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Sample records for airborne wideband camera

  1. A Cryogenic, Insulating Suspension System for the High Resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC)and Submillemeter And Far Infrared Experiment (SAFIRE) Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George M.; Jackson, Michael L.; Shirron, Peter J.; Tuttle, James G.

    2002-01-01

    The High Resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC) and the Submillimeter And Far Infrared Experiment (SAFIRE) will use identical Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR) to cool their detectors to 200mK and 100mK, respectively. In order to minimize thermal loads on the salt pill, a Kevlar suspension system is used to hold it in place. An innovative, kinematic suspension system is presented. The suspension system is unique in that it consists of two parts that can be assembled and tensioned offline, and later bolted onto the salt pill.

  2. Design and Fabrication of Two-Dimensional Semiconducting Bolometer Arrays for the High Resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC) and the Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera II (SHARC-II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George M.; Allen, Christine A.; Amato, Michael J.; Babu, Sachidananda R.; Bartels, Arlin E.; Benford, Dominic J.; Derro, Rebecca J.; Dowell, C. Darren; Harper, D. Al; Jhabvala, Murzy D.

    2002-01-01

    The High resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC) and the Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera II (SHARC II) will use almost identical versions of an ion-implanted silicon bolometer array developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The GSFC 'Pop-up' Detectors (PUD's) use a unique folding technique to enable a 12 x 32-element close-packed array of bolometers with a filling factor greater than 95 percent. A kinematic Kevlar(trademark) suspension system isolates the 200 mK bolometers from the helium bath temperature, and GSFC - developed silicon bridge chips make electrical connection to the bolometers, while maintaining thermal isolation. The JFET preamps operate at 120 K. Providing good thermal heat sinking for these, and keeping their conduction and radiation from reaching the nearby bolometers, is one of the principal design challenges encountered. Another interesting challenge is the preparation of the silicon bolometers. They are manufactured in 32-element, planar rows using Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) semiconductor etching techniques, and then cut and folded onto a ceramic bar. Optical alignment using specialized jigs ensures their uniformity and correct placement. The rows are then stacked to create the 12 x 32-element array. Engineering results from the first light run of SHARC II at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) are presented.

  3. Design and Fabrication of Two-Dimensional Semiconducting Bolometer Arrays for the High Resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC) and the Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera II (SHARC-II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George M.; Allen, Christine A.; Amato, Michael J.; Babu, Sachidananda R.; Bartels, Arlin E.; Benford, Dominic J.; Derro, Rebecca J.; Dowell, C. Darren; Harper, D. Al; Jhabvala, Murzy D.; Simpson, A. D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The High resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC) and the Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera II (SHARC 11) will use almost identical versions of an ion-implanted silicon bolometer array developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The GSFC "Pop-Up" Detectors (PUD's) use a unique folding technique to enable a 12 x 32-element close-packed array of bolometers with a filling factor greater than 95 percent. A kinematic Kevlar(Registered Trademark) suspension system isolates the 200 mK bolometers from the helium bath temperature, and GSFC - developed silicon bridge chips make electrical connection to the bolometers, while maintaining thermal isolation. The JFET preamps operate at 120 K. Providing good thermal heat sinking for these, and keeping their conduction and radiation from reaching the nearby bolometers, is one of the principal design challenges encountered. Another interesting challenge is the preparation of the silicon bolometers. They are manufactured in 32-element, planar rows using Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) semiconductor etching techniques, and then cut and folded onto a ceramic bar. Optical alignment using specialized jigs ensures their uniformity and correct placement. The rows are then stacked to create the 12 x 32-element array. Engineering results from the first light run of SHARC II at the CalTech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) are presented.

  4. Airborne ballistic camera tracking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redish, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    An operational airborne ballistic camera tracking system was tested for operational and data reduction feasibility. The acquisition and data processing requirements of the system are discussed. Suggestions for future improvements are also noted. A description of the data reduction mathematics is outlined. Results from a successful reentry test mission are tabulated. The test mission indicated that airborne ballistic camera tracking systems are feasible.

  5. CCD video camera and airborne applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturz, Richard A.

    2000-11-01

    The human need to see for ones self and to do so remotely, has given rise to video camera applications never before imagined and growing constantly. The instant understanding and verification offered by video lends its applications to every facet of life. Once an entertainment media, video is now ever present in out daily life. The application to the aircraft platform is one aspect of the video camera versatility. Integrating the video camera into the aircraft platform is yet another story. The typical video camera when applied to more standard scene imaging poses less demanding parameters and considerations. This paper explores the video camera as applied to the more complicated airborne environment.

  6. Television camera on RMS surveys insulation on Airborne Support Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The television camera on the end effector of the Canadian-built Remote Manipulator System (RMS) is seen surveying some of the insulation on the Airborne Support Equipment (ASE). Flight controllers called for the survey following the departure of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) and its Transfer Orbit Stage (TOS).

  7. An airborne multispectral imaging system based on two consumer-grade cameras for agricultural remote sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes the design and evaluation of an airborne multispectral imaging system based on two identical consumer-grade cameras for agricultural remote sensing. The cameras are equipped with a full-frame complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor with 5616 × 3744 pixels. One came...

  8. A simple method for vignette correction of airborne digital camera data

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, A.T.; Stow, D.A.; Hope, A.S.

    1996-11-01

    Airborne digital camera systems have gained popularity in recent years due to their flexibility, high geometric fidelity and spatial resolution, and fast data turn-around time. However, a common problem that plagues these types of framing systems is vignetting which causes falloff in image brightness away from principle nadir point. This paper presents a simple method for vignetting correction by utilizing laboratory images of a uniform illumination source. Multiple lab images are averaged and inverted to create digital correction templates which then are applied to actual airborne data. The vignette correction was effective in removing the systematic falloff in spectral values. We have shown that the vignette correction is a necessary part of the preprocessing of raw digital airborne remote sensing data. The consequences of not correcting for these effects are demonstrated in the context of monitoring of salt marsh habitat. 4 refs.

  9. Integrating an RGB - CIR Digital Camera With an Airborne Laser Swath Mapping System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.; Carter, W.; Shrestha, R.

    2003-12-01

    The National Science Foundation supported Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) utilizes the airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM) system jointly owned by the University of Florida (UF) and Florida International University (FIU). The UF/FIU ALSM system is comprised of an Optech Inc. Model 1233 ALTM unit, with supporting GPS receiver and real-time navigation display, mounted in a twin-inline-engine Cessna 337 aircraft. Shortly after taking delivery of the ALSM system, UF researchers, in collaboration with a commercial partner, added a small format digital camera (Kodak 420) to the system, rigidly mounting it to the ALSM sensor head. Software was developed to use the GPS position and orientation parameters from the IMU unit in the ALSM sensor to rectify and mosaic the digital images. The ALSM height and intensity values were combined pixel by pixel with the RGB digital images, to classify surface materials. Based on our experience with the initial camera, and recommendations received at the NCALM workshop, UF researchers decided to upgrade the system to a Redlake MASD Inc. model MS4100 RGB/CIR camera. The MS4100 contains three CCD arrays, which simultaneously capture full spatial resolution images in red and near IR band bands, and a factor of two lower spatial resolution images in the blue and green bands (the blue and green bands share a single CCD array and the color bands are separated with a Bayer filter). The CCD arrays are rectangular with 1920 x 1080 elements, each element being 7.4 x 7.4 micrometers. With a 28 mm focal length lens, and at a flying height of 550 meters, the effective groundel is approximately 15 x 15 cm. The new digital camera should be particularly useful for studies of vegetation, including agricultural and forestry applications, and for computer automated classification of surface materials. Examples of early results using the improved ALSM-digital imaging capabilities will be presented.

  10. Airborne Camera System for Real-Time Applications - Support of a National Civil Protection Exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gstaiger, V.; Romer, H.; Rosenbaum, D.; Henkel, F.

    2015-04-01

    In the VABENE++ project of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), powerful tools are being developed to aid public authorities and organizations with security responsibilities as well as traffic authorities when dealing with disasters and large public events. One focus lies on the acquisition of high resolution aerial imagery, its fully automatic processing, analysis and near real-time provision to decision makers in emergency situations. For this purpose a camera system was developed to be operated from a helicopter with light-weight processing units and microwave link for fast data transfer. In order to meet end-users' requirements DLR works close together with the German Federal Office of Civil Protection and Disaster Assistance (BBK) within this project. One task of BBK is to establish, maintain and train the German Medical Task Force (MTF), which gets deployed nationwide in case of large-scale disasters. In October 2014, several units of the MTF were deployed for the first time in the framework of a national civil protection exercise in Brandenburg. The VABENE++ team joined the exercise and provided near real-time aerial imagery, videos and derived traffic information to support the direction of the MTF and to identify needs for further improvements and developments. In this contribution the authors introduce the new airborne camera system together with its near real-time processing components and share experiences gained during the national civil protection exercise.

  11. Wide-Band Airborne Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Radiometers to Provide High-Resolution Wet-Tropospheric Path Delay Corrections for Coastal and Inland Water Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reising, Steven C.; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Brown, Shannon T.; Tanner, Alan B.; Padmanabhan, Sharmila; Parashare, Chaitali; Montes, Oliver; Dawson, Douglas E.; Gaier, Todd C.; Khayatian, Behrouz; Bosch-Lluis, Xavier; Nelson, Scott P.; Johnson, Thaddeus; Hadel, Victoria; Gilliam, Kyle L.; Razavi, Behzad

    2013-04-01

    Current satellite ocean altimeters include nadir-viewing, co-located 18-34 GHz microwave radiometers to measure wet-tropospheric path delay. Due to the area of the surface instantaneous fields of view (IFOV) at these frequencies, the accuracy of wet path retrievals is substantially degraded near coastlines, and retrievals are not provided over land. Retrievals are flagged as not useful about 40 km from the world's coastlines. A viable approach to improve their capability is to add wide-band millimeter-wave window channels at 90 to 170 GHz, yielding finer spatial resolution for a fixed antenna size. In addition, NASA's Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission in formulation (Phase A) is planned for launch in late 2020. The primary objectives of SWOT are to characterize ocean sub-mesoscale processes on 10-km and larger scales in the global oceans, and to measure the global water storage in inland surface water bodies and the flow rate of rivers. Therefore, an important new science objective of SWOT is to transition satellite radar altimetry into the coastal zone. The addition of millimeter-wave channels near 90, 130 and 166 GHz to current Jason-class radiometers is expected to improve retrievals of wet-tropospheric delay in coastal areas and to enhance the potential for over-land retrievals. The Ocean Surface Topography Science Team Meeting recommended in 2012 to add these millimeter-wave channels to the Jason Continuity of Service (CS) mission. To reduce the risks associated with wet-tropospheric path delay correction over coastal areas and fresh water bodies, we are developing an airborne radiometer with 18.7, 23.8 and 34.0 GHz microwave channels, as well as millimeter-wave window channels at 90, 130 and 166 GHz, and temperature sounding above 118 as well as water vapor sounding below 183 GHz for validation of wet-path delay. For nadir-viewing space-borne radiometers with no moving parts, two-point internal calibration sources are necessary, and the

  12. A Multispectral Image Creating Method for a New Airborne Four-Camera System with Different Bandpass Filters

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanlun; Zhang, Aiwu; Hu, Shaoxing

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an airborne high resolution four-camera multispectral system which mainly consists of four identical monochrome cameras equipped with four interchangeable bandpass filters. For this multispectral system, an automatic multispectral data composing method was proposed. The homography registration model was chosen, and the scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) and random sample consensus (RANSAC) were used to generate matching points. For the difficult registration problem between visible band images and near-infrared band images in cases lacking manmade objects, we presented an effective method based on the structural characteristics of the system. Experiments show that our method can acquire high quality multispectral images and the band-to-band alignment error of the composed multiple spectral images is less than 2.5 pixels. PMID:26205264

  13. Airborne multispectral identification of individual cotton plants using consumer-grade cameras

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although multispectral remote sensing using consumer-grade cameras has successfully identified fields of small cotton plants, improvements to detection sensitivity are needed to identify individual or small clusters of plants. The imaging sensor of consumer-grade cameras are based on a Bayer patter...

  14. Comparison of mosaicking techniques for airborne images from consumer-grade cameras

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Images captured from airborne imaging systems have the advantages of relatively low cost, high spatial resolution, and real/near-real-time availability. Multiple images taken from one or more flight lines could be used to generate a high-resolution mosaic image, which could be useful for diverse rem...

  15. Feasibility of an airborne TV camera as a size spectrometer for cloud droplets in daylight.

    PubMed

    Roscoe, H K; Lachlan-Cope, T A; Roscoe, J

    1999-01-20

    Photographs of clouds taken with a camera with a large aperture ratio must have a short depth of focus to resolve small droplets. Hence the sampling volume is small, which limits the number of droplets and gives rise to a large statistical error on the number counted. However, useful signals can be obtained with a small aperture ratio, which allows for a sample volume large enough for counting cloud droplets at aircraft speeds with useful spatial resolution. The signal is sufficient to discriminate against noise from a sunlit cloud as background, provided the bandwidth of the light source and camera are restricted, and against readout noise. Hence, in principle, an instrument to sample the size distribution of cloud droplets from aircraft in daylight can be constructed from a simple TV camera and an array of laser diodes, without any components or screens external to the aircraft window.

  16. Visibility through the gaseous smoke in airborne remote sensing using a DSLR camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabok, Mirahmad; Millington, Andrew; Hacker, Jorg M.; McGrath, Andrew J.

    2016-08-01

    Visibility and clarity of remotely sensed images acquired by consumer grade DSLR cameras, mounted on an unmanned aerial vehicle or a manned aircraft, are critical factors in obtaining accurate and detailed information from any area of interest. The presence of substantial haze, fog or gaseous smoke particles; caused, for example, by an active bushfire at the time of data capture, will dramatically reduce image visibility and quality. Although most modern hyperspectral imaging sensors are capable of capturing a large number of narrow range bands of the shortwave and thermal infrared spectral range, which have the potential to penetrate smoke and haze, the resulting images do not contain sufficient spatial detail to enable locating important objects or assist search and rescue or similar applications which require high resolution information. We introduce a new method for penetrating gaseous smoke without compromising spatial resolution using a single modified DSLR camera in conjunction with image processing techniques which effectively improves the visibility of objects in the captured images. This is achieved by modifying a DSLR camera and adding a custom optical filter to enable it to capture wavelengths from 480-1200nm (R, G and Near Infrared) instead of the standard RGB bands (400-700nm). With this modified camera mounted on an aircraft, images were acquired over an area polluted by gaseous smoke from an active bushfire. Processed data using our proposed method shows significant visibility improvements compared with other existing solutions.

  17. Application of phase matching autofocus in airborne long-range oblique photography camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrushevsky, Vladimir; Guberman, Asaf

    2014-06-01

    The Condor2 long-range oblique photography (LOROP) camera is mounted in an aerodynamically shaped pod carried by a fast jet aircraft. Large aperture, dual-band (EO/MWIR) camera is equipped with TDI focal plane arrays and provides high-resolution imagery of extended areas at long stand-off ranges, at day and night. Front Ritchey-Chretien optics is made of highly stable materials. However, the camera temperature varies considerably in flight conditions. Moreover, a composite-material structure of the reflective objective undergoes gradual dehumidification in dry nitrogen atmosphere inside the pod, causing some small decrease of the structure length. The temperature and humidity effects change a distance between the mirrors by just a few microns. The distance change is small but nevertheless it alters the camera's infinity focus setpoint significantly, especially in the EO band. To realize the optics' resolution potential, the optimal focus shall be constantly maintained. In-flight best focus calibration and temperature-based open-loop focus control give mostly satisfactory performance. To get even better focusing precision, a closed-loop phase-matching autofocus method was developed for the camera. The method makes use of an existing beamsharer prism FPA arrangement where aperture partition exists inherently in an area of overlap between the adjacent detectors. The defocus is proportional to an image phase shift in the area of overlap. Low-pass filtering of raw defocus estimate reduces random errors related to variable scene content. Closed-loop control converges robustly to precise focus position. The algorithm uses the temperature- and range-based focus prediction as an initial guess for the closed-loop phase-matching control. The autofocus algorithm achieves excellent results and works robustly in various conditions of scene illumination and contrast.

  18. Comparison of mosaicking techniques for airborne images from consumer-grade cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huaibo; Yang, Chenghai; Zhang, Jian; Hoffmann, Wesley Clint; He, Dongjian; Thomasson, J. Alex

    2016-01-01

    Images captured from airborne imaging systems can be mosaicked for diverse remote sensing applications. The objective of this study was to identify appropriate mosaicking techniques and software to generate mosaicked images for use by aerial applicators and other users. Three software packages-Photoshop CC, Autostitch, and Pix4Dmapper-were selected for mosaicking airborne images acquired from a large cropping area. Ground control points were collected for georeferencing the mosaicked images and for evaluating the accuracy of eight mosaicking techniques. Analysis and accuracy assessment showed that Pix4Dmapper can be the first choice if georeferenced imagery with high accuracy is required. The spherical method in Photoshop CC can be an alternative for cost considerations, and Autostitch can be used to quickly mosaic images with reduced spatial resolution. The results also showed that the accuracy of image mosaicking techniques could be greatly affected by the size of the imaging area or the number of the images and that the accuracy would be higher for a small area than for a large area. The results from this study will provide useful information for the selection of image mosaicking software and techniques for aerial applicators and other users.

  19. Long-Term Tracking of a Specific Vehicle Using Airborne Optical Camera Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, F.; Rosenbaum, D.; Runge, H.; Cerra, D.; Mattyus, G.; Reinartz, P.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present two low cost, airborne sensor systems capable of long-term vehicle tracking. Based on the properties of the sensors, a method for automatic real-time, long-term tracking of individual vehicles is presented. This combines the detection and tracking of the vehicle in low frame rate image sequences and applies the lagged Cell Transmission Model (CTM) to handle longer tracking outages occurring in complex traffic situations, e.g. tunnels. The CTM model uses the traffic conditions in the proximities of the target vehicle and estimates its motion to predict the position where it reappears. The method is validated on an airborne image sequence acquired from a helicopter. Several reference vehicles are tracked within a range of 500m in a complex urban traffic situation. An artificial tracking outage of 240m is simulated, which is handled by the CTM. For this, all the vehicles in the close proximity are automatically detected and tracked to estimate the basic density-flow relations of the CTM model. Finally, the real and simulated trajectories of the reference vehicles in the outage are compared showing good correspondence also in congested traffic situations.

  20. Airborne imaging for heritage documentation using the Fotokite tethered flying camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoeven, Geert; Lupashin, Sergei; Briese, Christian; Doneus, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Since the beginning of aerial photography, researchers used all kinds of devices (from pigeons, kites, poles, and balloons to rockets) to take still cameras aloft and remotely gather aerial imagery. To date, many of these unmanned devices are still used for what has been referred to as Low-Altitude Aerial Photography or LAAP. In addition to these more traditional camera platforms, radio-controlled (multi-)copter platforms have recently added a new aspect to LAAP. Although model airplanes have been around for several decades, the decreasing cost, increasing functionality and stability of ready-to-fly multi-copter systems has proliferated their use among non-hobbyists. As such, they became a very popular tool for aerial imaging. The overwhelming amount of currently available brands and types (heli-, dual-, tri-, quad-, hexa-, octo-, dodeca-, deca-hexa and deca-octocopters), together with the wide variety of navigation options (e.g. altitude and position hold, waypoint flight) and camera mounts indicate that these platforms are here to stay for some time. Given the multitude of still camera types and the image quality they are currently capable of, endless combinations of low- and high-cost LAAP solutions are available. In addition, LAAP allows for the exploitation of new imaging techniques, as it is often only a matter of lifting the appropriate device (e.g. video cameras, thermal frame imagers, hyperspectral line sensors). Archaeologists were among the first to adopt this technology, as it provided them with a means to easily acquire essential data from a unique point of view, whether for simple illustration purposes of standing historic structures or to compute three-dimensional (3D) models and orthophotographs from excavation areas. However, even very cheap multi-copters models require certain skills to pilot them safely. Additionally, malfunction or overconfidence might lift these devices to altitudes where they can interfere with manned aircrafts. As such, the

  1. <5cm Ground Resolution DEMs for the Atacama Fault System (Chile), Acquried With the Modular Airborne Camera System (MACS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielke, O.; Victor, P.; Oncken, O.; Bucher, T. U.; Lehmann, F.

    2011-12-01

    A primary step towards assessing time and size of future earthquakes is the identification of earthquake recurrence patterns in the existing seismic record. Geologic and geomorphic data are commonly analyzed for this purpose, reasoned by the lack of sufficiently long historical or instrumental seismic data sets. Until recently, those geomorphic data sets encompassed field observation, local total station surveys, and aerial photography. Over the last decade, LiDAR-based high-resolution topographic data sets became an additional powerful mean, contributing distinctly to a better understanding of earthquake rupture characteristics (e.g., single-event along-fault slip distribution, along-fault slip accumulation pattern) and their relation to fault geometric complexities. Typical shot densities of such data sets (e.g., airborne-LiDAR data along the San Andreas Fault) permit generation of digital elevation models (DEM) with <50 cm ground resolution, sufficient for depiction of meter-scale tectonic landforms. Identification of submeter-scale features is however prohibited by DEM resolution limitation. Here, we present a high-resolution topographic and visual data set from the Atacama fault system near Antofagasta, Chile. Data were acquired with Modular Airborne Camera System (MACS) - developed by the DLR (German Aerospace Center) in Berlin, Germany. The photogrammetrically derived DEM and True Ortho Images with <5cm ground resolution permit identification of very small-scale geomorphic features, thus enabling fault zone and earthquake rupture characterization at unprecedented detail. Compared to typical LiDAR-DEM, ground resolution is increased by an order of magnitude while the spatial extend of these data set is essentially the same. Here, we present examples of the <5cm resolution data set (DEM and visual results) and further explore resolution capabilities and potential with regards to the aforementioned tectono-geomorphic questions.

  2. Retrieval of water quality algorithms from airborne HySpex camera for oxbow lakes in north-eastern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slapinska, Malgorzata; Berezowski, Tomasz; Frąk, Magdalena; Chormański, Jarosław

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to retrieve empirical formulas for water quality of oxbow lakes in Lower Biebrza Basin (river located in NE Poland) using HySpex airborne imaging spectrometer. Biebrza River is one of the biggest wetland in Europe. It is characterised by low contamination level and small human influence. Because of those characteristics Biebrza River can be treated as a reference area for other floodplains and fen ecosystem in Europe. Oxbow lakes are important part of Lower Biebrza Basin due to their retention and habitat function. Hyperspectral remote sensing data were acquired by the HySpex sensor (which covers the range of 400-2500 nm) on 01-02.08.2015 with the ground measurements campaign conducted 03-04.08.2015. The ground measurements consisted of two parts. First part included spectral reflectance sampling with spectroradiometer ASD FieldSpec 3, which covered the wavelength range of 350-2500 nm at 1 nm intervals. In situ data were collected both for water and for specific objects within the area. Second part of the campaign included water parameters such as Secchi disc depth (SDD), electric conductivity (EC), pH, temperature and phytoplankton. Measured reflectance enabled empirical line atmospheric correction which was conducted for the HySpex data. Our results indicated that proper atmospheric correction was very important for further data analysis. The empirical formulas for our water parameters were retrieved based on reflecatance data. This study confirmed applicability of HySpex camera to retrieve water quality.

  3. Assessing the application of an airborne intensified multispectral video camera to measure chlorophyll a in three Florida estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Dierberg, F.E.; Zaitzeff, J.

    1997-08-01

    After absolute and spectral calibration, an airborne intensified, multispectral video camera was field tested for water quality assessments over three Florida estuaries (Tampa Bay, Indian River Lagoon, and the St. Lucie River Estuary). Univariate regression analysis of upwelling spectral energy vs. ground-truthed uncorrected chlorophyll a (Chl a) for each estuary yielded lower coefficients of determination (R{sup 2}) with increasing concentrations of Gelbstoff within an estuary. More predictive relationships were established by adding true color as a second independent variable in a bivariate linear regression model. These regressions successfully explained most of the variation in upwelling light energy (R{sup 2}=0.94, 0.82 and 0.74 for the Tampa Bay, Indian River Lagoon, and St. Lucie estuaries, respectively). Ratioed wavelength bands within the 625-710 nm range produced the highest correlations with ground-truthed uncorrected Chl a, and were similar to those reported as being the most predictive for Chl a in Tennessee reservoirs. However, the ratioed wavebands producing the best predictive algorithms for Chl a differed among the three estuaries due to the effects of varying concentrations of Gelbstoff on upwelling spectral signatures, which precluded combining the data into a common data set for analysis.

  4. Molecular Shocks Associated with Massive Young Stars: CO Line Images with a New Far-Infrared Spectroscopic Camera on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Dan M.

    1997-01-01

    Under the terms of our contract with NASA Ames Research Center, the University of Rochester (UR) offers the following final technical report on grant NAG 2-958, Molecular shocks associated with massive young stars: CO line images with a new far-infrared spectroscopic camera, given for implementation of the UR Far-Infrared Spectroscopic Camera (FISC) on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), and use of this camera for observations of star-formation regions 1. Two KAO flights in FY 1995, the final year of KAO operations, were awarded to this program, conditional upon a technical readiness confirmation which was given in January 1995. The funding period covered in this report is 1 October 1994 - 30 September 1996. The project was supported with $30,000, and no funds remained at the conclusion of the project.

  5. Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurements (WISM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Lambert, Kevin M.; Romanofsky, Robert R.; Durham, Tim; Speed, Kerry; Lange, Robert; Olsen, Art; Smith, Brett; Taylor, Robert; Schmidt, Mark; Racette, Paul; Bonds, Quenton; Brucker, Ludovic; Koenig, Lora; Marshall, Hans-Peter; Vanhille, Ken; Borissenko, Anatoly; Tsang, Leung; Tan, Shurun

    2016-01-01

    This presentation discusses current efforts to develop a Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurements (WISM). The objective of the effort are as follows: to advance the utility of a wideband active and passive instrument (8-40 gigahertz) to support the snow science community; improve snow measurements through advanced calibration and expanded frequency of active and passive sensors; demonstrate science utility through airborne retrievals of snow water equivalent (SWE); and advance the technology readiness of broadband current sheet array (CSA) antenna technology for spaceflight applications.

  6. Evaluation of an airborne remote sensing platform consisting of two consumer-grade cameras for crop identification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing systems based on consumer-grade cameras have been increasingly used in scientific research and remote sensing applications because of their low cost and ease of use. However, the performance of consumer-grade cameras for practical applications have not been well documented in related ...

  7. Optical design of high resolution and large format CCD airborne remote sensing camera on unmanned aerial vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yixian; Cheng, Xiaowei; Shao, Jie

    2010-11-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicle remote sensing (UAVRS) is lower in cost, flexible on task arrangement and automatic and intelligent in application, it has been used widely for mapping, surveillance, reconnaissance and city planning. Airborne remote sensing missions require sensors with both high resolution and large fields of view, large format CCD digital airborne imaging systems are now a reality. A refractive system was designed to meet the requirements with the help of code V software, It has a focal length of 150mm, F number of 5.6, waveband of 0.45~0.7um, and field of view reaches 20°. It is shown that the value of modulation transfer function is higher than 0.5 at 55lp/mm, distortion is less than 0.1%, image quality reaches the diffraction limit. The system with large format CCD and wide field can satisfy the demand of the wide ground overlay area and high resolution. The optical system with simpler structure, smaller size and lighter weight, can be used in airborne remote sensing.

  8. Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurements (WISM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides a brief summary of the utility of a wideband active and passive (radar and radiometer, respectively) instrument (8-40 GHz) to support the snow science community. The effort seeks to improve snow measurements through advanced calibration and expanded frequency of active and passive sensors and to demonstrate their science utility through airborne retrievals of snow water equivalent (SWE). In addition the effort seeks to advance the technology readiness of broadband current sheet array (CSA) antenna technology for spaceflight applications.

  9. Development of low-noise high-speed analog ASIC for X-ray CCD cameras and wide-band X-ray imaging sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Hirose, Shin-nosuke; Imatani, Ritsuko; Nagino, Ryo; Anabuki, Naohisa; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Doty, John P.; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Kitamura, Hisashi; Uchihori, Yukio

    2016-09-01

    We report on the development and performance evaluation of the mixed-signal Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) developed for the signal processing of onboard X-ray CCD cameras and various types of X-ray imaging sensors in astrophysics. The quick and low-noise readout is essential for the pile-up free imaging spectroscopy with a future X-ray telescope. Our goal is the readout noise of 5e- r . m . s . at the pixel rate of 1 Mpix/s that is about 10 times faster than those of the currently working detectors. We successfully developed a low-noise ASIC as the front-end electronics of the Soft X-ray Imager onboard Hitomi that was launched on February 17, 2016. However, it has two analog-to-digital converters per chain due to the limited processing speed and hence we need to correct the difference of gain to obtain the X-ray spectra. Furthermore, its input equivalent noise performance is not satisfactory (> 100 μV) at the pixel rate higher than 500 kpix/s. Then we upgrade the design of the ASIC with the fourth-order ΔΣ modulators to enhance its inherent noise-shaping performance. Its performance is measured using pseudo CCD signals with variable processing speed. Although its input equivalent noise is comparable with the conventional one, the integrated non-linearity (0.1%) improves to about the half of that of the conventional one. The radiation tolerance is also measured with regard to the total ionizing dose effect and the single event latch-up using protons and Xenon, respectively. The former experiment shows that all of the performances does not change after imposing the dose corresponding to 590 years in a low earth orbit. We also put the upper limit on the frequency of the latch-up to be once per 48 years.

  10. Development of Wide-Band Airborne Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Radiometers to Provide High-Resolution Wet-Tropospheric Path Delay Measurements for Coastal and Inland Water Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reising, S. C.; Kangaslahti, P.; Brown, S. T.; Tanner, A. B.; Padmanabhan, S.; Parashare, C.; Bosch-Lluis, X.; Nelson, S. P.; Johnson, T. P.; Hadel, V. D.; Dawson, D. E.; Montes, O.; Gaier, T. C.; Khayatian, B.; Gilliam, K. L.; Razavi, B.

    2012-12-01

    Current satellite ocean altimeters include nadir-viewing, co-located 18-34 GHz microwave radiometers to measure wet-tropospheric path delay. Due to the area of the surface instantaneous fields of view (IFOV) at these frequencies, the accuracy of wet path retrievals is substantially degraded near coastlines. In fact, Jason-1 and Jason-2 retrievals are flagged as contaminated within 50 km and 25 km of the coasts, respectively. In addition, they do not provide wet path delay estimates over land. A viable approach to meet these needs is the addition of wide-band millimeter-wave window channels at 90-170 GHz with internal calibration, yielding finer spatial resolution for a given antenna size. The addition of millimeter-wave channels near 90, 130 and 166 GHz to current Jason-class radiometers is expected to improve retrievals of wet-tropospheric delay in coastal areas and to enhance the potential for over-land retrievals. The principal objective of this research is to assess the ability of higher-frequency radiometers to meet the needs of the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission recommended by the U.S. National Research Council's Earth Science Decadal Survey, accelerated in 2010 and planned for launch in 2020. The primary objectives of SWOT are to characterize ocean sub-mesoscale processes on 10-km and larger scales in the global oceans, and to measure the global water storage in inland surface water bodies, including rivers, lakes, reservoirs, and wetlands. Therefore, an important new science objective of SWOT is to transition satellite radar altimetry into the coastal zone, indicating the need for a novel microwave radiometer to provide fine-scale spatial resolution wet-tropospheric path delay corrections near land. In addition, the Ka-band SWOT radar interferometer will for the first time broaden the altimeter field of view and improve spatial resolution to make coastal and inland surface water measurements, so the variability of atmospheric water vapor

  11. Airborne Demonstration of Microwave and Wide-Band Millimeter-Wave Radiometers to Provide High-Resolution Wet-Tropospheric Path Delay Corrections for Coastal and Inland Water Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reising, Steven; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Tanner, Alan; Padmanabhan, Sharmila; Montes, Oliver; Parashare, Chaitali; Bosch-Lluis, Xavier; Hadel, Victoria; Johnson, Thaddeus; Brown, Shannon; Khayatian, Behrouz; Dawson, Douglas; Gaier, Todd; Razavi, Behzad

    2014-05-01

    Current satellite ocean altimeters include nadir-viewing, co-located 18-34 GHz microwave radiometers to measure wet-tropospheric path delay. Due to the size of the surface instantaneous fields of view (IFOV) at these frequencies, the accuracy of wet path retrievals is substantially degraded near coastlines, and retrievals are not provided over land. Retrievals are flagged as not useful within approximately 40 km of the world's coastlines. A viable approach to improve their capability is to add wide-band high-frequency millimeter-wave window channels in the 90-180 GHz band, thereby achieving finer spatial resolution for a limited antenna size. In this context, the upcoming NASA/CNES/CSA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission is in formulation and planned for launch in late 2020. The primary objectives of SWOT are to characterize ocean mesoscale and sub-mesoscale processes on 10-km and larger scales in the global oceans and provide measurements of the global water storage in inland surface water bodies and the flow rate of rivers. Therefore, an important new science objective of SWOT is to transition satellite altimetry from the open ocean into the coastal zone and over inland water. The addition of 90-180 GHz millimeter-wave window-channel radiometers to current Jason-class 18-34 GHz radiometers is expected to improve retrievals of wet-tropospheric delay in coastal areas and to enhance the potential for over-land retrievals. In 2012 the Ocean Surface Topography Science Team Meeting recommended to add high-frequency millimeter-wave radiometers to the Jason Continuity of Service (CS) mission. To reduce the risks of wet-tropospheric path delay measurement over coastal areas and inland water bodies, we have designed, developed and fabricated a new airborne radiometer, combining three high-frequency millimeter-wave window channels at 90, 130 and 168 GHz, along with Jason-series microwave channels at 18.7, 23.8 and 34.0 GHz, and validation channels sounding

  12. Development of Wideband Feed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujihara, Hideki; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Sekido, Mamoru; Kondo, Tetsuro

    2015-08-01

    Wideband feeds have developed for Kashima 34m antenna and new 2.4m portable VLBI antennas. Prototypes of the wideband feeds are multimode horns, first one was set on 34m in the end of 2013, and then replaced next one with 6.5-15.0GHz receiving frequency. Now, a new feed for 3.2GHz-14.4GHz will be installed in 2.4m and 34m antennas in this spring, which are named NINJA feed, because of its design flexibility in beam shpae. Next, IGUANA feed is now under design and fabrication, which is aimed for 2.2-22GHz and covers VGOS(VLBI2010) specification. This has coaxial structure, the smaller "daughter feed" for 6.4-22GHz is placed in the center of the larger "Mother feed" for 2.2-6.4GHz.They are used for our project of time and frequency transfer between remote atomic clocks by wideband VLBI, named Gala-V(Garapagos VLBI), and will also be used wideband VLBI observation for astronmy and geodesy.Prototype feeds were tested in measurement of aperture efficiency, SEFD and Tsys of 34m "Super Kashima Antenna" and both 6.7/12.2GHz methanol maser detection in one reciever system, and then better one is used for wideband VLBI observations.

  13. Radiometric calibration procedures for a wideband infrared scene projector (WISP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, David S.; Marlow, Steven A.; Bergin, Thomas P.; Kircher, James R.

    1999-07-01

    The Wideband Infrared Scene Projector (WISP) has been undergoing development for the Kinetic-Kill Vehicle Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulator facility at Eglin AFB, Florida. In order to perform realistic tests of an infrared seeker, the radiometric output of the WISP system must produce the same response in the seeker as the real scene. In order to ensure this radiometric realism, calibration procedures must be established and followed. This paper describes calibration procedures that have been used in recent tests. The procedures require knowledge of the camera spectral response in the seeker under test. The camera is set up to operate over the desired range of observable radiances. The camera is then nonuniformity corrected (NUCed) and calibrated with an extended blackbody. The camera drift rates are characterized, and as necessary, the camera is reNUCed and recalibrated. The camera is then set up to observe the WISP system, and calibration measurements are made of the camera/WISP system.

  14. Overview of wideband packet protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherif, M. H.

    1992-10-01

    Wideband packet networks operate at rates equal to, or higher than, 64 kb/s, but lower than the basic broadband rate of 150 Mb/s, on cables or satellite links. Wideband packet protocols are the transmission protocols for these networks. They define open interfaces that can be used for public and private ISDNs. The protocols are defined in CCITT Recommendations G.764 and G.765. This paper describes the objectives of the wideband protocols, and how the objectives were achieved.

  15. Airborne Satcom Terminal Research at NASA Glenn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoder, Doug; Zakrajsek, Robert

    2002-01-01

    NASA Glenn has constructed an airborne Ku-band satellite terminal, which provides wideband full-duplex ground-aircraft communications. The terminal makes use of novel electronically-steered phased array antennas and provides IP connectivity to and from the ground. The satcom terminal communications equipment may be easily changed whenever a new configuration is required, enhancing the terminal's versatility.

  16. Ultra-wideband receiver

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) receiver utilizes a strobed input line with a sampler connected to an amplifier. In a differential configuration, .+-.UWB inputs are connected to separate antennas or to two halves of a dipole antenna. The two input lines include samplers which are commonly strobed by a gating pulse with a very low duty cycle. In a single ended configuration, only a single strobed input line and sampler is utilized. The samplers integrate, or average, up to 10,000 pulses to achieve high sensitivity and good rejection of uncorrelated signals.

  17. Ultra-wideband receiver

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) receiver utilizes a strobed input line with a sampler connected to an amplifier. In a differential configuration, .+-.UWB inputs are connected to separate antennas or to two halves of a dipole antenna. The two input lines include samplers which are commonly strobed by a gating pulse with a very low duty cycle. In a single ended configuration, only a single strobed input line and sampler is utilized. The samplers integrate, or average, up to 10,000 pulses to achieve high sensitivity and good rejection of uncorrelated signals.

  18. Ultra-wideband receiver

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-06-04

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) receiver utilizes a strobed input line with a sampler connected to an amplifier. In a differential configuration, {+-}UWB inputs are connected to separate antennas or to two halves of a dipole antenna. The two input lines include samplers which are commonly strobed by a gating pulse with a very low duty cycle. In a single ended configuration, only a single strobed input line and sampler is utilized. The samplers integrate, or average, up to 10,000 pulses to achieve high sensitivity and good rejection of uncorrelated signals. 21 figs.

  19. Ultra-wideband receiver

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1994-09-06

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) receiver utilizes a strobed input line with a sampler connected to an amplifier. In a differential configuration, [+-] UWB inputs are connected to separate antennas or to two halves of a dipole antenna. The two input lines include samplers which are commonly strobed by a gating pulse with a very low duty cycle. In a single ended configuration, only a single strobed input line and sampler is utilized. The samplers integrate, or average, up to 10,000 pulses to achieve high sensitivity and good rejection of uncorrelated signals. 16 figs.

  20. Land cover/use classification of Cairns, Queensland, Australia: A remote sensing study involving the conjunctive use of the airborne imaging spectrometer, the large format camera and the thematic mapper simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heric, Matthew; Cox, William; Gordon, Daniel K.

    1987-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the land cover/use classification accuracy obtainable from remotely sensed multispectral imagery, Airborne Imaging Spectrometer-1 (AIS-1) images were analyzed in conjunction with Thematic Mapper Simulator (NS001) Large Format Camera color infrared photography and black and white aerial photography. Specific portions of the combined data set were registered and used for classification. Following this procedure, the resulting derived data was tested using an overall accuracy assessment method. Precise photogrammetric 2D-3D-2D geometric modeling techniques is not the basis for this study. Instead, the discussion exposes resultant spectral findings from the image-to-image registrations. Problems associated with the AIS-1 TMS integration are considered, and useful applications of the imagery combination are presented. More advanced methodologies for imagery integration are needed if multisystem data sets are to be utilized fully. Nevertheless, research, described herein, provides a formulation for future Earth Observation Station related multisensor studies.

  1. Ultra-wideband Communications

    SciTech Connect

    Waltjen, K; Romero, C; Azevedo, S; Dowla, F; Spiridon, A; Benzel, D; Haugen, P

    2004-02-06

    Many applications in wireless communications often require short-range systems capable of rapidly collecting data and transmitting it reliably. Commercial communication systems operate in fixed frequency bands and are easily detectable and are prone to jamming by the enemy, among other shortcomings. The new ultra-wideband (UWB) communications system in the 3.1 to 10 GHz band is of significant interest to a number of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) programs including the Nonproliferation, Arms Control, and International Security (NAI) Directorate. Ultra-Wideband (UWB) technology has received a significant degree of attention from communications industry since the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rulings in February 2002. According to FCC, UWB signals have fractional bandwidth (B{sub f}) of 20% or larger at -10 dB cut-off frequencies, with minimum bandwidth of 500 MHz. Unlike traditional communication systems, UWB systems modulate carrier-less, short-duration (picosec to nanosec) pulses to transmit and receive information. A number of programmatic problems at LLNL, particularly in the NAI and other national security Directorates, require collecting information from multiple sensors distributed over a local area. The information must be collected covertly and by wireless means. The sensors produce data using low power devices and the communication link must operate in severe multipath environments over tens of meters; often the links must be channelized to handle multiple sensors. The communications links between these sensors is a critical issue in the development of LLNL programs to demonstrate distributed sensor network performance in real-time. In summary, such systems must be robust; have a low probability of detection and intercept; employ low-power, small-size hardware; and interface easily with other systems for analysis or to establish long-distance links. The purpose of this work was to develop a new UWB radio-frequency (RF

  2. Wideband waveguide polarizer development for SETI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, P.; Stanton, P.

    1991-01-01

    A wideband polarizer for the Deep Space Network (DSN) 34 meter beam waveguide antenna is needed for the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) project. The results of a computer analysis of a wideband polarizer are presented.

  3. Fast wideband acoustical holography.

    PubMed

    Hald, Jørgen

    2016-04-01

    Patch near-field acoustical holography methods like statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography and equivalent source method are limited to relatively low frequencies, where the average array-element spacing is less than half of the acoustic wavelength, while beamforming provides useful resolution only at medium-to-high frequencies. With adequate array design, both methods can be used with the same array. But for holography to provide good low-frequency resolution, a small measurement distance is needed, whereas beamforming requires a larger distance to limit sidelobe issues. The wideband holography method of the present paper was developed to overcome that practical conflict. Only a single measurement is needed at a relatively short distance and a single result is obtained covering the full frequency range. The method uses the principles of compressed sensing: A sparse sound field representation is assumed with a chosen set of basis functions, a measurement is taken with an irregular array, and the inverse problem is solved with a method that enforces sparsity in the coefficient vector. Instead of using regularization based on the 1-norm of the coefficient vector, an iterative solution procedure is used that promotes sparsity. The iterative method is shown to provide very similar results in most cases and to be computationally much more efficient. PMID:27106299

  4. Wideband Interferometric Sensing and Imaging Polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdi, James Salvatore; Kessler, Otto; Boerner, Wolfgang-Martin

    1996-01-01

    Wideband Interferometric Sensing and Imaging Polarimetry (WISIP) has become an important, indispensible tool in wide area military surveillance and global environmental monitoring of the terrestrial and planetary covers. It enables dynamic, real time optimal feature extraction of significant characteristics of desirable targets and/or target sections with simultaneous suppression of undesirable background clutter and propagation path speckle at hitherto unknown clarity and never before achieved quality. WISIP may be adopted to the detection, recognition, and identification (DRI) of any stationary, moving or vibrating targets or distributed scatterer segments versus arbitrary stationary, dynamical changing and/or moving geo-physical/ecological environments, provided the instantaneous 2x2 phasor and 4x4 power density matrices for forward propagation/backward scattering, respectively, can be measured with sufficient accuracy. For example, the DRI of stealthy, dynamically moving inhomogeneous volumetric scatter environments such as precipitation scatter, the ocean/sea/lake surface boundary layers, the littoral coastal surf zones, pack ice and snow or vegetative canopies, dry sands and soils, etc. can now be successfully realized. A comprehensive overview is presented on how these modern high resolution/precision, complete polarimetric co-registered signature sensing and imaging techniques, complemented by full integration of novel navigational electronic tools, such as DGPS, will advance electromagnetic vector wave sensing and imaging towards the limits of physical realization. Various examples utilizing the most recent image data take sets of airborne, space shuttle, and satellite imaging systems demonstrate the utility of WISIP.

  5. Broadband/Wideband Magnetoelectric Response

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Chee-Sung; Priya, Shashank

    2012-01-01

    A broadband/wideband magnetoelectric (ME) composite offers new opportunities for sensing wide ranges of both DC and AC magnetic fields. The broadband/wideband behavior is characterized by flat ME response over a given AC frequency range and DC magnetic bias. The structure proposed in this study operates in the longitudinal-transversal (L-T) mode. In this paper, we provide information on (i) how to design broadband/wideband ME sensors and (ii) how to control the magnitude of ME response over a desired frequency and DC bias regime. A systematic study was conducted to identify the factors affecting the broadband/wideband behavior by developing experimental models andmore » validating them against the predictions made through finite element modeling. A working prototype of the sensor with flat bands for both DC and AC magnetic field conditions was successfully obtained. These results are quite promising for practical applications such as current probe, low-frequency magnetic field sensing, and ME energy harvester.« less

  6. Hydrometeor Profiles Derived from Airborne Radar and Wideband Radiometer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, G. M.; Wang, J. R.; Heymsfield, G.; Hood, R.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A rich dataset was obtained with observations from the MIR (Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer, 89, 150, 183.3$\\pm$1, 183.3$\\pm$3,183.3$\\pm$7, and 220 apprx.GHz), the AMPR (Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer, 10.7, 19.35, 37, and 85 approx. GHz), and the EDOP (ER-2 Doppler Radar, 9.6 approx. GHz) on board the ER-2 aircraft during the CAMEX-3/TEFLUN-B (Convection and Moisture Experiment/Texas and Florida Underflights) TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) field campaign. Measurements over the ocean from these three instruments on 26 August 1998 were used in our iterative retrieval algorithm to estimate hydrometeor drop size profiles, The algorithm attempts to minimize the difference between the observations and forward radiometer and radar calculations based on the estimated profile. The high frequency MIR observations provide detailed information about the high altitude ice microphysics, while the AMPR is mostly used to define liquid hydrometeor characteristics. The EDOP provides an initial estimate of the profile and as a consistency check throughout the iterative cycle. The retrieval algorithm, specific results for convective and anvil cases, and general implications of this work will be presented.

  7. Camera Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    The camera presents an excellent way to illustrate principles of geometrical optics. Basic camera optics of the single-lens reflex camera are discussed, including interchangeable lenses and accessories available to most owners. Several experiments are described and results compared with theoretical predictions or manufacturer specifications.…

  8. Wideband RELAX and wideband CLEAN for aeroacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanwei; Li, Jian; Stoica, Petre; Sheplak, Mark; Nishida, Toshikazu

    2004-02-01

    Microphone arrays can be used for acoustic source localization and characterization in wind tunnel testing. In this paper, the wideband RELAX (WB-RELAX) and the wideband CLEAN (WB-CLEAN) algorithms are presented for aeroacoustic imaging using an acoustic array. WB-RELAX is a parametric approach that can be used efficiently for point source imaging without the sidelobe problems suffered by the delay-and-sum beamforming approaches. WB-CLEAN does not have sidelobe problems either, but it behaves more like a nonparametric approach and can be used for both point source and distributed source imaging. Moreover, neither of the algorithms suffers from the severe performance degradations encountered by the adaptive beamforming methods when the number of snapshots is small and/or the sources are highly correlated or coherent with each other. A two-step optimization procedure is used to implement the WB-RELAX and WB-CLEAN algorithms efficiently. The performance of WB-RELAX and WB-CLEAN is demonstrated by applying them to measured data obtained at the NASA Langley Quiet Flow Facility using a small aperture directional array (SADA). Somewhat surprisingly, using these approaches, not only were the parameters of the dominant source accurately determined, but a highly correlated multipath of the dominant source was also discovered. PMID:15000187

  9. Airborne Transparencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horne, Lois Thommason

    1984-01-01

    Starting from a science project on flight, art students discussed and investigated various means of moving in space. Then they made acetate illustrations which could be used as transparencies. The projection phenomenon made the illustrations look airborne. (CS)

  10. Design of an 8-40 GHz Antenna for the Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurements (WISM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Timothy E.; Vanhille, Kenneth J.; Trent, Christopher; Lambert, Kevin M.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of land surface snow remains a significant challenge in the remote sensing arena. Developing the tools needed to remotely measure Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) is an important priority. The Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurements (WISM) is being developed to address this need. WISM is an airborne instrument comprised of a dual-frequency (X- and Ku-bands) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and dual-frequency (K- and Ka-bands) radiometer. A unique feature of this instrument is that all measurement bands share a common antenna aperture consisting of an array feed reflector that covers the entire bandwidth. This paper covers the design and fabrication of the wideband array feed which is based on tightly coupled dipole arrays. Implementation using a relatively new multi-layer microfabrication process results in a small, 6x6 element, dual-linear polarized array with beamformer that operates from 8 to 40 gigahertz.

  11. Fractal-based wideband invisibility cloak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Nathan; Okoro, Obinna; Earle, Dan; Salkind, Phil; Unger, Barry; Yen, Sean; McHugh, Daniel; Polterzycki, Stefan; Shelman-Cohen, A. J.

    2015-03-01

    A wideband invisibility cloak (IC) at microwave frequencies is described. Using fractal resonators in closely spaced (sub wavelength) arrays as a minimal number of cylindrical layers (rings), the IC demonstrates that it is physically possible to attain a `see through' cloaking device with: (a) wideband coverage; (b) simple and attainable fabrication; (c) high fidelity emulation of the free path; (d) minimal side scattering; (d) a near absence of shadowing in the scattering. Although not a practical device, this fractal-enabled technology demonstrator opens up new opportunities for diverted-image (DI) technology and use of fractals in wideband optical, infrared, and microwave applications.

  12. Hemispheric ultra-wideband antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-04-01

    This report begins with a review of reduced size ultra-wideband (UWB) antennas and the peculiar problems that arise when building a UWB antenna. It then gives a description of a new type of UWB antenna that resolves these problems. This antenna, dubbed the hemispheric conical antenna, is similar to a conventional conical antenna in that it uses the same inverted conical conductor over a ground plane, but it also uses a hemispheric dielectric fill in between the conductive cone and the ground plane. The dielectric material creates a fundamentally new antenna which is reduced in size and much more rugged than a standard UWB conical antenna. The creation of finite-difference time domain (FDTD) software tools in spherical coordinates, as described in SAND2004-6577, enabled this technological advance.

  13. Ultra-wideband directional sampler

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-05-14

    The Ultra-Wideband (UWB) Directional Sampler is a four port device that combines the function of a directional coupler with a high speed sampler. Two of the four ports operate at a high sub-nanosecond speed, in ``real time``, and the other two ports operate at a slow millisecond-speed, in ``equivalent time``. A signal flowing inbound to either of the high speed ports is sampled and coupled, in equivalent time, to the adjacent equivalent time port while being isolated from the opposite equivalent time port. A primary application is for a time domain reflectometry (TDR) situation where the reflected pulse returns while the outbound pulse is still being transmitted, such as when the reflecting discontinuity is very close to the TDR apparatus. 3 figs.

  14. Ultra-wideband directional sampler

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    The Ultra-Wideband (UWB) Directional Sampler is a four port device that combines the function of a directional coupler with a high speed sampler. Two of the four ports operate at a high sub-nanosecond speed, in "real time", and the other two ports operate at a slow millisecond-speed, in "equivalent time". A signal flowing inbound to either of the high speed ports is sampled and coupled, in equivalent time, to the adjacent equivalent time port while being isolated from the opposite equivalent time port. A primary application is for a time domain reflectometry (TDR) situation where the reflected pulse returns while the outbound pulse is still being transmitted, such as when the reflecting discontinuity is very close to the TDR apparatus.

