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Sample records for aircraft exhaust plume

  1. Stratospheric aircraft exhaust plume and wake chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miake-Lye, R. C.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Brown, R. C.; Kolb, C. E.; Worsnop, D. R.; Zahniser, M. S.; Robinson, G. N.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Shia, R-L.

    1993-01-01

    Progress to date in an ongoing study to analyze and model emissions leaving a proposed High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) from when the exhaust gases leave the engine until they are deposited at atmospheric scales in the stratosphere is documented. A kinetic condensation model was implemented to predict heterogeneous condensation in the plume regime behind an HSCT flying in the lower stratosphere. Simulations were performed to illustrate the parametric dependence of contrail droplet growth on the exhaust condensation nuclei number density and size distribution. Model results indicate that the condensation of water vapor is strongly dependent on the number density of activated CN. Incorporation of estimates for dilution factors into a Lagrangian box model of the far-wake regime with scale-dependent diffusion indicates negligible decrease in ozone and enhancement of water concentrations of 6-13 times background, which decrease rapidly over 1-3 days. Radiative calculations indicate a net differential cooling rate of the plume about 3K/day at the beginning of the wake regime, with a total subsidence ranging between 0.4 and 1 km. Results from the Lagrangian plume model were used to estimate the effect of repeated superposition of aircraft plumes on the concentrations of water and NO(y) along a flight corridor. Results of laboratory studies of heterogeneous chemistry are also described. Kinetics of HCl, N2O5 and ClONO2 uptake on liquid sulfuric acid were measured as a function of composition and temperature. Refined measurements of the thermodynamics of nitric acid hydrates indicate that metastable dihydrate may play a role in the nucleation of more stable trihydrates PSC's.

  2. Hyper-spectral imaging of aircraft exhaust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Spencer; Bradley, Kenneth; Gross, Kevin; Perram, Glen; Marciniak, Michael

    2008-10-01

    An imaging Fourier-transform spectrometer has been used to determine low spatial resolution temperature and chemical species concentration distributions of aircraft jet engine exhaust plumes. An overview of the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer and the methodology of the project is presented. Results to date are shared and future work is discussed. Exhaust plume data from a Turbine Technologies, LTD, SR-30 turbojet engine at three engine settings was collected using a Telops Field-portable Imaging Radiometric Spectrometer Technology Mid-Wave Extended (FIRST-MWE). Although the plume exhibited high temporal frequency fluctuations, temporal averaging of hyper-spectral data-cubes produced steady-state distributions, which, when co-added and Fourier transformed, produced workable spectra. These spectra were then reduced using a simplified gaseous effluent model to fit forward-modeled spectra obtained from the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) and the high-resolution transmission (HITRAN) molecular absorption database to determine approximate temperature and concentration distributions. It is theorized that further development of the physical model will produce better agreement between measured and modeled data.

  3. Abatement of an aircraft exhaust plume using aerodynamic baffles.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Michael; Christie, Simon M; Graham, Angus; Garry, Kevin P; Velikov, Stefan; Poll, D Ian; Smith, Malcolm G; Mead, M Iqbal; Popoola, Olalekan A M; Stewart, Gregor B; Jones, Roderic L

    2013-03-05

    The exhaust jet from a departing commercial aircraft will eventually rise buoyantly away from the ground; given the high thrust/power (i.e., momentum/buoyancy) ratio of modern aero-engines, however, this is a slow process, perhaps requiring ∼ 1 min or more. Supported by theoretical and wind tunnel modeling, we have experimented with an array of aerodynamic baffles on the surface behind a set of turbofan engines of 124 kN thrust. Lidar and point sampler measurements show that, as long as the intervention takes place within the zone where the Coanda effect holds the jet to the surface (i.e., within about 70 m in this case), then quite modest surface-mounted baffles can rapidly lift the jet away from the ground. This is of potential benefit in abating both surface concentrations and jet blast downstream. There is also some modest acoustic benefit. By distributing the aerodynamic lift and drag across an array of baffles, each need only be a fraction of the height of a single blast fence.

  4. Computational models for the viscous/inviscid analysis of jet aircraft exhaust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, S. M.; Pergament, H. S.; Thorpe, R. D.

    1980-05-01

    Computational models which analyze viscous/inviscid flow processes in jet aircraft exhaust plumes are discussed. These models are component parts of an NASA-LaRC method for the prediction of nozzle afterbody drag. Inviscid/shock processes are analyzed by the SCIPAC code which is a compact version of a generalized shock capturing, inviscid plume code (SCIPPY). The SCIPAC code analyzes underexpanded jet exhaust gas mixtures with a self-contained thermodynamic package for hydrocarbon exhaust products and air. A detailed and automated treatment of the embedded subsonic zones behind Mach discs is provided in this analysis. Mixing processes along the plume interface are analyzed by two upgraded versions of an overlaid, turbulent mixing code (BOAT) developed previously for calculating nearfield jet entrainment. The BOATAC program is a frozen chemistry version of BOAT containing the aircraft thermodynamic package as SCIPAC; BOATAB is an afterburning version with a self-contained aircraft (hydrocarbon/air) finite-rate chemistry package. The coupling of viscous and inviscid flow processes is achieved by an overlaid procedure with interactive effects accounted for by a displacement thickness type correction to the inviscid plume interface.

  5. Computational models for the viscous/inviscid analysis of jet aircraft exhaust plumes. [predicting afterbody drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, S. M.; Pergament, H. S.; Thorpe, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Computational models which analyze viscous/inviscid flow processes in jet aircraft exhaust plumes are discussed. These models are component parts of an NASA-LaRC method for the prediction of nozzle afterbody drag. Inviscid/shock processes are analyzed by the SCIPAC code which is a compact version of a generalized shock capturing, inviscid plume code (SCIPPY). The SCIPAC code analyzes underexpanded jet exhaust gas mixtures with a self-contained thermodynamic package for hydrocarbon exhaust products and air. A detailed and automated treatment of the embedded subsonic zones behind Mach discs is provided in this analysis. Mixing processes along the plume interface are analyzed by two upgraded versions of an overlaid, turbulent mixing code (BOAT) developed previously for calculating nearfield jet entrainment. The BOATAC program is a frozen chemistry version of BOAT containing the aircraft thermodynamic package as SCIPAC; BOATAB is an afterburning version with a self-contained aircraft (hydrocarbon/air) finite-rate chemistry package. The coupling of viscous and inviscid flow processes is achieved by an overlaid procedure with interactive effects accounted for by a displacement thickness type correction to the inviscid plume interface.

  6. First direct sulfuric acid detection in the exhaust plume of a jet aircraft in flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtius, J.; Sierau, B.; Arnold, F.; Baumann, R.; Busen, R.; Schulte, P.; Schumann, U.

    Sulfuric acid (SA) was for the first time directly detected in the exhaust plume of a jet aircraft in flight. The measurements were made by a novel aircraft-based VACA (Volatile Aerosol Component Analyzer) instrument of MPI-K Heidelberg while the research aircraft Falcon was chasing another research aircraft ATTAS. The VACA measures the total SA in the gas and in volatile submicron aerosol particles. During the chase the engines of the ATTAS alternatively burned sulfur-poor and sulfur-rich fuel. In the sulfur-rich plume very marked enhancements of total SA were observed of up to 1300 pptv which were closely correlated with ΔCO2 and ΔT and were far above the local ambient atmospheric background-level of typically 15-50 pptv. Our observations indicate a lower limit for the efficiency ɛ for fuel-sulfur conversion to SA of 0.34 %.

  7. Stratospheric aircraft exhaust plume and wake chemistry studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miake-Lye, R. C.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Brown, R. C.; Kolb, C. E.; Worsnop, D. R.; Zahniser, M. S.; Robinson, G. N.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Shia, R-L.

    1992-01-01

    This report documents progress to date in an ongoing study to analyze and model emissions leaving a proposed High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) from when the exhaust gases leave the engine until they are deposited at atmospheric scales in the stratosphere. Estimates are given for the emissions, summarizing relevant earlier work (CIAP) and reviewing current propulsion research efforts. The chemical evolution and the mixing and vortical motion of the exhaust are analyzed to track the exhaust and its speciation as the emissions are mixed to atmospheric scales. The species tracked include those that could be heterogeneously reactive on the surfaces of the condensed solid water (ice) particles and on exhaust soot particle surfaces. Dispersion and reaction of chemical constituents in the far wake are studied with a Lagrangian air parcel model, in conjunction with a radiation code to calculate the net heating/cooling. Laboratory measurements of heterogeneous chemistry of aqueous sulfuric acid and nitric acid hydrates are also described. Results include the solubility of HCl in sulfuric acid which is a key parameter for modeling stratospheric processing. We also report initial results for condensation of nitric acid trihydrate from gas phase H2O and HNO3.

  8. Measurements of HONO, NO, NOy and SO2 in aircraft exhaust plumes at cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkat, T.; Voigt, C.; Arnold, F.; Schlager, H.; Kleffmann, J.; Aufmhoff, H.; Schäuble, D.; Schaefer, M.; Schumann, U.

    2011-05-01

    Measurements of gaseous nitrogen and sulfur oxide emissions in young aircraft exhaust plumes give insight into chemical oxidation processes inside aircraft engines. Particularly, the OH-induced formation of nitrous acid (HONO) from nitrogen oxide (NO) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) from sulfur dioxide (SO2) inside the turbine which is highly uncertain, need detailed analysis to address the climate impact of aviation. We report on airborne in situ measurements at cruise altitudes of HONO, NO, NOy, and SO2 in 9 wakes of 8 different types of modern jet airliners, including for the first time also an A380. Measurements of HONO and SO2 were made with an ITCIMS (Ion Trap Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer) using a new ion-reaction scheme involving SF5- reagent ions. The measured molar ratios HONO/NO and HONO/NOy with averages of 0.038 ± 0.010 and 0.027 ± 0.005 were found to decrease systematically with increasing NOx emission-index (EI NOx). We calculate an average EI HONO of 0.31 ± 0.12 g NO2 kg-1. Using reliable measurements of HONO and NOy, which are less adhesive than H2SO4 to the inlet walls, we derive the OH-induced conversion fraction of fuel sulfur to sulfuric acid $\\varepsilon$ with an average of 2.2 ± 0.5 %. $\\varepsilon$ also tends to decrease with increasing EI NOx, consistent with earlier model simulations. The lowest HONO/NO, HONO/NOy and $\\varepsilon$ was observed for the largest passenger aircraft A380.

  9. Sulfuric acid measurements in the exhaust plume of a jet aircraft in flight: Implications for the sulfuric acid formation efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtius, J.; Arnold, F.; Schulte, P.

    2002-04-01

    Sulfuric acid concentrations were measured in the exhaust plume of a B737-300 aircraft in flight. The measurements were made onboard of the German research aircraft Falcon using the Volatile Aerosol Component Analyzer (VACA). The VACA measures total H2SO4, which is the sum of gaseous H2SO4 and aerosol H2SO4. Measurements took place at distances of 25-200 m behind the B737 corresponding to plume ages of about 0.1-1 seconds. The fuel sulfur content (FSC) of the fuel burned by the B737 engines was alternatively 2.6 and 56 mg sulfur per kilogram fuel (ppmm). H2SO4 concentrations measured in the plume for the 56 ppmm sulfur case were up to ~600 pptv. The average concentration of H2SO4 measured in the ambient atmosphere outside the aircraft plume was 88 pptv, the maximum ambient atmospheric H2SO4 was ~300 pptv. Average efficiencies ɛΔCO2 = 3.3 +/- 1.8% and ɛΔT = 2.9 +/- 1.6% for fuel sulfur conversion to sulfuric acid were inferred when relating the H2SO4 data to measurements of the plume tracers ΔCO2 and ΔT.

  10. Influence of fuel sulfur on the composition of aircraft exhaust plumes: The experiments SULFUR 1-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, U.; Arnold, F.; Busen, R.; Curtius, J.; Kärcher, B.; Kiendler, A.; Petzold, A.; Schlager, H.; Schröder, F.; Wohlfrom, K.-H.

    2002-08-01

    The series of SULFUR experiments was performed to determine the aerosol particle and contrail formation properties of aircraft exhaust plumes for different fuel sulfur contents (FSC, from 2 to 5500 μg/g), flight conditions, and aircraft (ATTAS, A310, A340, B707, B747, B737, DC8, DC10). This paper describes the experiments and summarizes the results obtained, including new results from SULFUR 7. The conversion fraction ɛ of fuel sulfur to sulfuric acid is measured in the range 0.34 to 4.5% for an older (Mk501) and 3.3 +/- 1.8% for a modern engine (CFM56-3B1). For low FSC, ɛ is considerably smaller than what is implied by the volume of volatile particles in the exhaust. For FSC >= 100 μg/g and ɛ as measured, sulfuric acid is the most important precursor of volatile aerosols formed in aircraft exhaust plumes of modern engines. The aerosol measured in the plumes of various aircraft and models suggests ɛ to vary between 0.5 and 10% depending on the engine and its state of operation. The number of particles emitted from various subsonic aircraft engines or formed in the exhaust plume per unit mass of burned fuel varies from 2 × 1014 to 3 × 1015 kg-1 for nonvolatile particles (mainly black carbon or soot) and is of order 2 × 1017 kg-1 for volatile particles >1.5 nm at plume ages of a few seconds. Chemiions (CIs) formed in kerosene combustion are found to be quite abundant and massive. CIs contain sulfur-bearing molecules and organic matter. The concentration of CIs at engine exit is nearly 109 cm-3. Positive and negative CIs are found with masses partially exceeding 8500 atomic mass units. The measured number of volatile particles cannot be explained with binary homogeneous nucleation theory but is strongly related to the number of CIs. The number of ice particles in young contrails is close to the number of soot particles at low FSC and increases with increasing FSC. Changes in soot particles and FSC have little impact on the threshold temperature for contrail

  11. Exhaust Nozzle Plume and Shock Wave Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.; Elmiligui, Alaa; Cliff, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the exhaust plume. Both the nozzle exhaust plume shape and the tail shock shape may be affected by an interaction that may alter the vehicle sonic boom signature. The plume and shock interaction was studied using Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation on two types of convergent-divergent nozzles and a simple wedge shock generator. The nozzle plume effects on the lower wedge compression region are evaluated for two- and three-dimensional nozzle plumes. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the deflected lower plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the wedge is modified by the presence of the plume, and the computational predictions show significant (8 to 15 percent) changes in shock amplitude.

  12. The chemistry and diffusion of aircraft exhausts in the lower stratosphere during the first few hours after fly-by. [with attention to ozone depletion by SST exhaust plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilst, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis of the hydrogen-nitrogen-oxygen reaction systems in the lower stratosphere as they are initially perturbed by individual aircraft engine exhaust plumes was conducted in order to determine whether any significant chemical reactions occur, either among exhaust chemical species, or between these species and the environmental ozone, while the exhaust products are confined to intact plume segments at relatively high concentrations. The joint effects of diffusive mixing and chemical kinetics on the reactions were also studied, using the techniques of second-order closure diffusion/chemistry models. The focus of the study was on the larger problem of the potential depletion of ozone by supersonic transport aircraft exhaust materials emitted into the lower stratosphere.

  13. Multispectral imaging of aircraft exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkson, Emily E.; Messinger, David W.

    2016-05-01

    Aircraft pollutants emitted during the landing-takeoff (LTO) cycle have significant effects on the local air quality surrounding airports. There are currently no inexpensive, portable, and unobtrusive sensors to quantify the amount of pollutants emitted from aircraft engines throughout the LTO cycle or to monitor the spatial-temporal extent of the exhaust plume. We seek to thoroughly characterize the unburned hydrocarbon (UHC) emissions from jet engine plumes and to design a portable imaging system to remotely quantify the emitted UHCs and temporally track the distribution of the plume. This paper shows results from the radiometric modeling of a jet engine exhaust plume and describes a prototype long-wave infrared imaging system capable of meeting the above requirements. The plume was modeled with vegetation and sky backgrounds, and filters were selected to maximize the detectivity of the plume. Initial calculations yield a look-up chart, which relates the minimum amount of emitted UHCs required to detect the presence of a plume to the noise-equivalent radiance of a system. Future work will aim to deploy the prototype imaging system at the Greater Rochester International Airport to assess the applicability of the system on a national scale. This project will help monitor the local pollution surrounding airports and allow better-informed decision-making regarding emission caps and pollution bylaws.

  14. Infrared Signature Modeling and Analysis of Aircraft Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Arvind G.

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, the survivability of an aircraft has been put to task more than ever before. One of the main reasons is the increase in the usage of Infrared (IR) guided Anti-Aircraft Missiles, especially due to the availability of Man Portable Air Defence System (MANPADS) with some terrorist groups. Thus, aircraft IR signatures are gaining more importance as compared to their radar, visual, acoustic, or any other signatures. The exhaust plume ejected from the aircraft is one of the important sources of IR signature in military aircraft that use low bypass turbofan engines for propulsion. The focus of the present work is modelling of spectral IR radiation emission from the exhaust jet of a typical military aircraft and to evaluate the aircraft susceptibility in terms of the aircraft lock-on range due to its plume emission, for a simple case against a typical Surface to Air Missile (SAM). The IR signature due to the aircraft plume is examined in a holistic manner. A comprehensive methodology of computing IR signatures and its affect on aircraft lock-on range is elaborated. Commercial CFD software has been used to predict the plume thermo-physical properties and subsequently an in-house developed code was used for evaluating the IR radiation emitted by the plume. The LOWTRAN code has been used for modeling the atmospheric IR characteristics. The results obtained from these models are in reasonable agreement with some available experimental data. The analysis carried out in this paper succinctly brings out the intricacy of the radiation emitted by various gaseous species in the plume and the role of atmospheric IR transmissivity in dictating the plume IR signature as perceived by an IR guided SAM.

  15. Particle Characterization in Rocket Exhaust Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callen, E. Eugene, Jr.; Fisher, J. Scott

    1997-01-01

    A method to characterize particles in rocket exhaust plumes is developed. The particle velocity, size, and material composition are determined from crater characteristics resulting from impacts into aluminum and copper targets passed through the plume. The targets are mounted on a steel arm approximately 21 inches (53 cm) long which is rotated through the plume at sufficient velocity to prevent material failure resulting from thermal effects. A Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with secondary x-ray detectors is used to determine the particle material, and a standard optical measurement microscope is used to determine the crater diameter and depth. The crater diameter and depth are used in turn, as inputs to a ballistics computer code to estimate the velocity and size of the particle. The target has a safe residence time in the plume of approximately 50 ms before reaching an unacceptably high temperature. The = must mach a velocity of 104 ft/s (32 m/s) before entering the plume to produce the design residence time of 20 ms. The arm is actuated by a torsion spring with a 5-inch (13 cm) outer diameter, 0.625-inch (16 mm wire diameter, and 11 coils. A prototype of the entire rocket exhaust particle impact characterization system (PICS) was constructed and statically tested.

  16. Wedge Shock and Nozzle Exhaust Plume Interaction in a Supersonic Jet Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Zaman, Khairul; Fagan, Amy; Heath, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the nozzle exhaust plume. Aft body shock waves that interact with the exhaust plume contribute to the near-field pressure signature of a vehicle. The plume and shock interaction was studied using computational fluid dynamics and compared with experimental data from a coaxial convergent-divergent nozzle flow in an open jet facility. A simple diamond-shaped wedge was used to generate the shock in the outer flow to study its impact on the inner jet flow. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the opposite plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the nozzle exhaust plume was modified by the presence of the wedge. Both the experimental results and computational predictions show changes in plume deflection.

  17. Impact of aircraft plume dynamics on airport local air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Steven R. H.; Britter, Rex E.; Waitz, Ian A.

    2013-08-01

    Air quality degradation in the locality of airports poses a public health hazard. The ability to quantitatively predict the air quality impacts of airport operations is of importance for assessing the air quality and public health impacts of airports today, of future developments, and for evaluating approaches for mitigating these impacts. However, studies such as the Project for the Sustainable Development of Heathrow have highlighted shortcomings in understanding of aircraft plume dispersion. Further, if national or international aviation environmental policies are to be assessed, a computationally efficient method of modeling aircraft plume dispersion is needed. To address these needs, we describe the formulation and validation of a three-dimensional integral plume model appropriate for modeling aircraft exhaust plumes at airports. We also develop a simplified concentration correction factor approach to efficiently account for dispersion processes particular to aircraft plumes. The model is used to explain monitoring station results in the London Heathrow area showing that pollutant concentrations are approximately constant over wind speeds of 3-12 m s-1, and is applied to reproduce empirically derived relationships between engine types and peak NOx concentrations at Heathrow. We calculated that not accounting for aircraft plume dynamics would result in a factor of 1.36-2.3 over-prediction of the mean NOx concentration (depending on location), consistent with empirical evidence of a factor of 1.7 over-prediction. Concentration correction factors are also calculated for aircraft takeoff, landing and taxi emissions, providing an efficient way to account for aircraft plume effects in atmospheric dispersion models.

  18. Monopropellant thruster exhaust plume contamination measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baerwald, R. K.; Passamaneck, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    The potential spacecraft contaminants in the exhaust plume of a 0.89N monopropellant hydrazine thruster were measured in an ultrahigh quartz crystal microbalances located at angles of approximately 0 deg, + 15 deg and + or - 30 deg with respect to the nozzle centerline. The crystal temperatures were controlled such that the mass adhering to the crystal surface at temperatures of from 106 K to 256 K could be measured. Thruster duty cycles of 25 ms on/5 seconds off, 100 ms on/10 seconds off, and 200 ms on/20 seconds off were investigated. The change in contaminant production with thruster life was assessed by subjecting the thruster to a 100,000 pulse aging sequence and comparing the before and after contaminant deposition rates. The results of these tests are summarized, conclusions drawn, and recommendations given.

  19. Pollutant monitoring of aircraft exhaust with multispectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkson, Emily E.; Messinger, David W.

    2016-10-01

    Communities surrounding local airports are becoming increasingly concerned about the aircraft pollutants emitted during the landing-takeoff (LTO) cycle, and their potential for negative health effects. Chicago, Los Angeles, Boston and London have all recently been featured in the news regarding concerns over the amount of airport pollution being emitted on a daily basis, and several studies have been published on the increased risks of cancer for those living near airports. There are currently no inexpensive, portable, and unobtrusive sensors that can monitor the spatial and temporal nature of jet engine exhaust plumes. In this work we seek to design a multispectral imaging system that is capable of tracking exhaust plumes during the engine idle phase, with a specific focus on unburned hydrocarbon (UHC) emissions. UHCs are especially potent to local air quality, and their strong absorption features allow them to act as a spatial and temporal plume tracer. Using a Gaussian plume to radiometrically model jet engine exhaust, we have begun designing an inexpensive, portable, and unobtrusive imaging system to monitor the relative amount of pollutants emitted by aircraft in the idle phase. The LWIR system will use two broadband filters to detect emitted UHCs. This paper presents the spatial and temporal radiometric models of the exhaust plume from a typical jet engine used on 737s. We also select filters for plume tracking, and propose an imaging system layout for optimal detectibility. In terms of feasibility, a multispectral imaging system will be two orders of magnitude cheaper than current unobtrusive methods (PTR-MS) used to monitor jet engine emissions. Large-scale impacts of this work will include increased capabilities to monitor local airport pollution, and the potential for better-informed decision-making regarding future developments to airports.

  20. Organic positive ions in aircraft gas-turbine engine exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, Andrey; Arnold, Frank

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) represent a significant fraction of atmospheric aerosol. However the role of organic species emitted by aircraft (as a consequence of the incomplete combustion of fuel in the engine) in nucleation of new volatile particles still remains rather speculative and requires a much more detailed analysis of the underlying mechanisms. Measurements in aircraft exhaust plumes have shown the presence of both different non-methane VOCs (e.g. PartEmis project) and numerous organic cluster ions (MPIK-Heidelberg). However the link between detected organic gas-phase species and measured mass spectrum of cluster ions is uncertain. Unfortunately, up to now there are no models describing the thermodynamics of the formation of primary organic cluster ions in the exhaust of aircraft engines. The aim of this work is to present first results of such a model development. The model includes the block of thermodynamic data based on proton affinities and gas basicities of organic molecules and the block of non-equilibrium kinetics of the cluster ions evolution in the exhaust. The model predicts important features of the measured spectrum of positive ions in the exhaust behind aircraft. It is shown that positive ions emitted by aircraft engines into the atmosphere mostly consist of protonated and hydrated organic cluster ions. The developed model may be explored also in aerosol investigations of the background atmosphere as well as in the analysis of the emission of fine aerosol particles by automobiles.

  1. Prediction of thermal radiation from a rocket's exhaust plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, C. B.

    1969-01-01

    Data from absorption coefficients and fine-structure parameters measured for water vapor have been incorporated in an analytic program useful in evaluating heating by radiation from the exhaust plume of a large rocket.

  2. Implementation of microwave transmissions for rocket exhaust plume diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutu, Nicholas George

    Rocket-launched vehicles produce a trail of exhaust that contains ions, free electrons, and soot. The exhaust plume increases the effective conductor length of the rocket. A conductor in the presence of an electric field (e.g. near the electric charge stored within a cloud) can channel an electric discharge. The electrical conductivity of the exhaust plume is related to its concentration of free electrons. The risk of a lightning strike in-flight is a function of both the conductivity of the body and its effective length. This paper presents an approach that relates the electron number density of the exhaust plume to its propagation constant. Estimated values of the collision frequency and electron number density generated from a numerical simulation of a rocket plume are used to guide the design of the experimental apparatus. Test par meters are identified for the apparatus designed to transmit a signal sweep form 4 GHz to 7 GHz through the exhaust plume of a J-class solid rocket motor. Measurements of the scattering parameters imply that the transmission does not penetrate the plume, but instead diffracts around it. The electron density 20 cm downstream from the nozzle exit is estimated to be between 2.7x1014 m--3 and 5.6x10 15 m--3.

  3. Aircraft Piston Engine Exhaust Emission Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A 2-day symposium on the reduction of exhaust emissions from aircraft piston engines was held on September 14 and 15, 1976, at the Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Papers were presented by both government organizations and the general aviation industry on the status of government contracts, emission measurement problems, data reduction procedures, flight testing, and emission reduction techniques.

  4. Impact of rocket exhaust plumes on atmospheric composition and climate ― an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Ch.; Schumann, U.; Graf, K.; Gottschaldt, K.-D.

    2013-03-01

    Rockets are the only direct anthropogenic emission sources into the upper atmosphere. Gaseous rocket emissions include CO, N2, H2, H2O, and CO2, while solid rocket motors (SRM) additionally inject significant amounts of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) particles and gaseous chlorine species into the atmosphere. These emissions strongly perturb local atmospheric trace gas and aerosol distributions. Here, previous aircraft measurements in various rocket exhaust plumes including several large space shuttle launch vehicles are compiled. The observed changes of the lower stratospheric composition in the near field are summarized. The injection of chlorine species and particles into the stratosphere can lead to ozone loss in rocket exhaust plumes. Local observations are compared with global model simulations of the effects of rocket emissions on stratospheric ozone concentrations. Large uncertainties remain concerning individual ozone loss reaction rates and the impact of small-scale plume effects on global chemistry. Further, remote sensing data from satellite indicate that rocket exhaust plumes regionally increase iron and water vapor concentrations in the mesosphere potentially leading to the formation of mesospheric clouds at 80- to 90-kilometer altitude. These satellite observations are summarized and the rocket emission inventory is compared with other natural and anthropogenic sources to the stratosphere such as volcanism, meteoritic material, and aviation.

  5. Summary of nozzle-exhaust plume flowfield analyses related to space shuttle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penny, M. M.

    1975-01-01

    Exhaust plume shape simulation is studied, with the major effort directed toward computer program development and analytical support of various plume related problems associated with the space shuttle. Program development centered on (1) two-phase nozzle-exhaust plume flows, (2) plume impingement, and (3) support of exhaust plume simulation studies. Several studies were also conducted to provide full-scale data for defining exhaust plume simulation criteria. Model nozzles used in launch vehicle test were analyzed and compared to experimental calibration data.

  6. Aircraft emissions, plume chemistry, and alternative fuels: results from the APEX, AAFEX, and MDW-2009 campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, E. C.; Herndon, S. C.; Timko, M.; Yu, Z.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Lee, B. H.; Santoni, G.; Munger, J. W.; Wofsy, S.; Anderson, B.; Knighton, W. B.

    2009-12-01

    We describe observations of aircraft emissions from the APEX, JETS-APEX2, APEX3, MDW-2009 and AAFEX campaigns. Direct emissions of HOx precursors are important for understanding exhaust plume chemistry due to their role in determining HOx concentrations. Nitrous acid (HONO) and formaldehyde are crucial HOx precursors and thus drivers of plume chemistry. At idle power, aircraft engine exhaust is unique among fossil fuel combustion sources due to the speciation of both NOx and VOCs. The impacts of emissions of HOx precursors on plume chemistry at low power are demonstrated with empirical observations of rapid NO to NO2 conversion, indicative of rapid HOx chemistry. The impacts of alternative fuels (derived from biomass, coal, and natural gas) on emissions of NOx, CO, and speciated VOCs are discussed.

  7. Modeling Macro- and Micro-Scale Turbulent Mixing and Chemistry in Engine Exhaust Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    1998-01-01

    Simulation of turbulent mixing and chemical processes in the near-field plume and plume-vortex regimes has been successfully carried out recently using a reduced gas phase kinetics mechanism which substantially decreased the computational cost. A detailed mechanism including gas phase HOx, NOx, and SOx chemistry between the aircraft exhaust and the ambient air in near-field aircraft plumes is compiled. A reduced mechanism capturing the major chemical pathways is developed. Predictions by the reduced mechanism are found to be in good agreement with those by the detailed mechanism. With the reduced chemistry, the computer CPU time is saved by a factor of more than 3.5 for the near-field plume modeling. Distributions of major chemical species are obtained and analyzed. The computed sensitivities of major species with respect to reaction step are deduced for identification of the dominant gas phase kinetic reaction pathways in the jet plume. Both the near field plume and the plume-vortex regimes were investigated using advanced mixing models. In the near field, a stand-alone mixing model was used to investigate the impact of turbulent mixing on the micro- and macro-scale mixing processes using a reduced reaction kinetics model. The plume-vortex regime was simulated using a large-eddy simulation model. Vortex plume behind Boeing 737 and 747 aircraft was simulated along with relevant kinetics. Many features of the computed flow field show reasonable agreement with data. The entrainment of the engine plumes into the wing tip vortices and also the partial detrainment of the plume were numerically captured. The impact of fluid mechanics on the chemical processes was also studied. Results show that there are significant differences between spatial and temporal simulations especially in the predicted SO3 concentrations. This has important implications for the prediction of sulfuric acid aerosols in the wake and may partly explain the discrepancy between past numerical studies

  8. Rocket exhaust plume impingement on the Voyager spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baerwald, R. K.

    1978-01-01

    In connection with the conduction of the long-duration Voyager missions to the outer planets and the sophisticated propulsion systems required, it was necessary to carry out an investigation to avoid exhaust plume impingement problems. The rarefied gas dynamics literature indicates that, for most engineering surfaces, the assumption of diffuse reemission and complete thermal accommodation is warranted in the free molecular flow regime. This assumption was applied to an analysis of a spacecraft plume impingement problem in the near-free molecular flow regime and yielded results to within a few percent of flight data. The importance of a correct treatment of the surface temperature was also demonstrated. Specular reflection, on the other hand, was shown to yield results which may be unconservative by a factor of 2 or 3. It is pointed out that one of the most difficult portions of an exhaust plume impingement analysis is the simulation of the impinged hardware. The geometry involved must be described as accurately and completely as possible.

  9. Exhaust Plume Measurements of the VASIMR VX-200

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmier, Benjamin; Bering, Edgar, III; Squire, Jared; Glover, Tim; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Brukardt, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Recent progress is discussed in the development of an advanced RF electric propulsion concept: the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) VX-200 engine, a 200 kW flight-technology prototype. Results from high power Helicon only and Helicon with ICRH experiments are performed on the VX-200 using argon plasma. Recent measurements of axial plasma density and potential profiles, magnetic field-line shaping, charge exchange, and force measurements taken in the plume of the VX-200 exhaust are made within a new 125 cubic meter cryo-pumped vacuum chamber and are presented in the context of RF plasma thruster physics.

  10. Environmental Effects of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Exhaust Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, B.; Pergament, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    The deposition of NOx and HCl in the stratosphere from the space shuttle solid rocket motors (SRM) and exhaust plume is discussed. A detailed comparison between stratospheric deposition rates using the baseline SRM propellant and an alternate propellant, which replaces ammonium perchlorate by ammonium nitrate, shows the total NOx deposition rate to be approximately the same for each propellant. For both propellants the ratio of the deposition rates of NOx to total chlorine-containing species is negligibly small. Rocket exhaust ground cloud transport processes in the troposphere are also examined. A brief critique of the multilayer diffusion models (presently used for predicting pollutant deposition in the troposphere) is presented, and some detailed cloud rise calculations are compared with data for Titan 3C launches. The results show that, when launch time meteorological data are used as input, the model can reasonably predict measured cloud stabilization heights.

  11. Species separation in rocket exhaust plumes and analytic plume flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppenwallner, G.

    2001-08-01

    Species separation in the exhaust plume of control thrusters of satellites is of main importance for the contamination analysis. Contamination concerns mainly scientific instruments or sensitive surfaces.. In continuum fluid dynamics a multi- component gas mixture can be treated as mixture with mean properties and with a flow field independent composition. This basic feature of continuum flow ceases to be valid in the rarefied flow regimes. In this regime there are two main mechanism which cause a separation of species in the flow field. a. Strong velocity gradients or streamline curvature. Strong stream line curvatures with large centrifugal forces exist close to the nozzle throat of sonic free jets [Sherman] or at the nozzle lip. Heavy gas constituents will not be able to follow these strong stream line curvatures. b. Different thermal velocity or thermal diffusivity of heavy and light gas constituents The transition from continuum to free molecular plume expansion can approximately be described by the sudden freeze model of Bird. At the freezing point molecular collisions suddenly cease and the further expansion is given by the velocity vector of the individual molecules at this freezing point. As light molecules have a larger thermal speed c than the heavy ones their spreading potential is also higher. This mechanism will also produce an enrichment of the plume boundary with light molecules. The approaches to model species separation in exhaust plumes as result of the above mechanism will be reviewed. To gain more insight into the separation the following cases are analyzed in detail: [B ]The free molecular supersonic expansion from a freezing plane. □ The various analytic plume flow models and their capability to predict the lateral spreading at the plume boundary (e.g. Simmons, Boynton, Brook, DLR) □ DSMC test case calculations of single and two-species plumes with mass separation. (M. Ivanov, ITAM) Based on this analysis a new 3 region model for species

  12. Radiation from Rocket Exhaust Plumes. Part 1; Inhomogeneous Radiant Heat Transfer from Saturn Type Rocket Exhaust Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, Robert M.; Carlson, Donald J.

    1966-01-01

    A radiant heat transfer computer program has been developed by R-AERO-A to calculate radiation from inhomogeneous gases prevalent in Saturn-type exhaust plumes. The radiating species considered in this computer program are water vapor, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and carbon particles. The infrared spectral absorption characteristics of these species have been determined under NASA contract. Band model parameters have been used to represent the infrared spectral absorption coefficients over 25 cm-I increments. A modified Curtis-Goodson approximation is used in the inhomogeneous heat transfer calculation. This has been shown to give satisfactory results over the temperature and pressure range of interest in Saturn exhaust plumes. Results are shown for the Saturn-type engines for specific flow field assumptions. Some comparison with experimental spectroscopic data will also be presented. The effect of wavelength increment, field of view, and distance increment along the line of sight on the heat transfer will be discussed. Computer techniques for minimum computer time in calculating radiation from a three-dimensional flow field will also be outlined.

  13. Exhaust Nozzle Plume Effects on Sonic Boom Test Results for Isolated Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.

    2011-01-01

    Reducing or eliminating the operational restrictions of supersonic aircraft over populated areas has led to extensive research at NASA. Restrictions were due to the disturbance of the sonic boom, caused by the coalescence of shock waves formed off the aircraft. Recent work has been performed to reduce the magnitude of the sonic boom N-wave generated by airplane components with focus on shock waves caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Previous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis showed how the shock wave formed at the nozzle lip interacts with the nozzle boat-tail expansion wave. An experiment was conducted in the 1- by 1-ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center to validate the computational study. Results demonstrated how the nozzle lip shock moved with increasing nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) and reduced the nozzle boat-tail expansion, causing a favorable change in the observed pressure signature. Experimental results were presented for comparison to the CFD results. The strong nozzle lip shock at high values of NPR intersected the nozzle boat-tail expansion and suppressed the expansion wave. Based on these results, it may be feasible to reduce the boat-tail expansion for a future supersonic aircraft with under-expanded nozzle exhaust flow by modifying nozzle pressure or nozzle divergent section geometry.

  14. Calibration and demonstration of a condensation nuclei counting system for airborne measurements of aircraft exhausted particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cofer, Wesley R.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Winstead, Edward L.; Bagwell, Donald R.

    A system of multiple continuous-flow condensation nuclei counters (CNC) was assembled, calibrated, and demonstrated on a NASA T-39 Sabreliner jet aircraft. The mission was to penetrate the exhaust plumes and/or contrails of other subsonic jet aircraft and determine the concentrations of submicrometer diameter aerosol particles. Mission criteria required rapid response measurements ( ˜ 1 s) at aircraft cruise altitudes (9-12 km). The CNC sampling system was optimized to operate at 160 Torr. Aerosol samples were acquired through an externally mounted probe. Installed downstream of the probe was a critical flow orifice that provided sample to the CNC system. The orifice not only controlled volumetric flow rate, but also dampened probe pressure/flow oscillations encountered in the turbulent aircraft-wake vortex environment. Laboratory calibrations with NaCl particles under representative conditions are reported that indicate small amounts of particle loss and a maximum measurement efficiency of ˜ 75% for particles with diameters ranging from ⩾ 0.01- ⩽ 0.18 μm Data from exhaust/contrail samplings of a NASA B757 and DC-8 at cruise altitude are discussed. Data include exhaust/contrail measurements made during periods in which the B757 port jet engine burned low-sulfur fuel while the starboard engine simultaneously burned specially prepared high-sulfur fuel. The data discussed highlight the CNC systems performance, and introduce new observations pertinent to the behavior of sulfur in aircraft exhaust aerosol chemistry.

  15. Hydrazine engine plume contamination mapping. [measuring instruments for rocket exhaust from liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chirivella, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Instrumentation for the measurement of plume exhaust specie deposition rates were developed and demonstrated. The instruments, two sets of quartz crystal microbalances, were designed for low temperature operation in the back flow and variable temperature operation in the core flow regions of an exhaust plume. These quartz crystal microbalances performed nominally, and measurements of exhaust specie deposition rates for 8400 number of pulses for a 0.1-lb monopropellant thruster are reported.

  16. Analysis of Exhaust Plume Effects on Sonic Boom for a 59-Degree Wing Body Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.

    2011-01-01

    Reducing or eliminating the operational restrictions of supersonic aircraft over populated areas has led to extensive research at NASA. Restrictions are due to the disturbance of the sonic boom, caused by the coalescence of shock waves formed off the aircraft. Recent work has been performed to reduce the magnitude of the sonic boom N-wave generated by airplane components with focus on shock waves caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Previous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analyses showed how the shock wave formed at the nozzle lip interacted with the nozzle boat-tail expansion wave. The nozzle lip shock moved with increasing nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) and reduced the nozzle boat-tail expansion. Lip shock movement caused a favorable change in the observed pressure signature. These results were applied to a simplified supersonic vehicle geometry with no inlets and no tail, in which the goal was to demonstrate how under-expanded nozzle operation reduced the sonic boom signature by twelve percent. A secondary goal was to demonstrate the use of the Cart3D inviscid code for off-body pressure signatures including the nozzle plume effect.

  17. Design of Experiments for Both Experimental and Analytical Study of Exhaust Plume Effects on Sonic Boom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.

    2009-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to study the plume effects on sonic boom signature for isolated nozzle configurations. The objectives of these analyses were to provide comparison to past work using modern CFD analysis tools, to investigate the differences of high aspect ratio nozzles to circular (axisymmetric) nozzles, and to report the effects of under expanded nozzle operation on boom signature. CFD analysis was used to address the plume effects on sonic boom signature from a baseline exhaust nozzle. Nearfield pressure signatures were collected for nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) between 6 and 10. A computer code was used to extrapolate these signatures to a ground-observed sonic boom N-wave. Trends show that there is a reduction in sonic boom N-wave signature as NPR is increased from 6 to 10. As low boom designs are developed and improved, there will be a need for understanding the interaction between the aircraft boat tail shocks and the exhaust nozzle plume. These CFD analyses will provide a baseline study for future analysis efforts. For further study, a design of experiments has been conducted to develop a hybrid method where both CFD and small scale wind tunnel testing will validate the observed trends. The CFD and testing will be used to screen a number of factors which are important to low boom propulsion integration, including boat tail angle, nozzle geometry, and the effect of spacing and stagger on nozzle pairs. To design the wind tunnel experiment, CFD was instrumental in developing a model which would provide adequate space to observe the nozzle and boat tail shock structure without interference from the wind tunnel walls.

  18. Aircraft Engine Exhaust Nozzle System for Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Czech, Michael J. (Inventor); Elkoby, Ronen (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The aircraft exhaust engine nozzle system includes a fan nozzle to receive a fan flow from a fan disposed adjacent to an engine disposed above an airframe surface of the aircraft, a core nozzle disposed within the fan nozzle and receiving an engine core flow, and a pylon structure connected to the core nozzle and structurally attached with the airframe surface to secure the engine to the aircraft.

  19. Detection of aircraft exhaust in hyperspectral image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Sarah E.; West, Leanne L.; Gimmestad, Gary G.; Smith, William L., Sr.; Burdette, Edward M.

    2011-10-01

    The use of a hyperspectral imaging system for the detection of gases has been investigated, and algorithms have been developed for various applications. Of particular interest here is the ability to use these algorithms in the detection of the wake disturbances trailing an aircraft. A dataset of long wave infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral datacubes taken with a Telops Hyper-Cam at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta, Georgia is investigated. The methodology presented here assumes that the aircraft engine exhaust gases will become entrained in wake vortices that develop; therefore, if the exhaust can be detected upon exiting the engines, it can be followed through subsequent datacubes until the vortex disturbance is detected. Gases known to exist in aircraft exhaust are modeled, and the Adaptive Coherence/Cosine Estimator (ACE) is used to search for these gases. Although wake vortices have not been found in the data, an unknown disturbance following the passage of the aircraft has been discovered.

  20. Spectral radiance measurements of exhaust plumes from scale model rocket engines.

    PubMed

    McCaa, D J

    1968-05-01

    A short duration experimental technique for investigating radiative properties of rocket exhaust plumes at high altitudes is described. Experimental measurements of the spectral radiance of two interacting exhaust plumes generated by 1/45 scale F-l engines burning gaseous ethylene and oxygen are presented. In addition, the spectral radiance characteristics of several Saturn auxiliary solid propellant rocket motors have also been measured and these results are included. The measurements were obtained with a rapid scanning ir spectrometer.

  1. Range safety signal propagation through the SRM exhaust plume of the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, F. P.; Davies, A. R.; Rajasekhar, P. S.; Thompson, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical predictions of plume interference for the space shuttle range safety system by solid rocket booster exhaust plumes are reported. The signal propagation was calculated using a split operator technique based upon the Fresnel-Kirchoff integral, using fast Fourier transforms to evaluate the convolution and treating the plume as a series of absorbing and phase-changing screens. Talanov's lens transformation was applied to reduce aliasing problems caused by ray divergence.

  2. The role of ions in the formation and evolution of particles in aircraft plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fangqun; Turco, Richard P.

    We consider the effects on aircraft plume microphysics of ions generated by chemiionization processes within the engine combustors. Ions provide centers around which molecular clusters rapidly coalesce, thus promoting the formation of electrically charged sulfuric acid/water aerosols. The resulting charged micro-particles exhibit enhanced growth due to condensation and coagulation aided by electrostatic effects. Simulations with a plume microphysics code show that volatile particles observed behind aircraft may be explained by such processes, as long as initial ion concentrations in the exhaust exceed ˜108/cm³. This analysis also suggests that the primary emissions of sulfuric acid (plus sulfur trioxide) should amount to at least 20-30% of the fuel sulfur to explain the observed number of volatile particles >9 nm in diameter. Ionized plume simulations reveal a distinct bimodal aerosol distribution, in which an “ion” mode constitutes the larger “activated” volatile sulfuric acid particles, while a smaller “neutral” mode comprises the residual slowly-growing neutral molecular clusters formed in the highly supersaturated region of the plume.

  3. Exhaust emissions reduction for intermittent combustion aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rezy, B. J.; Stuckas, K. J.; Tucker, J. R.; Meyers, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Three concepts which, to an aircraft piston engine, provide reductions in exhaust emissions of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide while simultaneously improving fuel economy. The three chosen concepts, (1) an improved fuel injection system, (2) an improved cooling cylinder head, and (3) exhaust air injection, when combined, show a synergistic relationship in achieving these goals. In addition, the benefits of variable ignition timing were explored and both dynamometer and flight testing of the final engine configuration were accomplished.

  4. Exhaust Nozzle Plume Effects on Sonic Boom Test Results for Vectored Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Reducing or eliminating the operational restrictions of supersonic aircraft over populated areas has led to extensive research at NASA. Restrictions were due to the disturbance of the sonic boom, caused by the coalescence of shock waves formed off the aircraft. Recent work has been performed to reduce the magnitude of the sonic boom N-wave generated by airplane components with a focus on shock waves caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Previous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis showed how the shock wave formed at the nozzle lip interacts with the nozzle boat-tail expansion wave. An experiment was conducted in the 1- by 1-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Results show how the shock generated at the nozzle lip affects the near field pressure signature, and thereby the potential sonic boom contribution for a nozzle at vector angles from 3 to 8 . The experiment was based on the NASA F-15 nozzle used in the Lift and Nozzle Change Effects on Tail Shock experiment, which possessed a large external boat-tail angle. In this case, the large boat-tail angle caused a dramatic expansion, which dominated the near field pressure signature. The impact of nozzle vector angle and nozzle pressure ratio are summarized.

  5. Remote passive detection of aircraft exhausts at airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Klaus P.; Jahn, Carsten; Harig, Roland; Aleyt, Christian; Rusch, Peter

    Emissions from vented sources are often important inputs for the development of emission inventories and contribute to local air pollution and global enhancement of greenhouse gases. Aircraft engines are part of these emission sources. A passive measurement technique such as FTIR emission spectrometry is more cost effective and faster in operation for the determination of the composition of hot exhausts of this kind than other measurement systems as e.g. in situ techniques. Within the scope of aircraft emission investigations the measurements were performed from a measurement van which is equipped with an FTIR spectrometer of high spectral resolution coupled with a telescope and a two-axis movable mirror for rapid orientation towards the emission sources. At airports the emission indices of CO2, CO and NO of main engines and auxiliary power units of standing aircraft were determined. The measurement time is about one minute. The accuracy is better than 30 % as found from burner experiments with calibration gases (CO and NO). The method is also applied to detect exhausts of flares and smoke stacks. Currently, a new scanning FTIR-system is developed. The system allows imaging of the exhaust gas and rapid automated alignment of the field of view. The goal of the new development is to measure aircraft exhausts during normal operations at the airport. The spectrometer is coupled with a camera giving an image of the scenery so that a rapid selection of the hottest exhaust area is possible. It is planned to equip the system with an infrared camera for automatic tracking of this area with the scanning mirror so that measurements of the exhausts of a moving aircraft are possible.

  6. Identification of lubrication oil in the particulate matter emissions from engine exhaust of in-service commercial aircraft.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenhong; Herndon, Scott C; Ziemba, Luke D; Timko, Michael T; Liscinsky, David S; Anderson, Bruce E; Miake-Lye, Richard C

    2012-09-04

    Lubrication oil was identified in the organic particulate matter (PM) emissions of engine exhaust plumes from in-service commercial aircraft at Chicago Midway Airport (MDW) and O'Hare International Airport (ORD). This is the first field study focused on aircraft lubrication oil emissions, and all of the observed plumes described in this work were due to near-idle engine operations. The identification was carried out with an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF AMS) via a collaborative laboratory and field investigation. A characteristic mass marker of lubrication oil, I(85)/I(71), the ratio of ion fragment intensity between m/z = 85 and 71, was used to distinguish lubrication oil from jet engine combustion products. This AMS marker was based on ion fragmentation patterns measured using electron impact ionization for two brands of widely used lubrication oil in a laboratory study. The AMS measurements of exhaust plumes from commercial aircraft in this airport field study reveal that lubrication oil is commonly present in organic PM emissions that are associated with emitted soot particles, unlike the purely oil droplets observed at the lubrication system vent. The characteristic oil marker, I(85)/I(71), was applied to quantitatively determine the contribution from lubrication oil in measured aircraft plumes, which ranges from 5% to 100%.

  7. 78 FR 65554 - Exhaust Emission Standards for New Aircraft Turbine Engines and Identification Plate for Aircraft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 34 and 45 RIN 2120-AK15 Exhaust Emission Standards for New Aircraft Turbine Engines and Identification Plate for Aircraft Engines Correction In rule document 2013-24712, appearing on pages 63015-63017...

  8. Remote sensing of aircraft exhaust temperature and composition by passive Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Edgar; Schäfer, Klaus; Black, John; Harig, Roland; Jahn, Carsten

    2007-10-01

    The scanning infrared gas imaging system (SIGIS-HR) and the quantitative gas analysis software MAPS (Multicomponent Air Pollution Software) are applied to investigate the spatial distribution of the temperature and gas concentrations (CO, NO) within the plume of aircraft engines at airports. The system integrates an infrared camera also. It is used for the localisation of the hot source that additionally suggests the best measurement position of the SIGIS-HR. The application of emission FTIR spectrometry for the measurement of temperature and gas emission index of CO and NO is presented for the exhaust of a small turbojet based on a helicopter turbine. In these measurements the emitted infrared radiation from the exhaust gas stream was collected by the SIGIS-HR at different spectral resolution (56 cm -1 and 0.2 cm -1). The software MAPS includes the Instrumental Line Shape (ILS) of the OPAG- 22 FTIR spectrometer obtained by active gas cell measurements and ILS modelling. The rough concept of the system will be presented and operational applications will be discussed. The results of the investigation of the temperature and gas concentrations (CO, NO) within the aircraft engine plumes will be shown. The limitations and of the systems will be discussed.

  9. High-speed schlieren imaging of rocket exhaust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coultas-McKenney, Caralyn; Winter, Kyle; Hargather, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Experiments are conducted to examine the exhaust of a variety of rocket engines. The rocket engines are mounted in a schlieren system to allow high-speed imaging of the engine exhaust during startup, steady state, and shutdown. A variety of rocket engines are explored including a research-scale liquid rocket engine, consumer/amateur solid rocket motors, and water bottle rockets. Comparisons of the exhaust characteristics, thrust and cost for this range of rockets is presented. The variety of nozzle designs, target functions, and propellant type provides unique variations in the schlieren imaging.

  10. Measurements of nitrous acid in commercial aircraft exhaust at the Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ben H; Santoni, Gregory W; Wood, Ezra C; Herndon, Scott C; Miake-Lye, Richard C; Zahniser, Mark S; Wofsy, Steven C; Munger, J William

    2011-09-15

    The Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX), conducted in January of 2009 in Palmdale, California, quantified aerosol and gaseous emissions from a DC-8 aircraft equipped with CFM56-2C1 engines using both traditional and synthetic fuels. This study examines the emissions of nitrous acid (HONO) and nitrogen oxides (NO(x) = NO + NO(2)) measured 145 m behind the grounded aircraft. The fuel-based emission index (EI) for HONO increases approximately 6-fold from idle to takeoff conditions but plateaus between 65 and 100% of maximum rated engine thrust, while the EI for NO(x) increases continuously. At high engine power, NO(x) EI is greater when combusting traditional (JP-8) rather than Fischer-Tropsch fuels, while HONO exhibits the opposite trend. Additionally, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) was identified in exhaust plumes emitted only during engine idle. Chemical reactions responsible for emissions and comparison to previous measurement studies are discussed.

  11. Non-equilibrium radiation from viscous chemically reacting two-phase exhaust plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penny, M. M.; Smith, S. D.; Mikatarian, R. R.; Ring, L. R.; Anderson, P. G.

    1976-01-01

    A knowledge of the structure of the rocket exhaust plumes is necessary to solve problems involving plume signatures, base heating, plume/surface interactions, etc. An algorithm is presented which treats the viscous flow of multiphase chemically reacting fluids in a two-dimensional or axisymmetric supersonic flow field. The gas-particle flow solution is fully coupled with the chemical kinetics calculated using an implicit scheme to calculate chemical production rates. Viscous effects include chemical species diffusion with the viscosity coefficient calculated using a two-equation turbulent kinetic energy model.

  12. Speciation and chemical evolution of nitrogen oxides in aircraft exhaust near airports.

    PubMed

    Wood, Ezra C; Herndon, Scott C; Timko, Michael T; Yelvington, Paul E; Miake-Lye, Richard C

    2008-03-15

    Measurements of nitrogen oxides from a variety of commercial aircraft engines as part of the JETS-APEX2 and APEX3 campaigns show that NOx (NOx [triple bond] NO + NO2) is emitted primarily in the form of NO2 at idle thrust and NO at high thrust. A chemical kinetics combustion model reproduces the observed NO2 and NOx trends with engine power and sheds light on the relevant chemical mechanisms. Experimental evidence is presented of rapid conversion of NO to NO2 in the exhaust plume from engines at low thrust. The rapid conversion and the high NO2/NOx emission ratios observed are unrelated to ozone chemistry. NO2 emissions from a CFM56-3B1 engine account for approximately 25% of the NOx emitted below 3000 feet (916 m) and 50% of NOx emitted below 500 feet (153 m) during a standard ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) landing-takeoff cycle. Nitrous acid (HONO) accounts for 0.5% to 7% of NOy emissions from aircraft exhaust depending on thrust and engine type. Implications for photochemistry near airports resulting from aircraft emissions are discussed.

  13. Shuttle primary reaction control system engine exhaust plume contamination effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steve; Ehlers, Horst; Pedley, Mike; Cross, John; Hakes, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Space Shuttle proximity operations constitute an important part of the SSF induced external environment. The impingement of primary reaction control system (PRCS) engine plumes on SSF functional surfaces during docking or berthing and separation leads to concerns about molecular contamination and high speed particle impact. The Shuttle Plume Impingement flight Experiment (SPIE) was designed to provide a direct measure of both the molecular contamination and particle impact rates produced by Shuttle PRCS engines in the LEO environment. The measured permanent deposition produced by PRCS engine firings was less than that assumed in current SSF programatic assessments. Only two to three possible high velocity particle impact pits were observed on the RMS end effector hardware.

  14. Equations for calculating orbiter surface erosion and breakage rates in IUS and SSUS SRM exhaust plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    Equations and coefficients for calculating the flux of solid particles in the exhaust plumes of the interim upper stage and SSUS solid rocket motors (SRM) are considered. Modifications required to account for the independent motions of the orbiter and the SRM, such as will result during an on-orbit SRM firing are described.

  15. Computational models for the analysis of three-dimensional internal and exhaust plume flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, S. M.; Delguidice, P. D.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes computational procedures developed for the analysis of three-dimensional supersonic ducted flows and multinozzle exhaust plume flowfields. The models/codes embodying these procedures cater to a broad spectrum of geometric situations via the use of multiple reference plane grid networks in several coordinate systems. Shock capturing techniques are employed to trace the propagation and interaction of multiple shock surfaces while the plume interface, separating the exhaust and external flows, and the plume external shock are discretely analyzed. The computational grid within the reference planes follows the trace of streamlines to facilitate the incorporation of finite-rate chemistry and viscous computational capabilities. Exhaust gas properties consist of combustion products in chemical equilibrium. The computational accuracy of the models/codes is assessed via comparisons with exact solutions, results of other codes and experimental data. Results are presented for the flows in two-dimensional convergent and divergent ducts, expansive and compressive corner flows, flow in a rectangular nozzle and the plume flowfields for exhausts issuing out of single and multiple rectangular nozzles.

  16. Factors to Consider in Designing Aerosol Inlet Systems for Engine Exhaust Plume Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    This document consists of viewgraphs of charts and diagrams of considerations to take when sampling the engine exhaust plume. It includes a chart that compares the emissions from various fuels, a diagram and charts of the various processes and conditions that influence the particulate size and concentration,

  17. Pseudo Color Densitometer Analysis-the Apollo 17/Saturn V Exhaust Plume.

    PubMed

    Orville, R E; Helsdon, J H

    1974-10-01

    Spectra of the Apollo 17/Saturn V exhaust plume have been obtained in the uv (300ndash;400 nm), visible (400-650 nm), and ir (750-790 nm) regions. Analysis of these data with a pseudo color densitometer reveals (1) a standing wave pattern in the exhaust plume characterized by a wavelength of 9 m, (2) a region of intense continuum within 40 m of the exit plane which supports previous reports of a continuum blackbody source with a peak temperature near 2600 K, (3) a region of continuum emission beyond 40 m that is not blackbody, and (4) line emissions beyond 40 m attributed to the sodium D lines and potassium. It is suggested that an interference filter centered on the sodium D lines could be used on a high speed framing camera to study the turbulent structure of the plume in the nonblackbody region.

  18. Range safety signal attenuation by the Space Shuttle main engine exhaust plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, B. E.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of attenuation of the range safety signal at 416.5 MHz observed after SRB separation and ending at hand over to Bermuda, during which transmission must pass through the LOX/H2 propelled main engine exhaust plumes, is summarized. Absorption by free electrons in the exhaust plume can account for the nearly constant magnitude of the observed attenuation during this period; it does not explain the short term transient increases that occur at one or more times during this portion of the flight. It is necessary to assume that a trace amount (about 0.5 ppm) of easily ionizable impurity must be present in the exhaust flow. Other mechanisms of attenuation, such as scattering by turbulent fluctuations of both free and bound electrons and absorption by water vapor, were examined but found to be inadequate to explain the observations.

  19. Determination of Combustion Product Radicals in a Hydrocarbon Fueled Rocket Exhaust Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langford, Lester A.; Allgood, Daniel C.; Junell, Justin C.

    2007-01-01

    The identification of metallic effluent materials in a rocket engine exhaust plume indicates the health of the engine. Since 1989, emission spectroscopy of the plume of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) has been used for ground testing at NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC). This technique allows the identification and quantification of alloys from the metallic elements observed in the plume. With the prospect of hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engines, such as Rocket Propellant 1 (RP-1) or methane (CH4) fueled engines being considered for use in future space flight systems, the contributions of intermediate or final combustion products resulting from the hydrocarbon fuels are of great interest. The effect of several diatomic molecular radicals, such as Carbon Dioxide , Carbon Monoxide, Molecular Carbon, Methylene Radical, Cyanide or Cyano Radical, and Nitric Oxide, needs to be identified and the effects of their band systems on the spectral region from 300 nm to 850 nm determined. Hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engines will play a prominent role in future space exploration programs. Although hydrogen fuel provides for higher engine performance, hydrocarbon fuels are denser, safer to handle, and less costly. For hydrocarbon-fueled engines using RP-1 or CH4 , the plume is different from a hydrogen fueled engine due to the presence of several other species, such as CO2, C2, CO, CH, CN, and NO, in the exhaust plume, in addition to the standard H2O and OH. These species occur as intermediate or final combustion products or as a result of mixing of the hot plume with the atmosphere. Exhaust plume emission spectroscopy has emerged as a comprehensive non-intrusive sensing technology which can be applied to a wide variety of engine performance conditions with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Stennis Space Center researchers have been in the forefront of advancing experimental techniques and developing theoretical approaches in order to bring this technology to a more

  20. The effects of an ion-thruster exhaust plume on S-band carrier transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerknecht, W. E.; Stanton, P. H.

    1976-01-01

    The study reported here was undertaken (1) to develop models of the effects of an ion-thruster exhaust plume on S-band signals, and (2) to measure the effects. The results show that an S-band signal passing through an ion-thruster plume is reduced in amplitude and advanced in phase. The mathematical models gave reasonable estimates of the average signal attenuation and phase shift. Negligible fluctuations in the signal amplitude and phase were measured during steady-state thruster operation. However, large jumps in phase occurred when changes were made in the thruster operating state. This study confirms that the thruster plume can have a significant effect on S-band communication link performance; hence the plume effects must be considered in S-band link calculations when electric thrusters are used for spacecraft propulsion.

  1. Towards Simulating Non-Axisymmetric Influences on Aircraft Plumes for Signature Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenzakowski, D. C.; Shipman, J. D.; Dash, S. M.

    2000-01-01

    A methodology for efficiently including three-dimensional effects on aircraft plume signature is presented. First, exploratory work on the use of passive mixing enhancement devices, namely chevrons and tabs, in IR signature reduction for external turbofan plumes is demonstrated numerically and experimentally. Such small attachments, when properly designed, cause an otherwise axisymmetric plume to have significant 3D structures, affecting signature prediction. Second, an approach for including non-axisymmetric and installation effects in plume signature prediction is discussed using unstructured methodology. Unstructured flow solvers, using advanced turbulence modeling and plume thermochemistry, facilitate the modeling of aircraft effects on plume structure that previously have been neglected due to gridding complexities. The capabilities of the CRUNCH unstructured Navier-Stokes solver for plume modeling is demonstrated for a passively mixed turbofan nozzle, a generic fighter nozzle, and a complete aircraft.

