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Sample records for airbreathing pulse detonation

  1. Airbreathing Pulse Detonation Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.; Yungster, Shaye

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents performance results for pulse detonation engines taking into account the effects of dissociation and recombination. The amount of sensible heat recovered through recombination in the PDE chamber and exhaust process was found to be significant. These results have an impact on the specific thrust, impulse and fuel consumption of the PDE.

  2. Airbreathing Pulse Detonation Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.; Yungster, Shaye

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents performance results for pulse detonation engines (PDE) taking into account the effects of dissociation and recombination. The amount of sensible heat recovered through recombination in the PDE chamber and exhaust process was found to be significant. These results have an impact on the specific thrust, impulse and fuel consumption of the PDE.

  3. Analysis of Laser-Generated Impulse In An Airbreathing Pulsed Detonation Engine: Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Jacques C.; Myrabo, Leik N.

    2005-04-01

    An investigation is performed on an airbreathing laser propulsion (LP) system designed to propel a 1.4 m diameter, 120-kg (dry mass) vehicle called the Lightcraft Technology Demonstrator (LTD) into low Earth orbit, along with its opto-electronics payload. The LTD concept led directly to the model ♯200 lightcraft — recently demonstrated in laboratory and flight experiments at White Sands Missile Range, NM at the High Energy Laser Systems Test Facility (HELSTF), using the 10-kW PLVTS CO2 laser. The pulsed detonation wave engine (PDE) employs repetitively ignited, laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves to develop thrust by expanding high pressure blast waves over an annular, interior shroud surface. Numerical simulation of thruster impulse is accomplished with a 1-D cylindrical model of blast waves propagating radially outward from a laser-generated `line-source' of high temperature, high pressure air. External airflow over the LTD structure is also analyzed to predict basic engine/vehicle drag characteristics, including inlet total pressure recovery, and captured air mass flow rate — all projected vs. flight Mach number and altitude.

  4. Thermodynamic Cycle and CFD Analyses for Hydrogen Fueled Air-breathing Pulse Detonation Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.; Yungster, Shaye

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a thermodynamic cycle analysis of a pulse detonation engine (PDE) using a hydrogen-air mixture at static conditions. The cycle performance results, namely the specific thrust, fuel consumption and impulse are compared to a single cycle CFD analysis for a detonation tube which considers finite rate chemistry. The differences in the impulse values were indicative of the additional performance potential attainable in a PDE.

  5. Role of Air-Breathing Pulse Detonation Engines in High Speed Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.; Lee, Jin-Ho; Anderberg, Michael O.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of flight Mach number on the relative performance of pulse detonation engines and gas turbine engines is investigated. The effect of ram and mechanical compression on combustion inlet temperature and the subsequent sensible heat release is determined. Comparison of specific thrust, fuel consumption and impulse for the two engines show the relative benefits over the Mach number range.

  6. Optimal Area Profiles for Ideal Single Nozzle Air-Breathing Pulse Detonation Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of cross-sectional area variation on idealized Pulse Detonation Engine performance are examined numerically. A quasi-one-dimensional, reacting, numerical code is used as the kernel of an algorithm that iteratively determines the correct sequencing of inlet air, inlet fuel, detonation initiation, and cycle time to achieve a limit cycle with specified fuel fraction, and volumetric purge fraction. The algorithm is exercised on a tube with a cross sectional area profile containing two degrees of freedom: overall exit-to-inlet area ratio, and the distance along the tube at which continuous transition from inlet to exit area begins. These two parameters are varied over three flight conditions (defined by inlet total temperature, inlet total pressure and ambient static pressure) and the performance is compared to a straight tube. It is shown that compared to straight tubes, increases of 20 to 35 percent in specific impulse and specific thrust are obtained with tubes of relatively modest area change. The iterative algorithm is described, and its limitations are noted and discussed. Optimized results are presented showing performance measurements, wave diagrams, and area profiles. Suggestions for future investigation are also discussed.

  7. Pulse Detonation Engine Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2001-01-01

    Pulse Detonation Engine Technology is currently being investigated at Glenn for both airbreathing and rocket propulsion applications. The potential for both mechanical simplicity and high efficiency due to the inherent near-constant-volume combustion process, may make Pulse Detonation Engines (PDE's) well suited for a number of mission profiles. Assessment of PDE cycles requires a simulation capability that is both fast and accurate. It should capture the essential physics of the system, yet run at speeds that allow parametric analysis. A quasi-one-dimensional, computational-fluid-dynamics-based simulation has been developed that may meet these requirements. The Euler equations of mass, momentum, and energy have been used along with a single reactive species transport equation, and submodels to account for dominant loss mechanisms (e.g., viscous losses, heat transfer, and valving) to successfully simulate PDE cycles. A high-resolution numerical integration scheme was chosen to capture the discontinuities associated with detonation, and robust boundary condition procedures were incorporated to accommodate flow reversals that may arise during a given cycle. The accompanying graphs compare experimentally measured and computed performance over a range of operating conditions for a particular PDE. Experimental data were supplied by Fred Schauer and Jeff Stutrud from the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson AFB and by Royce Bradley from Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc. The left graph shows thrust and specific impulse, Isp, as functions of equivalence ratio for a PDE cycle in which the tube is completely filled with a detonable hydrogen/air mixture. The right graph shows thrust and specific impulse as functions of the fraction of the tube that is filled with a stoichiometric mixture of hydrogen and air. For both figures, the operating frequency was 16 Hz. The agreement between measured and computed values is quite good, both in terms of trend and

  8. Numerical simulations of a pulsed detonation wave augmentation device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc; Adelman, Henry; Menees, Gene P.

    1993-01-01

    We present here the concept of a hybrid engine for Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) air-breathing hypersonic vehicle. This concept relies on the use of pulsed detonation waves, both for thrust generation and mixing/combustion augmentation. We describe the principles behind the engine concept, which we call the Pulsed Detonation Wave Augmentor (PDWA). We demonstrate the principles of operation for two possible configurations through numerical simulations. We also attempt a first approximation to engine design, and propose various applications.

  9. Pulse Detonation Engines for High Speed Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    2002-01-01

    Revolutionary concepts in propulsion are required in order to achieve high-speed cruise capability in the atmosphere and for low cost reliable systems for earth to orbit missions. One of the advanced concepts under study is the air-breathing pulse detonation engine. Additional work remains in order to establish the role and performance of a PDE in flight applications, either as a stand-alone device or as part of a combined cycle system. In this paper, we shall offer a few remarks on some of these remaining issues, i.e., combined cycle systems, nozzles and exhaust systems and thrust per unit frontal area limitations. Currently, an intensive experimental and numerical effort is underway in order to quantify the propulsion performance characteristics of this device. In this paper, we shall highlight our recent efforts to elucidate the propulsion potential of pulse detonation engines and their possible application to high-speed or hypersonic systems.

  10. Confined Detonations and Pulse Detonation Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Explosive mixtures of liquid (automobile gasoline of Octane number from 72 to 93, aviation gasoline, n-hexane, ethanol , and acetone) and gaseous...conditions at the open end of the PDE at tj < 1 < ti are derived from the self-similar solutions [5] as: Pex = P,(72 + 1)72(Y2+1)/(721) Uex = aex - Dcj...y2 1)(72 + l)(.Y2+1)/(Y2-1) Pex Uex Dc 3 L (7201)(2+1+/(Y-1) a 3 2 208 PULSE DETONATION ENGINES During a part of the exhaust phase, tj < t < tnl, the

  11. Pulse Detonation Physiochemical and Exhaust Relaxation Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    knowledge of detonation initiation, propagation, and blow-down needed to develop a pulse detonation engine ( PDE ) that will function on hydrocarbon fuels...phenomena required to operate a PDE . Detonation tube exhaust blow-down conditions, which are predicted to have a significant impact upon performance...to establish the scientific knowledge of detonation initiation, propagation, and blow-down needed to develop a pulse detonation engine ( PDE ) that will

  12. Investigation of Sustained Detonation Devices: the Pulse Detonation Engine-Crossover System and the Rotating Detonation Engine System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Robert B.

    An experimental study is conducted on a Pulse Detonation Engine-Crossover System to investigate the feasibility of repeated, shock-initiated combustion and characterize the initiation performance. A PDE-crossover system can decrease deflagration-to-detonation transition length while employing a single spark source to initiate a multi-PDE system. Visualization of a transferred shock wave propagating through a clear channel reveals a complex shock train behind the leading shock. Shock wave Mach number and decay rate remains constant for varying crossover tube geometries and operational frequencies. A temperature gradient forms within the crossover tube due to forward flow of high temperature ionized gas into the crossover tube from the driver PDE and backward flow of ionized gas into the crossover tube from the driven PDE, which can cause intermittent auto-ignition of the driver PDE. Initiation performance in the driven PDE is strongly dependent on initial driven PDE skin temperature in the shock wave reflection region. An array of detonation tubes connected with crossover tubes is developed using optimized parameters and successful operation utilizing shock-initiated combustion through shock wave reflection is achieved and sustained. Finally, an air-breathing, PDE-Crossover System is developed to characterize the feasibility of shock-initiated combustion within an air-breathing pulse detonation engine. The initiation effectiveness of shock-initiated combustion is compared to spark discharge and detonation injection through a pre-detonator. In all cases, shock-initiated combustion produces improved initiation performance over spark discharge and comparable detonation transition run-up lengths relative to pre-detonator initiation. A computational study characterizes the mixing processes and injection flow field within a rotating detonation engine. Injection parameters including reactant flow rate, reactant injection area, placement of the fuel injection, and fuel

  13. Direct Initiation Through Detonation Branching in a Pulsed Detonation Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    important features noted ................................. 33  Figure 20. GM Quad 4 engine head used as the PDE research engine with the detonation tube...Deflagration to Detonation Transition EF – Engine Frequency FF – Fill Fraction NPT – National Pipe Thread MPT – Male National Pipe Thread PDE – Pulsed... Detonation Engines ( PDE ) has increased greatly in recent years due in part to the potential for increased thermal efficiency derived from constant

  14. Dissociation and Recombination Effects on the Performance of Pulse Detonation Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes major theoretical results for pulse detonation engine performance taking into account real gas chemistry, as well as significant performance differences resulting from the presence of ram and compression heating. An unsteady CFD analysis, as well as a thermodynamic cycle analysis, was conducted in order to determine the actual and the ideal performance for an air-breathing pulse detonation engine (PDE) using either a hydrogen-air or ethylene-air mixture over a flight Mach number range from 0 to 4. The results clearly elucidate the competitive regime of PDE application relative to ramjets and gas turbines.

  15. Pulse detonation assembly and hybrid engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasheed, Adam (Inventor); Dean, Anthony John (Inventor); Vandervort, Christian Lee (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A pulse detonation (PD) assembly includes a number of PD chambers adapted to expel respective detonation product streams and a number of barriers disposed between respective pairs of PD chambers. The barriers define, at least in part, a number of sectors that contain at least one PD chamber. A hybrid engine includes a number of PD chambers and barriers. The hybrid engine further includes a turbine assembly having at least one turbine stage, being in flow communication with the PD chambers and being configured to be at least partially driven by the detonation product streams. A segmented hybrid engine includes a number of PD chambers and segments configured to receive and direct the detonation product streams from respective PD chambers. The segmented hybrid engine further includes a turbine assembly configured to be at least partially driven by the detonation product streams.

  16. Pulsed Detonation Operation of an Axial Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munday, David; St. George, Andrew; Driscoll, Robert; Gutmark, Ephraim; Gas Dynamics and Propulsion Lab Team

    2013-11-01

    A detonation is by its nature a more thermodynamically efficient combustion mode than deflagration. Several attempts are underway to integrate detonating combustion into turbomachines in order to realize the increased efficiency available, save resources and reduce emissions. One approach to this challenge is to employ pulsed detonations as from pulsed detonation engines (PDEs) and use the pulsed outflow to drive a turbine. The difficulty with this approach is that turbines, especially the more efficient axial turbines suffer in efficiency when their inflow is pulsed. At present there is not even a commonly acknowledged turbine efficiency measure which works reasonably for a pulsed input. The present work investigates the efficiency of an axial turbine with pulsed flow. Initial tests are performed with non-combusting flow in order to study the influence of pulsation on the turbine performance. This cold flow will admit a broader range of instrumentation which can be inserted within the turbine. This allows time-resolved measure of the flow angles which have a pronounced effect on the turbine performance. Later tests with detonating inflow yield global measures and these are compared to the non-combusting results. Work sponsored by Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc.

  17. Experimental investigation of a unique airbreathing pulsed laser propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myrabo, L. N.; Nagamatsu, H. T.; Manka, C.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Investigations were conducted into unique methods of converting pulsed laser energy into propulsive thrust across a flat impulse surface under atmospheric conditions. The propulsion experiments were performed with a 1-micron neodymium-glass laser at the Space Plasma Branch of the Naval Research Laboratory. Laser-induced impulse was measured dynamically by ballistic pendulums and statically using piezoelectric pressure transducers on a stationary impulse surface. The principal goal was to explore methods for increasing the impulse coupling performance of airbreathing laser-propulsion engines. A magnetohydrodynamic thrust augmentation effect was discovered when a tesla-level magnetic field was applied perpendicular to the impulse surface. The impulse coupling coefficient performance doubled and continued to improve with increasing laser-pulse energies. The resultant performance of 180 to 200 N-s/MJ was found to be comparable to that of the earliest afterburning turbojets.

  18. Preliminary Studies of a Pulsed Detonation Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc; Adelman, H. G.; Menees, G. P.; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    In the new era of space exploration, there is a strong need for more efficient, cheaper and more reliable propulsion devices. With dramatic increase in specific impulse, the overall mass of fuel to be lifted into orbit is decreased, and this leads, in turn, to much lower mass requirements at lift-off, higher payload ratios and lower launch costs. The Pulsed Detonation engine (PDE) has received much attention lately due to its unique combination of simplicity, light-weight and efficiency. Current investigations focus principally on its use as a low speed, airbreathing engine, although other applications have also been proposed. Its use as a rocket propulsion device was first proposed in 1988 by the present authors. The superior efficiency of the Pulsed Detonation Rocket Engine (PDRE) is due to the near constant volume combustion process of a detonation wave. Our preliminary estimates suggest that the PDRE is theoretically capable of achieving specific impulses as high as 720 sec, a dramatic improvement over the current 480 sec of conventional rocket engines, making it competitive with nuclear thermal rockets. In addition to this remarkable efficiency, the PDRE may eliminate the need for high pressure cryogenic turbopumps, a principal source of failures. The heat transfer rates are also much lower, eliminating the need for nozzle cooling. Overall, the engine is more reliable and has a much lower weight. This paper will describe in detail the operation of the PDRE and calculate its performance, through numerical simulations. Engineering issues will be addressed and discussed, and the impact on mission profiles will also be presented. Finally, the performance of the PDRE using in-situ resources, such as CO and O2 from the martian atmosphere, will also be computed.

  19. Transient Heat Transfer Properties in a Pulse Detonation Combustor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    strategies for future systems. 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 89 14. SUBJECT TERMS Pulse Detonation Engines, PDE , Heat Transfer 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY...GUI Graphical User Interface NPS Naval Postgraduate School PDC Pulse Detonation Combustion PDE Pulse Detonation Engine RPL Rocket...a tactical missile with a Pulse Detonation Engine ( PDE ) and provide greater range for the same amount of fuel as compared to other current

  20. Branch Detonation of a Pulse Detonation Engine With Flash Vaporized JP-8

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    Mark F. Reeder (Member) date iii Abstract Pulse Detonation Engines ( PDE ) operating on liquid hydrocarbon fuels are... Detonation Transition FF – Fill Fraction FN – Flow Number NPT – National Pipe Thread OH – Hydroxyl PDE – Pulse Detonation Engine PF – Purge...Introduction Motivation Research on Pulsed Detonation Engines ( PDE ) has increased over the past ten years due to the potential for increased

  1. Pulse Detonation Engine Test Bed Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.

    2002-01-01

    A detonation is a supersonic combustion wave. A Pulse Detonation Engine (PDE) repetitively creates a series of detonation waves to take advantage of rapid burning and high peak pressures to efficiently produce thrust. NASA Glenn Research Center's Combustion Branch has developed a PDE test bed that can reproduce the operating conditions that might be encountered in an actual engine. It allows the rapid and cost-efficient evaluation of the technical issues and technologies associated with these engines. The test bed is modular in design. It consists of various length sections of both 2- and 2.6- in. internal-diameter combustor tubes. These tubes can be bolted together to create a variety of combustor configurations. A series of bosses allow instrumentation to be inserted on the tubes. Dynamic pressure sensors and heat flux gauges have been used to characterize the performance of the test bed. The PDE test bed is designed to utilize an existing calorimeter (for heat load measurement) and windowed (for optical access) combustor sections. It uses hydrogen as the fuel, and oxygen and nitrogen are mixed to simulate air. An electronic controller is used to open the hydrogen and air valves (or a continuous flow of air is used) and to fire the spark at the appropriate times. Scheduled tests on the test bed include an evaluation of the pumping ability of the train of detonation waves for use in an ejector and an evaluation of the pollutants formed in a PDE combustor. Glenn's Combustion Branch uses the National Combustor Code (NCC) to perform numerical analyses of PDE's as well as to evaluate alternative detonative combustion devices. Pulse Detonation Engine testbed.

  2. Analysis of Pulsed Laser-Generated Impulse in AN Advanced Airbreathing Thruster.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Jacques Constant

    This thesis describes the study of an advanced beam-powered propulsion system, called an External Radiation -Heated (ERH) thruster. The repetitively-pulsed, airbreathing engine develops thrust by expanding high pressure, radiation -heated gas over an annular shroud surface. The blast waves are generated by laser radiation heating of air using Laser Supported Detonation (LSD) waves. The phenomenology of LSD waves will be described in detail, as will the blast waves and resultant impulse they produce. Analytical simulation of the ERH thruster is accomplished with a one-dimensional model of blast waves propagating uniformly and radially outward from a laser -generated "line source" of high pressure, high temperature gas. Cylindrical blast wave scaling relationships developed by Sedov are employed in this model. The possibility of including other physical phenomena (e.g., viscosity, radiation, conduction or real gas effects) in the analysis will be reviewed. The analyses for the ERH thruster model are performed for a sample vehicle point design. This vehicle, known as the "Lightcraft Technology Demonstrator" (LTD), may be constructed within the next five years to illustrate the potential of Earth-to-Orbit laser propulsion. The external flow over the LTD vehicle was analyzed to determine basic drag characteristics, inlet total pressure recovery and captured air mass flow rate--all projected as functions of flight Mach number and altitude. The ERH thruster performance analysis indicates that the optimum LTD inlet air gap is about 3 cm around the 100 cm diameter centerbody, for transonic "refresh" air flow over the impulse surface. In this analysis, the principal indicator used to predict engine performance was the "impulse coupling coefficient (CC)"; i.e., the thrust developed per unit laser power input. Coupling coefficients up to 600-700 Newtons/Megawatt were found to be feasible, which are an order of magnitude larger than those for laser-heated rockets. For maximum

  3. Pulse Detonation Rocket Magnetohydrodynamic Power Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, R. J.; Jones, J. E.; Dobson, C. C.; Cole, J. W.; Thompson, B. R.; Plemmons, D. H.; Turner, M. W.

    2003-01-01

    The production of onboard electrical power by pulse detonation engines is problematic in that they generate no shaft power; however, pulse detonation driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation represents one intriguing possibility for attaining self-sustained engine operation and generating large quantities of burst power for onboard electrical systems. To examine this possibility further, a simple heat-sink apparatus was developed for experimentally investigating pulse detonation driven MHD generator concepts. The hydrogen oxygen fired driver was a 90 cm long stainless steel tube having a 4.5 cm square internal cross section and a short Schelkin spiral near the head end to promote rapid formation of a detonation wave. The tube was intermittently filled to atmospheric pressure and seeded with a CsOH/methanol prior to ignition by electrical spark. The driver exhausted through an aluminum nozzle having an area contraction ratio of A*/A(sub zeta) = 1/10 and an area expansion ratio of A(sub zeta)/A* = 3.2 (as limited by available magnet bore size). The nozzle exhausted through a 24-electrode segmented Faraday channel (30.5 cm active length), which was inserted into a 0.6 T permanent magnet assembly. Initial experiments verified proper drive operation with and without the nozzle attachment, and head end pressure and time resolved thrust measurements were acquired. The exhaust jet from the nozzle was interrogated using a polychromatic microwave interferometer yielding an electron number density on the order of 10(exp 12)/cm at the generator entrance. In this case, MHD power generation experiments suffered from severe near-electrode voltage drops and low MHD interaction; i.e., low flow velocity, due to an inherent physical constraint on expansion with the available magnet. Increased scaling, improved seeding techniques, higher magnetic fields, and higher expansion ratios are expected to greatly improve performance.

  4. Plasma Sensor Measurements in Pulse Detonation Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlis, Eric; Marshall, Curtis; Corke, Thomas; Gogineni, Sivaram

    2014-11-01

    Measurements have been conducted in a pulse detonation and rotating detonation engine using a newly developed plasma sensor. This sensor relies on the novel approach of using an ac-driven, weakly-ionized electrical discharge as the main sensing element. The advantages of this approach include a native high bandwidth of 1 MHz without the need for electronic frequency compensation, a dual-mode capability that provides sensitivity to multiple flow parameters, including velocity, pressure, temperature, and gas-species, and a simple and robust design making it very cost effective. The sensor design is installation-compatible with conventional sensors commonly used in gas-turbine research such as the Kulite dynamic pressure sensor while providing much better longevity. Developmental work was performed in high temperature facilities that are relevant to the propulsion and high-speed research community. This includes tests performed in a J85 augmentor at full afterburner and pulse-detonation engines at the University of Cincinnati (UC) at temperatures approaching 2760°C (5000°F).

  5. Integrated Pulse Detonation Propulsion and Magnetohydrodynamic Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, R. J.; Lyles, Garry M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The prospects for realizing an integrated pulse detonation propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power system are examined. First, energy requirements for direct detonation initiation of various fuel-oxygen and fuel-air mixtures are deduced from available experimental data and theoretical models. Second, the pumping power requirements for effective chamber scavenging are examined through the introduction of a scavenging ratio parameter and a scavenging efficiency parameter. A series of laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the basic engineering performance characteristics of a pulse detonation-driven MHD electric power generator. In these experiments, stoichiometric oxy-acetylene mixtures seeded with a cesium hydroxide/methanol spray were detonated at atmospheric pressure in a 1-m-long tube having an i.d. of 2.54 cm. Experiments with a plasma diagnostic channel attached to the end of the tube confirmed the attainment of detonation conditions (p(sub 2)/p(sub 1) approx. 34 and D approx. 2,400 m/sec) and enabled the direct measurement of current density and electrical conductivity (=6 S/m) behind the detonation wave front. In a second set of experiments, a 30-cm-long continuous electrode Faraday channel, having a height of 2.54 cm and a width of 2 cm, was attached to the end of the tube using an area transition duct. The Faraday channel was inserted in applied magnetic fields of 0.6 and 0.95 T. and the electrodes were connected to an active loading circuit to characterize power extraction dependence on load impedance while also simulating higher effective magnetic induction. The experiments indicated peak power extraction at a load impedance between 5 and 10 Ohm. The measured power density was in reasonable agreement with a simple electrodynamic model incorporating a correction for near-electrode potential losses. The time-resolved thrust characteristics of the system were also measured, and it was found that the MHD interaction exerted a

  6. Integrated Pulse Detonation Propulsion and Magnetohydrodynamic Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.

    2001-01-01

    The prospects for realizing an integrated pulse detonation propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power system are examined. First, energy requirements for direct detonation initiation of various fuel-oxygen and fuel-air mixtures are deduced from available experimental data and theoretical models. Second, the pumping power requirements for effective chamber scavenging are examined through the introduction of a scavenging ratio parameter and a scavenging efficiency parameter. A series of laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the basic engineering performance characteristics of a pulse detonation-driven MHD electric power generator. In these experiments, stoichiometric oxy-acetylene mixtures seeded with a cesium hydroxide/methanol spray were detonated at atmospheric pressure in a 1-m-long tube having an i.d. of 2.54 cm. Experiments with a plasma diagnostic channel attached to the end of the tube confirmed the attainment of detonation conditions (p2/p1 approximately 34 and D approximately 2,400 m/sec) and enabled the direct measurement of current density and electrical conductivity (approximately = 6 S/m) behind the detonation wave front, In a second set of experiments, a 30-cm-long continuous electrode Faraday channel, having a height of 2.54 cm and a width of 2 cm, was attached to the end of the tube using an area transition duct. The Faraday channel was inserted in applied magnetic fields of 0.6 and 0.95 T, and the electrodes were connected to an active loading circuit to characterize power extraction dependence on load impedance while also simulating higher effective magnetic induction. The experiments indicated peak power extraction at a load impedance between 5 and 10 Omega. The measured power density was in reasonable agreement with a simple electrodynamic model incorporating a correction for near-electrode potential losses. The time-resolved thrust characteristics of the system were also measured, and it was found that the NM interaction

  7. Performance Characterization of Swept Ramp Obstacle Fields in Pulse Detonation Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    field of practical obstacle geometries. 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 97 14. SUBJECT TERMS Pulse Detonation , PDE , Transient Plasma Ignition, TPI, Swept... Detonation Transition NI - National Instruments NPS - Naval Postgraduate School PDC - Pulse Detonation Combustor PDE - Pulse Detonation Engine...with incredible grace. xvi THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 1 I. INTRODUCTION Pulse detonation engines ( PDE ) continue to be explored due to

  8. Initiation Mechanisms of Low-loss Swept-ramp Obstacles for Deflagration to Detonation Transition in Pulse Detonation Combustors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    MECHANISMS OF LOW-LOSS SWEPT-RAMP OBSTACLES FOR DEFLAGRATION TO DETONATION TRANSITION IN PULSE DETONATION COMBUSTORS by Charles B. Myers IV...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Initiation Mechanisms of Low-loss Swept-ramp Obstacles for Deflagration to Detonation Transition in Pulse Detonation Combustors 6...DISTRIBUTION CODE A 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) In order to enhance the performance of pulse detonation combustors (PDCs), an efficient

  9. Pulse Detonation Rocket MHD Power Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A pulse detonation research engine (MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) Model PDRE (Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine) G-2) has been developed for the purpose of examining integrated propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic power generation applications. The engine is based on a rectangular cross-section tube coupled to a converging-diverging nozzle, which is in turn attached to a segmented Faraday channel. As part of the shakedown testing activity, the pressure wave was interrogated along the length of the engine while running on hydrogen/oxygen propellants. Rapid transition to detonation wave propagation was insured through the use of a short Schelkin spiral near the head of the engine. The measured detonation wave velocities were in excess of 2500 m/s in agreement with the theoretical C-J velocity. The engine was first tested in a straight tube configuration without a nozzle, and the time resolved thrust was measured simultaneously with the head-end pressure. Similar measurements were made with the converging-diverging nozzle attached. The time correlation of the thrust and head-end pressure data was found to be excellent. The major purpose of the converging-diverging nozzle was to configure the engine for driving an MHD generator for the direct production of electrical power. Additional tests were therefore necessary in which seed (cesium-hydroxide dissolved in methanol) was directly injected into the engine as a spray. The exhaust plume was then interrogated with a microwave interferometer in an attempt to characterize the plasma conditions, and emission spectroscopy measurements were also acquired. Data reduction efforts indicate that the plasma exhaust is very highly ionized, although there is some uncertainty at this time as to the relative abundance of negative OH ions. The emission spectroscopy data provided some indication of the species in the exhaust as well as a measurement of temperature. A 24-electrode-pair segmented Faraday channel and 0.6 Tesla permanent

  10. Investigation of pulse detonation engines; theory, design and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizcaino, Jeff

    Detonation and constant volume combustion has been known to the scientific community for some time but only recently has active research been done into its applications. Detonation based engines have received much attention in the last two decades because of its simple design and potential benefits to the aerospace industry. It is then the goal of this study to provide a background into detonation theory and application and establish the basis for future detonation based research at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. In this paper we will discuss the experimental aspects of building, testing, and analysis of a pulsed detonation tube including the development of a pulsed detonation testbed and analysis via computational fluid dynamics.

  11. Heat Transfer Experiments on a Pulse Detonation Driven Combustor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    steps that need to take place before such a hybrid is successfully developed. PDEs obtain their increased efficiency by means of detonation , a pressure...combustion in the Brayton cycle. A PDE utilizes detonations , which offer much higher pressures at the site of fuel ignition, generating less...HEAT TRANSFER EXPERIMENTS ON A PULSE DETONATION DRIVEN COMBUSTOR THESIS Nicholas C. Longo, Captain, USAF AFIT/GAE/ENY/11-M18

  12. Analysis of pulse detonation turbojet engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutthivithayarak, Ronnachai

    2011-12-01

    Research over the last two decades has shown the potential advantages of pulse detonation engines (PDEs) over existing aero-engines in terms of improved thermodynamics efficiency, improved thrust performance, simplicity of design, and flexibility to operate over a wide speed range. The inherently unsteady characteristic of PDEs makes it difficulty to analyze and evaluate their performance. The conventional method that relies on steady-state assumptions cannot be directly applied. PDE studies have to employ unsteady gasdynamics behavior. In this study, the thermodynamic cycle of a PDE, which can be called the ZND cycle, is theoretically analyzed. A parametric analysis of turbojet PDEs is considered for both ideal and non-ideal cases. The conventional turbojet with a Brayton cycle is brought in the comparison to verify that PDEs can provide better performance.

  13. Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Gasdynamics and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, C. I.

    2003-01-01

    Pulse detonation engines (PDB) have generated considerable research interest in recent years as a chemical propulsion system potentially offering improved performance and reduced complexity compared to conventional gas turbines and rocket engines. The detonative mode of combustion employed by these devices offers a theoretical thermodynamic advantage over the constant-pressure deflagrative combustion mode used in conventional engines. However, the unsteady blowdown process intrinsic to all pulse detonation devices has made realistic estimates of the actual propulsive performance of PDES problematic. The recent review article by Kailasanath highlights some of the progress that has been made in comparing the available experimental measurements with analytical and numerical models.

  14. Toward a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Drummond, J. Philip

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the continued development of an actuator, energized by pulsed detonations, that provides a pulsed jet suitable for flow control in high-speed applications. A high-speed valve, capable of delivering a pulsed stream of reactants a mixture of H2 and air at rates of up to 1500 pulses per second, has been constructed. The reactants burn in a resonant tube and the products exit the tube as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers have been used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device at various reactant injection frequencies, including both resonant and off-resonant conditions. Pulsed detonations have been demonstrated in the lambda/4 mode of an 8 inch long tube at approx. 600 Hz. The pulsed jet at the exit of the device has been observed using shadowgraph and an infrared camera.

  15. Toward a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Drummond, J. Philip

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the continued development of an actuator, energized by pulsed detonations, that provides a pulsed jet suitable for flow control in high-speed applications. A high-speed valve, capable of delivering a pulsed stream of reactants a mixture of H2 and air at rates of up to 1500 pulses per second, has been constructed. The reactants burn in a resonant tube and the products exit the tube as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers have been used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device at various reactant injection frequencies, including both resonant and off-resonant conditions. Pulsed detonations have been demonstrated in the lambda/4 mode of an 8 inch long tube at approximately 600 Hz. The pulsed jet at the exit of the device has been observed using shadowgraph and an infrared camera.

  16. A Performance Map for Ideal Air Breathing Pulse Detonation Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2001-01-01

    The performance of an ideal, air breathing Pulse Detonation Engine is described in a manner that is useful for application studies (e.g., as a stand-alone, propulsion system, in combined cycles, or in hybrid turbomachinery cycles). It is shown that the Pulse Detonation Engine may be characterized by an averaged total pressure ratio, which is a unique function of the inlet temperature, the fraction of the inlet flow containing a reacting mixture, and the stoichiometry of the mixture. The inlet temperature and stoichiometry (equivalence ratio) may in turn be combined to form a nondimensional heat addition parameter. For each value of this parameter, the average total enthalpy ratio and total pressure ratio across the device are functions of only the reactant fill fraction. Performance over the entire operating envelope can thus be presented on a single plot of total pressure ratio versus total enthalpy ratio for families of the heat addition parameter. Total pressure ratios are derived from thrust calculations obtained from an experimentally validated, reactive Euler code capable of computing complete Pulse Detonation Engine limit cycles. Results are presented which demonstrate the utility of the described method for assessing performance of the Pulse Detonation Engine in several potential applications. Limitations and assumptions of the analysis are discussed. Details of the particular detonative cycle used for the computations are described.

  17. Rotary wave-ejector enhanced pulse detonation engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalim, M. R.; Izzy, Z. A.; Akbari, P.

    2012-01-01

    The use of a non-steady ejector based on wave rotor technology is modeled for pulse detonation engine performance improvement and for compatibility with turbomachinery components in hybrid propulsion systems. The rotary wave ejector device integrates a pulse detonation process with an efficient momentum transfer process in specially shaped channels of a single wave-rotor component. In this paper, a quasi-one-dimensional numerical model is developed to help design the basic geometry and operating parameters of the device. The unsteady combustion and flow processes are simulated and compared with a baseline PDE without ejector enhancement. A preliminary performance assessment is presented for the wave ejector configuration, considering the effect of key geometric parameters, which are selected for high specific impulse. It is shown that the rotary wave ejector concept has significant potential for thrust augmentation relative to a basic pulse detonation engine.

  18. Parametric Study of High Frequency Pulse Detonation Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Anderw D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes development of high frequency pulse detonation tubes similar to a small pulse detonation engine (PDE). A high-speed valve injects a charge of a mixture of fuel and air at rates of up to 1000 Hz into a constant area tube closed at one end. The reactants detonate in the tube and the products exit as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers are used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device and thrust is measured with a balance. The effects of injection frequency, fuel and air flow rates, tube length, and injection location are considered. Both H2 and C2H4 fuels are considered. Optimum (maximum specific thrust) fuel-air compositions and resonant frequencies are identified. Results are compared to PDE calculations. Design rules are postulated and applications to aerodynamic flow control and propulsion are discussed.

  19. Combustion and Magnetohydrodynamic Processes in Advanced Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Lord Kahil

    A number of promising alternative rocket propulsion concepts have been developed over the past two decades that take advantage of unsteady combustion waves in order to produce thrust. These concepts include the Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine (PDRE), in which repetitive ignition, propagation, and reflection of detonations and shocks can create a high pressure chamber from which gases may be exhausted in a controlled manner. The Pulse Detonation Rocket Induced Magnetohydrodynamic Ejector (PDRIME) is a modification of the basic PDRE concept, developed by Cambier (1998), which has the potential for performance improvements based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) thrust augmentation. The PDRIME has the advantage of both low combustion chamber seeding pressure, per the PDRE concept, and efficient energy distribution in the system, per the rocket-induced MHD ejector (RIME) concept of Cole, et al. (1995). In the initial part of this thesis, we explore flow and performance characteristics of different configurations of the PDRIME, assuming quasi-one-dimensional transient flow and global representations of the effects of MHD phenomena on the gas dynamics. By utilizing high-order accurate solvers, we thus are able to investigate the fundamental physical processes associated with the PDRIME and PDRE concepts and identify potentially promising operating regimes. In the second part of this investigation, the detailed coupling of detonations and electric and magnetic fields are explored. First, a one-dimensional spark-ignited detonation with complex reaction kinetics is fully evaluated and the mechanisms for the different instabilities are analyzed. It is found that complex kinetics in addition to sufficient spatial resolution are required to be able to quantify high frequency as well as low frequency detonation instability modes. Armed with this quantitative understanding, we then examine the interaction of a propagating detonation and the applied MHD, both in one-dimensional and two

  20. Experimental Study of Key Issues on Pulse Detonation Engine Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng-Yuan; Fujiwara, Toshitaka; Miyasaka, Takeshi; Nakayama, Ei-Ichi; Hattori, Tsuyoshi; Azuma, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Satoru; Tamugi, Azusa

    An experimental study on the pulse detonation engine (PDE) is conducted using hydrogen-air mixtures. Several key issues for PDE development, including valve operation, injection, mixing, filling, cycle repetition, ignition timing, DDT distance and propagation of detonation/quasi-detonation, are investigated. The fuel and oxidizer are injected into the PDE from opposite sidewall directions so as to be well mixed by collision of the two jets. A good agreement is obtained between the calculated and measured mixing ratios, indicating the occurrence of nearly instant mixing. Before the detonation velocity has reached the CJ value, it was found that the wave propagation velocity at the PDE exit increases with the increase in diameter, length and blockage ratio of the Shchelkin wire, and initial pressure. The PDE performance acquired was a specific impulse of about 2000 s, which was measured from the pressure history at the head end of the PDE.

  1. Characteristics of pulse detonation engine versus ramjet characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egoryan, A. J.; Kraiko, A. N.; P'yankov, K. S.; Tishin, A. P.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss the method of comparing pulse detonation engines (PDE) and engines with combustion in subsonic flow (ramjet) by means of their specific impulse used by the "Center of Pulse-Detonation Combustion" (CPDC). We demonstrate that the method used by CPDC to calculate the performance of PDE overstates the value of specific impulse relative to its actual value by a factor of at least two. In contrast, the values of specific impulse for ramjet are understated. As a result, the specific impulse of PDE significantly exceeds that of ramjet or is close to it. We investigate these misleading conclusions, and demonstrate their complete failure.

  2. Design and Evaluation of a Single-Inlet Pulse Detonation Combustor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Kilogram/second m/s Meters/ second N Nitrogen NPS Naval Postgraduate School O Oxygen PDC Pulse Detonation Combustion PDE Pulse Detonation Engine...EVALUATION OF A SINGLE-INLET PULSE DETONATION COMBUSTOR by Danny Soria June 2011 Thesis Advisor: Christopher M. Brophy Second Reader: Garth V...COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Design and Evaluation of a Single-Inlet Pulse Detonation Combustor 6. AUTHOR(S) Danny Soria 5

  3. Evaluation of a Hybrid-Piston Pulsed Detonation Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Stutrud (AFRL/PRTS) and Jason Parker (ISSI) for their computer programs used to collect and analyze the data, and Mike Bruggeman (AFRL/PROE)for his...Performance Results for Pulsed Detonation Engine Applications". in 39th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit. Reno, NV (2001). 3. Heywood

  4. Multi-Level Analysis of Pulsed Detonation Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebrahimi, Houshang B.; Mohanraj, Rajendran; Merkle, Charles L.

    2001-01-01

    The present study explores some issues concerning the operational performance of pulsed detonation engines. Zero-, one- and two-dimensional, transient models are employed in a synergistic manner to elucidate the various characteristics that can be expected from each level of analysis. The zero-dimensional model provides rapid parametric trends that help to identify the global characteristics of pulsed detonation engines. The one-dimensional model adds key wave propagation issues that are omitted in the zero-dimensional model and helps to assess its limitations. Finally, the two-dimensional model allows estimates of the first-order multi-dimensional effects and provides an initial multi-dimensional end-correction for the one-dimensional model. The zero-dimensional results indicate that the pulsed detonation engine is competitive with a rocket engine when exhausting to vacuum conditions. At finite back pressures, the PDE out-performs the rocket if the combustion pressure rise from the detonation is added to the chamber pressure in the rocket. If the two peak pressures are the same, the rocket performance is higher. Two-dimensional corrections added to the one-dimensional model result in a modest improvement in predicted specific impulse over the constant pressure boundary condition.

  5. Metallized Gelled Propellants Combustion Experiments in a Pulse Detonation Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan; Jurns, John; Breisacher, Kevin; Kearns, Kim

    2006-01-01

    A series of combustion tests were performed with metallized gelled JP 8/aluminum fuels in a Pulse Detonation Engine (PDE). Nanoparticles of aluminum were used in the 60 to 100 nanometer diameter. Gellants were also of a nanoparticulate type composed of hydrocarbon alkoxide materials. Using simulated air (a nitrogen-oxygen mixture), the ignition potential of metallized gelled fuels with nanoparticle aluminum was investigated. Ignition of the JP 8/aluminum was possible with less than or equal to a 23-wt% oxygen loading in the simulated air. JP 8 fuel alone was unable to ignite with less than 30 percent oxygen loaded simulated air. The tests were single shot tests of the metallized gelled fuel to demonstrate the capability of the fuel to improve fuel detonability. The tests were conducted at ambient temperatures and with maximal detonation pressures of 1340 psia.

  6. Comparative Analysis of a High Bypass Turbofan Using a Pulsed Detonation Combustor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Thrust Specific Fuel Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 xiii List of Abbreviations Abbreviation Page PDE Pulsed Detonation Engine...past ten years to develop pulsed det- onation engines ( PDE ) as a means of aircraft propulsion. Detonation combustion holds the promise of a more...aviation engine, and detonation creates more of it than previous aircraft engines. It is hoped that a marriage of the PDE with traditional

  7. A flash vaporization system for detonation of hydrocarbon fuels in a pulse detonation engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Kelly Colin

    Current research by both the US Air Force and Navy is concentrating on obtaining detonations in a pulse detonation engine (PDE) with low vapor pressure, kerosene based jet fuels. These fuels, however, have a low vapor pressure and the performance of a liquid hydrocarbon fueled PDE is significantly hindered by the presence of fuel droplets. A high pressure, fuel flash vaporization system (FVS) has been designed and built to reduce and eliminate the time required to evaporate the fuel droplets. Four fuels are tested: n-heptane, isooctane, aviation gasoline, and JP-8. The fuels vary in volatility and octane number and present a clear picture on the benefits of flash vaporization. Results show the FVS quickly provided a detonable mixture for all of the fuels tested without coking or clogging the fuel lines. Combustion results validated the model used to predict the fuel and air temperatures required to achieve gaseous mixtures with each fuel. The most significant achievement of the research was the detonation of flash vaporized JP-8 and air. The results show that the flash vaporized JP-8 used 20 percent less fuel to ignite the fuel air mixture twice as fast (8 ms from 16 ms) when compared to the unheated JP-8 combustion data. Likewise, the FVS has been validated as a reliable method to create the droplet free mixtures required for liquid hydrocarbon fueled PDEs.

  8. Modeling of Multi-Tube Pulse Detonation Engine Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebrahimi, Houshang B.; Mohanraj, Rajendran; Merkle, Charles L.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper explores some preliminary issues concerning the operational characteristics of multiple-tube pulsed detonation engines (PDEs). The study is based on a two-dimensional analysis of the first-pulse operation of two detonation tubes exhausting through a common nozzle. Computations are first performed to assess isolated tube behavior followed by results for multi-tube flow phenomena. The computations are based on an eight-species, finite-rate transient flow-field model. The results serve as an important precursor to understanding appropriate propellant fill procedures and shock wave propagation in multi-tube, multi-dimensional simulations. Differences in behavior between single and multi-tube PDE models are discussed, The influence of multi-tube geometry and the preferred times for injecting the fresh propellant mixture during multi-tube PDE operation are studied.

  9. Quasi-One-Dimensional Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2003-01-01

    Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) offer potential performance improvements over conventional designs, but represent a challenging modeling task. A quasi 1-D, finite-rate chemistry CFD model for a PDRE & described and implemented. A parametric study of the effect of blowdown pressure ratio on the performance of an optimized, fixed PDRE nozzle configuration is reported. The results are compared to a steady-state rocket system using similar modeling assumptions.

  10. Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Gasdynamics And Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2004-01-01

    Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) offer potential performance improvements over conventional designs, but represent a challenging modeling task. A quasi-1-D, finite-rate chemistry computational fluid dynamics model for PDREs is described and implemented. Four different PDRE geometries are evaluated in this work: a baseline detonation tube, a detonation tube with a straight extension, and a detonation tube with two types of converging-diverging (C-D) nozzles. The effect of extension length and C-D nozzle area ratio on the single-shot gasdynamics and performance of a PDRE is studied over a wide range of blowdown pressure ratios (1-1000). The results indicate that a C-D nozzle is generally more effective than a straight extension in improving PDRE performance, particularly at higher pressure ratios. Additionally, the results show that the blowdown process of the C-D nozzle systems could be beneficially cut off well before the pressure at the end-wall reaches the ambient value. The performance results are also compared to a steady-state rocket system using similar modeling assumptions.

  11. Thrust Augmentation Measurements Using a Pulse Detonation Engine Ejector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, Robert J.; Pal, Sibtosh

    2003-01-01

    The present NASA GRC-funded three-year research project is focused on studying PDE driven ejectors applicable to a hybrid Pulse Detonation/Turbofan Engine. The objective of the study is to characterize the PDE-ejector thrust augmentation. A PDE-ejector system has been designed to provide critical experimental data for assessing the performance enhancements possible with this technology. Completed tasks include demonstration of a thrust stand for measuring average thrust for detonation tube multi-cycle operation, and design of a 72-in.-long, 2.25-in.-diameter (ID) detonation tube and modular ejector assembly. This assembly will allow testing of both straight and contoured ejector geometries. Initial ejectors that have been fabricated are 72-in.-long-constant-diameter tubes (4-, 5-, and 6-in.-diameter) instrumented with high-frequency pressure transducers. The assembly has been designed such that the detonation tube exit can be positioned at various locations within the ejector tube. PDE-ejector system experiments with gaseous ethylene/ nitrogen/oxygen propellants will commence in the very near future. The program benefits from collaborations with Prof. Merkle of University of Tennessee whose PDE-ejector analysis helps guide the experiments. The present research effort will increase the TRL of PDE-ejectors from its current level of 2 to a level of 3.

  12. A Hydrocarbon Fuel Flash Vaporization System for a Pulsed Detonation Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    Experiments were performed in the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Pulsed Detonation Research Facility at Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio. The PDE ...AFRL-MN-EG-TP-2006-7420 A HYDROCARBON FUEL FLASH VAPORIZATION SYSTEM FOR A PULSED DETONATION ENGINE (PREPRINT) K. Colin Tucker...85,7<&/$66,),&$7,212) E7(/(3+21(180%(5 ,QFOXGHDUHDFRGH A Hydrocarbon Fuel Flash Vaporization System for a Pulsed Detonation Engine K

  13. Flowpath Design of a Three-Tube Valve-Less Pulse Detonation Combustor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    geometry. 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 77 14. SUBJECT TERMS PDE Pulse Detonation Engine Side Dump Combustor Recirculation Zone 16. PRICE CODE 17...INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 1 I. BACKGROUND A. INTRODUCTION Multi-tube Pulse Detonation Engines ( PDEs ) represent a significant opportunity for reducing...rocket, for example. PDE Envelope (representative) 3 B. ENGINE OPERATION PDEs , of which the Pulse Detonation Combustor is the operational core, are

  14. Development of a Gas-Fed Pulse Detonation Research Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Hutt, John (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In response to the growing need for empirical data on pulse detonation engine performance and operation, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has developed and placed into operation a low-cost gas-fed pulse detonation research engine. The guiding design strategy was to achieve a simple and flexible research apparatus, which was inexpensive to build and operate. As such, the engine was designed to operate as a heat sink device, and testing was limited to burst-mode operation with run durations of a few seconds. Wherever possible, maximum use was made of standard off-the-shelf industrial or automotive components. The 5-cm diameter primary tube is about 90-cm long and has been outfitted with a multitude of sensor and optical ports. The primary tube is fed by a coaxial injector through an initiator tube, which is inserted directly into the injector head face. Four auxiliary coaxial injectors are also integrated into the injector head assembly. All propellant flow is controlled with industrial solenoid valves. An automotive electronic ignition system was adapted for use, and spark plugs are mounted in both tubes so that a variety of ignition schemes can be examined. A microprocessor-based fiber-optic engine control system was developed to provide precise control over valve and ignition timing. Initial shakedown testing with hydrogen/oxygen mixtures verified the need for Schelkin spirals in both the initiator and primary tubes to ensure rapid development of the detonation wave. Measured pressure wave time-of-flight indicated detonation velocities of 2.4 km/sec and 2.2 km/sec in the initiator and primary tubes, respectively. These values implied a fuel-lean mixture corresponding to an H2 volume fraction near 0.5. The axial distribution for the detonation velocity was found to be essentially constant along the primary tube. Time-resolved thrust profiles were also acquired for both underfilled and overfilled tube conditions. These profiles are consistent with previous time

  15. Effects of Corona, Spark and Surface Discharges on Ignition Delay and Deflagration-to-Detonation Times in Pulsed Detonation Engines (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2008-2034 EFFECTS OF CORONA, SPARK AND SURFACE DISCHARGES ON IGNITION DELAY AND DEFLAGRATION-TO-DETONATION TIMES IN PULSED ...DETONATION ENGINES (POSTPRINT) Kenneth Busby, Jennifer Corrigan , Sheng-Tao Yu, Skip Williams, Campbell D. Carter, Frederick Schauer, John Hoke...DELAY AND DEFLAGRATION-TO-DETONATION TIMES IN PULSED DETONATION ENGINES (POSTPRINT) 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 2308 5e

  16. Dynamics of galloping detonations: inert hydrodynamics with pulsed energy release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulescu, Matei I.; Shepherd, Joseph E.

    2015-11-01

    Previous models for galloping and cellular detonations of Ulyanitski, Vasil'ev and Higgins assume that the unit shock decay or cell can be modeled by Taylor-Sedov blast waves. We revisit this concept for galloping detonations, which we model as purely inert hydrodynamics with periodically pulsed energy deposition. At periodic time intervals, the chemical energy of the non-reacted gas accumulating between the lead shock and the contact surface separating reacted and non reacted gas is released nearly instantaneously. In between these pulses, the gas evolves as an inert medium. The resulting response of the gas to the periodic forcing is a sudden gain in pressure followed by mechanical relaxation accompanied by strong shock waves driven both forward and backwards. It is shown that the decay of the lead shock in-between pulses follows an exponential decay, whose time constant is controlled by the frequency of the energy deposition. More-over, the average speed of the lead shock is found to agree within 2 percent to the ideal Chapman-Jouguet value, while the large scale dynamics of the wave follows closely the ideal wave form of a CJ wave trailed by a Taylor expansion. When friction and heat losses are accounted for, velocity deficits are predicted, consistent with experiment. Work performed while MIR was on sabbatical at Caltech.

  17. Impact of Dissociation and Sensible Heat Release on Pulse Detonation and Gas Turbine Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    2001-01-01

    A thermodynamic cycle analysis of the effect of sensible heat release on the relative performance of pulse detonation and gas turbine engines is presented. Dissociation losses in the PDE (Pulse Detonation Engine) are found to cause a substantial decrease in engine performance parameters.