  15. Wideband Observations of Radio Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennucci, Timothy T.

    2015-08-01

    Pulsars are exotic objects which have yielded a bounty of important astrophysical results. As rapidly rotating, highly magnetized neutron stars, pulsars' stable rotation and beamed radio emission enables their use as interstellar laboratory clocks. The extraordinary timing regularity of the millisecond pulsar (MSP) population permits some of the most precise measurements in astronomy. The discovery of MSPs raised the probability of directly detecting gravitational waves for the first time. Ongoing efforts by several pulsar timing array (PTA) collaborations compliment the ground- and space-based efforts of laser interferometers. One such PTA is the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav). NANOGrav has recently employed a new set of wideband instruments to increase the sensitivity of their PTA, and the future of pulsar astronomy is moving towards progressively larger bandwidths. In this dissertation, we address the benefits and issues from adopting the new instrumentation, particularly for the scientific motivations of NANOGrav. We first develop a measurement technique for simultaneously obtaining pulse times-of-arrival (TOAs) and dispersion measures (DMs) using 2D models of evolving Gaussian components. We then apply the methodology broadly to a variety of pulsars, including a bright, test MSP in a globular cluster, the Galactic Center magnetar, and the entire suite of 37 MSPs from the NANOGrav 9-year data set. For a subset of these MSPs, we make targeted observations at specific orbital phases aimed at improving the timing models and constraining the Shapiro delay. With a few exceptions, we find positive or consistent timing results from the implementation of our first generation wideband timing protocol. Some highlights include: improved measurement uncertainties, mitigation of chromatic ISM effects, a reduction in the number of timing parameters and TOAs, signs of chromatic DMs, and at least one new pulsar mass.

  16. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  17. Space Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Nikon's F3 35mm camera was specially modified for use by Space Shuttle astronauts. The modification work produced a spinoff lubricant. Because lubricants in space have a tendency to migrate within the camera, Nikon conducted extensive development to produce nonmigratory lubricants; variations of these lubricants are used in the commercial F3, giving it better performance than conventional lubricants. Another spinoff is the coreless motor which allows the F3 to shoot 140 rolls of film on one set of batteries.

  18. Design of an 8-40 GHz Antenna for the Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurements (WISM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Timothy E.; Vanhille, Kenneth J.; Trent, Christopher R.; Lambert, Kevin M.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    This poster describes the implementation of a 6x6 element, dual linear polarized array with beamformer that operates from about 8-40 GHz. It is implemented using a relatively new multi-layer microfabrication process. The beamformer includes baluns that feed dual-polarized differential antenna elements and reactive splitters that cover the full frequency range of operation. This fixed beam array (FBA) serves as the feed for a multi-band instrument designed to measure snow water equivalent (SWE) from an airborne platform known as the Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurements (WISM).

  19. Airborne Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    ATM (Airborne Thematic Mapper) was developed for NSTL (National Space Technology Companies) by Daedalus Company. It offers expanded capabilities for timely, accurate and cost effective identification of areas with prospecting potential. A related system is TIMS, Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner. Originating from Landsat 4, it is also used for agricultural studies, etc.

  20. Infrared Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A sensitive infrared camera that observes the blazing plumes from the Space Shuttle or expendable rocket lift-offs is capable of scanning for fires, monitoring the environment and providing medical imaging. The hand-held camera uses highly sensitive arrays in infrared photodetectors known as quantum well infrared photo detectors (QWIPS). QWIPS were developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Center for Space Microelectronics Technology in partnership with Amber, a Raytheon company. In October 1996, QWIP detectors pointed out hot spots of the destructive fires speeding through Malibu, California. Night vision, early warning systems, navigation, flight control systems, weather monitoring, security and surveillance are among the duties for which the camera is suited. Medical applications are also expected.

  1. The Design and Characterization of Wideband Spline-profiled Feedhorns for Advanced Actpol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Sara M.; Austermann, Jason; Beall, James A.; Choi, Steve K.; Coughlin, Kevin P.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Henderson, Shawn W.; Hills, Felicity B.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hubmayr, Johannes; Josaitis, Alec; Koopman, Brian J.; McMahon, Jeff J.; Nati, Federico; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) is an upgraded camera for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) that will measure the cosmic microwave background in temperature and polarization over a wide range of angular scales and five frequency bands from 28-230 GHz. AdvACT will employ four arrays of feedhorn-coupled, polarization- sensitive multichroic detectors. To accommodate the higher pixel packing densities necessary to achieve Ad- vACTs sensitivity goals, we have developed and optimized wideband spline-profiled feedhorns for the AdvACT multichroic arrays that maximize coupling efficiency while carefully controlling polarization systematics. We present the design, fabrication, and testing of wideband spline-profiled feedhorns for the multichroic arrays of AdvACT.

  2. Wideband Analog Data System (WADS), system design document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brose, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The Wideband Analog System (WADS) which performs post flight structural dynamic analysis of wideband FM data recorded during orbital flight tests is defined. Screening, reporting, and plotting steady state and transient wave analysis data are provided by WADS.

  3. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1999-03-16

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks. 2 figs.

  4. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks.

  5. Wideband Agile Digital Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd C.; Brown, Shannon T.; Ruf, Christopher; Gross, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to take the initial steps needed to develop a field programmable gate array (FPGA)- based wideband digital radiometer backend (>500 MHz bandwidth) that will enable passive microwave observations with minimal performance degradation in a radiofrequency-interference (RFI)-rich environment. As manmade RF emissions increase over time and fill more of the microwave spectrum, microwave radiometer science applications will be increasingly impacted in a negative way, and the current generation of spaceborne microwave radiometers that use broadband analog back ends will become severely compromised or unusable over an increasing fraction of time on orbit. There is a need to develop a digital radiometer back end that, for each observation period, uses digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms to identify the maximum amount of RFI-free spectrum across the radiometer band to preserve bandwidth to minimize radiometer noise (which is inversely related to the bandwidth). Ultimately, the objective is to incorporate all processing necessary in the back end to take contaminated input spectra and produce a single output value free of manmade signals to minimize data rates for spaceborne radiometer missions. But, to meet these objectives, several intermediate processing algorithms had to be developed, and their performance characterized relative to typical brightness temperature accuracy re quirements for current and future microwave radiometer missions, including those for measuring salinity, soil moisture, and snow pack.

  6. CCD Camera

    DOEpatents

    Roth, R.R.

    1983-08-02

    A CCD camera capable of observing a moving object which has varying intensities of radiation emanating therefrom and which may move at varying speeds is shown wherein there is substantially no overlapping of successive images and wherein the exposure times and scan times may be varied independently of each other. 7 figs.

  7. CCD Camera

    DOEpatents

    Roth, Roger R.

    1983-01-01

    A CCD camera capable of observing a moving object which has varying intensities of radiation eminating therefrom and which may move at varying speeds is shown wherein there is substantially no overlapping of successive images and wherein the exposure times and scan times may be varied independently of each other.

  8. Nikon Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Nikon FM compact has simplification feature derived from cameras designed for easy, yet accurate use in a weightless environment. Innovation is a plastic-cushioned advance lever which advances the film and simultaneously switches on a built in light meter. With a turn of the lens aperture ring, a glowing signal in viewfinder confirms correct exposure.

  9. Narrowband Registration of Ultra-Wideband Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenev, A. V.; Satarov, R. N.; Yakubov, V. P.; Shipilov, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    The research of various parameters influence on the Fresnel reflector focusing properties in particular spatial sizes, the focal point position, etc. is conducted. The version of using a flat Fresnel reflector for receiving ultra-wideband signals with the use of Wiener filtering is suggested.

  10. Ultra-wideband radar sensors and networks

    DOEpatents

    Leach, Jr., Richard R; Nekoogar, Faranak; Haugen, Peter C

    2013-08-06

    Ultra wideband radar motion sensors strategically placed in an area of interest communicate with a wireless ad hoc network to provide remote area surveillance. Swept range impulse radar and a heart and respiration monitor combined with the motion sensor further improves discrimination.

  11. An ultra wideband Wilkinson power divider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazeri, Ali Reza

    2012-04-01

    In this article, an ultra wideband power divider is proposed, analysed and designed. The design approach of the proposed power divider is derived from even/odd mode analysis. The design approach is validated, and the power divider is simulated by two full-wave electromagnetic simulators (ADS and Sonnet) and fabricated on a substrate with a thickness of 0.635 mm and relative constant of 10.2. Measured results of the proposed power divider show equal power split, excellent insertion loss and good return loss at all the three ports, and a good isolation between the two output ports is achieved over the specified 3.1-10.6 GHz ultra wideband range. In the input port return loss, there are two transmission poles around 5.2 and 9.5 GHz. The overall size of the proposed power divider is just ? .

  12. AMiBA WIDEBAND ANALOG CORRELATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chao-Te; Kubo, Derek Y.; Lin, Kai-Yang; Chen, Ming-Tang; Ho, P. T. P.; Chen, Chung-Cheng; Han, Chih-Chiang; Oshiro, Peter; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chang, Shu-Hao; Altamirano, Pablo; Jiang, Homin; Wilson, Warwick; Chiueh, Tzi-Dar; Lien, Chun-Hsien; Wang, Huei; Wei, Ray-Ming; Yang, Chia-Hsiang; Peterson, Jeffrey B.

    2010-06-10

    A wideband analog correlator has been constructed for the Yuan-Tseh Lee Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy. Lag correlators using analog multipliers provide large bandwidth and moderate frequency resolution. Broadband intermediate frequency distribution, back-end signal processing, and control are described. Operating conditions for optimum sensitivity and linearity are discussed. From observations, a large effective bandwidth of around 10 GHz has been shown to provide sufficient sensitivity for detecting cosmic microwave background variations.

  13. AMiBA Wideband Analog Correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao-Te; Kubo, Derek Y.; Wilson, Warwick; Lin, Kai-Yang; Chen, Ming-Tang; Ho, P. T. P.; Chen, Chung-Cheng; Han, Chih-Chiang; Oshiro, Peter; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chang, Shu-Hao; Altamirano, Pablo; Jiang, Homin; Chiueh, Tzi-Dar; Lien, Chun-Hsien; Wang, Huei; Wei, Ray-Ming; Yang, Chia-Hsiang; Peterson, Jeffrey B.; Chang, Su-Wei; Huang, Yau-De; Hwang, Yuh-Jing; Kesteven, Michael; Koch, Patrick; Liu, Guo-Chin; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Umetsu, Keiichi; Wei, Tashun; Proty Wu, Jiun-Huei

    2010-06-01

    A wideband analog correlator has been constructed for the Yuan-Tseh Lee Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy. Lag correlators using analog multipliers provide large bandwidth and moderate frequency resolution. Broadband intermediate frequency distribution, back-end signal processing, and control are described. Operating conditions for optimum sensitivity and linearity are discussed. From observations, a large effective bandwidth of around 10 GHz has been shown to provide sufficient sensitivity for detecting cosmic microwave background variations.

  14. Caught on Camera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milshtein, Amy

    2002-01-01

    Describes the benefits of and rules to be followed when using surveillance cameras for school security. Discusses various camera models, including indoor and outdoor fixed position cameras, pan-tilt zoom cameras, and pinhole-lens cameras for covert surveillance. (EV)

  15. From Fibrevision To The Multi-Star Wideband Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, R.; Moore, D.

    1984-03-01

    Following experience gained with the Fibrevision cable TV trial at Milton Keynes the implementation of a large scale multi-star wideband local network is being investigated by British Telecom. An update on the Fibrevision trial is given followed by an outline description of a future multi-star wideband network.

  16. Compact wideband antenna above a wideband non-uniform artificial magnetic conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damaj, Lana; Lepage, Anne-Claire; Begaud, Xavier

    2014-08-01

    A compact wideband antenna place above a non-uniform artificial magnetic conductor (AMC) is presented. The antenna is composed of a wideband coplanar waveguide fed antenna, with wideband harmonic suppression characteristic using non-uniform defected ground structure. Besides, a non-uniform wideband AMC is designed. The AMC unit cell is composed of a square patch into which a four arms spiral shape is etched. It exhibits a wider ±90° bandwidth than the spiral unit cell and a smaller size than the square patch unit cell. The antenna is placed above the proposed AMC structure formed by 6 × 5 unit cells. The overall dimensions of the complete structure are 0.7 × 0.6 λ {0/2}, where λ 0 is the free-space wavelength at the lowest frequency. It offers a low-profile configuration with a total thickness of λ 0/14.3, and it is matched between 2.5 and 5.4 GHz (73.5 %). Furthermore, it has a stable main lobe radiation pattern in the E- and H-planes within the operating frequency band. Moreover, compared with the antenna without AMC, the broadside realized gain is significantly increased. A prototype has been realized, and there is a good agreement between simulated and measured results. Furthermore, the proposed structure presents a size reduction of about 34 %, and better radiation characteristics in comparison with the conventional square AMC.

  17. A wideband deflected reflection based on multiple resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongya; Ma, Hua; Wang, Jiafu; Qu, Shaobo; Li, Yongfeng; Wang, Jun; Yan, Mingbao; Pang, Yongqiang

    2015-07-01

    We propose to realize wideband deflected reflection in microwave regime through multiple resonances. A wideband deflected reflection of a phase gradient metasurface is designed using a double-head arrow structure, which has demonstrated an ultra-wideband cross-polarized reflection caused by multiple electric and magnetic resonances. The wideband effect benefits from the wideband cross-polarized reflection and flexible phase modulation of the double-head arrow structure. Simulated and experimental results agree well with theoretical predictions. Furthermore, relative bandwidths of deflected reflection reach to 71 % for both x- and y-polarized waves under normal incidence. Our method of expansion bandwidth may pave the way in many practical applications, such as RCS reduction, stealth surfaces.

  18. Mark 3 wideband digital recorder in perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinteregger, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    The tape recorder used for the Mark 3 data acquisition and processing system is compared with earlier very long baseline interferometry recorders. Wideband 33-1/3 kbpi digital channel characteristics of instrumentation recorders and of a modern video cassette recorder are illustrated. Factors which influenced selection of the three major commercial components (transport, heads, and tape) are discussed. A brief functional description and the reasons for development of efficient signal electronics and necessary auxiliary control electronics are given. The design and operation of a digital bit synchronizer is illustrated as an example of the high degree of simplicity achieved.

  19. Ultra-wideband radar motion sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1994-11-01

    A motion sensor is based on ultra-wideband (UWB) radar. UWB radar range is determined by a pulse-echo interval. For motion detection, the sensors operate by staring at a fixed range and then sensing any change in the averaged radar reflectivity at that range. A sampling gate is opened at a fixed delay after the emission of a transmit pulse. The resultant sampling gate output is averaged over repeated pulses. Changes in the averaged sampling gate output represent changes in the radar reflectivity at a particular range, and thus motion. 15 figs.

  20. Ultra-wideband radar motion sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    A motion sensor is based on ultra-wideband (UWB) radar. UWB radar range is determined by a pulse-echo interval. For motion detection, the sensors operate by staring at a fixed range and then sensing any change in the averaged radar reflectivity at that range. A sampling gate is opened at a fixed delay after the emission of a transmit pulse. The resultant sampling gate output is averaged over repeated pulses. Changes in the averaged sampling gate output represent changes in the radar reflectivity at a particular range, and thus motion.

  1. Wideband, phase coded millimeter wave instrumentation radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keicher, W. E.; Zieman, H. E.

    1982-10-01

    A wideband, biphase coded, CW millimeter wave instrumentation radar has been constructed to obtain both unresolved and resolved radar cross section data of tactical vehicles and naval vessels. The radar operates at 95.6 GHz with a selectable pseudo-noise code waveform which allows a variable range resolution and range ambiguity. The radar azimuth-elevation scanner is controlled by a microprocessor. Various scan patterns (e.g., raster) are stored in erasable programmable read only memory (EPROM). A 'sliding code' signal correlation is used to obtain processing gain as well as bandwidth compression in order to simplify signal recording and digitizing. Radar performance is also described.

  2. Wideband arrays with variable element sizes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, D. G.; Stutzman, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    A new planar array architecture based on adding half-sized elements in between the other elements in order to extend the frequency by one octave is proposed and validated. This wideband array with variable element sizes (WAVES) antenna is shown by calculations and by measurements using Archimedean spirals to be the elements necessary to maintain a simple clean mainbeam and principal plane sidelobes below about -10 dB over two octaves. In spite of using a test antenna with a simple parallel feed and no impedance matching or isolation, the agreement between predicted and measured results is good.

  3. Miniature biotelemeter gives multichannel wideband biomedical data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carraway, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    A miniature biotelemeter was developed for sensing and transmitting multiple channels of biomedical data over a radio link. The design of this miniature, 10-channel, wideband (5 kHz/channel), pulse amplitude modulation/ frequency modulation biotelemeter takes advantage of modern device technology (e.g., integrated circuit operational amplifiers, complementary symmetry/metal oxide semiconductor logic, and solid state switches) and hybrid packaging techniques. The telemeter is being used to monitor 10 channels of neuron firings from specific regions of the brain in rats implanted with chronic electrodes. Design, fabrication, and testing of an engineering model biotelemeter are described.

  4. Real-time wideband holographic surveillance system

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, David M.; Collins, H. Dale; Hall, Thomas E.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Gribble, R. Parks; Severtsen, Ronald H.; Prince, James M.; Reid, Larry D.

    1996-01-01

    A wideband holographic surveillance system including a transceiver for generating a plurality of electromagnetic waves; antenna for transmitting the electromagnetic waves toward a target at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; the transceiver also receiving and converting electromagnetic waves reflected from the target to electrical signals at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; a computer for processing the electrical signals to obtain signals corresponding to a holographic reconstruction of the target; and a display for displaying the processed information to determine nature of the target. The computer has instructions to apply a three dimensional backward wave algorithm.

  5. Real-time wideband holographic surveillance system

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, D.M.; Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.; McMakin, D.L.; Gribble, R.P.; Severtsen, R.H.; Prince, J.M.; Reid, L.D.

    1996-09-17

    A wideband holographic surveillance system including a transceiver for generating a plurality of electromagnetic waves; antenna for transmitting the electromagnetic waves toward a target at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; the transceiver also receiving and converting electromagnetic waves reflected from the target to electrical signals at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; a computer for processing the electrical signals to obtain signals corresponding to a holographic reconstruction of the target; and a display for displaying the processed information to determine nature of the target. The computer has instructions to apply a three dimensional backward wave algorithm. 28 figs.

  6. A Coordinated Ice-based and Airborne Snow and Ice Thickness Measurement Campaign on Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter-Menge, J.; Farrell, S.; Elder, B. C.; Gardner, J. M.; Brozena, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    A rare opportunity presented itself in March 2011 when the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and NASA IceBridge teamed with scientists from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) to coordinate a multi-scale approach to mapping snow depth and sea ice thickness distribution in the Arctic. Ground-truth information for calibration/validation of airborne and CryoSat-2 satellite data were collected near a manned camp deployed in support of the US Navy's Ice Expedition 2011 (ICEX 2011). The ice camp was established at a location approximately 230 km north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, at the edge of the perennial ice zone. The suite of measurements was strategically organized around a 9-km-long survey line that covered a wide range of ice types, including refrozen leads, deformed and undeformed first year ice, and multiyear ice. A highly concentrated set of in situ measurements of snow depth and ice thickness were taken along the survey line. Once the survey line was in place, NASA IceBridge flew a dedicated mission along the survey line, collecting data with an instrument suite that included the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), a high precision, airborne scanning laser altimeter; the Digital Mapping System (DMS), nadir-viewing digital camera; and the University of Kansas ultra-wideband Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) snow radar. NRL also flew a dedicated mission over the survey line with complementary airborne radar, laser and photogrammetric sensors (see Brozena et al., this session). These measurements were further leveraged by a series of CryoSat-2 under flights made in the region by the instrumented NRL and NASA planes, as well as US Navy submarine underpasses of the 9-km-long survey line to collect ice draft measurements. This comprehensive suite of data provides the full spectrum of sampling resolutions from satellite, to airborne, to ground-based, to submarine and will allow for a careful determination of

  7. Determining Camera Gain in Room Temperature Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua Cogliati

    2010-12-01

    James R. Janesick provides a method for determining the amplification of a CCD or CMOS camera when only access to the raw images is provided. However, the equation that is provided ignores the contribution of dark current. For CCD or CMOS cameras that are cooled well below room temperature, this is not a problem, however, the technique needs adjustment for use with room temperature cameras. This article describes the adjustment made to the equation, and a test of this method.

  8. Photonic downconversion with tunable wideband phase shift.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tianwei; Yu, Song; Wu, Ruihuan; Wang, Dongsheng; Gu, Wanyi

    2016-06-01

    A microwave photonic frequency downconversion system with wideband and continuous phase-shift function is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed system, a radio frequency (RF) and a local oscillator (LO) signal drive two arms of a dual-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator (DMZM). A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is used for reflecting the first-order sidebands of both RF and LO signals. Due to phase independence between RF and LO optical sidebands, the phase-shifting operation for an output intermediate frequency (IF) signal can be implemented either by adjusting the bias voltage of DMZM or by controlling the optical wavelength of laser. Experimental results demonstrate a full 0° to 360° phase shift, while an RF signal between 12 GHz to 20 GHz is downconverted to IFs below 4 GHz. The phase deviation is measured less than 2°, and the fluctuation of magnitude response is measured less than ±1  dB over a wideband frequency range. PMID:27244434

  9. An extremely wideband and lightweight metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yang; Pei, Zhibin; Pang, Yongqiang; Wang, Jiafu; Zhang, Anxue; Qu, Shaobo

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional microwave metamaterial absorber based on the stand-up resistive film patch array. The absorber has wideband absorption, lightweight, and polarization-independent properties. Our design comes from the array of unidirectional stand-up resistive film patches backed by a metallic plane, which can excite multiple standing wave modes. By rolling the resistive film patches as a square enclosure, we obtain the polarization-independent property. Due to the multiple standing wave modes, the most incident energy is dissipated by the resistive film patches, and thus, the ultra-wideband absorption can be achieved by overlapping all the absorption modes at different frequencies. Both the simulated and experimental results show that the absorber possesses a fractional bandwidth of 148.2% with the absorption above 90% in the frequency range from 3.9 to 26.2 GHz. Moreover, the proposed absorber is extremely lightweight. The areal density of the fabricated sample is about 0.062 g/cm2, which is approximately equivalent to that of eight stacked standard A4 office papers. It is expected that our proposed absorber may find potential applications such as electromagnetic interference and stealth technologies.

  10. A Novel Monopulse Angle Estimation Method for Wideband LFM Radars

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Xiong; Liu, Qi-Fan; Hong, Ru-Jia; Pan, Ping-Ping; Deng, Zhen-Miao

    2016-01-01

    Traditional monopulse angle estimations are mainly based on phase comparison and amplitude comparison methods, which are commonly adopted in narrowband radars. In modern radar systems, wideband radars are becoming more and more important, while the angle estimation for wideband signals is little studied in previous works. As noise in wideband radars has larger bandwidth than narrowband radars, the challenge lies in the accumulation of energy from the high resolution range profile (HRRP) of monopulse. In wideband radars, linear frequency modulated (LFM) signals are frequently utilized. In this paper, we investigate the monopulse angle estimation problem for wideband LFM signals. To accumulate the energy of the received echo signals from different scatterers of a target, we propose utilizing a cross-correlation operation, which can achieve a good performance in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions. In the proposed algorithm, the problem of angle estimation is converted to estimating the frequency of the cross-correlation function (CCF). Experimental results demonstrate the similar performance of the proposed algorithm compared with the traditional amplitude comparison method. It means that the proposed method for angle estimation can be adopted. When adopting the proposed method, future radars may only need wideband signals for both tracking and imaging, which can greatly increase the data rate and strengthen the capability of anti-jamming. More importantly, the estimated angle will not become ambiguous under an arbitrary angle, which can significantly extend the estimated angle range in wideband radars. PMID:27271629

  11. A Novel Monopulse Angle Estimation Method for Wideband LFM Radars.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Xiong; Liu, Qi-Fan; Hong, Ru-Jia; Pan, Ping-Ping; Deng, Zhen-Miao

    2016-01-01

    Traditional monopulse angle estimations are mainly based on phase comparison and amplitude comparison methods, which are commonly adopted in narrowband radars. In modern radar systems, wideband radars are becoming more and more important, while the angle estimation for wideband signals is little studied in previous works. As noise in wideband radars has larger bandwidth than narrowband radars, the challenge lies in the accumulation of energy from the high resolution range profile (HRRP) of monopulse. In wideband radars, linear frequency modulated (LFM) signals are frequently utilized. In this paper, we investigate the monopulse angle estimation problem for wideband LFM signals. To accumulate the energy of the received echo signals from different scatterers of a target, we propose utilizing a cross-correlation operation, which can achieve a good performance in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions. In the proposed algorithm, the problem of angle estimation is converted to estimating the frequency of the cross-correlation function (CCF). Experimental results demonstrate the similar performance of the proposed algorithm compared with the traditional amplitude comparison method. It means that the proposed method for angle estimation can be adopted. When adopting the proposed method, future radars may only need wideband signals for both tracking and imaging, which can greatly increase the data rate and strengthen the capability of anti-jamming. More importantly, the estimated angle will not become ambiguous under an arbitrary angle, which can significantly extend the estimated angle range in wideband radars. PMID:27271629

  12. Long-distance eye-safe laser TOF camera design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Anton V.; Polyakov, Vadim M.; Buchenkov, Vyacheslav A.

    2016-04-01

    We present a new TOF camera design based on a compact actively Q-switched diode pumped solid-state laser operating in 1.5 μm range and a receiver system based on a short wave infrared InGaAs PIN diodes focal plane array with an image intensifier and a special readout integration circuit. The compact camera is capable of depth imaging up to 4 kilometers with 10 frame/s and 1.2 m error. The camera could be applied for airborne and space geodesy location and navigation.

  13. Three Specialized Innovations for FAST Wideband Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xia; Yu, Xinying; Duan, Ran; Hao, Jie; Li, Di

    2015-08-01

    The National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) will soon finish the largest antenna in the world. Known as FAST, the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope will be the most sensitive single-dish radio telescope in the low frequency radio bands between 70 MHz and 3 GHz.To take advantage of its giant aperture, all relevant cutting-edge technology should be applied to FAST to ensure that it achieves the best possible overall performance. The wideband receiver that is currently under development can not only be directly applied to FAST, but also used for other Chinese radio telescopes, such as the Shanghai 65-meter telescope and the Xinjiang 110-meter telescope, to ensure that these telescopes are among the best in the world. Recently, rapid development related to this wideband receiver has been underway. In this paper, we will introduce three key aspects of the FAST wideband receiver project. First is the use of a high-performance analog-to-digital converter (ADC). With the cooperation of Hao Jie’s team from the Institute of Automation of the Chinese Academy of Sciences(CASIA), we have developed 3-Gsps,12-bit ADCs, which have not been used previously in astronomy, and we expect to realize the 3-GHz bandwidth in a single step by covering the entire bandwidth via interleaving or a complex fast Fourier transform (FFT).Second is the front-end analog signal integrated circuit board. We wish to achieve a series of amplification, attenuation, and mixing filtering operations on a single small board, thereby achieving digital control of the bandpass behavior both flexibly and highly-efficiently. This design will not only greatly reduce the required cost and power but will also make the best use of the digital-system’s flexibility. Third is optimization of the FFT: the existing FFT is not very efficient; therefore, we will optimize the FFT for large-scale operation. For this purpose, we intend to cascade two FFTs. Another

  14. Wideband micromachined microphones with radio frequency detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Sean Thomas

    There are many commercial, scientific, and military applications for miniature wideband acoustic sensors, including monitoring the condition or wear of equipment, collecting scientific data, and identifying and localizing military targets. The application of semiconductor micromachining techniques to sensor fabrication has the potential to transform acoustic sensing with small, reproducible, and inexpensive silicon-based microphones. However, such sensors usually suffer from limited bandwidth and from non-uniformities in their frequency response due to squeeze-film damping effects and narrow air gaps. Furthermore, they may be too fragile to be left unattended in a humid or dusty outdoor environment. Silicon microphones that incorporate capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer membranes overcome some of the drawbacks of conventional microphones. These micromachined membranes are small and robust enough to be vacuum-sealed, and can withstand atmospheric pressure and submersion in water. In addition, the membrane mechanical response is flat from dc up to ultrasonic frequencies, resulting in a wideband sensor for accurate spectral analysis of acoustic signals. However, a sensitive detection scheme is necessary to detect the small changes in membrane displacement that result from using smaller, stiffer membranes than do conventional microphones. We propose a radio frequency detection technique, in which the capacitive membranes are incorporated into a transmission line. Variations in membrane capacitance due to impinging sound pressure are sensed through the phase variations of a carrier signal that propagates along the line. This dissertation examines the design, fabrication, modeling, and experimental measurements of wideband micromachined microphones using sealed ultrasonic membranes and RF detection. Measurements of fabricated microphones demonstrate less than 0.5 dB variation in their output responses between 0.1 Hz to 100 kHz under electrostatic actuation of

  15. Improved Airborne System for Sensing Wildfires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKeown, Donald; Richardson, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Wildfire Airborne Sensing Program (WASP) is engaged in a continuing effort to develop an improved airborne instrumentation system for sensing wildfires. The system could also be used for other aerial-imaging applications, including mapping and military surveillance. Unlike prior airborne fire-detection instrumentation systems, the WASP system would not be based on custom-made multispectral line scanners and associated custom- made complex optomechanical servomechanisms, sensors, readout circuitry, and packaging. Instead, the WASP system would be based on commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) equipment that would include (1) three or four electronic cameras (one for each of three or four wavelength bands) instead of a multispectral line scanner; (2) all associated drive and readout electronics; (3) a camera-pointing gimbal; (4) an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver for measuring the position, velocity, and orientation of the aircraft; and (5) a data-acquisition subsystem. It would be necessary to custom-develop an integrated sensor optical-bench assembly, a sensor-management subsystem, and software. The use of mostly COTS equipment is intended to reduce development time and cost, relative to those of prior systems.

  16. Vacuum Camera Cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laugen, Geoffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Acquiring cheap, moving video was impossible in a vacuum environment, due to camera overheating. This overheating is brought on by the lack of cooling media in vacuum. A water-jacketed camera cooler enclosure machined and assembled from copper plate and tube has been developed. The camera cooler (see figure) is cup-shaped and cooled by circulating water or nitrogen gas through copper tubing. The camera, a store-bought "spy type," is not designed to work in a vacuum. With some modifications the unit can be thermally connected when mounted in the cup portion of the camera cooler. The thermal conductivity is provided by copper tape between parts of the camera and the cooled enclosure. During initial testing of the demonstration unit, the camera cooler kept the CPU (central processing unit) of this video camera at operating temperature. This development allowed video recording of an in-progress test, within a vacuum environment.

  17. Making Ceramic Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  18. Constrained space camera assembly

    DOEpatents

    Heckendorn, Frank M.; Anderson, Erin K.; Robinson, Casandra W.; Haynes, Harriet B.

    1999-01-01

    A constrained space camera assembly which is intended to be lowered through a hole into a tank, a borehole or another cavity. The assembly includes a generally cylindrical chamber comprising a head and a body and a wiring-carrying conduit extending from the chamber. Means are included in the chamber for rotating the body about the head without breaking an airtight seal formed therebetween. The assembly may be pressurized and accompanied with a pressure sensing means for sensing if a breach has occurred in the assembly. In one embodiment, two cameras, separated from their respective lenses, are installed on a mounting apparatus disposed in the chamber. The mounting apparatus includes means allowing both longitudinal and lateral movement of the cameras. Moving the cameras longitudinally focuses the cameras, and moving the cameras laterally away from one another effectively converges the cameras so that close objects can be viewed. The assembly further includes means for moving lenses of different magnification forward of the cameras.

  19. Adaptation of the Camera Link Interface for Flight-Instrument Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, David P.; Mahoney, John C.

    2010-01-01

    COTS (commercial-off-the-shelf) hard ware using an industry-standard Camera Link interface is proposed to accomplish the task of designing, building, assembling, and testing electronics for an airborne spectrometer that would be low-cost, but sustain the required data speed and volume. The focal plane electronics were designed to support that hardware standard. Analysis was done to determine how these COTS electronics could be interfaced with space-qualified camera electronics. Interfaces available for spaceflight application do not support the industry standard Camera Link interface, but with careful design, COTS EGSE (electronics ground support equipment), including camera interfaces and camera simulators, can still be used.

  20. Wideband sensitivity analysis of plasmonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Osman S.; Bakr, Mohamed H.; Li, Xun; Nomura, Tsuyoshi

    2013-03-01

    We propose an adjoint variable method (AVM) for efficient wideband sensitivity analysis of the dispersive plasmonic structures. Transmission Line Modeling (TLM) is exploited for calculation of the structure sensitivities. The theory is developed for general dispersive materials modeled by Drude or Lorentz model. Utilizing the dispersive AVM, sensitivities are calculated with respect to all the designable parameters regardless of their number using at most one extra simulation. This is significantly more efficient than the regular finite difference approaches whose computational overhead scales linearly with the number of design parameters. A Z-domain formulation is utilized to allow for the extension of the theory to a general material model. The theory has been successfully applied to a structure with teethshaped plasmonic resonator. The design variables are the shape parameters (widths and thicknesses) of these teeth. The results are compared to the accurate yet expensive finite difference approach and good agreement is achieved.

  1. Design of a Wideband Radio Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.; Weinreb, Sander; Mani, Handi

    2007-01-01

    A wideband Radio Telescope is being designed for use in the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope program. It uses an existing 34-meter antenna retrofitted with a tertiary offset mirror placed at the apex of the main reflector. It can be rotated to use two feeds that cover the 1.2 to 14 GHz band. The feed for 4.0 to 14.0 GHz is a cryogenically cooled commercially available open boundary quadridge horn from ETS-Lindgren. Coverage from 1.2 to 4.0 GHz is provided by an un-cooled scaled version of the same feed. The performance is greater than 40% over most of the band and greater than 55%from 6 to 13.5 GHz.

  2. Millimeter wave band ultra wideband transmitter MMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Jin; Rolland, Nathalie

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new millimeter-wave (MMW) ultra wideband (UWB) transmitter MMIC which has been developed in an OMMIC 0.1 μm GaAs PHEMT foundry process (ft = 100 GHz) for 22-29 GHz vehicular radar systems. The transmitter is composed of an MMW negative resistance oscillator (NRO), a power amplifier (PA), and two UWB pulse generators (PGs). In order to convert the UWB pulse signal to MMW frequency and reduce the total power consumption, the MMW NRO is driven by one of the UWB pulse generators and the power amplifier is triggered by another UWB pulse generator. The main advantages of this transmitter are: new design, simple architecture, high-precision distance measurements, infinite ON/OFF switch ratio, and low power consumption. The total power consumption of the transmitter MMIC is 218 mW with a peak output power of 5.5 dBm at 27 GHz.

  3. Wideband ECE Imaging Upgrade for TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domier, C. W.; Zhang, P.; Xia, Z. G.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Park, H.; Mazzucato, E.; van de Pol, M. J.; Classen, I. G. J.; Jaspers, R.; Donne, A. J. H.

    2006-10-01

    A 128 channel 2-D Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) Imaging instrument has been routinely used to study MHD physics such as m=1 and m=2 modes on the TEXTOR tokamak. As presently configured, each array element of the 16 element mixer array measures plasma emission at 8 simultaneous frequencies over a 4 GHz span to form a 16x8 image of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations over an area of 16 cm (vertical) by 6 cm (horizontal). This instrument will be upgraded in October 2006 with new wideband ECE electronics which increase the instantaneous frequency coverage by >50% to 6.4 GHz with a corresponding increase in horizontal plasma coverage. Arranged in a new modular fashion, the system is easily extended to form a 16x16 system spanning 12.8 GHz by employing two modules per array channel, or as high as 16x24 spanning 19.2 GHz by employing three modules per array channel.

  4. Nanosecond frame cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A M; Wilkins, P R

    2001-01-05

    The advent of CCD cameras and computerized data recording has spurred the development of several new cameras and techniques for recording nanosecond images. We have made a side by side comparison of three nanosecond frame cameras, examining them for both performance and operational characteristics. The cameras include; Micro-Channel Plate/CCD, Image Diode/CCD and Image Diode/Film; combinations of gating/data recording. The advantages and disadvantages of each device will be discussed.

  5. Elementary wideband timing of radio pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Pennucci, Timothy T.; Demorest, Paul B.; Ransom, Scott M. E-mail: pdemores@nrao.edu

    2014-08-01

    We present an algorithm for the simultaneous measurement of a pulse time-of-arrival (TOA) and dispersion measure (DM) from folded wideband pulsar data. We extend the prescription from Taylor's 1992 work to accommodate a general two-dimensional template 'portrait', the alignment of which can be used to measure a pulse phase and DM. We show that there is a dedispersion reference frequency that removes the covariance between these two quantities and note that the recovered pulse profile scaling amplitudes can provide useful information. We experiment with pulse modeling by using a Gaussian-component scheme that allows for independent component evolution with frequency, a 'fiducial component', and the inclusion of scattering. We showcase the algorithm using our publicly available code on three years of wideband data from the bright millisecond pulsar J1824–2452A (M28A) from the Green Bank Telescope, and a suite of Monte Carlo analyses validates the algorithm. By using a simple model portrait of M28A, we obtain DM trends comparable to those measured by more standard methods, with improved TOA and DM precisions by factors of a few. Measurements from our algorithm will yield precisions at least as good as those from traditional techniques, but is prone to fewer systematic effects and is without ad hoc parameters. A broad application of this new method for dispersion measure tracking with modern large-bandwidth observing systems should improve the timing residuals for pulsar timing array experiments, such as the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves.

  6. An Ultra-Wideband Millimeter-Wave Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Markus H.; Miranda, Felix A.; Volakis, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Wideband millimeter-wave arrays are of increasing importance due to their growing use in high data rate systems, including 5G communication networks. In this paper, we present a new class of ultra-wideband millimeter wave arrays that operate from nearly 20 GHz to 90 GHz. The array is based on tightly coupled dipoles. Feeding designs and fabrication challenges are presented, and a method for suppressing feed resonances is provided.

  7. An ultra-wideband antenna for pulsed applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, William H.; Burnside, Walter D.; Gilreath, Melvin C.

    1993-01-01

    A wideband feed is proposed to support wideband radiation, and a design process is presented for a slotline bowtie hybrid (SBH) antenna based on specified pattern characteristics. Measured results are presented to demonstrate the pattern control of the antenna over its bandwidth. Impulse response plots are used to illustrate the pulse performance of this antenna type. For the antenna discussed here, the bandwidth was measured to be 6 to 1 and actually is expected to be larger.

  8. Harpicon camera for HDTV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanada, Jun

    1992-08-01

    Ikegami has been involved in broadcast equipment ever since it was established as a company. In conjunction with NHK it has brought forth countless television cameras, from black-and-white cameras to color cameras, HDTV cameras, and special-purpose cameras. In the early days of HDTV (high-definition television, also known as "High Vision") cameras the specifications were different from those for the cameras of the present-day system, and cameras using all kinds of components, having different arrangements of components, and having different appearances were developed into products, with time spent on experimentation, design, fabrication, adjustment, and inspection. But recently the knowhow built up thus far in components, , printed circuit boards, and wiring methods has been incorporated in camera fabrication, making it possible to make HDTV cameras by metbods similar to the present system. In addition, more-efficient production, lower costs, and better after-sales service are being achieved by using the same circuits, components, mechanism parts, and software for both HDTV cameras and cameras that operate by the present system.

  9. Digital Pinhole Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancor, Rachael; Lancor, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In this article we describe how the classic pinhole camera demonstration can be adapted for use with digital cameras. Students can easily explore the effects of the size of the pinhole and its distance from the sensor on exposure time, magnification, and image quality. Instructions for constructing a digital pinhole camera and our method for…

  10. 2. VAL CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND TRACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VAL CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND TRACK WITH CAMERA STATION ABOVE LOOKING WEST TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. 6. VAL CAMERA CAR, DETAIL OF COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT INSIDE CAMERA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VAL CAMERA CAR, DETAIL OF COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT INSIDE CAMERA CAR WITH CAMERA MOUNT IN FOREGROUND. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. 7. VAL CAMERA CAR, DETAIL OF 'FLARE' OR TRAJECTORY CAMERA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VAL CAMERA CAR, DETAIL OF 'FLARE' OR TRAJECTORY CAMERA INSIDE CAMERA CAR. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. Tower Camera Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Moudry, D

    2005-01-01

    The tower camera in Barrow provides hourly images of ground surrounding the tower. These images may be used to determine fractional snow cover as winter arrives, for comparison with the albedo that can be calculated from downward-looking radiometers, as well as some indication of present weather. Similarly, during spring time, the camera images show the changes in the ground albedo as the snow melts. The tower images are saved in hourly intervals. In addition, two other cameras, the skydeck camera in Barrow and the piling camera in Atqasuk, show the current conditions at those sites.

  14. Automated Camera Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Siqi; Cheng, Yang; Willson, Reg

    2006-01-01

    Automated Camera Calibration (ACAL) is a computer program that automates the generation of calibration data for camera models used in machine vision systems. Machine vision camera models describe the mapping between points in three-dimensional (3D) space in front of the camera and the corresponding points in two-dimensional (2D) space in the camera s image. Calibrating a camera model requires a set of calibration data containing known 3D-to-2D point correspondences for the given camera system. Generating calibration data typically involves taking images of a calibration target where the 3D locations of the target s fiducial marks are known, and then measuring the 2D locations of the fiducial marks in the images. ACAL automates the analysis of calibration target images and greatly speeds the overall calibration process.

  15. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1989-01-01

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 KeV x-rays.

  16. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1984-09-28

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (uv to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 keV x-rays.

  17. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1989-03-21

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras is disclosed. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1,000 KeV x-rays. 3 figs.

  18. GRACE star camera noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Nate

    2016-08-01

    Extending results from previous work by Bandikova et al. (2012) and Inacio et al. (2015), this paper analyzes Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) star camera attitude measurement noise by processing inter-camera quaternions from 2003 to 2015. We describe a correction to star camera data, which will eliminate a several-arcsec twice-per-rev error with daily modulation, currently visible in the auto-covariance function of the inter-camera quaternion, from future GRACE Level-1B product releases. We also present evidence supporting the argument that thermal conditions/settings affect long-term inter-camera attitude biases by at least tens-of-arcsecs, and that several-to-tens-of-arcsecs per-rev star camera errors depend largely on field-of-view.

  19. Analytical multicollimator camera calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tayman, W.P.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration with the U.S. Geological survey multicollimator determines the calibrated focal length, the point of symmetry, the radial distortion referred to the point of symmetry, and the asymmetric characteristiecs of the camera lens. For this project, two cameras were calibrated, a Zeiss RMK A 15/23 and a Wild RC 8. Four test exposures were made with each camera. Results are tabulated for each exposure and averaged for each set. Copies of the standard USGS calibration reports are included. ?? 1978.

  20. Some Notes on Wideband Feedback Amplifiers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fitch, V.

    1949-03-16

    The extension of the passband of wideband amplifiers is a highly important problem to the designer of electronic circuits. Throughout the electronics industry and in many research programs in physics and allied fields where extensive use is made of video amplifiers, the foremost requirement is a passband of maximum width. This is necessary if it is desired to achieve a more faithful reproduction of transient wave forms, a better time resolution in physical measurements, or perhaps just a wider band gain-frequency response to sine wave signals. The art of electronics is continually faced with this omnipresent amplifier problem. In particular, the instrumentation techniques of nuclear physics require amplifiers with short rise times, a high degree of gain stability, and a linear response to high signal levels. While the distributed amplifier may solve the problems of those seeking only a wide passband, the requirements of stability and linearity necessitate using feedback circuits. This paper considers feedback amplifiers from the standpoint of high-frequency performance. The circuit conditions for optimum steady-state (sinusoidal) and transient response are derived and practical circuits (both interstage and output) are presented which fulfill these conditions. In general, the results obtained may be applied to the low-frequency end.

  1. A Channelization-Based DOA Estimation Method for Wideband Signals.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rui; Zhang, Yue; Lin, Qianqiang; Chen, Zengping

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel direction of arrival (DOA) estimation method for wideband signals with sensor arrays. The proposed method splits the wideband array output into multiple frequency sub-channels and estimates the signal parameters using a digital channelization receiver. Based on the output sub-channels, a channelization-based incoherent signal subspace method (Channelization-ISM) and a channelization-based test of orthogonality of projected subspaces method (Channelization-TOPS) are proposed. Channelization-ISM applies narrowband signal subspace methods on each sub-channel independently. Then the arithmetic mean or geometric mean of the estimated DOAs from each sub-channel gives the final result. Channelization-TOPS measures the orthogonality between the signal and the noise subspaces of the output sub-channels to estimate DOAs. The proposed channelization-based method isolates signals in different bandwidths reasonably and improves the output SNR. It outperforms the conventional ISM and TOPS methods on estimation accuracy and dynamic range, especially in real environments. Besides, the parallel processing architecture makes it easy to implement on hardware. A wideband digital array radar (DAR) using direct wideband radio frequency (RF) digitization is presented. Experiments carried out in a microwave anechoic chamber with the wideband DAR are presented to demonstrate the performance. The results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:27384566

  2. A Channelization-Based DOA Estimation Method for Wideband Signals

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Zhang, Yue; Lin, Qianqiang; Chen, Zengping

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel direction of arrival (DOA) estimation method for wideband signals with sensor arrays. The proposed method splits the wideband array output into multiple frequency sub-channels and estimates the signal parameters using a digital channelization receiver. Based on the output sub-channels, a channelization-based incoherent signal subspace method (Channelization-ISM) and a channelization-based test of orthogonality of projected subspaces method (Channelization-TOPS) are proposed. Channelization-ISM applies narrowband signal subspace methods on each sub-channel independently. Then the arithmetic mean or geometric mean of the estimated DOAs from each sub-channel gives the final result. Channelization-TOPS measures the orthogonality between the signal and the noise subspaces of the output sub-channels to estimate DOAs. The proposed channelization-based method isolates signals in different bandwidths reasonably and improves the output SNR. It outperforms the conventional ISM and TOPS methods on estimation accuracy and dynamic range, especially in real environments. Besides, the parallel processing architecture makes it easy to implement on hardware. A wideband digital array radar (DAR) using direct wideband radio frequency (RF) digitization is presented. Experiments carried out in a microwave anechoic chamber with the wideband DAR are presented to demonstrate the performance. The results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:27384566

  3. Polarization encoded color camera.

    PubMed

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Möller, Guðfríður; Di Caprio, Giuseppe

    2014-03-15

    Digital cameras would be colorblind if they did not have pixelated color filters integrated into their image sensors. Integration of conventional fixed filters, however, comes at the expense of an inability to modify the camera's spectral properties. Instead, we demonstrate a micropolarizer-based camera that can reconfigure its spectral response. Color is encoded into a linear polarization state by a chiral dispersive element and then read out in a single exposure. The polarization encoded color camera is capable of capturing three-color images at wavelengths spanning the visible to the near infrared. PMID:24690806

  4. Ringfield lithographic camera

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.

    1998-01-01

    A projection lithography camera is presented with a wide ringfield optimized so as to make efficient use of extreme ultraviolet radiation from a large area radiation source (e.g., D.sub.source .apprxeq.0.5 mm). The camera comprises four aspheric mirrors optically arranged on a common axis of symmetry with an increased etendue for the camera system. The camera includes an aperture stop that is accessible through a plurality of partial aperture stops to synthesize the theoretical aperture stop. Radiation from a mask is focused to form a reduced image on a wafer, relative to the mask, by reflection from the four aspheric mirrors.

  5. LSST Camera Optics Design

    SciTech Connect

    Riot, V J; Olivier, S; Bauman, B; Pratuch, S; Seppala, L; Gilmore, D; Ku, J; Nordby, M; Foss, M; Antilogus, P; Morgado, N

    2012-05-24

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) uses a novel, three-mirror, telescope design feeding a camera system that includes a set of broad-band filters and three refractive corrector lenses to produce a flat field at the focal plane with a wide field of view. Optical design of the camera lenses and filters is integrated in with the optical design of telescope mirrors to optimize performance. We discuss the rationale for the LSST camera optics design, describe the methodology for fabricating, coating, mounting and testing the lenses and filters, and present the results of detailed analyses demonstrating that the camera optics will meet their performance goals.

  6. Mars Airborne Prospecting Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkraus, J. M.; Wright, M. W.; Rheingans, B. E.; Steinkraus, D. E.; George, W. P.; Aljabri, A.; Hall, J. L.; Scott, D. C.

    2012-06-01

    One novel approach towards addressing the need for innovative instrumentation and investigation approaches is the integration of a suite of four spectrometer systems to form the Mars Airborne Prospecting Spectrometers (MAPS) for prospecting on Mars.

  7. Narrow- and wide-band channel characterization for land mobile satellite systems: Experimental results at L-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, Axel; Buonomo, Sergio; Sforza, Mario; Lutz, Erich

    1995-01-01

    The results of an airborne measurement campaign aimed at the characterization of the mobile satellite link are presented in this paper. The experimental tests were carried out at 1.8 GHz. The objective of the campaign was to obtain results applicable to all proposed satellite constellations: LEO, HEO, and GEO. Therefore, the measurements were performed for elevation angles from 10 deg...80 deg using a light aircraft. A set of different environments and operational scenarios have been investigated, typically for hand-held and car-mounted applications. We present a survey of wide- and narrowband results for a wide range of elevation angles and environments. For the wideband characterization, the power delay profiles of the channel impulse response are presented and discussed. Figures for the delay spread versus elevation and for the carrier-to-multipath ratio versus time are also given. The narrowband behaviour of the channel is described by power series.

  8. Wideband ultrafast fiber laser sources for OCT and metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Norihiko

    2016-09-01

    Fiber lasers, which use optical fibers as ideal waveguides, have been attracting a great deal of attention as stable, practical, and maintenance-free lasers. Using a combination of an ultrashort-pulse fiber laser and a nonlinear fiber, we can realize wideband highly functional ultrafast fiber laser sources. The generation of ultrashort pulses with wide wavelength tunability and supercontinua based on fiber lasers and nonlinear fibers has been demonstrated. These techniques are useful for laser applications, especially for imaging and metrology. In this topical review, the fundamentals of and recent progress in wideband ultrafast fiber laser sources and their applications are reviewed mainly based on the author’s work. First, a new pulse source based on a passively-mode-locked ultrashort-pulse fiber laser using carbon nanotubes is explained. Next, the development of wideband ultrafast fiber laser sources and their applications in ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography, optical frequency combs, and nonlinear microscopy are reviewed.

  9. Camera Operator and Videographer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2007-01-01

    Television, video, and motion picture camera operators produce images that tell a story, inform or entertain an audience, or record an event. They use various cameras to shoot a wide range of material, including television series, news and sporting events, music videos, motion pictures, documentaries, and training sessions. Those who film or…

  10. The Camera Cook Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA.

    Intended for use with the photographic materials available from the Workshop for Learning Things, Inc., this "camera cookbook" describes procedures that have been tried in classrooms and workshops and proven to be the most functional and inexpensive. Explicit starting off instructions--directions for exploring and loading the camera and for taking…

  11. Constrained space camera assembly

    DOEpatents

    Heckendorn, F.M.; Anderson, E.K.; Robinson, C.W.; Haynes, H.B.

    1999-05-11

    A constrained space camera assembly which is intended to be lowered through a hole into a tank, a borehole or another cavity is disclosed. The assembly includes a generally cylindrical chamber comprising a head and a body and a wiring-carrying conduit extending from the chamber. Means are included in the chamber for rotating the body about the head without breaking an airtight seal formed therebetween. The assembly may be pressurized and accompanied with a pressure sensing means for sensing if a breach has occurred in the assembly. In one embodiment, two cameras, separated from their respective lenses, are installed on a mounting apparatus disposed in the chamber. The mounting apparatus includes means allowing both longitudinal and lateral movement of the cameras. Moving the cameras longitudinally focuses the cameras, and moving the cameras laterally away from one another effectively converges the cameras so that close objects can be viewed. The assembly further includes means for moving lenses of different magnification forward of the cameras. 17 figs.

