Science.gov

Sample records for airbridges

  1. Air-bridge and Vertical CNT Switches for High Performance Switching Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Wong, Eric W.; Epp, Larry; Bronikowski, Michael J.; Hunt, BBrian D.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are attractive for switching applications since electrostatically-actuated CNT switches have low actuation voltages and power requirements, while allowing GHz switching speeds that stem from the inherently high elastic modulus and low mass of the CNT.Our first NEM structure, the air-bridge switch, consists of suspended single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) that lie above a sputtered Nb base electrode, where contact to the CNTs is made using evaporated Au/Ti. Electrical measurements of these air-bridge devices show well-defined ON and OFF states as a dc bias of a few volts is applied between the CNT and the Nb-base electrode. The CNT air-bridge switches were measured to have switching times down to a few nanoseconds. Our second NEM structure, the vertical CNT switch, consists of nanotubes grown perpendicular to the substrate. Vertical multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs) are grown directly on a heavily doped Si substrate, from 200 - 300 nm wide, approximately 1 micrometer deep nano-pockets, with Nb metal electrodes to result in the formation of a vertical single-pole-double-throw switch architecture.

  2. Design and fabrication of indium phosphide air-bridge waveguides with MEMS functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Wing H.; Podoliak, Nina; Horak, Peter; Wu, Jiang; Liu, Huiyun; Stewart, William J.; Kenyon, Anthony J.

    2015-05-01

    We present the design and fabrication of a dual air-bridge waveguide structure integrated with MEMS functionality. The structure is designed to function as a tunable optical buffer for telecommunication application. The optical buffer structure is based on two parallel waveguides made of high refractive index material with subwavelength dimensions. They are suspended in air, and are separated by a sub-micron air gap. Due to the fact that the size of the waveguides is much smaller than the wavelength of light that propagates in the structure, a significant fraction of the optical mode is in the air gap between the waveguides. By changing the size of the air gap using MEMS techniques, we can vary this fraction and hence the effective refractive index of the waveguide structure, thus generating tunable optical delay. The optical buffer structure was grown on an InP substrate by molecular beam epitaxy, and the device layer was made of InGaP. An InGaAs layer was sandwiched between the device layer and the substrate to serve as a sacrificial layer. The sub-micron waveguides, their supports in the form of side pillars with tapered shapes in order to minimize optical losses, and the MEMS structures were patterned using electron beam lithography and plasma etching. Electrodes were integrated into the structure to provide electrostatic actuation. After the sample patterning, the waveguide structure was released using HF etch. Our simulations predict that by varying the waveguide separation from 50 nm to 500 nm, we could achieve a change in propagation delay by a factor of two.

  3. Room-temperature light emission from an airbridge double-heterostructure microcavity of Er-doped Si photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; An, Jun-ming; Wu, Yuan-da; Hu, Xiong-wei

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an efficient enhancement of luminescence from two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal photonic crystal (PC) airbridge double-heterostructure microcavity with Er-doped silicon (Si) as light emitters on siliconon-insulator (SOI) wafer at room temperature. A single sharp resonant peak at 1 529.6 nm dominates the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum with the pumping power of 12.5 mW. The obvious red shift and the degraded quality factor (Q-factor) of resonant peak appear with the pumping power increasing, and the maximum measured Q-factor of 4 905 is achieved at the pumping power of 1.5 mW. The resonant peak is observed to shift depending on the structural parameters of PC, which indicates a possible method to control the wavelength of enhanced luminescence for Si-based light emitters based on PC microcavity.

  4. The French airbridge for circulatory support in the Carribean†

    PubMed Central

    Lebreton, Guillaume; Sanchez, Bruno; Hennequin, Jean-Luc; Resière, Dabor; Hommel, Didier; Léonard, Christian; Mehdaoui, Hossein; Roques, François

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We report the assessment and the activities for the first year of our airborne circulatory support mobile unit (CSMU) in the French Caribbean. METHODS From January 2010 to June 2011, 12 patients (mean age = 35.7 years; range: 15–62 years; sex ratio = 1:1) were attended outside Martinique by our CSMU and transferred to our unit by air. RESULTS Eight patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome and were assisted by veno-venous extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) four had refractory cardiogenic shock, assisted by extra corporeal life support (ECLS). The average air transfer distance for patients was 912 km (range: 198–1585 km). The average flying time was 124 min (range: 45–255 min). The aircraft used were heliciopter, military transport or private jet. The setting-up of assistance devices and transfer of patients was uneventful. One patient subsequently benefited from heart transplantation after long-term circulatory support. One patient died under ECMO support after 51 days of assistance and another died on the 60th day after withdrawal of ECLS. CONCLUSIONS CSMUs can be very efficient in providing support to patients in refractory shock, when remote from a cardiac surgery centre. The airborne transfer of patients on ECMO/ECLS can be achieved safely, even over long distances. PMID:22659268

  5. Prolonged spontaneous emission and dephasing of localized excitons in air-bridged carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarpkaya, Ibrahim; Zhang, Zhengyi; Walden-Newman, William; Wang, Xuesi; Hone, James; Wong, Chee W.; Strauf, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    The bright exciton emission of carbon nanotubes is appealing for optoelectronic devices and fundamental studies of light-matter interaction in one-dimensional nanostructures. However, to date, the photophysics of excitons in carbon nanotubes is largely affected by extrinsic effects. Here we perform time-resolved photoluminescence measurements over 14 orders of magnitude for ultra-clean carbon nanotubes bridging an air gap over pillar posts. Our measurements demonstrate a new regime of intrinsic exciton photophysics with prolonged spontaneous emission times up to T1=18 ns, about two orders of magnitude better than prior measurements and in agreement with values hypothesized by theorists about a decade ago. Furthermore, we establish for the first time exciton decoherence times of individual nanotubes in the time domain and find fourfold prolonged values up to T2=2.1 ps compared with ensemble measurements. These first observations motivate new discussions about the magnitude of the intrinsic dephasing mechanism while the prolonged exciton dynamics is promising for applications.