  2. Sulfuric Acid and Soot Particle Formation in Aircraft Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Verma, S.; Ferry, G. V.; Howard, S. D.; Vay, S.; Kinne, S. A.; Baumgardner, D.; Dermott, P.; Kreidenweis, S.; Goodman, J.; Gore, Waren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A combination of CN counts, Ames wire impactor size analyses and optical particle counter data in aircraft exhaust results in a continuous particle size distribution between 0.01 micrometer and 1 micrometer particle radius sampled in the exhaust of a Boeing 757 research aircraft. The two orders of magnitude size range covered by the measurements correspond to 6-7 orders of magnitude particle concentration. CN counts and small particle wire impactor data determine a nucleation mode, composed of aircraft-emitted sulfuric acid aerosol, that contributes between 62% and 85% to the total aerosol surface area and between 31% and 34% to its volume. Soot aerosol comprises 0.5% of the surface area of the sulfuric acid aerosol. Emission indices are: EIH2SO4 = 0.05 g/kgFUEL and (0.2-0.5) g/kgFUEL (for 75 ppmm and 675 ppmm fuel-S, respectively), 2.5E4

  3. Measurements of Cl, ClO, and CO2 in the Exhaust Plume of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toohey, D. W.; Thornton, B. F.; Avallone, L. M.; Ross, M. N.; Richard, E.; Kelly, K.

    2001-05-01

    Measurements of chlorine atoms (Cl), chlorine oxide (ClO), and carbon dioxide (CO2) were carried out in the exhaust plume of the Space Shuttle on September 8, 2000 (STS-106). Cl and ClO were detected at abundances exceeding 20 parts per billion (ppb) and 50 ppb, respectively at a sampling rate of 25 Hz by the technique of resonance fluorescence on the NASA WB-57 aircraft. These results provide a horizontal resolution of about 10 meters, and extreme variability is observed over these scales for over an hour. CO2 was measured by non-dispersive infrared with a sampling frequency of 1 second, with enhancements of tens of parts per million (ppm) on most passes. We examine the evolution of the ratio of Cl to ClO, referenced to CO2 as a conservative tracer of mixing, examine the correlations with ozone and methane, and discuss the implications for ozone loss.

  4. Measurements of Nucleation-Mode Particle Size Distributions in Aircraft Plumes during SULFUR 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, Charles A.; Bradford, Deborah G.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the participation of the University of Denver in an airborne measurement program, SULFUR 6, which was undertaken in late September and early October of 1998 by the Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft und Raumfahrt (DLR). Scientific findings from two papers that have been published or accepted and from one manuscript that is in preparation are presented. The SULFUR 6 experiment was designed to investigate the emissions from subsonic aircraft to constrain calculations of possible atmospheric chemical and climatic effects. The University of Denver effort contributed toward the following SULFUR 6 goals: (1) To investigate the relationship between fuel sulfur content (FSC--mass of sulfur per mass of fuel) and particle number and mass emission index (El--quantity emitted per kg of fuel burned); (2) To provide upper and lower limits for the mass conversion efficiency (nu) of fuel sulfur to gaseous and particulate sulfuric acid; (3) To constrain models of volatile particle nucleation and growth by measuring the particle size distribution between 3 and 100 nm at aircraft plume ages ranging from 10(exp -1) to 10(exp 3) s; (4) To determine microphysical and optical properties and bulk chemical composition of soot particles in aircraft exhaust; and (5) To investigate the differences in particle properties between aircraft plumes in contrail and non-contrail situations. The experiment focused on emissions from the ATTAS research aircraft (a well characterized, but older technology turbojet) and from an in-service Boeing 737-300 aircraft provided by Lufthansa, with modem, high-bypass turbofan engines. Measurements were made from the DLR Dassault Falcon 900 aircraft, a modified business jet. The Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Program (AEAP) provided funding to operate an instrument, the nucleation-mode aerosol size spectrometer (N-MASS), during the SULFUR 6 campaign and to analyze the data. The N-MASS was developed at the University of Denver with the support of

  5. Exhaust emission reduction for intermittent combustion aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffett, R. N.

    1979-01-01

    Three concepts for optimizing the performance, increasing the fuel economy, and reducing exhaust emission of the piston aircraft engine were investigated. High energy-multiple spark discharge and spark plug tip penetration, ultrasonic fuel vaporization, and variable valve timing were evaluated individually. Ultrasonic fuel vaporization did not demonstrate sufficient improvement in distribution to offset the performance loss caused by the additional manifold restriction. High energy ignition and revised spark plug tip location provided no change in performance or emissions. Variable valve timing provided some performance benefit; however, even greater performance improvement was obtained through induction system tuning which could be accomplished with far less complexity.

  6. The effect of exhaust plume/afterbody interaction on installed Scramjet performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Thomas Alan

    1988-01-01

    Newly emerging aerospace technology points to the feasibility of sustained hypersonic flight. Designing a propulsion system capable of generating the necessary thrust is now the major obstacle. First-generation vehicles will be driven by air-breathing scramjet (supersonic combustion ramjet) engines. Because of engine size limitations, the exhaust gas leaving the nozzle will be highly underexpanded. Consequently, a significant amount of thrust and lift can be extracted by allowing the exhaust gases to expand along the underbody of the vehicle. Predicting how these forces influence overall vehicle thrust, lift, and moment is essential to a successful design. This work represents an important first step toward that objective. The UWIN code, an upwind, implicit Navier-Stokes computer program, has been applied to hypersonic exhaust plume/afterbody flow fields. The capability to solve entire vehicle geometries at hypersonic speeds, including an interacting exhaust plume, has been demonstrated for the first time. Comparison of the numerical results with available experimental data shows good agreement in all cases investigated. For moderately underexpanded jets, afterbody forces were found to vary linearly with the nozzle exit pressure, and increasing the exit pressure produced additional nose-down pitching moment. Coupling a species continuity equation to the UWIN code enabled calculations indicating that exhaust gases with low isentropic exponents (gamma) contribute larger afterbody forces than high-gamma exhaust gases. Moderately underexpanded jets, which remain attached to unswept afterbodies, underwent streamwise separation on upswept afterbodies. Highly underexpanded jets produced altogether different flow patterns, however. The highly underexpanded jet creates a strong plume shock, and the interaction of this shock with the afterbody was found to produce complicated patterns of crossflow separation. Finally, the effect of thrust vectoring on vehicle balance has

  7. Space shuttle exhaust plumes in the lower thermosphere: Advective transport and diffusive spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Michael H.; Lossow, Stefan; Siskind, David E.; Meier, R. R.; Randall, Cora E.; Russell, James M.; Urban, Jo; Murtagh, Donal

    2014-02-01

    The space shuttle main engine plume deposited between 100 and 115 km altitude is a valuable tracer for global-scale dynamical processes. Several studies have shown that this plume can reach the Arctic or Antarctic to form bursts of polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) within a few days. The rapid transport of the shuttle plume is currently not reproduced by general circulation models and is not well understood. To help delineate the issues, we present the complete satellite datasets of shuttle plume observations by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry instrument and the Sub-Millimeter Radiometer instrument. From 2002 to 2011 these two instruments observed 27 shuttle plumes in over 600 limb scans of water vapor emission, from which we derive both advective meridional transport and diffusive spreading. Each plume is deposited at virtually the same place off the United States east coast so our results are relevant to northern mid-latitudes. We find that the advective transport for the first 6-18 h following deposition depends on the local time (LT) of launch: shuttle plumes deposited later in the day (~13-22 LT) typically move south whereas they otherwise typically move north. For these younger plumes rapid transport is most favorable for launches at 6 and 18 LT, when the displacement is 10° in latitude corresponding to an average wind speed of 30 m/s. For plumes between 18 and 30 h old some show average sustained meridional speeds of 30 m/s. For plumes between 30 and 54 h old the observations suggest a seasonal dependence to the meridional transport, peaking near the beginning of year at 24 m/s. The diffusive spreading of the plume superimposed on the transport is on average 23 m/s in 24 h. The plume observations show large variations in both meridional transport and diffusive spreading so that accurate modeling requires knowledge of the winds specific to each case. The combination of transport and spreading from the STS-118 plume in August

  8. Far-Field Turbulent Vortex-Wake/Exhaust Plume Interaction for Subsonic and HSCT Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Adam, Ihab; Wong, Tin-Chee

    1996-01-01

    Computational study of the far-field turbulent vortex-wake/exhaust plume interaction for subsonic and high speed civil transport (HSCT) airplanes is carried out. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are solved using the implicit, upwind, Roe-flux-differencing, finite-volume scheme. The two-equation shear stress transport model of Menter is implemented with the NS solver for turbulent-flow calculation. For the far-field study, the computations of vortex-wake interaction with the exhaust plume of a single engine of a Boeing 727 wing in a holding condition and two engines of an HSCT in a cruise condition are carried out using overlapping zonal method for several miles downstream. These results are obtained using the computer code FTNS3D. The results of the subsonic flow of this code are compared with those of a parabolized NS solver known as the UNIWAKE code.

  9. Real-time measurements of jet aircraft engine exhaust.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Fred; Arnott, Pat; Zielinska, Barbara; Sagebiel, John; Kelly, Kerry E; Wagner, David; Lighty, JoAnn S; Sarofim, Adel F

    2005-05-01

    Particulate-phase exhaust properties from two different types of ground-based jet aircraft engines--high-thrust and turboshaft--were studied with real-time instruments on a portable pallet and additional time-integrated sampling devices. The real-time instruments successfully characterized rapidly changing particulate mass, light absorption, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content. The integrated measurements included particulate-size distributions, PAH, and carbon concentrations for an entire test run (i.e., "run-integrated" measurements). In all cases, the particle-size distributions showed single modes peaking at 20-40nm diameter. Measurements of exhaust from high-thrust F404 engines showed relatively low-light absorption compared with exhaust from a turboshaft engine. Particulate-phase PAH measurements generally varied in phase with both net particulate mass and with light-absorbing particulate concentrations. Unexplained response behavior sometimes occurred with the real-time PAH analyzer, although on average the real-time and integrated PAH methods agreed within the same order of magnitude found in earlier investigations.

  10. A Computer Program for the Prediction of Radiation from Rocket Exhaust Plumes. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-05-31

    axisymmetricor three-dimen- sional cylindrical coordinate system . The program can integrate the ra- diation from the gas to a point to providE overall...used to describe the problem consists of two coordinate systems as illustrated in Figure 1. The gas properties are defined at locations in a cylindrical...coordinate system relative to the left-hand X, Y, Z coordinate system . For axisymmetric exhaust plumes, the Z-axis is the center of the cylindrical

  11. Integration of Engine, Plume, and CFD Analyses in Conceptual Design of Low-Boom Supersonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Campbell, Richard; Geiselhart, Karl; Shields, Elwood; Nayani, Sudheer; Shenoy, Rajiv

    2009-01-01

    This paper documents an integration of engine, plume, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses in the conceptual design of low-boom supersonic aircraft, using a variable fidelity approach. In particular, the Numerical Propulsion Simulation System (NPSS) is used for propulsion system cycle analysis and nacelle outer mold line definition, and a low-fidelity plume model is developed for plume shape prediction based on NPSS engine data and nacelle geometry. This model provides a capability for the conceptual design of low-boom supersonic aircraft that accounts for plume effects. Then a newly developed process for automated CFD analysis is presented for CFD-based plume and boom analyses of the conceptual geometry. Five test cases are used to demonstrate the integrated engine, plume, and CFD analysis process based on a variable fidelity approach, as well as the feasibility of the automated CFD plume and boom analysis capability.

  12. Rocket engine exhaust plume diagnostics and health monitoring/management during ground testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chenevert, D. J.; Meeks, G. R.; Woods, E. G.; Huseonica, H. F.

    1992-01-01

    The current status of a rocket exhaust plume diagnostics program sponsored by NASA is reviewed. The near-term objective of the program is to enhance test operation efficiency and to provide for safe cutoff of rocket engines prior to incipient failure, thereby avoiding the destruction of the engine and the test complex and preventing delays in the national space program. NASA programs that will benefit from the nonintrusive remote sensed rocket plume diagnostics and related vehicle health management and nonintrusive measurement program are Space Shuttle Main Engine, National Launch System, National Aero-Space Plane, Space Exploration Initiative, Advanced Solid Rocket Motor, and Space Station Freedom. The role of emission spectrometry and other types of remote sensing in rocket plume diagnostics is discussed.

  13. Analysis of large solid propellant rocket engine exhaust plumes using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueser, J. E.; Brock, F. J.; Melfi, L. T., Jr.; Bird, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    A new solution procedure has been developed to analyze the flowfield properties in the vicinity of the Inertial Upper Stage/Spacecraft during the 1st stage (SRMI) burn. Continuum methods are used to compute the nozzle flow and the exhaust plume flowfield as far as the boundary where the breakdown of translational equilibrium leaves these methods invalid. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is applied everywhere beyond this breakdown boundary. The flowfield distributions of density, velocity, temperature, relative abundance, surface flux density, and pressure are discussed for each species for 2 sets of boundary conditions: vacuum and freestream. The interaction of the exhaust plume and the freestream with the spacecraft and the 2-stream direct interaction are discussed. The results show that the low density, high velocity, counter flowing free-stream substantially modifies the flowfield properties and the flux density incident on the spacecraft. A freestream bow shock is observed in the data, located forward of the high density region of the exhaust plume into which the freestream gas does not penetrate. The total flux density incident on the spacecraft, integrated over the SRM1 burn interval is estimated to be of the order of 10 to the 22nd per sq m (about 1000 atomic layers).

  14. Temperature, Pressure, and Infrared Image Survey of an Axisymmetric Heated Exhaust Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Edward L.; Mahan, J. Robert; Birckelbaw, Larry D.; Turk, Jeffrey A.; Wardwell, Douglas A.; Hange, Craig E.

    1996-01-01

    The focus of this research is to numerically predict an infrared image of a jet engine exhaust plume, given field variables such as temperature, pressure, and exhaust plume constituents as a function of spatial position within the plume, and to compare this predicted image directly with measured data. This work is motivated by the need to validate computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes through infrared imaging. The technique of reducing the three-dimensional field variable domain to a two-dimensional infrared image invokes the use of an inverse Monte Carlo ray trace algorithm and an infrared band model for exhaust gases. This report describes an experiment in which the above-mentioned field variables were carefully measured. Results from this experiment, namely tables of measured temperature and pressure data, as well as measured infrared images, are given. The inverse Monte Carlo ray trace technique is described. Finally, experimentally obtained infrared images are directly compared to infrared images predicted from the measured field variables.

  15. Exhaust Plume Effects on Sonic Boom for a Delta Wing and a Swept Wing-Body Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Lake, Troy

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic travel is not allowed over populated areas due to the disturbance caused by the sonic boom. Research has been performed on sonic boom reduction and has included the contribution of the exhaust nozzle plume. Plume effect on sonic boom has progressed from the study of isolated nozzles to a study with four exhaust plumes integrated with a wing-body vehicle. This report provides a baseline analysis of the generic wing-body vehicle to demonstrate the effect of the nozzle exhaust on the near-field pressure profile. Reductions occurred in the peak-to-peak magnitude of the pressure profile for a swept wing-body vehicle. The exhaust plumes also had a favorable effect as the nozzles were moved outward along the wing-span.

  16. On-road measurement of particle emission in the exhaust plume of a diesel passenger car.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Rainer; Scheer, Volker; Casati, Roberto; Benter, Thorsten

    2003-09-15

    Particle size distributions were measured under real world dilution conditions in the exhaust plume of a diesel passenger car closely followed by a mobile laboratory on a high speed test track. Under carefully controlled conditions the exhaust plume was continuously sampled and analyzed inside the mobile laboratory. Exhaust particle size distribution data were recorded together with exhaust gas concentrations, i.e., CO, CO2, and NO(x), and compared to data obtained from the same vehicle tested on a chassis dynamometer. Good agreement was found for the soot mode particles which occurred at a geometric mean diameter of approximately 50 nm and a total particle emission rate of 10(14) particles km(-1). Using 350 ppm high sulfur fuel and the standard oxidation catalyst a bimodal size distribution with a nucleation mode at 10 nm was observed at car velocities of 100 km h(-1) and 120 km h(-1), respectively. Nucleation mode particles were only present if high sulfur fuel was used with the oxidation catalyst installed. This is in agreement with prior work that these particles are of semivolatile nature and originate from the nucleation of sulfates formed inside the catalyst. Temporal effects of the occurrence of nucleation mode particles during steady-state cruising and the dynamical behavior during acceleration and deceleration were investigated.

  17. Real Time Diagnostics of Jet Engine Exhaust Plumes Using a Chirped QC Laser Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, K. G.; Duxbury, G.; Langford, N.

    2010-06-01

    Quantitative measurements of real-time variations of the chemical composition of a jet engine exhaust plume is demonstrated using a 4.86 μmn intra-pulse quantum cascade laser spectrometer. The measurements of the gas turbine exhaust were carried out in collaboration with John Black and Mark Johnson at Rolls Royce. The recording of five sets of averaged spectra a second has allowed us to follow the build up of the combustion products within the exhaust, and to demonstrate the large variation of the integrated absorption of these absorption lines with temperature. The absorption cross sections of the lines of both carbon monoxide and water increase with temperature, whereas those of the three main absorption lines of carbon dioxide decrease. At the steady state limit the absorption lines of carbon dioxide are barely visible, and the spectrum is dominated by absorption lines of carbon monoxide and water.

  18. A plume capture technique for the remote characterization of aircraft engine emissions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G R; Mazaheri, M; Ristovski, Z D; Morawska, L

    2008-07-01

    A technique for capturing and analyzing plumes from unmodified aircraft or other combustion sources under real world conditions is described and applied to the task of characterizing plumes from commercial aircraft during the taxiing phase of the Landing/Take-Off (LTO) cycle. The method utilizes a Plume Capture and Analysis System (PCAS) mounted in a four-wheel drive vehicle which is positioned in the airfield 60 to 180 m downwind of aircraft operations. The approach offers low test turnaround times with the ability to complete careful measurements of particle and gaseous emission factors and sequentially scanned particle size distributions without distortion due to plume concentration fluctuations. These measurements can be performed for individual aircraft movements at five minute intervals. A Plume Capture Device (PCD) collected samples of the naturally diluted plume in a 200 L conductive membrane conforming to a defined shape. Samples from over 60 aircraft movements were collected and analyzed in situ for particulate and gaseous concentrations and for particle size distribution using a Scanning Particle Mobility Sizer (SMPS). Emission factors are derived for particle number, NO(x), and PM2.5 for a widely used commercial aircraft type, Boeing 737 airframes with predominantly CFM56 class engines, during taxiing. The practical advantages of the PCAS include the capacity to perform well targeted and controlled emission factor and size distribution measurements using instrumentation with varying response times within an airport facility, in close proximity to aircraft during their normal operations.

  19. Wind Tunnel Model Design for the Study of Plume Effects on Sonic Boom for Isolated Exhaust Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raynold S.

    2010-01-01

    A low cost test capability was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT), with a goal to reduce the disturbance caused by supersonic aircraft flight over populated areas. This work focused on the shock wave structure caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Analysis and design was performed on a new rig to test exhaust nozzle plume effects on sonic boom signature. Test capability included a baseline nozzle test article and a wind tunnel model consisting of a strut, a nosecone and an upper plenum. Analysis was performed on the external and internal aerodynamic configuration, including the shock reflections from the wind tunnel walls caused by the presence of the model nosecone. This wind tunnel model was designed to operate from Mach 1.4 to Mach 3.0 with nozzle pressure ratios from 6 to 12 and altitudes from 30,000 ft (4.36 psia) to 50,000 ft (1.68 psia). The model design was based on a 1 in. outer diameter, was 9 in. in overall length, and was mounted in the wind tunnel on a 3/8 in. wide support strut. For test conditions at 50,000 ft the strut was built to supply 90 psia of pressure, and to achieve 20 psia at the nozzle inlet with a maximum nozzle pressure of 52 psia. Instrumentation was developed to measure nozzle pressure ratio, and an external static pressure probe was designed to survey near field static pressure profiles at one nozzle diameter above the rig centerline. Model layout placed test nozzles between two transparent sidewalls in the 1 1 SWT for Schlieren photography and comparison to CFD analysis.

  20. Wind Tunnel Model Design for the Study of Plume Effects on Sonic Boom for Isolated Exhaust Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.

    2009-01-01

    A low cost test capability was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT), with a goal to reduce the disturbance caused by supersonic aircraft flight over populated areas. This work focused on the shock wave structure caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Analysis and design was performed on a new rig to test exhaust nozzle plume effects on sonic boom signature. Test capability included a baseline nozzle test article and a wind tunnel model consisting of a strut, a nose cone and an upper plenum. Analysis was performed on the external and internal aerodynamic configuration, including the shock reflections from the wind tunnel walls caused by the presence of the model nosecone. This wind tunnel model was designed to operate from Mach 1.4 to Mach 3.0 with nozzle pressure ratios from 6 to 12 and altitudes from 30,000 ft (4.36 psia) to 50,000 ft (1.68 psia). The model design was based on a 1 in. outer diameter, was 9 in. in overall length, and was mounted in the wind tunnel on a 3/8 in. wide support strut. For test conditions at 50,000 ft the strut was built to supply 90 psia of pressure, and to achieve 20 psia at the nozzle inlet with a maximum nozzle pressure of 52 psia. Instrumentation was developed to measure nozzle pressure ratio, and an external static pressure probe was designed to survey near field static pressure profiles at one nozzle diameter above the rig centerline. Model layout placed test nozzles between two transparent sidewalls in the 1x1 SWT for Schlieren photography and comparison to CFD analysis.

  1. Power-dependent speciation of volatile organic compounds in aircraft exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyersdorf, Andreas J.; Thornhill, K. Lee; Winstead, Edward L.; Ziemba, Luke D.; Blake, Donald R.; Timko, Michael T.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2012-12-01

    As part of the third NASA Aircraft Particle Emissions Experiment (APEX-3, November 2005), whole air samples were collected to determine the emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from aircraft equipped with three different gas-turbine engines (an Allison Engine 3007-A1E, a Pratt-Whitney 4158, and a Rolls-Royce RB211-535E4B). Samples were collected 1 m behind the engine exhaust plane of the engines while they were operated at powers ranging from idle up to 30% of maximum rated thrust. Exhaust emission indices (mass emitted per kilogram of fuel used) for CO and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) were calculated based on enhancements over background relative to CO2. Emissions of all NMHCs were greatest at low power with values decreasing by an order of magnitude with increasing power. Previous studies have shown that scaling idle hydrocarbon emissions to formaldehyde or ethene (which are typically emitted at a ratio of 1-to-1 at idle) reduces variability amongst engine types. NMHC emissions were found to scale at low power, with alkenes contributing over 50% of measured NMHCs. However, as the power increases hydrocarbon emissions no longer scale to ethene, as the aromatics become the dominant species emitted. This may be due in part to a shift in combustion processes from thermal cracking (producing predominantly alkenes) to production of new molecules (producing proportionally more aromatics) as power increases. The formation of these aromatics is an intermediate step in the production of soot, which also increases with increasing power. The increase in aromatics relative to alkenes additionally results in a decrease in the hydroxyl radical reactivity and ozone formation potential of aircraft exhaust. Samples collected 30 m downwind of the engine were also analyzed for NMHCs and carbonyl compounds (acetone, 2-butanone and C1-C9 aldehydes). Formaldehyde was the predominant carbonyl emitted; however, the ratio of ethene-to-formaldehyde varied between the

  2. Stratospheric plume dispersion: Measurements from STS and Titan solid rocket motor exhaust. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Beiting, E.J.

    1999-04-20

    Plume expansion was measured from nine Space Shuttle and Titan IV vehicles at altitudes of 18, 24, and 30 km in the stratosphere. The plume diameters were inferred from electronic images of polarized, near-infrared solar radiation scattered from the exhaust particles, and these diameters were found to increase linearly with time. The expansion rate was measured for as long as 50 min after the vehicle reached altitude. Measurements made simultaneously at multiple altitudes showed that the expansion rate increased with increasing altitude for six measurements made at Cape Canaveral but decreased between 24 and 30 km for the one measurement made at Vandenberg AFB. The average expansion rates for all measurements are 4.3 {+-} 1.0 m/s at 18 km, 6.8 {+-} 1.9 m/s at 24 km, and 8.7 {+-} 2.5 m/s at 30 km. Expansion rates varied from launch to launch by as much as a factor of 1.6 at 18 km, 2.2 at 24 km, and 2.7 at 30 km. No correlation between the expansion rate and wind speed or shear was evident. These data are compared to several models for diffusivity and are used to update a comprehensive particle model of solid rocket motor exhaust in the stratosphere. The expansion rates are required by models to calculate the spatial extent and temporal persistence of the local stratospheric ozone depletion cause by solid rocket exhaust.

  3. Wavelength-Agile Optical Sensor for Exhaust Plume and Cryogenic Fluid Interrogation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Scott T.; Chiaverini, Martin J.; Gramer, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    Two optical sensors developed in UW-Madison labs were evaluated for their potential to characterize rocket engine exhaust plumes and liquid oxygen (LOX) fluid properties. The plume sensor is based on wavelength-agile absorption spectroscopy A device called a chirped white pulse emitter (CWPE) is used to generate the wavelength agile light, scanning, for example, 1340 - 1560 nm every microsecond. Properties of the gases in the rocket plume (for example temperature and water mole fraction) can be monitored using these wavelength scans. We have performed preliminary tests in static gas cells, a laboratory GOX/GH2 thrust chamber, and a solid-fuel hybrid thrust chamber, and these initial tests demonstrate the potential of the CWPE for monitoring rocket plumes. The LOX sensor uses an alternative to wavelength agile sensing: two independent, fixed-wavelength lasers are combined into a single fiber. One laser is absorbed by LOX and the other not: by monitoring the differential transmission the LOX concentration in cryogenic feed lines can be inferred. The sensor was successful in interrogating static LOX pools in laboratory tests. Even in ice- and bubble-laden cryogenic fluids, LOX concentrations were measured to better than 1% with a 3 microsec time constant.

  4. An experimental and computational study of moderately underexpanded rocket exhaust plumes in a co-flowing hypersonic free stream

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, N.; Buttsworth, D.; Jones, T.; Brescianini, C. |

    1995-09-01

    Rocket plume exhaust structures are aerodynamically and thermochemically very complex and the prediction of plume properties such as temperature, velocity, pressure, chemical species concentrations and turbulence properties is a formidable task as there are no definitive models for viscous and chemical effects. Contemporary computational techniques are still in their infancy and cannot yet reliably predict plume properties. Only through validation of computer codes using experimental data, can computational models be developed to the point where they can be confidently used as design and predictive tools. The motivation for this study was to acquire well defined data for rocket plumes at low altitude hypersonic flight conditions so that the above issues could be investigated.

  5. An experimental and computational study of moderately underexpanded rocket exhaust plumes in a co-flowing hypersonic free stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, N.; Buttsworth, D.; Jones, T.; Brescianini, C.

    Rocket plume exhaust structures are aerodynamically and thermochemically very complex and the prediction of plume properties such as temperature, velocity, pressure, chemical species concentrations and turbulence properties is a formidable task as there are no definitive models for viscous and chemical effects. Contemporary computational techniques are still in their infancy and cannot yet reliably predict plume properties. Only through validation of computer codes using experimental data, can computational models be developed to the point where they can be confidently used as design and predictive tools. The motivation for this study was to acquire well defined data for rocket plumes at low altitude hypersonic flight conditions so that the above issues could be investigated.

  6. On-board Optical Spectrometry for Detection of Mixture Ratio and Eroded Materials in Rocket Engine Exhaust Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, Sarkis; Kittinger, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Optical spectrometry can provide means to characterize rocket engine exhaust plume impurities due to eroded materials, as well as combustion mixture ratio without any interference with plume. Fiberoptic probes and cables were designed, fabricated and installed on Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), allowing monitoring of the plume spectra in real time with a Commercial of the Shelf (COTS) fiberoptic spectrometer, located in a test-stand control room. The probes and the cables survived the harsh engine environments for numerous hot-fire tests. When the plume was seeded with a nickel alloy powder, the spectrometer was able to successfully detect all the metallic and OH radical spectra from 300 to 800 nanometers.

  7. Exhaust plume and contamination characteristics of a bipropellant (MMH/N2O4) RCS thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spisz, E. W.; Bowman, R. L.; Jack, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Results are presented for three recent tests in a series of thruster contamination experiments made in liquid helium-cooled environmental facility. The contaminating effects encountered on various materials, surfaces, and components, due to the exhaust products from a 5-pound thrust, bipropellant (MMH/N2O4) thruster are investigated. The angular distribution of plume effects around the periphery of the thruster established by transmittance changes of quartz samples over the wavelength range from 0.2 to 2.0 micrometer is studied, along with mass deposition rates at a specific location measured with a quartz crystal microbalance for three different experiments. Quadrupole mass spectrometer measurements of the exhaust products over the mass number range from 12 to 75; infrared transmittance measurements of contaminated samples for the wavelength range from 2.5 to 15 microns; and infrared transmittance measurements of residue from the thruster nozzle are also considered.

  8. Summary of measurement results of ozone, methane, and nonmethane hydrocarbons for C-54 aircraft. 1979 Southeastern Virginia Urban Plume Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, W. R., III; Purgold, G. C.; Gregory, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    Methane, nonmethane hydrocarbon, and ozone data collected in a C-54 aircraft during the 1979 Southeastern Virginia Urban Plume Study are presented. Three major aircraft experiments were flown on five separate days in August collecting 20 hours of flight data. Direct correlation between ozone and hydrocarbon plumes was observed on several occasions.

  9. Coupled turbulence and aerosol dynamics modeling of vehicle exhaust plumes using the CTAG model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan Jason; Zhang, K. Max

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents the development and evaluation of an environmental turbulent reacting flow model, the Comprehensive Turbulent Aerosol Dynamics and Gas Chemistry (CTAG) model. CTAG is designed to simulate transport and transformation of multiple air pollutants, e.g., from emission sources to ambient background. For the on-road and near-road applications, CTAG explicitly couples the major turbulent mixing processes, i.e., vehicle-induced turbulence (VIT), road-induced turbulence (RIT) and atmospheric boundary layer turbulence with gas-phase chemistry and aerosol dynamics. CTAG's transport model is referred to as CFD-VIT-RIT. This paper presents the evaluation of the CTAG model in simulating the dynamics of individual plumes in the “tailpipe-to-road” stage, i.e., VIT behind a moving van and aerosol dynamics in the wake of a diesel car by comparing the modeling results against the respective field measurements. Combined with sensitivity studies, we analyze the relative roles of VIT, sulfuric acid induced nucleation, condensation of organic compounds and presence of soot-mode particles in capturing the dynamics of exhaust plumes as well as their implications in vehicle emission controls.

  10. Near-field commercial aircraft contribution to nitrogen oxides by engine, aircraft type, and airline by individual plume sampling.

    PubMed

    Carslaw, David C; Ropkins, Karl; Laxen, Duncan; Moorcroft, Stephen; Marner, Ben; Williams, Martin L

    2008-03-15

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) concentrations were measured in individual plumes from aircraft departing on the northern runway at Heathrow Airport in west London. Over a period of four weeks 5618 individual plumes were sampled by a chemiluminescence monitor located 180 m from the runway. Results were processed and matched with detailed aircraft movement and aircraft engine data using chromatographic techniques. Peak concentrations associated with 29 commonly used engines were calculated and found to have a good relationship with N0x emissions taken from the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) databank. However, it is found that engines with higher reported NOx emissions result in proportionately lower NOx concentrations than engines with lower emissions. We show that it is likely that aircraft operational factors such as takeoff weight and aircraftthrust setting have a measurable and important effect on concentrations of N0x. For example, NOx concentrations can differ by up to 41% for aircraft using the same airframe and engine type, while those due to the same engine type in different airframes can differ by 28%. These differences are as great as, if not greater than, the reported differences in NOx emissions between different engine manufacturers for engines used on the same airframe.

  11. Field Tests of a Laser Raman Measurement System for Aircraft Engine Exhaust Emissions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-01

    practical one. The advantages of optical exhaust gas measurements versus probing systems has been demonstrated. It now remains to solve the remaining...Raman system NOVA digital data processor has the capability to service such additional measurements. If velocity information is desired a study should be...AD/A-003 648 FIELD TESTS OF A LASER RAMAN MEASURE- MENT SYSTEM FOR AIRCRAFT ENGINE EXHAUST EMISSIONS Donald A. Leunard Avoo Everett Researoh

  12. Modification of Roberts' Theory for Rocket Exhaust Plumes Eroding Lunar Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.; Immer, Christopher D.

    2008-01-01

    In preparation for the Apollo program, Leonard Roberts developed a remarkable analytical theory that predicts the blowing of lunar soil and dust beneath a rocket exhaust plume. Roberts' assumed that the erosion rate is determined by the "excess shear stress" in the gas (the amount of shear stress greater than what causes grains to roll). The acceleration of particles to their final velocity in the gas consumed a portion of the shear stress. The erosion rate continues to increase until the excess shear stress is exactly consumed, thus determining the erosion rate. He calculated the largest and smallest particles that could be eroded based on forces at the particle scale, but the erosion rate equation assumes that only one particle size exists in the soil. He assumed that particle ejection angles are determined entirely by the shape of the terrain, which acts like a ballistic ramp, the particle aerodynamics being negligible. The predicted erosion rate and particle upper size limit appeared to be within an order of magnitude of small-scale terrestrial experiments, but could not be tested more quantitatively at the time. The lower particle size limit and ejection angle predictions were not tested.

  13. Spectroscopic studies of the exhaust plume of a quasi-steady MPD accelerator. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, A. P.

    1972-01-01

    Spectroscopic and photographic investigations are reported that reveal a complex azimuthal species structure in the exhaust plume of a quasi-steady argon MPD accelerator. Over a wide range of operating conditions the injected argon remains collimated in discrete jets which are azimuthally in line with the six propellant injector orifices. The regions between these argon jets, including the central core of the exhaust flow, are occupied by impurities such as carbon, hydrogen and oxygen ablated from the Plexiglas back plate of the arc chamber. The features of this plume structure are found to be dependent on the arc current and mass flow rate. It is found that nearly half the observed velocity is attained in an acceleration region well downstream of the region of significant electromagnetic interaction. Recombination calculations show that the ionization energy is essentially frozen.

  14. 77 FR 76842 - Exhaust Emissions Standards for New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines and Identification Plate for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-31

    ... action revises the standards for oxides of nitrogen and test procedures for exhaust emissions based on... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed new aircraft engine emission standards for oxides of nitrogen (NO... Protection (CAEP) of ICAO uses to differentiate the CAEP work cycles that produce new standards. For...

  15. Sulfuric Acid and Soot Particles in Aircraft Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Verma, S.; Ferry, G. V.; Goodman, J.; Strawa, A. W.; Gore, Warren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Aircraft have become the fastest, fairly convenient and, in most cases of long-distance travel, most economical mode of travel. This is reflected in the increase of commercial air traffic at a rate of 6% per year since 1978. Future annual growth rates of passenger miles of 4% for domestic and 6% for international routes are projected. A still larger annual increase of 8.5% is expected for the Asia/Pacific region. To meet that growth, Boeing predicts the addition of 15,900 new aircraft to the world's fleets, valued at more than $1.1 trillion, within the next 20 years. The largest concern of environmental consequences of aircraft emissions deals with ozone (O3), because: (1) the O3 layer protects the blaspheme from short-ultraviolet radiation that can cause damage to human, animal and plant life, and possibly affect agricultural production and the marine food chain; (2) O3 is important for the production of the hydroxyl radical (OH) which, in turn, is responsible for the destruction of other greenhouse gases, e.g., methane (CH4) and for the removal of other pollutants, and (3) O3 is a greenhouse gas. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Characterizing and overcoming spectral artifacts in imaging Fourier-transform spectroscopy of turbulent exhaust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Elizabeth A.; Gross, Kevin C.; Bowen, Spencer J.; Perram, Glen P.; Chamberland, Martin; Farley, Vincent; Gagnon, Jean-Philippe; Lagueux, Philippe; Villemaire, André

    2009-05-01

    The midwave and shortwave infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum contain rich information enabling the characterization of hot, rapid events such as explosions, engine plumes, flares and other combustion events. High-speed sensors are required to analyze the content of such rapidly evolving targets. Cameras with high frame rates and non-imaging spectrometers with high data rates are typically used; however the information from these two types of instruments must be later fused to enable characterization of the transient targets. Imaging spectrometers have recently become commercially available for general scientific use, thus enabling simultaneous capture of both spatial and spectral information without co-registration issues. However, their use against rapidly-varying sources has traditionally been considered problematic, for even at moderate spatial and spectral resolutions the time to acquire a single spectrum can be long compared to the timescales associated with combustion events. This paper demonstrates that imaging Fourier-transform spectroscopy (IFTS) can successfully characterize the turbulent combustion exhaust from a turbojet engine. A Telops Hyper-Cam IFTS collected hyperspectral video from a Turbine Technologies SR-30 turbojet engine with a spectral resolution of δν = 1/cm-1 on a 200×64 pixel sub-window at a rate of 0.3 Hz. Scene-change artifacts (SCAs) are present in the spectra; however, the stochastic fluctuations in source intensity translate into high-frequency "noise." Temporal averaging affords a significant reduction of the noise associated with SCAs. Emission from CO and CO2 are clearly recognized in the averaged spectra, and information about their temperature and relative concentrations is evident.

  17. Nighttime aircraft measurements of power plant plumes in the Southeast U.S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. S.; Womack, R. W.; Edwards, P. M.; Dube, W. P.; Min, K.; Ryerson, T. B.; Peischl, J.; Pollack, I. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Veres, P. R.; Lee, B.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Thornton, J. A.; Neuman, J. A.; Nowak, J. B.; Graus, M.; Warneke, C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Brock, C. A.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    Coal fired electric power plants are responsible for a large but declining fraction of U.S. NO¬x emissions. The influence of these point source emissions on ozone photochemistry has been well documented. Less well understood, however, is their influence on nighttime chemistry, due in part to the difficulty of sampling such plumes at night, when they are emitted into the residual boundary layer and remain decoupled from the surface. Nighttime chemistry in such plumes influences rates of biogenic VOC oxidation by the nitrate radical (NO3), halogen activation through the heterogeneous uptake of N2O5 to form ClNO2, and the overnight removal of primary NO¬x emissions via conversion to soluble nitrate. During the recent SENEX campaign, night flights of the NOAA P-3 aircraft sampled several different power plant plumes across the southeastern U.S., including the E.C. Gaston plant in Alabama, the New Madrid plant in Missouri, and the White Bluff plant in Arkansas. This presentation will analyze these nighttime power plant plume intercepts in terms of mixing (i.e., plume dispersion) and nighttime chemistry. Results will be interpreted in the context of the overall decline in emissions from such sources across the eastern United States, as well as the impact of concentrated anthropogenic emission sources in a region with large summertime biogenic emissions.

  18. Effects of motion on jet exhaust noise from aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, K. S.; Berman, C. H.; Cowan, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    The various problems involved in the evaluation of the jet noise field prevailing between an observer on the ground and an aircraft in flight in a typical takeoff or landing approach pattern were studied. Areas examined include: (1) literature survey and preliminary investigation, (2) propagation effects, (3) source alteration effects, and (4) investigation of verification techniques. Sixteen problem areas were identified and studied. Six follow-up programs were recommended for further work. The results and the proposed follow-on programs provide a practical general technique for predicting flyover jet noise for conventional jet nozzles.

  19. Extrapolating Ground-Based Aircraft Engine Exhaust Emissions to Cruise Conditions: Lessons From the 2013 ACCESS Chase Plane Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R.; Shook, M.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E.; Anderson, B. E.

    2011-12-01

    Aircraft engine emissions constitute a tiny fraction of the global black carbon mass, but can have a disproportionate climatic impact because they are emitted high in the troposphere and in remote regions with otherwise low aerosol concentrations. Consequently, these particles are likely to strongly influence cirrus and contrail formation by acting as ice nuclei (IN). However, the ice nucleating properties of aircraft exhaust at relevant atmospheric conditions are not well known, and thus, the overall impact of aviation on cloud formation remains very uncertain. While a number of aircraft engine emissions studies have previously been conducted at sea level temperature and pressure (e.g., APEX, AAFEX-1 and 2), it unclear the extent to which exhaust emissions on the ground translate to emissions at cruise conditions with much lower inlet gas temperatures and pressures. To address this need, the NASA Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions (ACCESS) was conducted in February-April, 2013 to examine the aerosol and gas emissions from the NASA DC-8 under a variety of different fuel types, engine power, and altitude/meteorological conditions. Two different fuel types were studied: a traditional JP-8 fuel and a 50:50 blend of JP-8 and a camelina-based hydro-treated renewable jet (HRJ) fuel. Emissions were sampled using a comprehensive suite of gas- and aerosol-phase instrumentation integrated on an HU-25 Falcon jet that was positioned in the DC-8 exhaust plume at approximately 100-500m distance behind the engines. In addition, a four-hour ground test was carried out with sample probes positioned at 30 m behind each of the inboard engines. Measurements of aerosol concentration, size distribution, soot mass, and hygroscopicity were carried out along with trace gas measurements of CO2, NO, NO2, O3, and water vapor. NOx emissions were reconciled by employing the well-established Boeing method for normalizing engine fuel flow rates to STP; however, comparison

  20. Extrapolating Ground-Based Aircraft Engine Exhaust Emissions to Cruise Conditions: Lessons From the 2013 ACCESS Chase Plane Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R.; Shook, M.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E.; Anderson, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    Aircraft engine emissions constitute a tiny fraction of the global black carbon mass, but can have a disproportionate climatic impact because they are emitted high in the troposphere and in remote regions with otherwise low aerosol concentrations. Consequently, these particles are likely to strongly influence cirrus and contrail formation by acting as ice nuclei (IN). However, the ice nucleating properties of aircraft exhaust at relevant atmospheric conditions are not well known, and thus, the overall impact of aviation on cloud formation remains very uncertain. While a number of aircraft engine emissions studies have previously been conducted at sea level temperature and pressure (e.g., APEX, AAFEX-1 and 2), it unclear the extent to which exhaust emissions on the ground translate to emissions at cruise conditions with much lower inlet gas temperatures and pressures. To address this need, the NASA Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions (ACCESS) was conducted in February-April, 2013 to examine the aerosol and gas emissions from the NASA DC-8 under a variety of different fuel types, engine power, and altitude/meteorological conditions. Two different fuel types were studied: a traditional JP-8 fuel and a 50:50 blend of JP-8 and a camelina-based hydro-treated renewable jet (HRJ) fuel. Emissions were sampled using a comprehensive suite of gas- and aerosol-phase instrumentation integrated on an HU-25 Falcon jet that was positioned in the DC-8 exhaust plume at approximately 100-500m distance behind the engines. In addition, a four-hour ground test was carried out with sample probes positioned at 30 m behind each of the inboard engines. Measurements of aerosol concentration, size distribution, soot mass, and hygroscopicity were carried out along with trace gas measurements of CO2, NO, NO2, O3, and water vapor. NOx emissions were reconciled by employing the well-established Boeing method for normalizing engine fuel flow rates to STP; however, comparison

  1. Plume mass flow and optical damage distributions for an MMH/N2O4 RCS thruster. [exhaust plume contamination of spacecraft components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spisz, E. W.; Bowman, R. L.; Jack, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The data obtained from two recent experiments conducted in a continuing series of experiments at the Lewis Research Center into the contamination characteristics of a 5-pound thrust MMH/N2O4 engine are presented. The primary objectives of these experiments were to establish the angular distribution of condensible exhaust products within the plume and the corresponding optical damage angular distribution of transmitting optical elements attributable to this contaminant. The plume mass flow distribution was measured by five quartz crystal microbalances (QCM's) located at the engine axis evaluation. The fifth QCM was located above the engine and 15 deg behind the nozzle exit plane. The optical damage was determined by ex-situ transmittance measurements for the wavelength range from 0.2 to 0.6 microns on 2.54 cm diameter fused silica discs also located at engine centerline elevation. Both the mass deposition and optical damage angular distributions followed the expected trend of decreasing deposition and damage as the angle between sensor or sample and the nozzle axis increased. A simple plume gas flow equation predicted the deposition distribution reasonably well for angles of up to 55 degrees. The optical damage measurements also indicated significant effects at large angles.

  2. The Kinetic Nonequilibrium Processes in the Internal Flow and in the Plume of Subsonic and Supersonic Aircrafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starik, Alexander M.

    1997-01-01

    (1) Our results show that under combustion of thermal destruction products of n-C8H18, and other hydrocarbon fuels with air at the equivalent ratio -0.5 and less the chemical equilibrium is not realized at the exit plane of combustion chamber and in the gas turbine and nozzle for most of small components such as NO2, NO3, HNO, HNO2, HNO3, N(x)H(y), HO2, OH. The chemical equilibrium is not realized in the internal flow of ramjet hydrogen combustion engine too. So at the nozzle exit plane both of gas-turbine hydrocarbon combustion engine and of ramjet hydrogen combustion engine the relatively large values of concentration of such small components as NO3, HNO2, N2O, HNO3, HNO, NH, N2H, HO2, H2O2 may be realized. The exact definition of these component concentration as well as concentration of NO(x), OH, SO2, O, H, H2, H2O at the nozzle exit plane is very important for plume chemistry. (2) The results which were obtained for subsonic and hypersonic aircrafts indicate on the considerable change of the composition of the gas mixture along the plume. This change can be caused not only by the mixture of combustion products with the atmosphere air but by proceeding of whole complex of nonequilibrium photochemical reactions. The photodissociation processes begin to influence on the formation of the free atoms and radicals at flight altitude H greater than or equal to 18 km. Neglect of these processes can result in essential (up to 10(exp 4) times) mistakes of values gamma(sub OH), gamma(sub O), gamma(sub H), gamma(sub HSO3) and some products of CFC's disintegration. It was found that penetration of Cl-containing species from the atmosphere into the exhaust flow and its interaction with nitrogen oxides leads to essential increasing of the concentration of Cl, Cl2, ClO2, ClNO3, CH3Cl and sometimes HCl and the decreasing of ClO concentration by comparison with background values. The results of our analysis show that the plume aircraft with both hydrocarbon and hydrogen

  3. Aircraft measurements over Europe of an air pollution plume from Southeast Asia - aerosol and chemical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stohl, A.; Forster, C.; Huntrieser, H.; Mannstein, H.; McMillan, W. W.; Petzold, A.; Schlager, H.; Weinzierl, B.

    2007-02-01

    An air pollution plume from Southern and Eastern Asia, including regions in India and China, was predicted by the FLEXPART particle dispersion model to arrive in the upper troposphere over Europe on 24-25 March 2006. According to the model, the plume was exported from Southeast Asia six days earlier, transported into the upper troposphere by a warm conveyor belt, and travelled to Europe in a fast zonal flow. This is confirmed by the retrievals of carbon monoxide (CO) from AIRS satellite measurements, which are in excellent agreement with the model results over the entire transport history. The research aircraft DLR Falcon was sent into this plume west of Spain on 24 March and over Southern Europe on 25 March. On both days, the pollution plume was found close to the predicted locations and, thus, the measurements taken allowed the first detailed characterization of the aerosol content and chemical composition of an anthropogenic pollution plume after a nearly hemispheric transport event. The mixing ratios of CO, reactive nitrogen (NOy) and ozone (O3) measured in the Asian plume were all clearly elevated over a background that was itself likely elevated by Asian emissions: CO by 17-34 ppbv on average (maximum 60 ppbv) and O3 by 2-9 ppbv (maximum 22 ppbv). Positive correlations existed between these species, and a ΔO3/ΔCO slope of 0.25 shows that ozone was formed in this plume, albeit with moderate efficiency. Nucleation mode and Aitken particles were suppressed in the Asian plume, whereas accumulation mode aerosols were strongly elevated and correlated with CO. The suppression of the nucleation mode was likely due to the large pre-existing aerosol surface of the transported larger particles. Super-micron particles, likely desert dust, were found in part of the Asian pollution plume and also in surrounding cleaner air. The aerosol light absorption coefficient was enhanced in the plume (average values for individual plume encounters 0.25-0.70 Mm-1), as was the

  4. Aircraft measurements over Europe of an air pollution plume from Southeast Asia - aerosol and chemical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stohl, A.; Forster, C.; Huntrieser, H.; Mannstein, H.; McMillan, W. W.; Petzold, A.; Schlager, H.; Weinzierl, B.

    2006-12-01

    An air pollution plume from Southern and Eastern Asia, including regions in India and China, was predicted by the FLEXPART particle dispersion model to arrive in the upper troposphere over Europe on 24-25 March 2006. According to the model, the plume was exported from Southeast Asia only six days earlier, transported into the upper troposphere by a warm conveyor belt, and travelled to Europe in a fast zonal flow. This is confirmed by the retrievals of carbon monoxide (CO) from AIRS satellite measurements, which are in excellent agreement with the model results over the entire transport history. The research aircraft DLR Falcon was sent into this plume west of Spain on 24 March and over Southern Europe on 25 March. On both days, the pollution plume was indeed found close to the predicted locations and, thus, the measurements taken allowed the first detailed characterization of the aerosol content and chemical composition of an anthropogenic pollution plume after a nearly hemispheric transport event. The mixing ratios of CO, reactive nitrogen (NOy) and ozone (O3) measured in the Asian plume were all clearly elevated over a background that was itself likely elevated by Asian emissions: CO by 17-34 ppbv on average (maximum 60 ppbv) and O3 by 2-9 ppbv (maximum 22 ppbv). Positive correlations existed between these species, and a ΔO3/ΔCO slope of 0.25 shows that ozone was formed in this plume, albeit with moderate efficiency. Nucleation mode and Aitken particles were suppressed in the Asian plume, whereas accumulation mode aerosols were strongly elevated and correlated with CO. The suppression of the nucleation mode was likely due to the large pre-existing aerosol surface due to the transported larger particles. Super-micron particles, likely desert dust, were found in part of the Asian pollution plume and also in surrounding cleaner air. The aerosol light absorption coefficient was enhanced in the plume (average values for individual plume encounters 0.25-0.70 Mm-1

  5. Jet engine exhaust emissions of high altitude commercial aircraft projected to 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.; Ingebo, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Projected minimum levels of engine exhaust emissions that may be practicably achievable for future commercial aircraft operating at high-altitude cruise conditions are presented. The forecasts are based on:(1) current knowledge of emission characteristics of combustors and augmentors; (2) the status of combustion research in emission reduction technology; and (3) predictable trends in combustion systems and operating conditions as required for projected engine designs that are candidates for advanced subsonic or supersonic commercial aircraft fueled by either JP fuel, liquefied natural gas, or hydrogen. Results are presented for cruise conditions in terms of both an emission index (g constituent/kg fuel) and an emission rate (g constituent/hr).

  6. Numerically Modeling the Erosion of Lunar Soil by Rocket Exhaust Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    In preparation for the Apollo program, Leonard Roberts of the NASA Langley Research Center developed a remarkable analytical theory that predicts the blowing of lunar soil and dust beneath a rocket exhaust plume. Roberts assumed that the erosion rate was determined by the excess shear stress in the gas (the amount of shear stress greater than what causes grains to roll). The acceleration of particles to their final velocity in the gas consumes a portion of the shear stress. The erosion rate continues to increase until the excess shear stress is exactly consumed, thus determining the erosion rate. Roberts calculated the largest and smallest particles that could be eroded based on forces at the particle scale, but the erosion rate equation assumed that only one particle size existed in the soil. He assumed that particle ejection angles were determined entirely by the shape of the terrain, which acts like a ballistic ramp, with the particle aerodynamics being negligible. The predicted erosion rate and the upper limit of particle size appeared to be within an order of magnitude of small-scale terrestrial experiments but could not be tested more quantitatively at the time. The lower limit of particle size and the predictions of ejection angle were not tested. We observed in the Apollo landing videos that the ejection angles of particles streaming out from individual craters were time-varying and correlated to the Lunar Module thrust, thus implying that particle aerodynamics dominate. We modified Roberts theory in two ways. First, we used ad hoc the ejection angles measured in the Apollo landing videos, in lieu of developing a more sophisticated method. Second, we integrated Roberts equations over the lunar-particle size distribution and obtained a compact expression that could be implemented in a numerical code. We also added a material damage model that predicts the number and size of divots which the impinging particles will cause in hardware surrounding the landing

  7. Forecast of jet engine exhaust emissions for future high altitude commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.; Ingebo, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Projected minimum levels of engine exhaust emissions that may be practicably achievable for future commercial aircraft operating at high altitude cruise conditions are presented. The forecasts are based on: (1) current knowledge of emission characteristics of combustors and augmentors; (2) the current status of combustion research in emission reduction technology; (3) predictable trends in combustion systems and operating conditions as required for projected engine designs that are candidates for advanced subsonic or supersonic commercial aircraft. Results are presented for cruise conditions in terms of an emission index, g pollutant/kg fuel. Two sets of engine exhaust emission predictions are presented: the first, based on an independent NASA study and the second, based on the consensus of an ad hoc committee composed of industry, university, and government representatives. The consensus forecasts are in general agreement with the NASA forecasts.

  8. From Contrails and Smoke Trails to Exhaust Particle Processes: A Brief History of Aircraft Particulate Emissions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    2,6- Dimethylnaphthalene Acenaphthylene Acenaphthene Phenanthrene Anthracene Fluoranthene Benz[ a ]anthracene Benzofluoranthenes Benzo [ a ] pyrene Indeno...1,2,3-c,d] pyrene Benzo [g,h,i]perylene Methane Ethane Propane Acetylene Propene n-Pentane n-Hexane Toluene n-Decane Dodecane Tridecane Formaldehyd e...Aerodyne Research, Inc. From Contrails and Smoke Trails to Exhaust Particle Processes: A brief history of aircraft particulate emissions Presented

  9. Ground-based aircraft exhaust measurements of a Lufthansa Airbus A340 using FTIR emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Klaus; Heland, Joerg

    1999-01-01

    The emission inventories of aircraft emissions are being set up using flight routing data and test rig measurements of the engine manufacturers for certification purposes which have to be extrapolated with respect to the actual parameters at cruise altitude. Precise data from in-service engines are not existing. FTIR-emission-spectroscopy as a remote sensing multi-component exhaust gas analysis method has been further developed to specify the traceable molecules in aircraft exhausts, to determine the detection limits, and to obtain reliable statements concerning its accuracy. The first measurement with the Airbus A340 engine CFM56-5C2 during run up tests at ground level showed the overall ability of the FTIR-emission system to analyze the exhausts of modern gas turbines with high bypass ratio and mixing of fan air into the exhausts before the nozzle exit. Good quality spectra were measured and analyzed with respect to the mixing rations of CO2, H2O, CO, NO, and N2O, and the emission indices of CO, NO, and N2O. Total measurement times at one thrust level should be about 15 minutes to obtain reliable result which can be compared to the ICAO data of this engine.

  10. Assessment of analytical and experimental techniques utilized in conducting plume technology tests 575 and 593. [exhaust flow simulation (wind tunnel tests) of scale model Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, L. R.; Sulyma, P. R.; Tevepaugh, J. A.; Penny, M. M.

    1976-01-01

    Since exhaust plumes affect vehicle base environment (pressure and heat loads) and the orbiter vehicle aerodynamic control surface effectiveness, an intensive program involving detailed analytical and experimental investigations of the exhaust plume/vehicle interaction was undertaken as a pertinent part of the overall space shuttle development program. The program, called the Plume Technology program, has as its objective the determination of the criteria for simulating rocket engine (in particular, space shuttle propulsion system) plume-induced aerodynamic effects in a wind tunnel environment. The comprehensive experimental program was conducted using test facilities at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and Ames Research Center. A post-test examination of some of the experimental results obtained from NASA-MSFC's 14 x 14-inch trisonic wind tunnel is presented. A description is given of the test facility, simulant gas supply system, nozzle hardware, test procedure and test matrix. Analysis of exhaust plume flow fields and comparison of analytical and experimental exhaust plume data are presented.

  11. Flow field description of the Space Shuttle Vernier reaction control system exhaust plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerimele, Mary P.; Alred, John W.

    1987-01-01

    The flow field for the Vernier Reaction Control System (VRCS) jets of the Space Shuttle Orbiter has been calculated from the nozzle throat to the far-field region. The calculations involved the use of recently improved rocket engine nozzle/plume codes. The flow field is discussed, and a brief overview of the calculation techniques is presented. In addition, a proposed on-orbit plume measurement experiment, designed to improve future estimations of the Vernier flow field, is addressed.

  12. The 1979 Southeastern Virginia Urban Plume Study. Volume 1: Description of experiments and selected aircraft data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Lee, R. B., III; Mathis, J. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The Southeastern Virginia Urban Plume Study (SEV-UPS) utilizes remote sensors and satellite platforms to monitor the Earth's environment and resources. SEV-UPS focuses on the application of specific remote sensors to the monitoring and study of specific air quality problems. The 1979 SEV-UPS field program was conducted with specific objectives: (1) to provide correlative data to evaluate the Laser Absorption spectrometer ozone remote sensors; (2) to demonstrate the utility of the sensor for the study of urban ozone problems; (3) to provide additional insights into air quality phenomena occuring in Southeastern Virginia; and (4) to compare measurement results of various in situ measurement platforms. The field program included monitoring from 12 surface stations, 4 aircraft, 2 tethered balloons, 2 radiosonde release sites, and numerous surface meteorological observation sites. The aircraft monitored 03, NO, NOX, Bscat, temperature, and dewpoint temperature.

  13. Workshop on Jet Exhaust Noise Reduction for Tactical Aircraft - NASA Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.; Henderson, Brenda S.

    2007-01-01

    Jet noise from supersonic, high performance aircraft is a significant problem for takeoff and landing operations near air bases and aircraft carriers. As newer aircraft with higher thrust and performance are introduced, the noise tends to increase due to higher jet exhaust velocities. Jet noise has been a subject of research for over 55 years. Commercial subsonic aircraft benefit from changes to the engine cycle that reduce the exhaust velocities and result in significant noise reduction. Most of the research programs over the past few decades have concentrated on commercial aircraft. Progress has been made by introducing new engines with design features that reduce the noise. NASA has recently started a new program called "Fundamental Aeronautics" where three projects (subsonic fixed wing, subsonic rotary wing, and supersonics) address aircraft noise. For the supersonics project, a primary goal is to understand the underlying physics associated with jet noise so that improved noise prediction tools and noise reduction methods can be developed for a wide range of applications. Highlights from the supersonics project are presented including prediction methods for broadband shock noise, flow measurement methods, and noise reduction methods. Realistic expectations are presented based on past history that indicates significant jet noise reduction cannot be achieved without major changes to the engine cycle. NASA s past experience shows a few EPNdB (effective perceived noise level in decibels) can be achieved using low noise design features such as chevron nozzles. Minimal thrust loss can be expected with these nozzles (< 0.5%) and they may be retrofitted on existing engines. In the long term, it is desirable to use variable cycle engines that can be optimized for lower jet noise during takeoff operations and higher thrust for operational performance. It is also suggested that noise experts be included early in the design process for engine nozzle systems to participate

  14. Development of an experimental capability to validate infrared signature predictions of installed aircraft exhaust systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooks, Steve; Fair, Martin L.; Smith, Anthony G.; Chettle, Nicholas

    2002-08-01

    As methods continue to develop for predicting infrared signatures for complex propulsion systems, the need to validate such methods and, indeed to gain confidence in new designs grows. Within Dstl, work to develop static engine test rigs has been carried out. These rigs allow aspects of infrared signature such as plume mixing, cavity emissions, surface impingement and subsequent treatment, obscuration and nozzle shaping to be studied. However, there is a growing need for data, which is more closely related to actual flight conditions. Full flight measurements are prohibitively expensive and often out of the question when a range of geometries are to be studied. Wind tunnel tests can also be difficult because of the quantity of power required for the free stream flow and the need to produce realistic hot gas. This paper describes the work that has been carried out to produce a cost effective free stream measurement capability, which makes use of existing static engine facilities. By bleeding engine compressor flows and exhaust flows, a reduced scale system has been created which allows the simulation of infrared propulsion issues at free stream Mach numbers of up to 0.5. The data obtained with this system has been used to validate the prediction methods for 3D-exhaust plume and afterbody infrared signature.

  15. A simulation method of aircraft plumes for real-time imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ni; Lv, Zhenhua; Huai, Wenqin; Gong, Guanghong

    2016-07-01

    Real-time infrared simulation technology can provide a large number of infrared images under different conditions to support the design, test and evaluation of a system having infrared imaging equipment with very low costs. By synthesizing heat transfer, infrared physics, fluid mechanics and computer graphics, a real-time infrared simulation method is proposed based on the method of characteristics to predict the infrared feature of aircraft plumes, which tries to obtain a good balance between simulation precision and computation efficiency. The temperature and pressure distribution in the under-expansion status can be rapidly solved with dynamically changing flight statuses and engine working states. And a modified C-G (Curtis-Godson) spectral band model that combines the plume streamlines with the conventional C-G spectral band model was implemented to calculate the non-uniformly distributed radiation parameters inside a plume field. The simulation result was analyzed and compared with the CFD++, which validates the credibility and efficiency of the proposed simulation method.

