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Sample records for aircraft fuselage lap

  1. Measurements of fuselage skin strains and displacements near a longitudinal lap joint in a pressurized aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Edward P.; Britt, Vicki O.

    1991-01-01

    Strains and displacements in a small area near a longitudinal lap joint in the fuselage skin of a B737 aircraft were measured during a pressurization cycle to a differential pressure of 6.2 psi while the aircraft was on the ground. It was found that hoop strains were higher than longitudinal strains at each location; membrane strains in the unreinforced skin were higher than in the joint; membrane strains in the hoop direction, as well as radial displacements, tended to be highest at the mid-bay location between skin reinforcements; significant bending in the hoop direction occurred in the joint and in the skin near the joint, and the bending was unsymmetrically distributed about the stringer at the middle of the joint; and radial displacements were unsymmetrically distributed across the lap joint. The interpretation of the strain gage data for locations on the bonded and riveted lap joint assumed that the joint did not contain disbonded areas.

  2. Results of uniaxial and biaxial tests on riveted fuselage lap joint specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlieger, H.

    1994-01-01

    As part of an FAA-NLR collaborative program on structural integrity of aging aircraft, NLR carried out uniaxial and biaxial fatigue tests on riveted lap joint specimens being representative for application in a fuselage. All tests were constant amplitude tests with maximum stresses being representative for fuselage pressurization cycles and R-values of 0.1. The parameters selected in the testing program were the stress level (sigma(sub max) = 14 and 16 ksi) and the rivet spacing (0.75 and 1.0 inch). All specimens contained 3 rows of countersunk rivets, the rivet row spacing was 1 inch and the rivet orientation continuous.

  3. Evaluation of the fuselage lap joint fatigue and terminating action repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samavedam, Gopal; Thomson, Douglas; Jeong, David Y.

    1994-09-01

    Terminating action is a remedial repair which entails the replacement of shear head countersunk rivets with universal head rivets which have a larger shank diameter. The procedure was developed to eliminate the risk of widespread fatigue damage (WFD) in the upper rivet row of a fuselage lap joint. A test and evaluation program has been conducted by Foster-Miller, Inc. (FMI) to evaluate the terminating action repair of the upper rivet row of a commercial aircraft fuselage lap splice. Two full scale fatigue tests were conducted on fuselage panels using the growth of fatigue cracks in the lap joint. The second test was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the terminating action repair. In both tests, cyclic pressurization loading was applied to the panels while crack propagation was recorded at all rivet locations at regular intervals to generate detailed data on conditions of fatigue crack initiation, ligament link-up, and fuselage fracture. This program demonstrated that the terminating action repair substantially increases the fatigue life of a fuselage panel structure and effectively eliminates the occurrence of cracking in the upper rivet row of the lap joint. While high cycle crack growth was recorded in the middle rivet row during the second test, failure was not imminent when the test was terminated after cycling to well beyond the service life. The program also demonstrated that the initiation, propagation, and linkup of WFD in full-scale fuselage structures can be simulated and quantitatively studied in the laboratory. This paper presents an overview of the testing program and provides a detailed discussion of the data analysis and results. Crack distribution and propagation rates and directions as well as frequency of cracking are presented for both tests. The progression of damage to linkup of adjacent cracks and to eventual overall panel failure is discussed. In addition, an assessment of the effectiveness of the terminating action repair and the

  4. Evaluation of the fuselage lap joint fatigue and terminating action repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samavedam, Gopal; Thomson, Douglas; Jeong, David Y.

    1994-01-01

    Terminating action is a remedial repair which entails the replacement of shear head countersunk rivets with universal head rivets which have a larger shank diameter. The procedure was developed to eliminate the risk of widespread fatigue damage (WFD) in the upper rivet row of a fuselage lap joint. A test and evaluation program has been conducted by Foster-Miller, Inc. (FMI) to evaluate the terminating action repair of the upper rivet row of a commercial aircraft fuselage lap splice. Two full scale fatigue tests were conducted on fuselage panels using the growth of fatigue cracks in the lap joint. The second test was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the terminating action repair. In both tests, cyclic pressurization loading was applied to the panels while crack propagation was recorded at all rivet locations at regular intervals to generate detailed data on conditions of fatigue crack initiation, ligament link-up, and fuselage fracture. This program demonstrated that the terminating action repair substantially increases the fatigue life of a fuselage panel structure and effectively eliminates the occurrence of cracking in the upper rivet row of the lap joint. While high cycle crack growth was recorded in the middle rivet row during the second test, failure was not imminent when the test was terminated after cycling to well beyond the service life. The program also demonstrated that the initiation, propagation, and linkup of WFD in full-scale fuselage structures can be simulated and quantitatively studied in the laboratory. This paper presents an overview of the testing program and provides a detailed discussion of the data analysis and results. Crack distribution and propagation rates and directions as well as frequency of cracking are presented for both tests. The progression of damage to linkup of adjacent cracks and to eventual overall panel failure is discussed. In addition, an assessment of the effectiveness of the terminating action repair and the

  5. Multi-Site Fatigue Testing and Characterization of Fuselage Panels from Aging Aircraft Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-07

    Multi-site fatigue damage is a common problem in the riveted lap joint structure of aging aircraft. Modeling and characterization of such damage is...an especially daunting task. In this effort we present the results from fatigue tests which were performed on fuselage lap joints extracted from...in the lap joint . Some spot welded lap joint panels were also tested during the larger program; however, only the results from mechanically fastened

  6. Fracture analysis of multi-site cracking in fuselage lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuth, J. L.; Hutchinson, J. W.

    1994-09-01

    A two-dimensional plane stress elastic fracture mechanics analysis of a cracked lap joint fastened by rigid pins is presented and results are applied to the problem of multi-site damage (MSD) in riveted lap joints of aircraft fuselage skins. Two problems are addressed, the problem of equal length MSD cracks and the problem of alternating length MSD cracks. For the problem of equal length cracks, two models of rivet/skin interactions are studied and the role of residual stresses due to the riveting process is explored. Stress intensity factors are obtained as a function of normalized crack length. Also, the load distribution among rivet rows and the compliance change of the joint due to MSD cracking are obtained. For the problem of alternating length cracks, attention is focussed on how load is distributed between columns of rivets and how this load shedding can alter crack tip stress intensity factors. The equal and alternating length crack analyses reveal no clear-cut mechanism to explain the relative uniformity of fatigue cracks emerging from lap joint rivet holes in actual aircraft and in mechanical lap joint tests.

  7. Low frequency ultrasonic nondestructive inspection of aluminum/adhesive fuselage lap splices

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, Thadd

    1994-01-04

    This thesis is a collection of research efforts in ultrasonics, conducted at the Center for Aviation Systems Reliability located at Iowa State University, as part of the Federal Aviation Administration`s ``Aging Aircraft Program.`` The research was directed toward the development of an ultrasonic prototype to inspect the aluminum/adhesive fuselage lap splices found on 1970`s vintage Boeing passenger aircraft. The ultrasonic prototype consists of a normal incidence, low frequency inspection technique, and a scanning adapter that allows focused immersion transducers to be operated in a direct contact manner in any inspection orientation, including upside-down. The inspection technique uses a computer-controlled data acquisition system to produce a C-scan image of a radio frequency (RF) waveform created by a low frequency, broadband, focused beam transducer, driven with a spike voltage pulser. C-scans produced by this technique are color representations of the received signal`s peak-to-peak amplitude (voltage) taken over an (x, y) grid. Low frequency, in this context, refers to a wavelength that is greater than the lap splice`s layer thicknesses. With the low frequency technique, interface echoes of the lap splice are not resolved and gating of the signal is unnecessary; this in itself makes the technique simple to implement and saves considerable time in data acquisition. Along with the advantages in data acquisition, the low frequency technique is relatively insensitive to minor surface curvature and to ultrasonic interference effects caused by adhesive bondline thickness variations in the lap splice.

  8. Experimental and analytical program to determine strains in 737 LAP splice joints subjected to normal fuselage pressurization loads

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, D.P.; Jeong, D.Y.

    1996-02-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center (FAATC) has initiated several research projects to assess the structural integrity of the aging commercial aircraft fleet. One area of research involves the understanding of a phenomenon known as ``Widespread Fatigue Damage`` or WFD, which refers to a type of multiple element cracking that degrades the damage tolerance capability of an aircraft structure. Research on WFD has been performed both experimentally and analytically including finite element modeling of fuselage lap splice joints by the Volpe Center. Fuselage pressurization tests have also been conducted at the FAA`s Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) to obtain strain gage data from select locations on the FAA/AANC 737 Transport Aircraft Test Bed. One-hundred strain channels were used to monitor five different lap splice bays including the fuselage skin and substructure elements. These test results have been used to evaluate the accuracy of the analytical models and to support general aircraft analysis efforts. This paper documents the strain fields measured during the AANC tests and successfully correlates the results with analytical predictions.

  9. The Growth of Multi-Site Fatigue Damage in Fuselage Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1999-01-01

    Destructive examinations were performed to document the progression of multi-site damage (MSD) in three lap joint panels that were removed from a full scale fuselage test article that was tested to 60,000 full pressurization cycles. Similar fatigue crack growth characteristics were observed for small cracks (50 microns to 10 mm) emanating from counter bore rivets, straight shank rivets, and 100 deg counter sink rivets. Good correlation of the fatigue crack growth data base obtained in this study and FASTRAN Code predictions show that the growth of MSD in the fuselage lap joint structure can be predicted by fracture mechanics based methods.

  10. Structural analysis of Aircraft fuselage splice joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udaya Prakash, R.; Kumar, G. Raj; Vijayanandh, R.; Senthil Kumar, M.; Ramganesh, T.

    2016-09-01

    In Aviation sector, composite materials and its application to each component are one of the prime factors of consideration due to the high strength to weight ratio, design flexibility and non-corrosive so that the composite materials are widely used in the low weight constructions and also it can be treated as a suitable alternative to metals. The objective of this paper is to estimate and compare the suitability of a composite skin joint in an aircraft fuselage with different joints by simulating the displacement, normal stress, vonmises stress and shear stress with the help of numerical solution methods. The reference Z-stringer component of this paper is modeled by CATIA and numerical simulation is carried out by ANSYS has been used for splice joint presents in the aircraft fuselage with three combinations of joints such as riveted joint, bonded joint and hybrid joint. Nowadays the stringers are using to avoid buckling of fuselage skin, it has joined together by rivets and they are connected end to end by splice joint. Design and static analysis of three-dimensional models of joints such as bonded, riveted and hybrid are carried out and results are compared.

  11. Structural Configuration Systems Analysis for Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Welstead, Jason R.; Quinlan, Jesse R.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Structural configuration analysis of an advanced aircraft fuselage concept is investigated. This concept is characterized by a double-bubble section fuselage with rear mounted engines. Based on lessons learned from structural systems analysis of unconventional aircraft, high-fidelity finite-element models (FEM) are developed for evaluating structural performance of three double-bubble section configurations. Structural sizing and stress analysis are applied for design improvement and weight reduction. Among the three double-bubble configurations, the double-D cross-section fuselage design was found to have a relatively lower structural weight. The structural FEM weights of these three double-bubble fuselage section concepts are also compared with several cylindrical fuselage models. Since these fuselage concepts are different in size, shape and material, the fuselage structural FEM weights are normalized by the corresponding passenger floor area for a relative comparison. This structural systems analysis indicates that an advanced composite double-D section fuselage may have a relative structural weight ratio advantage over a conventional aluminum fuselage. Ten commercial and conceptual aircraft fuselage structural weight estimates, which are empirically derived from the corresponding maximum takeoff gross weight, are also presented and compared with the FEM- based estimates for possible correlation. A conceptual full vehicle FEM model with a double-D fuselage is also developed for preliminary structural analysis and weight estimation.

  12. Fatigue crack initiation in riveted lap joints and in pressurized fuselages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Richard P. G.

    1993-06-01

    Riveted joints in pressurized fuselages are exposed to severe fatigue loading. The study was carried out to increase fundamental understanding of the behavior of riveted fuselage joints. Areas of interest include rivet flexibility, load transfer, residual stress distribution, fatigue crack location, secondary bending and inter-sheet friction. These aspects depend on the squeezing force used to drive the rivet. Flat uniaxially loaded riveted lap joint specimens show longer fatigue lives than curved riveted panels loaded by internal pressure in a barrel test setup. Strain gauge measurements on a barrel test setup show more severe loading of the non-countersunk inner sheet compared to the countersunk outer sheet. Finite element calculations gave insight to the improved fatigue crack initiation performance for increased sqeezing force and to the crack initiation location. The early crack initiation at the edges of flat riveted lap joint panels is explained.

  13. The Characteristics of Fatigue Damage in the Fuselage Riveted Lap Splice Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    An extensive data base has been developed to form the physical basis for new analytical methodology to predict the onset of widespread fatigue damage in the fuselage lap splice joint. The results of detailed destructive examinations have been cataloged to describe the physical nature of MSD in the lap splice joint. ne catalog includes a detailed description, e.g., crack initiation, growth rates, size, location, and fracture morphology, of fatigue damage in the fuselage lap splice joint structure. Detailed examinations were conducted on a lap splice joint panel removed from a full scale fuselage test article after completing a 60,000 cycle pressure test. The panel contained a four bay region that exhibited visible outer skin cracks and regions of crack link-up along the upper rivet row. Destructive examinations revealed undetected fatigue damage in the outer skin, inner skin, and tear strap regions. Outer skin fatigue cracks were found to initiate by fretting damage along the faying surface. The cracks grew along the faying surface to a length equivalent to two to three skin thicknesses before penetrating the outboard surface of the outer skin. Analysis of fracture surface marker bands produced during full scale testing revealed that all upper rivet row fatigue cracks contained in a dim bay region grow at similar rates; this important result suggests that fracture mechanics based methods can be used to predict the growth of outer skin fatigue cracks in lap splice structure. Results are presented showing the affects of MSD and out-of-plane pressure loads on outer skin crack link-up.

  14. Fatigue growth of multiple-cracks near a row of fastener-holes in a fuselage lap-joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. H.; Atluri, S. N.

    1993-12-01

    The fatigue growth of multiple cracks, of arbitrary lengths, emanating from a row of fastener holes in a bonded, riveted, lap joint in a pressurized aircraft fuselage is studied. The effects of residual stresses due to a rivet misfit, and of plastic deformation near the hole, are included. A Schwartz-Neumann alternating method which uses the analytical solution for a row of multiple colinear cracks in an infinite sheet (the crack-faces being subject to arbitrary tractions), is developed to analyze this MSD problem on a personal computer. It is found that for a range of crack lengths, a phenomena wherein the shorter cracks may grow faster than longer cracks may exist.

  15. Design considerations for composite fuselage structure of commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. W.; Sakata, I. F.

    1981-01-01

    The structural, manufacturing, and service and environmental considerations that could impact the design of composite fuselage structure for commercial transport aircraft application were explored. The severity of these considerations was assessed and the principal design drivers delineated. Technical issues and potential problem areas which must be resolved before sufficient confidence is established to commit to composite materials were defined. The key issues considered are: definition of composite fuselage design specifications, damage tolerance, and crashworthiness.

  16. Determination of the Corrosive Conditions Present within Aircraft Lap-Splice Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Karen S.; Kelly, Robert G.; Piascik, Robert S.

    1999-01-01

    The complexity of airframe structure lends itself to damage resulting from crevice corrosion. Fuselage lap-splice joints are a particularly important structural detail in this regard because of the difficulty associated with detection and measurement of corrosion in these occluded regions. The objective of this work is to develop a laboratory corrosion test protocol to identify the chemistry to which lap joints are exposed and to develop a model of the corrosion within the joints. A protocol for collecting and identifying the chemistry of airframe crevice corrosion has been developed. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is used to identify the ionic species contained in corrosion product samples removed from fuselage lap splice joints. CE analysis has been performed on over sixty corrosion product samples removed from both civilian and military aircraft. Over twenty different ions have been detected. Measurements of pH of wetted corroded surfaces indicated an alkaline occluded solution. After determining the species present and their relative concentrations, the resultant solution was reproduced in bulk and electrochemical tests were performed to determine the corrosion rate. Electrochemical analyses of the behavior of AA2024-T3 in these solutions gave corrosion rates of up to 250 microns per year (10 mpy). Additional tests have determined the relative importance of each of the detected ions in model solutions used for future predictive tests. The statistically significant ions have been used to create a second generation solution. Laboratory studies have also included exposure tests involving artificial lap joints exposed to various simulated bulk and crevice environments. The extent and morphology of the attack in artificial lap joints has been compared to studies of corroded samples from actual aircraft. Other effects, such as temperature and potential, as well as the impact of the environment on fatigue crack growth have also been studied.