  18. Cycle Performance of a Pulse Detonation Engine with Supercritical Fuel Injection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-23

    Franke (Member) date iv AFIT/GAE/ENY/06-M14 Abstract Pulse detonation engines ( PDE ) rely on rapid ignition and formation of...on detonation tubes one and four .................................................... 61 Figure 34. Diagram of PDE engine with supercritical fuel...the detonation tube of PDE for several fuel injection temperatures with a stoichiometric JP-8/air mixture with a frequency of 20 Hz and an ignition

  19. Schlieren Imaging of a Single-Ejector, Multi-Tube Pulsed Detonation Engine (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    studies have shown the potential of an ejector to almost double the thrust of a pulsed detonation engine ( PDE ) tube [1-3]. Axial misalignment of the... Detonation Research Facility in the Air Force Research Laboratory were used for this study. The PDE utilizes automotive valving to feed up to four... detonation tubes. The damped thrust stand was setup to measure PDE thrust alone for baseline tests or total thrust from ejector and PDE . This

  20. Unsteady thrust measurement techniques for pulse detonation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Dibesh Dhoj

    Thrust is a critical performance parameter and its correct determination is necessary to characterize an engine. Many conventional thrust measurement techniques prevail. However, further developments are required for correct measurement of thrust in the case of a pulse detonation engine (PDE), since the entire thrust generation process is intermittent. The significant effect of system dynamics in the form of inertial forces, stress wave propagation and reflections initiated in the structure due to detonations and pulse-to-pulse interaction in a fast operating PDE further complicate the thrust measurement process. These complications call for a further, detailed study of the unsteady thrust characteristics. A general approach was first developed to recover actual thrust from the measured thrust generated by the PDE. The developed approach consisted of two steps. The first step incorporated a deconvolution procedure using a pre-established system transfer function and measured input to reconstruct the output yielding the deconvolved thrust. The second step accounted for inertial forces through an acceleration compensation procedure. These two steps allowed the actual thrust to be determined. A small scale PDE operating at 10 and 20 Hz with varied filling fractions and mixture equivalence ratios was used for the experimental application of the general approach. The analytical study of gas dynamics in the PDE while in operation and the measured pressure histories at the exit of the engine allowed the generated thrust during a cycle to be determined semi-empirically. The thrust values determined semi-empirically were compared against the experimental results. A dynamical model of the PDE was created for the study of the unsteady thrust characteristics using finite element analysis. The results from finite element analysis were compared against semi-empirical and experimental results. In addition, finite element analysis also facilitated to numerically determine the

  1. Laser-supported detonation waves and pulsed laser propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    A laser thermal rocket uses the energy of a large remote laser, possibly ground-based, to heat an inert propellant and generate thrust. Use of a pulsed laser allows the design of extremely simple thrusters with very high performance compared to chemical rockets. The temperatures, pressures, and fluxes involved in such thrusters (10{sup 4} K, 10{sup 2} atmospheres, 10{sup 7} w/cm{sup 2}) typically result in the creation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. The thrust cycle thus involves a complex set of transient shock phenomena, including laser-surface interactions in the ignition if the LSD wave, laser-plasma interactions in the LSD wave itself, and high-temperature nonequilibrium chemistry behind the LSD wave. The SDIO Laser Propulsion Program is investigating these phenomena as part of an overall effort to develop the technology for a low-cost Earth-to-orbit laser launch system. We will summarize the program's approach to developing a high performance thruster, the double-pulse planar thruster, and present an overview of some results obtained to date, along with a discussion of the many research questions still outstanding in this area. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Laser-supported detonation waves and pulsed laser propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J. )

    1990-07-30

    A laser thermal rocket uses the energy of a large remote laser, possibly ground-based, to heat an inert propellant and generate thrust. Use of a pulsed laser allows the design of extremely simple thrusters with very high performance compared to chemical rockets. The temperatures, pressures, and fluxes involved in such thrusters (10{sup 4} K, 10{sup 2} atmospheres, 10{sup 7} w/cm{sup 2}) typically result in the creation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. The thrust cycle thus involves a complex set of transient shock phenomena, including laser-surface interactions in the ignition of the LSD wave, laser-plasma interactions in the LSD wave itself, and high-temperature nonequilibrium chemistry behind the LSD wave. The SDIO Laser Propulsion Program is investigating these phenomena as part of an overall effort to develop the technology for a low-cost Earth-to-orbit laser launch system. We will summarize the Program's approach to developing a high performance thruster, the double-pulse planar thruster, and present an overview of some results obtained to date, along with a discussion of the many research question still outstanding in this area.

  3. Investigation of Transient Plasma Ignition for a Pulse Detonation Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    what occurs in physical terms following the motion of a detonation wave through a flammable mixture. Chapman (1899) and Jouguet (1905, 1906...experimentally observed detonation waves and presented the first theory of a detonation combustion wave [10]. Chapman and Jouguet (CJ) solved conservation...the auxiliary oxygen requirement of current PDE systems. TPI was tested and compared with a traditional capacitive discharge spark plug system in a

  4. Detonation Initiation by Annular Jets and Shock Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18, 19,20,21,22 to better understand the shock implosion process. The current interest in air-breathing pulse detonation engines ( PDEs ) has led...This technology has yet to be realized and, as a result, current PDEs use initiator tubes sensitized with oxygen 23 or detonate more sensitive mixtures... Detonation Initiation by Annular Jets and Shock Waves Final Report for Award ONR N00014-03 -0931 Joseph E. Shepherd Aeronautics California Institute

  5. Transient analysis of a pulsed detonation combustor using the numerical propulsion system simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasler, Anthony Scott

    The performance of a hybrid mixed flow turbofan (with detonation tubes installed in the bypass duct) is investigated in this study and compared with a baseline model of a mixed flow turbofan with a standard combustion chamber as a duct burner. Previous studies have shown that pulsed detonation combustors have the potential to be more efficient than standard combustors, but they also present new challenges that must be overcome before they can be utilized. The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) will be used to perform the analysis with a pulsed detonation combustor model based on a numerical simulation done by Endo, Fujiwara, et. al. Three different cases will be run using both models representing a take-off situation, a subsonic cruise and a supersonic cruise situation. Since this study investigates a transient analysis, the pulse detonation combustor is run in a rig setup first and then its pressure and temperature are averaged for the cycle to obtain quasi-steady results.

  6. The Use of Steady and Unsteady Detonation Waves for Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Henry G.; Menees, Gene P.; Cambier, Jean-Luc; Bowles, Jeffrey V.; Cavolowsky, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Detonation wave enhanced supersonic combustors such as the Oblique Detonation Wave Engine (ODWE) are attractive propulsion concepts for hypersonic flight. These engines utilize detonation waves to enhance fuel-air mixing and combustion. The benefits of wave combustion systems include shorter and lighter engines which require less cooling and generate lower internal drag. These features allow air-breathing operation at higher Mach numbers than the diffusive burning scramjet delaying the need for rocket engine augmentation. A comprehensive vehicle synthesis code has predicted the aerodynamic characteristics and structural size and weight of a typical single-stage-to-orbit vehicle using an ODWE. Other studies have focused on the use of unsteady or pulsed detonation waves. For low speed applications, pulsed detonation engines (PDE) have advantages in low weight and higher efficiency than turbojets. At hypersonic speeds, the pulsed detonations can be used in conjunction with a scramjet type engine to enhance mixing and provide thrust augmentation.

  7. Multiple-cycle Simulation of a Pulse Detonation Engine Ejector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yungster, S.; Perkins, H. D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study involving single and multiple-cycle numerical simulations of various PDE-ejector configurations utilizing hydrogen-oxygen mixtures. The objective was to investigate the thrust, impulse and mass flow rate characteristics of these devices. The results indicate that ejector systems can utilize the energy stored in the strong shock wave exiting the detonation tube to augment the impulse obtained from the detonation tube alone. Impulse augmentation ratios of up to 1.9 were achieved. The axial location of the converging-diverging ejectors relative to the end of the detonation tube were shown to affect the performance of the system.

  8. Parametric Investigation of Thrust Augmentation by Ejectors on a Pulsed Detonation Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack; Sgondea, Alexandru; Paxson, Daniel E.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.

    2005-01-01

    A parametric investigation has been made of thrust augmentation of a 1 inch diameter pulsed detonation tube by ejectors. A set of ejectors was used which permitted variation of the ejector length, diameter, and nose radius, according to a statistical design of experiment scheme. The maximum augmentations for each ejector were fitted using a polynomial response surface, from which the optimum ejector diameters, and nose radius, were found. Thrust augmentations above a factor of 2 were measured. In these tests, the pulsed detonation device was run on approximately stoichiometric air-hydrogen mixtures, at a frequency of 20 Hz. Later measurements at a frequency of 40 Hz gave lower values of thrust augmentation. Measurements of thrust augmentation as a function of ejector entrance to detonation tube exit distance showed two maxima, one with the ejector entrance upstream, and one downstream, of the detonation tube exit. A thrust augmentation of 2.5 was observed using a tapered ejector.

  9. Ion Based Pressure Sensor for Pulse Detonation Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    Chapman - Jouguet Detonation cycles to be 27%, 47%, and 49% respectively [6]. Compared to the constant pressure Brayton cycle, the Humphrey cycle...the wave, according to Chapman - Jouguet theory, travels at supersonic speeds relative to the unburned fuel-air mixture. The PDE takes advantage of...a successful detonation near Chapman - Jouguet predicted speeds, the combustion must produce a strong shock wave that travels down the tube. This

  10. Airbreathing Hypersonic Vision-Operational-Vehicles Design Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, James L.; Pegg, Robert J.; Petley, Dennis H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the status of the airbreathing hypersonic airplane and space-access vision-operational-vehicle design matrix, with emphasis on horizontal takeoff and landing systems being studied at Langley; it reflects the synergies and issues, and indicates the thrust of the effort to resolve the design matrix including Mach 5 to 10 airplanes with global-reach potential, pop-up and dual-role transatmospheric vehicles and airbreathing launch systems. The convergence of several critical systems/technologies across the vehicle matrix is indicated. This is particularly true for the low speed propulsion system for large unassisted horizontal takeoff vehicles which favor turbines and/or perhaps pulse detonation engines that do not require LOX which imposes loading concerns and mission flexibility restraints.

  11. Airbreathing Hypersonic Vision-Operational-Vehicles Design Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, James L.; Pegg, Robert J.; Petley, Dennis H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the status of the airbreathing hypersonic airplane and space-access vision-operational-vehicle design matrix, with emphasis on horizontal takeoff and landing systems being, studied at Langley, it reflects the synergies and issues, and indicates the thrust of the effort to resolve the design matrix including Mach 5 to 10 airplanes with global-reach potential, pop-up and dual-role transatmospheric vehicles and airbreathing launch systems. The convergence of several critical systems/technologies across the vehicle matrix is indicated. This is particularly true for the low speed propulsion system for large unassisted horizontal takeoff vehicles which favor turbines and/or perhaps pulse detonation engines that do not require LOX which imposes loading concerns and mission Flexibility restraints.

  12. Investigation on Novel Methods to Increase Specific Thrust in Pulse Detonation Engines via Imploding Detonations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    to-Detonation Transition, Specific Thrust 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS...hydrocarbon fuel-air mixtures such as acetylene -air, ethylene-air, propane-air and even JP10-air mixtures based on the required length of the induction zone

  13. The development and testing of pulsed detonation engine ground demonstrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panicker, Philip Koshy

    2008-10-01

    The successful implementation of a PDE running on fuel and air mixtures will require fast-acting fuel-air injection and mixing techniques, detonation initiation techniques such as DDT enhancing devices or a pre-detonator, an effective ignition system that can sustain repeated firing at high rates and a fast and capable, closed-loop control system. The control system requires high-speed transducers for real-time monitoring of the PDE and the detection of the detonation wave speed. It is widely accepted that the detonation properties predicted by C-J detonation relations are fairly accurate in comparison to experimental values. The post-detonation flow properties can also be expressed as a function of wave speed or Mach number. Therefore, the PDE control system can use C-J relations to predict the post-detonation flow properties based on measured initial conditions and compare the values with those obtained from using the wave speed. The controller can then vary the initial conditions within the combustor for the subsequent cycle, by modulating the frequency and duty cycle of the valves, to obtain optimum air and fuel flow rates, as well as modulate the energy and timing of the ignition to achieve the required detonation properties. Five different PDE ground demonstrators were designed, built and tested to study a number of the required sub-systems. This work presents a review of all the systems that were tested, along with suggestions for their improvement. The PDE setups, ranged from a compact PDE with a 19 mm (3/4 in.) i.d., to two 25 mm (1 in.) i.d. setups, to a 101 mm (4 in.) i.d. dual-stage PDE setup with a pre-detonator. Propane-oxygen mixtures were used in the smaller PDEs. In the dual-stage PDE, propane-oxygen was used in the pre-detonator, while propane-air mixtures were used in the main combustor. Both rotary valves and solenoid valve injectors were studied. The rotary valves setups were tested at 10 Hz, while the solenoid valves were tested at up to 30 Hz

  14. The Use of Steady and Pulsed Detonations for Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Henry G.; Menees, Gene P.; Cambier, Jean-Luc; Bowles, Jeffrey V.

    1996-01-01

    Objectives of the ODWE concept studies are: demonstrate the feasibility of the oblique detonation wave engine (ODWE) for hypersonic propulsion; demonstrate the existance and stability of an oblique detonation wave in hypersonic wind tunnels; develop engineering codes which predict the performance characteristics of the ODWE including specific impulse and thrust coefficients for various operating conditions; develop multi-dimensional computer codes which can model all aspects of the ODWE including fuel injection, mixing, ignition, combustion and expansion with fully detailed chemical kinetics and turbulence models; and validate the codes with experimental data use the simulations to predict the ODWE performance for conditions not easily obtained in wind tunnels.

  15. Swept-Ramp Detonation Initiation Performance in a High-Pressure Pulse Detonation Combustor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    Chapman - Jouguet CCD - Charge-Coupled Device DDT - Deflagration-To-Detonation Transition NI - National Instruments NPS - Naval...known as the upper (U) and lower (L) Chapman -Jouget (C-J) points. With this understanding, if the Hugoniot Relation of Equation (7) is...as compared to the more traditional Brayton cycle, and the lower entropy rise relative to deflagration-based processes. 10 Typical air

  16. Formation of detonation in a pulse combustion chamber with a porous obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhussan, Kh.; Assad, M. S.; Penyazkov, O. G.; Sevruk, K. L.

    2012-09-01

    A study has been made of the influence of a porous obstacle on deflagration-to-detonation transition in a pulse combustion chamber of small length. Dependences of the detonation-wave velocity on the distance have been obtained for two samples of a porous material (steel spheres and a ceramic porous body). It has been shown that the use of an insert from a porous material leads to a reduction of 40% in the predetonation distance without changing substantially the structure of the pulse combustion chamber.

  17. Fluidically Augmented Nozzles for Pulse Detonation Engine Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    the “ Pillow ” ..................................................38 Figure 28. Fully Rebuilt “ Pillow ...determine if the “ pillow ” would rebuild in a timely manner. The experiments were conducted using the previously fabricated nozzle with the...conducted was a non-detonation case, simulating the refresh segment of the PDE cycle, in order to visualize the subsonic “ pillow ” development. As

  18. Laser High-Cycle Thermal Fatigue of Pulse Detonation Engine Combustor Materials Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Pulse detonation engines (PDE's) have received increasing attention for future aerospace propulsion applications. Because the PDE is designed for a high-frequency, intermittent detonation combustion process, extremely high gas temperatures and pressures can be realized under the nearly constant-volume combustion environment. The PDE's can potentially achieve higher thermodynamic cycle efficiency and thrust density in comparison to traditional constant-pressure combustion gas turbine engines (ref. 1). However, the development of these engines requires robust design of the engine components that must endure harsh detonation environments. In particular, the detonation combustor chamber, which is designed to sustain and confine the detonation combustion process, will experience high pressure and temperature pulses with very short durations (refs. 2 and 3). Therefore, it is of great importance to evaluate PDE combustor materials and components under simulated engine temperatures and stress conditions in the laboratory. In this study, a high-cycle thermal fatigue test rig was established at the NASA Glenn Research Center using a 1.5-kW CO2 laser. The high-power laser, operating in the pulsed mode, can be controlled at various pulse energy levels and waveform distributions. The enhanced laser pulses can be used to mimic the time-dependent temperature and pressure waves encountered in a pulsed detonation engine. Under the enhanced laser pulse condition, a maximum 7.5-kW peak power with a duration of approximately 0.1 to 0.2 msec (a spike) can be achieved, followed by a plateau region that has about one-fifth of the maximum power level with several milliseconds duration. The laser thermal fatigue rig has also been developed to adopt flat and rotating tubular specimen configurations for the simulated engine tests. More sophisticated laser optic systems can be used to simulate the spatial distributions of the temperature and shock waves in the engine. Pulse laser high

  19. Pressure and Thrust Measurements of a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Namtran C.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a small-scale, high-frequency pulsed detonation actuator. The device utilized a fuel mixture of H2 and air, which was injected into the device at frequencies of up to 1200 Hz. Pulsed detonations were demonstrated in an 8-inch long combustion volume, at approx.600 Hz, for the lambda/4 mode. The primary objective of this experiment was to measure the generated thrust. A mean value of thrust was measured up to 6.0 lb, corresponding to specific impulse of 2611 s. This value is comparable to other H2-fueled pulsed detonation engines (PDEs) experiments. The injection and detonation frequency for this new experimental case was approx.600 Hz, and was much higher than typical PDEs, where frequencies are usually less than 100 Hz. The compact size of the model and high frequency of detonation yields a thrust-per-unit-volume of approximately 2.0 lb/cu in, and compares favorably with other experiments, which typically have thrust-per-unit-volume values of approximately 0.01 lb/cu in.

  20. Experimental Investigation on Heating Kerosene Using Thrust Tube Waste Heat of Pulse Detonation Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiqiao; Yan, Yu; Mu, Yang; Zheng, Longxi; Chen, Le

    2013-12-01

    Performance of liquid hydrocarbon fueled pulse detonation engines are hindered by the time required to evaporate liquid fuel droplets within the mixture. Efforts such as heating the liquid fuel before introduced into the engine were made to overcome this problem. The engine wall suffered high temperature of gaseous detonative products, which is harmful to the engine. Therefore the waste heat of PDE engine wall was used here to heat the liquid kerosene of the engine by using two concentric heat-exchangers with helical slot inside mounted at the tail of the pulse detonation engine. The pulse detonation engine (PDE) used here are 110 mm in inner diameter and 1700 mm in length and liquid kerosene and gaseous air were used as fuel and oxidizer respectively. Heating liquid kerosene was found effective in enhancing the engine performance, which was helpful for deflagration to detonation transition process. It was found that the waste heat could elevate the kerosene temperature effectively and the wall temperature could also be decreased obviously.

  1. Pressure and Thrust Measurements of a High-Frequency Pulsed Detonation Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, N.; Cutler, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of a small-scale, high-frequency pulsed detonation tube. The device utilized a mixture of H2 fuel and air, which was injected into the device at frequencies of up to 1200 Hz. Pulsed detonations were demonstrated in an 8-inch long combustion volume, at about 600 Hz, for the quarter wave mode of resonance. The primary objective of this experiment was to measure the generated thrust. A mean value of thrust was measured up to 6.0 lb, corresponding to H2 flow based specific impulse of 2970 s. This value is comparable to measurements in H2-fueled pulsed detonation engines (PDEs). The injection and detonation frequency for this new experimental case was much higher than typical PDEs, where frequencies are usually less than 100 Hz. The compact size of the device and high frequency of detonation yields a thrust-per-unit-volume of approximately 2.0 pounds per cubic inch, and compares favorably with other experiments, which typically have thrust-per-unit-volume of order 0.01 pound per cubic inch. This much higher volumetric efficiency results in a potentially much more practical device than the typical PDE, for a wide range of potential applications, including high-speed boundary layer separation control, for example in hypersonic engine inlets, and propulsion for small aircraft and missiles.

  2. Fuel Injection Strategy for a Next Generation Pulse Detonation Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    Fuel is fed to the injectors from a fuel tank which is pressure regulated with nitrogen. Pressurized hydraulic fluid is supplied to the injectors...of total pressure losses, and the removal of auxiliary oxygen system previously required to initiate a detonation wave in fuel-air mixtures within...development of a new design, in particular the reduction of total pressure losses, and the removal of auxiliary oxygen system previously required

  3. Slag Characterization and Removal Using Pulse Detonation for Coal Gasification.

    SciTech Connect

    Hugue, Z; Mei, D.; Biney, P.O.; Zhou, J.; Ali, M.R.

    1997-09-25

    The research activities performed in this quarter (reporting period: 07/01/97- 09/30/97) are summarized as follows: The research activities concentrated on (1) Design, development, and fabrication of a 9 positions (3x3 matrix form) fixture (2) Preparation of the test parameters (3) Multi-cycle detonation wave slag removal test (4) Partial analysis of the test results and (5) Interpretation and discussion of the test results.

  4. Fuel Composition Analysis of Endothermically Heated JP-8 Fuel for Use in a Pulse Detonation Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    were formed as a result of ionization ( Littlewood , 1970). The resistance in the gap between two electrodes was reduced allowing a current to flow...2005. Littlewood , A. Gas Chromatography, 2nd ed. New York, Academic Press, 1970. Miser, Christen L. Pulse Detonation Engine Thrust Tube Heat

  5. Parametric Investigation of Thrust Augmentation by Ejectors on a Pulsed Detonation Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack; Sgondea, Alexandru; Paxson, Daniel E.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.

    2006-01-01

    A parametric investigation has been made of thrust augmentation of a 1 in. diameter pulsed detonation tube by ejectors. A set of ejectors was used which permitted variation of the ejector length, diameter, and nose radius, according to a statistical design of experiment scheme. The maximum augmentation ratios for each ejector were fitted using a polynomial response surface, from which the optimum ratios of ejector diameter to detonation tube diameter, and ejector length and nose radius to ejector diameter, were found. Thrust augmentation ratios above a factor of 2 were measured. In these tests, the pulsed detonation device was run on approximately stoichiometric air-hydrogen mixtures, at a frequency of 20 Hz. Later measurements at a frequency of 40 Hz gave lower values of thrust augmentation. Measurements of thrust augmentation as a function of ejector entrance to detonation tube exit distance showed two maxima, one with the ejector entrance upstream, and one downstream, of the detonation tube exit. A thrust augmentation of 2.5 was observed using a tapered ejector.

  6. Application of steady and unsteady detonation waves to propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintenberger, Eric

    The present work investigates the applications of steady and unsteady detonation waves to air-breathing propulsion systems. The efficiency of ideal detonation-based propulsion systems is first investigated based on thermodynamics. We reformulate the Hugoniot analysis of steady combustion waves for a fixed initial stagnation state to conclude that steady detonation waves are less desirable than deflagrations for propulsion. However, a thermostatic approach shows that unsteady detonations have the potential for generating more work than constant-pressure combustion. The subsequent work focuses on specific engine concepts. A flow path analysis of ideal steady detonation engines is conducted and shows that their performance is limited and poorer than that of the ideal ramjet or turbojet engines. The limitations associated with the use of a steady detonation in the combustor are drastic and such engines do not appear to be practical. This leads us to focus on unsteady detonation engines, i.e., pulse detonation engines. The unsteady generation of thrust in the simple configuration of a detonation tube is first analyzed using gas dynamics. We develop one of the first models to quickly and reliably estimate the impulse of a pulse detonation tube. The impulse is found to scale directly with the mass of explosive in the tube and the square root of the energy release per unit mass of the mixture. Impulse values for typical fuel-oxidizer mixtures are found to be on the order of 160 s for hydrocarbon-oxygen mixtures and 120 s for fuel-air mixtures at standard conditions. These results are then used as a basis to develop the first complete system-level performance analysis of a supersonic, single-tube, air-breathing pulse detonation engine. We show that hydrogen- and JP10-fueled pulse detonation engines generate thrust up to a Mach number of 4, and that the specific impulse decreases quasi-linearly with increasing flight Mach number. Finally, we find that the performance of our

  7. Slang characterization and removal using pulse detonation technology during coal gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Huque, Z.; Mei, D.; Biney, P.O.; Zhou, J.

    1997-03-25

    Boiler slagging and fouling as a result of inorganic impurities in combustion gases being deposited on heat transfer tubes have caused severe problems in coal-fired power plant operation. These problems are fuel, system design, and operating condition dependent. Pulse detonation technology for the purpose of removing slag and fouling deposits in coal-fired utility power plant boilers offers great potential. The detonation wave technique based on high impact velocity with sufficient energy and thermal shock on the slag deposited on gas contact surfaces offers a convenient, inexpensive, yet efficient and effective way to supplement existing slag removal methods. These detonation waves have been demonstrated experimentally to have exceptionally high shearing capability important to the task of removing slag and fouling deposits. The experimental results show that the single shot detonation wave is capable of removing the entire slag (types of slag deposited on economizer) even at a distance of 8 in. from the exit of a detonation engine tube. Wave strength and slag orientation also have different effects on the chipping off of the slag. This paper discusses about the results obtained in effectively removing the economizer slag.

  8. Investigation of the effect of the ejector on the performance of the pulse detonation engine nozzle extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobov, A. E.; Golovastov, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    Influence of an ejector nozzle extension on gas flow at a pulse detonation engine was investigated numerically and experimentally. Detonation formation was organized in stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture in cylindrical detonation tube. Cylindrical ejector was constructed and mounted at the open end of the tube. Thrust, air consumption and parameters of the detonation were measured in single and multiple regimes of operation. Axisymmetric model was used in numerical investigation. Equations of Navies-Stokes were solved using a finite-difference scheme Roe of second order of accuracy. Initial conditions were estimated on a base of experimental data. Numerical results were validated with experiments data.

  9. Numerical study of sidewall filling for gas-fed pulse detonation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rongrat, Wunnarat

    Pulse detonation engines for aerospace propulsion are required to operate at 50-100 Hz meaning that each pulse is 10-20 ms long. Filling of the engine and the related purging process become dominant due to their long duration compared to ignition and detonation wave propagation. This study uses ANSYS FLUENT to investigate the filling of a 1 m long tube with an internal diameter of 100 mm. Six different configurations were investigated with an endwall port and various sidewall arrangements, including stagger and inclination. A stoichiometric mixture of gaseous octane and air at STP was used to fill the tube at injection rates of 40, 150 and 250 m/s. Phase injection was also investigated and it showed performance improvements such as reduced lling time and reduced propellant escape from the exit.

  10. Real Gas Effects on the Performance of Hydrocarbon-fueled Pulse Detonation Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.; Yungster, Shaye

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents results for a single-pulse detonation tube wherein the effects of high temperature dissociation and the subsequent recombination influence the sensible heat release available for providing propulsive thrust. The study involved the use of ethylene and air at equivalence ratios of 0.7 and 1.0. The real gas effects on the sensible heat release were found to be significantly large so as to have an impact on the thrust, impulse and fuel consumption of a PDE.

  11. Saturable absorption in aqueous suspensions of detonation nanodiamonds under irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheev, G. M.; Vanyukov, V. V.; Mogileva, T. N.; Puzyr', A. P.; Bondar', V. S.; Svirko, Y. P.

    2015-12-01

    The phenomenon of saturable absorption has been observed in aqueous suspensions of detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs) with 34, 50, and 110 nm sized clusters of nanoparticles under irradiation with 795-nm laser pulses of 120-fs duration. The saturable absorption intensity has been studied as a function of the DND concentration in suspension. At a concentration of 2 wt % of DNDs with 50-nm average cluster size, the saturable absorption intensity amounts to 950 GW/cm2.

  12. Detonation control

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, Jonathan L.; Seitz, Gerald J.; Bronisz, Lawrence E.

    2016-10-25

    Detonation control modules and detonation control circuits are provided herein. A trigger input signal can cause a detonation control module to trigger a detonator. A detonation control module can include a timing circuit, a light-producing diode such as a laser diode, an optically triggered diode, and a high-voltage capacitor. The trigger input signal can activate the timing circuit. The timing circuit can control activation of the light-producing diode. Activation of the light-producing diode illuminates and activates the optically triggered diode. The optically triggered diode can be coupled between the high-voltage capacitor and the detonator. Activation of the optically triggered diode causes a power pulse to be released from the high-voltage capacitor that triggers the detonator.

  13. On the Exit Boundary Condition for One-Dimensional Calculations of Pulsed Detonation Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2002-01-01

    In one-dimensional calculations of pulsed detonation engine (PDE) performance, the exit boundary condition is frequently taken to be a constant static pressure. In reality, for an isolated detonation tube, after the detonation wave arrives at the exit plane, there will be a region of high pressure, which will gradually return to ambient pressure as an almost spherical shock wave expands away from the exit, and weakens. Initially, the flow is supersonic, unaffected by external pressure, but later becomes subsonic. Previous authors have accounted for this situation either by assuming the subsonic pressure decay to be a relaxation phenomenon, or by running a two-dimensional calculation first, including a domain external to the detonation tube, and using the resulting exit pressure temporal distribution as the boundary condition for one-dimensional calculations. These calculations show that the increased pressure does affect the PDE performance. In the present work, a simple model of the exit process is used to estimate the pressure decay time. The planar shock wave emerging from the tube is assumed to transform into a spherical shock wave. The initial strength of the spherical shock wave is determined from comparison with experimental results. Its subsequent propagation, and resulting pressure at the tube exit, is given by a numerical blast wave calculation. The model agrees reasonably well with other, limited, results. Finally, the model was used as the exit boundary condition for a one-dimensional calculation of PDE performance to obtain the thrust wall pressure for a hydrogen-air detonation in tubes of length to diameter ratio (L/D) of 4, and 10, as well as for the original, constant pressure boundary condition. The modified boundary condition had no performance impact for values of L/D > 10, and moderate impact for L/D = 4.

  14. JANNAF Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee and 35th Combustion Subcommittee Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Ronald S. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor); Rognan, Melanie (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This document, CPIA Publication 682, Volume 1, is a compilation of 5 unclassified/unlimited technical papers (approved for public release) which were presented at the 1 998 meeting of the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee (APS) and Combustion Subcommittee (CS) held jointly with the Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee (PSHS). The meeting was held on 7-11 December 1998 at Raytheon Systems Company and the Marriott Hotel, Tucson, AZ. Topics covered include HyTech technology development, hydrocarbon fuel development for hypersonic applications, pulse detonation propulsion system development and arc heaters for direct-connect scramjet testing.

  15. A Resonant Pulse Detonation Actuator for High-Speed Boundary Layer Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, B. T.; Cutler, A. D.; Drummond, J. P.; Jones, S. B.

    2004-01-01

    A variety of different types of actuators have been previously investigated as flow control devices. Potential applications include the control of boundary layer separation in external flows, as well as jet engine inlet and diffuser flow control. The operating principles for such devices are typically based on either mechanical deflection of control surfaces (which include MEMS flap devices), mass injection (which includes combustion driven jet actuators), or through the use of synthetic jets (diaphragm devices which produce a pulsating jet with no net mass flow). This paper introduces some of the initial flow visualization work related to the development of a relatively new type of combustion-driven jet actuator that has been proposed based on a pulse detonation principle. The device is designed to utilize localized detonation of a premixed fuel (Hydrogen)-air mixture to periodically inject a jet of gas transversely into the primary flow. Initial testing with airflow successfully demonstrated resonant conditions within the range of acoustic frequencies expected for the design. Schlieren visualization of the pulsating air jet structure revealed axially symmetric vortex flow, along with the formation of shocks. Flow visualization of the first successful sustained oscillation condition is also demonstrated for one configuration of the current test section. Future testing will explore in more detail the onset of resonant combustion and the approach to conditions of sustained resonant detonation.

  16. SLAG CHARACTERIZATION AND REMOVAL USING PULSE DETONATION TECHNOLOGY DURING COAL GASIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    DR. DANIEL MEI; DR. JIANREN ZHOU; DR. PAUL O. BINEY; DR. ZIAUL HUQUE

    1998-07-30

    Pulse detonation technology for the purpose of removing slag and fouling deposits in coal-fired utility power plant boilers offers great potential. Conventional slag removal methods including soot blowers and water lances have great difficulties in removing slags especially from the down stream areas of utility power plant boilers. The detonation wave technique, based on high impact velocity with sufficient energy and thermal shock on the slag deposited on gas contact surfaces offers a convenient, inexpensive, yet efficient and effective way to supplement existing slag removal methods. A slight increase in the boiler efficiency, due to more effective ash/deposit removal and corresponding reduction in plant maintenance downtime and increased heat transfer efficiency, will save millions of dollars in operational costs. Reductions in toxic emissions will also be accomplished due to reduction in coal usage. Detonation waves have been demonstrated experimentally to have exceptionally high shearing capability, important to the task of removing slag and fouling deposits. The experimental results describe the parametric study of the input parameters in removing the different types of slag and operating condition. The experimental results show that both the single and multi shot detonation waves have high potential in effectively removing slag deposit from boiler heat transfer surfaces. The results obtained are encouraging and satisfactory. A good indication has also been obtained from the agreement with the preliminary computational fluid dynamics analysis that the wave impacts are more effective in removing slag deposits from tube bundles rather than single tube. This report presents results obtained in effectively removing three different types of slag (economizer, reheater, and air-heater) t a distance of up to 20 cm from the exit of the detonation tube. The experimental results show that the softer slags can be removed more easily. Also closer the slag to the exit of

  17. Simplified Analysis of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Blowdown Gasdynamics and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, C. I.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) offer potential performance improvements over conventional designs, but represent a challenging modellng task. A simplified model for an idealized, straight-tube, single-shot PDRE blowdown process and thrust determination is described and implemented. In order to form an assessment of the accuracy of the model, the flowfield time history is compared to experimental data from Stanford University. Parametric Studies of the effect of mixture stoichiometry, initial fill temperature, and blowdown pressure ratio on the performance of a PDRE are performed using the model. PDRE performance is also compared with a conventional steady-state rocket engine over a range of pressure ratios using similar gasdynamic assumptions.

  18. Experimental study of a valveless pulse detonation rocket engine using nontoxic hypergolic propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Brandon K.

    A pulsed detonation rocket engine concept was explored through the use of hypergolic propellants in a fuel-centered pintle injector combustor. The combustor design yielded a simple open ended chamber with a pintle type injection element and pressure instrumentation. High-frequency pressure measurements from the first test series showed the presence of large pressure oscillations in excess of 2000 psia at frequencies between 400-600 hz during operation. High-speed video confirmed the high-frequency pulsed behavior and large amounts of after burning. Damaged hardware and instrumentation failure limited the amount of data gathered in the first test series, but the experiments met original test objectives of producing large over-pressures in an open chamber. A second test series proceeded by replacing hardware and instrumentation, and new data showed that pulsed events produced under expanded exhaust prior to pulsing, peak pressures around 8000 psi, and operating frequencies between 400-800 hz. Later hot-fires produced no pulsed behavior despite undamaged hardware. The research succeeded in producing pulsed combustion behavior using hypergolic fuels in a pintle injector setup and provided insights into design concepts that would assist future injector designs and experimental test setups.

  19. Thermal Spray Using a High-Frequency Pulse Detonation Combustor Operated in the Liquid-Purge Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, T.; Obayashi, R.; Tajiri, T.; Kimura, K.; Morohashi, Y.; Johzaki, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Hanafusa, T.; Mizunari, S.

    2016-02-01

    Experiments on thermal spray by pulsed detonations at 150 Hz were conducted. Two types of pulse detonation combustors were used, one operated in the inert gas purge (GAP) mode and the other in the liquid-purge (LIP) mode. In both modes, all gases were supplied in the valveless mode. The GAP mode is free of moving components, although the explosive mixture is unavoidably diluted with the inert gas used for the purge of the hot burned gas. In the LIP mode, pure fuel-oxygen combustion can be realized, although a liquid-droplet injector must be actuated cyclically. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a higher spraying temperature in the LIP mode. First, the temperature of CoNiCrAlY particles heated by pulsed detonations was measured. As a result, the spraying temperature in the LIP mode was higher than that in the GAP mode by about 1000 K. Second, the temperature of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) particles, whose melting point was almost 2800 °C, heated by pulsed detonations in the LIP mode was measured. As a result, the YSZ particles were heated up to about 2500 °C. Finally, a thermal spray experiment using YSZ particles was conducted, and a coating with low porosity was successfully deposited.

  20. Numerical Analysis of a Pulse Detonation Cross Flow Heat Load Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Naples, Andrew .; Hoke, John L.; Schauer, Fred

    2011-01-01

    A comparison between experimentally measured and numerically simulated, time-averaged, point heat transfer rates in a pulse detonation (PDE) engine is presented. The comparison includes measurements and calculations for heat transfer to a cylinder in crossflow and to the tube wall itself using a novel spool design. Measurements are obtained at several locations and under several operating conditions. The measured and computed results are shown to be in substantial agreement, thereby validating the modeling approach. The model, which is based in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is then used to interpret the results. A preheating of the incoming fuel charge is predicted, which results in increased volumetric flow and subsequent overfilling. The effect is validated with additional measurements.

  1. Characterization of Pulse Detonation Engine Performance with Varying Free Stream Stagnation Pressure Levels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    PDE Operation ................................................................... 52 Detonation Tube Setup...16. PDE hydrogen and air supply system schematic ............................................. 48 Figure 17. Experimental detonation tube setup...Research Laboratory CFD Computational Fluid Dynamics C-J Chapman Jouguet (speed) DDT Deflagration to Detonation Transition FF Fill Fraction PDE

  2. Slag characterization and removal using pulse detonation for coal gasification. Quarterly research report, July 1--September 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Huque, Z.; Mei, D.; Biney, P.O.; Zhou, J.; Ali, M.R.

    1996-10-25

    Boiler slagging and fouling as a result of inorganic impurities in combustion gases being deposited on heat transfer tubes have caused severe problems in coal-fired power plant operation. These problems are fuel, system design, and operating condition dependent. Conventional slag and ash removal methods include the use of in situ blowing or jet-type devices such as air or steam soot blowers and water lances. Pulse detonation technology for the purpose of removing slag and fouling deposits in coal-fired utility power plant boilers offers great potential. The detonation wave technique based on high impact velocity with sufficient energy and thermal shock on the slag deposited on gas contact surfaces offers a convenient, inexpensive, yet efficient and effective way to supplement existing slag removal methods. These detonation waves have been demonstrated experimentally to have exceptionally high shearing capability important to the task of removing slag and fouling deposits. Several tests have been performed with single shot detonation wave at University of Texas at Arlington to remove the slag deposit. To hold the slag deposit samples at the exit of detonation tube, two types of fixture was designed and fabricated. They are axial arrangement and triangular arrangement. The slag deposits from the utility boilers have been used to prepare the slag samples for the test. The experimental results show that the single shot detonation wave is capable of removing the entire slag (types of slag deposited on economizer, and air-heater, i.e., relatively softer slags) and 30% of the reheater slag (which is harder) even at a distance of 6 in. from the exit of a detonation engine tube. Wave strength and slag orientation also have different effects on the chipping off of the slag. The annual report discusses about the results obtained in effectively removing the slag.

  3. Studies of Operating Frequency Effects On Ejector-based Thrust Augmentation in a Pulse Detonation Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landry, K.

    2005-01-01

    Studies were performed in order to characterize the thrust augmentation potential of an ejector in a Pulse Detonation Engine application. A 49-mm diameter tube of 0.914-m length was constructed with one open end and one closed end. Ethylene, oxygen, and nitrogen were introduced into the tube at the closed end through the implementation of a fast mixing injector. The tube was completely filled with a stoichiometric mixture containing a one to one molar ratio of nitrogen to oxygen. Ethylene was selected as the fuel due to its detonation sensitivity and the molar ratio of the oxidizer was chosen for heat transfer purposes. Detonations were initiated in the tube through the use of a spark ignition system. The PDE was operated in a multi-cycle mode at frequencies ranging from 20-Hz to 50-Hz. Baseline thrust measurements with no ejector present were performed while operating the engine at various frequencies and compared to theoretical estimates. The baseline values were observed to agree with the theoretical model at low operating frequencies and proved to be increasingly lower than the predicted values as the operating frequency was increased. The baseline thrust measurements were observed to agree within 15 percent of the model for all operating frequencies. A straight 152-mm diameter ejector was installed and thrust augmentation percentages were measured. The length of the ejector was varied while the overlap percentage (percent of the ejector length which overlapped the tube) was maintained at 25 percent for all tests. In addition, the effect of ejector inlet geometry was investigated by comparing results with a straight inlet to those of a 38-mm inlet diameter. The thrust augmentation of the straight inlet ejector proved to be independent of engine operating frequency, augmenting thrust by 40 percent for the 0.914-m length ejector. In contrast, the rounded lip ejector of the same length seemed to be highly dependent on the engine operating frequency. An optimum

  4. Unsteady specific work and isentropic efficiency of a radial turbine driven by pulsed detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouser, Kurt P.

    There has been longstanding government and industry interest in pressure-gain combustion for use in Brayton cycle based engines. Theoretically, pressure-gain combustion allows heat addition with reduced entropy loss. The pulsed detonation combustor (PDC) is a device that can provide such pressure-gain combustion and possibly replace typical steady deflagration combustors. The PDC is inherently unsteady, however, and comparisons with conventional steady deflagration combustors must be based upon time-integrated performance variables. In this study, the radial turbine of a Garrett automotive turbocharger was coupled directly to and driven, full admission, by a PDC in experiments fueled by hydrogen or ethylene. Data included pulsed cycle time histories of turbine inlet and exit temperature, pressure, velocity, mass flow, and enthalpy. The unsteady inlet flowfield showed momentary reverse flow, and thus unsteady accumulation and expulsion of mass and enthalpy within the device. The coupled turbine-driven compressor provided a time-resolved measure of turbine power. Peak power increased with PDC fill fraction, and duty cycle increased with PDC frequency. Cycle-averaged unsteady specific work increased with fill fraction and frequency. An unsteady turbine efficiency formulation is proposed, including heat transfer effects, enthalpy flux-weighted total pressure ratio, and ensemble averaging over multiple cycles. Turbine efficiency increased with frequency but was lower than the manufacturer reported conventional steady turbine efficiency.

  5. Ideal cycle analysis of a regenerative pulse detonation engine for power production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, Rafaela

    Over the last few decades, considerable research has been focused on pulse detonation engines (PDEs) as a promising replacement for existing propulsion systems with potential applications in aircraft ranging from the subsonic to the lower hypersonic regimes. On the other hand, very little attention has been given to applying detonation for electric power production. One method for assessing the performance of a PDE is through thermodynamic cycle analysis. Earlier works have adopted a thermodynamic cycle for the PDE that was based on the assumption that the detonation process could be approximated by a constant volume process, called the Humphrey cycle. The Fickett-Jacob cycle, which uses the one--dimensional Chapman--Jouguet (CJ) theory of detonation, has also been used to model the PDE cycle. However, an ideal PDE cycle must include a detonation based compression and heat release processes with a finite chemical reaction rate that is accounted for in the Zeldovich -- von Neumann -- Doring model of detonation where the shock is considered a discontinuous jump and is followed by a finite exothermic reaction zone. This work presents a thermodynamic cycle analysis for an ideal PDE cycle for power production. A code has been written that takes only one input value, namely the heat of reaction of a fuel-oxidizer mixture, based on which the program computes all the points on the ZND cycle (both p--v and T--s plots), including the von Neumann spike and the CJ point along with all the non-dimensionalized state properties at each point. In addition, the program computes the points on the Humphrey and Brayton cycles for the same input value. Thus, the thermal efficiencies of the various cycles can be calculated and compared. The heat release of combustion is presented in a generic form to make the program usable with a wide variety of fuels and oxidizers and also allows for its use in a system for the real time monitoring and control of a PDE in which the heat of reaction

  6. Experimental Study of Propulsion Performance by Single-Pulse Rotating Detonation with Gaseous Fuels-Oxygen Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toshimitsu, Kazuhiko; Hara, Kosei; Mikajiri, Shuuto; Takiguchi, Naoki

    2016-12-01

    A rotating detonation engine (RDE) is one of candidates of aerospace engines for supersonic cruse, which is better for propulsion system than a pulse detonation engine (PDE) from the view of continuous thrust and simple structure. The propulsion performance of a proto-type RDE and a PDE by single pulse explosion with methane-oxygen is investigated. Furthermore, the performance of the RDE with acetylene-oxygen gas mixtures is investigated. Its impulse is estimated through ballistic pendulum method with maximum displacement and damping ratio. The comparison of specific impulses of the mixture gases at atmospheric pressure is shown. The specific impulses of the RDE and the PDE are almost same with methane-oxygen gas. Furthermore, the fuel-base specific impulse of the RDE with acetylene-oxygen gas is about over twice as large as one of methane-oxygen, and its maximum specific impulse is 1100 seconds.

  7. Schlieren Imaging and Pulsed Detonation Engine Testing of Ignition by a Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Discharge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-16

    CHEMKIN II [31] are coupled together to efficiently model species evolution in 0-dimensional plasma-as- sisted combustion (PAC). Gas heating during the...of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, NJ 08544, USA bAerospace Systems Directorate, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433, USA c...quenched in-between pulses, resulting in a building up of heat and radicals in the center of the ignition kernel. Optical emission spectra revealed

  8. Study of ejector geometry on thrust augmentation for pulse detonation engine ejector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehadeh, Ra'fat

    Pulse detonation engine (PDE) technology is a novel form of propulsion that offers the potential of high efficiency combustion with reduced hardware complexity. Although the primary interest of the research in the pulse detonation engine field is directed towards overcoming the problems associated with operating a pure PDE system, there are other worthy options to be considered for these engines. The PDE driven ejector concept is one such option where the system would be part of a hybrid PD/Turbofan engine. This system offers the promise of replacing the high-pressure turbine sections of the core of a high bypass turbofan engine. The purpose of the current research is to investigate the thrust augmentation capabilities of a PDE driven ejector and provide experimental data that would assist in understanding the behavior of such a system. The major potential advantages of the PDE-ejector include reduced costs due to the reduced engine weight, along with improved specific fuel consumption and specific power inherent in the incorporation of a PDE component. To achieve the goal of this research, the thrust augmentation of a PDE driven ejector was characterized for a set of configurations. Two separate PDE's were utilized in this study. The first PDE was capable of operating at a constant frequency of 10 Hz de to flow rate limitations, and another PDE built to have an operational frequency range of 10 Hz-70 Hz to test the effect of operational frequency on PDE-ejector systems. Optical diagnostics were employed at specific positions of interest to understand the physical behavior of the flow. Baseline experimental results helped define and understand the operational characteristics of the PDE's utilized in this study. Thrust measurements were then made for PDE driven ejector configurations. The parameters that were independently changed were the inlet geometry of a constant diameter ejector, as well as the overlap distance between the PDE tube exit and ejector tube inlet

  9. Oxidation- and Creep-Enhanced Fatigue of Haynes 188 Alloy-Oxide Scale System Under Simulated Pulse Detonation Engine Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    The development of the pulse detonation engine (PDE) requires robust design of the engine components that are capable of enduring harsh detonation environments. In this study, a high cycle thermal fatigue test rig was developed for evaluating candidate PDE combustor materials using a CO2 laser. The high cycle thermal fatigue behavior of Haynes 188 alloy was investigated under an enhanced pulsed laser test condition of 30 Hz cycle frequency (33 ms pulse period, and 10 ms pulse width including 0.2 ms pulse spike). The temperature swings generated by the laser pulses near the specimen surface were characterized by using one-dimensional finite difference modeling combined with experimental measurements. The temperature swings resulted in significant thermal cyclic stresses in the oxide scale/alloy system, and induced extensive surface cracking. Striations of various sizes were observed at the cracked surfaces and oxide/alloy interfaces under the cyclic stresses. The test results indicated that oxidation and creep-enhanced fatigue at the oxide scale/alloy interface was an important mechanism for the surface crack initiation and propagation under the simulated PDE condition.

  10. Thermal Barrier and Protective Coatings to Improve the Durability of a Combustor Under a Pulse Detonation Engine Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Zhu, Dongming

    2008-01-01

    Pulse detonation engine (PDE) concepts are receiving increasing attention for future aeronautic propulsion applications, due to their potential thermodynamic cycle efficiency and higher thrust to density ratio that lead to the decrease in fuel consumption. But the resulting high gas temperature and pressure fluctuation distributions at high frequency generated with every detonation are viewed to be detrimental to the combustor liner material. Experimental studies on a typical metal combustion material exposed to a laser simulated pulse heating showed extensive surface cracking. Coating of the combustor materials with low thermal conductivity ceramics is shown to protect the metal substrate, reduce the thermal stresses, and hence increase the durability of the PDE combustor liner material. Furthermore, the temperature fluctuation and depth of penetration is observed to decrease with increasing the detonation frequency. A crack propagation rate in the coating is deduced by monitoring the variation of the coating apparent thermal conductivity with time that can be utilized as a health monitoring technique for the coating system under a rapid fluctuating heat flux.

  11. Detonation Jet Engine. Part 2--Construction Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulat, Pavel V.; Volkov, Konstantin N.

    2016-01-01

    We present the most relevant works on jet engine design that utilize thermodynamic cycle of detonative combustion. Detonation engines of various concepts, pulse detonation, rotational and engine with stationary detonation wave, are reviewed. Main trends in detonation engine development are discussed. The most important works that carried out…

  12. Unsteady Specific Work and Isentropic Efficiency of a Radial Turbine Driven by Pulsed Detonations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-14

    rotating detonation combustor RDE = rotating detonation engine SDC = steady deflagration combustor SiC = silicon carbide TDLAS = tunable diode...region of interest. Therefore, silicon carbide ( SiC ) seed particles (1-2 μm in size) have been used for seeding combustion flow fields. SiC filaments...Appendix F includes preliminary GT28 radial turbine inlet and exit flowfield measurements using high-speed cameras and silicon - carbide seed particles

  13. JANNAF 24th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee and 36th Combustion Subcommittee Joint Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Ronald S. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    Volume 1, the first of three volumes is a compilation of 16 unclassified/unlimited-technical papers presented at the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) 24th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee and 36th Combustion Subcommittee held jointly with the 181 Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee. The meeting was held on 18-21 October 1999 at NASA Kennedy Space Center and The DoubleTree Oceanfront Hotel, Cocoa Beach, Florida. Topics covered include overviews of RBCC and PDE hypersonic technology, Hyper-X propulsion ground testing, development of JP-8 for hypersonic vehicle applications, numerical simulation of dual-mode SJ combustion, V&V of M&S computer codes, MHD SJ and Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) launch vehicle concepts, and Pulse Detonation Engine (PDE) propulsion technology development including fundamental investigations, modeling, aerodynamics, operation and performance.

  14. Development and Characterization Testing of an Air Pulsation Valve for a Pulse Detonation Engine Supersonic Parametric Inlet Test Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornabene, Robert

    2005-01-01

    In pulse detonation engines, the potential exists for gas pulses from the combustor to travel upstream and adversely affect the inlet performance of the engine. In order to determine the effect of these high frequency pulses on the inlet performance, an air pulsation valve was developed to provide air pulses downstream of a supersonic parametric inlet test section. The purpose of this report is to document the design and characterization tests that were performed on a pulsation valve that was tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center 1x1 Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) test facility. The high air flow pulsation valve design philosophy and analyses performed are discussed and characterization test results are presented. The pulsation valve model was devised based on the concept of using a free spinning ball valve driven from a variable speed electric motor to generate air flow pulses at preset frequencies. In order to deliver the proper flow rate, the flow port was contoured to maximize flow rate and minimize pressure drop. To obtain sharp pressure spikes the valve flow port was designed to be as narrow as possible to minimize port dwell time.

  15. Evaluation and Selection of an Efficient Fuel/Air Initiation Strategy for Pulse Detonation Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Chapman - Jouguet (C-J) points, U and L. However, it must be noted that not all of the regions are physically observed. Region V is not possible, as it...7 The speed at which the burned reactants travel towards a detonation wave was an area of extensive study for two separate researchers, Chapman and... Jouguet , around the turn of the 20th century. The starting point for their derivations began with the conservation equations for steady, one

  16. Gaseous detonations

    SciTech Connect

    Nettleton, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Focusing predominantly on safety problems in handling combustible gas or dust mixtures with air or oxygen, the book is a reference on gaseous detonations. Topics covered include: unidimensional models, structure of detonation fronts, and interaction of a detonation with confinement.

  17. Hypersonic Airbreathing Missile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. L.; Lawing, P. L.; Marcum, D. C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A hypersonic airbreathing missile using dual mode scramjet engines for propulsion is described. The fuselage is constructed of a material with a high heat sink capacity and is covered with a thermal protective shield and lined with an internal insulating blanket. The engine airframe integration uses the flat lower portion of the lower fuselage to precompress the air entering the scramjet engines. The precompression of air entering the scramjet inlets increases as the angles of attack. This feature results in a highly maneuverable missile which can accelerate as it banks into a turn.

  18. New detonation concepts for propulsion and power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Eric M.

    A series of related analytical and experimental studies are focused on utilizing detonations for emerging propulsion and power generation devices. An understanding of the physical and thermodynamic processes for this unsteady thermodynamic cycle has taken over 100 years to develop. An overview of the thermodynamic processes and development history is provided. Thermodynamic cycle analysis of detonation-based systems has often been studied using surrogate models. A real gas model is used for a thermal efficiency prediction of a detonation wave based on the work and heat specified by process path diagrams and a control volume analysis. A combined first and second law analysis aids in understanding performance trends for different initial conditions. A cycle analysis model for an airbreathing, rotating detonation wave engine (RDE) is presented. The engine consists of a steady inlet system with an isolator which delivers air into an annular combustor. A detonation wave continuously rotates around the combustor with side relief as the flow expands towards the nozzle. Air and fuel enter the combustor when the rarefaction wave pressure behind the detonation front drops to the inlet supply pressure. To create a stable RDE, the inlet pressure is matched in a convergence process with the average combustor pressure by increasing the annulus channel width with respect to the isolator channel. Performance of this engine is considered using several parametric studies. RDEs require a fuel injection system that can cycle beyond the limits of mechanical valves. Fuel injectors composed of an orifice connected to a small plenum cavity were mounted on a detonation tube. These fuel injectors, termed fluidic valves, utilize their geometry and a supply pressure to deliver fuel and contain no moving parts. Their behavior is characterized in order to determine their feasibility for integration with high-frequency RDEs. Parametric studies have been conducted with the type of fuel injected

  19. Rotating Detonation Engine Operation (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    MdotH2 = mass flow of hydrogen MdotAir = mass flow of air PCB = Piezoelectric Pressure Sensor PDE = Pulsed Detonation Engine RDE = Rotating ...and unsteady thrust output of PDEs . One of the new designs was the Rotating Detonation Engine (RDE). An RDE operates by exhausting an initial...AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2012-0003 ROTATING DETONATION ENGINE OPERATION (PREPRINT) James A. Suchocki and Sheng-Tao John Yu The Ohio State

  20. Reverse slapper detonator

    DOEpatents

    Weingart, Richard C.