  6. A theoretical and experimental study of coplanar waveguide shunt stubs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dib, Nihad I.; Ponchak, George E.; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    1993-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical and experimental study of straight and bent coplanar waveguide (CPW) shunt stubs is presented. In the theoretical analysis, the CPW is assumed to be inside a cavity while, the experiments are performed on open structures. For the analysis of CPW discontinuities with air-bridges, a hybrid technique was developed which was validated through extensive theoretical and experimental comparisons. The effect of the cavity resonances on the behavior of the stubs with and without air-bridges is investigated. In addition, the encountered radiation loss due to the discontinuities is evaluated experimentally.

  7. Effects of Ground Equalization on the Electrical Performance of Asymmetric CPW Shunt Stubs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dib, Nihad; Gupta, Minoo; Ponchak, George; Katehi, Linda

    1993-01-01

    A hybrid technique is used to study the effects of ground equalization on the electrical performance of CPW shunt stubs. Extensive experiments have been performed and the results are in good agreement with theoretical data. The advantages of using air-bridges in CPW circuits as opposed to bond-wires are also discussed.

  8. Fabrication, Packaging, and Performance of VCSELs and Photodetectors for Space Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Armendariz, M.G.; Briggs, R.D.; Choquette, K.D.; Geib, K.M.; Serkland, D.K.

    1999-03-09

    Optocouplers are used for a variety of applications aboard spacecraft including electrical isolation, switching and power transfer. Commercially available light emitting diode (LED)-based optocouplers have experienced severe degradation of light output due to extensive displacement damage occurring in the semiconductor lattice caused by energetic proton bombardment. A new optocoupler has been designed and fabricated which utilizes vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) and resonant cavity photodetector (RCPD) technologies for the optocoupler emitter and detector, respectively. Linear arrays of selectively oxidized GaAs/AlGaAs VCSELS and RCPDS, each designed to operate at a wavelength of 850nm, were fabricated using an airbridge contacting scheme. The airbridged contacts were designed to improve packaging yields and device reliability by eliminating the use of a polyimide planarizing layer which provided poor adhesion to the bond pad metallization. Details of the airbridged optocoupler fabrication process are reported. Discrete VCSEL and RCPD devices were characterized at temperatures between {minus}100 to 100 C. Devices were packaged in a face-to-face configuration to form a single channel optocoupler and its performance was evaluated under conditions of high-energy proton bombardment.

  9. A Study of the Parasitic Properties of the Schottky Barrier Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Tianhao; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Shuang; Guo, Fangzhou; Jin, Zhi; Zhou, Jingtao; Yang, Chengyue

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present a newly designed parameter extraction method of the Schottky barrier diode (SBD) with the purpose of measuring and studying its parasitic properties. This method includes three kinds of auxiliary configurations and is named as three-configuration parameter extraction method (TPEM). TPEM has such features as simplicity of operation, self-consistence, and accuracy. With TPEM, the accurate parasitic parameters of the diode can be easily obtained. Taking a GaAs SBD as an example, the pad-to-pad capacitance is 7 fF, the air-bridge finger self-inductance 11 pH, the air-bridge finger self-resistance 0.6 Ω, and the finger-to-pad capacitance 2.1 fF. A more accurate approach to finding the value of the series resistant of the SBD is also proposed, and then a complete SBD model is built. The evaluation of the modeling technology, as well as TPEM, is implemented by comparing the simulated and measured I-V curves and the S-parameters. And good agreements are observed. By using TPEM, the influence of the variation of the geometric parameters is studied, and several ways to reduce the parasitic effect are presented. The results show that the width of the air-bridge finger and the length of the channel are the two largest influencing parameters, with the normalized impact factors 0.56 and 0.29, respectively. By using TPEM and the modeling technology presented in this paper, a design process of the SBD is proposed. As an example, a type of SBD suitable for 500-600 GHz zero-biased detection is designed, and the agreement between the simulated and measured results has been improved. SBDs for other applications could be designed in a similar way.

  10. Ultraflexible nanostructures and implications for future nanorobots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Robert W.; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-05-01

    Several high aspect ratio nanostructures have been made by capillary force directed self-assembly including polymeric nanofiber air-bridges, trampoline-like membranes, microsphere-beaded nanofibers, and intermetallic nanoneedles. Arrays of polymer air-bridges form in seconds by simply hand brushing a bead of polymeric liquid over an array of micropillars. The domination of capillary force that is thinning unstable capillary bridges leads to uniform arrays of nanofiber air-bridges. Similarly, arrays of vertically oriented Ag2Ga nanoneedles have been formed by dipping silvercoated arrays of pyramidal silicon into melted gallium. Force-displacement measurements of these structures are presented. These nanostructures, especially when compressively or torsionally buckled, have extremely low stiffnesses, motion due to thermal fluctuations that is relatively easily detected, and the ability to move great distances for very small changes in applied force. Nanofibers with bead-on-a-string structure, where the beads are micron diameter and loaded with magnetic iron oxide (maghemite), are shown to be simply viewable under optical microscopes, have micronewton/ m stiffness, and have ultralow torsional stiffnesses enabling the bead to be rotated numerous revolutions without breaking. Combination of these high aspect ratio structures with stretched elastomers offer interesting possibilities for robotic actuation and locomotion. Polydimethylsiloxane loaded with nanomaterials, e.g. nanotubes, graphene or MoS2, can be efficiently heated with directed light. Heating produces considerable force through the thermoelastic effect, and this force can be used for continuous translation or to trigger reversible elastic buckling of the nanostructures. The remote stimulation of motion with light provides a possible mechanism for producing cooperative behavior between swarms of semiautonomous nanorobots.