  16. Overestimation of on-road air quality surveying data measured with a mobile laboratory caused by exhaust plumes of a vehicle ahead in dense traffic areas.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sang-Hee; Kwak, Kyung-Hwan; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Chang Hyeok; Yook, Se-Jin; Jeon, Sangzin; Kwon, Sangil; Kim, Jeongsoo; Lee, Seung-Bok

    2016-11-01

    The unintended influence of exhaust plumes emitted from a vehicle ahead to on-road air quality surveying data measured with a mobile laboratory (ML) at 20-40 km h(-1) in dense traffic areas was investigated by experiment and life-sized computational fluidic dynamics (CFD) simulation. The ML equipped with variable sampling inlets of five columns by four rows was used to measure the spatial distribution of CO2 and NOx concentrations when following 5-20 m behind a sport utility vehicle (SUV) as an emitter vehicle equipped with a portable emission monitoring system (PEMS). The PEMS measured exhaust gases at the tailpipe for input data of the CFD simulations. After the CFD method was verified with experimental results of the SUV, dispersion of exhaust plumes emitted from a bus and a sedan was numerically analyzed. More dilution of the exhaust plume was observed at higher vehicle speeds, probably because of eddy diffusion that was proportional to turbulent kinetic energy and vehicle speed. The CO2 and NOx concentrations behind the emitter vehicle showed less overestimation as both the distance between the two vehicles and their background concentrations increased. If the height of the ML inlet is lower than 2 m and the ML travels within 20 m behind a SUV and a sedan ahead at 20 km h(-1), the overestimation should be considered by as much as 200 ppb in NOx and 80 ppm in CO2. Following a bus should be avoided if possible, because effect of exhaust plumes from a bus ahead could not be negligible even when the distance between the bus and the ML with the inlet height of 2 m, was more than 40 m. Recommendations are provided to avoid the unintended influence of exhaust plumes from vehicles ahead of the ML during on-road measurement in urban dense traffic conditions.

  17. Aircraft engine exhaust emissions and other airport-related contributions to ambient air pollution: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiol, Mauro; Harrison, Roy M.

    2014-10-01

    Civil aviation is fast-growing (about +5% every year), mainly driven by the developing economies and globalisation. Its impact on the environment is heavily debated, particularly in relation to climate forcing attributed to emissions at cruising altitudes and the noise and the deterioration of air quality at ground-level due to airport operations. This latter environmental issue is of particular interest to the scientific community and policymakers, especially in relation to the breach of limit and target values for many air pollutants, mainly nitrogen oxides and particulate matter, near the busiest airports and the resulting consequences for public health. Despite the increased attention given to aircraft emissions at ground-level and air pollution in the vicinity of airports, many research gaps remain. Sources relevant to air quality include not only engine exhaust and non-exhaust emissions from aircraft, but also emissions from the units providing power to the aircraft on the ground, the traffic due to the airport ground service, maintenance work, heating facilities, fugitive vapours from refuelling operations, kitchens and restaurants for passengers and operators, intermodal transportation systems, and road traffic for transporting people and goods in and out to the airport. Many of these sources have received inadequate attention, despite their high potential for impact on air quality. This review aims to summarise the state-of-the-art research on aircraft and airport emissions and attempts to synthesise the results of studies that have addressed this issue. It also aims to describe the key characteristics of pollution, the impacts upon global and local air quality and to address the future potential of research by highlighting research needs.

  18. Chemical composition and photochemical reactivity of exhaust from aircraft turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, C. W.; Holdren, M. W.; Riggin, R. M.; Lyon, T. F.

    1994-10-01

    Assessment of the environmental impact of aircraft emissions is required by planners and policy makers. Seveal areas of concern are: 1. exposure of airport workers and urban residents to toxic chemicals emitted when the engines operate at low power (idle and taxi) on the ground; 2. contributions to urban photochemical air pollution of aircraft volatile organic and nitrogen oxides emissions from operations around airports; and 3. emissions of nitrogen oxides and particles during high-altitude operation. The environmental impact of chemicals emitted from jet aircraft turbine engines has not been firmly established due to lack of data regarding emission rates and identities of the compounds emitted. This paper describes an experimental study of two different aircraft turbine engines designed to determine detailed organic emissions, as well as emissions of inorganic gases. Emissions were measured at several engine power settings. Measurements were made of detailed organic composition from C1 through C17, CO, CO2, NO, NOx, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Measurements were made using a multi-port sampling pro be positioned directly behind the engine in the exhaust exit plane. The emission measurements have been used to determine the organic distribution by carbon number and the distribution by compound class at each engine power level. The sum of the organic species was compared with an independent measurement of total organic carbon to assess the carbon mass balance. A portion of the exhaust was captured and irradiated in outdoor smog chambers to assess the photochemical reactivity of the emissions with respect to ozone formation. The reactivity of emissions from the two engines was apportioned by chemical compound class.

  19. Optical properties of mercury ion thruster exhaust plumes Significance for candidate SEP science instruments. [Solar Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R.; Monahan, K. M.

    1975-01-01

    Emission from the exhaust plume of a 30 cm mercury ion thruster was measured from 160 to 600 nm as a function of axial and radial distance from the thruster discharge chamber. The spectrally dispersed absolute intensities were used to construct an empirical volume emission rate function. The function was integrated along a typical instrument field of view, and the resulting apparent brightness was compared with instrument sensitivities to evaluate the extent of optical interference. The intensity levels degraded rapidly with distance from the thruster so that optical interference was negligible for fields of view not intercepting the beam axis. The operation of only one instrument, a zodiacal photopolarimeter was considered incompatible with simultaneous thruster operation.

  20. Characterizing and Overcoming Spectral Artifacts in Imaging Fourier-Transform Spectroscopy of Turbulent Exhaust Plumes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    refer to Figure 1). Within the Spectro Mode, the non-uniformity corrected broadband IR image is displayed in real-time. Moreover, the raw spectrum or...simplifications to help understand the problem, the first being that the plume is in local thermodynamic equilibrium . Inelastic collision rates are...Pi can be written as (2) where the gj denotes the degeneracy of the upper state, h is Planck’s constant , c is the speed of light, and kB is

  1. Task-specific tailored multiple-reflection mirror systems for sensitivity enhancement of spectroscopic measurements: application for aircraft engine exhaust emission measurements with FT-IR spectro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockmann, Klaus; Kurtenbach, Ralf; Kriesche, Volker; Wiesen, Peter; Heland, Joerg; Schaefer, Klaus

    1999-09-01

    Multi-path reflection mirror systems in White- or Herriott- type configuration have been widely used to enhance the absorption path-length and thus the sensitivity of laboratory spectroscopic systems, e.g. for smog chamber studies and molecular spectroscopy. Field studies, for instance using mobile tunable diode laser spectroscopy have widened the range of applications of these mirror systems for specific measurement tasks. In this paper a special designed White-type system mounted in two racks with 5 m base-length and adjustable optical path-length up to 74 passes is described. This system has been tested and successfully used to enhance the sensitivity of non-intrusive FT-IR measurements of aircraft engine exhaust emissions in the harsh environment of an engine test bed. The open cell around the engine plume including the transfer optics for the adaption of the spectrometers in a separate room allowed manual switching between passive FT-IR emission measurements, FT-IR absorption measurements with the cell, and, by covering the infrared source (globar) with a shutter, multi-path FT-IR emission measurements. Tests prior to the aircraft engine measurements were made to investigate the influence of different path- lengths, the position of the plume in the White cell, soot in the exhaust gas, and vibrations of the mirrors. The FT-IR spectra from all three measurement modes using the White cell during the engine measurements were found to be of good quality and the results of the analyses were comparable to the results from intrusive measurement systems.

  2. Comparison of the particle size distribution of heavy-duty diesel exhaust using a dilution tailpipe sampler and an in-plume sampler during on-road operation.

    PubMed

    Brown, J E; Clayton, M J; Harris, D B; King, F G

    2000-08-01

    Originally constructed to develop gaseous emission factors for heavy-duty diesel trucks, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) On-Road Diesel Emissions Characterization Facility has been modified to incorporate particle measurement instrumentation. An electrical low-pressure impactor designed to continuously measure and record size distribution data was used to monitor the particle size distribution of heavy-duty diesel truck exhaust. For this study, which involved a high-mileage (900,000 mi) truck running at full load, samples were collected by two different methods. One sample was obtained directly from the exhaust stack using an adaptation of the University of Minnesota's air-ejector-based mini-dilution sampler. The second sample was pulled from the plume just above the enclosed trailer, at a point approximately 11 m from the exhaust discharge. Typical dilution ratios of about 300:1 were obtained for both the dilution and plume sampling systems. Hundreds of particle size distributions were obtained at each sampling location. These were compared both selectively and cumulatively to evaluate the performance of the dilution system in simulating real-world exhaust plumes. The data show that, in its current residence-time configuration, the dilution system imposes a statistically significant bias toward smaller particles, with substantially more nanoparticles being collected than from the plume sample.

  3. Characterizing the Exhaust Plume of the Three-Electrode Micro Pulsed Plasma Thrusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Three-electrode micro -PPTs are a new version of two electrode micro -PPTs devices. Performance predictions and contamination expectations are...and velocity of the exhaust particles is the emphasis of this work. The results show that the three-electrode micro -PPT is more reliable than two...electrode micro -PPT and the operating energy range from 2 to 4.5 Joule is proper value to operate it. This research also shows that the angle

  4. Velocity and temperature characteristics of two-stream, coplanar jet exhaust plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U. H.; Goodykoontz, J. H.; Wasserbauer, C.

    1984-01-01

    The subsonic jet exhaust velocity and temperature characteristics of model scale, two stream coplanar nozzles were obtained experimentally. The data obtained included the effects of fan to primary stream velocity and temperature ratios on the jet axial and radial flow characteristics. Empirical parameters were developed to correlate the measured data. The resultant equations were shown to be extensions of a previously published single stream jet velocity and temperature correlation.

  5. Chemical characterization of freshly emitted particulate matter from aircraft exhaust using single particle mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abegglen, Manuel; Brem, B. T.; Ellenrieder, M.; Durdina, L.; Rindlisbacher, T.; Wang, J.; Lohmann, U.; Sierau, B.

    2016-06-01

    Non-volatile aircraft engine emissions are an important anthropogenic source of soot particles in the upper troposphere and in the vicinity of airports. They influence climate and contribute to global warming. In addition, they impact air quality and thus human health and the environment. The chemical composition of non-volatile particulate matter emission from aircraft engines was investigated using single particle time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The exhaust from three different aircraft engines was sampled and analyzed. The soot particulate matter was sampled directly behind the turbine in a test cell at Zurich Airport. Single particle analyses will focus on metallic compounds. The particles analyzed herein represent a subset of the emissions composed of the largest particles with a mobility diameter >100 nm due to instrumental restrictions. A vast majority of the analyzed particles was shown to contain elemental carbon, and depending on the engine and the applied thrust the elemental carbon to total carbon ratio ranged from 83% to 99%. The detected metallic compounds were all internally mixed with the soot particles. The most abundant metals in the exhaust were Cr, Fe, Mo, Na, Ca and Al; V, Ba, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, Mg, Mn, Si, Ti and Zr were also detected. We further investigated potential sources of the ATOFMS-detected metallic compounds using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. The potential sources considered were kerosene, engine lubrication oil and abrasion from engine wearing components. An unambiguous source apportionment was not possible because most metallic compounds were detected in several of the analyzed sources.

  6. Detection of emission indices of aircraft exhaust compounds by open-path optical methods at airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schürmann, Gregor; Schäfer, Klaus; Jahn, Carsten; Hoffmann, Herbert; Utzig, Selina

    2005-10-01

    Air pollutant emission rates of aircrafts are determined with test bed measurements. Regulations exist for CO2, NO, NO2, CO concentrations, the content of total unburned hydrocarbons and the smoke number, a measure of soot. These emission indices are listed for each engine in a data base of the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) for four different Air pollutant emission rates of aircrafts are determined with test bed measurements. Regulations exist for CO2, NO, NO2, CO concentrations, the content of total unburned hydrocarbons and the smoke number, a measure of soot. These emission indices are listed for each engine in a data base of the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) for four different thrust levels (Idle, approach, cruise and take-off). It is a common procedure to use this data base as a starting point to estimate aircraft emissions at airports and further on to calculate the contribution of airports on local air quality. The comparison of these indices to real in use measurements therefore is a vital task to test the quality of air quality models at airports. Here a method to determine emission indices is used, where concentration measurements of CO2 together with other pollutants in the aircraft plume are needed. During intensive measurement campaigns at Zurich (ZRH) and Paris Charles De Gaulle (CDG) airports, concentrations of CO2, NO, NO2 and CO were measured. The measurement techniques were Fourier-Transform-Infrared (FTIR) spectrometry and Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). The big advantage of these methods is that no operations on the airport are influenced during measurement times. Together with detailed observations of taxiway movements, a comparison of emission indices with real in use emissions is possible.

  7. Characteristics of aerosol particles and trace gases in ship exhaust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewnick, F.; Diesch, J.; Borrmann, S.

    2011-12-01

    Gaseous and particulate matter from marine vessels gain increasing attention due to their significant contribution to the anthropogenic burden of the atmosphere, implying the change of the atmospheric composition and the impact on local and regional air quality and climate (Eyring et al., 2010). As ship emissions significantly affect air quality of onshore regions, this study deals with various aspects of gas and particulate plumes from marine traffic measured near the Elbe river mouth in northern Germany. In addition to a detailed investigation of the chemical and physical particle properties from different types of commercial marine vessels, we will focus on the chemistry of ship plumes and their changes while undergoing atmospheric processing. Measurements of the ambient aerosol, various trace gases and meteorological parameters using a mobile laboratory (MoLa) were performed on the banks of the Lower Elbe which is passed on average, daily by 30 ocean-going vessels reaching the port of Hamburg, the second largest freight port of Europe. During 5 days of sampling from April 25-30, 2011 170 commercial marine vessels were probed at a distance of about 1.5-2 km with high temporal resolution. Mass concentrations in PM1, PM2.5 and PM10 and number as well as PAH and black carbon (BC) concentrations in PM1 were measured; size distribution instruments covered the size range from 6 nm up to 32 μm. The chemical composition of the non-refractory aerosol in the submicron range was measured by means of an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS). Gas phase species analyzers monitored various trace gas concentrations in the air and a weather station provided meteorological parameters. Additionally, a wide spectrum of ship information for each vessel including speed, size, vessel type, fuel type, gross tonnage and engine power was recorded via Automatic Identification System (AIS) broadcasts. Although commercial marine vessels powered by diesel engines consume high

  8. Apollo 12 Lunar Module exhaust plume impingement on Lunar Surveyor III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immer, Christopher; Metzger, Philip; Hintze, Paul E.; Nick, Andrew; Horan, Ryan

    2011-02-01

    Understanding plume impingement by retrorockets on the surface of the Moon is paramount for safe lunar outpost design in NASA's planned return to the Moon for the Constellation Program. Visual inspection, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and surface scanned topology have been used to investigate the damage to the Lunar Surveyor III spacecraft that was caused by the Apollo 12 Lunar Module's close proximity landing. Two parts of the Surveyor III craft returned by the Apollo 12 astronauts, Coupons 2050 and 2051, which faced the Apollo 12 landing site, show that a fine layer of lunar regolith coated the materials and was subsequently removed by the Apollo 12 Lunar Module landing rocket. The coupons were also pitted by the impact of larger soil particles with an average of 103 pits/cm 2. The average entry size of the pits was 83.7 μm (major diameter) × 74.5 μm (minor diameter) and the average estimated penetration depth was 88.4 μm. Pitting in the surface of the coupons correlates to removal of lunar fines and is likely a signature of lunar material imparting localized momentum/energy sufficient to cause cracking of the paint. Comparison with the lunar soil particle size distribution and the optical density of blowing soil during lunar landings indicates that the Surveyor III spacecraft was not exposed to the direct spray of the landing Lunar Module, but instead experienced only the fringes of the spray of soil. Had Surveyor III been exposed to the direct spray, the damage would have been orders of magnitude higher.

  9. Exhaust Nozzles for Propulsion Systems with Emphasis on Supersonic Cruise Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stitt, Leonard E.

    1990-01-01

    This compendium summarizes the contributions of the NASA-Lewis and its contractors to supersonic exhaust nozzle research from 1963 to 1985. Two major research and technology efforts sponsored this nozzle research work; the U.S. Supersonic Transport (SST) Program and the follow-on Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) Program. They account for two generations of nozzle technology: the first from 1963 to 1971, and the second from 1971 to 1985. First, the equations used to calculate nozzle thrust are introduced. Then the general types of nozzles are presented, followed by a discussion of those types proposed for supersonic aircraft. Next, the first-generation nozzles designed specifically for the Boeing SST and the second-generation nozzles designed under the SCR program are separately reviewed and then compared. A chapter on throttle-dependent afterbody drag is included, since drag has a major effect on the off-design performance of supersonic nozzles. A chapter on the performance of supersonic dash nozzles follows, since these nozzles have similar design problems, Finally, the nozzle test facilities used at NASA-Lewis during this nozzle research effort are identified and discussed. These facilities include static test stands, a transonic wind tunnel, and a flying testbed aircraft. A concluding section points to the future: a third generation of nozzles designed for a new era of high speed civil transports to produce even greater advances in performance, to meet new noise rules, and to ensure the continuity of over two decades of NASA research.

  10. A Transonic and Surpersonic Investigation of Jet Exhaust Plume Effects on the Afterbody and Base Pressures of a Body of Revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, C. D.; Cooper, C. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental aerodynamic investigation was conducted to provide data for studies to determine the criteria for simulating rocket engine plume induced aerodynamic effects in the wind tunnel using a simulated gaseous plume. Model surface and base pressure data were obtained in the presence of both a simulated and a prototype gaseous plume for a matrix of plume properties to enable investigators to determine the parameters that correlate the simulated and prototype plume-induced data. The test program was conducted in the Marshall Space Flight Center's 14 x 14-inch trisonic wind tunnel using two models, the first being a strut mounted cone-ogive-cylinder model with a fineness ratio of 9. Model exterior pressures, model plenum chamber and nozzle performance data were obtained at Mach numbers of 0.9, 1.2, 1.46, and 3.48. The exhaust plume was generated by using air as the simulant gas, or Freon-14 (CF4) as the prototype gas, over a chamber pressure range from 0 to 2,000 psia and a total temperature range from 50 to 600 F.

  11. Ultraviolet scattering properties of alumina particle clusters at three phase states in aircraft plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingying; Bai, Lu; Wu, Zhensen; Guo, Lixin; Gong, Yanjun

    2017-04-01

    We simulate the clusters of alumina particles using the parallel diffusion limited aggregation algorithm (DLA), and solve the scattering matrixes of the alumina particles in different phase states (alpha phase, gamma phase and liquid) through the multiple sphere T matrix method in UV. The effect of the number of monomers, fractal dimension and incident wavelength to the scattering phase function of the clusters of alumina particles is discussed. The results show that the different of the number of monomers, fractal dimensions and incident wavelengths have significant effect on the scattering properties of the clustered alumina particle. The researchers used to make the alumina particle equivalent to the alpha phase spherical particle, but it is too simplistic. We compare the scattering phase functions of the equivalent volume sphere (EVS), the equivalent surface sphere (ESS) and the clusters of alumina particles in three kinds of phase states. The results show that the backward scattering would be overestimated if the alumina particle is equivalent to the alpha phase spherical particle. Accurate phase function calculation in different phase states is very helpful to study the radiation propagation characteristics of aircraft plume.

  12. Unmanned Aircraft in the Measurement of Carbon Dioxide in Buoyant Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, J.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon sequestration, the storage of carbon dioxide gas underground, has the potential to reduce global warming by removing a greenhouse gas from the atmosphere. These storage sites, however, must first be monitored to detect if carbon dioxide is leaking back out to the atmosphere. As an alternative to traditional large ground-based sensor networks to monitor CO2 levels for leaks, unmanned aircraft offer the potential to perform in-situ atmospheric leak detection over large areas for a fraction of the cost. This project developed a proof-of-concept sensor system to map relative carbon dioxide levels to detect potential leaks. Ground tests were performed to verify and calibrate the system including wind tunnel tests to determine the optimal configuration of the system to account for dynamic calibration models required to determine accurate location of gas concentration in (x,y,z,t). Field tests were then conducted over a controlled release of CO2 as well as over controlled rangeland fires which released carbon dioxide over a large area. 3D maps of carbon dioxide were developed from the system telemetry that clearly illustrated increased CO2 levels from the fires. Results are compared with dynamic atmospheric models of gas dispersion within plumes.

  13. Laser Transmission Measurements of Soot Extinction Coefficients in the Exhaust Plume of the X-34 60K-lb Thrust Fastrac Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, C. C.; Eskridge, R. H.; Lee, M. H.

    2000-01-01

    A four-channel laser transmissometer has been used to probe the soot content of the exhaust plume of the X-34 60k-lb thrust Fastrac rocket engine at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The transmission measurements were made at an axial location approximately equal 1.65 nozzle diameters from the exit plane and are interpreted in terms of homogeneous radial zones to yield extinction coefficients from 0.5-8.4 per meter. The corresponding soot mass density, spatially averaged over the plume cross section, is, for Rayleigh particles, approximately equal 0.7 microgram/cc, and alternative particle distributions are briefly considered. Absolute plume radiance at the laser wavelength (515 nm) is estimated from the data at approximately equal 2,200 K equivalent blackbody temperature, and temporal correlations in emission from several spatial locations are noted.

  14. Laser Transmission Measurements of Soot Extinction Coefficients in the Exhaust Plume of the X-34 60k-lb Thrust Fastrac Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, C. C.; Eskridge, R. H.; Lee, M. H.

    2000-01-01

    A four-channel laser transmissometer has been used to probe the soot content of the exhaust plume of the X-34 60k-lb thrust Fastrac rocket engine at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The transmission measurements were made at an axial location about equal 1.65 nozzle diameters from the exit plane and are interpreted in terms of homogeneous radial zones to yield extinction coefficients from 0.5-8.4 per meter. The corresponding soot mass density, spatially averaged over the plume cross section, is, for Rayleigh particles, approximately equal to 0.7 micrograms/cubic cm and alternative particle distributions are briefly considered. Absolute plume radiance at the laser wavelength (515 nm) is estimated from the data at approximately equal to 2.200 K equivalent blackbody temperature, and temporal correlations in emission from several spatial locations are noted.

  15. Experimental Measurements of the Effects of Photo-chemical Oxidation on Aerosol Emissions in Aircraft Exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miracolo, M. A.; Presto, A. A.; Hennigan, C. J.; Nguyen, N.; Ranjan, M.; Reeder, A.; Lipsky, E.; Donahue, N. M.; Robinson, A. L.

    2009-12-01

    Many military and commercial airfields are located in non-attainment areas for particulate matter (PM2.5), but the contribution of emissions from in-use aircraft to local and regional PM2.5 concentrations is uncertain. In collaboration with the Pennsylvania Air National Guard 171st Air Refueling Wing, the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) Mobile Laboratory was deployed to measure fresh and aged emissions from a CFM56-2B1 gas-turbine engine mounted on a KC-135 Stratotanker airframe. The CFM-56 family of engine powers many different types of military and civilian aircraft, including the Boeing 737 and several Airbus models. It is one of the most widely deployed models of engines in the world. The goal of this work was to measure the gas-particle partitioning of the fresh emissions at atmospherically relevant conditions and to investigate the effect of atmospheric oxidation on aerosol loadings as the emissions age. Emissions were sampled from an inlet installed one meter downstream of the engine exit plane and transferred into a portable smog chamber via a heated inlet line. Separate experiments were conducted at different engine loads ranging from ground idle to take-off rated thrust. During each experiment, some diluted exhaust was added to the chamber and the volatility of the fresh emissions was then characterized using a thermodenuder. After this characterization, the chamber was exposed to either ambient sunlight or UV lights to initiate photochemical oxidation, which produced secondary aerosol and ozone. A suite of gas and particle-phase instrumentation was used to characterize the evolution of the gas and particle-phase emissions, including an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to measure particle size and composition distributions. Fresh emissions of fine particles varied with engine load with peak emission factors at low and high loads. At high engine loads, the fresh emissions were dominated by black carbon; at low loads volatile organic carbon emissions were

  16. Analysis of the effects of meteorology on aircraft exhaust dispersion and deposition using a Lagrangian particle model.

    PubMed

    Pecorari, Eliana; Mantovani, Alice; Franceschini, Chiara; Bassano, Davide; Palmeri, Luca; Rampazzo, Giancarlo

    2016-01-15

    The risk of air quality degradation is of considerable concern particularly for those airports that are located near urban areas. The ability to quantitatively predict the effects of air pollutants originated by airport operations is important for assessing air quality and the related impacts on human health. Current emission regulations have focused on local air quality in the proximity of airports. However, an integrated study should consider the effects of meteorological events, at both regional and local level, that can affect the dispersion and the deposition of exhausts. Rigorous scientific studies and extensive experimental data could contribute to the analysis of the impacts of airports expansion plans. This paper is focused on the analysis of the effects of meteorology on aircraft emission for the Marco Polo Airport in Venice. This is the most important international airport in the eastern part of the Po' Valley, one of the most polluted area in Europe. Air pollution is exacerbated by meteorology that is a combination of large and local scale effects that do not allow significant dispersion. Moreover, the airport is located near Venice, a city of noteworthy cultural and architectural relevance, and nearby the lagoon that hosts several areas of outstanding ecological importance at European level (Natura 2000 sites). Dispersion and deposit of the main aircraft exhausts (NOx, HC and CO) have been evaluated by using a Lagrangian particle model. Spatial and temporal aircraft exhaust dispersion has been analyzed for LTO cycle. Aircraft taxiing resulted to be the most impacting aircraft operation especially for the airport working area and its surroundings, however occasionally peaks may be observed even at high altitudes when cruise mode starts. Mixing height can affect concentrations more significantly than the concentrations in the exhausts themselves. An increase of HC and CO concentrations (15-50%) has been observed during specific meteorological events.

  17. The 1979 Southeastern Virginia Urban Plume Study. Volume 2: Data listings for NASA Cessna aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Lee, R. B., III; Mathis, J. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The data reported are these measured onboard the NASA Langley chartered Cessna aircraft. Data include ozone, nitrogen oxides, light scattering coefficient, temperature, dewpoint, and aircraft altitude.

  18. Subsidence of aircraft engine exhaust in the stratosphere: Implications for calculated ozone depletions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, J. M.; Shia, R.-L.; Ko, M. K. W.; Heisey, C. W.; Weistenstein, D. K.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Kolb, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    The deposition altitude of nitrogen oxides and other exhaust species emitted by stratospheric aircraft is a crucial parameter in determining the impact of these emissions on stratospheric ozone. We have utilized a model for the wake of a High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) to estimate the enhancements in water and reductions in ozone in these wakes as a function of time. Radiative calculations indicate differential cooling rates as large as -5K/day at the beginning of the far-wake regime, mostly due to the enhanced water abundance. These cooling rates would imply a net sinking of the wakes of about 1.2 km after three days in the limit of no mixing. Calculated mid-latitude column ozone reductions due to emissions from a Mach 2.4 HSCT would then change from about -1% to -06%. However, more realistic calculations adopting moderate mixing for the wake reduce the net sinking to less than 0.2 km, making the impact of radiative subsidence negligible.

  19. Summary of 1978 Southeastern Virginia Urban Plume study: Aircraft results for carbon monoxide, methane, nonmethane hydrocarbons, and ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, G. F.; Sachse, G. W.; Cofer, W. R., III

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of the Southeastern Virginia urban plume were defined with emphasis on the photon-oxidant species. The measurement area was a rectangle, approximately 150 km by 100 km centered around Cape Charles, Virginia. Included in this area are the cities of Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Chesapeake, Newport News, and Hampton. The area is bounded on the north by Wallops Island, Virginia, and on the south by the Hampton Roads area of Tidewater Virginia. The major axis of the rectangle is oriented in the southwest-northeast direction. The data set includes aircraft measurements for carbon monoxide, methane, nonmethane hydrocarbons, and ozone. The experiment shows that CO can be successfully measured as a tracer gas and used as an index for determining localized and urban plumes. The 1978 data base provided sufficient data to assess an automated chromatograph with flame ionization detection used for measuring methane and nonmethane hydrocarbons in flight.

  20. Hygroscopic Properties of Aircraft Engine Exhaust Aerosol Produced From Traditional and Alternative Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Chen, G.; Anderson, B. E.

    2012-12-01

    Aircraft emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols constitute an important component of anthropogenic climate forcing, of which aerosol-cloud interactions remain poorly understood. It is currently thought that the ability of these aerosols to alter upper tropospheric cirrus cloud properties may produce radiative forcings many times larger than the impact of linear contrails alone and which may partially offset the impact of greenhouse gas emissions from aviation (Burkhardt and Karcher, Nature, 2011). Consequently, it is important to characterize the ability of these engine-emitted aerosol to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) to form clouds. While a number of studies in the literature have examined aerosol-cloud interactions for laboratory-generated soot or from aircraft engines burning traditional fuels, limited attention has been given to how switching to alternative jet fuels impacts the ability of engine-emitted aerosols to form clouds. The key to understanding these changes is the aerosol hygroscopicity. To address this need, the second NASA Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX-II) was conducted in 2011 to examine the aerosol emissions from the NASA DC-8 under a variety of different engine power and fuel type conditions. Five fuel types were considered including traditional JP-8 fuel, synthetic Fischer-Tropsh (FT) fuel , sulfur-doped FT fuel (FTS) , hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuel, and a 50:50 blend of JP-8 with HRJ. Emissions were sampled from the DC-8 on the airport jetway at a distance of 145 meters downwind of the engine by a comprehensive suite of aerosol instrumentation that provided information on the aerosol concentration, size distribution, soot mass, and CCN activity. Concurrent measurements of carbon dioxide were used to account for plume dilution so that characteristic emissions indices could be determined. It is found that both engine power and fuel type significantly influence the hygroscopic properties of

  1. Removal of NOx and NOy in Asian outflow plumes: Aircraft measurements over the western Pacific in January 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegawa, N.; Kondo, Y.; Koike, M.; Chen, G.; Machida, T.; Watai, T.; Blake, D. R.; Streets, D. G.; Woo, J.-H.; Carmichael, G. R.; Kita, K.; Miyazaki, Y.; Shirai, T.; Liley, J. B.; Ogawa, T.

    2004-12-01

    The Pacific Exploration of Asian Continental Emission Phase A (PEACE-A) aircraft measurement campaign was conducted over the western Pacific in January 2002. Correlations of carbon monoxide (CO) with carbon dioxide (CO2) and back trajectories are used to identify plumes strongly affected by Asian continental emissions. ΔCO/ΔCO2 ratios (i.e., linear regression slopes of CO-CO2) in the plumes generally fall within the variability range of the CO/CO2 emission ratios estimated from an emission inventory for east Asia, demonstrating the consistency between the aircraft measurements and the emission characterization. Removal rates of reactive nitrogen (NOx and NOy) for the study region (altitude <4 km, 124°-140°E, 25°-45°N) are estimated using the correlation with CO2, the photochemical age of the plumes, and the NOx/CO2 emission ratio derived from the emission inventory. The plume age is estimated from the rates of hydrocarbon decay and hydroxyl radical (OH) concentration calculated using a constrained photochemical box model. The average lifetime of NOx is estimated to be 1.2 ± 0.4 days. Possible processes controlling the NOx lifetime are discussed in conjunction with results from earlier studies. The average lifetime of NOy is estimated to be 1.7 ± 0.5 days, which is comparable to the NOy lifetime of 1.7-1.8 days that has been previously reported for outflow from the United States. This similarity suggests the importance of chemical processing near the source regions in determining the NOy abundance.

  2. Simulation investigation of the effect of the NASA Ames 80-by 120-foot wind tunnel exhaust flow on light aircraft operating in the Moffett field trafffic pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streeter, Barry G.

    1986-01-01

    A preliminary study of the exhaust flow from the Ames Research Center 80 by 120 Foot Wind Tunnel indicated that the flow might pose a hazard to low-flying light aircraft operating in the Moffett Field traffic pattern. A more extensive evaluation of the potential hazard was undertaken using a fixed-base, piloted simulation of a light, twin-engine, general-aviation aircraft. The simulated aircraft was flown through a model of the wind tunnel exhaust by pilots of varying experience levels to develop a data base of aircraft and pilot reactions. It is shown that a light aircraft would be subjected to a severe disturbance which, depending upon entry condition and pilot reaction, could result in a low-altitude stall or cause damage to the aircraft tail structure.

  3. Airborne measurements of the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash plume over northwestern Germany with a light aircraft and an optical particle counter: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Konradin; Vogel, Andreas; Fischer, Christian; van Haren, Günther; Pohl, Tobias

    2010-10-01

    During the eruption phase of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in April/May 2010 the University of Applied Sciences Duesseldorf has performed 14 measurement flights over north-western Germany in the time period of 23 April 2010 to 21 May 2010. Additionally 4 flights have been performed for visual observations, referencing and transfer. The measurement flights have been performed in situations, where the ash plume was present over north-western Germany as well as in situations, when there was no ash plume predicted. For the measurements a light aircraft (Flight Design CTSW Shortwing) was used, which was equipped with an optical particle counter (Grimm 1.107). Additionally the aircraft was equipped for one flight with an UV-DOAS system and a CO2-measurement system. The optical particle counter allowed in-situ measurements of the particle distribution between 250 nm and 32 μm and of PM10, PM2.5 and PM1. The ash plume appeared during the measurements as inhomogeneous in structure. Layers or multilayers of one hundred meters to a few hundred meters vertical depth of ash plume could be identified. Sub-plumes with a horizontal extension of several kilometres to several tenths of kilometres could be found. The layers of the ash plume could be found in altitudes between 2500m and 4500m. The measured concentrations have been compared with the concentration and extension of the ash plume predicted by the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC).

  4. Verification of large-scale rapid transport in the lower thermosphere: Tracking the exhaust plume of STS-107 from launch to the Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niciejewski, R.; Skinner, W.; Cooper, M.; Marshall, A.; Meier, R. R.; Stevens, M. H.; Ortland, D.; Wu, Q.

    2011-05-01

    New analysis of the Doppler shift of O2 airglow spectra recorded by the TIMED Doppler Interferometer (TIDI) and the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) have provided conclusive evidence that the shuttle main engine exhaust plume generated in the lower thermosphere by the launch of STS-107 and imaged by the Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI) instrument on TIMED was transported to the Antarctic in ˜80 h, supporting a key inference from the initial study by Stevens et al. (2005). These new results were aided by improved knowledge of the effects of instrumental and satellite artifacts imposed on the Doppler spectra. STS-107 launched on 16 January 2003, and the neutral wind near its launch trajectory and nearby volume was sampled within minutes by TIDI. These initial observations suggested that the northernmost end of the shuttle's exhaust plume would move northeast and that the southern end would move southeast, motions that were identified in imagery acquired during the next orbit of TIMED. The direction and magnitude of plume motion inferred from GUVI images obtained 12, 26, and 50 h after launch were again confirmed by TIDI and HRDI. The appearance of the plume over the Antarctic ˜80 h after launch, inferred from earlier work by the appearance of iron ablated from the shuttle's main engines, was consistent with neutral winds measured by the satellite Doppler instruments over the Antarctic. The transport of the plume from the coast of Florida to the Antarctic was aided by the favorable phase and strong amplitude of a 2 day planetary wave of wave number three in the southern hemisphere on 18 January 2003. The existence of the 2 day wave was deduced from zonally averaged and combined TIDI and HRDI neutral wind observations. We conclude that the existence of strong and sustained winds in the MLT, significantly greater than expected from empirical and theoretical models, is indisputable and provides compelling evidence supporting the global-scale nature of

  5. Validation of scramjet exhaust simulation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, H. B.; Konopka, W.; Leng, J.

    1976-01-01

    Scramjet/airframe integration design philosophy for hypersonic aircraft results in configurations having lower aft surfaces that serve as exhaust nozzles. There is a strong coupling between the exhaust plume and the aerodynamics of the vehicle, making accurate simulation of the engine exhaust mandatory. The experimental verification of the simulation procedure is described. The detonation tube simulator was used to produce an exact simulation of the scramjet exhaust for a Mach 8 flight condition. The pressure distributions produced by the exact exhaust flow were then duplicated by a cool mixture Argon and Freon 13B1. Such a substitute gas mixture validated by the detonation tube technique could be used in conventional wind tunnel tests. The results presented show the substitute gas simulation technique to be valid for shockless expansions.

  6. Nitrogen oxides and PAN in plumes from boreal fires during ARCTAS-B and their impact on ozone: an integrated analysis of aircraft and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, M. J.; Logan, J. A.; Mao, J.; Apel, E.; Riemer, D.; Blake, D.; Cohen, R. C.; Min, K.-E.; Perring, A. E.; Browne, E. C.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Diskin, G. S.; Sachse, G. W.; Fuelberg, H.; Sessions, W. R.; Harrigan, D. L.; Huey, G.; Liao, J.; Case-Hanks, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Cubison, M. J.; Vay, S. A.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D. D.; Flocke, F. M.; Pollack, I. B.; Wennberg, P. O.; Kurten, A.; Crounse, J.; St. Clair, J. M.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Yantosca, R. M.; Carouge, C. C.; Le Sager, P.

    2010-10-01

    We determine enhancement ratios for NOx, PAN, and other NOy species from boreal biomass burning using aircraft data obtained during the ARCTAS-B campaign and examine the impact of these emissions on tropospheric ozone in the Arctic. We find an initial emission factor for NOx of 1.06 g NO per kg dry matter (DM) burned, much lower than previous observations of boreal plumes, and also one third the value recommended for extratropical fires. Our analysis provides the first observational confirmation of rapid PAN formation in a boreal smoke plume, with 40% of the initial NOx emissions being converted to PAN in the first few hours after emission. We find little clear evidence for ozone formation in the boreal smoke plumes during ARCTAS-B in either aircraft or satellite observations, or in model simulations. Only a third of the smoke plumes observed by the NASA DC8 showed a correlation between ozone and CO, and ozone was depleted in the plumes as often as it was enhanced. Special observations from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) also show little evidence for enhanced ozone in boreal smoke plumes between 15 June and 15 July 2008. Of the 22 plumes observed by TES, only 4 showed ozone increasing within the smoke plumes, and even in those cases it was unclear that the increase was caused by fire emissions. Using the GEOS-Chem atmospheric chemistry model, we show that boreal fires during ARCTAS-B had little impact on the median ozone profile measured over Canada, and had little impact on ozone within the smoke plumes observed by TES.

  7. Nitrogen oxides and PAN in plumes from boreal fires during ARCTAS-B and their impact on ozone: an integrated analysis of aircraft and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, M. J.; Logan, J. A.; Mao, J.; Apel, E.; Riemer, D.; Blake, D.; Cohen, R. C.; Min, K.-E.; Perring, A. E.; Browne, E. C.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Diskin, G. S.; Sachse, G. W.; Fuelberg, H.; Sessions, W. R.; Harrigan, D. L.; Huey, G.; Liao, J.; Case-Hanks, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Cubison, M. J.; Vay, S. A.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D. D.; Flocke, F. M.; Pollack, I. B.; Wennberg, P. O.; Kurten, A.; Crounse, J.; St. Clair, J. M.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Yantosca, R. M.; Carouge, C. C.; Le Sager, P.

    2010-06-01

    We determine enhancement ratios for NOx, PAN, and other NOy species from boreal biomass burning using aircraft data obtained during the ARCTAS-B campaign and examine the impact of these emissions on tropospheric ozone in the Arctic. We find an initial emission factor for NOx of 1.06 g NO per kg dry matter (DM) burned, much lower than previous observations of boreal plumes, and also one third the value recommended for extratropical fires. Our analysis provides the first observational confirmation of rapid PAN formation in a boreal smoke plume, with 40% of the initial NOx emissions being converted to PAN in the first few hours after emission. We find little clear evidence for ozone formation in the boreal smoke plumes during ARCTAS-B in either aircraft or satellite observations, or in model simulations. Only a third of the smoke plumes observed by the NASA DC8 showed a correlation between ozone and CO, and ozone was depleted in the plumes as often as it was enhanced. Special observations from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) also show little evidence for enhanced ozone in boreal smoke plumes between 15 June and 15 July 2008. Of the 22 plumes observed by TES, only 4 showed ozone increasing within the smoke plumes, and even in those cases it was unclear that the increase was caused by fire emissions. Using the GEOS-Chem atmospheric chemistry model, we show that boreal fires during ARCTAS-B had little impact on the median ozone profile measured over Canada, and had little impact on ozone within the smoke plumes observed by TES.

  8. Jet aircraft engine exhaust emissions database development: Year 1990 and 2015 scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landau, Z. Harry; Metwally, Munir; Vanalstyne, Richard; Ward, Clay A.

    1994-01-01

    Studies relating to environmental emissions associated with the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) military jet and charter jet aircraft were conducted by McDonnell Douglas Aerospace Transport Aircraft. The report includes engine emission results for baseline 1990 charter and military scenario and the projected jet engine emissions results for a 2015 scenario for a Mach 1.6 HSCT charter and military fleet. Discussions of the methodology used in formulating these databases are provided.

  9. Three dimensional model calculations of the global dispersion of high speed aircraft exhaust and implications for stratospheric ozone loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, Anne R.; Rood, Richard B.; Jackman, Charles H.; Weaver, Clark J.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional (zonally averaged) photochemical models are commonly used for calculations of ozone changes due to various perturbations. These include calculating the ozone change expected as a result of change in the lower stratospheric composition due to the exhaust of a fleet of supersonic aircraft flying in the lower stratosphere. However, zonal asymmetries are anticipated to be important to this sort of calculation. The aircraft are expected to be restricted from flying over land at supersonic speed due to sonic booms, thus the pollutant source will not be zonally symmetric. There is loss of pollutant through stratosphere/troposphere exchange, but these processes are spatially and temporally inhomogeneous. Asymmetry in the pollutant distribution contributes to the uncertainty in the ozone changes calculated with two dimensional models. Pollutant distributions for integrations of at least 1 year of continuous pollutant emissions along flight corridors are calculated using a three dimensional chemistry and transport model. These distributions indicate the importance of asymmetry in the pollutant distributions to evaluation of the impact of stratospheric aircraft on ozone. The implications of such pollutant asymmetries to assessment calculations are discussed, considering both homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions.

  10. Falcon 20-E5 Aircraft Flies Close Behind NASA DC-8 to Sample Exhaust

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video was taken from a NASA HU-25C Guardian chase plane looking toward NASA's DC-8, with a Falcon 20-E5 from the German Aerospace Agency (DLR) soon to fly into the DC-8's exhaust. The Falcon i...

  11. Real-Time Analysis of Raman Spectra for Temperature Field Characterization in Aircraft Exhaust Noise Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wormhoudt, J.; Nelson, D. D.; Annen, K.; Locke, R. J.; Wernet, M.

    2009-06-01

    Raman scattering has long been used as a non-intrusive diagnostic of temperatures in combustion exhaust flows, using a variety of spectral analysis techniques. As part of their ongoing program of experiments to support development of computer codes that calculate exhaust flow fields and predict jet noise, NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a laser Raman diagnostic system that will measure mean temperatures and temperature fluctuations in hot and cold jet flows. We describe a software package, ART (Analysis for Raman Temperatures), that analyzes Raman spectra of air for temperature and density using vibrational or resolved or unresolved rotational bands, presenting results in a variety of real-time displays. Each analysis technique presents its own challenges in obtaining the most precise and accurate values, and we will comment on these issues by exhibiting example spectra of each type. The ART program is closely related to another Aerodyne software package (TDLWintel) which automates the acquisition and analysis of tunable laser absorption spectra.

  12. A study of Asian dust plumes using satellite, surface, and aircraft measurements during the INTEX-B field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Timothy; Xi, Baike; Dong, Xiquan; Obrecht, Rebecca; Li, Zhanqing; Cribb, Maureen

    2010-04-01

    Asian dust events occur frequently during the boreal spring season. Their optical properties have been analyzed by using a combination of source region (ground-based and satellite) and remote Pacific Ocean (aircraft) measurements during the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-Phase B (INTEX-B) field campaign which lasted from 7 April to 15 May 2006. A strong dust event originating from the Gobi Desert and passing over the Xianghe surface site on 17 April 2006 has been extensively analyzed. The surface averaged aerosol optical depth (AOD) values increased from 0.17 (clear sky) to 4.0 (strong dust), and the Angström exponent (α) dropped from 1.26 (clear sky) to below 0.1. Its total downwelling SW flux over the Xianghe site (thousands of kilometers away from the dust source region) is only 46% of the clear-sky value with almost no direct transmission and nearly double the diffuse SW clear-sky value. This event was also captured 6 days later by satellite observations as well as the UND/NASA DC-8 aircraft over the eastern Pacific Ocean. The DC-8 measurements in the remote Pacific region further classified the plumes into dust dominant, pollution dominant, and a mixture of dust and pollution events. HYSPLIT backward trajectories not only verified the origins of each case we selected but also showed (1) two possible origins for the dust: the Gobi and Taklimakan deserts; and (2) pollution: urban areas in eastern China, Japan, and other industrialized cities east of the two deserts. Based on the averaged satellite retrieved AOD data (0.5° × 0.5° grid box), declining AOD values with respect to longitude demonstrated the evolution of the transpacific transport pathway of Asian dust and pollution over the period of the field campaign.

  13. Nitrogen oxides and PAN in plumes from boreal fires during ARCTAS-B and their impact on ozone: An integrated analysis of aircraft and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, M. J.; Logan, J. A.; Mao, J.; Apel, E. C.; Riemer, D. D.; Blake, D. R.; Cohen, R. C.; Min, K.; Perring, A. E.; Browne, E. C.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Diskin, G. S.; Sachse, G. W.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Sessions, W.; Harrigan, D. L.; Huey, L. G.; Liao, J.; Case Hanks, A. T.; Jimenez, J. L.; Cubison, M.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knapp, D. J.; Flocke, F. M.; Wennberg, P. O.; Kuerten, A.; Crounse, J.; St. Clair, J.; Wisthaler, A.; Vay, S. A.; Arctas Science Team

    2010-12-01

    We determine enhancement ratios for NOx , PAN, and other NOy species from boreal biomass burning using aircraft data obtained during the ARCTAS-B campaign and examine the impact of these emissions on tropospheric ozone in the Arctic. We find an initial emission factor for NOx of 1.06 g NO per kg dry matter (DM) burned, one third the value recommended for extratropical fires. Our analysis provides the first observational confirmation of rapid PAN formation in a boreal smoke plume, with 40% of the initial NOx emissions being converted to PAN in the first few hours after emission. We find little clear evidence for ozone formation in the boreal smoke plumes during ARCTAS-B in either aircraft or satellite observations, or in model simulations. Only a third of the smoke plumes observed by the NASA DC8 showed a correlation between ozone and CO, and ozone was depleted in the plumes as often as it was enhanced. Special observations from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) also show little evidence for enhanced ozone in boreal smoke plumes between 15 June and 15 July 2008. Using the GEOS-Chem atmospheric chemistry model, we show that boreal fires during ARCTAS-B had little impact on the median ozone profile measured over Canada, and had little impact on ozone within the smoke plumes observed by TES. We show that the modeled ozone levels are more sensitive to estimates of injection height, total biomass consumed and NOy emission factor than to the initial partitioning of the NOy emissions between NOx and PAN.

  14. Integrated exhaust gas analysis system for aircraft turbine engine component testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, R. L.; Anderson, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    An integrated exhaust gas analysis system was designed and installed in the hot-section facility at the Lewis Research Center. The system is designed to operate either manually or automatically and also to be operated from a remote station. The system measures oxygen, water vapor, total hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and oxides of nitrogen. Two microprocessors control the system and the analyzers, collect data and process them into engineering units, and present the data to the facility computers and the system operator. Within the design of this system there are innovative concepts and procedures that are of general interest and application to other gas analysis tasks.

  15. Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Company, Washington, DC Boeing Commercial Aircraft Division, Seattle, WA and Long Beach, CA Boeing Military Aircraft and Missile Division, St. Louis, MO and... aircraft ; military fixed-wing aircraft ; rotorcraft (helicopters and tiltrotor aircraft ); and aircraft jet engines. Two companies dominate the commercial... aircraft business, Boeing and Airbus. Four companies dominate the military fixed-wing market, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, BAE Systems, and European

  16. Ship emissions measurement in the Arctic by plume intercepts of the Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker Amundsen from the Polar 6 aircraft platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliabadi, Amir A.; Thomas, Jennie L.; Herber, Andreas B.; Staebler, Ralf M.; Leaitch, W. Richard; Schulz, Hannes; Law, Kathy S.; Marelle, Louis; Burkart, Julia; Willis, Megan D.; Bozem, Heiko; Hoor, Peter M.; Köllner, Franziska; Schneider, Johannes; Levasseur, Maurice; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.

    2016-06-01

    Decreasing sea ice and increasing marine navigability in northern latitudes have changed Arctic ship traffic patterns in recent years and are predicted to increase annual ship traffic in the Arctic in the future. Development of effective regulations to manage environmental impacts of shipping requires an understanding of ship emissions and atmospheric processing in the Arctic environment. As part of the summer 2014 NETCARE (Network on Climate and Aerosols) campaign, the plume dispersion and gas and particle emission factors of effluents originating from the Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker Amundsen operating near Resolute Bay, NU, Canada, were investigated. The Amundsen burned distillate fuel with 1.5 wt % sulfur. Emissions were studied via plume intercepts using the Polar 6 aircraft measurements, an analytical plume dispersion model, and using the FLEXPART-WRF Lagrangian particle dispersion model. The first plume intercept by the research aircraft was carried out on 19 July 2014 during the operation of the Amundsen in the open water. The second and third plume intercepts were carried out on 20 and 21 July 2014 when the Amundsen had reached the ice edge and operated under ice-breaking conditions. Typical of Arctic marine navigation, the engine load was low compared to cruising conditions for all of the plume intercepts. The measured species included mixing ratios of CO2, NOx, CO, SO2, particle number concentration (CN), refractory black carbon (rBC), and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The results were compared to similar experimental studies in mid-latitudes. Plume expansion rates (γ) were calculated using the analytical model and found to be γ = 0.75 ± 0.81, 0.93 ± 0.37, and 1.19 ± 0.39 for plumes 1, 2, and 3, respectively. These rates were smaller than prior studies conducted at mid-latitudes, likely due to polar boundary layer dynamics, including reduced turbulent mixing compared to mid-latitudes. All emission factors were in agreement with prior

  17. A plume-in-grid approach to characterize air quality impacts of aircraft emissions at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissman, J.; Arunachalam, S.; Woody, M.; West, J. J.; BenDor, T.; Binkowski, F. S.

    2013-09-01

    This study examined the impacts of aircraft emissions during the landing and takeoff cycle on PM2.5 concentrations during the months of June and July 2002 at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Primary and secondary pollutants were modeled using the Advanced Modeling System for Transport, Emissions, Reactions, and Deposition of Atmospheric Matter (AMSTERDAM). AMSTERDAM is a modified version of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model that incorporates a plume-in-grid process to simulate emissions sources of interest at a finer scale than can be achieved using CMAQ's model grid. Three fundamental issues were investigated: the effects of aircraft on PM2.5 concentrations throughout northern Georgia, the differences resulting from use of AMSTERDAM's plume-in-grid process rather than a traditional CMAQ simulation, and the concentrations observed in aircraft plumes at subgrid scales. Comparison of model results with an air quality monitor located in the vicinity of the airport found that normalized mean bias ranges from -77.5% to 6.2% and normalized mean error ranges from 40.4% to 77.5%, varying by species. Aircraft influence average PM2.5 concentrations by up to 0.232 μg m-3 near the airport and by 0.001-0.007 μg m-3 throughout the Atlanta metro area. The plume-in-grid process increases concentrations of secondary PM pollutants by 0.005-0.020 μg m-3 (compared to the traditional grid-based treatment) but reduces the concentration of non-reactive primary PM pollutants by up to 0.010 μg m-3, with changes concentrated near the airport. Examination of subgrid-scale results indicates that median aircraft contribution to grid cells is higher than median puff concentration in the airport's grid cell and outside of a 20 km × 20 km square area centered on the airport, while in a 12 km × 12 km square ring centered on the airport, puffs have median concentrations over an order of magnitude higher than aircraft contribution to the grid cells. Maximum

  18. Aircraft measurements of the impacts of urban plume on cloud activation properties during GoAmazon - preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Comstock, J. M.; Wang, J.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Hubbe, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Martin, S. T.; Longo, K.; Kuang, C.; Chand, D.; Pekour, M. S.; Shilling, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Currently, the indirect effects of atmospheric aerosols remain the most uncertain components in forcing of climate change over the industrial period (IPCC, 2007). This large uncertainty is partially a result of our incomplete understanding of the ability of particles to form cloud droplets under atmospherically relevant supersaturations. One of the objectives of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Green Ocean Amazon Project (GoAmazon) is to understand the influence of the emission from Manaus, a tropical megacity, on aerosol size, concentration, and chemical composition, and their impact on aerosol cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectrum. During the GoAmazon study, size distributions, CCN spectra and chemical composition of aerosols both under pristine conditions and inside Manaus plume were measured in-situ from the DOE Gulfstream 1 (G-1) research aircraft during two Intensive Operations Periods, one conducted in the wet season (Feb 22- March 24, 2014) and the other in dry season (Sep 1 - Oct 10, 2014). Aerosol size distributions were measured by a Fast Integrated Mobility Spectrometer (FIMS) and compared with the merged size distribution from two other instruments, an Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer - Airborne (UHSAS-A, DMT), and a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP-200, DMT). Optical measurements of light scattering by nephelometer and absorption by a particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) were combined with number/size distributions data in a iterative method, which retrieves the effective imaginary refractive index of the particles at a wavelength of 545 nm. Aerosol chemical composition was characterized using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, Aerodyne Inc.). CCN number concentration was measured by a DMT dual column CCN counter at two supersaturations 0.25% and 0.5%. Based on the aerosol properties mentioned above, CCN closure is carried out. In addition, the sensitivity of calculated CCN

  19. A reexamination of the formation of exhaust condensation trails by jet aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, H.M.; Hanson, D.M.

    1995-11-01

    With the end of World War II, it became apparent that a study should be undertaken to identify the factors controlling the production of aircraft condensation trails (contrails). This early work provided a theoretical prediction of T{sub c}, the critical temperature at which the values of the relative humidity and pressure are such that the formation of the contrail phenomenon will occur. As empirical data were obtained, the general agreement at increased altitude was not precise and several studies were made to obtain both theoretical and empirical fits that would provide a {open_quotes}yes/no{close_quotes} decision. These modifications did allow a better decision for the formation of contrails but were found to be increasingly inaccurate at greater altitudes. This study provides an improved algorithm that yields a theoretical prediction that is in general agreement with the available empirical data at all altitudes. It demonstrates that there is a need for additional effort in the identification and precision of relative humidity and pressure that are input to this computation. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Experimental clean combustor program, phase 1. [aircraft exhaust/gas analysis - gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Peduzzi, A.; Vitti, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    A program of screening three low emission combustors for conventional takeoff and landing, by testing and analyzing thirty-two configurations is presented. Configurations were tested that met the emission goals at idle operating conditions for carbon monoxide and for unburned hydrocarbons (emission index values of 20 and 4, respectively). Configurations were also tested that met a smoke number goal of 15 at sea-level take-off conditions. None of the configurations met the goal for oxides of nitrogen emissions at sea-level take-off conditions. The best configurations demonstrated oxide of nitrogen emission levels that were approximately 61 percent lower than those produced by the JT9D-7 engine, but these levels were still approximately 24 percent above the goal of an emission index level of 10. Additional combustor performance characteristics, including lean blowout, exit temperature pattern factor and radial profile, pressure loss, altitude stability, and altitude relight characteristics were documented. The results indicate the need for significant improvement in the altitude stability and relight characteristics. In addition to the basic program for current aircraft engine combustors, seventeen combustor configurations were evaluated for advanced supersonic technology applications. The configurations were tested at cruise conditions, and a conceptual design was evolved.

  1. Extending acoustic data measured with small-scale supersonic model jets to practical aircraft exhaust jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ching-Wen

    2010-06-01

    Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable geometry nozzles to provide optimum thrust in different operating conditions within the flight envelope. However, the acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full-scale measurements and the lack of details about the exact geometry of these nozzles. Thus the present effort at The Pennsylvania State University and the NASA Glenn Research Center, in partnership with GE Aviation, is aiming to study and characterize the acoustic field produced by supersonic jets issuing from converging-diverging military style nozzles. An equally important objective is to develop a scaling methodology for using data obtained from small- and moderate-scale experiments which exhibits the independence of the jet sizes to the measured noise levels. The experimental results presented in this thesis have shown reasonable agreement between small-scale and moderate-scale jet acoustic data, as well as between heated jets and heat-simulated ones. As the scaling methodology is validated, it will be extended to using acoustic data measured with small-scale supersonic model jets to the prediction of the most important components of full-scale engine noise. When comparing the measured acoustic spectra with a microphone array set at different radial locations, the characteristics of the jet noise source distribution may induce subtle inaccuracies, depending on the conditions of jet operation. A close look is taken at the details of the noise generation region in order to better understand the mismatch between spectra measured at various acoustic field radial locations. A processing methodology was developed to correct the effect of the noise source distribution and efficiently compare near-field and far-field spectra with unprecedented accuracy. This technique then demonstrates that the measured noise levels in the physically restricted space of an anechoic chamber can be appropriately

  2. Determination of major combustion products in aircraft exhausts by FTIR emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heland, J.; Schäfer, K.

    The results of ground-based FTIR emission measurements of major combustion products such as CO 2, H 2O, CO, NO, and N 2O of in-service aircraft engines are reported and compared to values published in recent literature. About 25% differences in the NO and CO emission indices at several power settings were found for two military bypass engines of the same type. In addition the measured CO emission index of (51.8±4.6) g kg -1 at idle power of a CFM56-3 engine was about 27% lower than the value given by Spicer et al. (1984, 1994)for this engine type and about 27-48% higher than the ICAO data ( ICAO, 1995) for the whole span of CFM56-3 engines. The CO emission index measured at idle power of a CFM56-5C2 engine of AN Airbus A340 was (24±4) g kg -1 and can be compared to the ICAO value of 34 g kg -1. The N 2O mixing ratios measured at a higher power setting of this engine was found to be 4 ppm and is in the range of reported literature values. Since the NO and CO emissions are strongly connected to the combustion process/efficiency and thus to the state of engine maintainance and/or the engine age, it can be concluded that there are significant engine-to-engine (of the same type) and possibly day-to-day variations in the emission characteristics of aero engines which cannot be neglected for the estimation of the overall air-traffic emissions.

  3. A plume-in-grid approach to characterize air quality impacts of aircraft emissions at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissman, J.; Arunachalam, S.; Woody, M.; West, J. J.; BenDor, T.; Binkowski, F. S.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the impacts of aircraft emissions during the landing and takeoff cycle on PM2.5 concentrations during the months of June 2002 and July 2002 at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Primary and secondary pollutants were modeled using the Advanced Modeling System for Transport, Emissions, Reactions, and Deposition of Atmospheric Matter (AMSTERDAM). AMSTERDAM is a modified version of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model that incorporates a plume-in-grid process to simulate emissions sources of interest at a finer scale than can be achieved using CMAQ's model grid. Three fundamental issues were investigated: the effects of aircraft on PM2.5 concentrations throughout northern Georgia, the differences resulting from use of AMSTERDAM's plume-in-grid process rather than a traditional CMAQ simulation, and the concentrations observed in aircraft plumes at sub-grid scales. Comparison of model results with an air quality monitor located in the vicinity of the airport found that normalized mean bias ranges from -77.5% to 6.2% and normalized mean error ranges from 40.4% to 77.5%, varying by species. Aircraft influence average PM2.5 concentrations by up to 0.232 μg m-3 near the airport and by 0.001-0.007 μg m-3 throughout the Atlanta metro area. The plume-in-grid process increases concentrations of secondary PM pollutants by 0.005-0.020 μg m-3 (compared to the traditional grid-based treatment) but reduces the concentration of non-reactive primary PM pollutants by up to 0.010 μg m-3, with changes concentrated near the airport. Examination of sub-grid scale results indicates that puffs within 20 km of the airport often have average PM2.5 concentrations one order of magnitude higher than aircraft contribution to the grid cells containing those puffs, and within 1-4 km of emitters, puffs may have PM2.5 concentrations 3 orders of magnitude greater than the aircraft contribution to their grid cells. 21% of all aircraft-related puffs

  4. Cart3D Analysis of Plume and Shock Interaction Effects on Sonic Boom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    A plume and shock interaction study was developed to collect data and perform CFD on a configuration where a nozzle plume passed through the shock generated from the wing or tail of a supersonic vehicle. The wing or tail was simulated with a wedge-shaped shock generator. Three configurations were analyzed consisting of two strut mounted wedges and one propulsion pod with an aft deck from a low boom vehicle concept. Research efforts at NASA were intended to enable future supersonic flight over land in the United States. Two of these efforts provided data for regulatory change and enabled design of low boom aircraft. Research has determined that sonic boom is a function of aircraft lift and volume distribution. Through careful tailoring of these variables, the sonic boom of concept vehicles has been reduced. One aspect of vehicle tailoring involved how the aircraft engine exhaust interacted with aft surfaces on a supersonic aircraft, such as the tail and wing trailing edges. In this work, results from Euler CFD simulations are compared to experimental data collected on sub-scale components in a wind tunnel. Three configurations are studied to simulate the nozzle plume interaction with representative wing and tail surfaces. Results demonstrate how the plume and tail shock structure moves with increasing nozzle pressure ratio. The CFD captures the main features of the plume and shock interaction. Differences are observed in the plume and deck shock structure that warrant further research and investigation.