  12. CCD Luminescence Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janesick, James R.; Elliott, Tom

    1987-01-01

    New diagnostic tool used to understand performance and failures of microelectronic devices. Microscope integrated to low-noise charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera to produce new instrument for analyzing performance and failures of microelectronics devices that emit infrared light during operation. CCD camera also used to indentify very clearly parts that have failed where luminescence typically found.

  13. Dry imaging cameras

    PubMed Central

    Indrajit, IK; Alam, Aftab; Sahni, Hirdesh; Bhatia, Mukul; Sahu, Samaresh

    2011-01-01

    Dry imaging cameras are important hard copy devices in radiology. Using dry imaging camera, multiformat images of digital modalities in radiology are created from a sealed unit of unexposed films. The functioning of a modern dry camera, involves a blend of concurrent processes, in areas of diverse sciences like computers, mechanics, thermal, optics, electricity and radiography. Broadly, hard copy devices are classified as laser and non laser based technology. When compared with the working knowledge and technical awareness of different modalities in radiology, the understanding of a dry imaging camera is often superficial and neglected. To fill this void, this article outlines the key features of a modern dry camera and its important issues that impact radiology workflow. PMID:21799589

  14. 47 CFR 90.1432 - Conditions for waiver to allow limited and temporary wideband operations in the 700 MHz public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... temporary wideband operations in the 700 MHz public safety spectrum. 90.1432 Section 90.1432... and temporary wideband operations in the 700 MHz public safety spectrum. (a) Wideband operations in the 700 MHz Public Safety spectrum. Wideband operations are prohibited in the public safety...

  15. Wideband filter radiometers for blackbody temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, L. P.; Bamber, C.; Gaertner, A. A.; Gerson, R. K.; Woods, D. J.; Woolliams, E. R.

    2010-10-01

    The use of high-temperature blackbody (HTBB) radiators to realize primary spectral irradiance scales requires that the operating temperature of the HTBB be accurately determined. We have developed five filter radiometers (FRs) to measure the temperature of the National Research Council of Canada's HTBB. The FRs are designed to minimize sensitivity to ambient temperature fluctuations. They incorporate air-spaced colored glass filters and a Si photodiode detector that are housed in a cell whose temperature is controlled to ±0.1°C by means of annular thermoelectric elements at the front and rear of the cell. These wideband filter radiometers operate in four different wavelength bands. The spectral responsivity measurements were performed in an underfill geometry for a power-mode calibration that is traceable to NRC's cryogenic radiometer. The spectral temperature sensitivity of each of these FRs has been measured. The apertures for these FRs were cold-formed by swaging machine-cut apertures onto precision dowel pins. A description of the filter radiometer design, fabrication and testing, together with a detailed uncertainty analysis, is presented. We derive the equations that relate the spectral irradiance measured by the FRs to the spectral radiance and temperature of the HTBB, and deal specifically with the change of index of refraction over the path of the radiation from the interior of the HTBB to the FRs. We believe these equations are more accurate than recently published derivations. Our measurements of the operating temperature of our HTBB working at temperatures near 2500 K, 2700 K and 2900 K, together with measurements using a pyrometer, show agreement between the five filter radiometers and with the pyrometer to within the estimated uncertainties.

  16. Spectral correlation of wideband target resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabio, Vincent

    1996-06-01

    The US Army Research Laboratory (ARL), working with the University of Maryland Department of Electrical Engineering, recently developed a novel method for efficient recognition of resonances in imagery from ARL's ultra-wideband (UWB) SAR instrumentation system, currently being used in foliage- and ground-penetration studies. The recognition technique uses linear transforms (Fourier, wavelets, etc.) to provide a basis for the design of spectrally matched filters. Implementation of the technique is very straightforward: an expectation of the target ringdown is projected onto a transform basis set, yielding a set of spectral coefficients (the 'spectral template'). UWB SAR image data are projected onto the same basis set, yielding a second vector of coefficients (the 'spectral image'). A simple correlation coefficient is generated from the two vectors, providing a measure of co-linearity of the spectral template and the spectral image: higher correlation values indicate greater co-linearity. Exceeding a correlation threshold results in a target implemented--a single 32-megabyte bipolar SAR image can be processed in less than five minutes. Initial spectral-correlation efforts focused on canonical targets and the results have been widely reported. Current studies are focusing on tactical targets, such as CUCVs. Early results on CUCVs have shown that sa single resonance-based template can be sued effectively in the recognition of tactical targets. Ongoing studies have demonstrated a substantial reduction in the false-alarm rate over results reported previously. These results, as well as improvements in the recognitions-processing stage, are reported in this paper.

  17. Narrowband and wideband characterisation of satellite mobile/PCN channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butt, G.; Parks, M. A. N.; Evans, B. G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents models characterizing satellite mobile channel. Statistical narrowband models based on the CSER high elevation angle channel measurement campaign are reported. Such models are understood to be useful for communication system simulations. It has been shown from the modelling results that for the mobile satellite links at high elevation angles line-of-sight (LOS) signal is available most of the time, even under the heavy shadowing conditions. Wideband measurement campaign which CSER is about to undertake, and subsequently the modelling approach to be adopted is also discussed. It is noted that a wideband channel model is expected to provide a useful tool in investigating CDMA applications.

  18. A compact wideband monopole antenna fed by coplanar waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Guoping; Zhao, Wenhua; Zhou, Jiang; Su, Yan; Li, Qifu

    2016-02-01

    A compact wideband printed antenna fed by coplanar waveguide (CPW) is presented in this paper. The wideband characteristic is achieved by coupling three monopole resonant modes of the proposed antenna. The proposed antenna is built and simulated to verify the design strategy. A wide impedance bandwidth of 100.5% (1.7866-5.3953 GHz) with S11< - 10 dB is achieved. The proposed antenna has stable performance, including bi-directional radiation pattern and gain. It also shows the merits of low cost and simple structure.

  19. Compressed wideband spectrum sensing based on discrete cosine transform.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yulin; Zhang, Gengxin

    2014-01-01

    Discrete cosine transform (DCT) is a special type of transform which is widely used for compression of speech and image. However, its use for spectrum sensing has not yet received widespread attention. This paper aims to alleviate the sampling requirements of wideband spectrum sensing by utilizing the compressive sampling (CS) principle and exploiting the unique sparsity structure in the DCT domain. Compared with discrete Fourier transform (DFT), wideband communication signal has much sparser representation and easier implementation in DCT domain. Simulation result shows that the proposed DCT-CSS scheme outperforms the conventional DFT-CSS scheme in terms of MSE of reconstruction signal, detection probability, and computational complexity.

  20. Compressed Wideband Spectrum Sensing Based on Discrete Cosine Transform

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yulin; Zhang, Gengxin

    2014-01-01

    Discrete cosine transform (DCT) is a special type of transform which is widely used for compression of speech and image. However, its use for spectrum sensing has not yet received widespread attention. This paper aims to alleviate the sampling requirements of wideband spectrum sensing by utilizing the compressive sampling (CS) principle and exploiting the unique sparsity structure in the DCT domain. Compared with discrete Fourier transform (DFT), wideband communication signal has much sparser representation and easier implementation in DCT domain. Simulation result shows that the proposed DCT-CSS scheme outperforms the conventional DFT-CSS scheme in terms of MSE of reconstruction signal, detection probability, and computational complexity. PMID:24526894

  1. Optical Communications Link to Airborne Transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regehr, Martin W.; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Biswas, Abhijit

    2011-01-01

    An optical link from Earth to an aircraft demonstrates the ability to establish a link from a ground platform to a transceiver moving overhead. An airplane has a challenging disturbance environment including airframe vibrations and occasional abrupt changes in attitude during flight. These disturbances make it difficult to maintain pointing lock in an optical transceiver in an airplane. Acquisition can also be challenging. In the case of the aircraft link, the ground station initially has no precise knowledge of the aircraft s location. An airborne pointing system has been designed, built, and demonstrated using direct-drive brushless DC motors for passive isolation of pointing disturbances and for high-bandwidth control feedback. The airborne transceiver uses a GPS-INS system to determine the aircraft s position and attitude, and to then illuminate the ground station initially for acquisition. The ground transceiver participates in link-pointing acquisition by first using a wide-field camera to detect initial illumination from the airborne beacon, and to perform coarse pointing. It then transfers control to a high-precision pointing detector. Using this scheme, live video was successfully streamed from the ground to the aircraft at 270 Mb/s while simultaneously downlinking a 50 kb/s data stream from the aircraft to the ground.

  2. 3. VAL CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND TRACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VAL CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND TRACK WITH THE VAL TO THE RIGHT, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. 7. VAL CAMERA STATION, INTERIOR VIEW OF CAMERA MOUNT, COMMUNICATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VAL CAMERA STATION, INTERIOR VIEW OF CAMERA MOUNT, COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT AND STORAGE CABINET. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Stations, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. Night Vision Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    PixelVision, Inc. developed the Night Video NV652 Back-illuminated CCD Camera, based on the expertise of a former Jet Propulsion Laboratory employee and a former employee of Scientific Imaging Technologies, Inc. The camera operates without an image intensifier, using back-illuminated and thinned CCD technology to achieve extremely low light level imaging performance. The advantages of PixelVision's system over conventional cameras include greater resolution and better target identification under low light conditions, lower cost and a longer lifetime. It is used commercially for research and aviation.

  5. Gamma camera purchasing.

    PubMed

    Wells, C P; Buxton-Thomas, M

    1995-03-01

    The purchase of a new gamma camera is a major undertaking and represents a long-term commitment for most nuclear medicine departments. The purpose of tendering for gamma cameras is to assess the best match between the requirements of the clinical department and the equipment available and not necessarily to buy the 'best camera' [1-3]. After many years of drawing up tender specifications, this paper tries to outline some of the traps and pitfalls of this potentially perilous, although largely rewarding, exercise. PMID:7770241

  6. Ringfield lithographic camera

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, W.C.

    1998-09-08

    A projection lithography camera is presented with a wide ringfield optimized so as to make efficient use of extreme ultraviolet radiation from a large area radiation source (e.g., D{sub source} {approx_equal} 0.5 mm). The camera comprises four aspheric mirrors optically arranged on a common axis of symmetry. The camera includes an aperture stop that is accessible through a plurality of partial aperture stops to synthesize the theoretical aperture stop. Radiation from a mask is focused to form a reduced image on a wafer, relative to the mask, by reflection from the four aspheric mirrors. 11 figs.

  7. Kitt Peak speckle camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Mcalister, H. A.; Robinson, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    The speckle camera in regular use at Kitt Peak National Observatory since 1974 is described in detail. The design of the atmospheric dispersion compensation prisms, the use of film as a recording medium, the accuracy of double star measurements, and the next generation speckle camera are discussed. Photographs of double star speckle patterns with separations from 1.4 sec of arc to 4.7 sec of arc are shown to illustrate the quality of image formation with this camera, the effects of seeing on the patterns, and to illustrate the isoplanatic patch of the atmosphere.

  8. Airborne thermography for condition monitoring of a public baths building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Mats; Hellman, Erik; Ljungberg, Sven-Ake

    2001-03-01

    Airborne and ground-based thermography surveys have been performed in order to detect moisture and energy related problems in the construction of a public swimming bath building. This paper describes the information potential and the advantages and limitations using a standard IR-camera and traditional inspection methods to gather information for retrofit priorities. The damage conditions indicated in the thermal images are confirmed by field inspections and photographic documentation.

  9. VHF Wide-Band, Dual-Polarization Microstrip-Patch Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John

    2008-01-01

    The figure depicts selected aspects of a very-high-frequency (VHF) microstrip patch antenna designed and built to satisfy requirements specific to an airborne synthetic-aperture radar system for measuring the thickness of sea ice. One of the requirements is that the antenna be capable of functioning over the relatively wide frequency band of 127 to 172 MHz corresponding to a fractional bandwidth of about 30 percent relative to a nominal mid-band frequency of 149.5 MHz. Another requirement is that the antenna be capable of functioning in either or both of two orthogonal linear polarizations. In addition, the antenna is required to be as compact and lightweight as possible. In a basic design according to generally accepted microstrip-patch-antenna engineering practice, one would ordinarily use a relatively thick dielectric substrate and multiple feed probes to obtain the desired combination of wide-band and dual-polarization capabilities. However, the combination of a thick substrate and multiple feeds would give rise to higher-order electromagnetic nodes, thereby undesirably contributing to cross polarization and to reduction of the isolation between feed probes. To counter these adverse effects while satisfying the requirements stated above, the design of this antenna incorporates several improvements over the basic design.

  10. Airborne data acquisition techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Arro, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    The introduction of standards on acceptable procedures for assessing building heat loss has created a dilemma for the contractor performing airborne thermographic surveys. These standards impose specifications on instrumentation, data acquisition, recording, interpretation, and presentation. Under the standard, the contractor has both the obligation of compliance and the requirement of offering his services at a reasonable price. This paper discusses the various aspects of data acquisition for airborne thermographic surveys and various techniques to reduce the costs of this operation. These techniques include the calculation of flight parameters for economical data acquisition, the selection and use of maps for mission planning, and the use of meteorological forecasts for flight scheduling and the actual execution of the mission. The proper consideration of these factors will result in a cost effective data acquisition and will place the contractor in a very competitive position in offering airborne thermographic survey services.

  11. Wide-band array signal processing via spectral smoothing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Guanghan; Kailath, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A novel algorithm for the estimation of direction-of-arrivals (DOA) of multiple wide-band sources via spectral smoothing is presented. The proposed algorithm does not require an initial DOA estimate or a specific signal model. The advantages of replacing the MUSIC search with an ESPRIT search are discussed.

  12. Fibre Optics In A Multi-Star Wideband Local Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, J. R.

    1983-08-01

    Early experience has been gained with the switched-star type of network in the Fibrevision cable TV trial at Milton Keynes, and British Telecom are progressing towards a full-scale multi-star wideband local network. This paper discusses both the present and future use of fibre optics in this type of network.

  13. Spread-spectrum multiple access using wideband noncoherent MFSK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Tri T.; Pratt, Timothy; Maggenti, Mark A.

    1987-11-01

    Two spread-spectrum multiple access systems which use wideband M-ary frequency shift keying (FSK) (MFSK) as the primary modulation are presented. A bit error rate performance analysis is presented and system throughput is calculated for sample C band and Ku band satellite systems. Sample link analyses are included to illustrate power and adjacent satellite interference considerations in practical multiple access systems.

  14. A note on the wide-band Gaussian broadcast channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceliece, Robert J.; Swanson, Laif

    1987-01-01

    The observations of Posner (1983) that on a wideband Gaussian broadcast channel ordinary time-shared coding performs almost as well as broadcast coding are investigated. A quantitative version of Posner's results is derived. A numerical example comparing the performance of broadcast coding and time-shared coding for a Gaussian broadcast channel model is presented.

  15. Archiving of Wideband Plasma Wave Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, William S.

    1997-01-01

    Beginning with the third year of funding, we began a more ambitious archiving production effort, minimizing work on new software and concentrating on building representative archives of the missions mentioned above, recognizing that only a small percentage of the data from any one mission can be archived with reasonable effort. We concentrated on data from Dynamics Explorer and ISEE 1, archiving orbits or significant fractions of orbits which attempt to capture the essence of the mission and provide data which will hopefully be sufficient for ongoing and new research as well as to provide a reference to upcoming and current ISTP missions which will not fly in the same regions of space as the older missions and which will not have continuous wideband data. We archived approximately 181 Gigabytes of data, accounting for some 1582 hours of data. Included in these data are all of the AMPTE chemical releases, all of the Spacelab 2/PDP data obtained during the free-flight portion of its mission, as well as significant portions of the S3, DE-1, Imp-6, Hawkeye, Injun 5, and ISEE 1 and 2 data sets. Table 1 summarizes these data. All of the data archived are summarized in gif-formatted images of frequency-time spectrograms which are directly accessible via the internet. Each of the gif files are identified by year, day, and time as described in the Web page. This provides a user with a specific date/time in mind a way of determining very quickly if there is data for the interval in question and, by clicking on the file name, browsing the data. Alternately, a user can browse the data for interesting features and events simply by viewing each of the gif files. When a user finds data of interest, he/she can notify us by email of the time period involved. Based on the user's needs, we can provide data on a convenient medium or by ftp, or we can mount the appropriate data and provide access to our analysis tools via the network. We can even produce products such as plots or

  16. Study on airborne multispectral imaging fusion detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Na; Gao, Jiaobo; Wang, Jun; Cheng, Juan; Gao, Meng; Gao, Fei; Fan, Zhe; Sun, Kefeng; Wu, Jun; Li, Junna; Gao, Zedong; Cheng, Gang

    2014-11-01

    The airborne multispectral imaging fusion detection technology is proposed in this paper. In this design scheme, the airborne multispectral imaging system consists of the multispectral camera, the image processing unit, and the stabilized platform. The multispectral camera can operate in the spectral region from visible to near infrared waveband (0.4-1.0um), it has four same and independent imaging channels, and sixteen different typical wavelengths to be selected based on the different typical targets and background. The related experiments were tested by the airborne multispectral imaging system. In particularly, the camouflage targets were fused and detected in the different complex environment, such as the land vegetation background, the desert hot background and underwater. In the spectral region from 0.4 um to 1.0um, the three different characteristic wave from sixteen typical spectral are selected and combined according to different backgrounds and targets. The spectral image corresponding to the three characteristic wavelengths is resisted and fused by the image processing technology in real time, and the fusion video with typical target property is outputted. In these fusion images, the contrast of target and background is greatly increased. Experimental results confirm that the airborne multispectral imaging fusion detection technology can acquire multispectral fusion image with high contrast in real time, and has the ability of detecting and identification camouflage objects from complex background to targets underwater.

  17. Wide-band gas leak imaging detection system using UFPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wei-qi; Li, Jia-kun; Dun, Xiong; Jin, Minglei; Wang, Xia

    2014-11-01

    The leakage of toxic or hazardous gases not only pollutes the environment, but also threatens people's lives and property safety. Many countries attach great importance to the rapid and effective gas leak detection technology and instrument development. However, the gas leak imaging detection systems currently existing are generally limited to a narrow-band in Medium Wavelength Infrared (MWIR) or Long Wavelength Infrared (LWIR) cooled focal plane imaging, which is difficult to detect the common kinds of the leaking gases. Besides the costly cooled focal plane array is utilized, the application promotion is severely limited. To address this issue, a wide-band gas leak IR imaging detection system using Uncooled Focal Plane Array (UFPA) detector is proposed, which is composed of wide-band IR optical lens, sub-band filters and switching device, wide-band UFPA detector, video processing and system control circuit. A wide-band (3µm~12µm) UFPA detector is obtained by replacing the protection window and optimizing the structural parameters of the detector. A large relative aperture (F#=0.75) wide-band (3μm~12μm) multispectral IR lens is developed by using the focus compensation method, which combining the thickness of the narrow-band filters. The gas leak IR image quality and the detection sensitivity are improved by using the IR image Non-Uniformity Correction (NUC) technology and Digital Detail Enhancement (DDE) technology. The wide-band gas leak IR imaging detection system using UFPA detector takes full advantage of the wide-band (MWIR&LWIR) response characteristic of the UFPA detector and the digital image processing technology to provide the resulting gas leak video easy to be observed for the human eyes. Many kinds of gases, which are not visible to the naked eyes, can be sensitively detected and visualized. The designed system has many commendable advantages, such as scanning a wide range simultaneously, locating the leaking source quickly, visualizing the gas

  18. Advanced CCD camera developments

    SciTech Connect

    Condor, A.

    1994-11-15

    Two charge coupled device (CCD) camera systems are introduced and discussed, describing briefly the hardware involved, and the data obtained in their various applications. The Advanced Development Group Defense Sciences Engineering Division has been actively designing, manufacturing, fielding state-of-the-art CCD camera systems for over a decade. These systems were originally developed for the nuclear test program to record data from underground nuclear tests. Today, new and interesting application for these systems have surfaced and development is continuing in the area of advanced CCD camera systems, with the new CCD camera that will allow experimenters to replace film for x-ray imaging at the JANUS, USP, and NOVA laser facilities.

  19. The MKID Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, P. R.; Czakon, N. G.; Day, P. K.; Duan, R.; Gao, J.; Glenn, J.; Golwala, S.; Hollister, M.; LeDuc, H. G.; Mazin, B.; Noroozian, O.; Nguyen, H. T.; Sayers, J.; Schlaerth, J.; Vaillancourt, J. E.; Vayonakis, A.; Wilson, P.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2009-12-01

    The MKID Camera project is a collaborative effort of Caltech, JPL, the University of Colorado, and UC Santa Barbara to develop a large-format, multi-color millimeter and submillimeter-wavelength camera for astronomy using microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). These are superconducting, micro-resonators fabricated from thin aluminum and niobium films. We couple the MKIDs to multi-slot antennas and measure the change in surface impedance produced by photon-induced breaking of Cooper pairs. The readout is almost entirely at room temperature and can be highly multiplexed; in principle hundreds or even thousands of resonators could be read out on a single feedline. The camera will have 576 spatial pixels that image simultaneously in four bands at 750, 850, 1100 and 1300 microns. It is scheduled for deployment at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory in the summer of 2010. We present an overview of the camera design and readout and describe the current status of testing and fabrication.

  20. The Complementary Pinhole Camera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissonnette, D.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Presents an experiment based on the principles of rectilinear motion of light operating in a pinhole camera that projects the image of an illuminated object through a small hole in a sheet to an image screen. (MDH)

  1. Miniature TV Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Originally devised to observe Saturn stage separation during Apollo flights, Marshall Space Flight Center's Miniature Television Camera, measuring only 4 x 3 x 1 1/2 inches, quickly made its way to the commercial telecommunications market.

  2. Airborne oceanographic lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Specifications and preliminary design of an Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) system, which is to be constructed for installation and used on a NASA Wallops Flight Center (WFC) C-54 research aircraft, are reported. The AOL system is to provide an airborne facility for use by various government agencies to demonstrate the utility and practicality of hardware of this type in the wide area collection of oceanographic data on an operational basis. System measurement and performance requirements are presented, followed by a description of the conceptual system approach and the considerations attendant to its development. System performance calculations are addressed, and the system specifications and preliminary design are presented and discussed.

  3. Airborne rain mapping radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. J.; Parks, G. S.; Li, F. K.; Im, K. E.; Howard, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    An airborne scanning radar system for remote rain mapping is described. The airborne rain mapping radar is composed of two radar frequency channels at 13.8 and 24.1 GHz. The radar is proposed to scan its antenna beam over + or - 20 deg from the antenna boresight; have a swath width of 7 km; a horizontal spatial resolution at nadir of about 500 m; and a range resolution of 120 m. The radar is designed to be applicable for retrieving rainfall rates from 0.1-60 mm/hr at the earth's surface, and for measuring linear polarization signatures and raindrop's fall velocity.

  4. Gamma ray camera

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, C.D.; Wang, S.

    1980-09-09

    An anger gamma ray camera is improved by the substitution of a gamma ray sensitive, proximity type image intensifier tube for the scintillator screen in the anger camera, the image intensifier tube having a negatively charged flat scintillator screen and a flat photocathode layer and a grounded, flat output phosphor display screen all of the same dimension (Unity image magnification) and all within a grounded metallic tube envelope and having a metallic, inwardly concaved input window between the scintillator screen and the collimator.

  5. NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991 Data from the 1991 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of Pinatubo in July ... and Osborn [1992a, 1992b]. Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  6. NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992 An airborne Nd:YAG (532 nm) lidar was operated by the NASA Langley Research Center about a year following the June 1991 eruption of ... Osborn [1992a, 1992b].  Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  7. 1. VARIABLEANGLE LAUNCHER CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VARIABLE-ANGLE LAUNCHER CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND TRACK WITH CAMERA STATION ABOVE LOOKING NORTH TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. 9. VIEW OF CAMERA STATIONS UNDER CONSTRUCTION INCLUDING CAMERA CAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF CAMERA STATIONS UNDER CONSTRUCTION INCLUDING CAMERA CAR ON RAILROAD TRACK AND FIXED CAMERA STATION 1400 (BUILDING NO. 42021) ABOVE, ADJACENT TO STATE HIGHWAY 39, LOOKING WEST, March 23, 1948. (Original photograph in possession of Dave Willis, San Diego, California.) - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Stations, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. Deployable Wireless Camera Penetrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Jones, Jack; Sherrit, Stewart; Wu, Jiunn Jeng

    2008-01-01

    A lightweight, low-power camera dart has been designed and tested for context imaging of sampling sites and ground surveys from an aerobot or an orbiting spacecraft in a microgravity environment. The camera penetrators also can be used to image any line-of-sight surface, such as cliff walls, that is difficult to access. Tethered cameras to inspect the surfaces of planetary bodies use both power and signal transmission lines to operate. A tether adds the possibility of inadvertently anchoring the aerobot, and requires some form of station-keeping capability of the aerobot if extended examination time is required. The new camera penetrators are deployed without a tether, weigh less than 30 grams, and are disposable. They are designed to drop from any altitude with the boost in transmitting power currently demonstrated at approximately 100-m line-of-sight. The penetrators also can be deployed to monitor lander or rover operations from a distance, and can be used for surface surveys or for context information gathering from a touch-and-go sampling site. Thanks to wireless operation, the complexity of the sampling or survey mechanisms may be reduced. The penetrators may be battery powered for short-duration missions, or have solar panels for longer or intermittent duration missions. The imaging device is embedded in the penetrator, which is dropped or projected at the surface of a study site at 90 to the surface. Mirrors can be used in the design to image the ground or the horizon. Some of the camera features were tested using commercial "nanny" or "spy" camera components with the charge-coupled device (CCD) looking at a direction parallel to the ground. Figure 1 shows components of one camera that weighs less than 8 g and occupies a volume of 11 cm3. This camera could transmit a standard television signal, including sound, up to 100 m. Figure 2 shows the CAD models of a version of the penetrator. A low-volume array of such penetrator cameras could be deployed from an

  10. Airborne Fraunhofer Line Discriminator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, F. C.; Markle, D. A.

    1969-01-01

    Airborne Fraunhofer Line Discriminator enables prospecting for fluorescent materials, hydrography with fluorescent dyes, and plant studies based on fluorescence of chlorophyll. Optical unit design is the coincidence of Fraunhofer lines in the solar spectrum occurring at the characteristic wavelengths of some fluorescent materials.

  11. Recognizing Airborne Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Christian M.

    1990-01-01

    The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in older buildings often do not adequately handle air-borne contaminants. Outlines a three-stage Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) assessment and describes a case in point at a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, school. (MLF)

  12. Airborne asbestos in buildings.

    PubMed

    Lee, R J; Van Orden, D R

    2008-03-01

    The concentration of airborne asbestos in buildings nationwide is reported in this study. A total of 3978 indoor samples from 752 buildings, representing nearly 32 man-years of sampling, have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The buildings that were surveyed were the subject of litigation related to suits alleging the general building occupants were exposed to a potential health hazard as a result the presence of asbestos-containing materials (ACM). The average concentration of all airborne asbestos structures was 0.01structures/ml (s/ml) and the average concentration of airborne asbestos > or = 5microm long was 0.00012fibers/ml (f/ml). For all samples, 99.9% of the samples were <0.01 f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm; no building averaged above 0.004f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm. No asbestos was detected in 27% of the buildings and in 90% of the buildings no asbestos was detected that would have been seen optically (> or = 5microm long and > or = 0.25microm wide). Background outdoor concentrations have been reported at 0.0003f/ml > or = 5microm. These results indicate that in-place ACM does not result in elevated airborne asbestos in building atmospheres approaching regulatory levels and that it does not result in a significantly increased risk to building occupants.

  13. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  14. Photoreactivation in Airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum

    PubMed Central

    Peccia, Jordan; Hernandez, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Photoreactivation was observed in airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum exposed concurrently to UV radiation (254 nm) and visible light. Photoreactivation rates of airborne cells increased with increasing relative humidity (RH) and decreased with increasing UV dose. Under a constant UV dose with visible light absent, the UV inactivation rate of airborne M. parafortuitum cells decreased by a factor of 4 as RH increased from 40 to 95%; however, under identical conditions with visible light present, the UV inactivation rate of airborne cells decreased only by a factor of 2. When irradiated in the absence of visible light, cellular cyclobutane thymine dimer content of UV-irradiated airborne M. parafortuitum and Serratia marcescens increased in response to RH increases. Results suggest that, unlike in waterborne bacteria, cyclobutane thymine dimers are not the most significant form of UV-induced DNA damage incurred by airborne bacteria and that the distribution of DNA photoproducts incorporated into UV-irradiated airborne cells is a function of RH. PMID:11526027

  15. THE DARK ENERGY CAMERA

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Alvarez, O.; Angstadt, R.; Annis, J. T.; Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Honscheid, K.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Bonati, M.; Antonik, M.; Brooks, D.; Ballester, O.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Beaufore, L.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bigelow, B.; Boprie, D.; Campa, J.; Castander, F. J.; Collaboration: DES Collaboration; and others

    2015-11-15

    The Dark Energy Camera is a new imager with a 2.°2 diameter field of view mounted at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4 m telescope on Cerro Tololo near La Serena, Chile. The camera was designed and constructed by the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration and meets or exceeds the stringent requirements designed for the wide-field and supernova surveys for which the collaboration uses it. The camera consists of a five-element optical corrector, seven filters, a shutter with a 60 cm aperture, and a charge-coupled device (CCD) focal plane of 250 μm thick fully depleted CCDs cooled inside a vacuum Dewar. The 570 megapixel focal plane comprises 62 2k × 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k × 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The CCDs have 15 μm × 15 μm pixels with a plate scale of 0.″263 pixel{sup −1}. A hexapod system provides state-of-the-art focus and alignment capability. The camera is read out in 20 s with 6–9 electron readout noise. This paper provides a technical description of the camera's engineering, construction, installation, and current status.

  16. The CAMCAO infrared camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, Antonio; Melo, Antonio; Alves, Joao; Rebordao, Jose; Pinhao, Jose; Bonfait, Gregoire; Lima, Jorge; Barros, Rui; Fernandes, Rui; Catarino, Isabel; Carvalho, Marta; Marques, Rui; Poncet, Jean-Marc; Duarte Santos, Filipe; Finger, Gert; Hubin, Norbert; Huster, Gotthard; Koch, Franz; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Marchetti, Enrico

    2004-09-01

    The CAMCAO instrument is a high resolution near infrared (NIR) camera conceived to operate together with the new ESO Multi-conjugate Adaptive optics Demonstrator (MAD) with the goal of evaluating the feasibility of Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics techniques (MCAO) on the sky. It is a high-resolution wide field of view (FoV) camera that is optimized to use the extended correction of the atmospheric turbulence provided by MCAO. While the first purpose of this camera is the sky observation, in the MAD setup, to validate the MCAO technology, in a second phase, the CAMCAO camera is planned to attach directly to the VLT for scientific astrophysical studies. The camera is based on the 2kx2k HAWAII2 infrared detector controlled by an ESO external IRACE system and includes standard IR band filters mounted on a positional filter wheel. The CAMCAO design requires that the optical components and the IR detector should be kept at low temperatures in order to avoid emitting radiation and lower detector noise in the region analysis. The cryogenic system inclues a LN2 tank and a sptially developed pulse tube cryocooler. Field and pupil cold stops are implemented to reduce the infrared background and the stray-light. The CAMCAO optics provide diffraction limited performance down to J Band, but the detector sampling fulfills the Nyquist criterion for the K band (2.2mm).

  17. CAOS-CMOS camera.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; La Torre, Juan Pablo; Amin, M Junaid

    2016-06-13

    Proposed and experimentally demonstrated is the CAOS-CMOS camera design that combines the coded access optical sensor (CAOS) imager platform with the CMOS multi-pixel optical sensor. The unique CAOS-CMOS camera engages the classic CMOS sensor light staring mode with the time-frequency-space agile pixel CAOS imager mode within one programmable optical unit to realize a high dynamic range imager for extreme light contrast conditions. The experimentally demonstrated CAOS-CMOS camera is built using a digital micromirror device, a silicon point-photo-detector with a variable gain amplifier, and a silicon CMOS sensor with a maximum rated 51.3 dB dynamic range. White light imaging of three different brightness simultaneously viewed targets, that is not possible by the CMOS sensor, is achieved by the CAOS-CMOS camera demonstrating an 82.06 dB dynamic range. Applications for the camera include industrial machine vision, welding, laser analysis, automotive, night vision, surveillance and multispectral military systems.

  18. The Dark Energy Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, B.

    2015-04-11

    The Dark Energy Camera is a new imager with a 2.2-degree diameter field of view mounted at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4-meter telescope on Cerro Tololo near La Serena, Chile. The camera was designed and constructed by the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, and meets or exceeds the stringent requirements designed for the wide-field and supernova surveys for which the collaboration uses it. The camera consists of a five element optical corrector, seven filters, a shutter with a 60 cm aperture, and a CCD focal plane of 250-μm thick fully depleted CCDs cooled inside a vacuum Dewar. The 570 Mpixel focal plane comprises 62 2k x 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k x 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The CCDs have 15μm x 15μm pixels with a plate scale of 0.263" per pixel. A hexapod system provides state-of-the-art focus and alignment capability. The camera is read out in 20 seconds with 6-9 electrons readout noise. This paper provides a technical description of the camera's engineering, construction, installation, and current status.

  19. CAOS-CMOS camera.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; La Torre, Juan Pablo; Amin, M Junaid

    2016-06-13

    Proposed and experimentally demonstrated is the CAOS-CMOS camera design that combines the coded access optical sensor (CAOS) imager platform with the CMOS multi-pixel optical sensor. The unique CAOS-CMOS camera engages the classic CMOS sensor light staring mode with the time-frequency-space agile pixel CAOS imager mode within one programmable optical unit to realize a high dynamic range imager for extreme light contrast conditions. The experimentally demonstrated CAOS-CMOS camera is built using a digital micromirror device, a silicon point-photo-detector with a variable gain amplifier, and a silicon CMOS sensor with a maximum rated 51.3 dB dynamic range. White light imaging of three different brightness simultaneously viewed targets, that is not possible by the CMOS sensor, is achieved by the CAOS-CMOS camera demonstrating an 82.06 dB dynamic range. Applications for the camera include industrial machine vision, welding, laser analysis, automotive, night vision, surveillance and multispectral military systems. PMID:27410361

  20. Satellite camera image navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamel, Ahmed A. (Inventor); Graul, Donald W. (Inventor); Savides, John (Inventor); Hanson, Charles W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Pixels within a satellite camera (1, 2) image are precisely located in terms of latitude and longitude on a celestial body, such as the earth, being imaged. A computer (60) on the earth generates models (40, 50) of the satellite's orbit and attitude, respectively. The orbit model (40) is generated from measurements of stars and landmarks taken by the camera (1, 2), and by range data. The orbit model (40) is an expression of the satellite's latitude and longitude at the subsatellite point, and of the altitude of the satellite, as a function of time, using as coefficients (K) the six Keplerian elements at epoch. The attitude model (50) is based upon star measurements taken by each camera (1, 2). The attitude model (50) is a set of expressions for the deviations in a set of mutually orthogonal reference optical axes (x, y, z) as a function of time, for each camera (1, 2). Measured data is fit into the models (40, 50) using a walking least squares fit algorithm. A transformation computer (66 ) transforms pixel coordinates as telemetered by the camera (1, 2) into earth latitude and longitude coordinates, using the orbit and attitude models (40, 50).

  1. The Dark Energy Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaugher, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Honscheid, K.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Alvarez, O.; Angstadt, R.; Annis, J. T.; Antonik, M.; Ballester, O.; Beaufore, L.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bigelow, B.; Bonati, M.; Boprie, D.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Campa, J.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Castander, F. J.; Castilla, J.; Cease, H.; Cela-Ruiz, J. M.; Chappa, S.; Chi, E.; Cooper, C.; da Costa, L. N.; Dede, E.; Derylo, G.; DePoy, D. L.; de Vicente, J.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eiting, J.; Elliott, A. E.; Emes, J.; Estrada, J.; Fausti Neto, A.; Finley, D. A.; Flores, R.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D.; Gladders, M. D.; Gregory, B.; Gutierrez, G. R.; Hao, J.; Holland, S. E.; Holm, S.; Huffman, D.; Jackson, C.; James, D. J.; Jonas, M.; Karcher, A.; Karliner, I.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kozlovsky, M.; Kron, R. G.; Kubik, D.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuk, K.; Lahav, O.; Lathrop, A.; Lee, J.; Levi, M. E.; Lewis, P.; Li, T. S.; Mandrichenko, I.; Marshall, J. L.; Martinez, G.; Merritt, K. W.; Miquel, R.; Muñoz, F.; Neilsen, E. H.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Olsen, J.; Palaio, N.; Patton, K.; Peoples, J.; Plazas, A. A.; Rauch, J.; Reil, K.; Rheault, J.-P.; Roe, N. A.; Rogers, H.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R. H.; Schmidt, R.; Schmitt, R.; Schubnell, M.; Schultz, K.; Schurter, P.; Scott, L.; Serrano, S.; Shaw, T. M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Stefanik, A.; Stuermer, W.; Suchyta, E.; Sypniewski, A.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tighe, R.; Tran, C.; Tucker, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wang, G.; Watson, M.; Weaverdyck, C.; Wester, W.; Woods, R.; Yanny, B.; DES Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The Dark Energy Camera is a new imager with a 2.°2 diameter field of view mounted at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4 m telescope on Cerro Tololo near La Serena, Chile. The camera was designed and constructed by the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration and meets or exceeds the stringent requirements designed for the wide-field and supernova surveys for which the collaboration uses it. The camera consists of a five-element optical corrector, seven filters, a shutter with a 60 cm aperture, and a charge-coupled device (CCD) focal plane of 250 μm thick fully depleted CCDs cooled inside a vacuum Dewar. The 570 megapixel focal plane comprises 62 2k × 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k × 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The CCDs have 15 μm × 15 μm pixels with a plate scale of 0.″263 pixel-1. A hexapod system provides state-of-the-art focus and alignment capability. The camera is read out in 20 s with 6-9 electron readout noise. This paper provides a technical description of the camera's engineering, construction, installation, and current status.

  2. Solid state television camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and tests of a solid state television camera using a new charge-coupled imaging device are reported. An RCA charge-coupled device arranged in a 512 by 320 format and directly compatible with EIA format standards was the sensor selected. This is a three-phase, sealed surface-channel array that has 163,840 sensor elements, which employs a vertical frame transfer system for image readout. Included are test results of the complete camera system, circuit description and changes to such circuits as a result of integration and test, maintenance and operation section, recommendations to improve the camera system, and a complete set of electrical and mechanical drawing sketches.

  3. HIGH SPEED CAMERA

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, B.T. Jr.; Davis, W.C.

    1957-12-17

    This patent relates to high speed cameras having resolution times of less than one-tenth microseconds suitable for filming distinct sequences of a very fast event such as an explosion. This camera consists of a rotating mirror with reflecting surfaces on both sides, a narrow mirror acting as a slit in a focal plane shutter, various other mirror and lens systems as well as an innage recording surface. The combination of the rotating mirrors and the slit mirror causes discrete, narrow, separate pictures to fall upon the film plane, thereby forming a moving image increment of the photographed event. Placing a reflecting surface on each side of the rotating mirror cancels the image velocity that one side of the rotating mirror would impart, so as a camera having this short a resolution time is thereby possible.

  4. Selective-imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold; Hsu, Charles; Landa, Joseph; Cha, Jae H.; Krapels, Keith A.

    2015-05-01

    How can we design cameras that image selectively in Full Electro-Magnetic (FEM) spectra? Without selective imaging, we cannot use, for example, ordinary tourist cameras to see through fire, smoke, or other obscurants contributing to creating a Visually Degraded Environment (VDE). This paper addresses a possible new design of selective-imaging cameras at firmware level. The design is consistent with physics of the irreversible thermodynamics of Boltzmann's molecular entropy. It enables imaging in appropriate FEM spectra for sensing through the VDE, and displaying in color spectra for Human Visual System (HVS). We sense within the spectra the largest entropy value of obscurants such as fire, smoke, etc. Then we apply a smart firmware implementation of Blind Sources Separation (BSS) to separate all entropy sources associated with specific Kelvin temperatures. Finally, we recompose the scene using specific RGB colors constrained by the HVS, by up/down shifting Planck spectra at each pixel and time.

  5. An airborne real-time hyperspectral target detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skauli, Torbjorn; Haavardsholm, Trym V.; Kåsen, Ingebjørg; Arisholm, Gunnar; Kavara, Amela; Opsahl, Thomas Olsvik; Skaugen, Atle

    2010-04-01

    An airborne system for hyperspectral target detection is described. The main sensor is a HySpex pushbroom hyperspectral imager for the visible and near-infrared spectral range with 1600 pixels across track, supplemented by a panchromatic line imager. An optional third sensor can be added, either a SWIR hyperspectral camera or a thermal camera. In real time, the system performs radiometric calibration and georeferencing of the images, followed by image processing for target detection and visualization. The current version of the system implements only spectral anomaly detection, based on normal mixture models. Image processing runs on a PC with a multicore Intel processor and an Nvidia graphics processing unit (GPU). The processing runs in a software framework optimized for large sustained data rates. The platform is a Cessna 172 aircraft based close to FFI, modified with a camera port in the floor.

  6. Electronic Still Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, S. Douglas (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A handheld, programmable, digital camera is disclosed that supports a variety of sensors and has program control over the system components to provide versatility. The camera uses a high performance design which produces near film quality images from an electronic system. The optical system of the camera incorporates a conventional camera body that was slightly modified, thus permitting the use of conventional camera accessories, such as telephoto lenses, wide-angle lenses, auto-focusing circuitry, auto-exposure circuitry, flash units, and the like. An image sensor, such as a charge coupled device ('CCD') collects the photons that pass through the camera aperture when the shutter is opened, and produces an analog electrical signal indicative of the image. The analog image signal is read out of the CCD and is processed by preamplifier circuitry, a correlated double sampler, and a sample and hold circuit before it is converted to a digital signal. The analog-to-digital converter has an accuracy of eight bits to insure accuracy during the conversion. Two types of data ports are included for two different data transfer needs. One data port comprises a general purpose industrial standard port and the other a high speed/high performance application specific port. The system uses removable hard disks as its permanent storage media. The hard disk receives the digital image signal from the memory buffer and correlates the image signal with other sensed parameters, such as longitudinal or other information. When the storage capacity of the hard disk has been filled, the disk can be replaced with a new disk.

  7. GROT in NICMOS Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosey, M.; Bergeron, E.

    1999-09-01

    Grot is exhibited as small areas of reduced sensitivity, most likely due to flecks of antireflective paint scraped off the optical baffles as they were forced against each other. This paper characterizes grot associated with all three cameras. Flat field images taken from March 1997 through January 1999 have been investigated for changes in the grot, including possible wavelength dependency and throughput characteristics. The main products of this analysis are grot masks for each of the cameras which may also contain any new cold or dead pixels not specified in the data quality arrays.

  8. Wide angle pinhole camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Hemispherical refracting element gives pinhole camera 180 degree field-of-view without compromising its simplicity and depth-of-field. Refracting element, located just behind pinhole, bends light coming in from sides so that it falls within image area of film. In contrast to earlier pinhole cameras that used water or other transparent fluids to widen field, this model is not subject to leakage and is easily loaded and unloaded with film. Moreover, by selecting glass with different indices of refraction, field at film plane can be widened or reduced.

  9. Artificial human vision camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudou, J.-F.; Maggio, S.; Fagno, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we present a real-time vision system modeling the human vision system. Our purpose is to inspire from human vision bio-mechanics to improve robotic capabilities for tasks such as objects detection and tracking. This work describes first the bio-mechanical discrepancies between human vision and classic cameras and the retinal processing stage that takes place in the eye, before the optic nerve. The second part describes our implementation of these principles on a 3-camera optical, mechanical and software model of the human eyes and associated bio-inspired attention model.

  10. Direction Dependent Effects In Widefield Wideband Full Stokes Radio Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannathan, Preshanth; Bhatnagar, Sanjay; Rau, Urvashi; Taylor, Russ

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis imaging in radio astronomy is affected by instrumental and atmospheric effects which introduce direction dependent gains.The antenna power pattern varies both as a function of time and frequency. The broad band time varying nature of the antenna power pattern when not corrected leads to gross errors in full stokes imaging and flux estimation. In this poster we explore the errors that arise in image deconvolution while not accounting for the time and frequency dependence of the antenna power pattern. Simulations were conducted with the wideband full stokes power pattern of the Very Large Array(VLA) antennas to demonstrate the level of errors arising from direction-dependent gains. Our estimate is that these errors will be significant in wide-band full-pol mosaic imaging as well and algorithms to correct these errors will be crucial for many up-coming large area surveys (e.g. VLASS)

  11. Wideband image demodulation via bi-dimensional multirate frequency transformations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjing; Santhanam, Balu

    2016-09-01

    Existing image demodulation approaches based on the two-dimensional (2D) multicomponent AM-FM model assume narrowband components that can be demodulated using energy operators, Hilbert transforms, or the monogenic image approaches. However, if the FM components are wideband, then these demodulation approaches incur significant errors. Recent work by the authors extended wideband FM demodulation in one dimension to accommodate large conversion factors using multirate frequency transformations. In this paper, we extend the multirate frequency transformations technique developed for one-dimensional signals to 2D and images in conjunction with a recently proposed 2D higher-order energy demodulation approach. This extension is applied to both synthetic and real images to demonstrate the efficacy of the approach. PMID:27607487

  12. Wideband enhancement of television images for people with visual impairments.

    PubMed

    Peli, Eli; Kim, Jeonghoon; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak; Goldstein, Robert B; Woods, Russell L

    2004-06-01

    Wideband enhancement was implemented by detecting visually relevant edge and bar features in an image to produce a bipolar contour map. The addition of these contours to the original image resulted in increased local contrast of these features and an increase in the spatial bandwidth of the image. Testing with static television images revealed that visually impaired patients (n = 35) could distinguish the enhanced images and preferred them over the original images (and degraded images). Most patients preferred a moderate level of wideband enhancement, since they preferred natural-looking images and rejected visible artifacts of the enhancement. Comparison of the enhanced images with the originals revealed that the improvement in the perceived image quality was significant for only 22% of the patients. Possible reasons for the limited increase in perceived image quality are discussed, and improvements are suggested. PMID:15191173

  13. Photonic crystal composites-based wide-band optical collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jinjie; Juluri, Bala Krishna; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Lu, Mengqian; Gao, Tieyu; Huang, Tony Jun

    2010-08-01

    Photonic crystal (PC) composites are sequenced series of PCs that feature the same periods but different filling fractions. By properly tuning the filling fractions of the individual PCs and merging the working band of each PC into a continuous frequency range, wide-band self-collimation of optical signals can be realized. The band diagrams and the equal-frequency contours of the PC structures were calculated through the plane wave expansion method and the finite-difference time-domain method was employed to simulate the propagation of electromagnetic waves through the PC structures. Our results show that while a single PC can only collimate optical waves over a narrow frequency range, a PC composite exhibits a much wider collimation band. Such a wide-band optical collimation lens can be useful in applications that demand directional optical energy flow over a long distance, such as optical imaging and biosensing.

  14. A wideband analog correlator system for AMiBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao-Te; Kubo, Derek; Han, Chih-Chiang; Chen, Chung-Cheng; Chen, Ming-Tang; Lien, Chun-Hsien; Wang, Huei; Wei, Ray-Ming; Yang, Chia-Hsiang; Chiueh, Tzi-Dar; Peterson, Jeffrey; Kesteven, Michael; Wilson, Warwick

    2004-10-01

    A wideband correlator system with a bandwidth of 16 GHz or more is required for Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA) to achieve the sensitivity of 10μK in one hour of observation. Double-balanced diode mixers were used as multipliers in 4-lag correlator modules. Several wideband modules were developed for IF signal distribution between receivers and correlators. Correlator outputs were amplified, and digitized by voltage-to-frequency converters. Data acquisition circuits were designed using field programmable gate arrays (FPGA). Subsequent data transfer and control software were based on the configuration for Australia Telescope Compact Array. Transform matrix method will be adopted during calibration to take into account the phase and amplitude variations of analog devices across the passband.

  15. Improving Automated Annotation of Benthic Survey Images Using Wide-band Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Beijbom, Oscar; Treibitz, Tali; Kline, David I.; Eyal, Gal; Khen, Adi; Neal, Benjamin; Loya, Yossi; Mitchell, B. Greg; Kriegman, David

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale imaging techniques are used increasingly for ecological surveys. However, manual analysis can be prohibitively expensive, creating a bottleneck between collected images and desired data-products. This bottleneck is particularly severe for benthic surveys, where millions of images are obtained each year. Recent automated annotation methods may provide a solution, but reflectance images do not always contain sufficient information for adequate classification accuracy. In this work, the FluorIS, a low-cost modified consumer camera, was used to capture wide-band wide-field-of-view fluorescence images during a field deployment in Eilat, Israel. The fluorescence images were registered with standard reflectance images, and an automated annotation method based on convolutional neural networks was developed. Our results demonstrate a 22% reduction of classification error-rate when using both images types compared to only using reflectance images. The improvements were large, in particular, for coral reef genera Platygyra, Acropora and Millepora, where classification recall improved by 38%, 33%, and 41%, respectively. We conclude that convolutional neural networks can be used to combine reflectance and fluorescence imagery in order to significantly improve automated annotation accuracy and reduce the manual annotation bottleneck. PMID:27021133

  16. Improving Automated Annotation of Benthic Survey Images Using Wide-band Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beijbom, Oscar; Treibitz, Tali; Kline, David I.; Eyal, Gal; Khen, Adi; Neal, Benjamin; Loya, Yossi; Mitchell, B. Greg; Kriegman, David

    2016-03-01

    Large-scale imaging techniques are used increasingly for ecological surveys. However, manual analysis can be prohibitively expensive, creating a bottleneck between collected images and desired data-products. This bottleneck is particularly severe for benthic surveys, where millions of images are obtained each year. Recent automated annotation methods may provide a solution, but reflectance images do not always contain sufficient information for adequate classification accuracy. In this work, the FluorIS, a low-cost modified consumer camera, was used to capture wide-band wide-field-of-view fluorescence images during a field deployment in Eilat, Israel. The fluorescence images were registered with standard reflectance images, and an automated annotation method based on convolutional neural networks was developed. Our results demonstrate a 22% reduction of classification error-rate when using both images types compared to only using reflectance images. The improvements were large, in particular, for coral reef genera Platygyra, Acropora and Millepora, where classification recall improved by 38%, 33%, and 41%, respectively. We conclude that convolutional neural networks can be used to combine reflectance and fluorescence imagery in order to significantly improve automated annotation accuracy and reduce the manual annotation bottleneck.

  17. Electro-optical microwave signal processor for high-frequency wideband frequency channelization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawber, William N.; Webster, Ken

    1998-08-01

    An electro-optic microwave signal processor for activity monitoring in an electronic warfare receiver, offering wideband operation, parallel output in real time and 100 percent probability of intercept is presented, along with results from a prototype system. Requirements on electronic warfare receiver system are demanding, because they have to defect and identify potential threats across a large frequency bandwidth and in the high pulse density expected of the battlefield environment. A technique of processing signals across a wide bandwidth is to use a channelizer in the receiver front-end, in order to produce a number of narrow band outputs that can be individually processed. In the presented signal processor, received microwave signals ar unconverted onto an optical carrier using an electro- optic modulator and then spatially separated into a series of spots. The position and intensity of the spots is determined by the received signal(s) frequency and strength. Finally a photodiode array can be used for fast parallel data readout. Thus the signal processor output is fully channelized according to frequency. A prototype signal processor has been constructed, which can process microwave frequencies from 500MHz to 8GHz. A standard telecommunications electro-optic intensity modulator with a 3dB bandwidth of approximately 2.5GHz provides frequency upconversion. Readout is achieved using either a near IR camera or a 16 element linear photodiode array.