  17. Composite Structure Modeling and Analysis of Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Sorokach, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project and the Boeing Company are collabrating to advance the unitized damage arresting composite airframe technology with application to the Hybrid-Wing-Body (HWB) aircraft. The testing of a HWB fuselage section with Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) construction is presently being conducted at NASA Langley. Based on lessons learned from previous HWB structural design studies, improved finite-element models (FEM) of the HWB multi-bay and bulkhead assembly are developed to evaluate the performance of the PRSEUS construction. In order to assess the comparative weight reduction benefits of the PRSEUS technology, conventional cylindrical skin-stringer-frame models of a cylindrical and a double-bubble section fuselage concepts are developed. Stress analysis with design cabin-pressure load and scenario based case studies are conducted for design improvement in each case. Alternate analysis with stitched composite hat-stringers and C-frames are also presented, in addition to the foam-core sandwich frame and pultruded rod-stringer construction. The FEM structural stress, strain and weights are computed and compared for relative weight/strength benefit assessment. The structural analysis and specific weight comparison of these stitched composite advanced aircraft fuselage concepts demonstrated that the pressurized HWB fuselage section assembly can be structurally as efficient as the conventional cylindrical fuselage section with composite stringer-frame and PRSEUS construction, and significantly better than the conventional aluminum construction and the double-bubble section concept.

  18. Fuselage ventilation due to wind flow about a postcrash aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Postcrash aircraft fuselage fire development, dependent on the internal and external fluid dynamics is discussed. The natural ventilation rate, a major factor in the internal flow patterns and fire development is reviewed. The flow about the fuselage as affected by the wind and external fire is studied. An analysis was performend which estimated the rates of ventilation produced by the wind for a limited idealized environmental configuration. The simulation utilizes the empirical pressure coefficient distribution of an infinite circular cylinder near a wall with its boundary later flow to represent the atmospheric boundary layer. The resulting maximum ventilation rate for two door size openings, with varying circumferential location in a common 10 mph wind was an order of magnitude greater than the forced ventilation specified in full scale fire testing. The parameter discussed are: (1) fuselage size and shape, (2) fuselage orientation and proximity to the ground, (3) fuselage-openings size and location, (4) wind speed and direction, and (5) induced flow of the external fire plume is recommended. The fire testing should be conducted to a maximum ventilation rate at least an order of magnitude greater than the inflight air conditioning rates.

  19. Analytical Fuselage and Wing Weight Estimation of Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Mark C.; Ardema, Mark D.; Patron, Anthony P.; Hahn, Andrew S.; Miura, Hirokazu; Moore, Mark D.

    1996-01-01

    A method of estimating the load-bearing fuselage weight and wing weight of transport aircraft based on fundamental structural principles has been developed. This method of weight estimation represents a compromise between the rapid assessment of component weight using empirical methods based on actual weights of existing aircraft, and detailed, but time-consuming, analysis using the finite element method. The method was applied to eight existing subsonic transports for validation and correlation. Integration of the resulting computer program, PDCYL, has been made into the weights-calculating module of the AirCraft SYNThesis (ACSYNT) computer program. ACSYNT has traditionally used only empirical weight estimation methods; PDCYL adds to ACSYNT a rapid, accurate means of assessing the fuselage and wing weights of unconventional aircraft. PDCYL also allows flexibility in the choice of structural concept, as well as a direct means of determining the impact of advanced materials on structural weight. Using statistical analysis techniques, relations between the load-bearing fuselage and wing weights calculated by PDCYL and corresponding actual weights were determined.

  20. Initiation and growth of multiple-site damage in the riveted lap joint of a curved stiffened fuselage panel: An experimental and analytical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Abubaker Ali

    As part of the structural integrity research of the National Aging Aircraft Research Program, a comprehensive study on multiple-site damage (MSD) initiation and growth in a pristine lap-joint fuselage panel has been conducted. The curved stiffened fuselage panel was tested at the Full-Scale Aircraft Structural Test Evaluation and Research (FASTER) facility located at the Federal Aviation Administration William J. Hughes Technical Center. A strain survey test was conducted to verify proper load application. The panel was then subjected to a fatigue test with constant-amplitude cyclic loading. The applied loading spectrum included underload marker cycles so that crack growth history could be reconstructed from post-test fractographic examinations. Crack formation and growth were monitored via nondestructive and high-magnification visual inspections. Strain gage measurements recorded during the strain survey tests indicated that the inner surface of the skin along the upper rivet row of the lap joint experienced high tensile stresses due to local bending. During the fatigue loading, cracks were detected by eddy-current inspections at multiple rivet holes along the upper rivet row. Through-thickness cracks were detected visually after about 80% of the fatigue life. Once MSD cracks from two adjacent rivet holes linked up, there was a quick deterioration in the structural integrity of the lap joint. The linkup resulted in a 2.87" (72.9-mm) lead fatigue crack that rapidly propagated across 12 rivet holes and crossed over into the next skin bay, at which stage the fatigue test was terminated. A post-fatigue residual strength test was then conducted by loading the panel quasi-statically up to final failure. The panel failed catastrophically when the crack extended instantaneously across three additional bays. Post-test fractographic examinations of the fracture surfaces in the lap joint of the fuselage panel were conducted to characterize subsurface crack initiation and

  1. Finite Element Model Development For Aircraft Fuselage Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Fleming, Gary A.; Pappa, Richard S.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2000-01-01

    The ability to extend the valid frequency range for finite element based structural dynamic predictions using detailed models of the structural components and attachment interfaces is examined for several stiffened aircraft fuselage structures. This extended dynamic prediction capability is needed for the integration of mid-frequency noise control technology. Beam, plate and solid element models of the stiffener components are evaluated. Attachment models between the stiffener and panel skin range from a line along the rivets of the physical structure to a constraint over the entire contact surface. The finite element models are validated using experimental modal analysis results.

  2. A finite element and experimental investigation on the fatigue of riveted lap joints in aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atre, Amarendra

    Aircraft fuselage skin panels are joined together by rivets. The initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks in aircraft structures at and around the rivet/skin interface is directly related to residual stress field induced during the riveting process and subsequent service loads. Variations in the manufacturing process, such as applied loading and presence of sealant can influence the induced residual stress field. In previous research, the riveting process has been simulated by a 2D axisymmetric force-controlled analysis. The 2D analysis cannot capture the unsymmetrical residual stress state resulting from process variations. Experimental work has also been limited to observing effects of squeeze force on fatigue crack initiation in the riveted lap joint. In this work, a 3D finite element model of the riveting process that incorporates plasticity and contact between the various surfaces is simulated using ABAQUS finite element code to capture the residual stress state at the rivet/skin interface. The finite element model is implemented to observe the effects of interference, sealant and hole quality on the residual stress state using Implicit and Explicit solvers. Effects of subsequent load transfer are also analyzed with the developed model. A set of controlled lap joint fatigue experiments for the different conditions provides validation to the model.

  3. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Aircraft design evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nobe, T.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross sections and structural members on the performance of hypersonic cruise aircraft are evaluated. Representative fuselage/tank area structure was analyzed for strength, stability, fatigue and fracture mechanics. Various thermodynamic and structural tradeoffs were conducted to refine the conceptual designs with the primary objective of minimizing weight and maximizing aircraft range.

  4. Finite Element Model Development and Validation for Aircraft Fuselage Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Fleming, Gary A.; Pappa, Richard S.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2000-01-01

    The ability to extend the valid frequency range for finite element based structural dynamic predictions using detailed models of the structural components and attachment interfaces is examined for several stiffened aircraft fuselage structures. This extended dynamic prediction capability is needed for the integration of mid-frequency noise control technology. Beam, plate and solid element models of the stiffener components are evaluated. Attachment models between the stiffener and panel skin range from a line along the rivets of the physical structure to a constraint over the entire contact surface. The finite element models are validated using experimental modal analysis results. The increased frequency range results in a corresponding increase in the number of modes, modal density and spatial resolution requirements. In this study, conventional modal tests using accelerometers are complemented with Scanning Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Electro-Optic Holography measurements to further resolve the spatial response characteristics. Whenever possible, component and subassembly modal tests are used to validate the finite element models at lower levels of assembly. Normal mode predictions for different finite element representations of components and assemblies are compared with experimental results to assess the most accurate techniques for modeling aircraft fuselage type structures.

  5. Fatigue damage assessment of high-usage in-service aircraft fuselage structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosinyi, Bao Rasebolai

    As the commercial and military aircraft fleets continue to age, there is a growing concern that multiple-site damage (MSD) can compromise structural integrity. Multiple site damage is the simultaneous occurrence of many small cracks at independent structural locations, and is the natural result of fatigue, corrosion, fretting and other possible damage mechanisms. These MSD cracks may linkup and form a fatigue lead crack of critical length. The presence of MSD also reduces the structure's ability to withstand longer cracks. The objective of the current study is to assess, both experimentally and analytically, MSD formation and growth in the lap joint of curved panels removed from a retired aircraft. A Boeing 727-232 airplane owned and operated by Delta Air Lines, and retired at its design service goal, was selected for the study. Two panels removed from the left-hand side of the fuselage crown, near stringer 4L, were subjected to extended fatigue testing using the Full-Scale Aircraft Structural Test Evaluation and Research (FASTER) facility located at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) William J. Hughes Technical Center. The state of MSD was continuously assessed using several nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods. Damage to the load attachment points of the first panel resulted in termination of the fatigue test at 43,500 fatigue cycles, before cracks had developed in the lap joint. The fatigue test for the second panel was initially conducted under simulated in-service loading conditions for 120,000 cycles, and no cracks were detected in the skin of the panel test section. Artificial damage was then introduced into the panel at selected rivets in the critical (lower) rivet row, and the fatigue loads were increased. Visually detectable crack growth from the artificial notches was first seen after 133,000 cycles. The resulting lead crack grew along the lower rivet row, eventually forming an 11.8" long unstable crack after 141,771 cycles, at which point the

  6. Development of pressure containment and damage tolerance technology for composite fuselage structures in large transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. J.; Thomson, L. W.; Wilson, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    NASA sponsored composites research and development programs were set in place to develop the critical engineering technologies in large transport aircraft structures. This NASA-Boeing program focused on the critical issues of damage tolerance and pressure containment generic to the fuselage structure of large pressurized aircraft. Skin-stringer and honeycomb sandwich composite fuselage shell designs were evaluated to resolve these issues. Analyses were developed to model the structural response of the fuselage shell designs, and a development test program evaluated the selected design configurations to appropriate load conditions.

  7. Preliminary results on the fracture analysis of multi-site cracking of lap joints in aircraft skins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuth, J. L., Jr.; Hutchinson, John W.

    1992-07-01

    Results of a fracture mechanics analysis relevant to fatigue crack growth at rivets in lap joints of aircraft skins are presented. Multi-site damage (MSD) is receiving increased attention within the context of problems of aging aircraft. Fracture analyses previously carried out include small-scale modeling of rivet/skin interactions, larger-scale two-dimensional models of lap joints similar to that developed here, and full scale three-dimensional models of large portions of the aircraft fuselage. Fatigue testing efforts have included flat coupon specimens, two-dimensional lap joint tests, and full scale tests on specimens designed to closely duplicate aircraft sections. Most of this work is documented in the proceedings of previous symposia on the aging aircraft problem. The effect MSD has on the ability of skin stiffeners to arrest the growth of long skin cracks is a particularly important topic that remains to be addressed. One of the most striking features of MSD observed in joints of some test sections and in the joints of some of the older aircraft fuselages is the relative uniformity of the fatigue cracks from rivet to rivet along an extended row of rivets. This regularity suggests that nucleation of the cracks must not be overly difficult. Moreover, it indicates that there is some mechanism which keeps longer cracks from running away from shorter ones, or, equivalently, a mechanism for shorter cracks to catch-up with longer cracks. This basic mechanism has not been identified, and one of the objectives of the work is to see to what extent the mechanism is revealed by a fracture analysis of the MSD cracks. Another related aim is to present accurate stress intensity factor variations with crack length which can be used to estimate fatigue crack growth lifetimes once cracks have been initiated. Results are presented which illustrate the influence of load shedding from rivets with long cracks to neighboring rivets with shorter cracks. Results are also included

  8. Preliminary results on the fracture analysis of multi-site cracking of lap joints in aircraft skins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuth, J. L., Jr.; Hutchinson, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a fracture mechanics analysis relevant to fatigue crack growth at rivets in lap joints of aircraft skins are presented. Multi-site damage (MSD) is receiving increased attention within the context of problems of aging aircraft. Fracture analyses previously carried out include small-scale modeling of rivet/skin interactions, larger-scale two-dimensional models of lap joints similar to that developed here, and full scale three-dimensional models of large portions of the aircraft fuselage. Fatigue testing efforts have included flat coupon specimens, two-dimensional lap joint tests, and full scale tests on specimens designed to closely duplicate aircraft sections. Most of this work is documented in the proceedings of previous symposia on the aging aircraft problem. The effect MSD has on the ability of skin stiffeners to arrest the growth of long skin cracks is a particularly important topic that remains to be addressed. One of the most striking features of MSD observed in joints of some test sections and in the joints of some of the older aircraft fuselages is the relative uniformity of the fatigue cracks from rivet to rivet along an extended row of rivets. This regularity suggests that nucleation of the cracks must not be overly difficult. Moreover, it indicates that there is some mechanism which keeps longer cracks from running away from shorter ones, or, equivalently, a mechanism for shorter cracks to catch-up with longer cracks. This basic mechanism has not been identified, and one of the objectives of the work is to see to what extent the mechanism is revealed by a fracture analysis of the MSD cracks. Another related aim is to present accurate stress intensity factor variations with crack length which can be used to estimate fatigue crack growth lifetimes once cracks have been initiated. Results are presented which illustrate the influence of load shedding from rivets with long cracks to neighboring rivets with shorter cracks. Results are also included

  9. A record of all marker bands found in the upper rivet rows of 2 adjacent bays from a fuselage lap splice joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willard, Scott A.

    1995-01-01

    A full scale fuselage test article was subjected to 60,000 load cycles (pressurizations) to study the effect of widespread fatigue damage in fuselage structures. Every 10,000 cycles coded marker block loading sequences were used to mark the fracture surfaces of the fatigue cracks propagating within the panel. The loading sequences consisted of series of underloads combined with a series of full pressurizations. The combination of loads and underloads marked the fracture surfaces with marker bands that could later be used to reconstruct the fatigue crack growth history of selected regions within the test article. Thirty rivet holes comprising the upper rivet rows from two adjacent bays (bays #3 and #4) from a fuselage lap splice joint were examined for the purpose of this study. Optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to locate the marker bands.

  10. Damage Tolerant Repair Techniques for Pressurized Aircraft Fuselages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-06

    slightly higher error in the tapered patch can be a result of the stepwise tapering done in modeling the patch. The test specimen had a smooth milled taper...patches to common errors made in fuselage structural repair. The test results show that the soft patching concept explained in the previous chapter...squeezing force. Some specimens were purposely manufactured with known defects to estimate the effects of typical errors made in the repair process. Two

  11. Automated design of minimum drag light aircraft fuselages and nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetana, F. O.; Fox, S. R.; Karlin, B. E.

    1982-01-01

    The constrained minimization algorithm of Vanderplaats is applied to the problem of designing minimum drag faired bodies such as fuselages and nacelles. Body drag is computed by a variation of the Hess-Smith code. This variation includes a boundary layer computation. The encased payload provides arbitrary geometric constraints, specified a priori by the designer, below which the fairing cannot shrink. The optimization may include engine cooling air flows entering and exhausting through specific port locations on the body.

  12. A Study of the Utilization of Advanced Composites in Fuselage Structures of Commercial Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, D. J.; Sumida, P. T.; Bunin, B. L.; Janicki, G. S.; Walker, J. V.; Fox, B. R.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to define the technology and data needed to support the introduction of advanced composites in the future production of fuselage structure in large transport aircraft. Fuselage structures of six candidate airplanes were evaluated for the baseline component. The MD-100 was selected on the basis of its representation of 1990s fuselage structure, an available data base, its impact on the schedule and cost of the development program, and its availability and suitability for flight service evaluation. Acceptance criteria were defined, technology issues were identified, and a composite fuselage technology development plan, including full-scale tests, was identified. The plan was based on composite materials to be available in the mid to late 1980s. Program resources required to develop composite fuselage technology are estimated at a rough order of magnitude to be 877 man-years exclusive of the bird strike and impact dynamic test components. A conceptual composite fuselage was designed, retaining the basic MD-100 structural arrangement for doors, windows, wing, wheel wells, cockpit enclosure, major bulkheads, etc., resulting in a 32 percent weight savings.