  5. Chemical characterization of the fine particle emissions from commercial aircraft engines during the Aircraft Particle Emissions eXperiment (APEX) 1 to 3

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper addresses the need for detailed chemical information on the fine particulate matter (PM2.5) generated by commercial aviation engines. The exhaust plumes of nine engine models were sampled during the three test campaigns of the Aircraft Particle Emissions eXperiment (AP...

  6. Validation of scramjet exhaust simulation technique at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, H. B.; Konopka, W.; Leng, J.

    1979-01-01

    Current design philosophy for hydrogen-fueled, scramjet-powered hypersonic aircraft results in configurations with strong couplings between the engine plume and vehicle aerodynamics. The experimental verification of the scramjet exhaust simulation is described. The scramjet exhaust was reproduced for the Mach 6 flight condition by the detonation tube simulator. The exhaust flow pressure profiles, and to a large extent the heat transfer rate profiles, were then duplicated by cool gas mixtures of Argon and Freon 13B1 or Freon 12. The results of these experiments indicate that a cool gas simulation of the hot scramjet exhaust is a viable simulation technique except for phenomena which are dependent on the wall temperature relative to flow temperature.

  7. The effects of aircraft on climate and pollution. Part II: 20-year impacts of exhaust from all commercial aircraft worldwide treated individually at the subgrid scale.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, M Z; Wilkerson, J T; Naiman, A D; Lele, S K

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the 20-year impacts of emissions from all commercial aircraft flights worldwide on climate, cloudiness, and atmospheric composition. Aircraft emissions from each individual flight worldwide were modeled to evolve from the subgrid to grid scale with the global model described and evaluated in Part I of this study. Simulations with and without aircraft emissions were run for 20 years. Aircraft emissions were found to be responsible for -6% of Arctic surface global warming to date, -1.3% of total surface global warming, and -4% of global upper tropospheric warming. Arctic warming due to aircraft slightly decreased Arctic sea ice area. Longer simulations should result in more warming due to the further increase in CO2. Aircraft increased atmospheric stability below cruise altitude and decreased it above cruise altitude. The increase in stability decreased cumulus convection in favor of increased stratiform cloudiness. Aircraft increased total cloud fraction on average. Aircraft increased surface and upper tropospheric ozone by -0.4% and -2.5%, respectively and surface and upper-tropospheric peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) by -0.1% and -5%, respectively. Aircraft emissions increased tropospheric OH, decreasing column CO and CH4 by -1.7% and -0.9%, respectively. Aircraft emissions increased human mortality worldwide by -620 (-240 to 4770) deaths per year, with half due to ozone and the rest to particulate matter less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter (PM2.5).

  8. Summary of aircraft results for 1978 southeastern Virginia urban plume measurement study of ozone, nitrogen oxides, and methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Wornom, D. E.; Mathis, J. J., Jr.; Sebacher, D. I.

    1980-01-01

    Ozone production was determined from aircraft and surface in situ measurements, as well as from an airborne laser absorption spectrometer. Three aircraft and approximately 10 surface stations provided air-quality data. Extensive meteorological, mixing-layer-height, and ozone-precursor data were also measured. Approximately 50 hrs (9 flight days) of data from the aircraft equipped to monitor ozone, nitrogen oxides, dewpoint temperature, and temperature are presented. In addition, each experiment conducted is discussed.

  9. Airborne in-situ investigations of the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash plume on Iceland and over north-western Germany with light aircrafts and optical particle counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, K.; Eliasson, J.; Vogel, A.; Fischer, C.; Pohl, T.; van Haren, G.; Meier, M.; Grobéty, B.; Dahmann, D.

    2012-03-01

    During the time period of the eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in April/May 2010 the Duesseldorf University of Applied Sciences has performed 14 research flights in situations with and without the volcanic ash plume over Germany. In parallel to the research flights in Germany three measurement flights have been performed by the University of Iceland in May 2010 over the western part of Iceland. During two of these flights the outskirts of the eruption plume were entered directly, delivering most direct measurements within the eruption plume during this eruptive event. For all the measurement flights reported here, light durable piston-motor driven aircrafts were used, which were equipped with optical particle counters for in-situ measurements. Real-time monitoring of the particle concentrations was possible during the flights. As different types of optical particle counters have been used in Iceland and Germany, the optical particle counters have been re-calibrated after the flights to the same standard using gravimetric reference methods and original Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash samples. In-situ measurement results with high spatial resolution, directly from the eruption plume in Iceland as well as from the dispersed and several days old plume over Germany, are therefore presented here for the first time. They are normalized to the same ash concentration calibration standard. Moreover, airborne particles could be sampled directly out of the eruption plume in Iceland as well as during the flights over Germany. During the research flights over Iceland from 9 May 2011 to 11 May 2011 the ash emitted from the vent of the volcano turned out to be concentrated in a narrow well-defined plume of about 10 km width at a distance of 45-60 km away from the vent. Outside this plume the airborne ash concentrations could be proved to be below 50 μg m -3 over western Iceland. However, by entering the outskirts of the plume directly the research aircraft could

  10. Analysis of Nozzle Jet Plume Effects on Sonic Boom Signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong

    2010-01-01

    An axisymmetric full Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study was conducted to examine nozzle exhaust jet plume effects on the sonic boom signature of a supersonic aircraft. A simplified axisymmetric nozzle geometry, representative of the nozzle on the NASA Dryden NF-15B Lift and Nozzle Change Effects on Tail Shock (LaNCETS) research airplane, was considered. The highly underexpanded nozzle flow is found to provide significantly more reduction in the tail shock strength in the sonic boom N-wave pressure signature than perfectly expanded and overexpanded nozzle flows. A tail shock train in the sonic boom signature, similar to what was observed in the LaNCETS flight data, is observed for the highly underexpanded nozzle flow. The CFD results provide a detailed description of the nozzle flow physics involved in the LaNCETS nozzle at different nozzle expansion conditions and help in interpreting LaNCETS flight data as well as in the eventual CFD analysis of a full LaNCETS aircraft. The current study also provided important information on proper modeling of the LaNCETS aircraft nozzle. The primary objective of the current CFD research effort was to support the LaNCETS flight research data analysis effort by studying the detailed nozzle exhaust jet plume s imperfect expansion effects on the sonic boom signature of a supersonic aircraft. Figure 1 illustrates the primary flow physics present in the interaction between the exhaust jet plume shock and the sonic boom coming off of an axisymmetric body in supersonic flight. The steeper tail shock from highly expanded jet plume reduces the dip of the sonic boom N-wave signature. A structured finite-volume compressible full Navier-Stokes CFD code was used in the current study. This approach is not limited by the simplifying assumptions inherent in previous sonic boom analysis efforts. Also, this study was the first known jet plume sonic boom CFD study in which the full viscous nozzle flow field was modeled, without

  11. Plume and Shock Interaction Effects on Sonic Boom in the 1-foot by 1-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Elmiligui, Alaa; Cliff, Susan; Winski, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    The desire to reduce or eliminate the operational restrictions of supersonic aircraft over populated areas has led to extensive research at NASA. Restrictions are due to the disturbance of the sonic boom, caused by the coalescence of shock waves formed by the aircraft. A study has been performed focused on reducing the magnitude of the sonic boom N-wave generated by airplane components with a focus on shock waves caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Testing was completed in the 1-foot by 1-foot supersonic wind tunnel to study the effects of an exhaust nozzle plume and shock wave interaction. The plume and shock interaction study was developed to collect data for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation of a nozzle plume passing through the shock generated from the wing or tail of a supersonic vehicle. The wing or tail was simulated with a wedgeshaped shock generator. This test entry was the first of two phases to collect schlieren images and off-body static pressure profiles. Three wedge configurations were tested consisting of strut-mounted wedges of 2.5- degrees and 5-degrees. Three propulsion configurations were tested simulating the propulsion pod and aft deck from a low boom vehicle concept, which also provided a trailing edge shock and plume interaction. Findings include how the interaction of the jet plume caused a thickening of the shock generated by the wedge (or aft deck) and demonstrate how the shock location moved with increasing nozzle pressure ratio.

  12. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, B.D.; Lissaman, P.B.S.; Morgan, W.R.; Radkey, R.L.

    1998-09-22

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing`s top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gases for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well. 31 figs.

  13. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, Bart D.; Lissaman, Peter B. S.; Morgan, Walter R.; Radkey, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing's top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gasses for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well.

  14. Testing of lift/cruise fan exhaust deflector. [for a tip turbine lift fan in short takeoff aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlundt, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    A lift/cruise exhaust deflector system for the LF336/A tip turbine lift fan was designed, built, and tested to determine the design and performance characteristics of a large-scale, single swivel nozzle thrust vectoring system. The exhaust deflector static testing was performed at the Ames Research Center outside static test stand facilities. The test hardware was installed on a hydraulic lift platform to permit both in and out of ground effect testing. The exhaust flow of the LF336/A lift fan was vectored from 0 degrees through 130 degrees during selected fan speeds to obtain performance at different operating conditions. The system was operated with and without flow vanes installed in the small radius bends to evaluate the system performance based on a proposed method of improving the internal flow losses. The program also included testing at different ground heights, to the nozzle exhaust plane, to obtain ground effect data, and the testing of two methods of thrust spoiling using a duct bypass door system and nozzle flap system.

  15. Calculations of economy of 18-cylinder radial aircraft engine with exhaust-gas turbine geared to the crankshaft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, Richard W; Zimmerman, Richard H

    1945-01-01

    Calculations based on dynamometer test-stand data obtained on an 18-cylinder radial engine were made to determine the improvement in fuel consumption that can be obtained at various altitudes by gearing an exhaust-gas turbine to the engine crankshaft in order to increase the engine-shaft work.

  16. Aircraft Fuel, Fuel Metering, Induction and Exhaust Systems (Course Outline), Aviation Mechanics (Power Plant): 9057.02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This document presents an outline for a 135-hour course designed to help the trainee gain the skills and knowledge necessary to become an aviation powerplant mechanic. The course outlines the theory of operation of various fuel systems, fuel metering, induction, and exhaust system components with an emphasis on troubleshooting, maintenance, and…

  17. In-flight measurements of cruise altitude nitric oxide emission indices of commercial jet aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, P.; Schlager, H.

    Simultaneous in-situ NO and CO2 measurements on board the DLR Falcon research aircraft in the exhaust plumes of commercial short to medium range jet aircraft are used to determine lower limits for the NOx emission indices EI(NOx) for cruising conditions. Concentration enhancements for NO and CO2 of 9 to 33 ppbv and 4 to 14 ppmv, respectively, relative to ambient background concentrations were observed in the exhaust trails 40 s to 130 s after emission. The derived EI(NOx)-limits range between 6.4 to 11.7 g/kg. Though the NO2 fraction in the exhaust plumes has not been measured during these pilot investigations, arguments are given that the derived lower limits represent a close approximation to the EI(NOx) values. Within the present uncertainties they are in agreement with predictions based on ground-based engine test data.

  18. Liquid Booster Module (LBM) plume flowfield model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1981-01-01

    A complete definition of the LBM plume is important for many Shuttle design criteria. The exhaust plume shape has a significant effect on the vehicle base pressure. The LBM definition is also important to the Shuttle base heating, aerodynamics and the influence of the exhaust plume on the launch stand and environment. For these reasons a knowledge of the LBM plume characteristics is necessary. A definition of the sea level LBM plume as well as at several points along the Shuttle trajectory to LBM, burnout is presented.

  19. Volcanic Plume Measurements with UAV (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, H.; Kaneko, T.; Ohminato, T.

    2013-12-01

    Volatiles in magmas are the driving force of volcanic eruptions and quantification of volcanic gas flux and composition is important for the volcano monitoring. Recently we developed a portable gas sensor system (Multi-GAS) to quantify the volcanic gas composition by measuring volcanic plumes and obtained volcanic gas compositions of actively degassing volcanoes. As the Multi-GAS measures variation of volcanic gas component concentrations in the pumped air (volcanic plume), we need to bring the apparatus into the volcanic plume. Commonly the observer brings the apparatus to the summit crater by himself but such measurements are not possible under conditions of high risk of volcanic eruption or difficulty to approach the summit due to topography etc. In order to overcome these difficulties, volcanic plume measurements were performed by using manned and unmanned aerial vehicles. The volcanic plume measurements by manned aerial vehicles, however, are also not possible under high risk of eruption. The strict regulation against the modification of the aircraft, such as installing sampling pipes, also causes difficulty due to the high cost. Application of the UAVs for the volcanic plume measurements has a big advantage to avoid these problems. The Multi-GAS consists of IR-CO2 and H2O gas analyzer, SO2-H2O chemical sensors and H2 semiconductor sensor and the total weight ranges 3-6 kg including batteries. The necessary conditions of the UAV for the volcanic plumes measurements with the Multi-GAS are the payloads larger than 3 kg, maximum altitude larger than the plume height and installation of the sampling pipe without contamination of the exhaust gases, as the exhaust gases contain high concentrations of H2, SO2 and CO2. Up to now, three different types of UAVs were applied for the measurements; Kite-plane (Sky Remote) at Miyakejima operated by JMA, Unmanned airplane (Air Photo Service) at Shinomoedake, Kirishima volcano, and Unmanned helicopter (Yamaha) at Sakurajima

  20. Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    national power. But with the recent events such as the war with Iraq, the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak, some major carriers... TITLE AND SUBTITLE 2003 Industry Studies: Aircraft 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  1. Real-time and integrated measurement of potential human exposure to particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from aircraft exhaust.

    PubMed Central

    Childers, J W; Witherspoon, C L; Smith, L B; Pleil, J D

    2000-01-01

    We used real-time monitors and low-volume air samplers to measure the potential human exposure to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations during various flight-related and ground-support activities of C-130H aircraft at an Air National Guard base. We used three types of photoelectric aerosol sensors (PASs) to measure real-time concentrations of particle-bound PAHs in a break room, downwind from a C-130H aircraft during a four-engine run-up test, in a maintenance hangar, in a C-130H aircraft cargo bay during cargo-drop training, downwind from aerospace ground equipment (AGE), and in a C-130H aircraft cargo bay during engine running on/off (ERO) loading and backup exercises. Two low-volume air samplers were collocated with the real-time monitors for all monitoring events except those in the break room and during in-flight activities. Total PAH concentrations in the integrated-air samples followed a general trend: downwind from two AGE units > ERO-loading exercise > four-engine run-up test > maintenance hangar during taxi and takeoff > background measurements in maintenance hangar. Each PAH profile was dominated by naphthalene, the alkyl-substituted naphthalenes, and other PAHs expected to be in the vapor phase. We also found particle-bound PAHs, such as fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene in some of the sample extracts. During flight-related exercises, total PAH concentrations in the integrated-air samples were 10-25 times higher than those commonly found in ambient air. Real-time monitor mean responses generally followed the integrated-air sample trends. These monitors provided a semiquantitative temporal profile of ambient PAH concentrations and showed that PAH concentrations can fluctuate rapidly from a baseline level < 20 to > 4,000 ng/m(3) during flight-related activities. Small handheld models of the PAS monitors exhibited potential for assessing incidental personal exposure to particle-bound PAHs in engine exhaust and for serving as

  2. Pollution reducing aircraft propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, R. M.

    1985-05-28

    Aircraft engine exhaust is mixed with air and fuel and recombusted. Air is drawn into the secondary combustion chamber from suction surfaces on wings. Exhaust of the secondary combustion chamber is blown over wing and fuselage surfaces.

  3. Preliminary Analysis of the Effect of Flow Separation Due to Rocket Jet Pluming on Aircraft Dynamic Stability During Atmospheric Exit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, Murray; North, Warren J.

    1959-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted to determine the effects of body boundary-layer separation resulting from a highly underexpanded jet on the dynamic stability of a typical rocket aircraft during an atmospheric exit trajectory. The particular flight condition studied on a digital computer for five degrees of freedom was at Mach 6.0 and 150,000 feet. In view of the unknown character of the separated flow field, two estimates of the pressures in the separated region were made to calculate the unbalanced forces and moments. These estimates, based on limited fundamental zero-angle-of-attack studies and observations, are believed to cover what may be the actual case. In addition to a fixed control case, two simulated pilot control inputs were studied: rate-limited and instantaneous responses. The resulting-motions with and without boundary-layer separation were compared for various initial conditions. The lower of the assumed misalinement forces and moments led to a situation whereby a slowly damped motion could be satisfactorily controlled with rate-limited control input. The higher assumption led to larger amplitude, divergent motions when the same control rates were used. These motions were damped only when the instantaneous control responses were assumed.

  4. Multiscale predictions of aviation-attributable PM2.5 for U.S. airports modeled using CMAQ with plume-in-grid and an aircraft-specific 1-D emission model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woody, M. C.; Wong, H.-W.; West, J. J.; Arunachalam, S.

    2016-12-01

    Aviation activities represent an important and unique mode of transportation, but also impact air quality. In this study, we aim to quantify the impact of aircraft on air quality, focusing on aviation-attributable PM2.5 at scales ranging from local (a few kilometers) to continental (spanning hundreds of kilometers) using the Community Multiscale Air Quality-Advanced Plume Treatment (CMAQ-APT) model. In our CMAQ-APT simulations, a plume scale treatment is applied to aircraft emissions from 99 major U.S. airports over the contiguous U.S. in January and July 2005. In addition to the plume scale treatment, we account for the formation of non-traditional secondary organic aerosols (NTSOA) from the oxidation of semivolatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds (S/IVOCs) emitted from aircraft, and utilize alternative emission estimates from the Aerosol Dynamics Simulation Code (ADSC). ADSC is a 1-D plume scale model that estimates engine specific PM and S/IVOC emissions at ambient conditions, accounting for relative humidity and temperature. We estimated monthly and contiguous U.S. average aviation-attributable PM2.5 to be 2.7 ng m-3 in January and 2.6 ng m-3 in July using CMAQ-APT with ADSC emissions. This represents an increase of 40% and 12% in January and July, respectively, over impacts using traditional modeling approaches (traditional emissions without APT). The maximum fine scale (subgrid scale) hourly impacts at a major airport were 133.6 μg m-3 in January and 165.4 μg m-3 in July, considerably higher than the maximum grid-based impacts at the airport of 4.3 μg m-3 in January and 0.5 μg m-3 in July.

  5. Validation of Inlet and Exhaust Boundary Conditions for a Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Shishir A.; Murman, Scott M.; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Inlets and exhaust nozzles are often omitted in aerodynamic simulations of aircraft due to the complexities involved in the modeling of engine details and flow physics. However, the omission is often improper since inlet or plume flows may have a substantial effect on vehicle aerodynamics. A method for modeling the effect of inlets and exhaust plumes using boundary conditions within an inviscid Cartesian flow solver is presented. This approach couples with both CAD systems and legacy geometry to provide an automated tool suitable for parameter studies. The method is validated using two and three-dimensional test problems which are compared with both theoretical and experimental results. The numerical results demonstrate excellent agreement with theory and available data, even for extremely strong jets and very sensitive inlets.

  6. 14 CFR 34.31 - Standards for exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Exhaust Emissions (In-use Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.31 Standards for exhaust emissions. (a) Exhaust emissions of smoke from each in-use aircraft gas turbine engine of Class T8, beginning February 1, 1974,...

  7. 14 CFR 34.31 - Standards for exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Exhaust Emissions (In-use Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.31 Standards for exhaust emissions. (a) Exhaust emissions of smoke from each in-use aircraft gas turbine engine of Class T8, beginning February 1, 1974,...

  8. 14 CFR 34.21 - Standards for exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Exhaust Emissions (New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.21 Standards for exhaust emissions. (a) Exhaust emissions of smoke from each new aircraft gas turbine engine of class T8 manufactured on or after February 1,...

  9. A Preliminary Study of the Prevention of Ice on Aircraft by the Use of Engine-exhaust Heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodert, Lewis A

    1939-01-01

    An investigation was made in the N.A.C.A. ice tunnel at air temperatures from 20 degrees to 28 degrees Fahrenheit and at a velocity of 80 miles per hour to determine whether ice formations on a model wing could be prevented by the use of the heat from the engine-exhaust gas. Various spanwise duct systems were tested in a 6-foot-chord N.A.C.A. 23012 wing model. The formation of ice over the entire wing chord was prevented by the direct heating of the forward 10 percent of the wing by hot air, which was passed through leading-edge ducts. Under dry conditions, enough heat to maintain the temperature of the forward 10 percent of the wing at about 200 degrees Fahrenheit above that of the ambient air was required for the prevention of ice formation. The air temperature in the ducts that was necessary to produce these skin temperatures varied from 360 degrees to 834 degrees Fahrenheit; the corresponding air velocities in the duct were 152 and 45 feet per second. Ice formations at the leading edge were locally prevented by air that passed over the interior of the wing surface at a velocity of 30 feet per second and a temperature of 122 degrees Fahrenheit.

  10. Direct measurements of HONO and NO2 by tunable infrared differential absorption spectroscopy; Results from two field campaigns sampling aircraft exhaust and ambient urban air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H.; Santoni, G.; Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Munger, J. W.; Wofsy, S. C.; Zahniser, M. S.; McManus, J. B.; Nelson, D. D.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important source of hydroxyl radicals (OH), the main oxidizing agent in the atmosphere. However, gaseous HONO has historically proven difficult to measure accurately and to date there is no standard technique. We describe a new instrument capable of high-frequency measurements of HONO and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) mixing ratios by tunable infrared differential absorption spectrometry. Mid-infrared light from two continuous-wave mode quantum cascade lasers traverse a 210 m path through a multi-pass astigmatic cell at reduced pressures for the direct detection of HONO (1660 cm-1) and NO2 (1604 cm-1). We achieve an absorbance precision less than 3×10-6 Hz-1 in one second, which translates to detection limits (S/N=3) of 300 and 30 ppt for HONO and NO2, respectively, in one second. Both lasers and the detector are thermoelectrically cooled, facilitating long-term unattended measurements. We also report preliminary results from two field campaigns; the Alternative Aviation Fuels Experiment (AAFEX) and the Study of Houston Air Radical Precursors (SHARP). At AAFEX, HONO emission ratios relative to CO2 and NOy observed in commercial aircraft exhaust are larger than in most other combustion sources and likely to play a significant role in regional HOx chemistry. Preliminary analysis from the SHARP campaign shows good agreement in HONO and NO2 levels between various measurement techniques.

  11. Rocket plume burn hazard.

    PubMed

    Stoll, A M; Piergallini, J R; Chianta, M A

    1980-05-01

    By use of miniature rocket engines, the burn hazard posed by exposure to ejection seat rocket plume flames was determined in the anaesthetized rat. A reference chart is provided for predicting equivalent effects in human skin based on extrapolation of earlier direct measurements of heat input for rat and human burns. The chart is intended to be used in conjunction with thermocouple temperature measurements of the plume environment for design and modification of escape seat system to avoid thermal injury on ejection from multiplace aircraft.

  12. Plume primary smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chastenet, J. C.

    1993-06-01

    The exhaust from a solid propellant rocket motor usually contains condensed species. These particles, also called 'Primary Smoke', are often prejudicial to missile detectability and to the guidance system. To avoid operational problems it is necessary to know and quantify the effects of particles on all aspects of missile deployment. A brief description of the origin of the primary smoke is given. It continues with details of the interaction between particles and light as function of both particles and light properties (nature, size, wavelength, etc). The effects of particles on plume visibility, attenuation of an optical beam propagated through the plume and the contribution of particles on optical signatures of the plume are also described. Finally, various methods used in NATO countries to quantify the primary smoke effects are discussed.

  13. 14 CFR 34.64 - Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring gaseous exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE... Turbine Engines) § 34.64 Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring gaseous exhaust emissions....

  14. 14 CFR 34.64 - Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring gaseous exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE... Turbine Engines) § 34.64 Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring gaseous exhaust emissions....

  15. IR sensor design insight from missile-plume prediction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapanotti, John L.; Gilbert, Bruno; Richer, Guy; Stowe, Robert

    2002-08-01

    Modern anti-tank missiles and the requirement of rapid deployment have significantly reduced the use of passive armour in protecting land vehicles. Vehicle survivability is becoming more dependent on sensors, computers and countermeasures to detect and avoid threats. An analysis of missile propellants suggests that missile detection based on plume characteristics alone may be more difficult than anticipated. Currently, the passive detection of missiles depends on signatures with a significant ultraviolet component. This approach is effective in detecting anti-aircraft missiles that rely on powerful motors to pursue high-speed aircraft. The high temperature exhaust from these missiles contains significant levels of carbon dioxide, water and, often, metal oxides such as alumina. The plumes emits strongest in the infrared, 1 to 5micrometers , regions with a significant component of the signature extending into the ultraviolet domain. Many anti-tank missiles do not need the same level of propulsion and radiate significantly less. These low velocity missiles, relying on the destructive force of shaped-charge warhead, are more difficult to detect. There is virtually no ultraviolet component and detection based on UV sensors is impractical. The transition in missile detection from UV to IR is reasonable, based on trends in imaging technology, but from the analysis presented in this paper even IR imagers may have difficulty in detecting missile plumes. This suggests that the emphasis should be placed in the detection of the missile hard body in the longer wavelengths of 8 to 12micrometers . The analysis described in this paper is based on solution of the governing equations of plume physics and chemistry. These models will be used to develop better sensors and threat detection algorithms.

  16. Transmittance and Radiance Computations for Rocket Engine Plume Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejwani, Gopal D.

    2003-01-01

    Emission and absorption characteristics of several atmospheric and combustion species have been studied and are presented with reference to rocket engine plume environments. The effects of clous, rain, and fog on plume radiance/transmittance has also been studied.Preliminary results for the radiance from the exhaust plume of the space shuttle main engine are shown and discussed.

  17. 40 CFR 87.31 - Standards for exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Gas Turbine Engines) § 87.31 Standards for exhaust emissions. (a) Exhaust emissions of smoke from each in-use aircraft gas turbine engine of Class T8, beginning February 1, 1974, shall not exceed: Smoke number of 30. (b) Exhaust emissions of smoke from each in-use aircraft gas turbine engine of class TF...

  18. 40 CFR 87.31 - Standards for exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Gas Turbine Engines) § 87.31 Standards for exhaust emissions. (a) Exhaust emissions of smoke from each in-use aircraft gas turbine engine of Class T8, beginning February 1, 1974, shall not exceed: Smoke number of 30. (b) Exhaust emissions of smoke from each in-use aircraft gas turbine engine of class TF...

  19. Hydrocarbon emissions from in-use commercial aircraft during airport operations.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Scott C; Rogers, Todd; Dunlea, Edward J; Jayne, John T; Miake-Lye, Richard; Knighton, Berk

    2006-07-15

    The emissions of selected hydrocarbons from in-use commercial aircraft at a major airport in the United States were characterized using proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and tunable infrared differential absorption spectroscopy (TILDAS) to probe the composition of diluted exhaust plumes downwind. The emission indices for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, benzene, and toluene, as well as other hydrocarbon species, were determined through analysis of 45 intercepted plumes identified as being associated with specific aircraft. As would have been predicted for high bypass turbine engines, the hydrocarbon emission index was greater in idle and taxiway acceleration plumes relative to approach and takeoff plumes. The opposite was seen in total NOy emission index, which increased from idle to takeoff. Within the idle plumes sampled in this study, the median emission index for formaldehyde was 1.1 g of HCHO per kg of fuel. For the subset of hydrocarbons measured in this work, the idle emissions levels relative to formaldehyde agree well with those of previous studies. The projected total unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) deduced from the range of in-use idle plumes analyzed in this work is greater than a plausible range of engine types using the defined idle condition (7% of rated engine thrust) in the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) databank reference.

  20. 14 CFR 34.82 - Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring smoke exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Test Procedures for Engine Smoke Emissions (Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) §...

  1. 14 CFR 34.82 - Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring smoke exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Test Procedures for Engine Smoke Emissions (Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) §...

  2. Monopropellant Thruster Exhaust Plume Contamination Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-09-01

    previously discussed. The optical surfaces of infrared sensors , for example, are particularly susceptiblo to performance degradation through in- creased...gases from a monopropellant rocket engine will not, in most cases, be trapped by the higher temperature surfaces of the spacecraft, the sensor may...K NH3 8.37 x 102 24.2 101°K H20 (b) 0.71 1590K N2H4 40 x 10-6 0.012 165 0 K (Ref. 15) Anilineh)- 0.55 1900K Percent Amonia Dissociation(c) - 65.5

  3. Splash Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. H.

    2006-12-01

    I have discovered a new class of thermal upwellings in mantle convection simulations which are not rooted in a thermal boundary layer (ref 1). Since they look a bit like water droplet splashes, I have abbreviated these `plumes not rooted in thermal boundary layers' as `splash plumes'. These mantle convection simulations are high resolution ( ~ 22km spacing) 3D spherical simulations at Earth-like vigour. They have a chondritic rate of internal heating and bottom heating that straddles expected Earth values. There is a realistic depth variation in viscosity, with a lithosphere and lower mantle more viscous than upper mantle. The mantle is compressible with the coefficient of thermal expansion decreasing with depth. Some models have phase transitions. The surface of the models is driven by 119Myr of recent plate motion history. At the end of most simulations (present day) we discover many examples of hot mid-mantle thermal anomalies in the shape of bowls which have hot cylindrical plumes rising from the rim. They originate at a range of depths and are not rooted in thermal boundary layers. These splash plumes are formed from hot mantle collecting beneath the surface, and then a cold instability from the surface descending onto the sheet of hot underlying material pushing it down into the mantle and forming a bowl. The plumes are formed by instabilities coming from the bowl rim edge. In fact the downwellings can push the sheets all the way to the core mantle boundary in certain cases where it is then difficult to tell splash plumes apart from `traditional plumes'. Splash plumes might provide explanations for weak, short-lived plumes that do not seem to have deep roots (e.g. Eifel). If the surface boundary condition is made free-slip (ref 2), rather than be driven by recent plate motion history, we do not discover splash plumes but rather large steady strong thermal boundary layer plumes. Therefore while the discovery of splash plumes is interesting, potentially a more

  4. Particle Size Distributions Measured in the B757 Engine Plume During EXCAVATE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Terry; Penko, Paul; Rivera, Monica; Culler, Steve

    2005-01-01

    The Experiment to Characterize Aircraft Volatile Aerosols and Trace Species Emissions (EXCAVATE) took place at NASA Langley Research Center during January 2002. This ground based study was conducted to examine the role of fuel sulfur content on particulate emissions. Size distributions as a function of engine operating conditions were measured in the exhaust plume of a B-757 at four downstream axial locations (1 m, 10 m, 25 m and 35 m). The engine was run on JP-5 with three different sulfur concentrations, 810 ppm, 1050 ppm, 1820 ppm; and was operated over a range of power settings from idle to near-full power. Zalabsky differential-mobility analyzers DMAS), Met One condensation-nuclei counters (CNCs), and a TSI 3022 condensation-particle counter (CPC) were used to measure the size distributions. The total number-count (particle concentration), number-based Emissions Index (EInumber) and mass-based Emissions Index (E1-J increased with fuel sulfur-content and engine pressure ratio (EPR). Count Mean Diameter (Ch4D) also increased with EPR yet remained fairly constant with fuel sulfur-content for a fixed location in the exhaust plume. Also the mode and CMD both increased with distance in the plume.

  5. Numerical methods for the calculation of three-dimensional nozzle exhaust flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, S. M.; Delguidice, P. D.

    1975-01-01

    Numerical codes developed for the calculation of three-dimensional nozzle exhaust flow fields associated with hypersonic airbreathing aircraft are described. Both codes employ reference plane grid networks with respect to three coordinate systems. Program CHAR3D is a characteristic code utilizing a new wave preserving network within the reference planes, while program BIGMAC is a finite difference code utilizing conservation variables and a one-sided difference algorithm. Secondary waves are numerically captured by both codes, while the underexpansion shock and plume boundary are treated discretely. The exhaust gas properties consist of hydrogen-air combustion product mixtures in local chemical equilibrium. Nozzle contours are treated by a newly developed geometry package based on dual cubic splines. Results are presented for simple configurations demonstrating two- and three-dimensional multiple wave interactions.

  6. The effects of aircraft on climate and pollution. Part I: Numerical methods for treating the subgrid evolution of discrete size- and composition-resolved contrails from all commercial flights worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, M. Z.; Wilkerson, J. T.; Naiman, A. D.; Lele, S. K.

    2011-06-01

    This paper provides and evaluates mass conservative, positive-definite, unconditionally-stable, and non-iterative numerical techniques for simulating the evolution of discrete, size- and composition-resolved aerosol and contrail particles in individual aircraft exhaust plumes in a global or regional 3-D atmospheric model and coupling the subgrid exhaust plume information to the grid scale. Such treatment represents a new method of simulating the effects of aircraft on climate, contrails, and atmospheric composition. Microphysical processes solved within each plume include size-resolved coagulation among and between aerosol and contrail particles and their inclusions, aerosol-to-hydrometeor particle ice and liquid nucleation, deposition/sublimation, and condensation/evaporation. Each plume has its own emission and supersaturation, and the spreading and shearing of each plume's cross-section are calculated as a function of time. Aerosol- and contrail-particle core compositions are tracked for each size and affect optical properties in each plume. When line contrails sublimate/evaporate, their size- and composition-resolved aerosol cores and water vapor are added to the grid scale where they affect large-scale clouds. Algorithm properties are analyzed, and the end-result model is evaluated against in situ and satellite data.

  7. 40 CFR 87.21 - Exhaust emission standards for Tier 4 and earlier engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM AIRCRAFT AND AIRCRAFT ENGINES Exhaust Emissions (New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 87.21 Exhaust emission standards for Tier 4 and earlier... apply for aircraft engines manufactured before July 18, 2012 and certain engines exempted under §...

  8. 40 CFR 87.21 - Exhaust emission standards for Tier 4 and earlier engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM AIRCRAFT AND AIRCRAFT ENGINES Exhaust Emissions (New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 87.21 Exhaust emission standards for Tier 4 and earlier... apply for aircraft engines manufactured before July 18, 2012 and certain engines exempted under §...

  9. PM emissions measurements of in-service commercial aircraft engines during the Delta-Atlanta Hartsfield Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Prem; Hagen, Donald E.; Whitefield, Philip D.; Raper, David

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the results of the physical characterization of aircraft engine PM emission measurements conducted during the Delta-Atlanta Hartsfield Study at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Engine exit plane PM emissions were sampled from on-wing engines on several in-service commercial transport aircraft from the fleet of Delta Airlines. The size distributions were lognormal in nature with a single mode. The geometric mean diameter was found to increase with increasing engine thrust, ranging from 15 nm at idle to 40 nm at takeoff. PM number- and mass-based emission indices were observed to be higher at the idle conditions (4% and 7%), lowest at 15%-30% thrust, and then increase with increasing thrust. Emissions measurements were also conducted during an advected plume study where over 300 exhaust plumes generated by a broad mix of commercial transports were sampled 100-350 m downwind from aircraft operational runways during normal airport operations. The range of values measured at take-off for the different engine types in terms of PM number-based emission index was between 7 × 1015-9 × 1017 particles/kg fuel burned, and that for PM mass-based emission index was 0.1-0.6 g/kg fuel burned. PM characteristics of aircraft engine specific exhaust were found to evolve over time as the exhaust plume expands, dilutes with ambient air, and cools. The data from these measurements will enhance the emissions inventory development for a subset of engines operating in the commercial fleet and improve/validate current environmental impact predictive tools with real world aircraft engine specific PM emissions inputs.

  10. Tvashtar's Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This dramatic image of Io was taken by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons at 11:04 Universal Time on February 28, 2007, just about 5 hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. The distance to Io was 2.5 million kilometers (1.5 million miles) and the image is centered at 85 degrees west longitude. At this distance, one LORRI pixel subtends 12 kilometers (7.4 miles) on Io.

    This processed image provides the best view yet of the enormous 290-kilometer (180-mile) high plume from the volcano Tvashtar, in the 11 o'clock direction near Io's north pole. The plume was first seen by the Hubble Space Telescope two weeks ago and then by New Horizons on February 26; this image is clearer than the February 26 image because Io was closer to the spacecraft, the plume was more backlit by the Sun, and a longer exposure time (75 milliseconds versus 20 milliseconds) was used. Io's dayside was deliberately overexposed in this picture to image the faint plumes, and the long exposure also provided an excellent view of Io's night side, illuminated by Jupiter. The remarkable filamentary structure in the Tvashtar plume is similar to details glimpsed faintly in 1979 Voyager images of a similar plume produced by Io's volcano Pele. However, no previous image by any spacecraft has shown these mysterious structures so clearly.

    The image also shows the much smaller symmetrical fountain of the plume, about 60 kilometers (or 40 miles) high, from the Prometheus volcano in the 9 o'clock direction. The top of a third volcanic plume, from the volcano Masubi, erupts high enough to catch the setting Sun on the night side near the bottom of the image, appearing as an irregular bright patch against Io's Jupiter-lit surface. Several Everest-sized mountains are highlighted by the setting Sun along the terminator, the line between day and night.

    This is the last of a handful of LORRI images that New Horizons is sending 'home' during its busy close

  11. Plume base flow simulation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B. B.; Wallace, R. O.; Sims, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    A combined analytical/empirical approach was studied in an effort to define the plume simulation parameters for base flow. For design purposes, rocket exhaust simulation (i.e., plume simulation) is determined by wind tunnel testing. Cold gas testing was concluded to be a cost and schedule effective data base of substantial scope. The results fell short of the target, although work conducted was conclusive and advanced the state of the art. Comparisons of wind tunnel predictions with Space Transportation System (STS) flight data showed considerable differences. However, a review of the technology program data base has yielded an additional parameter that may correlate flight and cold gas test data. Data from the plume technology program and the NASA test flights are presented to substantiate the proposed simulation parameters.

  12. Effect of air temperature and relative humidity at various fuel-air ratios on exhaust emissions on a per-mode basis of an Avco Lycoming 0-320 DIAD light aircraft engine. Volume 2: Individual data points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skorobatckyi, M.; Cosgrove, D. V.; Meng, P. R.; Kempke, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    A carbureted four cylinder air cooled 0-320 DIAD Lycoming aircraft engine was tested to establish the effects of air temperature and humidity at various fuel-air ratios on the exhaust emissions on a per-mode basis. The test conditions included carburetor lean-out at air temperatures of 50, 59, 80, and 100 F at relative humidities of 0, 30, 60, and 80 percent. Temperature-humidity effects at the higher values of air temperature and relative humidity tested indicated that the HC and CO emissions increased significantly, while the NOx emissions decreased. Even at a fixed fuel-air ratio, the HC emissions increase and the NOx emissions decrease at the higher values of air temperature and humidity. Volume II contains the data taken at each of the individual test points.

  13. REAL-TIME AND INTEGRATED MEASUREMENT OF POTENTIAL HUMAN EXPOSURE TO PARTICLE-BOUND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAHS) FROM AIRCRAFT EXHAUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time monitors and low-volume air samplers were used to measure the potential human exposure to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations during various flight-related and ground-support activities of C-130H aircraft at an Air National Guard base. Three...

  14. Ice Prevention on Aircraft by Means of Engine Exhaust Heat and a Technical Study of Heat Transmission from a Clark Y Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theodorsen, Theodore; Clay, William C

    1933-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to study the practicability of employing heat as a means of preventing the formation of ice on airplane wings. The report relates essentially to technical problems regarding the extraction of heat from the exhaust gases and its proper distribution over the exposed surfaces. In this connection a separate study has been made to determine the variation of the coefficient of heat transmission along the chord of a Clark Y airfoil. Experiments on ice prevention both in the laboratory and in flight show conclusively that it is necessary to heat only the front portion of the wing surface to effect complete prevention. Experiments in flight show that a vapor-heating system which extracts heat from the exhaust and distributes it to the wings is an entirely practical and efficient method for preventing ice formation.

  15. Direct Measurement of Mercury Reactions In Coal Power Plant Plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Levin

    2005-12-31

    west of Kenosha. Aircraft and ground measurements support the occurrence of a reduction in the fraction of reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) (with a corresponding increase in elemental mercury) as part of the Total Gaseous Mercury (TGM) emitted from the Pleasant Prairie stack. This occurrence is based on comparison of the RGM concentrations in the plume (at standard conditions) compared to the RGM in the stack. There was found to be a 44% drop in the fraction of RGM between the stack exit and the first sampling arc and a 66% reduction from the stack to the 5-mile sampling arc, with no additional drop between the 5- and 10-mile arcs. Smaller-scale experiments in both test chambers and pilot-scale coal combustor exhaust streams have indicated the presence of rapid and relatively complete reduction reactions converting divalent into elemental mercury within power plant plumes prior to full dispersion in the atmosphere. These measurements, however, have been unable to identify whether the reactions occur during plume rise from physical to virtual stack height (during positive thermal buoyancy). The presence, rate, completeness, ubiquity, and dependence on source characteristics of these reactions, however, must be demonstrated in plume environments associated with fully operational power plants. That requirement, to capture either the reactions or the reaction products of chemistry that may be occurring very close to stack exits in highly turbulent environments, constrains the precision and reproducibility with which such full-scale experiments can be carried out. The work described here is one of several initial steps required to test whether, and in what direction, such rapid mercury redox reactions might be occurring in such plumes.

  16. Digital filtering of plume emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madzsar, George C.

    1990-01-01

    Fourier transformation and digital filtering techniques were used to separate the superpositioned spectral phenomena observed in the exhaust plumes of liquid propellant rocket engines. Space shuttle main engine (SSME) spectral data were used to show that extraction of spectral lines in the spatial frequency domain does not introduce error, and extraction of the background continuum introduces only minimal error. Error introduced during band extraction could not be quantified due to poor spectrometer resolution. Based on the atomic and molecular species found in the SSME plume, it was determined that spectrometer resolution must be 0.03 nm for SSME plume spectral monitoring.

  17. Modeling of Lightning-Related Plumes into the Chemistry and Transport GEOS-Chem Global Model: Impact on the Upper Tropospheric Chemistry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gressent, A.

    2014-12-01

    This work is dedicated to the study of the lightning-related plumes in terms of origin, quantification of the plumes trace gas, and impact on the budget of ozone in particular in the upper troposphere (critical region regarding the greenhouse effect). Recently, Gressent et al., 2014, demonstrated that the majority (74%) of large scale plumes (>300km) from lightning emissions (LNOx) is related to warm conveyor belts and extra-tropical cyclones originating from North America and entering the intercontinental pathway between North America and Europe, leading to a negative (positive) west to east NOy (O3) zonal gradient with -0.4 (+18) ppb difference during spring and -0.6 (+14) ppb difference in summer. In order to better constraint lightning emissions impact in global models, a plume parameterization has been implemented in the 3D chemistry and transport GEOS-Chem global model (Harvard University). Such parameterization was successfully developed for aircraft exhausts application (Cariolle et al., 2009). It allows reproducing sub-grid processes related to lightning NOx chemistry and the chemical evolution during transport in the atmosphere. The issue is here based on the evaluation of parameters such as the plume lifetime and the effective reaction rate constant within the plume. The Dynamically Simple Model of Atmospheric Chemical Complexity (DSMACC) is used to determine such critical values and to better understand the chemical interactions between NOx and O3 species within the undiluted fraction of the plume. Additionally high-resolved simulations of the French meso-scale Meso-NH model are applied over specific case studies of thunderstorms in order to consider the dynamical conditions necessary to represent the plume dilution to the background atmosphere. Finally, sensitivity tests are carried out with the GEOS-Chem model to evaluate the impact of this plume-in-grid model on the ozone and nitrogen species budget.

  18. 14 CFR 34.31 - Standards for exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of smoke from each in-use aircraft gas turbine engine of Class T8, beginning February 1, 1974, shall not exceed a smoke number (SN) of 30. (b) Exhaust emissions of smoke from each in-use aircraft gas... paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section refer to exhaust smoke emission emitted during operation of the...

  19. 14 CFR 34.31 - Standards for exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of smoke from each in-use aircraft gas turbine engine of Class T8, beginning February 1, 1974, shall not exceed a smoke number (SN) of 30. (b) Exhaust emissions of smoke from each in-use aircraft gas... paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section refer to exhaust smoke emission emitted during operation of the...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  5. A preliminary assessment of the impact of 2-D exhaust-nozzle geometry on the cruise range of a hypersonic aircraft with top-mounted ramjet propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vahl, W. A.; Weidner, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    A theoretical study of full length and shortened, two dimensional, isentropic, exhaust nozzles integrated with top mounted ramjet propulsion nacelles were conducted. Both symmetric and asymmetric contoured nozzles with a range of angular orientations were considered. Performance comparisons to determine optimum installations for a representative hypersonic vehicle at Mach 5 cruise conditions are presented on the basis of cruise range, propulsive specific impulse, inlet area requirements, and overall lift drag ratio. The effect of approximating the nozzle internal contours with planar surfaces and the determination of viscous and frozen flow effects are also presented.

  6. Monitoring radioactive plumes by airborne gamma-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Grasty, R.L.; Hovgaard, J.; Multala, J.

    1996-06-01

    Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer surveys using large volume sodium-iodide detectors are routinely flown throughout the world for mineral exploration and geological mapping. Techniques have now been developed to detect and map man-made sources of radiation. In Canada, airborne gamma-rays surveys have been flown around nuclear reactors to map {sup 41}Ar plumes from nuclear reactors and to calculate the dose rate at ground level. In May 1986, the Finnish Geological survey aircraft flew through a radioactive plume from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. As the aircraft flew through the plume, the aircraft became increasingly contaminated. By measuring the final aircraft contamination, the activity of the plume could be separated from the contamination due to the aircraft. Within 1 h of encountering the plume, the aircraft activity was comparable to the maximum levels found in the plume. From an analysis of the gamma-ray spectra, the concentration of {sup 131}I and {sup 140}La within the plume were calculated as a function of time.

  7. Quantifying the Effects of Aircraft on Climate With a Model That Treats the Subgrid Evolution of Contrails From All Commercial Flights Worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, M. Z.; Wilkerson, J. T.; Naiman, A. D.; Lele, S. K.

    2009-12-01

    This study quantifies the modeled effects of aircraft on global climate, cloudiness, and atmospheric composition by treating, for the first time, exhaust from all commercial aircraft flights worldwide at the subgrid scale. Speciated gas and particle emission data for individual commercial aircraft flights in 2004 were obtained from the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center. Algorithms were developed for the global-local nested model GATOR-GCMOM to solve for the evolution of emissions within each subgrid exhaust plume of each segment of each flight. Processes solved included time-dependent spreading and shearing of individual subgrid line contrail cross sections and discrete size-resolved aerosol-hydrometeor ice nucleation, condensation/evaporation, deposition/sublimation, and coagulation among and between aerosol and contrail particles within each plume. When contrails sublimated/evaporated, they were added to the grid scale where they affected externally- and internally-mixed grid-scale size-resolved aerosols and stratus clouds and subgrid cumulus clouds. Baseline model results were analyzed against data. A nine-year sensitivity simulation indicated that aircraft exhaust caused a linear contrail cloud fraction of ~0.0012, comparable with results from other studies. Whereas aircraft increased cirrus fraction where contrails were most abundant, they decreased cirrus fraction in several locations by increasing tropospheric temperatures, reducing relative humidities in such locations. As such, aircraft can reduce cirrus when modeled microphysical and meteorological feedbacks are considered. Aircraft exhaust increased average global surface air temperatures by ~0.03 K (~4% of observed surface global warming since 1850) and upper tropospheric temperatures by ~0.06 K (~9% of observed upper-tropospheric warming from 1958-2002), increasing tropospheric stability. A second pair of global simulations with two additional model layers supported the first pair but

  8. Crater Formation Due to Lunar Plume Impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsell, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Thruster plume impingement on a surface comprised of small, loose particles may cause blast ejecta to be spread over a large area and possibly cause damage to the vehicle. For this reason it is important to study the effects of plume impingement and crater formation on surfaces like those found on the moon. Lunar soil, also known as regolith, is made up of fine granular particles on the order of 100 microns.i Whenever a vehicle lifts-off from such a surface, the exhaust plume from the main engine will cause the formation of a crater. This crater formation may cause laterally ejected mass to be deflected and possibly damage the vehicle. This study is a first attempt at analyzing the dynamics of crater formation due to thruster exhaust plume impingement during liftoff from the moon. Though soil erosion on the lunar surface is not considered, this study aims at examining the evolution of the shear stress along the lunar surface as the engine fires. The location of the regions of high shear stress will determine where the crater begins to form and will lend insight into how big the crater will be. This information will help determine the probability that something will strike the vehicle. The final sections of this report discuss a novel method for studying this problem that uses a volume of fluid (VOF)ii method to track the movement of both the exhaust plume and the eroding surface.

  9. The atmospheric effects of stratospheric aircraft: A third program report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S. (Editor); Wesoky, Howard L. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    A third report from the Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft (AESA) component of NASA's High-Speed Research Program (HSRP) is presented. Market and technology considerations continue to provide an impetus for high-speed civil transport research. A recent United Nations Environment Program scientific assessment showed that considerable uncertainty still exists about the possible impact of aircraft on the atmosphere. The AESA was designed to develop the body of scientific knowledge necessary for the evaluation of the impact of stratospheric aircraft on the atmosphere. The first Program report presented the basic objectives and plans for AESA. This third report marks the midpoint of the program and presents the status of the ongoing research on the impact of stratospheric aircraft on the atmosphere as reported at the third annual AESA Program meeting in June 1993. The focus of the program is on predicted atmospheric changes resulting from projected HSCT emissions. Topics reported on cover how high-speed civil transports (HSCT) might affect stratospheric ozone, emissions scenarios and databases to assess potential atmospheric effects from HSCT's, calculated results from 2-D zonal mean models using emissions data, engine trace constituent measurements, and exhaust plume/aircraft wake vortex interactions.

  10. Magnetic Detachment and Plume Control in Escaping Magnetized Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P. F. Schmit and N. J. Fisch

    2008-11-05

    The model of two-fluid, axisymmetric, ambipolar magnetized plasma detachment from thruster guide fields is extended to include plasmas with non-zero injection angular velocity profiles. Certain plasma injection angular velocity profiles are shown to narrow the plasma plume, thereby increasing exhaust efficiency. As an example, we consider a magnetic guide field arising from a simple current ring and demonstrate plasma injection schemes that more than double the fraction of useful exhaust aperture area, more than halve the exhaust plume angle, and enhance magnetized plasma detachment.

  11. PHYSICAL AND NUMERICAL MODELING OF ASD EXHAUST DISPERSION AROUND HOUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the use of a wind tunnel to physically model the dispersion of exhaust plumes from active soil depressurization (ASD) radon mitigation systems in houses. he testing studied the effects of exhaust location (grade level vs. above the eave), as house height, roo...

  12. Analysis of stratified and closely spaced jets exhausting into a crossflow. [aerodynamic characteristics of lift-jet, vectored thrust, and lift fan V/STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegler, H.; Woller, P. T.

    1973-01-01

    Procedures have been developed for determining the flow field about jets with velocity stratification exhausting into a crossflow. Jets with three different types of exit velocity stratification have been considered: (1) jets with a relatively high velocity core; (2) jets with a relatively low velocity core; and (3) jets originating from a vaned nozzle. The procedure developed for a jet originating from a high velocity core nozzle is to construct an equivalent nozzle having the same mass flow and thrust but having a uniform exit velocity profile. Calculations of the jet centerline and induced surface static pressures have been shown to be in good agreement with test data for a high velocity core nozzle. The equivalent ideal nozzle has also been shown to be a good representation for jets with a relatively low velocity core and for jets originating from a vaned nozzle in evaluating jet-induced flow fields. For the singular case of a low velocity core nozzle, namely a nozzle with a dead air core, and for the vaned nozzle, an alternative procedure has been developed. The internal mixing which takes place in the jet core has been properly accounted for in the equations of motion governing the jet development. Calculations of jet centerlines and induced surface static pressures show good agreement with test data these nozzles.

  13. Effect of Soot Particles on Supersonic Rocket Plume Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaissinski, Igor; Levy, Yeshayahou; Lev, Mikhael; Sherbaum, Valery

    2012-06-01

    Plumes from hydrocarbon-fueled rockets usually contain some amount of soot. In spite of the small amount, such soot particles can play a critical role in the characteristics of the infrared radiation emission since soot radiates a continuous, near-blackbody spectrum. The contribution of the soot to the plume radiation depends on the amount of soot, the physical properties of the particles, their concentration, and their temperature distribution in the flow field. The trajectories of solid particles and their temperatures can differ from those of the gas due to the particle mechanical and thermal inertia. CFD FLUENT code for solving two-phase Navier-Stokes equations coupled with chemical reactions and soot particle combustion was applied for exhaust plume simulations. Exhaust plumes with soot mass loading of 2% were simulated for three altitudes of 2 km, 8 km and 16 km. Radial distributions of the cloud particle density were obtained for different distances downstream the exhaust nozzle. As a result of the particle deceleration at the boundary layer inside the nozzle the particle concentration increased at the plume periphery. The particle temperature was higher than the gaseous temperature of the plume. The temperature difference between the soot particle and gas along corresponding trajectories was about 5-10%. The infrared radiation from the plumes with carbon soot was calculated. Its intensity was found to be dependent on the particle distribution in the plume.

  14. Atmospheric chemistry of an Antarctic volcanic plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheimer, Clive; Kyle, Philip; Eisele, Fred; Crawford, Jim; Huey, Greg; Tanner, David; Kim, Saewung; Mauldin, Lee; Blake, Don; Beyersdorf, Andreas; Buhr, Martin; Davis, Doug

    2010-01-01

    We report measurements of the atmospheric plume emitted by Erebus volcano, Antarctica, renowned for its persistent lava lake. The observations were made in December 2005 both at source, with an infrared spectrometer sited on the crater rim, and up to 56 km downwind, using a Twin Otter aircraft; with the two different measurement platforms, plume ages were sampled ranging from <1 min to as long as 9 h. Three species (CO, carbonyl sulfide (OCS), and SO2) were measured from both air and ground. While CO and OCS were conserved in the plume, consistent with their long atmospheric lifetimes, the downwind measurements indicate a SO2/CO ratio about 20% of that observed at the crater rim, suggesting rapid chemical conversion of SO2. The aircraft measurements also identify volcanogenic H2SO4, HNO3 and, recognized for the first time in a volcanic plume, HO2NO2. We did not find NOx in the downwind plume despite previous detection of NO2 above the crater. This suggests that near-source NOx was quickly oxidized to HNO3 and HO2NO2, and probably NO32-(aq), possibly in tandem with the conversion of SO2 to sulfate. These fast processes may have been facilitated by "cloud processing" in the dense plume immediately downwind from the crater. A further striking observation was O3 depletion of up to ˜35% in parts of the downwind plume. This is likely to be due to the presence of reactive halogens (BrO and ClO) formed through heterogeneous processes in the young plume. Our analysis adds to the growing evidence for the tropospheric reactivity of volcanic plumes and shows that Erebus volcano has a significant impact on Antarctic atmospheric chemistry, at least locally in the Southern Ross Sea area.

  15. Compact high-speed MWIR spectrometer applied to monitor CO2 exhaust dynamics from a turbojet engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares-Herrero, R.; Vergara, G.; Gutiérrez Álvarez, R.; Fernández Montojo, C.; Gómez, L. J.; Villamayor, V.; Baldasano Ramírez, A.; Montojo, M. T.; Archilla, V.; Jiménez, A.; Mercader, D.; González, A.; Entero, A.

    2013-05-01

    Dfgfdg Due to international environmental regulations, aircraft turbojet manufacturers are required to analyze the gases exhausted during engine operation (CO, CO2, NOx, particles, unburned hydrocarbons (aka UHC), among others).Standard procedures, which involve sampling the gases from the exhaust plume and the analysis of the emissions, are usually complex and expensive, making a real need for techniques that allow a more frequent and reliable emissions measurements, and a desire to move from the traditional gas sampling-based methods to real time and non-intrusive gas exhaust analysis, usually spectroscopic. It is expected that the development of more precise and faster optical methods will provide better solutions in terms of performance/cost ratio. In this work the analysis of high-speed infrared emission spectroscopy measurements of plume exhaust are presented. The data was collected during the test trials of commercial engines carried out at Turbojet Testing Center-INTA. The results demonstrate the reliability of the technique for studying and monitoring the dynamics of the exhausted CO2 by the observation of the infrared emission of hot gases. A compact (no moving parts), high-speed, uncooled MWIR spectrometer was used for the data collection. This device is capable to register more than 5000 spectra per second in the infrared band ranging between 3.0 and 4.6 microns. Each spectrum is comprised by 128 spectral subbands with aband width of 60 nm. The spectrometer operated in a passive stand-off mode and the results from the measurements provided information of both the dynamics and the concentration of the CO2 during engine operation.

  16. Modelling of thruster plume induced erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alred, John; Boeder, Paul; Mikatarian, Ron; Pankop, Courtney; Schmidl, William

    2003-09-01

    One source of external induced contamination on the International Space Station (ISS) is thruster plume exhausts. The contamination from these plumes onto ISS sensitive surfaces is due to liquid drops of unreacted or partially reacted propellants. However, the drag acceleration of these particles (drops) from the exhaust gases produces high velocity (~km/s) drops that will mechanically damage surfaces in the exhaust. Previous space flight experiments on the Space Shuttle Orbiter which studied thruster plume induced contamination also demonstrated the pitting nature of these particles. The External Contamination/Plasma Team of the Boeing ISS Program Office in Houston has developed an approach to modeling the mechanical erosion on surfaces due to the impact of particles in thruster plumes. This approach melds damage simulation data from a smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) into Boeing's own contamination computer tool (NASAN-II). The Boeing team has conducted several analyses simulating bipropellant thruster droplets impacting ISS sensitive surfaces. Computational results of various thrusters firing onto the ISS, at different build-stages, were completed and show a concern for particular solar array orientations during attitude control firings. Mitigation techniques for minimizing the erosion effects have also been determined and are presented.

  17. ICOARE: Impacts on Climate and Ozone from Aircraft and Rocket Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toohey, D. W.; Ross, M.

    2009-12-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of an Earth Venture proposal for a series of in situ measurements in the exhaust plumes of aircraft and rockets with the following objectives: to obtain information that is critical for reducing the uncertainties in assessments (e.g., WMO and IPCC) of the impacts of aviation and aerospace activities on regional and global climate; to assess the viability of a climate engineering scheme that employs injection of reflective particles into the lower stratosphere; and to initiate the development of an operational modeling tool that can be used by the aviation and aerospace industries to guide design of new transporation systems that minimize the impact on Earth’s climate. The ICOARE mission will deploy instruments to measure water vapor, ice water content, tracers, reactive species, particles, and radiation fields on a high-altitude aircraft to characterize the variability of water vapor in aircraft and rocket contrails, determine accurate emission indices for initialization of plume-wake and regional scale models, investigate the microphysical properties of cirrus particles in and out of aircraft corridors, and examine the light scattering properties of contrail ice crystals and small alumina particles. Focused campaigns will be timed to occur around the launch schedules of a variety of rocket types in order to characterize the range of emissions from the current launch suite. There will be special emphasis on characterizing the emissions from rockets employing new propellants, in particular those that may produce soot and nitrogen oxides. Observations in aircraft exhaust, and examinations of cirrus cloud properties and persistent contrails, will occur on flights that are not dedicated to studies of rockets (e.g., test, transit, and rocket-scrub flights). ICOARE will offer a unique opportunities for training students and postdoctorates, especially those from underrepresented groups, in areas of project management, logistics

  18. ASSESSMENT OF PLUME DIVING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation presents an assessment of plume diving. Observations included: vertical plume delineation at East Patchogue, NY showed BTEX and MTBE plumes sinking on either side of a gravel pit; Lake Druid TCE plume sank beneath unlined drainage ditch; and aquifer recharge/dis...

  19. Analysis of Plume Effects on Sonic Boom Signature for Isolated Nozzle Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.

    2008-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to study the plume effects on sonic boom signature for isolated nozzle configurations. The objectives of these analyses were to provide comparison to past work using modern CFD analysis tools, to investigate the differences of high aspect ratio nozzles to circular (axisymmetric) nozzles, and to report the effects of underexpanded nozzle operation on boom signature. CFD analysis was used to address the plume effects on sonic boom signature from a baseline exhaust nozzle. Near-field pressure signatures were collected for nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) between 6 and 10. A computer code was used to extrapolate these signatures to a ground-observed sonic boom N-wave. Trends show that there is a reduction in sonic boom N-wave signature as NPR is increased from 6 to 10. The performance curve for this supersonic nozzle is flat, so there is not a significant loss in thrust coefficient as the NPR is increased. As a result, this benefit could be realized without significant loss of performance. Analyses were also collected for a high aspect ratio nozzle based on the baseline design for comparison. Pressure signatures were collected for nozzle pressure ratios from 8 to 12. Signatures were nearly twice as strong for the two-dimensional case, and trends also show a reduction in sonic boom signature as NPR is increased from 8 to 12. As low boom designs are developed and improved, there will be a need for understanding the interaction between the aircraft boat tail shocks and the exhaust nozzle plume. These CFD analyses will provide a baseline study for future analysis efforts.

