electric arcs in the transmission lines for antennas for plasma heating and current drive. After a preliminary study to assess the feasibility of this technique, some experimental tests with real arcs were conducted on the MXP testbed installed at IPP, Garching. The low frequency (25MHz) GUIDAR signal, made of a sequence of short phase-modulated impulses, is up-shifted to around 400MHz and injected into the transmission line by mean of a directional coupler. The echoes are then extracted with another directional coupler and down-shifted again for the processing. The analysis is performed at a pulse repetition frequency of 120-165kHz, enabling an arc detection within 6-8μs. Tests have shown encouraging results to demonstrate the capability of the GUIDAR system to easily detect both high voltage and, most important, low voltage arcs. The possibility of locating the arcs has also been addressed in the testbed with simulated arcs. The insensitivity of the method to slow changes of the line voltage standing wave ratio (mimicking antenna load variations) was also tested.

  16. An Overview of NASA's Subsonic Research Aircraft Testbed (SCRAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, Ethan; Hernandez, Joe; Ruhf, John C.

    2013-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center acquired a Gulfstream III (GIII) aircraft to serve as a testbed for aeronautics flight research experiments. The aircraft is referred to as SCRAT, which stands for SubsoniC Research Aircraft Testbed. The aircraft's mission is to perform aeronautics research; more specifically raising the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of advanced technologies through flight demonstrations and gathering high-quality research data suitable for verifying the technologies, and validating design and analysis tools. The SCRAT has the ability to conduct a range of flight research experiments throughout a transport class aircraft's flight envelope. Experiments ranging from flight-testing of a new aircraft system or sensor to those requiring structural and aerodynamic modifications to the aircraft can be accomplished. The aircraft has been modified to include an instrumentation system and sensors necessary to conduct flight research experiments along with a telemetry capability. An instrumentation power distribution system was installed to accommodate the instrumentation system and future experiments. An engineering simulation of the SCRAT has been developed to aid in integrating research experiments. A series of baseline aircraft characterization flights has been flown that gathered flight data to aid in developing and integrating future research experiments. This paper describes the SCRAT's research systems and capabilities.

  17. STRS Radio Service Software for NASA's SCaN Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortensen, Dale J.; Bishop, Daniel Wayne; Chelmins, David T.

    2012-01-01

    NASAs Space Communication and Navigation(SCaN) Testbed was launched to the International Space Station in 2012. The objective is to promote new software defined radio technologies and associated software application reuse, enabled by this first flight of NASAs Space Telecommunications Radio System(STRS) architecture standard. Pre-launch testing with the testbeds software defined radios was performed as part of system integration. Radio services for the JPL SDR were developed during system integration to allow the waveform application to operate properly in the space environment, especially considering thermal effects. These services include receiver gain control, frequency offset, IQ modulator balance, and transmit level control. Development, integration, and environmental testing of the radio services will be described. The added software allows the waveform application to operate properly in the space environment, and can be reused by future experimenters testing different waveform applications. Integrating such services with the platform provided STRS operating environment will attract more users, and these services are candidates for interface standardization via STRS.

  18. The Hyperion Project: Partnership for an Advaned Technology Cluster Testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Seager, M; Leininger, M

    2008-04-28

    The Hyperion project offers a unique opportunity to participate in a community-driven testing and development resource at a scale beyond what can be accomplished by one entity alone. Hyperion is a new strategic technology partnership intended to support the member-driven development and testing at scale. This partnership will allow commodity clusters to scale up to meet the growing demands of customers multi-core petascale simulation environments. Hyperion will tightly couple together the outstanding research and development capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with leading technology companies, including Cisco, Data Direct Networks, Dell, Intel, LSI, Mellanox, Qlogic, RedHat, SuperMicro and Sun. The end goal of this project is to revolutionize cluster computing in fundamental ways by providing the critical software and hardware components for a highly scalable simulation environment. This environment will include support for high performance networking, parallel file systems, operating system, and cluster management. This goal will be achieved by building a scalable technology cluster testbed that will be fully dedicated to the partners and provide: (1) A scalable development testing and benchmarking environment for critical enabling Linux cluster technologies; (2) An evaluation testbed for new hardware and software technologies; and (3) A vehicle for forming long term collaborations.

  19. Contrast analysis and stability on the ExAO testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J; Thomas, S; Gavel, D; Dillon, D; Macintosh, B

    2008-06-10

    High-contrast adaptive optics systems, such as those needed to image extrasolar planets, are known to require excellent wavefront control and diffraction suppression. The Laboratory for Adaptive Optics at UC Santa Cruz is investigating limits to high-contrast imaging in support of the Gemini Planet Imager. Previous contrast measurements were made with a simple single-opening prolate spheroid shaped pupil that produced a limited region of high-contrast, particularly when wavefront errors were corrected with the 1024-actuator Boston Micromachines MEMS deformable mirror currently in use on the testbed. A more sophisticated shaped pupil is now being used that has a much larger region of interest facilitating a better understanding of high-contrast measurements. In particular we examine the effect of heat sources in the testbed on PSF stability. We find that rms image motion scales as 0.02 {lambda}/D per watt when the heat source is near the pupil plane. As a result heat sources of greater than 5 watts should be avoided near pupil planes for GPI. The safest place to introduce heat is near a focal plane. Heat also can effect the standard deviation of the high-contrast region but in the final instrument other sources of error should be more significant.

  20. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center's testbed for CCSDS compatible systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carper, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A testbed for flight and ground systems compatible with the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Recommendations has been developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The subsystems of an end-to-end CCSDS based data system are being developed. All return link CCSDS telemetry services (except Internet) and both versions of the CCSDS frame formats are being implemented. In key areas of uncertainty, multiple design approaches are being performed. In addition, key flight-qualifiable hardware components, such as Reed-Solomon encoders, are being developed to complement the testbed element development. The testbed and its capabilities are described. The method of dissemination of the testbed results are given, as are plans to make the testbed capabilities available to outside users. Plans for the development of standardized conformance and compatibility tests are provided.

  1. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center's testbed for CCSDS compatible systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carper, Richard D.

    1993-03-01

    A testbed for flight and ground systems compatible with the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Recommendations has been developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The subsystems of an end-to-end CCSDS based data system are being developed. All return link CCSDS telemetry services (except Internet) and both versions of the CCSDS frame formats are being implemented. In key areas of uncertainty, multiple design approaches are being performed. In addition, key flight-qualifiable hardware components, such as Reed-Solomon encoders, are being developed to complement the testbed element development. The testbed and its capabilities are described. The method of dissemination of the testbed results are given, as are plans to make the testbed capabilities available to outside users. Plans for the development of standardized conformance and compatibility tests are provided.

  2. High performance testbed for four-beam infrared interferometric nulling and exoplanet detection.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stefan; Booth, Andrew; Liewer, Kurt; Raouf, Nasrat; Loya, Frank; Tang, Hong

    2012-06-10

    Technology development for a space-based infrared nulling interferometer capable of earthlike exoplanet detection and characterization started in earnest in the last 10 years. At the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the planet detection testbed was developed to demonstrate the principal components of the beam combiner train for a high performance four-beam nulling interferometer. Early in the development of the testbed, the importance of "instability noise" for nulling interferometer sensitivity was recognized, and the four-beam testbed would produce this noise, allowing investigation of methods for mitigating this noise source. The testbed contains the required features of a four-beam combiner for a space interferometer and performs at a level matching that needed for the space mission. This paper describes in detail the design, functions, and controls of the testbed. PMID:22695670

  3. The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed: Enabling Techniques for High Angular Resolution Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, S. A.; Armstrong, T.; Frey, Bradley J.; Jung, J.; Kirk, J.; Leisawitz, David T.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Lyon, R.; Maher, Stephen; Martino, Anthony J.; Pauls, T.

    2007-01-01

    The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) was designed to develop techniques for wide-field of view imaging interferometry, using "double-Fourier" methods. These techniques will be important for a wide range of future spacebased interferometry missions. We have provided simple demonstrations of the methodology already, and continuing development of the testbed will lead to higher data rates, improved data quality, and refined algorithms for image reconstruction. At present, the testbed effort includes five lines of development; automation of the testbed, operation in an improved environment, acquisition of large high-quality datasets, development of image reconstruction algorithms, and analytical modeling of the testbed. We discuss the progress made towards the first four of these goals; the analytical modeling is discussed in a separate paper within this conference.

  4. Trade-off studies of a hyperspectral infrared sounder on a geostationary satellite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Li, Jun; Schmit, Timothy J; Ackerman, Steven A

    2007-01-10

    Trade-off studies on spectral coverage, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and spectral resolution for a hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounder on a geostationary satellite are summarized. The data density method is applied for the vertical resolution analysis, and the rms error between true and retrieved profiles is used to represent the retrieval accuracy. The effects of spectral coverage, SNR, and spectral resolution on vertical resolution and retrieval accuracy are investigated. The advantages of IR and microwave sounder synergy are also demonstrated. When focusing on instrument performance and data processing, the results from this study show that the preferred spectral coverage combines long-wave infrared (LWIR) with the shorter middle-wave IR (SMidW). Using the appropriate spectral coverage, a hyperspectral IR sounder with appropriate SNR can achieve the required science performance (1 km vertical resolution, 1 K temperature, and 10% relative humidity retrieval accuracy). The synergy of microwave and IR sounders can improve the vertical resolution and retrieval accuracy compared to either instrument alone. PMID:17268565

  5. Evolution of Satellite Imagers and Sounders for Low Earth Orbit and Technology Directions at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; McClain, Charles R.

    2010-01-01

    Imagers and Sounders for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) provide fundamental global daily observations of the Earth System for scientists, researchers, and operational weather agencies. The imager provides the nominal 1-2 km spatial resolution images with global coverage in multiple spectral bands for a wide range of uses including ocean color, vegetation indices, aerosol, snow and cloud properties, and sea surface temperature. The sounder provides vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature, water vapor cloud properties, and trace gases including ozone, carbon monoxide, methane and carbon dioxide. Performance capabilities of these systems has evolved with the optical and sensing technologies of the decade. Individual detectors were incorporated on some of the first imagers and sounders that evolved to linear array technology in the '80's. Signal-to-noise constraints limited these systems to either broad spectral resolution as in the case of the imager, or low spatial resolution as in the case of the sounder. Today's area 2-dimensional large format array technology enables high spatial and high spectral resolution to be incorporated into a single instrument. This places new constraints on the design of these systems and enables new capabilities for scientists to examine the complex processes governing the Earth System.

  6. Determination of film processing specifications for the Apollo 17 S-209 lunar sounder experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. S.

    1972-01-01

    The lunar sounder is described as a radar system operating at carrier frequencies of 5, 15, and 150 MHz. The radar echoes are recorded onto Kodak type S0-394 film through the use of an optical recorder utilizing a cathode ray tube as the exposing device. A processing configuration is determined with regard to linearity, dynamic range, and noise.

  7. High-powered Radar Sounders for the Investigation of Jupiter's Icy Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safaeinili, A.; Rodriguez, E.; Edelstein, Wendy

    2003-01-01

    This talk will address the main drivers in the design of a radar sounder for the JIMO mission and provide a potential solution that will optimize the chances of success in the detection of ice/water interface and sub-surface stratigraphy.

  8. Shallow scattering layer in the subarctic pacific ocean: detection by high-frequency echo sounder.

    PubMed

    Barraclough, W E; Lebrasseur, R J; Kennedy, O D

    1969-10-31

    Shallow scattering layers consisting mainly of Calanus cristatus were detected on a trans-Pacific crossing to depths of 60 meters with a high-frequency echo sounder. Biomass estimates of these layers indicate concentrations of zoo-plankton that are greater and more extensive than previously reported in the open ocean. PMID:17778203

  9. A technique for recording HF (High Frequency) oblique-incidence-sounder data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daehler, Mark

    1988-08-01

    This report details the equipment, formats, and procedures developed for recording and displaying HF propagation data produced by the AN/TRQ-35 RCS-4B oblique-incidence sounder receiver. The information is being published in this form because of numerous requests regarding a means for using the large volume of sounder data accumulated by NRL in the course of its ionospheric effects studies. These techniques may ultimately be incorporated in a proposed worldwide database of ionospheric data. The AN/TRQ-35 sounder equipment is available to all branches of the DOD and is widely used for near-real-time HF frequency management. The data it produces, if properly recorded and stored, can also be used for numerous other purposes related to studies of ionospheric structure and HF skywave communications. These include studies of the electron density versus height profile of the ionosphere; of forecasts of propagation conditions relevant to HF communications; of the geographical and temporal limitations of sounder data application; and of the effectiveness of frequency management techniques. Permanent records of ionospheric propagation have also proved valuable in evaluating tests of HF devices which are dependent on ionospheric propagation, such as communications transmitters and receivers, or direction finding equipment.

  10. Estimation of dielectric constant of lunar material by HF sounder observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Ono, T.

    Space borne radio sounding observation has been one of indispensable items in planetary missions An HF sounder Lunar Radar Sounder LRS will be onboard SELENE a lunar exploration program of Japan in 2007 Its primary objective is subsurface geologic structure of the Moon Especially mare regions are of strong interest of investigators because of its relatively smooth surface it is thought that smooth surface allows us to see subsurface feature with less difficulty However even if a clear subsurface image is obtained the data does not provide us with quantitative information unless the dielectric constant of the lunar subsurface material We propose a technique to estimate the dielectric constant of lunar material that utilizes HF sounder data of closely located multiple orbits The technique is applied to SAR images that are produced from HF sounder data and stands on the fact that the apparent position of subsurface object varies as a function of the dielectric constant of subsurface material Assuming a uniform subsurface material the displacement of images of a subsurface target should be consistent with that of observation orbits if the correct dielectric constant of the subsurface material is assumed A numerical model on geometrical optics estimates that the proposed technique requires a synthetic aperture larger than about 50km provided that the orbit altitude is 100km subsurface target depth is a few km and that the observation frequency is 5MHz with 2MHz bandwidth Some laboratory experiments were conducted to demonstrate validity of the

  11. High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) for the Nimbus F Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, E. W.

    1975-01-01

    Flown on Nimbus F in June 1975, the high resolution infrared radiation sounder (HIRS) scans with a geographical resolution of 23KM and samples radiance in seventeen selected spectral channels from visible (.7 micron) to far IR (15 micron). Vertical temperature profiles and atmospheric moisture content can be inferred from the output. System operation and test results are described.

  12. Instrument technology for magnetosphere plasma imaging from high Earth orbit. Design of a radio plasma sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, D. Mark; Reinisch, Bodo W.