  11. Array integration of thousands of photonic crystal nanolasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Takumi; Abe, Hiroshi; Nishijima, Yoshiaki; Baba, Toshihiko

    2014-03-01

    Photonic crystal (PC) nanolasers often consist of air-bridge PC slab, which enhances optical confinement while limiting its size to 30 × 30 μm2 due to the mechanical fragileness. This limit is broken by resin-mediated bonding of the PC slab on a host substrate. In this paper, we demonstrate a GaInAsP PC slab with a size of over 100 × 100 μm2 in which 1089, 2376, and 11 664 nanolasers showing high-yield laser operation are integrated.

  12. A comprehensive theoretical and experimental study of coplanar waveguide shunt stubs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dib, Nihad I.; Ponchak, George E.; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    1993-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical and experimental study of straight and bent coplanar waveguide (CPW) shunt stubs is presented. In the theoretical analysis, the CPW is assumed to be inside a cavity, while, the experiments are performed on open structures. A hybrid technique was developed to analyze the CPW discontinuities which proved to be accurate since the theoretical and experimental results agree very well. The effect of the cavity resonances on the behavior of the stubs with and without air-bridges is investigated. In addition, the encountered radiation loss due to the discontinuities is evaluated experimentally.

  13. Room temperature continuous wave operation of InAs/GaAs quantum dot photonic crystal nanocavity laser on silicon substrate.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Katsuaki; Nomura, Masahiro; Guimard, Denis; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2009-04-27

    Room temperature, continuous-wave lasing in a quantum dot photonic crystal nanocavity on a Si substrate has been demonstrated by optical pumping. The laser was an air-bridge structure of a two-dimensional photonic crystal GaAs slab with InAs quantum dots inside on a Si substrate fabricated through wafer bonding and layer transfer. This surface-emitting laser exhibited emission at 1.3 microm with a threshold absorbed power of 2 microW, the lowest out of any type of lasers on silicon.

  14. High-speed, room-temperature quantum cascade detectors at 4.3 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuhong; Zhai, Shenqiang; Wang, Fengjiao; Liu, Junqi; Liu, Fengqi; Liu, Shuman; Zhang, Jinchuan; Zhuo, Ning; Wang, Lijun; Wang, ZhanGuo

    2016-03-01

    We present high-speed, room-temperature operated 4.3 μm quantum cascade detectors. The devices are processed as square mesas with 50 Ω coplanar access line and air-bridge connector. The high frequency features are explored using microwave rectification technique and a RLC circuit model. The -3 dB cutoff frequency is experimentally 9 GHz and 4 GHz for 20×20 μm2 and 50×50 μm2 detectors, respectively. The equivalent circuit analysis shows that a second order filter feature governs the devices. Higher cutoff frequency can be achieved by eliminate the parasitics further.

  15. Array integration of thousands of photonic crystal nanolasers

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Takumi Abe, Hiroshi; Nishijima, Yoshiaki; Baba, Toshihiko

    2014-03-24

    Photonic crystal (PC) nanolasers often consist of air-bridge PC slab, which enhances optical confinement while limiting its size to 30 × 30 μm{sup 2} due to the mechanical fragileness. This limit is broken by resin-mediated bonding of the PC slab on a host substrate. In this paper, we demonstrate a GaInAsP PC slab with a size of over 100 × 100 μm{sup 2} in which 1089, 2376, and 11 664 nanolasers showing high-yield laser operation are integrated.

  16. A low-noise GaAs FET preamplifier for 21 GHz satellite earth terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thill, R. W.; Kennan, W.; Osbrink, N. K.

    1983-03-01

    The goal in the development programs was to devise a GaAs FET with a lower noise figure at a higher frequency than had previously been achieved. The device produced achieves a 2.0 dB noise figure with 10.5 dB associated gain at 22 GHz and a 2.6 dB noise figure with 7.2 dB associated gain at 32 GHz. The active channels of the FET are formed by vapor-phase epitaxy using hydride synthesis to produce the active and buffer combinations. The device employs a multifeed 'T' gate layout, with the two small side gate pads connected to the central gate bonding pad by an airbridge. The airbridge shunts the gate stripe of the FET in order to reduce the RF signal phase delay along the stripe. Since the unit gate width is thus reduced to 12.5 microns, the gate metal resistance becomes negligible. Among the other features are the traditional T-shaped gate to minimize feedback capacitance, a source-to-drain spacing of 3.5 microns, and a gate-to-source spacing of 1.0 micron.