  20. Volcanic Plume Chemistry: Models, Observations and Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Tjarda; Martin, Robert; Oppenheimer, Clive; Griffiths, Paul; Braban, Christine; Cox, Tony; Jones, Rod; Durant, Adam; Kelly, Peter

    2010-05-01

    mercury. Excitingly, we can now begin to compare the model simulations to very recently reported in-situ aircraft and balloon measurements in downwind volcanic plumes, which found e.g. ozone depletion at Redoubt, ozone depletion and elevated HNO3 at Erebus and sulfate-H2O interactions at Kilauea. Satellite observations of volcanic BrO, and DOAS observations of BrO under varying plume conditions have also recently been reported. Such comparisons may highlight additional chemistry (e.g. HO2NO2 at Erebus), identify further underlying processes (e.g. the role of plume dispersion and gas fluxes in controlling plume chemistry), guide future field-observation strategies, and support and improve the model simulations that aim to understand volcanic emissions, plume chemistry, and predict the environmental impacts of volcanic plumes.

  1. A Comprehensive Program for Measurement of Military Aircraft Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Mengdawn

    2009-11-01

    Emissions of gases and particulate matter by military aircraft were characterized inplume by 'extractive' and 'optical remote-sensing (ORS)' technologies. Non-volatile particle size distribution, number and mass concentrations were measured with good precision and reproducibly. Time-integrated particulate filter samples were collected and analyzed for smoke number, elemental composition, carbon contents, and sulfate. Observed at EEP the geometric mean diameter (as measured by the mobility diameter) generally increased as the engine power setting increased, which is consistent with downstream observations. The modal diameters at the downstream locations are larger than that at EEP at the same engine power level. The results indicate that engine particles were processed by condensation, for example, leading to particle growth in-plume. Elemental analysis indicated little metals were present in the exhaust, while most of the exhaust materials in the particulate phase were carbon and sulfate (in the JP-8 fuel). CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, HCHO, ethylene, acetylene, propylene, and alkanes were measured. The last five species were most noticeable under engine idle condition. The levels of hydrocarbons emitted at high engine power level were generally below the detection limits. ORS techniques yielded real-time gaseous measurement, but the same techniques could not be extended directly to ultrafine particles found in all engine exhausts. The results validated sampling methodology and measurement techniques used for non-volatile particulate aircraft emissions, which also highlighted the needs for further research on sampling and measurement for volatile particulate matter and semi-volatile species in the engine exhaust especially at the low engine power setting.

  2. Exhaust emission control apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, J.W.

    1991-09-24

    This patent describes an exhaust control apparatus for muffling noise and treating odors and pollutants, including solid particulate and gases in the exhaust of an internal combustion engine. It comprises an exhaust inlet tube for receiving the exhaust generated by an internal combustion engine; a cyclone barrier concentrically surrounding the exhaust inlet tube, a ring cavity between the cyclone tube and exhaust inlet tube defining a cyclone chamber in which the exhaust is treated; means for directing the exhaust from the exhaust inlet tube into the cyclone chamber; electrode means having small openings through which the exhaust passes to enter the cyclone chamber, the electrode means generating electrostatic forces which charge the solid particulate in the exhaust, ionize air and generate ozone in the cyclone chamber near the electrode; means for injecting air into the cyclone chamber causing centrifugal flow of the air and the exhausted within the cyclone chamber and increasing a dwell time of the exhaust within the cyclone chamber.

  3. Diagnostics of an argon arcjet plume with a diode laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, F Y; Komurasaki, K; Iida, T; Fujiwara, T

    1999-03-20

    The diode-laser absorption technique was applied for simultaneous velocity and temperature measurements of an argon plume exhausted by an arcjet. The Ar I absorption line at 811.531 nm was taken as the center absorption line. The velocity and the temperature were derived from the Doppler shift in the absorption profiles and the full width at half-maximum of the plume absorption profile, respectively. From the measured plume velocity and temperature, the total enthalpy of the exhausted plume, the thrust efficiency, and the thermal efficiency of the arcjet were derived, and the performance of the arcjet was examined. The results are demonstrated to agree with results derived by other methods, and the technique can be applied to the measurement of other arcjet systems without much modification.

  4. Research on infrared radiation signatures of high-altitude plume based on DSMC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xingdong; Mao, Hongxia; Wu, Jie; Dong, Yanbing

    2016-10-01

    Exhaust plume flow field have the characteristics of high temperature, high speed and multi-species flow. Exhaust plume infrared signal are important basis of diagnosing, detecting and identifying plume spectrum. This paper focuses on the infrared radiation characteristics of high-altitude plume. The plume flows exhausted from a micro-nozzle of a low-thrust engine at high-altitude have been simulated numerically through using a DSMC method. Both the properties of plume flow at high altitude and the non-equilibrium effect related to rarefied gases are analyzed. Results are given numerically in good agreement with high-altitude plume observations. With the fields of pressure, temperature and main components of the exhaust plume as input data, the line-by line method was used to calculate the 2 5μm infrared spectral radiation properties of the plume. Different flight conditions are considered to analyze the influence on the infrared radiation characteristics. Some interesting conclusion are finally achieved.

  5. 3-D adaptive grid Navier-Stokes rocket plume calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, J. Eric

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional adaptive-grid full Navier-Stokes calculations performed for the base region and plume of the Minuteman first stage and a simplified version of the Titan first stage are used to demonstrate the applicability of the Navier-Stokes flow solver, EAGLE adaptive grid generator, and k-epsilon turbulence model to rocket plume flowfields. The calculations include realistic exhaust gas thermodynamic properties, with frozen chemistry.

  6. Plume Mitigation: Soil Erosion and Lunar Prospecting Sensor Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.

    2014-01-01

    Demonstrate feasibility of the simplest, lowest-mass method of measuring density of a cloud of lunar soil ejected by rocket exhaust, using new math techniques with a small baseline laser/camera system. Focus is on exploring the erosion process that occurs when the exhaust plume of a lunar rocket impacts the regolith. Also, predicting the behavior of the lunar soil that would be blasted from a lunar landing/launch site shall assist in better design and protection of any future lunar settlement from scouring of structures and equipment. NASA is gathering experimental data to improve soil erosion models and understand how lunar particles enter the plume flow.

  7. Space shuttle exhaust cloud properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Keller, V. W.

    1983-01-01

    A data base describing the properties of the exhaust cloud produced by the launch of the Space Transportation System and the acidic fallout observed after each of the first four launches was assembled from a series of ground and aircraft based measurements made during the launches of STS 2, 3, and 4. Additional data were obtained from ground-based measurements during firings of the 6.4 percent model of the Solid Rocket Booster at the Marshall Center. Analysis indicates that the acidic fallout is produced by atomization of the deluge water spray by the rocket exhaust on the pad followed by rapid scavening of hydrogen chloride gas aluminum oxide particles from the Solid Rocket Boosters. The atomized spray is carried aloft by updrafts created by the hot exhaust and deposited down wind. Aircraft measurements in the STS-3 ground cloud showed an insignificant number of ice nuclei. Although no measurements were made in the column cloud, the possibility of inadvertent weather modification caused by the interaction of ice nuclei with natural clouds appears remote.

  8. Imaging Fourier transform spectrometry of chemical plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Kenneth C.; Gross, Kevin C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2009-05-01

    A midwave infrared (MWIR) imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), the Telops FIRST-MWE (Field-portable Imaging Radiometric Spectrometer Technology - Midwave Extended) has been utilized for the standoff detection and characterization of chemical plumes. Successful collection and analysis of MWIR hyperspectral imagery of jet engine exhaust has allowed us to produce spatial profiles of both temperature and chemical constituent concentrations of exhaust plumes. Successful characterization of this high temperature combustion event has led to the collection and analysis of hyperspectral imagery of lower temperature emissions from industrial smokestacks. This paper presents MWIR data from remote collection of hyperspectral imagery of methyl salicilate (MeS), a chemical warfare agent simulant, during the Chemical Biological Distributed Early Warning System (CBDEWS) test at Dugway Proving Grounds, UT in 2008. The data did not contain spectral lines associated with emission of MeS. However, a few broad spectral features were present in the background-subtracted plume spectra. Further analysis will be required to assign these features, and determine the utility of MWIR hyperspectral imagery for analysis of chemical warfare agent plumes.

  9. Measurement and infrared image prediction of a heated exhaust flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Edward L.; Mahan, J. Robert; Turk, Jeffrey A.; Birckelbaw, Larry D.; Wardwell, Douglas A.; Hange, Craig E.

    1994-06-01

    The focus of the current research is to numerically predict an infrared image of a jet engine exhaust plume, given field variables such as temperature, pressure, and exhaust plume constituents as a function of spatial position within the plume, and to compare this predicted image directly with measured data. This work is motivated by the need to validate CFD codes through infrared imaging. The technique of reducing the 3D field-variable domain to a 2D infrared image invokes the use of an inverse Monte-Carlo ray trace algorithm and an infrared band model for exhaust gases. This paper describes an experiment in which the above- mentioned field variables were carefully measured. Data from this experiment in the form of velocity plots are shown. The inverse Monte-Carlo ray trace technique is described. Finally, an experimentally obtained infrared image is directly compared to an infrared image predicted from the measured field variables.

  10. Prediction of jet exhaust noise on airframe surfaces during flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butzel, L. M.

    1981-01-01

    The behavior of pressure fluctuations measured on the airframe of a prototype high lift jet transport (YC-14) is presented. The data are characterized in terms of a particular jet exhaust flow field idealization, jet mixing noise, and exhaust shock noise. Generalized spectrum shapes and scaling relations for peak level and frequency of peak level are developed, and the frequency is found to depend on jet exhaust velocity and aircraft velocity. Comparisons are made with near-field engine exhaust noise of a conventional jet, and results suggest that the same two exhaust noises are important for both aircraft types. Surface fluctuating pressure data are assessed, and results suggest that the jet mixing and exhaust shock noise source characterizations for the YC-14 have useful applicability to conventionally configured jets.

  11. Rocket Engine Plume Diagnostics at Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejwani, Gopal D.; Langford, Lester A.; VanDyke, David B.; McVay, Gregory P.; Thurman, Charles C.

    2003-01-01

    The Stennis Space Center has been at the forefront of development and application of exhaust plume spectroscopy to rocket engine health monitoring since 1989. Various spectroscopic techniques, such as emission, absorption, FTIR, LIF, and CARS, have been considered for application at the engine test stands. By far the most successful technology h a been exhaust plume emission spectroscopy. In particular, its application to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) ground test health monitoring has been invaluable in various engine testing and development activities at SSC since 1989. On several occasions, plume diagnostic methods have successfully detected a problem with one or more components of an engine long before any other sensor indicated a problem. More often, they provide corroboration for a failure mode, if any occurred during an engine test. This paper gives a brief overview of our instrumentation and computational systems for rocket engine plume diagnostics at SSC. Some examples of successful application of exhaust plume spectroscopy (emission as well as absorption) to the SSME testing are presented. Our on-going plume diagnostics technology development projects and future requirements are discussed.

  12. 14 CFR 25.941 - Inlet, engine, and exhaust compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.941 Inlet, engine, and exhaust compatibility. For airplanes using variable inlet or exhaust system geometry, or both... malfunctions) upon the aerodynamic control of the airplane may not result in any condition that would...

  13. 14 CFR 25.941 - Inlet, engine, and exhaust compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.941 Inlet, engine, and exhaust compatibility. For airplanes using variable inlet or exhaust system geometry, or both... malfunctions) upon the aerodynamic control of the airplane may not result in any condition that would...

  14. 14 CFR 25.941 - Inlet, engine, and exhaust compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.941 Inlet, engine, and exhaust compatibility. For airplanes using variable inlet or exhaust system geometry, or both... malfunctions) upon the aerodynamic control of the airplane may not result in any condition that would...

  15. 14 CFR 25.941 - Inlet, engine, and exhaust compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.941 Inlet, engine, and exhaust compatibility. For airplanes using variable inlet or exhaust system geometry, or both... malfunctions) upon the aerodynamic control of the airplane may not result in any condition that would...

  16. 14 CFR 25.941 - Inlet, engine, and exhaust compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.941 Inlet, engine, and exhaust compatibility. For airplanes using variable inlet or exhaust system geometry, or both... malfunctions) upon the aerodynamic control of the airplane may not result in any condition that would...

  17. Simulation of Wake Vortex Radiometric Detection via Jet Exhaust Proxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis of the potential of an airborne hyperspectral imaging IR instrument to infer wake vortices via turbine jet exhaust as a proxy. The goal was to determine the requirements for an imaging spectrometer or radiometer to effectively detect the exhaust plume, and by inference, the location of the wake vortices. The effort examines the gas spectroscopy of the various major constituents of turbine jet exhaust and their contributions to the modeled detectable radiance. Initially, a theoretical analysis of wake vortex proxy detection by thermal radiation was realized in a series of simulations. The first stage used the SLAB plume model to simulate turbine jet exhaust plume characteristics, including exhaust gas transport dynamics and concentrations. The second stage used these plume characteristics as input to the Line By Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) to simulate responses from both an imaging IR hyperspectral spectrometer or radiometer. These numerical simulations generated thermal imagery that was compared with previously reported wake vortex temperature data. This research is a continuation of an effort to specify the requirements for an imaging IR spectrometer or radiometer to make wake vortex measurements. Results of the two-stage simulation will be reported, including instrument specifications for wake vortex thermal detection. These results will be compared with previously reported results for IR imaging spectrometer performance.

  18. Investigation of solid plume simulation criteria to produce flight plume effects on multibody configuration in wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, A. L.; Dill, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation to determine the sensitivity of the space shuttle base and forebody aerodynamics to the size and shape of various solid plume simulators was conducted. Families of cones of varying angle and base diameter, at various axial positions behind a Space Shuttle launch vehicle model, were wind tunnel tested. This parametric evaluation yielded base pressure and force coefficient data which indicated that solid plume simulators are an inexpensive, quick method of approximating the effect of engine exhaust plumes on the base and forebody aerodynamics of future, complex multibody launch vehicles.

  19. Modeling Europa's dust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, B. S.; Kempf, S.; Schmidt, J.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of Jupiter's moon Europa maintaining a probably sporadic water vapor plume constitutes a huge scientific opportunity for NASA's upcoming mission to this Galilean moon. Measuring properties of material emerging from interior sources offers a unique chance to understand conditions at Europa's subsurface ocean. Exploiting results obtained for the Enceladus plume, we simulate possible Europa plume configurations, analyze particle number density and surface deposition results, and estimate the expected flux of ice grains on a spacecraft. Due to Europa's high escape speed, observing an active plume will require low-altitude flybys, preferably at altitudes of 5-100 km. At higher altitudes a plume may escape detection. Our simulations provide an extensive library documenting the possible structure of Europa dust plumes, which can be quickly refined as more data on Europa dust plumes are collected.

  20. Dust Plume off Mauritania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A thick plume of dust blew off the coast of Mauritania in western Africa on October 2, 2007. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite observed the dust plume as it headed toward the southwest over the Atlantic Ocean. In this image, the dust varies in color from nearly white to medium tan. The dust plume is easier to see over the dark background of the ocean, but the plume stretches across the land surface to the east, as well. The dust plume's structure is clearest along the coastline, where relatively clear air pockets separate distinct puffs of dust. West of that, individual pillows of dust push together to form a more homogeneous plume. Near its southwest tip, the plume takes on yet another shape, with stripes of pale dust fanning out toward the northwest. Occasional tiny white clouds dot the sky overhead, but skies are otherwise clear.

  1. Composition and morphology of particle emissions from in-use aircraft during takeoff and landing.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, Mandana; Bostrom, Thor E; Johnson, Graham R; Morawska, Lidia

    2013-05-21

    In order to provide realistic data for air pollution inventories and source apportionment at airports, the morphology and composition of ultrafine particles (UFP) in aircraft engine exhaust were measured and characterized. For this purpose, two independent measurement techniques were employed to collect emissions during normal takeoff and landing operations at Brisbane Airport, Australia. PM1 emissions in the airfield were collected on filters and analyzed using the particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique. Morphological and compositional analyses of individual ultrafine particles in aircraft plumes were performed on silicon nitride membrane grids using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). TEM results showed that the deposited particles were in the range of 5-100 nm in diameter, had semisolid spherical shapes and were dominant in the nucleation mode (18-20 nm). The EDX analysis showed the main elements in the nucleation particles were C, O, S, and Cl. The PIXE analysis of the airfield samples was generally in agreement with the EDX in detecting S, Cl, K, Fe, and Si in the particles. The results of this study provide important scientific information on the toxicity of aircraft exhaust and their impact on local air quality.

  2. CFD Analysis of Nozzle Jet Plume Effects on Sonic Boom Signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.

    2009-01-01

    An axisymmetric full Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics study is conducted to examine nozzle exhaust jet plume effects on the sonic boom signature of a supersonic aircraft. A simplified axisymmetric nozzle geometry, representative of the nozzle on the NASA Dryden NF-15B Lift and Nozzle Change Effects on Tail Shock research airplane, is considered. The computational fluid dynamics code is validated using available wind-tunnel sonic boom experimental data. The effects of grid size, spatial order of accuracy, grid type, and flow viscosity on the accuracy of the predicted sonic boom pressure signature are quantified. Grid lines parallel to the Mach wave direction are found to give the best results. Second-order accurate upwind methods are required as a minimum for accurate sonic boom simulations. The highly underexpanded nozzle flow is found to provide significantly more reduction in the tail shock strength in the sonic boom N-wave pressure signature than perfectly expanded and overexpanded nozzle flows. A tail shock train in the sonic boom signature is observed for the highly underexpanded nozzle flow. Axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics simulations show the flow physics inside the F-15 nozzle to be nonisentropic and complex. Although the one-dimensional isentropic nozzle plume results look reasonable, they fail to capture the sonic boom shock train in the highly underexpanded nozzle flow.

  3. Space Shuttle Plume Simulation Effect on Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    Technology for simulating plumes in wind tunnel tests was not adequate to provide the required confidence in test data where plume induced aerodynamic effects might be significant. A broad research program was undertaken to correct the deficiency. Four tasks within the program are reported. Three of these tasks involve conducting experiments, related to three different aspects of the plume simulation problem: (1) base pressures; (2) lateral jet pressures; and (3) plume parameters. The fourth task involves collecting all of the base pressure test data generated during the program. Base pressures were measured on a classic cone ogive cylinder body as affected by the coaxial, high temperature exhaust plumes of a variety of solid propellant rockets. Valid data were obtained at supersonic freestream conditions but not at transonic. Pressure data related to lateral (separation) jets at M infinity = 4.5, for multiple clustered nozzles canted to the freestream and operating at high dynamic pressure ratios. All program goals were met although the model hardware was found to be large relative to the wind tunnel size so that operation was limited for some nozzle configurations.

  4. Particle and gaseous emissions from commercial aircraft at each stage of the landing and takeoff cycle.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, M; Johnson, G R; Morawska, L

    2009-01-15

    A novel technique was used to measure emission factors for commonly used commercial aircraft including a range of Boeing and Airbus airframes under real world conditions. Engine exhaust emission factors for particles in terms of particle number and mass (PM2.5), along with those for CO2 and NOx, were measured for over 280 individual aircraft during the various modes of landing/takeoff (LTO) cycle. Results from this study show that particle number, and NOx emission factors are dependent on aircraft engine thrust level. Minimum and maximum emissions factors for particle number, PM2.5, and NOx emissions were found to be in the range of 4.16 x 10(15)-5.42 x 10(16) kg(-1), 0.03-0.72 g.kg(-1), and 3.25-37.94 g.kg(-1), respectively, for all measured airframes and LTO cycle modes. Number size distributions of emitted particles for the naturally diluted aircraft plumes in each mode of LTO cycle showed that particles were predominantly in the range of 4-100 nm in diameter in all cases. In general, size distributions exhibit similar modality during all phases of the LTO cycle. A very distinct nucleation mode was observed in all particle size distributions, except for taxiing and landing of A320 aircraft. Accumulation modes were also observed in all particle size distributions. Analysis of aircraft engine emissions during LTO cycle showed that aircraft thrust level is considerably higher during taxiing than idling suggesting that International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards need to be modified as the thrust levels for taxi and idle are considered to be the same (7% of total thrust) (Environmental Protection, Annex 16, Vol. II, Aircraft Engine Emissions, 2nd ed.; ICAO--International Civil Aviation Organization: Montreal, 1993).

  5. Solid propellant exhausted aluminum oxide and hydrogen chloride - Environmental considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, W. R., III; Winstead, E. L.; Purgold, G. C.; Edahl, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of gaseous hydrogen chloride (HCl) and particulate aluminum oxide (Al2O3) were made during penetrations of five Space Shuttle exhaust clouds and one static ground test firing of a shuttle booster. Instrumented aircraft were used to penetrate exhaust clouds and to measure and/or collect samples of exhaust for subsequent analyses. The focus was on the primary solid rocket motor exhaust products, HCl and Al2O3, from the Space Shuttle's solid boosters. Time-dependent behavior of HCl was determined for the exhaust clouds. Composition, morphology, surface chemistry, and particle size distributions were determined for the exhausted Al2O3. Results determined for the exhaust cloud from the static test firing were complicated by having large amounts of entrained alkaline ground debris (soil) in the lofted cloud. The entrained debris may have contributed to neutralization of in-cloud HCl.

  6. Effluent sampling of Scout D and Delta launch vehicle exhausts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulten, W. C.; Storey, R. W.; Gregory, G. L.; Woods, D. C.; Harris, F. S., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Characterization of engine-exhaust effluents (hydrogen chloride, aluminum oxide, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide) has been attempted by conducting field experiments monitoring the exhaust cloud from a Scout-Algol III vehicle launch and a Delta-Thor vehicle launch. The exhaust cloud particulate size number distribution (total number of particles as a function of particle diameter), mass loading, morphology, and elemental composition have been determined within limitations. The gaseous species in the exhaust cloud have been identified. In addition to the ground-based measurements, instrumented aircraft flights through the low-altitude, stabilized-exhaust cloud provided measurements which identified CO and HCI gases and Al2O3 particles. Measurements of the initial exhaust cloud during formation and downwind at several distances have established sampling techniques which will be used for experimental verification of model predictions of effluent dispersion and fallout from exhaust clouds.

  7. Monitoring Engine Vibrations And Spectrum Of Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Carol L.; Randall, Michael R.; Reinert, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Real-time computation of intensities of peaks in visible-light emission spectrum of exhaust combined with real-time spectrum analysis of vibrations into developmental monitoring technique providing up-to-the-second information on conditions of critical bearings in engine. Conceived to monitor conditions of bearings in turbopump suppling oxygen to Space Shuttle main engine, based on observations that both vibrations in bearings and intensities of visible light emitted at specific wavelengths by exhaust plume of engine indicate wear and incipient failure of bearings. Applicable to monitoring "health" of other machinery via spectra of vibrations and electromagnetic emissions from exhausts. Concept related to one described in "Monitoring Bearing Vibrations For Signs Of Damage", (MFS-29734).

  8. Dynamic pressure loads associated with twin supersonic plume resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, J. M.; Manning, J. C.; Ponton, M. K.

    1986-01-01

    The phenomenon of twin supersonic plume resonance is defined and studied as it pertains to high level dynamic loads in the inter-nozzle region of aircraft like the F-15 and B1-A. Using a 1/40th scale model twin jet nacelle with powered choked nozzles, it is found that intense internozzle dynamic pressures are associated with the synchrophased coupling of each plume's jet flapping mode. This condition is found most prevalent when each plume's jet flapping mode has constituent elements composed of the B-type helical instability. Suppression of these fatigue bearing loads was accomplished by simple geometric modifications to only one plume's nozzle. These modifications disrupt the natural selection of the B-type mode and thereby decouple the plumes.

  9. Nighttime chemistry in the Houston urban plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luria, Menachem; Valente, Ralph J.; Bairai, Solomon; Parkhurst, William J.; Tanner, Roger L.

    A late afternoon polluted air parcel transported from the Houston metropolitan area was monitored by an instrumented aircraft throughout the night of 21-22 July, 2005. Sampling was conducted during three flight segments over several downwind areas that were identified by a controllable meteorological balloon released from the Houston area at sundown. Samples were taken for approximately 2 h over each area. Using carbon monoxide as a tracer of the urban plume, it was revealed that the dilution inside the plume was relatively small. Ozone levels of up to 120 ppb were found in the plume at the furthest downwind distance, some 250 km northwest of Houston, with plume transport in the direction of the Dallas metropolitan area. The data further suggest that the nighttime conversion of NO x to NO z was very rapid, with complete (˜100%) conversion by the end of the night. At two locations the urban plume mixed with fresh emissions from power plants. At these sampling points ˜50% of the NO y had already been converted to NO z, thus indicating very rapid oxidation at night.

  10. Microphysical properties of the Shuttle exhaust cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W.; Anderson, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    A data base describing the properties of the exhaust cloud produced by the launch of the STS has been developed based on data from a series of ground and aircraft based measurements made during the launches of STS 2, 3, and 4. Aircraft observations were performed during the STS-3 launch with a NOAA WP-3D Orion hurricane research aircraft which contained instrumentation for cloud condensation nucleus and ice nucleus counting, Aitken particle counting, and pH determination. Ground observations were conducted at 50 different sites, as well as in the direct exhaust from the solid rocket booster flame trench at all three launches. The data is analyzed in order to determine any possible adverse impacts of the exhaust products on human health and/or the environment. Analyses of the exhaust cloud measurements indicate that in the case of the ground cloud where plenty of large water drops are present and considerable scavenging and fallout of aerosol takes place, possible adverse impacts of the remaining aerosols (CCN and IN) on natural precipitation processes which may occur in the launch area hours after the launch are remote. However, it is determined that under certain atmospheric conditions there could be short term adverse effects on visibility.

  11. Representative Atmospheric Plume Development for Elevated Releases

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Prichard, Andrew W.

    2014-02-01

    An atmospheric explosion of a low-yield nuclear device will produce a large number of radioactive isotopes, some of which can be measured with airborne detection systems. However, properly equipped aircraft may not arrive in the region where an explosion occurred for a number of hours after the event. Atmospheric conditions will have caused the radioactive plume to move and diffuse before the aircraft arrives. The science behind predicting atmospheric plume movement has advanced enough that the location of the maximum concentrations in the plume can be determined reasonably accurately in real time, or near real time. Given the assumption that an aircraft can follow a plume, this study addresses the amount of atmospheric dilution expected to occur in a representative plume as a function of time past the release event. The approach models atmospheric transport of hypothetical releases from a single location for every day in a year using the publically available HYSPLIT code. The effective dilution factors for the point of maximum concentration in an elevated plume based on a release of a non-decaying, non-depositing tracer can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the day of the release, even for the same number of hours after the release event. However, the median of the dilution factors based on releases for 365 consecutive days at one site follows a power law relationship in time, as shown in Figure S-1. The relationship is good enough to provide a general rule of thumb for estimating typical future dilution factors in a plume starting at the same point. However, the coefficients of the power law function may vary for different release point locations. Radioactive decay causes the effective dilution factors to decrease more quickly with the time past the release event than the dilution factors based on a non-decaying tracer. An analytical expression for the dilution factors of isotopes with different half-lives can be developed given the power law expression

  12. Modeling Europa's Dust Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, B.; Kempf, S.; Schmidt, J.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of Europa maintaining a probably sporadic water vapor plume constitutes a huge scientific opportunity for NASA's upcoming mission to this Galilean moon. Measuring the properties of material emerging from interior sources offers a unique chance to understand conditions at Europa's subsurface ocean. Exploiting results obtained for the Enceladus plume, we adjust the ejection model by Schmidt et al. [2008] to the conditions at Europa. In this way, we estimate properties of a possible, yet unobserved dust component of the Europa plume. For a size-dependent speed distribution of emerging ice particles we use the model from Kempf et al. [2010] for grain dynamics, modified to run simulations of plumes on Europa. Specifically, we model emission from the two plume locations determined from observations by Roth et al. [2014] and also from other locations chosen at the closest approach of low-altitude flybys investigated in the Europa Clipper study. This allows us to estimate expected fluxes of ice grains on the spacecraft. We then explore the parameter space of Europa dust plumes with regard to particle speed distribution parameters, plume location, and spacecraft flyby elevation. Each parameter set results in a 3-dimensional particle density structure through which we simulate flybys, and a map of particle fallback ('snowfall') on the surface of Europa. Due to the moon's high escape speed, a Europa plume will eject few to no particles that can escape its gravity, which has several further consequences: (i) For given ejection velocity a Europa plume will have a smaller scale height, with a higher particle number densities than the plume on Enceladus, (ii) plume particles will not feed the diffuse Galilean dust ring, (iii) the snowfall pattern on the surface will be more localized about the plume location, and will not induce a global m = 2 pattern as seen on Enceladus, and (iv) safely observing an active plume will require low altitude flybys, preferably at 50

  13. Sampling and analysis of aircraft engine cold start particles and demonstration of an electrostatic personal particle sampler.

    PubMed

    Armendariz, Alfredo; Leith, David; Boundy, Maryanne; Goodman, Randall; Smith, Les; Carlton, Gary

    2003-01-01

    Aircraft engines emit an aerosol plume during startup in extremely cold weather that can drift into areas occupied by flightline ground crews. This study tested a personal sampler used to assess exposure to particles in the plume under challenging field conditions. Area and personal samples were taken at two U.S. Air Force (USAF) flightlines during the winter months. Small tube-and-wire electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) were mounted on a stationary stand positioned behind the engines to sample the exhaust. Other ESPs were worn by ground crews to sample breathing zone concentrations. In addition, an aerodynamic particle sizer 3320 (APS) was used to determine the size distribution of the particles. Samples collected with the ESP were solvent extracted and analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results indicated that the plume consisted of up to 75 mg/m(3) of unburned jet fuel particles. The APS showed that nearly the entire particle mass was respirable, because the plumes had mass median diameters less than 2 micro m. These tests demonstrated that the ESP could be used at cold USAF flightlines to perform exposure assessments to the cold start particles.

  14. A tandem mirror plasma source for hybrid plume plasma studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. F.; Chang, F. R.; Miller, R. H.; Wenzel, K. W.; Krueger, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    A tandem mirror device to be considered as a hot plasma source for the hybrid plume rocket concept is discussed. The hot plamsa from this device is injected into an exhaust duct, which will interact with an annular hypersonic layer of neutral gas. The device can be used to study the dynamics of the hybrid plume, and to verify the numerical predictions obtained with computer codes. The basic system design is also geared towards low weight and compactness, and high power density at the exhaust. The basic structure of the device consists of four major subsystems: (1) an electric power supply; (2) a low temperature, high density plasma gun, such as a stream gun, an MPD source or gas cell; (3) a power booster in the form of a tandem mirror machine; and (4) an exhaust nozzle arrangement. The configuration of the tandem mirror section is shown.

  15. Impacts of alternative fuels in aviation on microphysical aerosol properties and predicted ice nuclei concentration at aircraft cruise altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, B.; D'Ascoli, E.; Sauer, D. N.; Kim, J.; Scheibe, M.; Schlager, H.; Moore, R.; Anderson, B. E.; Ullrich, R.; Mohler, O.; Hoose, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the past decades air traffic has been substantially growing affecting air quality and climate. According to the International Civil Aviation Authority (ICAO), in the next few years world passenger and freight traffic is expected to increase annually by 6-7% and 4-5%, respectively. One possibility to reduce aviation impacts on the atmosphere and climate might be the replacement of fossil fuels by alternative fuels. However, so far the effects of alternative fuels on particle emissions from aircraft engines and their ability to form contrails remain uncertain. To study the effects of alternative fuels on particle emissions and the formation of contrails, the Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions (ACCESS) field experiment was conducted in California. In May 2014, the DLR Falcon 20 and the NASA HU-25 jet aircraft were instrumented with an extended aerosol and trace gas payload probing different types of fuels including JP-8 and JP-8 blended with HEFA (Hydroprocessed Esters and Fatty Acids) while the NASA DC8 aircraft acted as the source aircraft for ACCESS-2. Emission measurements were taken in the DC8 exhaust plumes at aircraft cruise level between 9-12 km altitude and at distances between 50 m and 20 km behind the DC8 engines. Here, we will present results from the ACCESS-2 aerosol measurements which show a 30-60% reduction of the non-volatile (mainly black carbon) particle number concentration in the aircraft exhaust for the HEFA-blend compared to conventional JP-8 fuel. Size-resolved particle emission indices show the largest reductions for larger particle sizes suggesting that the HEFA blend contains fewer and smaller black carbon particles. We will combine the airborne measurements with a parameterization of deposition nucleation developed during a number of ice nucleation experiments at the AIDA chamber in Karlsruhe and discuss the impact of alternative fuels on the abundance of potential ice nuclei at cruise conditions.

  16. Remote Sensing of Aircraft Contrails Using a Field Portable Digital Array Scanned Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William Hayden

    1997-01-01

    With a Digital Array Scanned Interferometer (DASI), we have obtained proof-of-concept observations with which we demonstrate DASI capabilities for the determination of contrail properties. These include the measurement of the cloud and soot microphysical parameters, as well, the abundances of specific pollutant species such as SO(sub x) or NO(sub x). From high quality hyperspectral data and using radiative transfer methods and atmospheric chemistry analysis in the data reduction and interpretation, powerful inferences concerning cloud formation, evolution and dissipation can be made. Under this sub-topic, we will integrate DASI with computer controlled scanning of the field-of-view to direct the sensor towards contrails and exhaust plumes for tracking the emitting vehicles. The optimum DASI wavelength sensitivity range for sensing contrails is 0.35 - 2.5 micron. DASI deploys on the ground or from aircraft to observe contrails in the vicinity. This enables rapid, accurate measurement of the temporal, spatial, and chemical evolution of contrails (or other plumes or exhaust sources) with a low cost, efficient sensor.

  17. Mechanisms of Exhaust Pollutants and Plume Formation in Continuous Combustion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    IN CONTINUOUS COMBUSTION E AFOSR 78-3586 G.S. Samuelsen UCI -ARTR-84-7 ci~LAi June 1984 Ř Mechanical Engineering Univgrsity of California Irvine...ORGANIZATION ’b- OFFICE SYMBOL 74. NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION University of California I IfiapphuabielArFreOfi fSintfcRsac UCI Combustion ...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION 17 COSATI CODES iI19. SUBJaECT TERI,.S (Continue on pWar~tlee~r aid ida ify by blocir nurnbar, ’efLO TGROUP I sue. R ’ Combustion and

  18. An Investigation of Instantaneous Plume Rise from Rocket Exhaust

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    equations will be used in the following sections to derive expressions for stability and the cloud stabilization height involved with hot, buoyant... cloud stabilization height by solving the conservation of momentum equation in the form given in equation 2-19: d2 ()W3) 3 dt2 - (2-29) This is a second...overall trend of lowering the value of y was an increase in the cloud stabilization height when comparing results from the same model. The trend held

  19. Experiment to Characterize Aircraft Volatile Aerosol and Trace-Species Emissions (EXCAVATE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. E.; Branham, H.-S.; Hudgins, C. H.; Plant, J. V.; Ballenthin, J. O.; Miller, T. M.; Viggiano, A. A.; Blake, D. R.; Boudries, H.; Canagaratna, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Experiment to Characterize Aircraft Volatile and Trace Species Emissions (EXCAVATE) was conducted at Langley Research Center (LaRC) in January 2002 and focused upon assaying the production of aerosols and aerosol precursors by a modern commercial aircraft, the Langley B757, during ground-based operation. Remaining uncertainty in the postcombustion fate of jet fuel sulfur contaminants, the need for data to test new theories of particle formation and growth within engine exhaust plumes, and the need for observations to develop air quality models for predicting pollution levels in airport terminal areas were the primary factors motivating the experiment. NASA's Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) and the Ultra Effect Engine Technology (UEET) Program sponsored the experiment which had the specific objectives of determining ion densities; the fraction of fuel S converted from S(IV) to S(VI); the concentration and speciation of volatile aerosols and black carbon; and gas-phase concentrations of long-chain hydrocarbon and PAH species, all as functions of engine power, fuel composition, and plume age.

  20. A study of extractive and remote-sensing sampling and measurement of emissions from military aircraft engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn; Corporan, Edwin

    2010-12-01

    Aircraft emissions contribute to the increased atmospheric burden of particulate matter (PM) that plays an important role in air quality, human health, visibility, contrail formation and climate change. Sampling and measurement of modern aircraft emissions at the engine exhaust plane (EEP) for engine and fuel certification remains challenging, as no agency-certified method is available. In this paper we summarize the results of three recent field studies devoted to investigate the consistency and applicability of "extractive" and "optical remote-sensing" (ORS) technologies in the sampling and measurement of gaseous and PM emitted by a number of military aircraft engines. Three classes of military engines were investigated; these include T56, TF33, and T700 & T701C types of engines, which consume 70-80% of the military aviation fuel each year. JP-8 and Fischer-Tropsch (FT)-derived paraffinic fuels were used to study the effect of fuels. It was found that non-volatile particles in the engine emissions were in the 20 nm range for the low power condition of new helicopter engines to 80 nm for the high power condition of legacy engines. Elemental analysis indicated little metals were present on particles, while most of the materials on the exhaust particles were carbon and sulfate based. Alkanes, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, ethylene, acetylene and propylene were detected. The last five species were most noticeable only under low engine power. The emission indices calculated based on the ORS data deviate significantly from those based on the extractive data. Nevertheless, the ORS techniques were useful in the sense that it provided non-intrusive real-time detection of species in the exhaust plume, which warrants further development. The results obtained in this program help validate sampling methodology and measurement techniques used for non-volatile PM aircraft emissions as described in the SAE AIR6037 (2009).

  1. Entrainment by Lazy Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, Nigel; Hunt, Gary

    2004-11-01

    We consider plumes with source conditions that have a net momentum flux deficit compared to a pure plume - so called lazy plumes. We examine both the case of constant buoyancy flux and buoyancy flux linearly increasing with height. By re-casting the plume conservation equations (Morton, Taylor & Turner 1956) for a constant entrainment coefficient ((α)) in terms of the plume radius (β) and the dimensionless parameter (Γ=frac5Q^2 B4α M^5/2) we show that the far-field flow in a plume with a linear internal buoyancy flux gain is a constant velocity lazy plume with reduced entrainment and radial growth rate. For highly lazy source conditions we derive first-order approximate solutions which indicate a region of zero entrainment near the source. These phenomena have previously been observed, however, it has often been assumed that reduced entrainment implies a reduced (α). We demonstrate that a constant (α) formulation is able to capture the behaviour of these reduced entrainment flows. Morton, B. R., Taylor, G. I. & Turner, J. S. (1956), Turbulent gravitational convection from maintained and instantaneous sources.', Proc. Roy. Soc. 234, 1-23.

  2. 14 CFR 34.6 - Aircraft safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aircraft safety. 34.6 Section 34.6 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES General Provisions § 34.6...

  3. 14 CFR 34.6 - Aircraft safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aircraft safety. 34.6 Section 34.6 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES General Provisions § 34.6...

  4. 14 CFR 34.6 - Aircraft safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aircraft safety. 34.6 Section 34.6 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES General Provisions § 34.6...

  5. 14 CFR 34.6 - Aircraft safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aircraft safety. 34.6 Section 34.6 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES General Provisions § 34.6...

  6. 14 CFR 34.6 - Aircraft safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aircraft safety. 34.6 Section 34.6 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES General Provisions § 34.6...

  7. Prometheus: Io's wandering plume.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, S W; Lopes-Gautier, R; McEwen, A; Smythe, W; Keszthelyi, L; Carlson, R

    2000-05-19

    Unlike any volcanic behavior ever observed on Earth, the plume from Prometheus on Io has wandered 75 to 95 kilometers west over the last 20 years since it was first discovered by Voyager and more recently observed by Galileo. Despite the source motion, the geometric and optical properties of the plume have remained constant. We propose that this can be explained by vaporization of a sulfur dioxide and/or sulfur "snowfield" over which a lava flow is moving. Eruption of a boundary-layer slurry through a rootless conduit with sonic conditions at the intake of the melted snow can account for the constancy of plume properties.

  8. Primary VOC emissions from Commercial Aircraft Jet Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Dogushan; Huang, Rujin; Slowik, Jay; Brem, Benjamin; Durdina, Lukas; Rindlisbacher, Theo; Baltensperger, Urs; Prevot, Andre

    2014-05-01

    Air traffic is growing continuously [1]. The increasing number of airplanes leads to an increase of aviation emissions giving rise to environmental concerns globally by high altitude emissions and, locally on air quality at the ground level [2]. The overall impact of aviation emissions on the environment is likely to increase when the growing air transportation trend [2] is considered. The Aviation Particle Regulatory Instrumentation Demonstration Experiment (APRIDE)-5 campaign took place at Zurich Airport in 2013. In this campaign, aircraft exhaust is sampled during engine acceptance tests after engine overhaul at the facilities of SR Technics. Direct sampling from the engine core is made possible due to the unique fixed installation of a retractable sampling probe and the use of a standardized sampling system designed for the new particulate matter regulation in development for aircraft engines. Many of the gas-phase aircraft emissions, e.g. CO2, NOX, CO, SO2, hydrocarbons, and volatile organic compounds (VOC) were detected by the instruments in use. This study, part of the APRIDE-5 campaign, focuses on the primary VOC emissions in order to produce emission factors of VOC species for varying engine operating conditions which are the surrogates for the flight cycles. Previously, aircraft plumes were sampled in order to quantify VOCs by a proton transfer reaction quadrupole mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) [3]. This earlier study provided a preliminary knowledge on the emission of species such as methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, benzene and toluene by varying engine thrust levels. The new setup was (i) designed to sample from the diluted engine exhaust and the new tool and (ii) used a high resolution time of flight PTR-MS with higher accuracy for many new species, therefore providing a more detailed and accurate inventory. We will present the emission factors for species that were quantified previously, as well as for many additional VOCs detected during the campaign

  9. Multiscale predictions of aviation-attributable PM2.5 for U.S. airports modeled using CMAQ with plume-in-grid and an aircraft-specific 1-D emission model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aviation activities represent an important and unique mode of transportation, but also impact air quality. In this study, we aim to quantify the impact of aircraft on air quality, focusing on aviation-attributable PM2.5 at scales ranging from local (a few kilometers) to continent...

  10. Estimation of Ship-plume Ozone Production Efficiency: ITCT 2K2 Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Song, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Ozone Production Efficiency (OPE) of ship plume was evaluated in this study, based on ship-plume photochemical/dynamic model simulations and the ship-plume composition data measured during the ITCT 2K2 (Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation 2002) aircraft campaign. The averaged instantaneous OPEs (OPEi ) estimated via the ship-plume photochemical/dynamic modeling for the ITCT 2K2 ship-plume ranged between 4.61 and 18.92, showing that the values vary with the extent of chemical evolution (or chemical stage) of the ship plume and the stability classes of the marine boundary layer (MBL). Together with OPEi, the equivalent OPEs (OPEe) for the entire ITCT 2K2 ship-plume were also estimated. The OPEe values varied between 9.73 (for the stable MBL) and 12.73 (for the moderately stable MBL), which agreed well with the OPEe of 12.85 estimated based on the ITCT 2K2 ship-plume observations. It was also found that both the model-simulated and observation-based OPEe inside the ship-plume were 0.29-0.38 times smaller than the OPEe calculated/measured outside the ITCT 2K2 ship-plume. Lower OPEs insides the ship plume were due to the high levels of NOx. Possible implications of this ship-plume OPE study in the global chemistry-transport modeling are also discussed in this study.

  11. Flow prediction for propfan engine installation effects on transport aircraft at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samant, S. S.; Yu, N. J.

    1986-01-01

    An Euler-based method for aerodynamic analysis of turboprop transport aircraft at transonic speeds has been developed. In this method, inviscid Euler equations are solved over surface-fitted grids constructed about aircraft configurations. Propeller effects are simulated by specifying sources of momentum and energy on an actuator disc located in place of the propeller. A stripwise boundary layer procedure is included to account for the viscous effects. A preliminary version of an approach to embed the exhaust plume within the global Euler solution has also been developed for more accurate treatment of the exhaust flow. The resulting system of programs is capable of handling wing-body-nacelle-propeller configurations. The propeller disks may be tractors or pushers and may represent single or counterrotation propellers. Results from analyses of three test cases of interest (a wing alone, a wing-body-nacelle model, and a wing-nacelle-endplate model) are presented. A user's manual for executing the system of computer programs with formats of various input files, sample job decks, and sample input files is provided in appendices.

  12. Scanning thermal plumes. [from power plant condensers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpace, F. L.; Madding, R. P.; Green, T., III

    1974-01-01

    In order to study the behavior and effects of thermal plumes associated with the condenser cooling of power plants, thermal line scans are periodically made from aircraft over all power plants along the Wisconsin shore of Lake Michigan. Simultaneous ground truth is also gathered with a radiometer. Some sequential imagery has been obtained for periods up to two hours to study short term variations in the surface temperature of the plume. The article concentrates on the techniques used to analyze thermal scanner data for a single power plant which was studied intensively. The calibration methods, temperature dependence of the thermal scanner, and calculation of the modulation transfer function for the scanner are treated. It is concluded that obtaining quantitative surface-temperature data from thermal scanning is a nontrivial task. Accuracies up to plus or minus 0.1 C are attainable.

  13. El Chichon - Composition of plume gases and particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotra, J. P.; Finnegan, D. L.; Zoller, W. H.; Hart, M. A.; Moyers, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Aircraft measurements were made of trace gases, atmospheric particles, and condensed acid volatiles in the plume of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico, in November 1982. Hydrogen sulfide was the primary gaseous sulfur species in the plume at the time of collection. Concentrations of 28 elements were determined by neutron activation analysis of particulate material from the plume. The volatile elements sulfur, chlorine, arsenic, selenium, bromine, antimony, iodine, tungsten, and mercury were enriched relative to bulk pyroclastic material by factors of 60 to 20,000. Arsenic, antimony, and selenium were associated predominantly with small (not greater than 3 micrometer) particles. Calcium and sodium were present almost exclusively on larger particles and aluminum and manganese were bimodally distributed. Ashladen particulate material injected into the stratosphere during the early violent eruptions was enriched by factors of 10 to 30 relative to ash in some of the same elements observed in the quiescent plume.

  14. El Chichon - Composition of plume gases and particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotra, J. P.; Finnegan, D. L.; Zoller, W. H.; Hart, M. A.; Moyers, J. L.

    1983-12-01

    Aircraft measurements were made of trace gases, atmospheric particles, and condensed acid volatiles in the plume of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico, in November 1982. Hydrogen sulfide was the primary gaseous sulfur species in the plume at the time of collection. Concentrations of 28 elements were determined by neutron activation analysis of particulate material from the plume. The volatile elements sulfur, chlorine, arsenic, selenium, bromine, antimony, iodine, tungsten, and mercury were enriched relative to bulk pyroclastic material by factors of 60 to 20,000. Arsenic, antimony, and selenium were associated predominantly with small (not greater than 3 micrometer) particles. Calcium and sodium were present almost exclusively on larger particles and aluminum and manganese were bimodally distributed. Ashladen particulate material injected into the stratosphere during the early violent eruptions was enriched by factors of 10 to 30 relative to ash in some of the same elements observed in the quiescent plume.

  15. Trajectories of the mount st. Helens eruption plume.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, E F

    1981-02-20

    The plume of the major eruption of Mount St. Helens on 18 May 1980 penetrated 10 to 11 kilometers into the stratosphere, attaining heights of 22 to 23 kilometers. Wind shears rapidly converted the plume from an expanding vertical cone to a thin, slightly inclined lamina. The lamina was extruded zonally in the stratosphere as the lower part moved eastward at jet stream velocities, while the upper part slowly moved westward in the region of nonsteady transition from the westerlies to the summer stratospheric easterlies. Trajectories computed to position the NASA U-2 aircraft for sampling in the plume are described. Plume volume after 8 hours of strong volcanic emission is estimated at 2 x 10(6) cubic kilometers. Only about 1 percent of this volume is attributed to the volcano; the rest was entrained from the environment.

  16. Trajectories of the Mount St. Helens eruption plume

    SciTech Connect

    Danielsen, E.F.

    1981-01-01

    The plume of the major eruption of Mount St. Helens on 18 May 1980 penetrated 10 to 11 kilometers into the stratosphere, attaining heights of 22 to 23 kilometers. Wind shears rapidly converted the plume from expanding vertical cone to a thin, slightly inclined lamina. The lamina was extruded zonally in the stratosphere as the lower part moved eastward at jet stream velocities, while the upper part slowly moved westward in the region of nonsteady transition from the westerlies to the summer stratospheric easterlies. Trajectories computed to position the NASA U-2 aircraft for sampling in the plume are described. Plume volume after 8 hours of strong volcanic emission is estimated at 2 x 10/sup +6/ cubic kilometers. Only about 1 percent of this volume is attributed to the volcano; the rest was entrained from the environment.

  17. Volcanic ash plume identification using polarization lidar: Augustine eruption, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhu, Jiang; Webley, Peter W.; Dean, K.; Cobb, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    During mid January to early February 2006, a series of explosive eruptions occurred at the Augustine volcanic island off the southern coast of Alaska. By early February a plume of volcanic ash was transported northward into the interior of Alaska. Satellite imagery and Puff volcanic ash transport model predictions confirm that the aerosol plume passed over a polarization lidar (0.694 mm wavelength) site at the Arctic Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. For the first time, lidar linear depolarization ratios of 0.10 – 0.15 were measured in a fresh tropospheric volcanic plume, demonstrating that the nonspherical glass and mineral particles typical of volcanic eruptions generate strong laser depolarization. Thus, polarization lidars can identify the volcanic ash plumes that pose a threat to jet air traffic from the ground, aircraft, or potentially from Earth orbit.

  18. CHLORINATED SOLVENT PLUME CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This lecture will cover recent success in controlling and assessing the treatment of shallow ground water plumes of chlorinated solvents, other halogenated organic compounds, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).

  19. Methane Plumes on Mars

    NASA Video Gallery

    Spectrometer instruments attached to several telescopes detect plumes of methane emitted from Mars during its summer and spring seasons. High levels of methane are indicated by warmer colors. The m...

  20. Reductions in aircraft particulate emissions due to the use of Fischer-Tropsch fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyersdorf, A. J.; Timko, M. T.; Ziemba, L. D.; Bulzan, D.; Corporan, E.; Herndon, S. C.; Howard, R.; Miake-Lye, R.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E.; Wey, C.; Yu, Z.; Anderson, B. E.

    2013-06-01

    The use of alternative fuels for aviation is likely to increase due to concerns over fuel security, price stability and the sustainability of fuel sources. Concurrent reductions in particulate emissions from these alternative fuels are expected because of changes in fuel composition including reduced sulfur and aromatic content. The NASA Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX) was conducted in January-February 2009 to investigate the effects of synthetic fuels on gas-phase and particulate emissions. Standard petroleum JP-8 fuel, pure synthetic fuels produced from natural gas and coal feedstocks using the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process, and 50% blends of both fuels were tested in the CFM-56 engines on a DC-8 aircraft. To examine plume chemistry and particle evolution with time, samples were drawn from inlet probes positioned 1, 30, and 145 m downstream of the aircraft engines. No significant alteration to engine performance was measured when burning the alternative fuels. However, leaks in the aircraft fuel system were detected when operated with the pure FT fuels as a result of the absence of aromatic compounds in the fuel. Dramatic reductions in soot emissions were measured for both the pure FT fuels (reductions of 84% averaged over all powers) and blended fuels (64%) relative to the JP-8 baseline with the largest reductions at idle conditions. The alternative fuels also produced smaller soot (e.g. at 85% power, volume mean diameters were reduced from 78 nm for JP-8 to 51 nm for the FT fuel), which may reduce their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The reductions in particulate emissions are expected for all alternative fuels with similar reductions in fuel sulfur and aromatic content regardless of the feedstock. As the plume cools downwind of the engine, nucleation-mode aerosols form. For the pure FT fuels, reductions (94% averaged over all powers) in downwind particle number emissions were similar to those measured at the exhaust plane (84

  1. Sulfur plumes off Namibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur plumes rising up from the bottom of the ocean floor produce colorful swirls in the waters off the coast of Namibia in southern Africa. The plumes come from the breakdown of marine plant matter by anaerobic bacteria that do not need oxygen to live. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on April 24, 2002 Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  2. Exhaust Trail of STS-51-L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    On January 28, 1986, the Space Shuttle Challenger and her seven-member crew were lost when a ruptured O-ring in the right Solid Rocket Booster caused an explosion soon after launch. This photograph, taken a few seconds after the accident, shows the Space Shuttle Main Engines and Solid Rocket Booster exhaust plumes entwined around a ball of gas from the External Tank. Because shuttle launches had become almost routine after fifty successful missions, those watching the shuttle launch in person and on television found the sight of the explosion especially shocking and difficult to believe until NASA confirmed the accident.

  3. Plume Measurement System (PLUMES) Calibration Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    Atle Lohrmann SonTek, Inc. 7940 Silverton Avenue, No. 105 San Diego, California 92126 and Craig Huhta JIMAR University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822...Measurement System (PLUMES) Calibration Experiment by Age Lohrmann SonTek, Inc. 7940 Silverton Avenue, No. 105 San Diego, CA 92126 Craig Huhta JIMAR...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) &. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION SonTek, Inc., 7940 Silverton Avenue, No. 105, San Diego, CA 92126 REPORT NUMBER

  4. Commercial aircraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. J.

    The history of aircraft noise control development is traced with an eye to forecasting the future. Noise control became imperative with the advent of the first generation of commercial jet aircraft, which were extremely loud. The steady increases in the size of turbofans have nearly matched the progress in noise reduction capabilities in recent years. Only 5 dB of reduction in fleet noise has been achieved since early standards were met. Current engine design is concentrated on increasing fuel efficiency rather than lowering noise emissions. Further difficulties exist because of continued flights with older aircraft. Gains in noise reduction have been made mainly by decreasing exhaust velocities from 600-700 m/sec to 300-400 m/sec. New techniques being explored comprise mixing the core and bypass flows, interaction tone control, reduction of broadband sources, development of acoustic liner technology and alterations in the number of fan blades and stage spacing.

  5. Plume Mitigation for Mars Terminal Landing: Soil Stabilization Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has led the efforts for lunar and Martian landing site preparation, including excavation, soil stabilization, and plume damage prediction. There has been much discussion of sintering but until our team recently demonstrated it for the lunar case there was little understanding of the serious challenges. Simplistic sintering creates a crumbly, brittle, weak surface unsuitable for a rocket exhaust plume. The goal of this project is to solve those problems and make it possible to land a human class lander on Mars, making terminal landing of humans on Mars possible for the first time.

  6. Performance and Handling Qualities - AH-1G Helicopter Equipped with Three Hot Metal/Plume Infrared Suppressors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    relative to the aircraft longitudinal axis. The ejector action, created by the engine exhaust as it is accelerated through the replacement nozzle, draws...Lycoming duct is 55 degrees upward relative to the aircraft longitudinal axis. The airflow induced by the ejector is approximately 80 percent of engine...flow. It is estimted that the exhaust gas exits the elbow at approximately 30 degrees relative to the aircraft longitudinal axis. Net increase to the

  7. The Effects of Aircraft Wake Dynamics on Contrail Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewellen, D. C.; Lewellen, W. S.; Grose, W. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Results of large-eddy simulations of the development of young persistent ice contrails are presented, concentrating on the interactions between the aircraft wake dynamics and the ice cloud evolution over ages front a few seconds to approx. 30 min. The 3D unsteady evolution of the dispersing engine exhausts, trailing vortex pair interaction and breakup, and subsequent Brunt-Vaisala oscillations of the older wake plume are modeled in detail in high-resolution simulations, coupled with it bulk microphysics model for the contrail ice development. The simulations confirm that the early wake dynamics can have a strong influence on the properties of persistent contrails even at late times. The vortex dynamics are the primary determinant of the vertical extent of the contrail (until precipitate ton becomes significant): and this together with the local wind shear largely determines the horizontal extent. The ice density, ice crystal number density, and a conserved exhaust tracer all develop and disperse in different fashions from each other. The total ice crystal number can be significantly reduced due to adiabatic compression resulting from the downward motion of the vortex system, even for ambient conditions that are substantially supersaturated with respect to ice. The fraction of the initial ice crystals surviving, their spatial distribution and the ice mass distribution are all sensitive to the aircraft type, ambient humidity, assumed initial ice crystal number, and ambient turbulence conditions. There is a significant range of conditions for which a smaller transport such as a B737 produces as significant a persistent contrail as a larger transport such as a B747, even though the latter consumes almost five times as much fuel. The difficulties involved in trying to minimize persistent contrail production are discussed.

  8. Method of hybrid plume plasma propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A technique for producing thrust by generating a hybrid plume plasma exhaust is disclosed. A plasma flow is generated and introduced into a nozzle which features one or more inlets positioned to direct a flow of neutral gas about the interior of the nozzle. When such a neutral gas flow is combined with the plasma flow within the nozzle, a hybrid plume is constructed including a flow of hot plasma along the center of the nozzle surrounded by a generally annular flow of neutral gas, with an annular transition region between the pure plasma and the neutral gas. The temperature of the outer gas layer is below that of the pure plasma and generally separates the pure plasma from the interior surfaces of the nozzle. The neutral gas flow both insulates the nozzle walls from the high temperatures of the plasma flow and adds to the mass flow rate of the hybrid exhaust. The rate of flow of neutral gas into the interior of the nozzle may be selectively adjusted to control the thrust and specific impulse of the device.

  9. RAXJET- TRANSONIC, AXISYMMETRIC FLOW OVER NOZZLE AFTERBODIES WITH SUPERSONIC JET EXHAUSTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    The nozzle afterbody is one of the main drag-producing components of an aircraft propulsion system. Thus, considerable effort has been devoted to developing techniques for predicting the afterbody flow field and drag. The RAXJET computer program was developed to predict the transonic, axisymmetric flow over nozzle afterbodies with supersonic jet exhausts and includes the effects of boundary-layer displacement, separation, jet entrainment, and inviscid jet plume blockage. RAXJET iteratively combines the South-Jameson relaxation procedure, the Reshotko-Tucker boundary-layer solution, the Presz separation model, the Dash-Pergament mixing model, and the Dash-Thorpe inviscid plume model into a single, comprehensive model. The approach taken in the RAXJET program requires considerably less computational time than the Navier-Stokes solutions and generally yields results of comparable accuracy. In RAXJET, the viscous-inviscid interaction model is constructed by dividing the afterbody flow field into six separate computational regions: (1) The inviscid external flow solution is based on the relaxation procedure of South and Jameson for solving the exact nonlinear potential flow equation in nonconservative form. (2) The flow field in the inviscid jet exhaust is solved by explicit spatial marching of the conservative finite-difference form of the inviscid flow equations for a uniform composition gas mixture. (3) The properties in the attached boundary-layer region are solved by a modified version of the Reshotko-Tucker integral method for turbulent flows. (4) The analysis of the separated flow region consists of predicting the separation location and calculating the discriminating streamline shape. (5) The jet wake region is determined by either a simple extrapolation model or by an integral method that accounts for entrainment effects. (6) The displacement-thickness distribution arising from entrainment into the jet mixing layer is calculated by the overlaid mixing model

  10. A Brilliant Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons captured another dramatic picture of Jupiter's moon Io and its volcanic plumes, 19 hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter on Feb. 28, 2007. LORRI took this 75 millisecond exposure at 0035 Universal Time on March 1, 2007, when Io was 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) from the spacecraft.

    Io's dayside is deliberately overexposed to bring out faint details in the plumes and on the moon's night side. The continuing eruption of the volcano Tvashtar, at the 1 o'clock position, produces an enormous plume roughly 330 kilometers (200 miles) high, which is illuminated both by sunlight and 'Jupiter light.'

    The shadow of Io, cast by the Sun, slices across the plume. The plume is quite asymmetrical and has a complicated wispy texture, for reasons that are still mysterious. At the heart of the eruption incandescent lava, seen here as a brilliant point of light, is reminding scientists of the fire fountains spotted by the Galileo Jupiter orbiter at Tvashtar in 1999.

    The sunlit plume faintly illuminates the surface underneath. 'New Horizons and Io continue to astonish us with these unprecedented views of the solar system's most geologically active body' says John Spencer, deputy leader of the New Horizons Jupiter Encounter Science Team and an Io expert from Southwest Research Institute.

    Because this image shows the side of Io that faces away from Jupiter, the large planet does not illuminate the moon's night side except for an extremely thin crescent outlining the edge of the disk at lower right. Another plume, likely from the volcano Masubi, is illuminated by Jupiter just above this lower right edge. A third and much fainter plume, barely visible at the 2 o'clock position, could be the first plume seen from the volcano Zal Patera.

    As in other New Horizons images of Io, mountains catch the setting Sun just beyond the terminator (the line dividing day and night

  11. Four dimensional reconstruction and analysis of plume images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhawan, Atam P.; Peck, Charles, III; Disimile, Peter

    1991-05-01

    A number of methods have been investigated and are under current investigation for monitoring the health of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Plume emission analysis has recently emerged as a potential technique for correlating the emission characteristics with the health of an engine. In order to correlate the visual and spectral signatures of the plume emission with the characteristic health monitoring features of the engine, the plume emission data must be acquired, stored, and analyzed in a manner similar to flame emission spectroscopy. The characteristic visual and spectral signatures of the elements vaporized in exhaust plume along with the features related to their temperature, pressure, and velocity can be analyzed once the images of plume emission are effectively acquired, digitized, and stored on a computer. Since the emission image varies with respect to time at a specified planar location, four dimensional visual and spectral analysis need to be performed on the plume emission data. In order to achieve this objective, feasibility research was conducted to digitize, store, analyze, and visualize the images of a subsonic jet in a cross flow. The jet structure was made visible using a direct injection flow visualization technique. The results of time-history based three dimensional reconstruction of the cross sectional images corresponding to a specific planar location of the jet structure are presented. The experimental set-up to acquire such data is described and three dimensional displays of time-history based reconstructions of the jet structure are discussed.