  18. Improving Automated Annotation of Benthic Survey Images Using Wide-band Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Beijbom, Oscar; Treibitz, Tali; Kline, David I; Eyal, Gal; Khen, Adi; Neal, Benjamin; Loya, Yossi; Mitchell, B Greg; Kriegman, David

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale imaging techniques are used increasingly for ecological surveys. However, manual analysis can be prohibitively expensive, creating a bottleneck between collected images and desired data-products. This bottleneck is particularly severe for benthic surveys, where millions of images are obtained each year. Recent automated annotation methods may provide a solution, but reflectance images do not always contain sufficient information for adequate classification accuracy. In this work, the FluorIS, a low-cost modified consumer camera, was used to capture wide-band wide-field-of-view fluorescence images during a field deployment in Eilat, Israel. The fluorescence images were registered with standard reflectance images, and an automated annotation method based on convolutional neural networks was developed. Our results demonstrate a 22% reduction of classification error-rate when using both images types compared to only using reflectance images. The improvements were large, in particular, for coral reef genera Platygyra, Acropora and Millepora, where classification recall improved by 38%, 33%, and 41%, respectively. We conclude that convolutional neural networks can be used to combine reflectance and fluorescence imagery in order to significantly improve automated annotation accuracy and reduce the manual annotation bottleneck.

  19. [Air-borne disease].

    PubMed

    Lameiro Vilariño, Carmen; del Campo Pérez, Victor M; Alonso Bürger, Susana; Felpeto Nodar, Irene; Guimarey Pérez, Rosa; Pérez Alvarellos, Alberto

    2003-11-01

    Respiratory protection is a factor which worries nursing professionals who take care of patients susceptible of transmitting microorganisms through the air more as every day passes. This type of protection covers the use of surgical or hygienic masks against the transmission of infection by airborne drops to the use of highly effective masks or respirators against the transmission of airborne diseases such as tuberculosis or SARS, a recently discovered disease. The adequate choice of this protective device and its correct use are fundamental in order to have an effective protection for exposed personnel. The authors summarize the main protective respiratory devices used by health workers, their characteristics and degree of effectiveness, as well as the circumstances under which each device is indicated for use. PMID:14705591

  20. Flight-qualification of a wideband laser diode transmitter module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holcomb, Terry L.; Mecherle, G. S.

    1992-01-01

    A diffraction-limited laser diode transmitter module suitable for wideband direct detection laser communication is described. The transmitter module incorporates a high power semiconductor diode laser, collimating lens, thermal control, and driver circuit in a hermetic enclosure. The module has undergone environmental testing which demonstrates its suitability for space application, and accelerated lifetesting of the laser diode suggests an operational lifetime of nearly ten years.

  1. Wideband radar signal modeling of ground moving targets in clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malas, John A.; Pasala, Krishna M.; Westerkamp, John J.

    2002-08-01

    Research in the area of air-to-ground target detection, track and identification (ID) requires the development of target signal models for known geometric shapes moving in ground clutter. Space-time adaptive filtering techniques in particular make good use of temporal-spatial synthetic radar signal return data. A radar signal model is developed to generate synthetic wideband radar signal data for use in multi-channel adaptive signal processing.

  2. Wideband precision analog telemetry link using digital techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hearn, W.E.

    1982-10-01

    A highly linear Wideband Analog Fiber Optic Link is described which samples at a 1 MHz rate with 10-bit accuracy and transmits and receives by means of a high speed PDM code. Aliasing and sampling effects are fully suppressed and a nearly Gaussian pulse response is attained with a 2 ..mu..sec risetime. Analog signals are recovered with very low distortion and d.c. drift and a S/N ratio of better than 52 db.

  3. A note on the wideband Gaussian broadcast channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceliece, R. J.; Posner, E. C.; Swanson, L.

    1986-01-01

    It is well known that for the Gaussian broadcast channel, timeshared coding is not as efficient as more sophisticated broadcast coding strategies. However, the relative advantage of broadcast coding over timeshared coding is shown to be small if the signal-to-noise ratios of both receivers are small. One surprising consequence of this is that for the wideband Gaussian broadcast channel, which is defined, broadcast coding offers no advantage over timeshared coding at all, and so timeshared coding is optimal.

  4. Iterative direction-of-arrival estimation with wideband chirp signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Genyuan; Xia, Xiang-Gen; Chen, Victor C.

    1999-11-01

    Amin et. al. recently developed a time-frequency MUSIC algorithm with narrow band models for the estimation of direction of arrival (DOA) when the source signals are chirps. In this research, we consider wideband models. The joint time-frequency analysis is first used to estimate the chirp rates of the source signals and then the DOA is estimated by the MUSIC algorithm with an iterative approach.

  5. MLS airborne antenna research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C. L.; Burnside, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The geometrical theory of diffraction was used to analyze the elevation plane pattern of on-aircraft antennas. The radiation patterns for basic elements (infinitesimal dipole, circumferential and axial slot) mounted on fuselage of various aircrafts with or without radome included were calculated and compared well with experimental results. Error phase plots were also presented. The effects of radiation patterns and error phase plots on the polarization selection for the MLS airborne antenna are discussed.

  6. Airborne forest fire research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattingly, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research relating to airborne fire fighting systems is reviewed to provide NASA/Langley Research Center with current information on the use of aircraft in forest fire operations, and to identify research requirements for future operations. A literature survey, interview of forest fire service personnel, analysis and synthesis of data from research reports and independent conclusions, and recommendations for future NASA-LRC programs are included.

  7. Snapshot polarimeter fundus camera.

    PubMed

    DeHoog, Edward; Luo, Haitao; Oka, Kazuhiko; Dereniak, Eustace; Schwiegerling, James

    2009-03-20

    A snapshot imaging polarimeter utilizing Savart plates is integrated into a fundus camera for retinal imaging. Acquired retinal images can be processed to reconstruct Stokes vector images, giving insight into the polarization properties of the retina. Results for images from a normal healthy retina and retinas with pathology are examined and compared. PMID:19305463

  8. Spas color camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toffales, C.

    1983-01-01

    The procedures to be followed in assessing the performance of the MOS color camera are defined. Aspects considered include: horizontal and vertical resolution; value of the video signal; gray scale rendition; environmental (vibration and temperature) tests; signal to noise ratios; and white balance correction.

  9. The LSST Camera Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Kirk; Kahn, Steven A.; Nordby, Martin; Burke, David; O'Connor, Paul; Oliver, John; Radeka, Veljko; Schalk, Terry; Schindler, Rafe; /SLAC

    2007-01-10

    The LSST camera is a wide-field optical (0.35-1um) imager designed to provide a 3.5 degree FOV with better than 0.2 arcsecond sampling. The detector format will be a circular mosaic providing approximately 3.2 Gigapixels per image. The camera includes a filter mechanism and, shuttering capability. It is positioned in the middle of the telescope where cross-sectional area is constrained by optical vignetting and heat dissipation must be controlled to limit thermal gradients in the optical beam. The fast, f/1.2 beam will require tight tolerances on the focal plane mechanical assembly. The focal plane array operates at a temperature of approximately -100 C to achieve desired detector performance. The focal plane array is contained within an evacuated cryostat, which incorporates detector front-end electronics and thermal control. The cryostat lens serves as an entrance window and vacuum seal for the cryostat. Similarly, the camera body lens serves as an entrance window and gas seal for the camera housing, which is filled with a suitable gas to provide the operating environment for the shutter and filter change mechanisms. The filter carousel can accommodate 5 filters, each 75 cm in diameter, for rapid exchange without external intervention.

  10. Jack & the Video Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlan, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    This article narrates how the use of video camera has transformed the life of Jack Williams, a 10-year-old boy from Colorado Springs, Colorado, who has autism. The way autism affected Jack was unique. For the first nine years of his life, Jack remained in his world, alone. Functionally non-verbal and with motor skill problems that affected his…

  11. Photogrammetric camera calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tayman, W.P.; Ziemann, H.

    1984-01-01

    Section 2 (Calibration) of the document "Recommended Procedures for Calibrating Photogrammetric Cameras and Related Optical Tests" from the International Archives of Photogrammetry, Vol. XIII, Part 4, is reviewed in the light of recent practical work, and suggestions for changes are made. These suggestions are intended as a basis for a further discussion. ?? 1984.

  12. Communities, Cameras, and Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Communities, Cameras, and Conservation (CCC) is the most exciting and valuable program the author has seen in her 30 years of teaching field science courses. In this citizen science project, students and community volunteers collect data on mountain lions ("Puma concolor") at four natural areas and public parks along the Front Range of Colorado.…

  13. Anger Camera Firmware

    2010-11-19

    The firmware is responsible for the operation of Anger Camera Electronics, calculation of position, time of flight and digital communications. It provides a first stage analysis of 48 signals from 48 analog signals that have been converted to digital values using A/D convertors.

  14. Make a Pinhole Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Diane K.; Novati, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    On Earth, using ordinary visible light, one can create a single image of light recorded over time. Of course a movie or video is light recorded over time, but it is a series of instantaneous snapshots, rather than light and time both recorded on the same medium. A pinhole camera, which is simple to make out of ordinary materials and using ordinary…

  15. Advanced Virgo phase cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Schaaf, L.; Agatsuma, K.; van Beuzekom, M.; Gebyehu, M.; van den Brand, J.

    2016-05-01

    A century after the prediction of gravitational waves, detectors have reached the sensitivity needed to proof their existence. One of them, the Virgo interferometer in Pisa, is presently being upgraded to Advanced Virgo (AdV) and will come into operation in 2016. The power stored in the interferometer arms raises from 20 to 700 kW. This increase is expected to introduce higher order modes in the beam, which could reduce the circulating power in the interferometer, limiting the sensitivity of the instrument. To suppress these higher-order modes, the core optics of Advanced Virgo is equipped with a thermal compensation system. Phase cameras, monitoring the real-time status of the beam constitute a critical component of this compensation system. These cameras measure the phases and amplitudes of the laser-light fields at the frequencies selected to control the interferometer. The measurement combines heterodyne detection with a scan of the wave front over a photodetector with pin-hole aperture. Three cameras observe the phase front of these laser sidebands. Two of them monitor the in-and output of the interferometer arms and the third one is used in the control of the aberrations introduced by the power recycling cavity. In this paper the working principle of the phase cameras is explained and some characteristic parameters are described.

  16. Imaging phoswich anger camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchanda, R. K.; Sood, R. K.

    1991-08-01

    High angular resolution and low background are the primary requisites for detectors for future astronomy experiments in the low energy gamma-ray region. Scintillation counters are still the only available large area detector for studies in this energy range. Preliminary details of a large area phoswich anger camera designed for coded aperture imaging is described and its background and position characteristics are discussed.

  17. Millisecond readout CCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokop, Mark; McCurnin, Thomas W.; Stradling, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a prototype of a fast-scanning CCD readout system to record a 1024 X 256 pixel image and transport the image to a recording station within 1 ms of the experimental event. The system is designed to have a dynamic range of greater than 1000 with adequate sensitivity to read single-electron excitations of a CRT phosphor when amplified by a microchannel plate image intensifier. This readout camera is intended for recording images from oscilloscopes, streak, and framing cameras. The sensor is a custom CCD chip, designed by LORAL Aeroneutronics. This CCD chip is designed with 16 parallel output ports to supply the necessary image transfer speed. The CCD is designed as an interline structure to allow fast clearing of the image and on-chip fast sputtering. Special antiblooming provisions are also included. The camera is designed to be modular and to allow CCD chips of other sizes to be used with minimal reengineering of the camera head.

  18. Millisecond readout CCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokop, M.; McCurnin, T. W.; Stradling, G.

    We have developed a prototype of a fast-scanning CCD readout system to record a 1024 x 256 pixel image and transport the image to a recording station within 1 ms of the experimental event. The system is designed to have a dynamic range of greater than 1000 with adequate sensitivity to read single-electron excitations of a CRT phosphor when amplified by a microchannel plate image intensifier. This readout camera is intended for recording images from oscilloscopes, streak, and framing cameras. The sensor is a custom CCD chip, designed by LORAL Aeroneutronics. This CCD chip is designed with 16 parallel output ports to supply the necessary image transfer speed. The CCD is designed as an interline structure to allow fast clearing of the image and on-chip fast shuttering. Special antiblooming provisions are also included. The camera is designed to be modular and to allow CCD chips of other sizes to be used with minimal reengineering of the camera head.

  19. Mutagenicity of airborne particles.

    PubMed

    Chrisp, C E; Fisher, G L

    1980-09-01

    The physical and chemical properties of airborne particles are important for the interpretation of their potential biologic significance as genotoxic hazards. For polydisperse particle size distributions, the smallest, most respirable particles are generally the most mutagenic. Particulate collection for testing purposes should be designed to reduce artifact formation and allow condensation of mutagenic compounds. Other critical factors such as UV irradiation, wind direction, chemical reactivity, humidity, sample storage, and temperature of combustion are important. Application of chemical extraction methods and subsequent class fractionation techniques influence the observed mutagenic activity. Particles from urban air, coal fly ash, automobile and diesel exhaust, agricultural burning and welding fumes contain primarily direct-acting mutagens. Cigarette smoke condensate, smoke from charred meat and protein pyrolysates, kerosene soot and cigarette smoke condensates contain primarily mutagens which require metabolic activation. Fractionation coupled with mutagenicity testing indicates that the most potent mutagens are found in the acidic fractions of urban air, coal fly ash, and automobile diesel exhaust, whereas mutagens in rice straw smoke and cigarette smoke condensate are found primarily in the basic fractions. The interaction of the many chemical compounds in complex mixtures from airborne particles is likely to be important in determining mutagenic or comutagenic potentials. Because the mode of exposure is generally frequent and prolonged, the presence of tumor-promoting agents in complex mixtures may be a major factor in evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of airborne particles.

  20. Mammalian airborne allergens.

    PubMed

    Aalberse, Rob C

    2014-01-01

    Historically, horse dandruff was a favorite allergen source material. Today, however, allergic symptoms due to airborne mammalian allergens are mostly a result of indoor exposure, be it at home, at work or even at school. The relevance of mammalian allergens in relation to the allergenic activity of house dust extract is briefly discussed in the historical context of two other proposed sources of house dust allergenic activity: mites and Maillard-type lysine-sugar conjugates. Mammalian proteins involved in allergic reactions to airborne dust are largely found in only 2 protein families: lipocalins and secretoglobins (Fel d 1-like proteins), with a relatively minor contribution of serum albumins, cystatins and latherins. Both the lipocalin and the secretoglobin family are very complex. In some instances this results in a blurred separation between important and less important allergenic family members. The past 50 years have provided us with much detailed information on the genomic organization and protein structure of many of these allergens. However, the complex family relations, combined with the wide range of post-translational enzymatic and non-enzymatic modifications, make a proper qualitative and quantitative description of the important mammalian indoor airborne allergens still a significant proteomic challenge. PMID:24925404

  1. Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods

    DOEpatents

    Deaton, Juan D.; Schmitt, Michael J.; Jones, Warren F.

    2011-12-13

    An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

  2. Detection of soil properties with airborne hyperspectral measurements of bare fields.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Airborne remote sensing data, using a hyperspectral (HSI) camera, were collected for a flight over two fields with a total of 128 ha. of recently seeded and nearly bare soil. The within-field spatial distribution of several soil properties was found by using multiple linear regression to select the ...

  3. Innovativ Airborne Sensors for Disaster Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altan, M. O.; Kemper, G.

    2016-06-01

    Disaster management by analyzing changes in the DSM before and after the "event". Advantage of Lidar is that beside rain and clouds, no other weather conditions limit their use. As an active sensor, missions in the nighttime are possible. The new mid-format cameras that make use CMOS sensors (e.g. Phase One IXU1000) can capture data also under poor and difficult light conditions and might will be the first choice for remotely sensed data acquisition in aircrafts and UAVs. UAVs will surely be more and more part of the disaster management on the detailed level. Today equipped with video live cams using RGB and Thermal IR, they assist in looking inside buildings and behind. Thus, they can continue with the aerial survey where airborne anomalies have been detected.

  4. Airborne seeker evaluation and test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jollie, William B.

    1991-08-01

    The Airborne Seeker Evaluation Test System (ASETS) is an airborne platform for development, test, and evaluation of air-to-ground seekers and sensors. ASETS consists of approximately 10,000 pounds of equipment, including sixteen racks of control, display, and recording electronics, and a very large stabilized airborne turret, all carried by a modified C- 130A aircraft. The turret measures 50 in. in diameter and extends over 50 in. below the aircraft. Because of the low ground clearance of the C-130, a unique retractor mechanism was designed to raise the turret inside the aircraft for take-offs and landings, and deploy the turret outside the aircraft for testing. The turret has over 7 cubic feet of payload space and can accommodate up to 300 pounds of instrumentation, including missile seekers, thermal imagers, infrared mapping systems, laser systems, millimeter wave radar units, television cameras, and laser rangers. It contains a 5-axis gyro-stabilized gimbal system that will maintain a line of sight in the pitch, roll, and yaw axes to an accuracy better than +/- 125 (mu) rad. The rack-mounted electronics in the aircraft cargo bay can be interchanged to operate any type of sensor and record the data. Six microcomputer subsystems operate and maintain all of the system components during a test mission. ASETS is capable of flying at altitudes between 200 and 20,000 feet, and at airspeeds ranging from 100 to 250 knots. Mission scenarios can include air-to-surface seeker testing, terrain mapping, surface target measurement, air-to-air testing, atmospheric transmission studies, weather data collection, aircraft or missile tracking, background signature measurements, and surveillance. ASETS is fully developed and available to support test programs.

  5. Airborne system for testing multispectral reconnaissance technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Dirk-Roger; Doergeloh, Heinrich; Keil, Heiko; Wetjen, Wilfried

    1999-07-01

    There is an increasing demand for future airborne reconnaissance systems to obtain aerial images for tactical or peacekeeping operations. Especially Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) equipped with multispectral sensor system and with real time jam resistant data transmission capabilities are of high interest. An airborne experimental platform has been developed as testbed to investigate different concepts of reconnaissance systems before their application in UAVs. It is based on a Dornier DO 228 aircraft, which is used as flying platform. Great care has been taken to achieve the possibility to test different kinds of multispectral sensors. Hence basically it is capable to be equipped with an IR sensor head, high resolution aerial cameras of the whole optical spectrum and radar systems. The onboard equipment further includes system for digital image processing, compression, coding, and storage. The data are RF transmitted to the ground station using technologies with high jam resistance. The images, after merging with enhanced vision components, are delivered to the observer who has an uplink data channel available to control flight and imaging parameters.

  6. Image Sensors Enhance Camera Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In the 1990s, a Jet Propulsion Laboratory team led by Eric Fossum researched ways of improving complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors in order to miniaturize cameras on spacecraft while maintaining scientific image quality. Fossum s team founded a company to commercialize the resulting CMOS active pixel sensor. Now called the Aptina Imaging Corporation, based in San Jose, California, the company has shipped over 1 billion sensors for use in applications such as digital cameras, camera phones, Web cameras, and automotive cameras. Today, one of every three cell phone cameras on the planet feature Aptina s sensor technology.

  7. Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final technical report for NASA-Ames grant NAG2-1068 to Caltech, entitled "Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy", which extended over the period May 1, 1996 through January 31, 1998. The grant was funded by the NASA airborne astronomy program, during a period of time after the Kuiper Airborne Observatory was no longer operational. Instead. this funding program was intended to help develop instrument concepts and technology for the upcoming SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) project. SOFIA, which is funded by NASA and is now being carried out by a consortium lead by USRA (Universities Space Research Association), will be a 747 aircraft carrying a 2.5 meter diameter telescope. The purpose of our grant was to fund the ongoing development of sensitive heterodyne receivers for the submillimeter band (500-1200 GHz), using sensitive superconducting (SIS) detectors. In 1997 July we submitted a proposal to USRA to construct a heterodyne instrument for SOFIA. Our proposal was successful [1], and we are now continuing our airborne astronomy effort with funding from USRA. A secondary purpose of the NAG2-1068 grant was to continue the anaIN'sis of astronomical data collected with an earlier instrument which was flown on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The KAO instrument and the astronomical studies which were carried out with it were supported primarily under another grant, NAG2-744, which extended over October 1, 1991 through Januarv 31, 1997. For a complete description of the astronomical data and its anailysis, we refer the reader to the final technical report for NAG2-744, which was submitted to NASA on December 1. 1997. Here we report on the SIS detector development effort for SOFIA carried out under NAG2-1068. The main result of this effort has been the demonstration of SIS mixers using a new superconducting material niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN), which promises to deliver dramatic improvements in sensitivity in the 700

  8. High Resolution Airborne Digital Imagery for Precision Agriculture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herwitz, Stanley R.

    1998-01-01

    The Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program is a NASA initiative that seeks to demonstrate the application of cost-effective aircraft and sensor technology to private commercial ventures. In 1997-98, a series of flight-demonstrations and image acquisition efforts were conducted over the Hawaiian Islands using a remotely-piloted solar- powered platform (Pathfinder) and a fixed-wing piloted aircraft (Navajo) equipped with a Kodak DCS450 CIR (color infrared) digital camera. As an ERAST Science Team Member, I defined a set of flight lines over the largest coffee plantation in Hawaii: the Kauai Coffee Company's 4,000 acre Koloa Estate. Past studies have demonstrated the applications of airborne digital imaging to agricultural management. Few studies have examined the usefulness of high resolution airborne multispectral imagery with 10 cm pixel sizes. The Kodak digital camera integrated with ERAST's Airborne Real Time Imaging System (ARTIS) which generated multiband CCD images consisting of 6 x 106 pixel elements. At the designated flight altitude of 1,000 feet over the coffee plantation, pixel size was 10 cm. The study involved the analysis of imagery acquired on 5 March 1998 for the detection of anomalous reflectance values and for the definition of spectral signatures as indicators of tree vigor and treatment effectiveness (e.g., drip irrigation; fertilizer application).

  9. Dual cameras acquisition and display system of retina-like sensor camera and rectangular sensor camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Nan; Cao, Fengmei; Lin, Yabin; Bai, Tingzhu; Song, Shengyu

    2015-04-01

    For a new kind of retina-like senor camera and a traditional rectangular sensor camera, dual cameras acquisition and display system need to be built. We introduce the principle and the development of retina-like senor. Image coordinates transformation and interpolation based on sub-pixel interpolation need to be realized for our retina-like sensor's special pixels distribution. The hardware platform is composed of retina-like senor camera, rectangular sensor camera, image grabber and PC. Combined the MIL and OpenCV library, the software program is composed in VC++ on VS 2010. Experience results show that the system can realizes two cameras' acquisition and display.

  10. Streak camera receiver definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. B.; Hunkler, L. T., Sr.; Letzring, S. A.; Jaanimagi, P.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed streak camera definition studies were made as a first step toward full flight qualification of a dual channel picosecond resolution streak camera receiver for the Geoscience Laser Altimeter and Ranging System (GLRS). The streak camera receiver requirements are discussed as they pertain specifically to the GLRS system, and estimates of the characteristics of the streak camera are given, based upon existing and near-term technological capabilities. Important problem areas are highlighted, and possible corresponding solutions are discussed.

  11. Automated Camera Array Fine Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clouse, Daniel; Padgett, Curtis; Ansar, Adnan; Cheng, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Using aerial imagery, the JPL FineCalibration (JPL FineCal) software automatically tunes a set of existing CAHVOR camera models for an array of cameras. The software finds matching features in the overlap region between images from adjacent cameras, and uses these features to refine the camera models. It is not necessary to take special imagery of a known target and no surveying is required. JPL FineCal was developed for use with an aerial, persistent surveillance platform.

  12. Combustion pinhole camera system

    DOEpatents

    Witte, A.B.

    1984-02-21

    A pinhole camera system is described utilizing a sealed optical-purge assembly which provides optical access into a coal combustor or other energy conversion reactors. The camera system basically consists of a focused-purge pinhole optical port assembly, a conventional TV vidicon receiver, an external, variable density light filter which is coupled electronically to the vidicon automatic gain control (agc). The key component of this system is the focused-purge pinhole optical port assembly which utilizes a purging inert gas to keep debris from entering the port and a lens arrangement which transfers the pinhole to the outside of the port assembly. One additional feature of the port assembly is that it is not flush with the interior of the combustor. 2 figs.

  13. Combustion pinhole camera system

    DOEpatents

    Witte, Arvel B.

    1984-02-21

    A pinhole camera system utilizing a sealed optical-purge assembly which provides optical access into a coal combustor or other energy conversion reactors. The camera system basically consists of a focused-purge pinhole optical port assembly, a conventional TV vidicon receiver, an external, variable density light filter which is coupled electronically to the vidicon automatic gain control (agc). The key component of this system is the focused-purge pinhole optical port assembly which utilizes a purging inert gas to keep debris from entering the port and a lens arrangement which transfers the pinhole to the outside of the port assembly. One additional feature of the port assembly is that it is not flush with the interior of the combustor.

  14. LSST Camera Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Seppala, L; Gilmore, K; Hale, L; Whistler, W

    2006-06-05

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is a unique, three-mirror, modified Paul-Baker design with an 8.4m primary, a 3.4m secondary, and a 5.0m tertiary feeding a camera system that includes corrector optics to produce a 3.5 degree field of view with excellent image quality (<0.3 arcsecond 80% encircled diffracted energy) over the entire field from blue to near infra-red wavelengths. We describe the design of the LSST camera optics, consisting of three refractive lenses with diameters of 1.6m, 1.0m and 0.7m, along with a set of interchangeable, broad-band, interference filters with diameters of 0.75m. We also describe current plans for fabricating, coating, mounting and testing these lenses and filters.

  15. NSTX Tangential Divertor Camera

    SciTech Connect

    A.L. Roquemore; Ted Biewer; D. Johnson; S.J. Zweben; Nobuhiro Nishino; V.A. Soukhanovskii

    2004-07-16

    Strong magnetic field shear around the divertor x-point is numerically predicted to lead to strong spatial asymmetries in turbulence driven particle fluxes. To visualize the turbulence and associated impurity line emission near the lower x-point region, a new tangential observation port has been recently installed on NSTX. A reentrant sapphire window with a moveable in-vessel mirror images the divertor region from the center stack out to R 80 cm and views the x-point for most plasma configurations. A coherent fiber optic bundle transmits the image through a remotely selected filter to a fast camera, for example a 40500 frames/sec Photron CCD camera. A gas puffer located in the lower inboard divertor will localize the turbulence in the region near the x-point. Edge fluid and turbulent codes UEDGE and BOUT will be used to interpret impurity and deuterium emission fluctuation measurements in the divertor.

  16. PHARUS airborne SAR concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeij, Paul; Pouwels, Henk; Koomen, Peter J.; Hoogeboom, Peter

    1995-11-01

    PHARUS (phased array universal SAR) is an airborne SAR concept which is being developed in the Netherlands. The PHARUS system differs from other airborne SARs by the use of a phased array antenna, which provides both for the flexibility in the design as well as for a compact, light-weight instrument that can be carried on small aircraft. The concept allows for the construction of airborne SAR systems on a common generic basis but tailored to specific user needs and can be seen as a preparation for future spaceborne SAR systems using solid state transmitters with electronically steerable phased array antenna. The whole approach is aimed at providing an economic and yet technically sophisticated solution to remote sensing or surveying needs of a specific user. The solid state phased array antenna consists of a collection of radiating patches; the design flexibility for a large part resides in the freedom to choose the number of patches, and thereby the essential radar performance parameters such as resolution and swath width. Another consequence of the use of the phased array antenna is the system's compactness and the possibility to rigidly mount it on a small aircraft. The use of small aircraft of course considerably improves the cost/benefit ratio of the use of airborne SAR. Flight altitude of the system is flexible between about 7,000 and 40,000 feet, giving much operational freedom within the meteo and airspace control limits. In the PHARUS concept the airborne segment is complemented by a ground segment, which consists of a SAR processor, possibly extended by a matching image processing package. (A quick look image is available in real-time on board the aircraft.) The SAR processor is UNIX based and runs on easily available hardware (SUN station). Although the additional image processing software is available, the SAR processing software is nevertheless designed to be able to interface with commercially available image processing software, as well as being able

  17. Development of an airborne laser bathymeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H., H.; Cervenka, P. O.; Lankford, C. B.

    1975-01-01

    An airborne laser depth sounding system was built and taken through a complete series of field tests. Two green laser sources were tried: a pulsed neon laser at 540 nm and a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG transmitter at 532 nm. To obtain a depth resolution of better than 20 cm, the pulses had a duration of 5 to 7 nanoseconds and could be fired up to at rates of 50 pulses per second. In the receiver, the signal was detected by a photomultiplier tube connected to a 28 cm diameter Cassegrainian telescope that was aimed vertically downward. Oscilloscopic traces of the signal reflected from the sea surface and the ocean floor could either be recorded by a movie camera on 35 mm film or digitized into 500 discrete channels of information and stored on magnetic tape, from which depth information could be extracted. An aerial color movie camera recorded the geographic footprint while a boat crew of oceanographers measured depth and other relevant water parameters. About two hundred hours of flight time on the NASA C-54 airplane in the area of Chincoteague, Virginia, the Chesapeake Bay, and in Key West, Florida, have yielded information on the actual operating conditions of such a system and helped to optimize the design. One can predict the maximum depth attainable in a mission by measuring the effective attenuation coefficient in flight. This quantity is four times smaller than the usual narrow beam attenuation coefficient. Several square miles of a varied underwater landscape were also mapped.

  18. Hemispherical Laue camera

    DOEpatents

    Li, James C. M.; Chu, Sungnee G.

    1980-01-01

    A hemispherical Laue camera comprises a crystal sample mount for positioning a sample to be analyzed at the center of sphere of a hemispherical, X-radiation sensitive film cassette, a collimator, a stationary or rotating sample mount and a set of standard spherical projection spheres. X-radiation generated from an external source is directed through the collimator to impinge onto the single crystal sample on the stationary mount. The diffracted beam is recorded on the hemispherical X-radiation sensitive film mounted inside the hemispherical film cassette in either transmission or back-reflection geometry. The distances travelled by X-radiation diffracted from the crystal to the hemispherical film are the same for all crystal planes which satisfy Bragg's Law. The recorded diffraction spots or Laue spots on the film thereby preserve both the symmetry information of the crystal structure and the relative intensities which are directly related to the relative structure factors of the crystal orientations. The diffraction pattern on the exposed film is compared with the known diffraction pattern on one of the standard spherical projection spheres for a specific crystal structure to determine the orientation of the crystal sample. By replacing the stationary sample support with a rotating sample mount, the hemispherical Laue camera can be used for crystal structure determination in a manner previously provided in conventional Debye-Scherrer cameras.

  19. Gamma ray camera

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1997-01-21

    A gamma ray camera is disclosed for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array. 6 figs.

  20. Gamma ray camera

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1997-01-01

    A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

  1. Orbiter Camera Payload System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Components for an orbiting camera payload system (OCPS) include the large format camera (LFC), a gas supply assembly, and ground test, handling, and calibration hardware. The LFC, a high resolution large format photogrammetric camera for use in the cargo bay of the space transport system, is also adaptable to use on an RB-57 aircraft or on a free flyer satellite. Carrying 4000 feet of film, the LFC is usable over the visible to near IR, at V/h rates of from 11 to 41 milliradians per second, overlap of 10, 60, 70 or 80 percent and exposure times of from 4 to 32 milliseconds. With a 12 inch focal length it produces a 9 by 18 inch format (long dimension in line of flight) with full format low contrast resolution of 88 lines per millimeter (AWAR), full format distortion of less than 14 microns and a complement of 45 Reseau marks and 12 fiducial marks. Weight of the OCPS as supplied, fully loaded is 944 pounds and power dissipation is 273 watts average when in operation, 95 watts in standby. The LFC contains an internal exposure sensor, or will respond to external command. It is able to photograph starfields for inflight calibration upon command.

  2. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL), a spatially scanning range-gated device installed on board a NASA C-54 aircraft, is described. The AOL system is capable of measuring topographical relief or water depth (bathymetry) with a range resolution of plus or minus 0.3 m in the vertical dimension. The system may also be used to measure fluorescent spectral signatures from 3500 to 8000 A with a resolution of 100 A. Potential applications of the AOL, including sea state measurements, water transparency assessments, oil spill identification, effluent identification and crop cover assessment are also mentioned.

  3. Wideband Acoustic Immittance: Normative Study and Test-Retest Reliability of Tympanometric Measurements in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to present normative data of tympanometric measurements of wideband acoustic immittance and to characterize wideband tympanograms. Method: Data were collected in 84 young adults with strictly defined normal hearing and middle ear status. Energy absorbance (EA) was measured using clicks for 1/12-octave…

  4. Effects of Consecutive Wideband Tympanometry Trials on Energy Absorbance Measures of the Middle Ear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdiek, Laina M.; Sun, Xiao-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Wideband acoustic immittance (WAI) is a new technique for assessing middle ear transfer function. It includes energy absorbance (EA) measures and can be acquired with the ear canal pressure varied, known as "wideband tympanometry" (WBTymp). The authors of this study aimed to investigate effects of consecutive WBTymp testing on…

  5. Vacuum-Compatible Wideband White Light and Laser Combiner Source System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azizi, Alineza; Ryan, Daniel J.; Tang, Hong; Demers, Richard T.; Kadogawa, Hiroshi; An, Xin; Sun, George Y.

    2010-01-01

    For the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) Spectrum Calibration Development Unit (SCDU) testbed, wideband white light is used to simulate starlight. The white light source mount requires extremely stable pointing accuracy (<3.2 microradians). To meet this and other needs, the laser light from a single-mode fiber was combined, through a beam splitter window with special coating from broadband wavelengths, with light from multimode fiber. Both lights were coupled to a photonic crystal fiber (PCF). In many optical systems, simulating a point star with broadband spectrum with stability of microradians for white light interferometry is a challenge. In this case, the cameras use the white light interference to balance two optical paths, and to maintain close tracking. In order to coarse align the optical paths, a laser light is sent into the system to allow tracking of fringes because a narrow band laser has a great range of interference. The design requirements forced the innovators to use a new type of optical fiber, and to take a large amount of care in aligning the input sources. The testbed required better than 1% throughput, or enough output power on the lowest spectrum to be detectable by the CCD camera (6 nW at camera). The system needed to be vacuum-compatible and to have the capability for combining a visible laser light at any time for calibration purposes. The red laser is a commercially produced 635-nm laser 5-mW diode, and the white light source is a commercially produced tungsten halogen lamp that gives a broad spectrum of about 525 to 800 nm full width at half maximum (FWHM), with about 1.4 mW of power at 630 nm. A custom-made beam splitter window with special coating for broadband wavelengths is used with the white light input via a 50-mm multi-mode fiber. The large mode area PCF is an LMA-8 made by Crystal Fibre (core diameter of 8.5 mm, mode field diameter of 6 mm, and numerical aperture at 625 nm of 0.083). Any science interferometer that needs a

  6. Airborne concentrations of peanut protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rodney M; Barnes, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    Food allergy to peanut is a significant health problem, and there are reported allergic reactions to peanuts despite not eating or having physical contact with peanuts. It is presumed that an allergic reaction may have occurred from inhalation of airborne peanut allergens. The purpose of this study was to detect the possible concentrations of airborne peanut proteins for various preparations and during specific activities. Separate Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and a polyclonal sandwich enzyme immunoassay for peanuts were used to detect the amount of airborne peanut protein collected using a Spincon Omni 3000 air collector (Sceptor Industries, Inc., Kansas City, MO) under different peanut preparation methods and situations. Air samples were measured for multiple peanut preparations and scenarios. Detectable amounts of airborne peanut protein were measured using a whole peanut immunoassay when removing the shells of roasted peanut. No airborne peanut allergen (Ara h 1 or Ara h 2) or whole peanut protein above the LLD was measured in any of the other peanut preparation collections. Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and polyclonal peanut proteins were detected from water used to boil peanuts. Small amounts of airborne peanut protein were detected in the scenario of removing shells from roasted peanuts; however, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 proteins were unable to be consistently detected. Although airborne peanut proteins were detected, the concentration of airborne peanut protein that is necessary to elicit a clinical allergic reaction is unknown.

  7. Airborne concentrations of peanut protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rodney M; Barnes, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    Food allergy to peanut is a significant health problem, and there are reported allergic reactions to peanuts despite not eating or having physical contact with peanuts. It is presumed that an allergic reaction may have occurred from inhalation of airborne peanut allergens. The purpose of this study was to detect the possible concentrations of airborne peanut proteins for various preparations and during specific activities. Separate Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and a polyclonal sandwich enzyme immunoassay for peanuts were used to detect the amount of airborne peanut protein collected using a Spincon Omni 3000 air collector (Sceptor Industries, Inc., Kansas City, MO) under different peanut preparation methods and situations. Air samples were measured for multiple peanut preparations and scenarios. Detectable amounts of airborne peanut protein were measured using a whole peanut immunoassay when removing the shells of roasted peanut. No airborne peanut allergen (Ara h 1 or Ara h 2) or whole peanut protein above the LLD was measured in any of the other peanut preparation collections. Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and polyclonal peanut proteins were detected from water used to boil peanuts. Small amounts of airborne peanut protein were detected in the scenario of removing shells from roasted peanuts; however, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 proteins were unable to be consistently detected. Although airborne peanut proteins were detected, the concentration of airborne peanut protein that is necessary to elicit a clinical allergic reaction is unknown. PMID:23406937

  8. Wideband, co-polarization anomalous reflection metasurface based on low-Q resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongfeng; Zhang, Jieqiu; Zhang, Yaodong; Chen, Hongya; Fan, Ya

    2016-09-01

    Wideband anomalous reflection using metasurface is usually accompanied by polarization conversion, which changes the polarization state of reflected waves. In this paper, we propose to realize wideband, co-polarization anomalous reflection using reflective phase gradient metasurface (PGM). To this end, a resonator with low quality factor Q is firstly designed as the elementary sub-unit of the PGM. Due to the wideband magnetic resonance of the resonator, nearly constant phase gradient can be achieved in a quite wideband from 14.0 to 21.0 GHz. Both the simulation and experiment verify the wideband, co-polarization anomalous reflection using the PGM. Since the polarization of reflected wave is unchanged after reflection, such PGMs can be used in many applications such as reflect array antennas, beam-steering antennas and radar cross-section reduction.

  9. An aerial composite imaging method with multiple upright cameras based on axis-shift theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Junyong; Liu, Xue; Xue, Yongqi; Tong, Qingxi

    2010-11-01

    Several composite camera systems were made for wide coverage by using 3 or 4 oblique cameras. A virtual projecting center and image was used for geometrical correction and mosaic with different projecting angles and different spatial resolutions caused by oblique cameras. An imaging method based axis-shift theory is proposed to acquire wide coverage images by several upright cameras. Four upright camera lenses have the same wide angle of view. The optic axis of lens is not on the center of CCD, and each CCD in each camera covers only one part of the whole focus plane. Oblique deformation caused by oblique camera would be avoided by this axis-shift imaging method. The principle and parameters are given and discussed. A prototype camera system is constructed by common DLSR (digital single lens reflex) cameras. The angle of view could exceed 80 degrees along the flight direction when the focal length is 24mm, and the ratio of base line to height could exceed 0.7 when longitudinal overlap is 60%. Some original and mosaic images captured by this prototype system in some ground and airborne experiments are given at last. Experimental results of image test show that the upright imaging method can effectively avoid the oblique deformation and meet the geometrical precision of image mosaic.

  10. Wide-band heterodyne receiver development for effluent measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.P.; Richards, R.K.; Simpson, M.L.; Bennett, C.A.; Liu, H.C.; Buchanan, M.

    1998-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing advanced infrared heterodyne receivers for plasma diagnostics in fusion reactors for over 20 years. Passive heterodyne radiometry in the LWIR region of the spectrum has historically been restricted by HgCdTe (MCT) detector technology to receiver bandwidths of only 2 GHz. Given typical atmospheric line widths of approximately 3 GHz, a CO{sub 2} (or isotope) laser local oscillator with an average line spacing of 50 GHz, and an MCT detector, only chemical species whose absorptions fall directly on top of laser lines can be measured. Thus, with traditional narrow-band heterodyne radiometry, much of the LWIR spectrum is missed and the less complex direct detection DIAL has been the preferred technique in remote sensing applications. Wide-band heterodyne receivers offer significant improvements in remote measurement capability. Progress at the Institute for Microstructural Sciences (IMS) at National Research Council of Canada and at ORNL in wide-band quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QIPs) and receivers is significantly enhancing the bandwidth capabilities of heterodyne radiometers. ORNL recently made measurements in the lab using QWIPs developed at IMS that demonstrate heterodyne quantum efficiencies of 5% with a heterodyne bandwidth of 7 GHz. The path forward indicates that > 10% heterodyne quantum efficiencies and 30-GHz bandwidths are achievable with current QWIP technology. With a chopped, 30-GHz passive heterodyne receiver, a much larger portion of the LWIR spectrum can now be covered. One potential advantage of wide-band heterodyne receivers for effluent measurements is to dramatically reduce the number of laser lines needed to characterize and distinguish multiple chemical species of interest. In the following paper, the authors discuss this and other implications of these new technologies to the characterization of effluents using both passive heterodyne radiometry and thermo-luminescence.

  11. Solar-Powered Airplane with Cameras and WLAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, Robert G.; Dunagan, Steve E.; Sullivan, Don; Slye, Robert; Brass, James; Leung, Joe G.; Gallmeyer, Bruce; Aoyagi, Michio; Wei, Mei Y.; Herwitz, Stanley R.; Johnson, Lee; Arvesen, John C.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental airborne remote sensing system includes a remotely controlled, lightweight, solar-powered airplane (see figure) that carries two digital-output electronic cameras and communicates with a nearby ground control and monitoring station via a wireless local-area network (WLAN). The speed of the airplane -- typically <50 km/h -- is low enough to enable loitering over farm fields, disaster scenes, or other areas of interest to collect high-resolution digital imagery that could be delivered to end users (e.g., farm managers or disaster-relief coordinators) in nearly real time.

  12. Antenna Characterization for the Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurements (WISM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Kevin M.; Miranda, Felix A.; Romanofsky, Robert R.; Durham, Timothy E.; Vanhille, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental characterization of the antenna for the Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurement (WISM) under development for the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), is discussed. A current sheet antenna, consisting of a small, 6x6 element, dual-linear polarized array with integrated beamformer, feeds an offset parabolic reflector, enabling WISM operation over an 8 to 40 GHz frequency band. An overview of the test program implemented for both the feed and the reflector antenna is given along with select results for specific frequencies utilized by the radar and radiometric sensors of the WISM.

  13. Antenna Characterization for the Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Kevin M.; Miranda, Felix A.; Romanofsky, Robert R.; Durham, Timothy E.; Vanhille, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental characterization of the antenna for the Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurements (WISM) under development for the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), is discussed. A current sheet antenna, consisting of a small, 6x6 element, dual-linear polarized array with integrated beamformer, feeds an offset parabolic reflector, enabling WISM operation over an 8 to 40 GHz frequency band. An overview of the test program implemented for both the feed and the reflector antenna is given along with select results for specific frequencies utilized by the radar and radiometric sensors of the WISM.

  14. Coherence properties of wideband satellite signals caused by ionospheric scintillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rufenach, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    Radio scintillation on satellite signals caused by small-scale irregularities in F-region ionospheric electron density can be an important limitation on earth-satellite communication and navigation systems. Scintillation imposes distortion in both amplitude and phase on wideband signals. In the present work, the shallow-modulated phase screen theory is developed in terms of coherence bandwidth including a model based on a turbulent-like power-law description of the irregularities. The model results usually show a greater coherence bandwidth in the signal phase than in the signal amplitude. Therefore, systems that require phase coherence over a large bandwidth should be less affected than those requiring amplitude coherence.

  15. Design and Performance of a Wideband Radio Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinreb, Sander; Imbriale, William A.; Jones, Glenn; Mani, Handi

    2012-01-01

    The Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) is an outreach project, a partnership involving NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Lewis Center for Educational Research (LCER), and the Apple Valley Unified School District near the NASA Goldstone deep space communication complex. This educational program currently uses a 34-meter antenna, DSS12, at Goldstone for classroom radio astronomy observations via the Internet. The current program utilizes DSS12 in two narrow frequency bands around S-band (2.3 GHz) and X-band (8.45 GHz), and is used by a training program involving a large number of secondary school teachers and their classrooms. To expand the program, a joint JPL/LCER project was started in mid-2006 to retrofit an additional existing 34-meter beam-waveguide antenna, DSS28, with wideband feeds and receivers to cover the 0.5-to- 14-GHz frequency bands. The DSS28 antenna has a 34-meter diameter main reflector, a 2.54-meter subreflector, and a set of beam waveguide mirrors surrounded by a 2.43-meter tube. The antenna was designed for high power and a narrow frequency band around 7.2 GHz. The performance at the low end of the frequency band desired for the educational program would be extremely poor if the beam waveguide system was used as part of the feed system. Consequently, the 34-meter antenna was retrofitted with a tertiary offset mirror placed at the vertex of the main reflector. The tertiary mirror can be rotated to use two wideband feeds that cover the 0.5-to-14-GHz band. The earlier designs for both GAVRT and the DSN only used narrow band feeds and consequently, only covered a small part of the S- and X-band frequencies. By using both a wideband feed and wideband amplifiers, the entire band from 0.5 to 14 GHz is covered, expanding significantly the science activities that can be studied using this system.

  16. UCom: Ultra-wideband Communications in Harsh Propagation Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Nekoogar, F

    2007-03-14

    LLNL has developed an ultra-wideband (UWB) system that provides unique, through-the-wall wireless communications in heavy metallic and heavy concrete indoor channels. LLNL's UWB system is the only available wireless communications system that performs successfully and reliably in facilities where conventional narrowband communications usually fail due to destructive reflections from multiple surfaces. These environments include: cargo ships and reinforced, heavy concrete buildings. LLNL's revolutionary system has applications for the military, as well as commercial indoor communications in multistory buildings, and cluttered industrial structures.

  17. Wideband propagation measurement system using spread spectrum signaling and TDRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Jeffrey D.; Fan, Yiping; Osborne, William P.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, a wideband propagation measurement system, which consisted of a ground-based transmitter, a mobile receiver, and a data acquisition system, was constructed. This system has been employed in a study of the characteristics of different propagation environments, such as urban, suburban and rural areas, by using a pseudonoise spreading sequence transmitted over NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System. The hardware and software tests showed that it met overall system requirements and it was very robust during a 3-month-long outdoor data collection experiment.

  18. Optically addressed ultra-wideband phased antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jian

    Demands for high data rate and multifunctional apertures from both civilian and military users have motivated development of ultra-wideband (UWB) electrically steered phased arrays. Meanwhile, the need for large contiguous frequency is pushing operation of radio systems into the millimeter-wave (mm-wave) range. Therefore, modern radio systems require UWB performance from VHF to mm-wave. However, traditional electronic systems suffer many challenges that make achieving these requirements difficult. Several examples includes: voltage controlled oscillators (VCO) cannot provide a tunable range of several octaves, distribution of wideband local oscillator signals undergo high loss and dispersion through RF transmission lines, and antennas have very limited bandwidth or bulky sizes. Recently, RF photonics technology has drawn considerable attention because of its advantages over traditional systems, with the capability of offering extreme power efficiency, information capacity, frequency agility, and spatial beam diversity. A hybrid RF photonic communication system utilizing optical links and an RF transducer at the antenna potentially provides ultra-wideband data transmission, i.e., over 100 GHz. A successful implementation of such an optically addressed phased array requires addressing several key challenges. Photonic generation of an RF source with over a seven-octave bandwidth has been demonstrated in the last few years. However, one challenge which still remains is how to convey phased optical signals to downconversion modules and antennas. Therefore, a feed network with phase sweeping capability and low excessive phase noise needs to be developed. Another key challenge is to develop an ultra-wideband array antenna. Modern frontends require antennas to be compact, planar, and low-profile in addition to possessing broad bandwidth, conforming to stringent space, weight, cost, and power constraints. To address these issues, I will study broadband and miniaturization

  19. Real-time wideband cylindrical holographic surveillance system

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.; Severtsen, Ronald H.

    1999-01-01

    A wideband holographic cylindrical surveillance system including a transceiver for generating a plurality of electromagnetic waves; antenna for transmitting the electromagnetic waves toward a target at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; the transceiver also receiving and converting electromagnetic waves reflected from the target to electrical signals at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; a computer for processing the electrical signals to obtain signals corresponding to a holographic reconstruction of the target; and a display for displaying the processed information to determine nature of the target. The computer has instructions to apply Fast Fourier Transforms and obtain a three dimensional cylindrical image.

  20. Real-time wideband cylindrical holographic surveillance system

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, D.M.; McMakin, D.L.; Hall, T.E.; Severtsen, R.H.

    1999-01-12

    A wideband holographic cylindrical surveillance system is disclosed including a transceiver for generating a plurality of electromagnetic waves; antenna for transmitting the electromagnetic waves toward a target at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; the transceiver also receiving and converting electromagnetic waves reflected from the target to electrical signals at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; a computer for processing the electrical signals to obtain signals corresponding to a holographic reconstruction of the target; and a display for displaying the processed information to determine nature of the target. The computer has instructions to apply Fast Fourier Transforms and obtain a three dimensional cylindrical image. 13 figs.

  1. DEVICE CONTROLLER, CAMERA CONTROL

    1998-07-20

    This is a C++ application that is the server for the cameral control system. Devserv drives serial devices, such as cameras and videoswitchers used in a videoconference, upon request from a client such as the camxfgbfbx ccint program. cc Deverv listens on UPD ports for clients to make network contractions. After a client connects and sends a request to control a device (such as to pan,tilt, or zooma camera or do picture-in-picture with a videoswitcher),more » devserv formats the request into an RS232 message appropriate for the device and sends this message over the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port and then formats and sends via multicast a status message. In addition, devserv periodically multicasts status or description messages so that all clients connected to the multicast channel know what devices are supported and their ranges of motion and the current position. The software design employs a class hierarchy such that an abstract base class for devices can be subclassed into classes for various device categories(e.g. sonyevid30, cononvco4, panasonicwjmx50, etc.). which are further subclassed into classes for various device categories. The devices currently supported are the Sony evi-D30, Canon, VCC1, Canon VCC3, and Canon VCC4 cameras and the Panasonic WJ-MX50 videoswitcher. However, developers can extend the class hierarchy to support other devices.« less

  2. Adaptive compressive sensing camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Charles; Hsu, Ming K.; Cha, Jae; Iwamura, Tomo; Landa, Joseph; Nguyen, Charles; Szu, Harold

    2013-05-01

    We have embedded Adaptive Compressive Sensing (ACS) algorithm on Charge-Coupled-Device (CCD) camera based on the simplest concept that each pixel is a charge bucket, and the charges comes from Einstein photoelectric conversion effect. Applying the manufactory design principle, we only allow altering each working component at a minimum one step. We then simulated what would be such a camera can do for real world persistent surveillance taking into account of diurnal, all weather, and seasonal variations. The data storage has saved immensely, and the order of magnitude of saving is inversely proportional to target angular speed. We did design two new components of CCD camera. Due to the matured CMOS (Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) technology, the on-chip Sample and Hold (SAH) circuitry can be designed for a dual Photon Detector (PD) analog circuitry for changedetection that predicts skipping or going forward at a sufficient sampling frame rate. For an admitted frame, there is a purely random sparse matrix [Φ] which is implemented at each bucket pixel level the charge transport bias voltage toward its neighborhood buckets or not, and if not, it goes to the ground drainage. Since the snapshot image is not a video, we could not apply the usual MPEG video compression and Hoffman entropy codec as well as powerful WaveNet Wrapper on sensor level. We shall compare (i) Pre-Processing FFT and a threshold of significant Fourier mode components and inverse FFT to check PSNR; (ii) Post-Processing image recovery will be selectively done by CDT&D adaptive version of linear programming at L1 minimization and L2 similarity. For (ii) we need to determine in new frames selection by SAH circuitry (i) the degree of information (d.o.i) K(t) dictates the purely random linear sparse combination of measurement data a la [Φ]M,N M(t) = K(t) Log N(t).