  13. Weight Assessment for Fuselage Shielding on Aircraft With Open-Rotor Engines and Composite Blade Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, Kelly; Pereira, Michael; Kohlman, Lee; Goldberg, Robert; Envia, Edmane; Lawrence, Charles; Roberts, Gary; Emmerling, William

    2013-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been engaged in discussions with airframe and engine manufacturers concerning regulations that would apply to new technology fuel efficient "openrotor" engines. Existing regulations for the engines and airframe did not envision features of these engines that include eliminating the fan blade containment systems and including two rows of counter-rotating blades. Damage to the airframe from a failed blade could potentially be catastrophic. Therefore the feasibility of using aircraft fuselage shielding was investigated. In order to establish the feasibility of this shielding, a study was conducted to provide an estimate for the fuselage shielding weight required to provide protection from an open-rotor blade loss. This estimate was generated using a two-step procedure. First, a trajectory analysis was performed to determine the blade orientation and velocity at the point of impact with the fuselage. The trajectory analysis also showed that a blade dispersion angle of 3deg bounded the probable dispersion pattern and so was used for the weight estimate. Next, a finite element impact analysis was performed to determine the required shielding thickness to prevent fuselage penetration. The impact analysis was conducted using an FAA-provided composite blade geometry. The fuselage geometry was based on a medium-sized passenger composite airframe. In the analysis, both the blade and fuselage were assumed to be constructed from a T700S/PR520 triaxially-braided composite architecture. Sufficient test data on T700S/PR520 is available to enable reliable analysis, and also demonstrate its good impact resistance properties. This system was also used in modeling the surrogate blade. The estimated additional weight required for fuselage shielding for a wing- mounted counterrotating open-rotor blade is 236 lb per aircraft. This estimate is based on the shielding material serving the dual use of shielding and fuselage structure. If the

  14. Experimental modal analysis of the fuselage panels of an Aero Commander aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geisler, D.

    1981-01-01

    The reduction of interior noise in light aircraft was investigated with emphasis the thin fuselage sidewall. The approach used is theoretical and involves modeling of the sidewall panels and stiffeners. Experimental data obtained from tests investigating the effects of mass and stiffness treatments to the sidewalls are presented. The dynamic characteristics of treated panels are contrasted with the untreated sidewall panels using experimental modal analysis techniques. The results include the natural frequencies, modal dampling, and mode shapes of selected panels. Frequency response functions, data relating to the global fuselage response, and acoustic response are also presented.

  15. Application study of filamentary composites in a commercial jet aircraft fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.; June, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    A study of applications of filamentary composite materials to aircraft fuselage structure was performed. General design criteria were established and material studies conducted using the 727-200 forebody as the primary structural component. Three design approaches to the use of composites were investigated: uniaxial reinforcement of metal structure, uniaxial and biaxial reinforcement of metal structure, and an all-composite design. Materials application studies for all three concepts were conducted on fuselage shell panels, keel beam, floor beams, floor panels, body frames, fail-safe straps, and window frames. Cost benefit studies were conducted and developmental program costs estimated. On the basis of weight savings, cost effectiveness, developmental program costs, and potential for early application on commercial aircraft, the unaxial design is recommended for a 5-year flight service evaluation program.

  16. a Reciprocity Technique for the Characterisation of Sound Transmission Into Aircraft Fuselages.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, James Meredith

    1990-01-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Experimental determination of the sound insulation of propfan aircraft fuselage structures is problematic. The use of full-scale flight tests to investigate and optimise sidewall design is expensive, while the use of simplified excitation tests is questionable, due to the complicated nature of propeller sound fields and their interaction with the fuselage. This thesis describes the development and evaluation of a new experimental reciprocity technique for calibrating a fuselage as a transmitter of pressure acting on the external surface to the interior: it is based upon the use of a transducer which measures the volume velocity of the vibrating fuselage surface. The data generated may be combined with any impinging sound field to obtain a prediction of cabin sound pressure level. In the first instance, the technique is validated for sound transmission through flat panels into a rigid walled box and the results presented demonstrate the validity of the approach. Tests are then conducted on a set of four quarter-scale 'green' fuselage model configurations, constructed to investigate the influence of ring frame bending-stiffness, stringers and floor on airborne sound transmission. Interior noise predictions are obtained for plane wave excitation and a representation of propeller sound field excitation. The important features relating to correct representation of the excitation field and the fuselage structure are isolated, within the scope of the models evaluated. In addition, a statistical perturbation technique is described which demonstrates confidence in the predictions. The technique is recommended for evaluation on a full size airframe.

  17. High transonic speed transport aircraft study. [aerodynamic characteristics of single-fuselage, yawed-wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulfan, R. M.; Neumann, F. D.; Nisbet, J. W.; Mulally, A. R.; Murakami, J. K.; Noble, E. C.; Mcbarron, J. P.; Stalter, J. L.; Gimmestad, D. W.; Sussman, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    An initial design study of high-transonic-speed transport aircraft has been completed. Five different design concepts were developed. These included fixed swept wing, variable-sweep wing, delta wing, double-fuselage yawed-wing, and single-fuselage yawed-wing aircraft. The boomless supersonic design objectives of range=5560 Km (3000 nmi), payload-18 143 kg (40 000lb), Mach=1.2, and FAR Part 36 aircraft noise levels were achieved by the single-fuselage yawed-wing configuration with a gross weight of 211 828 Kg (467 000 lb). A noise level of 15 EPNdB below FAR Part 36 requirements was obtained with a gross weight increase to 226 796 Kg (500 000 lb). Although wing aeroelastic divergence was a primary design consideration for the yawed-wing concepts, the graphite-epoxy wings of this study were designed by critical gust and maneuver loads rather than by divergence requirements. The transonic nacelle drag is shown to be very sensitive to the nacelle installation. A six-degree-of-freedom dynamic stability analysis indicated that the control coordination and stability augmentation system would require more development than for a symmetrical airplane but is entirely feasible. A three-phase development plan is recommended to establish the full potential of the yawed-wing concept.

  18. Development of a biaxial test facility for structural evaluation of aircraft fuselage panels

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, D.; Walkington, P.; Rice, T.

    1998-03-01

    The number of commercial airframes exceeding twenty years of service continues to grow. An unavoidable by-product of aircraft use is that crack and corrosion flaws develop throughout the aircraft`s skin and substructure elements. Economic barriers to the purchase of new aircraft have created an aging aircraft fleet and placed even greater demands on efficient and safe repair methods. Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is now possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. The composite doubler repair process produces both engineering and economic benefits. The FAA`s Airworthiness Assurance Center at Sandia National Labs completed a project to introduce composite doubler repair technology to the commercial aircraft industry. This paper focuses on a specialized structural test facility which was developed to evaluate the performance of composite doublers on actual aircraft structure. The facility can subject an aircraft fuselage section to a combined load environment of pressure (hoop stress) and axial, or longitudinal, stress. The tests simulate maximum cabin pressure loads and use a computerized feedback system to maintain the proper ratio between hoop and axial loads. Through the use of this full-scale test facility it was possible to: (1) assess general composite doubler response in representative flight load scenarios, and (2) verify the design and analysis approaches as applied to an L-1011 door corner repair.

  19. Damage Tolerant Repair Techniques for Pressurized Aircraft Fuselages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    knit, -2K, and polyester mat, -2M). The results of an empirical study of bonding variables are shown in table 4.3. Table 4.3. Results of cure parameter...values shown in table 6.6. Table 6.6. Apparent Crack Patching Effectiveness, Long Cracks. Crack half length, Erdogan AK, Empirical (patched) percent mm...couldn’t have done it without you, and I wouldn’t have wanted to. IIIoo Damage Tolerat Repai Techniques for Premunizod Aircraft FuAslages Table of

  20. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles, summary. [aircraft design of aircraft fuel systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirrello, C. J.; Baker, A. H.; Stone, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed analytical study was made to investigate the effects of fuselage cross section (circular and elliptical) and the structural arrangement (integral and nonintegral tanks) on aircraft performance. The vehicle was a 200 passenger, liquid hydrogen fueled Mach 6 transport designed to meet a range goal of 9.26 Mn (5000 NM). A variety of trade studies were conducted in the area of configuration arrangement, structural design, and active cooling design in order to maximize the performance of each of three point design aircraft: (1) circular wing-body with nonintegral tanks, (2) circular wing-body with integral tanks and (3) elliptical blended wing-body with integral tanks. Aircraft range and weight were used as the basis for comparison. The resulting design and performance characteristics show that the blended body integral tank aircraft weights the least and has the greatest range capability, however, producibility and maintainability factors favor nonintegral tank concepts.

  1. Classification of fatigue cracking data in a simulated aircraft fuselage using a self-organizing map

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, M.L.; Hill, E.V.K.

    1994-12-31

    Many aircraft are being flown beyond their design lifespans and have therefore fallen victim to fatigue cracking. In some cases, such as the 1988 Aloha Airlines 737-200 incident, catastrophic fatigue growth has caused the loss of life. Acoustic emission (AE) nondestructive testing has been used to detect and classical the growth of fatigue cracks in complex structures, such as aircraft fuselages and wings since as early as 1979. In order to simulate an aircraft fuselage undergoing pressurization cycle fatigue, a test was developed in which a thin-walled aluminum pressure vessel was instrumented with AE sensors and cyclically fatigued to promote crack growth at a stress concentration built into the vessel. The AE data acquisition system. extracted the six AE parameters - amplitude, counts, duration, energy, risetime, and count-to-peak from each of the sensor signals. One-third of these parameter data sets were used to tram a Kohonen self-organizing map (SOM) neural network. The remaining data sets were used to test the SOM. The SOM output is a two-dimensional map with similar input data sets located at similar coordinates on the map. Because the continuous AE parameter data are grouped into discrete bands or intervals, e.g., all the events having amplitudes between 51.00 dB and 51.99 dB are classified as 51 dB events, the initial SOM output showed no distinct clustering. However, when the output was transformed into three-dimensions, with the third dimension being the frequency of occurrence of each two-dimensional coordinate, several distinct peaks were evident. These peaks correspond to the three AE source in the vessel: metal rubbing, rivet fretting, and fatigue cracking. Thus, the three-dimensional SOM was able to unambiguously classify fatigue crack growth events in a simulated aircraft fuselage structure.

  2. Sound Pressures and Correlations of Noise on the Fuselage of a Jet Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shattuck, Russell D.

    1961-01-01

    Tests were conducted at altitudes of 10,000, 20,000, and 30,000 feet at speeds of Mach 0.4, 0.6, and O.8. It was found that the sound pressure levels on the aft fuselage of a jet aircraft in flight can be estimated using an equation involving the true airspeed and the free air density. The cross-correlation coefficient over a spacing of 2.5 feet was generalized with Strouhal number. The spectrum of the noise in flight is comparatively flat up to 10,000 cycles per second.

  3. Aircraft Engine Noise Scattering By Fuselage and Wings: A Computational Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanescu, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Farassat, F.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents a time-domain method for computation of sound radiation from aircraft engine sources to the far-field. The effects of nonuniform flow around the aircraft and scattering of sound by fuselage and wings are accounted for in the formulation. The approach is based on the discretization of the inviscid flow equations through a collocation form of the Discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method. An isoparametric representation of the underlying geometry is used in order to take full advantage of the spectral accuracy of the method. Large-scale computations are made possible by a parallel implementation based on message passing. Results obtained for radiation from an axisymmetric nacelle alone are compared with those obtained when the same nacelle is installed in a generic configuration, with and without a wing.

  4. Aircraft Engine Noise Scattering by Fuselage and Wings: A Computational Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanescu, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Farassat, F.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents a time-domain method for computation of sound radiation from aircraft engine sources to the far-field. The effects of nonuniform flow around the aircraft and scattering of sound by fuselage and wings are accounted for in the formulation. The approach is based on the discretization of the inviscid flow equations through a collocation form of the Discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method. An isoparametric representation of the underlying geometry is used in order to take full advantage of the spectral accuracy of the method. Large-scale computations are made possible by a parallel implementation based on message passing. Results obtained for radiation from an axisymmetric nacelle alone are compared with those obtained when the same nacelle is installed in a generic configuration, with and without a wing.

  5. Aircraft Engine Noise Scattering by Fuselage and Wings: A Computational Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Stanescu, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents a time-domain method for computation of sound radiation from aircraft engine sources to the far field. The effects of non-uniform flow around the aircraft and scattering of sound by fuselage and wings are accounted for in the formulation. The approach is based on the discretization of the inviscid flow equations through a collocation form of the discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method. An isoparametric representation of the underlying geometry is used in order to take full advantage of the spectral accuracy of the method. Large-scale computations are made possible by a parallel implementation based on message passing. Results obtained for radiation from an axisymmetric nacelle alone are compared with those obtained when the same nacelle is installed in a generic configuration, with and without a wing. 0 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Full-scale testing and progressive damage modeling of sandwich composite aircraft fuselage structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    A comprehensive experimental and computational investigation was conducted to characterize the fracture behavior and structural response of large sandwich composite aircraft fuselage panels containing artificial damage in the form of holes and notches. Full-scale tests were conducted where panels were subjected to quasi-static combined pressure, hoop, and axial loading up to failure. The panels were constructed using plain-weave carbon/epoxy prepreg face sheets and a Nomex honeycomb core. Panel deformation and notch tip damage development were monitored during the tests using several techniques, including optical observations, strain gages, digital image correlation (DIC), acoustic emission (AE), and frequency response (FR). Additional pretest and posttest inspections were performed via thermography, computer-aided tap tests, ultrasound, x-radiography, and scanning electron microscopy. The framework to simulate damage progression and to predict residual strength through use of the finite element (FE) method was developed. The DIC provided local and full-field strain fields corresponding to changes in the state-of-damage and identified the strain components driving damage progression. AE was monitored during loading of all panels and data analysis methodologies were developed to enable real-time determination of damage initiation, progression, and severity in large composite structures. The FR technique has been developed, evaluating its potential as a real-time nondestructive inspection technique applicable to large composite structures. Due to the large disparity in scale between the fuselage panels and the artificial damage, a global/local analysis was performed. The global FE models fully represented the specific geometries, composite lay-ups, and loading mechanisms of the full-scale tests. A progressive damage model was implemented in the local FE models, allowing the gradual failure of elements in the vicinity of the artificial damage. A set of modifications

  7. Nonlinear Acoustic Response of an Aircraft Fuselage Sidewall Structure by a Reduced-Order Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Rizzi, Stephen A.; Groen, David S.

    2006-01-01

    A reduced-order nonlinear analysis of a structurally complex aircraft fuselage sidewall panel is undertaken to explore issues associated with application of such analyses to practical structures. Of primary interest is the trade-off between computational efficiency and accuracy. An approach to modal basis selection is offered based upon the modal participation in the linear regime. The nonlinear static response to a uniform pressure loading and nonlinear random response to a uniformly distributed acoustic loading are computed. Comparisons of the static response with a nonlinear static solution in physical degrees-of-freedom demonstrate the efficacy of the approach taken for modal basis selection. Changes in the modal participation as a function of static and random loading levels suggest a means for improvement in the basis selection.

  8. Acoustic emission fatigue crack monitoring of a simulated aircraft fuselage structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Jeremy James

    The purpose of this research was to replicate the fatigue cracking that occurs in aircraft placed under loads from cyclical compression and decompression. As a fatigue crack grows, it releases energy in the form of acoustic emissions. These emissions are transmitted through the structure in waves, which can be recorded using acoustic emission (AE) transducers. This research employed a pressure vessel constructed out of aluminum and placed under cyclical loads at 1 Hz in order to simulate the loads placed on an aircraft fuselage in flight. The AE signals were recorded by four resonant AE transducers. These were placed on the pressure vessel such that it was possible to determine the location of each AE signal. These signals were then classified using a Kohonen self organizing map (SOM) neural network. By using proper data filtering before the SOM was run and using the correct classification parameters, it was shown that this is a highly accurate method of classifying AE waveforms from fatigue crack growth. This initial classification was done using AE waveform quantification parameters. The method was then validated by using both source location and then examining the waveforms in order to ensure that the waveforms classified into each category were the expected waveform types associated with each of the AE sources. Thus, acoustic emission nondestructive testing (NDT), in combination with a SOM neural network, proved to be an excellent means of fatigue crack growth monitoring in a simulated aluminum aircraft structure.

  9. Laboratory tests on an aircraft fuselage to determine the insertion loss of various acoustic add-on treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heitman, K. E.; Mixson, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a laboratory study of add-on acoustic treatments for a propeller-driven light aircraft fuselage. The treatments included: no treatment (i.e., baseline fuselage); a production-type double-wall interior; and various amounts of high density fiberglass added to the baseline fuselage. The sound source was a pneumatic-driver with attached exponential horn, supplied with a broadband signal. Data were acquired at the approximate head positions of the six passenger seats. The results were analyzed on space-averaged narrowband, one-third octave band and overall insertion loss basis. In addition, insertion loss results for the different configurations at specific frequencies representing propeller tone spectra are presented. The propeller tone data includes not only the space-averaged insertion loss, but also the variation of insertion loss at these particular frequencies across the six microphone positions.

  10. Testing and Analysis of a Composite Non-Cylindrical Aircraft Fuselage Structure . Part II; Severe Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Rouse, Marshall; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.