  12. Duplex tab exhaust nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmark, Ephraim Jeff (Inventor); Martens, Steven (nmn) (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An exhaust nozzle includes a conical duct terminating in an annular outlet. A row of vortex generating duplex tabs are mounted in the outlet. The tabs have compound radial and circumferential aft inclination inside the outlet for generating streamwise vortices for attenuating exhaust noise while reducing performance loss.

  13. The 1995 scientific assessment of the atmospheric effects of stratospheric aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Baughcum, Steven L.; Brune, William H.; Douglass, Anne R.; Fahey, David W.; Friedl, Randall R.; Liu, Shaw C.; Plumb, R. Alan; Poole, Lamont R.; Wesoky, Howard L.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides a scientific assessment of our knowledge concerning the impact of proposed high-speed civil transport (HSCT) aircraft on the atmosphere. It comes at the end of Phase 1 of the Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft element of the NASA High-Speed Research Program. The fundamental problem with stratospheric flight is that pollutant residence times are long because the stratosphere is a region of permanent temperature inversion with stable stratification. Using improved two-dimensional assessment models and detailed fleet emissions scenarios, the assessment examines the possible impact of the range of effluents from aircraft. Emphasis is placed on the effects of NO(x) and H2O on the atmospheric ozone content. Measurements in the plume of an in-flight Concorde supersonic transport indicated a large number of small particles. These measurements, coupled with model sensitivity studies, point out the importance of obtaining a more detailed understanding of the fate of sulfur in the HSCT exhaust. Uncertainties in the current understanding of the processes important for determining the overall effects of HSCT's on the atmosphere are discussed and partially quantified. Research directions are identified to improve the quantification of uncertainties and to reduce their magnitude.

  14. Test data from small solid propellant rocket motor plume measurements (FA-21)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, L. M.; Somers, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    A program is described for obtaining a reliable, parametric set of measurements in the exhaust plumes of solid propellant rocket motors. Plume measurements included pressures, temperatures, forces, heat transfer rates, particle sampling, and high-speed movies. Approximately 210,000 digital data points and 15,000 movie frames were acquired. Measurements were made at points in the plumes via rake-mounted probes, and on the surface of a large plate impinged by the exhaust plume. Parametric variations were made in pressure altitude, propellant aluminum loading, impinged plate incidence angle and distance from nozzle exit to plate or rake. Reliability was incorporated by continual use of repeat runs. The test setup of the various hardware items is described along with an account of test procedures. Test results and data accuracy are discussed. Format of the data presentation is detailed. Complete data are included in the appendix.

  15. Apollo experience report: Thermal protection from engine-plume environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    Portions of the combined Apollo spacecraft (the command and service module and the lunar module) are subjected to the impingement of hot exhaust gases from the various propulsion systems of the modules. The configurations of the vehicles and the sources of impinging engine plumes are described. A typical Apollo mission is outlined. Protection and design-verification methods are discussed. Finally, recommendations are made for future spacecraft programs.

  16. Numerical Investigation of Twin-Nozzle Rocket Plume Phenomenology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    calculations indicate that the viscous stress model, kinetic chemistry , and nozzle exit profile are significant parameters that should be considered in analyses and interpretation of the calculations....been completed to assess the effects of three-dimensionality, turbulent viscosity, afterburning, near-field shock structure, finite-rate kinetic ... chemistry , intranozzle geometric spacing, and initial nozzle exit plane profile effects on the subsequent plume exhaust flow field. The results of these

  17. Where Plumes Live

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S. D.

    2004-12-01

    From the perspective of fluid dynamics, `Plumes or not?' might be the wrong question. Let me begin by defining a few terms. Plume with a `P' is the well-known thermal structure with thin (order 100 km) tail and large, bulbous head that originates at the core-mantle boundary. The thin tail/large, bulbous-head morphology has been generated in a number of laboratory and numerical experiments. It can be seen, for example, on the cover of the famous fluid dynamics text by Batchelor. There is a clearly-defined range of parameters for which this structure is the preferred solution for instabilities arising from a bottom boundary layer in a convecting fluid. For example, a strong temperature-dependent rheology is needed. By contrast, plume with a `p' is any cylindrical or quasi-cylindrical instability originating from a thermal (or thermo-chemical) boundary layer. In fluid dynamics plume is sometimes used interchangeable with jet. Unless there is a very small temperature drop across the core-mantle boundary or a rather remarkable balance between temperature and composition at the base of the mantle, there are almost certainly plumes. (Note the little p.) Are these plumes the thermal structures with thin (order 100 km) tails and large bulbous heads or could they be broad, hot regions such as the degree 2 pattern seen in global seismic tomography images of the lower mantle, or the disconnected droplets seen in chaotic convection? To study this question, I will present a sequence of numerical `experiments' that illustrate the morphology of instabilities from a basal thermal boundary layer, i.e., plumes. Some of the aspects I will present include: spherical geometry, temperature-and pressure-dependence of rheology, internal heating, pressure-dependent coefficient of thermal expansion, variable coefficient of thermal diffusivity, phase transformations, and compositional layering at the base of the mantle. The goal is to map out the parameters and conditions where Plumes live

  18. Particulate exhaust emissions from an experimental combustor. [gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Ingebo, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    The concentration of dry particulates (carbon) in the exhaust of an experimental gas turbine combustor was measured at simulated takeoff operating conditions and correlated with the standard smoke-number measurement. Carbon was determined quantitatively from a sample collected on a fiberglass filter by converting the carbon in the smoke sample to carbon dioxide and then measuring the volume of carbon dioxide formed by gas chromatography. At a smoke of 25 (threshold of visibility of the smoke plume for large turbojets) the carbon concentration was 2.8 mg carbon/cu m exhaust gas, which is equivalent to an emission index of 0.17 g carbon/kg fuel.

  19. Simulation of Low-density Nozzle Plumes in Non-zero Ambient Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Chan-Hong; Dewitt, Kenneth J.; Stubbs, Robert M.; Penko, Paul F.

    1994-01-01

    The direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) method was applied to the analysis of low-density nitrogen plumes exhausting from a small converging-diverging nozzle into finite ambient pressures. Two cases were considered that simulated actual test conditions in a vacuum facility. The numerical simulations readily captured the complicated flow structure of the overexpanded plumes adjusting to the finite ambient pressures, including Mach disks and barrel shaped shocks. The numerical simulations compared well to experimental data of Rothe.

  20. A STUDY OF EXTRACTIVE AND REMOTE-SENSING SAMPLING AND MEASUREMENT OF EMISSIONS FROM MILITARY AIRCRAFT ENGINES

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Mengdawn; Corporan, E.

    2010-01-01

    90%) from (typically lower than) those based on the extractive techniques. However, the ORS techniques were useful in providing non-intrusive real-time measurements of gaseous species in the exhaust plume, which warrants further development. The results obtained in this program validate sampling methodology and measurement techniques used for non-volatile PM aircraft emissions as described in the SAE AIR-6037.

  1. Contamination control and plume assessment of low-energy thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.

    1993-01-01

    Potential contamination of a spacecraft cryogenic surface by a xenon (Xe) ion generator was evaluated. The analysis involves the description of the plume exhausted from the generator with its relative component fluxes on the spacecraft surfaces, and verification of the conditions for condensation, adsorption, and sputtering at those locations. The data describing the plume fluxes and their effects on surfaces were obtained from two sources: the tests carried out with the Xe generator in a small vacuum chamber to indicate deposits and sputter on monitor slides; and the extensive tests with a mercury (Hg) ion thruster in a large vacuum chamber. The Hg thruster tests provided data on the neutrals, on low-energy ion fluxes, on high-energy ion fluxes, and on sputtered materials at several locations within the plume.

  2. Testing Installed Propulsion for Shielded Exhaust Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.; Podboy, Gary G.; Brown, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    Jet-surface interaction (JSI) can be a significant factor in the exhaust noise of installed propulsion systems. Tests to further the understanding and prediction of the acoustic impacts of JSI have been described. While there were many objectives for the test, the overall objective was to prepare for a future test validating the design of a low-noise, lowboom supersonic commercial airliner. In this paper we explore design requirements for a partial aircraft model to be used in subscale acoustic testing, especially focusing on the amount of aircraft body that must be included to produce the acoustic environment between propulsion exhaust system and observer. We document the dual-stream jets, both nozzle and flow conditions, which were tested to extend JSI acoustic modeling from simple singlestream jets to realistic dual-stream exhaust nozzles. Sample observations are provided of changes to far-field sound as surface geometry and flow conditions were varied. Initial measurements are presented for integrating the propulsion on the airframe for a supersonic airliner with simulated airframe geometries and nozzles. Acoustic impacts of installation were modest, resulting in variations of less than 3 EPNdB in most configurations.

  3. LAMP Observes the LCROSS Plume

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows LAMP’s view of the LCROSS plume. The first half of the animation shows the LAMP viewport scanning across the horizon, passing through the plume, and moving on. The second half of...

  4. Hydrostatic Modeling of Buoyant Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroman, A.; Dewar, W. K.; Wienders, N.; Deremble, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has led to increased interest in understanding point source convection dynamics. Most of the existing oil plume models use a Lagrangian based approach, which computes integral measures such as plume centerline trajectory and plume radius. However, this approach doesn't account for feedbacks of the buoyant plume on the ambient environment. Instead, we employ an Eulerian based approach to acquire a better understanding of the dynamics of buoyant plumes. We have performed a series of hydrostatic modeling simulations using the MITgcm. Our results show that there is a dynamical response caused by the presence of the buoyant plume, in that there is a modification of the background flow. We find that the buoyant plume becomes baroclinically unstable and sheds eddies at the neutral buoyancy layer. We also explore different scenarios to determine the effect of the buoyancy source and the temperature stratification on the evolution of buoyant plumes.

  5. EUV analysis of polar plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, I. A.; Withbroe, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    Three polar plumes were studied using Skylab Mg X and O VI data. The plumes lie within the boundaries of a polar coronal hole. We find that the mean temperature of the plumes is about 1.1 million K and that they have a small vertical temperature gradient. Densities are determined and found consistent with white light analyses. The variation of density with height in the plumes is compared with that expected for hydrostatic equilibrium. As is the case for other coronal features, polar plumes will be a source of solar wind if the magnetic field lines are open. On the basis of the derived plume model and estimates of the numbers of plumes in polar coronal holes, it appears that polar plumes contain about 15% of the mass in a typical polar hole and occupy about 10% of the volume.

  6. CFD Analysis of Nozzle Jet Plume Effects on Sonic Boom Signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.

    2009-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study is conducted to examine nozzle exhaust jet plume effects on the Sonic boom signature of a supersonic aircraft. A simplified axisymmetric nozzle geometry, representative of the nozzle on the NASA Dryden NF-15B Lift and Nozzle Change Effects on Tail Shock research airplane, is considered. The computational fluid dynamics code is validated using available wind-tunnel sonic boom experimental data. The effects of grid size, spatial order of accuracy. grid type, and flow viscosity on the accuracy of the predicted sonic boom pressure signature are quantified. Grid lines parallel to the Mach wave direction are found to give the best results. Second-order accurate upwind methods are required as a minimum for accurate sonic boom simulations. The highly underexpanded nozzle flow is found to provide significantly more reduction in the tail shock strength in the sonic boom N-wave pressure signature than perfectly expanded and overexpanded nozzle flows. A tail shock train in the sonic boom signature is observed for the highly underexpanded nozzle flow. Axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics simulations show the flow physics inside the F-15 nozzle to be nonisentropic and complex.

  7. An exact solution of a simplified two-phase plume model. [for solid propellant rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S.-Y.; Roberts, B. B.

    1974-01-01

    An exact solution of a simplified two-phase, gas-particle, rocket exhaust plume model is presented. It may be used to make the upper-bound estimation of the heat flux and pressure loads due to particle impingement on the objects existing in the rocket exhaust plume. By including the correction factors to be determined experimentally, the present technique will provide realistic data concerning the heat and aerodynamic loads on these objects for design purposes. Excellent agreement in trend between the best available computer solution and the present exact solution is shown.

  8. 40 CFR 87.23 - Exhaust emission standards for Tier 6 and Tier 8 engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Exhaust emission standards for Tier 6 and Tier 8 engines. 87.23 Section 87.23 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Emissions (New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 87.23 Exhaust emission standards for Tier 6 and Tier...

  9. Enceladus' Water Vapour Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Candice J.; Esposito, L.; Colwell, J.; Hendrix, A.; Matson, Dennis; Parkinson, C.; Pryor, W.; Shemansky, D.; Stewart, I.; Tew, J.; Yung, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the discovery of Enceladus water vapor plumes is shown. Conservative modeling of this water vapor is also presented and also shows that Enceladus is the source of most of the water required to supply the neutrals in Saturn's system and resupply the E-ring against losses.

  10. Double Diffusive Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Bruce; Lee, Brace

    2008-11-01

    Sour gas flares attempt to dispose of deadly H2S gas through combustion. What does not burn rises as a buoyant plume. But the gas is heavier than air at room temperature, so as the rising gas cools eventually it becomes negatively buoyant and descends back to the ground. Ultimately, our intent is to predict the concentrations of the gas at ground level in realistic atmospheric conditions. As a first step towards this goal we have performed laboratory experiments examining the structure of a steady state plume of hot and salty water that rises buoyantly near the source and descends as a fountain after it has cooled sufficiently. We call this a double-diffusive plume because its evolution is dictated by the different (turbulent) diffusivities of heat and salt. A temperature and conductivity probe measures both the salinity and temperature along the centreline of the plume. The supposed axisymmetric structure of the salinity concentration as it changes with height is determined by light-attenuation methods. To help interpret the results, a theory has been successfully adapted from the work of Bloomfield and Kerr (2000), who developed coupled equations describing the structure of fountains. Introducing a new empirical parameter for the relative rates of turbulent heat and salt diffusion, the predictions are found to agree favourably with experimental results.

  11. Evaluation of Visible Plumes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Thomas

    Developed for presentation at the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971, this outline discusses plumes with contaminants that are visible to the naked eye. Information covers: (1) history of air pollution control regulations, (2) need for methods of evaluating…

  12. PLUME and research sotware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudin, Veronique; Gomez-Diaz, Teresa

    2013-04-01

    The PLUME open platform (https://www.projet-plume.org) has as first goal to share competences and to value the knowledge of software experts within the French higher education and research communities. The project proposes in its platform the access to more than 380 index cards describing useful and economic software for this community, with open access to everybody. The second goal of PLUME focuses on to improve the visibility of software produced by research laboratories within the higher education and research communities. The "development-ESR" index cards briefly describe the main features of the software, including references to research publications associated to it. The platform counts more than 300 cards describing research software, where 89 cards have an English version. In this talk we describe the theme classification and the taxonomy of the index cards and the evolution with new themes added to the project. We will also focus on the organisation of PLUME as an open project and its interests in the promotion of free/open source software from and for research, contributing to the creation of a community of shared knowledge.

  13. Buoyant plume calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.; Haselman, L.C.; Edwards, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    Smoke from raging fires produced in the aftermath of a major nuclear exchange has been predicted to cause large decreases in surface temperatures. However, the extent of the decrease and even the sign of the temperature change, depend on how the smoke is distributed with altitude. We present a model capable of evaluating the initial distribution of lofted smoke above a massive fire. Calculations are shown for a two-dimensional slab version of the model and a full three-dimensional version. The model has been evaluated by simulating smoke heights for the Hamburg firestorm of 1943 and a smaller scale oil fire which occurred in Long Beach in 1958. Our plume heights for these fires are compared to those predicted by the classical Morton-Taylor-Turner theory for weakly buoyant plumes. We consider the effect of the added buoyancy caused by condensation of water-laden ground level air being carried to high altitude with the convection column as well as the effects of background wind on the calculated smoke plume heights for several fire intensities. We find that the rise height of the plume depends on the assumed background atmospheric conditions as well as the fire intensity. Little smoke is injected into the stratosphere unless the fire is unusually intense, or atmospheric conditions are more unstable than we have assumed. For intense fires significant amounts of water vapor are condensed raising the possibility of early scavenging of smoke particles by precipitation. 26 references, 11 figures.

  14. D-558-2 Aircraft on lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1955-01-01

    longitudinal (pitch) motions; wing and tail loads, lift, drag, and buffeting characteristics of swept-wing aircraft at transonic and supersonic speeds; and the effects of the rocket exhaust plume on lateral dynamic stability throughout the speed range. (Plume effects were a new experience for aircraft.) The number three aircraft also gathered information about the effects of external stores (bomb shapes, drop tanks) upon the aircraft's behavior in the transonic region (roughly 0.7 to 1.3 times the speed of sound). In correlation with data from other early transonic research aircraft such as the XF-92A, this information contributed to solutions to the pitch-up problem in swept-wing aircraft. The three airplanes flew a total of 313 times--123 by the number one aircraft (Bureau No. 37973--NACA 143), 103 by the second Skyrocket (Bureau No. 37974--NACA 144), and 87 by airplane number three (Bureau No. 37975--NACA 145). Skyrocket 143 flew all but one of its missions as part of the Douglas contractor program to test the airplane's performance. NACA aircraft 143 was initially powered by a Westinghouse J-34-40 turbojet engine configured only for ground take-offs, but in 1954-55 the contractor modified it to an all-rocket air-launch capability featuring an LR8-RM-6, 4-chamber Reaction Motors engine rated at 6,000 pounds of thrust at sea level (the Navy designation for the Air Force's LR-11 used in the X-1). In this configuration, NACA research pilot John McKay flew the airplane only once for familiarization on September 17, 1956. The 123 flights of NACA 143 served to validate wind-tunnel predictions of the airplane's performance, except for the fact that the airplane experienced less drag above Mach 0.85 than the wind tunnels had indicated. NACA 144 also began its flight program with a turbojet powerplant. NACA pilots Robert A. Champine and John H. Griffith flew 21 times in this configuration to test airspeed calibrations and to research longitudinal and lateral stability and control

  15. 3D-CFD Investigation of Contrails and Volatile Aerosols Produced in the Near-Field of an Aircraft Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, F.; Ghedhaifi, W.; Vancassel, X.; Khou, J. C.; Montreuil, E.

    2015-12-01

    Civil aviation contributes to degradation of air quality around airport (SOx, NOx, speciated hydrocarbons,…) and climate change through its emissions of greenhouse gases (CO2, water vapor), as well as particulate matters. These particles include soot particles formed in the combustor, volatile aerosols and contrails generated in the aircraft wake. Although the aircraft emissions represent today only about 3% of all those produced on the surface of the earth by other anthropogenic sources, they are mostly released in the very sensitive region of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere. These emissions have a radiative effect reinforced by specific physical and chemical processes at high altitudes, such as cloud formation and ozone production. In this context, most of the work to-date assessed that the actual effect of aviation on the climate are affected by very large uncertainties, partly due to lack of knowledge on the mechanisms of new particles formation and growth processes in the exhaust plume of the aircraft. The engine exhaust gases are mixed in the ambient air under the influence of the interaction between the jet engine and the wing tip vortices. The characteristics of vortices as well as their interaction with the jet depend on the aircraft airframe especially on the wing geometry and the engine position (distance from the wing tip). The aim of this study is to examine the influence of aircraft parameters on contrail formation using a 3D CFD calculation based on a RANS (Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes) approach. Numerical simulations have been performed using CEDRE, the multiphysics ONERA code for energetics. CEDRE is a CFD code using finite volume methods and unstructured meshes. These meshes are especially appropriate when complex geometries are used. A transport model has been used for condensation of water vapor onto ice particles. Growth is evaluated using a modified Fick's law to mass transfer on particles. In this study, different aircraft

  16. Modeling the Complex Photochemistry of Biomass Burning Plumes in Plume-Scale, Regional, and Global Air Quality Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, M. J.; Lonsdale, C. R.; Yokelson, R. J.; Travis, K.; Fischer, E. V.; Lin, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Forecasting the impacts of biomass burning (BB) plumes on air quality is difficult due to the complex photochemistry that takes place in the concentrated young BB plumes. The spatial grid of global and regional scale Eulerian models is generally too large to resolve BB photochemistry, which can lead to errors in predicting the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and O3, as well as the partitioning of NOyspecies. AER's Aerosol Simulation Program (ASP v2.1) can be used within plume-scale Lagrangian models to simulate this complex photochemistry. We will present results of validation studies of the ASP model against aircraft observations of young BB smoke plumes. We will also present initial results from the coupling of ASP v2.1 into the Lagrangian particle dispersion model STILT-Chem in order to better examine the interactions between BB plume chemistry and dispersion. In addition, we have used ASP to develop a sub-grid scale parameterization of the near-source chemistry of BB plumes for use in regional and global air quality models. The parameterization takes inputs from the host model, such as solar zenith angle, temperature, and fire fuel type, and calculates enhancement ratios of O3, NOx, PAN, aerosol nitrate, and other NOy species, as well as organic aerosol (OA). We will present results from the ASP-based BB parameterization as well as its implementation into the global atmospheric composition model GEOS-Chem for the SEAC4RS campaign.

  17. Atmospheric scavenging exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, D. L.; Purcell, R. Y.

    1977-01-01

    Solid propellant rocket exhaust was directly utilized to ascertain raindrop scavenging rates for hydrogen chloride. The airborne HCl concentration varied from 0.2 to 10.0 ppm and the raindrop sizes tested included 0.55 mm, 1.1 mm, and 3.0 mm. Two chambers were used to conduct the experiments. A large, rigid walled, spherical chamber stored the exhaust constituents while the smaller chamber housing all the experiments was charged as required with rocket exhaust HCl. Surface uptake experiments demonstrated an HCl concentration dependence for distilled water. Sea water and brackish water HCl uptake was below the detection limit of the chlorine-ion analysis technique employed. Plant life HCl uptake experiments were limited to corn and soybeans. Plant age effectively correlated the HCl uptake data. Metallic corrosion was not significant for single 20 minute exposures to the exhaust HCl under varying relative humidity.

  18. D-558-2 Aircraft on lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    gathered a great deal of data about pitch-up and the coupling of lateral (yaw) and longitudinal (pitch) motions; wing and tail loads, lift, drag, and buffeting characteristics of swept-wing aircraft at transonic and supersonic speeds; and the effects of the rocket exhaust plume on lateral dynamic stability throughout the speed range. (Plume effects were a new experience for aircraft.) The number three aircraft also gathered information about the effects of external stores (bomb shapes, drop tanks) upon the aircraft's behavior in the transonic region (roughly 0.7 to 1.3 times the speed of sound). In correlation with data from other early transonic research aircraft such as the XF-92A, this information contributed to solutions to the pitch-up problem in swept-wing aircraft. The three airplanes flew a total of 313 times--123 by the number one aircraft (Bureau No. 37973--NACA 143), 103 by the second Skyrocket (Bureau No. 37974--NACA 144), and 87 by airplane number three (Bureau No. 37975--NACA 145). Skyrocket 143 flew all but one of its missions as part of the Douglas contractor program to test the airplane's performance. NACA aircraft 143 was initially powered by a Westinghouse J-34-40 turbojet engine configured only for ground take-offs, but in 1954-55 the contractor modified it to an all-rocket air-launch capability featuring an LR8-RM-6, 4-chamber Reaction Motors engine rated at 6,000 pounds of thrust at sea level (the Navy designation for the Air Force's LR-11 used in the X-1). In this configuration, NACA research pilot John McKay flew the airplane only once for familiarization on September 17, 1956. The 123 flights of NACA 143 served to validate wind-tunnel predictions of the airplane's performance, except for the fact that the airplane experienced less drag above Mach 0.85 than the wind tunnels had indicated. NACA 144 also began its flight program with a turbojet powerplant. NACA pilots Robert A. Champine and John H. Griffith flew 21 times in this configuration to test

  19. An Experimental Investigation of Rectangular Exhaust-Gas Ejectors Applicable for Engine Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manganiello, Eugene J; Bogatsky, Donald

    1945-01-01

    An experimental investigation of rectangular exhaust-gas ejector pumps was conducted to provide data that would serve as a guide to the design of ejector applications for aircraft engines with marginal cooling. The pumping characteristics of rectangular ejectors actuated by the exhaust of a single-cylinder aircraft engine were determined for a range of ejector mixing-section area from 20 to 50 square inches, over-all length from 12 to 42 inches, aspect ratio from 1 to 5, diffusing exit area from 20 to 81 square inches, and exhaust-nozzle aspect ratio from 1 to 42.

  20. Dynamics of thermochemical plumes: 2. Complexity of plume structures and its implications for mapping mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shu-Chuan; van Keken, Peter E.

    2006-03-01

    The mantle plume hypothesis provides explanations for several major observations of surface volcanism. The dynamics of plumes with purely thermal origin has been well established, but our understanding of the role of compositional variations in the Earth's mantle on plume formation is still incomplete. In this study we explore the structures of plumes originating from a thermochemical boundary layer at the base of the mantle in an attempt to complement fluid dynamical studies of purely thermal plumes. Our numerical experiments reveal diverse characteristics of thermochemical plumes that frequently deviate from the classic features of plumes. In addition, owing to the interplay between the thermal and compositional buoyancy forces, the morphology, temperature, and flow fields in both the plume head and plume conduit are strongly time-dependent. The entrainment of the dense layer and secondary instabilities developed in the boundary layer contribute to lateral heterogeneities and enhance stirring processes in the plume head. Our models show that substantial topography of the compositional layer can develop simultaneously with the plumes. In addition, plumes may be present in the lower mantle for more than 70 million years. These features may contribute to the large low seismic velocity provinces beneath the south central Pacific, the southern Atlantic Ocean, and Africa. Our model results support the idea that the dynamics of mantle plumes is much more complicated than conventional thinking based on studies of purely thermal plumes. The widely used criteria for mapping mantle plumes, such as a vertically continuous low seismic velocity signature and strong surface topography swell, may not be universally applicable. We propose that the intrinsic density contrast of the distinct composition may reduce the associated topography of some large igneous provinces such as Ontong Java.

  1. Sampling by mantle plumes : the legacy of the plume source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandeis, G.; Touitou, F.; Davaille, A.

    2013-12-01

    Plumes in the Earth's mantle are considered to be at the origin of intraplate volcanism (or hotspots). They continue to fascinate the scientific community by the heterogeneity of the material they sample on the surface of our planet. To characterize what part of the mantle is sampled by plumes, we have developed a laboratory model for laminar thermal plumes at high Prandtl number, in a fluid whose viscosity depends strongly on the temperature. This study describes the precise phenomenology of the plume and proposes scaling laws for the speed and temperature of the conduit of the plume. We show a strong dependence of these features of the plume with the Rayleigh number and viscosity ratio. Our visualization technique allows for the simultaneous non-intrusive measurements of the temperature, deformation and velocity fields. By calculating numerically the advection of passive markers through the experimental velocity field, we found that (1) the hot center of the plume conduit only consists of fluid which has passed through the thermal boundary layer ("TBL") at the bottom of the tank from which the plume was issued. Moreover, as material is stretched by velocity gradients, it is also in the thermal boundary layer that most of the material stretching occurs (2). The fluid is then transported in the conduit without lateral mixing, and further stretched vertically by the lateral velocity gradients. Since it is only the hot upwelling plume center which melts and therefore is sampled by volcanic activity, (1) implies that the plume geochemical signature is representative of the material located in the deep TBL of the mantle from which the plume is issued. On the other hand, (2) implies that filaments, pancakes, and concentric or bimodal zonation of the plume at the surface all result from different distributions of the heterogeneities in the plume source, filaments being the most generic case. Finally, we apply the scaling laws to the case of Hawaii.

  2. Aircraft Wake RCS Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilson, William H.

    1994-01-01

    A series of multi-frequency radar measurements of aircraft wakes at altitudes of 5,000 to 25,00 ft. were performed at Kwajalein, R.M.I., in May and June of 1990. Two aircraft were tested, a Learjet 35 and a Lockheed C-5A. The cross-section of the wake of the Learjet was too small for detection at Kwajalein. The wake of the C-5A, although also very small, was detected and measured at VHF, UHF, L-, S-, and C-bands, at distances behind the aircraft ranging from about one hundred meters to tens of kilometers. The data suggest that the mechanism by which aircraft wakes have detectable radar signatures is, contrary to previous expectations, unrelated to engine exhaust but instead due to turbulent mixing by the wake vortices of pre-existing index of refraction gradients in the ambient atmosphere. These measurements were of necessity performed with extremely powerful and sensitive instrumentation radars, and the wake cross-section is too small for most practical applications.

  3. Aircraft noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippone, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    This contribution addresses the state-of-the-art in the field of aircraft noise prediction, simulation and minimisation. The point of view taken in this context is that of comprehensive models that couple the various aircraft systems with the acoustic sources, the propagation and the flight trajectories. After an exhaustive review of the present predictive technologies in the relevant fields (airframe, propulsion, propagation, aircraft operations, trajectory optimisation), the paper addresses items for further research and development. Examples are shown for several airplanes, including the Airbus A319-100 (CFM engines), the Bombardier Dash8-Q400 (PW150 engines, Dowty R408 propellers) and the Boeing B737-800 (CFM engines). Predictions are done with the flight mechanics code FLIGHT. The transfer function between flight mechanics and the noise prediction is discussed in some details, along with the numerical procedures for validation and verification. Some code-to-code comparisons are shown. It is contended that the field of aircraft noise prediction has not yet reached a sufficient level of maturity. In particular, some parametric effects cannot be investigated, issues of accuracy are not currently addressed, and validation standards are still lacking.

  4. Behavior of Mercury Emissions from a Commercial Coal-Fired Utility Boiler: TheRelationship Between Stack Speciation and Near-Field Plume Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reduction of divalent gaseous mercury (HgII) to elemental gaseous mercury (Hg0) in a commercial coal-fired power plant (CFPP)exhaust plume was investigated by simultaneous measurement in-stack and in-plume as part of a collaborative study among the U.S....

  5. Ozone production efficiency of a ship-plume: ITCT 2K2 case study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun S; Kim, Yong H; Han, Kyung M; Kim, Jhoon; Song, Chul H

    2016-01-01

    Ozone production efficiency (OPE) of ship plume was first evaluated in this study, based on ship-plume photochemical/dynamic model simulations and the ship-plume composition data measured during the ITCT 2K2 (Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation 2002) aircraft campaign. The averaged instantaneous OPEs (OPE(i)‾) estimated via the ship-plume photochemical/dynamic modeling for the ITCT 2K2 ship-plume ranged between 4.61 and 18.92, showing that the values vary with the extent of chemical evolution (or chemical stage) of the ship plume and the stability classes of the marine boundary layer (MBL). Together with OPE(i)‾, the equivalent OPEs (OPE(e)‾) for the entire ITCT 2K2 ship-plume were also estimated. The OPE(e)‾ values varied between 9.73 (for the stable MBL) and 12.73 (for the moderately stable MBL), which agreed well with the OPE(e)‾ of 12.85 estimated based on the ITCT 2K2 ship-plume observations. It was also found that both the model-simulated and observation-based OPE(e)‾ inside the ship-plume were 0.29-0.38 times smaller than the OPE(e)‾ calculated/measured outside the ITCT 2K2 ship-plume. Such low OPEs insides the ship plume were due to the high levels of NO and non-liner ship-plume photochemistry. Possible implications of this ship-plume OPE study in the global chemistry-transport modeling are also discussed.

  6. Gasdynamic propagation of rocket exhaust products in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanov, A. G.; Platov, Yu. V.

    2011-12-01

    The dispersion of exhaust products of rocket fuel in the direction perpendicular to the motion of a rocket is investigated in this work. A comparison of the results of numerical calculations with a self-similar approximation of a strong cylindrically symmetric explosion is fulfilled. It is shown that at sufficiently high rocket velocity V ∞, which exceeds the sum of gas exhaust velocity V e from the nozzle and sound speed V s ( V ∞ > V e + V s ), a gasdynamic hole can arise around the rocket trajectory in the upper atmosphere, inside which the total concentration of gas becomes less than the equilibrium concentration of gas at a given altitude. The dynamics of the profiles of density and temperature of the exhaust products inside a rocket plume is calculated.

  7. Detection of aerosol plumes from associated gas flaring by laser sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penner, I. E.; Balin, Yu. S.; Kokhanenko, G. P.; Belan, B. D.; Arshinov, M. Y.; Chernov, D. G.; Kozlov, V. S.

    2015-11-01

    A cycle of the TU-134 "Optik" aircraft-laboratory flights was carried out was carried out in the frameworks of investigations of radiative and climatic changes in sub-Arctic regions of Siberia. The vast aerosol plume was observed from onboard the aircraft using the data of laser sensing. Comprehensive analysis of the results of measurements of aerosol and gaseous components of the atmosphere and the accompanying data allowed us to reveal the nature of appearance of this plume from associated gas burning.

  8. Delta 2 Explosion Plume Analysis Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Randolph J.

    2000-01-01

    A Delta II rocket exploded seconds after liftoff from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) on 17 January 1997. The cloud produced by the explosion provided an opportunity to evaluate the models which are used to track potentially toxic dispersing plumes and clouds at CCAFS. The primary goal of this project was to conduct a case study of the dispersing cloud and the models used to predict the dispersion resulting from the explosion. The case study was conducted by comparing mesoscale and dispersion model results with available meteorological and plume observations. This study was funded by KSC under Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) option hours. The models used in the study are part of the Eastern Range Dispersion Assessment System (ERDAS) and include the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), HYbrid Particle And Concentration Transport (HYPACT), and Rocket Exhaust Effluent Dispersion Model (REEDM). The primary observations used for explosion cloud verification of the study were from the National Weather Service's Weather Surveillance Radar 1988-Doppler (WSR-88D). Radar reflectivity measurements of the resulting cloud provided good estimates of the location and dimensions of the cloud over a four-hour period after the explosion. The results indicated that RAMS and HYPACT models performed reasonably well. Future upgrades to ERDAS are recommended.

  9. Hyperventilation and exhaustion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ristiniemi, Heli; Perski, Aleksander; Lyskov, Eugene; Emtner, Margareta

    2014-12-01

    Chronic stress is among the most common diagnoses in Sweden, most commonly in the form of exhaustion syndrome (ICD-10 classification - F43.8). The majority of patients with this syndrome also have disturbed breathing (hyperventilation). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between hyperventilation and exhaustion syndrome. Thirty patients with exhaustion syndrome and 14 healthy subjects were evaluated with the Nijmegen Symptom Questionnaire (NQ). The participants completed questionnaires about exhaustion, mental state, sleep disturbance, pain and quality of life. The evaluation was repeated 4 weeks later, after half of the patients and healthy subjects had engaged in a therapy method called 'Grounding', a physical exercise inspired by African dance. The patients reported significantly higher levels of hyperventilation as compared to the healthy subjects. All patients' average score on NQ was 26.57 ± 10.98, while that of the healthy subjects was 15.14 ± 7.89 (t = -3.48, df = 42, p < 0.001). The NQ scores correlated strongly with two measures of exhaustion (Karolinska Exhaustion Scale KES r = 0.772, p < 0.01; Shirom Melamed Burnout Measure SMBM r = 0.565, p < 0.01), mental status [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (HADS) depression r = 0.414, p < 0.01; HADS anxiety r = 0.627, p < 0.01], sleep disturbances (r = -0.514, p < 0.01), pain (r = -.370, p < 0.05) and poor well-being (Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form 36 questionnaire- SR Health r = -0.529, p < 0.05). In the logistic regression analysis, the variance in the scores from NQ were explained to a high degree (R(2) = 0.752) by scores in KES and HADS. The brief Grounding training contributed to a near significant reduction in hyperventilation (F = 2.521, p < 0.124) and to significant reductions in exhaustion scores and scores of depression and anxiety. The conclusion is that hyperventilation is common in exhaustion syndrome patients and that it can be reduced by systematic physical therapy

  10. A Method for Reducing the Temperature of Exhaust Manifolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schey, Oscar W; Young, Alfred W

    1931-01-01

    This report describes tests conducted at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory on an "air-inducting" exhaust manifold for aircraft engines. The exhaust gases from each cylinder port are discharged into the throat of an exhaust pipe which has a frontal bellmouth. Cooling air is drawn into the pipe, where it surrounds and mixes with the exhaust gases. Temperatures of the manifold shell and of the exhaust gases were obtained in flight for both a conventional manifold and the air-inducting manifold. The air-inducting manifold was installed on an engine which was placed on a test stand. Different fuels were sprayed on and into the manifold to determine whether the use of this manifold reduced the fire hazard. The flight tests showed reductions in manifold temperatures of several hundred degrees, to values below the ignition point of aviation gasoline. On the test stand when the engine was run at idling speeds fuels sprayed into the manifold ignited. It is believed that at low engine speeds the fuel remained in the manifold long enough to become thoroughly heated, and was then ignited by the exhaust gas which had not mixed with cooling air. The use of the air-inducting exhaust manifold must reduce the fire hazard by virtue of its lower operating temperature, but it is not a completely satisfactory solution of the problem.

  11. Nighttime NOx Chemistry in Coal-Fired Power Plant Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fibiger, D. L.; McDuffie, E. E.; Dube, W. P.; Veres, P. R.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Lee, B. H.; Green, J. R.; Fiddler, M. N.; Ebben, C. J.; Sparks, T.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Montzka, D.; Campos, T. L.; Cohen, R. C.; Bililign, S.; Holloway, J. S.; Thornton, J. A.; Brown, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) play a key role in atmospheric chemistry. During the day, they catalyze ozone (O3) production, while at night they can react to form nitric acid (HNO3) and nitryl chloride (ClNO2) and remove O3 from the atmosphere. These processes are well studied in the summer, but winter measurements are more limited. Coal-fired power plants are a major source of NOx to the atmosphere, making up approximately 30% of emissions in the US (epa.gov). NOx emissions can vary seasonally, as well as plant-to-plant, with important impacts on the details of the plume chemistry. In particular, due to inefficient plume dispersion, nighttime NOx emissions from power plants are held in concentrated plumes, where rates of mixing with ambient O3 have a strong influence on plume evolution. We will show results from the aircraft-based WINTER campaign over the northeastern United States, where several nighttime intercepts of power plant plumes were made. Several of these intercepts show complete O3 titration, which can have a large influence on NOx lifetime, and thus O3 production, in the plume. When power plant NO emissions exceed background O3 levels, O3 is completely consumed converting NO to NO2. In the presence of O3, NO2 will be oxidized to NO3, which will then react with NO2 to form N2O5, which can then form HNO3 and/or ClNO2 and, ultimately, remove NOx from the atmosphere or provide next-day oxidant sources. If there is no O3 present, however, no further chemistry can occur and NO and NO2 will be transported until mixing with sufficient O3 for higher oxidation products. Modeling results of plume development and mixing, which can tell us more about this transport, will also be presented.

  12. Seismic Imaging of Mantle Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nataf, Henri-Claude

    The mantle plume hypothesis was proposed thirty years ago by Jason Morgan to explain hotspot volcanoes such as Hawaii. A thermal diapir (or plume) rises from the thermal boundary layer at the base of the mantle and produces a chain of volcanoes as a plate moves on top of it. The idea is very attractive, but direct evidence for actual plumes is weak, and many questions remain unanswered. With the great improvement of seismic imagery in the past ten years, new prospects have arisen. Mantle plumes are expected to be rather narrow, and their detection by seismic techniques requires specific developments as well as dedicated field experiments. Regional travel-time tomography has provided good evidence for plumes in the upper mantle beneath a few hotspots (Yellowstone, Massif Central, Iceland). Beneath Hawaii and Iceland, the plume can be detected in the transition zone because it deflects the seismic discontinuities at 410 and 660 km depths. In the lower mantle, plumes are very difficult to detect, so specific methods have been worked out for this purpose. There are hints of a plume beneath the weak Bowie hotspot, as well as intriguing observations for Hawaii. Beneath Iceland, high-resolution tomography has just revealed a wide and meandering plume-like structure extending from the core-mantle boundary up to the surface. Among the many phenomena that seem to take place in the lowermost mantle (or D''), there are also signs there of the presence of plumes. In this article I review the main results obtained so far from these studies and discuss their implications for plume dynamics. Seismic imaging of mantle plumes is still in its infancy but should soon become a turbulent teenager.

  13. Empirical Scaling Laws of Rocket Exhaust Cratering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, Carly M.; Metzger, Philip T.; Immer, Christopher D.

    2005-01-01

    When launching or landing a space craft on the regolith of a terrestrial surface, special attention needs to be paid to the rocket exhaust cratering effects. If the effects are not controlled, the rocket cratering could damage the spacecraft or other surrounding hardware. The cratering effects of a rocket landing on a planet's surface are not understood well, especially for the lunar case with the plume expanding in vacuum. As a result, the blast effects cannot be estimated sufficiently using analytical theories. It is necessary to develop physics-based simulation tools in order to calculate mission-essential parameters. In this work we test out the scaling laws of the physics in regard to growth rate of the crater depth. This will provide the physical insight necessary to begin the physics-based modeling.

  14. Mantle plumes and continental tectonics.

    PubMed

    Hill, R I; Campbell, I H; Davies, G F; Griffiths, R W

    1992-04-10

    Mantle plumes and plate tectonics, the result of two distinct modes of convection within the Earth, operate largely independently. Although plumes are secondary in terms of heat transport, they have probably played an important role in continental geology. A new plume starts with a large spherical head that can cause uplift and flood basalt volcanism, and may be responsible for regional-scale metamorphism or crustal melting and varying amounts of crustal extension. Plume heads are followed by narrow tails that give rise to the familiar hot-spot tracks. The cumulative effect of processes associated with tail volcanism may also significantly affect continental crust.

  15. Axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics analysis of a film/dump-cooled rocket nozzle plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, P. K.; Warsi, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    Prediction of convective base heating rates for a new launch vehicle presents significant challenges to analysts concerned with base environments. The present effort seeks to augment classical base heating scaling techniques via a detailed investigation of the exhaust plume shear layer of a single H2/O2 Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). Use of fuel-rich turbine exhaust to cool the STME nozzle presented concerns regarding potential recirculation of these gases to the base region with attendant increase in the base heating rate. A pressure-based full Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code with finite rate chemistry is used to predict plumes for vehicle altitudes of 10 kft and 50 kft. Levels of combustible species within the plume shear layers are calculated in order to assess assumptions made in the base heating analysis.

  16. Axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics analysis of a film/dump-cooled rocket nozzle plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, P. K.; Warsi, S. A.

    1993-06-01

    Prediction of convective base heating rates for a new launch vehicle presents significant challenges to analysts concerned with base environments. The present effort seeks to augment classical base heating scaling techniques via a detailed investigation of the exhaust plume shear layer of a single H2/O2 Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). Use of fuel-rich turbine exhaust to cool the STME nozzle presented concerns regarding potential recirculation of these gases to the base region with attendant increase in the base heating rate. A pressure-based full Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code with finite rate chemistry is used to predict plumes for vehicle altitudes of 10 kft and 50 kft. Levels of combustible species within the plume shear layers are calculated in order to assess assumptions made in the base heating analysis.

  17. The 1979 Southeastern Virginia Urban Plume Study (SEV-UPS): Surface and airborne studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J. H.; Eaton, W. C.; Saeger, M. L.; Strong, R. B.; Tommerdahl, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    The operation of two surface monitoring stations (one in downtown Norfolk, Virginia, one south of the city near the Great Dismal Swamp) and the collection of 40 hours of airborne measurements is described. Surface site measurements of ozone, oxides of nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, temperature, dew point, b sub seat, and condensation nuclei were made. Instrument calibrations, quality assurance audits, and preliminary data analysis in support of the Urban Plume Study were also made. The air pollution problems that were addressed are discussed. Data handling procedures followed for the surface stations are presented. The operation of the aircraft sampling platform is described. Aircraft sampling procedures are discussed. A preliminary descriptive analysis of the aircraft data is given along with data or plots for surface sites, airborne studies, hydrocarbon species, and instrument performance audits. Several of the aircraft flights clearly show the presence of an urban ozone plume downwind of Norfolk in the direction of the mean wind flow.

  18. Exhaust bypass flow control for exhaust heat recovery

    DOEpatents

    Reynolds, Michael G.

    2015-09-22

    An exhaust system for an engine comprises an exhaust heat recovery apparatus configured to receive exhaust gas from the engine and comprises a first flow passage in fluid communication with the exhaust gas and a second flow passage in fluid communication with the exhaust gas. A heat exchanger/energy recovery unit is disposed in the second flow passage and has a working fluid circulating therethrough for exchange of heat from the exhaust gas to the working fluid. A control valve is disposed downstream of the first and the second flow passages in a low temperature region of the exhaust heat recovery apparatus to direct exhaust gas through the first flow passage or the second flow passage.

  19. Hybrid Exhaust Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelletier, Gerard D. (Inventor); Logan, Charles P. (Inventor); McEnerney, Bryan William (Inventor); Haynes, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An exhaust includes a wall that has a first composite material having a first coefficient of thermal expansion and a second composite material having a second coefficient of the thermal expansion that is less than the first coefficient of thermal expansion.

  20. Diesel engine exhaust

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Diesel engine exhaust ; CASRN N.A . Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  1. Turbulence modeling of free shear layers for high-performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sondak, Douglas L.

    1993-01-01

    The High Performance Aircraft (HPA) Grand Challenge of the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) program involves the computation of the flow over a high performance aircraft. A variety of free shear layers, including mixing layers over cavities, impinging jets, blown flaps, and exhaust plumes, may be encountered in such flowfields. Since these free shear layers are usually turbulent, appropriate turbulence models must be utilized in computations in order to accurately simulate these flow features. The HPCC program is relying heavily on parallel computers. A Navier-Stokes solver (POVERFLOW) utilizing the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model was developed and tested on a 128-node Intel iPSC/860. Algebraic turbulence models run very fast, and give good results for many flowfields. For complex flowfields such as those mentioned above, however, they are often inadequate. It was therefore deemed that a two-equation turbulence model will be required for the HPA computations. The k-epsilon two-equation turbulence model was implemented on the Intel iPSC/860. Both the Chien low-Reynolds-number model and a generalized wall-function formulation were included.

  2. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY REACTIONS IN COAL POWER PLANT PLUMES

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Levin

    2006-06-01

    -September 5, 2003. The experimental site was the Pleasant Prairie Power Plant in Pleasant Prairie, Wisconsin, just west of Kenosha. The experiment involved using an aircraft to capture emissions and document chemistry changes in the plume. While using the airplane for sampling, supplemental fast-response sensors for NOx, connected to data loggers, were used to gauge entry and exit times and transect intervals through plume emissions material. The Frontier Geosciences Static Plume Dilution Chamber (SPDC) was employed simultaneously adjacent to the stack to correlate its findings with the aircraft sampling, as well as providing evaluation of the SPDC as a rapid, less costly sampler for mercury chemistry. A complementary stack plume method, the Dynamic Plume Dilution (DPD) was used in the latter portion of the experiment to measure mercury speciation to observe any mercury reduction reaction with respect to both the reaction time (5 to 30 seconds) and dilution ratio. In addition, stack sampling using the ''Ontario Hydro'' wet chemistry method and continuous mercury monitors (CMM) were used to establish the baseline chemistry in the stack. Comparisons among stack, SPDC, DPD and aircraft measurements allow establishment of whether significant chemical changes to mercury occur in the plume, and of the verisimilitude of the SPDC and DPD methods. This progress report summarizes activities during a period of results review from the stack/aircraft subcontractor, data analysis and synthesis, and preparation and presentation of preliminary results to technical and oversight meetings.

  3. Testing Installed Propulsion For Shielded Exhaust Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Podboy, Gary G.; Brown, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    Jet-surface interaction (JSI) can be a significant factor in the exhaust noise of installed propulsion. Tests to further understanding and prediction of the acoustic impacts of JSI have been described. While there were many objectives for the NASA JSI1044 test, the overall objective was to prepare for a 2016 test validating the design of a low-noise, low-boom supersonic commercial airliner. In this paper we explore design requirements for a partial aircraft model to be used in subscale acoustic testing, especially focusing on the amount of shielding surface that must be provided to simulate the acoustic environment between propulsion exhaust system and observer. We document the dual-stream jets, both nozzle and flow conditions, which were tested to extend JSI acoustic modeling from simple single-stream jets to realistic dual-stream exhaust nozzles. Examples of observations found as surface geometry and flow conditions were varied were provided. And we have presented initial measurements of the installation impacts of integrating the propulsion on the airframe for a supersonic airliner with realistic airframe geometries and nozzles.

  4. Single SCA-plume dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, J.-I.; Baizig, Hichem

    2012-11-01

    A fully prognostic prototype of bulk mass-flux convection parameterization is presented. The bulk mass-flux parameterization is formulated by assuming a subgrid-scale system consisting only of a convective plume and environment. Both subcomponents (segments) are assumed to be homogeneous horizontally. This assumption is called the segmentally constant approximation (SCA). The present study introduces this purely geometrical constraint (SCA) into the full nonhydrostatic anelastic system. A continuous-space description of the full system is, thus, replaced by a discretization consisting only of two segments (plume and environment) in the horizontal direction. The resulting discretized system is mathematically equivalent to a 0th order finite volume formulation with the only two finite volumes. The model is presented under a two-dimensional configuration. Interfaces between the plume and the environment segments may either be fixed in time or Lagrangianly advected as two limiting cases. Under this framework, the single-plume dynamics is systematically investigated in a wide phase space of Richardson number, the aspect ratio, and a displacement rate of the plume interfaces relative to the Lagrangian displacement. Advantage of the present model is in evaluating the lateral mixing processes of the plume without invoking an entrainment-detrainment hypothesis. The fractional entrainment-detrainment rate diagnosed from the present model simulations highly varies both over space and time, suggesting a limitation of applying an entrainment-detrainment hypothesis to unsteady plumes, as in the present case, in which circulations of the plume scale dominates over the turbulent mixing process. Furthermore, when the entrainment-plume hypothesis of Morton et al. is adopted for defining the plume-interface displacement rate, the plume continuously expands with time without reaching equilibrium.

  5. Flow fields of low pressure vent exhausts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.

    1989-01-01

    The flow field produced by low pressure gas vents are described based on experimental data obtained from tests in a large vacuum chamber. The gas density, pressure, and flux at any location in the flow field are calculated based on the vent plume description and the knowledge of the flow rate and velocity of the venting gas. The same parameters and the column densities along a specified line of sight traversing the plume are also obtained and shown by a computer-generated graphical representation. The fields obtained with a radially scanning Pitot probe within the exhausting gas are described by a power of the cosine function, the mass rate and the distance from the exit port. The field measurements were made for gas at pressures ranging from 2 to 50 torr venting from pipe fittings with diameters of 3/16 inch to 1-1/2 inches I.D. (4.76 mm to 38.1 mm). The N(2) mass flow rates ranged from 2E-4 to 3.7E-1 g/s.

  6. Flow fields of low pressure vent exhausts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.

    1990-01-01

    The flow field produced by low pressure gas vents are described based on experimental data obtained from tests in a large vacuum chamber. The gas density, pressure, and flux at any location in the flow field are calculated based on the vent plume description and the knowledge of the flow rate and velocity of the venting gas. The same parameters and the column densities along a specified line of sight traversing the plume are also obtained and shown by a computer generated graphical representation. The fields obtained with a radically scanning Pitot probe within the exhausting gas are described by a power of the cosine function, the mass rate, and the distance from the exit port. The field measurements were made for gas at pressures ranging from 2 to 50 torr venting from pipe fittings with diameters to 3/16 to 1-1/2 inches I.D. (4.76 to 38.1 mm). The N2 mass flow rates ranged from 2E-4 to 3.7E-1 g/s.

  7. Overview of NASA GRCs Green Propellant Infusion Mission Thruster Testing and Plume Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Matthew C.; Reed, Brian D.; Yim, John T.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Williams, George J.; Kojima, Jun J.; McLean, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) is sponsored by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) office. The goal of GPIM is to advance the technology readiness level of a green propulsion system, specifically, one using the monopropellant, AF-M315E, by demonstrating ground handling, spacecraft processing, and on-orbit operations. One of the risks identified for GPIM is potential contamination of sensitive spacecraft surfaces from the effluents in the plumes of AF-M315E thrusters. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is conducting activities to characterize the effects of AF-M315E plume impingement and deposition. GRC has established individual plume models of the 22-N and 1-N thrusters that will be used on the GPIM spacecraft. The models describe the pressure, temperature, density, Mach number, and species concentration of the AF-M315E thruster exhaust plumes. The models are being used to assess the impingement effects of the AF-M315E thrusters on the GPIM spacecraft. The model simulations will be correlated with plume measurement data from Laboratory and Engineering Model 22-N, AF-M315E thrusters. The thrusters will be tested in a small rocket, altitude facility at NASA GRC. The GRC thruster testing will be conducted at duty cycles representatives of the planned GPIM maneuvers. A suite of laser-based diagnostics, including Raman spectroscopy, Rayleigh spectroscopy, Schlieren imaging, and physical probes will be used to acquire plume measurements of AFM315E thrusters. Plume data will include temperature, velocity, relative density, and species concentration. The plume measurement data will be compared to the corresponding simulations of the plume model. The GRC effort will establish a data set of AF-M315E plume measurements and a plume model that can be used for future AF-M315E applications.

  8. Midwave infrared imaging Fourier transform spectrometry of combustion plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Kenneth C.

    A midwave infrared (MWIR) imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (IFTS) was used to successfully capture and analyze hyperspectral imagery of combustion plumes. Jet engine exhaust data from a small turbojet engine burning diesel fuel at a low rate of 300 cm3/min was collected at 1 cm -1 resolution from a side-plume vantage point on a 200x64 pixel window at a range of 11.2 meters. Spectral features of H2O, CO, and CO2 were present, and showed spatial variability within the plume structure. An array of thermocouple probes was positioned within the plume to aid in temperature analysis. A single-temperature plume model was implemented to obtain spatially-varying temperatures and plume concentrations. Model-fitted temperatures of 811 +/- 1.5 K and 543 +/- 1.6 K were obtained from plume regions in close proximity to thermocouple probes measuring temperatures of 719 K and 522 K, respectively. Industrial smokestack plume data from a coal-burning stack collected at 0.25 cm-1 resolution at a range of 600 meters featured strong emission from NO, CO, CO2, SO 2, and HCl in the spectral region 1800-3000 cm-1. A simplified radiative transfer model was employed to derive temperature and concentrations for clustered regions of the 128x64 pixel scene, with corresponding statistical error bounds. The hottest region (closest to stack centerline) was 401 +/- 0.36 K, compared to an in-stack measurement of 406 K, and model-derived concentration values of NO, CO2, and SO2 were 140 +/- 1 ppmV, 110,400 +/- 950 ppmV, and 382 +/- 4 ppmV compared to in-stack measurements of 120 ppmV (NOx), 94,000 ppmV, and 382 ppmV, respectively. In-stack measurements of CO and HCl were not provided by the stack operator, but model-derived values of 19 +/- 0.2 ppmV and 111 +/- 1 ppmV are reported near stack centerline. A deployment to Dugway Proving Grounds, UT to collect hyperspectral imagery of chemical and biological threat agent simulants resulted in weak spectral signatures from several species. Plume

  9. Technologies for Aircraft Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    2006-01-01

    Technologies for aircraft noise reduction have been developed by NASA over the past 15 years through the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program and the Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) project. This presentation summarizes highlights from these programs and anticipated noise reduction benefits for communities surrounding airports. Historical progress in noise reduction and technologies available for future aircraft/engine development are identified. Technologies address aircraft/engine components including fans, exhaust nozzles, landing gear, and flap systems. New "chevron" nozzles have been developed and implemented on several aircraft in production today that provide significant jet noise reduction. New engines using Ultra-High Bypass (UHB) ratios are projected to provide about 10 EPNdB (Effective Perceived Noise Level in decibels) engine noise reduction relative to the average fleet that was flying in 1997. Audio files are embedded in the presentation that estimate the sound levels for a 35,000 pound thrust engine for takeoff and approach power conditions. The predictions are based on actual model scale data that was obtained by NASA. Finally, conceptual pictures are shown that look toward future aircraft/propulsion systems that might be used to obtain further noise reduction.

  10. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes.

    PubMed

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-04-13

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis.

  11. Apollo Video Photogrammetry Estimation Of Plume Impingement Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher; Lane, John; Metzger, Philip T.; Clements, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    The Constellation Project's planned return to the moon requires numerous landings at the same site. Since the top few centimeters are loosely packed regolith, plume impingement from the Lander ejects the granular material at high velocities. Much work is needed to understand the physics of plume impingement during landing in order to protect hardware surrounding the landing sites. While mostly qualitative in nature, the Apollo Lunar Module landing videos can provide a wealth of quantitative information using modem photogrammetry techniques. The authors have used the digitized videos to quantify plume impingement effects of the landing exhaust on the lunar surface. The dust ejection angle from the plume is estimated at 1-3 degrees. The lofted particle density is estimated at 10(exp 8)- 10(exp 13) particles per cubic meter. Additionally, evidence for ejection of large 10-15 cm sized objects and a dependence of ejection angle on thrust are presented. Further work is ongoing to continue quantitative analysis of the landing videos.

  12. Numerical investigations in the backflow region of a vacuum plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Goang-Shin

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this research is to numerically simulate the vacuum plume flow field in the backflow region of a low thrust nozzle exit. In space applications, the low thrust nozzles are used as a propulsion device to control the vehicle attitude, or to maneuver the vehicle flight trajectory. When the spacecraft is deployed in the orbit or cruising in a planetary mission, the vacuum plume is created behind the nozzle exit (so called backflow region), by the exhausting gas of the propulsion system or by venting internal gas to the extremely low density ambient. The low density vacuum plume flow regions cover the continuum, transitional and free molecular flow regimes, which were characterized by the Knudsen number K(sub n), K(sub n) = lambda(sub m)/L where lambda(sub m) is the mean free path of the gas molecules and L is the characteristic length of the flow field. The transitional regime is defined by 0.01 is less than or equal to K(sub n) is less than or equal to 10. The conventional Navier-Stokes equations are valid only in the flow region close to the nozzle exit since the validity of the Navier-Stokes equations fails asymptotically as the Knudsen number increases. The vacuum plume characteristics prediction is primarily a problem of transitional aerodynamics.

  13. Measurement and analysis of a small nozzle plume in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penko, P. F.; Boyd, I. D.; Meissner, D. L.; Dewitt, K. J.

    1993-01-01

    Pitot pressures and flow angles are measured in the plume of a nozzle flowing nitrogen and exhausting to a vacuum. Total pressures are measured with Pitot tubes sized for specific regions of the plume and flow angles measured with a conical probe. The measurement area for total pressure extends 480 mm (16 exit diameters) downstream of the nozzle exit plane and radially to 60 mm (1.9 exit diameters) off the plume axis. The measurement area for flow angle extends to 160 mm (5 exit diameters) downstream and radially to 60 mm. The measurements are compared to results from a numerical simulation of the flow that is based on kinetic theory and uses the direct-simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Comparisons of computed results from the DSMC method with measurements of flow angle display good agreement in the far-field of the plume and improve with increasing distance from the exit plane. Pitot pressures computed from the DSMC method are in reasonably good agreement with experimental results over the entire measurement area.

  14. Numerical investigations in the backflow region of a vacuum plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Goang-Shin

    1992-05-01

    The objective of this research is to numerically simulate the vacuum plume flow field in the backflow region of a low thrust nozzle exit. In space applications, the low thrust nozzles are used as a propulsion device to control the vehicle attitude, or to maneuver the vehicle flight trajectory. When the spacecraft is deployed in the orbit or cruising in a planetary mission, the vacuum plume is created behind the nozzle exit (so called backflow region), by the exhausting gas of the propulsion system or by venting internal gas to the extremely low density ambient. The low density vacuum plume flow regions cover the continuum, transitional and free molecular flow regimes, which were characterized by the Knudsen number K(sub n), K(sub n) = lambda(sub m)/L where lambda(sub m) is the mean free path of the gas molecules and L is the characteristic length of the flow field. The transitional regime is defined by 0.01 is less than or equal to K(sub n) is less than or equal to 10. The conventional Navier-Stokes equations are valid only in the flow region close to the nozzle exit since the validity of the Navier-Stokes equations fails asymptotically as the Knudsen number increases. The vacuum plume characteristics prediction is primarily a problem of transitional aerodynamics.

  15. Anthropogenic point and area source CO2 plume measurements: Implications for spaceborne CO2 sensor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, A. E.; Ryerson, T. B.; Peischl, J.; Parrish, D. D.; Trainer, M.; Tans, P. P.