    1995-01-01

    The use of radio sounding techniques for the study of the ionospheric plasma dates back to G. Briet and M. A. Tuve in 1926. Ground based swept frequency sounders can monitor the electron number density (N(sub e)) as a function of height (the N(sub e) profile). These early instruments evolved into a global network that produced high-resolution displays of echo time delay vs frequency on 35-mm film. These instruments provided the foundation for the success of the International Geophysical Year (1958). The Alouette and International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) programs pioneered the used of spaceborne, swept frequency sounders to obtain N(sub e) profiles of the topside of the ionosphere, from a position above the electron density maximum. Repeated measurements during the orbit produced an orbital plane contour which routinely provided density measurements to within 10%. The Alouette/ISIS experience also showed that even with a high powered transmitter (compared to the low power sounder possible today) a radio sounder can be compatible with other imaging instruments on the same satellite. Digital technology was used on later spacecraft developed by the Japanese (the EXOS C and D) and the Soviets (Intercosmos 19 and Cosmos 1809). However, a full coherent pulse compression and spectral integrating capability, such as exist today for ground-based sounders (Reinisch et al., 1992), has never been put into space. NASA's 1990 Space Physics Strategy Implementation Study "The NASA Space Physics Program from 1995 to 2010" suggested using radio sounders to study the plasmasphere and the magnetopause and its boundary layers (Green and Fung, 1993). Both the magnetopause and plasmasphere, as well as the cusp and boundary layers, can be observed by a radio sounder in a high-inclination polar orbit with an apogee greater than 6 R(sub e) (Reiff et al., 1994; Calvert et al., 1995). Magnetospheric radio sounding from space will provide remote density measurements of

  13. Design of the Dual Conjugate Adaptive Optics Test-bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharf, Inna; Bell, K.; Crampton, D.; Fitzsimmons, J.; Herriot, Glen; Jolissaint, Laurent; Lee, B.; Richardson, H.; van der Kamp, D.; Veran, Jean-Pierre

    In this paper, we describe the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics laboratory test-bed presently under construction at the University of Victoria, Canada. The test-bench will be used to support research in the performance of multi-conjugate adaptive optics, turbulence simulators, laser guide stars and miniaturizing adaptive optics. The main components of the test-bed include two micro-machined deformable mirrors, a tip-tilt mirror, four wavefront sensors, a source simulator, a dual-layer turbulence simulator, as well as computational and control hardware. The paper will describe in detail the opto-mechanical design of the adaptive optics module, the design of the hot-air turbulence generator and the configuration chosen for the source simulator. Below, we present a summary of these aspects of the bench. The optical and mechanical design of the test-bed has been largely driven by the particular choice of the deformable mirrors. These are continuous micro-machined mirrors manufactured by Boston Micromachines Corporation. They have a clear aperture of 3.3 mm and are deformed with 140 actuators arranged in a square grid. Although the mirrors have an open-loop bandwidth of 6.6 KHz, their shape can be updated at a sampling rate of 100 Hz. In our optical design, the mirrors are conjugated at 0km and 10 km in the atmosphere. A planar optical layout was achieved by using four off-axis paraboloids and several folding mirrors. These optics will be mounted on two solid blocks which can be aligned with respect to each other. The wavefront path design accommodates 3 monochromatic guide stars that can be placed at either 90 km or at infinity. The design relies on the natural separation of the beam into 3 parts because of differences in locations of the guide stars in the field of view. In total four wavefront sensors will be procured from Adaptive Optics Associates (AOA) or built in-house: three for the guide stars and the fourth to collect data from the science source output in

  14. PHARUS airborne SAR concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeij, Paul; Pouwels, Henk; Koomen, Peter J.; Hoogeboom, Peter

    1995-11-01

    PHARUS (phased array universal SAR) is an airborne SAR concept which is being developed in the Netherlands. The PHARUS system differs from other airborne SARs by the use of a phased array antenna, which provides both for the flexibility in the design as well as for a compact, light-weight instrument that can be carried on small aircraft. The concept allows for the construction of airborne SAR systems on a common generic basis but tailored to specific user needs and can be seen as a preparation for future spaceborne SAR systems using solid state transmitters with electronically steerable phased array antenna. The whole approach is aimed at providing an economic and yet technically sophisticated solution to remote sensing or surveying needs of a specific user. The solid state phased array antenna consists of a collection of radiating patches; the design flexibility for a large part resides in the freedom to choose the number of patches, and thereby the essential radar performance parameters such as resolution and swath width. Another consequence of the use of the phased array antenna is the system's compactness and the possibility to rigidly mount it on a small aircraft. The use of small aircraft of course considerably improves the cost/benefit ratio of the use of airborne SAR. Flight altitude of the system is flexible between about 7,000 and 40,000 feet, giving much operational freedom within the meteo and airspace control limits. In the PHARUS concept the airborne segment is complemented by a ground segment, which consists of a SAR processor, possibly extended by a matching image processing package. (A quick look image is available in real-time on board the aircraft.) The SAR processor is UNIX based and runs on easily available hardware (SUN station). Although the additional image processing software is available, the SAR processing software is nevertheless designed to be able to interface with commercially available image processing software, as well as being able

  15. Airborne radioactive contamination monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Whitley, C.R.; Adams, J.R.; Bounds, J.A.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1996-03-01

    Current technologies for the detection of airborne radioactive contamination do not provide real-time capability. Most of these techniques are based on the capture of particulate matter in air onto filters which are then processed in the laboratory; thus, the turnaround time for detection of contamination can be many days. To address this shortcoming, an effort is underway to adapt LRAD (Long-Range-Alpha-Detection) technology for real-time monitoring of airborne releases of alpa-emitting radionuclides. Alpha decays in air create ionization that can be subsequently collected on electrodes, producing a current that is proportional to the amount of radioactive material present. Using external fans on a pipe containing LRAD detectors, controlled samples of ambient air can be continuously tested for the presence of radioactive contamination. Current prototypes include a two-chamber model. Sampled air is drawn through a particulate filter and then through the first chamber, which uses an electrostatic filter at its entrance to remove ambient ionization. At its exit, ionization that occurred due to the presence of radon is collected and recorded. The air then passes through a length of pipe to allow some decay of short-lived radon species. A second chamber identical to the first monitors the remaining activity. Further development is necessary on air samples without the use of particulate filtering, both to distinguish ionization that can pass through the initial electrostatic filter on otherwise inert particulate matter from that produced through the decay of radioactive material and to separate both of these from the radon contribution. The end product could provide a sensitive, cost-effective, real-time method of determining the presence of airborne radioactive contamination.

  16. Airborne Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaps, Wm. S.; Burris, J.

    1996-12-01

    We designed and tested an airborne lidar system using Raman scattering to make simultaneous measurements of methane, water vapor, and temperature in a series of flights on a NASA-operated C-130 aircraft. We present the results for methane detection, which show that the instrument has the requisite sensitivity to atmospheric trace gases. Ultimately these measurements can be used to examine the transport of chemically processed air from within the polar vortex to mid-latitudinal regions and the exchange of stratospheric air between tropical and mid-latitudinal regions.

  17. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL), a spatially scanning range-gated device installed on board a NASA C-54 aircraft, is described. The AOL system is capable of measuring topographical relief or water depth (bathymetry) with a range resolution of plus or minus 0.3 m in the vertical dimension. The system may also be used to measure fluorescent spectral signatures from 3500 to 8000 A with a resolution of 100 A. Potential applications of the AOL, including sea state measurements, water transparency assessments, oil spill identification, effluent identification and crop cover assessment are also mentioned.

  18. SPHERES: Design of a Formation Flying Testbed for ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, S. W.; Chen, S. E.

    2002-01-01

    The SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites) payload is an innovative formation-flying spacecraft testbed currently being developed for use internally aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The purpose of the testbed is to provide a cost-effective, long duration, replenishable, and easily reconfigurable platform with representative dynamics for the development and validation of metrology, formation flying, and autonomy algorithms. The testbed components consist of three 8-inch diameter free-flying "satellites," five ultrasound beacons, and an ISS laptop workstation. Each satellite is self-contained with on-board battery power, cold-gas propulsion (CO2), and processing systems. Satellites use two packs of eight standard AA batteries for approximately 90 minutes of lifetime while beacons last the duration of the mission powered by a single AA battery. The propulsion system uses pressurized carbon dioxide gas, stored in replaceable tanks, distributed through an adjustable regulator and associated tubing to twelve thrusters located on the faces of the satellites. A Texas Instruments C6701 DSP handles control algorithm data while an FPGA manages all sensor data, timing, and communication processes on the satellite. All three satellites communicate with each other and with the controlling laptop via a wireless RF link. Five ultrasound beacons, located around a predetermined work area, transmit ultrasound signals that are received by each satellite. The system effectively acts as a pseudo-GPS system, allowing the satellites to determine position and attitude and to navigate within the test arena. The payload hardware are predominantly Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) products with the exception of custom electronics boards, selected propulsion system adaptors, and beacon and satellite structural elements. Operationally, SPHERES will run in short duration test sessions with approximately two weeks between each session. During

  19. Space Station technology testbed: 2010 deep space transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Alan C.

    1993-12-01

    A space station in a crew-tended or permanently crewed configuration will provide major R&D opportunities for innovative, technology and materials development and advanced space systems testing. A space station should be designed with the basic infrastructure elements required to grow into a major systems technology testbed. This space-based technology testbed can and should be used to support the development of technologies required to expand our utilization of near-Earth space, the Moon and the Earth-to-Jupiter region of the Solar System. Space station support of advanced technology and materials development will result in new techniques for high priority scientific research and the knowledge and R&D base needed for the development of major, new commercial product thrusts. To illustrate the technology testbed potential of a space station and to point the way to a bold, innovative approach to advanced space systems' development, a hypothetical deep space transport development and test plan is described. Key deep space transport R&D activities are described would lead to the readiness certification of an advanced, reusable interplanetary transport capable of supporting eight crewmembers or more. With the support of a focused and highly motivated, multi-agency ground R&D program, a deep space transport of this type could be assembled and tested by 2010. Key R&D activities on a space station would include: (1) experimental research investigating the microgravity assisted, restructuring of micro-engineered, materials (to develop and verify the in-space and in-situ 'tuning' of materials for use in debris and radiation shielding and other protective systems), (2) exposure of microengineered materials to the space environment for passive and operational performance tests (to develop in-situ maintenance and repair techniques and to support the development, enhancement, and implementation of protective systems, data and bio-processing systems, and virtual reality and

  20. Space Station technology testbed: 2010 deep space transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Alan C.

    1993-01-01

    A space station in a crew-tended or permanently crewed configuration will provide major R&D opportunities for innovative, technology and materials development and advanced space systems testing. A space station should be designed with the basic infrastructure elements required to grow into a major systems technology testbed. This space-based technology testbed can and should be used to support the development of technologies required to expand our utilization of near-Earth space, the Moon and the Earth-to-Jupiter region of the Solar System. Space station support of advanced technology and materials development will result in new techniques for high priority scientific research and the knowledge and R&D base needed for the development of major, new commercial product thrusts. To illustrate the technology testbed potential of a space station and to point the way to a bold, innovative approach to advanced space systems' development, a hypothetical deep space transport development and test plan is described. Key deep space transport R&D activities are described would lead to the readiness certification of an advanced, reusable interplanetary transport capable of supporting eight crewmembers or more. With the support of a focused and highly motivated, multi-agency ground R&D program, a deep space transport of this type could be assembled and tested by 2010. Key R&D activities on a space station would include: (1) experimental research investigating the microgravity assisted, restructuring of micro-engineered, materials (to develop and verify the in-space and in-situ 'tuning' of materials for use in debris and radiation shielding and other protective systems), (2) exposure of microengineered materials to the space environment for passive and operational performance tests (to develop in-situ maintenance and repair techniques and to support the development, enhancement, and implementation of protective systems, data and bio-processing systems, and virtual reality and

  1. Airborne concentrations of peanut protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rodney M; Barnes, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    Food allergy to peanut is a significant health problem, and there are reported allergic reactions to peanuts despite not eating or having physical contact with peanuts. It is presumed that an allergic reaction may have occurred from inhalation of airborne peanut allergens. The purpose of this study was to detect the possible concentrations of airborne peanut proteins for various preparations and during specific activities. Separate Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and a polyclonal sandwich enzyme immunoassay for peanuts were used to detect the amount of airborne peanut protein collected using a Spincon Omni 3000 air collector (Sceptor Industries, Inc., Kansas City, MO) under different peanut preparation methods and situations. Air samples were measured for multiple peanut preparations and scenarios. Detectable amounts of airborne peanut protein were measured using a whole peanut immunoassay when removing the shells of roasted peanut. No airborne peanut allergen (Ara h 1 or Ara h 2) or whole peanut protein above the LLD was measured in any of the other peanut preparation collections. Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and polyclonal peanut proteins were detected from water used to boil peanuts. Small amounts of airborne peanut protein were detected in the scenario of removing shells from roasted peanuts; however, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 proteins were unable to be consistently detected. Although airborne peanut proteins were detected, the concentration of airborne peanut protein that is necessary to elicit a clinical allergic reaction is unknown. PMID:23406937

  2. Airborne ballistic camera tracking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redish, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    An operational airborne ballistic camera tracking system was tested for operational and data reduction feasibility. The acquisition and data processing requirements of the system are discussed. Suggestions for future improvements are also noted. A description of the data reduction mathematics is outlined. Results from a successful reentry test mission are tabulated. The test mission indicated that airborne ballistic camera tracking systems are feasible.

  3. The computational structural mechanics testbed architecture. Volume 2: The interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, Carlos A.

    1988-01-01

    This is the third set of five volumes which describe the software architecture for the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed. Derived from NICE, an integrated software system developed at Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory, the architecture is composed of the command language CLAMP, the command language interpreter CLIP, and the data manager GAL. Volumes 1, 2, and 3 (NASA CR's 178384, 178385, and 178386, respectively) describe CLAMP and CLIP and the CLIP-processor interface. Volumes 4 and 5 (NASA CR's 178387 and 178388, respectively) describe GAL and its low-level I/O. CLAMP, an acronym for Command Language for Applied Mechanics Processors, is designed to control the flow of execution of processors written for NICE. Volume 3 describes the CLIP-Processor interface and related topics. It is intended only for processor developers.

  4. SIM Interferometer Testbed (SCDU) Status and Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemati, Bijan; An, Xin; Goullioud, Renaud; Shao, Michael; Shen, Tsae-Pyng; Wehmeier, Udo J.; Weilert, Mark A.; Wang, Xu; Werne, Thomas A.; Wu, Janet P.; Zhai, Chengxing

    2010-01-01

    SIM Lite is a space-borne stellar interferometer capable of searching for Earth-size planets in the habitable zones of nearby stars. This search will require measurement of astrometric angles with sub micro-arcsecond accuracy and optical pathlength differences to 1 picometer by the end of the five-year mission. One of the most significant technical risks in achieving this level of accuracy is from systematic errors that arise from spectral differences between candidate stars and nearby reference stars. The Spectral Calibration Development Unit (SCDU), in operation since 2007, has been used to explore this effect and demonstrate performance meeting SIM goals. In this paper we present the status of this testbed and recent results.

  5. Universal Linear Optics: A Testbed for Optical Quantum Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, Chris; Carolan, Jacques; Harrold, Christopher; Russell, Nicholas; Marshall, Graham; Silverstone, Joshua; Thompson, Mark; Matthews, Jonathan; O'Brien, Jeremy; Laing, Anthony; Martin-Lopez, Enrique; Shadbolt, Peter; Matsuda, Nobuyuki; Oguma, Manabu; Itoh, Mikitaka; Hashimoto, Toshikazu

    Linear optics is a promising platform for scalable quantum information processing. We demonstrate a single reprogrammable optical circuit that is sufficient to implement all possible linear optical protocols up the size of the circuit [Carolan et al., Science, 349, (2015)]. The system is an ideal testbed for rapidly prototyping new linear optical quantum gates, and testing known protocols in experimentally realistic scenarios. We use the device to perform a series of postselected and heralded quantum logic gates including a new scheme for heralded bell state generation, a key primitive in measurement-based linear optical quantum computation. We propose and demonstrate techniques for efficiently and accurately characterising and verifying these gates' operation. The ability to rapidly reprogram linear optical devices promises to replace a multitude of existing and future prototype systems, pointing the way to applications across quantum technologies.

  6. Test applications for heterogeneous real-time network testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Mines, R.F.; Knightly, E.W.

    1994-07-01

    This paper investigates several applications for a heterogeneous real-time network testbed. The network is heterogeneous in terms of network devices, technologies, protocols, and algorithms. The network is real-time in that its services can provide per-connection end-to-end performance guarantees. Although different parts of the network use different algorithms, all components have the necessary mechanisms to provide performance guarantees: admission control and priority scheduling. Three applications for this network are described in this paper: a video conferencing tool, a tool for combustion modeling using distributed computing, and an MPEG video archival system. Each has minimum performance requirements that must be provided by the network. By analyzing these applications, we provide insights to the traffic characteristics and performance requirements of practical real-time loads.