    1990-01-01

    A reverse slapper detonator (70), and methodology related thereto, are provided. The detonator (70) is adapted to be driven by a pulse of electric power from an external source (80). A conductor (20) is disposed along the top (14), side (18), and bottom (16) surfaces of a sheetlike insulator (12). Part of the conductor (20) comprises a bridge (28), and an aperture (30) is positioned within the conductor (20), with the bridge (28) and the aperture (30) located on opposite sides of the insulator (12). A barrel (40) and related explosive charge (50) are positioned adjacent to and in alignment with the aperture (30), and the bridge (28) is buttressed with a backing layer (60). When the electric power pulse vaporizes the bridge (28), a portion of the insulator (12) is propelled through the aperture (30) and barrel (40), and against the explosive charge (50), thereby detonating it.

  1. Numerical simulation of deflagration-to-detonation transition by coupled flame tracking - particle method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, S. M.; Ivanov, V. S.

    2011-10-01

    The objective of the study outlined in this paper was to develop the computationally efficient algorithm for multidimensional numerical simulation of deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in gas-fueled airbreathing pulse detonation engine (PDE). It is implied that the availability of such an algorithm will allow for more realistic estimates of PDE performances (specific impulse, thrust, etc.) than those obtained with the presumption of direct detonation initiation. The new algorithm is based on the coupled Flame Tracking - Particle (FTP) method implemented into the standard Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code solving the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations by the control-volume technique. The coupled methodology has been applied to the two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulation of repeatable DDT in a propane-fueled PDE at Mach 3.0 flight conditions at altitudes 9.3 and 16 km. The fuel-based specific impulse was estimated as 1700-1800 s. The DDT was shown to be a feasible approach for practical PDEs.

  2. Effect of Mixture Pressure and Equivalence Ratio on Detonation Cell Size for Hydrogen-Air Mixtures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Detonation MAPE Mean Absolute Percent Error PDE Pulsed Detonation Engine RDE Rotating Detonation Engine ZND...1997. DeBarmore, Nick D., Paul King, Fred Schauer, and John Hoke, “Nozzle Guide Vane Integration into Rotating Detonation Engine,” 51st AIAA...initial mixture pressure and equivalence ratio. ^Hydrogen and air, detonation cell size, detonation , cell size, Rotating Detonation Engine, RDE U U U UU 129 Dr. Paul I. King, AFIT/ENY (937) 255-3636 x4628

  3. Pulse Detonation Propulsion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    du moteur - integration et gestion thermique) 14. ABSTRACT The objective of theoretical, computational and experimental studies outlined in this...determined as qhhHHWWW ae +−=−=−= 00 , where eW is the expansion work and )( 00 vvpWa −= is the work against ambient pressure. The thermal...22390)( 0G00G =−+= ′′ TTcTcH pp cal/mol. Combustion at constant ambient pressure (without mixture precompression) results in zero thermodynamic

  4. Detonator comprising a nonlinear transmission line

    DOEpatents

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M

    2014-12-30

    Detonators are described herein. In a general embodiment, the detonator includes a nonlinear transmission line that has a variable capacitance. Capacitance of the nonlinear transmission line is a function of voltage on the nonlinear transmission line. The nonlinear transmission line receives a voltage pulse from a voltage source and compresses the voltage pulse to generate a trigger signal. Compressing the voltage pulse includes increasing amplitude of the voltage pulse and decreasing length of the voltage pulse in time. An igniter receives the trigger signal and detonates an explosive responsive to receipt of the trigger signal.

  5. Development of a numerical tool to study the mixing phenomenon occurring during mode one operation of a multi-mode ejector-augmented pulsed detonation rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Joshua

    A novel multi-mode implementation of a pulsed detonation engine, put forth by Wilson et al., consists of four modes; each specifically designed to capitalize on flow features unique to the various flow regimes. This design enables the propulsion system to generate thrust through the entire flow regime. The Multi-Mode Ejector-Augmented Pulsed Detonation Rocket Engine operates in mode one during take-off conditions through the acceleration to supersonic speeds. Once the mixing chamber internal flow exceeds supersonic speed, the propulsion system transitions to mode two. While operating in mode two, supersonic air is compressed in the mixing chamber by an upstream propagating detonation wave and then exhausted through the convergent-divergent nozzle. Once the velocity of the air flow within the mixing chamber exceeds the Chapman-Jouguet Mach number, the upstream propagating detonation wave no longer has sufficient energy to propagate upstream and consequently the propulsive system shifts to mode three. As a result of the inability of the detonation wave to propagate upstream, a steady oblique shock system is established just upstream of the convergent-divergent nozzle to initiate combustion. And finally, the propulsion system progresses on to mode four operation, consisting purely of a pulsed detonation rocket for high Mach number flight and use in the upper atmosphere as is needed for orbital insertion. Modes three and four appear to be a fairly significant challenge to implement, while the challenge of implementing modes one and two may prove to be a more practical goal in the near future. A vast number of potential applications exist for a propulsion system that would utilize modes one and two, namely a high Mach number hypersonic cruise vehicle. There is particular interest in the dynamics of mode one operation, which is the subject of this research paper. Several advantages can be obtained by use of this technology. Geometrically the propulsion system is fairly

  6. Innovative Airbreathing Propulsion Concepts for High-speed Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlow, Woodrow, Jr.

    2002-01-01

    The current cost to launch payloads to low earth orbit (LEO) is approximately loo00 U.S. dollars ($) per pound ($22000 per kilogram). This high cost limits our ability to pursue space science and hinders the development of new markets and a productive space enterprise. This enterprise includes NASA's space launch needs and those of industry, universities, the military, and other U.S. government agencies. NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP) proposes a vision of the future where space travel is as routine as in today's commercial air transportation systems. Dramatically lower launch costs will be required to make this vision a reality. In order to provide more affordable access to space, NASA has established new goals in its Aeronautics and Space Transportation plan. These goals target a reduction in the cost of launching payloads to LEO to $lo00 per pound ($2200 per kilogram) by 2007 and to $100' per pound by 2025 while increasing safety by orders of magnitude. Several programs within NASA are addressing innovative propulsion systems that offer potential for reducing launch costs. Various air-breathing propulsion systems currently are being investigated under these programs. The NASA Aerospace Propulsion and Power Base Research and Technology Program supports long-term fundamental research and is managed at GLenn Research Center. Currently funded areas relevant to space transportation include hybrid hyperspeed propulsion (HHP) and pulse detonation engine (PDE) research. The HHP Program currently is addressing rocket-based combined cycle and turbine-based combined cycle systems. The PDE research program has the goal of demonstrating the feasibility of PDE-based hybrid-cycle and combined cycle propulsion systems that meet NASA's aviation and access-to-space goals. The ASTP also is part of the Base Research and Technology Program and is managed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. As technologies developed under the Aerospace Propulsion and Power Base

  7. Design of a flux diverter and containment tube with results of tests at ACTF and CNRS. [For testing response of soils to thermal pulse of nuclear detonations

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, B.A.; Knasel, T.M.; Sievers, R.; Bomar, S.; Royere, C.; McDonnel, M.D.

    1980-01-01

    Obtaining empirical data on the response of soils and changes in the overlying air due to the thermal pulse of nuclear detonations required development of special test apparatus and use of high fluxes in a large solar furnace. The development of such apparatus, based on non-imaging optic principles; the influence of solar furnace test series in which the apparatus and instrumentation have been tested for thoroughput, durability, and suitability for meeting the requirements are discussed. Tests were conducted at the Advanced Components Test Facility and the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique 1 MW solar furnace. These tests resulted in apparatus redesign, and change in procedures and instrumentation in preparation for further testing.

  8. Integrated System Test of an Airbreathing Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Gregory; Beaudry, Charles; Ketchum, Andrew; McArthur, J. Craig (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on NASA's attempts to develop an air-breathing propulsion in an effort to make future space transportation safer, more reliable and significantly less expensive than today's missions. Spacecraft powered by air-breathing rocket engines would be completely reusable, able to take off and land at airport runways and ready to fly again within days. A radical new engine project is called the Integrated System Tests of an Air-breathing Rocket, or ISTAR.

  9. Airbreathing Acceleration Toward Earth Orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J C

    2007-05-09

    As flight speed increases, aerodynamic drag rises more sharply than the availability of atmospheric oxygen. The ratio of oxygen mass flux to dynamic pressure cannot be improved by changing altitude. The maximum possible speed for airbreathing propulsion is limited by the ratio of air capture area to vehicle drag area, approximately Mach 6 at equal areas. Simulation of vehicle acceleration shows that the use of atmospheric oxygen offers a significant potential for minimizing onboard consumables at low speeds. These fundamental calculations indicate that a practical airbreathing launch vehicle would accelerate to near steady-state speed while consuming only onboard fuel, then transition to rocket propulsion. It is suggested that an aircraft carrying a rocket-propelled vehicle to approximately Mach 5 could be a realistic technical goal toward improving access to orbit.

  10. Air-Breathing Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This photograph depicts an air-breathing rocket engine prototype in the test bay at the General Applied Science Lab facility in Ronkonkoma, New York. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Program at Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  11. Optically triggered fire set/detonator system

    DOEpatents

    Chase, Jay B.; Pincosy, Philip A.; Chato, Donna M.; Kirbie, Hugh; James, Glen F.

    2007-03-20

    The present invention is directed to a system having a plurality of capacitor discharge units (CDUs) that includes electrical bridge type detonators operatively coupled to respective explosives. A pulse charging circuit is adapted to provide a voltage for each respective capacitor in each CDU. Such capacitors are discharged through the electrical bridge type detonators upon receiving an optical signal to detonate respective operatively coupled explosives at substantially the same time.

  12. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A

    2005-12-21

    Many energetic systems can be activated via mechanical means. Percussion primers in small caliber ammunition and stab detonators used in medium caliber ammunition are just two examples. Current medium caliber (20-60mm) munitions are detonated through the use of impact sensitive stab detonators. Stab detonators are very sensitive and must be small, as to meet weight and size limitations. A mix of energetic powders, sensitive to mechanical stimulus, is typically used to ignite such devices. Stab detonators are mechanically activated by forcing a firing pin through the closure disc of the device and into the stab initiating mix. Rapid heating caused by mechanically driven compression and friction of the mixture results in its ignition. The rapid decomposition of these materials generates a pressure/temperature pulse that is sufficient to initiate a transfer charge, which has enough output energy to detonate the main charge. This general type of ignition mix is used in a large variety of primers, igniters, and detonators.[1] Common primer mixes, such as NOL-130, are made up of lead styphnate (basic) 40%, lead azide (dextrinated) 20%, barium nitrate 20%, antimony sulfide 15%, and tetrazene 5%.[1] These materials pose acute and chronic toxicity hazards during mixing of the composition and later in the item life cycle after the item has been field functioned. There is an established need to replace these mixes on toxicity, health, and environmental hazard grounds. This effort attempts to demonstrate that environmentally acceptable energetic solgel coated flash metal multilayer nanocomposites can be used to replace current impact initiated devices (IIDs), which have hazardous and toxic components. Successful completion of this project will result in IIDs that include innocuous compounds, have sufficient output energy for initiation, meet current military specifications, are small, cost competitive, and perform as well as or better than current devices. We expect flash

  13. Exhaust Nozzle for a Multitube Detonative Combustion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratkovich, Thomas E.; Williams, Kevin E.; Bussing, Thomas R. A.; Lidstone, Gary L.; Hinkey, John B.

    2004-01-01

    An improved type of exhaust nozzle has been invented to help optimize the performances of multitube detonative combustion engines. The invention is applicable to both air-breathing and rocket engines used to propel some aircraft and spacecraft, respectively. In a detonative combustion engine, thrust is generated through the expulsion of combustion products from a detonation process in which combustion takes place in a reaction zone coupled to a shock wave. The combustion releases energy to sustain the shock wave, while the shock wave enhances the combustion in the reaction zone. The coupled shockwave/reaction zone, commonly referred to as a detonation, propagates through the reactants at very high speed . typically of the order of several thousands of feet per second (of the order of 1 km/s). The very high speed of the detonation forces combustion to occur very rapidly, thereby contributing to high thermodynamic efficiency. A detonative combustion engine of the type to which the present invention applies includes multiple parallel cylindrical combustion tubes, each closed at the front end and open at the rear end. Each tube is filled with a fuel/oxidizer mixture, and then a detonation wave is initiated at the closed end. The wave propagates rapidly through the fuel/oxidizer mixture, producing very high pressure due to the rapid combustion. The high pressure acting on the closed end of the tube contributes to forward thrust. When the detonation wave reaches the open end of the tube, it produces a blast wave, behind which the high-pressure combustion products are expelled from the tube. The process of filling each combustion tube with a detonable fuel/oxidizer mixture and then producing a detonation repeated rapidly to obtain repeated pulses of thrust. Moreover, the multiple combustion tubes are filled and fired in a repeating sequence. Hence, the pressure at the outlet of each combustion tube varies cyclically. A nozzle of the present invention channels the

  14. Analysis of nozzle effect on pulsed detonation engine performance based on laser absorption spectroscopy with Doppler frequency shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiao-long; Li, Ning; Weng, Chun-sheng; Lv, Xiao-jing

    2016-10-01

    An optical experiment system of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy is designed for valveless gas-liquid PDE to reveal the mechanism of nozzle improved the thrust performance. The velocity of detonation exhaust with non-nozzle, convergent nozzle, divergent nozzle and convergent-divergent nozzle is tested by laser Doppler velocimetry. The results indicate that laser Doppler method can accurately infer the instantaneous flow velocity, especially the velocity platform where contributes more to the engine impulse. The maximum value is 1222.66 m/s, 1128.52 m/s, 1338.64 m/s and 1296.93 m/s, the time of duration which the velocity is greater than 400m/s is 8.51ms, 7.58ms, 5.83ms and 17.62ms of the velocity under the condition of non-nozzle, convergent nozzle, divergent nozzle and convergent-divergent nozzle respectively.

  15. Detonating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    1. Apparatus for detonation of high explosive in uniform timing comprising in combination, an outer case, spark gap electrodes insulatedly supported in spaced relationship within said case to form a spark gap, high explosive of the class consisting of pentaerythritol tetranitrate and trimethylene trinitramine substantially free from material sensitive to detonation by impact compressed in surrounding relation to said electrodes including said spark gap under a pressure from about 100 psi to about 500 psi, said spark gap with said compressed explosive therein requiring at least 1000 volts for sparking, and means for impressing at least 1000 volts on said spark gap.

  16. Characterization of Rotating Detonation Engine Exhaust Through Nozzle Guide Vanes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-21

    Equilibrium with Applications program NRL Naval Research Laboratories NGV Nozzle Guide Vane PDE Pulse Detonation Engine RDE Rotating Detonation Engine...CHARACTERIZATION OF ROTATING DETONATION ENGINE EXHAUST THROUGH NOZZLE GUIDE VANES THESIS Nick D. DeBarmore, Second Lieutenant, USAF AFIT/GAE/ENY/13...Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT/GAE/ENY/13-M09 CHARACTERIZATION OF ROTATING DETONATION ENGINE EXHAUST

  17. Prompt detonation of secondary explosives by laser

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    Secondary high explosives have been promptly detonated by directing a laser beam of various wavelengths from 266 nanometers to 1.06 micron on the surface of the explosives. For this paper ''prompt'' means the excess transit time through an explosive charge is /approximately/250 nanoseconds (or less) less than the accepted full detonation velocity time. Timing between laser pulse, explosive initiation and detonation velocity and function time have been recorded. The laser parameters studied include: wavelength, pulse length, energy and power density, and beam diameter (spot size). Explosives evaluated include: PETN, HNS, HMX, and graphited PETN, HNS, and HMX. Explosive parameters that have been correlated with optical parameters include: density, surface area, critical diameter (spot size), spectral characteristics and enhance absorption. Some explosives have been promptly detonated over the entire range of wavelengths, possibly by two competing initiating mechanisms. Other explosives could not be detonated at any of the wavelengths or power densities tested. 8 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Impulse generation by detonation tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Marcia Ann

    Impulse generation with gaseous detonation requires conversion of chemical energy into mechanical energy. This conversion process is well understood in rocket engines where the high pressure combustion products expand through a nozzle generating high velocity exhaust gases. The propulsion community is now focusing on advanced concepts that utilize non-traditional forms of combustion like detonation. Such a device is called a pulse detonation engine in which laboratory tests have proven that thrust can be achieved through continuous cyclic operation. Because of poor performance of straight detonation tubes compared to conventional propulsion systems and the success of using nozzles on rocket engines, the effect of nozzles on detonation tubes is being investigated. Although previous studies of detonation tube nozzles have suggested substantial benefits, up to now there has been no systematic investigations over a range of operating conditions and nozzle configurations. As a result, no models predicting the impulse when nozzles are used exist. This lack of data has severely limited the development and evaluation of models and simulations of nozzles on pulse detonation engines. The first experimental investigation measuring impulse by gaseous detonation in plain tubes and tubes with nozzles operating in varying environment pressures is presented. Converging, diverging, and converging-diverging nozzles were tested to determine the effect of divergence angle, nozzle length, and volumetric fill fraction on impulse. The largest increases in specific impulse, 72% at an environment pressure of 100 kPa and 43% at an environment pressure of 1.4 kPa, were measured with the largest diverging nozzle tested that had a 12° half angle and was 0.6 m long. Two regimes of nozzle operation that depend on the environment pressure are responsible for these increases and were first observed from these data. To augment this experimental investigation, all data in the literature regarding

  19. Effects of Fuel Distribution on Detonation Tube Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, H. Douglas; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2003-01-01

    A pulse detonation engine uses a series of high frequency intermittent detonation tubes to generate thrust. The process of filling the detonation tube with fuel and air for each cycle may yield non-uniform mixtures. Uniform mixing is commonly assumed when calculating detonation tube thrust performance. In this study, detonation cycles featuring idealized non-uniform Hz/air mixtures were analyzed using a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics code with detailed chemistry. Mixture non-uniformities examined included axial equivalence ratio gradients, transverse equivalence ratio gradients, and partially fueled tubes. Three different average test section equivalence ratios were studied; one stoichiometric, one fuel lean, and one fuel rich. All mixtures were detonable throughout the detonation tube. Various mixtures representing the same average test section equivalence ratio were shown to have specific impulses within 1% of each other, indicating that good fuel/air mixing is not a prerequisite for optimal detonation tube performance under conditions investigated.

  20. Detonation wave compression in gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortman, A.

    1986-01-01

    A study was made of the concept of augmenting the performance of low pressure ratio gas turbines by detonation wave compression of part of the flow. The concept exploits the constant volume heat release of detonation waves to increase the efficiency of the Brayton cycle. In the models studied, a fraction of the compressor output was channeled into detonation ducts where it was processed by transient transverse detonation waves. Gas dynamic studies determined the maximum cycling frequency of detonation ducts, proved that upstream propagation of pressure pulses represented no problems and determined the variations of detonation duct output with time. Mixing and wave compression were used to recombine the combustor and detonation duct flows and a concept for a spiral collector to further smooth the pressure and temperature pulses was presented as an optional component. The best performance was obtained with a single firing of the ducts so that the flow could be re-established before the next detonation was initiated. At the optimum conditions of maximum frequency of the detonation ducts, the gas turbine efficiency was found to be 45 percent while that of a corresponding pressure ratio 5 conventional gas turbine was only 26%. Comparable improvements in specific fuel consumption data were found for gas turbines operating as jet engines, turbofans, and shaft output machines. Direct use of the detonation duct output for jet propulsion proved unsatisfactory. Careful analysis of the models of the fluid flow phenomena led to the conclusion that even more elaborate calculations would not diminish the uncertainties in the analysis of the system. Feasibility of the concept to work as an engine now requires validation in an engineering laboratory experiment.

  1. Flight testing of airbreathing hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, John W.

    1993-01-01

    Using the scramjet engine as the prime example of a hypersonic airbreathing concept, this paper reviews the history of and addresses the need for hypersonic flight tests. It also describes how such tests can contribute to the development of airbreathing technology. Aspects of captive-carry and free-flight concepts are compared. An incremental flight envelope expansion technique for manned flight vehicles is also described. Such critical issues as required instrumentation technology and proper scaling of experimental devices are addressed. Lastly, examples of international flight test approaches, existing programs, or concepts currently under study, development, or both, are given.

  2. Spectroscopic studies of detonating heterogeneous explosives. [HNS

    SciTech Connect

    Renlund, A.M.; Trott, W.M.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental objectives of this work are to use real-time spectroscopic techniques, emission spectroscopy and Raman spectra to monitor chemical and physical changes in shock-loaded or detonating high explosive (HE) samples. The investigators hope to identify chemical species including any transient intermediates. Also, they wish to determine the physical state of the material when the reactions are taking place; measure the temperature and the pressure; and study the effect of different initiation parameters and bulk properties of the explosive material. This work is just part of the effort undertaken to gain information on the detailed chemistry involved in initiation and detonation. In summary, the investigators have obtained vibrational temperatures of some small radical products of detonation, which may correlate with the detonation temperature. They have also observed that NO/sub 2/ is an early product from detonating HNS and RDX, and that other electronically excited radical species such as CN(B) are formed in HNS detonations. In the Raman work, the single-pulse spectra could be obtained even in the severe environment of a detonation, and that the rate of removal of the parent molecule could be monitored. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Detonation Trap Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-08-01

    Critical Dimensions for Propagation l Fluid Detonation Reaction Zone Thickness l Heat - of - Detonation and Reaction l Fluid and Materials of Construction...characteristics of the fluid really depend on reaction zone thickness, heat - of - detonation /reaction, sound velocity, and thermal characteristics (e.g... HEAT - OF - DETONATION HIGH LOW MEDIUM III. HEAT-OF-REACTION HIGH X LOW X MEDIUM X IV. DDT CHARACTERISTIC SHORT LONG MEDIUM DILUTION X X

  4. High temperature detonator

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, James O.; Dinegar, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    A detonator assembly is provided which is usable at high temperatures about 300.degree. C. A detonator body is provided with an internal volume defining an anvil surface. A first acceptor explosive is disposed on the anvil surface. A donor assembly having an ignition element, an explosive material, and a flying plate, are placed in the body effective to accelerate the flying plate to impact the first acceptor explosive on the anvil for detonating the first acceptor explosive. A second acceptor explosive is eccentrically located in detonation relationship with the first acceptor explosive to thereafter effect detonation of a main charge.

  5. Detonation Wave Profile

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-12-14

    The Zel’dovich-von Neumann-Doering (ZND) profile of a detonation wave is derived. Two basic assumptions are required: i. An equation of state (EOS) for a partly burned explosive; P(V, e, λ). ii. A burn rate for the reaction progress variable; d/dt λ = R(V, e, λ). For a steady planar detonation wave the reactive flow PDEs can be reduced to ODEs. The detonation wave profile can be determined from an ODE plus algebraic equations for points on the partly burned detonation loci with a specified wave speed. Furthermore, for the CJ detonation speed the end of the reaction zone is sonic. A solution to the reactive flow equations can be constructed with a rarefaction wave following the detonation wave profile. This corresponds to an underdriven detonation wave, and the rarefaction is know as a Taylor wave.

  6. Development of a laser ignited all secondary explosive DDT detonator

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, C.M.; Spangler, E.M.; Beckman, T.M.; Kramer, D.P.

    1992-09-01

    A hermetic, stand alone, laser-ignited deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) detonator has been developed. The detonator uses the secondary explosive HMX (cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine) and was originally developed for use with the US Navy`s Laser Initiated Transfer Energy subsystem (LITES). The design of the new detonator allows for its use with a variety of laser fire sets. A high density blend 6f 830 cm2/g HMX with 3% carbon black by weight was used for the ignition charge. Deflagration-to-detonation transition was achieved with a transition charge of undoped 830 cm2/g HMX. Using a 12-ms ND-YAG laser pulse coupled to the detonator via a 1-mm diameter optical fiber, the ignition threshold was determined to be approximately 30 mJ. Full detonating outputs were demonstrated by function testing in Navy detonation sensitivity fittings. Finally, the detonator was tested in several configurations with shielded mild detonating chord (SNMC) endrips to determine its capability for lighting transfer lines.

  7. Transition to Detonation in Exploding Bridgewire Detonators

    SciTech Connect

    Roeski, F; Benterou, J; Lee, R; Roos, R

    2003-01-08

    We are investigating using breakout profile measurements and/or Fabry-Perot velocimeter measurements during early stages of initiation in Exploding Bridge Wire (EBW) detonators as a tool for understanding the physics of initiation of these devices and as a tool for monitoring aging effects. We believe any changes due to aging may be more readily observed in the very early stages of the initiation. We have developed a method that allows measurement of the detonation velocity, detonation profile and interface velocity as a function of distance from the bridgewire.

  8. Supersonic Air-Breathing Stage For Commercial Launch Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Concept proposed to expand use of air-breathing, reusable stages to put more payload into orbit at less cost. Stage with supersonic air-breathing engines added to carry expendable stages from subsonic airplane to supersonic velocity. Carry payload to orbit. Expendable stages and payload placed in front of supersonic air-breathing stage. After releasing expendable stages, remotely piloted supersonic air-breathing stage returns to takeoff site and land for reuse. New concept extends use of low-cost reusable hardware and increases payload delivered from B-52.

  9. Airbreathing hypersonic vehicle design and analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, Mary Kae; Petley, Dennis H.; Hunt, James L.; Martin, John G.

    1996-01-01

    The design, analysis, and optimization of airbreathing hypersonic vehicles requires analyses involving many highly coupled disciplines at levels of accuracy exceeding those traditionally considered in a conceptual or preliminary-level design. Discipline analysis methods including propulsion, structures, thermal management, geometry, aerodynamics, performance, synthesis, sizing, closure, and cost are discussed. Also, the on-going integration of these methods into a working environment, known as HOLIST, is described.

  10. Swimming in air-breathing fishes.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, S; Domenici, P; McKenzie, D J

    2014-03-01

    Fishes with bimodal respiration differ in the extent of their reliance on air breathing to support aerobic metabolism, which is reflected in their lifestyles and ecologies. Many freshwater species undertake seasonal and reproductive migrations that presumably involve sustained aerobic exercise. In the six species studied to date, aerobic exercise in swim flumes stimulated air-breathing behaviour, and there is evidence that surfacing frequency and oxygen uptake from air show an exponential increase with increasing swimming speed. In some species, this was associated with an increase in the proportion of aerobic metabolism met by aerial respiration, while in others the proportion remained relatively constant. The ecological significance of anaerobic swimming activities, such as sprinting and fast-start manoeuvres during predator-prey interactions, has been little studied in air-breathing fishes. Some species practise air breathing during recovery itself, while others prefer to increase aquatic respiration, possibly to promote branchial ion exchange to restore acid-base balance, and to remain quiescent and avoid being visible to predators. Overall, the diversity of air-breathing fishes is reflected in their swimming physiology as well, and further research is needed to increase the understanding of the differences and the mechanisms through which air breathing is controlled and used during exercise.

  11. Air-breathing Rocket Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This Quick Time movie depicts the Rocketdyne static test of an air-breathing rocket. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's advanced Transportation Program at the Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  12. [Research on diagnosis of gas-liquid detonation exhaust based on double optical path absortion spectroscopy technique].

    PubMed

    Lü, Xiao-Jing; Li, Ning; Weng, Chun-Sheng

    2014-03-01

    The effect detection of detonation exhaust can provide measurement data for exploring the formation mechanism of detonation, the promotion of detonation efficiency and the reduction of fuel waste. Based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy technique combined with double optical path cross-correlation algorithm, the article raises the diagnosis method to realize the on-line testing of detonation exhaust velocity, temperature and H2O gas concentration. The double optical path testing system is designed and set up for the valveless pulse detonation engine with the diameter of 80 mm. By scanning H2O absorption lines of 1343nm with a high frequency of 50 kHz, the on-line detection of gas-liquid pulse detonation exhaust is realized. The results show that the optical testing system based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy technique can capture the detailed characteristics of pulse detonation exhaust in the transient process of detonation. The duration of single detonation is 85 ms under laboratory conditions, among which supersonic injection time is 5.7 ms and subsonic injection time is 19.3 ms. The valveless pulse detonation engine used can work under frequency of 11 Hz. The velocity of detonation overflowing the detonation tube is 1,172 m x s(-1), the maximum temperature of detonation exhaust near the nozzle is 2 412 K. There is a transitory platform in the velocity curve as well as the temperature curve. H2O gas concentration changes between 0-7% during detonation under experimental conditions. The research can provide measurement data for the detonation process diagnosis and analysis, which is of significance to advance the detonation mechanism research and promote the research of pulse detonation engine control technology.

  13. Theory of Detonation Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1942-05-04

    and progresses through .an explosive. Such a theory must explain how the head of the detonation wave initiates· the reaction (and the detonation ... theory of detonation is based on the assumption that the actual value of 9’ is this lower limit Cf1 ! This is tho so-called hypothesis of’ Chapman and...DEVELOP!i!ENT Progress Report on 11 Theory of Detonation Waves 11 to April 1, 1942 by John von Nounr.n Institute for Adv&nccd Study Princeton

  14. Detonation command and control

    DOEpatents

    Mace, Jonathan L.; Seitz, Gerald J.; Echave, John A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2015-11-10

    The detonation of one or more explosive charges and propellant charges by a detonator in response to a fire control signal from a command and control system comprised of a command center and instrumentation center with a communications link therebetween. The fire control signal is selectively provided to the detonator from the instrumentation center if plural detonation control switches at the command center are in a fire authorization status, and instruments, and one or more interlocks, if included, are in a ready for firing status. The instrumentation and command centers are desirably mobile, such as being respective vehicles.

  15. Hydrazine vapor detonations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedley, M. D.; Bishop, C. V.; Benz, F. J.; Bennett, C. A.; Mcclenagan, R. D.

    1988-01-01

    The detonation velocity and cell widths for hydrazine decomposition were measured over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. The detonation velocity in pure hydrazine was within 5 percent of the calculated C-J velocity. The detonation cell width measurements were interpreted using the Zeldovich-Doering-von Neumann model with a detailed reaction mechanism for hydrazine decomposition. Excellent agreement with experimental data for pure hydrazine was obtained using the empirical relation that detonation cell width was equal to 29 times the kinetically calculated reaction zone length.

  16. Detonation command and control

    DOEpatents

    Mace, Jonathan L.; Seitz, Gerald J.; Echave, John A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2016-05-31

    The detonation of one or more explosive charges and propellant charges by a detonator in response to a fire control signal from a command and control system comprised of a command center and instrumentation center with a communications link there between. The fire control signal is selectively provided to the detonator from the instrumentation center if plural detonation control switches at the command center are in a fire authorization status, and instruments, and one or more interlocks, if included, are in a ready for firing status. The instrumentation and command centers are desirably mobile, such as being respective vehicles.

  17. Airbreathing/Rocket Single-Stage-to-Orbit Design Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, James L.

    1995-01-01

    A definitive design/performance study was performed on a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) airbreathing propelled orbital vehicle with rocket propulsion augmentation in the Access to Space activities during 1993. A credible reference design was established, but by no means an optimum. The results supported the viability of SSTO airbreathing/rocket vehicles for operational scenarios and indicated compelling reasons to continue to explore the design matrix. This paper will (1) summarize the Access to Space design activity from the SSTO airbreathing/rocket perspective, (2) present an airbreathing/rocket SSTO design matrix established for continued optimization of the design space, and (3) focus on the compelling reasons for airbreathing vehicles in Access to Space scenarios.

  18. Bidirectional slapper detonator

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, Robert N.; Boyd, Melissa D.

    1984-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a bidirectional slapper detonator. One embodiment utilizes a single bridge circuit to detonate a pair of opposing initiating pellets. A line generator embodiment uses a plurality of bridges in electrical series to generate opposing cylindrical wavefronts.

  19. Air-Breathing Rocket Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This photograph depicts an air-breathing rocket engine that completed an hour or 3,600 seconds of testing at the General Applied Sciences Laboratory in Ronkonkoma, New York. Referred to as ARGO by its design team, the engine is named after the mythological Greek ship that bore Jason and the Argonauts on their epic voyage of discovery. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's Advanced SpaceTransportation Program at Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  20. STS 2000 - A reference airbreathing SSTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Alain; Thevenot, Regis

    1991-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the most recent results (including wind tunnel testing) dealing with a SSTO using airbreathing propulsion up to March 6. The choice of the external shape of the vehicle is explained then the aerodynamic coefficients of the glider are derived. The integration of the propulsion system (a turborocket-ramjet-rocket) to the vehicle is then presented including forebody effects. The launch trajectory and the way to refine it thanks to a simultaneous optimization of the mass budget, is described. The internal accommodation and the structural concepts are briefly presented.

  1. Atomistic simulation of detonation initiation by ultra-short impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murzov, S. A.; Zhakhovsky, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    We present results of the classical molecular dynamics simulation of detonation initiation in simple AB model of a high explosive compressed by ultra-short shock wave (SW). The simplified reactive empirical bond order potential (REBO) defines interatomic forces in the AB model explosive made up of diatomic AB molecules. Simulation of ultra-short piston-driven compression of AB explosive with duration of picoseconds represents an indirect initiation via a thin metal foil irradiated by a femtosecond laser pulse. We studied transition of SW to a detonation wave (DW), including evolution of calculated pressure profile in a sample. A run distance to detonation of such AB explosive film, which is required for detonation initiation, was obtained. Variation of loading time and piston velocity gives a 2D region of transition from SW to DW. The influence of pores on detonation initiation threshold is discussed.

  2. Optimization of Air-Breathing Engine Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Lavelle, Thomas M.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1996-01-01

    The design optimization of air-breathing propulsion engine concepts has been accomplished by soft-coupling the NASA Engine Performance Program (NEPP) analyzer with the NASA Lewis multidisciplinary optimization tool COMETBOARDS. Engine problems, with their associated design variables and constraints, were cast as nonlinear optimization problems with thrust as the merit function. Because of the large number of mission points in the flight envelope, the diversity of constraint types, and the overall distortion of the design space; the most reliable optimization algorithm available in COMETBOARDS, when used by itself, could not produce satisfactory, feasible, optimum solutions. However, COMETBOARDS' unique features-which include a cascade strategy, variable and constraint formulations, and scaling devised especially for difficult multidisciplinary applications-successfully optimized the performance of subsonic and supersonic engine concepts. Even when started from different design points, the combined COMETBOARDS and NEPP results converged to the same global optimum solution. This reliable and robust design tool eliminates manual intervention in the design of air-breathing propulsion engines and eases the cycle analysis procedures. It is also much easier to use than other codes, which is an added benefit. This paper describes COMETBOARDS and its cascade strategy and illustrates the capabilities of the combined design tool through the optimization of a high-bypass- turbofan wave-rotor-topped subsonic engine and a mixed-flow-turbofan supersonic engine.

  3. Effects of Fuel Distribution on Detonation Tube Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Hugh Douglas

    2002-01-01

    A pulse detonation engine (PDE) uses a series of high frequency intermittent detonation tubes to generate thrust. The process of filling the detonation tube with fuel and air for each cycle may yield non-uniform mixtures. Lack of mixture uniformity is commonly ignored when calculating detonation tube thrust performance. In this study, detonation cycles featuring idealized non-uniform H2/air mixtures were analyzed using the SPARK two-dimensional Navier-Stokes CFD code with 7-step H2/air reaction mechanism. Mixture non-uniformities examined included axial equivalence ratio gradients, transverse equivalence ratio gradients, and partially fueled tubes. Three different average test section equivalence ratios (phi), stoichiometric (phi = 1.00), fuel lean (phi = 0.90), and fuel rich (phi = 1.10), were studied. All mixtures were detonable throughout the detonation tube. It was found that various mixtures representing the same test section equivalence ratio had specific impulses within 1 percent of each other, indicating that good fuel/air mixing is not a prerequisite for optimal detonation tube performance.

  4. Numerical investigation of oblique detonation waves for a shcramjet combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusina, Giovanni

    Research in hypersonic airbreathing propulsion strives to provide an efficient, cost-effective alternative to rocket propulsion for space transportation systems. The supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) is one of the most common hypersonic airbreathing propulsion concepts, but its massive combustor could have detrimental effects on its efficiency. The shock-induced combustion ramjet (shcramjet) overcomes this drawback by using standing oblique detonation waves (coupled shock-combustion fronts) as a means of nearly instantaneous heat addition. A numerical investigation of standing oblique detonation waves for their use in shcramjet propulsion is the main purpose of this investigation. The laminar, two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations coupled with non-equilibrium hydrogen/air combustion models based on chemical kinetics are used to represent the physical system. The combustion models are incorporated into an in-house computational fluid dynamics solver based on a shock-capturing scheme by Yee scheme and an approximate factorization algorithm with a dual-time stepping technique to regain time-accuracy. The solver is validated with experimental data found in the literature. A time accurate simulation of the formation of a standing oblique detonation wave (ODW) near the Chapman Jouguet (minimum entropy) condition yields a non-oscillatory, stable structure. The stability of the ODW to inhomogeneities in the oncoming fuel/air mixture is assessed through other time-accurate simulations by artificially introducing small disturbances consisting of pure air just upstream of the ODW structure. The ODW is shown to be resilient to these disturbances: an upstream displacement is observed followed by the return of the ODW to its original position. Steady-state simulations are carried out to determine the effect of laminar boundary layers on ODW structures and properties above and below the Chapman-Jouguet point. A comparison with analogous inviscid simulations shows that the

  5. Direct observation detonator operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Charles R.

    2001-11-01

    The analysis of detonator-timing performance has involved the use of rotating-mirror cameras (RMC) used in the streak mode and high-speed film. Fiducial timing marks are applied to the film to provide temporal references. The use of a RMC for detonator analysis requires aligning the camera, performing an exposure test, capturing light from the detonation and then processing the film. This procedure can take up to an hour for two technicians. After the film is possessed another technician compares each light streak on the film with the fiducial timing marks also recorded on the film. Capturing light from a detonator and recording it directly to a digitizer can improve detonator-timing measurement in several ways. The digitized signals can then be directly analyzed with software. The direct recording method reduces the need for expensive rotating mirror cameras, film processing and subjective optical measurement comparison. Furthermore, an extensive support facility requiring several specialized technicians is reduced to a single technician in a modest laboratory. This technician is then capable of performing several tests an hour. Tests were preformed to measure light intensity at detonation. An optical method of capturing the light was designed using a remote microscope coupled to optical fiber to bring the light to an optical/electrical converter and a digitizer then records the signal. This system is presently used in parallel with a RMC. The results are compared for accuracy.

  6. Cable Discharge System for fundamental detonator studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peevy, Gregg R.; Barnhart, Steven G.; Brigham, William P.

    1994-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has recently completed the modification and installation of a cable discharge system (CDS) which will be used to study the physics of exploding bridgewire (EBW) detonators and exploding foil initiators (EFI or slapper). Of primary interest are the burst characteristics of these devices when subjected to the constant current pulse delivered by this system. The burst process involves the heating of the bridge material to a conductive plasma and is essential in describing the electrical properties of the bridgewire foil for use in diagnostics or computer models. The CDS described herein is capable of delivering up to an 8000 A pulse of 3 micron duration. Experiments conducted with the CDS to characterize the EBW and EFI burst behavior are also described. In addition, the CDS simultaneous VISAR capability permits updating the EFI electrical Gurney analysis parameters used in our computer simulation codes. Examples of CDS generated data for a typical EFI and EBW detonator are provided.

  7. Air-Breathing Launch Vehicle Technology Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trefny, Charles J.

    2003-01-01

    Of the technical factors that would contribute to lowering the cost of space access, reusability has high potential. The primary objective of the GTX program is to determine whether or not air-breathing propulsion can enable reusable single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) operations. The approach is based on maturation of a reference vehicle design with focus on the integration and flight-weight construction of its air-breathing rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) propulsion system.

  8. Airbreathing Hypersonic Technology Vision Vehicles and Development Dreams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClinton, C. R.; Hunt, J. L.; Ricketts, R. H.; Reukauf, P.; Peddie, C. L.

    1999-01-01

    Significant advancements in hypersonic airbreathing vehicle technology have been made in the country's research centers and industry over the past 40 years. Some of that technology is being validated with the X-43 flight tests. This paper presents an overview of hypersonic airbreathing technology status within the US, and a hypersonic technology development plan. This plan builds on the nation's large investment in hypersonics. This affordable, incremental plan focuses technology development on hypersonic systems, which could be operating by the 2020's.

  9. Detonation front curvatures and detonation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauderbach, Lisa M.; Lorenz, K. Thomas; Lee, Edward L.; Souers, P. Clark

    2017-01-01

    Many detonation front curvatures are reviewed. Most are of the Shock Dynamics type, which are described as a combination of quadratic and 8th power-of-the-radius curves. The integrated fraction of the 8th power curve is taken as a measure of curvature, which we are able to relate to the logarithm of the detonation rate. This provides a means of estimating the rates of some unknown explosives from the curvature. Using the edge lag divided by the radius is an even better way. A second group of curvatures are almost or purely quadratic. This is probably not associated with density gradients but may be caused by low sound speeds. A final group of "sombreros" show curvy fronts for ideal explosives, which appear to be caused by density gradients.

  10. Air-breathing adaptation in a marine Devonian lungfish

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Alice M.; Long, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent discoveries of tetrapod trackways in 395 Myr old tidal zone deposits of Poland (Niedźwiedzki et al. 2010 Nature 463, 43–48 (doi:10.1038/nature.08623)) indicate that vertebrates had already ventured out of the water and might already have developed some air-breathing capacity by the Middle Devonian. Air-breathing in lungfishes is not considered to be a shared specialization with tetrapods, but evolved independently. Air-breathing in lungfishes has been postulated as starting in Middle Devonian times (ca 385 Ma) in freshwater habitats, based on a set of skeletal characters involved in air-breathing in extant lungfishes. New discoveries described herein of the lungfish Rhinodipterus from marine limestones of Australia identifies the node in dipnoan phylogeny where air-breathing begins, and confirms that lungfishes living in marine habitats had also developed specializations to breathe air by the start of the Late Devonian (ca 375 Ma). While invasion of freshwater habitats from the marine realm was previously suggested to be the prime cause of aerial respiration developing in lungfishes, we believe that global decline in oxygen levels during the Middle Devonian combined with higher metabolic costs is a more likely driver of air-breathing ability, which developed in both marine and freshwater lungfishes and tetrapodomorph fishes such as Gogonasus. PMID:20147310

  11. Research on filling process of fuel and oxidant during detonation based on absorption spectrum technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiao-Jing; Li, Ning; Weng, Chun-Sheng

    2014-12-01

    Research on detonation process is of great significance for the control optimization of pulse detonation engine. Based on absorption spectrum technology, the filling process of fresh fuel and oxidant during detonation is researched. As one of the most important products, H2O is selected as the target of detonation diagnosis. Fiber distributed detonation test system is designed to enable the detonation diagnosis under adverse conditions in detonation process. The test system is verified to be reliable. Laser signals at different working frequency (5Hz, 10Hz and 20Hz) are detected. Change of relative laser intensity in one detonation circle is analyzed. The duration of filling process is inferred from the change of laser intensity, which is about 100~110ms. The peak of absorption spectrum is used to present the concentration of H2O during the filling process of fresh fuel and oxidant. Absorption spectrum is calculated, and the change of absorption peak is analyzed. Duration of filling process calculated with absorption peak consisted with the result inferred from the change of relative laser intensity. The pulse detonation engine worked normally and obtained the maximum thrust at 10Hz under experiment conditions. The results are verified through H2O gas concentration monitoring during detonation.

  12. The History of the Study of Detonation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulat, Pavel V.; Volkov, Konstantin N.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we reviewed the main concepts of detonative combustion. Concepts of slow and fast combustion, of detonation adiabat are introduced. Landmark works on experimental and semi-empirical detonation study are presented. We reviewed Chapman-Jouguet stationary detonation and spin detonation. Various mathematical model of detonation wave…

  13. In-Situ Continuous Detonation Velocity Measurements Using Fiber-optic Bragg Grating Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Benterou, J; Udd, E; Wilkins, P; Roeske, F; Roos, E; Jackson, D

    2007-07-25

    In order to fully calibrate hydrocodes and dynamic chemistry burn models, initiation and detonation research requires continuous measurement of low order detonation velocities as the detonation runs up to full order detonation for a given density and initiation pressure pulse. A novel detector of detonation velocity is presented using a 125 micron diameter optical fiber with an integral chirped fiber Bragg grating as an intrinsic sensor. This fiber is embedded in the explosive under study and interrogated during detonation as the fiber Bragg grating scatters light back along the fiber to a photodiode, producing a return signal dependant on the convolution integral of the grating reflection bandpass, the ASE intensity profile and the photodetector response curve. Detonation velocity is measured as the decrease in reflected light exiting the fiber as the grating is consumed when the detonation reaction zone proceeds along the fiber sensor axis. This small fiber probe causes minimal perturbation to the detonation wave and can measure detonation velocities along path lengths tens of millimeters long. Experimental details of the associated equipment and preliminary data in the form of continuous detonation velocity records within nitromethane and PBX-9502 are presented.

  14. Detonation Shock Radius Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, David; Debes, Joshua; Stewart, Scott; Yoo, Sunhee

    2007-06-01

    A previous passover experiment [1] was designed to create a complex detonation transient used in validating a reduced, asymptotically derived description of detonation shock dynamics (DSD). An underlying question remained on determining the location of the initial detonation shock radius to start the DSD simulation with respect to the dynamical response of the initiation system coupling's to the main charge. This paper concentrates on determining the initial shock radius required of such DSD governed problems. `Cut-back' experiments of PBX-9501 were conducted using an initiation system that sought to optimize the transferred detonation to the desired constant radius, hemispherical shape. Streak camera techniques captured the breakout on three of the prism's surfaces for time-of-arrival data. The paper includes comparisons to simulations using constant volume explosion and high pressure hot spots. The results of the experiments and simulation efforts provide fundamental design considerations for actual explosive systems and verify necessary conditions from which the asymptotic theory of DSD may apply. [1] Lambert, D., Stewart, D. Scott and Yoo, S. and Wescott, B., ``Experimental Validation of Detonation Shock Dynamics in Condensed Explosives. J. of Fluid Mechs., Vol. 546, pp.227-253 (2006).

  15. Motivations for laser detonator and firing system developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, James E.

    2006-08-01

    For ordnance system and testing applications in which safety is paramount, laser detonators and firing systems are strong candidates. Both low-power (1 W) and high-power (~1 MW) laser-driven explosive devices provide safety against stray current and electrostatic discharges, including lightning. This article addresses only one class of high-power laser-driven detonators that provide prompt detonation - the laser-driven analog of electrical exploding bridgewire (EBW) detonatorsm which we call a "laser EBW." Coupling of laser power into a plasma and then to the explosive powder will be described. Drawing upon current initiatives within DOE laboratories, this talk will emphasize similarities between high-power laser detonators and high-power electrical detonators in terms of firing power requirements and development of deonation. In explosive testing applications, laser detonators provide separation of noisy electrical firing systems from diagnostic sensors that may be embedded in an experimental assembly. Laser detonators can be made without any metallic content, and that is desirable for radiography experiments. Feasibility of reliable transmission of a firing pulse through optical fibers is a key element in applications for missile ordnance, warhead firing, and other mobile systems. The preparation and characterization of fibers, and their capabilities and limitations are also discussed briefly.

  16. Alternative Pulse Detonation Engine Ignition System Investigation through Detonation Splitting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    Vielle, Berthelot , Mallard, and Le Chatelier must have been astounded when they saw flame speeds, which for deflagration typically fix around one...reduced to the forms shown in Eqn.’s 1, 2, and 3. Additionally, by combining these equations and using the assumptions above, the Rayleigh and Rankine...Rayleigh line relationship is examined. Equation 4 is solved for P2. The downstream density is the independent variable in Equation 4. The ρ2 range is

  17. Detonation Propagation Through Ducts in a Pulsed Detonation Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Frederick R. Schauer (Member) Date ____________________________________ ________ Mark F. Reeder (Member) Date iv AFIT/GAE/ENY...Acknowledgements I would first like to thank Dr. Schauer and AFRL/RZTC for providing the funding and motivation for this research. I can honestly say that...I had a lot of fun with this project and that is in large part due to the atmosphere Dr. Schauer has built in his lab. I am grateful for the

  18. Development of a Detonation Diffuser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    reflection of the shock would result in a detonation that runs out of reactants when it encounters the combustion front. Rotating the reflecting surface...FEASIBILITY AND PARAMETER STUDY OF A DETONATION DIFFUSER DISSERTATION Christopher A Stevens, CTR AFIT-DS...States Government. iii AFIT-DS-ENY-14-M-05 FEASIBILITY AND PARAMETER STUDY OF A DETONATION DIFFUSER DISSTERTATION

  19. Hypersonic airbreathing propulsion/airframe integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, John P.

    1992-01-01

    Recent interest in airbreathing hypersonic flight has centered around the need to develop advanced space launch systems which can reduce the cost of inserting payloads in orbit and make space more accessible. An effect of the thermal environment is to require the vehicle to operate at high altitudes, in very thin air, to maintain aircraft structural load limits. The high altitudes at which the hypersonic vehicle must operate give rise to the concept of an airframe integrated propulsion system to provide a much larger inlet and nozzle to process the required volume of air at low density, atmospheric conditions. In the integrated system, the forward portion of the vehicle compresses the air flow and serves as the external portion of the inlet; the aftbody completes the expansion process for the nozzle. In addition, the engine, which is contained between the body and the forebody shock wave, lends itself to a modular integration of a number of separate engines. In this manner, a relatively small engine can be defined to allow engine development in existing ground facilities.

  20. Nonequilibrium detonation of composite explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols III, A.L.

    1997-07-01

    The effect of nonequilibrium diffusional flow on detonation velocities in composite explosives is examined. Detonation conditions are derived for complete equilibrium, temperature and pressure equilibrium, and two forms of pressure equilibrium. Partial equilibria are associated with systems which have not had sufficient time for transport to smooth out the gradients between spatially separate regions. The nonequilibrium detonation conditions are implemented in the CHEQ equation of state code. We show that the detonation velocity decreases as the non-chemical degrees of freedom of the explosive are allowed to equilibrate. It is only when the chemical degrees of freedom are allowed to equilibrate that the detonation velocity increases.

  1. Clamp for detonating fuze

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holderman, E. J.

    1968-01-01

    Quick acting clamp provides physical support for a closely confined detonating fuse in an application requiring removal and replacement at frequent intervals during test. It can be designed with a base of any required strength and configuration to permit the insertion of an object.

  2. Miniature plasma accelerating detonator and method of detonating insensitive materials

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, Jr., Robert W.; Kopczewski, Michael R.; Schwarz, Alfred C.

    1986-01-01

    The invention is a detonator for use with high explosives. The detonator comprises a pair of parallel rail electrodes connected to a power supply. By shorting the electrodes at one end, a plasma is generated and accelerated toward the other end to impact against explosives. A projectile can be arranged between the rails to be accelerated by the plasma. An alternative arrangement is to a coaxial electrode construction. The invention also relates to a method of detonating explosives.

  3. Miniature plasma accelerating detonator and method of detonating insensitive materials

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Kopczewski, M.R.; Schwarz, A.C.

    1985-01-04

    The invention is a detonator for use with high explosives. The detonator comprises a pair of parallel rail electrodes connected to a power supply. By shorting the electrodes at one end, a plasma is generated and accelerated toward the other end to impact against explosives. A projectile can be arranged between the rails to be accelerated by the plasma. An alternative arrangement is to a coaxial electrode construction. The invention also relates to a method of detonating explosives. 3 figs.