  3. DEVICE CONTROLLER, CAMERA CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Marcia

    1998-07-20

    This is a C++ application that is the server for the cameral control system. Devserv drives serial devices, such as cameras and videoswitchers used in a videoconference, upon request from a client such as the camxfgbfbx ccint program. cc Deverv listens on UPD ports for clients to make network contractions. After a client connects and sends a request to control a device (such as to pan,tilt, or zooma camera or do picture-in-picture with a videoswitcher), devserv formats the request into an RS232 message appropriate for the device and sends this message over the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port and then formats and sends via multicast a status message. In addition, devserv periodically multicasts status or description messages so that all clients connected to the multicast channel know what devices are supported and their ranges of motion and the current position. The software design employs a class hierarchy such that an abstract base class for devices can be subclassed into classes for various device categories(e.g. sonyevid30, cononvco4, panasonicwjmx50, etc.). which are further subclassed into classes for various device categories. The devices currently supported are the Sony evi-D30, Canon, VCC1, Canon VCC3, and Canon VCC4 cameras and the Panasonic WJ-MX50 videoswitcher. However, developers can extend the class hierarchy to support other devices.

  4. Neutron imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, S. D.; de Nolfo, G. A.; Barbier, L. M.; Link, J. T.; Son, S.; Floyd, S. R.; Guardala, N.; Skopec, M.; Stark, B.

    2008-04-01

    The Neutron Imaging Camera (NIC) is based on the Three-dimensional Track Imager (3_DTI) technology developed at GSFC for gamma-ray astrophysics applications. The 3-DTI, a large volume time-projection chamber, provides accurate, ~0.4 mm resolution, 3-D tracking of charged particles. The incident direction of fast neutrons, En > 0.5 MeV, are reconstructed from the momenta and energies of the proton and triton fragments resulting from 3He(n,p)3H interactions in the 3-DTI volume. The performance of the NIC from laboratory is presented.

  5. Neutron Imaging Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley; deNolfo, G. A.; Barbier, L. M.; Link, J. T.; Son, S.; Floyd, S. R.; Guardala, N.; Skopec, M.; Stark, B.

    2008-01-01

    The Neutron Imaging Camera (NIC) is based on the Three-dimensional Track Imager (3DTI) technology developed at GSFC for gamma-ray astrophysics applications. The 3-DTI, a large volume time-projection chamber, provides accurate, approximately 0.4 mm resolution, 3-D tracking of charged particles. The incident direction of fast neutrons, En > 0.5 MeV, are reconstructed from the momenta and energies of the proton and triton fragments resulting from (sup 3)He(n,p) (sup 3)H interactions in the 3-DTI volume. The performance of the NIC from laboratory and accelerator tests is presented.

  6. Remote sensing applications with NH hyperspectral portable video camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takara, Yohei; Manago, Naohiro; Saito, Hayato; Mabuchi, Yusaku; Kondoh, Akihiko; Fujimori, Takahiro; Ando, Fuminori; Suzuki, Makoto; Kuze, Hiroaki

    2012-11-01

    Recent advances in image sensor and information technologies have enabled the development of small hyperspectral imaging systems. EBA JAPAN (Tokyo, Japan) has developed a novel grating-based, portable hyperspectral imaging camera NH-1 and NH-7 that can acquire a 2D spatial image (640 x 480 and 1280 x 1024 pixels, respectively) with a single exposure using an internal self-scanning system. The imagers cover a wavelength range of 350 - 1100 nm, with a spectral resolution of 5 nm. Because of their small weight of 750 g, the NH camera systems can easily be installed on a small UAV platform. We show the results from the analysis of data obtained by remote sensing applications including land vegetation and atmospheric monitoring from both ground- and airborne/UAV-based observations.

  7. Oblique Multi-Camera Systems - Orientation and Dense Matching Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupnik, E.; Nex, F.; Remondino, F.

    2014-03-01

    The use of oblique imagery has become a standard for many civil and mapping applications, thanks to the development of airborne digital multi-camera systems, as proposed by many companies (Blomoblique, IGI, Leica, Midas, Pictometry, Vexcel/Microsoft, VisionMap, etc.). The indisputable virtue of oblique photography lies in its simplicity of interpretation and understanding for inexperienced users allowing their use of oblique images in very different applications, such as building detection and reconstruction, building structural damage classification, road land updating and administration services, etc. The paper reports an overview of the actual oblique commercial systems and presents a workflow for the automated orientation and dense matching of large image blocks. Perspectives, potentialities, pitfalls and suggestions for achieving satisfactory results are given. Tests performed on two datasets acquired with two multi-camera systems over urban areas are also reported.

  8. Modeling for Airborne Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    F.R. Faillace; Y. Yuan

    2000-08-31

    The objective of Modeling for Airborne Contamination (referred to from now on as ''this report'') is to provide a documented methodology, along with supporting information, for estimating the release, transport, and assessment of dose to workers from airborne radioactive contaminants within the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface during the pre-closure period. Specifically, this report provides engineers and scientists with methodologies for estimating how concentrations of contaminants might be distributed in the air and on the drift surfaces if released from waste packages inside the repository. This report also provides dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways used to derive doses to potentially exposed subsurface workers. The scope of this report is limited to radiological contaminants (particulate, volatile and gaseous) resulting from waste package leaks (if any) and surface contamination and their transport processes. Neutron activation of air, dust in the air and the rock walls of the drift during the preclosure time is not considered within the scope of this report. Any neutrons causing such activation are not themselves considered to be ''contaminants'' released from the waste package. This report: (1) Documents mathematical models and model parameters for evaluating airborne contaminant transport within the MGR subsurface; and (2) Provides tables of dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways for important radionuclides. The dose conversion factors for air submersion and ground exposure pathways are further limited to drift diameters of 7.62 m and 5.5 m, corresponding to the main and emplacement drifts, respectively. If the final repository design significantly deviates from these drift dimensions, the results in this report may require revision. The dose conversion factors are further derived by using concrete of sufficient thickness to simulate the drift

  9. Mars Science Laboratory Engineering Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Justin N.; Thiessen, David L.; Pourangi, Ali M.; Kobzeff, Peter A.; Lee, Steven W.; Dingizian, Arsham; Schwochert, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, which launched to Mars in 2011, is equipped with a set of 12 engineering cameras. These cameras are build-to-print copies of the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) cameras, which were sent to Mars in 2003. The engineering cameras weigh less than 300 grams each and use less than 3 W of power. Images returned from the engineering cameras are used to navigate the rover on the Martian surface, deploy the rover robotic arm, and ingest samples into the rover sample processing system. The navigation cameras (Navcams) are mounted to a pan/tilt mast and have a 45-degree square field of view (FOV) with a pixel scale of 0.82 mrad/pixel. The hazard avoidance cameras (Haz - cams) are body-mounted to the rover chassis in the front and rear of the vehicle and have a 124-degree square FOV with a pixel scale of 2.1 mrad/pixel. All of the cameras utilize a frame-transfer CCD (charge-coupled device) with a 1024x1024 imaging region and red/near IR bandpass filters centered at 650 nm. The MSL engineering cameras are grouped into two sets of six: one set of cameras is connected to rover computer A and the other set is connected to rover computer B. The MSL rover carries 8 Hazcams and 4 Navcams.

  10. Accuracy Potential and Applications of MIDAS Aerial Oblique Camera System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani, M.

    2012-07-01

    Airborne oblique cameras such as Fairchild T-3A were initially used for military reconnaissance in 30s. A modern professional digital oblique camera such as MIDAS (Multi-camera Integrated Digital Acquisition System) is used to generate lifelike three dimensional to the users for visualizations, GIS applications, architectural modeling, city modeling, games, simulators, etc. Oblique imagery provide the best vantage for accessing and reviewing changes to the local government tax base, property valuation assessment, buying & selling of residential/commercial for better decisions in a more timely manner. Oblique imagery is also used for infrastructure monitoring making sure safe operations of transportation, utilities, and facilities. Sanborn Mapping Company acquired one MIDAS from TrackAir in 2011. This system consists of four tilted (45 degrees) cameras and one vertical camera connected to a dedicated data acquisition computer system. The 5 digital cameras are based on the Canon EOS 1DS Mark3 with Zeiss lenses. The CCD size is 5,616 by 3,744 (21 MPixels) with the pixel size of 6.4 microns. Multiple flights using different camera configurations (nadir/oblique (28 mm/50 mm) and (50 mm/50 mm)) were flown over downtown Colorado Springs, Colorado. Boresight fights for 28 mm nadir camera were flown at 600 m and 1,200 m and for 50 mm nadir camera at 750 m and 1500 m. Cameras were calibrated by using a 3D cage and multiple convergent images utilizing Australis model. In this paper, the MIDAS system is described, a number of real data sets collected during the aforementioned flights are presented together with their associated flight configurations, data processing workflow, system calibration and quality control workflows are highlighted and the achievable accuracy is presented in some detail. This study revealed that the expected accuracy of about 1 to 1.5 GSD (Ground Sample Distance) for planimetry and about 2 to 2.5 GSD for vertical can be achieved. Remaining systematic

  11. HONEY -- The Honeywell Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, C. A.; Wilkins, T. N.

    The Honeywell model 3000 colour graphic recorder system (hereafter referred to simply as Honeywell) has been bought by Starlink for producing publishable quality photographic hardcopy from the IKON image displays. Full colour and black & white images can be recorded on positive or negative 35mm film. The Honeywell consists of a built-in high resolution flat-faced monochrome video monitor, a red/green/blue colour filter mechanism and a 35mm camera. The device works on the direct video signals from the IKON. This means that changing the brightness or contrast on the IKON monitor will not affect any photographs that you take. The video signals from the IKON consist of separate red, green and blue signals. When you take a picture, the Honeywell takes the red, green and blue signals in turn and displays three pictures consecutively on its internal monitor. It takes an exposure through each of three filters (red, green and blue) onto the film in the camera. This builds up the complete colour picture on the film. Honeywell systems are installed at nine Starlink sites, namely Belfast (locally funded), Birmingham, Cambridge, Durham, Leicester, Manchester, Rutherford, ROE and UCL.

  12. WFOV star tracker camera

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, I.T. ); Ledebuhr, A.G.; Axelrod, T.S.; Kordas, J.F.; Hills, R.F. )

    1991-04-01

    A prototype wide-field-of-view (WFOV) star tracker camera has been fabricated and tested for use in spacecraft navigation. The most unique feature of this device is its 28{degrees} {times} 44{degrees} FOV, which views a large enough sector of the sky to ensure the existence of at least 5 stars of m{sub v} = 4.5 or brighter in all viewing directions. The WFOV requirement and the need to maximize both collection aperture (F/1.28) and spectral input band (0.4 to 1.1 {mu}m) to meet the light gathering needs for the dimmest star have dictated the use of a novel concentric optical design, which employs a fiber optic faceplate field flattener. The main advantage of the WFOV configuration is the smaller star map required for position processing, which results in less processing power and faster matching. Additionally, a size and mass benefit is seen with a larger FOV/smaller effective focal length (efl) sensor. Prototype hardware versions have included both image intensified and un-intensified CCD cameras. Integration times of {le} 50 msec have been demonstrated with both the intensified and un-intensified versions. 3 refs., 16 figs.

  13. NFC - Narrow Field Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukal, J.; Srba, J.; Gorková, S.

    2015-01-01

    We have been introducing a low-cost CCTV video system for faint meteor monitoring and here we describe the first results from 5 months of two-station operations. Our system called NFC (Narrow Field Camera) with a meteor limiting magnitude around +6.5mag allows research on trajectories of less massive meteoroids within individual parent meteor showers and the sporadic background. At present 4 stations (2 pairs with coordinated fields of view) of NFC system are operated in the frame of CEMeNt (Central European Meteor Network). The heart of each NFC station is a sensitive CCTV camera Watec 902 H2 and a fast cinematographic lens Meopta Meostigmat 1/50 - 52.5 mm (50 mm focal length and fixed aperture f/1.0). In this paper we present the first results based on 1595 individual meteors, 368 of which were recorded from two stations simultaneously. This data set allows the first empirical verification of theoretical assumptions for NFC system capabilities (stellar and meteor magnitude limit, meteor apparent brightness distribution and accuracy of single station measurements) and the first low mass meteoroid trajectory calculations. Our experimental data clearly showed the capabilities of the proposed system for low mass meteor registration and for calculations based on NFC data to lead to a significant refinement in the orbital elements for low mass meteoroids.

  14. PAU camera: detectors characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, Ricard; Ballester, Otger; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Castilla, Javier; Jiménez, Jorge; Maiorino, Marino; Pío, Cristóbal; Sevilla, Ignacio; de Vicente, Juan

    2012-07-01

    The PAU Camera (PAUCam) [1,2] is a wide field camera that will be mounted at the corrected prime focus of the William Herschel Telescope (Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, Canary Islands, Spain) in the next months. The focal plane of PAUCam is composed by a mosaic of 18 CCD detectors of 2,048 x 4,176 pixels each one with a pixel size of 15 microns, manufactured by Hamamatsu Photonics K. K. This mosaic covers a field of view (FoV) of 60 arcmin (minutes of arc), 40 of them are unvignetted. The behaviour of these 18 devices, plus four spares, and their electronic response should be characterized and optimized for the use in PAUCam. This job is being carried out in the laboratories of the ICE/IFAE and the CIEMAT. The electronic optimization of the CCD detectors is being carried out by means of an OG (Output Gate) scan and maximizing it CTE (Charge Transfer Efficiency) while the read-out noise is minimized. The device characterization itself is obtained with different tests. The photon transfer curve (PTC) that allows to obtain the electronic gain, the linearity vs. light stimulus, the full-well capacity and the cosmetic defects. The read-out noise, the dark current, the stability vs. temperature and the light remanence.

  15. MEMS digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, R. C.; Tang, T. K.; Calvet, R.; Fossum, E. R.

    2007-02-01

    MEMS technology uses photolithography and etching of silicon wafers to enable mechanical structures with less than 1 μm tolerance, important for the miniaturization of imaging systems. In this paper, we present the first silicon MEMS digital auto-focus camera for use in cell phones with a focus range of 10 cm to infinity. At the heart of the new silicon MEMS digital camera, a simple and low-cost electromagnetic actuator impels a silicon MEMS motion control stage on which a lens is mounted. The silicon stage ensures precise alignment of the lens with respect to the imager, and enables precision motion of the lens over a range of 300 μm with < 5 μm hysteresis and < 2 μm repeatability. Settling time is < 15 ms for 200 μm step, and < 5ms for 20 μm step enabling AF within 0.36 sec at 30 fps. The precise motion allows COTS optics to maintain MTF > 0.8 at 20 cy/mm up to 80% field over the full range of motion. Accelerated lifetime testing has shown that the alignment and precision of motion is maintained after 8,000 g shocks, thermal cycling from - 40 C to 85 C, and operation over 20 million cycles.

  16. Stereoscopic camera design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David J.; Jones, Christopher K.; Stewart, James N.; Smith, Alan

    2002-05-01

    It is clear from the literature that the majority of work in stereoscopic imaging is directed towards the development of modern stereoscopic displays. As costs come down, wider public interest in this technology is expected to increase. This new technology would require new methods of image formation. Advances in stereo computer graphics will of course lead to the creation of new stereo computer games, graphics in films etc. However, the consumer would also like to see real-world stereoscopic images, pictures of family, holiday snaps etc. Such scenery would have wide ranges of depth to accommodate and would need also to cope with moving objects, such as cars, and in particular other people. Thus, the consumer acceptance of auto/stereoscopic displays and 3D in general would be greatly enhanced by the existence of a quality stereoscopic camera. This paper will cover an analysis of existing stereoscopic camera designs and show that they can be categorized into four different types, with inherent advantages and disadvantages. A recommendation is then made with regard to 3D consumer still and video photography. The paper will go on to discuss this recommendation and describe its advantages and how it can be realized in practice.

  17. Airborne agent concentration analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gelbard, Fred

    2004-02-03

    A method and system for inferring airborne contaminant concentrations in rooms without contaminant sensors, based on data collected by contaminant sensors in other rooms of a building, using known airflow interconnectivity data. The method solves a least squares problem that minimizes the difference between measured and predicted contaminant sensor concentrations with respect to an unknown contaminant release time. Solutions are constrained to providing non-negative initial contaminant concentrations in all rooms. The method can be used to identify a near-optimal distribution of sensors within the building, when then number of available sensors is less than the total number of rooms. This is achieved by having a system-sensor matrix that is non-singular, and by selecting that distribution which yields the lowest condition number of all the distributions considered. The method can predict one or more contaminant initial release points from the collected data.

  18. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  19. Ultra-wideband reflective polarization converter based on anisotropic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jia-Liang; Lin, Bao-Qin; Da, Xin-Yu

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose an ultra-wideband reflective linear cross-polarization converter based on anisotropic metasurface. Its unit cell is composed of a square-shaped resonator with intersectant diagonal and metallic ground sheet separated by dielectric substrate. Simulated results show that the converter can generate resonances at four frequencies under normal incident electromagnetic (EM) wave, leading to the bandwidth expansion of cross-polarization reflection. For verification, the designed polarization converter is fabricated and measured. The measured and simulated results agree well with each other, showing that the fabricated converter can convert x- or y-polarized incident wave into its cross polarized wave in a frequency range from 7.57 GHz to 20.46 GHz with a relative bandwidth of 91.2%, and the polarization conversion efficiency is greater than 90%. The proposed polarization converter has a simple geometry but an ultra wideband compared with the published designs, and hence possesses potential applications in novel polarization-control devices. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61471387, 61271250, and 61571460).

  20. Detection of antipodal signalling and its application to wideband SETI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Ian S.

    2012-09-01

    The SETI community is becoming increasingly interested in extending its searches to include wideband signals, such as information-bearing beacons. However, prior to discovery of a target signal, a SETI receiver has no knowledge of the signal parameters (bandwidth, carrier frequency, modulation type, etc.) and so detection can be very challenging, especially at low signal-to-noise ratios. However, this paper shows by example that there exist signal classes and corresponding detection methods that permit straightforward discovery of wideband signals of unknown structure. The example given is a form of binary antipodal signalling that utilises spread-spectrum modulation, which offers benefits to the receiver in terms of immunity to noise/interference and ease of detection. The proposed detection method is a 'symbol-wise' autocorrelation process that takes advantage of the cyclostationarity property of modulated signals. Detection sensitivity is suboptimal in comparison with what is possible if the target signal structure is known. However, this deficit can be overcome by processing longer timespans of signal, providing scope for detection at extremely low signal-to-noise ratios. It is postulated that antipodal signalling represents an attractive option for interstellar beacons because it is both power efficient and there exists a simple complementary detection method not requiring explicit coordination between the transmitter and receiver. This in turn suggests there is a case for extending future SETI searches to include this class of signal.

  1. Ultra-wideband optical leaky-wave slot antennas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Helmy, Amr S; Eleftheriades, George V

    2011-06-20

    We propose and investigate an ultra-wideband leaky-wave antenna that operates at optical frequencies for the purpose of efficient energy coupling between localized nanoscale optical circuits and the far-field. The antenna consists of an optically narrow aluminum slot on a silicon substrate. We analyze its far-field radiation pattern in the spectral region centered around 1550 nm with a 50% bandwidth ranging from 2000 nm to 1200 nm. This plasmonic leaky-wave slot produces a maximum far-field radiation angle at 32° and a 3 dB beamwidth of 24° at its center wavelength. The radiation pattern is preserved within the 50% bandwidth suffering only insignificant changes in both the radiation angle and the beamwidth. This wide-band performance is quite unique when compared to other optical antenna designs. Furthermore, the antenna effective length for radiating 90% and 99.9% of the input power is only 0.5λ(0) and 1.5λ(0) respectively at 1550 nm. The versatility and simplicity of the proposed design along with its small footprint makes it extremely attractive for integration with nano-optical components using existing technologies. PMID:21716477

  2. Wideband-Switchable Metamaterial Absorber Using Injected Liquid Metal.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Ki; Lee, Dongju; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterial absorbers can provide good solutions for radar-cross-section (RCS) reduction. In spite of their attractive features of thinness, lightness, and low cost, resonant metamaterial absorbers have a drawback of narrow bandwidth. For practical radar applications, wideband absorbers are necessary. In this paper, we propose a wideband-switchable metamaterial absorber using liquid metal. In order to reduce RCS both for X-band and C-band, the switchable Jerusalem cross (JC) resonator is introduced. The JC resonator consists of slotted circular rings, chip resistors, and microfluidic channels. The JC resonator is etched on a flexible printed circuit board (FPCB), and the microfluidic channels are laser-etched on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) material. The proposed absorber can switch the absorption frequency band by injecting a liquid metal alloy into the channels. The performance of the absorber was demonstrated through full-wave simulation and through measurements employing prototypes. The experimental results showed absorption ratios of over 90% from 7.43 GHz to 14.34 GHz, and from 5.62 GHz to 7.3 GHz, with empty channels and liquid metal-filled channels, respectively. Therefore, the absorption band was successfully switched between the C-band (4-8 GHz) and the X-band (8-12 GHz) by injecting liquid metal eutectic gallium indium alloy (EGaIn) into the channels. PMID:27546310

  3. Digital Front End for Wide-Band VLBI Science Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jongeling, Andre; Sigman, Elliott; Navarro, Robert; Goodhart, Charles; Rogstad, Steve; Chandra, Kumar; Finley, Sue; Trinh, Joseph; Soriano, Melissa; White, Les; Proctor, Robert; Rayhrer, Benno

    2006-01-01

    An upgrade to the very-long-baseline-interferometry (VLBI) science receiver (VSR) a radio receiver used in NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) is currently being implemented. The current VSR samples standard DSN intermediate- frequency (IF) signals at 256 MHz and after digital down-conversion records data from up to four 16-MHz baseband channels. Currently, IF signals are limited to the 265-to-375-MHz range, and recording rates are limited to less than 80 Mbps. The new digital front end, denoted the Wideband VSR, provides improvements to enable the receiver to process wider bandwidth signals and accommodate more data channels for recording. The Wideband VSR utilizes state-of-the-art commercial analog-to-digital converter and field-programmable gate array (FPGA) integrated circuits, and fiber-optic connections in a custom architecture. It accepts IF signals from 100 to 600 MHz, sampling the signal at 1.28 GHz. The sample data are sent to a digital processing module, using a fiber-optic link for isolation. The digital processing module includes boards designed around an Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture (ATCA) industry-standard backplane. Digital signal processing implemented in FPGAs down-convert the data signals in up to 16 baseband channels with programmable bandwidths from 1 kHz to 16 MHz. Baseband samples are transmitted to a computer via multiple Ethernet connections allowing recording to disk at rates of up to 1 Gbps.

  4. The Estimation of Hydrometeor Profiles from Wideband Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail M.; Wang, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Profiles of the microphysical properties of clouds and raincells are essential in many areas of atmospheric research and operational meteorology. In order to enhance the understanding of the nonlinear and underconstrained relationships between cloud and hydrometeor microphysical profiles and passive microwave brightness temperatures, estimations of cloud profiles for an anvil, a convective, and an updraft region of an oceanic squall were performed. The estimations relied on comparisons between radiative transfer calculations of incrementally estimated microphysical profiles and concurrent dual-altitude wideband brightness temperatures from the 22 February 1993 flight during TOGA-COARE. The wideband observations (10--220 GHz) are necessary for estimating cloud profiles reaching up to 20 km. The low frequencies enhance the rain and cloud water profiles, while the high frequencies are required to detail the higher altitude ice microphysics. A microphysical profile was estimated for each of the three regions of the storm. Each of the three estimated profiles produced calculated brightness temperatures within approximately 10 K of the observations. A majority, of the total iterative adjustment were to the estimated profile's frozen hydrometeor characteristics and were necessary to match the high frequency calculations with the observations. This indicates a need to validate cloud resolving models using high frequencies. Some difficulties matching the 37 GHz observation channels on the DC-8 and ER-2 aircrafts with the calculations simulated at the two aircraft heights (approximately 11 km and 20 km, respectively) were noted and potential causes presented.

  5. Wideband-Switchable Metamaterial Absorber Using Injected Liquid Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Ki; Lee, Dongju; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-08-01

    Metamaterial absorbers can provide good solutions for radar-cross-section (RCS) reduction. In spite of their attractive features of thinness, lightness, and low cost, resonant metamaterial absorbers have a drawback of narrow bandwidth. For practical radar applications, wideband absorbers are necessary. In this paper, we propose a wideband-switchable metamaterial absorber using liquid metal. In order to reduce RCS both for X-band and C-band, the switchable Jerusalem cross (JC) resonator is introduced. The JC resonator consists of slotted circular rings, chip resistors, and microfluidic channels. The JC resonator is etched on a flexible printed circuit board (FPCB), and the microfluidic channels are laser-etched on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) material. The proposed absorber can switch the absorption frequency band by injecting a liquid metal alloy into the channels. The performance of the absorber was demonstrated through full-wave simulation and through measurements employing prototypes. The experimental results showed absorption ratios of over 90% from 7.43 GHz to 14.34 GHz, and from 5.62 GHz to 7.3 GHz, with empty channels and liquid metal-filled channels, respectively. Therefore, the absorption band was successfully switched between the C-band (4-8 GHz) and the X-band (8-12 GHz) by injecting liquid metal eutectic gallium indium alloy (EGaIn) into the channels.

  6. Wideband-Switchable Metamaterial Absorber Using Injected Liquid Metal

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Ki; Lee, Dongju; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterial absorbers can provide good solutions for radar-cross-section (RCS) reduction. In spite of their attractive features of thinness, lightness, and low cost, resonant metamaterial absorbers have a drawback of narrow bandwidth. For practical radar applications, wideband absorbers are necessary. In this paper, we propose a wideband-switchable metamaterial absorber using liquid metal. In order to reduce RCS both for X-band and C-band, the switchable Jerusalem cross (JC) resonator is introduced. The JC resonator consists of slotted circular rings, chip resistors, and microfluidic channels. The JC resonator is etched on a flexible printed circuit board (FPCB), and the microfluidic channels are laser-etched on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) material. The proposed absorber can switch the absorption frequency band by injecting a liquid metal alloy into the channels. The performance of the absorber was demonstrated through full-wave simulation and through measurements employing prototypes. The experimental results showed absorption ratios of over 90% from 7.43 GHz to 14.34 GHz, and from 5.62 GHz to 7.3 GHz, with empty channels and liquid metal-filled channels, respectively. Therefore, the absorption band was successfully switched between the C-band (4–8 GHz) and the X-band (8–12 GHz) by injecting liquid metal eutectic gallium indium alloy (EGaIn) into the channels. PMID:27546310

  7. Wideband-Switchable Metamaterial Absorber Using Injected Liquid Metal.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Ki; Lee, Dongju; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-08-22

    Metamaterial absorbers can provide good solutions for radar-cross-section (RCS) reduction. In spite of their attractive features of thinness, lightness, and low cost, resonant metamaterial absorbers have a drawback of narrow bandwidth. For practical radar applications, wideband absorbers are necessary. In this paper, we propose a wideband-switchable metamaterial absorber using liquid metal. In order to reduce RCS both for X-band and C-band, the switchable Jerusalem cross (JC) resonator is introduced. The JC resonator consists of slotted circular rings, chip resistors, and microfluidic channels. The JC resonator is etched on a flexible printed circuit board (FPCB), and the microfluidic channels are laser-etched on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) material. The proposed absorber can switch the absorption frequency band by injecting a liquid metal alloy into the channels. The performance of the absorber was demonstrated through full-wave simulation and through measurements employing prototypes. The experimental results showed absorption ratios of over 90% from 7.43 GHz to 14.34 GHz, and from 5.62 GHz to 7.3 GHz, with empty channels and liquid metal-filled channels, respectively. Therefore, the absorption band was successfully switched between the C-band (4-8 GHz) and the X-band (8-12 GHz) by injecting liquid metal eutectic gallium indium alloy (EGaIn) into the channels.

  8. Wideband-Switchable Metamaterial Absorber Using Injected Liquid Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Ki; Lee, Dongju; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-08-01

    Metamaterial absorbers can provide good solutions for radar-cross-section (RCS) reduction. In spite of their attractive features of thinness, lightness, and low cost, resonant metamaterial absorbers have a drawback of narrow bandwidth. For practical radar applications, wideband absorbers are necessary. In this paper, we propose a wideband-switchable metamaterial absorber using liquid metal. In order to reduce RCS both for X-band and C-band, the switchable Jerusalem cross (JC) resonator is introduced. The JC resonator consists of slotted circular rings, chip resistors, and microfluidic channels. The JC resonator is etched on a flexible printed circuit board (FPCB), and the microfluidic channels are laser-etched on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) material. The proposed absorber can switch the absorption frequency band by injecting a liquid metal alloy into the channels. The performance of the absorber was demonstrated through full-wave simulation and through measurements employing prototypes. The experimental results showed absorption ratios of over 90% from 7.43 GHz to 14.34 GHz, and from 5.62 GHz to 7.3 GHz, with empty channels and liquid metal-filled channels, respectively. Therefore, the absorption band was successfully switched between the C-band (4–8 GHz) and the X-band (8–12 GHz) by injecting liquid metal eutectic gallium indium alloy (EGaIn) into the channels.

  9. Estimation of angle of arrival for wideband and coherent signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Akito; Kobayashi, Hirokazu

    1997-06-01

    For angle of arrival (AOA), angle resolution and classification of coherent and non-coherent wideband signals will be major problems, especially under the electronic warfare environment. Several methods have been considered for the estimation of the AOA. Multiple signal classification (MUSIC) is one of new suitable methods. But, the method has a disadvantage that it is impossible to estimate the AOA, if the inputs include coherent signal sources such as multipath. In this paper, the array antenna is constructed by some sub-array antennas. The elements of a sub-array antenna are arranged with non-equispace for the classification of noncoherent signals over wideband and some sub-array antennas are also arranged at non-equal distances for the rejection of the angle ambiguity of coherent signals. We applied MUSIC with a spatial smoothing to the array antenna and study how to reject the ambiguity and how to reduce the sidelobe level by using computer simulations. We also make experiments in anechoic chamber to confirm the simulation results. We then indicate that the spatial smoothing of sub-arrays with non-equispace removes the ambiguity of AOA and the classification of coherent signals and noncoherent signals over 8-18GHz is possible.

  10. Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, Sean; Freeborn, Dana; Crichton, Dan; Law, Emily; Kay-Im, Liz

    2011-01-01

    Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE) is JPL's internal investment to improve the return on airborne missions. Improve development performance of the data system. Improve return on the captured science data. The investment is to develop a common science data system capability for airborne instruments that encompasses the end-to-end lifecycle covering planning, provisioning of data system capabilities, and support for scientific analysis in order to improve the quality, cost effectiveness, and capabilities to enable new scientific discovery and research in earth observation.

  11. Far ultraviolet imaging from the IMAGE spacecraft. 2. Wideband FUV imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mende, S. B.; Heetderks, H.; Frey, H. U.; Lampton, M.; Geller, S. P.; Abiad, R.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Tremsin, A. S.; Spann, J.; Dougani, H.; Fuselier, S. A.; Magoncelli, A. L.; Bumala, M. B.; Murphree, S.; Trondsen, T.

    2000-01-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Wideband Imaging Camera (WIC) complements the magnetospheric images taken by the IMAGE satellite instruments with simultaneous global maps of the terrestrial aurora. Thus, a primary requirement of WIC is to image the total intensity of the aurora in wavelength regions most representative of the auroral source and least contaminated by dayglow, have sufficient field of view to cover the entire polar region from spacecraft apogee and have resolution that is sufficient to resolve auroras on a scale of 1 to 2 latitude degrees. The instrument is sensitive in the spectral region from 140-190 nm. The WIC is mounted on the rotating IMAGE spacecraft viewing radially outward and has a field of view of 17 deg in the direction parallel to the spacecraft spin axis. Its field of view is 30 deg in the direction perpendicular to the spin axis, although only a 17 degx17 deg image of the Earth is recorded. The optics was an all-reflective, inverted Cassegrain Burch camera using concentric optics with a small convex primary and a large concave secondary mirror. The mirrors were coated by a special multi-layer coating, which has low reflectivity in the visible and near UV region. The detector consists of a MCP-intensified CCD. The MCP is curved to accommodate the focal surface of the concentric optics. The phosphor of the image intensifier is deposited on a concave fiberoptic window, which is then coupled to the CCD with a fiberoptic taper. The camera head operates in a fast frame transfer mode with the CCD being read approximately 30 full frames (512x256 pixel) per second with an exposure time of 0.033 s. The image motion due to the satellite spin is minimal during such a short exposure. Each image is electronically distortion corrected using the look up table scheme. An offset is added to each memory address that is proportional to the image shift due to satellite rotation, and the charge signal is digitally summed in memory. On orbit, approximately 300 frames

  12. Far Ultraviolet Imaging from the Image Spacecraft. 2; Wideband FUV Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.; Heetderks, H.; Frey, H. U.; Geller, S. P.; Abiad, R.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Tremsin, A. S.; Spann, J.; Dougani, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Wideband Imaging Camera (WIC) complements the magnetospheric images taken by the IMAGE satellite instruments with simultaneous global maps of the terrestrial aurora. Thus, a primary requirement of WIC is to image the total intensity of the aurora in wavelength regions most representative of the aurora] source and least contaminated by dayglow, have sufficient field of view to cover the entire polar region from spacecraft apogee and have resolution that is Sufficient to resolve auroras on a scale of 1 to 2 latitude degrees, The instrument is sensitive in the spectral region from 140- 190 nm. The WIC is mounted on the rotating, IMAGE spacecraft viewing radially outward and has a field of view of 17 deg in the direction parallel to the spacecraft spin axis. Its field of view is 30 deg in the direction perpendicular to the spin axis, although only a 17 deg x 17 deg image of the Earth is recorded. The optics was an all-reflective, inverted Cassegrain Burch camera using concentric optics with a small convex primary and a large concave secondary mirror. The mirrors were coated by a special multi-layer coating, which has low reflectivity in the visible and near UV region, The detector consists of a MCP-Intensified CCD. The MCP is curved to accommodate the focal surface of the concentric optics. Tile phosphor of the image intensifier is deposited on a concave fiberoptic window, which is then Coupled to the CCD with a fiberoptic taper. The camera head operates in a fast frame transfer mode with the CCD being read approximately 30 full frames (512 by 256 pixel) per second with an exposure time of 0.033 s. The image motion (file to the satellite spin is minimal during such a short exposure. Each image is electronically distortion corrected using the look up table scheme. An offset is added to each memory address that is proportional to the image shift due to satellite rotation, and the charge signal is digitally summed in memory. On orbit, approximately 300

  13. Transmission electron microscope CCD camera

    DOEpatents

    Downing, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

  14. Target-Tracking Camera for a Metrology System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Carl; Bartman, Randall; Chapsky, Jacob; Abramovici, Alexander; Brown, David

    2009-01-01

    An analog electronic camera that is part of a metrology system measures the varying direction to a light-emitting diode that serves as a bright point target. In the original application for which the camera was developed, the metrological system is used to determine the varying relative positions of radiating elements of an airborne synthetic aperture-radar (SAR) antenna as the airplane flexes during flight; precise knowledge of the relative positions as a function of time is needed for processing SAR readings. It has been common metrology system practice to measure the varying direction to a bright target by use of an electronic camera of the charge-coupled-device or active-pixel-sensor type. A major disadvantage of this practice arises from the necessity of reading out and digitizing the outputs from a large number of pixels and processing the resulting digital values in a computer to determine the centroid of a target: Because of the time taken by the readout, digitization, and computation, the update rate is limited to tens of hertz. In contrast, the analog nature of the present camera makes it possible to achieve an update rate of hundreds of hertz, and no computer is needed to determine the centroid. The camera is based on a position-sensitive detector (PSD), which is a rectangular photodiode with output contacts at opposite ends. PSDs are usually used in triangulation for measuring small distances. PSDs are manufactured in both one- and two-dimensional versions. Because it is very difficult to calibrate two-dimensional PSDs accurately, the focal-plane sensors used in this camera are two orthogonally mounted one-dimensional PSDs.

  15. Neutron Imaging Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.; DeNolfo, Georgia; Floyd, Sam; Krizmanic, John; Link, Jason; Son, Seunghee; Guardala, Noel; Skopec, Marlene; Stark, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We describe the Neutron Imaging Camera (NIC) being developed for DTRA applications by NASA/GSFC and NSWC/Carderock. The NIC is based on the Three-dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) technology developed at GSFC for gamma-ray astrophysics applications. The 3-DTI, a large volume time-projection chamber, provides accurate, approximately 0.4 mm resolution. 3-D tracking of charged particles. The incident direction of fast neutrons, E(sub N) > 0.5 MeV. arc reconstructed from the momenta and energies of the proton and triton fragments resulting from 3He(n,p)3H interactions in the 3-DTI volume. We present angular and energy resolution performance of the NIC derived from accelerator tests.

  16. A Motionless Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Omniview, a motionless, noiseless, exceptionally versatile camera was developed for NASA as a receiving device for guiding space robots. The system can see in one direction and provide as many as four views simultaneously. Developed by Omniview, Inc. (formerly TRI) under a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant, the system's image transformation electronics produce a real-time image from anywhere within a hemispherical field. Lens distortion is removed, and a corrected "flat" view appears on a monitor. Key elements are a high resolution charge coupled device (CCD), image correction circuitry and a microcomputer for image processing. The system can be adapted to existing installations. Applications include security and surveillance, teleconferencing, imaging, virtual reality, broadcast video and military operations. Omniview technology is now called IPIX. The company was founded in 1986 as TeleRobotics International, became Omniview in 1995, and changed its name to Interactive Pictures Corporation in 1997.

  17. Wide-band analog frequency modulation of optic signals using indirect techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzmartin, D. J.; Balboni, E. J.; Gels, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    The wideband frequency modulation (FM) of an optical carrier by a radio frequency (RF) or microwave signal can be accomplished independent of laser type when indirect modulation is employed. Indirect modulators exploit the integral relation of phase to frequency so that phase modulators can be used to impress frequency modulation on an optical carrier. The use of integrated optics phase modulators, which are highly linear, enables the generation of optical wideband FM signals with very low intermodulation distortion. This modulator can be used as part of an optical wideband FM link for RF and microwave signals. Experimental results from the test of an indirect frequency modulator for an optical carrier are discussed.

  18. Comparison of Digital Surface Models for Snow Depth Mapping with Uav and Aerial Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesch, R.; Bühler, Y.; Marty, M.; Ginzler, C.

    2016-06-01

    Photogrammetric workflows for aerial images have improved over the last years in a typically black-box fashion. Most parameters for building dense point cloud are either excessive or not explained and often the progress between software releases is poorly documented. On the other hand, development of better camera sensors and positional accuracy of image acquisition is significant by comparing product specifications. This study shows, that hardware evolutions over the last years have a much stronger impact on height measurements than photogrammetric software releases. Snow height measurements with airborne sensors like the ADS100 and UAV-based DSLR cameras can achieve accuracies close to GSD * 2 in comparison with ground-based GNSS reference measurements. Using a custom notch filter on the UAV camera sensor during image acquisition does not yield better height accuracies. UAV based digital surface models are very robust. Different workflow parameter variations for ADS100 and UAV camera workflows seem to have only random effects.

  19. Camera Calibration for Uav Application Using Sensor of Mobile Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Chikatsu, H.

    2015-05-01

    Recently, 3D measurements using small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have increased in Japan, because small type UAVs is easily available at low cost and the analysis software can be created the easily 3D models. However, small type UAVs have a problem: they have very short flight times and a small payload. In particular, as the payload of a small type UAV increases, its flight time decreases. Therefore, it is advantageous to use lightweight sensors in small type UAVs. A mobile camera is lightweight and has many sensors such as an accelerometer, a magnetic field, and a gyroscope. Moreover, these sensors can be used simultaneously. Therefore, the authors think that the problems of small UAVs can be solved using the mobile camera. The authors executed camera calibration using a test target for evaluating sensor values measured using a mobile camera. Consequently, the authors confirmed the same accuracy with normal camera calibration.

  20. Realization of Miniaturized Multi-/Wideband Microwave Front-Ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Shamaileh, Khair A.

    The ever-growing demand toward designing microwave front-end components with enhanced access to the radio spectrum (e.g., multi-/wideband functionality) and improved physical features (e.g., miniaturized circuitry, ease and cost of fabrication) is becoming more paramount than ever before. This dissertation proposes new design methodologies, simulations, and experimental validations of passive front-ends (i.e., antennas, couplers, dividers) at microwave frequencies. The presented design concepts optimize both electrical and physical characteristics without degrading the intended performance. The developed designs are essential to the upcoming wireless technologies. The first proposed component is a compact ultra-wideband (UWB) Wilkinson power divider (WPD). The design procedure is accomplished by replacing the uniform transmission lines in each arm of the conventional single-frequency divider with impedance-varying profiles governed by a truncated Fourier series. While such non-uniform transmission lines (NTLs) are obtained through the even-mode analysis, three isolation resistors are optimized in the odd-mode circuit to achieve proper isolation and output ports matching over the frequency range of interest. The proposed design methodology is systematic, and results in single-layered and compact structures. For verification purposes, an equal split WPD is designed, simulated, and measured. The obtained results show that the input and output ports matching as well as the isolation between the output ports are below --10 dB; whereas the transmission parameters vary between --3.2 dB and --5 dB across the 3.1--10.6 GHz band. The designed divider is expected to find applications in UWB antenna diversity, multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) schemes, and antenna arrays feeding networks. The second proposed component is a wideband multi-way Bagley power divider (BPD). Wideband functionality is achieved by replacing the single-frequency matching uniform microstrip lines in

  1. Infrared heterodyne radiometer for airborne atmospheric transmittance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolczok, J. M.; Lange, R. A.; Dinardo, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    An infrared heterodyne radiometer (IHR) was used to measure atmospheric transmittance at selected hydrogen fluoride (2.7 micrometer) and deuterium fluoride (3.8 micrometer) laser transitions. The IHR was installed aboard a KC-135 aircraft for an airborne atmospheric measurements program that used the sun as a backlighting source for the transmission measurements. The critical components are: a wideband indium antimonide (1nSb) photomixer, a CW HF/DF laser L0, a radiometric processor, and a 1900 K blackbody reference source. The measured heterodyne receiver sensitivity (NEP) is 1.3 x 10 to the -19th power W/Hz, which yields a calculated IHR temperature resolution accuracy of delta I sub S/-3 sub S = 0.005 for a source temperature of 1000 K and a total transmittance of 0.5. Measured atmospheric transmittance at several wavelengths and aircraft altitudes from 9.14 km (30,000 ft) to 13.72 km (45,000 ft) were obtained during the measurements program and have been compared with values predicted by the AFGL Atmospheric Line Parameter Compilation.

  2. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our

  3. Wideband monolithically integrated front-end subsystems and components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mruk, Joseph Rene

    This thesis presents the analysis, design, and measurements of passive, monolithically integrated, wideband recta-coax and printed circuit board front-end components. Monolithic fabrication of antennas, impedance transformers, filters, and transitions lowers manufacturing costs by reducing assembly time and enhances performance by removing connectors and cabling between the devices. Computational design, fabrication, and measurements are used to demonstrate the capabilities of these front-end assemblies. Two-arm wideband planar log-periodic antennas fed using a horizontal feed that allows for filters and impedance transformers to be readily fabricated within the radiating region of the antenna are demonstrated. At microwave frequencies, low-cost printed circuit board processes are typically used to produce planar devices. A 1.8 to 11 GHz two-arm planar log-periodic antenna is designed with a monolithically integrated impedance transformer. Band rejection methods based on modifying the antenna aperture, use of an integrated filter, and the application of both methods are investigated with realized gain suppressions of over 25 dB achieved. The ability of standard circuit board technology to fabricate millimeter-wave devices up to 110 GHz is severely limited. Thin dielectrics are required to prevent the excitation of higher order modes in the microstrip substrate. Fabricating the thin line widths required for the antenna aperture also becomes prohibitively challenging. Surface micro-machining typically used in the fabrication of MEMS devices is capable of producing the extremely small features that can be used to fabricate antennas extending through W-band. A directly RF fed 18 to 110 GHz planar log-periodic antenna is developed. The antenna is fabricated with an integrated impedance transformer and additional transitions for measurement characterization. Singly terminated low-loss wideband millimeter-wave filters operating over V- and W- band are developed. High

  4. Wide-Band Microwave Receivers Using Photonic Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; Itchenko, Vladimir; Yu, Nan; Strekalov, Dmitry; Savchenkov, Anatoliy

    2008-01-01

    In wide-band microwave receivers of a type now undergoing development, the incoming microwave signals are electronically preamplified, then frequency-up-converted to optical signals that are processed photonically before being detected. This approach differs from the traditional approach, in which incoming microwave signals are processed by purely electronic means. As used here, wide-band microwave receivers refers especially to receivers capable of reception at any frequency throughout the range from about 90 to about 300 GHz. The advantage expected to be gained by following the up-conversion-and-photonic-processing approach is the ability to overcome the limitations of currently available detectors and tunable local oscillators in the frequency range of interest. In a receiver following this approach (see figure), a preamplified incoming microwave signal is up-converted by the method described in the preceeding article. The frequency up-converter exploits the nonlinearity of the electromagnetic response of a whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator made of LiNbO3. Up-conversion takes place by three-wave mixing in the resonator. The WGM resonator is designed and fabricated to function simultaneously as an electro-optical modulator and to exhibit resonance at the microwave and optical operating frequencies plus phase matching among the microwave and optical signals circulating in the resonator. The up-conversion is an efficient process, and the efficiency is enhanced by the combination of microwave and optical resonances. The up-converted signal is processed photonically by use of a tunable optical filter or local oscillator, and is then detected. Tunable optical filters can be made to be frequency agile and to exhibit high resonance quality factors (high Q values), thereby making it possible to utilize a variety of signal-processing modalities. Therefore, it is anticipated that when fully developed, receivers of this type will be compact and will be capable of both

  5. An Educational PET Camera Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. E.; Nilsson, Ch.; Tegner, P. E.

    2006-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) cameras are now in widespread use in hospitals. A model of a PET camera has been installed in Stockholm House of Science and is used to explain the principles of PET to school pupils as described here.

  6. Radiation camera motion correction system

    DOEpatents

    Hoffer, P.B.

    1973-12-18

    The device determines the ratio of the intensity of radiation received by a radiation camera from two separate portions of the object. A correction signal is developed to maintain this ratio at a substantially constant value and this correction signal is combined with the camera signal to correct for object motion. (Official Gazette)

  7. Camera artifacts in IUE spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruegman, O. W.; Crenshaw, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    This study of emission line mimicking features in the IUE cameras has produced an atlas of artifiacts in high-dispersion images with an accompanying table of prominent artifacts and a table of prominent artifacts in the raw images along with a medium image of the sky background for each IUE camera.

  8. Multi-PSPMT scintillation camera

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Trotta, G.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.; Vincentis, G. de; Scafe, R.; Pergola, A.

    1999-06-01

    Gamma ray imaging is usually accomplished by the use of a relatively large scintillating crystal coupled to either a number of photomultipliers (PMTs) (Anger Camera) or to a single large Position Sensitive PMT (PSPMT). Recently the development of new diagnostic techniques, such as scintimammography and radio-guided surgery, have highlighted a number of significant limitations of the Anger camera in such imaging procedures. In this paper a dedicated gamma camera is proposed for clinical applications with the aim of improving image quality by utilizing detectors with an appropriate size and shape for the part of the body under examination. This novel scintillation camera is based upon an array of PSPMTs (Hamamatsu R5900-C8). The basic concept of this camera is identical to the Anger Camera with the exception of the substitution of PSPMTs for the PMTs. In this configuration it is possible to use the high resolution of the PSPMTs and still correctly position events lying between PSPMTs. In this work the test configuration is a 2 by 2 array of PSPMTs. Some advantages of this camera are: spatial resolution less than 2 mm FWHM, good linearity, thickness less than 3 cm, light weight, lower cost than equivalent area PSPMT, large detection area when coupled to scintillating arrays, small dead boundary zone (< 3 mm) and flexibility in the shape of the camera.

  9. Mars Exploration Rover engineering cameras

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maki, J.N.; Bell, J.F.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Squyres, S. W.; Kiely, A.; Klimesh, M.; Schwochert, M.; Litwin, T.; Willson, R.; Johnson, Aaron H.; Maimone, M.; Baumgartner, E.; Collins, A.; Wadsworth, M.; Elliot, S.T.; Dingizian, A.; Brown, D.; Hagerott, E.C.; Scherr, L.; Deen, R.; Alexander, D.; Lorre, J.

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Mission will place a total of 20 cameras (10 per rover) onto the surface of Mars in early 2004. Fourteen of the 20 cameras are designated as engineering cameras and will support the operation of the vehicles on the Martian surface. Images returned from the engineering cameras will also be of significant importance to the scientific community for investigative studies of rock and soil morphology. The Navigation cameras (Navcams, two per rover) are a mast-mounted stereo pair each with a 45?? square field of view (FOV) and an angular resolution of 0.82 milliradians per pixel (mrad/pixel). The Hazard Avoidance cameras (Hazcams, four per rover) are a body-mounted, front- and rear-facing set of stereo pairs, each with a 124?? square FOV and an angular resolution of 2.1 mrad/pixel. The Descent camera (one per rover), mounted to the lander, has a 45?? square FOV and will return images with spatial resolutions of ???4 m/pixel. All of the engineering cameras utilize broadband visible filters and 1024 x 1024 pixel detectors. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. The "All Sky Camera Network"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Andy

    2005-01-01

    In 2001, the "All Sky Camera Network" came to life as an outreach program to connect the Denver Museum of Nature and Science (DMNS) exhibit "Space Odyssey" with Colorado schools. The network is comprised of cameras placed strategically at schools throughout Colorado to capture fireballs--rare events that produce meteorites. Meteorites have great…

  11. Polarization differences in airborne ground penetrating radar performance for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogaru, Traian; Le, Calvin

    2016-05-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has investigated the ultra-wideband (UWB) radar technology for detection of landmines, improvised explosive devices and unexploded ordnance, for over two decades. This paper presents a phenomenological study of the radar signature of buried landmines in realistic environments and the performance of airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in detecting these targets as a function of multiple parameters: polarization, depression angle, soil type and burial depth. The investigation is based on advanced computer models developed at ARL. The analysis includes both the signature of the targets of interest and the clutter produced by rough surface ground. Based on our numerical simulations, we conclude that low depression angles and H-H polarization offer the highest target-to-clutter ratio in the SAR images and therefore the best radar performance of all the scenarios investigated.

  12. Airborne GLM Simulator (FEGS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, M.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Christian, H. J., Jr.; Stewart, M. F.; Podgorny, S.; Corredor, D.

    2015-12-01

    Real time lightning observations have proven to be useful for advanced warning and now-casting of severe weather events. In anticipation of the launch of the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) onboard GOES-R that will provide continuous real time observations of total (both cloud and ground) lightning, the Fly's Eye GLM Simulator (FEGS) is in production. FEGS is an airborne instrument designed to provide cal/val measurements for GLM from high altitude aircraft. It consists of a 5 x 5 array of telescopes each with a narrow passband filter to isolate the 777.4 nm neutral oxygen emission triplet radiated by lightning. The telescopes will measure the optical radiance emitted by lightning that is transmitted through the cloud top with a temporal resolution of 10 μs. When integrated on the NASA ER-2 aircraft, the FEGS array with its 90° field-of-view will observe a cloud top area nearly equal to a single GLM pixel. This design will allow FEGS to determine the temporal and spatial variation of light that contributes to a GLM event detection. In addition to the primary telescope array, the instrument includes 5 supplementary optical channels that observe alternate spectral emission features and will enable the use of FEGS for interesting lightning physics applications. Here we present an up-to-date summary of the project and a description of its scientific applications.