    2016-01-01

    The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project aimed to develop aircraft technologies enabling significant fuel burn and community noise reductions. Small incremental changes to the conventional metallic alloy-based 'tube and wing' configuration were not sufficient to achieve the desired metrics. One airframe concept identified by the project as having the potential to dramatically improve aircraft performance was a composite-based hybrid wing body configuration. Such a concept, however, presented inherent challenges stemming from, among other factors, the necessity to transfer wing loads through the entire center fuselage section which accommodates a pressurized cabin confined by flat or nearly flat panels. This paper discusses a finite element analysis and the testing of a large-scale hybrid wing body center section structure developed and constructed to demonstrate that the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure concept can meet these challenging demands of the next generation airframes. Part II of the paper considers the final test to failure of the test article in the presence of an intentionally inflicted severe discrete source damage under the wing up-bending loading condition. Finite element analysis results are compared with measurements acquired during the test and demonstrate that the hybrid wing body test article was able to redistribute and support the required design loads in a severely damaged condition.

  11. Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of a Composite Non-Cylindrical Pressurized Aircraft Fuselage Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.; Shaw, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project aims to develop aircraft technologies enabling significant fuel burn and community noise reductions. Small incremental changes to the conventional metallic alloy-based 'tube and wing' configuration are not sufficient to achieve the desired metrics. One of the airframe concepts that might dramatically improve aircraft performance is a composite-based hybrid wing body configuration. Such a concept, however, presents inherent challenges stemming from, among other factors, the necessity to transfer wing loads through the entire center fuselage section which accommodates a pressurized cabin confined by flat or nearly flat panels. This paper discusses a nonlinear finite element analysis of a large-scale test article being developed to demonstrate that the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure concept can meet these challenging demands of the next generation airframes. There are specific reasons why geometrically nonlinear analysis may be warranted for the hybrid wing body flat panel structure. In general, for sufficiently high internal pressure and/or mechanical loading, energy related to the in-plane strain may become significant relative to the bending strain energy, particularly in thin-walled areas such as the minimum gage skin extensively used in the structure under analysis. To account for this effect, a geometrically nonlinear strain-displacement relationship is needed to properly couple large out-of-plane and in-plane deformations. Depending on the loading, this nonlinear coupling mechanism manifests itself in a distinct manner in compression- and tension-dominated sections of the structure. Under significant compression, nonlinear analysis is needed to accurately predict loss of stability and postbuckled deformation. Under significant tension, the nonlinear effects account for suppression of the out-of-plane deformation due to in-plane stretching. By comparing the present results with the previously

  12. Structural FEM analysis of the strut-to-fuselage joint of a two-seat composite aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas-Rojas, Erik Camarena-Arellano, Diego Hernández-Moreno, Hilario

    2014-05-15

    An analysis of a strut-to-fuselage joint is realized in order to evaluate the zones with a high probability of failure by means of a safety factor. The whole section is analyzed using the Finite Element Method (FEM) so as to estimate static resistance behavior, therefore it is necessary a numerical mock-up of the section, the mechanical properties of the Carbon-Epoxy (C-Ep) material, and to evaluate the applied loads. Results of the analysis show that the zones with higher probability of failure are found around the wing strut and the fuselage joint, with a safety factor lower than expected in comparison with the average safety factor used on aircrafts built mostly with metals.

  13. Investigation of the level difference between sound pressure and sound intensity in an aircraft cabin under different fuselage conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, M. S.; Crocker, M. J.; Heitman, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    Problems in using two-microphone sound-intensity (SI) measurements to measure structural transmission losses are investigated in experiments involving light-aircraft fuselage panels and windows. Both sound pressure (SP) and SI are measured near the passenger and door windows and panels of a single-engine aircraft and with these barriers removed, and the effect of increasing interior acoustic absorption and blocking flanking transmission paths is also tested. The results are presented graphically, and the SP measurements are used to indicate frequency ranges in which the two-microphone technique significantly underestimates SI. It is inferred that flanking paths and interior reverberation must be effectively suppressed in order to obtain accurate transmission-loss measurements.

  14. Effects of cavity resonances on sound transmission into a thin cylindrical shell. [noise reduction in aircraft fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koval, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    In the context of the transmission of airborne noise into an aircraft fuselage, a mathematical model is presented for the effects of internal cavity resonances on sound transmission into a thin cylindrical shell. The 'noise reduction' of the cylinder is defined and computed, with and without including the effects of internal cavity resonances. As would be expected, the noise reduction in the absence of cavity resonances follows the same qualitative pattern as does transmission loss. Numerical results show that cavity resonances lead to wide fluctuations and a general decrease of noise reduction, especially at cavity resonances. Modest internal absorption is shown to greatly reduce the effect of cavity resonances. The effects of external airflow, internal cabin pressurization, and different acoustical properties inside and outside the cylinder are also included and briefly examined.

  15. Efficacy of aerial spray applications using fuselage booms on Air Force C-130H aircraft against mosquitoes and biting midges.

    PubMed

    Breidenbaugh, Mark S; Haagsma, Karl A; Wojcik, George M; De Szalay, Ferenc A

    2009-12-01

    The effectiveness of a novel fuselage boom configuration was tested with flat-fan nozzles on U.S. Air Force C-130H aircraft to create ultra-low volume sprays to control mosquitoes (Culicidae) and biting midges (Ceratopogonidae). The mortality of mosquitoes and biting midges in bioassay cages and natural populations, using the organophosphate adulticide, naled, was measured. Mosquitoes in bioassay cages had 100% mortality at 639 m downwind in all single-pass spray trials, and most trials had >90% mortality up to 1491 m downwind. Mosquito mortality was negatively correlated with distance from the spray release point (r2 = 0.38, P < 0.001). The volume median diam of droplets collected was 44 tm at 213 m and decreased to 11 microm at 2130 m downwind of the release point. Droplet density decreased from an average of 18.4 drops/cm2 at 213 m to 2 drops/cm2 at 2130 m. Droplet densities of 10-18 droplets/cm2 were recorded at sampling stations with high mosquito mortality rates (>90%). In wide-area operational applications, numbers of mosquitoes from natural populations 1 wk postspray were 83% (range 55%-95%), lower than prespray numbers (P < 0.05). Biting midge numbers were reduced by 86% (range 53%-97%) on average (P = 0.051) after 7 days. The results of these field trials indicate that the fuselage boom configuration on C-130H aircraft are an effective method to conduct large-scale aerial sprays during military operations and public health emergencies.

  16. Applications of advanced fracture mechanics to fuselage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanninen, M. F.; O'Donoghue, P. E.; Green, S. T.; Leung, C. P.; Roy, S.; Burnside, O. H.

    Multi-site damage (MSD) in the form of cracking at rivet holes in lap splice joints has been identified as a serious threat to the integrity of commercial aircraft nearing their design life targets. Consequently, to assure the safety of aircraft that have accumulated large numbers of flights, flight hours and years in service requires requires inspection procedures that are based on the possibility that MSD may be present. For inspections of aircraft components to be properly focused on me defect sizes that are critical for structural integrity, fracture analyses are needed. The current methods are essentially those of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) which are strictly valid only for cracks that extend in a quasi-static manner under small-scale crack tip plasticity conditions. While LEFM is very likely to be appropriate for subcritical crack growth, quantifying the conditions for fracture instability and subsequent propagation may require advanced fracture mechanics techniques. The specific focus in this paper was to identify the conditions in which inelastic-dynamic effects occur in (1) the linking up Of local damage in a lap splice joint to form a major crack, and (2) large-scale fuselage failure by a rapidly occurring fluid structure interaction process.

  17. Testing and Analysis of a Composite Non-Cylindrical Aircraft Fuselage Structure. Part 1; Ultimate Design Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Rouse, Marshall; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.

    2016-01-01

    The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project aimed to develop aircraft technologies enabling significant fuel burn and community noise reductions. Small incremental changes to the conventional metallic alloy-based 'tube and wing' configuration were not sufficient to achieve the desired metrics. One airframe concept identified by the project as having the potential to dramatically improve aircraft performance was a composite-based hybrid wing body configuration. Such a concept, however, presented inherent challenges stemming from, among other factors, the necessity to transfer wing loads through the entire center fuselage section which accommodates a pressurized cabin confined by flat or nearly flat panels. This paper discusses finite element analysis and testing of a large-scale hybrid wing body center section structure developed and constructed to demonstrate that the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure concept can meet these challenging demands of the next generation airframes. Part I of the paper considers the five most critical load conditions, which are internal pressure only and positive and negative g-loads with and without internal pressure. Analysis results are compared with measurements acquired during testing. Performance of the test article is found to be closely aligned with predictions and, consequently, able to support the hybrid wing body design loads in pristine and barely visible impact damage conditions.

  18. Fuselage Boundary Layer Ingestion Propulsion Applied to a Thin Haul Commuter Aircraft for Optimal Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Gregor Veble; Stoll, Alex; Bevirt, JoeBen; Grah, Rok; Moore, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical aspects of aerodynamic efficiency of propulsion systems are studied. Focus is on types of propulsion that closely couples to the aerodynamics of the complete vehicle. We discuss the effects of local flow fields, which are affected both by conservative flow acceleration as well as total pressure losses, on the efficiency of boundary layer immersed propulsion devices. We introduce the concept of a boundary layer retardation turbine that helps reduce skin friction over the fuselage. We numerically investigate efficiency gains offered by boundary layer and wake interacting devices. We discuss the results in terms of a total energy consumption framework and show that efficiency gains offered depend on all the elements of the propulsion system.

  19. On sound transmission into a heavily-damped cylinder. [aircraft noise in fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koval, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    A mathematical model for the transmission of sound into a thin monocoque cylindrical shell is discussed. The model is used to evaluate an oblique plane wave incident upon a flexible thin cylindrical shell. The solution is applicable to the transmission of sound under actual flight conditions. The model is then used to determine curves of cylinder-transmission loss for heavily damped cylinders. Numerical results are found for several plane-wave incidence angles for a narrow-bodied jet fuselage made of aluminum. It is noted that damping (i.e., the loss factor) increases, dips because of reduced cylinder resonances, and eventually disappears when the loss factor of the shell is large enough.

  20. Volumetric pattern analysis of fuselage-mounted airborne antennas. Ph.D. Thesis; [prediction analysis techniques for antenna radiation patterns of microwave antennas on commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    A volumetric pattern analysis of fuselage-mounted airborne antennas at high frequencies was investigated. The primary goal of the investigation was to develop a numerical solution for predicting radiation patterns of airborne antennas in an accurate and efficient manner. An analytical study of airborne antenna pattern problems is presented in which the antenna is mounted on the fuselage near the top or bottom. Since this is a study of general-type commercial aircraft, the aircraft was modeled in its most basic form. The fuselage was assumed to be an infinitely long perfectly conducting elliptic cylinder in its cross-section and a composite elliptic cylinder in its elevation profile. The wing, cockpit, stabilizers (horizontal and vertical) and landing gear are modeled by "N" sided bent or flat plates which can be arbitrarily attached to the fuselage. The volumetric solution developed utilizes two elliptic cylinders, namely, the roll plane and elevation plane models to approximate the principal surface profile (longitudinal and transverse) at the antenna location. With the belt concept and the aid of appropriate coordinate system transformations the solution can be used to predict the volumetric patterns of airborne antennas in an accurate and efficient manner. Applications of this solution to various airborne antenna problems show good agreement with scale model measurements. Extensive data are presented for a microwave landing antenna system.

  1. Modelling Strategies for Predicting the Residual Strength of Impacted Composite Aircraft Fuselages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachaud, Frederic; Espinosa, Christine; Michel, Laurent; Rahme, Pierre; Piquet, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Aeronautic Certification rules established for the metallic materials are not convenient for the composite structures concerning the resistance against impact. The computer-based design is a new methodology that is thought about to replace the experimental tests. It becomes necessary for numerical methods to be robust and predictive for impact. Three questions are addressed in this study: (i) can a numerical model be "mechanically intrinsic" to predict damage after impact, (ii) can this model be the same for a lab sample and a large structure, and (iii) can the numerical model be predictive enough to predict the Compression After Impact (CAI)? Three different computational strategies are used and compared: a Cohesive Model (CM), a Continuous Damage Model (CDM) coupling failure modes and damage, and a Mixed Methodology (MM) using the CDM for delamination initiation and the CM for cracks propagation. The first attempts to use the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics method are presented. Finally, impact on a fuselage is modelled and a numerical two-stage strategy is developed to predict the CAI.

  2. An artifical corrosion protocol for lap-splices in aircraft skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Bevil J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the progress to date to formulate an artificial corrosion protocol for the Tinker AFB C/KC-135 Corrosion Fatigue Round Robin Test Program. The project has provided new test methods to faithfully reproduce the corrosion damage within a lap-splice by accelerated means, the rationale for a new laboratory test environment, and a means for corrosion damage quantification. The approach is pragmatic and the resulting artificial corrosion protocol lays the foundation for future research in the assessment of aerospace alloys. The general means for quantification of corrosion damage has been presented in a form which can be directly applied to structural integrity calculations.

  3. Aerodynamics of the Fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Multhopp, H.

    1942-01-01

    The present report deals with a number of problems, particularly with the interaction of the fuselage with the wing and tail, on the basis of simple calculating method's derived from greatly idealized concepts. For the fuselage alone it affords, in variance with potential theory, a certain frictional lift in yawed flow, which, similar to the lift of a wing of small aspect ratio, is no longer linearly related to the angle of attack. Nevertheless there exists for this frictional lift something like a neutral stability point the position of which on oblong fuselages appears to be associated with the lift increase of the fuselage in proximity to the zero lift, according to the present experiments. The Pitching moments of the fuselage can be determined with comparatively great reliability so far as the flow conditions in the neighborhood of the axis of the fuselage can be approximated if the fuselage were absent, which, in general, is not very difficult. For the unstable contribution of the fuselage to the static longitudinal stability of the airplane it affords comparatively simple formulas, the evaluation of which offers little difficulty. On the engine nacelles there is, in addition a very substantial wing moment contribution induced by the nonuniform distribution of the transverse displacement flow of the nacelle along the wing chord; this also can be represented by a simple formula. A check on a large number of dissimilar aircraft types regarding the unstable fuselage and nacelle moments disclosed an agreement with the wind-tunnel tests, which should be sufficient for practical requirements. The errors remained throughout within the scope of instrumental accuracy.

  4. Multifrequency Eddy Current Inspection of Corrosion in Clad Aluminum Riveted Lap Joints and Its Effect on Fatigue Life

    SciTech Connect

    Okafor, A. C.; Natarajan, S.

    2007-03-21

    Aging aircraft are prone to corrosion damage and fatigue cracks in riveted lap joints of fuselage skin panels. This can cause catastrophic failure if not detected and repaired. Hence detection of corrosion damage and monitoring its effect on structural integrity are essential. This paper presents multifrequency eddy current (EC) inspection of corrosion damage and machined material loss defect in clad A1 2024-T3 riveted lap joints and its effect on fatigue life. Results of eddy current inspection, corrosion product removal and fatigue testing are presented.

  5. Evaluation of the concept of pressure proof testing fuselage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Orringer, Oscar

    1991-01-01

    The FAA and NASA have recently completed independent technical evaluations of the concept of pressure proof testing the fuselage of commercial transport airplanes. The results of these evaluations are summarized. The objectives of the evaluations were to establish the potential benefit of the pressure proof test, to quantify the most desirable proof test pressure, and to quantify the required proof test interval. The focus of the evaluations was on multiple-site cracks extending from adjacent rivet holes of a typical fuselage longitudinal lap splice joint. The FAA and NASA do not support pressure proof testing the fuselage of aging commercial transport aircraft. The argument against proof testing is as follows: (1) a single proof test does not insure an indefinite life; therefore, the proof test must be repeated at regular intervals; (2) for a proof factor of 1.33, the required proof test interval must be below 300 flights to account for uncertainties in the evaluation; (3) conducting the proof test at a proof factor of 1.5 would considerably exceed the fuselage design limit load; therefore, it is not consistent with accepted safe practices; and (4) better safety can be assured by implementing enhanced nondestructive inspection requirements, and adequate reliability can be achieved by an inspection interval several times longer than the proof test interval.

  6. Noise Reduction in an Aircraft Fuselage Model Using Active Trim Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, Richard J.; Lyle, Karen H.

    1996-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the use of force actuators on a model aircraft interior trim panel as the control element for active control of interior noise. The trim panel, designed specifically for this study, was constructed in three large identical sections and hard mounted to the ring frames of the primary structure. Piezoceramic actuators were bonded to the outer surface of the trim panels. Studies of the interior pressure response due to both the primary source alone and control sources alone were conducted as well as the control cases. A single acoustic loudspeaker, centered at the axial midpoint, generated the acoustic field to be controlled.