  4. The hydrodynamic theory of detonation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langweiler, Heinz

    1939-01-01

    This report derives equations containing only directly measurable constants for the quantities involved in the hydrodynamic theory of detonation. The stable detonation speed, D, is revealed as having the lowest possible value in the case of positive material velocity, by finding the minimum of the Du curve (u denotes the speed of the gases of combustion). A study of the conditions of energy and impulse in freely suspended detonating systems leads to the disclosure of a rarefaction front traveling at a lower speed behind the detonation front; its velocity is computed. The latent energy of the explosive passes into the steadily growing detonation zone - the region between the detonation front and the rarefaction front. The conclusions lead to a new definition of the concept of shattering power. The calculations are based on the behavior of trinitrotoluene.

  5. 2-D Air-Breathing Lightcraft Engine Experiments in Hypersonic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, Israel I.; Myrabo, Leik N.; Minucci, Marco A. S.; de Oliveira, Antonio C.; Toro, Paulo G. P.; Chanes, José B.; Rego, Israel S.

    2011-11-01

    Experiments were performed with a 2-D, repetitively-pulsed (RP) laser Lightcraft model in hypersonic flow conditions. The main objective was the feasibility analysis for impulse generation with repetitively-pulsed air-breathing laser Lightcraft engines at hypersonic speeds. The future application of interest for this basic research endeavor is the laser launch of pico-, nano-, and micro-satellites (i.e., 0.1-100 kg payloads) into Low-Earth-Orbit, at low-cost and on-demand. The laser propulsion experiments employed a Hypersonic Shock Tunnel integrated with twin gigawatt pulsed Lumonics 620-TEA CO2 lasers (˜ 1 μs pulses), to produce the required test conditions. This hypersonic campaign was carried out at nominal Mach numbers ranging from 6 to 10. Time-dependent surface pressure distributions were recorded together with Schlieren movies of the flow field structure resulting from laser energy deposition. Results indicated laser-induced pressure increases of 0.7-0.9 bar with laser pulse energies of ˜ 170 J, on off-shroud induced breakdown condition, and Mach number of 7.

  6. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-11

    a mixture of lead azide, lead styphnate , barium nitrate, antimony sulfides, and tetracene) mJ millijoule (10–3 J) FINAL REPORT PP...initiating mix (NOL-130) and transfer charge of current stab detonators contain hazardous materials such as lead azide, lead styphnate , and barium nitrate...tetracene) and heavy metal constituents (e.g., lead styphnate , lead azide, barium nitrate, and antimony sulfides) present in the NOL-130 initiating

  7. Recent work on gaseous detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettleton, M. A.

    The paper reviews recent progress in the field of gaseous detonations, with sections on shock diffraction and reflection, the transition to detonation, hybrid, spherically-imploding, and galloping and stuttering fronts, their structure, their transmission and quenching by additives, the critical energy for initiation and detonation of more unusual fuels. The final section points out areas where our understanding is still far from being complete and contains some suggestions of ways in which progress might be made.

  8. Prospects for future hypersonic air-breathing vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, H. L., Jr.; Blankson, Isaiah M.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the technical progress achieved in key areas of hypersonic airbreathing vehicle development is presented. The context for hypersonic applications is discussed with emphasis placed on technology issues and requirements, particularly for propulsion and technology integration. Attention is given to CFD technology which allows the consideration of configurations and extrapolations to flight conditions that cannot be simulated on the ground.

  9. Computational analysis of hypersonic airbreathing aircraft flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwoyer, Douglas L.; Kumar, Ajay

    1987-01-01

    The general problem of calculating the flow fields associated with hypersonic airbreathing aircraft is presented. Unique aspects of hypersonic aircraft aerodynamics are introduced and their demands on computational fluid dynamics are outlined. Example calculations associated with inlet/forebody integration and hypersonic nozzle design are presented to illustrate the nature of the problems considered.

  10. Low voltage nonprimary explosive detonator

    DOEpatents

    Dinegar, Robert H.; Kirkham, John

    1982-01-01

    A low voltage, electrically actuated, nonprimary explosive detonator is disclosed wherein said detonation is achieved by means of an explosive train in which a deflagration-to-detonation transition is made to occur. The explosive train is confined within a cylindrical body and positioned adjacent to low voltage ignition means have electrical leads extending outwardly from the cylindrical confining body. Application of a low voltage current to the electrical leads ignites a self-sustained deflagration in a donor portion of the explosive train which then is made to undergo a transition to detonation further down the train.

  11. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... the underside of the opposite wrist, below the base of the thumb. Press with flat fingers until ... determine if the patient's heart is pumping. Pulse measurement has other uses as well. During or immediately ...

  12. Innovative Airbreathing Propulsion Concepts for Access to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlow, Jr., Woodrow; Blech, Richard A.; Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will present technologies and concepts for novel aeropropulsion systems. These technologies will enhance the safety of operations, reduce life cycle costs, and contribute to reduced costs of air travel and access to space. One of the goals of the NASA program is to reduce the carbon-dioxide emissions of aircraft engines. Engine concepts that use highly efficient fuel cell/electric drive technologies in hydrogen-fueled engines will be presented in the proposed paper. Carbon-dioxide emissions will be eliminated by replacing hydrocarbon fuel with hydrogen, and reduce NOx emissions through better combustion process control. A revolutionary exoskeletal engine concept, in which the engine drum is rotated, will be shown. This concept has the potential to allow a propulsion system that can be used for subsonic through hypersonic flight. Dual fan concepts that have ultra-high bypass ratios, low noise, and low drag will be presented. Flow-controlled turbofans and control-configured turbofans also will be discussed. To increase efficiency, a system of microengines distributed along lifting surfaces and on the fuselage is being investigated. This concept will be presented in the paper. Small propulsion systems for affordable, safe personal transportation vehicles will be discussed. These low-oil/oilless systems use technologies that enable significant cost and weight reductions. Pulse detonation engine-based hybrid-cycle and combined-cycle propulsion systems for aviation and space access will be presented.

  13. Detonator-activated ball shutter

    DOEpatents

    McWilliams, Roy A.; von Holle, William G.

    1983-01-01

    A detonator-activated ball shutter for closing an aperture in about 300.mu. seconds. The ball shutter containing an aperture through which light, etc., passes, is closed by firing a detonator which propels a projectile for rotating the ball shutter, thereby blocking passage through the aperture.

  14. Detonator-activated ball shutter

    DOEpatents

    McWilliams, R.A.; Holle, W.G. von.

    1983-08-16

    A detonator-activated ball shutter for closing an aperture in about 300[mu] seconds. The ball shutter containing an aperture through which light, etc., passes, is closed by firing a detonator which propels a projectile for rotating the ball shutter, thereby blocking passage through the aperture. 3 figs.

  15. Steady Non-Ideal Detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, G. J.; Luheshi, M. Y.; Braithwaite, M.; Falle, S. A. E. G.

    2009-12-01

    Highly non-ideal explosives, such as commercial ammonium nitrate based explosives used in mining and blasting, have critical charge diameters of several centimetres and relatively low detonation speeds. Shock polar match analyses between these explosives and confining inert materials give two main types of interactions. For the first type (denoted here by case I), the detonation drives an oblique shock into the confiner. For the second type (case II), a wave propagates in the confiner ahead of the detonation wave in the explosive. In case I, numerical simulations show that for a given explosive model there is a unique relationship (valid for all charge diameters and confinements) between the velocity of detonation (VoD) and the curvature of the detonation shock at the charge axis. This relationship is shown to be well predicted by a quasi-one-dimensional analysis. A simple detonation shock dynamics method which uses this relationship predicts the VoD provided the explosive is sufficiently confined (usually the case in mining), but is inaccurate in the limit of an unconfined charge. For commercial explosives confined by rocks, a significant proportion of problems are case II. Numerical simulations are performed to investigate the coupling mechanisms in these situations. It is found that, in agreement with an approximate theory, the detonation is driven up to VoDs near the confiner's sound speed, and the wave in the confiner weakly pre-compresses the explosive ahead of the detonation front.

  16. A Pulsed Detonation Microthruster for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, E.; Brouillette, M.

    The majority of microsatellites in orbit do not have a propulsion system, which greatly limits their flexibility and their ability to perform complex tasks. Ambitious future missions will need the capability to produce the thrust required for either orbit change, drag makeup, station keeping or attitude control, and this usually requires more than one propulsion system [1].

  17. Nanocarbon condensation in detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastea, Sorin

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the definition of the Gibbs free energy of a nanoparticle in a reactive fluid environment, and propose an approach for predicting the size of carbon nanoparticles produced by the detonation of carbon-rich explosives that regards their condensation as a nucleation process and takes into account absolute entropy effects of the cluster population. The results are consistent with experimental observations and indicate that such entropy considerations are important for determining chemical equilibrium states in energetic materials that contain an excess of carbon. The analysis may be useful for other applications that deal with the nucleation of nanoparticles under reactive conditions.

  18. Semiconductor bridge (SCB) detonator

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, Jr., Robert W.; Grubelich, Mark C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a low-energy detonator for high-density secondary-explosive materials initiated by a semiconductor bridge igniter that comprises a pair of electrically conductive lands connected by a semiconductor bridge. The semiconductor bridge is in operational or direct contact with the explosive material, whereby current flowing through the semiconductor bridge causes initiation of the explosive material. Header wires connected to the electrically-conductive lands and electrical feed-throughs of the header posts of explosive devices, are substantially coaxial to the direction of current flow through the SCB, i.e., substantially coaxial to the SCB length.

  19. Semiconductor bridge (SCB) detonator

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Grubelich, M.C.

    1999-01-19

    The present invention is a low-energy detonator for high-density secondary-explosive materials initiated by a semiconductor bridge (SCB) igniter that comprises a pair of electrically conductive lands connected by a semiconductor bridge. The semiconductor bridge is in operational or direct contact with the explosive material, whereby current flowing through the semiconductor bridge causes initiation of the explosive material. Header wires connected to the electrically-conductive lands and electrical feed-throughs of the header posts of explosive devices, are substantially coaxial to the direction of current flow through the SCB, i.e., substantially coaxial to the SCB length. 3 figs.

  20. Nanocarbon condensation in detonation

    PubMed Central

    Bastea, Sorin

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the definition of the Gibbs free energy of a nanoparticle in a reactive fluid environment, and propose an approach for predicting the size of carbon nanoparticles produced by the detonation of carbon-rich explosives that regards their condensation as a nucleation process and takes into account absolute entropy effects of the cluster population. The results are consistent with experimental observations and indicate that such entropy considerations are important for determining chemical equilibrium states in energetic materials that contain an excess of carbon. The analysis may be useful for other applications that deal with the nucleation of nanoparticles under reactive conditions. PMID:28176827

  1. Ferrite core coupled slapper detonator apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Boberg, R.E.; Lee, R.S.; Weingart, R.C.

    1989-08-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for coupling a temporally short electric power pulse from a thick flat-conductor power cable into a thin flat-conductor slapper detonator circuit. A first planar and generally circular loop is formed from an end portion of the power cable. A second planar and generally circular loop, of similar diameter, is formed from all or part of the slapper detonator circuit. The two loops are placed together, within a ferrite housing that provides a ferrite path that magnetically couples the two loops. Slapper detonator parts may be incorporated within the ferrite housing. The ferrite housing may be made vacuum and water-tight, with the addition of a hermetic ceramic seal, and provided with an enclosure for protecting the power cable and parts related thereto. 10 figs.

  2. Mathematical modeling of detonation initiation via flow cumulation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, I.; Utkin, P.; Akhmedyanov, I.

    2016-07-01

    The paper concerns two problems connected with the idea of gaseous detonation initiation via flow cumulation effects and convergence of relatively weak shock waves (SW). The first one is the three-dimensional (3D) numerical investigation of shock-to-detonation transition (SDT) in methane-air mixture in a tube with parabolic contraction followed by the tube section of narrow diameter and conical expansion. The second problem is the numerical study of the start-up of the model small-scale hydrogen electrochemical pulse detonation engine with the use of electrical discharge generating the toroidal SW. The investigation is performed by means of numerical simulation with the use of modern high-performance computing systems.

  3. Ferrite core coupled slapper detonator apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Boberg, Ralph E.; Lee, Ronald S.; Weingart, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for coupling a temporally short electric power pulse from a thick flat-conductor power cable into a thin flat-conductor slapper detonator circuit. A first planar and generally circular loop is formed from an end portion of the power cable. A second planar and generally circular loop, of similar diameter, is formed from all or part of the slapper detonator circuit. The two loops are placed together, within a ferrite housing that provides a ferrite path that magnetically couples the two loops. Slapper detonator parts may be incorporated within the ferrite housing. The ferrite housing may be made vacuum and water-tight, with the addition of a hermetic ceramic seal, and provided with an enclosure for protecting the power cable and parts related thereto.

  4. Planar Reflection of Gaseous Detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damazo, Jason Scott

    Pipes containing flammable gaseous mixtures may be subjected to internal detonation. When the detonation normally impinges on a closed end, a reflected shock wave is created to bring the flow back to rest. This study built on the work of Karnesky (2010) and examined deformation of thin-walled stainless steel tubes subjected to internal reflected gaseous detonations. A ripple pattern was observed in the tube wall for certain fill pressures, and a criterion was developed that predicted when the ripple pattern would form. A two-dimensional finite element analysis was performed using Johnson-Cook material properties; the pressure loading created by reflected gaseous detonations was accounted for with a previously developed pressure model. The residual plastic strain between experiments and computations was in good agreement. During the examination of detonation-driven deformation, discrepancies were discovered in our understanding of reflected gaseous detonation behavior. Previous models did not accurately describe the nature of the reflected shock wave, which motivated further experiments in a detonation tube with optical access. Pressure sensors and schlieren images were used to examine reflected shock behavior, and it was determined that the discrepancies were related to the reaction zone thickness extant behind the detonation front. During these experiments reflected shock bifurcation did not appear to occur, but the unfocused visualization system made certainty impossible. This prompted construction of a focused schlieren system that investigated possible shock wave-boundary layer interaction, and heat-flux gauges analyzed the boundary layer behind the detonation front. Using these data with an analytical boundary layer solution, it was determined that the strong thermal boundary layer present behind the detonation front inhibits the development of reflected shock wave bifurcation.

  5. Flowfield characterization and model development in detonation tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Zachary Clark

    A series of experiments and numerical simulations are performed to advance the understanding of flowfield phenomena and impulse generation in detonation tubes. Experiments employing laser-based velocimetry, high-speed schlieren imaging and pressure measurements are used to construct a dataset against which numerical models can be validated. The numerical modeling culminates in the development of a two-dimensional, multi-species, finite-rate-chemistry, parallel, Navier-Stokes solver. The resulting model is specifically designed to assess unsteady, compressible, reacting flowfields, and its utility for studying multidimensional detonation structure is demonstrated. A reduced, quasi-one-dimensional model with source terms accounting for wall losses is also developed for rapid parametric assessment. Using these experimental and numerical tools, two primary objectives are pursued. The first objective is to gain an understanding of how nozzles affect unsteady, detonation flowfields and how they can be designed to maximize impulse in a detonation based propulsion system called a pulse detonation engine. It is shown that unlike conventional, steady-flow propulsion systems where converging-diverging nozzles generate optimal performance, unsteady detonation tube performance during a single-cycle is maximized using purely diverging nozzles. The second objective is to identify the primary underlying mechanisms that cause velocity and pressure measurements to deviate from idealized theory. An investigation of the influence of non-ideal losses including wall heat transfer, friction and condensation leads to the development of improved models that reconcile long-standing discrepancies between predicted and measured detonation tube performance. It is demonstrated for the first time that wall condensation of water vapor in the combustion products can cause significant deviations from ideal theory.

  6. Deflagration-to-detonation transition in gases in tubes with cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, N. N.; Nikitin, V. F.; Phylippov, Yu. G.

    2010-12-01

    The existence of a supersonic second combustion mode — detonation — discovered by Mallard and Le Chatelier and by Berthélot and Vieille in 1881 posed the question of mechanisms for transition from one mode to the other. In the period 1959-1969, experiments by Salamandra, Soloukhin, Oppenheim, and their coworkers provided insights into this complex phenomenon. Since then, among all the phenomena related to combustion processes, deflagration-to-detonation transition is, undoubtedly, the most intriguing one. Deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in gases is connected with gas and vapor explosion safety issues. Knowing mechanisms of detonation onset control is of major importance for creating effective mitigation measures addressing two major goals: to prevent DDT in the case of mixture ignition, or to arrest the detonation wave in the case where it has been initiated. A new impetus to the increase in interest in deflagration-to-detonation transition processes was given by the recent development of pulse detonation devices. The probable application of these principles to creation of a new generation of engines put the problem of effectiveness of pulse detonating devices at the top of current research needs. The effectiveness of the pulse detonation cycle turned out to be the key factor characterizing the Pulse Detonation Engine (PDE), whose operation modes were shown to be closely related to periodical onset and degeneration of a detonation wave. Those unsteady-state regimes should be self-sustained to guarantee a reliable operation of devices using the detonation mode of burning fuels as a constitutive part of their working cycle. Thus deflagration-to-detonation transition processes are of major importance for the issue. Minimizing the predetonation length and ensuring stability of the onset of detonation enable one to increase the effectiveness of a PDE. The DDT turned out to be the key factor characterizing the PDE operating cycle. Thus, the problem of

  7. Detonation initiation in solid explosive: MD simulation using AB interatomic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murzov, Semen; Zhakhovsky, Vasily

    2017-01-01

    The classical molecular dynamics method is used for atomistic simulation of detonation initiation in AB model of condensed phase explosive, in which the simplified REBO potential defines reactive interatomic interactions between atoms period A and B. The simulated ultra-short (picoseconds) shock wave (SW) compression of an explosive corresponds to indirect detonation initiation produced by femtosecond laser pulses. We study shock to detonation transition (SDT) including the evolution of pressure profiles in an AB explosive film. It is demonstrated that the pressure profile of detonation wave (DW) can be calculated from a time-dependent rear-surface velocity measured in experiments. The role of a single cylindrical pore in detonation initiation is investigated. The thresholds for long-term (tens of picosecond) and sustained loading initiating regimes are determined.

  8. Detonation tube impulse in sub-atmospheric environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Marcia A.; Shepherd, Joseph E.

    2005-04-01

    The thrust from a multi-cycle, pulse detonation engine operating at practical flight altitudes will vary with the surrounding environment pressure. We have carried out the first experimental study using a detonation tube hung in a ballistic pendulum arrangement within a large pressure vessel in order to determine the effect that the environment has on the single-cycle impulse. The air pressure inside the vessel surrounding the detonation tube varied between 100 and 1.4 kPa while the initial pressure of the stoichiometric ethylene-oxygen mixture inside the tube varied between 100 and 30 kPa. The original impulse model (Wintenberger et al., Journal of Propulsion and Power, Vol. 19, No. 1, 2002) was modified to predict the observed increase in impulse and blow down time as the environment pressure decreased below one atmosphere. Comparisons between the impulse from detonation tubes and ideal, steady flow rockets indicate incomplete expansion of the detonation tube exhaust, resulting in a 37% difference in impulse at a pressure ratio (ratio of pressure behind the Taylor wave to the environment pressure) of 100.

  9. Laser power beaming for rocket propulsion and airbreathing propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, A.

    1980-01-01

    The developing technology of laser power beaming is introduced, and two systems are used as examples of the capabilities of the laser for beamed energy. In the first system, the potential of the laser to power flight systems ranging from hypersonic air-breathing launch vehicles to commercial jet transports is examined. Attention is given to the possibility of an air-breathing propulsion which offers the promise of a global air transportation network independent of kerosene and powered by solar energy. In addition, consideration is given to a new type of rocket propulsion based on the laser's ability to concentrate coherent laser energy to high power densities. Focused laser beams would heat the propellants directly to produce specific impulses approaching ion and MHD rocket levels, and would do so without the burden of a heavy electrical power supply.

  10. Airbreathing Hypersonic Systems Focus at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, James L.; Rausch, Vincent L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the status of the airbreathing hypersonic airplane and space-access vehicle design matrix, reflects on the synergies and issues, and indicates the thrust of the effort to resolve the design matrix and to focus/advance systems technology maturation. Priority is given to the design of the vision operational vehicles followed by flow-down requirements to flight demonstrator vehicles and their design for eventual consideration in the Future-X Program.

  11. Optimization of Air-Breathing Propulsion Engine Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1997-01-01

    Air-breathing propulsion engines play an important role in the development of both civil and military aircraft Design optimization of such engines can lead to higher power, or more thrust for less fuel consumption. A multimission propulsion engine design can be modeled mathematically as a multivariable global optimization problem, with a sequence of subproblems, which are specific to the mission events defined through Mach number, altitude, and power setting combinations.

  12. Airbreathing Laser Propulsion Experiments with 1 {mu}m Terawatt Pharos IIILaser: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Myrabo, L. N.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.; Liu, S.; Manka, C.

    2011-11-10

    This basic research study examines the physics of airbreathing laser propulsion at the extreme flux range of 1-2x10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}--within the air breakdown threshold for l {mu}m radiation--using the terawatt Pharos III neodymium-glass pulsed laser. Six different experimental setups were employed using a 34 mm line focus with 66 {mu}m focal waist, positioned near the flat impulse surface. The 2nd Campaign investigated impulse generation with the laser beam focused at grazing incidence across near horizontal target surfaces, with pulse energies ranging from 55 to 186 J, and pulse-widths of 2 to 30 ns FWHM. Laser generated impulse was measured with a horizontal Plexiglas registered ballistic pendulum equipped with either a steel target insert or 0.5 Tesla permanent magnet (NEIT-40), to quantify changes in the momentum coupling coefficient (C{sub M}). Part 2 of this 2-part paper covers Campaign no. 2 results including C{sub M} performance data, and long exposure color photos of LP plasma phenomena.

  13. Quantitative Studies of Detonator Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott, J.; Collins, A. L.; Proud, W. G.

    2009-12-01

    Detonators are widely used in explosive applications, with commercial systems being mass produced from a number of suppliers. One issue that affects producers and users is the reproducibility and output of the explosive system. This can be considered from both the component parts and as the fully assembled detonator. This paper outlines a simple experimental system for measuring the output of detonators or small amounts of explosive. The basis of the technique was pioneered by Bertram Hopkinson in the early 20th Century, here the fundamental idea is applied with advanced instrumentation to both calibrate the system and show its potential for use in both fundamental and applied research.

  14. Two phase detonation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholls, J. A.; Pierce, T. H.; Miyajima, H.; Oza, R.; Patil, P.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental study of the passage of a shock wave over a burning fuel drop is described. This includes high speed framing photographs of the interaction taken at 500,000 frames per second. A theoretical prediction of the ignition of a fuel drop by a shock wave is presented and the results compared with earlier experimental work. Experimental attempts to generate a detonation in a liquid fuel drop (kerosene)-liquid oxidizer drop (hydrogen peroxide)-inert gas-environment are described. An appendix is included which gives the analytical prediction of power requirements for the drop generator to produce certain size drops at a certain mass rate. A bibliography is also included which lists all of the publications resulting from this research grant.

  15. New generation detonics

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P.C.

    1996-12-15

    Modern theory is being used to accelerate the development of new high performance explosive molecules. Combining quantum chemistry calculations with synthesis of promising candidate molecules may enable the advance of the state of the art in this field by more than 50 years. We have established a high explosive performance prediction code by linking the thermochemical code CHEETAH with the ab initio electronic structure code GAUSSIAN and the molecular packing code MOLPAK. GAUSSIAN is first used to determine the shape of the molecule and its binding energy; the molecules are then packed together into a low energy configuration by MOLPAK. Finally, CHEETAH is used to transform the crystal energy and density into explosive performance measures such as detonation velocity, pressure, and energy. Over 70 target molecules have been created, and several of these show promise in combining performance, chemical stability, and ease of synthesis.

  16. Seal Technology Development for Advanced Component for Airbreathing Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Philip H.

    2008-01-01

    Key aspects of the design of sealing systems for On Rotor Combustion/Wave Rotor (ORC/WR) systems were addressed. ORC/WR systems generally fit within a broad class of pressure gain Constant Volume Combustors (CVCs) or Pulse Detonation Combustors (PDCs) which are currently being considered for use in many classes of turbine engines for dramatic efficiency improvement. Technology readiness level of this ORC/WR approaches are presently at 2.0. The results of detailed modeling of an ORC/WR system as applied to a regional jet engine application were shown to capture a high degree of pressure gain capabilities. The results of engine cycle analysis indicated the level of specific fuel consumption (SFC) benefits to be 17 percent. The potential losses in pressure gain due to leakage were found to be closely coupled to the wave processes at the rotor endpoints of the ORC/WR system. Extensive investigation into the sealing approaches is reported. Sensitivity studies show that SFC gains of 10 percent remain available even when pressure gain levels are highly penalized. This indicates ORC/WR systems to have a high degree of tolerance to rotor leakage effects but also emphasizes their importance. An engine demonstration of an ORC/WR system is seen as key to progressing the TRL of this technology. An industrial engine was judged to be a highly advantageous platform for demonstration of a first generation ORC/WR system. Prior to such a demonstration, the existing NASA pressure exchanger wave rotor rig was identified as an opportunity to apply both expanded analytical modeling capabilities developed within this program and to identify and fix identified leakage issues existing within this rig. Extensive leakage analysis of the rig was performed and a detailed design of additional sealing strategies for this rig was generated.

  17. Review of the PDWA Concept for Combustion Enhancement in a Supersonic Air-Breathing Combustor Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canbier, Jean-Luc; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews the design of the Pulsed Detonation Wave Augmentor (PDWA) concept and the preliminary computational fluid dynamics studies that supported it. The PDWA relies on the rapid generation of detonation waves in a small tube, which are then injected into the supersonic stream of the main combustor. The blast waves thus generated are used to stimulate the mixing and combustion inside the main combustor. The mixing enhancement relies on various forms of the baroclinic interaction, where misaligned pressure and density gradients combine to produce vortical flow. By using unsteady shock waves, the concept also uses the Richtmyer-Meshkov effect to further increase the rate of mixing. By carefully designing the respective configurations of the combustor and the detonation tubes, one can also increase the penetration of the fuel into the supersonic air stream. The unsteady shocks produce lower stagnation pressure losses than steady shocks. Combustion enhancement can also be obtained through the transient shock-heating of the fuel-air interface, and the lowering of the ignition delay in these regions. The numerical simulations identify these processes, and show which configurations give the best results. Engineering considerations are also presented, and discuss the feasibility of the concept. Of primary importance are the enhancements in performance, the design simplicity, the minimization of the power, cost, and weight, and the methods to achieve very rapid cycling.

  18. Steady non-ideal detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Gary

    2009-06-01

    Theories for determining the velocity of detonation (VoD) in highly non-ideal explosives, e.g. commercial explosives used in mining, are discussed. Such explosives have critical charge diameters of several centimetres. An analysis of the interaction between detonations and confining materials along the explosive-confiner interface reveals there a two main types of interaction. In the first (denoted here by case 1) the detonation drives an oblique shock into the confiner. For the second (case 2), a wave propagates in the confiner ahead of the detonation in the explosive. Shock polar interactions are examined for commercial explosives and rocks, which shows that a significant proportion of problems are case 2 in mining. For case 1, numerical simulations show that for a given explosive model there is a unique relationship (valid for all charge diameters and confinements) between the VoD and the curvature of the detonation shock at the charge axis. This relationship is shown to be well predicted by a quasi-one-dimensional type analysis. A simple detonation shock dynamics method which uses this relationships predicts well the VoD even in highly non-ideal cases, provided the explosive is sufficiently confined (usually the case in mining), but which is inaccurate in the limit of an unconfined charge. Preliminary results of a novel variational method for solving the unconfined situation are also discussed. Numerical simulations are performed to investigate the coupling mechanisms in case 2 situations, including the influence on diameter effects. It is shown that, in agreement with an approximate theory, the detonation is driven up to VoDs above the confiner's sound speed, and the wave in the confiner weakly pre-compresses the explosive ahead of the detonation front.

  19. Detonation Propulsion - A Navy Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    Session 2 Detonation Propulsion -A Navy Perspective Gabriel Roy Office of Naval Research Global 46 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Office of Naval Research Global 8...ADA593185 2013 International Workshop for Detonations in Propulsion (IWDP 2013) Held in Tainan, Taiwan on July 26-28, 2013. 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT

  20. Double-Front Detonation Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubin, S. A.; Sumskoi, S. I.; Victorov, S. B.

    According to the theory of detonation, in a detonation wave there is a sound plane, named Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) plane. There are certain stationary parameters for this plane. In this work the possibility of the second CJ plane is shown. This second CJ plane is stationary as well. The physical mechanism of non-equilibrium transition providing the existence of the second CJ plane is presented. There is a non-equilibrium state, when the heat is removed from the reaction zone and the heat capacity decreases sharply. As a result of this non-equilibrium state, the sound velocity increases, and the local supersonic zone with second sonic plane (second CJ plane) appears. So the new mode of detonation wave is predicted. Equations describing this mode of detonation are presented. The exact analytical solution for the second CJ plane parameters is obtained. The example of double-front detonation in high explosive (TNT) is presented. In this double-front structure "nanodiamond-nanographite" phase transition takes place in condensed particles of detonation products.

  1. Gaseous hydrocarbon-air detonations

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Stamps, D.W.; Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    Detonation cell width measurements are made on mixtures of air and methane, ethane, dimethyl-ether, nitroethane, ethylene, acetylene, propane, 1,2-epoxypropane, n-hexane, 1-nitrohexane, mixed primary hexylnitrate, n-octane, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, cyclooctane, 1-octene, cis-cyclooctene, 1-7-octadiene, 1-octyne, n-decane, 1,2-epoxydecane, pentyl-ether, and JP4. There is a slight decrease in detonation cell width that is within the uncertainty of the data for stoichiometric alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes with increasing temperature between 25 and 100/degree/C. Also there appears to be no effect of molecular weight from ethane to decane, on detonation cell width for stoichiometric alkanes. Molecular structure is found to affect detonability for C/sub 8/ hydrocarbons, where the saturated ring structure is more sensitive than the straight-chain alkane. Unsaturated alkenes and alkynes are more sensitive to detonation than saturated alkanes. However, the degree of sensitization decreases with increasing molecular weight. Addition of functional groups such as nitro, nitrate, epoxy, and ethers are found to significantly reduce the detonation cell width from the parent n-alkane. Nitrated n-alkanes can be more sensitive than hydrogen-air mixtures. The increase in sensitivity of epoxy groups appears to be related to the oxygen to carbon ratio of the molecule. Good results are obtained between the data and predictions from a ZND model with detailed chemical kinetics. 46 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Diminishing detonator effectiveness through electromagnetic effects

    DOEpatents

    Schill, Jr, Robert A.

    2016-09-20

    An inductively coupled transmission line with distributed electromotive force source and an alternative coupling model based on empirical data and theory were developed to initiate bridge wire melt for a detonator with an open and a short circuit detonator load. In the latter technique, the model was developed to exploit incomplete knowledge of the open circuited detonator using tendencies common to all of the open circuit loads examined. Military, commercial, and improvised detonators were examined and modeled. Nichrome, copper, platinum, and tungsten are the detonator specific bridge wire materials studied. The improvised detonators were made typically made with tungsten wire and copper (.about.40 AWG wire strands) wire.

  3. Airbreathing Laser Propulsion Experiments with 1 {mu}m Terawatt Pharos III Laser: Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Myrabo, L. N.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.; Liu, S.; Manka, C.

    2011-11-10

    This basic research study examines the physics of airbreathing laser propulsion at the extreme flux range of 1-2x10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}--within the air breakdown threshold for l {mu}m radiation--using the terawatt PHAROS III neodymium-glass pulsed laser. Six different experimental setups were tested using a 34 mm line focus with 66 {mu}m focal waist, positioned near the flat impulse surface. The first campaign investigated impulse generation with the beam oriented almost normal to the target surface, with energies ranging from 23 to 376 J, and pulses of 5 to 30 ns FWHM. Air breakdown/ plasma dynamics were diagnosed with GOI cameras and color photography. Laser generated impulse was quantified with both vertical pendulums and piezoelectric pressure transducers using the standard performance metric, C{sub M}--the momentum coupling coefficient. Part 1 of this 2-part paper covers Campaign no. 1 results including laser plasma diagnostics, pressure gage and vertical pendulum data.

  4. Research in Hypersonic Airbreathing Propulsion at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Drummond, J. Philip; McClinton, Charles R.; Hunt, James L.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center has been conducting research for over four decades to develop technology for an airbreathing-propelled vehicle. Several other organizations within the United States have also been involved in this endeavor. Even though significant progress has been made over this period, a hypersonic airbreathing vehicle has not yet been realized due to low technology maturity. One of the major reasons for the slow progress in technology development has been the low level and cyclic nature of funding. The paper provides a brief historical overview of research in hypersonic airbreathing technology and then discusses current efforts at NASA Langley to develop various analytical, computational, and experimental design tools and their application in the development of future hypersonic airbreathing vehicles. The main focus of this paper is on the hypersonic airbreathing propulsion technology.

  5. Static and Hypersonic Experimental Analysis of Impulse Generation in Air-Breathing Laser-Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, Israel Irone

    (98 to 161 mm in diameter), probably due to the more efficient delivery of laser-induced blast wave energy across the 2D model's larger impulse surface area. Next, the hypersonic campaign was carried out, subjecting the 2D model to nominal Mach numbers ranging from 6 to 10. Again, time-dependent surface pressure distributions were recorded together with Schlieren movies of the flow field structure resulting from laser energy deposition. These visualizations of inlet and absorption chamber flowfields, enabled the qualitative analysis of important phenomena impacting laser-propelled hypersonic airbreathing flight. The laser-induced breakdown took an elongated vertically-oriented geometry, occurring off-surface and across the inlet's mid-channel---quite different from the static case in which the energy was deposited very near the shroud under-surface. The shroud under-surface pressure data indicated laser-induced increases of 0.7-0.9 bar with laser pulse energies of ˜170 J, off-shroud induced breakdown condition, and Mach number of 7. The results of this research corroborate the feasibility of laser powered, airbreathing flight with infinite specific impulse (Isp=infinity): i.e., without the need for propellant injection at the laser focus. Additionally, it is shown that further reductions in inlet air working fluid velocity---with attendant increases in static pressure and density---is necessary to generate higher absorption chamber pressure and engine impulse. Finally, building on lessons learned from the present work, the future research plan is laid out for: a) the present 2D model with full inlet forebody, exploring higher laser pulse energies and multi-pulse phenomena; b) a smaller, redesigned 2D model; c) a 254 mm diameter axisymmetric Lightcraft model; and, d) a laser-electromagnetic accelerator model, designed around a 2-Tesla pulsed electromagnet contracted under the present program.

  6. Sustained periodic terrestrial locomotion in air-breathing fishes.

    PubMed

    Pace, C M; Gibb, A C

    2014-03-01

    While emergent behaviours have long been reported for air-breathing osteichthyians, only recently have researchers undertaken quantitative analyses of terrestrial locomotion. This review summarizes studies of sustained periodic terrestrial movements by air-breathing fishes and quantifies the contributions of the paired appendages and the axial body to forward propulsion. Elongate fishes with axial-based locomotion, e.g. the ropefish Erpetoichthys calabaricus, generate an anterior-to-posterior wave of undulation that travels down the axial musculoskeletal system and pushes the body against the substratum at multiple points. In contrast, appendage-based locomotors, e.g. the barred mudskipper Periophthalmus argentilineatus, produce no axial bending during sustained locomotion, but instead use repeated protraction-retraction cycles of the pectoral fins to elevate the centre of mass and propel the entire body anteriorly. Fishes that use an axial-appendage-based mechanism, e.g. walking catfishes Clarias spp., produce side-to-side, whole-body bending in co-ordination with protraction-retraction cycles of the pectoral fins. Once the body is maximally bent to one side, the tail is pressed against the substratum and drawn back through the mid-sagittal plane, which elevates the centre of mass and rotates it about a fulcrum formed by the pectoral fin and the ground. Although appendage-based terrestrial locomotion appears to be rare in osteichthyians, many different species appear to have converged upon functionally similar axial-based and axial-appendage-based movements. Based on common forms observed across divergent taxa, it appears that dorsoventral compression of the body, elongation of the axial skeleton or the presence of robust pectoral fins can facilitate effective terrestrial movement by air-breathing fishes.

  7. Laser-driven hypersonic air-breathing propulsion simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Prakash B.; Lo, Edmond Y.; Pugh, Evan R.

    1992-01-01

    A feasibility study is presented of simulating airbreathing propulsion on small scale hypersonic models using laser energy. The laser heat addition scheme allows simultaneous inlet and exhaust flows during wind tunnel testing of models with scramjet models. The proposed propulsion simulation concept has extended the Kantrowitz (1974) idea to propulsive wind tunnel models of hypersonic aircraft. Critical issues in aeropropulsive testing of models based on a ramjet power plant are addressed which include transfer of the correct amount of energy to the flowing gas, efficient absorption of laser energy into the gas, and test performance under tunnel reservoir conditions and at reasonable Reynolds numbers.

  8. Prospects for future hypersonic air-breathing vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, H. L., Jr.; Blankson, Isaiah M.

    1991-01-01

    The age of hypersonics is (almost) here. This is evident from the amount of activity in the United States, Europe, the USSR and Japan; this activity is a reflection of technical progress in key areas which will enable new vehicle systems, as well as renewed interest in the utilization of these systems. The current situation, at least in the United States, is the product of an interesting history which is briefly reviewed here. The context for hypersonic applications is discussed, but the emphasis is on hypersonic technology issues and needs, particularly for propulsion and technology integration. The paper concludes with prospects for accomplishing the objective of air-breathing hypersonic vehicle systems.

  9. Fluid dynamic problems associated with air-breathing propulsive systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    A brief account of research activities on problems related to air-breathing propulsion is made in this final report for the step funded research grant NASA NGL 14-005-140. Problems include the aircraft ejector-nozzle propulsive system, nonconstant pressure jet mixing process, recompression and reattachment of turbulent free shear layer, supersonic turbulent base pressure, low speed separated flows, transonic boattail flow with and without small angle of attack, transonic base pressures, Mach reflection of shocks, and numerical solution of potential equation through hodograph transformation.

  10. Surface chemical reaction of laser ablated aluminum sample for detonation initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang-hwan; Yoh, Jack J.

    2011-05-01

    We explore the evolution of metal plasma generated by high laser irradiances and its effect on the surrounding air by using shadowgraph images after laser pulse termination; hence the formation of laser supported detonation and combustion processes has been investigated. The essence of the paper is in observing initiation of chemical reaction between ablated aluminum plasma and oxygen from air by inducing high power laser pulse (>1000 mJ/pulse) and conduct a quantitative comparison of chemically reactive laser initiated waves with the classical detonation of exploding aluminum (dust) cloud in air. Findings in this work may lead to a new method of initiating detonation from metal sample in its bulk form without the need of mixing nano-particles with oxygen for initiation.

  11. Exhaust Gas Emissions from a Rotating Detonation-wave Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kailasanath, Kazhikathra; Schwer, Douglas

    2015-11-01

    Rotating detonation-wave engines (RDE) are a form of continuous detonation-wave engines. They potentially provide further gains in performance than an intermittent or pulsed detonation-wave engine (PDE). The overall flow field in an idealized RDE, primarily consisting of two concentric cylinders, has been discussed in previous meetings. Because of the high pressures involved and the lack of adequate reaction mechanisms for this regime, previous simulations have typically used simplified chemistry models. However, understanding the exhaust species concentrations in propulsion devices is important for both performance considerations as well as estimating pollutant emissions. Progress towards addressing this need will be discussed in this talk. In this approach, an induction parameter model is used for simulating the detonation but a more detailed finite-chemistry model including NOx chemistry is used in the expansion flow region, where the pressures are lower and the uncertainties in the chemistry model are greatly reduced. Results show that overall radical concentrations in the exhaust flow are substantially lower than from earlier predictions with simplified models. The performance of a baseline hydrogen/air RDE increased from 4940 s to 5000 s with the expansion flow chemistry, due to recombination of radicals and more production of H2O, resulting in additional heat release. Work sponsored by the Office of Naval Research.

  12. Simulations of a Detonation Wave in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Lord; Karagozian, Ann; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2010-11-01

    Numerical simulations of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) effects on detonation wave structures are performed, with applications to flow control and MHD power extraction in Pulse Detonation Engines (PDE) and their design variations. In contrast to prior studies of MHD interactions in PDEs,ootnotetextCambier, et al., AIAA-2008-4688 the effects of the finite relaxation length scale for ionization on the stability of the detonation wave are examined. Depending on the coupling parameters, the magnetic field can quench the detonation and effectively act as a barrier to its propagation. Conversely, an applied transient magnetic field can exert a force on a pre-ionized gas and accelerate it. The dynamics are subject to non-linear effects; a propagating transverse magnetic field will initially exert a small force if the gas has a low conductivity and the magnetic Reynolds number (Rem) is low. Nevertheless, the gas accelerated by the "piston" action of the field can pre-heat the ambient gas and increase its conductivity. As the wave progresses, Rem increases and the magnetic field becomes increasingly effective. The dynamics of this process are examined in detail with a high-order shock-capturing method and full kinetics of combustion and ionization. The complex chemical kinetics calculations are ported onto a GPU using the CUDA language, and computational performance is compared with standard CPU-based computations.

  13. Gaseous hydrocarbon-air detonations

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Stamps, D.W. ); Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. )

    1991-04-01

    Detonation cell width measurements were made on mixtures of air and methane, ethane, dimethyl-ether, nitroethane, ethylene, acetylene, propane, 1,2-epoxypropane, n-hexane, 1-nitrohexane, mixed primary hexylnitrate, n-octane, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, cyclooctane, 1-octene, cis-cyclooctene, 1,7-octadiene, 1-octyne, n-decane, 1,2-epoxydecane, pentyl-ether, and JP4. Cell width measurements were carried out at 25 and 100 {degrees} C for some of these fuel-air mixtures. For the stoichiometric alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes, there is a very slight decrease in the detonation cell width with increasing initial temperature from 25 {degrees} C to 100 {degrees} C, although the differences are within the experimentally uncertainties in cell width measurements. Also within the uncertainty limits of the measurements, there is no variation in detonation cell width with increase fuel molecular weight for n-alkanes from ethane to n-decane. Molecular structure is found to affect detonability for C{sub 8} hydrocarbons, where the saturated ring structure is more sensitive than the straight-chain alkane, which is more sensitive than the branched-chain alkane. Unsaturated alkenes and alkynes are more sensitive to detonation than saturated alkanes.

  14. Infrared signatures from bomb detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orson, Jay A.; Bagby, William F.; Perram, Glen P.

    2003-04-01

    Remote observations of the temporal and spectral characteristics of the infrared emissions from bomb detonations have been correlated with explosion conditions. A Fourier transform interferometer was used to record spectra in the 1.6-20 μm range at spectral resolutions of 4-16 cm -1 and temporal resolutions of 0.047-0.123 s. Field observations of 56 detonation events included a set of aircraft delivered ordinance and a series of static ground detonations for a variety of bomb sizes, types and environmental conditions. The emission is well represented by a gray body with continuously decreasing temperature and characteristic decay times of 1-4 s, providing only limited variability with detonation conditions. However, the fireball size times the emissivity as a function of time can be determined from the spectra without imaging and provides a more sensitive signature. The degree of temporal overlap as a function of frequency for a pair of detonation events provides a very sensitive discriminator for explosion conditions. The temporal overlap decreases with increasing emission frequency for all the observed events, indicating more information content at higher frequencies.

  15. DETONATION PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS ON PETN

    SciTech Connect

    Green, L G; Lee, E L

    2006-06-23

    PETN is widely recognized as an example of nearly ideal detonation performance. The chemical composition is such that little or no carbon is produced in the detonation products. The reaction zone width is less than currently detectable. (<1 ns) Observations on PETN have thus become a baseline for EOS model predictions. It has therefore become important to characterize the detonation parameters as accurately as possible in order to provide the most exacting comparisons of EOS predictions with experimental results. We undertook a painstaking review of the detonation pressure measurements reported in an earlier work that was presented at the Fifth Detonation Symposium and found that corrections were required in determining the shock velocity in the PMMA witness material. We also refined the impedance calculation to account for the difference between the usual ''acoustic'' method and the more accurate Riemann integral. Our review indicates that the CJ pressures previously reported for full density PETN require an average lowering of about 6 percent. The lower densities require progressively smaller corrections. We present analysis of the records, supporting hydrodynamic simulations, the Riemann integral results, and EOS parameter values derived from the revised results.

  16. Instrumented Floret Tests of Detonation Spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, James; Plaksin, Igor; Thomas, Keith; Martin, Eric; Lee, Kien-Yin; Akinci, Adrian; Asay, Blaine; Campos, Jose; Direito, Jose

    2004-07-01

    The floret test was originally devised to permit comparison of detonation-spreading performance of various insensitive explosive materials, using only the dent in a copper witness plate as a metric. Dent depth in the copper plate is directly related to the fraction of a thin acceptor pellet that was detonated by impact of a small explosive-driven flyer plate. We have now added instrumentation to quantitatively measure the detonation corner-turning behavior of IHEs. Results of multi-fiber optical probe measurements are shown for LLM-105 and UF-TATB explosive materials. Results are interpreted and compared with predictions from one reaction-rate model used to describe detonation spreading, and may be advantageous for comparison with other reactive-flow wave-code models. Detonation spreading in UF-TATB occurred with formation of a non-detonating region surrounding a detonating core, and re-establishment of detonation in a "lateral" direction beyond that region.

  17. Laser system to detonate explosive devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menichelli, V. J.; Yang, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    Detonating system is not affected by electromagnetic interference. System includes laser source, Q-switch, and optical fiber connected to explosive device. Fiber can be branched out and connected to several devices for simultaneous detonation.

  18. DSD front models : nonideal explosive detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Bdzil, J. B.; Short, M.; Aslam, T. D.; Catanach, R. A.; Hill, L. G.

    2001-01-01

    The Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) method for propagating detonation in numerical simulation of detonation in high explosive (HE) is based on three elements: (1) a subscale theory of multi-dimensional detonation that treats the evolving detonation as a front with dynamics that depends only on metrics of the front (such as curvature, etc.), (2) high-resolution direct numerical sirnuliltion of detonation serving both to test existing subscale theories and suggest modifications, and (3) physical experiments to characterize multi-dimensional detonation propagation on real explosives and to calibrate the front models for use in engineering simulations. In this paper we describe our work on all three of these elements of the DSD method as it applies to detonation in nonideal explosives.

  19. Development and qualification testing of a laser-ignited, all-secondary (DDT) detonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blachowski, Thomas J.; Krivitsky, Darrin Z.; Tipton, Stephen

    1994-01-01

    The Indian Head Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center (IHDIV, NSWC) is conducting a qualification program for a laser-ignited, all-secondary (DDT) explosive detonator. This detonator was developed jointly by IHDIV, NSWC and the Department of Energy's EG&G Mound Applied Technologies facility in Miamisburg, Ohio to accept a laser initiation signal and produce a fully developed shock wave output. The detonator performance requirements were established by the on-going IHDIV, NSWC Laser Initiated Transfer Energy Subsystem (LITES) advanced development program. Qualification of the detonator as a component utilizing existing military specifications is the selected approach for this program. The detonator is a deflagration-to-detonator transfer (DDT) device using a secondary explosive, HMX, to generate the required shock wave output. The prototype development and initial system integration tests for the LITES and for the detonator were reported at the 1992 International Pyrotechnics Society Symposium and at the 1992 Survival and Flight Equipment National Symposium. Recent results are presented for the all-fire sensitivity and qualification tests conducted at two different laser initiation pulses.

  20. Gasdynamic Inlet Isolation in Rotating Detonation Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    ISOLATION IN ROTATING DETONATION ENGINE by Wei Han Eugene Lim December 2010 Thesis Co-Advisors: Jose O. Sinibaldi Christopher M. Brophy...COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Gasdynamic Inlet Isolation in Rotating Detonation Engine 6. AUTHOR(S) Wei Han Eugene Lim 5. FUNDING...DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) The Rotating Detonation Engine (RDE) concept represents the next-generation of detonation -based

  1. Time-resolved spectroscopic studies of detonating heterogeneous explosives. [HMX and HNS

    SciTech Connect

    Trott, W.M.; Renlund, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    Emission spectroscopy and pulsed-laser-excited Raman scattering methods have been applied to the study of detonating heterogeneous explosives, including PETN, HMX and HNS. Time-resolved spectra of emission from detonating HNS show the evolution of features due to electronically-excited radical species. For HNS, the CN(B-X) system near 388 nm has been studied at a wavelength resolution of 0.5 A. Boltzmann vibrational temperatures have been calculated by comparing the experimental data with computer-simulated spectra. These temperatures are consistent with the expected trend of detonation temperature as a function of charge density. Using 532-nm laser excitation, single-pulse Raman scattering measurements have been made at the free surface of detonating HMX and PETN samples. Monotonic attenuation of Raman scattering intensity over a 100-ns interval is observed after detonation front arrival at the free surface. Depletion of the Raman signal occurs prior to significant loss of the scattered laser light. The significance of the Raman measurements as a possible probe of reaction zone length in detonating explosives is discussed. 21 refs., 11 figs.

  2. Detonation synthesis of superhard materials

    SciTech Connect

    Drobyshev, V.N.

    1983-09-01

    This article demonstrates how the high pressures and temperatures generated by solid explosive detonation can be directly utilized to synthesize superhard materials. The pressures and temperatures developed upon detonation, the size of the zone, and the chemical reaction time depend mainly on the power of the explosion and the density of the charge. The partial fusion of carbon or boron nitride with subsequent crystallization of diamond or the cubic boron nitride phase from the melt is considered. It is concluded that the detonation synthesis of superhard materials is distinguished by simplicity, quite high efficiency of conversion of original material into end product (up to 50%), the possibility of accomplishing synthesis in explosion chambers, and the possibility of superhard material production using automation techniques.

  3. Detonation Jet Engine. Part 1--Thermodynamic Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulat, Pavel V.; Volkov, Konstantin N.

    2016-01-01

    We present the most relevant works on jet engine design that utilize thermodynamic cycle of detonative combustion. The efficiency advantages of thermodynamic detonative combustion cycle over Humphrey combustion cycle at constant volume and Brayton combustion cycle at constant pressure were demonstrated. An ideal Ficket-Jacobs detonation cycle, and…

  4. Advanced controls for airbreathing engines, volume 3: Allison gas turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bough, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    The application of advanced control concepts to airbreathing engines may yield significant improvements in aircraft/engine performance and operability. Screening studies of advanced control concepts for airbreathing engines were conducted by three major domestic aircraft engine manufacturers to determine the potential impact of concepts on turbine engine performance and operability. The purpose of the studies was to identify concepts which offered high potential yet may incur high research and development risk. A target suite of proposed advanced control concepts was formulated and evaluated in a two-phase study to quantify each concept's impact on desired engine characteristics. To aid in the evaluation specific aircraft/engine combinations were considered: a Military High Performance Fighter mission, a High Speed Civil Transport mission, and a Civil Tiltrotor mission. Each of the advanced control concepts considered in the study are defined and described. The concept potential impact on engine performance was determined. Relevant figures of merit on which to evaluate the concepts are determined. Finally, the concepts are ranked with respect to the target aircraft/engine missions. A final report describing the screening studies was prepared by each engine manufacturer. Volume 3 of these reports describes the studies performed by the Allison Gas Turbine Division.