  13. IMAX camera (12-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The IMAX camera system is used to record on-orbit activities of interest to the public. Because of the extremely high resolution of the IMAX camera, projector, and audio systems, the audience is afforded a motion picture experience unlike any other. IMAX and OMNIMAX motion picture systems were designed to create motion picture images of superior quality and audience impact. The IMAX camera is a 65 mm, single lens, reflex viewing design with a 15 perforation per frame horizontal pull across. The frame size is 2.06 x 2.77 inches. Film travels through the camera at a rate of 336 feet per minute when the camera is running at the standard 24 frames/sec.

  14. Ultra-wideband radar methods and techniques of medical sensing and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulson, Christine N.; Chang, John T.; Romero, Carlos E.; Watson, Joseph; Pearce, Fred J.; Levin, Nathan

    2005-11-01

    Ultra-wideband radar holds great promise for a variety of medical applications. We have demonstrated the feasibility of using ultra-wideband sensors for detection of internal injuries, monitoring of respiratory and cardiac functions, and continuous non-contact imaging of the human body. Sensors are low-power, portable, and do not require physical contact with the patient. They are ideal for use by emergency responders to make rapid diagnosis and triage decisions. In the hospital, vital signs monitoring and imaging application could improve patient outcomes. In this paper we present an overview of ultra-wideband radar technology, discuss key design tradeoffs, and give examples of ongoing research in applying ultra-wideband technology to the medical field.

  15. High frequency wide-band transformer uses coax to achieve high turn ratio and flat response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Parry, T.

    1966-01-01

    Center-tap push-pull transformer with toroidal core helically wound with a single coaxial cable creates a high frequency wideband transformer. This transformer has a high-turn ratio, a high coupling coefficient, and a flat broadband response.

  16. WISM - A Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurement: Past Accomplishments, Current Status, and Path Forward

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonds, Quenton; Racette, Paul; Durham, Tim (Principal Investigator)

    2016-01-01

    Presented are the prior accomplishments, current status and path forward for GSFC's Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurement (WISM). This work is a high level overview of the project, presented via Webinar to the IEEE young professionals.

  17. A different approach to use narrowband super-resolution multiple signal classification algorithm on wideband sources.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Mohammad; Soltani, Nasim Yahya; Riahi, Ali

    2010-01-01

    There are varieties of wideband direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation algorithms. Their structure comprises a number of narrowband ones, each performs in one frequency in a given bandwidth, and then different responses should be combined in a proper way to yield true DOAs. Hence, wideband algorithms are always complex and so non-real-time. This paper investigates a method to derive a flat response of narrowband multiple signal classification (MUSIC) [R. O. Schmidt, IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag., 34, 276-280 (1986)] algorithm in the whole frequencies of given band. Therefore, required conditions of applying narrowband algorithm on wideband impinging signals will be given through a concrete analysis. It could be found out that array sensor locations are able to compensate the frequency variations to reach a flat response of DOAs in a specified wideband frequency. PMID:20058975

  18. Ultra-wideband Radar Methods and Techniques of Medical Sensing and Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, C N; Chang, J T; Romero, C E; Watson, J; Pearce, F J; Levin, N

    2005-10-07

    Ultra-wideband radar holds great promise for a variety of medical applications. We have demonstrated the feasibility of using ultra-wideband sensors for detection of internal injuries, monitoring of respiratory and cardiac functions, and continuous non-contact imaging of the human body. Sensors are low-power, portable, and do not require physical contact with the patient. They are ideal for use by emergency responders to make rapid diagnosis and triage decisions. In the hospital, vital signs monitoring and imaging application could improve patient outcomes. In this paper we present an overview of ultra-wideband radar technology, discuss key design tradeoffs, and give examples of ongoing research in applying ultra-wideband technology to the medical field.

  19. An EnantioMorphic BLumlein ultra-wideband source

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, L.F.; Buttram, M.T.; Crowe, W.R.; Clark, R.S.; Lundstrom, J.M.; Patterson, P.E.

    1992-01-01

    Working designs exist for 1 GW, 1 kHz ultra-wideband (UWB) sources (e. g. SNIPER). As these generators are pressed to higher peak powers and repetition rates, insulation, energy loss due to stray capacitance, and system efficiency (including power supplies and modulators) become critical issues. The EnantioMorphic (mirror image) BLumlein (EMBL) is a new type of vector inversion transmission line pulser which is designed to alleviate some of these problems. The design goals for EMBL are: 10 GW peak power, 700 kV,{approximately}1 kHz rep-rate and <100 ps risetime in a 50 ohm geometry. A gas spark gap peaking switch adds UWB frequency components to the EMBL output pulse.

  20. An EnantioMorphic BLumlein ultra-wideband source

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, L.F.; Buttram, M.T.; Crowe, W.R.; Clark, R.S.; Lundstrom, J.M.; Patterson, P.E.

    1992-09-01

    Working designs exist for 1 GW, 1 kHz ultra-wideband (UWB) sources (e. g. SNIPER). As these generators are pressed to higher peak powers and repetition rates, insulation, energy loss due to stray capacitance, and system efficiency (including power supplies and modulators) become critical issues. The EnantioMorphic (mirror image) BLumlein (EMBL) is a new type of vector inversion transmission line pulser which is designed to alleviate some of these problems. The design goals for EMBL are: 10 GW peak power, 700 kV,{approximately}1 kHz rep-rate and <100 ps risetime in a 50 ohm geometry. A gas spark gap peaking switch adds UWB frequency components to the EMBL output pulse.

  1. A Wideband Circularly Polarized Pixelated Dielectric Resonator Antenna.

    PubMed

    Trinh-Van, Son; Yang, Youngoo; Lee, Kang-Yoon; Hwang, Keum Cheol

    2016-01-01

    The design of a wideband circularly polarized pixelated dielectric resonator antenna using a real-coded genetic algorithm (GA) is presented for far-field wireless power transfer applications. The antenna consists of a dielectric resonator (DR) which is discretized into 8 × 8 grid DR bars. The real-coded GA is utilized to estimate the optimal heights of the 64 DR bars to realize circular polarization. The proposed antenna is excited by a narrow rectangular slot etched on the ground plane. A prototype of the proposed antenna is fabricated and tested. The measured -10 dB reflection and 3 dB axial ratio bandwidths are 32.32% (2.62-3.63 GHz) and 14.63% (2.85-3.30 GHz), respectively. A measured peak gain of 6.13 dBic is achieved at 3.2 GHz. PMID:27563897

  2. Cognitive wideband spectrum sensing using cosine-modulated filter banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Nan; Pu, Fangling; Xu, Xin; Chen, Nengcheng

    2015-11-01

    A multichannel joint spectrum sensing strategy based on cosine-modulated filter banks (CMFBs) was developed to improve sensing efficiency. The received wideband signal was split into several bands through the filters that are constructed by grouping continuous sub-band filters. Through flexibly designing prototype filter, not only the spectrum of non-uniform bandwidth can be estimated, but also the spectral leakage between adjacent channels can be adjusted. The probabilities of false alarm and detection for multichannel jointly spectrum sensing in the Rayleigh fading channel were deduced. The decision thresholds of different channels were obtained as regards the probability of false alarm. Simulation results show that compared with the traditional energy detector, the detection capability and sensing efficiency have been improved, especially at low signal-to-noise ratio. The CMFB-based multichannel joint sensing scheme not only increases the efficiency of detection, but also enhances the flexibility on the control of bandwidth and spectral leakage between neighbouring channels.

  3. Macro-motion detection using ultra-wideband impulse radar.

    PubMed

    Xin Li; Dengyu Qiao; Ye Li

    2014-01-01

    Radar has the advantage of being able to detect hidden individuals, which can be used in homeland security, disaster rescue, and healthcare monitoring-related applications. Human macro-motion detection using ultra-wideband impulse radar is studied in this paper. First, a frequency domain analysis is carried out to show that the macro-motion yields a bandpass signal in slow-time. Second, the FTFW (fast-time frequency windowing), which has the advantage of avoiding the measuring range reduction, and the HLF (high-pass linear-phase filter), which can preserve the motion signal effectively, are proposed to preprocess the radar echo. Last, a threshold decision method, based on the energy detector structure, is presented.

  4. Linear and nonlinear analyses of a wideband gyro-TWT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheo, Bernard R.; Rekiouak, Abdelkrim

    1989-04-01

    Linear and nonlinear analyses on a gyrotron amplifier with a periodically disk-loaded cylindrical waveguide circuit are performed. The dispersion relation of the circuit allows for wideband interaction with a relativistic beam of moderate power (Vb = 60 kV, Ib = 5 A). Linear analysis of the interaction with the fundamental mode shows a gain of the order of 50-60 dB/m over a bandwidth larger than 22 percent and a linear phase-vs-frequency characteristic. Nonlinear analysis predicts 48-kW saturated output power at 5.3 GHz with 18-percent efficiency. The saturation length for a 20-dB tube is about 37 cm.

  5. Miniature PCM compatible wideband spectral analyzer for hypersonic flight research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diamond, John K.

    1988-01-01

    The design concept and prototype performance of a 10-400-kHz wideband spectral analyzer being developed at NASA Langley as part of the Hypersonic Flight Instrumentation Research Experiment are described and illustrated with diagrams and graphs. The analyzer is intended to compress the bandwidth of data from up to 20 hot-film anemometers, so that the analog PSD waveform from each sensor can be encoded for serial PCM telemetry. Components include an analog multiplier, digital waveform generator, sine-wave VCO, digital VCO, analog low-pass filter, switched-capacitor filter, and rms-dc detector. The prototype demonstrated 1-percent accuracy (referred to a 5-V full-scale output) for sweep rates up to 3/sec over the 10-400-kHz spectrum.

  6. Wideband Waveform Design principles for Solid-state Weather Radars

    SciTech Connect

    Bharadwaj, Nitin; Chandrasekar, V.

    2012-01-01

    The use of solid-state transmitter is becoming a key part of the strategy to realize a network of low cost electronically steered radars. However, solid-state transmitters have low peak powers and this necessitates the use of pulse compression waveforms. In this paper a frequency diversity wideband waveforms design is proposed to mitigate low sensitivity of solid-state transmitters. In addition, the waveforms mitigate the range eclipsing problem associated with long pulse compression. An analysis of the performance of pulse compression using mismatched compression filters designed to minimize side lobe levels is presented. The impact of range side lobe level on the retrieval of Doppler moments are presented. Realistic simulations are performed based on CSU-CHILL radar data and Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) Integrated Project I (IP1) radar data.

  7. Macro-motion detection using ultra-wideband impulse radar.

    PubMed

    Xin Li; Dengyu Qiao; Ye Li

    2014-01-01

    Radar has the advantage of being able to detect hidden individuals, which can be used in homeland security, disaster rescue, and healthcare monitoring-related applications. Human macro-motion detection using ultra-wideband impulse radar is studied in this paper. First, a frequency domain analysis is carried out to show that the macro-motion yields a bandpass signal in slow-time. Second, the FTFW (fast-time frequency windowing), which has the advantage of avoiding the measuring range reduction, and the HLF (high-pass linear-phase filter), which can preserve the motion signal effectively, are proposed to preprocess the radar echo. Last, a threshold decision method, based on the energy detector structure, is presented. PMID:25570432

  8. Miniature biotelemeter giving 10 channels of wideband biomedical data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carraway, J.

    1972-01-01

    A miniature biotelemeter has been developed for sensing and transmitting multiple channels of wideband biomedical data over a radio link. Its small size and weight make it capable of being carried by free-moving laboratory animals as small as rats. Ten data channels each of 5-kHz data bandwidth are provided to permit monitoring of a wide variety of physiological signals. Multichannel telemetry of electroencephalograms, electrocardiograms, electromyograms, state functions, and dynamic processes such as blood flow and body chemistry are possible applications. Utilization of newly available monolithic chip components, low-power COS/MOS MSI digital logic, and state-of-the-art hybrid mounting techniques makes this novel device useful for both research and clinical bioinstrumentation.

  9. Calculations of a wideband metamaterial absorber using equivalent medium theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaojun; Yang, Helin; Wang, Danqi; Yu, Shengqing; Lou, Yanchao; Guo, Ling

    2016-08-01

    Metamaterial absorbers (MMAs) have drawn increasing attention in many areas due to the fact that they can achieve electromagnetic (EM) waves with unity absorptivity. We demonstrate the design, simulation, experiment and calculation of a wideband MMA based on a loaded double-square-loop (DSL) array of chip resisters. For a normal incidence EM wave, the simulated results show that the absorption of the full width at half maximum is about 9.1 GHz, and the relative bandwidth is 87.1%. Experimental results are in agreement with the simulations. More importantly, equivalent medium theory (EMT) is utilized to calculate the absorptions of the DSL MMA, and the calculated absorptions based on EMT agree with the simulated and measured results. The method based on EMT provides a new way to analysis the mechanism of MMAs.

  10. A reconfigurable software defined ultra-wideband impulse radio transceiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blech, M. D.; Ott, A. T.; Neumeier, P.; Möller, M.; Eibert, T. F.

    2010-09-01

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) software defined radio (SDR) implementation is presented. The developed impulse radio (IR) transceiver employs first order bandpass (BP) sampling at a conversion frequency which is four times the channel bandwidth. The subsampling architecture directly provides the RF signal avoiding any non-ideal mixer stages and reduces the requirements of digital signal processing implemented in a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The transmitter consists basically of a multi-Nyquist digital to analog converter (DAC), whereas the implemented matched filter (MF) receiver prototype employs a standard digitizing oscilloscope. This design can be adaptively reconfigured in terms of modulation, data rate, and channel equalization. The reconfigurable design is used for an extensive performance analysis of the quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) modulation scheme investigating the influence of different antennas, amplifiers, narrowband interferers as well as different equalizer lengths. Even for distances up to 7 m in a multipath environment robust communication was achieved.

  11. A GPU-Based Wide-Band Radio Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennamangalam, Jayanth; Scott, Simon; Jones, Glenn; Chen, Hong; Ford, John; Kepley, Amanda; Lorimer, D. R.; Nie, Jun; Prestage, Richard; Roshi, D. Anish; Wagner, Mark; Werthimer, Dan

    2014-12-01

    The graphics processing unit has become an integral part of astronomical instrumentation, enabling high-performance online data reduction and accelerated online signal processing. In this paper, we describe a wide-band reconfigurable spectrometer built using an off-the-shelf graphics processing unit card. This spectrometer, when configured as a polyphase filter bank, supports a dual-polarisation bandwidth of up to 1.1 GHz (or a single-polarisation bandwidth of up to 2.2 GHz) on the latest generation of graphics processing units. On the other hand, when configured as a direct fast Fourier transform, the spectrometer supports a dual-polarisation bandwidth of up to 1.4 GHz (or a single-polarisation bandwidth of up to 2.8 GHz).

  12. A wideband-PCM recorder for the Space Shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petit, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    The Shuttle wideband-PCM recorder accomplishes recording on up to 14 data tracks with analog or digital data inputs. FM multiplexed analog frequencies of up to 2 MHz and digital rates of 1 Mb/s are accommodated at a tape speed of 120 in/s. Recording time in analog mode varies between 4 min for 2 MHz data to 80 min for 100 kHz data. The total digital data storage is 3.44 x 10 to the 9th bits with recording times from 1 hour for 1 Mb/s to 19 hours for 50 Kb/s data in the serial track switching mode. A versatile command decoder and control interface are used for eight primary modes of operation.

  13. A novel millimetre wave EBG-SIW wideband delay line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Meng-Xia; Shi, Zhen-Zhen

    2013-06-01

    A novel millimetre wave wideband time delay line based on substrate integrated waveguide (SIW) is proposed in this article to achieve true time delay. The delay line is formed by loading the SIW with cross electromagnetic bandgap (EBG) unit. The higher delay time can be obtained by adjusting the structure size without affecting its transmission characteristics. A simulation software HFSS is utilised for the optimisation to achieve a better performance. ? , ? , ? delay lines have been designed and measured in Ka band. All delay line is implemented in this article in Rogers Duroid5880. Compared to the microstrip of the same length, the average delay time is about four times of ? microstrip on the same substrate in the whole bandwidth from 27.7 GHz to 37.7 GHz. The simulation and measurement show good consistency.

  14. Ultra-wideband horn antenna with abrupt radiator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    An ultra-wideband horn antenna transmits and receives impulse waveforms for short-range radars and impulse time-of flight systems. The antenna reduces or eliminates various sources of close-in radar clutter, including pulse dispersion and ringing, sidelobe clutter, and feedline coupling into the antenna. Dispersion is minimized with an abrupt launch point radiator element; sidelobe and feedline coupling are minimized by recessing the radiator into a metallic horn. Low frequency cut-off associated with a horn is extended by configuring the radiator drive impedance to approach a short circuit at low frequencies. A tapered feed plate connects at one end to a feedline, and at the other end to a launcher plate which is mounted to an inside wall of the horn. The launcher plate and feed plate join at an abrupt edge which forms the single launch point of the antenna.

  15. Ultra-wideband horn antenna with abrupt radiator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-05-19

    An ultra-wideband horn antenna transmits and receives impulse waveforms for short-range radars and impulse time-of flight systems. The antenna reduces or eliminates various sources of close-in radar clutter, including pulse dispersion and ringing, sidelobe clutter, and feedline coupling into the antenna. Dispersion is minimized with an abrupt launch point radiator element; sidelobe and feedline coupling are minimized by recessing the radiator into a metallic horn. Low frequency cut-off associated with a horn is extended by configuring the radiator drive impedance to approach a short circuit at low frequencies. A tapered feed plate connects at one end to a feedline, and at the other end to a launcher plate which is mounted to an inside wall of the horn. The launcher plate and feed plate join at an abrupt edge which forms the single launch point of the antenna. 8 figs.

  16. A Wideband Circularly Polarized Pixelated Dielectric Resonator Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Trinh-Van, Son; Yang, Youngoo; Lee, Kang-Yoon; Hwang, Keum Cheol

    2016-01-01

    The design of a wideband circularly polarized pixelated dielectric resonator antenna using a real-coded genetic algorithm (GA) is presented for far-field wireless power transfer applications. The antenna consists of a dielectric resonator (DR) which is discretized into 8 × 8 grid DR bars. The real-coded GA is utilized to estimate the optimal heights of the 64 DR bars to realize circular polarization. The proposed antenna is excited by a narrow rectangular slot etched on the ground plane. A prototype of the proposed antenna is fabricated and tested. The measured −10 dB reflection and 3 dB axial ratio bandwidths are 32.32% (2.62–3.63 GHz) and 14.63% (2.85–3.30 GHz), respectively. A measured peak gain of 6.13 dBic is achieved at 3.2 GHz. PMID:27563897

  17. Micro-Doppler processing for ultra-wideband radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Graeme E.; Ahmad, Fauzia; Amin, Moeness G.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we describe an operational pulse Doppler radar imaging system for indoor target localization and classification, and show how a target's micro-Doppler signature (μDS) can be processed when ultra-wideband (UWB) waveforms are employed. Unlike narrowband radars where time-frequency signal representations can be applied to reveal the target time-Doppler frequency signatures, the UWB system permits joint range-time-frequency representation (JRTFR). JRTFR outputs the data in a 3D domain representing range, frequency, and time, allowing both the μDS and high range resolution (HRR) signatures to be observed. We delineate the relationship between the μDS and the HRR signature, showing how they would form a complimentary joint feature for classification. We use real-data to demonstrate the effectiveness of the UWB pulse-Doppler radar, combined with nonstationary signal analyses, in gaining valuable insights into human positioning and motions.

  18. DSN 34-meter Antenna Optics Analysis for Wideband SETI Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slobin, S. D.

    1985-01-01

    A DSN 34-meter symmetric Cassegrain antenna configuration is examined for wideband use over the frequency range of 1 to 10 GHz, rather than only at the narrow-band operational design frequencies of 2.295 GHz (S-band) and 8.448 GHz (X-band). Aperture efficiency and surface efficiency are calculated as the components determining the gain of the antenna. Noise temperature contributions arise from the ground, atmosphere, and quadripod scattering. These components are calculated as a function of frequency elevation angle to determine a G/T (gain/system noise temperature) figure-of-merit for a nominal 34-meter antenna configuration. A computational method was developed which will enable design of a multi-horn antenna feed system to optimally cover the 1 to 10 GHz frequency range.

  19. Reconfigurable Wideband Circularly Polarized Microstrip Patch Antenna for Wireless Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khidre, Ahmed

    In this thesis, developments of rectangular microstrip patch antenna to have circular polarization agility with wideband performance, for wireless applications are presented. First, a new technique to achieve circularly polarized (CP) probe feed single-layer microstrip patch antenna with wideband characteristics is proposed. The antenna is a modified form of the popular E-shaped patch, used to broaden the impedance bandwidth of a basic rectangular patch antenna. This is established by letting the two parallel slots of the E-patch unequal. Thus, by introducing asymmetry two orthogonal currents on the patch are excited and circularly polarized fields are realized. The proposed technique exhibits the advantage of the simplicity inherent in the E-shaped patch design. It requires only slot lengths, widths, and position parameters to be determined. Also, it is suitable for later adding the reconfigurable capability. With the aid of full-wave simulator Ansoft HFSS, investigations on the effect of various dimensions of the antenna have been carried out via parametric analysis. Based on these investigations, a design procedure for a CP E-shaped patch is summarized. Various design examples with different substrate thicknesses and material types are presented and compared, with CP U-slot patch antennas, recently proposed in the literature. A prototype has been constructed following the suggested design procedure to cover the IEEE 802.11b/g WLAN band. The performance of the fabricated antenna was measured and compared with the simulation results for the reflection coefficient, axial ratio, radiation pattern, and antenna gain. Good agreement is achieved between simulation and measured results demonstrating a high gain and wideband performance. Second, a polarization reconfigurable single feed E-shaped patch antenna with wideband performance is proposed. The antenna is capable of switching from right-hand circular polarization (RHCP) to left-hand circular polarization (LHCP) and

  20. Field of view selection for optimal airborne imaging sensor performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, Tristan M.; Barnard, P. Werner; Fildis, Halidun; Erbudak, Mustafa; Senger, Tolga; Alpman, Mehmet E.

    2014-05-01

    The choice of the Field of View (FOV) of imaging sensors used in airborne targeting applications has major impact on the overall performance of the system. Conducting a market survey from published data on sensors used in stabilized airborne targeting systems shows a trend of ever narrowing FOVs housed in smaller and lighter volumes. This approach promotes the ever increasing geometric resolution provided by narrower FOVs, while it seemingly ignores the influences the FOV selection has on the sensor's sensitivity, the effects of diffraction, the influences of sight line jitter and collectively the overall system performance. This paper presents a trade-off methodology to select the optimal FOV for an imaging sensor that is limited in aperture diameter by mechanical constraints (such as space/volume available and window size) by balancing the influences FOV has on sensitivity and resolution and thereby optimizing the system's performance. The methodology may be applied to staring array based imaging sensors across all wavebands from visible/day cameras through to long wave infrared thermal imagers. Some examples of sensor analysis applying the trade-off methodology are given that highlights the performance advantages that can be gained by maximizing the aperture diameters and choosing the optimal FOV for an imaging sensor used in airborne targeting applications.

  1. Repetitive, plasma switched, gigawatt, ultra-wideband impulse transmitter development

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.S.; Rinehart, L.F.; Buttram, M.T.; Aurand, J.F.; Lundstrom, J.M.; Patterson, P.E.; Roose, L.D.; Crowe, W.

    1992-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed several repetitive, ultra-wideband (UWB), impulse transmitters to address impulse source, and to support experimental applications. The sources fall into two different classes, pulse peaking and pulse shorting. SNIPER (Sub-Nanosecond ImPulsE Radiator) is a source which uses an oil peaking switch to obtain a fast risetime (250-pS) pulse of 2-nS duration. The output voltage ranges between few tens of kilovolts to 250-kV. EMBL (EnantioMorphic Blumlein) is a similar device (presently under development) which uses a gas switch to short the falling portion of a 2-nS pulse to approximately 100-pS. To date, an output voltage of approximately 600-kV has been obtained (700-kV is the design goal). Depending upon the source, repetitive operation from single shot to 5-kHz (1-kHz nominal) has been obtained with excellent reliability and repeatability. Both sources are plasma switched impulse transmitters using a Hydrogen-thyratron based modulator, an oil-filled Blumlein (of two types), a peaking (or shorting) switch and a wideband TEM horn. Powers exceeding one-gigawatt are routinely generated. This technology appears to be extendable to at least 10-gigawatts. The frequency spectrum of the radiated pulse from these sources include the spectrum of 100-MHz to 3-GHz. The pulse is generated externally and then injected into the antenna. Due to the high powers involved and the need to radiate a broad spectrum of frequencies, Sandia has concentrated on TEM horn antennas. Several TEM horns have been built and used during this program. In those cases where higher gains are desired for the higher frequencies, TEM horn-fed dish antennas have been employed. A detailed overview of the UWB Transmitters along with measured radiated electric field strengths will be presented.

  2. Repetitive, plasma switched, gigawatt, ultra-wideband impulse transmitter development

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.S.; Rinehart, L.F.; Buttram, M.T.; Aurand, J.F.; Lundstrom, J.M.; Patterson, P.E.; Roose, L.D.; Crowe, W.

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed several repetitive, ultra-wideband (UWB), impulse transmitters to address impulse source, and to support experimental applications. The sources fall into two different classes, pulse peaking and pulse shorting. SNIPER (Sub-Nanosecond ImPulsE Radiator) is a source which uses an oil peaking switch to obtain a fast risetime (250-pS) pulse of 2-nS duration. The output voltage ranges between few tens of kilovolts to 250-kV. EMBL (EnantioMorphic Blumlein) is a similar device (presently under development) which uses a gas switch to short the falling portion of a 2-nS pulse to approximately 100-pS. To date, an output voltage of approximately 600-kV has been obtained (700-kV is the design goal). Depending upon the source, repetitive operation from single shot to 5-kHz (1-kHz nominal) has been obtained with excellent reliability and repeatability. Both sources are plasma switched impulse transmitters using a Hydrogen-thyratron based modulator, an oil-filled Blumlein (of two types), a peaking (or shorting) switch and a wideband TEM horn. Powers exceeding one-gigawatt are routinely generated. This technology appears to be extendable to at least 10-gigawatts. The frequency spectrum of the radiated pulse from these sources include the spectrum of 100-MHz to 3-GHz. The pulse is generated externally and then injected into the antenna. Due to the high powers involved and the need to radiate a broad spectrum of frequencies, Sandia has concentrated on TEM horn antennas. Several TEM horns have been built and used during this program. In those cases where higher gains are desired for the higher frequencies, TEM horn-fed dish antennas have been employed. A detailed overview of the UWB Transmitters along with measured radiated electric field strengths will be presented.

  3. Next-generation wideband multimode fibers for data centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balemarthy, Kasyapa; Shubochkin, Roman; Sun, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Short-reach optical links such as those used in data centers pre-dominantly employ VCSELs together with laser- optimized OM4 and OM3 multimode fiber (MMF), mainly due to their reliability, energy-efficiency and low end-to-end system cost. The IEEE 802.3bm specification for 100Gbps Ethernet utilizes four parallel MMFs each operating at a serial data rate of 25Gbps. Due to the rapidly increasing internet traffic, the IEEE P802.3bs Task Force is working towards a 400Gbps Ethernet standard requiring a commensurate increase in the number of parallel fibers deployed. Using 16 parallel lanes, while feasible, is not the most efficient use of cabling. One solution to the data rate - cable density problem is the use of shortwave wavelength division multiplexing (SWDM) near 850nm. For example, employing four wavelengths separated by ~30nm (with an operational window of ~840-950nm) results in a four-fold increase in the per-fiber data rate. Furthermore, SWDM can be combined with the parallel solution to support 400Gbps with the same cable density as the current 100Gbps Ethernet solution using OM4 fiber. Conventional laser-optimized OM4 gives diminished performance at the longer wavelengths compared to 850nm. Shifting the OM4 optimization wavelength to longer wavelengths sacrifices the 850nm performance. In this paper, we present next-generation wideband multimode fibers (NG-WBMMF) that are optimized for SWDM operation using a novel design approach employing multiple dopants. We have fabricated and characterized a wideband MMF that is OM4 compliant over the 850-950nm wavelength window. BER measurements demonstrate that this next-generation WB MMF satisfies the pre-FEC requirement of 5 × 10-5 even after transmission over 300m.

  4. Lights, Camera, Courtroom? Should Trials Be Televised?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirtley, Jane E.; Brothers, Thomas W.; Veal, Harlan K.

    1999-01-01

    Presents three differing perspectives from American Bar Association members on whether television cameras should be allowed in the courtroom. Contends that cameras should be allowed with differing degrees of certainty: cameras truly open the courts to the public; cameras must be strategically placed; and cameras should be used only with the…

  5. Specifying and calibrating instrumentations for wideband electronic power measurements. [in switching circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesco, D. J.; Weikle, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The wideband electric power measurement related topics of electronic wattmeter calibration and specification are discussed. Tested calibration techniques are described in detail. Analytical methods used to determine the bandwidth requirements of instrumentation for switching circuit waveforms are presented and illustrated with examples from electric vehicle type applications. Analog multiplier wattmeters, digital wattmeters and calculating digital oscilloscopes are compared. The instrumentation characteristics which are critical to accurate wideband power measurement are described.

  6. Proportional counter radiation camera

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, C.J.; Kopp, M.K.

    1974-01-15

    A gas-filled proportional counter camera that images photon emitting sources is described. A two-dimensional, positionsensitive proportional multiwire counter is provided as the detector. The counter consists of a high- voltage anode screen sandwiched between orthogonally disposed planar arrays of multiple parallel strung, resistively coupled cathode wires. Two terminals from each of the cathode arrays are connected to separate timing circuitry to obtain separate X and Y coordinate signal values from pulse shape measurements to define the position of an event within the counter arrays which may be recorded by various means for data display. The counter is further provided with a linear drift field which effectively enlarges the active gas volume of the counter and constrains the recoil electrons produced from ionizing radiation entering the counter to drift perpendicularly toward the planar detection arrays. A collimator is interposed between a subject to be imaged and the counter to transmit only the radiation from the subject which has a perpendicular trajectory with respect to the planar cathode arrays of the detector. (Official Gazette)

  7. Camera sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlueter, Jonathan; Murphey, Yi L.; Miller, John W. V.; Shridhar, Malayappan; Luo, Yun; Khairallah, Farid

    2004-12-01

    As the cost/performance Ratio of vision systems improves with time, new classes of applications become feasible. One such area, automotive applications, is currently being investigated. Applications include occupant detection, collision avoidance and lane tracking. Interest in occupant detection has been spurred by federal automotive safety rules in response to injuries and fatalities caused by deployment of occupant-side air bags. In principle, a vision system could control airbag deployment to prevent this type of mishap. Employing vision technology here, however, presents a variety of challenges, which include controlling costs, inability to control illumination, developing and training a reliable classification system and loss of performance due to production variations due to manufacturing tolerances and customer options. This paper describes the measures that have been developed to evaluate the sensitivity of an occupant detection system to these types of variations. Two procedures are described for evaluating how sensitive the classifier is to camera variations. The first procedure is based on classification accuracy while the second evaluates feature differences.

  8. Airborne test results for smart pushbroom imaging system with optoelectronic image correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernykh, Valerij; Dyblenko, Serguei; Janschek, Klaus; Seifart, Klaus; Harnisch, Bernd

    2004-02-01

    Smart pushbroom imaging system (SMARTSCAN) solves the problem of image correction for satellite pushbroom cameras which are disturbed by satellite attitude instability effects. Satellite cameras with linear sensors are particularly sensitive to attitude errors, which cause considerable image distortions. A novel solution of distortions correction is presented, which is based on the real-time recording of the image motion in the focal plane of the satellite camera. This allows using such smart pushbroom cameras (multi-/hyperspectral) even on moderately stabilised satellites, e.g. small sat's, LEO comsat's. The SMARTSCAN concept uses in-situ measurements of the image motion with additional CCD-sensors in the focal plane and real-time image processing of these measurements by an onboard Joint Transform Optical Correlator. SMARTSCAN has been successfully demonstrated with breadboard models for the Optical Correlator and a Smart Pushbroom Camera at laboratory level (satellite motion simulator on base of a 5 DOF industrial robot) and by an airborne flight demonstration in July 2002. The paper describes briefly the principle of operation of the system and gives a description of the hardware model are provided. Detailed results of the airborne tests and performance analysis are given as well as detailed tests description.

  9. Operation Sun Beam, Shots Little Feller II and Small Boy. Project Officer's report - Project 7. 16. Airborne E-field radiation measurements of electromagnetic-pulse phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, K.L.

    1985-09-01

    Airborne measurements of the absolute vertical electric field (E-field) of the radiated electromagnetic pulse were attempted for Shots Little Feller II and Small Boy. Instrumentation included calibrated vertical whip antennas, wideband magnetic tape recorders, and photographs of oscilloscope traces. One instrumented aircraft participated in Little Feller II (C-131F); two aircraft participated in Small Boy (a C-131F and an A-3A). No detectable signals were recorded for either event. It is concluded that the vertical E-field intensities encountered were below the calibrated levels of the instrumentation or the method of instrumentation and calibration was inadequate for nonrepetitive pulse signals.

  10. Airborne Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Wildfire Detection and Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Allison, Robert S; Johnston, Joshua M; Craig, Gregory; Jennings, Sion

    2016-08-18

    For decades detection and monitoring of forest and other wildland fires has relied heavily on aircraft (and satellites). Technical advances and improved affordability of both sensors and sensor platforms promise to revolutionize the way aircraft detect, monitor and help suppress wildfires. Sensor systems like hyperspectral cameras, image intensifiers and thermal cameras that have previously been limited in use due to cost or technology considerations are now becoming widely available and affordable. Similarly, new airborne sensor platforms, particularly small, unmanned aircraft or drones, are enabling new applications for airborne fire sensing. In this review we outline the state of the art in direct, semi-automated and automated fire detection from both manned and unmanned aerial platforms. We discuss the operational constraints and opportunities provided by these sensor systems including a discussion of the objective evaluation of these systems in a realistic context.

  11. Airborne Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Wildfire Detection and Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Robert S.; Johnston, Joshua M.; Craig, Gregory; Jennings, Sion

    2016-01-01

    For decades detection and monitoring of forest and other wildland fires has relied heavily on aircraft (and satellites). Technical advances and improved affordability of both sensors and sensor platforms promise to revolutionize the way aircraft detect, monitor and help suppress wildfires. Sensor systems like hyperspectral cameras, image intensifiers and thermal cameras that have previously been limited in use due to cost or technology considerations are now becoming widely available and affordable. Similarly, new airborne sensor platforms, particularly small, unmanned aircraft or drones, are enabling new applications for airborne fire sensing. In this review we outline the state of the art in direct, semi-automated and automated fire detection from both manned and unmanned aerial platforms. We discuss the operational constraints and opportunities provided by these sensor systems including a discussion of the objective evaluation of these systems in a realistic context. PMID:27548174

  12. Airborne Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Wildfire Detection and Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Allison, Robert S; Johnston, Joshua M; Craig, Gregory; Jennings, Sion

    2016-01-01

    For decades detection and monitoring of forest and other wildland fires has relied heavily on aircraft (and satellites). Technical advances and improved affordability of both sensors and sensor platforms promise to revolutionize the way aircraft detect, monitor and help suppress wildfires. Sensor systems like hyperspectral cameras, image intensifiers and thermal cameras that have previously been limited in use due to cost or technology considerations are now becoming widely available and affordable. Similarly, new airborne sensor platforms, particularly small, unmanned aircraft or drones, are enabling new applications for airborne fire sensing. In this review we outline the state of the art in direct, semi-automated and automated fire detection from both manned and unmanned aerial platforms. We discuss the operational constraints and opportunities provided by these sensor systems including a discussion of the objective evaluation of these systems in a realistic context. PMID:27548174

  13. Airborne Laser Polar Nephelometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grams, Gerald W.

    1973-01-01

    A polar nephelometer has been developed at NCAR to measure the angular variation of the intensity of light scattered by air molecules and particles. The system has been designed for airborne measurements using outside air ducted through a 5-cm diameter airflow tube; the sample volume is that which is common to the intersection of a collimated source beam and the detector field of view within the airflow tube. The source is a linearly polarized helium-neon laser beam. The optical system defines a collimated field-of-view (0.5deg half-angle) through a series of diaphragms located behind a I72-mm focal length objective lens. A photomultiplier tube is located immediately behind an aperture in the focal plane of the objective lens. The laser beam is mechanically chopped (on-off) at a rate of 5 Hz; a two-channel pulse counter, synchronized to the laser output, measures the photomultiplier pulse rate with the light beam both on and off. The difference in these measured pulse rates is directly proportional to the intensity of the scattered light from the volume common to the intersection of the laser beam and the detector field-of-view. Measurements can be made at scattering angles from 15deg to 165deg with reference to the direction of propagation of the light beam. Intermediate angles are obtained by selecting the angular increments desired between these extreme angles (any multiple of 0.1deg can be selected for the angular increment; 5deg is used in normal operation). Pulses provided by digital circuits control a stepping motor which sequentially rotates the detector by pre-selected angular increments. The synchronous photon-counting system automatically begins measurement of the scattered-light intensity immediately after the rotation to a new angle has been completed. The instrument has been flown on the NASA Convair 990 airborne laboratory to obtain data on the complex index of refraction of atmospheric aerosols. A particle impaction device is operated simultaneously

  14. Microprocessor-Based Airborne Spectrometer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kates, John C.

    1980-08-01

    A system for airborne infrared spectral signature measurements has been developed using a Fourier transform spectrometer interfaced to a microprocessor data acquisition, control and display system. The microprocessor is a DEC LSI-ll with 20KW RAM, 4KW EPROM, DMA spectrometer interface, digital magnetic tape, and dot-matrix video graphic display. A real-time executive tailored to the requirements and resources available allows concurrent data acquisition, recording, reduction and display. Using multiple buffers, acquisition of spectrometer data via DMA is overlapped with magnetic tape output. A background task selects the most recent spectrometer data and processes it using an FFT into a raw spectrum. A reference background spectrum is subtracted to isolate the data component, then a reference instrument response function is applied to obtain a calibrated absolute irradiance spectrum. The irradiance spectrum is displayed on the video graphic display and mixed with boresight camera video to show the target spectrum superimposed on the target image. Extensive selftest facilities are incorporated for testing all system components and compatibility with data reduction systems. System calibration is supported by selection of reference blackbody temperatures, apertures, and distances. The instrument response curve obtained during calibration is displayed for verification of correct spectrometer operation or diagnosis of faults.

  15. An airborne icing characterization probe: nephelometer prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roques, S.

    2007-10-01

    The aeronautical industry uses airborne probes to characterize icing conditions for flight certification purposes by counting and sizing cloud droplets. Existing probes have been developed for meteorologists in order to study cloud microphysics. They are used on specific aircraft, instrumented for this type of study, but are not adapted for an industrial flight test environment. The development by Airbus of a new probe giving a real time response for particle sizes between 10 and 500 µm, adapted to operational requirements, is in progress. An optical principle by coherent shadowgraphy with a low coherency point source is used for the application. The size of the droplets is measured from their shadows on a CCD. A pulsed laser coupled to a fast camera freezes the movement. Usually, image processing rejects out-of-focus objects. Here, particles far from the focal plane can be sized because of the large depth of field due to the point source. The technique used increases the depth of field and the sampled volume is enough to build a histogram even for low droplet concentrations. Image processing is done in real time and results are provided to the flight test engineer. All data and images are recorded in order to allow on-ground complementary analysis if necessary. A non-telescopic prototype has been tested in a wind tunnel and in flight. The definitive probe being retractable is designed to be easily installed through a dummy window. Retracted, it will allow the aircraft to fly at VMO (maximum operating limit speed).

  16. Miniaturized Airborne Imaging Central Server System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiuhong

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, some remote-sensing applications require advanced airborne multi-sensor systems to provide high performance reflective and emissive spectral imaging measurement rapidly over large areas. The key or unique problem of characteristics is associated with a black box back-end system that operates a suite of cutting-edge imaging sensors to collect simultaneously the high throughput reflective and emissive spectral imaging data with precision georeference. This back-end system needs to be portable, easy-to-use, and reliable with advanced onboard processing. The innovation of the black box backend is a miniaturized airborne imaging central server system (MAICSS). MAICSS integrates a complex embedded system of systems with dedicated power and signal electronic circuits inside to serve a suite of configurable cutting-edge electro- optical (EO), long-wave infrared (LWIR), and medium-wave infrared (MWIR) cameras, a hyperspectral imaging scanner, and a GPS and inertial measurement unit (IMU) for atmospheric and surface remote sensing. Its compatible sensor packages include NASA s 1,024 1,024 pixel LWIR quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) imager; a 60.5 megapixel BuckEye EO camera; and a fast (e.g. 200+ scanlines/s) and wide swath-width (e.g., 1,920+ pixels) CCD/InGaAs imager-based visible/near infrared reflectance (VNIR) and shortwave infrared (SWIR) imaging spectrometer. MAICSS records continuous precision georeferenced and time-tagged multisensor throughputs to mass storage devices at a high aggregate rate, typically 60 MB/s for its LWIR/EO payload. MAICSS is a complete stand-alone imaging server instrument with an easy-to-use software package for either autonomous data collection or interactive airborne operation. Advanced multisensor data acquisition and onboard processing software features have been implemented for MAICSS. With the onboard processing for real time image development, correction, histogram-equalization, compression, georeference, and

  17. Vision Sensors and Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefflinger, Bernd

    Silicon charge-coupled-device (CCD) imagers have been and are a specialty market ruled by a few companies for decades. Based on CMOS technologies, active-pixel sensors (APS) began to appear in 1990 at the 1 μm technology node. These pixels allow random access, global shutters, and they are compatible with focal-plane imaging systems combining sensing and first-level image processing. The progress towards smaller features and towards ultra-low leakage currents has provided reduced dark currents and μm-size pixels. All chips offer Mega-pixel resolution, and many have very high sensitivities equivalent to ASA 12.800. As a result, HDTV video cameras will become a commodity. Because charge-integration sensors suffer from a limited dynamic range, significant processing effort is spent on multiple exposure and piece-wise analog-digital conversion to reach ranges >10,000:1. The fundamental alternative is log-converting pixels with an eye-like response. This offers a range of almost a million to 1, constant contrast sensitivity and constant colors, important features in professional, technical and medical applications. 3D retino-morphic stacking of sensing and processing on top of each other is being revisited with sub-100 nm CMOS circuits and with TSV technology. With sensor outputs directly on top of neurons, neural focal-plane processing will regain momentum, and new levels of intelligent vision will be achieved. The industry push towards thinned wafers and TSV enables backside-illuminated and other pixels with a 100% fill-factor. 3D vision, which relies on stereo or on time-of-flight, high-speed circuitry, will also benefit from scaled-down CMOS technologies both because of their size as well as their higher speed.

  18. Indoor experimental facility for airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) configurations - rail-SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirose, Getachew; Phelan, Brian R.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Koenig, Francois; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2014-05-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is developing an indoor experimental facility to evaluate and assess airborne synthetic-aperture-radar-(SAR)-based detection capabilities. The rail-SAR is located in a multi-use facility that also provides a base for research and development in the area of autonomous robotic navigation. Radar explosive hazard detection is one key sensordevelopment area to be investigated at this indoor facility. In particular, the mostly wooden, multi-story building houses a two (2) story housing structure and an open area built over a large sandbox. The housing structure includes reconfigurable indoor walls which enable the realization of multiple See-Through-The-Wall (STTW) scenarios. The open sandbox, on the other hand, allows for surface and buried explosive hazard scenarios. The indoor facility is not rated for true explosive hazard materials so all targets will need to be inert and contain surrogate explosive fills. In this paper we discuss the current system status and describe data collection exercises conducted using canonical targets and frequencies that may be of interest to designers of ultra-wideband (UWB) airborne, ground penetrating SAR systems. A bi-static antenna configuration will be used to investigate the effects of varying airborne SAR parameters such as depression angle, bandwidth, and integration angle, for various target types and deployment scenarios. Canonical targets data were used to evaluate overall facility capabilities and limitations. These data is analyzed and summarized for future evaluations. Finally, processing techniques for dealing with RF multi-path and RFI due to operating inside the indoor facility are described in detail. Discussion of this facility and its capabilities and limitations will provide the explosive hazard community with a great airborne platform asset for sensor to target assessment.

  19. Airborne laser topographic mapping results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, W. B.; Collins, J. G.; Link, L. E.; Swift, R. N.; Butler, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of terrain mapping experiments utilizing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) over forested areas are presented. The flight tests were conducted as part of a joint NASA/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (CE) investigation aimed at evaluating the potential of an airborne laser ranging system to provide cross-sectional topographic data on flood plains that are difficult and expensive to survey using conventional techniques. The data described in this paper were obtained in the Wolf River Basin located near Memphis, TN. Results from surveys conducted under winter 'leaves off' and summer 'leaves on' conditions, aspects of day and night operation, and data obtained from decidous and coniferous tree types are compared. Data processing techniques are reviewed. Conclusions relative to accuracy and present limitations of the AOL, and airborne lidar systems in general, to terrain mapping over forested areas are discussed.

  20. An airborne isothermal haze chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindman, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal gradient diffusion cloud chambers (TGDCC) are used to determine the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) with critical supersaturations greater than or equal to about 0.2%. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than theoretically predicted by factors ranging between 7.9 and 9.0. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than the concentrations measured with the larger laboratory IHC's by factors ranging between 3.9 and 7.5. The bounds of the supersaturation ranges of the airborne IHC and the CSU-Mee TGDCC do not overlap. Nevertheless, the slopes of the interpolated data between the bounds agree favorably with the theoretical slopes.

  1. WESTERN AIRBORNE CONTAMINANTS ASSESSMENT PROJECT RESEARCH PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of the Western Airborne Contaminants Assessment Project (WACAP) is to assess the deposition of airborne contaminants in Western National Parks, providing regional and local information on exposure, accumulation, impacts, and probable sources. This project is being desig...

  2. Airborne Transmission of Bordetella pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Warfel, Jason M.; Beren, Joel; Merkel, Tod J.

    2012-01-01

    Pertussis is a contagious, acute respiratory illness caused by the bacterial pathogen Bordetella pertussis. Although it is widely believed that transmission of B. pertussis occurs via aerosolized respiratory droplets, no controlled study has ever documented airborne transmission of pertussis. We set out to determine if airborne transmission occurs between infected and naive animals, utilizing the baboon model of pertussis. Our results showed that 100% of exposed naive animals became infected even when physical contact was prevented, demonstrating that pertussis transmission occurs via aerosolized respiratory droplets. PMID:22807521

  3. An Inexpensive Digital Infrared Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Details are given for the conversion of an inexpensive webcam to a camera specifically sensitive to the near infrared (700-1000 nm). Some experiments and practical applications are suggested and illustrated. (Contains 9 figures.)

  4. Solid State Television Camera (CID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, D. W.; Green, W. T.

    1976-01-01

    The design, development and test are described of a charge injection device (CID) camera using a 244x248 element array. A number of video signal processing functions are included which maximize the output video dynamic range while retaining the inherently good resolution response of the CID. Some of the unique features of the camera are: low light level performance, high S/N ratio, antiblooming, geometric distortion, sequential scanning and AGC.

  5. The future of consumer cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiato, Sebastiano; Moltisanti, Marco

    2015-03-01

    In the last two decades multimedia, and in particular imaging devices (camcorders, tablets, mobile phones, etc.) have been dramatically diffused. Moreover the increasing of their computational performances, combined with an higher storage capability, allows them to process large amount of data. In this paper an overview of the current trends of consumer cameras market and technology will be given, providing also some details about the recent past (from Digital Still Camera up today) and forthcoming key issues.

  6. Astronomy and the camera obscura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feist, M.

    2000-02-01

    The camera obscura (from Latin meaning darkened chamber) is a simple optical device with a long history. In the form considered here, it can be traced back to 1550. It had its heyday during the Victorian era when it was to be found at the seaside as a tourist attraction or sideshow. It was also used as an artist's drawing aid and, in 1620, the famous astronomer-mathematician, Johannes Kepler used a small tent camera obscura to trace the scenery.

  7. Picosecond (picoframe) framing camera evaluations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Sibbett, W; Walker, D R

    1992-03-01

    Detailed theoretical evaluations of picoframe-I- and II-type framing cameras are presented, and predicted performance characteristics are compared with experimental results. The methods of theoretical simulations are described, and a suite of computer programs was developed. The theoretical analyses indicate that the existence of fringe fields in the vicinity of the deflectors is the main factor that limits the dynamic spatial resolutions and frame times of these particular designs of framing camera, and possible refinements are outlined. PMID:20720702

  8. NASA Airborne Lidar 1982-1984 Flights

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar 1982-1984 Flights Data from the 1982 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of El Chichon ... continuing to January 1984. Transcribed from the following NASA Tech Reports: McCormick, M. P., and M. T. Osborn, Airborne lidar ...

  9. Science, conservation, and camera traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas; O'Connel, Allan F.; O'Connell, Allan F.; Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas

    2011-01-01

    Biologists commonly perceive camera traps as a new tool that enables them to enter the hitherto secret world of wild animals. Camera traps are being used in a wide range of studies dealing with animal ecology, behavior, and conservation. Our intention in this volume is not to simply present the various uses of camera traps, but to focus on their use in the conduct of science and conservation. In this chapter, we provide an overview of these two broad classes of endeavor and sketch the manner in which camera traps are likely to be able to contribute to them. Our main point here is that neither photographs of individual animals, nor detection history data, nor parameter estimates generated from detection histories are the ultimate objective of a camera trap study directed at either science or management. Instead, the ultimate objectives are best viewed as either gaining an understanding of how ecological systems work (science) or trying to make wise decisions that move systems from less desirable to more desirable states (conservation, management). Therefore, we briefly describe here basic approaches to science and management, emphasizing the role of field data and associated analyses in these processes. We provide examples of ways in which camera trap data can inform science and management.

  10. Passive front-ends for wideband millimeter wave electronic warfare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jastram, Nathan Joseph

    This thesis presents the analysis, design and measurements of novel passive front ends of interest to millimeter wave electronic warfare systems. However, emerging threats in the millimeter waves (18 GHz and above) has led to a push for new systems capable of addressing these threats. At these frequencies, traditional techniques of design and fabrication are challenging due to small size, limited bandwidth and losses. The use of surface micromachining technology for wideband direction finding with multiple element antenna arrays for electronic support is demonstrated. A wideband tapered slot antenna is first designed and measured as an array element for the subsequent arrays. Both 18--36 GHz and 75--110 GHz amplitude only and amplitude/phase two element direction finding front ends are designed and measured. The design of arrays using Butler matrix and Rotman lens beamformers for greater than two element direction finding over W band and beyond using is also presented. The design of a dual polarized high power capable front end for electronic attack over an 18--45 GHz band is presented. To combine two polarizations into the same radiating aperture, an orthomode transducer (OMT) based upon a new double ridge waveguide cross section is developed. To provide greater flexibility in needed performance characteristics, several different turnstile junction matching sections are tested. A modular horn section is proposed to address flexible and ever changing operational requirements, and is designed for performance criteria such as constant gain, beamwidth, etc. A multi-section branch guide coupler and low loss Rotman lens based upon the proposed cross section are also developed. Prototyping methods for the herein designed millimeter wave electronic warfare front ends are investigated. Specifically, both printed circuit board (PCB) prototyping of micromachined systems and 3D printing of conventionally machined horns are presented. A 4--8 GHz two element array with

  11. Ultra-Wideband Optical Modulation Spectrometer (OMS) Development: Study of the Optical Setup of a Wide-Band Optical Modulation Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolls, Volker; Stringfellow, Guy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to advance the design of the optical setup for a wide-band Optical Modulation Spectrometer (OMS) for use with astronomical heterodyne receiver systems. This report describes the progress of this investigation achieved from March until December 2001.

  12. Airborne Imagery Collections Barrow 2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Cherry, Jessica; Crowder, Kerri

    2015-07-20

    The data here are orthomosaics, digital surface models (DSMs), and individual frames captured during low altitude airborne flights in 2013 at the Barrow Environmental Observatory. The orthomosaics, thermal IR mosaics, and DSMs were generated from the individual frames using Structure from Motion techniques.