  7. Experimental validation of docking and capture using space robotics testbeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spofford, John; Schmitz, Eric; Hoff, William

    1991-01-01

    This presentation describes the application of robotic and computer vision systems to validate docking and capture operations for space cargo transfer vehicles. Three applications are discussed: (1) air bearing systems in two dimensions that yield high quality free-flying, flexible, and contact dynamics; (2) validation of docking mechanisms with misalignment and target dynamics; and (3) computer vision technology for target location and real-time tracking. All the testbeds are supported by a network of engineering workstations for dynamic and controls analyses. Dynamic simulation of multibody rigid and elastic systems are performed with the TREETOPS code. MATRIXx/System-Build and PRO-MATLAB/Simulab are the tools for control design and analysis using classical and modern techniques such as H-infinity and LQG/LTR. SANDY is a general design tool to optimize numerically a multivariable robust compensator with a user-defined structure. Mathematica and Macsyma are used to derive symbolically dynamic and kinematic equations.

  8. Photovoltaic Engineering Testbed Designed for Calibrating Photovoltaic Devices in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2002-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the performance of solar arrays in space requires that the cells be tested in comparison with a space-flown standard. Recognizing that improvements in future solar cell technology will require an ever-increasing fidelity of standards, the Photovoltaics and Space Environment Branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center, in collaboration with the Ohio Aerospace Institute, designed a prototype facility to allow routine calibration, measurement, and qualification of solar cells on the International Space Station, and then the return of the cells to Earth for laboratory use. For solar cell testing, the Photovoltaic Engineering Testbed (PET) site provides a true air-mass-zero (AM0) solar spectrum. This allows solar cells to be accurately calibrated using the full spectrum of the Sun.

  9. X-ray Pulsar Navigation Algorithms and Testbed for SEXTANT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winternitz, Luke M. B.; Hasouneh, Monther A.; Mitchell, Jason W.; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Price, Samuel R.; Semper, Sean R.; Yu, Wayne H.; Ray, Paul S.; Wood, Kent S.; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Grendreau, Keith C.

    2015-01-01

    The Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation Technology (SEXTANT) is a NASA funded technologydemonstration. SEXTANT will, for the first time, demonstrate real-time, on-board X-ray Pulsar-based Navigation (XNAV), a significant milestone in the quest to establish a GPS-like navigation capability available throughout our Solar System and beyond. This paper describes the basic design of the SEXTANT system with a focus on core models and algorithms, and the design and continued development of the GSFC X-ray Navigation Laboratory Testbed (GXLT) with its dynamic pulsar emulation capability. We also present early results from GXLT modeling of the combined NICER X-ray timing instrument hardware and SEXTANT flight software algorithms.

  10. The computational structural mechanics testbed architecture. Volume 2: Directives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, Carlos A.

    1989-01-01

    This is the second of a set of five volumes which describe the software architecture for the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed. Derived from NICE, an integrated software system developed at Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory, the architecture is composed of the command language (CLAMP), the command language interpreter (CLIP), and the data manager (GAL). Volumes 1, 2, and 3 (NASA CR's 178384, 178385, and 178386, respectively) describe CLAMP and CLIP and the CLIP-processor interface. Volumes 4 and 5 (NASA CR's 178387 and 178388, respectively) describe GAL and its low-level I/O. CLAMP, an acronym for Command Language for Applied Mechanics Processors, is designed to control the flow of execution of processors written for NICE. Volume 2 describes the CLIP directives in detail. It is intended for intermediate and advanced users.

  11. Modular, Rapid Propellant Loading System/Cryogenic Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Walter, Sr.; Jumper, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The Cryogenic Test Laboratory (CTL) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has designed, fabricated, and installed a modular, rapid propellant-loading system to simulate rapid loading of a launch-vehicle composite or standard cryogenic tank. The system will also function as a cryogenic testbed for testing and validating cryogenic innovations and ground support equipment (GSE) components. The modular skid-mounted system is capable of flow rates of liquid nitrogen from 1 to 900 gpm (approx equals 3.8 to 3,400 L/min), of pressures from ambient to 225 psig (approx equals 1.5 MPa), and of temperatures to -320 F (approx equals -195 C). The system can be easily validated to flow liquid oxygen at a different location, and could be easily scaled to any particular vehicle interface requirements

  12. MIT-KSC space life sciences telescience testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A Telescience Life Sciences Testbed is being developed. The first phase of this effort consisted of defining the experiments to be performed, investigating the various possible means of communication between KSC and MIT, and developing software and hardware support. The experiments chosen were two vestibular sled experiments: a study of ocular torsion produced by Y axis linear acceleration, based on the Spacelab D-1 072 Vestibular Experiment performed pre- and post-flight at KSC; and an optokinetic nystagmus (OKN)/linear acceleration interaction experiment. These two experiments were meant to simulate actual experiments that might be performed on the Space Station and to be representative of space life sciences experiments in general in their use of crew time and communications resources.

  13. Simulation to Flight Test for a UAV Controls Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motter, Mark A.; Logan, Michael J.; French, Michael L.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Flying Controls Testbed (FLiC) is a relatively small and inexpensive unmanned aerial vehicle developed specifically to test highly experimental flight control approaches. The most recent version of the FLiC is configured with 16 independent aileron segments, supports the implementation of C-coded experimental controllers, and is capable of fully autonomous flight from takeoff roll to landing, including flight test maneuvers. The test vehicle is basically a modified Army target drone, AN/FQM-117B, developed as part of a collaboration between the Aviation Applied Technology Directorate (AATD) at Fort Eustis, Virginia and NASA Langley Research Center. Several vehicles have been constructed and collectively have flown over 600 successful test flights, including a fully autonomous demonstration at the Association of Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) UAV Demo 2005. Simulations based on wind tunnel data are being used to further develop advanced controllers for implementation and flight test.

  14. The computational structural mechanics testbed architecture. Volume 1: The language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, Carlos A.

    1988-01-01

    This is the first set of five volumes which describe the software architecture for the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed. Derived from NICE, an integrated software system developed at Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory, the architecture is composed of the command language CLAMP, the command language interpreter CLIP, and the data manager GAL. Volumes 1, 2, and 3 (NASA CR's 178384, 178385, and 178386, respectively) describe CLAMP and CLIP, and the CLIP-processor interface. Volumes 4 and 5 (NASA CR's 178387 and 178388, respectively) describe GAL and its low-level I/O. CLAMP, an acronym for Command Language for Applied Mechanics Processors, is designed to control the flow of execution of processors written for NICE. Volume 1 presents the basic elements of the CLAMP language and is intended for all users.

  15. Intelligent Elements for the ISHM Testbed and Prototypes (ITP) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Park, Han; Schwabacher, Mark; Watson, Michael; Mackey, Ryan; Fijany, Amir; Trevino, Luis; Weir, John

    2005-01-01

    Deep-space manned missions will require advanced automated health assessment capabilities. Requirements such as in-space assembly, long dormant periods and limited accessibility during flight, present significant challenges that should be addressed through Integrated System Health Management (ISHM). The ISHM approach will provide safety and reliability coverage for a complete system over its entire life cycle by determining and integrating health status and performance information from the subsystem and component levels. This paper will focus on the potential advanced diagnostic elements that will provide intelligent assessment of the subsystem health and the planned implementation of these elements in the ISHM Testbed and Prototypes (ITP) Project under the NASA Exploration Systems Research and Technology program.

  16. Easy and hard testbeds for real-time search algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, S.; Simmons, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    Although researchers have studied which factors influence the behavior of traditional search algorithms, currently not much is known about how domain properties influence the performance of real-time search algorithms. In this paper we demonstrate, both theoretically and experimentally, that Eulerian state spaces (a super set of undirected state spaces) are very easy for some existing real-time search algorithms to solve: even real-time search algorithms that can be intractable, in general, are efficient for Eulerian state spaces. Because traditional real-time search testbeds (such as the eight puzzle and gridworlds) are Eulerian, they cannot be used to distinguish between efficient and inefficient real-time search algorithms. It follows that one has to use non-Eulerian domains to demonstrate the general superiority of a given algorithm. To this end, we present two classes of hard-to-search state spaces and demonstrate the performance of various real-time search algorithms on them.

  17. Airborne transmission of lyssaviruses.

    PubMed

    Johnson, N; Phillpotts, R; Fooks, A R

    2006-06-01

    In 2002, a Scottish bat conservationist developed a rabies-like disease and subsequently died. This was caused by infection with European bat lyssavirus 2 (EBLV-2), a virus closely related to Rabies virus (RABV). The source of this infection and the means of transmission have not yet been confirmed. In this study, the hypothesis that lyssaviruses, particularly RABV and the bat variant EBLV-2, might be transmitted via the airborne route was tested. Mice were challenged via direct introduction of lyssavirus into the nasal passages. Two hours after intranasal challenge with a mouse-adapted strain of RABV (Challenge Virus Standard), viral RNA was detectable in the tongue, lungs and stomach. All of the mice challenged by direct intranasal inoculation developed disease signs by 7 days post-infection. Two out of five mice challenged by direct intranasal inoculation of EBLV-2 developed disease between 16 and 19 days post-infection. In addition, a simple apparatus was evaluated in which mice could be exposed experimentally to infectious doses of lyssavirus from an aerosol. Using this approach, mice challenged with RABV, but not those challenged with EBLV-2, were highly susceptible to infection by inhalation. These data support the hypothesis that lyssaviruses, and RABV in particular, can be spread by airborne transmission in a dose-dependent manner. This could present a particular hazard to personnel exposed to aerosols of infectious RABV following accidental release in a laboratory environment. PMID:16687600

  18. New Air-Launched Small Missile (ALSM) Flight Testbed for Hypersonic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.; Lux, David P.; Stenger, Mike; Munson, Mike; Teate, George

    2006-01-01

    A new testbed for hypersonic flight research is proposed. Known as the Phoenix air-launched small missile (ALSM) flight testbed, it was conceived to help address the lack of quick-turnaround and cost-effective hypersonic flight research capabilities. The Phoenix ALSM testbed results from utilization of two unique and very capable flight assets: the United States Navy Phoenix AIM-54 long-range, guided air-to-air missile and the NASA Dryden F-15B testbed airplane. The U.S. Navy retirement of the Phoenix AIM-54 missiles from fleet operation has presented an excellent opportunity for converting this valuable flight asset into a new flight testbed. This cost-effective new platform will fill an existing gap in the test and evaluation of current and future hypersonic systems for flight Mach numbers ranging from 3 to 5. Preliminary studies indicate that the Phoenix missile is a highly capable platform. When launched from a high-performance airplane, the guided Phoenix missile can boost research payloads to low hypersonic Mach numbers, enabling flight research in the supersonic-to-hypersonic transitional flight envelope. Experience gained from developing and operating the Phoenix ALSM testbed will be valuable for the development and operation of future higher-performance ALSM flight testbeds as well as responsive microsatellite small-payload air-launched space boosters.

  19. Demo III: Department of Defense testbed for unmanned ground mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Chuck M.; Bornstein, Jonathan A.; Myers, Scott D.; Brendle, Bruce E., Jr.

    1999-07-01

    Robotics has been identified by numerous recent Department of Defense (DOD) studies as a key enabling technology for future military operational concepts. The Demo III Program is a multiyear effort encompassing technology development and demonstration on testbed platforms, together with modeling simulation and experimentation directed toward optimization of operational concepts to employ this technology. Primary program focus is the advancement of capabilities for autonomous mobility through unstructured environments, concentrating on both perception and intelligent control technology. The scout mission will provide the military operational context for demonstration of this technology, although a significant emphasis is being placed upon both hardware and software modularity to permit rapid extension to other military missions. The Experimental Unmanned Vehicle (XUV) is a small (approximately 1150 kg, V-22 transportable) technology testbed vehicle designed for experimentation with multiple military operational concepts. Currently under development, the XUV is scheduled for roll-out in Summer 1999, with an initial troop experimentation to be conducted in September 1999. Though small, and relatively lightweight, modeling has shown the chassis capable of automotive mobility comparable to the current Army lightweight high-mobility, multipurpose, wheeled vehicle (HMMWV). The XUV design couples multisensor perception with intelligent control to permit autonomous cross-country navigation at speeds of up to 32 kph during daylight and 16 kph during hours of darkness. A small, lightweight, highly capable user interface will permit intuitive control of the XUV by troops from current-generation tactical vehicles. When it concludes in 2002, Demo III will provide the military with both the technology and the initial experience required to develop and field the first generation of semi-autonomous tactical ground vehicles for combat, combat support, and logistics applications.

  20. Vacuum Nuller Testbed Performance, Characterization and Null Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, R. G.; Clampin, M.; Petrone, P.; Mallik, U.; Madison, T.; Bolcar, M.; Noecker, C.; Kendrick, S.; Helmbrecht, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) can detect and characterize exoplanets with filled, segmented and sparse aperture telescopes, thereby spanning the choice of future internal coronagraph exoplanet missions. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has developed a Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) to advance this approach, and assess and advance technologies needed to realize a VNC as a flight instrument. The VNT is an ultra-stable testbed operating at 15 Hz in vacuum. It consists of a MachZehnder nulling interferometer; modified with a "W" configuration to accommodate a hexpacked MEMS based deformable mirror (DM), coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. The 2-output channels are imaged with a vacuum photon counting camera and conventional camera. Error-sensing and feedback to DM and delay line with control algorithms are implemented in a real-time architecture. The inherent advantage of the VNC is that it is its own interferometer and directly controls its errors by exploiting images from bright and dark channels simultaneously. Conservation of energy requires the sum total of the photon counts be conserved independent of the VNC state. Thus sensing and control bandwidth is limited by the target stars throughput, with the net effect that the higher bandwidth offloads stressing stability tolerances within the telescope. We report our recent progress with the VNT towards achieving an incremental sequence of contrast milestones of 10(exp 8) , 10(exp 9) and 10(exp 10) respectively at inner working angles approaching 2A/D. Discussed will be the optics, lab results, technologies, and null control. Shown will be evidence that the milestones have been achieved.

  1. Progress at the starshade testbed at Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems: comparisons with computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuele, Rocco; Varshneya, Rupal; Johnson, Tim P.; Johnson, Adam M. F.; Glassman, Tiffany

    2010-07-01

    We report on progress at the Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) starshade testbed. The starshade testbed is a 42.8 meter vacuum chamber that replicates the Fresnel number of an equivalent full-scale starshade mission, namely the flagship New Worlds Observer (NWO) configuration. This paper reports on recent upgrades to the testbed and comparisons of previously published experimental results with computer simulations - which show encouraging agreement to within a factor of 1.5. We also report on a new generation of sub-scale starshades that for the first time allow us to exactly match the Fresnel number of a full-scale mission.

  2. The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT): Recent Progress and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen A.; Frey, Bradley J.; Leisawitz, David T.; Lyon, Richard G.; Maher, Stephen F.; Martino, Anthony J.

    2008-01-01

    Continued research with the Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) has achieved several important milestones. We have moved WIIT into the Advanced Interferometry and Metrology (AIM) Laboratory at Goddard, and have characterized the testbed in this well-controlled environment. The system is now completely automated and we are in the process of acquiring large data sets for analysis. In this paper, we discuss these new developments and outline our future research directions. The WIIT testbed, combined with new data analysis techniques and algorithms, provides a demonstration of the technique of wide-field interferometric imaging, a powerful tool for future space-borne interferometers.

  3. Temperature and Dust Profiles During the Martian Global Dust Storm in 2007 from Mars Climate Sounder Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinboehl, A.; Kass, D. M.; Schofield, J. T.; McCleese, D. J.

    2014-07-01

    In 2007 the Mars Climate Sounder observed a global dust storm on Mars. We will present results that show the development of the dust storm over time and the vertical structure of atmospheric temperature and dust.