  17. Scalable approach for vertical device integration of epitaxial nanowires.

    PubMed

    Lugstein, A; Steinmair, M; Henkel, C; Bertagnolli, E

    2009-05-01

    In this letter, we demonstrate the simultaneous vertical integration of self-contacting and highly oriented nanowires (NWs) into airbridge structures, which have been developed into surround gated metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). With the use of conventional photolithography, reactive ion etching (RIE), and low pressure chemical vapor deposition, a suspended vertical NW architecture is formed on a silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate where the nanodevice will later be fabricated on. The vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) grown Si-NWs are contacted to prepatterned airbridges by a self-aligned process, and there is no need for postgrowth NW assembly or alignment. Such vertical NW architecture can be easily integrated into existing ICs processes opening the path to a new generation of nonconventional nano devices. To demonstrate the potential of this method, surround gated vertical MOSFETs have been fabricated with a highly simplified integration scheme combining top-down and bottom-up approaches, but in the same way, one can think about the realization of integrated nano sensors on the industrial scale.

  18. Dual band sensitivity enhancements of a VO(x) microbolometer array using a patterned gold black absorber.

    PubMed

    Smith, Evan M; Panjwani, Deep; Ginn, James; Warren, Andrew P; Long, Christopher; Figuieredo, Pedro; Smith, Christian; Nath, Janardan; Perlstein, Joshua; Walter, Nick; Hirschmugl, Carol; Peale, Robert E; Shelton, David

    2016-03-10

    Infrared-absorbing gold black has been selectively patterned onto the active surfaces of a vanadium-oxide-based infrared bolometer array. Patterning by metal lift-off relies on protection of the fragile gold black with an evaporated oxide, which preserves much of gold black's high absorptance. This patterned gold black also survives the dry-etch removal of the sacrificial polyimide used to fabricate the air-bridge bolometers. For our fabricated devices, infrared responsivity is improved 22% in the long-wave IR and 70% in the mid-wave IR by the gold black coating, with no significant change in detector noise, using a 300°C blackbody and 80 Hz chopping rate. The increase in the time constant caused by the additional mass of gold black is ∼15%. PMID:26974804

  19. Advanced fabrication technologies for nano-electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.A.; Weckwerth, M.V.; Baca, W.E.

    1996-03-01

    Three novel fabrication technologies are presented which greatly increase the tools available for the realization of nano-electronic devices. First, a sub-micron area post structure descending from a metallic airbridge allows gating of regions as small as 0.1 {mu}m in diameter. This has enabled the study of such quantum phenomena as coupling of parallel quantum point contacts, and electron focusing around a tunable quantum antidot. We also describe two new techniques for backgating multiquantum well structures with submicron lateral resolution. These techniques enable separate ohmic contacts to individual quantum wells spaced as closely as 100 {Angstrom}, and thus allow the fabrication of novel quantum tunneling devices. The first technique uses regrowth over a patterned ion-implanted substrate. The second involves a novel epoxy-bond-and-stop-etch (EBASE) processing scheme, whereby the original substrate is etched away and the backside then patterned using conventional methods.

  20. PZT transduction of high-overtone contour-mode resonators.

    PubMed

    Chandrahalim, Hengky; Bhave, Sunil A; Polcawich, Ronald G; Pulskamp, Jeffrey S; Kaul, Roger

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents the Butterworth-van Dyke model and quantitative comparison that explore the design space of lead zirconate titanate-only (PZT) and PZT on 3-, 5-, and 10-μm single-crystal silicon (SCS) high-overtone width-extensional mode (WEM) resonators with identical lateral dimensions for incorporation into radio frequency microelectromechanical systems (RF MEMS) filters and oscillators. A novel fabrication technique was developed to fabricate the resonators with and without a silicon carrier layer using the same mask set on the same wafer. The air-bridge metal routings were implemented to carry electrical signals while avoiding large capacitances from the bond-pads. We theoretically derived and experimentally measured the correlation of motional impedance (RX), quality factor (Q), and resonance frequency (f) with the resonators' silicon layer thickness (tSi) up to frequencies of operation above 1 GHz.

  1. Responsivity improvements for a vanadium oxide microbolometer using subwavelength resonant absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Evan M.; Nath, Janardan; Ginn, James; Peale, Robert E.; Shelton, David

    2016-05-01

    Subwavelength resonant structures designed for long-wave infrared (LWIR) absorption have been integrated with a standard vanadium-oxide microbolometer. Dispersion of the dielectric refractive index provides for multiple overlapping resonances that span the 8-12 μm LWIR wavelength band, a broader range than can be achieved using the usual quarter-wave resonant cavity engineered into the air-bridge structures. Experimental measurements show a 49% increase in responsivity for LWIR and a 71% increase across a full waveband as compared to a similar device designed for only LWIR absorption, using a 300°C blackbody at 35 Hz chopping rate. Increased thermal time constant due to additional mass is shown to lessen this enhancement at higher chopping rates.

  2. Operation of an InAs quantum-dot embedded GaAs photonic crystal slab waveguide laser by using two-photon pumping for photonics integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, H.; Yamanaka, A.; Ozaki, N.; Ikeda, N.; Sugimoto, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The development of small sized laser operating above room temperature is important in the realization of optical integrated circuits. Recently, micro-lasers consisting of photonic crystals (PhCs) and whispering gallery mode cavities have been demonstrated. Optically pumped laser devices could be easily designed using photonic crystal-slab waveguides (PhC-WGs) with an air-bridge type structure. In this study, we observe lasing at 1.3μm from two-photon pumped InAs-quantum-dots embedded GaAs PhC-WGs above room temperature. This type of compact laser shows promise as a new light source in ultra-compact photonics integrated circuits.