  5. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A E

    2006-07-07

    The coupling of energetic metallic multilayers (a.k.a. flash metal) with energetic sol-gel synthesis and processing is an entirely new approach to forming energetic devices for several DoD and DOE needs. They are also practical and commercially viable manufacturing techniques. Improved occupational safety and health, performance, reliability, reproducibility, and environmentally acceptable processing can be achieved using these methodologies and materials. The development and fielding of this technology will enhance mission readiness and reduce the costs, environmental risks and the necessity of resolving environmental concerns related to maintaining military readiness while simultaneously enhancing safety and health. Without sacrificing current performance, we will formulate new impact initiated device (IID) compositions to replace materials from the current composition that pose significant environmental, health, and safety problems associated with functions such as synthesis, material receipt, storage, handling, processing into the composition, reaction products from testing, and safe disposal. To do this, we will advance the use of nanocomposite preparation via the use of multilayer flash metal and sol-gel technologies and apply it to new small IIDs. This work will also serve to demonstrate that these technologies and resultant materials are relevant and practical to a variety of energetic needs of DoD and DOE. The goal will be to produce an IID whose composition is acceptable by OSHA, EPA, the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Resource Recovery Act, etc. standards, without sacrificing current performance. The development of environmentally benign stab detonators and igniters will result in the removal of hazardous and toxic components associated with their manufacturing, handling, and use. This will lead to improved worker safety during manufacturing as well as reduced exposure of Service personnel during their storage and or use in operations. The

  6. Detonation waves in relativistic hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cissoko, M. )

    1992-02-15

    This paper is concerned with an algebraic study of the equations of detonation waves in relativistic hydrodynamics taking into account the pressure and the energy of thermal radiation. A new approach to shock and detonation wavefronts is outlined. The fluid under consideration is assumed to be perfect (nonviscous and nonconducting) and to obey the following equation of state: {ital p}=({gamma}{minus}1){rho} where {ital p}, {rho}, and {gamma} are the pressure, the total energy density, and the adiabatic index, respectively. The solutions of the equations of detonation waves are reduced to the problem of finding physically acceptable roots of a quadratic polynomial {Pi}({ital X}) where {ital X} is the ratio {tau}/{tau}{sub 0} of dynamical volumes behind and ahead of the detonation wave. The existence and the locations of zeros of this polynomial allow it to be shown that if the equation of state of the burnt fluid is known then the variables characterizing the unburnt fluid obey well-defined physical relations.

  7. Sensitized Liquid Hydrazine Detonation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathgeber, K. A.; Keddy, C. P.; Bunker, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Vapor-phase hydrazine (N2H4) is known to be very sensitive to detonation while liquid hydrazine is very insensitive to detonation, theoretically requiring extremely high pressures to induce initiation. A review of literature on solid and liquid explosives shows that when pure explosive substances are infiltrated with gas cavities, voids, and/or different phase contaminants, the energy or shock pressure necessary to induce detonation can decrease by an order of magnitude. Tests were conducted with liquid hydrazine in a modified card-gap configuration. Sensitization was attempted by bubbling helium gas through and/or suspending ceramic microspheres in the liquid. The hydrazine was subjected to the shock pressure from a 2 lb (0.9 kg) Composition C-4 explosive charge. The hydrazine was contained in a 4 in. (10.2 cm) diameter stainless steel cylinder with a 122 in(sup 3) (2 L) volume and sealed with a polyethylene cap. Blast pressures from the events were recorded by 63 high speed pressure transducers located on three radial legs extending from 4 to 115 ft (1.2 to 35.1 in) from ground zero. Comparison of the neat hydrazine and water baseline tests with the "sensitized" hydrazine tests indicates the liquid hydrazine did not detonate under these conditions.

  8. Performance Impact of Deflagration to Detonation Transition Enhancing Obstacles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Schauer, Frederick; Hopper, David

    2012-01-01

    A sub-model is developed to account for the drag and heat transfer enhancement resulting from deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) inducing obstacles commonly used in pulse detonation engines (PDE). The sub-model is incorporated as a source term in a time-accurate, quasi-onedimensional, CFD-based PDE simulation. The simulation and sub-model are then validated through comparison with a particular experiment in which limited DDT obstacle parameters were varied. The simulation is then used to examine the relative contributions from drag and heat transfer to the reduced thrust which is observed. It is found that heat transfer is far more significant than aerodynamic drag in this particular experiment.

  9. Instrumentation requirements from the user's view. [For airbreathing hypersonic engines

    SciTech Connect

    Harsha, P.T.

    1988-01-01

    The use of combustor diagnostics is considered from the point of view of demonstration of performance of an airbreathing hypersonic engine. The basic need is seen to be that of providing the data necessary to verify performance predictions for the engine as installed in the airplane. This necessitates the use of a diagnostics capability that can provide the inputs required by the computational analyses that will be used to assess this performance. Because of the cost of ground test facilities, a premium is placed on measurement technique reliability and redundancy of instrumentation. A mix of nonintrusive optical techniques and probe-based measurements is seen to be the best approach using current diagnostics capability; one such instrument mix is outlined for a ramjet/scramjet test program. 11 references.

  10. Composite predictive flight control for airbreathing hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Zhao, Zhenhua; Li, Shihua; Zheng, Wei Xing

    2014-09-01

    The robust optimised tracking control problem for a generic airbreathing hypersonic vehicle (AHV) subject to nonvanishing mismatched disturbances/uncertainties is investigated in this paper. A baseline nonlinear model predictive control (MPC) method is firstly introduced for optimised tracking control of the nominal dynamics. A nonlinear-disturbance-observer-based control law is then developed for robustness enhancement in the presence of both external disturbances and uncertainties. Compared with the existing robust tracking control methods for AHVs, the proposed composite nonlinear MPC method obtains not only promising robustness and disturbance rejection performance but also optimised nominal tracking control performance. The merits of the proposed method are validated by implementing simulation studies on the AHV system.

  11. Theme and variations: amphibious air-breathing intertidal fishes.

    PubMed

    Martin, K L

    2014-03-01

    Over 70 species of intertidal fishes from 12 families breathe air while emerging from water. Amphibious intertidal fishes generally have no specialized air-breathing organ but rely on vascularized mucosae and cutaneous surfaces in air to exchange both oxygen and carbon dioxide. They differ from air-breathing freshwater fishes in morphology, physiology, ecology and behaviour. Air breathing and terrestrial activity are present to varying degrees in intertidal fish species, correlated with the tidal height of their habitat. The gradient of amphibious lifestyle includes passive remainers that stay in the intertidal zone as tides ebb, active emergers that deliberately leave water in response to poor aquatic conditions and highly mobile amphibious skipper fishes that may spend more time out of water than in it. Normal terrestrial activity is usually aerobic and metabolic rates in air and water are similar. Anaerobic metabolism may be employed during forced exercise or when exposed to aquatic hypoxia. Adaptations for amphibious life include reductions in gill surface area, increased reliance on the skin for respiration and ion exchange, high affinity of haemoglobin for oxygen and adjustments to ventilation and metabolism while in air. Intertidal fishes remain close to water and do not travel far terrestrially, and are unlikely to migrate or colonize new habitats at present, although in the past this may have happened. Many fish species spawn in the intertidal zone, including some that do not breathe air, as eggs and embryos that develop in the intertidal zone benefit from tidal air emergence. With air breathing, amphibious intertidal fishes survive in a variable habitat with minimal adjustments to existing structures. Closely related species in different microhabitats provide unique opportunities for comparative studies.

  12. Air-breathing fishes in aquaculture. What can we learn from physiology?

    PubMed

    Lefevre, S; Wang, T; Jensen, A; Cong, N V; Huong, D T T; Phuong, N T; Bayley, M

    2014-03-01

    During the past decade, the culture of air-breathing fish species has increased dramatically and is now a significant global source of protein for human consumption. This development has generated a need for specific information on how to maximize growth and minimize the environmental effect of culture systems. Here, the existing data on metabolism in air-breathing fishes are reviewed, with the aim of shedding new light on the oxygen requirements of air-breathing fishes in aquaculture, reaching the conclusion that aquatic oxygenation is much more important than previously assumed. In addition, the possible effects on growth of the recurrent exposure to deep hypoxia and associated elevated concentrations of carbon dioxide, ammonia and nitrite, that occurs in the culture ponds used for air-breathing fishes, are discussed. Where data on air-breathing fishes are simply lacking, data for a few water-breathing species will be reviewed, to put the physiological effects into a growth perspective. It is argued that an understanding of air-breathing fishes' respiratory physiology, including metabolic rate, partitioning of oxygen uptake from air and water in facultative air breathers, the critical oxygen tension, can provide important input for the optimization of culture practices. Given the growing importance of air breathers in aquaculture production, there is an urgent need for further data on these issues.

  13. Combining MHD Airbreathing and Fusion Rocket Propulsion for Earth-to-Orbit Flight

    SciTech Connect

    Froning, H. D. Jr; Yang, Yang; Momota, H.; Burton, E.; Miley, G. H.; Luo, Nie

    2005-02-06

    Previous studies have shown that Single-State-to-Orbit (SSTO) vehicle propellant can be reduced by Magnets-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) processes that minimize airbreathing propulsion losses and propellant consumption during atmospheric flight. Similarly additional reduction in SSTO propellant is enabled by Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion, whose more energetic reactions reduce rocket propellant needs. MHD airbreathing propulsion during an SSTO vehicle's initial atmospheric flight phase and IEC fusion propulsion during its final exo-atmospheric flight phase is therefore being explored. Accomplished work is not yet sufficient for claiming such a vehicle's feasibility. But takeoff and propellant mass for an MHD airbreathing and IEC fusion vehicle could be as much as 25 and 40 percent less than one with ordinary airbreathing and IEC fusion; and as much as 50 and 70 percent less than SSTO takeoff and propellant mass with MHD airbreathing and chemical rocket propulsion. Thus this unusual combined cycle engine shows great promise for performance gains beyond contemporary combined-cycle airbreathing engines.

  14. Laser-shocked energetic materials with metal additives: evaluation of chemistry and detonation performance.

    PubMed

    Gottfried, Jennifer L; Bukowski, Eric J

    2017-01-20

    A focused, nanosecond-pulsed laser has been used to ablate, atomize, ionize, and excite milligram quantities of metal-doped energetic materials that undergo exothermic reactions in the laser-induced plasma. The subsequent shock wave expansion in the air above the sample has been monitored using high-speed schlieren imaging in a recently developed technique, laser-induced air shock from energetic materials (LASEM). The method enables the estimation of detonation velocities based on the measured laser-induced air-shock velocities and has previously been demonstrated for organic military explosives. Here, the LASEM technique has been extended to explosive formulations with metal additives. A comparison of the measured laser-induced air-shock velocities for TNT, RDX, DNTF, and LLM-172 doped with Al or B to the detonation velocities predicted by the thermochemical code CHEETAH for inert or active metal participation demonstrates that LASEM has potential for predicting the early time (<10  μs) participation of metal additives in detonation events. The LASEM results show that while Al is mostly inert at early times in the detonation event (confirmed from large-scale detonation testing), B is active-and reducing the amount of hydrogen present during the early chemical reactions increases the resulting estimated detonation velocities.

  15. Free-expansion experiments and modeling in detonation: Chemistry and hydrodynamics on a laboratory scale

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, N.R.; Blais, N.

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory-scale (25-50 mg) detonations of PETN, RDX, HNS, and TNT have been carried out in a high-vacuum chamber, and collisionless molecular beams of the freely expanding detonation products have been analyzed as a function of time with a mass spectrometer. Concurrently, time-sequenced schlieren and shadowgraph images of the initial expansion of the product plume are recorded using a pulsed laser for illumination. These data tie the chemistry and hydrodynamics of the detonation event together. The results, interpreted with the aid of a computer model, suggest that this experiment freezes the chemical reactions of detonation by rapid adiabatic cooling and provides a continuum of samples in the molecular beam, representing the sequence of reactions in the detonating charge. With a suitable model of the expansion hydrodynamics, the hydrodynamic histories of a sequence of volume elements can be associated with their frozen chemistries. We expect experiments like this to provide a test for molecular models of detonation. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  16. HERMES: A Model to Describe Deformation, Burning, Explosion, and Detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J E

    2011-11-22

    pressure that results from a more gradual increase. This disagrees with experiments, where explosives were subjected to a gradual rise in pressure and did not exhibit reaction. More recent models do distinguish between slow pressure rises and shocks, and have had some success in the describing the response of explosives to single and multiple shocks, and the increase of shock sensitivity with porosity, at least over a limited range. The original formulation is appropriate for sustained shocks, but further work is ongoing to describe the response to short pulses. The HERMES model combines features from these prior models. It describes burning and explosion in damaged reactant, and also will develop a detonation if the gradual rise in pressure from burning steepens into a strong-enough shock. The shock strength needed for detonation in a fixed run distance decreases with increasing porosity.

  17. Hydrogen-oxygen flame acceleration and transition to detonation in channels with no-slip walls for a detailed chemical reaction model.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, M F; Kiverin, A D; Liberman, M A

    2011-05-01

    The features of flame acceleration in channels with wall friction and the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) are investigated theoretically and using high resolution numerical simulations of two-dimensional reactive Navier-Stokes equations, including the effects of viscosity, thermal conduction, molecular diffusion, and a detailed chemical reaction mechanism for hydrogen-oxygen gaseous mixture. It is shown that in a wide channel, from the beginning, the flame velocity increases exponentially for a short time and then flame acceleration decreases, ending up with the abrupt increase of the combustion wave velocity and the actual transition to detonation. In a thin channel with a width smaller than the critical value, the exponential increase of the flame velocity is not bounded and ends up with the transition to detonation. The transition to detonation occurs due to the pressure pulse, which is formed at the tip of the accelerating flame. The amplitude of the pressure pulse grows exponentially due to a positive feedback coupling between the pressure pulse and the heat released in the reaction. Finally, large amplitude pressure pulse steepens into a strong shock coupled with the reaction zone forming the overdriven detonation. The evolution from a temperature gradient to a detonation via the Zeldovich gradient mechanism and its applicability to the deflagration-to-detonation transition is investigated for combustible materials whose chemistry is governed by chain-branching kinetics. The results of the high resolution simulations are fully consistent with experimental observations of the flame acceleration and DDT.

  18. Non-detonable explosive simulators

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1994-11-01

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules. 5 figs.

  19. Non-detonable explosive simulators

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Randall L.; Pruneda, Cesar O.

    1994-01-01

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules.

  20. Improved detonation modeling with CHEETAH

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, A.

    1997-11-01

    A Livermore software program called CHEETAH, an important, even indispensable tool for energetic materials researchers worldwide, was made more powerful in the summer of 1997 with the release of CHEETAH 2.0, an advanced version that simulates a wider variety of detonations. Derived from more than 40 years of experiments on high explosives at Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos national laboratories, CHEETAH predicts the results from detonating a mixture of specified reactants. It operates by solving thermodynamic equations to predict detonation products and such properties as temperature, pressure, volume, and total energy released. The code is prized by synthesis chemists and other researchers because it allows them to vary the starting molecules and conditions to optimize the desired performance properties. One of the Laboratory`s most popular computer codes, CHEETAH is used at more than 200 sites worldwide, including ones in England, Canada, Sweden, Switzerland, and France. Most sites are defense-related, although a few users, such as Japanese fireworks researchers, are in the civilian sector.

  1. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A; Barbee, T; Simpson, R; Satcher, J; Walton, C

    2003-12-15

    This effort attempts to demonstrate that environmentally acceptable energetic sol-gel coated flash metal multilayer nanocomposites can be used to replace current impact initiated devices (IIDs) which have hazardous and toxic components. Successful completion of this project will result in IIDs that include innocuous compounds, have sufficient output energy for initiation, meet current military specifications, are small, cost competitive, and perform as well as or better than current devices. We expect flash metal multilayer and sol-gel to be generic technologies applicable to a wide range of devices, especially in small caliber ammunition and sub-munitions. We will replace the NOL-130 mixture with a nanocomposite that consists of a mechanically robust energetic multilayer foil that has been coated with a sol-gel energetic material. The exothermic reactions are activated in this nanocomposite are the transformation of the multilayer material to its respective intermetallic alloy and the thermite reaction, which is characterized by very high temperatures, a small pressure pulse, and hot particle ejection. The proposed materials and their reaction products consist of, but are not limited to aluminum, nickel, iron, aluminum oxide, titanium, iron oxide and boron. These materials have much more desirable environmental and health characteristics than the NOL-130 composition.

  2. A summary of hydrogen-air detonation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Guirao, C.M.; Knystautas, R.; Lee, J.H.

    1989-05-01

    Dynamic detonation parameters are reviewed for hydrogen-air-diluent detonations and deflagration-to-detonation transitions (DDT). These parameters include the characteristic chemical length scale, such as the detonation cell width, associated with the three-dimensional cellular structure of detonation waves, critical transmission conditions of confined detonations into unconfined environments, critical initiation energy for unconfined detonations, detonability limits, and critical conditions for DDT. The detonation cell width, which depends on hydrogen and diluent concentrations, pressure, and temperature, is an important parameter in the prediction of critical geometry-dependent conditions for the transmission of confined detonations into unconfined environments and the critical energies for the direct initiation of unconfined detonations. Detonability limits depend on both initial and boundary conditions and the limit has been defined as the onset of single head spin. Four flame propagation regimes have been identified and the criterion for DDT in a smooth tube is discussed. 108 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Plasma-assisted ignition and deflagration-to-detonation transition.

    PubMed

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Aleksandrov, Nickolay; Rakitin, Aleksandr

    2012-02-13

    Non-equilibrium plasma demonstrates great potential to control ultra-lean, ultra-fast, low-temperature flames and to become an extremely promising technology for a wide range of applications, including aviation gas turbine engines, piston engines, RAMjets, SCRAMjets and detonation initiation for pulsed detonation engines. The analysis of discharge processes shows that the discharge energy can be deposited into the desired internal degrees of freedom of molecules when varying the reduced electric field, E/n, at which the discharge is maintained. The amount of deposited energy is controlled by other discharge and gas parameters, including electric pulse duration, discharge current, gas number density, gas temperature, etc. As a rule, the dominant mechanism of the effect of non-equilibrium plasma on ignition and combustion is associated with the generation of active particles in the discharge plasma. For plasma-assisted ignition and combustion in mixtures containing air, the most promising active species are O atoms and, to a smaller extent, some other neutral atoms and radicals. These active particles are efficiently produced in high-voltage, nanosecond, pulse discharges owing to electron-impact dissociation of molecules and electron-impact excitation of N(2) electronic states, followed by collisional quenching of these states to dissociate the molecules. Mechanisms of deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) initiation by non-equilibrium plasma were analysed. For longitudinal discharges with a high power density in a plasma channel, two fast DDT mechanisms have been observed. When initiated by a spark or a transient discharge, the mixture ignited simultaneously over the volume of the discharge channel, producing a shock wave with a Mach number greater than 2 and a flame. A gradient mechanism of DDT similar to that proposed by Zeldovich has been observed experimentally under streamer initiation.

  4. Temperatures and Hugoniots of Nitromethane Detonation Products*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, C. S.; Holmes, N. C.; Souers, P. C.

    1997-07-01

    Current thermochemical models for high explosives are largely based on Hugoniots obtained in a pressure-volume space; there is very little constraint on temperatures and kinetics. Therefore, we have measured the shock temperatures of nitromethane at various overdriven states by using a time-resolved optical method at a two-stage gas-gun. Based on these P-T Hugoniot data, we construct the detonation diagram of nitromethane, which consists of no-detonation, super-detonation, normal-detonation zones. In the super-detonation zone between 12 and 19 GPa, the shock-compressed nitromethane detonates with a significant induction time; whereas, the detonation occurs nearly instaneously in the normal-detonation zone above 19 GPa. Considering the CJ-pressure of nitromethane being 12.8 GPa, this result signifies the kinetic effect on shock Hugoniots even at overdriven states. For this reason, we have measured the Hugoniot of nitromethane in a stepwise configuration to minimize the kinetic effect less than 0.5 μs. However, the data still show an indication of slow kinetics of nitromethane detonation, particularly near the CJ-condition. In this paper, we also compare the results with thermochemical calculations. ^* Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under the contract number W-7405-ENG-48.

  5. Two phase detonation studies conducted in 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholls, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    A report is presented describing the research conducted on five phases: (1) ignition of fuel drops by a shock wave and passage of a shock wave over a burning drop, (2) the energy release pattern of a two-phase detonation with controlled drop sizes, (3) the attenuation of shock and detonation waves passing over an acoustic liner, (4) experimental and theoretical studies of film detonations, and (5) a simplified analytical model of a rotating two-phase detonation wave in a rocket motor.

  6. Deflagrations and detonations in thermonuclear supernovae.

    PubMed

    Gamezo, Vadim N; Khokhlov, Alexei M; Oran, Elaine S

    2004-05-28

    We study a type Ia supernova explosion using three-dimensional numerical simulations based on reactive fluid dynamics. We consider a delayed-detonation model that assumes a deflagration-to-detonation transition. In contrast with the pure deflagration model, the delayed-detonation model releases enough energy to account for a healthy explosion, and does not leave carbon, oxygen, and intermediate-mass elements in central parts of a white dwarf. This removes the key disagreement between simulations and observations, and makes a delayed detonation the mostly likely mechanism for type Ia supernovae.

  7. Detonability of hydrocarbon fuels in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeson, H. D.; Mcclenagan, R. D.; Bishop, C. V.; Benz, F. J.; Pitz, W. J.; Westbrook, C. K.; Lee, J. H. S.

    1991-01-01

    Studies were conducted of the detonation of gas-phase mixtures of n-hexane and JP-4, with oxidizers as varied as air and pure oxygen, measuring detonation velocities and cell sizes as a function of stoichiometry and diluent concentration. The induction length of a one-dimensional Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doering detonation was calculated on the basis of a theoretical model that employed the reaction kinetics of the hydrocarbon fuels used. Critical energy and critical tube diameter are compared for a relative measure of the heavy hydrocarbon fuels studied; detonation sensitivity appears to increase slightly with increasing carbon number.

  8. Radioactive Fallout from Terrorist Nuclear Detonations

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R E

    2007-05-03

    Responding correctly during the first hour after a terrorist nuclear detonation is the key to reducing casualties from a low-yield surface burst, and a correct response requires an understanding of the rapidly changing dose rate from fallout. This report provides an empirical formula for dose rate as a function of time and location that can guide the response to an unexpected nuclear detonation. At least one post-detonation radiation measurement is required if the yield and other characteristics of the detonation are unknown.

  9. Laser diode initiated detonators for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewick, David W.; Graham, J. A.; Hawley, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    Ensign Bickford Aerospace Company (EBAC) has over ten years of experience in the design and development of laser ordnance systems. Recent efforts have focused on the development of laser diode ordnance systems for space applications. Because the laser initiated detonators contain only insensitive secondary explosives, a high degree of system safety is achieved. Typical performance characteristics of a laser diode initiated detonator are described in this paper, including all-fire level, function time, and output. A finite difference model used at EBAC to predict detonator performance, is described and calculated results are compared to experimental data. Finally, the use of statistically designed experiments to evaluate performance of laser initiated detonators is discussed.

  10. The Feasibility of Applying AC Driven Low-Temperature Plasma for Multi-Cycle Detonation Initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dianfeng

    2016-11-01

    Ignition is a key system in pulse detonation engines (PDE). As advanced ignition methods, nanosecond pulse discharge low-temperature plasma ignition is used in some combustion systems, and continuous alternating current (AC) driven low-temperature plasma using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is used for the combustion assistant. However, continuous AC driven plasmas cannot be used for ignition in pulse detonation engines. In this paper, experimental and numerical studies of pneumatic valve PDE using an AC driven low-temperature plasma igniter were described. The pneumatic valve was jointly designed with the low-temperature plasma igniter, and the numerical simulation of the cold-state flow field in the pneumatic valve showed that a complex flow in the discharge area, along with low speed, was beneficial for successful ignition. In the experiments ethylene was used as the fuel and air as oxidizing agent, ignition by an AC driven low-temperature plasma achieved multi-cycle intermittent detonation combustion on a PDE, the working frequency of the PDE reached 15 Hz and the peak pressure of the detonation wave was approximately 2.0 MPa. The experimental verifications of the feasibility in PDE ignition expanded the application field of AC driven low-temperature plasma. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51176001)

  11. An Overview of SBIR Phase 2 Airbreathing Propulsion Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.; Bitler, Dean W.

    2014-01-01

    Technological innovation is the overall focus of NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The program invests in the development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA's mission directorates address critical research and development needs for agency projects. This report highlights innovative SBIR Phase II projects from 2007-2012 specifically addressing areas in Airbreathing Propulsion which is one of six core competencies at NASA Glenn Research Center. There are twenty technologies featured with emphasis on a wide spectrum of applications such as with a Turbo-Brayton cryocooler for aircraft superconducting systems, braided composite rotorcraft structures, engine air brake, combustion control valve, flexible composite driveshaft, and much more. Each article in this booklet describes an innovation, technical objective, and highlights NASA commercial and industrial applications. This report serves as an opportunity for NASA personnel including engineers, researchers, and program managers to learn of NASA SBIR's capabilities that might be crosscutting into this technology area. As the result, it would cause collaborations and partnerships between the small companies and NASA Programs and Projects resulting in benefit to both SBIR companies and NASA.

  12. Thermodynamic Cycle Analysis of Magnetohydrodynamic-Bypass Airbreathing Hypersonic Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Bityurin, Valentine A.; Lineberry, John T.

    1999-01-01

    Established analyses of conventional ramjet/scramjet performance characteristics indicate that a considerable decrease in efficiency can be expected at off-design flight conditions. This can be explained, in large part, by the deterioration of intake mass flow and limited inlet compression at low flight speeds and by the onset of thrust degradation effects associated with increased burner entry temperature at high flight speeds. In combination, these effects tend to impose lower and upper Mach number limits for practical flight. It has been noted, however, that Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy management techniques represent a possible means for extending the flight Mach number envelope of conventional engines. By transferring enthalpy between different stages of the engine cycle, it appears that the onset of thrust degradation may be delayed to higher flight speeds. Obviously, the introduction of additional process inefficiencies is inevitable with this approach, but it is believed that these losses are more than compensated through optimization of the combustion process. The fundamental idea is to use MHD energy conversion processes to extract and bypass a portion of the intake kinetic energy around the burner. We refer to this general class of propulsion system as an MHD-bypass engine. In this paper, we quantitatively assess the performance potential and scientific feasibility of MHD-bypass airbreathing hypersonic engines using ideal gasdynamics and fundamental thermodynamic principles.

  13. Airframe Research and Technology for Hypersonic Airbreathing Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Merski, N. Ronald; Glass, Christopher E.

    2002-01-01

    The Hypersonics Investment Area (HIA) within NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP) has the responsibility to develop hypersonic airbreathing vehicles for access to space. The Airframe Research and Technology (AR and T) Project, as one of six projects in the HIA, will push the state-of-the-art in airframe and vehicle systems for low-cost, reliable, and safe space transportation. The individual technologies within the project are focused on advanced, breakthrough technologies in airframe and vehicle systems and cross-cutting activities that are the basis for improvements in these disciplines. Both low and medium technology readiness level (TRL) activities are being pursued. The key technical areas that will be addressed by the project include analysis and design tools, integrated vehicle health management (IVHM), composite (polymer, metal, and ceramic matrix) materials development, thermal/structural wall concepts, thermal protection systems, seals, leading edges, aerothermodynamics, and airframe/propulsion flowpath technology. Each of the technical areas or sub-projects within the Airframe R and T Project is described in this paper.

  14. Airbreathing Propulsion System Analysis Using Multithreaded Parallel Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schunk, Richard Gregory; Chung, T. J.; Rodriguez, Pete (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, parallel processing is used to analyze the mixing, and combustion behavior of hypersonic flow. Preliminary work for a sonic transverse hydrogen jet injected from a slot into a Mach 4 airstream in a two-dimensional duct combustor has been completed [Moon and Chung, 1996]. Our aim is to extend this work to three-dimensional domain using multithreaded domain decomposition parallel processing based on the flowfield-dependent variation theory. Numerical simulations of chemically reacting flows are difficult because of the strong interactions between the turbulent hydrodynamic and chemical processes. The algorithm must provide an accurate representation of the flowfield, since unphysical flowfield calculations will lead to the faulty loss or creation of species mass fraction, or even premature ignition, which in turn alters the flowfield information. Another difficulty arises from the disparity in time scales between the flowfield and chemical reactions, which may require the use of finite rate chemistry. The situations are more complex when there is a disparity in length scales involved in turbulence. In order to cope with these complicated physical phenomena, it is our plan to utilize the flowfield-dependent variation theory mentioned above, facilitated by large eddy simulation. Undoubtedly, the proposed computation requires the most sophisticated computational strategies. The multithreaded domain decomposition parallel processing will be necessary in order to reduce both computational time and storage. Without special treatments involved in computer engineering, our attempt to analyze the airbreathing combustion appears to be difficult, if not impossible.

  15. Stack air-breathing membraneless glucose microfluidic biofuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-de-la-Rosa, J.; Moreno-Zuria, A.; Vallejo-Becerra, V.; Arjona, N.; Guerra-Balcázar, M.; Ledesma-García, J.; Arriaga, L. G.

    2016-11-01

    A novel stacked microfluidic fuel cell design comprising re-utilization of the anodic and cathodic solutions on the secondary cell is presented. This membraneless microfluidic fuel cell employs porous flow-through electrodes in a “V”-shape cell architecture. Enzymatic bioanodic arrays based on glucose oxidase were prepared by immobilizing the enzyme onto Toray carbon paper electrodes using tetrabutylammonium bromide, Nafion and glutaraldehyde. These electrodes were characterized through the scanning electrochemical microscope technique, evidencing a good electrochemical response due to the electronic transference observed with the presence of glucose over the entire of the electrode. Moreover, the evaluation of this microfluidic fuel cell with an air-breathing system in a double-cell mode showed a performance of 0.8951 mWcm-2 in a series connection (2.2822mAcm-2, 1.3607V), and 0.8427 mWcm-2 in a parallel connection (3.5786mAcm-2, 0.8164V).

  16. Thermodynamic Cycle Analysis of Magnetohydrodynamic-Bypass Hypersonic Airbreathing Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, R. J.; Cole, J. W.; Bityurin, V. A.; Lineberry, J. T.

    2000-01-01

    The prospects for realizing a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) bypass hypersonic airbreathing engine are examined from the standpoint of fundamental thermodynamic feasibility. The MHD-bypass engine, first proposed as part of the Russian AJAX vehicle concept, is based on the idea of redistributing energy between various stages of the propulsion system flow train. The system uses an MHD generator to extract a portion of the aerodynamic heating energy from the inlet and an MHD accelerator to reintroduce this power as kinetic energy in the exhaust stream. In this way, the combustor entrance Mach number can be limited to a specified value even as the flight Mach number increases. Thus, the fuel and air can be efficiently mixed and burned within a practical combustor length, and the flight Mach number operating envelope can be extended. In this paper, we quantitatively assess the performance potential and scientific feasibility of MHD-bypass engines using a simplified thermodynamic analysis. This cycle analysis, based on a thermally and calorically perfect gas, incorporates a coupled MHD generator-accelerator system and accounts for aerodynamic losses and thermodynamic process efficiencies in the various engin components. It is found that the flight Mach number range can be significantly extended; however, overall performance is hampered by non-isentropic losses in the MHD devices.

  17. Evaluation of the oblique detonation wave ramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    The potential performance of oblique detonation wave ramjets is analyzed in terms of multishock diffusion, oblique detonation waves, and heat release. Results are presented in terms of thrust coefficients and specific impulses for a range of flight Mach numbers of 6 to 16.

  18. Using Schlieren Visualization to Track Detonator Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. A.; Bolme, C. A.; Murphy, M. J.; Landon, C. D.; Mason, T. A.; Adrian, R. J.; Akinci, A. A.; Martinez, M. E.; Thomas, K. A.

    2007-12-01

    Several experiments will be presented that are part of a phased plan to understand the evolution of detonation in a detonator from initiation shock through run to detonation, to full detonation, to transition, to booster and booster detonation. High-speed multiframe schlieren imagery has been used to study several explosive initiation events, such as exploding bridgewires (EBWs), exploding foil initiators (EFIs or "slappers"), direct optical initiation (DOI), and electrostatic discharge. Additionally, a series of tests has been performed on "cut-back" detonators with varying initial pressing heights. We have also used this diagnostic to visualize a range of EBW, EFI, and DOI full-up detonators. Future applications to other explosive events, such as boosters and insensitive high explosives booster evaluation, will be discussed. The EPIC finite element code has been used to analyze the shock fronts from the schlieren images to solve iteratively for consistent boundary or initial conditions to determine the temporal-spatial pressure profile across the output face of the detonator.

  19. Using Schlieren Visualization to Track Detonator Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Steven; Thomas, Keith; Martinez, Michael; Akinci, Adrian; Murphy, Michael; Adrian, Ronald

    2007-06-01

    Several experiments that are part of a phased plan to understand the evolution of detonation in a detonator from initiation shock through run to detonation to full detonation to transition to booster and booster detonation will be presented. High Speed Laser Schlieren Movies have been used to study several explosive initiation events, such as exploding bridgewires (EBW), Exploding Foil Initiators (EFI) (or slappers), Direct Optical Initiation (DOI), and ElectroStatic Discharge (ESD). Additionally, a series of tests have been performed on ``cut-back'' detonators with varying initial pressing (IP) heights. We have also used this diagnostic to visualize a range of EBW, EFI, and DOI full-up detonators. Future applications to other explosive events such as boosters and IHE booster evaluation will be discussed. EPIC Hydrodynamic code has been used to analyze the shock fronts from the Schlieren images to reverse calculate likely boundary or initial conditions to determine the temporal-spatial pressure profile across the output face of the detonator. LA-UR-07-1229

  20. 14 CFR 33.47 - Detonation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.47 Detonation test. Each engine must be tested to establish that the engine can function without detonation throughout its range...

  1. 14 CFR 33.47 - Detonation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.47 Detonation test. Each engine must be tested to establish that the engine can function without detonation throughout its range...

  2. 14 CFR 33.47 - Detonation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Detonation test. 33.47 Section 33.47 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.47 Detonation test. Each...

  3. 14 CFR 33.47 - Detonation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Detonation test. 33.47 Section 33.47 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.47 Detonation test. Each...

  4. 14 CFR 33.47 - Detonation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Detonation test. 33.47 Section 33.47 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.47 Detonation test. Each...

  5. Detonation properties of the nitromethane/ diethylenetriamine solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalova, Valentina; Utkin, Alexander; Lapin, Sergey

    2015-06-01

    The results of the experimental determination of detonation parameters for the mixture of nitromethane (NM) with diethylenetriamine (DETA) are presented in this work. By the using of a laser interferometer VISAR the stability of detonation waves, detonation velocity and the reaction time with the change of the DETA concentration from 0 to 60 weight percentages were investigated. It is shown that detonation waves are stable up to 25% DETA, and the character reaction time is reduced from 50 ns up to 30 ns with the addition of a few percentages of the sensitizer and then remains almost the constant. With further increase of the DETA concentration the detonation front becomes unstable, and it results in an arising of pulsations with amplitude of 10 microns. The limit concentration of DETA, above which the detonation of the mixture was impossible, was determined. This concentration was equal to 60%. It is shown that the dependence of the detonation velocity on the DETA concentration is non-monotonic. In particular, the increase of detonation velocity in the vicinity of small concentrations of the sensitizer, about 0.1%, was recorded. The work was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Project 15-03-07830).

  6. High capacity for extracellular acid-base regulation in the air-breathing fish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus.

    PubMed

    Damsgaard, Christian; Gam, Le Thi Hong; Tuong, Dang Diem; Thinh, Phan Vinh; Huong Thanh, Do Thi; Wang, Tobias; Bayley, Mark

    2015-05-01

    The evolution of accessory air-breathing structures is typically associated with reduction of the gills, although branchial ion transport remains pivotal for acid-base and ion regulation. Therefore, air-breathing fishes are believed to have a low capacity for extracellular pH regulation during a respiratory acidosis. In the present study, we investigated acid-base regulation during hypercapnia in the air-breathing fish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus in normoxic and hypoxic water at 28-30°C. Contrary to previous studies, we show that this air-breathing fish has a pronounced ability to regulate extracellular pH (pHe) during hypercapnia, with complete metabolic compensation of pHe within 72 h of exposure to hypoxic hypercapnia with CO2 levels above 34 mmHg. The high capacity for pHe regulation relies on a pronounced ability to increase levels of HCO3(-) in the plasma. Our study illustrates the diversity in the physiology of air-breathing fishes, such that generalizations across phylogenies may be difficult.

  7. Phase detonated shock tube (PFST)

    SciTech Connect

    Zerwekh, W.D.; Marsh, S.P.; Tan, Tai-Ho

    1993-07-01

    The simple, cylindrically imploding and axially driven fast shock tube (FST) has been a basic component in the high velocity penetrator (HVP) program. It is a powerful device capable of delivering a directed and very high pressure output that has been successfully employed to drive hypervelocity projectiles. The FST is configured from a hollow, high-explosive (HE) cylinder, a low-density Styrofoam core, and a one-point initiator at one end. A Mach stem is formed in the core as the forward-propagating, HE detonation wave intersects the reflected radial wave. This simple FST has been found to be a powerful pressure multiplier. Up to 1-Mbar output pressure can be obtained from this device. Further increase in the output pressure can be achieved by increasing the HE detonation velocity. The FST has been fine tuned to drive a thin plate to very high velocity under an impulse per unit area of about 1 Mbar{mu}s/cm{sup 2}. A 1.5-mm-thick stainless steel disk has been accelerated intact to 0.8 cm/{mu}s under a loading pressure rate of several Mbar/{mu}s. By making the plate curvature slightly convex at the loading side the authors have successfully accelerated it to almost 1.0 cm/{mu}s. The incorporation of a barrel at the end of the FST has been found to be important as confinement of the propellant gas by the barrel tends to accelerate the projectile to higher velocity. The desire to accelerate the plate above 1.0 cm/{mu}s provided the impetus to develop a more advanced fast shock tube to deliver a much higher output pressure. This report describes the investigation of a relatively simple air-lens phase-detonation system (PFST) with fifty percent higher phase-detonation velocity and a modest 2 Mbar output. Code calculations have shown that this PFST acceleration of a plate to about 1.2 cm/{mu}s can be achieved. The performance of these PFSTs has been evaluated and the details are discussed.

  8. Phase detonated shock tube (PFST)

    SciTech Connect

    Zerwekh, W.D.; Marsh, S.P.; Tan, Tai-Ho.

    1993-01-01

    The simple, cylindrically imploding and axially driven fast shock tube (FST) has been a basic component in the high velocity penetrator (HVP) program. It is a powerful device capable of delivering a directed and very high pressure output that has been successfully employed to drive hypervelocity projectiles. The FST is configured from a hollow, high-explosive (HE) cylinder, a low-density Styrofoam core, and a one-point initiator at one end. A Mach stem is formed in the core as the forward-propagating, HE detonation wave intersects the reflected radial wave. This simple FST has been found to be a powerful pressure multiplier. Up to 1-Mbar output pressure can be obtained from this device. Further increase in the output pressure can be achieved by increasing the HE detonation velocity. The FST has been fine tuned to drive a thin plate to very high velocity under an impulse per unit area of about 1 Mbar[mu]s/cm[sup 2]. A 1.5-mm-thick stainless steel disk has been accelerated intact to 0.8 cm/[mu]s under a loading pressure rate of several Mbar/[mu]s. By making the plate curvature slightly convex at the loading side the authors have successfully accelerated it to almost 1.0 cm/[mu]s. The incorporation of a barrel at the end of the FST has been found to be important as confinement of the propellant gas by the barrel tends to accelerate the projectile to higher velocity. The desire to accelerate the plate above 1.0 cm/[mu]s provided the impetus to develop a more advanced fast shock tube to deliver a much higher output pressure. This report describes the investigation of a relatively simple air-lens phase-detonation system (PFST) with fifty percent higher phase-detonation velocity and a modest 2 Mbar output. Code calculations have shown that this PFST acceleration of a plate to about 1.2 cm/[mu]s can be achieved. The performance of these PFSTs has been evaluated and the details are discussed.

  9. Cylindrically converging shock and detonation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, H.

    1983-07-01

    The non-self-similar implosion of cylindrical shock and detonation waves generated by an instantaneous energy release at a cylindrical wall is analyzed theoretically by the method of integral relations. The analysis shows that as the wave propagates towards the axis, the solutions tend to approach but never reach the self-similar implosion limit. The rate of approach appears to be slower than expected, and the region of applicability of the self-similar solution appears to be restricted to a very small region behind the front. This tendency is more pronounced for the detonation case. It is also demonstrated that for detonations where the initiation energy is negligible in comparison with the chemical energy, the Chapman-Jouguet detonation jump conditions apply at the front except near the axis and near the outer wall. The chemical heating in the detonation process increases the pressure and the temperature but considerably reduces the density near the front.

  10. New explosive detonator improves worksite safety

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The industry has long been concerned about preventing unwanted detonation of explosives around work sites or downhole, because of inadvertent contact with stray electrical currents, impacts, heat, etc. To answer the challenge of developing a safer, more economical system to use in explosive perforating, cutting and severing jobs, Halliburton Energy Services has introduced the Rig Environment Detonator (RED). The new electroexplosive device utilizes semiconductor bridge technology and a special deflagration-to-detonation technique involving secondary, not primary, explosives. Three independent testing authorities in the US and the UK have recognized the improved safety of the system. Details of available conventional detonators ranging from the earliest blasting caps to very safe, but expensive, systems; design/testing of the new device; and case histories of its use are presented and illustrated in SPE paper 36637, ``Unique electrical detonator enhances safety in explosive operations: case histories``. This paper contains extracts from the SPE paper.

  11. Hydrodynamical simulations of detonations in superbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, Claire; Busegnies, Yves; Papalexandris, Miltiadis V.; Goriely, Stephane

    2008-07-01

    A new hydrodynamical algorithm to study astrophysical detonations is presented. A prime motivation of this development is the description of a carbon detonation in conditions relevant to superbursts, which are thought to result from the propagation of a detonation front around the surface of a neutron star in the carbon layer underlying the atmosphere. The algorithm we have developed is a finite-volume method inspired by the original MUSCL scheme of van Leer (1979). The one-dimensional calculations we have performed demonstrate that the carbon detonation at the surface of a neutron star is a multiscale phenomenon. The length scale of liberation of energy is 106 times smaller than the total reaction length. We show that a multi-resolution approach can be used to solve all the reaction lengths. For mixed H/He accreting systems, we have introduced a new reduced network to study the impact of the photodisintegration of the heavy elements on the detonation.

  12. Internal Detonation Velocity Measurements Inside High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Benterou, J; Bennett, C V; Cole, G; Hare, D E; May, C; Udd, E

    2009-01-16

    In order to fully calibrate hydrocodes and dynamic chemistry burn models, initiation models and detonation models of high explosives, the ability to continuously measure the detonation velocity within an explosive is required. Progress on an embedded velocity diagnostic using a 125 micron diameter optical fiber containing a chirped fiber Bragg grating is reported. As the chirped fiber Bragg grating is consumed by the moving detonation wave, the physical length of the unconsumed Bragg grating is monitored with a fast InGaAs photodiode. Experimental details of the associated equipment and data in the form of continuous detonation velocity records within PBX-9502 are presented. This small diameter fiber sensor has the potential to measure internal detonation velocities on the order of 10 mm/{micro}sec along path lengths tens of millimeters long.

  13. Performance characterization of the NASA standard detonator

    SciTech Connect

    Tarbell, W.W.; Burke, T.L.; Solomon, S.E.

    1995-05-01

    The NASA Standard Detonator (NSD) is employed in support of a number of current applications, including the Space Shuttle. This effort was directed towards providing test results to characterize the output of this device for its use in a safe and arm device. As part of the investigation, flash X-ray was used to provide stop-motion photographs of the flying metal plate that is created by initiation of the detonator. This provided researchers with a better understanding of the shape and character of the high-velocity disk as it propagated across the gap between the detonator and next assembly. The second portion of the study used a velocity interferometer to evaluate the acceleration and velocity histories of the flying plate, providing a quantified assessment of the detonator`s ability to initiate the explosive in the next explosive.

  14. Detonation properties of nitromethane/diethylenetriamine solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalova, V.; Utkin, A.; Lapin, S.

    2017-01-01

    The results of the experimental determination of the detonation parameters of nitromethane (NM) with diethylenetriamine (DETA) solution are presented in this work. With the using of a laser interferometer VISAR the stability of detonation waves, the detonation velocity and the reaction time at the concentration of DETA from 0 to 60 weight percentage were investigated. It is shown that the stability of detonation waves is retained up to 25% DETA, at that the characteristic reaction time is reduced by about half at the addition of several percentage of the sensitizer to NM and then remains almost constant. The increase of the detonation velocity in the vicinity of the small, about 0.1%, concentrations of sensitizer is recorded.

  15. Initiation train experiments to enable detonator diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois, Elizabeth; Thomas, Keith; Liechty, Gary; Johnson, Carl

    2017-01-01

    A measurement of when the detonator breaks out and lights an initiation train has been a desirable diagnostic for both modelers and experimentalists alike. A detonator diagnostic has been developed using magnet wire circuit to transmit a signal when the detonation wave breaks the cup. This is used to establish time zero for a variety of types of shots. This paper describes the design and testing challenges of this diagnostic, and the tests conducted to prove the concept. The value of this diagnostic is that it is an in situ measurement, meaning it can easily be housed inside the booster counterbore on the detonator face. It provides an unambiguous measurement of time zero, when coupled with diagnostics that supply detonator bridge burst information.

  16. Numerical Analysis of a Rotating Detonation Engine in the Relative Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    A two-dimensional, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation of a semi-idealized rotating detonation engine (RDE) is described. The simulation operates in the detonation frame of reference and utilizes a relatively coarse grid such that only the essential primary flow field structure is captured. This construction yields rapidly converging, steady solutions. Results from the simulation are compared to those from a more complex and refined code, and found to be in reasonable agreement. The performance impacts of several RDE design parameters are then examined. Finally, for a particular RDE configuration, it is found that direct performance comparison can be made with a straight-tube pulse detonation engine (PDE). Results show that they are essentially equivalent.

  17. Initiation of Gaseous Detonation by Conical Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verreault, Jimmy

    Initiation and stabilization of detonation by hypersonic conical projectiles launched into combustible gas mixtures is investigated. This phenomenon must be understood for the design and optimization of specific hypersonic propulsion devices, such as the oblique detonation wave engine and the ram accelerator. The criteria for detonation initiation by a projectile is also related to fundamental aspects of detonation research, such as the requirement for direct initiation of a detonation by a blast wave. Experimental results of this problem also offer useful references for validation of numerical and theoretical modeling. Projectiles with cone half angles varying from 15° to 60° were launched into stoichiometric mixtures of hydrogen/oxygen with 70% argon dilution at initial pressures between 10 and 200 kPa. The projectiles were launched from a combustion-driven gas gun at velocities up to 2.2 km/s (corresponding to 133% of the Chapman Jouguet velocity). Pictures of the flowfields generated by the projectiles were taken via Schlieren photography. Five combustion regimes were observed about the projectile ranging from prompt and delayed oblique detonation wave formation, combustion instabilities, a wave splitting, and an inert shock wave. Two types of transition from the prompt oblique detonation wave regime to the inert shock regime were observed. The first (the delayed oblique detonation wave regime) showed an inert shock attached to the tip of the projectile followed by a sharp kink at the onset of an oblique detonation wave; this regime occurred by decreasing the cone angle at high mixture pressures. The second (the combustion instabilities regime) exhibited large density gradients due to combustion ignition and quenching phenomena; this regime occurred by decreasing the mixture pressure at large cone angles. A number of theoretical models were considered to predict critical conditions for the initiation of oblique detonations. The Lee-Vasiljev model agreed

  18. Three Dimensional Analysis of Induced Detonation of Cased Explosive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    generate a shockwave strong enough to cause detonation of the explosive, as well as the resulting pressure profile of the detonation wave. Detonation...initial shockwave . Detonation was also caused by pressure waves reflecting against the casing of the explosive leading to the so-called sympathetic

  19. Impact sensitivity and the maximum heat of detonation.

    PubMed

    Politzer, Peter; Murray, Jane S

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that a large heat of detonation is undesirable from the standpoint of the impact sensitivity of an explosive and also unnecessary from the standpoints of its detonation velocity and detonation pressure. High values of the latter properties can be achieved even with a moderate heat of detonation, and this in turn enhances the likelihood of relatively low sensitivity.

  20. Achieving 5- microsec Simultaneity of 36 RP-80 Detonators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    detonators simultaneously using the FS-43 firing system. The results of the investigation demonstrated an in- house capability for initiating 36 detonators...detonation wave fronts. Preliminary discussions with scientists, engineers, and technicians within ARL indicated that previous in- house experiences...novel in- house application, possibly with complexity and constraint beyond that of a circuit for several detonators. To establish a level of

  1. Excretory nitrogen metabolism and defence against ammonia toxicity in air-breathing fishes.

    PubMed

    Chew, S F; Ip, Y K

    2014-03-01

    With the development of air-breathing capabilities, some fishes can emerge from water, make excursions onto land or even burrow into mud during droughts. Air-breathing fishes have modified gill morphology and morphometry and accessory breathing organs, which would tend to reduce branchial ammonia excretion. As ammonia is toxic, air-breathing fishes, especially amphibious ones, are equipped with various strategies to ameliorate ammonia toxicity during emersion or ammonia exposure. These strategies can be categorized into (1) enhancement of ammonia excretion and reduction of ammonia entry, (2) conversion of ammonia to a less toxic product for accumulation and subsequent excretion, (3) reduction of ammonia production and avoidance of ammonia accumulation and (4) tolerance of ammonia at cellular and tissue levels. Active ammonia excretion, operating in conjunction with lowering of ambient pH and reduction in branchial and cutaneous NH₃ permeability, is theoretically the most effective strategy to maintain low internal ammonia concentrations. NH₃ volatilization involves the alkalization of certain epithelial surfaces and requires mechanisms to prevent NH₃ back flux. Urea synthesis is an energy-intensive process and hence uncommon among air-breathing teleosts. Aestivating African lungfishes detoxify ammonia to urea and the accumulated urea is excreted following arousal. Reduction in ammonia production is achieved in some air-breathing fishes through suppression of amino acid catabolism and proteolysis, or through partial amino acid catabolism leading to alanine formation. Others can slow down ammonia accumulation through increased glutamine synthesis in the liver and muscle. Yet, some others develop high tolerance of ammonia at cellular and tissue levels, including tissues in the brain. In summary, the responses of air-breathing fishes to ameliorate ammonia toxicity are many and varied, determined by the behaviour of the species and the nature of the environment in

  2. Evaluation of some significant issues affecting trajectory and control management for air-breathing hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hattis, Philip D.; Malchow, Harvey L.

    1992-01-01

    Horizontal takeoff airbreathing-propulsion launch vehicles require near-optimal guidance and control which takes into account performance sensitivities to atmospheric characteristics while satisfying physically-derived operational constraints. A generic trajectory/control analysis tool that deepens insight into these considerations has been applied to two versions of a winged-cone vehicle model. Information that is critical to the design and trajectory of these vehicles is derived, and several unusual characteristics of the airbreathing propulsion model are shown to have potentially substantial effects on vehicle dynamics.

  3. A conceptual design of an unmanned test vehicle using an airbreathing propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    According to Aviation Week and Space Technology (Nov. 16, 1992), without a redefined approach to the problem of achieving single stage-to-orbit flight, the X-30 program is virtually assured of cancellation. One of the significant design goals of the X-30 program is to achieve single stage to low-earth orbit using airbreathing propulsion systems. In an attempt to avoid cancellation, the NASP Program has decided to design a test vehicle to achieve these goals. This report recommends a conceptual design of an unmanned test vehicle using an airbreathing propulsion system.

  4. Enhanced Control Effector Designs for Airbreathing Transatmospheric Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, Charles E.; McMinn, John D.

    1997-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the potential effectiveness of a moveable cowl-trailing-edge design for airbreathing hypersonic single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) configurations, which can be extended or deflected from the nominal position in order to provide additional pitching moment capability. This additional pitching moment capability may reduce the necessary deflection angle from conventional control surfaces and the associated trim drag penalty. Calculations for a generic SSTO configuration with baseline and modified cowl trailing edge geometries were performed at Mach 6 and 10 initially with an engineering analysis code in order to examine several design parametrics. In order to more accurately model geometries and flow physics, 2-D viscous computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions were obtained. FInally, a limited set of 3D CFD predictions were obtained at Mach 6 in order to show the effects of modeling 3D flow fields as well as the full 3D vehicle geometry. Comparisons of aftbody surface pressures and force and moment predictions show differences between initial predictions and 2-D CFD solutions due to geometry modeling and calculation method differences. The 3-D CFD predictions confirm the trends observed in the 2-D solutions and provide additional information on 3D effects. These analyses shows that cowl-trailing-edge extensions were effective in providing additional (nose-down) pitching moment increments as well as increased thrust compared to the baseline geometry. These effects reduce the control surface deflection angle required to trim the vehicle and the associated trim drag. Cowl-trailingedge deflections were not as effective, generating more nose-up pitching moment and decreased thrust compared to non-deflected cases.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Aluminum Dust Detonations with Different Product Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, H. H.; Jiang, Z. L.