  4. Processor architecture for airborne SAR systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Digital processors for spaceborne imaging radars and application of the technology developed for airborne SAR systems are considered. Transferring algorithms and implementation techniques from airborne to spaceborne SAR processors offers obvious advantages. The following topics are discussed: (1) a quantification of the differences in processing algorithms for airborne and spaceborne SARs; and (2) an overview of three processors for airborne SAR systems.

  5. Evaluation of meteorological airborne Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, P. H.; Mueller, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper will discuss the capabilities of airborne Doppler radar for atmospheric sciences research. The evaluation is based on airborne and ground based Doppler radar observations of convective storms. The capability of airborne Doppler radar to measure horizontal and vertical air motions is evaluated. Airborne Doppler radar is shown to be a viable tool for atmospheric sciences research.

  6. Airborne agent concentration analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gelbard, Fred

    2004-02-03

    A method and system for inferring airborne contaminant concentrations in rooms without contaminant sensors, based on data collected by contaminant sensors in other rooms of a building, using known airflow interconnectivity data. The method solves a least squares problem that minimizes the difference between measured and predicted contaminant sensor concentrations with respect to an unknown contaminant release time. Solutions are constrained to providing non-negative initial contaminant concentrations in all rooms. The method can be used to identify a near-optimal distribution of sensors within the building, when then number of available sensors is less than the total number of rooms. This is achieved by having a system-sensor matrix that is non-singular, and by selecting that distribution which yields the lowest condition number of all the distributions considered. The method can predict one or more contaminant initial release points from the collected data.

  7. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  8. Technology Development for a Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, W.; Galbraith, C.; Hilliard, L.; Racette, P.; Thompson, E.

    2014-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) is being developed at Lincoln Laboratories and accommodated by the Goddard Space Flight Center for a flight opportunity on a NASA research aircraft. The term hyperspectral microwave is used to indicate an all-weather sounding instrument that performs equivalent to hyperspectral infrared sounders in clear air with vertical resolution of approximately 1 km. Deploying the HyMAS equipped scanhead with the existing Conical Scanning Microwave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) shortens the path to a flight demonstration. Hyperspectral microwave is achieved through the use of independent RF antennas that sample the volume of the Earths atmosphere through various levels of frequencies, thereby producing a set of dense, spaced vertical weighting functions.

  9. Underwater Acoustic Transponders Tracking While Mapping With A Multibeam Echo-Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Moustier, C. P.; Franzheim, A.; Testa, W.; Burns, J. M.; Foy, R.

    2010-12-01

    A 160 kHz multibeam echo-sounder was used to interrogate and receive the replies from custom-built miniature underwater acoustic transponders attached to the carapace of king crabs in Womens Bay, Alaska. This new application of multibeam echo-sounders combines acoustic tracking and mapping, thus providing environmental context to the tracking information. Each transponder replies with its own coded sequence that stands out from other echoes received by the sonar. Range and bearing of the replies from multiple transponders can be obtained in a single sonar ping. The king crab experiment was done in 25-35 m of water depth, and the system was successfully tested without animals at 190 m depth. Work supported by NOAA's Undersea Research Program Grant G4768, with field work support from NOAA-NMFS/AFSC/RACE and Electronic Navigation Ltd.

  10. GeoSTAR - A Synthetic Aperture Microwave Sounder for Geostationary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Wilson, William; Tanner, Alan; Kangaslahti, Pekka

    2004-01-01

    The Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR) is a new microwave atmospheric sounder under development. It will bring capabilities similar to those now available on low-earth orbiting environmental satellites to geostationary orbit - where such capabilities have not been available. GeoSTAR will synthesize the multimeter aperture needed to achieve the required spatial resolution, which will overcome the obstacle that has prevented a GEO microwave sounder from being implemented until now. The synthetic aperture approach has until recently not been feasible, due to the high power needed to operate the on-board high-speed massively parallel processing system required for 2D-synthesis, as well as a number of system and calibration obstacles. The development effort under way at JPL, with important contributions from the Goddard Space Flight Center and the University of Michigan, is intended to demonstrate the measurement concept and retire much of the technology risk.

  11. The Stratospheric Wind Ingrared Limb Sounder: Investigation of atmospheric dynamics and transport from Eos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccleese, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    The Stratospheric Wind Infrared Limb Sounder (SWIRLS) is one of the instruments in the atmospheric sounder package to be flown by NASA on the Earth Observing System (EOS) B platform in the late 1990's. SWIRLS is designed to measure the horizontal vector wind field, atmospheric temperature, and the abundances and distributions of ozone and nitrous oxide in the middle atmosphere. These measurements will constitute a dynamical climatology of the stratosphere covering time scales ranging from diurnal to interannual. In addition, the SWIRLS investigation will quantify the physical mechanisms responsible for the structure and variations of stratospheric circulation and temperature fields, including the transport of species, particularly ozone, heat and momentum. Existing data sets lack the combination of accuracy, global and temporal coverage, spatial resoultion and simultaneity required to distinguish unambiguosly between the roles of dynamical and chemical processes in determining the current distribution of ozone and its evolution in the future. The measurement objectives, measurement approach, and instrumentation of SWIRLS is described.

  12. Science Highlights and Lessons Learned from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Suda, Jarrod; Licata, Steve

    2011-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and companion instrument, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) on the NASA Earth Observing System Aqua spacecraft are facility instruments designed to support measurements of atmospheric temperature, water vapor and a wide range of atmospheric constituents in support of weather forecasting and scientific research in climate and atmospheric chemistry. This paper is an update to the science highlights from a paper by the authors released last year and also looks back at the lessons learned and future needs of the scientific community. These lessons not only include requirements on the measurements, but scientific shortfalls as well. Results from the NASA Science Community Workshop in IR and MW Sounders relating to AIRS and AMSU requirements and concerns are covered and reflect much of what has been learned and what is needed for future atmospheric sounding from Low Earth Orbit.

  13. Space Plasma Slab Studies using a new 3D Embedded Reconfigurable MPSoC Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekoulis, George

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents recent ionospheric slab thickness measurements using a new mobile digital sounder system. The datasets obtained have been compared to the results of existing sounders in operation. The data validity has been verified. The slab thickness data allow constant monitoring of the lower ionosphere revealing the dynamic trends of the physical processes being involved. The prototype offers a tremendous amount of hardware processing power and a previously unseen response time in servicing the input and output data interfaces. This has been enabled by incorporating the latest three-dimensional Ultrascale+ technologies available commercially from the reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) computing industry. Furthermore, a previously developed Network-on-Chip (NoC) design methodology has been incorporated for connecting and controlling the application driven multiprocessor network. The system determines electron distributions, aggregate electromagnetic field gradients and plasma current density.

  14. ULF wave occurrence statistics in a high-latitude HF Doppler sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, D. M.; Yeoman, T. K.; Jones, T. B.

    1999-06-01

    Ultra low frequency (ULF) wave activity in the high-latitude ionosphere has been observed by a high frequency (HF) Doppler sounder located at Tromsø, Norway (69.7°N, 19.2°E geographic coordinates). A statistical study of the occurrence of these waves has been undertaken from data collected between 1979 and 1984. The diurnal, seasonal, solar cycle and geomagnetic activity variations in occurrence have been investigated. The findings demonstrate that the ability of the sounder to detect ULF wave signatures maximises at the equinoxes and that there is a peak in occurrence in the morning sector. The occurrence rate is fairly insensitive to changes associated with the solar cycle but increases with the level of geomagnetic activity. As a result, it has been possible to characterise the way in which prevailing ionospheric and magnetospheric conditions affect such observations of ULF waves.

  15. Development of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) for NPOESS C1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brann, C.; Kunkee, D.

    2008-12-01

    The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System's Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is planned for flight on the first NPOESS mission (C1) in 2013. The C1 ATMS will be the second instrument of the ATMS series and will provide along with the companion Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles for NPOESS. The first flight of the ATMS is scheduled in 2010 on the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite, which is an early instrument risk reduction component of the NPOESS mission. This poster will focus on the development of the ATMS for C1 including aspects of the sensor calibration, antenna beam and RF characteristics and scanning. New design aspects of the C1 ATMS, required primarily by parts obsolescence, will also be addressed in this poster.

  16. Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, Sean; Freeborn, Dana; Crichton, Dan; Law, Emily; Kay-Im, Liz

    2011-01-01

    Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE) is JPL's internal investment to improve the return on airborne missions. Improve development performance of the data system. Improve return on the captured science data. The investment is to develop a common science data system capability for airborne instruments that encompasses the end-to-end lifecycle covering planning, provisioning of data system capabilities, and support for scientific analysis in order to improve the quality, cost effectiveness, and capabilities to enable new scientific discovery and research in earth observation.

  17. Passive microwave airborne measurements of the sea surface response at 89 and 157 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillou, C.; English, S. J.; Prigent, C.; Jones, D. C.

    1996-02-01

    Microwave measurements of the ocean-roughened surface have been collected during several recent international experiments using an airborne radiometer observing at 89 and 157 GHz. The purpose of this project is to test and validate the sea emissivity model required for the future humidity sounder, advanced microwave sounder unit B, over a wide range of atmospheric and surface conditions. In this paper, the measurements are statistically analyzed and compared with a geometric optics model with special emphasis on the sensitivity to the input parameters. This model is shown to provide good overall agreement with the data when coupled to the wave slope description of Cox and Munk (1954), the liquid water dielectric permittivity of Liebe et al. (1991), and the foam coverage of Monahan and Lu (1990), after increasing the theoretical predictions by a bias of about 2.5 K at 89 GHz and 1.7 K at 157 GHz. In addition, an empirical emissivity algorithm derived from low-frequency observations (Hollinger, 1971; Stogryn, 1972) and widely used for satellite retrieval purposes is shown to be inappropriate for use at millimeter frequencies.

  18. Airborne laser ranging system for monitoring regional crustal deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    Alternate approaches for making the atmospheric correction without benefit of a ground-based meteorological network are discussed. These include (1) a two-color channel that determines the atmospheric correction by measuring the time delay induced by dispersion between pulses at two optical frequencies; (2) single-color range measurements supported by an onboard temperature sounder, pressure altimeter readings, and surface measurements by a few existing meteorological facilities; and (3) inclusion of the quadratic polynomial coefficients as variables to be solved for along with target coordinates in the reduction of the single-color range data. It is anticipated that the initial Airborne Laser Ranging System (ALRS) experiments will be carried out in Southern California in a region bounded by Santa Barbara on the norht and the Mexican border on the south. The target area will be bounded by the Pacific Ocean to the west and will extend eastward for approximately 400 km. The unique ability of the ALRS to provide a geodetic 'snapshot' of such a large area will make it a valuable geophysical tool.

  19. Level 1B products from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, H. H.; Overoye, Ken

    2003-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) was launched May 4, 2002 on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft. A discussion is given of the objectives of the AIRS experiment, including requirements on the data products. We summarize the instrument characteristics, including sensitivity, noise, and spectral response, and preflight calibration results leading to the estimate of the calibration accuracy. The Level 1B calibration algorithm is presented as well as the results of in-flight stability and sensitivity measurements.

  20. Demonstrating the Operational Value of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Profiles in the Pre-Convective Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, Danielle; Zavodsky, Bradley; Stano, Geoffrey; Jedlovec, Gary

    2011-01-01

    The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) is a project to transition those NASA observations and research capabilities to the weather forecasting community to improve the short-term regional forecasts. This poster reviews the work to demonstrate the value to these forecasts of profiles from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on board the Aqua satellite with particular assistance in predicting thunderstorm forecasts by the profiles of the pre-convective environment.

  1. Analysis of testbed airborne multispectral scanner data from Superflux II. [Chesapeake Bay plume and James Shelf data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowker, D. E.; Hardesty, C. A.; Jobson, D. J.; Bahn, G. S.

    1981-01-01

    A test bed aircraft multispectral scanner (TBAMS) was flown during the James Shelf, Plume Scan, and Chesapeake Bay missions as part of the Superflux 2 experiment. Excellent correlations were obtained between water sample measurements of chlorophyll and sediment and TBAMS radiance data. The three-band algorithms used were insensitive to aircraft altitude and varying atmospheric conditions. This was particularly fortunate due to the hazy conditions during most of the experiments. A contour map of sediment, and also chlorophyll, was derived for the Chesapeake Bay plume along the southern Virginia-Carolina coastline. A sediment maximum occurs about 5 nautical miles off the Virginia Beach coast with a chlorophyll maximum slightly shoreward of this. During the James Shelf mission, a thermal anomaly (or front) was encountered about 50 miles from the coast. There was a minor variation in chlorophyll and sediment across the boundary. During the Chesapeake Bay mission, the Sun elevation increased from 50 degrees to over 70 degrees, interfering with the generation of data products.

  2. Optical Network Testbed-Key Enabler in Developing Current and Future Network Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukovic, Alex; Wu, Jing; Savoie, Michel; Hua, Heng; Campbell, Scott; Zhang, Hanxi

    2005-10-01

    The all-optical network (AON) demonstrator is a trial system-level testbed for the validation and verification of key network building blocks, scalable architectures, as well as control and management solutions for next-generation wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) networks. Developed at the Communications Research Centre (CRC) in Ottawa, ON, Canada, the AON testbed has already validated certain system-level concepts at the physical and upper layers. The paper describes the crucial role of the AON testbed in research, development, and "proof of concept" for both emerging optical technologies at the physical layer (performance characterization) and customer-managed networks at the upper layer (network management). Moreover, it is expected that the AON testbed will continue to be a valuable playground for future developments of emerging technologies, solutions, and applications.

  3. Description of the control system design for the SSF PMAD DC testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baez, Anastacio N.; Kimnach, Greg L.

    1991-01-01

    The Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) DC Testbed Control System for Space Station Freedom was developed using a top down approach based on classical control system and conventional terrestrial power utilities design techniques. The design methodology includes the development of a testbed operating concept. This operating concept describes the operation of the testbed under all possible scenarios. A unique set of operating states was identified and a description of each state, along with state transitions, was generated. Each state is represented by a unique set of attributes and constraints, and its description reflects the degree of system security within which the power system is operating. Using the testbed operating states description, a functional design for the control system was developed. This functional design consists of a functional outline, a text description, and a logical flowchart for all the major control system functions. Described here are the control system design techniques, various control system functions, and the status of the design and implementation.

  4. Response of a 2-story test-bed structure for the seismic evaluation of nonstructural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soroushian, Siavash; Maragakis, E. "Manos"; Zaghi, Arash E.; Rahmanishamsi, Esmaeel; Itani, Ahmad M.; Pekcan, Gokhan

    2016-03-01

    A full-scale, two-story, two-by-one bay, steel braced-frame was subjected to a number of unidirectional ground motions using three shake tables at the UNR-NEES site. The test-bed frame was designed to study the seismic performance of nonstructural systems including steel-framed gypsum partition walls, suspended ceilings and fire sprinkler systems. The frame can be configured to perform as an elastic or inelastic system to generate large floor accelerations or large inter story drift, respectively. In this study, the dynamic performance of the linear and nonlinear test-beds was comprehensively studied. The seismic performance of nonstructural systems installed in the linear and nonlinear test-beds were assessed during extreme excitations. In addition, the dynamic interactions of the test-bed and installed nonstructural systems are investigated.

  5. Carrier Plus: A Sensor Payload for Living With a Star Space Environment Testbed (LWS/SET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Cheryl; Moss, Steven; Howard, Regan; LaBel, Kenneth; Grycewicz, Tom; Barth, Janet; Brewer, Dana

    2003-01-01

    The paper discusses the following: 1. Living with a Star (LWS) program: space environment testbed (SET); natural space environment. 2. Carrier plus: goals and benefits. 3. ON-orbit sensor measurements. 4. Carrier plus architecture. 5. Participation in carrier plus.