  3. Oscillation up to 1.92 THz in resonant tunneling diode by reduced conduction loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, Takeru; Kanaya, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Safumi; Asada, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    A large increase in oscillation frequency was achieved in resonant-tunneling-diode (RTD) terahertz oscillators by reducing the conduction loss. An n+-InGaAs layer under the air-bridge electrode connected to the RTD was observed to cause a large conduction loss for high-frequency current due to the skin effect. By introducing a new fabrication process removing the InGaAs layer, we obtained 1.92-THz oscillation, which extended the highest frequency of room-temperature electronic single oscillators. Theoretical calculations reasonably agreed with the experiment, and an oscillation above 2 THz is further expected with an improved structure of the slot antenna used as a resonator and radiator.

  4. A Superconducting Bolometer Antenna-Coupled to Terahertz Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibella, S.; Carelli, P.; Castellano, M. G.; Foglietti, V.; Leoni, R.; Ortolani, M.; Torrioli, G.

    2009-03-01

    The electrical performances and the optical response of a superconducting hotspot air-bridge bolometer (SHAB) coupled through a planar antenna to Terahertz waves and operating in vacuum at about 4.2 K, have been measured. The SHAB consists of a narrow Nb air bridge, voltage biased to form, in the middle of the suspended Nb stripe, a resistive hotspot, whose volume is modulated by the incoming radiation. The signal resulting from the coupled optical power and the device noise performance have been measured by using a home made transimpedance amplifier operating at room temperature, resulting in an electrical NEP of about 40 fW/Hz1/2. Passive detection of the 300 K blackbody radiation at frequency lower than 1.6 THz, band limited by a low-pass optical filters, has been successfully carried out by using a SHAB.

  5. Design and fabrication of one-dimensional and two- dimensional photonic bandgap devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kuo-Yi

    1999-10-01

    One-dimensional and two-dimensional photonic bandgap devices have been designed and fabricated using III-V compound semiconductors. The one-dimensional photonic bandgap devices consist of monorail and air-bridge waveguide microcavities, while the two-dimensional photonic bandgap devices consist of light-emitting devices with enhanced extraction efficiency. Fabrication techniques such as gas source molecular beam epitaxy, direct-write electron-beam lithography, reactive ion etching and thermal oxidation of AlxGa1- xAs have been employed. The III-V thermal oxide, in particular, is used as an index confinement material, as a sacrificial material for micromechanical fabrication of the air-bridge microcavity, and in the realization of a wide-bandwidth distributed Bragg reflector. The one-dimensional photonic bandgap waveguide microcavities have been designed to operate in the wavelength regimes of 4.5 m m and 1.55 m m. The devices designed to operate in the 1.55 m m wavelength regime have been optically characterized. The transmission spectra exhibit resonances at around 1.55 m m and cavity quality factors (Q's) ranging from 136 to 334. The resonant modal volume is calculated to be about 0.056 m m3. Tunability in the resonance wavelengths has also been demonstrated by changing the size of the defect in the one-dimensional photonic crystal. The two-dimensional photonic bandgap light-emitting device consists of a In0.51Ga0.49P/In0.2Ga0.8As/In 0.51Ga0.49P quantum well emitting at 980nm with a triangular photonic lattice of holes in the top cladding layer of the quantum well. The photonic crystal prohibits the propagation of guided modes in the semiconductor, thus enhancing the extraction of light vertical to the light-emitting device. A wide-bandwidth GaAs/AlxOy distributed Bragg reflector mirror under the quantum well structure further enhances the extraction of light from the devices. The extraction efficiency of the two-dimensional photonic bandgap light-emitting device

  6. Analog/RF Study of Self-aligned In0.53Ga0.47As MOSFET with Scaled Gate Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehzangi, Arash; Larki, Farhad; Mohd Razip Wee, M. F.; Wichmann, Nicolas; Majlis, Burhanuddin Y.; Bollaert, Sylvain

    2016-10-01

    This study presents the impact of gate length scaling on analog and radio frequency (RF) performance of a self- aligned multi-gate n-type In0.53Ga0.47As metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor. The device is fabricated using a self-aligned method, air-bridge technology, and 8 nm thickness of the Al2O3 oxide layer with different gate lengths. The transconductance-to-normalized drain current ratio (g m/I D) method is implemented to investigate analog parameters. Moreover, g m and drain conductance (g D) as key parameters in analog performance of the device are evaluated with g m/I D and gate length variation, where g m and g D are both showing enhancement due to scaling of the gate length. Early voltage (V EA) and intrinsic voltage gain (A V) value presents a decreasing trend by shrinking the gate length. In addition, the results of RF measurement for cut-off and maximum oscillation frequency for devices with different gate lengths are compared.