    2011-12-01

    Anthropogenic point and area source CO2 plume measurements: Implications for spaceborne CO2 sensor design A. Andrews, T. Ryerson, J. Peischl, D. Parrish, M. Trainer, P. Tans An extensive dataset of CO2 concentrations including enhancements in point and area source plumes is available from in situ measurements collected using the NOAA P-3 and NCAR Electra research aircraft during seven major field projects from 1999 through 2010. Research flights sampled emission plumes from coal-, oil-, and natural gas-fired electric utility power plants, industrial facilities, and urban areas. Plume sampling often included horizontal transects at several altitudes and multiple distances downwind. CO2 data from crosswind transects upwind and downwind, coupled with ancillary measurements of co-emitted nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide, along with plume location, and wind speed and direction permit unambiguous attribution and quantification of atmospheric plumes from individual sources. Certain point sources were revisited on multiple flights over the course of 1-2 month long field projects and on successive field projects spanning several years. Sampling occurred primarily in the summertime, daytime continental boundary layer, with some plume studies performed after dark and in the spring, fall, and winter seasons. The data provide rigorously calibrated, measurement-based constraints on the expected range of atmospheric CO2 plume enhancements that can be used to assess satellite sensor concepts. Crosswind near-field (~5 km) transects in the summer daytime mixed-layer downwind of the strongest point sources were characterized by peak plume CO2 mixing ratio enhancements >100 ppm above background for the 100-m spatial averages reported from the moving aircraft. On many flights, the aircraft tracked such emissions plumes beyond 150 km downwind, or up to 10 hours of transport time, until plume enhancements were indistinguishable from background variability in CO2

  16. An expert system for spectroscopic analysis of rocket engine plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reese, Greg; Valenti, Elizabeth; Alphonso, Keith; Holladay, Wendy

    1991-01-01

    The expert system described in this paper analyzes spectral emissions of rocket engine exhaust plumes and shows major promise for use in engine health diagnostics. Plume emission spectroscopy is an important tool for diagnosing engine anomalies, but it is time-consuming and requires highly skilled personnel. The expert system was created to alleviate such problems. The system accepts a spectral plot in the form of wavelength vs intensity pairs and finds the emission peaks in the spectrum, lists the elemental emitters present in the data and deduces the emitter that produced each peak. The system consists of a conventional language component and a commercially available inference engine that runs on an Apple Macintosh computer. The expert system has undergone limited preliminary testing. It detects elements well and significantly decreases analysis time.

  17. Aircraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H. (Inventor); Uden, Edward (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention is an aircraft wing design that creates a bell shaped span load, which results in a negative induced drag (induced thrust) on the outer portion of the wing; such a design obviates the need for rudder control of an aircraft.

  18. Partially integrated exhaust manifold

    SciTech Connect

    Hayman, Alan W; Baker, Rodney E

    2015-01-20

    A partially integrated manifold assembly is disclosed which improves performance, reduces cost and provides efficient packaging of engine components. The partially integrated manifold assembly includes a first leg extending from a first port and terminating at a mounting flange for an exhaust gas control valve. Multiple additional legs (depending on the total number of cylinders) are integrally formed with the cylinder head assembly and extend from the ports of the associated cylinder and terminate at an exit port flange. These additional legs are longer than the first leg such that the exit port flange is spaced apart from the mounting flange. This configuration provides increased packaging space adjacent the first leg for any valving that may be required to control the direction and destination of exhaust flow in recirculation to an EGR valve or downstream to a catalytic converter.

  19. Aircraft Particle Emissions eXperiment (APEX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, C. C.; Anderson, B. E.; Hudgins, C.; Wey, C.; Li-Jones, X.; Winstead, E.; Thornhill, L. K.; Lobo, P.; Hagen, D.; Whitefield, P.

    2006-01-01

    APEX systematically investigated the gas-phase and particle emissions from a CFM56-2C1 engine on NASA's DC-8 aircraft as functions of engine power, fuel composition, and exhaust plumage. Emissions parameters were measured at 11 engine power, settings, ranging from idle to maximum thrust, in samples collected at 1, 10, and 30 m downstream of the exhaust plane as the aircraft burned three fuels to stress relevant chemistry. Gas-phase emission indices measured at 1 m were in good agreement with the ICAO data and predictions provided by GEAE empirical modeling tools. Soot particles emitted by the engine exhibited a log-normal size distribution peaked between 15 and 40 nm, depending on engine power. Samples collected 30 m downstream of the engine exhaust plane exhibited a prominent nucleation mode.

  20. Volcanic Plume Above Mount St. Helens Detected with GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlié, N.; Briole, P.; Nercessian, A.; Murakami, M.

    2005-07-01

    Eruptions can produce not only flows of incandescent material along the slopes of a volcano but also ash plumes in the troposphere [Sparks et al., 1997] that can threaten aircraft flying in the vicinity [Fisher et al., 1997]. To protect aircraft, passengers, and crews, the International Civil Aviation Organization and the World Meteorological Organization created eight Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC, http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/VAAC/vaac.html) around the globe with the goal of tracking volcanic plumes and releasing eruption alerts to airports, pilots, and companies. Currently, the VAAC monitoring system is based mostly on the monitoring systems of any local volcano observatories and on real-time monitoring of data acquired by meteorological satellites. In the case of the 18 August 2000 eruption of the Miyakejima volcano in Japan, Houlié et al. [2005] showed that the Global Positioning System(GPS) might be used as an additional tool for monitoring volcanic plumes. The present article indicates that the 9 March 2005 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, also produced detectable anomalies in GPS data.>

  1. Physical characterization of the fine particle emissions from commercial aircraft engines during the Aircraft Particle Emissions Experiment (APEX) 1 to 3

    EPA Science Inventory

    The f1me particulate matter (PM) emissions from nine commercial aircraft engine models were determined by plume sampling during the three field campaigns of the Aircraft Particle Emissions Experiment (APEX). Ground-based measurements were made primarily at 30 m behind the engine ...

  2. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY REACTIONS IN COAL POWER PLANT PLUMES

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Levin

    2004-01-01

    -September 5, 2003. The experimental site was the Pleasant Prairie Power Plant in Pleasant Prairie, Wisconsin, just west of Kenosha. The experiment involved using an aircraft to capture emissions and document chemistry changes in the plume. While using the airplane for sampling, supplemental fast-response sensors for NOx, connected to data loggers, were used to gauge entry and exit times and transect intervals through plume emissions material. The Frontier Geosciences Static Plume Dilution Chamber (SPDC) was employed simultaneously adjacent to the stack to correlate its findings with the aircraft sampling, as well as providing evaluation of the SPDC as a rapid, less costly sampler for mercury chemistry. A complementary stack plume method, the Dynamic Plume Dilution (DPD) was used in the latter portion of the experiment to measure mercury speciation to observe any mercury reduction reaction with respect to both the reaction time (5 to 30 seconds) and dilution ratio. In addition, stack sampling using the ''Ontario Hydro'' wet chemistry method and continuous mercury monitors (CMM) were used to establish the baseline chemistry in the stack. Comparisons among stack, SPDC, DPD and aircraft measurements following data analysis will allow establishment of whether significant chemical changes to mercury occur in the plume, and of the verisimilitude of the SPDC and DPD methods.

  3. Observation and Modeling of the Evolution of Texas Power Plant Plumes

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the second Texas Air Quality Study 2006 (TexAQS II), a full range of pollutants was measured by aircraft in eastern Texas during successive transects of power plant plumes (PPPs). A regional photochemical model is applied to simulate the physical and chemical evolution of ...

  4. Laser pointing in the vicinity of jet engine plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleijpen, Ric H. M. A.

    2009-09-01

    Target tracking and laser-based pointing from airborne platforms can be degraded significantly by the propagation environment around an airborne platform including zones of severe turbulence generated by rotor downwash and engine exhausts. This is the topic of the EDA study group ERG 108.019 on "Laser beam propagation and imaging through severe environments". This paper reports on experiments on optical propagation in the vicinity of a plume of a scaled down jet engine, performed by this co-operation group. The group is also working on methods for estimating the extent of the turbulence effects on the tracking and pointing performance under these conditions.

  5. Real-time diagnostics of a jet engine exhaust using an intra-pulse quantum cascade laser spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, Geoffrey; Hay, Kenneth G.; Langford, Nigel; Johnson, Mark P.; Black, John D.

    2011-09-01

    It has been demonstrated that an intra-pulse scanned quantum cascade laser spectrometer may be used to obtain real-time diagnostics of the amounts of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water, in the exhaust of an aero gas turbine (turbojet) engine operated in a sea level test cell. Measurements have been made of the rapid changes in composition following ignition, the composition under steady state operating conditions, and the composition changes across the exhaust plume. The minimum detection limit for CO in a double pass through a typical gas turbine plume of 50 cm in diameter, with 0.4 seconds integration time, is approximately 2 ppm.

  6. Aerosol microphysical processes and properties in Canadian boreal forest fire plumes measured during BORTAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Kimiko; Allen, James; Coe, Hugh; Taylor, Jonathan; Duck, Thomas; Pierce, Jeffrey

    2013-04-01

    Biomass burning emissions contribute significantly to aerosol concentrations and clound condensation nuclei in many regions of the atmosphere. Plume-aerosol characteristics vary according to age, fuel type, and region. These differences are poorly represented in regional and global aerosol models, and they contribute to large uncertainties in predicted size distributions in biomass-burning-dominated regions. The Quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellites (BORTAS) measurement campaign was designed to invesigate boreal biomass burning emissions over Atlantic Canada during July-August of 2011. Aged (2-3 days) biomass burning aerosols originating from western Ontario were measured by an SMPS and AMS on board the British Atmospheric Research Aircraft. We identify the presence of plumes using CO concentrations and acetonitrile enhancement ratios. In-plume aerosol size distributions were collected for six aged plume profiles. The size distributions show an accumulation-mode median diameter of ~240 nm. However, there are persistant nucleation and Aitken modes present in the profiles, even 2-3 days from the source. Without continuous nucleation and condensation (likely SOA production), these small modes would be lost by coagulation in less than 1 day. We use an aerosol microphysics plume model to estimate the mean nucleation and condensation rates necessary to maintain the small aerosols, and calculate how these processes enhance the total number of particles and cloud condensation nuclei in the aged plume.

  7. An Overview of the Nighttime Aerosol/Oxidant Plume Experiment (NAOPEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, Carl M.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Hubbe, John M.; Springston, Stephen R.; Coulter, Richard L.

    2003-12-01

    The Nighttime Aerosol/Oxidant Plume Experiment was designed to characterize aerosols (number density, geographic distribution, physical characteristics) and trace gases coming from the greater Boston area at night between July 29 and August 8, 2002. Aircraft flights below 1500m MSL measured upwind/downwind characteristics of the urban plume and included Lagrangian measurements made in conjunction with tetroon releases within the plume. We focus here on just the upwind/downwind characeristics of the plume, with the Lagrangian results to be presented elsewhere. Statistically insignificant variations in aerosol number density, O3, and CO downwind of Boston were found under conditions of westerly flow, although large (50%) increases in downwind NOy were measured. Much bigger upwind/downwind differences were found in O3 and CO when sampling under light and variable wind conditions although the downwind NOy levels were much less (increase of only 15%), and were not associated with any measurable increase in the NOx relative to observations made under westerly flow. There was, in general, little evidence of the Boston plume at aircraft sampling heights, which suggests a greatly reduced potential for long range transport of the urban plume within the free troposphere over the Atlantic.

  8. Buckling of Chemical Wave Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Michael C.; Morris, Stephen W.

    2004-03-01

    Chemical wave fronts are found in many autocatalytic chemical reactions, such as the iodate oxidation of arsenous acid. In vertical capillary tubes, ascending chemical wave fronts show convective behavior when a dimensionless driving parameter S exceeds a critical value Sc ˜ 100. S ∝ a^3, where a is the radius of the tube. In the iodate arsenous-acid reaction, the density jump that drives convection is created by both the partial molal density decrease of the product solution and by thermal expansion due to the slight exothermicity of the reaction. We observed strongly supercritical ascending chemical wave plumes in vertical tubes with S 10^7. We report on the motion of these plumes in experiments where both the viscosity and the temperature of the reactant fluid are control parameters. We find experimentally that the background temperature of the reactant fluid has a significant influence on the behavior of the plumes. Above a critical temperature, plumes rise straight up the tube, whereas below this temperature, plumes go through an initial stage of buckling before they surrender to straight rising motion. The flow induced by the chemical plumes can be visualized using tracer particles. The buckling behavior of the plumes may arise from the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, as in the case of a fluid jet descending through stratified surroundings [Pesci et al., Phys. Rev. E, 68, 056305 (2003)].

  9. El Chichon: Composition of Plume Gases and Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan Kotra, Janet; Finnegan, David L.; Zoller, William H.; Hart, Mark A.; Moyers, Jarvis L.

    1983-12-01

    Aircraft measurements were made of trace gases, atmospheric particles, and condensed acid volatiles in the plume of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico, in November 1982. Hydrogen sulfide was the primary gaseous sulfur species in the plume at the time of collection. Concentrations of 28 elements were determined by neutron activation analysis of particulate material from the plume. Rates of trace element emission to the atmosphere for each species were estimated by normalization to the simultaneously determined total sulfur emission rate. The volatile elements sulfur, chlorine, arsenic, selenium, bromine, antimony, iodine, tungsten, and mercury were enriched relative to bulk pyroclastic material by factors of 60 to 20,000. Arsenic, antimony, and selenium were associated predominantly with small (<= 3 micrometer) particles. Calcium and sodium were present almost exclusively on larger particles and aluminum and manganese were bimodally distributed. Ashladen particulate material injected into the stratosphere during the early violent eruptions was enriched by factors of 10 to 30 relative to ash in some of the same elements observed in the quiescent plume.

  10. A new method for GPS-based wind speed determinations during airborne volcanic plume measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doukas, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    Begun nearly thirty years ago, the measurement of gases in volcanic plumes is today an accepted technique in volcano research. Volcanic plume measurements, whether baseline gas emissions from quiescent volcanoes or more substantial emissions from volcanoes undergoing unrest, provide important information on the amount of gaseous output of a volcano to the atmosphere. Measuring changes in gas emission rates also allows insight into eruptive behavior. Some of the earliest volcanic plume measurements of sulfur dioxide were made using a correlation spectrometer (COSPEC). The COSPEC, developed originally for industrial pollution studies, is an upward-looking optical spectrometer tuned to the ultraviolet absorption wavelength of sulfur dioxide (Millán and Hoff, 1978). In airborne mode, the COSPEC is mounted in a fixed-wing aircraft and flown back and forth just underneath a volcanic plume, perpendicular to the direction of plume travel (Casadevall and others, 1981; Stoiber and others, 1983). Similarly, for plumes close to the ground, the COSPEC can be mounted in an automobile and driven underneath a plume if a suitable road system is available (Elias and others, 1998). The COSPEC can also be mounted on a tripod and used to scan a volcanic plume from a fixed location on the ground, although the effectiveness of this configuration declines with distance from the plume (Kyle and others, 1990). In the 1990’s, newer airborne techniques involving direct sampling of volcanic plumes with infrared spectrometers and electrochemical sensors were developed in order to measure additional gases such as CO2 and H2S (Gerlach and others, 1997; Gerlach and others, 1999; McGee and others, 2001). These methods involve constructing a plume cross-section from several measurement traverses through the plume in a vertical plane. Newer instruments such as open-path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers are now being used to measure the gases in volcanic plumes mostly from fixed

  11. A wide field-of-view imaging DOAS instrument for two-dimensional trace gas mapping from aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönhardt, A.; Altube, P.; Gerilowski, K.; Krautwurst, S.; Hartmann, J.; Meier, A. C.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    -west Germany, AirMAP clearly detected the emission plume downwind from the exhaust stack, with NO2 vertical columns around 2 × 1016 molecules cm-2 in the plume centre. NOx emissions estimated from the AirMAP observations are consistent with reports in the European Pollutant Release and Transfer Register. Strong spatial gradients and variability in NO2 amounts across and along flight direction are observed, and small-scale enhancements of NO2 above a motorway are detected.

  12. Defense Science Board Task Force on Future Need for VTOL/STOL Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    aircraft utilizing features that enhance lift (e.g., the Coanda effect ) can reduce takeoff and landing distances.21 But heavy STOL aircraft inflict...severely restricting the sortie rate. 21. The Coanda effect entails the use of engine exhaust flowing over upper wing surfaces to enhance lift during...in a hybrid aircraft. But a single aircraft designed for such purposes is likely to be very expensive. Therefore the most cost- effective solution may

  13. COMPARING AND LINKING PLUMES ACROSS MODELING APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    River plumes carry many pollutants, including microorganisms, into lakes and the coastal ocean. The physical scales of many stream and river plumes often lie between the scales for mixing zone plume models, such as the EPA Visual Plumes model, and larger-sized grid scales for re...

  14. Gas and hydrogen isotopic analyses of volcanic eruption clouds in Guatemala sampled by aircraft

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, W.I.; Cadle, R.D.; Heidt, L.E.; Friedman, I.; Lazrus, A.L.; Huebert, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    Gas samples were collected by aircraft entering volcanic eruption clouds of three Guatemalan volcanoes. Gas chromatographic analyses show higher H2 and S gas contents in ash eruption clouds and lower H2 and S gases in vaporous gas plumes. H isotopic data demonstrate lighter isotopic distribution of water vapor in ash eruption clouds than in vaporous gas plumes. Most of the H2O in the vaporous plumes is probably meteoric. The data are the first direct gas analyses of explosive eruptive clouds, and demonstrate that, in spite of atmospheric admixture, useful compositional information on eruptive gases can be obtained using aircraft. ?? 1980.

  15. Observations of ozone formation in power plant plumes and implications for ozone control strategies.

    PubMed

    Ryerson, T B; Trainer, M; Holloway, J S; Parrish, D D; Huey, L G; Sueper, D T; Frost, G J; Donnelly, S G; Schauffler, S; Atlas, E L; Kuster, W C; Goldan, P D; Hubler, G; Meagher, J F; Fehsenfeld, F C

    2001-04-27

    Data taken in aircraft transects of emissions plumes from rural U.S. coal-fired power plants were used to confirm and quantify the nonlinear dependence of tropospheric ozone formation on plume NO(x) (NO plus NO(2)) concentration, which is determined by plant NO(x) emission rate and atmospheric dispersion. The ambient availability of reactive volatile organic compounds, principally biogenic isoprene, was also found to modulate ozone production rate and yield in these rural plumes. Differences of a factor of 2 or greater in plume ozone formation rates and yields as a function of NO(x) and volatile organic compound concentrations were consistently observed. These large differences suggest that consideration of power plant NO(x) emission rates and geographic locations in current and future U.S. ozone control strategies could substantially enhance the efficacy of NO(x) reductions from these sources.

  16. Electrical Charging of Volcanic Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Wilson, L.; Lane, S. J.; Gilbert, J. S.; Mather, T. A.; Harrison, R. G.; Martin, R. S.

    2008-06-01

    Many explosive terrestrial volcanic eruptions are accompanied by lightning and other atmospheric electrical phenomena. The plumes produced generate large perturbations in the surface atmospheric electric potential gradient and high charge densities have been measured on falling volcanic ash particles. The complex nature of volcanic plumes (which contain gases, solid particles, and liquid drops) provides several possible charging mechanisms. For plumes rich in solid silicate particles, fractoemission (the ejection of ions and atomic particles during fracture events) is probably the dominant source of charge generation. In other plumes, such as those created when lava enters the sea, different mechanisms, such as boiling, may be important. Further charging mechanisms may also subsequently operate, downwind of the vent. Other solar system bodies also show evidence for volcanism, with activity ongoing on Io. Consequently, volcanic electrification under different planetary scenarios (on Venus, Mars, Io, Moon, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione and Triton) is also discussed.

  17. Electrical Charging of Volcanic Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Wilson, L.; Lane, S. J.; Gilbert, J. S.; Mather, T. A.; Harrison, R. G.; Martin, R. S.

    Many explosive terrestrial volcanic eruptions are accompanied by lightning and other atmospheric electrical phenomena. The plumes produced generate large perturbations in the surface atmospheric electric potential gradient and high charge densities have been measured on falling volcanic ash particles. The complex nature of volcanic plumes (which contain gases, solid particles, and liquid drops) provides several possible charging mechanisms. For plumes rich in solid silicate particles, fractoemission (the ejection of ions and atomic particles during fracture events) is probably the dominant source of charge generation. In other plumes, such as those created when lava enters the sea, different mechanisms, such as boiling, may be important. Further charging mechanisms may also subsequently operate, downwind of the vent. Other solar system bodies also show evidence for volcanism, with activity ongoing on Io. Consequently, volcanic electrification under different planetary scenarios (on Venus, Mars, Io, Moon, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione and Triton) is also discussed.

  18. Collapsing plumes and resurrecting fountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bremer, Ton; Hunt, Gary

    2012-11-01

    We explore the range of behaviour predicted for steady plumes and fountains that undergo an increase or decrease in buoyancy which arise due to phase changes or chemical reactions. We model these changes in the simplest possible way by assuming a quadratic relationship between the density and the temperature of the fluid. We thereby extend the model of Caulfield & Woods (`95) to include the most recent developments in the literature on steady releases of buoyancy emitted vertically from horizontal area sources in unconfined quiescent environments of uniform density based on the plume model of Morton, Taylor & Turner (`56). We provide closed-form solutions and identify four classes of solution: collapsing plumes, resurrecting fountains, plumes with enhanced buoyancy and fountains with enhanced negative buoyancy. We provide criteria for each category of behaviour in terms of the source-value of two non-dimensional quantities: the Richardson number and a temperature parameter.

  19. Measuring Wildfires From Aircraft And Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brass, J. A.; Arvesen, J. C.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Riggan, P. J.; Meyers, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    Aircraft and satellite systems yield wide-area views, providing total coverage of affected areas. System developed for use aboard aircraft includes digital scanner that records data in 12 channels. Transmits data to ground station for immediate use in fighting fires. Enables researchers to estimate gaseous and particulate emissions from fires. Provides information on temperatures of flame fronts and soils, intensities and rate of spread of fires, characteristics of fuels and smoke plumes, energy-release rates, and concentrations and movements of trace gases. Data relates to heating and cooling of soils, loss of nutrients, and effects on atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic systems.

  20. Remote monitoring of the Gravelly Run thermal plume at Hopewell and the thermal plume at the Surry Nuclear Power Plant on the James River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talay, T. A.; Sykes, K. W.; Kuo, C. Y.

    1979-01-01

    On May 17, 1977, a remote sensing experiment was conducted on the James River, Virginia, whereby thermal spectrometer and near-infrared photography data of thermal discharges at Hopewell and the Surry nuclear power plant were obtained by an aircraft for one tidal cycle. These data were used in subsequent investigations into the near field discharge trajectories. For the Gravelly Run thermal plume at Hopewell, several empirical expressions for the plume centerline were evaluated by comparisons of the computed trajectories and those observed in the remote sensing images.

  1. Aircraft Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-19

    NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 AIRCRAFT STEELS by E. U. Lee R. Taylor C. Lei H. C. Sanders 19 February 2009...MARYLAND NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 19 February 2009 AIRCRAFT STEELS by E. U. Lee R. Taylor C. Lei H. C. Sanders...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 ii SUMMARY Five high strength and four stainless steels have been studied, identifying their

  2. Pool fires in a simulated aircraft cabin interior with ventilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, C. P.; Back, L. H.; Cho, Y. I.; Shakkottai, P.

    1987-01-01

    Results of experiments conducted at the JPL to evaluate aircraft postcrash fire hazards are presented. The experiments were carried out in a one-third scale simulated aircraft cabin geometry to study pool fire and ventilation flow interactions. It is shown that wind-induced ventilation may significantly affect fire plume orientation, smoke transport, and heat fluxes and thus will affect subsequent fire spread and the immediate survivability of the passengers.

  3. Pollution Emission Analysis of Selected Air Force Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-04-29

    percent for large non-combat tranaport engines) are proposed. Eraoke numbers wlilch will ensure Invisible aircraft smoke plumes are specified. The...standards are being violated, as well as being significant sources of smoke , ,••(3) that maintenance of the national ambient sir quality BlSndards...and reduced impact of smoke emission requires that air- craft and aircraft engines be Bubjected to a program of control compatible with their

  4. Exhaust gas ignition

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This article describes a system developed for rapid light-off of underbody catalysts that has shown potential to meet Euro Stage III emissions targets and to be more cost-effective than some alternatives. Future emissions legislation will require SI engine aftertreatment systems to approach full operating efficiency within the first few seconds after starting to reduce the high total-emissions fraction currently contributed by the cold phase of driving. A reduction of cold-start emissions during Phase 1 (Euro) or Bag 1 (FTP), which in many cases can be as much as 80% of the total for the cycle, has been achieved by electrical heating of the catalytic converter. But electrically heated catalyst (EHC) systems require high currents (100--200 A) to heat the metallic substrate to light-off temperatures over the first 15--20 seconds. Other viable approaches to reducing cold-start emissions include use of a fuel-powered burner upstream of the catalyst. However, as with EHC, the complexity of parts and the introduction of raw fuel into the exhaust system make this device unsatisfactory. Still another approach, an exhaust gas ignition (EGI) system, was first demonstrated in 1991. The operation of a system developed by engineers at Ford Motor Co., Ltd., Cambustion Ltd., and Tickford Ltd. is described here.

  5. Space shuttle vehicle rocket plume impingement study for separation analysis. Tasks 2 and 3: Definition and preliminary plume impingement analysis for the MSC booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojciechowski, C. J.; Penny, M. M.; Prozan, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    The results are presented of a space shuttle plume impingement study for the Manned Spacecraft Center configuration. This study was conducted as two tasks which were to (1) define the orbiter main stage engine exhaust plume flow field, and (2) define the plume impingement heating, force and resulting moment environments on the booster during the staging maneuver. To adequately define these environments during the staging maneuver and allow for deviation from the nominal separation trajectory, a multitude of relative orbiter/booster positions are analyzed which map the region that contains the separation trajectories. The data presented can be used to determine a separation trajectory which will result in acceptable impingement heating rates, forces, and the resulting moments. The data, presented in graphical form, include the effect of roll, pitch and yaw maneuvers for the booster. Quasi-steady state analysis methods were used with the orbiter engine operating at full thrust. To obtain partial thrust results, simple ratio equations are presented.

  6. Spectrally resolved Rayleigh scattering diagnostic for hydrogen-oxygen rocket plume studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, R. G.; Zupanc, F. J.; Schneider, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    A Rayleigh scattering diagnostic has been developed to measure gas density, temperature, and velocity in the exhaust plume of 100 N thrust class hydrogen-oxygen rockets. The spectrum of argon-ion laser light scattered by the gas molecules in the plume (predominantly water vapor) is measured with a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer. The gas density is determined from the total scattered power, the gas temperature from the spectral width, and the velocity from the shift in the peak of the spectrum from the frequency of the incident laser light. The diagnostic has been demonstrated in a rocket test cell and a discussion of results is given.

  7. Hot streak characterization in serpentine exhaust nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, Darrell S.

    Modern aircraft of the United States Air Force face increasingly demanding cost, weight, and survivability requirements. Serpentine exhaust nozzles within an embedded engine allow a weapon system to fulfill mission survivability requirements by providing denial of direct line-of-sight into the high-temperature components of the engine. Recently, aircraft have experienced material degradation and failure along the aft deck due to extreme thermal loading. Failure has occurred in specific regions along the aft deck where concentrations of hot gas have come in contact with the surface causing hot streaks. The prevention of these failures will be aided by the accurate prediction of hot streaks. Additionally, hot streak prediction will improve future designs by identifying areas of the nozzle and aft deck surfaces that require thermal management. To this end, the goal of this research is to observe and characterize the underlying flow physics of hot streak phenomena. The goal is accomplished by applying computational fluid dynamics to determine how hot streak phenomena is affected by changes in nozzle geometry. The present research first validates the computational methods using serpentine inlet experimental and computational studies. A design methodology is then established for creating six serpentine exhaust nozzles investigated in this research. A grid independent solution is obtained on a nozzle using several figures of merit and the grid-convergence index method. An investigation into the application of a second-order closure turbulence model is accomplished. Simulations are performed for all serpentine nozzles at two flow conditions. The research introduces a set of characterization and performance parameters based on the temperature distribution and flow conditions at the nozzle throat and exit. Examination of the temperature distribution on the upper and lower nozzle surfaces reveals critical information concerning changes in hot streak phenomena due to changes

  8. Volatile nanoparticle formation and growth within a diluting diesel car exhaust.

    PubMed

    Uhrner, Ulrich; Zallinger, Michael; von Löwis, Sibylle; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wehner, Birgit; Stratmann, Frank; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2011-04-01

    A major source of particle number emissions is road traffic. However, scientific knowledge concerning secondary particle formation and growth of ultrafine particles within vehicle exhaust plumes is still very limited. Volatile nanoparticle formation and subsequent growth conditions were analyzed here to gain a better understanding of "real-world" dilution conditions. Coupled computational fluid dynamics and aerosol microphysics models together with measured size distributions within the exhaust plume of a diesel car were used. The impact of soot particles on nucleation, acting as a condensational sink, and the possible role of low-volatile organic components in growth were assessed. A prescribed reduction of soot particle emissions by 2 orders of magnitude (to capture the effect of a diesel particle filter) resulted in concentrations of nucleation-mode particles within the exhaust plume that were approximately 1 order of magnitude larger. Simulations for simplified sulfuric acid-water vapor gas-oil containing nucleation-mode particles show that the largest particle growth is located in a recirculation zone in the wake of the car. Growth of particles within the vehicle exhaust plume up to detectable size depends crucially on the relationship between the mass rate of gaseous precursor emissions and rapid dilution. Chassis dynamometer measurements indicate that emissions of possible hydrocarbon precursors are significantly enhanced under high engine load conditions and high engine speed. On the basis of results obtained for a diesel passenger car, the contributions from light diesel vehicles to the observed abundance of measured nucleation-mode particles near busy roads might be attributable to the impact of two different time scales: (1) a short one within the plume, marked by sufficient precursor emissions and rapid dilution; and (2) a second and comparatively long time scale resulting from the mix of different precursor sources and the impact of atmospheric

  9. Precursor gases of aerosols in the Mount St. Helens eruption plumes at stratospheric altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inn, E. C. Y.; Vedder, J. F.; Condon, E. P.; Ohara, D.

    1982-01-01

    Nineteen stratospheric samples from the eruption plumes of Mount St. Helens were collected in five flight experiments. The plume samples were collected at various altitudes from 13.1 to 20.7 km by using the Ames cryogenic sampling system on board the NASA U-2 aircraft. The enriched, cryogenically collected samples were analyzed by chromatography. The concentrations of aerosols precursor gases (OCS, SO2, and CS2), CH3Cl, N2O, CF2Cl2, and CFCl3 were measured by gas chromatography. Large enhancement of the mixing ratio of SO2 and moderate enhancement of CS2 and OCS were found in the plume samples compared with similar measurement under pre-volcanic conditions. A fast decay rate of the SO2 mixing ratio in the plume was observed. Measurement of Cl(-), SO2(2-), and NO3(-) by ion chromatography was also carried out on water solutions prepared from the plume samples. The results obtained with this technique imply large mixing ratios of HCl, (NO + NO2 + HNO3), and SO2, in which these constituents are the respective sources of the anions. Measurement of the Rn222 concentration in the plume was made. Other stratospheric constituents in the plume samples, such as H2O, CO2, CH4, and CO, were also observed.

  10. High-speed Civil Transport Aircraft Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miake-Lye, Richard C.; Matulaitis, J. A.; Krause, F. H.; Dodds, Willard J.; Albers, Martin; Hourmouziadis, J.; Hasel, K. L.; Lohmann, R. P.; Stander, C.; Gerstle, John H.

    1992-01-01

    Estimates are given for the emissions from a proposed high speed civil transport (HSCT). This advanced technology supersonic aircraft would fly in the lower stratosphere at a speed of roughly Mach 1.6 to 3.2 (470 to 950 m/sec or 920 to 1850 knots). Because it would fly in the stratosphere at an altitude in the range of 15 to 23 km commensurate with its design speed, its exhaust effluents could perturb the chemical balance in the upper atmosphere. The first step in determining the nature and magnitude of any chemical changes in the atmosphere resulting from these proposed aircraft is to identify and quantify the chemically important species they emit. Relevant earlier work is summarized, dating back to the Climatic Impact Assessment Program of the early 1970s and current propulsion research efforts. Estimates are provided of the chemical composition of an HSCT's exhaust, and these emission indices are presented. Other aircraft emissions that are not due to combustion processes are also summarized; these emissions are found to be much smaller than the exhaust emissions. Future advances in propulsion technology, in experimental measurement techniques, and in understanding upper atmospheric chemistry may affect these estimates of the amounts of trace exhaust species or their relative importance.

  11. Refinement of Plume Modeling in the Infrared Spectral Region

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-30

    complex shock wave structure and the presence of a turbulent viscous lnixing layer between the inner hot jet flow and the external freestream flow. The...and Gray [ 19-1 for the compressible free mixing of a primary jet with quiescent air: -p = K pLUs a~ ar where K is the mixing rate factor, L is a...22,23J, which were developed for CO2 radiation from aircraft plumes, to include water vapor radiation and to include the capability of treating

  12. Active Volcanic Plumes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This color image, acquired during Galileo's ninth orbit around Jupiter, shows two volcanic plumes on Io. One plume was captured on the bright limb or edge of the moon (see inset at upper right), erupting over a caldera (volcanic depression) named Pillan Patera after a South American god of thunder, fire and volcanoes. The plume seen by Galileo is 140 kilometers (86 miles) high and was also detected by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Galileo spacecraft will pass almost directly over Pillan Patera in 1999 at a range of only 600 kilometers (373 miles).

    The second plume, seen near the terminator (boundary between day and night), is called Prometheus after the Greek fire god (see inset at lower right). The shadow of the 75-kilometer (45- mile) high airborne plume can be seen extending to the right of the eruption vent. The vent is near the center of the bright and dark rings. Plumes on Io have a blue color, so the plume shadow is reddish. The Prometheus plume can be seen in every Galileo image with the appropriate geometry, as well as every such Voyager image acquired in 1979. It is possible that this plume has been continuously active for more than 18 years. In contrast, a plume has never been seen at Pillan Patera prior to the recent Galileo and Hubble Space Telescope images.

    North is toward the top of the picture. The resolution is about 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) per picture element. This composite uses images taken with the green, violet and near infrared filters of the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The images were obtained on June 28, 1997, at a range of more than 600,000 kilometers (372,000 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page

  13. Comprehensive simultaneous shipboard and airborne characterization of exhaust from a modern container ship at sea.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Shane M; Agrawal, Harshit; Sorooshian, Armin; Padró, Luz T; Gates, Harmony; Hersey, Scott; Welch, W A; Lung, H; Miller, J W; Cocker, David R; Nenes, Athanasios; Jonsson, Haflidi H; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H

    2009-07-01

    We report the first joint shipboard and airborne study focused on the chemical composition and water-uptake behavior of particulate ship emissions. The study focuses on emissions from the main propulsion engine of a Post-Panamax class container ship cruising off the central coast of California and burning heavy fuel oil. Shipboard sampling included micro-orifice uniform deposit impactors (MOUDI) with subsequent off-line analysis, whereas airborne measurements involved a number of real-time analyzers to characterize the plume aerosol, aged from a few seconds to over an hour. The mass ratio of particulate organic carbon to sulfate at the base of the ship stack was 0.23 +/- 0.03, and increased to 0.30 +/- 0.01 in the airborne exhaust plume, with the additional organic mass in the airborne plume being concentrated largely in particles below 100 nm in diameter. The organic to sulfate mass ratio in the exhaust aerosol remained constant during the first hour of plume dilution into the marine boundary layer. The mass spectrum of the organic fraction of the exhaust aerosol strongly resembles that of emissions from other diesel sources and appears to be predominantly hydrocarbon-like organic (HOA) material. Background aerosol which, based on air mass back trajectories, probably consisted of aged ship emissions and marine aerosol, contained a lower organic mass fraction than the fresh plume and had a much more oxidized organic component. A volume-weighted mixing rule is able to accurately predict hygroscopic growth factors in the background aerosol but measured and calculated growth factors do not agree for aerosols in the ship exhaust plume. Calculated CCN concentrations, at supersaturations ranging from 0.1 to 0.33%, agree well with measurements in the ship-exhaust plume. Using size-resolved chemical composition instead of bulk submicrometer composition has little effect on the predicted CCN concentrations because the cutoff diameter for CCN activation is larger than the

  14. Performance Characteristics of an Aircraft Engine with Exhaust Turbine Supercharger

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1941-05-01

    installation of’the ex- haust turbine supercha~ger. The two piston rods at oppb- si t e ends of the s e r vo c~rl iuder ware connect a d to the aut 0... crankshaft through multispeed gears. INTRODUCTION It is the function of superchargers in general to aug- Dent the porforcance of an internal-combustion engine...to the arbitrary design limit of the turbine and blower combination, the unit should be capable of main- taining approximate12r sea-level operating

  15. Plumes, orogenesis, and supercontinental fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalziel, I. W. D.; Lawver, L. A.; Murphy, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    A time-space relationship between large igneous provinces (LIPS), present day hot spots, and the fragmentation of Pangea has been documented over several decades, but the cause of fragmentation has remained elusive. LIPS are regarded either as the result of impingement of a mantle plume on the base of the lithosphere, or as the initial products of adiabatic decompression melting of anomalously hot mantle. Do LIPS therefore constitute evidence of an active role for plumes from the deep mantle in supercontinental fragmentation, or are they merely the first indications of a large-scale but near-surface tectonic process? Two long recognized and enigmatic orogenic events may offer a solution to this geologically important 'chicken or egg' conundrum. The reconstructed early Mesozoic Gondwanide fold belt of South America, southern Africa, and Antarctica, could have resulted from 'plume-modified orogeny', flattening of a downgoing lithospheric slab due to the buoyancy of a plume rising beneath a continental margin subduction zone. If so, the ˜180 Ma Karroo and Ferrar LIPS associated with the opening of the ocean basin between East and West Gondwanaland at ˜165 Ma resulted from impingement of this plume and are unrelated to the thermal insulation of the shallow mantle beneath Gondwanaland. It would then follow that the plume itself played an active, possibly critical, role in the initial breakup of the supercontinent. The Late Paleozoic 'Ancestral Rockies' deformation in the southwestern United States could be yet another example of orogeny driven by a plume that initiated the break-up of Pangea approximately 15 Myr earlier in the Central Atlantic region.

  16. Exhaust gas sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hiller, J.; Miree, T.J.

    1997-02-09

    The automotive industry needed a fast, reliable, under-the-hood method of determining nitrogen oxides in automobile exhaust. Several technologies were pursued concurrently. These sensing technologies were based on light absorption, electrochemical methods, and surface mass loading. The Y-12 plant was selected to study the methods based on light absorption. The first phase was defining the detailed technical objectives of the sensors--this was the role of the automobile companies. The second phase was to develop prototype sensors in the laboratories--the national laboratories. The final phase was testing of the prototype sensors by the automobile industries. This program was canceled a few months into what was to be a three-year effort.

  17. Automated analyzer for aircraft measurements of atmospheric methane and total hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, W. R., III; Purgold, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    An automated methane/total hydrocarbon analyzer is presented, which can produce alternate methane/total hydrocarbon measurements every 7 seconds to provide the spatial resolution required for regional hydrocarbon measurements at aircraft speeds. The construction and sampling techniques developed for the aircraft mounted system are discussed. A technique to periodically measure atmosphere oxygen is incorporated into the analyzer to ensure accurate hydrocarbon measurements, and a data collection methodology is developed to minimize errors resulting from changes in flame ionization detector sensitivity at different altitudes. Aircraft data acquired at the 1979 Southeastern Virginia Urban Plume Study are also presented, which illustrate the application of the instrument to a troposphere pollution plume.

  18. Experimental evaluation of resistojet thruster plume shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, Lynnette M.; Bailey, Allan B.

    1988-01-01

    The exhaust of an engineering model resistojet has been investigated using rotary pitot probes and a rotary quartz crystal microbalance. The resistojet operated on CO2 propellant at a mass flow rate of 0.29 g/sec in both heated and unheated flows. Measurements of local flow angles in the near field of a conical plume shield indicated that the shield was not wholly effective in confining the flow to the region upstream of its exit plane. However, the absolute levels of the measured mass flux into the backflow region were very low, on the order of 7 x 10 to the -7 power g/sqcm/sec or less. The use of a circualr disk at the exit plane of the existing conical shield showed some benefit in decreasing the amount of backflow by a factor of two. Lastly, a detached shield placed upstream of the resistojet exit plane demonstrated a small degree of local shielding for the region directly behind it.

  19. NO(x) reduction additives for aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Henry G.; Menees, Gene P.; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1993-01-01

    The reduction of oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) emissions from aircraft gas turbine engines is a vital part of the NASA High Speed Research Program. Emissions reductions are critical to the feasibility of future High Speed Civil Transports which operate at supersonic speeds in the stratosphere. It is believed that large fleets of such aircraft using conventional gas turbine engines would emit levels of NO(x) that would be harmful to the stratospheric ozone layer. Previous studies have shown that NO(x) emissions can be reduced from stationary powerplant exhausts by the addition of additives such as ammonia to the exhaust gases. Since the exhaust residence times, pressures and temperatures may be different for aircraft gas turbines, a study has been made of additive effectiveness for high speed, high altitude flight.

  20. D-558-2 being mounted to P2B-1S launch aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    aircraft of that era, particularly at low speeds during take-off and landing and in tight turns. The three aircraft gathered a great deal of data about pitch-up and the coupling of lateral (yaw) and longitudinal (pitch) motions; wing and tail loads, lift, drag, and buffeting characteristics of swept-wing aircraft at transonic and supersonic speeds; and the effects of the rocket exhaust plume on lateral dynamic stability throughout the speed range. (Plume effects were a new experience for aircraft.) The number three aircraft also gathered information about the effects of external stores (bomb shapes, drop tanks) upon the aircraft's behavior in the transonic region (roughly 0.7 to 1.3 times the speed of sound). In correlation with data from other early transonic research aircraft such as the XF-92A, this information contributed to solutions to the pitch-up problem in swept-wing aircraft. The three airplanes flew a total of 313 times--123 by the number one aircraft (Bureau No. 37973--NACA 143), 103 by the second Skyrocket (Bureau No. 37974--NACA 144), and 87 by airplane number three (Bureau No. 37975--NACA 145). Skyrocket 143 flew all but one of its missions as part of the Douglas contractor program to test the airplane's performance. NACA aircraft 143 was initially powered by a Westinghouse J-34-40 turbojet engine configured only for ground take-offs, but in 1954-55 the contractor modified it to an all-rocket air-launch capability featuring an LR8-RM-6, 4-chamber Reaction Motors engine rated at 6,000 pounds of thrust at sea level (the Navy designation for the Air Force's LR-11 used in the X-1). In this configuration, NACA research pilot John McKay flew the airplane only once for familiarization on September 17, 1956. The 123 flights of NACA 143 served to validate wind-tunnel predictions of the airplane's performance, except for the fact that the airplane experienced less drag above Mach 0.85 than the wind tunnels had indicated. NACA 144 also began its flight program with a

  1. D-558-2 being mounted to P2B-1S launch aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    aircraft gathered a great deal of data about pitch-up and the coupling of lateral (yaw) and longitudinal (pitch) motions; wing and tail loads, lift, drag, and buffeting characteristics of swept-wing aircraft at transonic and supersonic speeds; and the effects of the rocket exhaust plume on lateral dynamic stability throughout the speed range. (Plume effects were a new experience for aircraft.) The number three aircraft also gathered information about the effects of external stores (bomb shapes, drop tanks) upon the aircraft's behavior in the transonic region (roughly 0.7 to 1.3 times the speed of sound). In correlation with data from other early transonic research aircraft such as the XF-92A, this information contributed to solutions to the pitch-up problem in swept-wing aircraft. The three airplanes flew a total of 313 times--123 by the number one aircraft (Bureau No. 37973--NACA 143), 103 by the second Skyrocket (Bureau No. 37974--NACA 144), and 87 by airplane number three (Bureau No. 37975--NACA 145). Skyrocket 143 flew all but one of its missions as part of the Douglas contractor program to test the airplane's performance. NACA aircraft 143 was initially powered by a Westinghouse J-34-40 turbojet engine configured only for ground take-offs, but in 1954-55 the contractor modified it to an all-rocket air-launch capability featuring an LR8-RM-6, 4-chamber Reaction Motors engine rated at 6,000 pounds of thrust at sea level (the Navy designation for the Air Force's LR-11 used in the X-1). In this configuration, NACA research pilot John McKay flew the airplane only once for familiarization on September 17, 1956. The 123 flights of NACA 143 served to validate wind-tunnel predictions of the airplane's performance, except for the fact that the airplane experienced less drag above Mach 0.85 than the wind tunnels had indicated. NACA 144 also began its flight program with a turbojet powerplant. NACA pilots Robert A. Champine and John H. Griffith flew 21 times in this configuration

  2. Automotive Fuel and Exhaust Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, James F.; And Others

    Materials are provided for a 14-hour course designed to introduce the automotive mechanic to the basic operations of automotive fuel and exhaust systems incorporated on military vehicles. The four study units cover characteristics of fuels, gasoline fuel system, diesel fuel systems, and exhaust system. Each study unit begins with a general…

  3. Turbocharged engine with exhaust purifier

    SciTech Connect

    Tadokoro, T.; Matsuda, I.; Okimoto, H.

    1986-09-23

    The patent described a control system for an automobile engine having intake and exhaust systems for respectively conducting intake gases to and exhaust gases from the engine, which comprises, in combination: a turbocharger including a turbine disposed in the exhaust system and adapted to be driven by the flow of the exhaust gases therethrough and a blower disposed in the intake system and drivingly connected with the turbine for supercharging the intake gases; and exhaust purifying device disposed in the exhaust system downstream of the turbine with respect to the direction of flow of the exhaust gases; a regulating means for varying the effective cross-section of a portion of the exhaust system leading to the turbine; a control means for controlling the regulating means in dependence on an operating condition of the engine, the control means causing the regulating means to decrease the effective cross-section during a low speed operating condition, but to increase the effective cross-section during a high speed operating condition of the engine.

  4. Chemical characterization of the fine particle emissions from commercial aircraft engines during the Aircraft Particle Emissions eXperiment (APEX) 1 to 3.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, J S; Hays, M D; Dong, Y; Williams, D C; Logan, R

    2011-04-15

    This paper addresses the need for detailed chemical information on the fine particulate matter (PM) generated by commercial aviation engines. The exhaust plumes of seven turbofan engine models were sampled as part of the three test campaigns of the Aircraft Particle Emissions eXperiment (APEX). In these experiments, continuous measurements of black carbon (BC) and particle surface-bound polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs) were conducted. In addition, time-integrated sampling was performed for bulk elemental composition, water-soluble ions, organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), and trace semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs). The continuous BC and PAH monitoring showed a characteristic U-shaped curve of the emission index (EI or mass of pollutant/mass of fuel burned) vs fuel flow for the turbofan engines tested. The time-integrated EIs for both elemental composition and water-soluble ions were heavily dominated by sulfur and SO(4)(2-), respectively, with a ∼2.4% median conversion of fuel S(IV) to particle S(VI). The corrected OC and EC emission indices obtained in this study ranged from 37 to 83 mg/kg and 21 to 275 mg/kg, respectively, with the EC/OC ratio ranging from ∼0.3 to 7 depending on engine type and test conditions. Finally, the particle SVOC EIs varied by as much as 2 orders of magnitude with distinct variations in chemical composition observed for different engine types and operating conditions.

  5. Distributed Exhaust Nozzles for Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Gaeta, R. J.; Hellman, B.; Schein, D. B.; Solomon, W. D., Jr.; Huff, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to validate the jet noise reduction potential of a concept associated with distributed exhaust nozzles. Under this concept the propulsive thrust is generated by a larger number of discrete plumes issuing from an array of small or mini-nozzles. The potential of noise reduction of this concept stems from the fact that a large number of small jets will produce very high frequency noise and also, if spaced suitably, they will coalesce at a smaller velocity to produce low amplitude, low frequency noise. This is accomplished through detailed acoustic and fluid measurements along with a Computational Fluidic Dynamic (CFD) solution of the mean (DE) Distributed Exhaust nozzle flowfield performed by Northrop-Grumman. The acoustic performance is quantified in an anechoic chamber. Farfield acoustic data is acquired for a DE nozzle as well as a round nozzle of the same area. Both these types of nozzles are assessed numerically using Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) techniques. The CFD analysis ensures that both nozzles issued the same amount of airflow for a given nozzle pressure ratio. Data at a variety of nozzle pressure ratios are acquired at a range of polar and azimuthal angles. Flow visualization of the DE nozzle is used to assess the fluid dynamics of the small jet interactions. Results show that at high subsonic jet velocities, the DE nozzle shifts its frequency of peak amplitude to a higher frequency relative to a round nozzle of equivalent area (from a S(sub tD) = 0.24 to 1. 3). Furthermore, the DE nozzle shows reduced sound pressure levels (as much as 4 - 8 dB) in the low frequency part of the spectrum (less than S(sub tD) = 0.24 ) compared to the round nozzle. At supersonic jet velocities, the DE nozzle does not exhibit the jet screech and the shock-associated broadband noise is reduced by as much as 12 dB.

  6. Bromine oxidation in volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrowski, N.; Vogel, L.; Kern, C.; Giuffrida, G. B.; Delgado-Granados, H.; Platt, U.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanoes are very strong sources of hydrogen, carbon, sulphur and halogen compounds, as well as of particles. Some gases only behave as passive tracers; others interact and affect the formation, growth or chemical characteristics of aerosol particles in a complex system. Recent measurements of halogen radicals in volcanic plumes showed that volcanic plumes are chemically very active. Kinetic considerations (Oppenheimer et al., 2006) and detailed calculations with an atmospheric chemistry model (Bobrowski et al., 2007) explain the halogen chemistry mainly with photochemical reactions involving both, the gas and particle phase. They reproduce the measured gas-phase concentrations quite well. However, temporal evolution of BrO in the early plume is not well described in the models. The understanding of chemical kinetics of BrO formation is still not complete. Recent measurement results (Vogel et al., 2008) do not fit with initial model calculation. The new data lead to the suggestion that the BrO formation could be much faster during the first few minutes after emission than initially suggested. Old and recent data sets will be confronted, compared and possible causes of their differences discussed. The measurements considered were taken at Mt. Etna (Italy), Villarica (Chile), and Popocatépetl (Mexico) volcanoes. Additionally, at Mt Etna the emission consists of up to four individual plumes from four summit craters. The differences between the individual plumes have been investigated during the last years and will be presented.

  7. Stationary Plasma Thruster Plume Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Manzella, David H.

    1994-01-01

    Stationary Plasma Thrusters (SPT's) are being investigated for application to a variety of near-term missions. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study of the thruster plume characteristics which are needed to assess spacecraft integration requirements. Langmuir probes, planar probes, Faraday cups, and a retarding potential analyzer were used to measure plume properties. For the design operating voltage of 300 V the centerline electron density was found to decrease from approximately 1.8 x 10 exp 17 cubic meters at a distance of 0.3 m to 1.8 X 10 exp 14 cubic meters at a distance of 4 m from the thruster. The electron temperature over the same region was between 1.7 and 3.5 eV. Ion current density measurements showed that the plume was sharply peaked, dropping by a factor of 2.6 within 22 degrees of centerline. The ion energy 4 m from the thruster and 15 degrees off-centerline was approximately 270 V. The thruster cathode flow rate and facility pressure were found to strongly affect the plume properties. In addition to the plume measurements, the data from the various probe types were used to assess the impact of probe design criteria

  8. Studies of Tampa Bay Region Power Plant Plumes during the Bay Region Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, T. B.; Luke, W. T.; Arnold, J. R.; Gunter, L. R.

    2003-12-01

    The NOAA Air Resources Laboratory made aircraft measurements of chemical and meteorological parameters during 21 flights of the NOAA Twin Otter as part of the Bay Region Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE). BRACE was conducted in May 2002. The aircraft flew horizontal transects upwind and downwind of the urban area on 13 of these flights to characterize the urban and power plant plumes. Vertical profiles from 60 to 3000 m MSL were made on most flights. Profiles were made over the Gulf of Mexico, Tampa Bay, and various land sites. On many flights, transects were located immediately downwind of the urban region and power plants and at successive distances farther downwind to characterize the horizontal distribution and chemical processing of the plumes as they aged. At each distance, data was collected during multiple passes at different altitudes to characterize the vertical structure. Many of the downwind passes were flown over the Gulf where sources are limited and the plumes can be observed in relative isolation. The contribution of the power plant plumes are analyzed to determine changes in the vertical and horizontal distribution of the plumes; horizontal fluxes of NOx, NOy, and ozone; production of ozone; deposition rates; and changes on successive days of regional background and concentration maxima caused by the power plant emissions.

  9. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 6: Water ejector plume tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcginnis, F. K.; Summerhays, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Results are given of vacuum testing of nozzles designed to eject water vapor away from the space shuttle to prevent contamination of the spacecraft surfaces and payload. The water vapor is generated by an active cooling system which evaporates excess fuel cell water to supplement a modular radiator system (MRS). The complete heat rejection system including the MRS, flash evaporator or sublimator and nozzle were first tested to demonstrate the system operational characteristics. The plume tests were performed in two phases and the objectives of this test series were: (1) to determine the effectiveness of a supersonic nozzle and a plugged nozzle in minimizing impingement upon the spacecraft of water vapor exhausted by an active device (flash evaporator or sublimator); and (2) to obtain basic data on the flow fields of exhaust plumes generated by these active devices, both with and without nozzles installed.

  10. USAF Aircraft Engine Emission Goals: A Critical Review.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    dif- ficult to obtain. Combustion product gases at the exhaust plane are extremely reactive and at high temperature; consequently, much of the CO and...19. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side if necessary and identify by block number) J Pollution Abatement Exhaust Emissions Combustion Aircraft...The USAF must continue basic research in areas of combustion , smoke formation, etc. it - -W: (7) Variability of emissions is an area where more

  11. Characterization of particulate matter and gaseous emissions of a C-130H aircraft.

    PubMed

    Corporan, Edwin; Quick, Adam; DeWitt, Matthew J

    2008-04-01

    The gaseous and nonvolatile particulate matter (PM) emissions of two T56-A-15 turboprop engines of a C-130H aircraft stationed at the 123rd Airlift Wing in the Kentucky Air National Guard were characterized. The emissions campaign supports the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) project WP-1401 to determine emissions factors from military aircraft. The purpose of the project is to develop a comprehensive emissions measurement program using both conventional and advanced techniques to determine emissions factors of pollutants, and to investigate the spatial and temporal evolutions of the exhaust plumes from fixed and rotating wing military aircraft. Standard practices for the measurement of gaseous emissions from aircraft have been well established; however, there is no certified methodology for the measurement of aircraft PM emissions. In this study, several conventional instruments were used to physically characterize and quantify the PM emissions from the two turboprop engines. Emissions samples were extracted from the engine exit plane and transported to the analytical instrumentation via heated lines. Multiple sampling probes were used to assess the spatial variation and obtain a representative average of the engine emissions. Particle concentrations, size distributions, and mass emissions were measured using commercially available aerosol instruments. Engine smoke numbers were determined using established Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) practices, and gaseous species were quantified via a Fourier-transform infrared-based gas analyzer. The engines were tested at five power settings, from idle to take-off power, to cover a wide range of operating conditions. Average corrected particle numbers (PNs) of (6.4-14.3) x 10(7) particles per cm3 and PN emission indices (EI) from 3.5 x 10(15) to 10.0 x 10(15) particles per kg-fuel were observed. The highest PN EI were observed for the idle power conditions. The mean particle diameter

  12. Nozzle exit exhaust products from space shuttle boost vehicle (November 1973 design)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Principal exhaust species emitted at various altitudes for two trajectories of the space shuttle vehicle are presented. The exhaust composition is given for the nozzle exit plane on the basis of equilibrium chemistry. Afterburning of excess H, H2, and CO in the plume is accounted for. Species considered include HCl and Al2O3, which have been recognized as environmentally significant, as well as others such as H2O (produced by both the solid rocket motor and the orbiter main engine) which, although innocuous, may participate in subsequent chemical reactions in the atmosphere.

  13. Simulation of Europa's water plume .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchetti, A.; Cremonese, G.; Schneider, N. M.; Plainaki, C.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Zusi, M.; Palumbo, P.

    Plumes on Europa would be extremely interesting science and mission targets, particularly due to the unique opportunity to obtain direct information on the subsurface composition, thereby addressing Europa's potential habitability. The existence of water plume on the Jupiter's moon Europa has been long speculated until the recent discover. HST imaged surpluses of hydrogen Lyman alpha and oxygen emissions above the southern hemisphere in December 2012 that are consistent with two 200 km high plumes of water vapor (Roth et al. 2013). In previous works ballistic cryovolcanism has been considered and modeled as a possible mechanism for the formation of low-albedo features on Europa's surface (Fagents et al. 2000). Our simulation agrees with the model of Fagents et al. (2000) and consists of icy particles that follow ballistic trajectories. The goal of such an analysis is to define the height, the distribution and the extension of the icy particles falling on the moon's surface as well as the thickness of the deposited layer. We expect to observe high albedo regions in contrast with the background albedo of Europa surface since we consider that material falling after a cryovolcanic plume consists of snow. In order to understand if this phenomenon is detectable we convert the particles deposit in a pixel image of albedo data. We consider also the limb view of the plume because, even if this detection requires optimal viewing geometry, it is easier detectable in principle against sky. Furthermore, we are studying the loss rates due to impact electron dissociation and ionization to understand how these reactions decrease the intensity of the phenomenon. We expect to obtain constraints on imaging requirements necessary to detect potential plumes that could be useful for ESA's JUICE mission, and in particular for the JANUS camera (Palumbo et al. 2014).

  14. Modeling Leaking Gas Plume Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, Dmitriy; Patzek, Tad; Benson, Sally M.

    2007-08-20

    In this study, we obtain simple estimates of 1-D plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. Application of the Buckley-Leverett model to describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases leads to a transparent theory predicting the evolution of the plume. We obtain that the plume does not migrate upward like a gas bubble in bulk water. Rather, it stretches upward until it reaches a seal or until the fluids become immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration that does not lend itself to a simple analytical solution (Silin et al., 2006). The range of applicability of the simplified solution is assessed and provided. This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. One of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is leakage of CO{sub 2} from the underground storage reservoir into sources of drinking water. Ideally, the injected green-house gases will stay in the injection zone for a geologically long time and eventually will dissolve in the formation brine and remain trapped by mineralization. However, naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leak from primary storage. Even in supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the indigenous formation brine. Therefore, buoyancy will tend to drive the CO{sub 2} upward unless it is trapped beneath a low permeability seal. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution, are critical for developing technology

  15. Aircraft cybernetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The use of computers for aircraft control, flight simulation, and inertial navigation is explored. The man-machine relation problem in aviation is addressed. Simple and self-adapting autopilots are described and the assets and liabilities of digital navigation techniques are assessed.

  16. Mobile Bay turbidity plume study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crozier, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory and field transmissometer studies on the effect of suspended particulate material upon the appearance of water are reported. Quantitative correlations were developed between remotely sensed image density, optical sea truth data, and actual sediment load. Evaluation of satellite image sea truth data for an offshore plume projects contours of transmissivity for two different tidal phases. Data clearly demonstrate the speed of change and movement of the optical plume for water patterns associated with the mouth of Mobile bay in which relatively clear Gulf of Mexico water enters the bay on the eastern side. Data show that wind stress in excess of 15 knots has a marked impact in producing suspended sediment loads.

  17. 14 CFR 23.1123 - Exhaust system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Exhaust System § 23.1123 Exhaust system. (a) Each exhaust system must be fireproof and corrosion-resistant, and must have means...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1123 - Exhaust system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Exhaust System § 23.1123 Exhaust system. (a) Each exhaust system must be fireproof and corrosion-resistant, and must have means...

  19. 14 CFR 23.1123 - Exhaust system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Exhaust System § 23.1123 Exhaust system. (a) Each exhaust system must be fireproof and corrosion-resistant, and must have means...

  20. 14 CFR 23.1123 - Exhaust system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Exhaust System § 23.1123 Exhaust system. (a) Each exhaust system must be fireproof and corrosion-resistant, and must have means...

  1. 14 CFR 23.1123 - Exhaust system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Exhaust System § 23.1123 Exhaust system. (a) Each exhaust system must be fireproof and corrosion-resistant, and must have means...

  2. Subsonic Jet Noise Reduced With Improved Internal Exhaust Gas Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Aircraft noise pollution is becoming a major environmental concern for the world community. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is responding to this concern by imposing more stringent noise restrictions for aircraft certification then ever before to keep the U.S. industry competitive with the rest of the world. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, attempts are underway to develop noise-reduction technology for newer engines and for retrofitting existing engines so that they are as quiet as (or quieter than) required. Lewis conducted acoustic and Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) tests using Pratt & Whitney's Internal Exhaust Gas Mixers (IEGM). The IEGM's mix the core flow with the fan flow prior to their common exhaust. All tests were conducted in Lewis' Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory--a semihemispheric dome open to the ambient atmosphere. This was the first time Laser Doppler Velocimetry was used in such a facility at Lewis. Jet exhaust velocity and turbulence and the internal velocity fields were detailed. Far-field acoustics were also measured. Pratt & Whitney provided 1/7th scale model test hardware (a 12-lobe mixer, a 20-lobe mixer, and a splitter) for 1.7 bypass ratio engines, and NASA provided the research engineers, test facility, and test time. The Pratt & Whitney JT8D-200 engine power conditions were used for all tests.

  3. Exhaust Nozzle Materials Development for the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, J. E.

    1999-01-01

    The United States has embarked on a national effort to develop the technology necessary to produce a Mach 2.4 High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) for entry into service by the year 2005. The viability of this aircraft is contingent upon its meeting both economic and environmental requirements. Two engine components have been identified as critical to the environmental acceptability of the HSCT. These include a combustor with significantly lower emissions than are feasible with current technology, and a lightweight exhaust nozzle that meets community noise standards. The Enabling Propulsion Materials (EPM) program will develop the advanced structural materials, materials fabrication processes, structural analysis and life prediction tools for the HSCT combustor and low noise exhaust nozzle. This is being accomplished through the coordinated efforts of the NASA Lewis Research Center, General Electric Aircraft Engines and Pratt & Whitney. The mission of the EPM Exhaust Nozzle Team is to develop and demonstrate this technology by the year 1999 to enable its timely incorporation into HSCT propulsion systems.