  6. Preliminary Design of a Galactic Cosmic Ray Shielding Materials Testbed for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Berkebile, Stephen; Sechkar, Edward A.; Panko, Scott R.

    2012-01-01

    The preliminary design of a testbed to evaluate the effectiveness of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) shielding materials, the MISSE Radiation Shielding Testbed (MRSMAT) is presented. The intent is to mount the testbed on the Materials International Space Station Experiment-X (MISSE-X) which is to be mounted on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2016. A key feature is the ability to simultaneously test nine samples, including standards, which are 5.25 cm thick. This thickness will enable most samples to have an areal density greater than 5 g/sq cm. It features a novel and compact GCR telescope which will be able to distinguish which cosmic rays have penetrated which shielding material, and will be able to evaluate the dose transmitted through the shield. The testbed could play a pivotal role in the development and qualification of new cosmic ray shielding technologies.

  7. TPF Planet Detection Testbed: demonstrating deep, stable nulling and planet detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    The design of a testbed being built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is described. Simulatiung a dual chopped Bracewell interferometer, the testbed comprises a four beam star and planet source and nulling beam combiner. Since achieving a stable null is of great concern the testbed has many control systems designed to achieve stability of alignment and optical path difference over long periods of time. Comparisons between the testbed and the flight system are drawn and key performance parameters are discussed. The interaction between designs for phaseplate systems that achromatically invert the electric field of one of each pair of the incoming beams to achieve the null and the choice of fringe tracking schemes is also discussed.

  8. Independent Technology Assessment within the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, A. B.; Robinson, E.; Graybeal, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) is a community of science, data and information technology practitioners. ESIP's mission is to support the networking and data dissemination needs of our members and the global community. We do this by linking the functional sectors of education, observation, research and application with the ultimate use of Earth science. Amongst the services provided to ESIP members is the Testbed; a collaborative forum for the development of technology standards, services, protocols and best practices. ESIP has partnered with the NASA Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) program to integrate independent assessment of Testing Readiness Level (TRL) into the ESIP Testbed. In this presentation we will 1) demonstrate TRL assessment in the ESIP Testbed using three AIST projects, 2) discuss challenges and insights into creating an independent validation/verification framework and 3) outline the versatility of the ESIP Testbed as applied to other technology projects.

  9. A Real-Time Testbed for Satellite and Terrestrial Communications Experimentation and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angkasa, K.; Hamkins, J.; Jao, J.; Lay, N.; Satorius, E.; Zevallos, A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a programmable DSP-based testbed that is employed in the development and evaluation of blind demodulation algorithms to be used in wireless satellite or terrestrial communications systems. The testbed employs a graphical user interface (GUI) to provide independent, real-time control of modulator, channel and demodulator parameters and also affords realtime observation of various diagnostic signals such as carrier, timing recovery and decoder metrics. This interactive flexibility enables an operator to tailor the testbed parameters and environment to investigate the performance of any arbitrary communications system and channel model. Furthermore, a variety of digital and analog interfaces allow the testbed to be used either as a stand-alone digital modulator or receiver, thereby extending its experimental utility from the laboratory to the field.

  10. Estimation of volcanic ash refractive index from satellite infrared sounder data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, H.; Masuda, K.

    2014-12-01

    The properties of volcanic ash clouds (cloud height, optical depth, and effective radius of the particles) are planned to estimate from the data of the next Japanese geostationary meteorological satellite, Himawari 8/9. The volcanic ash algorithms, such as those proposed by NOAA/NESDIS and by EUMETSAT, are based on the infrared absorption properties of the ash particles, and the refractive index of a typical volcanic rock (i.e. andesite) has been used in the forward radiative transfer calculations. Because of a variety of the absorption properties for real volcanic ash particles at infrared wavelengths (9-13 micron), a large retrieval error may occur if the refractive index of the observed ash particles was different from that assumed in the retrieval algorithm. Satellite infrared sounder provides spectral information for the volcanic ash clouds. If we can estimate the refractive index of the ash particles from the infrared sounder data, a dataset of the optical properties for similar rock type of the volcanic ash can be prepared for the ash retrieval algorithms of geostationary/polar-orbiting satellites in advance. Furthermore, the estimated refractive index can be used for a diagnostic and a correction of the ash particle model in the retrieval algorithm within a period of the volcanic activities. In this work, optimal estimation of the volcanic ash parameters was conducted through the radiative transfer calculations for the window channels of the atmospheric infrared sounder (AIRS). The estimated refractive indices are proposed for the volcanic ash particles of some eruption events.

  11. Ultraspectral sounder data compression using error-detecting reversible variable-length coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bormin; Ahuja, Alok; Huang, Hung-Lung; Schmit, Timothy J.; Heymann, Roger W.

    2005-08-01

    Nonreversible variable-length codes (e.g. Huffman coding, Golomb-Rice coding, and arithmetic coding) have been used in source coding to achieve efficient compression. However, a single bit error during noisy transmission can cause many codewords to be misinterpreted by the decoder. In recent years, increasing attention has been given to the design of reversible variable-length codes (RVLCs) for better data transmission in error-prone environments. RVLCs allow instantaneous decoding in both directions, which affords better detection of bit errors due to synchronization losses over a noisy channel. RVLCs have been adopted in emerging video coding standards--H.263+ and MPEG-4--to enhance their error-resilience capabilities. Given the large volume of three-dimensional data that will be generated by future space-borne ultraspectral sounders (e.g. IASI, CrIS, and HES), the use of error-robust data compression techniques will be beneficial to satellite data transmission. In this paper, we investigate a reversible variable-length code for ultraspectral sounder data compression, and present its numerical experiments on error propagation for the ultraspectral sounder data. The results show that the RVLC performs significantly better error containment than JPEG2000 Part 2.

  12. Inter-Comparison of GOES-8 Imager and Sounder Skin Temperature Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Stephanie L.; Suggs, Ronnie J.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Skin temperature (ST) retrievals derived from geostationary satellite observations have both high temporal and spatial resolutions and are therefore useful for applications such as assimilation into mesoscale forecast models, nowcasting, and diagnostic studies. Our retrieval method uses a Physical Split Window technique requiring at least two channels within the longwave infrared window. On current GOES satellites, including GOES-11, there are two Imager channels within the required spectral interval. However, beginning with the GOES-M satellite the 12-um channel will be removed, leaving only one longwave channel. The Sounder instrument will continue to have three channels within the longwave window, and therefore ST retrievals will be derived from Sounder measurements. This research compares retrievals from the two instruments and evaluates the effects of the spatial resolution and sensor calibration differences on the retrievals. Both Imager and Sounder retrievals are compared to ground-truth data to evaluate the overall accuracy of the technique. An analysis of GOES-8 and GOES-11 intercomparisons is also presented.

  13. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS): The First 10 Months On-Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward; Lyu, C-H Joseph; Blackwell, Willaim; Leslie, R. Vince; Baker, Neal; Mo, Tsan; Sun, Ninghai; Bi, Li; Anderson, Kent; Landrum, Mike; DeAmici, Giovanni; Gu, Degui; Foo, Alex; Ibrahim, Wael; Robinson, Kris; Chidester, Lynn; Shiue, James

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is a new satellite microwave sounding sensor designed to provide operational weather agencies with atmospheric temperature and moisture profile information for global weather forecasting and climate applications. A TMS will continue the microwave sounding capabilities first provided by its predecessors, the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). The first ATMS was launched October 28, 2011 on board the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite. Microwave soundings by themselves are the highest-impact input data used by Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models, especially under cloudy sky conditions. ATMS has 22 channels spanning 23-183 GHz, closely following the channel set of the MSU, AMSU-A1/2, AMSU-B, Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), and Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB). All this is accomplished with approximately 1/4 the volume, 1/2 the mass, and 1/2 the power of the three AMSUs. A description of ATMS cal/val activities will be presented followed by examples of its performance after its first 10 months on orbit.

  14. Wide Field Collimator 2 (WFC2) for GOES Imager and Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etemad, Shahriar; Bremer, James C.; Zukowski, Barbara J.; Pasquale, Bert A.; zukowski, Tmitri J.; Prince, Robert E.; O'Neill, Patrick A.; Ross, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    Two of the GOES instruments, the Imager and the Sounder, perform scans of the Earth to provide a full disc picture of the Earth. To verify the entire scan process, an image of a target that covers an 18 deg. circular field-of-view is collimated and projected into the field of regard of each instrument. The Wide Field Collimator 2 (WFC2) has many advantages over its predecessor, WFC1, including lower thermal dissipation higher fir field MTF, smaller package, and a more intuitive (faster) focusing process. The illumination source is an LED array that emits in a narrow spectral band centered at 689 nm, within the visible spectral bands of the Imager and Sounder. The illumination level can be continuously adjusted electronically. Lower thermal dissipation eliminates the need for forced convection cooling and minimizes time to reach thermal stability. The lens system has been optimized for the illumination source spectral output and athernalized to remain in focus during bulk temperature changes within the laboratory environment. The MTF of the lens is higher than that of the WFC1 at the edge of FOV. The target is focused in three orthogonal motions, controlled by an ergonomic system that saves substantial time and produces a sharper focus. Key words: Collimator, GOES, Imager, Sounder, Projector

  15. A new multibeam echo sounder/sonar for fishery research applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Lars Nonboe; Berg, Sverre; Stenersen, Erik; Gammelsaeter, Ole Bernt; Lunde, Even Borte

    2003-10-01

    Fisheries scientists have for many years been requesting a calibrated multibeam echo sounder/sonar specially designed for fishery research applications. Simrad AS has, in cooperation with IFREMER, France, agreed on specifications for a multibeam echo sounder and with IMR, Norway for a multibeam sonar, and contracts were signed for development of such systems in January 2003. The systems have 800 transmitting and receiving channels with similar hardware, but different software, and are characterized by narrow beams, low-sidelobe levels, and operate in the frequency range 70-120 kHz. The echo sounder is designed for high operating flexibility, with 1 to 47 beams of approximately 2°, covering a maximum sector of 60°. In addition, normal split beam mode on 70 and 120 kHz with 7° beams for comparison with standard system is available. The sonar will be mounted on a drop keel, looking horizontally, covering a horizontal sector of +/-30°, and a vertical sector of 45°. Total number of beams is 500, 25 beams horizontally with a resolution of ~3°, and 20 beams vertically with a resolution of ~4°. Both systems are designed for accurate fish-stock assessment and fish-behavior studies.

  16. Calibration status of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder after eleven years in operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Denis A.; Weiler, Margie; Manning, Evan M.; Pagano, Thomas S.; Broberg, Steven E.; Aumann, Hartmut H.

    2013-09-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating array infrared hyperspectral sounder with 2378 channels from 3.75 to 15.4 microns with spectral resolution 1200 to 1400 depending on the channel. AIRS was designed as an aid to weather prediction and for atmospheric process studies. It produces profiles of atmospheric temperature and water vapor. Because of its spectral coverage and spectral resolution it is sensitive to a number of trace atmospheric constituents including CO2, CO, SO2, O3, and CH4. The AIRS sensitivity, stability, and long life have led to its use in climate process studies and climate model validation, both of which place far more stringent requirements on calibration than weather forecasting does. This paper describes results from several special calibration sequences, originally developed for prelaunch testing, that have been used to monitor the AIRS calibration accuracy and instrument health on-orbit, including the scan mirror, space view response, and channel health. It also describes reanalyses of pre-launch calibration data used to determine calibration parameters. Finally, it shows comparisons of AIRS radiometry with two other hyperspectral infrared sounders presently in space—IASI and CrIS.

  17. Comparison of Airborne Lidar and Multibeam Bathymetric Data in the Florida Reef Tract Along Broward County

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, N. E.; Burd, J. J.

    2003-12-01

    Although large, well-known concentrations of corals are found in deeper waters off Florida's eastern seaboard, most mapping of Florida's coral resources addresses the relatively shallow waters of the Florida Keys. To date, technological limitations precluded mapping corals in these deeper waters. Satellite imaging systems and natural color aerial photography, two mapping mainstays, are generally only effective in Florida waters shallower than 20 meters. Conservation of the northern portion of the Florida reef tract, which parallels the Atlantic coast in Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties, has been hampered by minimal or nonexistent coordinated management, monitoring, and mapping activities. In November 2000, the Simrad EM3000 multibeam system was used to collect data south of Port Everglades. Additionally, the Broward County shore protection project conducted a Laser Airborne Depth Sounder (LADS) survey in 2001. Wavelet analyses performed on overlapping transects of the two data sets compare the accuracy of reef bathymetry and complexity captured in the two data collection projects.

  18. Versatile simulation testbed for rotorcraft speech I/O system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Carol A.

    1986-01-01

    A versatile simulation testbed for the design of a rotorcraft speech I/O system is described in detail. The testbed will be used to evaluate alternative implementations of synthesized speech displays and speech recognition controls for the next generation of Army helicopters including the LHX. The message delivery logic is discussed as well as the message structure, the speech recognizer command structure and features, feedback from the recognizer, and random access to controls via speech command.

  19. Validation of the CERTS Microgrid Concept The CEC/CERTS MicrogridTestbed

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, David K.; Stevens, John; Lasseter, Robert H.; Eto,Joseph H.

    2006-06-01

    The development of test plans to validate the CERTSMicrogrid concept is discussed, including the status of a testbed.Increased application of Distributed Energy Resources on the Distributionsystem has the potential to improve performance, lower operational costsand create value. Microgrids have the potential to deliver these highvalue benefits. This presentation will focus on operationalcharacteristics of the CERTS microgrid, the partners in the project andthe status of the CEC/CERTS microgrid testbed. Index Terms DistributedGeneration, Distributed Resource, Islanding, Microgrid,Microturbine

  20. Large-scale structural analysis: The structural analyst, the CSM Testbed and the NAS System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Mccleary, Susan L.; Macy, Steven C.; Aminpour, Mohammad A.

    1989-01-01

    The Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) activity is developing advanced structural analysis and computational methods that exploit high-performance computers. Methods are developed in the framework of the CSM testbed software system and applied to representative complex structural analysis problems from the aerospace industry. An overview of the CSM testbed methods development environment is presented and some numerical methods developed on a CRAY-2 are described. Selected application studies performed on the NAS CRAY-2 are also summarized.

  1. A high-resolution, four-band SAR testbed with real-time image formation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, B.; Sander, G.; Thompson, M.; Burns, B.; Fellerhoff, R.; Dubbert, D.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the Twin-Otter SAR Testbed developed at Sandia National Laboratories. This SAR is a flexible, adaptable testbed capable of operation on four frequency bands: Ka, Ku, X, and VHF/UHF bands. The SAR features real-time image formation at fine resolution in spotlight and stripmap modes. High-quality images are formed in real time using the overlapped subaperture (OSA) image-formation and phase gradient autofocus (PGA) algorithms.

  2. Designing an autonomous helicopter testbed: From conception through implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Richard D.

    Miniature Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are currently being researched for a wide range of tasks, including search and rescue, surveillance, reconnaissance, traffic monitoring, fire detection, pipe and electrical line inspection, and border patrol to name only a few of the application domains. Although small/miniature UAVs, including both Vertical Takeoff and Landing (VTOL) vehicles and small helicopters, have shown great potential in both civilian and military domains, including research and development, integration, prototyping, and field testing, these unmanned systems/vehicles are limited to only a handful of university labs. For VTOL type aircraft the number is less than fifteen worldwide! This lack of development is due to both the extensive time and cost required to design, integrate and test a fully operational prototype as well as the shortcomings of published materials to fully describe how to design and build a "complete" and "operational" prototype system. This dissertation overcomes existing barriers and limitations by describing and presenting in great detail every technical aspect of designing and integrating a small UAV helicopter including the on-board navigation controller, capable of fully autonomous takeoff, waypoint navigation, and landing. The presented research goes beyond previous works by designing the system as a testbed vehicle. This design aims to provide a general framework that will not only allow researchers the ability to supplement the system with new technologies but will also allow researchers to add innovation to the vehicle itself. Examples include modification or replacement of controllers, updated filtering and fusion techniques, addition or replacement of sensors, vision algorithms, Operating Systems (OS) changes or replacements, and platform modification or replacement. This is supported by the testbed's design to not only adhere to the technology it currently utilizes but to be general enough to adhere to a multitude of

  3. New Air-Launched Small Missile (ALSM) Flight Testbed for Hypersonic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.; Lux, David P.; Stenger, Michael T.; Munson, Michael J.; Teate, George F.