  7. CMOS compatible high-Q photonic crystal nanocavity fabricated with photolithography on silicon photonic platform.

    PubMed

    Ooka, Yuta; Tetsumoto, Tomohiro; Fushimi, Akihiro; Yoshiki, Wataru; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2015-01-01

    Progress on the fabrication of ultrahigh-Q photonic-crystal nanocavities (PhC-NCs) has revealed the prospect for new applications including silicon Raman lasers that require a strong confinement of light. Among various PhC-NCs, the highest Q has been recorded with silicon. On the other hand, microcavity is one of the basic building blocks in silicon photonics. However, the fusion between PhC-NCs and silicon photonics has yet to be exploited, since PhC-NCs are usually fabricated with electron-beam lithography and require an air-bridge structure. Here we show that a 2D-PhC-NC fabricated with deep-UV photolithography on a silica-clad silicon-on-insulator (SOI) structure will exhibit a high-Q of 2.2 × 10(5) with a mode-volume of ~ 1.7(λ/n)(3). This is the highest Q demonstrated with photolithography. We also show that this device exhibits an efficient thermal diffusion and enables high-speed switching. The demonstration of the photolithographic fabrication of high-Q silica-clad PhC-NCs will open possibility for mass-manufacturing and boost the fusion between silicon photonics and CMOS devices.

  8. Promising low-damage fabrication method for the photonic crystals with hexagonal or triangular air holes: selective area metal organic vapor phase epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Motohisa, Junichi; Takeda, Junichiro; Fukui, Takashi

    2005-12-26

    The photonic band diagrams of the photonic crystal slabs (PCSs) with various structural air holes were calculated by plane wave expansion method with super cell method. The calculated results indicate that the PCSs with hexagonal or triangular air holes have enough large photonic band gaps in the guided mode spectrum, hence they are good candidates to be used for the PC devices. The PCs with hexagonal or triangular air holes were fabricated successfully on n-type GaAs (111)B substrate by selective-area metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (SA-MOVPE). Vertical and smooth facets are formed and the uniformities are very good. The same process was also used to fabricate hexagonal air hole arrays with the width of 100 nm successfully. A procedure was proposed and utilized to fabricate the air-bridge PCS with normal hexagonal air holes. The fabricated hexagonal air holes are very uniform and the sidewalls are smooth and vertical. Our experimental results indicate that SA-MOVPE growth is a promising low-damage fabrication method for PC devices and photonic nano-strucutres.

  9. Gate length variation effect on performance of gate-first self-aligned In₀.₅₃Ga₀.₄₇As MOSFET.

    PubMed

    Mohd Razip Wee, Mohd F; Dehzangi, Arash; Bollaert, Sylvain; Wichmann, Nicolas; Majlis, Burhanuddin Y

    2013-01-01

    A multi-gate n-type In₀.₅₃Ga₀.₄₇As MOSFET is fabricated using gate-first self-aligned method and air-bridge technology. The devices with different gate lengths were fabricated with the Al2O3 oxide layer with the thickness of 8 nm. In this letter, impact of gate length variation on device parameter such as threshold voltage, high and low voltage transconductance, subthreshold swing and off current are investigated at room temperature. Scaling the gate length revealed good enhancement in all investigated parameters but the negative shift in threshold voltage was observed for shorter gate lengths. The high drain current of 1.13 A/mm and maximum extrinsic transconductance of 678 mS/mm with the field effect mobility of 364 cm(2)/Vs are achieved for the gate length and width of 0.2 µm and 30 µm, respectively. The source/drain overlap length for the device is approximately extracted about 51 nm with the leakage current in order of 10(-8) A. The results of RF measurement for cut-off and maximum oscillation frequency for devices with different gate lengths are compared. PMID:24367548

  10. An AlGaN/GaN HEMT with enhanced breakdown and a near-zero breakdown voltage temperature coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Gang; Tang, Cen; Wang, Tao; Guo, Qing; Zhang, Bo; Sheng, Kuang; Wai, Tung Ng

    2013-02-01

    An AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with a novel source-connected air-bridge field plate (AFP) is experimentally verified. The device features a metal field plate that jumps from the source over the gate region and lands between the gate and drain. When compared to a similar size HEMT device with a conventional field plate (CFP) structure, the AFP not only minimizes the parasitic gate to source capacitance, but also exhibits higher OFF-state breakdown voltage and one order of magnitude lower drain leakage current. In a device with a gate to drain distance of 6 μm and a gate length of 0.8 μm, three times higher forward blocking voltage of 375 V was obtained at VGS = -5 V. In contrast, a similar sized HEMT with a CFP can only achieve a breakdown voltage no higher than 125 V using this process, regardless of device dimensions. Moreover, a temperature coefficient of 0 V/K for the breakdown voltage is observed. However, devices without a field plate (no FP) and with an optimized conventional field plate (CFP) exhibit breakdown voltage temperature coefficients of -0.113 V/K and -0.065 V/K, respectively.

  11. CMOS compatible high-Q photonic crystal nanocavity fabricated with photolithography on silicon photonic platform

    PubMed Central

    Ooka, Yuta; Tetsumoto, Tomohiro; Fushimi, Akihiro; Yoshiki, Wataru; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2015-01-01

    Progress on the fabrication of ultrahigh-Q photonic-crystal nanocavities (PhC-NCs) has revealed the prospect for new applications including silicon Raman lasers that require a strong confinement of light. Among various PhC-NCs, the highest Q has been recorded with silicon. On the other hand, microcavity is one of the basic building blocks in silicon photonics. However, the fusion between PhC-NCs and silicon photonics has yet to be exploited, since PhC-NCs are usually fabricated with electron-beam lithography and require an air-bridge structure. Here we show that a 2D-PhC-NC fabricated with deep-UV photolithography on a silica-clad silicon-on-insulator (SOI) structure will exhibit a high-Q of 2.2 × 105 with a mode-volume of ~1.7(λ/n)3. This is the highest Q demonstrated with photolithography. We also show that this device exhibits an efficient thermal diffusion and enables high-speed switching. The demonstration of the photolithographic fabrication of high-Q silica-clad PhC-NCs will open possibility for mass-manufacturing and boost the fusion between silicon photonics and CMOS devices. PMID:26086849