  7. Lake Michigan and Lake Superior air quality: The 1994-2003 LADCO Aircraft Project (LAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, T. A.; Betterton, E. A.; Jacko, R.; Hillery, J.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of the 1994 to 2003 LADCO Airplane Project (LAP) was to study ozone formation over Lake Michigan so that equitable regional control strategies could be devised. During the ten year LAP campaign, a total of 328 flights were flown on 81 days over Lake Michigan and its southern and western boundaries. LAP also monitored air quality over Lake Superior and other areas in the Midwestern and southern United States. From 2001 to 2003, 117 flights were conducted over Lake Superior, Isle Royale National Park, Painted Rocks National Lakeshore and the Seeney National Wildlife Refuge in Michigan. 63 flights were conducted over St. Louis and 58 flights over the Dolly Sods Wilderness Area in West Virginia. We are looking for collaborators to help us analyze this vast data archive. Our first paper (Atmospheric Environment 45 (2011) 3192-3202) documented the project and presented results of our ozone analysis. Our results support the hypothesis of Dye et al. (1995), who found that the atmosphere over Lake Michigan is stable in the summer due to the air water temperature difference, which creates an efficient reaction chamber for ozone formation. They also hypothesized that the southwest winds characteristic of ozone-conducive conditions transport ozone further north over the lake before it crosses the shoreline onto land. We found that below 200 m above the lake, ozone formation is VOC-limited in the morning and becomes NOx limited in the afternoon. Above 200 m, ozone formation is NOx-limited throughout the day. The onshore NOx and VOC diurnal cycles peak during the early morning rush hour and are clearly linked to traffic patterns. Over the lake, VOC and NOy concentrations peak during the mid-morning rather than the early morning, supporting the hypothesis that the land breeze transports VOC and NOy over the lake. The diurnal NOx pattern over Lake Michigan is less clearly defined than the VOC pattern possibly as a result of emissions from five coal-burning power plants

  8. Inspection of fabricated fuselage panels using electronic shearography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, John, II; Feferman, Ben

    1992-07-01

    The results of a proof of principle demonstration of using electronic shearography to detect induced damage in fabricated aircraft panels are presented. The demonstration was performed at the FAA's Aircraft Panel Test Facility in Waltham, Massachusetts and all shearography equipment and its operational support was provided by Laser Technology, Inc. (LTI) under a separate contract from the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center. The test panels that were inspected using the electronic shearography were constructed to closely simulate the fuselage and skin structure of Boeing 727 and 737 aircraft. These panels contained programmed flaws intended to simulate two major types of defects associated with aging aircraft, namely cracks along fastener rows, and disbonded tear strap doublers and lap joints. The proof of principle consisted of a series of inspections that demonstrated shearography's capability to detect cracks and disbonds in the fuselage panel specimens. The sensitivity of shearography to detect short, simulated fatigue cracks that would correspond to a multiple site damage situation was too low to provide sufficient confidence that the method could economically replace existing eddy current surface methods. The sensitivity of the method to detect panel disbonding, however, is sufficient to encourage further development of the technique.

  9. A Comprehensive Structural Analysis Process for Failure Assessment in Aircraft Lap-Joint Mimics Using Multi-Modal Fusion of NDE Data (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    modality . In order to address the limitations of FEM-based methods in their ability to predict fatigue, more specialized numerical modeling...AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2012-0350 A COMPREHENSIVE STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS PROCESS FOR FAILURE ASSESSMENT IN AIRCRAFT LAP-JOINT MIMICS USING MULTI- MODAL ...structural analysis process is presented that includes intra- and inter- modal NDE data fusion. The process includes defect detection, defect

  10. The Influence of Feedback on the Aeroelastic Behavior of Tilt Proprotor Aircraft Including the Effects of Fuselage Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtiss, H. C., Jr.; Komatsuzaki, T.; Traybar, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of single loop feedbacks to improve the stability of the system are considered. Reduced order dynamic models are employed where appropriate to promote physical insight. The influence of fuselage freedom on the aeroelastic stability, and the influence of the airframe flexibility on the low frequency modes of motion relevant to the stability and control characteristics of the vehicle were examined.

  11. Interference Effects of Fuselage-Stored Missiles on Inlet Duct Model of an Interceptor-Type Aircraft at Mach Numbers 1.5 to 1.9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piercy, T. G.; Davis, O. H.

    1957-01-01

    The effect of missile armament on the performance of an interceptor-type aircraft model has been determined at Mach numbers 1.5, 1.7, and 1.9 and at angles of attack to 19 deg. With this configuration missiles were carried in a bay located on the bottom of the aircraft fuselage and mounted to a rotatable missile door. Rotation of the door then brought the missiles into the external or firing position. The aircraft model was characterized by triangular-shaped normal-shock inlets located at the wing roots. Relatively short and curved subsonic diffusers fed simulated twin side-by-side turbojet engines. Inasmuch as the missile bay extended considerably ahead of the inlet station, rotation of the missile door created considerable disturbance of the flow entering the inlets. In comparison with the internal missile arrangement, the external missile configurations increased the model lift, drag, and pitching moment. While the diffuser-exit flow distortion and static-pressure fluctuations were not greatly affected, diffuser total-pressure recovery was reduced as much as 0.058 at Mach number 1.9 for one missile configuration. The most detrimental effect of missile-door rotation occurred at the transient door positions, or with the door halfwzy between the missiles-in and -out conditions. At this door position the flow into the inlets was highly asymmetrical. Although the performance of both left and right ducts was generally reduced, the inlet duct on the cavity side of the missile door was most severely penalized, becoming unstable recovery losses and increases in flow distortion. The installation of fuselage fences along the missile bay was only partially effective in reducing these losses.

  12. Abernathy's Lap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A lap in this instance is not a midriff but a tool for presision.polishing and grinding. During the Saturn V moonbooster program, Marshall Space Flight Center found a need for a better lap. The need arose from the exquisitely precise tolerances required for parts of the launch vehicle's guidance,and control system. So William J. Abernathy, a former Marshall employee, built a better lap; he invented a method for charging aluminum lap plates with diamond powder, then hard-anodizing them. The resulting lap produces a high polish on materials ranging from the softest aluminum to the hardest ceramics. It operates faster, wears longer and requires less reworking. Abernathy got NASA's permission to obtain a personal patent and he formed the one-man Abernathy Laps Co. in Huntsville, which produces a variety of laps. One of Abernathy's customers is Bell Aerospace Textron, Buffalo, which uses the laps to finish polish delicate instrument parts produced for NASA's Viking and other space programs. Says a Bell official: "Time needed (with the Abernathy lap) is a fraction of that required by conventional methods. The result is extremely accurate flatness and surface finish." Abernathy is providing laps for other manufacturing applications and for preparation of metallurgical specimens. The business is small but steady, and Abernathy plans expansion into other markets.

  13. Fuselage upwash effects on RSRA rotor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, J.; Dadone, L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of RSRA fuselage configurations on rotor performance and loads have been quantified analytically by means of currently available potential flow and rotor analysis. Four configurations of the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA) were considered in this study. They were: (1) fuselage alone (conventional helicopter); (2) fuselage with auxiliary propulsion; (3) fuselage with wings (auxiliary lift); and (4) fuselage with both auxiliary lift propulsion. The rotor system investigated was identical to a CH-47D front rotor except that it had four instead of three blades. Two scaled-down versions of the same rotor were also analyzed to determine the effect of rotor scale on the fuselage upwash effects. The flight conditions considered for the upwash study are discussed. The potential flow models for the RSRA configuration, with and without the wings and the auxiliary propulsion system, are presented. The results of fuselage/wing/propulsion system upwash on performance and loads are also presented.

  14. Laboratory study of the effects of sidewall treatment, source directivity and temperature on the interior noise of a light aircraft fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heitman, K. E.; Mixson, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a laboratory study of add-on {coustic treatments for a twin-engine, propeller-driven aircraft fuselage. The sound source was a pneumatic-driver, with attached horn to simulate propeller noise distribution, powered by a white noise signal. Treatments included a double-wall, production-line treatment and various fiberglass and lead-vinyl treatments. Insertion losses, space-averaged across six interior microphone positions, were used to evaluate the treatments. In addition, the effects of sound source angle and ambient temperature on interior sound pressure level are presented. The sound source angle is shown to have a significant effect on one-third octave band localized sound pressure level. While changes in ambient temperature are shown to have little effect on one-third octave band localized sound pressure level, the change in narrowband localized sound pressure level may be dramatic.

  15. Determination of Paris' law constants and crack length evolution via Extended and Unscented Kalman filter: An application to aircraft fuselage panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiwei; Binaud, Nicolas; Gogu, Christian; Bes, Christian; Fu, Jian

    2016-12-01

    Prediction of fatigue crack length in aircraft fuselage panels is one of the key issues for aircraft structural safety since it helps prevent catastrophic failures. Accurate estimation of crack length propagation is also meaningful for helping develop aircraft maintenance strategies. Paris' law is often used to capture the dynamics of fatigue crack propagation in metallic material. However, uncertainties are often present in the crack growth model, measured crack size and pressure differential in each flight and need to be accounted for accurate prediction. The aim of this paper is to estimate the two unknown Paris' law constants m and C as well as the crack length evolution by taking into account these uncertainties. Due to the nonlinear nature of the Paris' law, we propose here an on-line estimation algorithm based on two widespread nonlinear filtering techniques, Extended Kalman filter (EKF) and Unscented Kalman filter (UKF). The numerical experiments indicate that both EKF and UKF estimated the crack length well and accurately identified the unknown parameters. Although UKF is theoretical superior to EKF, in this Paris' law application EKF is comparable in accuracy to UKF and requires less computational expense.

  16. Advanced technology commercial fuselage structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, L. B.; Smith, P. J.; Walker, T. H.; Johnson, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    Boeing's program for Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structure (ATCAS) has focused on the manufacturing and performance issues associated with a wide body commercial transport fuselage. The primary goal of ATCAS is to demonstrate cost and weight savings over a 1995 aluminum benchmark. A 31 foot section of fuselage directly behind the wing to body intersection was selected for study purposes. This paper summarizes ATCAS contract plans and review progress to date. The six year ATCAS program will study technical issues for crown, side, and keel areas of the fuselage. All structural details in these areas will be included in design studies that incorporate a design build team (DBT) approach. Manufacturing technologies will be developed for concepts deemed by the DBT to have the greatest potential for cost and weight savings. Assembly issues for large, stiff, quadrant panels will receive special attention. Supporting technologies and mechanical tests will concentrate on the major issues identified for fuselage. These include damage tolerance, pressure containment, splices, load redistribution, post-buckled structure, and durability/life. Progress to date includes DBT selection of baseline fuselage concepts; cost and weight comparisons for crown panel designs; initial panel fabrication for manufacturing and structural mechanics research; and toughened material studies related to keel panels. Initial ATCAS studies have shown that NASA's Advanced Composite Technology program goals for cost and weight savings are attainable for composite fuselage.

  17. Flying wings / flying fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper has documented the historical relationships between various classes of all lifting vehicles, which includes the flying wing, all wing, tailless, lifting body, and lifting fuselage. The diversity in vehicle focus was to ensure that all vehicle types that map have contributed to or been influenced by the development of the classical flying wing concept was investigated. The paper has provided context and perspective for present and future aircraft design studies that may employ the all lifting vehicle concept. The paper also demonstrated the benefit of developing an understanding of the past in order to obtain the required knowledge to create future concepts with significantly improved aerodynamic performance.

  18. The characterization of widespread fatigue damage in fuselage structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.; Miller, Matthew

    1994-01-01

    The characteristics of widespread fatigue damage (WSFD) in fuselage riveted structure were established by detailed nondestructive and destructive examinations of fatigue damage contained in a full size fuselage test article. The objectives of this were to establish an experimental data base for validating emerging WSFD analytical prediction methodology and to identify first order effects that contribute to fatigue crack initiation and growth. Detailed examinations were performed on a test panel containing four bays of a riveted lap splice joint. The panel was removed from a full scale fuselage test article after receiving 60,000 full pressurization cycles. The results of in situ examinations document the progression of fuselage skin fatigue crack growth through crack linkup. Detailed tear down examinations and fractography of the lap splice joint region revealed fatigue crack initiation sites, crack morphology, and crack linkup geometry. From this large data base, distributions of crack size and locations are presented and discussions of operative damage mechanisms are offered.

  19. Effects of boundary layer refraction and fuselage scattering on fuselage surface noise from advanced turboprop propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaninch, G. L.; Rawls, J. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An acoustic disturbance's propagation through a boundary layer is discussed with a view to the analysis of the acoustic field generated by a propfan rotor incident to the fuselage of an aircraft. Applying the parallel flow assumption, the resulting partial differential equations are reduced to an ordinary acoustic pressure differential equation by means of the Fourier transform. The methods used for the solution of this equation include those of Frobenius and of analytic continuation; both yield exact solutions in series form. Two models of the aircraft fuselage-boundary layer system are considered, in the first of which the fuselage is replaced by a flat plate and the acoustic field is assumed to be two-dimensional, while in the second the fuselage is a cylinder in a fully three-dimensional acoustic field. It is shown that the boundary layer correction improves theory-data comparisons over simple application of a pressure-doubling rule at the fuselage.

  20. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, B.D.; Lissaman, P.B.S.; Morgan, W.R.; Radkey, R.L.

    1998-09-22

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing`s top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gases for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well. 31 figs.

  1. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, Bart D.; Lissaman, Peter B. S.; Morgan, Walter R.; Radkey, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing's top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gasses for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well.

  2. Dynamic thermal tomography for nondestructive inspection of aging aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Del Grande, N.K.; Dolan, K.W.; Durbin, P.F.; Gorvad, M.R.; Shapiro, A.B.

    1993-11-01

    The authors apply dual-band infrared (DBIR) imaging as a dynamic thermal tomography tool for wide area inspection of a Boeing 737 aircraft and several Boeing KC-135 aircraft panels. The analyses are discussed in this report. After flash-heating the aircraft skin, they record synchronized DBIR images every 40 ms, from onset to 8 seconds after the heat flash. They analyze selective DBIR image ratios which enhance surface temperature contrast and remove surface-emissivity clutter. The Boeing 737 and KC-135 aircraft fuselage panels have varying percent thickness losses from corrosion. They established the correlation of percent thickness loss with surface temperature rise (above ambient) for a partially corroded F-18 wing box structure and several aluminum plates which had 6 to 60% thickness losses at milled flat-bottom hole sites. Based on this correlation, lap splice temperatures rise 1C per 24 {plus_minus} 5% material loss at 0.4 s after the heat flash. They tabulate and map corrosion-related percent thickness loss effects for the riveted Boeing 737, and the riveted Boeing KKC-135. They map the fuselage composite thermal inertia, based on the (inverse) slope of the surface temperature versus inverse square root of time. Composite thermal inertia maps characterized shallow skin defects within the lap splice at early times (< 0.3 s) and deeper skin defects within the lap splice at late times (> 0.4 s). Late time composite thermal inertia maps depict where corrosion-related thickness losses occur (e.g., on the inside of the Boeing 737 lap splice, beneath the galley and the latrine). Lap splice sites on a typical Boeing KC-135 panel with low composite thermal inertia values had high skin-thickness losses from corrosion.

  3. Microphone Boom for Aircraft-Engine Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, R.; Economu, M.; Albrecht, W.

    1986-01-01

    Microphone for measuring aircraft engine noise mounted on lengthwise boom supported away from fuselage and engine. This configuration minimizes boundary-layer effects and pressure doubling that is present if microphone were mounted in aircraft fuselage.

  4. Dual-band infrared (DBIR) imaging inspections of Boeing 737 and KC-135 aircraft panels

    SciTech Connect

    Del Grande, N.K.; Dolan, K.W.; Durbin, P.F.; Gorvad, M.R.; Shapiro, A.B.

    1993-08-27

    We apply dual-band infrared (DBIR) imaging as a dynamic thermal tomography tool for wide area inspection of a Boeing 737 aircraft, and several Boeing KC-135 aircraft panels. Our analyses are discussed in this report. After flash-heating the aircraft skin, we record synchronized DBIR images every 40 ms, from onset to 8 seconds after the heat flash. We analyze selective DBIR image ratios which enhance surface temperature contrast and remove surface-emissivity clutter (from dirt, dents, tape, markings, ink, sealants, uneven paint, paint stripper, exposed metal and roughness variations). The Boeing 737 and KC-135 aircraft fuselage panels have varying percent thickness losses from corrosion. We established the correlation of percent thickness loss with surface temperature rise (above ambient) for a partially corroded F-18 wing box structure and several aluminum reference panels. Based on this correlation, lap splice temperatures rise 1{degrees}C per 24 {plus_minus} 5 % material loss at 0.4 s after the heat flash. We show tables, charts and temperature maps of typical lap splice material losses for the riveted (and bonded) Boeing 737, and the riveted (but unbonded) Boeing KC-135. We map the fuselage composite thermal inertia, based on the (inverse) slope of the surface temperature versus inverse square root of time. Composite thermal inertia maps characterize shallow skin defects within the lap splice at early times (<0.3 s) and deeper skin defects within the lap splice at late times (>0.4 s). Late time composite thermal inertia maps depict where corrosion-related thickness losses occur. Lap splice sites on a typical Boeing KC-135 panel with low composite thermal inertia values had high skin-thickness losses from corrosion.

  5. Fuselage ventilation under wind conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    To determine realistic fuselage ventilation rates for post-crash fires and full-scale fire tests, the effects on wind-about fuselage ventilation rate of various parameters were studied. The parameters investigated were fuselage size and shape, fuselage orientation and proximity to ground, fuselage-opening and location, and wind speed and direction.