    2007-01-01

    The Phoenix Air-Launched Small Missile (ALSM) flight testbed was conceived and is proposed to help address the lack of quick-turnaround and cost-effective hypersonic flight research capabilities. The Phoenix ALSM testbed results from utilization of the United States Navy Phoenix AIM-54 (Hughes Aircraft Company, now Raytheon Company, Waltham, Massachusetts) long-range, guided air-to-air missile and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) F-15B (McDonnell Douglas, now the Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) testbed airplane. The retirement of the Phoenix AIM-54 missiles from fleet operation has presented an opportunity for converting this flight asset into a new flight testbed. This cost-effective new platform will fill the gap in the test and evaluation of hypersonic systems for flight Mach numbers ranging from 3 to 5. Preliminary studies indicate that the Phoenix missile is a highly capable platform; when launched from a high-performance airplane, the guided Phoenix missile can boost research payloads to low hypersonic Mach numbers, enabling flight research in the supersonic-to-hypersonic transitional flight envelope. Experience gained from developing and operating the Phoenix ALSM testbed will assist the development and operation of future higher-performance ALSM flight testbeds as well as responsive microsatellite-small-payload air-launched space boosters.

  4. Mounted Smartphones as Measurement and Control Platforms for Motor-Based Laboratory Test-Beds.

    PubMed

    Frank, Jared A; Brill, Anthony; Kapila, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory education in science and engineering often entails the use of test-beds equipped with costly peripherals for sensing, acquisition, storage, processing, and control of physical behavior. However, costly peripherals are no longer necessary to obtain precise measurements and achieve stable feedback control of test-beds. With smartphones performing diverse sensing and processing tasks, this study examines the feasibility of mounting smartphones directly to test-beds to exploit their embedded hardware and software in the measurement and control of the test-beds. This approach is a first step towards replacing laboratory-grade peripherals with more compact and affordable smartphone-based platforms, whose interactive user interfaces can engender wider participation and engagement from learners. Demonstrative cases are presented in which the sensing, computation, control, and user interaction with three motor-based test-beds are handled by a mounted smartphone. Results of experiments and simulations are used to validate the feasibility of mounted smartphones as measurement and feedback control platforms for motor-based laboratory test-beds, report the measurement precision and closed-loop performance achieved with such platforms, and address challenges in the development of platforms to maintain system stability. PMID:27556464

  5. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS): First Year On-Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E. J.; Lyu, C.; Blackwell, W. J.; Leslie, V.; Baker, N.; Mo, T.; Sun, N.; Bi, L.; Anderson, K.; Landrum, M.; De Amici, G.; Gu, D.; Foo, A.; Ibrahim, W.; Robinson, K.

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is a new satellite microwave sounding sensor designed to provide operational weather agencies with atmospheric temperature and moisture profile information for global weather forecasting and climate applications. ATMS will continue the microwave sounding capabilities first provided by its predecessors, the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). The first ATMS was launched October 28, 2011 on board the Suomi-NPOESS Preparatory Project (S-NPP) satellite and has just finished its first year on orbit. Microwave soundings by themselves are the highest-impact input data used by Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models; and ATMS, when combined with the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), forms the Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS). The microwave soundings help meet NWP sounding requirements under cloudy sky conditions and provide key profile information near the surface. Designed & built by Aerojet Corporation in Azusa, California, (now Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems), ATMS has 22 channels spanning 23—183 GHz, closely following the channel set of the MSU, AMSU-A1 and A2, AMSU-B, Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), and Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB). It continues their cross-track scanning geometry, but for the first time, provides Nyquist sample spacing. All this is accomplished with approximately one quarter the volume, one half the mass, and one half the power of the three AMSUs. A summary description of the ATMS design will be presented. Post-launch calibration/validation activities include geolocation determination, radiometric calibration using the on-board warm targets and cold space views, simultaneous observations by microwave sounders on other satellites, comparison vs. pre-launch thermovacuum test performance; observations vs. atmospheric model predicted radiances, and comparisons of soundings vs. radiosondes. Brief descriptions of these

  6. Profiling the atmosphere with the airborne radio occultation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muradyan, Paytsar

    successfully retrieved out of the 19 possible cases. Profiles from rising occultations were retrieved with comparable quality to setting occultations. The only missed occultations were due to missing or poor quality ancillary navigation data from the global tracking network and the aircraft turns. We demonstrate that the OL tracking receiver performs much better than the conventional receivers, consistently tracking as low as 0.5 to 3.4 km. Based on this success rate and the improved global network coverage since 2008 providing navigation data bits, the airborne RO system on a straight flight path today would achieve 3 occultations per hour of flight time. The refractivity profiles retrieved with a geometric optics method show a bias with respect to the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) analysis profiles. The data were compared with a co-located spaceborne RO profile, and although the airborne data shows a larger bias with respect to ECMWF profiles, there is a correlation of the vertical variations observed with both datasets. The standard deviation of the difference with the ECMWF profile refractivity is less than 1 % in terms of refractivity. The comparison of the retrieved refractivity and a co-located radiosonde station profile shows a bias as well, with a standard deviation of 2.3 % from 5-12 km altitude. Future efforts should be directed at resolving the source of the bias, in which case the data will be quite useful for assimilation. The differences are within the range of the observation errors typically assigned to RO data below 10 km during assimilation. Signal tracking and retrieval in the lower troposphere continues to be a major challenge for spaceborne RO, and has limited the impact of all RO data in NWP in the lower troposphere. Full bandwidth signals from airborne measurements could provide a testbed for improving the quality of future spaceborne RO measurements. The airborne RO technique could potentially be implemented on commercial

  7. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our

  8. Microburst characteristics determined from 1988-1991 TDWR testbed measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biron, Paul J.; Isaminger, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents some recent results germane to airborne windshear system design and certification. We first discuss the data analysis procedure and the associated caveats. The relative frequency, severity, and duration of microburst hazards at the various locations is important for determining the tradeoffs between safety and operational impact of false alerts which are encompassed in detection system thresholds. We then consider radar/lidar design issues such as reflective in microbursts and the vertical structure of outflows. Finally, we provide recent surface thermodynamic data associated with microbursts.

  9. The Living With a Star Space Environment Testbeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, D.; Barth, J.; Label, K.

    The Living With a Star (LWS) Space Environment Testbeds (SET) are a series of projects that contain investigations that collect data in space and use it to provide products that improve the engineering approach to accommodate and/or mitigate the effects of solar variability on spacecraft design and operations. The improvements reduce requirements for design and operations margins to account for the uncertainties in the space environment and its effects. Reducing the requirements will increase the payload fraction, permit the use of a smaller launch vehicle (thereby reducing mission cost), and/or enable routine operations in new segments of the environment (such as middle Earth orbit, the region from 2000 km to 10,000 km) at costs similar to those for operations below 2000 km. A new SET project starts about very two years when investigations are selected. Five categories of investigations included in SET projects are: (1) Characterization of the space environment in the presence of a spacecraft; (2) Definition of the mechanisms for materials' degradation and the performance characterization of materials designed for shielding from ionizing radiation; (3) Accommodation and/or mitigation of space environment effects for detectors/sensors; (4) Performance improvement methodology for microelectronics used in space; and, (5) Accommodation and/or mitigation of charging/discharging effects on spacecraft and spacecraft components. All SET projects use secondary access to space and partnering to leverage resources. An overview of the SET segment of the LWS program will be presented.

  10. Priority scheme planning for the robust SSM/PMAD testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elges, Michael R.; Ashworth, Barry R.

    Whenever mixing priorities of manually controlled resources with those of autonomously controlled resources, the space station module power management and distribution (SSM/PMAD) environment requires cooperating expert system interaction between the planning function and the priority manager. The elements and interactions of the SSM/PMAD planning and priority management functions are presented. Their adherence to cooperating for common achievement are described. In the SSM/PMAD testbed these actions are guided by having a system planning function, KANT, which has insight to the executing system and its automated database. First, the user must be given access to all information which may have an effect on the desired outcome. Second, the fault manager element, FRAMES, must be informed as to the change so that correct diagnoses and operations take place if and when faults occur. Third, some element must engage as mediator for selection of resources and actions to be added or removed at the user's request. This is performed by the priority manager, LPLMS. Lastly, the scheduling mechanism, MAESTRO, must provide future schedules adhering to the user modified resource base.

  11. A Test-Bed Configuration: Toward an Autonomous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocaña, F.; Castillo, M.; Uranga, E.; Ponz, J. D.; TBT Consortium

    2015-09-01

    In the context of the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) program of ESA, it is foreseen to deploy several large robotic telescopes in remote locations to provide surveillance and tracking services for man-made as well as natural near-Earth objects (NEOs). The present project, termed Telescope Test Bed (TBT) is being developed under ESA's General Studies and Technology Programme, and shall implement a test-bed for the validation of an autonomous optical observing system in a realistic scenario, consisting of two telescopes located in Spain and Australia, to collect representative test data for precursor NEO services. In order to fulfill all the security requirements for the TBT project, the use of a autonomous emergency system (AES) is foreseen to monitor the control system. The AES will monitor remotely the health of the observing system and the internal and external environment. It will incorporate both autonomous and interactive actuators to force the protection of the system (i.e., emergency dome close out).

  12. Articulated navigation testbed (ANT): an example of adaptable intrinsic mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosinsky, Chris A.; Hanna, Doug M.; Penzes, Steven G.

    2000-07-01

    An important but oft overlooked aspect of any robotic system is the synergistic benefit of designing the chassis to have high intrinsic mobility which complements rather than limits, its system capabilities. This novel concept continues to be investigated by the Defence Research Establishment Suffield (DRES) with the Articulated Navigation Testbed (ANT) Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV). The ANT demonstrates high mobility through the combination of articulated steering and a hybrid locomotion scheme which utilizes individually powered wheels on the edge of rigid legs; legs which are capable of approximately 450 degrees of rotation. The configuration can be minimally configured as a 4x4 and modularly expanded to 6x6, 8x8, and so on. This enhanced mobility configuration permits pose control and novel maneuvers such as stepping, bridging, crawling, etc. Resultant mobility improvements, particularly in unstructured and off-road environments, will reduce the resolution with which the UGV sensor systems must perceive its surroundings and decreases the computational requirements of the UGV's perception systems1 for successful semi-autonomous or autonomous terrain negotiation. This paper reviews critical vehicle developments leading up to the ANT concept, describes the basis for its configuration and speculates on the impact of the intrinsic mobility concept for UGV effectiveness.

  13. Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph: Visible Nulling Coronagraph Testbed Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    The Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) is a proposed NASA Discovery mission to image and characterize extrasolar giant planets in orbits with semi-major axes between 2 and 10 AU. EPIC will provide insights into the physical nature of a variety of planets in other solar systems complimenting radial velocity (RV) and astrometric planet searches. It will detect and characterize the atmospheres of planets identified by radial velocity surveys, determine orbital inclinations and masses, characterize the atmospheres around A and F stars, observed the inner spatial structure and colors of inner Spitzer selected debris disks. EPIC would be launched to heliocentric Earth trailing drift-away orbit, with a 3-year mission lifetime ( 5 year goal) and will revisit planets at least three times at intervals of 9 months. The starlight suppression approach consists of a visible nulling coronagraph (VNC) that enables high order starlight suppression in broadband light. To demonstrate the VNC approach and advance it's technology readiness the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and Lockheed-Martin have developed a laboratory VNC and have demonstrated white light nulling. We will discuss our ongoing VNC work and show the latest results from the VNC testbed,

  14. Development of a Testbed for Distributed Satellite Command and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zetocha, Paul; Brito, Margarita

    2002-01-01

    At the Air Force Research Laboratory's Space Vehicles Directorate we are investigating and developing architectures for commanding and controlling a cluster of cooperating satellites through prototype development for the TechSat-21 program. The objective of this paper is to describe a distributed satellite testbed that is currently under development and to summarize near term prototypes being implemented for cluster command and control. To design, develop, and test our architecture we are using eight PowerPC 750 VME-based single board computers, representing eight satellites. Each of these computers is hosting the OSE(TM) real-time operating system from Enea Systems. At the core of our on-board cluster manager is ObjectAgent. ObjectAgent is an agent-based object-oriented framework for flight systems, which is particularly suitable for distributed applications. In order to handle communication with the ground as well as to assist with the cluster management we are using the Spacecraft Command Language (SCL). SCL is also at the centerpiece of our ground control station and handles cluster commanding, telemetry decommutation, state-of-health monitoring, and Fault Detection, Isolation, and Resolution (FDIR). For planning and scheduling activities we are currently using ASPEN from NASA/JPL. This paper will describe each of the above components in detail and then present the prototypes being implemented.

  15. Wavefront Control Toolbox for James Webb Space Telescope Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiri, Ron; Aronstein, David L.; Smith, Jeffery Scott; Dean, Bruce H.; Sabatke, Erin

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a Matlab toolbox for wavefront control of optical systems. We have applied this toolbox to the optical models of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in general and to the JWST Testbed Telescope (TBT) in particular, implementing both unconstrained and constrained wavefront optimization to correct for possible misalignments present on the segmented primary mirror or the monolithic secondary mirror. The optical models implemented in Zemax optical design program and information is exchanged between Matlab and Zemax via the Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE) interface. The model configuration is managed using the XML protocol. The optimization algorithm uses influence functions for each adjustable degree of freedom of the optical mode. The iterative and non-iterative algorithms have been developed to converge to a local minimum of the root-mean-square (rms) of wavefront error using singular value decomposition technique of the control matrix of influence functions. The toolkit is highly modular and allows the user to choose control strategies for the degrees of freedom to be adjusted on a given iteration and wavefront convergence criterion. As the influence functions are nonlinear over the control parameter space, the toolkit also allows for trade-offs between frequency of updating the local influence functions and execution speed. The functionality of the toolbox and the validity of the underlying algorithms have been verified through extensive simulations.

  16. Priority scheme planning for the robust SSM/PMAD testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elges, Michael R.; Ashworth, Barry R.

    1991-01-01

    Whenever mixing priorities of manually controlled resources with those of autonomously controlled resources, the space station module power management and distribution (SSM/PMAD) environment requires cooperating expert system interaction between the planning function and the priority manager. The elements and interactions of the SSM/PMAD planning and priority management functions are presented. Their adherence to cooperating for common achievement are described. In the SSM/PMAD testbed these actions are guided by having a system planning function, KANT, which has insight to the executing system and its automated database. First, the user must be given access to all information which may have an effect on the desired outcome. Second, the fault manager element, FRAMES, must be informed as to the change so that correct diagnoses and operations take place if and when faults occur. Third, some element must engage as mediator for selection of resources and actions to be added or removed at the user's request. This is performed by the priority manager, LPLMS. Lastly, the scheduling mechanism, MAESTRO, must provide future schedules adhering to the user modified resource base.