  12. Surface passivation of a photonic crystal band-edge laser by atomic layer deposition of SiO2 and its application for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Hyungrae; Lee, Jeongkug; Jordan, Luke R.; Lee, Si Hoon; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Hyo Jin; Park, Juhun; Hong, Seunghun; Jeon, Heonsu

    2015-02-01

    We report on the conformal surface passivation of photonic crystal (PC) laser devices with an ultrathin dielectric layer. Air-bridge-type Γ-point band-edge lasers (BELs) are fabricated by forming a honeycomb lattice two-dimensional PC structure into an InGaAsP multiple-quantum-well epilayer. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is employed for conformal deposition of a few-nanometer-thick SiO2 layer over the entire device surface, not only on the top and bottom surfaces of the air-bridge membrane but also on the air-hole sidewalls. Despite its extreme thinness, the ALD passivation layer is found to protect the InGaAsP BEL devices from harsh chemicals. In addition, the ALD-SiO2 is compatible with the silane-based surface chemistry, which allows us to use ALD-passivated BEL devices as label-free biosensors. The standard streptavidin-biotin interaction shifts the BEL lasing wavelength by ~1 nm for the dipole-like Γ-point band-edge mode. A sharp lasing line (<0.2 nm, full width at half-maximum) and a large refractive index sensitivity (~163 nm per RIU) produce a figure of merit as high as ~800 for our BEL biosensor, which is at least an order of magnitude higher than those of more common biosensors that rely on a broad resonance peak, showing that our nanolaser structures are suitable for highly sensitive biosensor applications.

  13. A reusable robust radio frequency biosensor using microwave resonator by integrated passive device technology for quantitative detection of glucose level.

    PubMed

    Kim, N Y; Dhakal, R; Adhikari, K K; Kim, E S; Wang, C

    2015-05-15

    A reusable robust radio frequency (RF) biosensor with a rectangular meandered line (RML) resonator on a gallium arsenide substrate by integrated passive device (IPD) technology was designed, fabricated and tested to enable the real-time identification of the glucose level in human serum. The air-bridge structure fabricated by an IPD technology was applied to the RML resonator to improve its sensitivity by increasing the magnitude of the return loss (S21). The resonance behaviour, based on S21 characteristics of the biosensor, was analysed at 9.20 GHz with human serum containing different glucose concentration ranging from 148-268 mg dl(-1), 105-225 mg dl(-1) and at a deionised (D) water glucose concentration in the range of 25- 500 mg dl(-1) for seven different samples. A calibration analysis was performed for the human serum from two different subjects and for D-glucose at a response time of 60 s; the reproducibility, the minimum shift in resonance frequency and the long-term stability of the signal were investigated. The feature characteristics based on the resonance concept after the use of serum as an analyte are modelled as an inductor, capacitor and resistor. The findings support the development of resonance-based sensing with an excellent sensitivity of 1.08 MHz per 1 mg dl(-1), a detection limit of 8.01 mg dl(-1), and a limit of quantisation of 24.30 mg dl(-1).

  14. Structure dependence of oscillation characteristics of resonant-tunneling-diode terahertz oscillators associated with intrinsic and extrinsic delay times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, Hidetoshi; Maekawa, Takeru; Suzuki, Safumi; Asada, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the effect of intrinsic and extrinsic delay times on the oscillation characteristics of resonant-tunneling-diode (RTD) terahertz oscillators. The intrinsic delay time is composed of the electron dwell time in the resonant tunneling region and the electron transit time in the collector depletion region. We obtain and discuss the structure dependence of these factors in terms of the oscillation frequency and output power measured for RTD oscillators with different quantum-well and collector-spacer thicknesses and different air-bridge widths between the RTD and a slot antenna. The highest oscillation frequency achieved in this experiment is 1.86 THz for the well and spacer thicknesses of 2.5 and 12 nm, respectively, with a 1-µm-wide air bridge. In this structure, the extrinsic delay time (80 fs) estimated from the parasitic elements is more than double the intrinsic delay time (35 fs). It is shown theoretically that an oscillation frequency of over 2 THz is possible upon the reduction in the extrinsic delay time caused by the bulk and spread resistances in RTDs.

  15. Surface passivation of a photonic crystal band-edge laser by atomic layer deposition of SiO2 and its application for biosensing.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hyungrae; Lee, Jeongkug; Jordan, Luke R; Lee, Si Hoon; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Hyo Jin; Park, Juhun; Hong, Seunghun; Jeon, Heonsu

    2015-02-28

    We report on the conformal surface passivation of photonic crystal (PC) laser devices with an ultrathin dielectric layer. Air-bridge-type Γ-point band-edge lasers (BELs) are fabricated by forming a honeycomb lattice two-dimensional PC structure into an InGaAsP multiple-quantum-well epilayer. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is employed for conformal deposition of a few-nanometer-thick SiO2 layer over the entire device surface, not only on the top and bottom surfaces of the air-bridge membrane but also on the air-hole sidewalls. Despite its extreme thinness, the ALD passivation layer is found to protect the InGaAsP BEL devices from harsh chemicals. In addition, the ALD-SiO2 is compatible with the silane-based surface chemistry, which allows us to use ALD-passivated BEL devices as label-free biosensors. The standard streptavidin-biotin interaction shifts the BEL lasing wavelength by ∼1 nm for the dipole-like Γ-point band-edge mode. A sharp lasing line (<0.2 nm, full width at half-maximum) and a large refractive index sensitivity (∼163 nm per RIU) produce a figure of merit as high as ∼800 for our BEL biosensor, which is at least an order of magnitude higher than those of more common biosensors that rely on a broad resonance peak, showing that our nanolaser structures are suitable for highly sensitive biosensor applications.