    Detonation waves are waves of supersonic combustion induced by strong coupling shock and heat release. Detonation research has attracted much attention in recent years owing to its potential applications in hypersonic propulsion. Aluminum (Al) particle detonation is a type of dust detonation, and its research is important in the prevention of industrial explosions. Al dust detonations for flake and spherical particles have been studied , which is found to be very sensitive to the specific area[1].

  6. Eigenvalue Detonation of Combined Effects Aluminized Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capellos, C.; Baker, E. L.; Nicolich, S.; Balas, W.; Pincay, J.; Stiel, L. I.

    2007-12-01

    Theory and performance for recently developed combined—effects aluminized explosives are presented. Our recently developed combined-effects aluminized explosives (PAX-29C, PAX-30, PAX-42) are capable of achieving excellent metal pushing, as well as high blast energies. Metal pushing capability refers to the early volume expansion work produced during the first few volume expansions associated with cylinder and wall velocities and Gurney energies. Eigenvalue detonation explains the observed detonation states achieved by these combined effects explosives. Cylinder expansion data and thermochemical calculations (JAGUAR and CHEETAH) verify the eigenvalue detonation behavior.

  7. Functional performance of the T-6A Texan (JPATS) CFIS laser detonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blachowski, Thomas J.; Thom, Travis

    2010-08-01

    The Indian Head Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center (IHD NSWC) CAD Engineering Division is conducting a program to evaluate the laser and energetic components which comprise the Canopy Fracturing Initiation System (CFIS). This system is currently installed on the T-6A Texan II or JPATS (Joint Primary Aircraft Training System) aircraft. The T-6A Texan II is the first aircraft used by the military to train future pilots. The CFIS is an element of the pilot emergency escape system which weakens the canopy in the path of the ejection seat. The CFIS is comprised of three differing laser configurations (Internal, External, and Seat Motion) which generate a pulse that is distributed through a fiber optic energy transmission system. This pulse, in turn, initiates one of the system's explosive components, a detonator (specifically, the CCU-158/A Laser Initiated Detonator). This detonator transfers the signal to the remaining energetic components that, in turn, function to weaken their respective canopies. All of the CFIS laser types are flashlamp-pumped, neodymium glass lasers which are located at various positions in the aircraft cockpit area. This paper builds on the previous SPIE papers (2008 - Conference 7070 and 2009 - Conference 7434, respectively) and presents the initial functional test results for the CFIS Laser Detonator. These functional test results provide the technical support to justify the useful lifetime of this energetic component while being installed in the T-6A Texan II aircraft under operational conditions.

  8. The Attenuation of a Detonation Wave by an Aircraft Engine Axial Turbine Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale; Envia, Edmane; Turner, Mark G.

    2007-01-01

    A Constant Volume Combustion Cycle Engine concept consisting of a Pulse Detonation Combustor (PDC) followed by a conventional axial turbine was simulated numerically to determine the attenuation and reflection of a notional PDC pulse by the turbine. The multi-stage, time-accurate, turbomachinery solver TURBO was used to perform the calculation. The solution domain consisted of one notional detonation tube coupled to 5 vane passages and 8 rotor passages representing 1/8th of the annulus. The detonation tube was implemented as an initial value problem with the thermodynamic state of the tube contents, when the detonation wave is about to exit, provided by a 1D code. Pressure time history data from the numerical simulation was compared to experimental data from a similar configuration to verify that the simulation is giving reasonable results. Analysis of the pressure data showed a spectrally averaged attenuation of about 15 dB across the turbine stage. An evaluation of turbine performance is also presented.

  9. Printable sensors for explosive detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Matthew J. Cooling, Nathan A.; Elkington, Daniel C.; Belcher, Warwick J.; Dastoor, Paul C.; Muller, Elmar

    2014-10-06

    Here, we report the development of an organic thin film transistor (OTFT) based on printable solution processed polymers and employing a quantum tunnelling composite material as a sensor to convert the pressure wave output from detonation transmission tubing (shock tube) into an inherently amplified electronic signal for explosives initiation. The organic electronic detector allows detection of the signal in a low voltage operating range, an essential feature for sites employing live ordinances that is not provided by conventional electronic devices. We show that a 30-fold change in detector response is possible using the presented detector assembly. Degradation of the OTFT response with both time and repeated voltage scans was characterised, and device lifetime is shown to be consistent with the requirements for on-site printing and usage. The integration of a low cost organic electronic detector with inexpensive shock tube transmission fuse presents attractive avenues for the development of cheap and simple assemblies for precisely timed initiation of explosive chains.

  10. Interaction of turbulence with a detonation wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Ribner, H. S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses a specific reactive-flow configuration, namely, the interaction of a detonation wave with convected homogeneous isotropic weak turbulence (which can be constructed by a Fourier synthesis of small-amplitude vorticity waves). The effect of chemical heat release on the rms fluctuations downstream of the detonation is presented as a function of Mach number. In addition, for the particular case of the von Karman spectrum, the one-dimensional power spectra of these flow quantities are given.

  11. Survey of Aerothermodynamics Facilities Useful for the Design of Hypersonic Vehicles Using Air-Breathing Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Deiwert, George S.

    1997-01-01

    This paper surveys the use of aerothermodynamic facilities which have been useful in the study of external flows and propulsion aspects of hypersonic, air-breathing vehicles. While the paper is not a survey of all facilities, it covers the utility of shock tunnels and conventional hypersonic blow-down facilities which have been used for hypersonic air-breather studies. The problems confronting researchers in the field of aerothermodynamics are outlined. Results from the T5 GALCIT tunnel for the shock-on lip problem are outlined. Experiments on combustors and short expansion nozzles using the semi-free jet method have been conducted in large shock tunnels. An example which employed the NASA Ames 16-Inch shock tunnel is outlined, and the philosophy of the test technique is described. Conventional blow-down hypersonic wind tunnels are quite useful in hypersonic air-breathing studies. Results from an expansion ramp experiment, simulating the nozzle on a hypersonic air-breather from the NASA Ames 3.5 Foot Hypersonic wind tunnel are summarized. Similar work on expansion nozzles conducted in the NASA Langley hypersonic wind tunnel complex is cited. Free-jet air-frame propulsion integration and configuration stability experiments conducted at Langley in the hypersonic wind tunnel complex on a small generic model are also summarized.

  12. Analysis of a Nuclear Enhanced Airbreathing Rocket for Earth to Orbit Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert B.; Landrum, D. Brian; Brown, Norman (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The proposed engine concept is the Nuclear Enhanced Airbreathing Rocket (NEAR). The NEAR concept uses a fission reactor to thermally heat a propellant in a rocket plenum. The rocket is shrouded, thus the exhaust mixes with ingested air to provide additional thermal energy through combustion. The combusted flow is then expanded through a nozzle to provide thrust.

  13. Characterization of novel optical fibers for use in laser detonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, M. D.; Drake, R. C.; Singleton, C. A.

    2006-08-01

    A system for launching flyers using a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser has been developed for shock initiation of secondary explosives. Flyers have been launched at velocities approaching 6 km s -1. Optical fibers are used to transport the optical energy from the laser to the detonator. The launch of these flyers with sufficient velocity requires a fluence in the region of 35 J cm -2, significantly above the damage threshold of most optical fibers. This damage is typically caused by laser absorption at the input face due to imperfections in the surface polishing. A variety of optical fibers with high quality input faces have been tested at fluences up to 50 J cm -2, and their damage thresholds and beam profiles have been measured. The standard fiber used in this system is a low hydroxyl (-OH) content, 400μm diameter core silica fiber, with CO2 laser polished faces. In addition to this, fibers tapering down to 300μm and 200μm core diameter were investigated, as a means of increasing the efficiency of the system, along with mechanically polished fibers. The fiber currently enters the detonator body from the rear. Depending on the application, it may be required for the fiber to enter from the side. To facilitate this, fibers with a machined output face, designed to produce an output at approximately 90 degrees to the fiber axis were tested. Finally, a 2:1 fiber splitter was tested, as a first step to enable simultaneous firing of several detonators. Multiple initiation points are desirable for applications such as programmable initiation, and it is intended to study fiber splitters with a higher split ratio, such as 4:1 and 8:1. The results of these experiments are presented, and assessments made of suitability for transmission of high-power Qswitched Nd:YAG laser pulses.

  14. Effect of Resolution on Propagating Detonation Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2014-07-10

    Simulations of the cylinder test are used to illustrate the effect of mesh resolution on a propagating detonation wave. For this study we use the xRage code with the SURF burn model for PBX 9501. The adaptive mesh capability of xRage is used to vary the resolution of the reaction zone. We focus on two key properties: the detonation speed and the cylinder wall velocity. The latter is related to the release isentrope behind the detonation wave. As the reaction zone is refined (2 to 15 cells for cell size of 62 to 8μm), both the detonation speed and final wall velocity change by a small amount; less than 1 per cent. The detonation speed decreases with coarser resolution. Even when the reaction zone is grossly under-resolved (cell size twice the reaction-zone width of the burn model) the wall velocity is within a per cent and the detonation speed is low by only 2 per cent.

  15. Initiation and Detonation Physics on Millimeter Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Philllips, D F; Benterou, J J; May, C A

    2012-03-20

    The LLNL Detonation Science Project has a major interest in understanding the physics of detonation on a millimeter scale. This report summarizes the rate stick experiment results of two high explosives. The GO/NO-GO threshold between varying diameters of ultra-fine TATB (ufTATB) and LX-16 were recorded on an electronic streak camera and analyzed. This report summarizes the failure diameters of rate sticks for ufTATB and LX-16. Failure diameter for the ufTATB explosive, with densities at 1.80 g/cc, begin at 2.34 mm (not maintaining detonation velocity over the entire length of the rate stick). ufTATB rate sticks at the larger 3.18 mm diameter maintain a constant detonation velocity over the complete length. The PETN based and LLNL developed explosive, LX-16, with densities at 1.7 g/cc, shows detonation failure between 0.318 mm and 0.365 mm. Additional tests would be required to narrow this failure diameter further. Many of the tested rate sticks were machined using a femtosecond laser focused into a firing tank - in case of accidental detonation.

  16. One Year Term Review as a Participating Guest in the Detonator and Detonation Physics Group

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A; Roeske, F; Tran, T; Lee, R S

    2006-02-06

    The one year stay was possible after a long administrative process, because of the fact that this was the first participating guest of B division as a foreign national in HEAF (High Explosives Application Facility) with the Detonator/Detonation Physics Group.

  17. Detonability of H/sub 2/-air-diluent mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Sherman, M.P.; Benedick, W.B.; Berman, M.

    1987-06-01

    This report describes the Heated Detonation Tube (HDT). Detonation cell width and velocity results are presented for H/sub 2/-air mixtures, undiluted and diluted with CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O for a range of H/sub 2/ concentration, initial temperature and pressure. The results show that the addition of either CO/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/O significantly increases the detonation cell width and hence reduces the detonability of the mixture. The results also show that the detonation cell width is reduced (detonability is increased) for increased initial temperature and/or pressure.

  18. Gaseous detonation synthesis and characterization of nano-oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Honghao; Wu, Linsong; Li, Xiaojie; Wang, Xiaohong

    2015-07-01

    Gaseous detonation is a new method of heating the precursor of nanomaterials into gas, and integrating it with combustible gas as mixture to be detonated for the synthesis of nanomaterials. In this paper, the mixed gas of oxygen and hydrogen is used as the source for detonation, to synthesize nano TiO2, nano SiO2 and nano SnO2 through gaseous detonation method, characterization and analysis of the products, it was found that the products from gaseous detonation method were of high purity, good dispersion, smaller particle size and even distribution. It also shows that for the synthesis of nano-oxides, gaseous detonation is universal.

  19. High order hybrid numerical simulations of two dimensional detonation waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Wei

    1993-01-01

    In order to study multi-dimensional unstable detonation waves, a high order numerical scheme suitable for calculating the detailed transverse wave structures of multidimensional detonation waves was developed. The numerical algorithm uses a multi-domain approach so different numerical techniques can be applied for different components of detonation waves. The detonation waves are assumed to undergo an irreversible, unimolecular reaction A yields B. Several cases of unstable two dimensional detonation waves are simulated and detailed transverse wave interactions are documented. The numerical results show the importance of resolving the detonation front without excessive numerical viscosity in order to obtain the correct cellular patterns.

  20. Detonation nanodiamonds for doping Kevlar.

    PubMed

    Comet, Marc; Pichot, Vincent; Siegert, Benny; Britz, Fabienne; Spitzer, Denis

    2010-07-01

    This paper reports on the first attempt to enclose diamond nanoparticles--produced by detonation--into a Kevlar matrix. A nanocomposite material (40 wt% diamond) was prepared by precipitation from an acidic solution of Kevlar containing dispersed nanodiamonds. In this material, the diamond nanoparticles (Ø = 4 nm) are entirely wrapped in a Kevlar layer about 1 nm thick. In order to understand the interactions between the nanodiamond surface and the polymer, the oxygenated surface functional groups of nanodiamond were identified and titrated by Boehm's method which revealed the exclusive presence of carboxyl groups (0.85 sites per nm2). The hydrogen interactions between these groups and the amide groups of Kevlar destroy the "rod-like" structure and the classical three-dimensional organization of this polymer. The distortion of Kevlar macromolecules allows the wrapping of nanodiamonds and leads to submicrometric assemblies, giving a cauliflower structure reminding a fractal object. Due to this structure, the macroscopic hardness of Kevlar doped by nanodiamonds (1.03 GPa) is smaller than the one of pure Kevlar (2.31 GPa). To our knowledge, this result is the first illustration of the change of the mechanical properties induced by doping the Kevlar with nanoparticles.

  1. Determination of Effective Crossover Location and Dimensions for Branched Detonation in a Pulsed Detonation Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-22

    Frederick R. Schauer (Member) Date ___________________________________ ________ James L. Rutledge, Capt, USAF (Member...I would like to thank Dr. Paul King, Dr. Fred Schauer , Dr. John Hoke, and Capt Jay Rutledge for taking the time to share their knowledge and... marks are left on the polycarbonate where the crossover geometry and polycarbonate meet. The burn marks are visible in the Schlieren field of view when

  2. A Flash Vaporization System for Detonation of Hydrocarbon Fuels in a Pulse Detonation Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    electrode of NGK spark plug. Circle denotes 1.17 cm long center electrode. Arrow is at point weld failed between two materials of center electrode...the fuel and oxygen are completely consumed producing only H2O and CO2 during the reaction. If the ratio is less than stoichiometric (φ < 1) then...length of the mixer was 0.53 m with two 0.46 m long pipes welded within the mixer body. The average velocity entering the mixer was 27.5 m/s and the

  3. Chemical Kinetics in the expansion flow field of a rotating detonation-wave engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kailasanath, Kazhikathra; Schwer, Douglas

    2014-11-01

    Rotating detonation-wave engines (RDE) are a form of continuous detonation-wave engines. They potentially provide further gains in performance than an intermittent or pulsed detonation-wave engine (PDE). The overall flow field in an idealized RDE, primarily consisting of two concentric cylinders, has been discussed in previous meetings. Because of the high pressures involved and the lack of adequate reaction mechanisms for this regime, previous simulations have typically used simplified chemistry models. However, understanding the exhaust species concentrations in propulsion devices is important for both performance considerations as well as estimating pollutant emissions. A key step towards addressing this need will be discussed in this talk. In this approach, an induction parameter model is used for simulating the detonation but a more detailed finite-chemistry model is used in the expansion flow region, where the pressures are lower and the uncertainties in the chemistry model are greatly reduced. Results show that overall radical concentrations in the exhaust flow are substantially lower than from earlier predictions with simplified models. The performance of a baseline hydrogen/air RDE increased from 4940 s to 5000 s with the expansion flow chemistry, due to recombination of radicals and more production of H2O, resulting in additional heat release.

  4. Detonation initiation in solid explosive: MD simulation using AB interatomic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murzov, Semen; Zhakhovsky, Vasily

    2015-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation of impact detonation initiation in an AB model of condensed-phase explosive is performed with using a simplified reactive empirical bond order potential. Simulation of ultra-short piston-driven compression of AB explosive for the duration of a few picoseconds represents the indirect initiation of detonation by an ultra-short shock wave (SW) generated in a thin metal foil irradiated by a femtosecond laser pulse. Impact conditions required for transition of SW to detonation wave (DW) are studied. Variation of loading time and piston velocity, which controls piston pressure and input energy, is used to plot 2D regions of transition from SW to DW in pressure-time and energy-time planes. We demonstrate that the input energy required for initiation has a global minimum. Analysis of evolution of calculated pressure profiles gives a critical thickness of such AB explosive film in which transition from SW to DW can be completed. The effect of porosity and roughness of AB sample on impact detonation initiation is discussed.

  5. Laser-shocked energetic materials with metal additives: evaluation of detonation performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottfried, Jennifer; Bukowski, Eric

    A focused, nanosecond-pulsed laser with sufficient energy to exceed the breakdown threshold of a material generates a laser-induced plasma with high peak temperatures, pressures, and shock velocities. Depending on the laser parameters and material properties, nanograms to micrograms of material is ablated, atomized, ionized and excited in the laser-induced plasma. The subsequent shock wave expansion into the air above the sample has been monitored using high-speed schlieren imaging in a recently developed technique, laser-induced air shock from energetic materials (LASEM). The estimated detonation velocities using LASEM agree well with published experimental values. A comparison of the measured shock velocities for various energetic materials including RDX, DNTF, and LLM-172 doped with Al or B to the detonation velocities predicted by CHEETAH for inert or active metal participation demonstrates that LASEM has potential for predicting the early time participation of metal additives in detonation events. The LASEM results show that reducing the amount of hydrogen present in B formulations increases the resulting detonation velocities

  6. Ultrafast Fiber Bragg Grating Interrogation for Sensing in Detonation and Shock Wave Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, George; Gilbertson, Steve M.

    2017-01-01

    Chirped fiber Bragg grating (CFBG) sensors coupled to high speed interrogation systems are described as robust diagnostic approaches to monitoring shock wave and detonation front propagation tracking events for use in high energy density shock physics applications. Taking advantage of the linear distributed spatial encoding of the spectral band in single-mode CFBGs, embedded fiber systems and associated photonic interrogation methodologies are shown as an effective approach to sensing shock and detonation-driven loading processes along the CFBG length. Two approaches, one that detects spectral changes in the integrated spectrum of the CFBG and another coherent pulse interrogation approach that fully resolves its spectral response, shows that 100-MHz–1-GHz interrogation rates are possible with spatial resolution along the CFBG in the 50 μm to sub-millimeter range depending on the combination of CFBG parameters (i.e., length, chirp rate, spectrum) and interrogator design specifics. Results from several dynamic tests are used to demonstrate the performance of these high speed systems for shock and detonation propagation tracking under strong and weak shock pressure loading: (1) linear detonation front tracking in the plastic bonded explosive (PBX) PBX-9501; (2) tracking of radial decaying shock with crossover to non-destructive CFBG response; (3) shock wave tracking along an aluminum cylinder wall under weak loading accompanied by dynamic strain effects in the CFBG sensor. PMID:28134819

  7. Modeling of Non-Ideal Aluminized Detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, W. Michael; Fried, Laurence E.; Souers, P. Clark

    1999-06-01

    We have implemented a Wood-Kirkwood (WK) kinetic detonation model based on multi-species equations of state and multiple reaction rate laws. Finite rate laws are used for the slowest chemical reactions, while other reactions are given infinite rates and are kept in constant thermodynamic equilibrium. Within the context of WK theory, we study the chemical interaction between Al and HMX detonation products in non-ideal explosives. We develop a kinetic rate law for the burning of Al in condensed detonation that depends on the surface properties of the Al grains and the detonation product gases. Moreover, we use an exp-6 equation of state for the product fluids that reproduces a wide range experimental shock hugoniot and static compression data. We use a Murnaghan form for the equation of state of the solid and liquid Al and Al_2O_3. We find that we can replicate experimental detonation velocities to within a few per cent for a wide range of aluminum content. We discuss the uncertainties in our model and the implications of our results on the modeling of other non-ideal explosives. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48.

  8. Modeling Hemispheric Detonation Experiments in 2-Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W M; Fried, L E; Vitello, P A; Druce, R L; Phillips, D; Lee, R; Mudge, S; Roeske, F

    2006-06-22

    Experiments have been performed with LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% Kel-F 800 binder) to study scaling of detonation waves using a dimensional scaling in a hemispherical divergent geometry. We model these experiments using an arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian (ALE3D) hydrodynamics code, with reactive flow models based on the thermo-chemical code, Cheetah. The thermo-chemical code Cheetah provides a pressure-dependent kinetic rate law, along with an equation of state based on exponential-6 fluid potentials for individual detonation product species, calibrated to high pressures ({approx} few Mbars) and high temperatures (20000K). The parameters for these potentials are fit to a wide variety of experimental data, including shock, compression and sound speed data. For the un-reacted high explosive equation of state we use a modified Murnaghan form. We model the detonator (including the flyer plate) and initiation system in detail. The detonator is composed of LX-16, for which we use a program burn model. Steinberg-Guinan models5 are used for the metal components of the detonator. The booster and high explosive are LX-10 and LX-17, respectively. For both the LX-10 and LX-17, we use a pressure dependent rate law, coupled with a chemical equilibrium equation of state based on Cheetah. For LX-17, the kinetic model includes carbon clustering on the nanometer size scale.

  9. Characterization Of High Explosives Detonations Via Laser-Induced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    2015-10-08

    One objective of the Department of Energy’s National Security Administration is to develop technologies that can help the United States government to detect foreign nuclear weapons development activities. The realm of high explosive (HE) experiments is one of the key areas to assess the nuclear ambitions of a country. SRNL has participated in the collection of particulates from HE experiments and characterized the material with the purpose to correlate particulate matter with HE. Since these field campaigns are expensive, on-demand simulated laboratory-scale explosion experiments are needed to further our knowledge of the chemistry and particle formation in the process. Our goal is to develop an experimental test bed in the laboratory to test measurement concepts and correlate particle formation processes with the observables from the detonation fireball. The final objective is to use this knowledge to tailor our experimental setups in future field campaigns. The test bed uses pulsed laser-induced plasmas to simulate micro-explosions, with the intent to study the temporal behavior of the fireball observed in field tests. During FY15, a plan was prepared and executed which assembled two laser ablation systems, procured materials for study, and tested a Step-Scan Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (SS-FTIR). Designs for a shadowgraph system for shock wave analysis, design for a micro-particulate collector from ablated pulse were accomplished. A novel spectroscopic system was conceived and a prototype system built for acquisition of spectral/temporal characterization of a high speed event such as from a high explosive detonation. Experiments and analyses will continue into FY16.

  10. High Resolution WENO Simulation of 3D Detonation Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-27

    pocket behind the detonation front was not observed in their results because the rotating transverse detonation completely consumed the unburned gas. Dou...three-dimensional detonations We add source terms (functions of x, y, z and t) to the PDE system so that the following functions are exact solutions to... detonation rotates counter-clockwise, opposite to that in [48]. It can be seen that, the triple lines and transverse waves collide with the walls, and strong

  11. Precursor detonation wave development in ANFO due to aluminum confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Scott I; Klyanda, Charles B; Short, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Detonations in explosive mixtures of ammonium-nitrate-fuel-oil (ANFO) confined by aluminum allow for transport of detonation energy ahead of the detonation front due to the aluminum sound speed exceeding the detonation velocity. The net effect of this energy transport on the detonation is unclear. It could enhance the detonation by precompressing the explosive near the wall. Alternatively, it could decrease the explosive performance by crushing porosity required for initiation by shock compression or destroying confinement ahead of the detonation. At present, these phenomena are not well understood. But with slowly detonating, non-ideal high explosive (NIHE) systems becoming increasing prevalent, proper understanding and prediction of the performance of these metal-confined NIHE systems is desirable. Experiments are discussed that measured the effect of this ANFO detonation energy transported upstream of the front by a 76-mm-inner-diameter aluminum confining tube. Detonation velocity, detonation-front shape, and aluminum response are recorded as a function of confiner wall thickness and length. Detonation shape profiles display little curvature near the confining surface, which is attributed to energy transported upstream modifying the flow. Average detonation velocities were seen to increase with increasing confiner thickness, while wavefront curvature decreased due to the stiffer, subsonic confinement. Significant radial sidewall tube motion was observed immediately ahead of the detonation. Axial motion was also detected, which interfered with the front shape measurements in some cases. It was concluded that the confiner was able to transport energy ahead of the detonation and that this transport has a definite effect on the detonation by modifying its characteristic shape.

  12. Detonator cable initiation system safety investigation: Consequences of energizing the detonator and actuator cables

    SciTech Connect

    Osher, J.; Chau, H.; Von Holle, W.

    1994-03-01

    This study was performed to explore and assess the worst-case response of a W89-type weapons system, damaged so as to expose detonator and/or detonator safing strong link (DSSL) cables to the most extreme, credible lightning-discharge, environment. The test program used extremely high-current-level, fast-rise-time (1- to 2-{mu}s) discharges to simulate lightning strikes to either the exposed detonator or DSSL cables. Discharges with peak currents above 700 kA were required to explode test sections of detonator cable and launch a flyer fast enough potentially to detonate weapon high explosive (HE). Detonator-safing-strong-link (DSSL) cables were exploded in direct contact with hot LX-17 and Ultrafine TATB (UFTATB). At maximum charging voltage, the discharge system associated with the HE firing chamber exploded the cables at more than 600-kA peak current; however, neither LX-17 nor UFTATB detonated at 250{degree}C. Tests showed that intense surface arc discharges of more than 700 kA/cm in width across the surface of hot UFTATB [generally the more sensitive of the two insensitive high explosives (IHE)] could not initiate this hot IHE. As an extension to this study, we applied the same technique to test sections of the much-narrower but thicker-cover-layer W87 detonator cable. These tests were performed at the same initial stored electrical energy as that used for the W89 study. Because of the narrower cable conductor in the W87 cables, discharges greater than 550-kA peak current were sufficient to explode the cable and launch a fast flyer. In summary, we found that lightning strikes to exposed DSSL cables cannot directly detonate LX-17 or UFTATB even at high temperatures, and they pose no HE safety threat.

  13. Detonation cellular structure and image proces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, J. E.; Tieszen, S. R.

    Gaseous detonations universally exhibit an instability that is manifested as cellular patterns on witness plates (sooted foils) or open shutter photographs. The characteristic dimension or cell width lambda of the periodic cellular pattern has previously been shown to correlate with failure diameter, critical diffraction aperture dimension and direct initiation energy requirements. Due to the importance of predicting these parameters in assessing detonability hazards, a quantitative method for cell size mesurement is urgently needed. We discuss a technique based on digital image processing of sooted foil records and illustrate the results with data from experiments performed in the Heated Detonation Tube facility at Sandia. We demonstrate that image processing can be used to eliminate some of the uncertainty now present in cell size measurements. The possibility of quantifying cellular irregularity is also explored.

  14. Eigenvalue Detonation of Combined Effects Aluminized Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capellos, Christos; Baker, Ernest; Balas, Wendy; Nicolich, Steven; Stiel, Leonard

    2007-06-01

    This paper reports on the development of theory and performance for recently developed combined effects aluminized explosives. Traditional high energy explosives used for metal pushing incorporate high loading percentages of HMX or RDX, whereas blast explosives incorporate some percentage of aluminum. However, the high blast explosives produce increased blast energies, with reduced metal pushing capability due to late time aluminum reaction. Metal pushing capability refers to the early volume expansion work produced during the first few volume expansions associated with cylinder wall velocities and Gurney energies. Our Recently developed combined effects aluminized explosives (PAX-29C, PAX-30, PAX-42) are capable of achieving excellent metal pushing and high blast energies. Traditional Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory does not explain the observed detonation states achieved by these combined effects explosives. This work demonstrates, with the use of cylinder expansion data and thermochemical code calculations (JAGUAR and CHEETAH), that eigenvalue detonation theory explains the observed behavior.

  15. Detonation wave profiles in HMX based explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavsen, R.L.; Sheffield, S.A.; Alcon, R.R.

    1997-11-01

    Detonation wave profiles have been measured in several HMX based plastic bonded explosives including PBX9404, PBX9501, and EDC-37, as well as two HMX powders (coarse and fine) pressed to 65% of crystal density. The powders had 120 and 10 {micro}m average grain sizes, respectively. Planar detonations were produced by impacting the explosive with projectiles launched in a 72-mm bore gas gun. Impactors, impact velocity, and explosive thickness were chosen so that the run distance to detonation was always less than half the explosive thickness. For the high density plastic bonded explosives, particle velocity wave profiles were measured at an explosive/window interface using two VISAR interferometers. PMMA windows with vapor deposited aluminum mirrors were used for all experiments. Wave profiles for the powdered explosives were measured using magnetic particle velocity gauges. Estimates of the reaction zone parameters were obtained from the profiles using Hugoniots of the explosive and window.

  16. Multistage reaction pathways in detonating RDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2017-01-01

    Atomistic mechanisms underlying the reaction time and intermediate reaction products of detonating high explosives far from equilibrium have been elusive. This is because detonation is one of the hardest multiscale physics problems, in which diverse length and time scales play important roles. Here, large spatiotemporal-scale reactive molecular dynamics simulations validated by quantum molecular dynamics simulations reveal a two-stage reaction mechanism during the detonation of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine cystal. Rapid production of N2 and H2O within ˜10 ps is followed by delayed production of CO molecules beyond ns. We found that further decomposition towards the final products is inhibited by the formation of large metastable carbon- and oxygen- rich clusters with fractal geometry. In addition, we found distinct unimolecular and intermolecular reaction pathways, respectively, for the rapid N2 and H2O productions.

  17. Multistage reaction pathways in detonating high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Vashishta, Priya

    2014-11-17

    Atomistic mechanisms underlying the reaction time and intermediate reaction products of detonating high explosives far from equilibrium have been elusive. This is because detonation is one of the hardest multiscale physics problems, in which diverse length and time scales play important roles. Here, large spatiotemporal-scale reactive molecular dynamics simulations validated by quantum molecular dynamics simulations reveal a two-stage reaction mechanism during the detonation of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine crystal. Rapid production of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O within ∼10 ps is followed by delayed production of CO molecules beyond ns. We found that further decomposition towards the final products is inhibited by the formation of large metastable carbon- and oxygen-rich clusters with fractal geometry. In addition, we found distinct unimolecular and intermolecular reaction pathways, respectively, for the rapid N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O productions.

  18. Detonation Properties of Ammonium Dinitramide (ADN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wätterstam, A.; Östmark, H.; Helte, A.; Karlsson, S.

    1999-06-01

    Ammonium Dinitramide, ADN, has a potential as an oxidizer for underwater high explosives. Pure ADN has a large reaction-zone length and shows a strong non-ideal behaviour. The work presented here is an extension of previous work.(Sensitivity and Performance Characterization of Ammonium Dinitramide (ADN). Presented at 11th International Detonation Symposium, Snowmass, CO, 1998.) Experiments for determining the detonation velocity as a function of inverse charge radius and density, reaction-zone length and curvature, and the detonation pressure are presented. Measurements of pressure indicates that no, or weak von-Neumann spike exists, suggesting an immediate chemical decomposition. Experimental data are compared with predicted using thermochemical codes and ZND-theory.

  19. 30 CFR 75.1311 - Transporting explosives and detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transporting explosives and detonators. 75.1311... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1311 Transporting explosives and detonators. (a) When explosives and detonators are to be transported...

  20. 30 CFR 75.1311 - Transporting explosives and detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transporting explosives and detonators. 75.1311... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1311 Transporting explosives and detonators. (a) When explosives and detonators are to be transported...

  1. 30 CFR 75.1311 - Transporting explosives and detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transporting explosives and detonators. 75.1311... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1311 Transporting explosives and detonators. (a) When explosives and detonators are to be transported...

  2. 30 CFR 75.1311 - Transporting explosives and detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transporting explosives and detonators. 75.1311... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1311 Transporting explosives and detonators. (a) When explosives and detonators are to be transported...

  3. 30 CFR 75.1311 - Transporting explosives and detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transporting explosives and detonators. 75.1311... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1311 Transporting explosives and detonators. (a) When explosives and detonators are to be transported...

  4. 30 CFR 57.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 57.6400... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar...

  5. 30 CFR 56.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 56.6400... Electric Blasting § 56.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar electrical firing characteristics....

  6. 30 CFR 56.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 56.6400... Electric Blasting § 56.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar electrical firing characteristics....

  7. 30 CFR 57.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 57.6400... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar...

  8. 30 CFR 56.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 56.6400... Electric Blasting § 56.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar electrical firing characteristics....

  9. 30 CFR 56.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 56.6400... Electric Blasting § 56.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar electrical firing characteristics....

  10. 30 CFR 57.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 57.6400... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar...

  11. 30 CFR 57.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 57.6400... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar...

  12. 30 CFR 56.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 56.6400... Electric Blasting § 56.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar electrical firing characteristics....

  13. 30 CFR 57.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 57.6400... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar...

  14. 30 CFR 56.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deenergized circuits near detonators. 56.6402... Electric Blasting § 56.6402 Deenergized circuits near detonators. Electrical distribution circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site shall be deenergized. Such circuits need not...

  15. 30 CFR 57.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deenergized circuits near detonators. 57.6402... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6402 Deenergized circuits near detonators. Electrical distribution circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site shall be deenergized....

  16. Assessment of the MC3608 detonator shipping package hazard classification

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.B.

    1981-08-07

    An investigation was made to determine whether the MC 3608 Detonator should be assigned a DOT hazard classification of Detonating Fuze, Class C Explosive, per 49 CFR 173.113. This study covers the propagation test as approved by DOE-Albuquerque Operations Office. Analysis of the test data led to the recommended hazard classification of Detonating Fuze, Class C Explosive.

  17. Propulsion Airframe Integration Test Techniques for Hypersonic Airbreathing Configurations at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, David W.; Huebner, Lawrence D.; Trexler, Carl A.; Cabell, Karen F.; Andrews, Earl H., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The scope and significance of propulsion airframe integration (PAI) for hypersonic airbreathing vehicles is presented through a discussion of the PAI test techniques utilized at NASA Langley Research Center. Four primary types of PAI model tests utilized at NASA Langley for hypersonic airbreathing vehicles are discussed. The four types of PAI test models examined are the forebody/inlet test model, the partial-width/truncated propulsion flowpath test model, the powered exhaust simulation test model, and the full-length/width propulsion flowpath test model. The test technique for each of these four types of PAI test models is described, and the relevant PAI issues addressed by each test technique are illustrated through the presentation of recent PAI test data.

  18. An Air-Breathing Launch Vehicle Concept for Single-Stage-to-Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trefny, Charles J.

    1999-01-01

    The "Trailblazer" is a 300-lb payload, single-stage-to-orbit launch vehicle concept that uses air-breathing propulsion to reduce the required propellant fraction. The integration of air-breathing propulsion is done considering performance, structural and volumetric efficiency, complexity, and design risk. The resulting configuration is intended to be viable using near-term materials and structures. The aeropropulsion performance goal for the Trailblazer launch vehicle is an equivalent effective specific impulse (I*) of 500 sec. Preliminary analysis shows that this requires flight in the atmosphere to about Mach 10, and that the gross lift-off weight is 130,000 lb. The Trailblazer configuration and proposed propulsion system operating modes are described. Preliminary performance results are presented, and key technical issues are highlighted. An overview of the proposed program plan is given.

  19. Calibration of the Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel for Hypersonic Airbreathing Propulsion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, Lawrence D.; Rock, Kenneth E.; Voland, Randall T.; Wieting, Allan R.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel has recently been modified to produce a unique testing capability for hypersonic airbreathing propulsion systems. Prior to these modifications, the facility was used primarily for aerothermal loads and structural verification testing at true flight total enthalpy conditions for Mach numbers between 6 and 7. One of the recent modifications was an oxygen replenishment system which allows operating airbreathing propulsion systems to be tested at true flight total enthalpies. Following the modifications to the facility, calibration runs were performed at total enthalpies corresponding to flight Mach numbers of 6.3 and 6.8 to establish the flow characteristics of the facility with its new capabilities. The results of this calibration, as well as modifications to tunnel combustor hardware prior to calibration to improve tunnel flow quality, are described in this paper.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmentation of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-28

    system will either be over- or under-expanded for the majority of the cycle , with en- ergy being used without maximum gain. Magnetohydrodynamic ( MHD ...to their potentially superior performance over constant pressure cycle engines. Yet due to its unsteady chamber pressure, the PDE system will either...be over- or under-expanded for the majority of the cycle , with energy being used without maximum gain. Magnetohydrodynamic ( MHD ) augmentation offers

  1. Initiator Diffraction Limits for Pulse Detonation Engine Operation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    12 Figure 9. Location of 3.39 µm He-Ne Laser Transmission...transmission measurements were made at two locations with a 3.39 µm He-Ne laser [Figure 9] and an infrared diode to determine the proper timing of the...the main combustor [Figure 10]. Figure 9. Location of 3.39 µm He-Ne Laser Transmission Figure 10. Transducer Locations 13 Various other

  2. Experimental Magnetohydrodynamic Energy Extraction from a Pulsed Detonation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    5 A capacitor in series with a resistor as shown in Fig. 1 is subject to exponential change of electrical charge on the plates. This exponential...below the channel[2]. In order to maximize the electromotive effect of the magnetic field on charged particles in the conductive fluid, the magnetic...field across a conductive fluid to generate an electromotive force in line with the bulk flow velocity since neither field alone applied across a

  3. Combustion and Magnetohydrodynamic Processes in Advanced Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    itself is a conductor of electricity, the motion of this fluid through a magnetic field gives rise to electromotive force (drag) and flow current in...the system resulting in an electromotive force (thrust). In the AJAX system, energy is diverted from the inlet flow via MHD generation, it is then re...engine configurations explored and reviewed in this dis- sertation utilize electromotive forces (Lorentz forces) generated by a moving charge to augment

  4. Computer modeling of electrical performance of detonators

    SciTech Connect

    Furnberg, C.M.; Peevy, G.R.; Brigham, W.P.; Lyons, G.R.

    1995-05-01

    An empirical model of detonator electrical performance which describes the resistance of the exploding bridgewire (EBW) or exploding foil initiator (EFI or slapper) as a function of energy, deposition will be described. This model features many parameters that can be adjusted to obtain a close fit to experimental data. This has been demonstrated using recent experimental data taken with the cable discharge system located at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper will be a continuation of the paper entitled ``Cable Discharge System for Fundamental Detonator Studies`` presented at the 2nd NASA/DOD/DOE Pyrotechnic Workshop.

  5. Statistical Hot Spot Model for Explosive Detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, III, A L

    2005-07-14

    The Non-local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Statistical Hot Spot Model (NLTE SHS), a new model for explosive detonation, is described. In this model, the formation, ignition, propagation, and extinction of hot spots is explicitly modeled. The equation of state of the explosive mixture is treated with a non-local equilibrium thermodynamic assumption. A methodology for developing the parameters for the model is discussed, and applied to the detonation velocity diameter effect. Examination of these results indicates where future improvements to the model can be made.

  6. Statistical Hot Spot Model for Explosive Detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols III, A L

    2004-05-10

    The Non-local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Statistical Hot Spot Model (NLTE SHS), a new model for explosive detonation, is described. In this model, the formation, ignition, propagation, and extinction of hot spots is explicitly modeled. The equation of state of the explosive mixture is treated with a nonlocal equilibrium thermodynamic assumption. A methodology for developing the parameters for the model is discussed, and applied to the detonation velocity diameter effect. Examination of these results indicates where future improvements to the model can be made.

  7. Minimum-fuel ascent to orbit using air-breathing propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Buren, Mark A.; Mease, Kenneth D.

    1989-01-01

    Single-stage vehicles using air-breathing propulsion hold promise for more economical delivery of payloads to orbit. The characterization of minimum-fuel trajectories over the range of possible engine and aerodynamic performance of such vehicles provides useful feedback to engine and vehicle designers and paves the way for the development of guidance logic. The minimum-fuel trajectory problem is formulated, propulsion system and aerodynamic models are presented, a numerical solution approach is described, and some preliminary results are discussed.

  8. Air-breathing hypersonic cruise - Prospects for Mach 4-7 waverider aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankson, Isaiah M.

    1992-01-01

    In the Mach 4-7 range, waverider aircraft are considered as candidates for both short- and long-range cruise missions, as hypersonic missiles, and as high L/D highly maneuverable craft. The potential for near- and far-term application of airbreathing engines to the waverider vehicle missions and concepts is presented. Attention is focused on the cruise mission and attempts are made to compare and contrast it with the accelerator mission.

  9. Investigation of antimatter air-breathing propulsion for single-stage-to-orbit ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froning, H. D.

    Because the mutual annihilation of matter and antimatter releases all the energy that is stored within the physical structure of material mass, it provides the most powerful reaction that is possible for propulsive thrust. This paper considers the use of such annihilation energy for single-stage-to-orbit vehicles that would be powered by rocket and air-breathing propulsion and would reach and return from orbit with a single propulsive stage.

  10. A fast ascent trajectory optimization method for hypersonic air-breathing vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, Oscar J., Jr.

    The objective of this dissertation is to investigate a fast and reliable method to generate three-dimensional optimal ascent trajectories for hypersonic air-breathing vehicles. The problem is notoriously difficult because of the strong nonlinear coupling amongst aerodynamics, propulsion, vehicle attitude and trajectory state. As such an algorithm matures, the ultimate goal is to realize optimal closed-loop ascent guidance for hypersonic air-breathing vehicles. The problem is formulated as a fuel-optimal control problem. The corresponding necessary conditions are given. It is shown how the original problem of search for the optimal control commands can be reduced to a univariate root-finding problem at each point along the trajectory. A finite difference scheme is used to numerically solve the associated two-point-boundary-value problem. Evaluation of the approach is done through open-loop solutions and closed-loop simulations. The results show promising potential of the proposed approach as a rapid trajectory optimization tool for the class of hypersonic air-breathing vehicles.

  11. Impact of aeroelasticity on propulsion and longitudinal flight dynamics of an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, David L.; Mcminn, John D.; Pototzky, Anthony S.; Wooley, Christine L.

    1993-01-01

    Many air-breathing hypersonic aerospacecraft design concepts incorporate an elongated fuselage forebody acting as the aerodynamic compression surface for a hypersonic combustion module, or scram jet. This highly integrated design approach creates the potential for an unprecedented form of aero-propulsive-elastic interaction in which deflections of the vehicle fuselage give rise to propulsion transients, producing force and moment variations that may adversely impact the rigid body flight dynamics and/or further excite the fuselage bending modes. To investigate the potential for such interactions, a math model was developed which included the longitudinal flight dynamics, propulsion system, and first seven elastic modes of a hypersonic air-breathing vehicle. Perturbation time histories from a simulation incorporating this math model are presented that quantify the propulsive force and moment variations resulting from aeroelastic vehicle deflections. Root locus plots are presented to illustrate the effect of feeding the propulsive perturbations back into the aeroelastic model. A concluding section summarizes the implications of the observed effects for highly integrated hypersonic air-breathing vehicle concepts.

  12. Impact of aeroelasticity on propulsion and longitudinal flight dynamics of an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raney, David L.; McMinn, John D.; Pototzky, Anthony S.; Wooley, Christine L.

    1993-04-01

    Many air-breathing hypersonic aerospacecraft design concepts incorporate an elongated fuselage forebody acting as the aerodynamic compression surface for a hypersonic combustion module, or scram jet. This highly integrated design approach creates the potential for an unprecedented form of aero-propulsive-elastic interaction in which deflections of the vehicle fuselage give rise to propulsion transients, producing force and moment variations that may adversely impact the rigid body flight dynamics and/or further excite the fuselage bending modes. To investigate the potential for such interactions, a math model was developed which included the longitudinal flight dynamics, propulsion system, and first seven elastic modes of a hypersonic air-breathing vehicle. Perturbation time histories from a simulation incorporating this math model are presented that quantify the propulsive force and moment variations resulting from aeroelastic vehicle deflections. Root locus plots are presented to illustrate the effect of feeding the propulsive perturbations back into the aeroelastic model. A concluding section summarizes the implications of the observed effects for highly integrated hypersonic air-breathing vehicle concepts.

  13. Measurement of carbon condensates using small-angle x-ray scattering during detonation of high explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willey, T. M.; Bagge-Hansen, M.; Lauderbach, L.; Hodgin, R.; Hansen, D.; May, C.; van Buuren, T.; Dattelbaum, D. M.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Watkins, E. B.; Firestone, M. A.; Jensen, B. J.; Graber, T.; Bastea, S.; Fried, L.

    2017-01-01

    The lack of experimental validation for processes occurring at sub-micron length scales on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds hinders detonation model development. Particularly, quantification of late-time energy release requires measurement of carbon condensation kinetics behind detonation fronts. A new small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) endstation has been developed for use at The Dynamic Compression Sector to observe carbon condensation during detonation. The endstation and beamline demonstrate unprecedented fidelity; SAXS profiles can be acquired from single x-ray pulses, which in 24-bunch mode are about 80 ps in duration and arrive every 153.4 ns. This paper presents both the current temporal capabilities of this beamline, and the ability to distinguish different carbon condensate morphologies as they form behind detonation fronts. To demonstrate temporal capabilities, three shots acquired during detonation of hexanitrostilbene (HNS) are interleaved to show the evolution of the SAXS in about 50 ns steps. To show fidelity of the SAXS, the scattering from carbon condensates at several hundred nanoseconds varies with explosive: scattering from HNS is consistent with a complex morphology that we assert is associated with sp2 carbon., while Comp B scattering is consistent with soots containing three-dimensional diamond nanoparticles.

  14. Detonation performance of high-dense BTF charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgoborodov, A.; Brazhnikov, M.; Makhov, M.; Gubin, S.; Maklashova, I.

    2014-05-01

    New experimental data on detonation wave parameters and explosive performance for benzotrifuroxan are presented. Optical pyrometry was applied in order to measure the temperature and pressure of BTF detonation products. Chapman-Jouguet temperature was obtained as 3990 - 4170 K (charge densities 1.82 - 1.84 g/cc). The heat of explosion and the acceleration ability were measured also. It is also considered the hypothesis of formation of nanodiamond particles in detonation products directly behind the detonation front and influence of these processes on the temperature-time history in detonation products.

  15. Detonation of hydrogen-air mixtures. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.S.; Knystautas, R.; Benedick, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    The detonation of a hydrogen-air cloud subsequent to an accidental release of hydrogen into ambient surroundings cannot be totally ruled out in view of the relative sensitivity of the hydrogen-air system. The present paper investigates the key parameters involved in hydrogen-air detonations and attempts to establish quantitative correlations between those that have important practical implications. Thus, for example, the characteristic length scale lambda describing the cellular structure of a detonation front is measured for a broad range of hydrogen-air mixtures and is quantitatively correlated with the key dynamic detonation properties such as detonability, transmission and initiation.

  16. Inert particles size distribution influence on heterogeneous detonation suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratova, Yu. V.; Fedorov, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Interaction of a detonation wave propagating in the cellular detonation mode with a cloud of non-reactive particles is numerically studied. It is demonstrated that the presence of inert particles alters the detonation wave structure and its velocity. The influence of various parameters of the non-reactive cloud is investigated. The critical length of the cloud sufficient for detonation suppression is determined. It is shown that the disperse composition and the non-uniform distribution of particles in the cloud are important parameters affecting the detonation propagation mode.

  17. Laser supported detonation wave source of atomic oxygen for aerospace material testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krech, Robert H.; Caledonia, George E.

    1990-01-01

    A pulsed high-flux source of nearly monoenergetic atomic oxygen was developed to perform accelerated erosion testing of spacecraft materials in a simulated low-earth orbit (LEO) environment. Molecular oxygen is introduced into an evacuated conical expansion nozzle at several atmospheres pressure through a pulsed molecular beam valve. A laser-induced breakdown is generated in the nozzle throat by a pulsed CO2 TEA laser. The resulting plasma is heated by the ensuing laser-supported detonation wave, and then it rapidly expands and cools. An atomic oxygen beam is generated with fluxes above 10 to the 18th atoms per pulse at 8 + or - 1.6 km/s with an ion content below 1 percent for LEO testing. Materials testing yielded the same surface oxygen enrichment in polyethylene samples as observed on the STS mission, and scanning electron micrographs of the irradiated polymer surfaces showed an erosion morphology similar to that obtained on low earth orbit.

  18. Hydrogen detonation and detonation transition data from the High-Temperature Combustion Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ciccarelli, G.; Boccio, J.L.; Ginsberg, T.; Finfrock, C.

    1996-03-01

    The BNL High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) is an experimental research tool capable of investigating the effects of initial thermodynamic state on the high-speed combustion characteristic of reactive gas mixtures. The overall experimental program has been designed to provide data to help characterize the influence of elevated gas-mixture temperature (and pressure) on the inherent sensitivity of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonation, on the potential for flames accelerating in these mixtures to transition into detonations, on the effects of gas venting on the flame-accelerating process, on the phenomena of initiation of detonations in these mixtures by jets of hot reactant products, and on the capability of detonations within a confined space to transmit into another, larger confined space. This paper presents results obtained from the completion of two of the overall test series that was designed to characterize high-speed combustion phenomena in initially high-temperature gas mixtures. These two test series are the intrinsic detonability test series and the deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) test series. A brief description of the facility is provided below.

  19. Hydrogen detonation and detonation transition data from the High-Temperature Combustion Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ciccarelli, G.; Boccio, J.L.; Ginsberg, T.; Finfrock, C.; Gerlach, L.; Tagawa, H.; Malliakos, A.

    1995-12-31

    The BNL High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) is an experimental research tool capable of investigating the effects of initial thermodynamic state on the high-speed combustion characteristic of reactive gas mixtures. The overall experimental program has been designed to provide data to help characterize the influence of elevated gas-mixture temperature (and pressure) on the inherent sensitivity of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonation, on the potential for flames accelerating in these mixtures to transition into detonations, on the effects of gas venting on the flame-accelerating process, on the phenomena of initiation of detonations in these mixtures by jets of hot reactant product,s and on the capability of detonations within a confined space to transmit into another, larger confined space. This paper presents results obtained from the completion of two of the overall test series that was designed to characterize high-speed combustion phenomena in initially high-temperature gas mixtures. These two test series are the intrinsic detonability test series and the deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) test series. A brief description of the facility is provided below.

  20. Scanning Gamma Ray Densitometer System for Detonations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    in loaded detonators and delays. The 317 KEV gamma rays from an Ir192 source were collimated into a beam of 0.002 by 0.100 inch. A scanning system...minus 3%. With Ir192 , density measurements on NOL-130 were reproduced to plus or minus 5%, and on RDX to plus or minus 16%. Based on gamma ray

  1. Ethylene-air detonation in water spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarsalé, G.; Virot, F.; Chinnayya, A.

    2016-09-01

    Detonation experiments are conducted in a 52 {mm} square channel with an ethylene-air gaseous mixture with dispersed liquid water droplets. The tests were conducted with a fuel-air equivalence ratio ranging from 0.9 to 1.1 at atmospheric pressure. An ultrasonic atomizer generates a polydisperse liquid water spray with droplet diameters of 8.5-12 μm, yielding an effective density of 100-120 g/m3. Pressure signals from seven transducers and cellular structure are recorded for each test. The detonation structure in the two-phase mixture exhibits a gaseous-like behaviour. The pressure profile in the expansion fan is not affected by the addition of water. A small detonation velocity deficit of up to 5 % was measured. However, the investigation highlights a dramatic increase in the cell size (λ ) associated with the increase in the liquid water mass fraction in the two-phase mixture. The detonation structure evolves from a multi-cell to a half-cell mode. The analysis of the decay of the post-shock pressure fluctuations reveals that the ratio of the hydrodynamic thickness over the cell size (x_{{HT}}/{λ }) remains quite constant, between 5 and 7. A slight decrease of this ratio is observed as the liquid water mass fraction is increased, or the ethylene-air mixture is made leaner.