  17. TORCH Computational Reference Kernels - A Testbed for Computer Science Research

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Alex; Williams, Samuel Webb; Madduri, Kamesh; Ibrahim, Khaled; Bailey, David H.; Demmel, James W.; Strohmaier, Erich

    2010-12-02

    For decades, computer scientists have sought guidance on how to evolve architectures, languages, and programming models in order to improve application performance, efficiency, and productivity. Unfortunately, without overarching advice about future directions in these areas, individual guidance is inferred from the existing software/hardware ecosystem, and each discipline often conducts their research independently assuming all other technologies remain fixed. In today's rapidly evolving world of on-chip parallelism, isolated and iterative improvements to performance may miss superior solutions in the same way gradient descent optimization techniques may get stuck in local minima. To combat this, we present TORCH: A Testbed for Optimization ResearCH. These computational reference kernels define the core problems of interest in scientific computing without mandating a specific language, algorithm, programming model, or implementation. To compliment the kernel (problem) definitions, we provide a set of algorithmically-expressed verification tests that can be used to verify a hardware/software co-designed solution produces an acceptable answer. Finally, to provide some illumination as to how researchers have implemented solutions to these problems in the past, we provide a set of reference implementations in C and MATLAB.

  18. Analyses of liquid rocket instabilities using a computational testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Grenda, J.M.; Venkateswaran, S.; Merkle, C.L.

    1994-12-31

    A synergistic hierarchy of numerical and analytical models is used to simulate three-dimensional combustion instability in liquid rocket engines. Existing phenomenological models for vaporization and atomization are used in quasi-steady form to describe the liquid phase processes. In addition to a complete nonlinear numerical model, linearized numerical and closed-form analytical models are used to validate the numerical solution and to obtain initial estimates of stable and unstable operating regimes. All three models are fully three dimensional. The simultaneous application of these approaches permits computationally inexpensive surveys to be performed in rapid parametric fashion for a wide variety of operating conditions. Stability maps obtained from the computations indicate that, when droplet temperature fluctuations are present, vaporization and atomization can drive instability. The presence of droplet temperature fluctuations introduces areas of instability for smaller drop sizes and colder drop temperatures. The computational procedures are demonstrated to accurately capture the three-dimensional wave propagation within the combustion chamber. The validated results indicate excellent amplitude and phase agreement for properly selected grid resolution. The nonlinear model demonstrates limit cycle behavior for growing waves and wave steepening for large-amplitude disturbances. The current work represents a validated computational testbed upon which more comprehensive physical modeling may be incorporated.

  19. Aerospace Engineering Systems and the Advanced Design Technologies Testbed Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDalsem, William R.; Livingston, Mary E.; Melton, John E.; Torres, Francisco J.; Stremel, Paul M.

    1999-01-01

    Continuous improvement of aerospace product development processes is a driving requirement across much of the aerospace community. As up to 90% of the cost of an aerospace product is committed during the first 10% of the development cycle, there is a strong emphasis on capturing, creating, and communicating better information (both requirements and performance) early in the product development process. The community has responded by pursuing the development of computer-based systems designed to enhance the decision-making capabilities of product development individuals and teams. Recently, the historical foci on sharing the geometrical representation and on configuration management are being augmented: 1) Physics-based analysis tools for filling the design space database; 2) Distributed computational resources to reduce response time and cost; 3) Web-based technologies to relieve machine-dependence; and 4) Artificial intelligence technologies to accelerate processes and reduce process variability. The Advanced Design Technologies Testbed (ADTT) activity at NASA Ames Research Center was initiated to study the strengths and weaknesses of the technologies supporting each of these trends, as well as the overall impact of the combination of these trends on a product development event. Lessons learned and recommendations for future activities are reported.

  20. Finite Element Modeling of the NASA Langley Aluminum Testbed Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Pritchard, Joselyn I.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Langley Aluminum Testbed Cylinder (ATC) was designed to serve as a universal structure for evaluating structural acoustic codes, modeling techniques and optimization methods used in the prediction of aircraft interior noise. Finite element models were developed for the components of the ATC based on the geometric, structural and material properties of the physical test structure. Numerically predicted modal frequencies for the longitudinal stringer, ring frame and dome component models, and six assembled ATC configurations were compared with experimental modal survey data. The finite element models were updated and refined, using physical parameters, to increase correlation with the measured modal data. Excellent agreement, within an average 1.5% to 2.9%, was obtained between the predicted and measured modal frequencies of the stringer, frame and dome components. The predictions for the modal frequencies of the assembled component Configurations I through V were within an average 2.9% and 9.1%. Finite element modal analyses were performed for comparison with 3 psi and 6 psi internal pressurization conditions in Configuration VI. The modal frequencies were predicted by applying differential stiffness to the elements with pressure loading and creating reduced matrices for beam elements with offsets inside external superelements. The average disagreement between the measured and predicted differences for the 0 psi and 6 psi internal pressure conditions was less than 0.5%. Comparably good agreement was obtained for the differences between the 0 psi and 3 psi measured and predicted internal pressure conditions.

  1. Virtual Testbed Aerospace Operations Center (VT-AOC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunaway, Bradley; Broadstock, Tom

    2003-09-01

    The Air Force is conducting research in new technologies for next-generation Aerospace Operations Centers (AOCs). The Virtual Testbed Aerospace Operations Center (VT-AOC) will support advanced research in information technologies that operate in or are closely tied to AOCs. The VT-AOC will provide a context for developing, demonstrating, and testing new processes and tools in a realistic environment. To generate the environment, the VT-AOC will incorporate multiple mixed-resolution simulations that are capable of driving existing and future AOC command and control (C2) systems. The VT-AOC will provide the capability to capture existing or proposed C2 processes and then evaluate them operating in conjunction with new technologies. The VT-AOC will also be capable of connecting with other facilities to support increasingly more complex experiments and demonstrations. Together, these capabilities support key initiatives such as Agile Research and Development/Science and Technology (R&D/S&T), Predictive Battlespace Awareness, and Effects-Based Operations.

  2. User's guide to the Reliability Estimation System Testbed (REST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Rifkin, Adam

    1992-01-01

    The Reliability Estimation System Testbed is an X-window based reliability modeling tool that was created to explore the use of the Reliability Modeling Language (RML). RML was defined to support several reliability analysis techniques including modularization, graphical representation, Failure Mode Effects Simulation (FMES), and parallel processing. These techniques are most useful in modeling large systems. Using modularization, an analyst can create reliability models for individual system components. The modules can be tested separately and then combined to compute the total system reliability. Because a one-to-one relationship can be established between system components and the reliability modules, a graphical user interface may be used to describe the system model. RML was designed to permit message passing between modules. This feature enables reliability modeling based on a run time simulation of the system wide effects of a component's failure modes. The use of failure modes effects simulation enhances the analyst's ability to correctly express system behavior when using the modularization approach to reliability modeling. To alleviate the computation bottleneck often found in large reliability models, REST was designed to take advantage of parallel processing on hypercube processors.

  3. NN-SITE: A remote monitoring testbed facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kadner, S.; White, R.; Roman, W.; Sheely, K.; Puckett, J.; Ystesund, K.

    1997-08-01

    DOE, Aquila Technologies, LANL and SNL recently launched collaborative efforts to create a Non-Proliferation Network Systems Integration and Test (NN-Site, pronounced N-Site) facility. NN-Site will focus on wide area, local area, and local operating level network connectivity including Internet access. This facility will provide thorough and cost-effective integration, testing and development of information connectivity among diverse operating systems and network topologies prior to full-scale deployment. In concentrating on instrument interconnectivity, tamper indication, and data collection and review, NN-Site will facilitate efforts of equipment providers and system integrators in deploying systems that will meet nuclear non-proliferation and safeguards objectives. The following will discuss the objectives of ongoing remote monitoring efforts, as well as the prevalent policy concerns. An in-depth discussion of the Non-Proliferation Network Systems Integration and Test facility (NN-Site) will illuminate the role that this testbed facility can perform in meeting the objectives of remote monitoring efforts, and its potential contribution in promoting eventual acceptance of remote monitoring systems in facilities worldwide.

  4. High-performance testbed network with ATM technology for neuroimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. K.; Arenson, Ronald L.; Dillon, William P.; Lou, Shyhliang A.; Bazzill, Todd M.; Wong, Albert W. K.; Gould, Robert G.

    1995-05-01

    Today's teleradiology transmits images with telephone lines (from 14400 to 1.5 Mbits/sec). However, the large amount of data commonly produced during an MR or CT procedure can limit some applications of teleradiology. This paper is a progress report of a high speed (155 Mbits/sec) testbed teleradiology network using asynchronous transfer mode (ATM OC 3) technology for neuroradiology. The network connects radiology departments of four affiliated hospitals and one MR imaging center within the San Francisco Bay Area with ATM switches through the Pacific Bell ATM main switch at Oakland, California; they are: University of California at San Francisco Hospital and Medical School (UCSF), Mt. Zion Hospital (MZH), San Francisco VA Medical Center (SFVAMC), San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH), and San Francisco Magnetic Resonance Imaging Center (SFMRC). UCSF serves as the expert center and the ATM switch is connected to its PACS infrastructure, the others are considered as satellite sites. Images and related patient data are transmitted from the four satellite sites to the expert canter for interpretation and consultation.

  5. An integrated dexterous robotic testbed for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Larry C.; Nguyen, Hai; Sauer, Edward

    1992-01-01

    An integrated dexterous robotic system was developed as a testbed to evaluate various robotics technologies for advanced space applications. The system configuration consisted of a Utah/MIT Dexterous Hand, a PUMA 562 arm, a stereo vision system, and a multiprocessing computer control system. In addition to these major subsystems, a proximity sensing system was integrated with the Utah/MIT Hand to provide capability for non-contact sensing of a nearby object. A high-speed fiber-optic link was used to transmit digitized proximity sensor signals back to the multiprocessing control system. The hardware system was designed to satisfy the requirements for both teleoperated and autonomous operations. The software system was designed to exploit parallel processing capability, pursue functional modularity, incorporate artificial intelligence for robot control, allow high-level symbolic robot commands, maximize reusable code, minimize compilation requirements, and provide an interactive application development and debugging environment for the end users. An overview is presented of the system hardware and software configurations, and implementation is discussed of subsystem functions.

  6. Preparing for LISA Data: The Testbed for LISA Analysis Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Lee Samuel; Benacquista, Matthew J.; Larson, Shane L.; Rubbo, Louis J.

    2006-11-01

    The Testbed for LISA Analysis (TLA) Project aims to facilitate the development, validation, and comparison of different methods for LISA science data analysis by the broad LISA Science Community to meet the special challenges that LISA poses. It includes a well-defined Simulated LISA Data Product (SLDP), which provides a clean interface between the modeling of LISA, the preparation of LISA data, and the analysis of the LISA science data stream; a web-based clearinghouse (at ) providing SLDP software libraries, relevant software, papers and other documentation, and a repository for SLDP data sets; a set of mailing lists for communication between and among LISA simulator developers and LISA science analysts; a problem tracking system for SLDP support; and a program of workshops to allow the burgeoning LISA science community to further refine the SLDP definition, define specific LISA science analysis challenges, and report their results. This proceedings paper describes the TLA Project, the resources it provides immediately, its future plans, and invites the participation of the broader community in the furtherance of its goals.

  7. Airborne GLM Simulator (FEGS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, M.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Christian, H. J., Jr.; Stewart, M. F.; Podgorny, S.; Corredor, D.

    2015-12-01

    Real time lightning observations have proven to be useful for advanced warning and now-casting of severe weather events. In anticipation of the launch of the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) onboard GOES-R that will provide continuous real time observations of total (both cloud and ground) lightning, the Fly's Eye GLM Simulator (FEGS) is in production. FEGS is an airborne instrument designed to provide cal/val measurements for GLM from high altitude aircraft. It consists of a 5 x 5 array of telescopes each with a narrow passband filter to isolate the 777.4 nm neutral oxygen emission triplet radiated by lightning. The telescopes will measure the optical radiance emitted by lightning that is transmitted through the cloud top with a temporal resolution of 10 μs. When integrated on the NASA ER-2 aircraft, the FEGS array with its 90° field-of-view will observe a cloud top area nearly equal to a single GLM pixel. This design will allow FEGS to determine the temporal and spatial variation of light that contributes to a GLM event detection. In addition to the primary telescope array, the instrument includes 5 supplementary optical channels that observe alternate spectral emission features and will enable the use of FEGS for interesting lightning physics applications. Here we present an up-to-date summary of the project and a description of its scientific applications.

  8. Airborne rescue system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslim, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The airborne rescue system includes a boom with telescoping members for extending a line and collar to a rescue victim. The boom extends beyond the tip of the helicopter rotor so that the victim may avoid the rotor downwash. The rescue line is played out and reeled in by winch. The line is temporarily retained under the boom. When the boom is extended, the rescue line passes through clips. When the victim dons the collar and the tension in the line reaches a predetermined level, the clips open and release the line from the boom. Then the rescue line can form a straight line between the victim and the winch, and the victim can be lifted to the helicopter. A translator is utilized to push out or pull in the telescoping members. The translator comprises a tape and a rope. Inside the telescoping members the tape is curled around the rope and the tape has a tube-like configuration. The tape and rope are provided from supply spools.

  9. Instrument technology for magnetosphere plasma imaging from high Earth orbit. Design of a radio plasma sounder. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, D.M.; Reinisch, B.W.

    1995-01-01

    The use of radio sounding techniques for the study of the ionospheric plasma dates back to G. Briet and M. A. Tuve in 1926. Ground based swept frequency sounders can monitor the electron number density (N{sub e}) as a function of height (the N{sub e} profile). These early instruments evolved into a global network that produced high-resolution displays of echo time delay vs frequency on 35-mm film. These instruments provided the foundation for the success of the International Geophysical Year. The Alouette and International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) programs pioneered the used of spaceborne, swept frequency sounders to obtain N{sub e} profiles of the topside of the ionosphere, from a position above the electron density maximum. Repeated measurements during the orbit produced an orbital plane contour which routinely provided density measurements to within 10%. The Alouette/ISIS experience also showed that even with a high powered transmitter (compared to the low power sounder possible today) a radio sounder can be compatible with other imaging instruments on the same satellite. Digital technology was used on later spacecraft developed by the Japanese (the EXOS C and D) and the Soviets (Intercosmos 19 and Cosmos 1809). However, a full coherent pulse compression and spectral integrating capability, such as exist today for ground-based sounders (Reinisch et al.), has never been put into space. NASA`s 1990 Space Physics Strategy Implementation Study `The NASA Space Physics Program from 1995 to 2010` suggested using radio sounders to study the plasmasphere and the magnetopause and its boundary layers (Green and Fung). Both the magnetopause and plasmasphere, as well as the cusp and boundary layers, can be observed by a radio sounder in a high-inclination polar orbit with an apogee greater than 6 R{sub e} (Reiff et al.; Calvert et al.).

  10. Probing Shallow Aquifers in Northern Kuwait Using Airborne Sounding Radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heggy, E.; Fadlelmawla, A.; Farr, T. G.; Al-Rashed, M.