  6. Investigation of the Effect of Fuselage Dents on Compressive Failure Load

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Aluminum Alloy 2024 - T3 , a typical material used for fuselages of older transport aircrafts. Our finite element model consisted of impact analysis...SUBJECT TERMS Fuselage, Dents, Damages, Buckling, Al- 2024 - T3 , Impact, Stiffened Plate, Stiffened Panel 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY...finite element models is Aluminum Alloy 2024 - T3 , a typical material used for fuselages of older transport aircrafts. Our finite element model

  7. Composite Fuselage Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagace, Paul A.

    1999-01-01

    Work was conducted over a ten-year period to address the central issue of damage in primary load-bearing aircraft composite structure, specifically fuselage structure. This included the three facets of damage resistance, damage tolerance, and damage arrest. Experimental, analytical, and numerical work was conducted in order to identify and better understand the mechanisms that control the structural behavior of fuselage structures in their response to the three aspects of damage. Furthermore, work was done to develop straightforward design methodologies that can be employed by structural designers in preliminary design stages to make intelligent choices concerning the material, layup, and structural configurations so that a more efficient structure with structural integrity can be designed and built. Considerable progress was made towards achieving these goals via this work. In regard to damage tolerance considerations, the following were identified as important effects: composite layup and associated orthotropy/structural anisotropy, specifics of initial local damage mechanisms, role of longitudinal versus hoop stress, and large deformation and associated geometric nonlinearity. Means were established to account for effects of radius and for the nonlinear response. In particular, nondimensional parameters were identified to characterize the importance of nonlinearity in the response of pressurized cylinders. This led to the establishment of a iso-nonlinear-error plot for reference in structural design. Finally, in the case of damage tolerance, the general approach of the original methodology to predict the failure pressure involving extending basic plate failure data by accounting for the local stress intensification was accomplished for the general case by accounting for the mechanisms noted by utilizing the capability of the STAGS finite element code and numerically calculating the local stress intensification for the particular configuration to be considered

  8. Composite fuselage shell structures research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Shuart, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    Fuselage structures for transport aircraft represent a significant percentage of both the weight and the cost of these aircraft primary structures. Composite materials offer the potential for reducing both the weight and the cost of transport fuselage structures, but only limited studies of the response and failure of composite fuselage structures have been conducted for transport aircraft. The behavior of these important primary structures must be understood, and the structural mechanics methodology for analyzing and designing these complex stiffened shell structures must be validated in the laboratory. The effects of local gradients and discontinuities on fuselage shell behavior and the effects of local damage on pressure containment must be thoroughly understood before composite fuselage structures can be used for commercial aircraft. This paper describes the research being conducted and planned at NASA LaRC to help understand the critical behavior or composite fuselage structures and to validate the structural mechanics methodology being developed for stiffened composite fuselage shell structure subjected to combined internal pressure and mechanical loads. Stiffened shell and curved stiffened panel designs are currently being developed and analyzed, and these designs will be fabricated and then tested at Langley to study critical fuselage shell behavior and to validate structural analysis and design methodology. The research includes studies of the effects of combined internal pressure and mechanical loads on nonlinear stiffened panel and shell behavior, the effects of cutouts and other gradient-producing discontinuities on composite shell response, and the effects of local damage on pressure containment and residual strength. Scaling laws are being developed that relate full-scale and subscale behavior of composite fuselage shells. Failure mechanisms are being identified and advanced designs will be developed based on what is learned from early results from

  9. Transport composite fuselage technology: Impact dynamics and acoustic transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. C.; Balena, F. J.; Labarge, W. L.; Pei, G.; Pitman, W. A.; Wittlin, G.

    1986-01-01

    A program was performed to develop and demonstrate the impact dynamics and acoustic transmission technology for a composite fuselage which meets the design requirements of a 1990 large transport aircraft without substantial weight and cost penalties. The program developed the analytical methodology for the prediction of acoustic transmission behavior of advanced composite stiffened shell structures. The methodology predicted that the interior noise level in a composite fuselage due to turbulent boundary layer will be less than in a comparable aluminum fuselage. The verification of these analyses will be performed by NASA Langley Research Center using a composite fuselage shell fabricated by filament winding. The program also developed analytical methodology for the prediction of the impact dynamics behavior of lower fuselage structure constructed with composite materials. Development tests were performed to demonstrate that the composite structure designed to the same operating load requirement can have at least the same energy absorption capability as aluminum structure.

  10. How cats lap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocker, Roman; Reis, Pedro; Jung, Sunghwan; Aristoff, Jeffrey

    2010-11-01

    We studied the lapping of the domestic cat (Felis catus) by combining high-speed photography with a laboratory model of lapping. We found that Felis catus laps by a subtle mechanism based on water adhesion to the dorsal side of the tongue and the creation of a liquid column, exploiting inertia to defeat gravity and pull liquid into the mouth. The competition between inertia and gravity controls the pinch-off time of the column, determining the optimal lapping frequency, f. Felis catus was found to operate near the optimum and theoretical analysis yielded a scaling, f ˜M-1/6, of lapping frequency with animal mass, M. This prediction was verified by measuring lapping frequency across felids, from ocelots to lions, suggesting that the lapping mechanism is conserved among felines.

  11. Variable Geometry Aircraft Wing Supported by Struts And/Or Trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E. (Inventor); Dudley, Michael R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention provides an aircraft having variable airframe geometry for accommodating efficient flight. The aircraft includes an elongated fuselage, an oblique wing pivotally connected with said fuselage, a wing pivoting mechanism connected with said oblique wing and said fuselage, and a brace operably connected between said oblique wing and said fuselage. The present invention also provides an aircraft having an elongated fuselage, an oblique wing pivotally connected with said fuselage, a wing pivoting mechanism connected with said oblique wing and said fuselage, a propulsion system pivotally connected with said oblique wing, and a brace operably connected between said propulsion system and said fuselage.

  12. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilden, K. S.; Harris, C. G.; Flynn, B. W.; Gessel, M. G.; Scholz, D. B.; Stawski, S.; Winston, V.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program is to develop the technology required for cost-and weight-efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements, and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of stringer-stiffened and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant-section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements cocured to skin structures. Significant process development efforts included AFP, braiding, RTM, autoclave cure, and core blanket fabrication for both sandwich and stiffened-skin structure. Outer-mold-line and inner-mold-line tooling was developed for sandwich structures and stiffened-skin structure. The effect of design details, process control and tool design on repeatable, dimensionally stable, structure for low cost barrel assembly was assessed. Subcomponent panels representative of crown, keel, and side quadrant panels were fabricated to assess scale-up effects and manufacturing anomalies for full-scale structures. Manufacturing database including time studies, part quality, and manufacturing plans were generated to support the development of designs and analytical models to access cost, structural performance, and dimensional tolerance.

  13. Crack Growth Simulation and Residual Strength Prediction in Airplane Fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chuin-Shan; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives were to create a capability to simulate curvilinear crack growth and ductile tearing in aircraft fuselages subjected to widespread fatigue damage and to validate with tests. Analysis methodology and software program (FRANC3D/STAGS) developed herein allows engineers to maintain aging aircraft economically, while insuring continuous airworthiness, and to design more damage-tolerant aircraft for the next generation. Simulations of crack growth in fuselages were described. The crack tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion, obtained from laboratory tests, was used to predict fracture behavior of fuselage panel tests. Geometrically nonlinear, elastic-plastic, thin shell finite element crack growth analyses were conducted. Comparisons of stress distributions, multiple stable crack growth history, and residual strength between measured and predicted results were made to assess the validity of the methodology. Incorporation of residual plastic deformations and tear strap failure was essential for accurate residual strength predictions. Issue related to predicting crack trajectory in fuselages were also discussed. A directional criterion, including T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy, was developed. Curvilinear crack growth was simulated in coupon and fuselage panel tests. Both T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy were essential to predict the observed crack paths. Flapping of fuselages were predicted. Measured and predicted results agreed reasonable well.

  14. Al-Li Alloy 1441 for Fuselage Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, R. K.; Dicus, D. L.; Fridlyander, J. N.; Sandler, V. S.

    2000-01-01

    A cooperative investigation was conducted to evaluate Al-Cu-Mg-Li alloy 1441 for long service life fuselage applications. Alloy 1441 is currently being used for fuselage applications on the Russian Be-103 amphibious aircraft, and is expected to be used for fuselage skin on a new Tupolev business class aircraft. Alloy 1441 is cold-rollable and has several attributes that make it attractive for fuselage skin applications. These attributes include lower density and higher specific modulus with similar strength as compared to conventional Al-Cu-Mg alloys. Cold-rolled 1441 Al-Li sheet specimens were tested at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and at the All-Russia Institute of Aviation Materials (VIAM) in Russia to evaluate tensile properties, fracture toughness, impact resistance, fatigue life and fatigue crack growth rate. In addition, fuselage panels were fabricated by Tupolev Design Bureau (TDB) using 1441 skins and Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy stiffeners. The panels were subjected to cyclic pressurization fatigue tests at TDB and at LaRC to simulate fuselage pressurization/depressurization during aircraft service. This paper discusses the results from this investigation.

  15. Performance of fuselage pressure structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maclin, James R.

    1992-01-01

    There are currently more than 1,000 Boeing airplanes around the world over 20 years old. That number is expected to double by the year 1995. With these statistics comes the reality that structural airworthiness will be in the forefront of aviation issues well into the next century. The results of previous and recent test programs Boeing has implemented to study the structural performance of older airplanes relative to pressurized fuselage sections are described. Included in testing were flat panels with multiple site damage (MSD), a full-scale 737 and 2 747s as well as panels representing a 737 and 777, and a generic aircraft in large pressure-test fixtures. Because damage is a normal part of aging, focus is on the degree to which structural integrity is maintained after failure or partial failure of any structural element, including multiple site damage (MSD), and multiple element damage (MED).

  16. Oblique-wing supersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An aircraft including a single fuselage having a main wing and a horizontal stabilizer airfoil pivotally attached at their centers to the fuselage is described. The pivotal attachments allow the airfoils to be yawed relative to the fuselage for high speed flight, and to be positioned at right angles with respect to the fuselage during takeoff, landing, and low speed flight. The main wing and the horizontal stabilizer are upwardly curved from their center pivotal connections towards their ends to form curvilinear dihedrals.

  17. Structural Concepts Study of Non-circular Fuselage Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivel

    1996-01-01

    A preliminary study of structural concepts for noncircular fuselage configurations is presented. For an unconventional flying-wing type aircraft, in which the fuselage is inside the wing, multiple fuselage bays with non-circular sections need to be considered. In a conventional circular fuselage section, internal pressure is carried efficiently by a thin skin via hoop tension. If the section is non-circular, internal pressure loads also induce large bending stresses. The structure must also withstand additional bending and compression loads from aerodynamic and gravitational forces. Flat and vaulted shell structural configurations for such an unconventional, non-circular pressurized fuselage of a large flying-wing were studied. A deep honeycomb sandwich-shell and a ribbed double-wall shell construction were considered. Combinations of these structural concepts were analyzed using both analytical and simple finite element models of isolated sections for a comparative conceptual study. Weight, stress, and deflection results were compared to identify a suitable configuration for detailed analyses. The flat sandwich-shell concept was found preferable to the vaulted shell concept due to its superior buckling stiffness. Vaulted double-skin ribbed shell configurations were found to be superior due to their weight savings, load diffusion, and fail-safe features. The vaulted double-skin ribbed shell structure concept was also analyzed for an integrated wing-fuselage finite element model. Additional problem areas such as wing-fuselage junction and pressure-bearing spar were identified.

  18. Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Company, Washington, DC Boeing Commercial Aircraft Division, Seattle, WA and Long Beach, CA Boeing Military Aircraft and Missile Division, St. Louis, MO and... aircraft ; military fixed-wing aircraft ; rotorcraft (helicopters and tiltrotor aircraft ); and aircraft jet engines. Two companies dominate the commercial... aircraft business, Boeing and Airbus. Four companies dominate the military fixed-wing market, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, BAE Systems, and European

  19. Composite fuselage technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Michael J.; Lagace, Paul A.

    1990-01-01

    The overall objective is to identify and understand, via directed experimentation and analysis, the mechanisms which control the structural behavior of fuselages in their response to damage (resistance, tolerance, and arrest). A further objective is to develop straightforward design methodologies which can be employed by structural designers in preliminary design stages to make intelligent choices concerning the material, layup, and structural configuration so that a more efficient structure with structural integrity can be designed and built.

  20. Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagerser, D. A.; Ludemann, S. G.

    1985-01-01

    The propfan is an advanced propeller concept which maintains the high efficiencies traditionally associated with conventional propellers at the higher aircraft cruise speeds associated with jet transports. The large-scale advanced propfan (LAP) program extends the research done on 2 ft diameter propfan models to a 9 ft diameter article. The program includes design, fabrication, and testing of both an eight bladed, 9 ft diameter propfan, designated SR-7L, and a 2 ft diameter aeroelastically scaled model, SR-7A. The LAP program is complemented by the propfan test assessment (PTA) program, which takes the large-scale propfan and mates it with a gas generator and gearbox to form a propfan propulsion system and then flight tests this system on the wing of a Gulfstream 2 testbed aircraft.

  1. Fuselage shell and cavity response measurements on a DC-9 test section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, M. A.; Mathur, G. P.; Cannon, M. R.; Tran, B. N.; Burge, P. L.

    1991-01-01

    A series of fuselage shell and cavity response measurements conducted on a DC-9 aircraft test section are described. The objectives of these measurements were to define the shell and cavity model characteristics of the fuselage, understand the structural-acoustic coupling characteristics of the fuselage, and measure the response of the fuselage to different types of acoustic and vibration excitation. The fuselage was excited with several combinations of acoustic and mechanical sources using interior and exterior loudspeakers and shakers, and the response to these inputs was measured with arrays of microphones and accelerometers. The data were analyzed to generate spatial plots of the shell acceleration and cabin acoustic pressure field, and corresponding acceleration and pressure wavenumber maps. Analysis and interpretation of the spatial plots and wavenumber maps provided the required information on modal characteristics, structural-acoustic coupling, and fuselage response.

  2. Study for prediction of rotor/wake/fuselage interference, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, D. R.; Maskew, B.

    1985-01-01

    A method was developed which allows the fully coupled calculation of fuselage and rotor airloads for typical helicopter configurations in forward flight. To do this, an iterative solution is carried out based on a conventional panel representation of the fuselage and a blade element representation of the rotor where fuselage and rotor singularity strengths are determined simultaneously at each step and the rotor wake is allowed to relax (deform) in response to changes in rotor wake loading and fuselage presence. On completion of the iteration, rotor loading and inflow, fuselage singularity strength (and, hence, pressure and velocity distributions) and rotor wake are all consistent. The results of a fully coupled calculation of the flow around representative helicopter configurations are presented. The effect of fuselage components on the rotor flow field and the overall wake structure is detailed and the aerodynamic interference between the different parts of the aircraft is discussed.

  3. Study for prediction of rotor/wake/fuselage interference. Part 2: Program users guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, D. R.; Maskew, B.

    1985-01-01

    A method was developed which permits the fully coupled calculation of fuselage and rotor airloads for typical helicopter configurations in forward flight. To do this, an iterative solution is carried out based on a conventional panel representation of the fuselage and a blade element representation of the rotor where fuselage and rotor singularity strengths are determined simultaneously at each step and the rotor wake is allowed to relax (deform) in response to changes in rotor wake loading and fuselage presence. On completion of the iteration, rotor loading and inflow, fuselage singularity strength (and, hence, pressure and velocity distributions) and rotor wake are all consistent. The results of a fully coupled calculation of the flow around representative helicopter configurations are presented. The effect of fuselage components on the rotor flow field and the overall wake structure is discussed as well as the aerodynamic interference between the different parts of the aircraft. Details of the computer program are given.

  4. 6. Detail of forward fuselage showing open cockpit hatch and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Detail of forward fuselage showing open cockpit hatch and ladder. View to southeast. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Aircraft, On Operational Apron covering northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  5. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage: Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, L. B.; Smith, P. J.; Hanson, C. T.; Walker, T. H.; Metschan, S. L.; Mabson, G. E.; Wilden, K. S.; Flynn, B. W.; Scholz, D. B.; Polland, D. R.; Fredrikson, H. G.; Olson, J. T.; Backman, B. F.

    1997-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program has studied transport fuselage structure with a large potential reduction in the total direct operating costs for wide-body commercial transports. The baseline fuselage section was divided into four 'quadrants', crown, keel, and sides, gaining the manufacturing cost advantage possible with larger panels. Key processes found to have savings potential include (1) skins laminated by automatic fiber placement, (2) braided frames using resin transfer molding, and (3) panel bond technology that minimized mechanical fastening. The cost and weight of the baseline fuselage barrel was updated to complete Phase B of the program. An assessment of the former, which included labor, material, and tooling costs, was performed with the help of design cost models. Crown, keel, and side quadrant cost distributions illustrate the importance of panel design configuration, area, and other structural details. Composite sandwich panel designs were found to have the greatest cost savings potential for most quadrants. Key technical findings are summarized as an introduction to the other contractor reports documenting Phase A and B work completed in functional areas. The current program status in resolving critical technical issues is also highlighted.