  2. Detonation duct gas generator demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortman, Andrew; Brinlee, Gayl A.; Othmer, Peter; Whelan, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of the generation of detonation waves moving periodically across high speed channel flow is experimentally demonstrated. Such waves are essential to the concept of compressing requirements and increasing the engine pressure compressor with the objective of reducing conventional compressor requirements and increasing the engine thermodynamic efficiency through isochoric energy addition. By generating transient transverse waves, rather than standing waves, shock wave losses are reduced by an order of magnitude. The ultimate objective is to use such detonation ducts downstream of a low pressure gas turbine compressor to produce a high overall pressure ratio thermodynamic cycle. A 4 foot long, 1 inch x 12 inch cross-section, detonation duct was operated in a blow-down mode using compressed air reservoirs. Liquid or vapor propane was injected through injectors or solenoid valves located in the plenum or the duct itself. Detonation waves were generated when the mixture was ignited by a row of spark plugs in the duct wall. Problems with fuel injection and mixing limited the air speeds to about Mach 0.5, frequencies to below 10 Hz, and measured pressure ratios of about 5 to 6. The feasibility of the gas dynamic compression was demonstrated and the critical problem areas were identified.

  3. Influence of and additives on acetylene detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakon, A.; Emelianov, A.; Eremin, A.

    2014-03-01

    The influence of and admixtures (known as detonation suppressors for combustible mixtures) on the development of acetylene detonation was experimentally investigated in a shock tube. The time-resolved images of detonation wave development and propagation were registered using a high-speed streak camera. Shock wave velocity and pressure profiles were measured by five calibrated piezoelectric gauges and the formation of condensed particles was detected by laser light extinction. The induction time of detonation development was determined as the moment of a pressure rise at the end plate of the shock tube. It was shown that additive had no influence on the induction time. For , a significant promoting effect was observed. A simplified kinetic model was suggested and characteristic rates of diacetylene formation were estimated as the limiting stage of acetylene polymerisation. An analysis of the obtained data indicated that the promoting species is atomic chlorine formed by pyrolysis, which interacts with acetylene and produces radical, initiating a chain mechanism of acetylene decomposition. The results of kinetic modelling agree well with the experimental data.

  4. Detonation propagation in a high loss configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Scott I; Shepherd, Joseph E

    2009-01-01

    This work presents an experimental study of detonation wave propagation in tubes with inner diameters (ID) comparable to the mixture cell size. Propane-oxygen mixtures were used in two test section tubes with inner diameters of 1.27 mm and 6.35 mm. For both test sections, the initial pressure of stoichiometric mixtures was varied to determine the effect on detonation propagation. For the 6.35 mm tube, the equivalence ratio {phi} (where the mixture was {phi} C{sub 3}H{sub 8} + 50{sub 2}) was also varied. Detonations were found to propagate in mixtures with cell sizes as large as five times the diameter of the tube. However, under these conditions, significant losses were observed, resulting in wave propagation velocities as slow as 40% of the CJ velocity U{sub CJ}. A review of relevant literature is presented, followed by experimental details and data. Observed velocity deficits are predicted using models that account for boundary layer growth inside detonation waves.

  5. Ultrashort-pulse laser generated nanoparticles of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Welle, Eric J.; Tappan, Alexander S.; Palmer, Jeremy A.

    2010-08-03

    A process for generating nanoscale particles of energetic materials, such as explosive materials, using ultrashort-pulse laser irradiation. The use of ultrashort laser pulses in embodiments of this invention enables one to generate particles by laser ablation that retain the chemical identity of the starting material while avoiding ignition, deflagration, and detonation of the explosive material.

  6. Sperm whales (Physeter catodon L. 1758) do not react to sounds from detonators.

    PubMed

    Madsen, P T; Møhl, B

    2000-01-01

    A number of observations show that sperm whales (Physeter catodon L. 1758) react to various man-made pulses with moderate source levels. The behavioral responses are described to vary from silence to fear. Click rates of five submerged male sperm whales were measured during the discharge of eight detonators off Andenes, northern Norway. In addition, the behavioral response of a surfaced specimen was observed. Click rates of the submerged whales and the behavior of the surfaced specimen did not change during the discharges with received sound levels of some 180 dB re 1 microPa peRMS. The apparent lack of response to the discharges could be due to similarity between sperm whale clicks and detonations. Accordingly, it can be speculated that the discharges may have been perceived as isolated clicks from conspecifics.

  7. 2-D Airbreathing Lightcraft Engine Experiments in Quiescent Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, Israel I.; Myrabo, Leik N.; Minucci, Marco A. S.; de Oliveira, Antonio C.; Toro, Paulo G. P.; Chanes, José B.; Rego, Israel S.

    2011-11-01

    Ground-breaking laser propulsion (LP) experiments were performed under quiescent conditions with a 25 cm wide, two-dimensional Lightcraft model using a Lumonics TEA-622 CO2 laser emitting ˜ 1 μs pulses. In preparation for subsequent hypersonic experiments, this static test campaign was conducted at ambient pressures of 0.06, 0.15, 0.30 and 1 bar with laser pulse energies of 150 to 230 J. Time-variant pressure distributions, generated over engine "absorption chamber" walls, were integrated to obtain total impulse and momentum coupling coefficients (Cm) representative of a single propulsion cycle. Schlieren visualization of laser-induced air breakdown and expanding blast waves was also accomplished. Surprisingly, the Cm results of 600-3000 Ns/MJ were 2.5x to 5x greater than previous results from smaller Lightcraft models; this suggests that higher static Cm performance can likely be achieved in larger scale LP engines. This research collaboration, forged between the USAF and Brazilian Air Force, was carried out at the Henry T. Nagamatsu Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics in Brazil.

  8. Synchro-ballistic recording of detonation phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Critchfield, R.R.; Asay, B.W.; Bdzil, J.B.; Davis, W.C.; Ferm, E.N.; Idar, D.J.

    1997-09-01

    Synchro-ballistic use of rotating-mirror streak cameras allows for detailed recording of high-speed events of known velocity and direction. After an introduction to the synchro-ballistic technique, this paper details two diverse applications of the technique as applied in the field of high-explosives research. In the first series of experiments detonation-front shape is recorded as the arriving detonation shock wave tilts an obliquely mounted mirror, causing reflected light to be deflected from the imaging lens. These tests were conducted for the purpose of calibrating and confirming the asymptotic Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) theory of Bdzil and Stewart. The phase velocities of the events range from ten to thirty millimeters per microsecond. Optical magnification is set for optimal use of the film`s spatial dimension and the phase velocity is adjusted to provide synchronization at the camera`s maximum writing speed. Initial calibration of the technique is undertaken using a cylindrical HE geometry over a range of charge diameters and of sufficient length-to-diameter ratio to insure a stable detonation wave. The final experiment utilizes an arc-shaped explosive charge, resulting in an asymmetric detonation-front record. The second series of experiments consists of photographing a shaped-charge jet having a velocity range of two to nine millimeters per microsecond. To accommodate the range of velocities it is necessary to fire several tests, each synchronized to a different section of the jet. The experimental apparatus consists of a vacuum chamber to preclude atmospheric ablation of the jet tip with shocked-argon back lighting to produce a shadow-graph image.

  9. Numerical study of nonequilibrium plasma assisted detonation initiation in detonation tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Siyin; Wang, Fang; Che, Xueke; Nie, Wansheng

    2016-12-01

    Nonequilibrium plasma has shown great merits in ignition and combustion nowadays, which should be especially useful for hypersonic propulsion. A coaxial electrodes configuration was established to investigate the effect of alternating current (AC) dielectric barrier discharge nonequilibrium plasma on the detonation initiation process in a hydrogen-oxygen mixture. A discharge simulation-combustion simulation loosely coupled method was used to simulate plasma assisted detonation initiation. First, the dielectric barrier discharge in the hydrogen-oxygen mixture driven by an AC voltage was simulated, which takes 17 kinds of particles (including positively charged particles, negatively charged particles, and neutral particles) and 47 reactions into account. The temporal and spatial characteristics of the discharge products were obtained. Then, the discharge products were incorporated into the combustion model of a detonation combustor as the initial conditions for the later detonation initiation simulation. Results showed that the number density distributions of plasma species are different in space and time, and develop highly nonuniformly from high voltage electrode to grounded electrode at certain times. All the active species reach their highest concentration at approximately 0.6T (T denotes a discharge cycle). Compared with the no plasma case, the differences of flowfield shape mainly appear in the early stage of the deflagration to detonation transition process. None of the sub-processes (including the very slow combustion, deflagration, over-driven detonation, detonation decay, and propagation of a self-sustained stable detonation wave) have been removed by the plasma. After the formation of a C-J detonation wave, the whole flowfield remains unchanged. With the help of plasma, the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) time and distance are reduced by about 11.6% and 12.9%, respectively, which should be attributed to the active particles effect of

  10. Partitioning of oxygen uptake and cost of surfacing during swimming in the air-breathing catfish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Sjannie; Wang, Tobias; Huong, Do Thi Thanh; Phuong, Nguyen Thanh; Bayley, Mark

    2013-02-01

    Though air-breathing has probably evolved mainly as a response to hypoxia, it may provide an important oxygen supplement when metabolism is elevated, as for example during swimming. Due to the increased travelling distance involved when an air-breathing fish swims to and from the surface, and the increased drag when the surface is breached, it can be proposed that air-breathing results in a rise in the apparent cost of transport. In order to investigate this hypothesis, it is necessary to use a fish that is able to swim equally well with and without access to air. The striped catfish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus has been shown to have a sufficiently high capacity for aquatic oxygen uptake in normoxia, to allow for such a comparison. Here, we measured the partitioning of oxygen uptake (MO2) during swimming and recovery, and calculated the apparent cost of transport with and without access to air, under normoxic conditions. Aerial MO2 constituted 25-40 % of the total MO2 during swimming and less than 15 % during recovery. The net cost of transport was 25 % lower in fish that did not air-breathe compared to fish that did, showing that the cost of surfacing can be substantial. This is the first study to measure partitioning in an air-breathing fish during swimming at velocities close to the critical swimming speed.

  11. Proton radiography of PBX 9502 detonation shock dynamics confinement sandwich test

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam, Tariq D; Jackson, Scott I; Morris, John S

    2009-01-01

    Recent results utilizing proton radiography (P-Rad) during the detonation of the high explosive PBX 9502 are presented. Specifically, the effects of confinement of the detonation are examined in the LANL detonation confinement sandwich geometry. The resulting detonation velocity and detonation shock shape are measured. In addition, proton radiography allows one to image the reflected shocks through the detonation products. Comparisons are made with detonation shock dynamics (DSD) and reactive flow models for the lead detonation shock and detonation velocity. In addition, predictions of reflected shocks are made with the reactive flow models.

  12. Restart of theory of air-breathing engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rester, Austin

    1992-07-01

    Expansion and compression ratios are treated as independent variables in the derivation of new equations for thermal efficiencies. A conceptual process of isentropic compression of exhaust gases to ambient conditions simplifies the equations for piston engines. Expansion is shown to govern thermal efficiency. A variable-process piston engine is introduced in this paper. Relative to 1/2 load conditions, this new engine is 25 percent more efficient than an Otto engine. Relative to full load, the new engine is 35 percent more powerful than a naturally-aspirated Otto engine. New energy-efficient gas turbines and turbo-jets which utilize pulse-combustion to maximize expansion of combustion gases are also introduced.

  13. Model of non-ideal detonation of condensed high explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, E. B.; Kostitsin, O. V.; Koval, A. V.; Akhlyustin, I. A.

    2016-11-01

    The Zeldovich-Neumann-Doering theory of ideal detonation allows one to describe adequately the detonation of charges with near-critical diameter. For smaller diameters, detonation velocity can differ significantly from an ideal value expected based on equilibrium chemical thermodynamics. This difference is quite evident when using non-ideal explosives; in certain cases, this value can be up to one third of ideal detonation velocity. Numerical simulation of these systems is a very labor-consuming process because one needs to compute the states inside the chemical reaction zone, as well as to obtain data on the equation of state of high-explosive detonation products mixture and on the velocity of chemical reaction; however, these characteristics are poorly studied today. For practical purposes, one can use the detonation shock dynamics model based on interrelation between local velocity of the front and its local curvature. This interrelation depends on both the equation of state of explosion products, and the reaction velocity; but the explicit definition of these characteristics is not needed. In this paper, experimental results are analyzed. They demonstrate interrelation between the local curvature of detonation front and the detonation velocity. Equation of detonation front shape is found. This equation allows us to predict detonation velocity and shape of detonation wave front in arbitrary geometry by integrating ordinary differential equation for the front shape with a boundary condition at the charge edge. The results confirm that the model of detonation shock dynamics can be used to describe detonation processes in non-ideal explosives.

  14. From combustion and detonation to nitrogen oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, M. F.; Kiverin, A. D.; Klumov, B. A.; Fortov, V. E.

    2014-03-01

    This paper looks at Ya B Zeldovich's ideas on the combustion and detonation physics of gaseous mixtures and how they evolved as work in this field progressed. The paper demonstrates the fundamental role of Zeldovich's concept of spontaneous combustion waves in studying transient initiation processes for various combustion regimes and in determining the energy and concentration inflammation limits for combustible gaseous mixtures. It shows how his notion that flame front stretching crucially influences flame acceleration in channels explains in a new way the deflagration-to-detonation transition in highly reactive gaseous mixtures. Most of the presented results were obtained by simulations, allowing Zeldovich's ideas to be extended to the combustion of real gaseous mixtures, where chemical reactions and gasdynamical flows add hugely to the complexity of the problem. The paper concludes by using Zeldovich's mechanism to assess the amount of nitrogen oxide produced by a lightning discharge.

  15. Detonation in shocked homogeneous high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Holmes, N.C.; Souers, P.C.

    1995-11-01

    We have studied shock-induced changes in homogeneous high explosives including nitromethane, tetranitromethane, and single crystals of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) by using fast time-resolved emission and Raman spectroscopy at a two-stage light-gas gun. The results reveal three distinct steps during which the homogeneous explosives chemically evolve to final detonation products. These are (1) the initiation of shock compressed high explosives after an induction period, (2) thermal explosion of shock-compressed and/or reacting materials, and (3) a decay to a steady-state representing a transition to the detonation of uncompressed high explosives. Based on a gray-body approximation, we have obtained the CJ temperatures: 3800 K for nitromethane, 2950 K for tetranitromethane, and 4100 K for PETN. We compare the data with various thermochemical equilibrium calculations. In this paper we will also show a preliminary result of single-shot time-resolved Raman spectroscopy applied to shock-compressed nitromethane.

  16. Detonation temperature of high explosives from structural parameters.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein

    2006-10-11

    A new scheme is introduced for calculating detonation temperature of different classes of high explosives. The ratio of oxygen to carbon and hydrogen to oxygen as well as specific structural parameters are the fundamental factors in the new method. An empirical new correlation is used to calculate detonation temperature of energetic compounds without considering heat contents of explosives and detonation products. Calculated detonation temperatures for both pure and explosive formulations show good agreement with respect to measured detonation temperatures and complicated computer code using BKWR and BKWS equations of state. Predicted detonation temperatures have root-mean-square (rms) percent deviation of 4.6, 14.2 and 4.6 from measured values for new method, BKWR and BKWS equations of state, respectively.

  17. Insensitive detonator apparatus for initiating large failure diameter explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, III, William Leroy

    2015-07-28

    A munition according to a preferred embodiment can include a detonator system having a detonator that is selectively coupled to a microwave source that functions to selectively prime, activate, initiate, and/or sensitize an insensitive explosive material for detonation. The preferred detonator can include an explosive cavity having a barrier within which an insensitive explosive material is disposed and a waveguide coupled to the explosive cavity. The preferred system can further include a microwave source coupled to the waveguide such that microwaves enter the explosive cavity and impinge on the insensitive explosive material to sensitize the explosive material for detonation. In use the preferred embodiments permit the deployment and use of munitions that are maintained in an insensitive state until the actual time of use, thereby substantially preventing unauthorized or unintended detonation thereof.

  18. DSD front models: nonideal explosive detonation in ANFO

    SciTech Connect

    Bdzil, J. B.; Aslam, T. D.; Catanach, R. A.; Hill, L. G.; Short, M.

    2002-01-01

    The DSD method for modeling propagating detonation is based on three elements: (1) a subscale theory of multi-dimensional detonation that treats the detonation as a front whose dynamics depends only on metrics of the front (such as curvature, etc.), (2) high-resolution, direct numerical simulation of detonation using Euler equation models, and (3) physical experiments to characterize multi-dimensional detonation propagation in real explosives and to provide data to calibrate DSD front models. In this paper, we describe our work on elements (1) and (3), develop a DSD calibration for the nonideal explosive ANFO and then demonstrate the utility of the ANFO calibration, with an example 3D detonation propagation calculation.

  19. Methods for proving the equivalency of detonator performance

    SciTech Connect

    Munger, Alan C; Akinci, Adrian A; Thomas, Keith A; Clarke, Steve A; Martin, Eric S; Murphy, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    One of the challenges facing engineers is developing newer, safer detonators that are equivalent to devices currently in use. There is no clear consensus on an exact method for drawing equivalence of detonators. This paper summarizes our current efforts to develop diagnostics addressing various aspects of detonator design to better quantify and prove equivalency. We consider various optical techniques to quantify the output pressure and output wave shape. The development of a unique interpretation of streak camera breakouts, known as the apparent center of initiation, will be discussed as a metric for detonation wave shape. Specific examples apply these techniques to the comparison of a new laser-driven detonator with an existing exploding bridgewire (EBW) detonator. Successes and short-comings of the techniques will be discussed.

  20. Dissolution of Composition B Detonation Residuals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    to U.S. Copyright. Publ. 2005 Am. Chem. Soc. VOL. 39, NO. 22, 2005 / ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY 9 8803 Published on Web 10/13/2005 Report...areas) adhering to a Comp B particle from a low-order detonation. 8804 9 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY / VOL. 39, NO. 22, 2005 well below their...2005 / ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY 9 8805 in the surface appearance. Wax initially used to coat the RDX crystals during manufacture may have

  1. Joining of tubes by gas detonation forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkouk, Vahid; Patil, Sandeep; Markert, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    For many applications, such as in structural components, it is required to join two tubes - sometimes with dissimilar material properties. Only few research studies have investigated the joining of tubular metallic components by means of high-velocity forming processes. In this paper, we present the novel process of joining of two tubes by a gas detonation pressure wave. In particular, the joining of a copper and a steel tube is discussed by means of a finite element study and a conducted experiment.

  2. Acute toxicity bioassays of mercuric chloride and malathion on air-breathing fish Channa punctatus (Bloch).

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sanjay; Kumar, Ravindra; Sharma, Shilpi; Nagpure, N S; Srivastava, Satish K; Verma, M S

    2005-05-01

    Acute toxicity tests (96 h) were conducted in flow-through systems to determine the lethal toxicity of a heavy metal compound, mercuric chloride, and an organophosphorus pesticide, malathion, to air-breathing teleost fish, Channa punctatus (Bloch) and to study their behavior. The 96-h LC50 values were determined, as well as safe levels. The results indicate that mercuric chloride is more toxic than malathion to the fish species under study. Dose- and dose-time-dependent increases in mortality rate were also observed in response to both test chemicals.

  3. Study of Forebody Injection and Mixing with Application to Hypervelocity Airbreathing Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axdahl, Erik; Kumar, Ajay; Wilhite, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The use of premixed, shock-induced combustion in the context of a hypervelocity, airbreathing vehicle requires effective injection and mixing of hydrogen fuel and air on the vehicle forebody. Three dimensional computational simulations of fuel injection and mixing from flush-wall and modified ramp and strut injectors are reported in this study. A well-established code, VULCAN, is used to conduct nonreacting, viscous, turbulent simulations on a flat plate at conditions relevant to a Mach 12 flight vehicle forebody. In comparing results of various fuel injection strategies, it is found that strut injection provides the greatest balance of performance between mixing efficiency and stream thrust potential.

  4. The QED engine spectrum - Fusion-electric propulsion for air-breathing to interstellar flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussard, Robert W.; Jameson, Lorin W.

    1993-01-01

    A new inertial-electrostatic-fusion direct electric power source can be used to drive a relativistic e-beam to heat propellant. The resulting system is shown to yield specific impulse and thrust/mass ratio 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than from other advanced propulsion concepts. This QED system can be applied to aerospace vehicles from air-breathing to near-interstellar flight. Examples are given for Earth/Mars flight missions, that show transit times of 40 d with 20 percent payload in single-stage vehicles.

  5. Aerodynamic characteristics of a series of single-inlet air-breathing missile configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, C.

    1983-01-01

    A series of air-breathing missile configurations was investigated to provide a data base for the design of such missiles. The model could be configured with either a single axisymmetric or a two dimensional inlet located at the bottom of the body. Two tail configurations were investigated: a tri-tail and an X-tail. The tail surfaces could be deflected to provide pitch control. A wing could be located above the inlet on the center line of the model. Tests were made at supersonic Mach numbers with the inlet open and internal flow, and at subsonic-transonic Mach numbers with the internal duct closed and no internal flow.

  6. Hypersonic airbreathing missile concepts under study at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. L.; Johnston, P. J.; Cubbage, J. M.; Dillon, J. L.; Richie, C. B.; Marcum, D. C., Jr.; Carlson, C. H.

    1982-01-01

    The design and performance of several tactical and strategic hypersonic airbreathing missile concepts under study at the NASA Langley Research Center are discussed from an evolutionary perspective. A mid- and chin inlet missile design, constrained to the Navy's vertical box launcher, was investigated; a performance comparison is presented that is favorable to the mid-inlet approach. Parasol wing, confined flow field, and spatula-like cruise missile configurations were examined with strategic applications in mind. The preliminary results are encouraging with respect to aerodynamic and volumetric efficiency and choice of engine integration schemes.

  7. Turbulent Mixing and Combustion for High-Speed Air-Breathing Propulsion Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-12

    AIR-BREATHING PROPULSION APPLICATIONS P . E. Dimotakis, Principal Investigator John K. Northrop Professor ofAeronautics and Professor of Applied Physics...performance of the device is the overall pressure coefficient, C = 2(pe- p )/(pU12), where pe and pi are the exit and inlet pressures, respectively. In...1 . O. 1 o-o p ) Fig. 6 Instantaneous passive scalar isosurfaces for a M, 0.5 top stream. 7 Fig. 7 Computed pressure coefficient on the top (solid line

  8. Cubic PdNP-based air-breathing cathodes integrated in glucose hybrid biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggion Junior, D.; Haddad, R.; Giroud, F.; Holzinger, M.; Maduro de Campos, C. E.; Acuña, J. J. S.; Domingos, J. B.; Cosnier, S.

    2016-05-01

    Cubic Pd nanoparticles (PdNPs) were synthesized using ascorbic acid as a reducing agent and were evaluated for the catalytic oxygen reduction reaction. PdNPs were confined with multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) dispersions to form black suspensions and these inks were dropcast onto glassy carbon electrodes. Different nanoparticle sizes were synthesized and investigated upon oxygen reduction capacities (onset potential and electrocatalytic current densities) under O2 saturated conditions at varying pH values. Strong evidence of O2 diffusion limitation was demonstrated. In order to overcome oxygen concentration and diffusion limitations in solution, we used a gas diffusion layer to create a PdNP-based air-breathing cathode, which delivered -1.5 mA cm-2 at 0.0 V with an onset potential of 0.4 V. This air-breathing cathode was combined with a specially designed phenanthrolinequinone/glucose dehydrogenase-based anode to form a complete glucose/O2 hybrid bio-fuel cell providing an open circuit voltage of 0.554 V and delivering a maximal power output of 184 +/- 21 μW cm-2 at 0.19 V and pH 7.0.Cubic Pd nanoparticles (PdNPs) were synthesized using ascorbic acid as a reducing agent and were evaluated for the catalytic oxygen reduction reaction. PdNPs were confined with multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) dispersions to form black suspensions and these inks were dropcast onto glassy carbon electrodes. Different nanoparticle sizes were synthesized and investigated upon oxygen reduction capacities (onset potential and electrocatalytic current densities) under O2 saturated conditions at varying pH values. Strong evidence of O2 diffusion limitation was demonstrated. In order to overcome oxygen concentration and diffusion limitations in solution, we used a gas diffusion layer to create a PdNP-based air-breathing cathode, which delivered -1.5 mA cm-2 at 0.0 V with an onset potential of 0.4 V. This air-breathing cathode was combined with a specially designed phenanthrolinequinone

  9. The Design of Future Airbreathing Engine Systems within an Intelligent Synthesis Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, J. B.; Housner, J. M.; Lytle, J. K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a new Initiative proposed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The purpose of this initiative is to develop a future design environment for engineering and science mission synthesis for use by NASA scientists and engineers. This new initiative is called the Intelligent Synthesis Environment (ISE). The paper describes the mission of NASA, future aerospace system characteristics, the current engineering design process, the ISE concept, and concludes with a description of possible ISE applications for the decision of air-breathing propulsion systems.

  10. Smooth blasting with the electronic delay detonator

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Masaaki; Ichijo, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Yoshiharu

    1995-12-31

    The authors utilized electronic detonators (EDs) to investigate the effect of high detonator delay accuracy on overbreak, remaining rock damage, and surface smoothness, in comparison with that of long-period delay detonators (0.25 sec interval) PDs. The experiments were conducted in a deep mine, in a test site region composed of very hard granodiorite with a seismic wave velocity of about 6.0 km/sec and a uniaxial compressive strength, uniaxial tensile strength, and Young`s modulus of 300 MPa, 12 MPa, and 73 GPa, respectively. The blasting design was for a test tunnel excavation of 8 m{sup 2} in cross section, with an advance per round of 2.5 m. Five rounds were performed, each with a large-hole cut and perimeter holes in a 0.4-m spacing charged with 20-mm-diameter water gel explosive to obtain low charge concentration. EDs were used in the holes on the perimeter of the right half, and PDs were used in all other holes. Following each shot, the cross section was measured by laser to determine amount of overbreak and surface smoothness. In situ seismic prospecting was used to estimate the depth of damage in the remaining rock, and the damage was further investigated by boring into both side walls.

  11. Detonation of Meta-stable Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, Allen; Kuhl, Allen L.; Fried, Laurence E.; Howard, W. Michael; Seizew, Michael R.; Bell, John B.; Beckner, Vincent; Grcar, Joseph F.

    2008-05-31

    We consider the energy accumulation in meta-stable clusters. This energy can be much larger than the typical chemical bond energy (~;;1 ev/atom). For example, polymeric nitrogen can accumulate 4 ev/atom in the N8 (fcc) structure, while helium can accumulate 9 ev/atom in the excited triplet state He2* . They release their energy by cluster fission: N8 -> 4N2 and He2* -> 2He. We study the locus of states in thermodynamic state space for the detonation of such meta-stable clusters. In particular, the equilibrium isentrope, starting at the Chapman-Jouguet state, and expanding down to 1 atmosphere was calculated with the Cheetah code. Large detonation pressures (3 and 16 Mbar), temperatures (12 and 34 kilo-K) and velocities (20 and 43 km/s) are a consequence of the large heats of detonation (6.6 and 50 kilo-cal/g) for nitrogen and helium clusters respectively. If such meta-stable clusters could be synthesized, they offer the potential for large increases in the energy density of materials.

  12. Characterizing detonator output using dynamic witness plates

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Michael John; Adrian, Ronald J

    2009-01-01

    A sub-microsecond, time-resolved micro-particle-image velocimetry (PIV) system is developed to investigate the output of explosive detonators. Detonator output is directed into a transparent solid that serves as a dynamic witness plate and instantaneous shock and material velocities are measured in a two-dimensional plane cutting through the shock wave as it propagates through the solid. For the case of unloaded initiators (e.g. exploding bridge wires, exploding foil initiators, etc.) the witness plate serves as a surrogate for the explosive material that would normally be detonated. The velocity-field measurements quantify the velocity of the shocked material and visualize the geometry of the shocked region. Furthermore, the time-evolution of the velocity-field can be measured at intervals as small as 10 ns using the PIV system. Current experimental results of unloaded exploding bridge wire output in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) witness plates demonstrate 20 MHz velocity-field sampling just 300 ns after initiation of the wire.

  13. Generation of high pressure and temperature by converging detonation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, V. P.; Shukla, S. K.

    1987-07-01

    Generation of high pressure and temperature has various applications in defense. Several techniques, viz flying plate method, collapsing of linear, convergence of detonation waves in solid explosives, have been established in this connection. In this paper, converging detonation waves in solid explosives, where variable heat of detonation is being added to the front, are studied by using Whitham's characteristics rule. Results are compared with those reported elsewhere.

  14. Detonation Parameters for Australian High-Explosives Composition,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    components are mixed in different proportions in Australia from those used overseas. The choice of explosive depends on its sensitivity during manufacture...analysis are detonation velocity, pressure , temperature and energy output. Their experimental measurement is usually slow and potentially hazardous...compared. Theoretical estimates of detonation parameters are based on suitable high- pressure equations-of-state for the gaseous detonation products. The 0

  15. Numerical Simulation of Detonation in Condensed Phase Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    available, which forces the explosive to detonate at the correct detonation velocity and pressure . A model for non-ideal explosives is also included. This...uses a three term reaction rate model developed for composite explosives, and a polytropic equation of state with a density dependent index. The code...transport by heat conduction, viscosity, and radiation is negligibly small compared with transport by motion. The pressures generated by the detonation of a

  16. Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition Control by Nanosecond Gas Discharges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-07

    Report 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 1 April 2007 - 18 August 09 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Deflagration-To- Detonation Transition Control By Nanosecond...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT During the current project, an extensive experimental study of detonation initiation by high{voltage...nanosecond gas discharges has been performed in a smooth detonation tube with different discharge chambers and various discharge cell numbers. The chambers

  17. Initiation of Orderly Spinning Detonation Waves via Phased Sparking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boening, Jacob A.

    A Continuous Rotating Detonation Engine (CRDE) was tested with two unique features. First, the conventional pre-detonator was replaced by a novel detonation wave generator. This generator sequentially fired spark plugs at a speed near the acoustic speed of a reactant gas mixture thereby producing free radicals ready to partake in detonation. The generator produced high speed detonation waves traveling with homogenous direction in gaseous mixtures of H2 and O2. Detonation waves continued to spin in a self-sustained fashion after turning off the wave generator. The number of simultaneous sparks did not influence the number of detonation waves observed. Instead the number of observed detonation waves was a strong function of the mass flow rate of reactants. Second, the fuel and oxidizer were injected radially. To avoid the thrust-area loss of conventional axial injection, all injection holes were oriented along the annulus radially, thereby allowing the high pressure to work over the entire front end area. Furthermore, radial injection modulated the mixing of fuel and oxidizer to adjust the axial location of detonation zones avoiding damage to the wave generator.

  18. Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Coatings with Incorporated Detonationally Generated Nanodiamonds

    SciTech Connect

    Pramatarova, L.; Pecheva, E.; Hikov, T.; Fingarova, D.; Dimitrova, R.; Spassov, T.; Krasteva, N.; Mitev, D.

    2010-01-21

    We studied the effect of the substrate chemistry on the morphology of hydroxyapatite-detonational nanodiamond composite coatings grown by a biomimetic approach (immersion in a supersaturated simulated body fluid). When detonational nanodiamond particles were added to the solution, the morphology of the grown for 2 h composite particles was porous but more compact then that of pure hydroxyapatite particles. The nanodiamond particles stimulated the hydroxyapatite growth with different morphology on the various substrates (Ti, Ti alloys, glasses, Si, opal). Biocompatibility assay with MG63 osteoblast cells revealed that the detonational nanodiamond water suspension with low and average concentration of the detonational nanodiamond powder is not toxic to living cells.

  19. Safety and performance enhancement circuit for primary explosive detonators

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Ronald W.

    2006-04-04

    A safety and performance enhancement arrangement for primary explosive detonators. This arrangement involves a circuit containing an energy storage capacitor and preset self-trigger to protect the primary explosive detonator from electrostatic discharge (ESD). The circuit does not discharge into the detonator until a sufficient level of charge is acquired on the capacitor. The circuit parameters are designed so that normal ESD environments cannot charge the protection circuit to a level to achieve discharge. When functioned, the performance of the detonator is also improved because of the close coupling of the stored energy.

  20. Numerical simulations of an oblique detonation wave engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc; Adelman, Henry; Menees, Gene P.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of the numerical methods employed in a code for the simulation of supersonic combustion, which is then applied to the simulation of attached detonations and flames associated with the oblique-detonation wave supersonic combustor concept. The addition of heat by a detonation wave results in a shorter combustor than can be obtained in more conventional scramjet designs. Pure oblique detonations have been produced in a stoichiometric, uniformly mixed hydrogen/air stream; the wave rotates upstream with energy release, according to simple analytical arguments. Flow visualization maps for Mach number and temperature are presented.

  1. A library of prompt detonation reaction zone data

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P. C., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    Tables are given listing literature data that allows calculation of sonic reaction zones at or near steady-state for promptly detonating explosive cylinders. The data covers homogeneous, heterogeneous, composite, inorganic and binary explosives and allows comparison across the entire explosive field. Table 1 lists detonation front curvatures. Table 2 lists Size Effect data, i.e. the change of detonation velocity with cylinder radius. Table 3 lists failure radii and detonation velocities. Table 4 lists explosive compositions. A total of 51 references dating back into the 1950`s are given. Calculated reaction zones, radii of curvature and growth rate coefficients are listed.

  2. Hazard classification assessment for the MC3423 detonator shipping package

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.B.

    1981-11-05

    An investigation was made to determine whether the MC3423 detonator should be assigned a DOT hazard classification of Detonating Fuze, Class C Explosive, per Federal Register 49 CFR 173.113, when packaged as specified. This study covers two propagation tests which evaluated the effects of two orientations of the MC3423 in its shipping tray. The method of testing was approved by DOE, Albuquerque Operations Office. Test data led to the recommended hazard classification of Detonating Fuze, Class C Explosive for both orientations of the detonator.

  3. Detonation shock dynamics calibration for non-ideal HE: ANFO

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Mark; Salyer, Terry R; Aslam, Tariq D; Kiyanda, Charles B; Morris, John S; Zimmerley, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Linear D{sub n}-{kappa} detonation shock dynamics (DSD) filling forms are obtained for four ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO) mixtures involving variations in the ammonium nitrate prill properties and ANFO stoichiometries. The detonation of ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO) mixtures is considered to be highly nonideal involving long reaction zones ({approx} several cms), low detonation energies and large failure diameters ({approx} 10s-100s cms). A number of experimental programs have been undertaken to understand ANFO detonation properties as a function of the AN properties [1]-[7]. Given the highly heterogeneous nature of ANFO mixtures (typical high explosive (HE) grade AN prills are porous with a range of diameters) a predictive reactive flow simulation of ANFO detonation will present significant challenges. At Los Alamos, a simulation capability has been developed for predicting the propagation of detonation in non-ideal HE and the work conducted on surrounding materials via a combination of a detonation shock dynamics (DSD) approach and a modified programmed burn method known as the pseudo-reaction-zone (or PRZ) method that accounts for the long detonation reaction zone. In the following, linear D{sub n}-{kappa} DSD fitting forms are obtained for four ammonium nitrate-fuel oil mixtures involving variation in the ammonium nitrate prill properties and ANFO stoichiometries. A detonation shock dynamics calibration for ANFO consisting of regular porous HE grade AN in a 94/6 wt.% AN to FO mix has been obtained in [7].

  4. The Detonation Mechanism of the Pulsationally Assisted Gravitationally Confined Detonation Model of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, G. C., IV; Graziani, C.; Fisher, R. T.; Townsley, D. M.; Meakin, C.; Weide, K.; Reid, L. B.; Norris, J.; Hudson, R.; Lamb, D. Q.

    2012-11-01

    We describe the detonation mechanism composing the "pulsationally assisted" gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) model of Type Ia supernovae. This model is analogous to the previous GCD model reported in Jordan et al.; however, the chosen initial conditions produce a substantively different detonation mechanism, resulting from a larger energy release during the deflagration phase. The resulting final kinetic energy and 56Ni yields conform better to observational values than is the case for the "classical" GCD models. In the present class of models, the ignition of a deflagration phase leads to a rising, burning plume of ash. The ash breaks out of the surface of the white dwarf, flows laterally around the star, and converges on the collision region at the antipodal point from where it broke out. The amount of energy released during the deflagration phase is enough to cause the star to rapidly expand, so that when the ash reaches the antipodal point, the surface density is too low to initiate a detonation. Instead, as the ash flows into the collision region (while mixing with surface fuel), the star reaches its maximally expanded state and then contracts. The stellar contraction acts to increase the density of the star, including the density in the collision region. This both raises the temperature and density of the fuel-ash mixture in the collision region and ultimately leads to thermodynamic conditions that are necessary for the Zel'dovich gradient mechanism to produce a detonation. We demonstrate feasibility of this scenario with three three-dimensional (3D), full star simulations of this model using the FLASH code. We characterized the simulations by the energy released during the deflagration phase, which ranged from 38% to 78% of the white dwarf's binding energy. We show that the necessary conditions for detonation are achieved in all three of the models.

  5. Derivation of Effective Resuspension Factors in Scenarios for Inhalation Exposure Involving Resuspension of Previously Deposited Fallout by Nuclear Detonations at Nevada Test Site

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-30

    ground zero where the thermal pulse that was produced in a detonation was an important cause of resuspension and 10−4 m−1 in the region farther from...ground zero where resuspension was caused only by the blast wave. These effective resuspension factors were determined mainly by the assumed...ground zero where thermal pulse was important cause of resuspension of surface soil and blast-wave region extending beyond region impacted by

  6. Numerical Study of Underwater Explosions and Following Bubble Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, A.; Katayama, M.; Murata, K.; Kato, Y.; Tanaka, K.

    2007-12-01

    Underwater explosions and following bubble pulses were simulated by using a hydrocode ANSYS® AUTODYN®. Effects of (a) pressure gradient depending on a water depth, (b) atmospheric pressure, (c) gravitational acceleration during bubble pulsation and (d) reaction process of non-ideal detonation on bubble pulsation phenomena were investigated numerically. Numerical bubble properties were compared with experimental data. Emulsion explosive of a charge weight 100 g was detonated at water depth of 4 m in an underwater explosion testing tank. These conditions (a), (b) and (d) could lead precise simulations of the bubble pulses consistent with the experimental data. The condition (c) could give bubble upward motion under its buoyancy effect.

  7. Power Reduction of the Air-Breathing Hall-Effect Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungrae

    Electric propulsion system is spotlighted as the next generation space propulsion system due to its benefits; one of them is specific impulse. While there are a lot of types in electric propulsion system, Hall-Effect Thruster, one of electric propulsion system, has higher thrust-to-power ratio and requires fewer power supplies for operation in comparison to other electric propulsion systems, which means it is optimal for long space voyage. The usual propellant for Hall-Effect Thruster is Xenon and it is used to be stored in the tank, which may increase the weight of the thruster. Therefore, one theory that uses the ambient air as a propellant has been proposed and it is introduced as Air-Breathing Hall-Effect Thruster. Referring to the analysis on Air-Breathing Hall-Effect Thruster, the goal of this paper is to reduce the power of the thruster so that it can be applied to real mission such as satellite orbit adjustment. To reduce the power of the thruster, two assumptions are considered. First one is changing the altitude for the operation, while another one is assuming the alpha value that is electron density to ambient air density. With assumptions above, the analysis was done and the results are represented. The power could be decreased to 10s˜1000s with the assumptions. However, some parameters that do not satisfy the expectation, which would be the question for future work, and it will be introduced at the end of the thesis.

  8. Survey of Aerothermodynamics Facilities Useful for the Design of Hypersonic Vehicles Using Air-Breathing Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Deiwert, G. S.

    1997-01-01

    The dream of producing an air-breathing, hydrogen fueled, hypervelocity aircraft has been before the aerospace community for decades. However, such a craft has not yet been realized, even in an experimental form. Despite the simplicity and beauty of the concept, many formidable problems must be overcome to make this dream a reality. This paper summarizes the aero/aerothermodynamic issues that must be addressed to make the dream a reality and discusses how aerothermodynamics facilities and their modem companion, real-gas computational fluid dynamics (CFD), can help solve the problems blocking the way to realizing the dream. The approach of the paper is first to outline the concept of an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle and then discuss the nose-to-tail aerothermodynamics issues and special aerodynamic problems that arise with such a craft. Then the utility of aerothermodynamic facilities and companion CFD analysis is illustrated by reviewing results from recent United States publications wherein these problems have been addressed. Papers selected for the discussion have k e n chosen such that the review will serve to survey important U.S. aero/aerothermodynamic real gas and conventional wind tunnel facilities that are useful in the study of hypersonic, hydrogen propelled hypervelocity vehicles.

  9. Affordable Flight Demonstration of the GTX Air-Breathing SSTO Vehicle Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivanek, Thomas M.; Roche, Joseph M.; Riehl, John P.; Kosareo, Daniel N.

    2002-01-01

    The rocket based combined cycle (RBCC) powered single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) reusable launch vehicle has the potential to significantly reduce the total cost per pound for orbital payload missions. To validate overall system performance, a flight demonstration must be performed. This paper presents an overview of the first phase of a flight demonstration program for the GTX SSTO vehicle concept. Phase 1 will validate the propulsion performance of the vehicle configuration over the supersonic and hypersonic airbreathing portions of the trajectory. The focus and goal of Phase 1 is to demonstrate the integration and performance of the propulsion system flowpath with the vehicle aerodynamics over the air-breathing trajectory. This demonstrator vehicle will have dual mode ramjet/scramjets, which include the inlet, combustor, and nozzle with geometrically scaled aerodynamic surface outer mold lines (OML) defining the forebody, boundary layer diverter, wings, and tail. The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate propulsion system performance and operability including the ram to scram transition, as well as to validate vehicle aerodynamics and propulsion airframe integration. To minimize overall risk and development cost the effort will incorporate proven materials, use existing turbomachinery in the propellant delivery systems, launch from an existing unmanned remote launch facility, and use basic vehicle recovery techniques to minimize control and landing requirements. A second phase would demonstrate propulsion performance across all critical portions of a space launch trajectory (lift off through transition to all-rocket) integrated with flight-like vehicle systems.

  10. Performance Validation Approach for the GTX Air-Breathing Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trefny, Charles J.; Roche, Joseph M.

    2002-01-01

    The primary objective of the GTX effort is to determine whether or not air-breathing propulsion can enable a launch vehicle to achieve orbit in a single stage. Structural weight, vehicle aerodynamics, and propulsion performance must be accurately known over the entire flight trajectory in order to make a credible assessment. Structural, aerodynamic, and propulsion parameters are strongly interdependent, which necessitates a system approach to design, evaluation, and optimization of a single-stage-to-orbit concept. The GTX reference vehicle serves this purpose, by allowing design, development, and validation of components and subsystems in a system context. The reference vehicle configuration (including propulsion) was carefully chosen so as to provide high potential for structural and volumetric efficiency, and to allow the high specific impulse of air-breathing propulsion cycles to be exploited. Minor evolution of the configuration has occurred as analytical and experimental results have become available. With this development process comes increasing validation of the weight and performance levels used in system performance determination. This paper presents an overview of the GTX reference vehicle and the approach to its performance validation. Subscale test rigs and numerical studies used to develop and validate component performance levels and unit structural weights are outlined. The sensitivity of the equivalent, effective specific impulse to key propulsion component efficiencies is presented. The role of flight demonstration in development and validation is discussed.

  11. Discrete approximations of detonation flows with structured detonation reaction zones by discontinuous front models: A program burn algorithm based on detonation shock dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bdzil, J.B.; Jackson, T.L.; Stewart, D.S.

    1999-02-02

    In the design of explosive systems the generic problem that one must consider is the propagation of a well-developed detonation wave sweeping through an explosive charge with a complex shape. At a given instant of time the lead detonation shock is a surface that occupies a region of the explosive and has a dimension that is characteristic of the explosive device, typically on the scale of meters. The detonation shock is powered by a detonation reaction zone, sitting immediately behind the shock, which is on the scale of 1 millimeter or less. Thus, the ratio of the reaction zone thickness to the device dimension is of the order of 1/1,000 or less. This scale disparity can lead to great difficulties in computing three-dimensional detonation dynamics. An attack on the dilemma for the computation of detonation systems has lead to the invention of sub-scale models for a propagating detonation front that they refer to herein as program burn models. The program burn model seeks not to resolve the fine scale of the reaction zone in the sense of a DNS simulation. The goal of a program burn simulation is to resolve the hydrodynamics in the inert product gases on a grid much coarser than that required to resolve a physical reaction zone. The authors first show that traditional program burn algorithms for detonation hydrocodes used for explosive design are inconsistent and yield incorrect shock dynamic behavior. To overcome these inconsistencies, they are developing a new class of program burn models based on detonation shock dynamic (DSD) theory. It is hoped that this new class will yield a consistent and robust algorithm which reflects the correct shock dynamic behavior.

  12. The delayed-detonation model of Type Ia supernovae. 2: The detonation phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, David; Livne, Eli

    1994-01-01

    The investigation, by use of two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamics simulations, of the 'delayed detonation' mechanism of Khokhlov for the explosion of Type Ia supernovae is continued. Previously we found that the deflagration is insufficient to unbind the star. Expansion shuts off the flame; much of this small production of iron group nuclei occurs at lower densities, which reduces the electron-capture problem. Because the degenerate star has an adiabatic exponent only slightly above 4/3, the energy released by deflagration drives a pulsation of large amplitude. During the first expansion phase, adiabatic cooling shuts off the burning, and a Rayleigh-Taylor instability then gives mixing of high-entropy ashes with low-entropy fuel. During the first contraction phase, compressional heating reignites the material. The burning was allowed to develop into a detonation in these nonspherical models. The detonation grows toward spherical symmetry at late times. At these densities (rho approx. 10(exp 7) to 10(exp 8) g cm(exp -3)), either Ni-56 or nuclei of the Si-Ca group are the dominant products of the burning. The bulk yields are sensitive to the density of the star when the transition to detonation occurs. The relevance of the abundances, velocities, mixing, and total energy release to the theory and interpretation of Type Ia supernovae is discussed.

  13. Aerospace applications of pulsed plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey

    2012-10-01

    The use of a thermal equilibrium plasma for combustion control dates back more than a hundred years to the advent of internal combustion (IC) engines and spark ignition systems. The same principles are still applied today to achieve high efficiency in various applications. Recently, the potential use of nonequilibrium plasma for ignition and combustion control has garnered increasing interest due to the possibility of plasma-assisted approaches for ignition and flame stabilization. During the past decade, significant progress has been made toward understanding the mechanisms of plasma chemistry interactions, energy redistribution and the nonequilibrium initiation of combustion. In addition, a wide variety of fuels have been examined using various types of discharge plasmas. Plasma application has been shown to provide additional combustion control, which is necessary for ultra-lean flames, high-speed flows, cold low-pressure conditions of high-altitude gas turbine engine (GTE) relight, detonation initiation in pulsed detonation engines (PDE) and distributed ignition control in homogeneous charge-compression ignition (HCCI) engines, among others. The present paper describes the current understanding of the nonequilibrium excitation of combustible mixtures by electrical discharges and plasma-assisted ignition and combustion. Nonequilibrium plasma demonstrates an ability to control ultra-lean, ultra-fast, low-temperature flames and appears to be an extremely promising technology for a wide range of applications, including aviation GTEs, piston engines, ramjets, scramjets and detonation initiation for pulsed detonation engines. To use nonequilibrium plasma for ignition and combustion in real energetic systems, one must understand the mechanisms of plasma-assisted ignition and combustion and be able to numerically simulate the discharge and combustion processes under various conditions.

  14. 33 CFR 154.820 - Fire, explosion, and detonation protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fire, explosion, and detonation... SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Vapor Control Systems § 154.820 Fire, explosion, and detonation protection. (a) A vapor control system with a...

  15. Unidirectional Propagation of Gas Detonations in Channels with Sawtooth Walls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-10

    1713. 6. S.M. Kogarko, On the possibility of detonation of gaseous mixtures in conical tubes. Izvestia Akad . Nauk SSSR , OKhN, 4 (1956) 419-426. 7. V.V...Mitrofanov, R.I. Soloukhin, The diffraction of multifront detonation waves. Sov. Phys. Dokl . 9 (1965) 1055-1058. 8. D.H. Edwards, G.O. Thomas, M.A

  16. Detonator Performance Characterization Using Multi-Frame Laser Schlieren Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. A.; Landon, C. D.; Murphy, M. J.; Martinez, M. E.; Mason, T. A.; Thomas, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    Several experiments that are part of a phased plan to understand the evolution of detonation in a detonator from initiation shock through run to detonation to full detonation to transition to booster and booster detonation will be presented. High speed laser schlieren movies have been used to study several explosive initiation events, such as exploding bridgewires (EBW), exploding foil initiators (EFI) (or slappers), direct optical initiation (DOI), and electrostatic discharge (ESD). Additionally, a series of tests have been performed on "cut-back" detonators with varying initial pressing (IP) heights. We have also used this diagnostic to visualize a range of EBW, EFI, and DOI full-up detonators. Future applications to other explosive events such as boosters and IHE booster evaluation will be discussed. The EPIC hydrodynamic code has been used to analyze the shock fronts from the schlieren images to reverse calculate likely boundary or initial conditions to determine the temporal-spatial pressure profile across the output face of the detonator. LA-UR-05099

  17. Modelling of detonation cellular structure in aluminium suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briand, A.; Veyssiere, B.; Khasainov, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    Heterogeneous detonations involving aluminium suspensions have been studied for many years for industrial safety policies, and for military and propulsion applications. Owing to their weak detonability and to the lack of available experimental results on the detonation cellular structure, numerical simulations provide a convenient way to improve the knowledge of such detonations. One major difficulty arising in numerical study of heterogeneous detonations involving suspensions of aluminium particles in oxidizing atmospheres is the modelling of aluminium combustion. Our previous two-step model provided results on the effect on the detonation cellular structure of particle diameter and characteristic chemical lengths. In this study, a hybrid model is incorporated in the numerical code EFAE, combining both kinetic and diffusion regimes in parallel. This more realistic model provides good agreement with the previous two-step model and confirms the correlations found between the detonation cell width, and particle diameter and characteristic lengths. Moreover, the linear dependence found between the detonation cell width and the induction length remains valid with the hybrid model.

  18. 33 CFR 154.820 - Fire, explosion, and detonation protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fire, explosion, and detonation protection. 154.820 Section 154.820 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Systems § 154.820 Fire, explosion, and detonation protection. (a) A vapor control system with a...

  19. Computation of a diverging Comp-B detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Bukiet, B.G.

    1989-01-01

    The expansion which occurs in diverging detonations weakens the wave and yields pressures and densities below those occurring in planar geometry. We study the problem of a spherically expanding detonation of Comp-B. The effect of varying the order of reaction as well as the rate law parameters (using an Arrhenius burn model) is studied. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Numerical Simulation of the Detonation Propagation in Silicon Carbide Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balagansky, Igor; Terechov, Anton

    2013-06-01

    Last years it was experimentally shown that in condensed high explosive charges (HE) placed in silicon carbide shell with sound velocity greater than the detonation velocity in HE, there may be observed interesting phenomena. Depending on the conditions, as an increase or decrease of the detonation velocity and pressure on the detonation front can be observed. There is also the distortion of the detonation front until the formation of a concave front. For a detailed explanation of the physical nature of the phenomenon we have provided numerical simulation of detonation wave propagation in Composition B HE charge, which was placed in silicon carbide shell. Modeling was performed with Ansys Autodyn in 2D-axis symmetry posting on an Eulerian mesh. Special attention was paid to selection of the parameters values in Lee-Tarver kinetic equation for HE and choice of constants to describe behavior of the ceramics. For comparison, also we have carried out the modeling of propagation of detonation in a completely similar assembly with brass shell. The simulation results agree well with the experimental data. In particular, in silicon carbide shell distortion of the detonation front was observed. A characteristic feature of the process is the pressure waves propagating in the direction of the axis of symmetry on the back surface of the detonation front.