    2011-12-01

    Most of the global warming observations, scientific interest and data analyses have concentrated on the earth Polar Regions and forested areas, as they provide direct measurable impacts of large scale environmental changes. Unfortunately, the arid environments, which represent ~20% of the earth surface, have remained poorly studied. Yet water rarity and freshness, drastic changes in rainfall, flash floods, high rates of aquifer discharge and an accelerated large-scale desertification process are all alarming signs that suggest a substantial large-scale climatic variation in those areas that can be correlated to the global change that is affecting the volatile dynamic in arid zones. Unfortunately the correlations, forcings and feedbacks between the relevant processes (precipitation, surface fresh water, aquifer discharge, sea water rise and desertification) in these zones remain poorly observed, modeled, let alone understood. Currently, local studies are often oriented toward understanding small-scale or regional water resources and neither benefit from nor feedback to the global monitoring of water vapor, precipitation and soil moisture in arid and semi-arid areas. Furthermore techniques to explore deep subsurface water on a large scale in desertic environments remain poorly developed making current understanding of earth paleo-environment, water assessment and exploration efforts poorly productive and out-phased with current and future needs to quantitatively understand the evolution of earth water balance. To address those deficiencies we performed a comprehensive test mapping of shallow subsurface hydro-geological structures in the western Arabic peninsula in Kuwait, using airborne low frequency sounding radars with the main objectives to characterize shallow fossil aquifers in term of depth, sizes and water freshness. In May 2011, an experimental airborne radar sounder operating at 50 MHz was deployed in Kuwait and demonstrated an ability to penetrate down to

  11. Description of the SSF PMAD DC testbed control system data acquisition function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baez, Anastacio N.; Mackin, Michael; Wright, Theodore

    1992-01-01

    The NASA LeRC in Cleveland, Ohio has completed the development and integration of a Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) DC Testbed. This testbed is a reduced scale representation of the end to end, sources to loads, Space Station Freedom Electrical Power System (SSF EPS). This unique facility is being used to demonstrate DC power generation and distribution, power management and control, and system operation techniques considered to be prime candidates for the Space Station Freedom. A key capability of the testbed is its ability to be configured to address system level issues in support of critical SSF program design milestones. Electrical power system control and operation issues like source control, source regulation, system fault protection, end-to-end system stability, health monitoring, resource allocation, and resource management are being evaluated in the testbed. The SSF EPS control functional allocation between on-board computers and ground based systems is evolving. Initially, ground based systems will perform the bulk of power system control and operation. The EPS control system is required to continuously monitor and determine the current state of the power system. The DC Testbed Control System consists of standard controllers arranged in a hierarchical and distributed architecture. These controllers provide all the monitoring and control functions for the DC Testbed Electrical Power System. Higher level controllers include the Power Management Controller, Load Management Controller, Operator Interface System, and a network of computer systems that perform some of the SSF Ground based Control Center Operation. The lower level controllers include Main Bus Switch Controllers and Photovoltaic Controllers. Power system status information is periodically provided to the higher level controllers to perform system control and operation. The data acquisition function of the control system is distributed among the various levels of the hierarchy. Data

  12. Airborne Laser Polar Nephelometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grams, Gerald W.

    1973-01-01

    A polar nephelometer has been developed at NCAR to measure the angular variation of the intensity of light scattered by air molecules and particles. The system has been designed for airborne measurements using outside air ducted through a 5-cm diameter airflow tube; the sample volume is that which is common to the intersection of a collimated source beam and the detector field of view within the airflow tube. The source is a linearly polarized helium-neon laser beam. The optical system defines a collimated field-of-view (0.5deg half-angle) through a series of diaphragms located behind a I72-mm focal length objective lens. A photomultiplier tube is located immediately behind an aperture in the focal plane of the objective lens. The laser beam is mechanically chopped (on-off) at a rate of 5 Hz; a two-channel pulse counter, synchronized to the laser output, measures the photomultiplier pulse rate with the light beam both on and off. The difference in these measured pulse rates is directly proportional to the intensity of the scattered light from the volume common to the intersection of the laser beam and the detector field-of-view. Measurements can be made at scattering angles from 15deg to 165deg with reference to the direction of propagation of the light beam. Intermediate angles are obtained by selecting the angular increments desired between these extreme angles (any multiple of 0.1deg can be selected for the angular increment; 5deg is used in normal operation). Pulses provided by digital circuits control a stepping motor which sequentially rotates the detector by pre-selected angular increments. The synchronous photon-counting system automatically begins measurement of the scattered-light intensity immediately after the rotation to a new angle has been completed. The instrument has been flown on the NASA Convair 990 airborne laboratory to obtain data on the complex index of refraction of atmospheric aerosols. A particle impaction device is operated simultaneously

  13. Emulating JWST Exoplanet Transit Observations in a Testbed laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touli, D.; Beichman, C. A.; Vasisht, G.; Smith, R.; Krist, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    The transit technique is used for the detection and characterization of exoplanets. The combination of transit and radial velocity (RV) measurements gives information about a planet's radius and mass, respectively, leading to an estimate of the planet's density (Borucki et al. 2011) and therefore to its composition and evolutionary history. Transit spectroscopy can provide information on atmospheric composition and structure (Fortney et al. 2013). Spectroscopic observations of individual planets have revealed atomic and molecular species such as H2O, CO2 and CH4 in atmospheres of planets orbiting bright stars, e.g. Deming et al. (2013). The transit observations require extremely precise photometry. For instance, Jupiter transit results to a 1% brightness decrease of a solar type star while the Earth causes only a 0.0084% decrease (84 ppm). Spectroscopic measurements require still greater precision <30ppm. The Precision Projector Laboratory (PPL) is a collaboration between the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and California Institute of Technology (Caltech) to characterize and validate detectors through emulation of science images. At PPL we have developed a testbed to project simulated spectra and other images onto a HgCdTe array in order to assess precision photometry for transits, weak lensing etc. for Explorer concepts like JWST, WFIRST, EUCLID. In our controlled laboratory experiment, the goal is to demonstrate ability to extract weak transit spectra as expected for NIRCam, NIRIS and NIRSpec. Two lamps of variable intensity, along with spectral line and photometric simulation masks emulate the signals from a star-only, from a planet-only and finally, from a combination of a planet + star. Three masks have been used to simulate spectra in monochromatic light. These masks, which are fabricated at JPL, have a length of 1000 pixels and widths of 2 pixels, 10 pixels and 1 pixel to correspond respectively to the noted above JWST instruments. From many-hour long

  14. Laboratory Spacecraft Data Processing and Instrument Autonomy: AOSAT as Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightholder, Jack; Asphaug, Erik; Thangavelautham, Jekan

    2015-11-01

    Recent advances in small spacecraft allow for their use as orbiting microgravity laboratories (e.g. Asphaug and Thangavelautham LPSC 2014) that will produce substantial amounts of data. Power, bandwidth and processing constraints impose limitations on the number of operations which can be performed on this data as well as the data volume the spacecraft can downlink. We show that instrument autonomy and machine learning techniques can intelligently conduct data reduction and downlink queueing to meet data storage and downlink limitations. As small spacecraft laboratory capabilities increase, we must find techniques to increase instrument autonomy and spacecraft scientific decision making. The Asteroid Origins Satellite (AOSAT) CubeSat centrifuge will act as a testbed for further proving these techniques. Lightweight algorithms, such as connected components analysis, centroid tracking, K-means clustering, edge detection, convex hull analysis and intelligent cropping routines can be coupled with the tradition packet compression routines to reduce data transfer per image as well as provide a first order filtering of what data is most relevant to downlink. This intelligent queueing provides timelier downlink of scientifically relevant data while reducing the amount of irrelevant downlinked data. Resulting algorithms allow for scientists to throttle the amount of data downlinked based on initial experimental results. The data downlink pipeline, prioritized for scientific relevance based on incorporated scientific objectives, can continue from the spacecraft until the data is no longer fruitful. Coupled with data compression and cropping strategies at the data packet level, bandwidth reductions exceeding 40% can be achieved while still downlinking data deemed to be most relevant in a double blind study between scientist and algorithm. Applications of this technology allow for the incorporation of instrumentation which produces significant data volumes on small spacecraft

  15. Geo Light Imaging National Testbed (GLINT): past, present, and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Stephen D.; Voelz, David G.; Gamiz, Victor L.; Storm, Susan L.; Czyzak, Stanley R.; Oldenettel, Jerry; Hunter, Allen

    1999-09-01

    Object identification in deep space is a surveillance mission crucial to our national defense. Satellite health/status monitoring is another important space surveillance task with both military and civilian applications. Deep space satellites provide challenging targets for ground-based optical sensors due to the extreme range imposed by geo-stationary and geo-synchronous orbits. The Air Force Research Laboratory, in partnership with Trex Enterprises and our other contractor partners, will build a new ground-based sensor to address these deficiencies. The Geo Light Imaging National Testbed (GLINT) is based on an active imaging concept known as Fourier telescopy. In this technique, the target satellite is illuminated by two or more laser sources. The corresponding fields interfere at the satellite to form interference fringes. These fringes may be made to move across the target by the introduction of a frequency shift between the laser beams. The resulting time-varying laser backscatter contains information about a Fourier component of the target reflectivity and may be collected with a large solar heliostat array. This large unphased receiver provides sufficient signal-to-noise ratio for each Fourier component using relatively low power laser sources. A third laser source allows the application of phase closure in the image reconstruction software. Phase closure removes virtually all low frequency phase distortion and guarantees that the phases of all fringes are relatively fixed. Therefore, the Fourier phase associated with each component can be recovered accurately. This paper briefly reviews the history of Fourier telescopy, the proposed design of the GLINT system, and the future of this research area.

  16. The AMES Photometric Testbed for the Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, D.; Witteborn, F.; Dunham, E.; Jenkins, J.; Borucki, W.; Webster, W.

    1999-09-01

    A testbed facility has been constructed to perform end-to-end laboratory tests of the photometric method for finding terrestrial-size planets. The main objective of the facility is to determine the effects of various induced noise sources on the capability of a CCD photometer to maintain an instrument relative precision of better than 1x10(-5) . The photometry facility includes: a simulated star field with a source to approximate a solar spectrum, fast optics to simulate the telescope, a thinned back-illuminated CCD similar to those to be used on the spacecraft operating at 1 MHz read rate, shutterless operation, and computers to perform the onboard CCD control and data handling. The test structure is thermally and mechanically isolated. Each source of noise is introduced in a controlled fashion and evaluated as to its contribution to the total noise budget. Pointing noise or changing thermal gradients in the spacecraft can cause star-image motion at the milli-pixel level. These motions are imposed by piezo-electric devices that move the photometer relative to the star field. Signals as small as those associated with terrestrial-size transits of solar-like stars are produced in the facility. This is accomplished by electrical self-heating and expansion of fine wires placed across many of the star apertures. The effective small decrease in stellar brightness is used to demonstrate that terrestrial-size planets can be detected under realistic instrument noise conditions and at the shot-noise-limited level. Algorithms identical to both the onboard and ground processing systems are used to extract and process the data. These processes use differential photometry to construct light curves and search for transits. Examples are presented of the effects of imposing several noise sources and the resulting detectability of planets.

  17. Field-aligned electron density irregularities near 500 km. Equator to polar cap topside sounder Z mode observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    In addition to spread F, evidence for field-aligned electron density irregularities is commonly observed on Alouette 2 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee (500 km). This evidence is provided by distinctive signal returns from sounder-generated Z mode waves. At low latitudes these waves become guided in wave ducts caused by field-aligned electron density irregularities and give rise to strong long-duration echoes. At high latitudes, extending well into the polar cap, these Z mode waves (and stimulated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency) produce a series of vertical bars on the ionogram display as the satellite traverses discrete field-aligned density structures. The radio frequency (RF) noise environment to be expected in the 400 to 500 km altitude region from low to high latitudes was examined by analyzing perigee Alouette 2 topside sounder data. All observed noise bands were scaled on nearly 200 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee at low, mid, and high latitude telemetry stations. The minimum and maximum frequencies of each noise band were entered into a data base or compuer analysis. The signals of primary interest in the perigee study were found to be sounder-generated.

  18. IMAGE Observations of Sounder Stimulated and Naturally Occurring Fast Z mode Cavity Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonwalkar, V. S.; Taylor, C.; Reddy, A.

    2015-12-01

    We report first observations of sounder stimulated and naturally occurring fast Z mode (ZM) cavity noise detected by the Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) on the IMAGE satellite. The fast Z mode cavity noise is a banded, structure-less radio emission trapped inside fast Z mode cavities, which are characterized by a minimum (fz,min) in fast Z mode cut-off frequency (fz) along a geomagnetic field line [Gurnett et al., JGR, 1983]. Fast Z mode waves reflect at fz ~ f, where f is the wave frequency. Waves in the frequency range fz,min < f < fz,max, where fz,max is the maximum fz above fz,min altitude, are trapped within the cavity as they bounce back and forth between reflection altitudes (fz ~ f) above and below the fz,min altitude. These trapped waves will be observed by a satellite passing through the cavity. The observed cavity noise lower cutoff is at the local Z mode cut-off frequency (fz,Sat) and the upper cut-off is presumably close to fz,max. The cavity noise is observed typically inside the plasmasphere. Comparison of cavity noise as observed on the plasmagram obtained during active sounding with that observed on the dynamic spectra obtained from the interspersed passive wave measurements indicate that the cavity noise is either stimulated by transmissions from the sounder (RPI) or is of natural origin. The sounder stimulated noise is often accompanied by fast Z mode echoes. The naturally occurring cavity noise is observed on both the plasmagram and the dynamic spectra. We believe the stimulated cavity noise is generated due to scattering from small-scale irregularities of waves transmitted by RPI. One potential candidate for the source of naturally occurring Z mode cavity noise is the ring current electrons that can generate fast ZM waves via higher order cyclotron resonance [Nishimura et al., Earth Planets Space, 2007].

  19. GeoSTAR: Developing a Microwave Sounder for Geostationary Weather Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrigtsen, B.; Wilson, W.; Tanner, A.; Kangaslahti, P.; Gaier, T.; Dinardo, S.; Brown, S.; Piepmeier, J.; Ruf, C.

    2005-12-01

    The Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR) is a new concept for a microwave sounder, intended to be deployed on NOAA's next generation of geostationary weather satellites, the GOES-R series. A ground based prototype has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, under NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) sponsorship, and is now undergoing tests and performance characterization. With the aperture synthesis approach used by GeoSTAR it is possible to achieve very high spatial resolutions even in the crucial 50-GHz temperature sounding band without having to deploy the impractically large parabolic reflector antenna that is required with the conventional approach. GeoSTAR will finally, after many years of searching for a solution, make it possible to add a microwave sounder to the GOES instrument suite - a capability that is crucial for monitoring cloudy regions and severe storms. The technology and system design required for GeoSTAR are rapidly maturing, and it is expected that a space demonstration mission can be developed before the first GOES-R launch. GeoSTAR will be ready for operational deployment 2-3 years after that. The prototype developed under IIP implements a small version of the temperature sounding component of GeoSTAR, is fully functional as a sounder and has all of the features and capabilities of an operational system with the exception of spatial resolution. It therefore represents a complete proof of concept as well as significant risk reduction for a space implementation. Further technology risk reduction, with particular focus on the 183-GHz water vapor sounding band, is also under way.

  20. Preliminary validation of the refractivity from the new radio occultation sounder GNOS/FY-3C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Mi; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Guang-Lin; Bi, Yan-Meng; Liu, Yan; Bai, Wei-Hua; Meng, Xiang-Guang; Du, Qi-Fei; Sun, Yue-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    As a new member of the space-based radio occultation sounders, the GNOS (Global Navigation Satellite System Occultation Sounder) mounted on Fengyun-3C (FY-3C) has been carrying out atmospheric sounding since 23 September 2013. GNOS takes approximately 800 daily measurements using GPS (Global Positioning System) and Chinese BDS (BeiDou navigation satellite) signals. In this work, the atmospheric refractivity profiles from GNOS were compared with the ones obtained from the co-located ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) reanalysis. The mean bias of the refractivity obtained through GNOS GPS (BDS) was found to be approximately -0.09 % (-0.04 %) from the near surface to up to 46 km. While the average standard deviation was approximately 1.81 % (1.26 %), it was as low as 0.75 % (0.53 %) in the range of 5-25 km, where best sounding results are usually achieved. Further, COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate) and MetOp/ GRAS (GNSS Receiver for Atmospheric Sounding) radio occultation data were compared with the ECMWF reanalysis; the results thus obtained could be used as reference data for GNOS. Our results showed that GNOS/FY-3C meets the design requirements in terms of accuracy and precision of the sounder. It possesses a sounding capability similar to COSMIC and MetOp/GRAS in the vertical range of 0-30 km, though it needs further improvement above 30 km. Overall, it provides a new data source for the global numerical weather prediction (NWP) community.