  6. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Materials and Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, D. B.; Dost, E. F.; Flynn, B. W.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Nelson, K. M.; Sawicki, A. J.; Walker, T. H.; Lakes, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program was to develop the technology required for cost and weight efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. This contractor report describes results of material and process selection, development, and characterization activities. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of monolithic and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential frames and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements. Significant development efforts were expended on the AFP, braiding, and RTM processes. Sandwich core materials and core edge close-out design concepts were evaluated. Autoclave cure processes were developed for stiffened skin and sandwich structures. The stiffness, strength, notch sensitivity, and bearing/bypass properties of fiber-placed skin materials and braided/RTM'd circumferential frame materials were characterized. The strength and durability of cocured and cobonded joints were evaluated. Impact damage resistance of stiffened skin and sandwich structures typical of fuselage panels was investigated. Fluid penetration and migration mechanisms for sandwich panels were studied.

  7. Advanced composite fuselage technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Smith, Peter J.; Horton, Ray E.

    1993-01-01

    Boeing's ATCAS program has completed its third year and continues to progress towards a goal to demonstrate composite fuselage technology with cost and weight advantages over aluminum. Work on this program is performed by an integrated team that includes several groups within The Boeing Company, industrial and university subcontractors, and technical support from NASA. During the course of the program, the ATCAS team has continued to perform a critical review of composite developments by recognizing advances in metal fuselage technology. Despite recent material, structural design, and manufacturing advancements for metals, polymeric matrix composite designs studied in ATCAS still project significant cost and weight advantages for future applications. A critical path to demonstrating technology readiness for composite transport fuselage structures was created to summarize ATCAS tasks for Phases A, B, and C. This includes a global schedule and list of technical issues which will be addressed throughout the course of studies. Work performed in ATCAS since the last ACT conference is also summarized. Most activities relate to crown quadrant manufacturing scaleup and performance verification. The former was highlighted by fabricating a curved, 7 ft. by 10 ft. panel, with cocured hat-stiffeners and cobonded J-frames. In building to this scale, process developments were achieved for tow-placed skins, drape formed stiffeners, braided/RTM frames, and panel cure tooling. Over 700 tests and supporting analyses have been performed for crown material and design evaluation, including structural tests that demonstrated limit load requirements for severed stiffener/skin failsafe damage conditions. Analysis of tests for tow-placed hybrid laminates with large damage indicates a tensile fracture toughness that is higher than that observed for advanced aluminum alloys. Additional recent ATCAS achievements include crown supporting technology, keel quadrant design evaluation, and

  8. Pollution reducing aircraft propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, R. M.

    1985-05-28

    Aircraft engine exhaust is mixed with air and fuel and recombusted. Air is drawn into the secondary combustion chamber from suction surfaces on wings. Exhaust of the secondary combustion chamber is blown over wing and fuselage surfaces.

  9. [Sample German LAPS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Bianca

    Four learning activity packages (LAPS) for use in secondary school German programs contain instructional materials which enable students to improve their basic linguistic skills. The units include: (1) "Grusse," (2) "Ich Heisse...Namen," (3) "Tune into Your Career: Business Correspondence 'Auf Deutch'," and (4) "Understanding German Culture."…

  10. Some computational tools for the analysis of through cracks in stiffened fuselage shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, C. C.; Brogan, F. A.; Riks, E.

    1992-10-01

    A method for computing the energy release rate for cracks of varying length in a typical stiffened metallic fuselage under general loading conditions is presented. Reliable analytical methods that predict the structural integrity and residual strength of aircraft fuselage structures containing cracks are needed to help to understand the behavior of pressurized stiffened shells with damage, to determine the safe life of such a shell. The models used in the simulation are derived from an extensive analysis of a fuselage barrel section subjected to operational flight loads. Energy release rates are computed as a function of the length of the crack, its location, and the crack propagation mode.

  11. Global cost and weight evaluation of fuselage keel design concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, B. W.; Morris, M. R.; Metschan, S. L.; Swanson, G. D.; Smith, P. J.; Griess, K. H.; Schramm, M. R.; Humphrey, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    The Boeing program entitled Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structure (ATCAS) is focused on the application of affordable composite technology to pressurized fuselage structure of future aircraft. As part of this effort, a design study was conducted on the keel section of the aft fuselage. A design build team (DBT) approach was used to identify and evaluate several design concepts which incorporated different material systems, fabrication processes, structural configurations, and subassembly details. The design concepts were developed in sufficient detail to accurately assess their potential for cost and weight savings as compared with a metal baseline representing current wide body technology. The cost and weight results, along with an appraisal of performance and producibility risks, are used to identify a globally optimized keel design; one which offers the most promising cost and weight advantages over metal construction. Lastly, an assessment is given of the potential for further cost and weight reductions of the selected keel design during local optimization.

  12. A Practical Engineering Approach to Predicting Fatigue Crack Growth in Riveted Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Piascik, Robert S.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    An extensive experimental database has been assembled from very detailed teardown examinations of fatigue cracks found in rivet holes of fuselage structural components. Based on this experimental database, a comprehensive analysis methodology was developed to predict the onset of widespread fatigue damage in lap joints of fuselage structure. Several computer codes were developed with specialized capabilities to conduct the various analyses that make up the comprehensive methodology. Over the past several years, the authors have interrogated various aspects of the analysis methods to determine the degree of computational rigor required to produce numerical predictions with acceptable engineering accuracy. This study led to the formulation of a practical engineering approach to predicting fatigue crack growth in riveted lap joints. This paper describes the practical engineering approach and compares predictions with the results from several experimental studies.

  13. A Practical Engineering Approach to Predicting Fatigue Crack Growth in Riveted Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.; Piascik, R. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An extensive experimental database has been assembled from very detailed teardown examinations of fatigue cracks found in rivet holes of fuselage structural components. Based on this experimental database, a comprehensive analysis methodology was developed to predict the onset of widespread fatigue damage in lap joints of fuselage structure. Several computer codes were developed with specialized capabilities to conduct the various analyses that make up the comprehensive methodology. Over the past several years, the authors have interrogated various aspects of the analysis methods to determine the degree of computational rigor required to produce numerical predictions with acceptable engineering accuracy. This study led to the formulation of a practical engineering approach to predicting fatigue crack growth in riveted lap joints. This paper describes the practical engineering approach and compares predictions with the results from several experimental studies.

  14. Detailed design of a lattice composite fuselage structure by a mixed optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Toropov, V.; Hühne, C.; Armani, U.

    2016-10-01

    In this article, a procedure for designing a lattice fuselage barrel is developed. It comprises three stages: first, topology optimization of an aircraft fuselage barrel is performed with respect to weight and structural performance to obtain the conceptual design. The interpretation of the optimal result is given to demonstrate the development of this new lattice airframe concept for the fuselage barrel. Subsequently, parametric optimization of the lattice aircraft fuselage barrel is carried out using genetic algorithms on metamodels generated with genetic programming from a 101-point optimal Latin hypercube design of experiments. The optimal design is achieved in terms of weight savings subject to stability, global stiffness and strain requirements, and then verified by the fine mesh finite element simulation of the lattice fuselage barrel. Finally, a practical design of the composite skin complying with the aircraft industry lay-up rules is presented. It is concluded that the mixed optimization method, combining topology optimization with the global metamodel-based approach, allows the problem to be solved with sufficient accuracy and provides the designers with a wealth of information on the structural behaviour of the novel anisogrid composite fuselage design.

  15. Rubicon swaps autophagy for LAP.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Keith B; Randow, Felix

    2015-07-01

    Phagocytic cells engulf their prey into vesicular structures called phagosomes, of which a certain proportion becomes demarcated for enhanced maturation by a process called LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP). Light has now been shed on the molecular requirements of LAP, establishing a central role for the protein Rubicon in the immune response to Aspergillus fumigatus.

  16. Methodology for Predicting the Onset of Widespread Fatigue Damage in Lap-Splice Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Harris, C. E.; Piascik, R. S.; Dawicke, D. S.

    1998-01-01

    NASA has conducted an Airframe Structural Integrity Program to develop the methodology to predict the onset of widespread fatigue damage to lap-splice joints of fuselage structures. Several stress analysis codes have been developed or enhanced to analyze the lap-splice-joint configuration. Fatigue lives in lap-splice-joint specimens and fatigue-crack growth in a structural fatigue test article agreed well with calculations from small-crack theory and fatigue-crack growth analyses with the FASTRAN code. Residual-strength analyses of laboratory specimens and wide stiffened panels were predicted quite well from the critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion and elastic-plastic finite-element analyses (two- or three-dimensional codes and the STAGS shell code).

  17. 14 CFR 25.783 - Fuselage doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuselage doors. 25.783 Section 25.783... Fuselage doors. (a) General. This section applies to fuselage doors, which includes all doors, hatches... of tools to open or close. This also applies to each door or hatch through a pressure...

  18. 14 CFR 25.783 - Fuselage doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... station that all required operations to close, latch, and lock the door(s) have been completed. (2) There... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuselage doors. 25.783 Section 25.783... Fuselage doors. (a) General. This section applies to fuselage doors, which includes all doors,...

  19. Continued development and correlation of analytically based weight estimation codes for wings and fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, J., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The implementation of the changes to the program for Wing Aeroelastic Design and the development of a program to estimate aircraft fuselage weights are described. The equations to implement the modified planform description, the stiffened panel skin representation, the trim loads calculation, and the flutter constraint approximation are presented. A comparison of the wing model with the actual F-5A weight material distributions and loads is given. The equations and program techniques used for the estimation of aircraft fuselage weights are described. These equations were incorporated as a computer code. The weight predictions of this program are compared with data from the C-141.

  20. Impact damage resistance of composite fuselage structure, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dost, E. F.; Avery, W. B.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Grande, D. H.; Coxon, B. R.

    1992-01-01

    The impact damage resistance of laminated composite transport aircraft fuselage structures was studied experimentally. A statistically based designed experiment was used to examine numerous material, laminate, structural, and extrinsic (e.g., impactor type) variables. The relative importance and quantitative measure of the effect of each variable and variable interactions on responses including impactor dynamic response, visibility, and internal damage state were determined. The study utilized 32 three-stiffener panels, each with a unique combination of material type, material forms, and structural geometry. Two manufacturing techniques, tow placement and tape lamination, were used to build panels representative of potential fuselage crown, keel, and lower side-panel designs. Various combinations of impactor variables representing various foreign-object-impact threats to the aircraft were examined. Impacts performed at different structural locations within each panel (e.g., skin midbay, stiffener attaching flange, etc.) were considered separate parallel experiments. The relationship between input variables, measured damage states, and structural response to this damage are presented including recommendations for materials and impact test methods for fuselage structure.

  1. Application of a design-build-team approach to low cost and weight composite fuselage structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, L. B.; Walker, T. H.; Willden, K. S.; Swanson, G. D.; Truslove, G.; Metschan, S. L.; Pfahl, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Relationships between manufacturing costs and design details must be understood to promote the application of advanced composite technologies to transport fuselage structures. A team approach, integrating the disciplines responsible for aircraft structural design and manufacturing, was developed to perform cost and weight trade studies for a twenty-foot diameter aft fuselage section. Baseline composite design and manufacturing concepts were selected for large quadrant panels in crown, side, and keel areas of the fuselage section. The associated technical issues were also identified. Detailed evaluation of crown panels indicated the potential for large weight savings and costs competitive with aluminum technology in the 1995 timeframe. Different processes and material forms were selected for the various elements that comprise the fuselage structure. Additional cost and weight savings potential was estimated for future advancements.

  2. Crash Simulation of a Boeing 737 Fuselage Section Vertical Drop Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Jones, Yvonne T.; Frings, Gary; Vu, Tong

    2004-01-01

    A 30-ft/s vertical drop test of a fuselage section of a Boeing 737 aircraft was conducted in October of 1999 at the FAA Technical Center in Atlantic City, NJ. This test was performed to evaluate the structural integrity of a conformable auxiliary fuel tank mounted beneath the floor and to determine its effect on the impact response of the airframe structure and the occupants. The test data were used to compare with a finite element simulation of the fuselage structure and to gain a better understanding of the impact physics through analytical/experimental correlation. To perform this simulation, a full-scale 3-dimensional finite element model of the fuselage section was developed using the explicit, nonlinear transient-dynamic finite element code, MSC.Dytran. The emphasis of the simulation was to predict the structural deformation and floor-level acceleration responses obtained from the drop test of the B737 fuselage section with the auxiliary fuel tank.

  3. Cabin-fuselage-wing structural design concept with engine installation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ariotti, Scott; Garner, M.; Cepeda, A.; Vieira, J.; Bolton, D.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide a fuselage structural assembly and wing structural design that will be able to withstand the given operational parameters and loads provided by Federal Aviation Regulation Part 23 (FAR 23) and the Statement of Work (SOW). The goal is to provide a durable lightweight structure that will transfer the applied loads through the most efficient load path. Areas of producibility and maintainability of the structure will also be addressed. All of the structural members will also meet or exceed the desired loading criteria, along with providing adequate stiffness, reliability, and fatigue life as stated in the SOW. Considerations need to be made for control system routing and cabin heating/ventilation. The goal of the wing structure and carry through structure is also to provide a simple, lightweight structure that will transfer the aerodynamic forces produced by the wing, tailboom, and landing gear. These forces will be channeled through various internal structures sized for the pre-determined loading criteria. Other considerations were to include space for flaps, ailerons, fuel tanks, and electrical and control system routing. The difficulties encountered in the fuselage design include expanding the fuselage cabin to accept a third occupant in a staggered configuration and providing ample volume for their safety. By adding a third person the CG of aircraft will move forward so the engine needs to be moved aft to compensate for the difference in the moment. This required the provisions of a ring frame structure for the new position of the engine mount. The difficulties encountered in the wing structural design include resizing the wing for the increased capacity and weight, and compensating for a large torsion produced by the tail boom by placing a great number of stiffeners inside the boom, which will result in the relocation of the fuel tank. Finally, an adequate carry through structure for the wing and fuselage interface will be

  4. Crack Growth Simulation and Residual Strength Prediction in Airplane Fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chuin-Shan; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report for the NASA funded project entitled "Crack Growth Prediction Methodology for Multi-Site Damage." The primary objective of the project was to create a capability to simulate curvilinear fatigue crack growth and ductile tearing in aircraft fuselages subjected to widespread fatigue damage. The second objective was to validate the capability by way of comparisons to experimental results. Both objectives have been achieved and the results are detailed herein. In the first part of the report, the crack tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion, obtained and correlated from coupon tests to predict fracture behavior and residual strength of built-up aircraft fuselages, is discussed. Geometrically nonlinear, elastic-plastic, thin shell finite element analyses are used to simulate stable crack growth and to predict residual strength. Both measured and predicted results of laboratory flat panel tests and full-scale fuselage panel tests show substantial reduction of residual strength due to the occurrence of multi-site damage (MSD). Detailed comparisons of n stable crack growth history, and residual strength between the predicted and experimental results are used to assess the validity of the analysis methodology. In the second part of the report, issues related to crack trajectory prediction in thin shells; an evolving methodology uses the crack turning phenomenon to improve the structural integrity of aircraft structures are discussed, A directional criterion is developed based on the maximum tangential stress theory, but taking into account the effect of T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy. Possible extensions of the current crack growth directional criterion to handle geometrically and materially nonlinear problems are discussed. The path independent contour integral method for T-stress evaluation is derived and its accuracy is assessed using a p- and hp-version adaptive finite element method. Curvilinear crack growth is simulated in

  5. Design and analysis of a stiffened composite fuselage panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickson, J. N.; Biggers, S. B.

    1980-01-01

    The design and analysis of stiffened composite panel that is representative of the fuselage structure of existing wide bodied aircraft is discussed. The panel is a minimum weight design, based on the current level of technology and realistic loads and criteria. Several different stiffener configurations were investigated in the optimization process. The final configuration is an all graphite/epoxy J-stiffened design in which the skin between adjacent stiffeners is permitted to buckle under design loads. Fail safe concepts typically employed in metallic fuselage structure have been incorporated in the design. A conservative approach has been used with regard to structural details such as skin/frame and stringer/frame attachments and other areas where sufficient design data was not available.

  6. Design and Analysis of a Stiffened Composite Fuselage Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickson, J. N.; Biggers, S. B.

    1980-01-01

    A stiffened composite panel has been designed that is representative of the fuselage structure of existing wide bodied aircraft. The panel is a minimum weight design, based on the current level of technology and realistic loads and criteria. Several different stiffener configurations were investigated in the optimization process. The final configuration is an all graphite epoxy J-stiffened design in which the skin between adjacent stiffeners is permitted to buckle under design loads. Fail-safe concepts typically employed in metallic fuselage structure have been incorporated in the design. A conservative approach has been used with regard to structural details such as skin frame and stringer frame attachments and other areas where sufficient design data was not available.

  7. Design of fuselage shapes for natural laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodbele, S. S.; Vandam, C. P.; Vijgen, P. M. H. W.