  13. Airborne fungi--a resurvey

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, G.H.; Prince, H.E.; Raymer, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    A 15-month survey of airborne fungi at 14 geographical stations was conducted to determine the incidence of different fungal genera. Five of these stations were surveyed 25 years earlier. A comparison between previous studies and present surveys revealed similar organisms at each station with slight shifts in frequency of dominant genera.

  14. Tropospheric and Airborne Emission Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas; Beer, Reinhard

    1996-01-01

    X This paper describes the development of two related instruments, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES). Both instruments are infrared imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers, used for measuring the state of the lower atmosphere, and in particular the measurement of ozone and ozone sources and sinks.

  15. Airborne chemicals and forest health

    SciTech Connect

    Woodman, J.N.; Cowling, E.B.

    1987-02-01

    Over the past few years the possible contribution of acid rain to the problem of forest decline has been a cause of increasing public concern. Research has begun to determine whether airborne chemicals are causing or contributing to visible damage and mortality in eastern spruce-fir and sugar maple forests and to changes in tree growth, usually without visible symptoms, in other parts of North America. This paper describes some of the complex biological relationships that determine health and productivity of forests and that make it difficult to distinguish effects of airborne chemicals from effects of natural stress. It describes four major research approaches for assessment of the effects of airborne chemicals on forests, and it summarizes current understanding of the known and possible effects of airborne chemicals on forest trees in North America and Europe. It also briefly describes the major air quality and forest health research programs in North America, and it assesses how ell these programs are likely to meet information needs during the coming decade. 69 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  16. Airborne asbestos in public buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Chesson, J.; Hatfield, J.; Schultz, B.; Dutrow, E.; Blake, J. )

    1990-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sampled air in 49 government-owned buildings (six buildings with no asbestos-containing material, six buildings with asbestos-containing material in generally good condition, and 37 buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material). This is the most comprehensive study to date of airborne asbestos levels in U.S. public buildings during normal building activities. The air outside each building was also sampled. Air samples were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy using a direct transfer preparation technique. The results show an increasing trend in average airborne asbestos levels; outdoor levels are lowest and levels in buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material are highest. However, the measured levels and the differences between indoors and outdoors and between building categories are small in absolute magnitude. Comparable studies from Canada and the UK, although differing in their estimated concentrations, also conclude that while airborne asbestos levels may be elevated in buildings that contain asbestos, levels are generally low. This conclusion does not eliminate the possibility of higher airborne asbestos levels during maintenance or renovation that disturbs the asbestos-containing material.

  17. Sub-Camera Calibration of a Penta-Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, K.; Gerke, M.

    2016-03-01

    Penta cameras consisting of a nadir and four inclined cameras are becoming more and more popular, having the advantage of imaging also facades in built up areas from four directions. Such system cameras require a boresight calibration of the geometric relation of the cameras to each other, but also a calibration of the sub-cameras. Based on data sets of the ISPRS/EuroSDR benchmark for multi platform photogrammetry the inner orientation of the used IGI Penta DigiCAM has been analyzed. The required image coordinates of the blocks Dortmund and Zeche Zollern have been determined by Pix4Dmapper and have been independently adjusted and analyzed by program system BLUH. With 4.1 million image points in 314 images respectively 3.9 million image points in 248 images a dense matching was provided by Pix4Dmapper. With up to 19 respectively 29 images per object point the images are well connected, nevertheless the high number of images per object point are concentrated to the block centres while the inclined images outside the block centre are satisfying but not very strongly connected. This leads to very high values for the Student test (T-test) of the finally used additional parameters or in other words, additional parameters are highly significant. The estimated radial symmetric distortion of the nadir sub-camera corresponds to the laboratory calibration of IGI, but there are still radial symmetric distortions also for the inclined cameras with a size exceeding 5μm even if mentioned as negligible based on the laboratory calibration. Radial and tangential effects of the image corners are limited but still available. Remarkable angular affine systematic image errors can be seen especially in the block Zeche Zollern. Such deformations are unusual for digital matrix cameras, but it can be caused by the correlation between inner and exterior orientation if only parallel flight lines are used. With exception of the angular affinity the systematic image errors for corresponding

  18. Ultra Wideband (UWB) communication vulnerability for security applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, H. Timothy

    2010-07-01

    RF toxicity and Information Warfare (IW) are becoming omnipresent posing threats to the protection of nuclear assets, and within theatres of hostility or combat where tactical operation of wireless communication without detection and interception is important and sometimes critical for survival. As a result, a requirement for deployment of many security systems is a highly secure wireless technology manifesting stealth or covert operation suitable for either permanent or tactical deployment where operation without detection or interruption is important The possible use of ultra wideband (UWB) spectrum technology as an alternative physical medium for wireless network communication offers many advantages over conventional narrowband and spread spectrum wireless communication. UWB also known as fast-frequency chirp is nonsinusoidal and sends information directly by transmitting sub-nanosecond pulses without the use of mixing baseband information upon a sinusoidal carrier. Thus UWB sends information using radar-like impulses by spreading its energy thinly over a vast spectrum and can operate at extremely low-power transmission within the noise floor where other forms of RF find it difficult or impossible to operate. As a result UWB offers low probability of detection (LPD), low probability of interception (LPI) as well as anti-jamming (AJ) properties in signal space. This paper analyzes and compares the vulnerability of UWB to narrowband and spread spectrum wireless network communication.

  19. Ultra wideband ground penetrating radar imaging of heterogeneous solids

    DOEpatents

    Warhus, J.P.; Mast, J.E.

    1998-11-10

    A non-invasive imaging system for analyzing engineered structures comprises pairs of ultra wideband radar transmitters and receivers in a linear array that are connected to a timing mechanism that allows a radar echo sample to be taken at a variety of delay times for each radar pulse transmission. The radar transmitters and receivers are coupled to a position determining system that provides the x,y position on a surface for each group of samples measured for a volume from the surface. The radar transmitter and receivers are moved about the surface, e.g., attached to the bumper of a truck, to collect such groups of measurements from a variety of x,y positions. Return signal amplitudes represent the relative reflectivity of objects within the volume and the delay in receiving each signal echo represents the depth at which the object lays in the volume and the propagation speeds of the intervening material layers. Successively deeper z-planes are backward propagated from one layer to the next with an adjustment for variations in the expected propagation velocities of the material layers that lie between adjacent z-planes. 11 figs.

  20. Ultra wideband ground penetrating radar imaging of heterogeneous solids

    DOEpatents

    Warhus, John P.; Mast, Jeffrey E.

    1998-01-01

    A non-invasive imaging system for analyzing engineered structures comprises pairs of ultra wideband radar transmitters and receivers in a linear array that are connected to a timing mechanism that allows a radar echo sample to be taken at a variety of delay times for each radar pulse transmission. The radar transmitters and receivers are coupled to a position determining system that provides the x,y position on a surface for each group of samples measured for a volume from the surface. The radar transmitter and receivers are moved about the surface, e.g., attached to the bumper of a truck, to collect such groups of measurements from a variety of x,y positions. Return signal amplitudes represent the relative reflectivity of objects within the volume and the delay in receiving each signal echo represents the depth at which the object lays in the volume and the propagation speeds of the intervening material layers. Successively deeper z-planes are backward propagated from one layer to the next with an adjustment for variations in the expected propagation velocities of the material layers that lie between adjacent z-planes.

  1. Conceptual design of combined visible - Xray Wide-Band telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, Yoshiyuki; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Otani, Chico; Shimizu, Hirohiko M.; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    2002-12-01

    Superconduting tunnel junctions (STJ) have been developed to detect X-ray ~ visivle photons for application to astrophysics, particle physics, material physics, and so on. STJ are applicable as photon detectors with good energy resolution and a high photon-counting rate. STJ also have good efficiency because of their high absorption efficiency below 1 keV photon energy. That is advantageous in the observation of the faint objects with which the photon number is limited like astronomical objects and planetary plasma observation. STJ have potentials to open new windows of telescope. On the other hand, the progress of multilayers makes it possible to fabricated a normal incidence telescope (NIT) with high angular resolution and wide field of view up to 500 eV photon energyThe combination of the improved optical elements (multilayer) and STJ will enable us to design a new optical system in the near future. We demonstrate the design combined Visible - X-ray Wide-Band Space Telescope (WBST).

  2. Ultra-Wideband Angle-of-Arrival Tracking Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey; Ngo, Phong H.; Phan, Chau T.; Gross, Julia; Ni, Jianjun; Dusl, John

    2010-01-01

    Systems that measure the angles of arrival of ultra-wideband (UWB) radio signals and perform triangulation by use of those angles in order to locate the sources of those signals are undergoing development. These systems were originally intended for use in tracking UWB-transmitter-equipped astronauts and mobile robots on the surfaces of remote planets during early stages of exploration, before satellite-based navigation systems become operational. On Earth, these systems could be adapted to such uses as tracking UWB-transmitter-equipped firefighters inside buildings or in outdoor wildfire areas obscured by smoke. The same characteristics that have made UWB radio advantageous for fine resolution ranging, covert communication, and ground-penetrating radar applications in military and law-enforcement settings also contribute to its attractiveness for the present tracking applications. In particular, the waveform shape and the short duration of UWB pulses make it possible to attain the high temporal resolution (of the order of picoseconds) needed to measure angles of arrival with sufficient precision, and the low power spectral density of UWB pulses enables UWB radio communication systems to operate in proximity to other radio communication systems with little or no perceptible mutual interference.

  3. Optimal waveforms design for ultra-wideband impulse radio sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Zhou, Zheng; Zou, Weixia; Li, Dejian; Zhao, Chong

    2010-01-01

    Ultra-wideband impulse radio (UWB-IR) sensors should comply entirely with the regulatory spectral limits for elegant coexistence. Under this premise, it is desirable for UWB pulses to improve frequency utilization to guarantee the transmission reliability. Meanwhile, orthogonal waveform division multiple-access (WDMA) is significant to mitigate mutual interferences in UWB sensor networks. Motivated by the considerations, we suggest in this paper a low complexity pulse forming technique, and its efficient implementation on DSP is investigated. The UWB pulse is derived preliminarily with the objective of minimizing the mean square error (MSE) between designed power spectrum density (PSD) and the emission mask. Subsequently, this pulse is iteratively modified until its PSD completely conforms to spectral constraints. The orthogonal restriction is then analyzed and different algorithms have been presented. Simulation demonstrates that our technique can produce UWB waveforms with frequency utilization far surpassing the other existing signals under arbitrary spectral mask conditions. Compared to other orthogonality design schemes, the designed pulses can maintain mutual orthogonality without any penalty on frequency utilization, and hence, are much superior in a WDMA network, especially with synchronization deviations. PMID:22163511

  4. Enhanced compressive wideband frequency spectrum sensing for dynamic spectrum access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yipeng; Wan, Qun

    2012-12-01

    Wideband spectrum sensing detects the unused spectrum holes for dynamic spectrum access (DSA). Too high sampling rate is the main challenge. Compressive sensing (CS) can reconstruct sparse signal with much fewer randomized samples than Nyquist sampling with high probability. Since survey shows that the monitored signal is sparse in frequency domain, CS can deal with the sampling burden. Random samples can be obtained by the analog-to-information converter. Signal recovery can be formulated as the combination of an L0 norm minimization and a linear measurement fitting constraint. In DSA, the static spectrum allocation of primary radios means the bounds between different types of primary radios are known in advance. To incorporate this a priori information, we divide the whole spectrum into sections according to the spectrum allocation policy. In the new optimization model, the minimization of the L2 norm of each section is used to encourage the cluster distribution locally, while the L0 norm of the L2 norms is minimized to give sparse distribution globally. Because the L2/L0 optimization is not convex, an iteratively re-weighted L2/L1 optimization is proposed to approximate it. Simulations demonstrate the proposed method outperforms others in accuracy, denoising ability, etc.

  5. Cluster Wideband Data Products in the Cluster Active Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickett, J. S.; Seeberger, J. M.; Christopher, I. W.; Santolík, O.; Sigsbee, K. M.

    Cluster Wideband Data (WBD) plasma wave receivers are mounted on all four of the Cluster spacecraft providing approximately 4-7% orbit coverage since mission operations began in February 2001. Data obtained by the WBD instruments are downlinked in real time to various Deep Space Network (DSN) and Panska Ves (PV) ground stations. The strengths of the WBD instruments lie in their high time and frequency resolution data, which allow analysis of the wave fine structure in order to more accurately investigate the linear and nonlinear nature of the waves, and in their use in carrying out Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) investigations to locate and characterize remote wave sources and their characteristics. The WBD team has already archived at the Cluster Active Archive (CAA) the documentation, software and data plots required for carrying on an independent scientific investigation. A document on interpretation issues has also been archived to help ensure that signals which are not naturally in the plasma are not misinterpreted. The WBD team also plans to archive digital, calibrated data files for the entire mission in cdf format at NASA's CDAWeb and submit these files for conversion to the Cluster standard cef format and archiving at the CAA. In order to ensure that the calibration of the WBD data has been done properly, WBD has taken part in Cluster cross calibration activities with the other wave instruments with regard to wave amplitudes in the time and frequency domains and with the PEACE instruments with regard to low density measurements.

  6. Rapid Synchronization of Ultra-Wideband Transmitted-Reference Receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Nekoogar, F; Dowla, F; Spiridon, A

    2004-05-21

    Time synchronization is a major challenge and a rich area of study in ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems. Transmitted-reference (TR) receivers avoid the stringent synchronization requirements that exist in conventional pulse detection schemes. However, the performance of such receivers is highly sensitive to precise timing acquisition and tracking of integration window that defines the limits of the finite integrator prior to final decision block. In this paper we propose a novel rapid synchronization technique that allows us to extract the timing information very accurately in UWB-TR receivers in the presence of a variety of channel noise and interference. The principles of the method are presented and the BER performance of a synchronized UWB-TR receiver is investigated in the presence of a range of values for timing jitter by computer simulations. Our studies show that the proposed synchronization technique greatly improves the performance of UWB-TR receivers in the presence of jitter and AWGN with modest increase in complexity.

  7. Ultra-Wideband Tracking System Design for Relative Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, Jianjun David; Arndt, Dickey; Bgo, Phong; Dekome, Kent; Dusl, John

    2011-01-01

    This presentation briefly discusses a design effort for a prototype ultra-wideband (UWB) time-difference-of-arrival (TDOA) tracking system that is currently under development at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The system is being designed for use in localization and navigation of a rover in a GPS deprived environment for surface missions. In one application enabled by the UWB tracking, a robotic vehicle carrying equipments can autonomously follow a crewed rover from work site to work site such that resources can be carried from one landing mission to the next thereby saving up-mass. The UWB Systems Group at JSC has developed a UWB TDOA High Resolution Proximity Tracking System which can achieve sub-inch tracking accuracy of a target within the radius of the tracking baseline [1]. By extending the tracking capability beyond the radius of the tracking baseline, a tracking system is being designed to enable relative navigation between two vehicles for surface missions. A prototype UWB TDOA tracking system has been designed, implemented, tested, and proven feasible for relative navigation of robotic vehicles. Future work includes testing the system with the application code to increase the tracking update rate and evaluating the linear tracking baseline to improve the flexibility of antenna mounting on the following vehicle.

  8. A survey of antennas for ultra-wideband applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarfaraz, Maysam; Shirkhodaie, Amir

    2008-04-01

    The usage of ultra-wideband (UWB) technology is growing in many communication systems such as radar systems, communication and measurement systems and imaging systems mainly because unlike the other wireless technologies UWB is not restricted to using a narrow waveband and it has high speed data rate. The large transmission bandwidth makes UWB-based electronic device resistive to interferences and gives immunity against getting detected. Typical operational frequency range of the UWB devices varies from few 100s MHz to 10 GHz. However, the most popular UWB devices are designed to operate between 1-3 GHz. This paper presents an overview of different types of commercially available antennas suitable for UWB applications. The paper begins with the basics of understanding of antennas properties. Next, it discusses the main antenna characteristics like: radiation pattern (directional or omni-directional), gain, bandwidth, size, etc for different UWB applications and explains criterions for quantitative and qualitative performance measure of the antennas. The antennas covered in this paper include: TEM Horn, Folded horn, Dipole, Planner Fat Dipole, Cross Dipole, Rolled Dipole, UWB dielectric, Bowtie, Wire Bowtie, etc. This paper describes the pros and cons of each antenna and highlights the application areas of each antenna. Lastly, this paper summaries the important characteristics of the antennas and presents several promising directions for future enhancement of UWB antenna systems.

  9. Wideband impedance spectrum analyzer for process automation applications.

    PubMed

    Doerner, Steffen; Schneider, Thomas; Hauptmann, Peter R

    2007-10-01

    For decades impedance spectroscopy is used in technical laboratories and research departments to investigate effects or material characteristics that affect the impedance spectrum of the sensor. Establishing this analytical approach for process automation and stand-alone applications will deliver additional and valuable information beside traditional measurement techniques such as the measurement of temperature, flow rate, and conductivity, among others. As yet, most of the current impedance analysis methods are suited for laboratory applications only since they involve stand-alone network analyzers that are slow, expensive, large, or immobile. Furthermore, those systems offer a large range of functionality that is not being used in process control and other fields of application. We developed a sensor interface based on high speed direct digital signal processing offering wideband impedance spectrum analysis with high resolution for frequency adjustment, excellent noise rejection, very high measurement rate, and convenient data exchange to common interfaces. The electronics has been implemented on two small circuit boards and it is well suited for process control applications such as monitoring phase transitions, characterization of fluidal systems, and control of biological processes. The impedance spectrum analyzer can be customized easily for different measurement applications by adapting the appropriate sensor module. It has been tested for industrial applications, e.g., dielectric spectroscopy and high temperature gas analysis.

  10. A wideband channel model for land mobile satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, Axel; Buonomo, Sergio; Sforza, Mario; Lutz, Erich

    1995-01-01

    A wideband channel model for Land Mobile Satellite (LMS) services is presented which characterizes the time-varying transmission channel between a satellite and a mobile user terminal. The channel model statistic parameters are the results of fitting procedures to measured data. The data used for fitting have a time resolution of 33 ns corresponding to a bandwidth of 30 MHz. Thus, the model is capable to characterize the channel behaviour for a wide range of services e.g., voice transmission, digital audio broadcasting (DAB), and spread spectrum modulation schemes. The model is presented for different environments and scenarios. The model is derived for a quasi-mobile user with hand-held terminal being in two different environments: rural and urban. The parameters needed for the description are (a) the number of echoes, (b) the distribution of the echo power, and (c) the distribution of the echo delay. It is shown that the direct path follows a Rician distribution whereas the reflected paths are Rayleigh/lognormal distributed. The parameters are given for an elevation angle of 25 deg.

  11. Ultra Wideband Indoor Positioning Technologies: Analysis and Recent Advances †

    PubMed Central

    Alarifi, Abdulrahman; Al-Salman, AbdulMalik; Alsaleh, Mansour; Alnafessah, Ahmad; Al-Hadhrami, Suheer; Al-Ammar, Mai A.; Al-Khalifa, Hend S.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, indoor positioning has emerged as a critical function in many end-user applications; including military, civilian, disaster relief and peacekeeping missions. In comparison with outdoor environments, sensing location information in indoor environments requires a higher precision and is a more challenging task in part because various objects reflect and disperse signals. Ultra WideBand (UWB) is an emerging technology in the field of indoor positioning that has shown better performance compared to others. In order to set the stage for this work, we provide a survey of the state-of-the-art technologies in indoor positioning, followed by a detailed comparative analysis of UWB positioning technologies. We also provide an analysis of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) to analyze the present state of UWB positioning technologies. While SWOT is not a quantitative approach, it helps in assessing the real status and in revealing the potential of UWB positioning to effectively address the indoor positioning problem. Unlike previous studies, this paper presents new taxonomies, reviews some major recent advances, and argues for further exploration by the research community of this challenging problem space. PMID:27196906

  12. Ultra Wideband Indoor Positioning Technologies: Analysis and Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Alarifi, Abdulrahman; Al-Salman, AbdulMalik; Alsaleh, Mansour; Alnafessah, Ahmad; Al-Hadhrami, Suheer; Al-Ammar, Mai A; Al-Khalifa, Hend S

    2016-05-16

    In recent years, indoor positioning has emerged as a critical function in many end-user applications; including military, civilian, disaster relief and peacekeeping missions. In comparison with outdoor environments, sensing location information in indoor environments requires a higher precision and is a more challenging task in part because various objects reflect and disperse signals. Ultra WideBand (UWB) is an emerging technology in the field of indoor positioning that has shown better performance compared to others. In order to set the stage for this work, we provide a survey of the state-of-the-art technologies in indoor positioning, followed by a detailed comparative analysis of UWB positioning technologies. We also provide an analysis of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) to analyze the present state of UWB positioning technologies. While SWOT is not a quantitative approach, it helps in assessing the real status and in revealing the potential of UWB positioning to effectively address the indoor positioning problem. Unlike previous studies, this paper presents new taxonomies, reviews some major recent advances, and argues for further exploration by the research community of this challenging problem space.

  13. Wideband Heterodyne QWIP Receiver Development for Thermonuclear Fusion Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.A.; Buchanan, M.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Liu, H.C.; Richards, R.K.; Simpson, M.L.

    1998-11-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing heterodyne receivers for plasma diagnostic applications for over 20 years. One area of this work has been the development of a diagnostic system for the measurement of the energy of alpha particles created in a thermonuclear fusion reactor. These particles originate with an energy of 3.5 MeV and cool to the thermal energy of the plasma (around 15 keV) after several seconds. To measure the velocity distribution of these alpha particles, a Thomson scattering diagnostic is under development based on a high power CO{sub 2} laser at 10 microns with a heterodyne receiver. The Doppler shift generated by Thomson scattering of the alpha particles requires a wideband heterodyne receiver (greater than 10 GHz). Because Mercury-Cadimum-Telluride (MCT) detectors are limited to a bandwidth of approximately 2 GHz, a Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) detector was obtained from the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) and evaluated for its heterodyne performance using the heterodyne testing facility developed at ORNL.

  14. Collaborative Wideband Compressed Signal Detection in Interplanetary Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yulin; Zhang, Gengxin; Bian, Dongming; Gou, Liang; Zhang, Wei

    2014-07-01

    As the development of autonomous radio in deep space network, it is possible to actualize communication between explorers, aircrafts, rovers and satellites, e.g. from different countries, adopting different signal modes. The first mission to enforce the autonomous radio is to detect signals of the explorer autonomously without disturbing the original communication. This paper develops a collaborative wideband compressed signal detection approach for InterPlaNetary (IPN) Internet where there exist sparse active signals in the deep space environment. Compressed sensing (CS) can be utilized by exploiting the sparsity of IPN Internet communication signal, whose useful frequency support occupies only a small portion of an entirely wide spectrum. An estimate of the signal spectrum can be obtained by using reconstruction algorithms. Against deep space shadowing and channel fading, multiple satellites collaboratively sense and make a final decision according to certain fusion rule to gain spatial diversity. A couple of novel discrete cosine transform (DCT) and walsh-hadamard transform (WHT) based compressed spectrum detection methods are proposed which significantly improve the performance of spectrum recovery and signal detection. Finally, extensive simulation results are presented to show the effectiveness of our proposed collaborative scheme for signal detection in IPN Internet. Compared with the conventional discrete fourier transform (DFT) based method, our DCT and WHT based methods reduce computational complexity, decrease processing time, save energy and enhance probability of detection.

  15. Predicting the intelligibility of vocoded and wideband Mandarin Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the limited number of cochlear implantees speaking Mandarin Chinese, it is extremely difficult to evaluate new speech coding algorithms designed for tonal languages. Access to an intelligibility index that could reliably predict the intelligibility of vocoded (and non-vocoded) Mandarin Chinese is a viable solution to address this challenge. The speech-transmission index (STI) and coherence-based intelligibility measures, among others, have been examined extensively for predicting the intelligibility of English speech but have not been evaluated for vocoded or wideband (non-vocoded) Mandarin speech despite the perceptual differences between the two languages. The results indicated that the coherence-based measures seem to be influenced by the characteristics of the spoken language. The highest correlation (r= 0.91–0.97) was obtained in Mandarin Chinese with a weighted coherence measure that included primarily information from high-intensity voiced segments (e.g., vowels) containing F0 information, known to be important for lexical tone recognition. In contrast, in English, highest correlation was obtained with a coherence measure that included information from weak consonants and vowel∕consonant transitions. A band-importance function was proposed that captured information about the amplitude envelope contour. A higher modulation rate (100 Hz) was found necessary for the STI-based measures for maximum correlation (r = 0.94–0.96) with vocoded Mandarin and English recognition. PMID:21568429

  16. Ultra Wideband Indoor Positioning Technologies: Analysis and Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Alarifi, Abdulrahman; Al-Salman, AbdulMalik; Alsaleh, Mansour; Alnafessah, Ahmad; Al-Hadhrami, Suheer; Al-Ammar, Mai A; Al-Khalifa, Hend S

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, indoor positioning has emerged as a critical function in many end-user applications; including military, civilian, disaster relief and peacekeeping missions. In comparison with outdoor environments, sensing location information in indoor environments requires a higher precision and is a more challenging task in part because various objects reflect and disperse signals. Ultra WideBand (UWB) is an emerging technology in the field of indoor positioning that has shown better performance compared to others. In order to set the stage for this work, we provide a survey of the state-of-the-art technologies in indoor positioning, followed by a detailed comparative analysis of UWB positioning technologies. We also provide an analysis of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) to analyze the present state of UWB positioning technologies. While SWOT is not a quantitative approach, it helps in assessing the real status and in revealing the potential of UWB positioning to effectively address the indoor positioning problem. Unlike previous studies, this paper presents new taxonomies, reviews some major recent advances, and argues for further exploration by the research community of this challenging problem space. PMID:27196906

  17. Unrecorded wideband instrumentation reference tape feasibility study: Frequency response results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hust, D. R.

    1980-03-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine signal response variations when a variety of wideband instrumentation magnetic tapes is used on a cross section of recorder/reproducer systems. Data for the investigation were collected by transmitting a set of eight sample test tapes to participating data recording/reproducing facilities for the purpose of making data measurements. Data collected represent measurements made with 16 different recorder/reproducer systems at 11 different testing facilities located throughout the United States. The data-collection process involved approximately 2 years of testing. The originating/coordinating facility was the Pacific Missile Test Center, Point Mugu, California. The test results indicated the following: all of the sample test tapes exhibited bidirectional performance within the limits of measurement repeatability; overall system stability was better in the low-band regions than in the upper-band regions; and the overall relative frequency response of the sample test tapes did not change appreciably during the 2 year investigative period. The most significant result of the test measurements is that at least 90% of the frequency response values were within + or - 2.0 dB at all frequencies. Machine stability factors such as azimuth, equalizer, and gain changes had more effect on data variability than did magnetic tape or tape speed. The use of a reference tape system is recommended as a method to assure that relative frequency response variations will be less than or equal to + or - 2.0 dB.

  18. Field test of a wideband downhole EM transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Alex; Lee, Ki Ha; Reginato, Lou

    1999-07-01

    A viable large bandwidth TEM transmitter can be constructed using very conventional means although in the present case the effective magnetic permeability of the solenoid core was lower than expected. Only a small number of turns can be used too maintain reasonably low inductance. This has to be compensated with the use of large currents. In this case, good ventilation must be provided to avoid overheating the electronics. In our case the most temperature sensitive element was the optic fiber transmitter which usually failed after about an hour of operation. Care must also be taken to guarantee balance between the negative and positive pulses as this improves the signal/noise ratio. Finally, we reiterate the need to review the origin and nature of the trigger pulse so that consistent properly clocked data can be acquired. In spite of the unlimited nature of the RFS tests which prevented us from acquiring data suitable for a direct demonstration of the wavefield transform, we did secure high quality wideband data that confirmed the proper performance of the prototype transmitter. We are certain that this equipment can now be used in an oil-field environment to acquire data suitable for a practical verification of the wavefield transform.

  19. Principles and Limitations of Ultra-Wideband FM Communications Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerrits, John F. M.; Kouwenhoven, Michiel H. L.; van der Meer, Paul R.; Farserotu, John R.; Long, John R.

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents a novel UWB communications system using double FM: a low-modulation index digital FSK followed by a high-modulation index analog FM to create a constant-envelope UWB signal. FDMA techniques at the subcarrier level are exploited to accommodate multiple users. The system is intended for low (1-10 kbps) and medium (100-1000 kbps) bit rate, and short-range WPAN systems. A wideband delay-line FM demodulator that is not preceded by any limiting amplifier constitutes the key component of the UWBFM receiver. This unusual approach permits multiple users to share the same RF bandwidth. Multipath, however, may limit the useful subcarrier bandwidth to one octave. This paper addresses the performance with AWGN and multipath, the resistance to narrowband interference, as well as the simultaneous detection of multiple FM signals at the same carrier frequency. SPICE and Matlab simulation results illustrate the principles and limitations of this new technology. A hardware demonstrator has been realized and has allowed the confirmation of theory with practical results.

  20. Routing architecture and security for airborne networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hongmei; Xie, Peng; Li, Jason; Xu, Roger; Levy, Renato

    2009-05-01

    Airborne networks are envisioned to provide interconnectivity for terrestial and space networks by interconnecting highly mobile airborne platforms. A number of military applications are expected to be used by the operator, and all these applications require proper routing security support to establish correct route between communicating platforms in a timely manner. As airborne networks somewhat different from traditional wired and wireless networks (e.g., Internet, LAN, WLAN, MANET, etc), security aspects valid in these networks are not fully applicable to airborne networks. Designing an efficient security scheme to protect airborne networks is confronted with new requirements. In this paper, we first identify a candidate routing architecture, which works as an underlying structure for our proposed security scheme. And then we investigate the vulnerabilities and attack models against routing protocols in airborne networks. Based on these studies, we propose an integrated security solution to address routing security issues in airborne networks.

  1. Progress in the development of airborne remote sensing instrumentation for the National Ecological Observatory Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampe, Thomas U.; McCorkel, Joel; Hamlin, Louise; Green, Robert O.; Krause, Keith S.; Johnson, Brian R.

    2011-09-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a planned facility of the National Science Foundation with the mission to enable understanding and forecasting of the impacts of climate change, land use change and invasive species on continental-scale ecology. Airborne remote sensing plays a critical role by providing measurements at the scale of individual shrubs and larger plants over hundreds of square kilometers. The NEON Airborne Observation Platform is designed to bridge scales from organism and stand scales, as captured by plot and tower observations, to the scale of satellite based remote sensing. Fused airborne spectroscopy and waveform LiDAR is used to quantify vegetation composition and structure. Panchromatic photography at better than 30 cm resolution will retrieve fine-scale information on land use, roads, impervious surfaces, and built structures. NEON will build three airborne systems to allow for regular coverage of NEON sites and the capacity to respond to investigator requests for specific projects. The system design achieves a balance between performance and development cost and risk, taking full advantage of existing commercial airborne LiDAR and camera components. To reduce risk during NEON construction, an imaging spectrometer design verification unit is being developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to demonstrate that operational and performance requirements can be met. As part of this effort, NEON is also focusing on science algorithm development, computing hardware prototyping and early airborne test flights with similar technologies. This paper presents an overview of the development status of the NEON airborne instrumentation in the context of the NEON mission.

  2. CARTOGAM: a portable gamma camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, O.; Izac, C.; Lainé, F.; Nguyen, A.

    1997-02-01

    The gamma camera is devised to establish the cartography of radioactive sources against a visible background in quasi real time. This device is designed to spot sources from a distance during the preparation of interventions on active areas of nuclear installations. This implement will permit to optimize interventions especially on the dosimetric level. The camera consists of a double cone collimator, a scintillator and an intensified CCD camera. This chain of detection provides the formation of both gamma images and visible images. Even though it is wrapped in a denal shield, the camera is still portable (mass < 15 kg) and compact (external diameter = 8 cm). The angular resolution is of the order of one degree for gamma rays of 1 MeV. In a few minutes, the device is able to measure a dose rate of 10 μGy/h delivered for instance by a source of 60Co of 90 mCi located at 10 m from the detector. The first images recorded in the laboratory will be presented and will illustrate the performances obtained with this camera.

  3. The Clementine longwave infrared camera

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, R.E.; Lewis, I.T.; Sewall, N.R.; Park, H.S.; Shannon, M.J.; Ledebuhr, A.G.; Pleasance, L.D.; Massie, M.A.; Metschuleit, K.

    1995-04-01

    The Clementine mission provided the first ever complete, systematic surface mapping of the moon from the ultra-violet to the near-infrared regions. More than 1.7 million images of the moon, earth and space were returned from this mission. The longwave-infrared (LWIR) camera supplemented the UV/Visible and near-infrared mapping cameras providing limited strip coverage of the moon, giving insight to the thermal properties of the soils. This camera provided {approximately}100 m spatial resolution at 400 km periselene, and a 7 km across-track swath. This 2.1 kg camera using a 128 x 128 Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) FPA viewed thermal emission of the lunar surface and lunar horizon in the 8.0 to 9.5 {micro}m wavelength region. A description of this light-weight, low power LWIR camera along with a summary of lessons learned is presented. Design goals and preliminary on-orbit performance estimates are addressed in terms of meeting the mission`s primary objective for flight qualifying the sensors for future Department of Defense flights.

  4. Medium Format Camera Evaluation Based on the Latest Phase One Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tölg, T.; Kemper, G.; Kalinski, D.

    2016-06-01

    In early 2016, Phase One Industrial launched a new high resolution camera with a 100 MP CMOS sensor. CCD sensors excel at ISOs up to 200, but in lower light conditions, exposure time must be increased and Forward Motion Compensation (FMC) has to be employed to avoid smearing the images. The CMOS sensor has an ISO range of up to 6400, which enables short exposures instead of using FMC. This paper aims to evaluate the strengths of each of the sensor types based on real missions over a test field in Speyer, Germany, used for airborne camera calibration. The test field area has about 30 Ground Control Points (GCPs), which enable a perfect scenario for a proper geometric evaluation of the cameras. The test field includes both a Siemen star and scale bars to show any blurring caused by forward motion. The result of the comparison showed that both cameras offer high accuracy photogrammetric results with post processing, including triangulation, calibration, orthophoto and DEM generation. The forward motion effect can be compensated by a fast shutter speed and a higher ISO range of the CMOS-based camera. The results showed no significant differences between cameras.

  5. Medium format cameras used by NASA astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amsbury, David; Bremer, Jeff

    1989-01-01

    The medium format cameras and other hardware used for photographing the earth from the Space Shuttle are discussed. Illustrations and descriptions are given for the two types of cameras used for most earth photography, the NASA-modified Hasselblad 500 EL/M 70-mm cameras and the Linhof AeroTechnika 45 camera. Also, the data recording modules used on Space Shuttle missions and a mounting device to produce simultaneous photography using two cameras are examined.

  6. The GISMO-2 Bolometer Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staguhn, Johannes G.; Benford, Dominic J.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Hilton, Gene; Irwin, Kent D.; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kovacs, Attila; Leclercq, Samuel; Maher, Stephen F.; Miller, Timothy M.; Moseley, Samuel H.; Sharp, Elemer H.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the concept for the GISMO-2 bolometer camera) which we build for background-limited operation at the IRAM 30 m telescope on Pico Veleta, Spain. GISM0-2 will operate Simultaneously in the 1 mm and 2 mm atmospherical windows. The 1 mm channel uses a 32 x 40 TES-based Backshort Under Grid (BUG) bolometer array, the 2 mm channel operates with a 16 x 16 BUG array. The camera utilizes almost the entire full field of view provided by the telescope. The optical design of GISM0-2 was strongly influenced by our experience with the GISMO 2 mm bolometer camera which is successfully operating at the 30m telescope. GISMO is accessible to the astronomical community through the regular IRAM call for proposals.

  7. Perceptual Color Characterization of Cameras

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Corral, Javier; Connah, David; Bertalmío, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Color camera characterization, mapping outputs from the camera sensors to an independent color space, such as XY Z, is an important step in the camera processing pipeline. Until now, this procedure has been primarily solved by using a 3 × 3 matrix obtained via a least-squares optimization. In this paper, we propose to use the spherical sampling method, recently published by Finlayson et al., to perform a perceptual color characterization. In particular, we search for the 3 × 3 matrix that minimizes three different perceptual errors, one pixel based and two spatially based. For the pixel-based case, we minimize the CIE ΔE error, while for the spatial-based case, we minimize both the S-CIELAB error and the CID error measure. Our results demonstrate an improvement of approximately 3% for the ΔE error, 7% for the S-CIELAB error and 13% for the CID error measures. PMID:25490586

  8. Dark Energy Camera for Blanco

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Gary A.; /Caltech /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    In order to make accurate measurements of dark energy, a system is needed to monitor the focus and alignment of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) to be located on the Blanco 4m Telescope for the upcoming Dark Energy Survey. One new approach under development is to fit out-of-focus star images to a point spread function from which information about the focus and tilt of the camera can be obtained. As a first test of a new algorithm using this idea, simulated star images produced from a model of DECam in the optics software Zemax were fitted. Then, real images from the Mosaic II imager currently installed on the Blanco telescope were used to investigate the algorithm's capabilities. A number of problems with the algorithm were found, and more work is needed to understand its limitations and improve its capabilities so it can reliably predict camera alignment and focus.

  9. Camera-on-a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory's research on a second generation, solid-state image sensor technology has resulted in the Complementary Metal- Oxide Semiconductor Active Pixel Sensor (CMOS), establishing an alternative to the Charged Coupled Device (CCD). Photobit Corporation, the leading supplier of CMOS image sensors, has commercialized two products of their own based on this technology: the PB-100 and PB-300. These devices are cameras on a chip, combining all camera functions. CMOS "active-pixel" digital image sensors offer several advantages over CCDs, a technology used in video and still-camera applications for 30 years. The CMOS sensors draw less energy, they use the same manufacturing platform as most microprocessors and memory chips, and they allow on-chip programming of frame size, exposure, and other parameters.

  10. Spectrally and Radiometrically Stable, Wideband, Onboard Calibration Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, James B.; Richardson, Brandon S.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Sarture, Charles M.; Quetin, Gregory R.; Porter, Michael D.; Green, Robert O.; Nolte, Scott H.; Hernandez, Marco A.; Knoll, Linley A.

    2013-01-01

    The Onboard Calibration (OBC) source incorporates a medical/scientific-grade halogen source with a precisely designed fiber coupling system, and a fiber-based intensity-monitoring feedback loop that results in radiometric and spectral stabilities to within less than 0.3 percent over a 15-hour period. The airborne imaging spectrometer systems developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory incorporate OBC sources to provide auxiliary in-use system calibration data. The use of the OBC source will provide a significant increase in the quantitative accuracy, reliability, and resulting utility of the spectral data collected from current and future imaging spectrometer instruments.

  11. An Ultra-wideband and Polarization-independent Metasurface for RCS Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Su, Pei; Zhao, Yongjiu; Jia, Shengli; Shi, Wenwen; Wang, Hongli

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an ultra-wideband and polarization-independent metasurface for radar cross section (RCS) reduction is proposed. The unit cell of the metasurface operates in a linear cross-polarization scheme in a broad band. The phase and amplitude of cross-polarized reflection can be separately controlled by its geometry and rotation angle. Based on the diffuse reflection theory, a 3-bit coding metasurface is designed to reduce the RCS in an ultra-wide band. The wideband property of the metasurface benefits from the wideband cross polarization conversion and flexible phase modulation. In addition, the polarization-independent feature of the metasurface is achieved by tailoring the rotation angle of each element. Both the simulated and measured results demonstrate that the proposed metasurface can reduce the RCS significantly in an ultra-wide frequency band for both normal and oblique incidences, which makes it promising in the applications such as electromagnetic cloaking. PMID:26864084

  12. An Ultra-wideband and Polarization-independent Metasurface for RCS Reduction.

    PubMed

    Su, Pei; Zhao, Yongjiu; Jia, Shengli; Shi, Wenwen; Wang, Hongli

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an ultra-wideband and polarization-independent metasurface for radar cross section (RCS) reduction is proposed. The unit cell of the metasurface operates in a linear cross-polarization scheme in a broad band. The phase and amplitude of cross-polarized reflection can be separately controlled by its geometry and rotation angle. Based on the diffuse reflection theory, a 3-bit coding metasurface is designed to reduce the RCS in an ultra-wide band. The wideband property of the metasurface benefits from the wideband cross polarization conversion and flexible phase modulation. In addition, the polarization-independent feature of the metasurface is achieved by tailoring the rotation angle of each element. Both the simulated and measured results demonstrate that the proposed metasurface can reduce the RCS significantly in an ultra-wide frequency band for both normal and oblique incidences, which makes it promising in the applications such as electromagnetic cloaking. PMID:26864084

  13. An Ultra-wideband and Polarization-independent Metasurface for RCS Reduction.

    PubMed

    Su, Pei; Zhao, Yongjiu; Jia, Shengli; Shi, Wenwen; Wang, Hongli

    2016-02-11

    In this paper, an ultra-wideband and polarization-independent metasurface for radar cross section (RCS) reduction is proposed. The unit cell of the metasurface operates in a linear cross-polarization scheme in a broad band. The phase and amplitude of cross-polarized reflection can be separately controlled by its geometry and rotation angle. Based on the diffuse reflection theory, a 3-bit coding metasurface is designed to reduce the RCS in an ultra-wide band. The wideband property of the metasurface benefits from the wideband cross polarization conversion and flexible phase modulation. In addition, the polarization-independent feature of the metasurface is achieved by tailoring the rotation angle of each element. Both the simulated and measured results demonstrate that the proposed metasurface can reduce the RCS significantly in an ultra-wide frequency band for both normal and oblique incidences, which makes it promising in the applications such as electromagnetic cloaking.

  14. An Ultra-wideband and Polarization-independent Metasurface for RCS Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Pei; Zhao, Yongjiu; Jia, Shengli; Shi, Wenwen; Wang, Hongli

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, an ultra-wideband and polarization-independent metasurface for radar cross section (RCS) reduction is proposed. The unit cell of the metasurface operates in a linear cross-polarization scheme in a broad band. The phase and amplitude of cross-polarized reflection can be separately controlled by its geometry and rotation angle. Based on the diffuse reflection theory, a 3-bit coding metasurface is designed to reduce the RCS in an ultra-wide band. The wideband property of the metasurface benefits from the wideband cross polarization conversion and flexible phase modulation. In addition, the polarization-independent feature of the metasurface is achieved by tailoring the rotation angle of each element. Both the simulated and measured results demonstrate that the proposed metasurface can reduce the RCS significantly in an ultra-wide frequency band for both normal and oblique incidences, which makes it promising in the applications such as electromagnetic cloaking.

  15. A Novel Compact Wideband TSA Array for Near-Surface Ice Sheet Penetrating Radar Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng; Liu, Xiaojun; Fang, Guangyou

    2014-03-01

    A novel compact tapered slot antenna (TSA) array for near-surface ice sheet penetrating radar applications is presented. This TSA array is composed of eight compact antenna elements which are etched on two 480mm × 283mm FR4 substrates. Each antenna element is fed by a wideband coplanar waveguide (CPW) to coupled strip-line (CPS) balun. The two antenna substrates are connected together with a metallic baffle. To obtain wideband properties, another two metallic baffles are used along broadsides of the array. This array is fed by a 1 × 8 wideband power divider. The measured S11 of the array is less than -10dB in the band of 500MHz-2GHz, and the measured gain is more than 6dBi in the whole band which agrees well with the simulated results.

  16. Large aperture scanning airborne lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J.; Bindschadler, R.; Boers, R.; Bufton, J. L.; Clem, D.; Garvin, J.; Melfi, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    A large aperture scanning airborne lidar facility is being developed to provide important new capabilities for airborne lidar sensor systems. The proposed scanning mechanism allows for a large aperture telescope (25 in. diameter) in front of an elliptical flat (25 x 36 in.) turning mirror positioned at a 45 degree angle with respect to the telescope optical axis. The lidar scanning capability will provide opportunities for acquiring new data sets for atmospheric, earth resources, and oceans communities. This completed facility will also make available the opportunity to acquire simulated EOS lidar data on a near global basis. The design and construction of this unique scanning mechanism presents exciting technological challenges of maintaining the turning mirror optical flatness during scanning while exposed to extreme temperatures, ambient pressures, aircraft vibrations, etc.

  17. Introduction of a Photogrammetric Camera System for Rpas with Highly Accurate Gnss/imu Information for Standardized Workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, T.; Geßner, M.; Meißner, H.; Przybilla, H. J.; Gerke, M.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present the evaluation of DLR's modular airborne camera system MACS-Micro for remotely piloted aircraft system (RPAS) with a maximum takeoff weight (MTOW) less than 5kg. The main focus is on standardized calibration and test procedures as well as on standardized photogrammetric workflows as a proof of feasibility for this aerial camera concept. The prototype consists of an industrial grade frame imaging camera and a compact GNSS/IMU solution which are operated by an embedded PC. The camera has been calibrated pre- and post- flight using a three dimensional test field. The validation of the latest prototype is done by a traditional photogrammetric evaluation of an aerial survey using 39 ground control points. The results, concerning geometric and radiometric features of the present system concept as well as the quality of the aero triangulation, fulfill many of the aimed keyspecifications.

  18. Magnetic airborne survey - geophysical flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros Camara, Erick; Nei Pereira Guimarães, Suze

    2016-06-01

    This paper provides a technical review process in the area of airborne acquisition of geophysical data, with emphasis for magnetometry. In summary, it addresses the calibration processes of geophysical equipment as well as the aircraft to minimize possible errors in measurements. The corrections used in data processing and filtering are demonstrated with the same results as well as the evolution of these techniques in Brazil and worldwide.

  19. Nonlinear wideband optical filters for laser protection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donval, Ariela; Golding, Karin; Nevo, Doron; Fisher, Tali; Lipman, Ofir; Oron, Moshe

    2012-02-01

    With the development of more powerful lasers for applications, optical limiters and blockers are required for providing human eye and optical sensors protection. We report on passive optical power control devices based on a range of photonic nanostructures, including mainly nanostructures for spatial field localization to enhance optical nonlinearities. We present the two main optical power control mechanisms: blocking and limiting, as well as their corresponding nanoscale phenomena. We propose a dynamic protection to cameras, sensors and the human eye from laser threats.

  20. Ultra-Wideband Optical Modulation Spectrometer (OMS) Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan (Technical Monitor); Tolls, Volker

    2004-01-01

    The optical modulation spectrometer (OMS) is a novel, highly efficient, low mass backend for heterodyne receiver systems. Current and future heterodyne receiver systems operating at frequencies up to a few THz require broadband spectrometer backends to achieve spectral resolutions of R approximately 10(exp 5) to 10(exp 6) to carry out many important astronomical investigations. Among these are observations of broad emission and absorption lines from extra-galactic objects at high redshifts, spectral line surveys, and observations of planetary atmospheres. Many of these lines are pressure or velocity broadened with either large half-widths or line wings extending over several GHz. Current backend systems can cover the needed bandwidth only by combining the output of several spectrometers, each with typically up to 1 GHz bandwidth, or by combining several frequency-shifted spectra taken with a single spectrometer. An ultra-wideband optical modulation spectrometer with 10 - 40 GHz bandwidth will enable broadband ob- servations without the limitations and disadvantages of hybrid spectrometers. Spectrometers like the OMS will be important for both ground-based observatories and future space missions like the Single Aperture Far-Infrared Telescope (SAFIR) which might carry IR/submm array heterodyne receiver systems requiring a spectrometer for each array pixel. Small size, low mass and small power consumption are extremely important for space missions. This report summarizes the specifications developed for the OMS and lists already identified commercial parts. The report starts with a review of the principle of operation, then describes the most important components and their specifications which were derived from theory, and finishes with a conclusion and outlook.

  1. Augmented reality using ultra-wideband radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Lam; Koenig, Francois; Sherbondy, Kelly

    2011-06-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has been investigating the utility of ultra-wideband (UWB) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology for detecting concealed targets in various applications. We have designed and built a vehicle-based, low-frequency UWB SAR radar for proof-of-concept demonstration in detecting obstacles for autonomous navigation, detecting concealed targets (mines, etc.), and mapping internal building structures to locate enemy activity. Although the low-frequency UWB radar technology offers valuable information to complement other technologies due to its penetration capability, it is very difficult to comprehend the radar imagery and correlate the detection list from the radar with the objects in the real world. Using augmented reality (AR) technology, we can superimpose the information from the radar onto the video image of the real world in real-time. Using this, Soldiers would view the environment and the superimposed graphics (SAR imagery, detection locations, digital map, etc.) via a standard display or a head-mounted display. The superimposed information would be constantly changed and adjusted for every perspective and movement of the user. ARL has been collaborating with ITT Industries to implement an AR system that integrates the video data captured from the real world and the information from the UWB radar. ARL conducted an experiment and demonstrated the real-time geo-registration of the two independent data streams. The integration of the AR sub-system into the radar system is underway. This paper presents the integration of the AR and SAR systems. It shows results that include the real-time embedding of the SAR imagery and other information into the video data stream.

  2. A wideband Gaussian noise generator utilizing simultaneously generated pn-sequences.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    A digital system has been constructed for the generation of wideband Gaussian noise with a spectrum which is flat to within plus or minus 0.5 dB from 0 to 10 MHz. These characteristics are substantially better than those of commercially available analog noise generators, and are required in testing and simulation of wideband communications systems. The noise is generated by the analog summation of thirty essentially independent binary waveforms, clocked at 35 MHz, and low-pass filtered to 10 MHz.

  3. Novel wideband MIMO antennas that can cover the whole LTE spectrum in handsets and portable computers.

    PubMed

    Sanad, Mohamed; Hassan, Noha

    2014-01-01

    A dual resonant antenna configuration is developed for multistandard multifunction mobile handsets and portable computers. Only two wideband resonant antennas can cover most of the LTE spectrums in portable communication equipment. The bandwidth that can be covered by each antenna exceeds 70% without using any matching or tuning circuits, with efficiencies that reach 80%. Thus, a dual configuration of them is capable of covering up to 39 LTE (4G) bands besides the existing 2G and 3G bands. 2×2 MIMO configurations have been also developed for the two wideband antennas with a maximum isolation and a minimum correlation coefficient between the primary and the diversity antennas.

  4. An estimate of the response of a telephone repeater to a wideband pulse using FAAT techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, L.D.; Hoffman, J.M.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of a FAAT analysis is to estimate the probability of system upset to an electromagnetic threat, for systems on which we have incomplete information. As an example of this process, we will discuss the response of part of a telephone repeater system to wideband transients. We first estimate the currents induced on above-ground and buried cables. After that, we describe the simple circuit we used to build a model of the amplifier and protective devices. Finally, we describe the scaling of the energy deposited in the electronics, including its nonlinear large-signal response, with the amplitude of the wideband waveforms.

  5. Size, gain and bandwidth trade-offs for wideband diamond dipole with AMC reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Chetan; Lepage, Anne Claire; Sarrazin, Julien; Begaud, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Compact and directive ultra-wideband antennas are required in variety of applications. Directional wideband antennas can be designed by using a reflector to redirect the energy back in half space and increase the gain. Use of artificial magnetic conductors (AMC) as reflectors for antennas allows reduction in the thickness of an antenna using traditional perfect electrical conductors (PEC) reflectors. The lateral size of the reflector also has an important effect on the antenna performance. In this paper, we study the trade-offs involved in the design of an AMC used as a reflector for broadband diamond dipole antenna by simulating various sizes of the reflector.