  1. 29 CFR 1926.908 - Use of detonating cord.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... cord extending out of a bore hole or from a charge shall be cut from the supply spool before loading... methods. Knot-type or other cord-to-cord connections shall be made only with detonating cord in which the... kinks, or angles that direct the cord back toward the oncoming line of detonation. (g) All...

  2. 29 CFR 1926.908 - Use of detonating cord.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cord extending out of a bore hole or from a charge shall be cut from the supply spool before loading... methods. Knot-type or other cord-to-cord connections shall be made only with detonating cord in which the... kinks, or angles that direct the cord back toward the oncoming line of detonation. (g) All...

  3. Some Numerical Experiments on Detonation Wave Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of a series of numerical experiments done on the propagation and initiation of a detonation wave. The calculations are performed in one-dimension, with considerable grid resolution. Of particular interest are the following questions: (1) the nature of periodic and chaotic instabilities generated by the wave; (2) the influence of the grid resolution on these instabilities; (3) the influence of the 'quality' of the numerical scheme; and (4) the influence of 'noise'. In the calculations, we use a second-order Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) scheme as the basic numerical method, with grid spacings as low as a fraction of a micron. Detonations waves are generated at the closed end of a tube, and allowed to propagate for approximately 20 cm. The required energy for successful initiation of the detonation will be measured for different cases of grid resolution and numerical schemes. A modified version of the TVD scheme has also been devised, which allows for much lower numerical diffusion of the radical species in the exponentially growing region behind the shock. The effect of this modification will be demonstrated. Oscillations in peak pressure and induction length are seen to develop in some cases: the oscillations can go through a sequence of modes, from a regular, high frequency mode to a low frequency mode with period doubling. A chaotic regime can also be obtained. General conclusions on the quality of algorithms will be presented. We will also discuss the performance of a version of the code developed on the IBM SP2 parallel computer.

  4. Impact waves and detonation. Part I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R

    1929-01-01

    Among the numerous thermodynamic and kinetic problems that have arisen in the application of the gaseous explosive reaction as a source of power in the internal combustion engine, the problem of the mode or way by which the transformation proceeds and the rate at which the heat energy is delivered to the working fluid became very early in the engine's development a problem of prime importance. The work of Becker here given is a notable extension of earlier investigations, because it covers the entire range of the explosive reaction in gases - normal detonation and burning.

  5. Gaseous Detonation-Driven Fracture of Tubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    and crack speeds. The curved crack paths were digitized. The Chapman - Jouguet pressure, initial axial flaw length and torsion level were varied to...detonation velocity, strain history, blast pressure from the crack opening, and crack speeds. The curved crack paths were digitized. The Chapman - Jouguet ...compressibility m 2/N L initial notch length m M bending moment N-m P pressure N/m2 Pcj Chapman - Jouguet pressure N/m 2 Pinit Initial pressure N/m 2 R gas constant

  6. Shock-to-Detonation Transition simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-07-14

    Shock-to-detonation transition (SDT) experiments with embedded velocity gauges provide data that can be used for both calibration and validation of high explosive (HE) burn models. Typically, a series of experiments is performed for each HE in which the initial shock pressure is varied. Here we describe a methodology for automating a series of SDT simulations and comparing numerical tracer particle velocities with the experimental gauge data. Illustrative examples are shown for PBX 9502 using the HE models implemented in the xRage ASC code at LANL.

  7. Laser image recording on detonation nanodiamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheev, G. M.; Mikheev, K. G.; Mogileva, T. N.; Puzyr, A. P.; Bondar, V. S.

    2014-01-01

    A focused He - Ne laser beam is shown to cause local blackening of semitransparent detonation nanodiamond (DND) films at incident power densities above 600 W cm-2. Data obtained with a Raman spectrometer and low-power 632.8-nm laser source indicate that the blackening is accompanied by a decrease in broadband background luminescence and emergence of sharp Raman peaks corresponding to the structures of nanodiamond and sp2 carbon. The feasibility of image recording on DND films by a focused He - Ne laser beam is demonstrated.

  8. Detonation Reaction Zones in Condensed Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    2005-07-14

    Experimental measurements using nanosecond time resolved embedded gauges and laser interferometric techniques, combined with Non-Equilibrium Zeldovich--von Neumann--Doring (NEZND) theory and Ignition and Growth reactive flow hydrodynamic modeling, have revealed the average pressure/particle velocity states attained in reaction zones of self-sustaining detonation waves in several solid and liquid explosives. The time durations of these reaction zone processes is discussed for explosives based on pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), nitromethane, octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), triaminitrinitrobenzene(TATB) and trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  9. Energy Absorption Structure of Laser Supported Detonation Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Hatai, Keigo; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2010-05-01

    In Repetitive Pulsed (RP) laser propulsion, when the high energy laser beam is focused in the thruster, Laser Supported Detonation (LSD) wave is generated. This LSD wave converts the laser energy to the enthalpy of the blast wave, which will then apply impulse to the wall of the thruster. Therefore, the energy absorption structure and sustaining condition of LSD wave are important to be understood, which was still not clear though some visualized experiments have been conducted by Ushio et al. before. In this paper, 2-wavelength Mach-Zehnder interferometry is brought to investigate the electron density distribution of LSD area. At the same time, the temperature of the laser induced plasma is measured by an emission spectroscopy experiment, and calculated based on the assumption of local thermal equilibrium. The results show that in LSD, the electron density has a peak (as high as 2×1024[m-3]) behind the shock wave. The irradiated laser can be entirely absorbed before reaching the position of this peak. As a result, a new peak is always generating in front of the old one and this propagating has the same velocity as that of the blast wave. In this way, high heating ratio is sustained right after the shock front. However, as the laser pulse energy becomes lower, the propagating peak cannot catch up with the blast wave anymore, which leads to a termination of the LSD wave. From this study, it is found that for sustaining the LSD wave, a sufficiently thin laser absorption layer is necessary.

  10. On the Initiation Mechanism in Exploding Bridgewire and Laser Detonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. Scott; Thomas, Keith A.; Clarke, S.; Mallett, H.; Martin, E.; Martinez, M.; Munger, A.; Saenz, Juan

    2006-07-01

    Since its invention by Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project era the exploding bridgewire detonator (EBW) has seen tremendous use and study. Recent development of a laser-powered device with detonation properties similar to an EBW is reviving interest in the basic physics of the deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) process in both of these devices. Cutback experiments using both laser interferometry and streak camera observations are providing new insight into the initiation mechanism in EBWs. These measurements are being correlated to a DDT model of compaction to detonation and shock to detonation developed previously by Xu and Stewart. The DDT model is incorporated into a high-resolution, multi-material model code for simulating the complete process. Model formulation and the modeling issues required to describe the test data will be discussed.

  11. Embedded fiber optic Bragg grating (FBG) detonation velocity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benterou, Jerry; Bennett, Corey V.; Cole, Garrett; Hare, D. E.; May, Chadd; Udd, Eric; Mihailov, Stephen J.; Lu, Ping

    2009-05-01

    In order to fully calibrate hydrocodes and dynamic chemistry burn models, initiation models and detonation models of high explosives, the ability to continuously measure the detonation velocity within an explosive is required. Progress on an embedded velocity diagnostic using a 125 micron diameter optical fiber containing a chirped fiber Bragg grating is reported. As the chirped fiber Bragg grating is consumed by the moving detonation wave, the physical length of the unconsumed Bragg grating is monitored with a fast InGaAs photodiode. Experimental details of the associated equipment and data in the form of continuous detonation velocity records within PBX-9502 are presented. This small diameter fiber sensor has the potential to measure internal detonation velocities on the order of 10 mm/μsec along path lengths tens of millimeters long.

  12. Jaguar Procedures for Detonation Behavior of Explosives Containing Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiel, L. I.; Baker, E. L.; Capellos, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Jaguar product library was expanded to include boron and boron containing products by analysis of Available Hugoniot and static volumetric data to obtain constants of the Murnaghan relationships for the components. Experimental melting points were also utilized to obtain the constants of the volumetric relationships for liquid boron and boron oxide. Detonation velocities for HMX—boron mixtures calculated with these relationships using Jaguar are in closer agreement with literature values at high initial densities for inert (unreacted) boron than with the completely reacted metal. These results indicate that the boron does not react near the detonation front or that boron mixtures exhibit eigenvalue detonation behavior (as shown by some aluminized explosives), with higher detonation velocities at the initial points. Analyses of calorimetric measurements for RDX—boron mixtures indicate that at high boron contents the formation of side products, including boron nitride and boron carbide, inhibits the detonation properties of the formulation.

  13. Measuring In-Situ Mdf Velocity Of Detonation

    DOEpatents

    Horine, Frank M.; James, Jr., Forrest B.

    2005-10-25

    A system for determining the velocity of detonation of a mild detonation fuse mounted on the surface of a device includes placing the device in a predetermined position with respect to an apparatus that carries a couple of sensors that sense the passage of a detonation wave at first and second spaced locations along the fuse. The sensors operate a timer and the time and distance between the locations is used to determine the velocity of detonation. The sensors are preferably electrical contacts that are held spaced from but close to the fuse such that expansion of the fuse caused by detonation causes the fuse to touch the contact, causing an electrical signal to actuate the timer.

  14. Mid-infrared Laser Absorption Diagnostics for Detonation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spearrin, R. M.; Goldenstein, C. S.; Jeffries, J. B.; Hanson, R. K.

    Detonation-based engines represent a challenging application for diagnostics due to the wide range of thermodynamic conditions involved (T~500-3000 K, P~2-60 atm) and the short time scales of change (~10- 6 to 10- 4 sec) associated with such systems. Non-intrusive laser absorption diagnostics can provide high time-resolution and have been employed extensively in shock tube kinetics experiments (P~1-20 atm), offering high potential for application in detonation environments with modest utilization to date [1-4]. Limiting factors in designing effective tunable laser absorption sensors for detonation engines can be divided into two sets of challenges: high-pressure, high-temperature absorption spectroscopy and harsh thermo-mechanical environments. The present work, conducted in a high-pressure shock tube and operating detonation combustor, addresses both sets of difficulties, with the objective of developing time-resolved, in-situ temperature and concentration sensors for detonation studies.

  15. Light detonation wave in a cylindrical Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusupaliev, U.; Sysoev, N. N.; Shuteev, S. A.; Elenskii, V. G.

    2015-09-01

    A secondary compression wave previously observed by other researchers in a cylindrical Z-pinch has been identified in this work as a light detonation wave. It appears on the inner surface of a discharge chamber under the action of the intense ultraviolet radiation from a plasma pinch at the stage of its maximum compression. The condition of the light detonation wave has been determined experimentally. The dependence of its Mach number on a generalized dimensionless variable has been determined taking into account the conservation laws for the light detonation wave including the pressure of the gas, expenses on the formation of the surface plasma, and the energy of ionization of the gas involved in the wave. An analogy with the laser-supported detonation wave created by intense laser radiation has been revealed. The indicated dependence is within the error of measurement in agreement with the experimental data for light detonation waves created by both methods.

  16. Experimental Validation of Detonation Shock Dynamics in Condensed Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. Scott; Lambert, David E.; Yoo, Sunhee; Wescott, Bradley L.

    2005-07-01

    Experiments in the HMX-based, condensed explosive PBX-9501 were carried out to validate a reduced, asymptotically derived description of detonation shock dynamics (DSD) where it is assumed that the normal detonation shock speed is determined by the total shock curvature. The passover experiment has a lead disk embedded in a right circular cylindrical charge of PBX-9501 and is initiated from the bottom. A range of dynamic detonation states with both diverging (convex) and converging (concave) shock shapes are realized as the detonation shock passes over the disk. The time of arrival of the detonation shock at the top surface of the charge is recorded and compared against DSD simulation and direct multi-material simulation. A new wide-ranging equation of state (EOS) and rate law is used to describe the explosive and is employed in both theory and multi-material simulation. The experiment and theory and simulation are found to be in excellent agreement.

  17. Numerical analysis of thermonuclear detonation in dense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avronin, Y. N.; Bunatyan, A. A.; Gadzhiyev, A. D.; Mustafin, K. A.; Nurbakov, A. S.; Pisarev, V. N.; Feoktistov, L. P.; Frolov, V. D.; Shibarshov, L. I.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation of thermonuclear combustion from the region heated to thermonuclear temperatures by an external source to the remaining part of the target was investigated. The target was a tube of inert material (gold, lead, beryllium, etc.) filled with a deuterium-tritium mixture. It was determined analytically that thermonuclear combustion can propagate from a small portion of a nonspherical target to the remainder of the target and that a steady-state thermonuclear detonation wave can be formed. The role of various physical processes in thermonuclear detonation was investigated. Shock wave is the main mechanism underlying detonation propagation. The detonation rate and intensity of the thermonuclear reaction is influenced by the leakage of heat due to transvere heat conductivity. The critical diameter for thermonuclear detonation was determined approximately for a plasma filament encased in a housing with twice the density of the fuel.

  18. Numerical modeling of acoustic timescale detonation initiation using the Adaptive Wavelet-Collocation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regele, Jonathan D.

    Multi-dimensional numerical modeling of detonation initiation is the primary goal of this thesis. The particular scenario under examination is initiating a detonation wave through acoustic timescale thermal power deposition. Physically this would correspond to igniting a reactive mixture with a laser pulse as opposed to a typical electric spark. Numerous spatial and temporal scales are involved, which makes these problems computationally challenging to solve. In order to model these problems, a shock capturing scheme is developed that utilizes the computational efficiency of the Adaptive Wavelet-Collocation Method (AWCM) to properly handle the multiple scales involved. With this technique, previous one-dimensional problems with unphysically small activation energies are revisited and simulated with the AWCM. The results demonstrate a qualitative agreement with previous work that used a uniform grid MacCormack scheme. Both sets of data show the basic sequence of events that are needed in order for a DDT process to occur. Instead of starting with a strong shock-coupled reaction zone as many other studies have done, the initial pulse is weak enough to allow the shock and the reaction zone to decouple. Reflected compression waves generated by the inertially confined reaction zone lead to localized reaction centers, which eventually explode and further accelerate the process. A shock-coupled reaction zone forms an initially overdriven detonation, which relaxes to a steady CJ wave. The one-dimensional problems are extended to two dimensions using a circular heat deposition in a channel. Two-dimensional results demonstrate the same sequence of events, which suggests that the concepts developed in the original one-dimensional work are applicable to multiple dimensions.

  19. Detonation characteristics of dimethyl ether and ethanol-air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakow, P.; Cross, M.; Ciccarelli, G.

    2015-05-01

    The detonation cell structure in dimethyl ether vapor and ethanol vapor-air mixtures was measured at atmospheric pressure and initial temperatures in the range of 293-373 K. Tests were carried out in a 6.2-m-long, 10-cm inner diameter tube. For more reactive mixtures, a series of orifice plates were used to promote deflagration-to-detonation transition in the first half of the tube. For less reactive mixtures prompt detonation initiation was achieved with an acetylene-oxygen driver. The soot foil technique was used to capture the detonation cell structure. The measured cell size was compared to the calculated one-dimensional detonation reaction zone length. For fuel-rich dimethyl ether mixtures the calculated reaction zone is highlighted by a temperature gradient profile with two maxima, i.e., double heat release. The detonation cell structure was interpreted as having two characteristic sizes over the full range of mixture compositions. For mixtures at the detonation propagation limits the large cellular structure approached a single-head spin, and the smaller cells approached the size of the tube diameter. There is little evidence to support the idea that the two cell sizes observed on the foils are related to the double heat release predicted for the rich mixtures. There was very little influence of initial temperature on the cell size over the temperature range investigated. A double heat release zone was not predicted for ethanol-air detonations. The detonation cell size for stoichiometric ethanol-air was found to be similar to the size of the small cells for dimethyl ether. The measured cell size for ethanol-air did not vary much with composition in the range of 30-40 mm. For mixtures near stoichiometric it was difficult to discern multiple cell sizes. However, near the detonation limits there was strong evidence of a larger cell structure similar to that observed in dimethyl ether air mixtures.

  20. Bonfire-safe low-voltage detonator

    DOEpatents

    Lieberman, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    A column of explosive in a low-voltage detonator which makes it bonfire-safe includes a first layer of an explosive charge of CP, or a primary explosive, and a second layer of a secondary organic explosive charge, such as PETN, which has a degradation temperature lower than the autoignition temperature of the CP or primary explosives. The first layer is composed of a pair of increments disposed in a bore of a housing of the detonator in an ignition region of the explosive column and adjacent to and in contact with an electrical ignition device at one end of the bore. The second layer is composed of a plurality of increments disposed in the housing bore in a transition region of the explosive column next to and in contact with the first layer on a side opposite from the ignition device. The first layer is loaded under a sufficient high pressure, 25 to 40 kpsi, to achieve ignition, whereas the second layer is loaded under a sufficient low pressure, about 10 kpsi, to allow occurrence of DDT. Each increment of the first and second layers has an axial length-to-diameter ratio of one-half. 2 figs.

  1. Bonfire-safe low-voltage detonator

    DOEpatents

    Lieberman, Morton L.

    1990-01-01

    A column of explosive in a low-voltage detonator which makes it bonfire-safe includes a first layer of an explosive charge of CP, or a primary explosive, and a second layer of a secondary organic explosive charge, such as PETN, which has a degradation temperature lower than the autoignition temperature of the CP or primary explosives. The first layer is composed of a pair of increments disposed in a bore of a housing of the detonator in an ignition region of the explosive column and adjacent to and in contact with an electrical ignition device at one end of the bore. The second layer is composed of a plurality of increments disposed in the housing bore in a transition region of the explosive column next to and in contact with the first layer on a side opposite from the ignition device. The first layer is loaded under a sufficient high pressure, 25 to 40 kpsi, to achieve ignition, whereas the second layer is loaded under a sufficient low pressure, about 10 kpsi, to allow occurrence of DDT. Each increment of the first and second layers has an axial length-to-diameter ratio of one-half.

  2. Spark-safe low-voltage detonator

    DOEpatents

    Lieberman, Morton L.

    1989-01-01

    A column of explosive in a low-voltage detonator which makes it spark-safe ncludes an organic secondary explosive charge of HMX in the form of a thin pad disposed in a bore of a housing of the detonator in an ignition region of the explosive column and adjacent to an electrical ignition device at one end of the bore. The pad of secondary charge has an axial thickness within the range of twenty to thirty percent of its diameter. The explosive column also includes a first explosive charge of CP disposed in the housing bore in the ignition region of the explosive column next to the secondary charge pad on a side opposite from the ignition device. The first CP charge is loaded under sufficient pressure, 25 to 40 kpsi, to provide mechanical confinement of the pad of secondary charge and physical coupling thereof with the ignition device. The explosive column further includes a second explosive charge of CP disposed in the housing bore in a transition region of the explosive column next to the first CP charge on a side opposite from the pad of secondary charge. The second CP charge is loaded under sufficient pressure, about 10 kpsi, to allow occurrence of DDT. The first explosive CP charge has an axial thickness within the range of twenty to thirty percent of its diameter, whereas the second explosive CP charge contains a series of increments (nominally 4) each of which has an axial thickness-to-diameter ratio of one to two.

  3. Unique passive diagnostic for slapper detonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brigham, William P.; Schwartz, John J.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to find a material and configuration that could reliably detect the proper functioning of a slapper (non-explosive) detonator. Because of the small size of the slapper geometry (on the order of a 15 mils), most diagnostic techniques are not suitable. This program has the additional requirements that the device would be used on centrifuge so that it could not use any electrical power or output signals. This required that the diagnostic be completely passive. The paper describes the three facets of the development effort: complete characterization of the slapper using VISAR measurements, selection of the diagnostic material and configuration, and testing of the prototype designs. The VISAR testing required that use of a special optical probe to allow the laser light to reach both bridges of the dual-slapper detonator. Results are given in the form of flyer velocity as a function of the initiating charge voltage level. The selected diagnostic design functions in a manner similar to a dent block except that the impact of the Kapton disk from a properly-functioning slapper causes a fracture pattern. A quick visual inspection is all that is needed to determine if the flyer velocity exceeded the threshold value. Sub-threshold velocities produce a substantially different appearance.

  4. The dynamics of unsteady detonation in ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam, Tariq D; Powers, Joseph M

    2008-01-01

    An ultra-fine, sub-micron discrete grid is used to capture the unsteady dynamics of a one-dimensional detonation in an inviscid O - O{sub 2} - O{sub 3} mixture. The ultra-fine grid is necessary to capture the length scales revealed by a complementary analysis of the steady detonation wave structure. For the unsteady calculations, shock-fitting coupled with a high order spatio-temporal discretization scheme combine to render numerical corruption negligible. As a result, mathematically verified solutions for a mixture initially of all O{sub 3} at one atmosphere and 298.15 K have been obtained; the solutions are converging at a rate much faster than the sub-first order convergence rate of all shock-capturing schemes. Additionally, the model has been validated against limited experimental data. Transient calculations show that strongly overdriven waves are stable and moderately overdriven waves unstable. New limit cycle behavior is revealed, and the first high resolution bifurcation diagram for etonation with detailed kinetics is found.

  5. Utilizing Near-IR Tunable Laser Absorption Spectroscopy to Study Detonation and Combustion Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    A Hencken burner, Rotating Detonation Engine (RDE), and a detonation tube were studied using a Time-Devision Multiplexed Tunable Diode Laser...3 2.1 Rotating Detonation Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.1.1 Previous & Current...Laboratory RDE Rotating Detonation Engine RMS Root Mean Square RMSE Root Mean Square Error TC Temperature Controller TEC Thermal Electric Cooler TDLAS

  6. Hypersonic propulsion flight tests as essential to air-breathing aerospace plane development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, U.

    1995-01-01

    Hypersonic air-breathing propulsion utilizing scramjets can fundamentally change transatmospheric acclerators for transportation from low Earth orbits (LEOs). The value and limitations of ground tests, of flight tests, and of computations are presented, and scramjet development requirements are discussed. Near-full-scale hypersonic propulsion flight tests are essential for developing a prototype hypersonic propulsion system and for developing computation-design technology that can be used in designing that system. In order to determine how these objectives should be achieved, some lessons learned from past programs are presented. A conceptual two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) prototype/experimental aerospace plane is recommended as a means of providing access-to-space and for conducting flight tests. A road map for achieving these objectives is also presented.

  7. Air-breathing aerospace plane development essential: Hypersonic propulsion flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.

    1995-01-01

    Hypersonic airbreathing propulsion utilizing scramjets can change transatmospheric accelerators for low earth-to-orbit and return transportation. The value and limitation of ground tests, of flight tests, and of computations are presented, and scramjet development requirements are discussed. It is proposed that near full-scale hypersonic propulsion flight tests are essential for developing computational design technology so that it can be used for designing this system. In order to determine how these objectives should be achieved, some lessons learned from past programs are presented. A conceptual two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) prototype/experimental aerospace plane is recommended as a means of providing access-to-space and for conducting flight tests.

  8. Ascent performance of an air-breathing horizontal-takeoff launch vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Richard W.; Shaughnessy, John D.; Cruz, Christopher I.; Naftel, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    Simulations are conducted to investigate a proposed NASA launch vehicle that is fully reusable, takes off horizontally, and uses airbreathing propulsion in a single stage. The propulsion model is based on a cycle analysis method, and the vehicle is assumed to be a rigid structure with distributed fuel, operating under a range of atmospheric conditions. The program to optimize simulated trajectories (POST) is modified to include a predictor-corrector guidance capability and then used to generate the trajectories. Significant errors are encountered during the unpowered coast phase due to uncertainty in the atmospheric density profile. The amount of ascent propellant needed is shown to be directly related to the thrust-vector angle and the location of the center of gravity of the vehicle because of the importance of aim-drag losses to total ideal velocity.

  9. Multi-Disciplinary Design Optimization of Hypersonic Air-Breathing Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Peng; Tang, Zhili; Sheng, Jianda

    2016-06-01

    A 2D hypersonic vehicle shape with an idealized scramjet is designed at a cruise regime: Mach number (Ma) = 8.0, Angle of attack (AOA) = 0 deg and altitude (H) = 30kms. Then a multi-objective design optimization of the 2D vehicle is carried out by using a Pareto Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGA-II). In the optimization process, the flow around the air-breathing vehicle is simulated by inviscid Euler equations using FLUENT software and the combustion in the combustor is modeled by a methodology based on the well known combination effects of area-varying pipe flow and heat transfer pipe flow. Optimization results reveal tradeoffs among total pressure recovery coefficient of forebody, lift to drag ratio of vehicle, specific impulse of scramjet engine and the maximum temperature on the surface of vehicle.

  10. Planar array stack design aided by rapid prototyping in development of air-breathing PEMFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen-Yu; Lai, Wei-Hsiang; Weng, Biing-Jyh; Chuang, Huey-Jan; Hsieh, Ching-Yuan; Kung, Chien-Chih

    The polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is one of the most important research topics in the new and clean energy area. The middle or high power PEMFCs can be applied to the transportation or the distributed power system. But for the small power application, it is needed to match the power requirement of the product generally. On the other hand, the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is one of the most common type that researchers are interested in, but recently the miniature or the micro-PEMFCs attract more attention due to their advantages of high open circuit voltage and high power density. The objective of this study is to develop a new air-breathing planar array fuel cell stacked from 10 cells made by rapid prototyping technology which has potential for fast commercial design, low cost manufacturing, and even without converters/inverters for the system. In this paper, the main material of flow field plates is acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) which allows the fuel cell be mass-manufactured by plastic injection molding technology. The rapid prototyping technology is applied to construct the prototype and verify the practicability of the proposed stack design. A 10-cell air-breathing miniature PEMFC stack with a volume of 6 cm × 6 cm × 0.9 cm is developed and tested. Its segmented membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is designed with the active surface area of 1.3 cm × 1.3 cm in each individual MEA. The platinum loading at anode and cathode are 0.2 mg cm -2 and 0.4 mg cm -2, respectively. Results show that the peak power densities of the parallel connected and serial connected stack are 99 mW cm -2 at 0.425 V and 92 mW cm -2 at 4.25 V, respectively under the conditions of 70 °C relative saturated humidity (i.e., dew point temperature), ambient temperature and free convection air. Besides, the stack performance is increased under forced convection. If the cell surface air is blown by an electric fan, the peak power densities of parallel connected and

  11. Analysis of possible improvement of acceleration of a high-velocity air-breathing flying vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goonko, Yu. P.; Mazhul, I. I.

    2008-09-01

    Results of parametric calculations of the total aeropropulsive characteristics and characteristics of acceleration of a small-scale high-velocity flying vehicle with an air-breathing engine are presented. Integral parameters of acceleration from the flight Mach number M∞ = 4 to M∞ = 7 are determined, namely, the time required fuel stock, and range. A schematic configuration of the vehicle is considered, which allows studying the basic parameters, such as the forebody shape, the angles of surfaces of compression of the stream captured by the inlet, angles of external aerodynamic surfaces of the airframe, relative planform area of the wing panels, and relative area of the nozzle cross section. A comparative estimate of the effect of these parameters shows that it is possible to improve the characteristics of acceleration of vehicles of the type considered.

  12. Robust tracking control for an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle with input constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Gang; Wang, Jinzhi; Wang, Xianghua

    2014-12-01

    The focus of this paper is on the design and simulation of robust tracking control for an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle (AHV), which is affected by high nonlinearity, uncertain parameters and input constraints. The linearisation method is employed for the longitudinal AHV model about a specific trim condition, and then considering the additive uncertainties of three parameters, the linearised model is just in the form of affine parameter dependence. From this point, the linear parameter-varying method is applied to design the desired controller. The poles for the closed-loop system of the linearised model are placed into a desired vertical strip, and the quadratic stability of the closed-loop system is guaranteed. Input constraints of the AHV are addressed by additional linear matrix inequalities. Finally, the designed controller is evaluated on the nonlinear AHV model and simulation results demonstrate excellent tracking performance with good robustness.

  13. Water management in a planar air-breathing fuel cell array using operando neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coz, E.; Théry, J.; Boillat, P.; Faucheux, V.; Alincant, D.; Capron, P.; Gébel, G.

    2016-11-01

    Operando Neutron imaging is used for the investigation of a planar air-breathing array comprising multiple cells in series. The fuel cell demonstrates a stable power density level of 150 mW/cm2. Water distribution and quantification is carried out at different operating points. Drying at high current density is observed and correlated to self-heating and natural convection. Working in dead-end mode, water accumulation at lower current density is largely observed on the anode side. However, flooding mechanisms are found to begin with water condensation on the cathode side, leading to back-diffusion and anodic flooding. Specific in-plane and through-plane water distribution is observed and linked to the planar array design.

  14. Continuous high order sliding mode controller design for a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Zong, Qun; Su, Rui; Tian, Bailing

    2014-05-01

    This paper investigates the problem of tracking control with uncertainties for a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle (FAHV). In order to overcome the analytical intractability of this model, an Input-Output linearization model is constructed for the purpose of feedback control design. Then, the continuous finite time convergence high order sliding mode controller is designed for the Input-Output linearization model without uncertainties. In addition, a nonlinear disturbance observer is applied to estimate the uncertainties in order to compensate the controller and disturbance suppression, where disturbance observer and controller synthesis design is obtained. Finally, the synthesis of controller and disturbance observer is used to achieve the tracking for the velocity and altitude of the FAHV and simulations are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the control strategies.

  15. Air-breathing aerospace plane development essential: Hypersonic propulsion flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.

    1994-01-01

    Hypersonic air-breathing propulsion utilizing scramjets can fundamentally change transatmospheric accelerators for low earth-to-orbit and return transportation. The value and limitations of ground tests, of flight tests, and of computations are presented, and scramjet development requirements are discussed. It is proposed that near full-scale hypersonic propulsion flight tests are essential for developing a prototype hypersonic propulsion system and for developing computational-design technology so that it can be used for designing this system. In order to determine how these objectives should be achieved, some lessons learned from past programs are presented. A conceptual two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) prototype/experimental aerospace plane is recommended as a means of providing access-to-space and for conducting flight tests. A road map for achieving these objectives is also presented.

  16. Influence of copper treatment on the immune response in an air-breathing teleost, Saccobranchus fossilis

    SciTech Connect

    Khangarot, B.S.; Ray, P.K.; Singh, K.P.

    1988-08-01

    The introduction of small amounts of copper ions from natural and anthropogenic sources into the aquatic environment causes multiple changes in freshwater organisms, even at non-lethal levels. Exposure of mammalian test animals to heavy metals, even at moderate levels of contract, may alter the immunological responses. Therefore, there is an increasing interest in the use of the immune systems as a target organ for detecting toxicity of environmental pollutants. The fish immune system is well defined and has many sensitive parameters whose alteration, as a result of pollutant exposure, are easily determined. The effect of copper on the fish immune system is of particular interest since it is known that chronic treatment of copper decreases resistance of the blue gourami (Trichogaster trichopterus) to virus and bacterial (Roales and Perlmutter 1977). The purpose of this study was to determine if sublethal doses of copper would alter the immune response of the air-breathing fish, Saccobranchus fossilis.

  17. Air-Breathing Hypersonic Vehicle Tracking Control Based on Adaptive Dynamic Programming.

    PubMed

    Mu, Chaoxu; Ni, Zhen; Sun, Changyin; He, Haibo

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a data-driven supplementary control approach with adaptive learning capability for air-breathing hypersonic vehicle tracking control based on action-dependent heuristic dynamic programming (ADHDP). The control action is generated by the combination of sliding mode control (SMC) and the ADHDP controller to track the desired velocity and the desired altitude. In particular, the ADHDP controller observes the differences between the actual velocity/altitude and the desired velocity/altitude, and then provides a supplementary control action accordingly. The ADHDP controller does not rely on the accurate mathematical model function and is data driven. Meanwhile, it is capable to adjust its parameters online over time under various working conditions, which is very suitable for hypersonic vehicle system with parameter uncertainties and disturbances. We verify the adaptive supplementary control approach versus the traditional SMC in the cruising flight, and provide three simulation studies to illustrate the improved performance with the proposed approach.

  18. Geometry Modeling and Adaptive Control of Air-Breathing Hypersonic Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vick, Tyler Joseph

    Air-breathing hypersonic vehicles have the potential to provide global reach and affordable access to space. Recent technological advancements have made scramjet-powered flight achievable, as evidenced by the successes of the X-43A and X-51A flight test programs over the last decade. Air-breathing hypersonic vehicles present unique modeling and control challenges in large part due to the fact that scramjet propulsion systems are highly integrated into the airframe, resulting in strongly coupled and often unstable dynamics. Additionally, the extreme flight conditions and inability to test fully integrated vehicle systems larger than X-51 before flight leads to inherent uncertainty in hypersonic flight. This thesis presents a means to design vehicle geometries, simulate vehicle dynamics, and develop and analyze control systems for hypersonic vehicles. First, a software tool for generating three-dimensional watertight vehicle surface meshes from simple design parameters is developed. These surface meshes are compatible with existing vehicle analysis tools, with which databases of aerodynamic and propulsive forces and moments can be constructed. A six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear dynamics simulation model which incorporates this data is presented. Inner-loop longitudinal and lateral control systems are designed and analyzed utilizing the simulation model. The first is an output feedback proportional-integral linear controller designed using linear quadratic regulator techniques. The second is a model reference adaptive controller (MRAC) which augments this baseline linear controller with an adaptive element. The performance and robustness of each controller are analyzed through simulated time responses to angle-of-attack and bank angle commands, while various uncertainties are introduced. The MRAC architecture enables the controller to adapt in a nonlinear fashion to deviations from the desired response, allowing for improved tracking performance, stability, and

  19. Cascade Optimization Strategy for Aircraft and Air-Breathing Propulsion System Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Lavelle, Thomas M.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Coroneos, Rula M.

    1996-01-01

    Design optimization for subsonic and supersonic aircraft and for air-breathing propulsion engine concepts has been accomplished by soft-coupling the Flight Optimization System (FLOPS) and the NASA Engine Performance Program analyzer (NEPP), to the NASA Lewis multidisciplinary optimization tool COMETBOARDS. Aircraft and engine design problems, with their associated constraints and design variables, were cast as nonlinear optimization problems with aircraft weight and engine thrust as the respective merit functions. Because of the diversity of constraint types and the overall distortion of the design space, the most reliable single optimization algorithm available in COMETBOARDS could not produce a satisfactory feasible optimum solution. Some of COMETBOARDS' unique features, which include a cascade strategy, variable and constraint formulations, and scaling devised especially for difficult multidisciplinary applications, successfully optimized the performance of both aircraft and engines. The cascade method has two principal steps: In the first, the solution initiates from a user-specified design and optimizer, in the second, the optimum design obtained in the first step with some random perturbation is used to begin the next specified optimizer. The second step is repeated for a specified sequence of optimizers or until a successful solution of the problem is achieved. A successful solution should satisfy the specified convergence criteria and have several active constraints but no violated constraints. The cascade strategy available in the combined COMETBOARDS, FLOPS, and NEPP design tool converges to the same global optimum solution even when it starts from different design points. This reliable and robust design tool eliminates manual intervention in the design of aircraft and of air-breathing propulsion engines where it eases the cycle analysis procedures. The combined code is also much easier to use, which is an added benefit. This paper describes COMETBOARDS

  20. On the Initiation Mechanism in Exploding Bridgewire and Laser Detonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. Scott; Thomas, K.; Saenz, J.

    2005-07-01

    Since its invention by Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project era the exploding bridgewire detonator (EBW) has seen tremendous use and study. Recent development of a laser-powered device with detonation properties similar to an EBW is reviving interest in the basic physics of the Deflagration-to-Detonation (DDT) process in both of these devices,[1]. Cutback experiments using both laser interferometry and streak camera observations are providing new insight into the initiation mechanism in EBWs. These measurements are being correlated to a DDT model of compaction to detonation and shock to detonation developed previously by Xu and Stewart, [2]. The DDT model is incorporated into a high-resolution, multi-material model code for simulating the complete process. Model formulation and predictions against the test data will be discussed. REFS. [1] A. Munger, J. Kennedy, A. Akinci, and K. Thomas, "Dev. of a Laser Detonator" 30th Int. Pyrotechnics Seminar, Fort Collins, CO, (2004). [2] Xu, S. and Stewart, D. S. Deflagration to detonation transition in porous energetic materials: A model study. J. Eng. Math., 31, 143-172 (1997)

  1. Optimum Performance of Explosives in a Quasistatic Detonation Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Ernest; Stiel, Leonard

    2015-06-01

    Analyses were conducted on the behavior of explosives in a quasistatic detonation cycle. This type of cycle has been proposed for the determination of the maximum work that can be performed by the explosive. The Jaguar thermochemical equilibrium program enabled the direct analyses of explosive performance at the various steps in the detonation cycle. In all cases the explosive is initially detonated to a point on the Hugoniot curve for the reaction products. The maximum work that can be obtained from the explosive is equal to the P-V work on the isentrope for expansion after detonation to atmosperic pressure, minus one-half the square of the particle velocity at the detonation point. This quantity is calculated form the internal energy of the explosive at the initial and final atmospheric temperatures. Cycle efficiencies (net work/ heat added) are also calculated with these procedures. For several explosives including TNT RDX, and aluminized compositions, maximum work effects. were established through the Jaguar calculations for Hugoniot points corresponding to C-J, overdriven, underdriven and constant volume detonations. As expected, detonation to the C-J point is found to result in the maximum net work in all cases.

  2. Optimum performance of explosives in a quasistatic detonation cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Ernest L.; Stiel, Leonard I.

    2017-01-01

    Analyses were conducted on the behavior of explosives in a quasistatic detonation cycle. This type of cycle has been proposed for the determination of the maximum work that can be performed by the explosive. The Jaguar thermochemical equilibrium program enabled the direct analyses of explosive performance at the various steps in the detonation cycle. In all cases the explosive is initially detonated to a point on the Hugoniot curve for the reaction products. The maximum useful work that can be obtained from the explosive is equal to the P-V work on the isentrope for expansion after detonation to atmospheric pressure, minus one-half the square of the particle velocity at the detonation point. This quantity is calculated form the internal energy of the explosive at the initial and final atmospheric temperatures. Cycle efficiencies (net work/ heat added) are also calculated with these procedures. For several explosives including TNT, RDX, and aluminized compositions, maximum work effects were established through the Jaguar calculations for Hugoniot points corresponding to C-J, overdriven, underdriven and constant volume detonations. Detonation to the C-J point is found to result in the maximum net work in all cases.

  3. Effect of fuel stratification on detonation wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masselot, Damien; Fievet, Romain; Raman, Venkat

    2016-11-01

    Rotating detonation engines (RDEs) form a class of pressure-gain combustion systems of higher efficiency compared to conventional gas turbine engines. One of the key features of the design is the injection system, as reactants need to be continuously provided to the detonation wave to sustain its propagation speed. As inhomogeneities in the reactant mixture can perturb the detonation wave front, premixed fuel jet injectors might seem like the most stable solution. However, this introduces the risk of the detonation wave propagating through the injector, causing catastrophic failure. On the other hand, non-premixed fuel injection will tend to quench the detonation wave near the injectors, reducing the likelihood of such failure. Still, the effects of such non-premixing and flow inhomogeneities ahead of a detonation wave have yet to be fully understood and are the object of this study. A 3D channel filled with O2 diluted in an inert gas with circular H2 injectors is simulated as a detonation wave propagates through the system. The impact of key parameters such as injector spacing, injector size, mixture composition and time variations will be discussed. PhD Candidate.

  4. Stability Affects of Artificial Viscosity in Detonation Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P; Souers, P C

    2002-06-03

    Accurate multi-dimensional modeling of detonation waves in solid HE materials is a difficult task. To treat applied problems which contain detonation waves one must consider reacting flow with a wide range of length-scales, non-linear equations of state (EOS), and material interfaces at which the detonation wave interacts with other materials. To be useful numerical models of detonation waves must be accurate, stable, and insensitive to details of the modeling such as the mesh spacing, and mesh aspect ratio for multi-dimensional simulations. Studies we have performed show that numerical simulations of detonation waves can be very sensitive to the form of the artificial viscosity term used. The artificial viscosity term is included in our ALE hydrocode to treat shock discontinuities. We show that a monotonic, second order artificial viscosity model derived from an approximate Riemann solver scheme can strongly damp unphysical oscillations in the detonation wave reaction zone, improving the detonation wave boundary wall interaction. These issues are demonstrated in 2D model simulations presented of the 'Bigplate' test. Results using LX-I 7 explosives are compared with numerical simulation results to demonstrate the affects of the artificial viscosity model.

  5. Predicting polarization signatures for double-detonation and delayed-detonation models of Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulla, M.; Sim, S. A.; Kromer, M.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Fink, M.; Ciaraldi-Schoolmann, F.; Röpke, F. K.; Hillebrandt, W.; Pakmor, R.; Ruiter, A. J.; Taubenberger, S.

    2016-10-01

    Calculations of synthetic spectropolarimetry are one means to test multidimensional explosion models for Type Ia supernovae. In a recent paper, we demonstrated that the violent merger of a 1.1 and 0.9 M⊙ white dwarf binary system is too asymmetric to explain the low polarization levels commonly observed in normal Type Ia supernovae. Here, we present polarization simulations for two alternative scenarios: the sub-Chandrasekhar mass double-detonation and the Chandrasekhar mass delayed-detonation model. Specifically, we study a 2D double-detonation model and a 3D delayed-detonation model, and calculate polarization spectra for multiple observer orientations in both cases. We find modest polarization levels (<1 per cent) for both explosion models. Polarization in the continuum peaks at ˜0.1-0.3 per cent and decreases after maximum light, in excellent agreement with spectropolarimetric data of normal Type Ia supernovae. Higher degrees of polarization are found across individual spectral lines. In particular, the synthetic Si II λ6355 profiles are polarized at levels that match remarkably well the values observed in normal Type Ia supernovae, while the low degrees of polarization predicted across the O I λ7774 region are consistent with the non-detection of this feature in current data. We conclude that our models can reproduce many of the characteristics of both flux and polarization spectra for well-studied Type Ia supernovae, such as SN 2001el and SN 2012fr. However, the two models considered here cannot account for the unusually high level of polarization observed in extreme cases such as SN 2004dt.

  6. Deflagrations, Detonations, and the Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition in Methane-Air Mixtures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-27

    we attempt to answer the question: Given a large enough volume of flammable mixture of NG and air, can a weak spark ignition develop into a...detonation? Large -scale numerical simulations, in conjunction with experimental work conducted at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and...12 2.3.3. Flame Acceleration and DDT in Channels with Obstacles . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2.3.4. DDT in Large Spaces

  7. Experimental Validation of Detonation Shock Dynamics in Condensed Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    materials to produce the desired action. Conventional designs have assumed that the detonation shock propagates normal to itself at the Chapman – Jouguet (CJ...the length of the detonation reaction zone for a steady, one-dimensional Zeldovich–von Neumann–Doering (ZND), Chapman – Jouguet wave, is a fraction of a...normal detonation shock velocity, Dn written as κ = F (Dn), (1.1) with the property F (DCJ )= 0, where DCJ is the Chapman – Jouguet velocity. The normal

  8. Deflagration-to-Detonation in HMX-Based Propellants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    AFOSR-TR- 82-0 67,3 DEFLAGRATION-TO- DETONATION ., IN HMX-BASED PROPELLANTS Final Report Covering the Period January 1, 1977 to November 1, 1981 March...NUMBER AI STR- 8,9.0f)7 3L4 1-1/~/ _ _ _ _ 4. TTLE and ubtile)S. TYPE OF REPORT A PERIOD COVE IED Final Report - January 1, DEFLAGRATION-TO- DETONATION IN...necessary and Identify by block number) The objective of the research was to develop the capability of assessinj the deflagration-to- detonation transistion

  9. The Physical Effects of Detonation in a Closed Cylindrical Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, C S

    1935-01-01

    Detonation in the internal-combustion engine is studied as a physical process. It is shown that detonation is accompanied by pressure waves within the cylinder charge. Sound theory is applied to the calculation of resonant pressure-wave frequencies. Apparatus is described for direct measurement of pressure-wave frequencies. Frequencies determined from two engines of different cylinder sizes are shown to agree with the values calculated from sound theory. An outline of the theoretically possible modes of vibration in a right circular cylinder with flat ends is included. An appendix by John P. Elting gives a method of calculating pressure in the sound wave following detonation.

  10. The dynamics of unsteady detonation with diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam, Tariq Dennis; Romick, Christopher; Powers, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Here we consider an unsteady detonation with diffusion included. This introduces an interaction between the reaction length scales and diffusion length scales. Detailed kinetics introduce multiple length scales as shown though the spatial eigenvalue analysis of hydrogen-oxygen system; the smallest length scale is {approx} 10{sup 7} m and the largest {approx} 10{sup -2} m; away from equilibrium, the breadth can be larger. In this paper, we consider a simpler set of model equations, similar to the inviscid reactive compressible fluid equations, but include diffusion (in the form of thermal/energy, momentum, and mass diffusion). We will seek to reveal how the complex dynamics already discovered in one-step systems in the inviscid limit changes with the addition of diffusion.

  11. Dynamic mode decomposition analysis of detonation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, L.; Kumar, R.; Ravindran, P.

    2012-06-01

    Dynamic mode decomposition is applied to study the self-excited fluctuations supported by transversely unstable detonations. The focus of this study is on the stability of the limit cycle solutions and their response to forcing. Floquet analysis of the unforced conditions reveals that the least stable perturbations are almost subharmonic with ratio between global mode and fundamental frequency λi/ωf = 0.47. This suggests the emergence of period doubling modes as the route to chaos observed in larger systems. The response to forcing is analyzed in terms of the coherency of the four fundamental energy modes: acoustic, entropic, kinetic, and chemical. Results of the modal decomposition suggest that the self-excited oscillations are quite insensitive to vortical forcing, and maintain their coherency up to a forcing turbulent Mach number of 0.3.

  12. Spark-safe low-voltage detonator

    DOEpatents

    Lieberman, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    A column of explosive in a low-voltage detonator which makes it spark-safe includes an organic secondary explosive charge of HMX in the form of a thin pad disposed in a bore of a housing of the detonator in an ignition region of the explosive column and adjacent to an electrical ignition device at one end of the bore. The pad of secondary charge has an axial thickness within the range of twenty to thirty percent of its diameter. The explosive column also includes a first explosive charge of CP disposed in the housing bore in the ignition region of the explosive column next to the secondary charge pad on a side opposite from the ignition device. The first CP charge is loaded under sufficient pressure, 25 to 40 kpsi, to provide mechanical confinement of the pad of secondary charge and physical coupling thereof with the ignition device. The explosive column further includes a second explosive charge of CP disposed in the housing bore in a transition region of the explosive column next to the first CP charge on a side opposite from the pad of secondary charge. The second CP charge is loaded under sufficient pressure, about 10 kpsi, to allow occurrence of DDT. The first explosive CP charge has an axial thickness within the range of twenty to thirty percent of its diameter, whereas the second explosive CP charge contains a series of increments (nominally 4), each of which has an axial thickness-to-diameter ratio of one to two. 2 figs.

  13. [Detonation temperature measurement of epoxypropane using instantaneous spectrum method].

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Li, Ping; Xiao, Hai-Bo; Hu, Dong; Yuan, Chang-Ying

    2008-03-01

    After solving the problems of synchronization of the measuring system and the avoidance of false trigger signal, the instantaneous emission spectrum of epoxypropane with an exposure time of 2 micros and a resolution of 0.2 nm was acquired from a side window of a shock tube at the very moment when the epoxypropane transformed from deflagration to detonation. The measuring system consists of an advanced intensified charge-coupled-device spectroscopic detector, a digital delay generator DG535, an explosion shock tube and optical fibers. The DDT process was monitored by pressure transducers. After correcting the intensity of the spectrum obtained, the background curve of the heat radiation intensity of the detonation was given immediately. The detonation temperature of 2 416 K for epoxypropane was derived from fitting the curve with Planck blackbody formula by least squares principle. The detonation temperature of epoxypropane can provide an experimental datum for analyzing the microscopic mechanism of DDT process.

  14. Behavior of detonation propagation in mixtures with concentration gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Brian C.; Kirwin, William D.

    2007-08-01

    Behavior of detonation waves in mixtures with concentration gradients normal to the propagation direction was studied experimentally. Mixtures with various concentration gradients were formed by sliding the separation plate which divides a detonation chamber from a diffusion chamber in which a diffusion gas was initially introduced. A stoichiometric hydrogen oxygen mixture was charged in the detonation chamber, while oxygen or nitrogen was filled in the diffusion gas chamber. Temporal concentration measurement was conducted by the infrared absorption method using ethane as alternate of oxygen. Smoked foil records show a deformation of regular diamond cells to parallelogram ones, which well corresponds to local mixture concentration. Schlieren photographs reveal the tilted wave front whose angle is consistent with the deflection angle of the detonation front obtained from trajectories of the triple point. The local deflection angle increases with increase in local concentration gradient. Calculation of wave trajectory based on the ray tracing theory predicts formation of the tilted wave front from an initial planar front.

  15. Explosive Products EOS: Adjustment for detonation speed and energy release

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2014-09-05

    Propagating detonation waves exhibit a curvature effect in which the detonation speed decreases with increasing front curvature. The curvature effect is due to the width of the wave profile. Numerically, the wave profile depends on resolution. With coarse resolution, the wave width is too large and results in a curvature effect that is too large. Consequently, the detonation speed decreases as the cell size is increased. We propose a modification to the products equation of state (EOS) to compensate for the effect of numerical resolution; i.e., to increase the CJ pressure in order that a simulation propagates a detonation wave with a speed that is on average correct. The EOS modification also adjusts the release isentrope to correct the energy release.

  16. A Case for Basic Rotating Detonation Engine Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    A brief review is provided covering the benefits to air breathing and chemical rocket propulsion found from pressure gain combustion in general, and rotating detonation in particular. Challenges are also identified.

  17. 33 CFR 154.2106 - Detonation arresters installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... arrester, line size expansions must be in a straight pipe run and must be no closer than 120 times the pipe's diameter from the detonation arrester unless the manufacturer has test data to show the...

  18. Numerical analysis of a two-dimensional nonsteady detonations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taki, S.; Fujiwara, T.

    1976-01-01

    In the present work a system of two-dimensional nonsteady hydrodynamic and chemical kinetic equations was numerically integrated for an exothermic system. Assumed two-step reaction model simulates practically an oxyhydrogen mixture. The calculation starts from a plane Chapman-Jouguet detonation as an initial condition. Two-dimensional disturbances are generated by artificially placing nonuniformities ahead of the detonation front. Regardless of the difference of the given initial disturbances, a fixed number of triple shock waves were produced for a fixed combination of mixture model and geometry when the transition period was over. This shows that for a given detonation tube geometry any exothermic system has its own characteristic multidimensional structure. The obtained number of triple shock waves contained in the detonation front was in agreement with existing experimental observations under the same condition.

  19. Jaguar Analyses of Experimental Detonation Values for Aluminized Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiel, Leonard I.; Baker, Ernest L.; Capellos, Christos

    2004-07-01

    Comparisons of JAGUAR C-J velocities with experimental detonation values for a number of explosives indicate that only slight, if any, aluminum reaction occurs at the detonation front even if small or sub-micron particles are utilized. For sub-micron particles, it is important to account for the presence of aluminum oxide in the explosive formulation. The agreement with the calculated JAGUAR values for zero aluminum reaction is within 2% for most experimental detonation velocities considered. Comparisons of experimental cylinder velocities by JAGUAR analytical procedures indicate that with small aluminum particles substantial aluminum reaction occurs at low values of the radial expansion, even though little reaction is observed at the detonation front.

  20. Non-ideal detonation behaviour of PBX 9502

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoch, Stefan; Nikiforakis, Nikos

    2009-06-01

    Numerical experiments are performed investigating the non-ideal detonation behaviour of PBX 9502 in two setups. In the first setup we consider a three-dimensional rate stick experiment. A booster charge initiates a reaction front leading to a curved detonation wave. The numerical results are compared to theory and experimental evidence. The effects of weak and strong confinement are discussed. The second setup considers the so called ``hockey puck experiment.'' Experimental results show the appearance of a dead zone due to the effect of the geometry. This is captured by the numerical results, which also reveal that the initially spherical detonation is diffracted leading to local detonation failure. The numerical simulations are performed by solving a mathematical model for a three-phase medium based on the Euler equations. The numerical results are obtained using high-resolution shock-capturing methods combined with adaptive mesh refinement.