  16. Surface passivation of a photonic crystal band-edge laser by atomic layer deposition of SiO2 and its application for biosensing.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hyungrae; Lee, Jeongkug; Jordan, Luke R; Lee, Si Hoon; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Hyo Jin; Park, Juhun; Hong, Seunghun; Jeon, Heonsu

    2015-02-28

    We report on the conformal surface passivation of photonic crystal (PC) laser devices with an ultrathin dielectric layer. Air-bridge-type Γ-point band-edge lasers (BELs) are fabricated by forming a honeycomb lattice two-dimensional PC structure into an InGaAsP multiple-quantum-well epilayer. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is employed for conformal deposition of a few-nanometer-thick SiO2 layer over the entire device surface, not only on the top and bottom surfaces of the air-bridge membrane but also on the air-hole sidewalls. Despite its extreme thinness, the ALD passivation layer is found to protect the InGaAsP BEL devices from harsh chemicals. In addition, the ALD-SiO2 is compatible with the silane-based surface chemistry, which allows us to use ALD-passivated BEL devices as label-free biosensors. The standard streptavidin-biotin interaction shifts the BEL lasing wavelength by ∼1 nm for the dipole-like Γ-point band-edge mode. A sharp lasing line (<0.2 nm, full width at half-maximum) and a large refractive index sensitivity (∼163 nm per RIU) produce a figure of merit as high as ∼800 for our BEL biosensor, which is at least an order of magnitude higher than those of more common biosensors that rely on a broad resonance peak, showing that our nanolaser structures are suitable for highly sensitive biosensor applications. PMID:25631610

  17. Optimization of kinetic inductance detectors for millimeter and submillimeter wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coiffard, G.; Schuster, K. F.; Monfardini, A.; Adane, A.; Barbier, B.; Boucher, C.; Calvo, M.; Goupy, J.; Leclercq, S.; Pignard, S.

    2014-07-01

    We present the latest improvements of lumped element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs) for the NIKA camera at the 30-m telescope of IRAM at Pico Veleta (Spain) [1]. LEKIDs are direct absorption detectors for millimeter wavelength and represent a particularly efficient concept of planar array continuum detectors for the millimeter and submillimeter wavelength range. To improve the detector radiation coupling over a wider frequency range, a combination of backplane reflector and a supplementary layer of dielectric between silicon substrate and backplane has been successfully explored. To this end we apply deep silicon etching to the substrate in order to decrease its effective dielectric constant in an intermediate layer. In the first generation of LEKIDs array, the response is disturbed by the presence of slot-modes in the frequency multiplexing coplanar feed/readout line, an effect which was reduced when applying wire bonding across the readout line. Superconducting air-bridges can be integrated into the array fabrication process. The suppression of slot-modes also reduces undesired cross-talk between pixels. Our current KID detectors are made of very thin aluminum films, but with a thickness of less than 20 nm we have reached some limitations concerning the layout and material processing. Following the results from Leduc et al. [2], we developed non-stoichiometric titanium nitride (TiN) at IRAM as an alternative material. We focus on the work done to achieve reproducible and homogenous films with the required transition temperature for mm-wave detection. We present characterization techniques that allow room temperature measurements to be correlated to the transition temperature of TiNx and first measurements on a test sample.

  18. Room temperature strong light-matter coupling in 3D THz meta-atoms (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulillo, Bruno; Manceau, Jean-Michel; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund; Colombelli, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate strong light-matter coupling at room temperature in the terahertz (THz) spectral region using 3D meta-atoms with extremely sub-wavelength volumes. Using an air-bridge fabrication scheme, we have implemented sub-wavelength 3D THz micro-resonators that rely on suspended loop antennas connected to semiconductor-filled patch cavities. We have experimentally shown that they possess the functionalities of lumped LC resonators: their frequency response can be adjusted by independently tuning the inductance associated the antenna element or the capacitance provided by the metal-semiconductor-metal cavity. Moreover, the radiation coupling and efficiency can be engineered acting on the design of the loop antenna, similarly to conventional RF antennas. Here we take advantage of this rich playground in the context of cavity electrodynamics/intersubband polaritonics. In the strong light-matter coupling regime, a cavity and a two-level system exchange energy coherently at a characteristic rate called the vacuum Rabi frequency ΩR which is dominant with respect to all other loss mechanisms involved. The signature, in the frequency domain, is the appearance of a splitting between the bare cavity and material system resonances: the new states are called upper and a lower polariton branches. So far, most experimental demonstrations of strong light-matter interaction between an intersubband transition and a deeply sub-wavelength mode in the THz or mid-infrared ranges rely on wavelength-scale or larger resonators such as photonic crystals, diffractive gratings, dielectric micro-cavities or patch cavities. Lately, planar metamaterials have been used to enhance the light-matter interaction and strongly reduce the interaction volume by engineering the electric and magnetic resonances of the individual subwavelength constituents. In this contribution we provide evidence of strong coupling between a THz intersubband transition and an extremely sub-wavelength mode (≈λ/10