  6. Airborne particulate matter in spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Acceptability limits and sampling and monitoring strategies for airborne particles in spacecraft were considered. Based on instances of eye and respiratory tract irritation reported by Shuttle flight crews, the following acceptability limits for airborne particles were recommended: for flights of 1 week or less duration (1 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in aerodynamic diameter (AD) plus 1 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD); and for flights greater than 1 week and up to 6 months in duration (0.2 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in AD plus 0.2 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD. These numerical limits were recommended to aid in spacecraft atmosphere design which should aim at particulate levels that are a low as reasonably achievable. Sampling of spacecraft atmospheres for particles should include size-fractionated samples of 0 to 10, 10 to 100, and greater than 100 micron particles for mass concentration measurement and elementary chemical analysis by nondestructive analysis techniques. Morphological and chemical analyses of single particles should also be made to aid in identifying airborne particulate sources. Air cleaning systems based on inertial collection principles and fine particle collection devices based on electrostatic precipitation and filtration should be considered for incorporation into spacecraft air circulation systems. It was also recommended that research be carried out in space in the areas of health effects and particle characterization.

  7. NASA Student Airborne Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, E. L.; Shetter, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) is a unique summer internship program for advanced undergraduates and early graduate students majoring in the STEM disciplines. SARP participants acquire hands-on research experience in all aspects of an airborne research campaign, including flying onboard an major NASA resource used for studying Earth system processes. In summer 2012, thirty-two participants worked in four interdisciplinary teams to study surface, atmospheric, and oceanographic processes. Participants assisted in the operation of instruments onboard the NASA P-3B aircraft where they sampled and measured atmospheric gases and imaged land and water surfaces in multiple spectral bands. Along with airborne data collection, students participated in taking measurements at field sites. Mission faculty and research mentors helped to guide participants through instrument operation, sample analysis, and data reduction. Over the eight-week program, each student developed an individual research project from the data collected and delivered a conference-style final presentation on his/her results. We will discuss the results and effectiveness of the program from the first four summers and discuss plans for the future.

  8. Stratoscope 2 integrating television camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The development, construction, test and delivery of an integrating television camera for use as the primary data sensor on Flight 9 of Stratoscope 2 is described. The system block diagrams are presented along with the performance data, and definition of the interface of the telescope with the power, telemetry, and communication system.

  9. Making Films without a Camera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Carole

    1980-01-01

    Describes draw-on filmmaking as an exciting way to introduce children to the plastic, fluid nature of the film medium, to develop their appreciation and understanding of divergent cinematic techniques and themes, and to invite them into the dream world of filmmaking without the need for a camera. (AEA)

  10. High speed multiwire photon camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved multiwire proportional counter camera having particular utility in the field of clinical nuclear medicine imaging. The detector utilizes direct coupled, low impedance, high speed delay lines, the segments of which are capacitor-inductor networks. A pile-up rejection test is provided to reject confused events otherwise caused by multiple ionization events occurring during the readout window.

  11. High speed multiwire photon camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved multiwire proportional counter camera having particular utility in the field of clinical nuclear medicine imaging. The detector utilizes direct coupled, low impedance, high speed delay lines, the segments of which are capacitor-inductor networks. A pile-up rejection test is provided to reject confused events otherwise caused by multiple ionization events occuring during the readout window.

  12. Measuring Distances Using Digital Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendal, Dave

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a generic method of calculating accurate horizontal and vertical object distances from digital images taken with any digital camera and lens combination, where the object plane is parallel to the image plane or tilted in the vertical plane. This method was developed for a project investigating the size, density and spatial…

  13. Camera assisted multimodal user interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannuksela, Jari; Silvén, Olli; Ronkainen, Sami; Alenius, Sakari; Vehviläinen, Markku

    2010-01-01

    Since more processing power, new sensing and display technologies are already available in mobile devices, there has been increased interest in building systems to communicate via different modalities such as speech, gesture, expression, and touch. In context identification based user interfaces, these independent modalities are combined to create new ways how the users interact with hand-helds. While these are unlikely to completely replace traditional interfaces, they will considerably enrich and improve the user experience and task performance. We demonstrate a set of novel user interface concepts that rely on built-in multiple sensors of modern mobile devices for recognizing the context and sequences of actions. In particular, we use the camera to detect whether the user is watching the device, for instance, to make the decision to turn on the display backlight. In our approach the motion sensors are first employed for detecting the handling of the device. Then, based on ambient illumination information provided by a light sensor, the cameras are turned on. The frontal camera is used for face detection, while the back camera provides for supplemental contextual information. The subsequent applications triggered by the context can be, for example, image capturing, or bar code reading.

  14. Gamma-ray camera flyby

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Animation based on an actual classroom demonstration of the prototype CCI-2 gamma-ray camera's ability to image a hidden radioactive source, a cesium-137 line source, in three dimensions. For more information see http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2010/06/02/applied-nuclear-physics/.

  15. The Camera Comes to Court.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floren, Leola

    After the Lindbergh kidnapping trial in 1935, the American Bar Association sought to eliminate electronic equipment from courtroom proceedings. Eventually, all but two states adopted regulations applying that ban to some extent, and a 1965 Supreme Court decision encouraged the banning of television cameras at trials as well. Currently, some states…

  16. High-speed pulse camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, J. R.

    1968-01-01

    Miniaturized, 16 mm high speed pulse camera takes spectral photometric photographs upon instantaneous command. The design includes a low-friction, low-inertia film transport, a very thin beryllium shutter driven by a low-inertia stepper motor for minimum actuation time after a pulse command, and a binary encoder.

  17. Recent advances in digital camera optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Keizo

    2012-10-01

    The digital camera market has extremely expanded in the last ten years. The zoom lens for digital camera is especially the key determining factor of the camera body size and image quality. Its technologies have been based on several analog technological progresses including the method of aspherical lens manufacturing and the mechanism of image stabilization. Panasonic is one of the pioneers of both technologies. I will introduce the previous trend in optics of zoom lens as well as original optical technologies of Panasonic digital camera "LUMIX", and in addition optics in 3D camera system. Besides, I would like to suppose the future trend in digital cameras.

  18. Introduction to an airborne remote sensing system equipped onboard the Chinese marine surveillance plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Fang; Wang, Difeng; Pan, Delu; Hao, Zengzhou

    2008-10-01

    The airborne remote sensing system onboard the Chinese Marine Surveillance Plane have three scanners including marine airborne multi-spectrum scanner(MAMS), airborne hyper spectral system(AISA+) and optical-electric platform(MOP) currently. MAMS is developed by Shanghai Institute of Technology and Physics CAS with 11 bands from ultraviolet to infrared and mainly used for inversion of oceanic main factors and pollution information, like chlorophyll, sea surface temperature, red tide, etc. The AISA+ made by Finnish Specim company is a push broom system, consist of a high spectrum scanner head, a miniature GPS/INS sensor and data collecting PC. It is a kind of aviation imaging spectrometer and has the ability of ground target imaging and measuring target spectrum characteristic. The MOP mainly supports for object watching, recording and track. It mainly includes 3 equipments: digital CCD with Sony-DXC390, CANON EOS film camera and digital camera Sony F717. This paper mainly introduces these three remote sensing instruments as well as the ground processing information system, involving the system's hardware and software design, related algorithm research, etc.

  19. Airborne multisensor pod system (AMPS) data: Multispectral data integration and processing hints

    SciTech Connect

    Leary, T.J.; Lamb, A.

    1996-11-01

    The Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Non-Proliferation (NN-20) has developed a suite of airborne remote sensing systems that simultaneously collect coincident data from a US Navy P-3 aircraft. The primary objective of the Airborne Multisensor Pod System (AMPS) Program is {open_quotes}to collect multisensor data that can be used for data research, both to reduce interpretation problems associated with data overload and to develop information products more complete than can be obtained from any single sensor.{close_quotes} The sensors are housed in wing-mounted pods and include: a Ku-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar; a CASI Hyperspectral Imager; a Daedalus 3600 Airborne Multispectral Scanner; a Wild Heerbrugg RC-30 motion compensated large format camera; various high resolution, light intensified and thermal video cameras; and several experimental sensors (e.g. the Portable Hyperspectral Imager of Low-Light Spectroscopy (PHILLS)). Over the past year or so, the Coastal Marine Resource Assessment (CAMRA) group at the Florida Department of Environmental Protection`s Marine Research Institute (FMRI) has been working with the Department of Energy through the Naval Research Laboratory to develop applications and products from existing data. Considerable effort has been spent identifying image formats integration parameters. 2 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Airborne observations of regional variation in fluorescent aerosol across the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perring, A. E.; Schwarz, J. P.; Baumgardner, D.; Hernandez, M. T.; Spracklen, D. V.; Heald, C. L.; Gao, R. S.; Kok, G.; McMeeking, G. R.; McQuaid, J. B.; Fahey, D. W.

    2015-02-01

    Airborne observations of fluorescent aerosol were made aboard an airship during CloudLab, a series of flights that took place in September and October of 2013 and covered a wideband of longitude across the continental U.S. between Florida and California and between 28 and 37 N latitudes. Sampling occurred from near the surface to 1000 m above the ground. A Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS-4) measured average concentrations of supermicron fluorescent particles aloft (1 µm to 10 µm), revealing number concentrations ranging from 2.1 ± 0.8 to 8.7 ± 2.2 × 104 particles m-3 and representing up to 24% of total supermicron particle number. We observed distinct variations in size distributions and fluorescent characteristics in different regions, and attribute these to geographically diverse bioaerosol. Fluorescent aerosol detected in the east is largely consistent with mold spores observed in a laboratory setting, while a shift to larger sizes associated with different fluorescent patterns is observed in the west. Fluorescent bioaerosol loadings in the desert west were as high as those near the Gulf of Mexico, suggesting that bioaerosol is a substantial component of supermicron aerosol both in humid and arid environments. The observations are compared to model fungal and bacterial loading predictions, and good agreement in both particle size and concentrations is observed in the east. In the west, the model underestimated observed concentrations by a factor between 2 and 4 and the prescribed particle sizes are smaller than the observed fluorescent aerosol. A classification scheme for use with WIBS data is also presented.

  1. Autocalibrating vision guided navigation of unmanned air vehicles via tactical monocular cameras in GPS denied environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Koray

    This thesis presents a novel robotic navigation strategy by using a conventional tactical monocular camera, proving the feasibility of using a monocular camera as the sole proximity sensing, object avoidance, mapping, and path-planning mechanism to fly and navigate small to medium scale unmanned rotary-wing aircraft in an autonomous manner. The range measurement strategy is scalable, self-calibrating, indoor-outdoor capable, and has been biologically inspired by the key adaptive mechanisms for depth perception and pattern recognition found in humans and intelligent animals (particularly bats), designed to assume operations in previously unknown, GPS-denied environments. It proposes novel electronics, aircraft, aircraft systems, systems, and procedures and algorithms that come together to form airborne systems which measure absolute ranges from a monocular camera via passive photometry, mimicking that of a human-pilot like judgement. The research is intended to bridge the gap between practical GPS coverage and precision localization and mapping problem in a small aircraft. In the context of this study, several robotic platforms, airborne and ground alike, have been developed, some of which have been integrated in real-life field trials, for experimental validation. Albeit the emphasis on miniature robotic aircraft this research has been tested and found compatible with tactical vests and helmets, and it can be used to augment the reliability of many other types of proximity sensors.

  2. Binaural detection with narrowband and wideband reproducible noise maskers: II. Results for rabbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ling; Early, Susan J.; Mason, Christine R.; Idrobo, Fabio; Harrison, J. Michael; Carney, Laurel H.

    2002-01-01

    Binaural detection with narrowband and wideband noise maskers was examined by using a Pavlovian-conditioned eyeblink response in rabbits. The target was a tone at 500 Hz, and the maskers were ten individual noise samples having one of two bandwidths, 200 Hz (410 Hz to 610 Hz) or 2900 Hz (100 Hz to 3 kHz). The narrowband noise maskers were created by filtering the wideband noise maskers such that the two sets of maskers had identical spectra in the 200-Hz frequency region surrounding the tone. The responses across the set of noise maskers were compared across bandwidths and across interaural configurations (N0S0 and N0Sπ). Responses across the set of noise waveforms were not strongly correlated across bandwidths; this result is inconsistent with models for binaural detection that depend only upon the narrow band of energy centered at the frequency of the target tone. Responses were correlated across interaural configurations for the wideband masker condition, but not for the narrowband masker. All of these results were consistent with the companion study of human listeners [Evilsizer et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 111, 336-345 (2002)] and with the results of human studies of binaural detection that used only wideband [Gilkey et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 78, 1207-1219 (1985)] or narrowband [Isabelle and Colburn, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 89, 352-259 (1991)] individual noise maskers.

  3. 47 CFR 15.250 - Operation of wideband systems within the band 5925-7250 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation of wideband systems within the band 5925-7250 MHz. 15.250 Section 15.250 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.250...

  4. 47 CFR 15.250 - Operation of wideband systems within the band 5925-7250 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation of wideband systems within the band 5925-7250 MHz. 15.250 Section 15.250 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.250...

  5. 47 CFR 15.250 - Operation of wideband systems within the band 5925-7250 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation of wideband systems within the band 5925-7250 MHz. 15.250 Section 15.250 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.250...

  6. Laser optoacoustic diagnostics of femtosecond filaments in air using wideband piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uryupina, D. S.; Bychkov, A. S.; Pushkarev, D. V.; Mitina, E. V.; Savel'ev, A. B.; Kosareva, O. G.; Panov, N. A.; Karabutov, A. A.; Cherepetskaya, E. B.

    2016-09-01

    New opportunities in ultrasound diagnostics of femtosecond laser filaments with wideband piezoelectric transducers are considered. Transverse spatial resolution better than 100 microns is demonstrated in the single and regular multiple filamentation regime making path toward 3D filament tomography. The simple analytical model of the cylindrical acoustic source fitted well with the experimental data.

  7. Techniques for radar imaging using a wideband adaptive array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Mark Andrew

    A microwave imaging approach is simulated and validated experimentally that uses a small, wideband adaptive array. The experimental 12-element linear array and microwave receiver uses stepped frequency CW signals from 2--3 GHz and receives backscattered energy from short range objects in a +/-90° field of view. Discone antenna elements are used due to their wide temporal bandwidth, isotropic azimuth beam pattern and fixed phase center. It is also shown that these antennas have very low mutual coupling, which significantly reduces the calibration requirements. The MUSIC spectrum is used as a calibration tool. Spatial resampling is used to correct the dispersion effects, which if not compensated causes severe reduction in detection and resolution for medium and large off-axis angles. Fourier processing provides range resolution and the minimum variance spectral estimate is employed to resolve constant range targets for improved angular resolution. Spatial smoothing techniques are used to generate signal plus interference covariance matrices at each range bin. Clutter affects the angular resolution of the array due to the increase in rank of the signal plus clutter covariance matrix, whereas at the same time the rank of this matrix is reduced for closely spaced scatterers due to signal coherence. A method is proposed to enhance angular resolution in the presence of clutter by an approximate signal subspace projection (ASSP) that maps the received signal space to a lower effective rank approximation. This projection operator has a scalar control parameter that is a function of the signal and clutter amplitude estimates. These operations are accomplished without using eigendecomposition. The low sidelobe levels allow the imaging of the integrated backscattering from the absorber cones in the chamber. This creates a fairly large clutter signature for testing ASSP. We can easily resolve 2 dihedrals placed at about 70% of a beamwidth apart, with a signal to clutter ratio

  8. Evaluation of a Metric Camera System Tailored for High Precision Uav Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, T.; Geßner, M.; Meißner, H.; Cramer, M.; Gerke, M.; Przybilla, H. J.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present the further evaluation of DLR's modular airborne camera system MACS-Micro for small unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The main focus is on standardized calibration procedures and on photogrammetric workflows. The current prototype consists of an industrial grade frame imaging camera with 12 megapixel resolutions and a compact GNSS/IMU solution which are operated by an embedded computing unit (CPU). The camera was calibrated once pre-flight and several times post-flight over a period of 5 month using a three dimensional test field. The verification of the radiometric quality of the acquired images has been done under controlled static conditions and kinematic conditions testing different demosaicing methods. The validation of MACS-Micro is done by comparing a traditional photogrammetric evaluation with the workflows of Agisoft Photoscan and Pix4D Mapper. The analyses are based on an aerial survey of an urban environment using precise ground control points and acquired GNSS observations. Aerial triangulations with different configuratrions of ground control points (GCP's) had been calculated, comparing the results of using a camera self-calibration and introducing fixed interior orientation parameters for Agisoft and Pix4D. The results are promising concerning the metric characteristics of the used camera and achieved accuracies in this test case. Further aspects have to be evaluated by further expanded test scenarios.

  9. The Geospectral Camera: a Compact and Geometrically Precise Hyperspectral and High Spatial Resolution Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delauré, B.; Michiels, B.; Biesemans, J.; Livens, S.; Van Achteren, T.

    2013-04-01

    Small unmanned aerial vehicles are increasingly being employed for environmental monitoring at local scale, which drives the demand for compact and lightweight spectral imagers. This paper describes the geospectral camera, which is a novel compact imager concept. The camera is built around an innovative detector which has two sensor elements on a single chip and therefore offers the functionality of two cameras within the volume of a single one. The two sensor elements allow the camera to derive both spectral information as well as geometric information (high spatial resolution imagery and a digital surface model) of the scene of interest. A first geospectral camera prototype has been developed. It uses a linear variable optical filter which is installed in front of one of the two sensors of the MEDUSA CMOS imager chip. A accompanying software approach has been developed which exploits the simultaneous information of the two sensors in order to extract an accurate spectral image product. This method has been functionally demonstrated by applying it on image data acquired during an airborne acquisition.

  10. Development of an imaging hyperspectral camera using the ultraviolet and visible wavelength AOTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosaki, Hirohisa; Shingu, Hirokimi; Enkyo, Shigeharu; Suzuki, Takao; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Takefuji, Yoshiyasu

    2003-04-01

    A spectroscopic camera has been developed which has spectral resolution of less than 1.5nm in the ultraviolet (UV) and visible wavelength bands (320-580 nm). Its main components are a specially coated UV objective lens, a UV Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter (AOTF) with a thermo-electric cooling system, and a imaging system based on a high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP) developed by NHK Science and Technical Research Laboratories. Research is currently under way to develop the hyperspectral camera into a sensor package for airborne and ultimately space-based remote sensing applications. This paper presents the basic principle and configuration of the hyperspectral camera, and gives details of tests to measure its performance. The results of spectral resolution tests analyzing very close two spectra from a helium-discharge lamp demonstrate the camera's high spectral resolution performance. Full color and spectral images obtained by a spectrometry experiment are also presented to demonstrate the camera's hyperspectral capabilities.

  11. Optical characterization of the SOFIA telescope using fast EM-CCD cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfüller, Enrico; Wolf, Jürgen; Hall, Helen; Röser, Hans-Peter

    2012-09-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) has recently demonstrated its scientific capabilities in a first series of astronomical observing flights. In parallel, special measurements and engineering flights were conducted aiming at the characterization and the commissioning of the telescope and the complete airborne observatory. To support the characterization measurements, two commercial Andor iXon EM-CCD cameras have been used, a DU-888 dubbed Fast Diagnostic Camera (FDC) running at frame rates up to about 400 fps, and a DU-860 as a Super Fast Diagnostic Camera (SFDC) providing 2000 fps. Both cameras have been mounted to the telescope’s Focal Plane Imager (FPI) flange in lieu of the standard FPI tracking camera. Their fast image sequences have been used to analyze and to improve the telescope’s pointing stability, especially to help tuning active mass dampers that suppress eigenfrequencies in the telescope system, to characterize and to optimize the chopping secondary mirror and to investigate the structure and behavior of the shear layer that forms over the open telescope cavity in flight. In June 2011, a collaboration between the HIPO science instrument team, the MIT’s stellar occultation group and the FDC team, led to the first SOFIA observation of a stellar occultation by the dwarf planet Pluto over the Pacific.

  12. The Hayabusa Spacecraft Asteroid Multi-band Imaging Camera (AMICA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Masateru; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Tholen, David J.; Hirata, Naru; Demura, Hirohide; Nemoto, Etsuko; Nakamura, Akiko M.; Higuchi, Yuta; Sogame, Akito; Yamamoto, Aya; Kitazato, Kohei; Yokota, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Takashi; Hashimoto, Tatsuaki; Saito, Jun

    2010-06-01

    The Hayabusa Spacecraft Asteroid Multi-band Imaging Camera (AMICA) has acquired more than 1400 multispectral and high-resolution images of its target asteroid, 25143 Itokawa, since late August 2005. In this paper, we summarize the design and performance of AMICA. In addition, we describe the calibration methods, assumptions, and models, based on measurements. Major calibration steps include corrections for linearity and modeling and subtraction of bias, dark current, read-out smear, and pixel-to-pixel responsivity variations. AMICA v-band data were calibrated to radiance using in-flight stellar observations. The other band data were calibrated to reflectance by comparing them to ground-based observations to avoid the uncertainty of the solar irradiation in those bands. We found that the AMICA signal was linear with respect to the input signal to an accuracy of ≪1% when the signal level was <3800 DN. We verified that the absolute radiance calibration of the AMICA v-band (0.55 μm) was accurate to 4% or less, the accuracy of the disk-integrated spectra with respect to the AMICA v-band was about 1%, and the pixel-to-pixel responsivity (flat-field) variation was 3% or less. The uncertainty in background zero level was 5 DN. From wide-band observations of star clusters, we found that the AMICA optics have an effective focal length of 120.80 ± 0.03 mm, yielding a field-of-view (FOV) of 5.83° × 5.69°. The resulting geometric distortion model was accurate to within a third of a pixel. We demonstrated an image-restoration technique using the point-spread functions of stars, and confirmed that the technique functions well in all loss-less images. An artifact not corrected by this calibration is scattered light associated with bright disks in the FOV.

  13. Combustion pinhole-camera system

    DOEpatents

    Witte, A.B.

    1982-05-19

    A pinhole camera system is described utilizing a sealed optical-purge assembly which provides optical access into a coal combustor or other energy conversion reactors. The camera system basically consists of a focused-purge pinhole optical port assembly, a conventional TV vidicon receiver, an external, variable density light filter which is coupled electronically to the vidicon automatic gain control (agc). The key component of this system is the focused-purge pinhole optical port assembly which utilizes a purging inert gas to keep debris from entering the port and a lens arrangement which transfers the pinhole to the outside of the port assembly. One additional feature of the port assembly is that it is not flush with the interior of the combustor.

  14. A 10-microm infrared camera.

    PubMed

    Arens, J F; Jernigan, J G; Peck, M C; Dobson, C A; Kilk, E; Lacy, J; Gaalema, S

    1987-09-15

    An IR camera has been built at the University of California at Berkeley for astronomical observations. The camera has been used primarily for high angular resolution imaging at mid-IR wavelengths. It has been tested at the University of Arizona 61- and 90-in. telescopes near Tucson and the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, HI. In the observations the system has been used as an imager with interference coated and Fabry-Perot filters. These measurements have demonstrated a sensitivity consistent with photon shot noise, showing that the system is limited by the radiation from the telescope and atmosphere. Measurements of read noise, crosstalk, and hysteresis have been made in our laboratory. PMID:20490151

  15. Electronographic cameras for space astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, G. R.; Opal, C. B.

    1972-01-01

    Magnetically-focused electronographic cameras have been under development at the Naval Research Laboratory for use in far-ultraviolet imagery and spectrography, primarily in astronomical and optical-geophysical observations from sounding rockets and space vehicles. Most of this work has been with cameras incorporating internal optics of the Schmidt or wide-field all-reflecting types. More recently, we have begun development of electronographic spectrographs incorporating an internal concave grating, operating at normal or grazing incidence. We also are developing electronographic image tubes of the conventional end-window-photo-cathode type, for far-ultraviolet imagery at the focus of a large space telescope, with image formats up to 120 mm in diameter.

  16. Benchmarking High Density Image Matching for Oblique Airborne Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavegn, S.; Haala, N.; Nebiker, S.; Rothermel, M.; Tutzauer, P.

    2014-08-01

    Both, improvements in camera technology and new pixel-wise matching approaches triggered the further development of software tools for image based 3D reconstruction. Meanwhile research groups as well as commercial vendors provide photogrammetric software to generate dense, reliable and accurate 3D point clouds and Digital Surface Models (DSM) from highly overlapping aerial images. In order to evaluate the potential of these algorithms in view of the ongoing software developments, a suitable test bed is provided by the ISPRS/EuroSDR initiative Benchmark on High Density Image Matching for DSM Computation. This paper discusses the proposed test scenario to investigate the potential of dense matching approaches for 3D data capture from oblique airborne imagery. For this purpose, an oblique aerial image block captured at a GSD of 6 cm in the west of Zürich by a Leica RCD30 Oblique Penta camera is used. Within this paper, the potential test scenario is demonstrated using matching results from two software packages, Agisoft PhotoScan and SURE from University of Stuttgart. As oblique images are frequently used for data capture at building facades, 3D point clouds are mainly investigated at such areas. Reference data from terrestrial laser scanning is used to evaluate data quality from dense image matching for several facade patches with respect to accuracy, density and reliability.

  17. ISO camera array development status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, F.; Cesarsky, C.; Agnese, P.; Rouan, D.

    1989-01-01

    A short outline is given of the Infrared Space Observatory Camera (ISOCAM), one of the 4 instruments onboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), with the current status of its two 32x32 arrays, an InSb charge injection device (CID) and a Si:Ga direct read-out (DRO), and the results of the in orbit radiation simulation with gamma ray sources. A tentative technique for the evaluation of the flat fielding accuracy is also proposed.

  18. Graphic design of pinhole cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, H. B.; Chu, W. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes a graphic technique for the analysis and optimization of pinhole size and focal length. The technique is based on the use of the transfer function of optical elements described by Scott (1959) to construct the transfer function of a circular pinhole camera. This transfer function is the response of a component or system to a pattern of lines having a sinusoidally varying radiance at varying spatial frequencies. Some specific examples of graphic design are presented.

  19. SPEIR: A Ge Compton Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Mihailescu, L; Vetter, K M; Burks, M T; Hull, E L; Craig, W W

    2004-02-11

    The SPEctroscopic Imager for {gamma}-Rays (SPEIR) is a new concept of a compact {gamma}-ray imaging system of high efficiency and spectroscopic resolution with a 4-{pi} field-of-view. The system behind this concept employs double-sided segmented planar Ge detectors accompanied by the use of list-mode photon reconstruction methods to create a sensitive, compact Compton scatter camera.

  20. A Robust Separating and Tracking Method on Two Wideband Sources by Subspace Rotation with One Vector Hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, De-jun; Li, Feng-hua

    2010-09-01

    It has been proved theoretically that two incompletely correlated sources can be identified by linear signal processing methods. However, it is difficult in practice. A new method to separate two wideband sources with one vector sensor is presented in this paper. The method is the combination of subspace rotation and spatial matched filter. Simulations show that this method is insensitive to the initial azimuth error, independent of signal spectrum, and better man wideband focusing subspace methods at low SNR. The sea trial is performed and the experiment results show that the proposed method is effective to separate and track two wideband sources in the underwater environment.

  1. 21 CFR 886.1120 - Opthalmic camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Opthalmic camera. 886.1120 Section 886.1120 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1120 Opthalmic camera. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic camera is an AC-powered device intended to take photographs of the eye and the surrounding...

  2. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food... DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A positron camera is a device intended to image the distribution of positron-emitting radionuclides in the...

  3. 16 CFR 501.1 - Camera film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Camera film. 501.1 Section 501.1 Commercial... 500 § 501.1 Camera film. Camera film packaged and labeled for retail sale is exempt from the net... should be expressed, provided: (a) The net quantity of contents on packages of movie film and bulk...

  4. 16 CFR 501.1 - Camera film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Camera film. 501.1 Section 501.1 Commercial... 500 § 501.1 Camera film. Camera film packaged and labeled for retail sale is exempt from the net... should be expressed, provided: (a) The net quantity of contents on packages of movie film and bulk...

  5. 16 CFR 501.1 - Camera film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Camera film. 501.1 Section 501.1 Commercial... 500 § 501.1 Camera film. Camera film packaged and labeled for retail sale is exempt from the net... should be expressed, provided: (a) The net quantity of contents on packages of movie film and bulk...

  6. 16 CFR 501.1 - Camera film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... should be expressed, provided: (a) The net quantity of contents on packages of movie film and bulk still... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Camera film. 501.1 Section 501.1 Commercial... 500 § 501.1 Camera film. Camera film packaged and labeled for retail sale is exempt from the...

  7. 16 CFR 501.1 - Camera film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Camera film. 501.1 Section 501.1 Commercial... 500 § 501.1 Camera film. Camera film packaged and labeled for retail sale is exempt from the net... should be expressed, provided: (a) The net quantity of contents on packages of movie film and bulk...

  8. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  9. Coaxial fundus camera for opthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Matos, Luciana; Castro, Guilherme; Castro Neto, Jarbas C.

    2015-09-01

    A Fundus Camera for ophthalmology is a high definition device which needs to meet low light illumination of the human retina, high resolution in the retina and reflection free image1. Those constraints make its optical design very sophisticated, but the most difficult to comply with is the reflection free illumination and the final alignment due to the high number of non coaxial optical components in the system. Reflection of the illumination, both in the objective and at the cornea, mask image quality, and a poor alignment make the sophisticated optical design useless. In this work we developed a totally axial optical system for a non-midriatic Fundus Camera. The illumination is performed by a LED ring, coaxial with the optical system and composed of IR of visible LEDs. The illumination ring is projected by the objective lens in the cornea. The Objective, LED illuminator, CCD lens are coaxial making the final alignment easily to perform. The CCD + capture lens module is a CCTV camera with autofocus and Zoom built in, added to a 175 mm focal length doublet corrected for infinity, making the system easily operated and very compact.

  10. Geophex airborne unmanned survey system

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.J.; Taylor, D.W.A.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This nonintrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits two operators to rapidly conduct geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance, of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak anomalies can be detected.

  11. Airborne wavemeter validation and calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goad, Joseph H., Jr.; Rinsland, Pamela L.; Kist, Edward H., Jr.; Geier, Erika B.; Banziger, Curtis G.

    1992-01-01

    This manuscript outlines a continuing effort to validate and verify the performance of an airborne autonomous wavemeter for tuning solid state lasers to a desired wavelength. The application is measuring the vertical profiles of atmospheric water vapor using a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique. Improved wavemeter performance data for varying ambient temperatures are presented. This resulted when the electronic grounding and shielding were improved. The results with short pulse duration lasers are also included. These lasers show that similar performance could be obtained with lasers operating in the continuous and the pulsed domains.

  12. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.J.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits rapid geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected.

  13. Airborne Research Experience for Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, V. B.; Albertson, R.; Smith, S.; Stockman, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Airborne Research Experience for Educators (AREE) Program, conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Office of Education in partnership with the AERO Institute, NASA Teaching From Space Program, and California State University Fullerton, is a complete end-to-end residential research experience in airborne remote sensing and atmospheric science. The 2009 program engaged ten secondary educators who specialize in science, technology, engineering or mathematics in a 6-week Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) offered through NSERC. Educators participated in collection of in-flight remote sensor data during flights aboard the NASA DC-8 as well as in-situ research on atmospheric chemistry (bovine emissions of methane); algal blooms (remote sensing to determine location and degree of blooms for further in-situ analysis); and crop classification (exploration of how drought conditions in Central California have impacted almond and cotton crops). AREE represents a unique model of the STEM teacher-as-researcher professional development experience because it asks educators to participate in a research experience and then translate their experiences into classroom practice through the design, implementation, and evaluation of instructional materials that emphasize the scientific research process, inquiry-based investigations, and manipulation of real data. Each AREE Master Educator drafted a Curriculum Brief, Teachers Guide, and accompanying resources for a topic in their teaching assignment Currently, most professional development programs offer either a research experience OR a curriculum development experience. The dual nature of the AREE model engaged educators in both experiences. Educators’ content and pedagogical knowledge of STEM was increased through the review of pertinent research articles during the first week, attendance at lectures and workshops during the second week, and participation in the airborne and in-situ research studies, data

  14. Cyberinfrastructure for Airborne Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.

    2009-01-01

    Since 2004 the NASA Airborne Science Program has been prototyping and using infrastructure that enables researchers to interact with each other and with their instruments via network communications. This infrastructure uses satellite links and an evolving suite of applications and services that leverage open-source software. The use of these tools has increased near-real-time situational awareness during field operations, resulting in productivity improvements and the collection of better data. This paper describes the high-level system architecture and major components, with example highlights from the use of the infrastructure. The paper concludes with a discussion of ongoing efforts to transition to operational status.

  15. Requirements for airborne vector gravimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, K. P.; Colombo, O.; Hein, G.; Knickmeyer, E. T.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of airborne vector gravimetry is the determination of the full gravity disturbance vector along the aircraft trajectory. The paper briefly outlines the concept of this method using a combination of inertial and GPS-satellite data. The accuracy requirements for users in geodesy and solid earth geophysics, oceanography and exploration geophysics are then specified. Using these requirements, accuracy specifications for the GPS subsystem and the INS subsystem are developed. The integration of the subsystems and the problems connected with it are briefly discussed and operational methods are indicated that might reduce some of the stringent accuracy requirements.

  16. Biological monitoring of airborne pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Ditz, D.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Common plants such as grasses, mosses, and even goldenrod may turn out to have a new high-tech role as monitors of airborne pollution from solid waste incinerators. Certain plants that respond to specific pollutants can provide continuous surveillance of air quality over long periods of time: they are bio-indicators. Other species accumulate pollutants and can serve as sensitive indicators of pollutants and of food-chain contamination: they are bio-accumulators. Through creative use of these properties, biological monitoring can provide information that cannot be obtained by current methods such as stack testing.

  17. Estimation of the Atmospheric Refraction Effect in Airborne Images Using Radiosonde Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisl, U.; Tempelmann, U.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of the atmospheric refraction on the geometric accuracy of airborne photogrammetric images was already considered in the days of analogue photography. The effect is a function of the varying refractive index on the path from the ground to the image sensor. Therefore the effect depends on the height over ground, the view zenith angle and the atmospheric constituents. It is leading to a gradual increase of the scale towards the borders of the image, i.e. a magnification takes place. Textbooks list a shift of several pixels at the borders of standard wide angle images. As it was the necessity of that time when images could only be acquired at good weather conditions, the effect was calculated using standard atmospheres for good atmospheric conditions, leading to simple empirical formulas. Often the pixel shift caused by refraction was approximated as linear with height and compensated by an adjustment of the focal length. With the advent of sensitive digital cameras, the image dynamics allows for capturing images at adverse weather conditions. So the influence of the atmospheric profiles on the geometric accuracy of the images has to be investigated and the validity of the standard correction formulas has to be checked. This paper compares the results from the standard formulas by Saastamoinen with the results calculated from a broad selection of atmospheres obtained from radiosonde profile data. The geometric deviation is calculated by numerical integration of the refractive index as a function of the height using the refractive index formula by Ciddor. It turns out that the effect of different atmospheric profiles (including inversion situations) is generally small compared to the overall effect except at low camera heights. But there the absolute deviation is small. Since the necessary atmospheric profile data are often not readily available for airborne images a formula proposed by Saastamoinen is verified that uses only camera height, the pressure

  18. Toolsets for Airborne Data - URS and New Documentation

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-03-23

    ... airborne field missions, documentation, and EOSDIS User Registration System (URS) authentication. This web application features an intuitive user interface for variable selection across different airborne field studies and ...

  19. Meeting Review: Airborne Aerosol Inlet Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Huebert, Barry; Wilson, Chuck

    1991-01-01

    Proceedings from the Airborne Aerosol Inlet Workshop are presented. The two central topics of discussion were the role of aerosols in atmospheric processes and the difficulties in characterizing aerosols. The following topics were discussed during the working sessions: airborne observations to date; identification of inlet design issues; inlet modeling needs and directions; objectives for aircraft experiments; and future laboratory and wind tunnel studies.

  20. Airborne Relay-Based Regional Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyuman; Noh, Hongjun; Lim, Jaesung

    2015-01-01

    Ground-based pseudolite systems have some limitations, such as low vertical accuracy, multipath effects and near-far problems. These problems are not significant in airborne-based pseudolite systems. However, the monitoring of pseudolite positions is required because of the mobility of the platforms on which the pseudolites are mounted, and this causes performance degradation. To address these pseudolite system limitations, we propose an airborne relay-based regional positioning system that consists of a master station, reference stations, airborne relays and a user. In the proposed system, navigation signals are generated from the reference stations located on the ground and are relayed via the airborne relays. Unlike in conventional airborne-based systems, the user in the proposed system sequentially estimates both the locations of airborne relays and his/her own position. Therefore, a delay due to monitoring does not occur, and the accuracy is not affected by the movement of airborne relays. We conducted several simulations to evaluate the performance of the proposed system. Based on the simulation results, we demonstrated that the proposed system guarantees a higher accuracy than airborne-based pseudolite systems, and it is feasible despite the existence of clock offsets among reference stations. PMID:26029953

  1. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) (Global Carbon Cycle)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This bimonthly contractor progress report covers the operation, maintenance and data management of the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar and the Airborne Topographic Mapper. Monthly activities included: mission planning, sensor operation and calibration, data processing, data analysis, network development and maintenance and instrument maintenance engineering and fabrication.

  2. Global Test Range: Toward Airborne Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Thomas H.; Freudinger, Larry; DelFrate John H.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the planned global sensor network that will monitor the Earth's climate, and resources using airborne sensor systems. The vision is an intelligent, affordable Earth Observation System. Global Test Range is a lab developing trustworthy services for airborne instruments - a specialized Internet Service Provider. There is discussion of several current and planned missions.

  3. A Simple Method for Collecting Airborne Pollen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kevan, Peter G.; DiGiovanni, Franco; Ho, Rong H.; Taki, Hisatomo; Ferguson, Kristyn A.; Pawlowski, Agata K.

    2006-01-01

    Pollination is a broad area of study within biology. For many plants, pollen carried by wind is required for successful seed set. Airborne pollen also affects human health. To foster studies of airborne pollen, we introduce a simple device--the "megastigma"--for collecting pollen from the air. This device is flexible, yielding easily obtained data…

  4. The Continuous wavelet in airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, X.; Liu, L.

    2013-12-01

    Airborne gravimetry is an efficient method to recover medium and high frequency band of earth gravity over any region, especially inaccessible areas, which can measure gravity data with high accuracy,high resolution and broad range in a rapidly and economical way, and It will play an important role for geoid and geophysical exploration. Filtering methods for reducing high-frequency errors is critical to the success of airborne gravimetry due to Aircraft acceleration determination based on GPS.Tradiontal filters used in airborne gravimetry are FIR,IIR filer and so on. This study recommends an improved continuous wavelet to process airborne gravity data. Here we focus on how to construct the continuous wavelet filters and show their working principle. Particularly the technical parameters (window width parameter and scale parameter) of the filters are tested. Then the raw airborne gravity data from the first Chinese airborne gravimetry campaign are filtered using FIR-low pass filter and continuous wavelet filters to remove the noise. The comparison to reference data is performed to determinate external accuracy, which shows that continuous wavelet filters applied to airborne gravity in this thesis have good performances. The advantages of the continuous wavelet filters over digital filters are also introduced. The effectiveness of the continuous wavelet filters for airborne gravimetry is demonstrated through real data computation.

  5. Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communications Program (AVLOC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The design, development, and operation of airborne and ground-based laser communications and laser radar hardware is described in support of the Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communication program. The major emphasis is placed on the development of a highly flexible test bed for the evaluation of laser communications systems techniques and components in an operational environment.

  6. Passive Millimeter Wave Camera (PMMWC) at TRW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Engineers at TRW, Redondo Beach, California, inspect the Passive Millimeter Wave Camera, a weather-piercing camera designed to see through fog, clouds, smoke and dust. Operating in the millimeter wave portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, the camera creates visual-like video images of objects, people, runways, obstacles and the horizon. A demonstration camera (shown in photo) has been completed and is scheduled for checkout tests and flight demonstration. Engineer (left) holds a compact, lightweight circuit board containing 40 complete radiometers, including antenna, monolithic millimeter wave integrated circuit (MMIC) receivers and signal processing and readout electronics that forms the basis for the camera's 1040-element focal plane array.

  7. Passive Millimeter Wave Camera (PMMWC) at TRW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Engineers at TRW, Redondo Beach, California, inspect the Passive Millimeter Wave Camera, a weather-piercing camera designed to 'see' through fog, clouds, smoke and dust. Operating in the millimeter wave portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, the camera creates visual-like video images of objects, people, runways, obstacles and the horizon. A demonstration camera (shown in photo) has been completed and is scheduled for checkout tests and flight demonstration. Engineer (left) holds a compact, lightweight circuit board containing 40 complete radiometers, including antenna, monolithic millimeter wave integrated circuit (MMIC) receivers and signal processing and readout electronics that forms the basis for the camera's 1040-element focal plane array.

  8. HHEBBES! All sky camera system: status update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettonvil, F.

    2015-01-01

    A status update is given of the HHEBBES! All sky camera system. HHEBBES!, an automatic camera for capturing bright meteor trails, is based on a DSLR camera and a Liquid Crystal chopper for measuring the angular velocity. Purpose of the system is to a) recover meteorites; b) identify origin/parental bodies. In 2015, two new cameras were rolled out: BINGO! -alike HHEBBES! also in The Netherlands-, and POgLED, in Serbia. BINGO! is a first camera equipped with a longer focal length fisheye lens, to further increase the accuracy. Several minor improvements have been done and the data reduction pipeline was used for processing two prominent Dutch fireballs.

  9. Spectrometry with consumer-quality CMOS cameras.

    PubMed

    Scheeline, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Many modern spectrometric instruments use diode arrays, charge-coupled arrays, or CMOS cameras for detection and measurement. As portable or point-of-use instruments are desirable, one would expect that instruments using the cameras in cellular telephones and tablet computers would be the basis of numerous instruments. However, no mass market for such devices has yet developed. The difficulties in using megapixel CMOS cameras for scientific measurements are discussed, and promising avenues for instrument development reviewed. Inexpensive alternatives to use of the built-in camera are also mentioned, as the long-term question is whether it is better to overcome the constraints of CMOS cameras or to bypass them.

  10. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.L.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-12-31

    Ground-based surveys place personnel at risk due to the proximity of buried unexploded ordnance (UXO) items or by exposure to radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide stand-off capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected. The Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) is designed to detect and locate small-scale anomalies at hazardous sites using magnetic and electromagnetic survey techniques. The system consists of a remotely-piloted, radio-controlled, model helicopter (RCH) with flight computer, light-weight geophysical sensors, an electronic positioning system, a data telemetry system, and a computer base-station. The report describes GAUSS and its test results.

  11. Airborne cw Doppler lidar (ADOLAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahm, Stefan; Werner, Christian; Nagel, E.; Herrmann, H.; Klier, M.; Knott, H. P.; Haering, R.; Wildgruber, J.

    1994-12-01

    During the last 10 years the DLR container LDA (Laser Doppler Anemometer) was used for many wind related measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer. The experience out of this were used to construct an airborne Doppler lidar ADOLAR. Based on the available Doppler lidars it is now proposed to perform a campaign to demonstrate the concept of the spaceborne sensor ALADIN, and to answer some questions concerning the signal quality from clouds, water and land. For the continuous wave CO2 laser, the energy is focused by the telescope into the region of investigation. Some of the radiation is back scattered by small aerosol particles drifting with the wind speed through the sensing volume. The back scattered radiation is collected by the telescope and detected by coherent technique. With the laser Doppler method one gets the radial wind component. To determine the magnitude and direction of the horizontal wind, some form of scanning in azimuth and elevation is required. To keep the airborne system compact, the transceiver optics is directly coupled to a wedge scanner which provides the conical scan with the axis in Nadir direction from the aircraft. The system ADOLAR was tested in 1994. Results of the flight over the lake Ammersee are presented and are compared with the data of the inertial reference system of the aircraft.

  12. Airborne thermography applications in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Eduardo H.; Selles, Eduardo J.; Costanzo, Marcelo; Franco, Oscar; Diaz, Jose

    2002-03-01

    Forest fires in summer and sheep buried under the snow in winter have become important problems in the south of our country, in the region named Patagonia. We are studying to find a solution by means of an airborne imaging system whose construction we have just finished. It is a 12 channel multispectral airborne scanner system that can be mounted in a Guarani airplane or in a Learjet; the first is a non- pressurized aircraft for flight at low height and the second is a pressurized one for higher flights. The scanner system is briefly described. Their sensors can detect radiation from the ultra violet to the thermal infrared. The images are visualized in real time in a monitor screen and can be stored in the hard disc of the PC for later processing. The use of this scanner for some applications that include the prevention and fighting of forest fires and the study of the possibility of detection of sheep under snow in the Patagonia is now being accomplished. Theoretical and experimental results in fire detection and a theoretical model for studying the possibility of detection of the buried sheep are presented.

  13. Mini gamma camera, camera system and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randolph F.

    2001-01-01

    A gamma camera comprising essentially and in order from the front outer or gamma ray impinging surface: 1) a collimator, 2) a scintillator layer, 3) a light guide, 4) an array of position sensitive, high resolution photomultiplier tubes, and 5) printed circuitry for receipt of the output of the photomultipliers. There is also described, a system wherein the output supplied by the high resolution, position sensitive photomultipiler tubes is communicated to: a) a digitizer and b) a computer where it is processed using advanced image processing techniques and a specific algorithm to calculate the center of gravity of any abnormality observed during imaging, and c) optional image display and telecommunications ports.

  14. Broadband Terahertz Computed Tomography Using a 5k-pixel Real-time THz Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichopoulos, Georgios C.; Sertel, Kubilay

    2015-07-01

    We present a novel THz computed tomography system that enables fast 3-dimensional imaging and spectroscopy in the 0.6-1.2 THz band. The system is based on a new real-time broadband THz camera that enables rapid acquisition of multiple cross-sectional images required in computed tomography. Tomographic reconstruction is achieved using digital images from the densely-packed large-format (80×64) focal plane array sensor located behind a hyper-hemispherical silicon lens. Each pixel of the sensor array consists of an 85 μm × 92 μm lithographically fabricated wideband dual-slot antenna, monolithically integrated with an ultra-fast diode tuned to operate in the 0.6-1.2 THz regime. Concurrently, optimum impedance matching was implemented for maximum pixel sensitivity, enabling 5 frames-per-second image acquisition speed. As such, the THz computed tomography system generates diffraction-limited resolution cross-section images as well as the three-dimensional models of various opaque and partially transparent objects. As an example, an over-the-counter vitamin supplement pill is imaged and its material composition is reconstructed. The new THz camera enables, for the first time, a practical application of THz computed tomography for non-destructive evaluation and biomedical imaging.

  15. Initial laboratory evaluation of color video cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P L

    1991-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has considerable experience with monochrome video cameras used in alarm assessment video systems. Most of these systems, used for perimeter protection, were designed to classify rather than identify an intruder. Monochrome cameras are adequate for that application and were selected over color cameras because of their greater sensitivity and resolution. There is a growing interest in the identification function of security video systems for both access control and insider protection. Color information is useful for identification purposes, and color camera technology is rapidly changing. Thus, Sandia National Laboratories established an ongoing program to evaluate color solid-state cameras. Phase one resulted in the publishing of a report titled, Initial Laboratory Evaluation of Color Video Cameras (SAND--91-2579).'' It gave a brief discussion of imager chips and color cameras and monitors, described the camera selection, detailed traditional test parameters and procedures, and gave the results of the evaluation of twelve cameras. In phase two six additional cameras were tested by the traditional methods and all eighteen cameras were tested by newly developed methods. This report details both the traditional and newly developed test parameters and procedures, and gives the results of both evaluations.

  16. Phenology cameras observing boreal ecosystems of Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltoniemi, Mikko; Böttcher, Kristin; Aurela, Mika; Kolari, Pasi; Tanis, Cemal Melih; Linkosalmi, Maiju; Loehr, John; Metsämäki, Sari; Nadir Arslan, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Cameras have become useful tools for monitoring seasonality of ecosystems. Low-cost cameras facilitate validation of other measurements and allow extracting some key ecological features and moments from image time series. We installed a network of phenology cameras at selected ecosystem research sites in Finland. Cameras were installed above, on the level, or/and below the canopies. Current network hosts cameras taking time lapse images in coniferous and deciduous forests as well as at open wetlands offering thus possibilities to monitor various phenological and time-associated events and elements. In this poster, we present our camera network and give examples of image series use for research. We will show results about the stability of camera derived color signals, and based on that discuss about the applicability of cameras in monitoring time-dependent phenomena. We will also present results from comparisons between camera-derived color signal time series and daily satellite-derived time series (NVDI, NDWI, and fractional snow cover) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) at selected spruce and pine forests and in a wetland. We will discuss the applicability of cameras in supporting phenological observations derived from satellites, by considering the possibility of cameras to monitor both above and below canopy phenology and snow.

  17. Characterization of the Series 1000 Camera System

    SciTech Connect

    Kimbrough, J; Moody, J; Bell, P; Landen, O

    2004-04-07

    The National Ignition Facility requires a compact network addressable scientific grade CCD camera for use in diagnostics ranging from streak cameras to gated x-ray imaging cameras. Due to the limited space inside the diagnostic, an analog and digital input/output option in the camera controller permits control of both the camera and the diagnostic by a single Ethernet link. The system consists of a Spectral Instruments Series 1000 camera, a PC104+ controller, and power supply. The 4k by 4k CCD camera has a dynamic range of 70 dB with less than 14 electron read noise at a 1MHz readout rate. The PC104+ controller includes 16 analog inputs, 4 analog outputs and 16 digital input/output lines for interfacing to diagnostic instrumentation. A description of the system and performance characterization is reported.

  18. Wide-Band Radar for Measuring Thickness of Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gogineni, Prasad; Kanagaratnam, Pannir; Holt, M.

    2008-01-01

    A wide-band penetrating radar system for measuring the thickness of sea ice is under development. The need for this or a similar system arises as follows: Spatial and temporal variations in the thickness of sea ice are important indicators of heat fluxes between the ocean and atmosphere and, hence, are important indicators of climate change in polar regions. A remote-sensing system that could directly measure the thickness of sea ice over a wide thickness range from aboard an aircraft or satellite would be of great scientific value. Obtaining thickness measurements over a wide region at weekly or monthly time intervals would contribute significantly to understanding of changes in the spatial distribution and of the mass balance of sea ice. A prototype of the system was designed on the basis of computational simulations directed toward understanding what signal frequencies are needed to satisfy partly competing requirements to detect both bottom and top ice surfaces, obtain adequate penetration despite high attenuation in the lossy sea-ice medium, and obtain adequate resolution, all over a wide thickness range. The prototype of the system is of the frequency-modulation, continuous-wave (FM-CW) type. At a given time, the prototype functions in either of two frequency-band/operational-mode combinations that correspond to two thickness ranges: a lower-frequency (50 to 250 MHz) mode for measuring thickness greater than about 1 m, and a higher frequency (300 to 1,300 MHz) mode for measuring thickness less than about 1 m. The bandwidth in the higher-frequency (lesser-thickness) mode is adequate for a thickness resolution of 15 cm; the bandwidth in the lower-frequency (greater-thickness) mode is adequate for a thickness resolution of 75 cm. Although a thickness resolution of no more than 25 cm is desired for scientific purposes, the 75-cm resolution was deemed acceptable for the purpose of demonstrating feasibility. The prototype was constructed as a modified version of a

  19. PDX infrared TV camera system

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, R.A.

    1981-08-01

    An infrared TV camera system has been developed for use on PDX. This system is capable of measuring the temporal and spatial energy deposition on the limiters and divertor neutralizer plates; time resolutions of 1 ms are achievable. The system has been used to measure the energy deposition on the PDX neutralizer plates and the temperature jump of limiter surfaces during a pulse. The energy scrapeoff layer is found to have characteristic dimensions of the order of a cm. The measurement of profiles is very sensitive to variations in the thermal emissivity of the surfaces.

  20. Cryogenic mechanism for ISO camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luciano, G.

    1987-12-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) camera configuration, architecture, materials, tribology, motorization, and development status are outlined. The operating temperature is 2 to 3 K, at 2.5 to 18 microns. Selected material is a titanium alloy, with MoS2/TiC lubrication. A stepping motor drives the ball-bearing mounted wheels to which the optical elements are fixed. Model test results are satisfactory, and also confirm the validity of the test facilities, particularly for vibration tests at 4K.