  4. GASOLINE VEHICLE EXHAUST PARTICLE SAMPLING STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Kittelson, D; Watts, W; Johnson, J; Zarling, D Schauer,J Kasper, K; Baltensperger, U; Burtscher, H

    2003-08-24

    The University of Minnesota collaborated with the Paul Scherrer Institute, the University of Wisconsin (UWI) and Ricardo, Inc to physically and chemically characterize the exhaust plume from recruited gasoline spark ignition (SI) vehicles. The project objectives were: (1) Measure representative particle size distributions from a set of on-road SI vehicles and compare these data to similar data collected on a small subset of light-duty gasoline vehicles tested on a chassis dynamometer with a dilution tunnel using the Unified Drive Cycle, at both room temperature (cold start) and 0 C (cold-cold start). (2) Compare data collected from SI vehicles to similar data collected from Diesel engines during the Coordinating Research Council E-43 project. (3) Characterize on-road aerosol during mixed midweek traffic and Sunday midday periods and determine fleet-specific emission rates. (4) Characterize bulk- and size-segregated chemical composition of the particulate matter (PM) emitted in the exhaust from the gasoline vehicles. Particle number concentrations and size distributions are strongly influenced by dilution and sampling conditions. Laboratory methods were evaluated to dilute SI exhaust in a way that would produce size distributions that were similar to those measured during laboratory experiments. Size fractionated samples were collected for chemical analysis using a nano-microorifice uniform deposit impactor (nano-MOUDI). In addition, bulk samples were collected and analyzed. A mixture of low, mid and high mileage vehicles were recruited for testing during the study. Under steady highway cruise conditions a significant particle signature above background was not measured, but during hard accelerations number size distributions for the test fleet were similar to modern heavy-duty Diesel vehicles. Number emissions were much higher at high speed and during cold-cold starts. Fuel specific number emissions range from 1012 to 3 x 1016 particles/kg fuel. A simple

  5. Space Shuttle and Launch Pad Lift-Off Debris Transport Analysis: SRB Plume-Driven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Jeff; Strutzenberg, Louis; Dougherty, Sam; Radke, Jerry; Liever, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the Space Shuttle Lift-Off model developed for potential Lift-Off Debris transport. A critical Lift-Off portion of the flight is defined from approximately 1.5 sec after SRB Ignition up to 'Tower Clear', where exhaust plume interactions with the Launch Pad occur. A CFD model containing the Space Shuttle and Launch Pad geometry has been constructed and executed. The CFD model works in conjunction with a debris particle transport model and a debris particle impact damage tolerance model. These models have been used to assess the effects of the Space Shuttle plumes, the wind environment, their interactions with the Launch Pad, and their ultimate effect on potential debris during Lift-Off. Emphasis in this paper is on potential debris that might be caught by the SRB plumes.

  6. Underexpanded Supersonic Plume Surface Interactions: Applications for Spacecraft Landings on Planetary Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, M.; Sengupta, A.; Renno, N. O.; Norman, J. W.; Gulick, D. S.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical and experimental investigations of both far-field and near-field supersonic steady jet interactions with a flat surface at various atmospheric pressures are presented in this paper. These studies were done in assessing the landing hazards of both the NASA Mars Science Laboratory and Phoenix Mars spacecrafts. Temporal and spatial ground pressure measurements in conjunction with numerical solutions at altitudes of approx.35 nozzle exit diameters and jet expansion ratios (e) between 0.02 and 100 are used. Data from steady nitrogen jets are compared to both pulsed jets and rocket exhaust plumes at Mach approx.5. Due to engine cycling, overpressures and the plate shock dynamics are different between pulsed and steady supersonic impinging jets. In contrast to highly over-expanded (e <1) and underexpanded exhaust plumes, results show that there is a relative ground pressure load maximum for moderately underexpanded (e approx.2-5) jets which demonstrate a long collimated plume shock structure. For plumes with e much >5 (lunar atmospheric regime), the ground pressure is minimal due to the development of a highly expansive shock structure. We show this is dependent on the stability of the plate shock, the length of the supersonic core and plume decay due to shear layer instability which are all a function of the jet expansion ratio. Asymmetry and large gradients in the spatial ground pressure profile and large transient overpressures are predominantly linked to the dynamics of the plate shock. More importantly, this study shows that thruster plumes exhausting into martian environments possess the largest surface pressure loads and can occur at high spacecraft altitudes in contrast to the jet interactions at terrestrial and lunar atmospheres. Theoretical and analytical results also show that subscale supersonic cold gas jets adequately simulate the flow field and loads due to rocket plume impingement provided important scaling parameters are in agreement. These

  7. POD Analysis of Jet-Plume/Afterbody-Wake Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Nathan E.; Seiner, John M.; Jansen, Bernard J.; Gui, Lichuan; Sockwell, Shuan; Joachim, Matthew

    2009-11-01

    The understanding of the flow physics in the base region of a powered rocket is one of the keys to designing the next generation of reusable launchers. The base flow features affect the aerodynamics and the heat loading at the base of the vehicle. Recent efforts at the National Center for Physical Acoustics at the University of Mississippi have refurbished two models for studying jet-plume/afterbody-wake interactions in the NCPA's 1-foot Tri-Sonic Wind Tunnel Facility. Both models have a 2.5 inch outer diameter with a nominally 0.5 inch diameter centered exhaust nozzle. One of the models is capable of being powered with gaseous H2 and O2 to study the base flow in a fully combusting senario. The second model uses hi-pressure air to drive the exhaust providing an unheated representative flow field. This unheated model was used to acquire PIV data of the base flow. Subsequently, a POD analysis was performed to provide a first look at the large-scale structures present for the interaction between an axisymmetric jet and an axisymmetric afterbody wake. PIV and Schlieren data are presented for a single jet-exhaust to free-stream flow velocity along with the POD analysis of the base flow field.

  8. Thermal Analysis for Orbiter and ISS Plume Impingement on International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochelle, William C.; Reid, Ethan A.; Carl, Terry L.; Smith, Ries N.; Lumpkin, Forrest E.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Reaction Control System (RCS) Plume Model (RPM) is an exhaust plume flow field and impingement heating code that has been updated and applied to components of the International Space Station (ISS). The objective of this study was to use this code to determine if plume environments from either Orbiter PRCS jets or ISS reboost and Attitude Control System (ACS) jets cause thermal issues on ISS component surfaces. This impingement analysis becomes increasingly important as the ISS is being assembled with its first permanent crew scheduled to arrive by the end of fall 2000. By early summer 2001 , the ISS will have a number of major components installed such as the Unity (Node 1), Destiny (Lab Module), Zarya (Functional Cargo Block), and Zvezda (Service Module) along with the P6 solar arrays and radiators and the Z-1 truss. Plume heating to these components has been analyzed with the RPM code as well as additional components for missions beyond Flight 6A such as the Propulsion Module (PM), Mobile Servicing System, Space Station Remote Manipulator System, Node 2, and the Cupola. For the past several years NASA/JSC has been developing the methodology to predict plume heating on ISS components. The RPM code is a modified source flow code with capabilities for scarfed nozzles and intersecting plumes that was developed for the 44 Orbiter RCS jets. This code has been validated by comparison with Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX) heat flux and pressure data and with CFD and Method of Characteristics solutions. Previous analyses of plume heating predictions to the ISS using RPM have been reported, but did not consider thermal analysis for the components nor jet-firing histories as the Orbiter approaches the ISS docking ports. The RPM code has since been modified to analyze surface temperatures with a lumped mass approach and also uses jet-firing histories to produce pulsed heating rates. In addition, RPM was modified to include plume heating from ISS

  9. A tandem mirror plasma source for a hybrid plume plasma propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. F.; Miller, R. H.; Wenzel, K. W.; Krueger, W. A.; Chang, F. R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a tandem mirror magnetic plasma confinement device to be considered as a hot plasma source for the hybrid plume rocket concept. The hot plasma from this device is injected into an exhaust duct, which will interact with an annular layer of hypersonic neutral gas. Such a device can be used to study the dynamics of the hybrid plume and to experimentally verify the numerical predictions obtained with computer codes. The basic system design is also geared toward being lightweight and compact, as well as having high power density (i.e., several kW/sq cm) at the exhaust. This feature is aimed toward the feasibility of 'space testing'. The plasma is heated by microwaves. A 50 percent heating efficiency can be obtained by using two half-circle antennas. The preliminary Monte Carlo modeling of test particles result reported here indicates that interaction does take place in the exhaust duct. Neutrals gain energy from the ion, which confirms the hybrid plume concept.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics and frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method coupling for the interaction between microwaves and plasma in rocket plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Kinefuchi, K.; Funaki, I.; Shimada, T.; Abe, T.

    2012-10-15

    Under certain conditions during rocket flights, ionized exhaust plumes from solid rocket motors may interfere with radio frequency transmissions. To understand the relevant physical processes involved in this phenomenon and establish a prediction process for in-flight attenuation levels, we attempted to measure microwave attenuation caused by rocket exhaust plumes in a sea-level static firing test for a full-scale solid propellant rocket motor. The microwave attenuation level was calculated by a coupling simulation of the inviscid-frozen-flow computational fluid dynamics of an exhaust plume and detailed analysis of microwave transmissions by applying a frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method with the Drude dispersion model. The calculated microwave attenuation level agreed well with the experimental results, except in the case of interference downstream the Mach disk in the exhaust plume. It was concluded that the coupling estimation method based on the physics of the frozen plasma flow with Drude dispersion would be suitable for actual flight conditions, although the mixing and afterburning in the plume should be considered depending on the flow condition.

  11. Airborne radiological sampling of Mount St. Helens plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, V.E.

    1981-04-01

    Particulate and gaseous samples for radiologial analyses were collected from the plumes created by eruptions of Mount St. Helens. The sampling aircraft and equipment used are routinely employed in aerial radiological surveillance at the Nevada Test Site by the Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada. An initial sample set was collected on April 4, 1980, during the period of recurring minor eruptions. Samples were collected again on May 19 and 20 following the major eruption of May 18. The Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Radiation Programs analyzed the samples for uranium and thorium isotopes, radium-226, lead-210, polonium-210, and radon-222. Other laboratories analyzed samples to determine particle size distribution and elemental composition. The only samples containing radioactivity above normal ambient levels were collected on May 20. Polonium-210 concentrations in the plume, determined from a sample collected between 5 and 30 km from the crater, were approximately an order of magnitude above background. Radon-222 concentrations in samples collected from the plume centerline at a distance of 15 km averaged approximately four times the average surface concentrations. The small increases in radioactivity would cause no observable adverse health effects.

  12. Tropospheric impacts of volcanic halogen emissions: first simulations of reactive halogen chemistry in the Eyjafjallajökull eruption plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Tjarda

    2013-04-01

    Volcanic plumes are regions of high chemical reactivity. Instrumented research aircraft that probed the 2010 Icelandic Eyjafjallajökull eruption plume identified in-plume ozone depletion and reactive halogens (Cl, BrO), the latter also detected by satellite. These measurements add to growing evidence that volcanic plumes support rapid reactive halogen chemistry, with predicted impacts including depletion of atmospheric oxidants and mercury deposition. However, attempts to simulate volcanic plume halogen chemistry and predict impacts are subject to considerable uncertainties. e.g. in rate constants for HOBr reactive uptake (see this session: EGU2013-6076), or in the high-temperature initialisation. Model studies attempting to replicate volcanic plume halogen chemistry are restricted by a paucity of field data that is required both for model tuning and verification, hence reported model 'solutions' are not necessarily unique. To this end, the aircraft, ground-based and satellite studies of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption provide a valuable combination of datasets for improving our understanding of plume chemistry and impacts. Here, PlumeChem simulations of Eyjafjallajökull plume reactive halogen chemistry and impacts are presented and verified by observations for the first time. Observed ozone loss, a function of plume strength and age, is quantitatively reproduced by the model. Magnitudinal agreement to reported downwind BrO and Cl is also shown. The model predicts multi-day impacts, with reactive bromine mainly as BrO, HOBr and BrONO2 during daytime, and Br2 and BrCl at night. BrO/SO2 is reduced in more dispersed plumes due to enhanced partitioning to HOBr, of potential interest to satellite studies of BrO downwind of volcanoes. Additional predicted impacts of Eyjafjallajökull volcanic plume halogen chemistry include BrO-mediated depletion of HOx that reduces the rate of SO2 oxidation to H2SO4, hence the formation of sulphate aerosol. The model predicts NOx is

  13. 40 CFR 87.82 - Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring smoke exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring smoke exhaust emissions. 87.82 Section 87.82 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... (Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 87.82 Sampling and analytical procedures for measuring smoke...

  14. External fins and ejector action for reducing the infrared emission of engine exhaust ducting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanfossen, G. J., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of using external fins and ejector action on the exhaust ducting of a helicopter to reduce the infrared emission of the aircraft. Temperatures were calculated for both circular disk fins and pin fins. Results show that combining ejector action with fins can lower the metal temperature to acceptable levels at least for high flight speeds.

  15. Behavior of mercury emissions from a commercial coal-fired power plant: the relationship between stack speciation and near-field plume measurements.

    PubMed

    Landis, Matthew S; Ryan, Jeffrey V; ter Schure, Arnout F H; Laudal, Dennis

    2014-11-18

    The reduction of divalent gaseous mercury (Hg(II)) to elemental gaseous mercury (Hg(0)) in a commercial coal-fired power plant (CFPP) exhaust plume was investigated by simultaneous measurement in-stack and in-plume as part of a collaborative study among the U.S. EPA, EPRI, EERC, and Southern Company. In-stack continuous emission monitoring data were used to establish the CFPP's real-time mercury speciation and plume dilution tracer species (SO2, NOX) emission rates, and an airship was utilized as an airborne sampling platform to maintain static position with respect to the exhaust plume centerline for semicontinuous measurement of target species. Varying levels of Hg(II) concentration (2.39-3.90 μg m(-3)) and percent abundance (∼ 87-99%) in flue gas and in-plume reduction were observed. The existence and magnitude of Hg(II) reduction to Hg(0) (0-55%) observed varied with respect to the types and relative amounts of coals combusted, suggesting that exhaust plume reduction occurring downwind of the CFPP is influenced by coal chemical composition and characteristics.

  16. Characterization of the Nashville urban plume on July 3 and July 18, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Nunnermacker, L.J.; Imre, D.; Daum, P.H.; Kleinman, L.; Lee, Y.-N; Lee, J.H.; Springston, S.R.; Newman, L. Weinstein-Lloyd, J. Sillman, S.; Keigley, G.W. Zhou, X.

    1998-11-01

    This paper reports results from the Southern Oxidants Study field campaign designed to characterize the formation and distribution of ozone and related species in the Nashville urban region. Data from several airborne platforms as well as surface observations on July 3 and 18 are examined to gain insight into the factors that control O{sub 3} formation rates and concentrations in the regional plumes. On both days, well-defined urban and power plant plumes were sampled. Utilizing both aircraft and surface data, a detailed kinetic analysis of the chemical evolution of the urban plume is performed to derive NO{sub x} lifetime, ozone production efficiency, OH concentration, HNO{sub 3} dry deposition rate, and the relative importance of natural and anthropogenic hydrocarbons to O{sub 3} production. Analysis of the urban plume data revealed a very active photochemical system (average [OH]{approximately}1.2{times}10{sup 7}&hthinsp;molecules&hthinsp;cm{sup {minus}3}) which consumed 50{percent} of the NO{sub x} within approximately 2 hours, at an ozone production efficiency of 2.5 to 4 molecules for each molecule of NO{sub x}. Anthropogenic hydrocarbons provided approximately 44{percent} of the fuel for ozone production by the urban plume. The dry deposition rate for HNO{sub 3} in the urban plume was estimated to be of the order of 5 to 7 cm&hthinsp;s{sup {minus}1}. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  17. Smoke Plume Over Eastern Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In late May, a massive smoke plume hundreds of kilometers across blew eastward over New Brunswick toward the Atlantic Ocean. On May 26, 2007, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image at 11:40 a.m. local time. By the time MODIS took this picture, the smoke appeared to have completely detached itself from the source, a large fire burning in southwestern Quebec, beyond the western edge of this image. In this image, the smoke appears as a gray-beige opaque mass with fuzzy, translucent edges. The plume is thickest in the southwest and diminishes toward the northeast. Just southwest of the plume is a red outline indicating a hotspot an area where MODIS detected anomalously warm surface temperatures, such as those resulting from fires. This hotspot, however, is not the source for this smoke plume. According to a bulletin from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the southwestern Quebec fire was the source. According to reports from the Canadian Interagency Forest Fire Centre on May 29, that fire was estimated at 63,211 hectares (156,197 acres), and it was classified as 'being held.' At the same time, more than 20 wildfires burned in Quebec, news sources reported, and firefighters from other Canadian provinces and the United States had been brought in to provide reinforcements for the area's firefighters.

  18. Suppression of Thermal Emission from Exhaust Components Using an Integrated Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    Thick Film Cooling; Thin Film Cooling; Fin cooling; Hidden Sacrifice Surface using Coanda Effect ; View hiding with insulation; Emissivity Control Plume...system while using a hidden surface to stabilize the flow and the Coanda effect to turn the flow in a desired direction at the exit plane. When view...34* Simple Exhaust using Coanda Effect to direct flow away from the vehicle; "* Segmentation into multiple jets to test self absorption; "* Vortex

  19. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements of OMS and LR91 Amine Rocket Exhausts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    interpretation of the LIF signal to yield radial and temporal profiles of radial flow velocity and static temperature. CFD modeling of the plumes was used to...provide baseline estimates of the exhaust flow properties. It was found that the CFD model does a fairly good job of predicting the gross behavior...collection and interpretation of the LIF signal to yield radial and temporal profiles of radial flow velocity and static temperature. CFD modeling of the

  20. Heat sources for mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, C.; Rushmer, T.; Turner, S. P.

    2008-06-01

    Melting anomalies in the Earth's upper mantle have often been attributed to the presence of mantle plumes that may originate in the lower mantle, possibly from the core-mantle boundary. Globally, mantle plumes exhibit a large range in buoyancy flux that is proportional to their temperature and volume. Plumes with higher buoyancy fluxes should have higher temperatures and experience higher degrees of partial melting. This excess heat in mantle plumes could reflect either (1) an enrichment of the heat-producing elements (HPE: U, Th, K) in their mantle source leading to an increase of heat production by radioactive decay, (2) material transport from core to mantle (either advective or diffusive), or (3) conductive heat transport across the core-mantle boundary. The advective/diffusive transport of heat may result in a physical contribution of material from the core to the lower mantle. If core material is incorporated into the lower mantle, mantle plumes with a higher buoyancy flux should have higher core tracers, e.g., increased 186Os, 187Os, and Fe concentrations. Geophysical and dynamic modeling indicate that at least Afar, Easter, Hawaii, Louisville, and Samoa may all originate at the core-mantle boundary. These plumes encompass the whole range of known buoyancy fluxes from 0.9 Mg s-1 (Afar) to 8.7 Mg s-1 (Hawaii), providing evidence that the buoyancy flux is largely independent of other geophysical parameters. In an effort to explore whether the heat-producing elements are the cause of excess heat we looked for correlations between fractionation-corrected concentrations of the HPE and buoyancy flux. Our results suggest that there is no correlation between HPE concentrations and buoyancy flux (with and without an additional correction for variable degrees of partial melting). As anticipated, K, Th, and U are positively correlated with each other (e.g., Hawaii, Iceland, and Galapagos have significantly lower concentrations than, e.g., Tristan da Cunha, the Canary

  1. Chesapeake Bay plume dynamics from LANDSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munday, J. C., Jr.; Fedosh, M. S.

    1981-01-01

    LANDSAT images with enhancement and density slicing show that the Chesapeake Bay plume usually frequents the Virginia coast south of the Bay mouth. Southwestern (compared to northern) winds spread the plume easterly over a large area. Ebb tide images (compared to flood tide images) show a more dispersed plume. Flooding waters produce high turbidity levels over the shallow northern portion of the Bay mouth.

  2. Downwelling wind, tides, and estuarine plume dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhigang; Ma, Ronghua; Huang, Mingfen; Chen, Changsheng; Chen, Yong; Xie, Congbin; Beardsley, Robert C.

    2016-06-01

    The estuarine plume dynamics under a downwelling-favorable wind condition were examined in the windy dry season of the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) using the PRE primitive-equation Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM). The wind and tide-driven estuarine circulation had a significant influence on the plume dynamics on both local and remote scales. Specifically, the local effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was similar to the theoretical descriptions of coastal plumes, narrowing the plume width, and setting up a vertically uniform downstream current at the plume edge. Tides tended to reduce these plume responses through local turbulent mixing and advection from upstream regions, resulting in an adjustment of the isohalines in the plume and a weakening of the vertically uniform downstream current. The remote effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was due to the wind-induced estuarine sea surface height (SSH), which strengthened the estuarine circulation and enhanced the plume transport accordingly. Associated with these processes, tide-induced mixing tended to weaken the SSH gradient and thus the estuarine circulation over a remote influence scale. Overall, the typical features of downwelling-favorable wind-driven estuarine plumes revealed in this study enhanced our understanding of the estuarine plume dynamics under downwelling-favorable wind conditions.

  3. Reductions in aircraft particulate emissions due to the use of Fischer-Tropsch fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyersdorf, A. J.; Timko, M. T.; Ziemba, L. D.; Bulzan, D.; Corporan, E.; Herndon, S. C.; Howard, R.; Miake-Lye, R.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E.; Wey, C.; Yu, Z.; Anderson, B. E.

    2014-01-01

    feedstock. As the plume cools downwind of the engine, nucleation-mode aerosols form. For the pure FT fuels, reductions (94% averaged over all powers) in downwind particle number emissions were similar to those measured at the exhaust plane (84%). However, the blended fuels had less of a reduction (reductions of 30-44%) than initially measured (64%). The likely explanation is that the reduced soot emissions in the blended fuel exhaust plume results in promotion of new particle formation microphysics, rather than coating on pre-existing soot particles, which is dominant in the JP-8 exhaust plume. Downwind particle volume emissions were reduced for both the pure (79 and 86% reductions) and blended FT fuels (36 and 46%) due to the large reductions in soot emissions. In addition, the alternative fuels had reduced particulate sulfate production (near zero for FT fuels) due to decreased fuel sulfur content. To study the formation of volatile aerosols (defined as any aerosol formed as the plume ages) in more detail, tests were performed at varying ambient temperatures (-4 to 20 °C). At idle, particle number and volume emissions were reduced linearly with increasing ambient temperature, with best fit slopes corresponding to -8 × 1014 particles (kg fuel)-1 °C-1 for particle number emissions and -10 mm3 (kg fuel)-1 °C-1 for particle volume emissions. The temperature dependency of aerosol formation can have large effects on local air quality surrounding airports in cold regions. Aircraft-produced aerosols in these regions will be much larger than levels expected based solely on measurements made directly at the engine exit plane. The majority (90% at idle) of the volatile aerosol mass formed as nucleation-mode aerosols, with a smaller fraction as a soot coating. Conversion efficiencies of up to 2.8% were measured for the partitioning of gas-phase precursors (unburned hydrocarbons and SO2) to form volatile aerosols. Highest conversion efficiencies were measured at 45% power.

  4. A Survey of Challenges in Aerodynamic Exhaust Nozzle Technology for Aerospace Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyne, Rickey J.

    2002-01-01

    The current paper discusses aerodynamic exhaust nozzle technology challenges for aircraft and space propulsion systems. Technology advances in computational and experimental methods have led to more accurate design and analysis tools, but many major challenges continue to exist in nozzle performance, jet noise and weight reduction. New generations of aircraft and space vehicle concepts dictate that exhaust nozzles have optimum performance, low weight and acceptable noise signatures. Numerous innovative nozzle concepts have been proposed for advanced subsonic, supersonic and hypersonic vehicle configurations such as ejector, mixer-ejector, plug, single expansion ramp, altitude compensating, lobed and chevron nozzles. This paper will discuss the technology barriers that exist for exhaust nozzles as well as current research efforts in place to address the barriers.

  5. Opacity meter for monitoring exhaust emissions from non-stationary sources

    DOEpatents

    Dec, John Edward

    2000-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the opacity of exhaust plumes from moving emissions sources. In operation, a light source is activated at a time prior to the arrival of a diesel locomotive at a measurement point, by means of a track trigger switch or the Automatic Equipment Identification system, such that the opacity measurement is synchronized with the passage of an exhaust plume past the measurement point. A beam of light from the light source passes through the exhaust plume of the locomotive and is detected by a suitable detector, preferably a high-rate photodiode. The light beam is well-collimated and is preferably monochromatic, permitting the use of a narrowband pass filter to discriminate against background light. In order to span a double railroad track and provide a beam which is substantially stronger than background, the light source, preferably a diode laser, must provide a locally intense beam. A high intensity light source is also desirable in order to increase accuracy at the high sampling rates required. Also included is a computer control system useful for data acquisition, manipulation, storage and transmission of opacity data and the identification of the associated diesel engine to a central data collection center.

  6. Turbine engine exhaust gas measurements using in-situ FT-IR emission/transmission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marran, David F.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Neira, Jorge; Markham, James R.; Rutka, Ronald; Strange, Richard R.

    2001-02-01

    12 An advanced multiple gas analyzer based on in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy has been used to successfully measure the exhaust plume composition and temperature of an operating gas turbine engine at a jet engine test stand. The sensor, which was optically coupled to the test cell using novel broadband hollow glass waveguides, performed well in this harsh environment (high acoustical noise and vibration, considerable temperature swings in the ambient with engine operation), providing quantitative gas phase information. Measurements were made through the diameter of the engine's one meter exhaust plume, about 0.7 meters downstream of the engine exit plane. The sensor performed near simultaneous infrared transmission and infrared emission measurements through the centerline of the plume. Automated analysis of the emission and transmission spectra provided the temperature and concentration information needed for engine tuning and control that will ensure optimal engine operation and reduced emissions. As a demonstration of the utility and accuracy of the technique, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, water, and carbon dioxide were quantified in spite of significant variations in the exhaust gas temperature. At some conditions, unburned fuel, particulates (soot/fuel droplets), methane, ethylene and aldehydes were identified, but not yet quantified.

  7. Aircraft Corrosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    chlore mais dans une proportion semblable b cells d’une eau de vil)e ; - lea solides, d’aprbs lea analyses chimique et criatallographique, paraissaiont...IATA member airlines at $100 million based on 1976 operations. Thus the numbers are large, but detailed analyses on specific aircraft types, in known...demonstrate this in any quantitative way with accurate figures. Better information is required on the cost of corrosion, together with analyses of the

  8. Aircraft Ducting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Templeman Industries developed the Ultra-Seal Ducting System, an environmental composite air duct with a 50 percent weight savings over current metallic ducting, but could not find a commercial facility with the ability to test it. Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a structural evaluation of the duct, equivalent to 86 years of take-offs and landings in an aircraft. Boeing Commercial Airplane Group and McDonnell Douglas Corporation are currently using the ducts.

  9. Eye and respiratory irritants in jet engine exhaust.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Y

    1986-11-01

    It has been noted that eye and respiratory irritation frequently occurred in the ground crews and pilots working on the field behind an aircraft with a low smoke combustor (LSC) engine. This study was attempted to analyze the exhaust sampled at about 50 m behind the LSC J79 engines at idle power setting by means of a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique. Nine kinds of lower aliphatic carbonyl compound (seven aldehydes and two ketones) were identified. The concentration of formaldehyde was the highest among them, showing the value above the threshold reported by previous investigators. Concentration of NOx was simultaneously measured by a gas detector tube in the same sample. The exhaust of a conventional J79 engine, which has rarely caused irritation, was also analyzed by the same technique and the results were compared. It was concluded that formaldehyde plays a major role in causing irritation.

  10. Bright polar mesospheric clouds formed by main engine exhaust from the space shuttle's final launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Michael H.; Lossow, Stefan; Fiedler, Jens; Baumgarten, Gerd; Lübken, Franz-Josef; Hallgren, Kristofer; Hartogh, Paul; Randall, Cora E.; Lumpe, Jerry; Bailey, Scott M.; Niciejewski, R.; Meier, R. R.; Plane, John M. C.; Kochenash, Andrew J.; Murtagh, Donal P.; Englert, Christoph R.

    2012-10-01

    The space shuttle launched for the last time on 8 July 2011. As with most shuttle launches, the three main engines injected about 350 t of water vapor between 100 and 115 km off the east coast of the United States during its ascent to orbit. We follow the motion of this exhaust with a variety of satellite and ground-based data sets and find that (1) the shuttle water vapor plume spread out horizontally in all directions over a distance of 3000 to 4000 km in 18 h, (2) a portion of the plume reached northern Europe in 21 h to form polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) that are brighter than over 99% of all PMCs observed in that region, and (3) the observed altitude dependence of the particle size is reversed with larger particles above smaller particles. We use a one-dimensional cloud formation model initialized with predictions of a plume diffusion model to simulate the unusually bright PMCs. We find that eddy mixing can move the plume water vapor down to the mesopause near 90 km where ice particles can form. If the eddy diffusion coefficient is 400 to 1000 m2/s, the predicted integrated cloud brightness is in agreement with both satellite and ground-based observations of the shuttle PMCs. The propellant mass of the shuttle is about 20% of that from all vehicles launched during the northern 2011 PMC season. We suggest that the brightest PMC population near 70°N is formed by space traffic exhaust.

  11. Development and Evaluation of a Reactive-Dispersive Plume Model: TexAQS II 2006 Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong Hoon; Kim, Hyun Soo; Song, Chul Han

    2015-04-01

    We describe the development and evaluation of a reactive-dispersive plume model (RDPM) that combines a photo-chemistry model with a plume dilution driven by turbulent dispersion of a power-plant plume. The plume transport and turbulent dispersion are derived from a Gaussian plume model and the plume chemistry model uses 71 HxOy-NxOy-CH4 chemistry-related reactions and 184 NMHC-related reactions. Emissions from large-scale point sources have continuously increased due to the rapid industrial growth. To extensively understand and assess atmospheric impacts of the power-plant emissions, a general RDPM was applied to simultaneously simulate the dynamics and photo-chemistry of the Texas power-plant plumes. During the second Texas Air Quality Study 2006 (TexAQS II 2006) on 16 September 2006, pollutant concentrations were measured by NOAA WP-3D aircraft with successive transects across power-plant plumes in Texas, USA. The simulation performances of the RDPM were evaluated by a comparison study, using the observation data obtained from the measurements of a NOAA WP-3D flight during TexAQS II 2006 airborne field campaign. On 16 September, the WP-3D aircraft observed mainly meteorological parameters and particulate species concentrations, traversing the Monticello and Welsh power-plant plumes four times from transects A to D. In addition, some meteorological variables in an initial condition for model simulation were obtained from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model output for the specific objects. These power-plant plume cases were selected in this study, because a large number of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide concentrations inside the power-plant plumes were measured without any interruption of other emission sources. For the Monticello and Welsh power-plant plumes, the model-predicted concentrations showed good agreements with the observed concentrations of ambient species (e.g., nitrogen oxides, ozone, sulfur dioxide, etc.) at the four transects. Based

  12. Turbulent forces within river plumes affect spread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-08-01

    When rivers drain into oceans through narrow mouths, hydraulic forces squeeze the river water into buoyant plumes that are clearly visible in satellite images. Worldwide, river plumes not only disperse freshwater, sediments, and nutrients but also spread pollutants and organisms from estuaries into the open ocean. In the United States, the Columbia River—the largest river by volume draining into the Pacific Ocean from North America—generates a plume at its mouth that transports juvenile salmon and other fish into the ocean. Clearly, the behavior and spread of river plumes, such as the Columbia River plume, affect the nation's fishing industry as well as the global economy.

  13. A multi-sensor plume height analysis of the 2009 Redoubt eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekstrand, Angela L.; Webley, Peter W.; Garay, Michael J.; Dehn, Jonathan; Prakash, Anupma; Nelson, David L.; Dean, Kenneson G.; Steensen, Torge

    2013-06-01

    During an explosive volcanic eruption, accurately determining the height of a volcanic plume or cloud is essential to accurately forecast its motion because volcanic ash transport and dispersion models require the initial plume height as an input parameter. The direct use of satellite infrared temperatures for height determination, one of the most commonly employed methods at the Alaska Volcano Observatory, often does not yield unique solutions for height. This result is documented here for the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano. Satellite temperature heights consistently underestimated the height of ash plumes in comparison to other methods such as ground-based radar and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) stereo heights. For ash plumes below the tropopause, increasing transparency of a plume begins to affect the accuracy of simple temperature height retrievals soon after eruption. With decreasing opacity, plume temperature heights become increasingly inaccurate. Comparison with dispersion models and aircraft gas flight data confirms that radar and MISR stereo heights are more accurate than basic satellite temperature heights. Even in the cases in which satellite temperature results appeared to be relatively accurate (e.g., for plumes below the tropopause), a mixed signal of plume and ground radiation still presented an issue for almost every event studied. This was true regardless of the fact that a band differencing method was used to remove presumably translucent pixels. The data presented here make a strong case for the use of data fusion in volcano monitoring, as there is a need to confirm satellite temperature heights with other height data. If only basic satellite temperature heights are available for a given eruption, then these heights must be considered with a significant margin of error.

  14. Axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics analysis of Saturn V/S1-C/F1 nozzle and plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.

    1993-01-01

    An axisymmetric single engine Computational Fluid Dynamics calculation of the Saturn V/S 1-C vehicle base region and F1 engine plume is described. There were two objectives of this work, the first was to calculate an axisymmetric approximation of the nozzle, plume and base region flow fields of S1-C/F1, relate/scale this to flight data and apply this scaling factor to a NLS/STME axisymmetric calculations from a parallel effort. The second was to assess the differences in F1 and STME plume shear layer development and concentration of combustible gases. This second piece of information was to be input/supporting data for assumptions made in NLS2 base temperature scaling methodology from which the vehicle base thermal environments were being generated. The F1 calculations started at the main combustion chamber faceplate and incorporated the turbine exhaust dump/nozzle film coolant. The plume and base region calculations were made for ten thousand feet and 57 thousand feet altitude at vehicle flight velocity and in stagnant freestream. FDNS was implemented with a 14 species, 28 reaction finite rate chemistry model plus a soot burning model for the RP-1/LOX chemistry. Nozzle and plume flow fields are shown, the plume shear layer constituents are compared to a STME plume. Conclusions are made about the validity and status of the analysis and NLS2 vehicle base thermal environment definition methodology.

  15. Development and Validation of a Computational Model for Predicting the Behavior of Plumes from Large Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Jason E.; Black, David L.; Taylor, Casey L.

    2013-01-01

    Exhaust plumes from large solid rocket motors fired at ATK's Promontory test site carry particulates to high altitudes and typically produce deposits that fall on regions downwind of the test area. As populations and communities near the test facility grow, ATK has become increasingly concerned about the impact of motor testing on those surrounding communities. To assess the potential impact of motor testing on the community and to identify feasible mitigation strategies, it is essential to have a tool capable of predicting plume behavior downrange of the test stand. A software package, called PlumeTracker, has been developed and validated at ATK for this purpose. The code is a point model that offers a time-dependent, physics-based description of plume transport and precipitation. The code can utilize either measured or forecasted weather data to generate plume predictions. Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) data and field observations from twenty-three historical motor test fires at Promontory were collected to test the predictive capability of PlumeTracker. Model predictions for plume trajectories and deposition fields were found to correlate well with the collected dataset.

  16. Uptake of HNO3 on aviation kerosene and aircraft engine soot: influences of H2O or/and H2SO4.

    PubMed

    Loukhovitskaya, Ekaterina E; Talukdar, Ranajit K; Ravishankara, A R

    2013-06-13

    The uptake of HNO3 on aviation kerosene soot (TC-1 soot) was studied in the absence and presence of water vapor at 295 and 243 K. The influence of H2SO4 coating of the TC-1 soot surface on HNO3 uptake was also investigated. Only reversible uptake of HNO3 was observed. HONO and NO2, potential products of reactive uptake of HNO3, were not observed under any conditions studied here. The uptake of nitric acid increased slightly with relative humidity (RH). Coating of the TC-1 soot surface with sulfuric acid decreased the uptake of HNO3 and did not lead to displacement of H2SO4 from the soot surface. A limited set of measurements was carried out on soot generated by aircraft engine combustor (E-soot) with results similar to those on TC-1 soot. The influence of water on HNO3 uptake on E-soot appeared to be more pronounced than on TC-1 soot. Our results suggest that HNO3 loss in the upper troposphere due to soot is not significant except perhaps in aircraft exhaust plumes. Our results also suggest that HNO3 is not converted to either NO2 or HONO upon its uptake on soot in the atmosphere.

  17. Critical Propulsion Components. Volume 3; Exhaust Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Several studies have concluded that a supersonic aircraft, if environmentally acceptable and economically viable, could successfully compete in the 21st century marketplace. However, before industry can commit to what is estimated as a 15 to 20 billion dollar investment, several barrier issues must be resolved. In an effort to address these barrier issues, NASA and Industry teamed to form the High-Speed Research (HSR) program. As part of this program, the Critical Propulsion Components (CPC) element was created and assigned the task of developing those propulsion component technologies necessary to: (1) reduce cruise emissions by a factor of 10 and (2) meet the ever-increasing airport noise restrictions with an economically viable propulsion system. The CPC-identified critical components were ultra-low emission combustors, low-noise/high-performance exhaust nozzles, low-noise fans, and stable/high-performance inlets. Propulsion cycle studies (coordinated with NASA Langley Research Center sponsored airplane studies) were conducted throughout this CPC program to help evaluate candidate components and select the best concepts for the more complex and larger scale research efforts. The propulsion cycle and components ultimately selected were a mixed-flow turbofan (MFTF) engine employing a lean, premixed, prevaporized (LPP) combustor coupled to a two-dimensional mixed compression inlet and a two-dimensional mixer/ejector nozzle. Due to the large amount of material presented in this report, it was prepared in four volumes; Volume 1: Summary, Introduction, and Propulsion System Studies, Volume 2: Combustor, Volume 3: Exhaust Nozzle, and Volume 4: Inlet and Fan/Inlet Acoustic Team.

  18. Teaching the Mantle Plumes Debate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulger, G. R.

    2010-12-01

    There is an ongoing debate regarding whether or not mantle plumes exist. This debate has highlighted a number of issues regarding how Earth science is currently practised, and how this feeds into approaches toward teaching students. The plume model is an hypothesis, not a proven fact. And yet many researchers assume a priori that plumes exist. This assumption feeds into teaching. That the plume model is unproven, and that many practising researchers are skeptical, may be at best only mentioned in passing to students, with most teachers assuming that plumes are proven to exist. There is typically little emphasis, in particular in undergraduate teaching, that the origin of melting anomalies is currently uncertain and that scientists do not know all the answers. Little encouragement is given to students to become involved in the debate and to consider the pros and cons for themselves. Typically teachers take the approach that “an answer” (or even “the answer”) must be taught to students. Such a pedagogic approach misses an excellent opportunity to allow students to participate in an important ongoing debate in Earth sciences. It also misses the opportunity to illustrate to students several critical aspects regarding correct application of the scientific method. The scientific method involves attempting to disprove hypotheses, not to prove them. A priori assumptions should be kept uppermost in mind and reconsidered at all stages. Multiple working hypotheses should be entertained. The predictions of a hypothesis should be tested, and unpredicted observations taken as weakening the original hypothesis. Hypotheses should not be endlessly adapted to fit unexpected observations. The difficulty with pedagogic treatment of the mantle plumes debate highlights a general uncertainty about how to teach issues in Earth science that are not yet resolved with certainty. It also represents a missed opportunity to let students experience how scientific theories evolve, warts

  19. Biofuel Blending Impacts on Aircraft Engine Particle Emissions at Cruise Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R.

    2015-12-01

    We present measurements of aerosol emissions indices and microphysical properties measured in-situ behind the CFM56-2-C1 engines of the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the 2014 Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions (ACCESS) project. Aircraft engine emissions can have a disproportionately large climatic impact since they are emitted high in the troposphere and in remote regions with otherwise low aerosol concentrations. This has motivated numerous past ground-based studies focused on quantifying the emissions indices of non-volatile and semi-volatile aerosol species, however, it is unclear the extent to which emissions on the ground translate to emissions at cruise conditions. In addition, the ability of engine-emitted aerosols to nucleate ice crystals and form linear contrails or contrail cirrus clouds remains poorly understood. To better understand these effects, two chase plane experiments were carried out in 2013 and 2014. Three different fuel types are discussed: a low-sulfur JP-8 fuel, a 50:50 blend of JP-8 and a camelina-based HEFA fuel, and the JP-8 fuel doped with sulfur. Emissions were sampled using a large number of aerosol and gas instruments integrated on HU-25 and Falcon 20 jets that were positioned in the DC-8 exhaust plume at approximately 50-500 m distance behind the engines. It was found that the biojet fuel blend substantially decreases the aerosol number and mass emissions indices, while the gas phase emission indices were similar across fuels. The magnitude of the effects of these fuel-induced changes of aerosol emissions and implications for future aviation biofuel blending impacts will be discussed.

  20. DOAS measurements of NO2 from an ultralight aircraft during the Earth Challenge expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlaud, A.; van Roozendael, M.; van Gent, J.; Fayt, C.; Maes, J.; Toledo, X.; Ronveaux, O.; de Mazière, M.

    2012-02-01

    We report on airborne Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements of NO2 tropospheric columns above South Asia, Arabic peninsula, North Africa, and Italy in November and December 2009. The DOAS instrument was installed on an ultralight aircraft involved in the Earth Challenge project, an expedition of seven pilots flying on four ultralight aircraft between Australia and Belgium. The instrument recorded spectra in limb geometry with a large field-of-view, a set-up which provides a high sensitivity to the boundary layer NO2 while minimizing the uncertainties related to the attitude variations. We compare our measurements with OMI and GOME-2 tropospheric NO2 products when the latter are available. Above Rajasthan and the Po Valley, two areas where the NO2 field is homogeneous, data sets agree very well. Our measurements in this areas are respectively 0.1 ± 0.1 to 2.8 ± 1 × 1015 molec cm-2 and 2.5 ± 0.5 × 1016 molec cm-2. Flying downwind of Riyadh, our NO2 measurements show with a higher spatial resolution than OMI the structure of the megacities'exhaust plume. Moreover, our measurements indicate larger columns (up to 70%) than the one seen by satellites. We also derived tropopsheric columns when no satellite data was available, if it was possible to get information on the visibility from satellite measurements of aerosol optical thickness. The maximum column we measured was above Benghazi, with 5.7 ± 2 × 1016 molec cm-2. This experiment also provides a confirmation for the recent finding of a soil signature above desert.

  1. DOAS measurements of NO2 from an ultralight aircraft during the Earth Challenge expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlaud, A.; Van Roozendael, M.; van Gent, J.; Fayt, C.; Maes, J.; Toledo-Fuentes, X.; Ronveaux, O.; De Mazière, M.

    2012-08-01

    We report on airborne Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements of NO2 tropospheric columns above South Asia, the Arabic peninsula, North Africa, and Italy in November and December 2009. The DOAS instrument was installed on an ultralight aircraft involved in the Earth Challenge project, an expedition of seven pilots flying on four ultralight aircraft between Australia and Belgium. The instrument recorded spectra in limb geometry with a large field of view, a set-up which provides a high sensitivity to the boundary layer NO2 while minimizing the uncertainties related to the attitude variations. We compare our measurements with OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) and GOME-2 (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2) tropospheric NO2 products when the latter are available. Above Rajasthan and the Po Valley, two areas where the NO2 field is homogeneous, data sets agree very well. Our measurements in these areas are 0.1 ± 0.1 to 3 ± 1 × 1015 molec cm-2 and 2.6 ± 0.8 × 1016 molec cm-2, respectively. Flying downwind of Riyadh, our NO2 measurements show the structure of the megacity's exhaust plume with a higher spatial resolution than OMI. Moreover, our measurements are larger (up to 40%) than those seen by satellites. We also derived tropospheric columns when no satellite data were available if it was possible to get information on the visibility from satellite measurements of aerosol optical thickness. This experiment also provides a confirmation for the recent finding of a soil signature above desert.

  2. Plasma plume MHD power generator and method

    DOEpatents

    Hammer, James H.

    1993-01-01

    Highly-conducting plasma plumes are ejected across the interplanetary magnetic field from a situs that is moving relative to the solar wind, such as a spacecraft or an astral body, such as the moon, having no magnetosphere that excludes the solar wind. Discrete plasma plumes are generated by plasma guns at the situs extending in opposite directions to one another and at an angle, preferably orthogonal, to the magnetic field direction of the solar wind plasma. The opposed plumes are separately electrically connected to their source by a low impedance connection. The relative movement between the plasma plumes and the solar wind plasma creates a voltage drop across the plumes which is tapped by placing the desired electrical load between the electrical connections of the plumes to their sources. A portion of the energy produced may be used in generating the plasma plumes for sustained operation.

  3. The climate impact of ship NOx emissions: uncertainties due to plume chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, C. D.; Prather, M. J.; Vinken, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    Ships are an important source of reactive trace gases in the marine atmosphere, comprising about 17% of total anthropogenic NOx emissions. In the marine environment, ship NOx emissions generate ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radicals (OH) more efficiently than in continental air. Global atmospheric chemistry and transport models (CTMs) have found that ship NOx cools Earth's climate because reductions in methane radiative forcing (RF) due to the OH enhancements more than compensate for warming caused by ship-induced ozone. These past model studies, however, all assumed that the concentrated plumes of ship exhaust are instantly diluted into a grid cell spanning hundreds of kilometers. This expedient but inaccurate model assumption overestimates ozone and OH production, because the affected models bypass the early stages of plume evolution when high NOx concentrations intensify NOx chemical losses. We provide here the first estimate of RF from ship NOx that accounts for sub-grid-scale ship plume chemistry. First, we improve the plume-in-grid representation of exhaust gas chemistry, which is derived from a plume dispersion model, in the GEOS-Chem global CTM. The CTM now calculates methane oxidation within exhaust plumes for the first time, where OH concentrations are 2-3 times greater than background air. We also account for the effect of wind speed on ozone production and losses of NOx and methane in young plumes. We evaluate the CTM against airborne measurements of NOx and ozone over the ocean. The global ship-induced perturbations to ozone and methane concentrations in the improved model are smaller than suggested by the ensemble of past global modeling studies. If we assume instant dilution of ship NOx emissions in our CTM, we can reproduce the past model results, but ozone production is overestimated by 20% and the resulting ozone column enhancements and RF by 40%. Thus, the ozone and methane RF components from ship NOx are likely much smaller than suggested by past

  4. Assessing and controlling the effect of aircraft on the environment: Pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppoff, I. G.; Grobman, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    The air pollution created by aircraft engines around airports and the global atmospheric problem of supersonic aircraft operating in the stratosphere are discussed. Methods for assessing the air pollution impact are proposed. The use of atmospheric models to determine the air pollution extent is described. Methods for controlling the emissions of aircraft engines are examined. Diagrams of the atmospheric composition resulting from exhaust gas emissions are developed.

  5. Cold Flow Plume Entrainment Test Final Report NTF Test Number 2456

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; McDaniels, David; Mishtawy, Jason; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Hammad, Khaled J.

    2005-01-01

    As part of the Space Shuttle Return to Flight (RTF) program, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis to define the velocity flowfields around the Shuttle stack at liftoff. These CFD predicted velocity flowfields were used in debris transport analysis (DTA). High speed flows such as plumes induce or 'entrain' mass from the surrounding environment. Previous work had shown that CFD analysis over-predicts plume induced flows. Therefore, the DTA would tend to 1) predict more debris impacts, and 2) the debris velocity (and kinetic energy) of those impacts would be too high. At a November, 2004 peer-review it was recommended that the Liftoff DTA team quantify the uncertainty in the DTA caused by the CFD's over prediction of plume induced flow. To do so, the Liftoff DTA team needed benchmark quality data for plume induced flow to quantify the CFD accuracy and its effect on the DTA. MSFC's Nozzle Test Facility (NTF) conducted the "Nozzle Induced Flows test, P#2456" to obtain experimental data for plume induced flows for nozzle flow exhausting into q quiescent freestream. Planning for the test began in December, 2004 and the experimental data was obtained in February and March of 2005. The funding for this test was provided by MSFC's Space Shuttle Propulsion Systems Integration and Engineering office.

  6. Filter measurements of stratospheric sulfate and chloride in the eruption plume of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Gandrud, B.W.; Lazrus, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    Five flights of the U-2 aircraft with a filter sampler aboard were flown in the Mount St. Helens debris from 19 May to 17 June 1980. Sulfate concentrations as large as 216 times the expected background were observed. The enhancements of acid chloride vapor were considerably smaller, suggesting an insignificant increase of background values of hydrogen chloride once the plume is well mixed throughout the lower stratosphere.

  7. Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei in the stratosphere around the plume of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.F.; Hudson, J.G.; Kocmond, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei were made from small samples of stratospheric air taken from a U-2 aircraft at altitudes ranging from 13 to 19 kilometers. The measured concentrations of nuclei both in and outside the plume from the May and June 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens were higher than expected, ranging from about 100 to about 1000 per cubic centimeter active at 1 percent supersaturation.

  8. Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei in the stratosphere around the plume of mount st. Helens.

    PubMed

    Rogers, C F; Hudson, J G; Kocmond, W C

    1981-02-20

    Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei were made from small samples of stratospheric air taken from a U-2 aircraft at altitudes ranging from 13 to 19 kilometers. The measured concentrations of nuclei both in and outside the plume from the May and June 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens were higher than expected, ranging from about 100 to about 1000 per cubic centimeter active at 1 percent supersaturation.

  9. Filter measurements of stratospheric sulfate and chloride in the eruption plume of mount st. Helens.

    PubMed

    Gandrud, B W; Lazrus, A L

    1981-02-20

    Five flights of the U-2 aircraft with a filter sampler aboard were flown in the Mount St. Helens debris from 19 May to 17 June 1980. Sulfate concentrations as large as 216 times the expected background were observed. The enhancements of acid chloride vapor were considerably smaller, suggesting an insignificant increase of background values of hydrogen chloride once the plume is well mixed throughout the lower stratosphere.

  10. Community sensitivity to changes in aircraft noise exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fidell, S.; Horonjeff, R.; Teffeteller, S.; Pearsons, K.

    1981-01-01

    Interviews were conducted in the vicinity of Burbank Airport during a four month period during which a counterbalanced series of changes in aircraft noise exposure occurred due to runway repairs. Another interview was undertaken approximately one year after completion of the initial runway repairs. Noise measurements were made in conjunction with administration of a brief questionnaire to a near exhaustive sample of residents in four airport neighborhoods. The magnitude and direction of change of annoyance with aircraft noise exposure corresponded closely to the actual changes in physical exposure. Estimates were made of time constants for the rate of change of attitudes toward aircraft noise.

  11. Educating with Aircraft Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Hobie

    1976-01-01

    Described is utilization of aircraft models, model aircraft clubs, and model aircraft magazines to promote student interest in aerospace education. The addresses for clubs and magazines are included. (SL)

  12. Irritants in cigarette smoke plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Ayer, H.E.; Yeager, D.W.

    1982-11-01

    Concentrations of the irritants formaldehyde and acrolein in side stream cigarette smoke plumes are up to three orders of magnitude above occupational limits, readily accounting for eye and nasal irritation. ''Low-tar'' cigarettes appear at least as irritating as other cigarettes. More than half the irritant is associated with the particulate phase of the smoke, permitting deposition throughout the entire respiratory tract and raising the issue of whether formaldehyde in smoke is associated with bronchial cancer.

  13. Hydrothermal plumes along the East Pacific Rise, 8 deg 40 min to 11 deg 50 min N: Plume distribution and relationship to the apparent magmatic budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, E. T.; Feely, R. A.; Mottl, M. J.; Sansone, F. T.; Wheat, C. G.; Resing, J. A.; Lupton, J. E.

    1994-11-01

    The interactions between hydrothermal circulation and large-scale geological and geophysical characteristics of the mid-ocean ridge cannot be ascertained without large-scale views of the pattern of hydrothermal venting. Such multi-ridge-segment surveys of venting are accomplished most efficiently by mapping the distribution and intensity of hydrothermal plumes. In November 1991, we mapped hydrothermal temperature (Delta(theta)) and light attenuation (Delta(c)) anomalies above the East Pacific Rise (EPR) continuously from 8 deg 40 min to 11 deg 50 min N, a fast spreading ridge crest portion bisected by the Clipperton Transform Fault. Plume distributions show a precise correlation with the distribution of active vents where video coverage of the axial caldera is exhaustive. Elsewhere in the study area the sketchy knowledge of vent locations gleaned from scattered camera tows predicts only poorly the large-scale hydrothermal pattern revealed by our plume studies. Plumes were most intense between 9 deg 42 min and 9 deg 54 min N, directly over a March/April, 1991, seafloor eruption. These plumes had exceptionally high Delta(c)/Delta(theta) ratios compared to the rest of the study area; we suggest that the phase-separated gas-rich vent fluids discharging here fertilize an abundant population of bacteria. Hydrothermal plume distributions define three categories: intense and continuous, weak and discontinuous and negligible. The location of each category is virtually congruent with areas that are, respectively, magmatically robust, magmatically weak and magmatically starved, as inferred from previous measurements of axial bathymetric undulations, cross-axis inflation and magma chamber depth and continuity. This congruency implies a fine-scale spatial and temporal connection between magmatic fluctuations and hydrothermal venting. We thus speculate that, at least along this fast spreading section of the EPR, cyclic replenishment, eruption and freezing of the thin axial melt

  14. The ice plumes of Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, William

    2014-10-01

    It is of extreme interest to NASA and the scientific community that evidence has been found for plumes of water ice venting from the polar regions of Europa (Roth et al 2014) - spectroscopic detection of off-limb line emission from the dissociation products of water. We were awarded Cycle 21 time to seek direct images of the Europa exosphere, including Enceladus-like plumes if present, basing our study on FUV images of Europa as it transits the smooth face of Jupiter. We also obtained a necessary FUV image of Europa out of transit. These observations provide additional evidence for the presence of ice plumes on Europa. Here, we propose to augment our previous imaging work and to seek an initial, efficient characterization of off-limb emission as Europa orbits Jupiter. Such images provide sensitive flux and column density limits, with exceptional spatial resolution. In transit, our strategy can place firm limits on, or measurements of, absorbing columns, their distribution with altitude above the surface of Europa, and constrain their wavelength dependence and hence composition. Out of transit, geometrical and surface brightness considerations can help us distinguish between continuum FUV emission from forward- or back-scattering, from line emission, or, though we might prefer otherwise, from more subtle instrumental artifacts than hitherto understood. If the ice fountains of Europa arise from the deep ocean, we have gained access to probably the most astrobiologically interesting location in the Solar System.

  15. Microbial populations in contaminant plumes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haack, S.K.; Bekins, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    Efficient biodegradation of subsurface contaminants requires two elements: (1) microbial populations with the necessary degradative capabilities, and (2) favorable subsurface geochemical and hydrological conditions. Practical constraints on experimental design and interpretation in both the hydrogeological and microbiological sciences have resulted in limited knowledge of the interaction between hydrogeological and microbiological features of subsurface environments. These practical constraints include: (1) inconsistencies between the scales of investigation in the hydrogeological and microbiological sciences, and (2) practical limitations on the ability to accurately define microbial populations in environmental samples. However, advances in application of small-scale sampling methods and interdisciplinary approaches to site investigations are beginning to significantly improve understanding of hydrogeological and microbiological interactions. Likewise, culture-based and molecular analyses of microbial populations in subsurface contaminant plumes have revealed significant adaptation of microbial populations to plume environmental conditions. Results of recent studies suggest that variability in subsurface geochemical and hydrological conditions significantly influences subsurface microbial-community structure. Combined investigations of site conditions and microbial-community structure provide the knowledge needed to understand interactions between subsurface microbial populations, plume geochemistry, and contaminant biodegradation.

  16. Ventilation Exhaust Power Recovery Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yandell, Jeremy

    2012-11-01

    Due to the expense of designing ductwork and exhaust fans to meet the exact desired flow rate for building exhaust, there is wasted energy that is unrecovered when exhausted to the atmosphere. By designing a small diameter wind turbine the kinetic energy in the exhaust stream can be recovered and power provided back into the building. Unlike large scale commercial wind turbines that must be designed to provide power from a large range of wind speeds and directions, this smaller scale turbine can be optimized for a single constant wind speed with no variation in direction. The critical component is to prevent backpressure feeding through the system and increasing the load on the exhaust fan. This design project began with the theoretical airfoil and blade design, followed by modeling the system in fluid dynamics software, a full CAD design was created and modified for the selected manufacturing process, prototype creation and testing will be completed both in a wind tunnel and in a real environment, and the completed data will be compared with theoretical and computational results. Note: There is a patent pending for this design and concept.

  17. Analysis of the measured effects of the principal exhaust effluents from solid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawbarn, R.; Kinslow, M.; Watson, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of conducting environmental chamber tests using a small rocket motor to study the physical processes which occur when the exhaust products from solid motors mix with the ambient atmosphere was investigated. Of particular interest was the interaction between hydrogen chloride, aluminum oxide, and water vapor. Several types of instruments for measuring HCl concentrations were evaluated. Under some conditions it was noted that acid aerosols were formed in the ground cloud. These droplets condensed on Al2O3 nuclei and were associated with the rocket exhaust cooling during the period of plume rise to stabilization. Outdoor firings of the solid rocket motors of a 6.4 percent scaled model of the space shuttle were monitored to study the interaction of the exhaust effluents with vegetation downwind of the test site. Data concerning aluminum oxide particles produced by solid rocket motors were evaluated.

  18. Exhaust Gas Modeling Effects on Hypersonic Powered Simulation at Mach 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatum, Kenneth E.; Huebner, Lawrence D.

    1995-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to investigate the accuracy and validity of cold-gas simulation of actual hot scramjet exhaust within a Mach 10 free stream over a representative single-stage-to-orbit airbreathing configuration. In particular, exhausts of various noncombusting chemistry models were studied to characterize their effects on the vehicle aftbody performance and the plume flow field definition. Two approximations of the hot scramjet combustion products were utilized to determine the requirement for expensive, multi-species numerical modeling, and to establish a baseline for the validation of cold-gas simulation. Cold-gas simulation at Mach 10 is shown to be a viable technique using an appropriate thermally perfect gas mixture for reproducing hot scramjet exhaust effects.

  19. Commercial aircraft engine emissions characterization of in-use aircraft at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Scott C; Jayne, John T; Lobo, Prem; Onasch, Timothy B; Fleming, Gregg; Hagen, Donald E; Whitefield, Philip D; Miake-Lye, Richard C

    2008-03-15

    The emissions from in-use commercial aircraft engines have been analyzed for selected gas-phase species and particulate characteristics using continuous extractive sampling 1-2 min downwind from operational taxi- and runways at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Using the aircraft tail numbers, 376 plumes were associated with specific engine models. In general, for takeoff plumes, the measured NOx emission index is lower (approximately 18%) than that predicted by engine certification data corrected for ambient conditions. These results are an in-service observation of the practice of "reduced thrust takeoff". The CO emission index observed in ground idle plumes was greater (up to 100%) than predicted by engine certification data for the 7% thrust condition. Significant differences are observed in the emissions of black carbon and particle number among different engine models/technologies. The presence of a mode at approximately 65 nm (mobility diameter) associated with takeoff plumes and a smaller mode at approximately 25 nm associated with idle plumes has been observed. An anticorrelation between particle mass loading and particle number concentration is observed.

  20. Volcanic plumes and wind: Jetstream interaction examples and implications for air traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bursik, M. I.; Kobs, S. E.; Burns, A.; Braitseva, O. A.; Bazanova, L. I.; Melekestsev, I. V.; Kurbatov, A.; Pieri, D. C.

    2009-09-01

    Volcanic plumes interact with the wind at all scales. On smaller scales, wind affects local eddy structure; on larger scales, wind shapes the entire plume trajectory. The polar jets or jetstreams are regions of high [generally eastbound] winds that span the globe from 30 to 60° in latitude, centered at an altitude of about 10 km. They can be hundreds of kilometers wide, but as little as 1 km in thickness. Core windspeeds are up to 130 m/s. Modern transcontinental and transoceanic air routes are configured to take advantage of the jetstream. Eastbound commercial jets can save both time and fuel by flying within it; westbound aircraft generally seek to avoid it. Using both an integral model of plume motion that is formulated within a plume-centered coordinate system (BENT) as well as the Active Tracer High-resolution Atmospheric Model (ATHAM), we have calculated plume trajectories and rise heights under different wind conditions. Model plume trajectories compare well with the observed plume trajectory of the Sept 30/Oct 1, 1994, eruption of Kliuchevskoi Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia, for which measured maximum windspeed was 30-40 m/s at about 12 km. Tephra fall patterns for some prehistoric eruptions of Avachinsky Volcano, Kamchatka, and Inyo Craters, CA, USA, are anomalously elongated and inconsistent with simple models of tephra dispersal in a constant windfield. The Avachinsky deposit is modeled well by BENT using a windspeed that varies with height. Two potentially useful conclusions can be made about air routes and volcanic eruption plumes under jetstream conditions. The first is that by taking advantage of the jetstream, aircraft are flying within an airspace that is also preferentially occupied by volcanic eruption clouds and particles. The second is that, because eruptions with highly variable mass eruption rate pump volcanic particles into the jetstream under these conditions, it is difficult to constrain the tephra grain size distribution and mass loading