    1986-01-01

    Recent technological advances in airplane construction techniques and materials allow for the production of aerodynamic surfaces without significant waviness and roughness, permitting long runs of natural laminar flow (NLF). The present research effort seeks to refine and validate computational design tools for use in the design of axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric natural-laminar-flow bodies. The principal task of the investigation involves fuselage body shaping using a computational design procedure. Analytical methods were refined and exploratory calculations conducted to predict laminar boundary-layer on selected body shapes. Using a low-order surface-singularity aerodynamic analysis program, pressure distribution, boundary-layer development, transition location and drag coefficient have been obtained for a number of body shapes including a representative business-aircraft fuselage. Extensive runs of laminar flow were predicted in regions of favorable pressure gradient on smooth body surfaces. A computational design procedure was developed to obtain a body shape with minimum drag having large extent of NLF.

  8. Algebraic grid generation about wing-fuselage bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R.E.; Kudlinski, R. A.; Everton, E. L.; Wiese, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    An algebraic procedure for generating boundary-fitted grids about wing-fuselage configurations is presented. A wing-fuselage configuration consists of two aircraft components specified by cross sections and mathematically represented by Coons' patches. Several grid blocks are constructed to cover the entire region surrounding the configuration, and each grid block maps into a computational cube. Grid points are first determined on the six boundary surfaces of a block and then in the interior. Grid points on the surface of the configuration are derived from the intersection of planes with the Coons' patch definition. Approximate arc length distributions along the resulting grid curves concentrate and disperse grid points. The two-boundary technique and transfinite interpolation are used to determine grid points on the remaining boundary surfaces and block interiors.

  9. Transonic Flow Field Analysis for Wing-Fuselage Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boppe, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    A computational method for simulating the aerodynamics of wing-fuselage configurations at transonic speeds is developed. The finite difference scheme is characterized by a multiple embedded mesh system coupled with a modified or extended small disturbance flow equation. This approach permits a high degree of computational resolution in addition to coordinate system flexibility for treating complex realistic aircraft shapes. To augment the analysis method and permit applications to a wide range of practical engineering design problems, an arbitrary fuselage geometry modeling system is incorporated as well as methodology for computing wing viscous effects. Configuration drag is broken down into its friction, wave, and lift induced components. Typical computed results for isolated bodies, isolated wings, and wing-body combinations are presented. The results are correlated with experimental data. A computer code which employs this methodology is described.

  10. Investigation on Sound Field Model of Propeller AIRCRAFT—THE Effect of Rigid Fuselage Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T. Q.; Zhou, S.

    1998-01-01

    An improved sound field model with multiple propeller noise sources and finite fuselage boundary has been developed for the prediction of propeller aircraft noise by using the acoustic analogy method. It involves the effects of fuselage boundary with arbitrary shape and coupling of multiple propeller sources. It is also applicable to solving the interaction between any known boundary and harmonic sound source. The model has been used to calculate the sound field of propeller aircraft Y12 with rigid fuselage boundary and the sound field of rigid sphere in planar harmonic sound wave. The latter has an analytical solution which could be used to check the present method. The calculation results show that the model is reasonable and valuable.

  11. An unsteady rotor/fuselage interaction method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. Alan; Lorber, Peter F.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical method has been developed to treat unsteady helicopter rotor, wake, and fuselage interaction aerodynamics. An existing lifting line/prescribed wake rotor analysis and a source panel fuselage analysis were modified to predict vibratory fuselage airloads. The analyses were coupled through the induced flow velocities of the rotor and wake on the fuselage and the fuselage on the rotor. A prescribed displacement technique was used to distort the rotor wake about the fuselage. Sensitivity studies were performed to determine the influence of wake and body geometry on the computed airloads. Predicted and measured mean and unsteady pressures on a cylindrical body in the wake of a two-bladed rotor were compared. Initial results show good qualitative agreement.

  12. Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    national power. But with the recent events such as the war with Iraq, the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak, some major carriers... TITLE AND SUBTITLE 2003 Industry Studies: Aircraft 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  13. Nonlinear analysis of damaged stiffened fuselage shells subjected to combined loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Britt, Vicki O.; Young, Richard D.; Rankin, Charles C.; Shore, Charles P.; Bains, Jane C.

    1994-01-01

    The results of an analytical study of the nonlinear response of stiffened fuselage shells with long cracks are presented. The shells are modeled with a hierarchical modeling strategy that accounts for global and local response phenomena accurately. Results are presented for internal pressure and mechanical bending loads. The effects of crack location and orientation on shell response are described. The effects of mechanical fasteners on the response of a lap joint and the effects of elastic and elastic-plastic material properties on the buckling response of tension-loaded flat panels with cracks are also addressed.

  14. Cabin fuselage structural design with engine installation and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, Tanapaal; Bishop, Mike; Gumus, Ilker; Gussy, Joel; Triggs, Mike

    1994-01-01

    Design requirements for the cabin, cabin system, flight controls, engine installation, and wing-fuselage interface that provide adequate interior volume for occupant seating, cabin ingress and egress, and safety are presented. The fuselage structure must be sufficient to meet the loadings specified in the appropriate sections of Federal Aviation Regulation Part 23. The critical structure must provide a safe life of 10(exp 6) load cycles and 10,000 operational mission cycles. The cabin seating and controls must provide adjustment to account for various pilot physiques and to aid in maintenance and operation of the aircraft. Seats and doors shall not bind or lockup under normal operation. Cabin systems such as heating and ventilation, electrical, lighting, intercom, and avionics must be included in the design. The control system will consist of ailerons, elevator, and rudders. The system must provide required deflections with a combination of push rods, bell cranks, pulleys, and linkages. The system will be free from slack and provide smooth operation without binding. Environmental considerations include variations in temperature and atmospheric pressure, protection against sand, dust, rain, humidity, ice, snow, salt/fog atmosphere, wind and gusts, and shock and vibration. The following design goals were set to meet the requirements of the statement of work: safety, performance, manufacturing and cost. To prevent the engine from penetrating the passenger area in the event of a crash was the primary safety concern. Weight and the fuselage aerodynamics were the primary performance concerns. Commonality and ease of manufacturing were major considerations to reduce cost.

  15. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Repair and Damage Assessment Supporting Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, B. W.; Bodine, J. B.; Dopker, B.; Finn, S. R.; Griess, K. H.; Hanson, C. T.; Harris, C. G.; Nelson, K. M.; Walker, T. H.; Kennedy, T. C.; Nahan, M. F.

    1997-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored contracts for Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) and Materials Development Omnibus Contract (MDOC), Boeing is studying the technologies associated with the application of composite materials to commercial transport fuselage structure. Included in the study is the incorporation of maintainability and repairability requirements of composite primary structure into the design. This contractor report describes activities performed to address maintenance issues in composite fuselage applications. A key aspect of the study was the development of a maintenance philosophy which included consideration of maintenance issues early in the design cycle, multiple repair options, and airline participation in design trades. Fuselage design evaluations considered trade-offs between structural weight, damage resistance/tolerance (repair frequency), and inspection burdens. Analysis methods were developed to assess structural residual strength in the presence of damage, and to evaluate repair design concepts. Repair designs were created with a focus on mechanically fastened concepts for skin/stringer structure and bonded concepts for sandwich structure. Both a large crown (skintstringer) and keel (sandwich) panel were repaired. A compression test of the keel panel indicated the demonstrated repairs recovered ultimate load capability. In conjunction with the design and manufacturing developments, inspection methods were investigated for their potential to evaluate damaged structure and verify the integrity of completed repairs.

  16. An unsteady helicopter rotor: Fuselage interaction analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorber, Peter F.; Egolf, T. Alan

    1988-01-01

    A computational method was developed to treat unsteady aerodynamic interactions between a helicopter rotor, wake, and fuselage and between the main and tail rotors. An existing lifting line prescribed wake rotor analysis and a source panel fuselage analysis were coupled and modified to predict unsteady fuselage surface pressures and airloads. A prescribed displacement technique is used to position the rotor wake about the fuselage. Either a rigid blade or an aeroelastic blade analysis may be used to establish rotor operating conditions. Sensitivity studies were performed to determine the influence of the wake fuselage geometry on the computation. Results are presented that describe the induced velocities, pressures, and airloads on the fuselage and on the rotor. The ability to treat arbitrary geometries is demonstrated using a simulated helicopter fuselage. The computational results are compared with fuselage surface pressure measurements at several locations. No experimental data was available to validate the primary product of the analysis: the vibratory airloads on the entire fuselage. A main rotor-tail rotor interaction analysis is also described, along with some hover and forward flight.

  17. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage-Structural Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, T. H.; Minguet, P. J.; Flynn, B. W.; Carbery, D. J.; Swanson, G. D.; Ilcewicz, L. B.

    1997-01-01

    Boeing is studying the technologies associated with the application of composite materials to commercial transport fuselage structure under the NASA-sponsored contracts for Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) and Materials Development Omnibus Contract (MDOC). This report addresses the program activities related to structural performance of the selected concepts, including both the design development and subsequent detailed evaluation. Design criteria were developed to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements and typical company objectives. Accurate analysis methods were selected and/or developed where practical, and conservative approaches were used where significant approximations were necessary. Design sizing activities supported subsequent development by providing representative design configurations for structural evaluation and by identifying the critical performance issues. Significant program efforts were directed towards assessing structural performance predictive capability. The structural database collected to perform this assessment was intimately linked to the manufacturing scale-up activities to ensure inclusion of manufacturing-induced performance traits. Mechanical tests were conducted to support the development and critical evaluation of analysis methods addressing internal loads, stability, ultimate strength, attachment and splice strength, and damage tolerance. Unresolved aspects of these performance issues were identified as part of the assessments, providing direction for future development.

  18. Aircraft Configured for Flight in an Atmosphere Having Low Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croom, Mark A. (Inventor); Smith, Stephen C. (Inventor); Gelhausen, Paul A. (Inventor); Guynn, Mark D. (Inventor); Hunter, Craig A. (Inventor); Paddock, David A. (Inventor); Riddick, Steven E. (Inventor); Teter, Jr., John E. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An aircraft is configured for flight in an atmosphere having a low density. The aircraft includes a fuselage, a pair of wings, and a rear stabilizer. The pair of wings extends from the fuselage in opposition to one another. The rear stabilizer extends from the fuselage in spaced relationship to the pair of wings. The fuselage, the wings, and the rear stabilizer each present an upper surface opposing a lower surface. The upper and lower surfaces have X, Y, and Z coordinates that are configured for flight in an atmosphere having low density.

  19. Test and analysis results for composite transport fuselage and wing structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Madan, Ram C.; Chen, Victor L.

    1992-01-01

    Automated tow placement (ATP) and stitching of dry textile composite preforms followed by resin transfer molding (RTM) are being studied as cost effective manufacturing processes for obtaining damage tolerant fuselage and wing structures for transport aircraft. Data are presented to assess the damage tolerance of ATP and RTM fuselage elements with stitched-on stiffeners from compression tests of impacted three J-stiffened panels and from stiffener pull-off tests. Data are also presented to assess the damage tolerance of RTM wing elements which had stitched skin and stiffeners from impacted single stiffener and three blade stiffened compression tests and stiffener pull-off tests.

  20. Cashier/Checker Learning Activity Packets (LAPs).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    Twenty-four learning activity packets (LAPs) are provided for six areas of instruction in a cashier/checker program. Section A, Orientation, contains an LAP on exploring the job of cashier-checker. Section B, Operations, has nine LAPs, including those on operating the cash register, issuing trading stamps, and completing the cash register balance…

  1. Alleviation of fuselage form drag using vortex flows: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wortman, A.

    1987-09-15

    The concept of using vortex generators to reduce the fuselage form drag of transport aircraft combines the outflow from the plane of symmetry which is induced by the rotational component of the vortex flow with the energization of the boundary layer to reduce the momentum thickness and to delay or eliminate flow separation. This idea was first advanced by the author in 1981. Under a DOE grant, the concept was validated in wind tunnel tests of approximately 1:17 scale models of fuselages of Boeing 747 and Lockheed C-5 aircraft. The search for the minimum drag involved three vortex generator configurations with three sizes of each in six locations clustered in the aft regions of the fuselages at the beginning of the tail upsweep. The local Reynolds number, which is referred to the length of boundary layer run from the nose, was approximately 10{sup 7} so that a fully developed turbulent boundary layer was present. Vortex generator planforms ranged from swept tapered, through swept straight, to swept reverse tapered wings whose semi-spans ranged from 50% to 125% of the local boundary layer thickness. Pitch angles of the vortex generators were varied by inboard actuators under the control of an external proportional digital radio controller. It was found that certain combinations of vortex generator parameters increased drag. However, with certain configurations, locations, and pitch angles of vortex generators, the highest drag reductions were 3% for the 747 and about 6% for the C-5, thus confirming the arguments that effectiveness increases with the rate of upsweep of the tail. Greatest gains in performance are therefore expected on aft loading military transports. 10 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Test and analysis results for composite transport fuselage and wing structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Madan, Ram C.; Chen, Victor L.

    1992-01-01

    Automated tow placement (ATP) and stitching of dry textile composite preforms followed by resin transfer molding (RTM) are being investigated by researchers at NASA LaRC and Douglas Aircraft Company as cost-effective manufacturing processes for obtaining damage tolerant fuselage and wing structures for transport aircraft. The Douglas work is being performed under a NASA contract entitled 'Innovative Composites Aircraft Primary Structures (ICAPS)'. Data are presented in this paper to assess the damage tolerance of ATP and RTM fuselage elements with stitched-on stiffeners from compression tests of impacted three-J-stiffened panels and from stiffener pull-off tests. Data are also presented to assess the damage tolerance of RTM wing elements which had stitched skin and stiffeners from impacted single stiffener and three blade-stiffened compression tests and stiffener pull-off tests.

  3. A laboratory study of fracture in the presence of lap splice multiple site damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayville, Ronald A.; Warren, Thomas J.

    Flat coupons were tested in the laboratory to determine a fracture criterion for link-up of fuselage lap splice multiple site damage at adjacent rivet holes. Experiments were performed on 0.040 inch (1 mm) thick 2024-T3 clad aluminum sheet. Continuous and riveted lap splice coupons were tested with simulated uniform (equal crack lengths) and nonuniform MSD, and the effects of notch sharpness were also studied. A net section stress criterion was found to provide excellent predictions of fracture for uniform MSD and uniform stress distributions. This same criterion provides conservative predictions for nonuniform MSD in uniform stress fields. An overload/cyclic stress experiment was also conducted to explore the pressurized proof test scenario of ensuring structural integrity.

  4. Some computational tools for the analysis of through cracks in stiffened fuselage shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, C. C.; Brogan, F. A.; Riks, E.

    1993-12-01

    Reliable analytical methods that predict the structural integrity and residual strength of aircraft fuselage structures containing cracks are needed to help to understand the behavior of pressurized stiffened shells with damage, so that it becomes possible to determine the safe life of such a shell. Of special importance is the ability to determine under what conditions local failure, once initiated, will propagate. In this paper we shall present a reliable and efficient method for computing the energy release rate for cracks of varying length in a typical stiffened metallic fuselage under general loading conditions. The models used in the simulation are derived from an extensive analysis of a fuselage barrel section subjected to operational flight loads. Energy release rates are computed as a function of the length of the crack, its location, and the crack propagation mode.

  5. Additive manufacturing of tools for lapping glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Wesley B.

    2013-09-01

    Additive manufacturing technologies have the ability to directly produce parts with complex geometries without the need for secondary processes, tooling or fixtures. This ability was used to produce concave lapping tools with a VFlash 3D printer from 3D Systems. The lapping tools were first designed in Creo Parametric with a defined constant radius and radial groove pattern. The models were converted to stereolithography files which the VFlash used in building the parts, layer by layer, from a UV curable resin. The tools were rotated at 60 rpm and used with 120 grit and 220 grit silicon carbide lapping paste to lap 0.750" diameter fused silica workpieces. The samples developed a matte appearance on the lapped surface that started as a ring at the edge of the workpiece and expanded to the center. This indicated that as material was removed, the workpiece radius was beginning to match the tool radius. The workpieces were then cleaned and lapped on a second tool (with equivalent geometry) using a 3000 grit corundum aluminum oxide lapping paste, until a near specular surface was achieved. By using lapping tools that have been additively manufactured, fused silica workpieces can be lapped to approach a specified convex geometry. This approach may enable more rapid lapping of near net shape workpieces that minimize the material removal required by subsequent polishing. This research may also enable development of new lapping tool geometry and groove patterns for improved loose abrasive finishing.

  6. Analysis Concerning the Inspection Threshold for Multi-Site Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    uL 200 words) Periodic inspections, at a prescribed interval, for Multi-Site Damage (MSD) in longitudinal fuselage lap-joints start when the aircraft ...at a prescribed interval, for Multi-Site Damage (MSD) in longitudinal fuselage lap-joints start when the aircraft has accumulated a certain number of...viii 1. INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE The cumulative probability of detection of Multi-Site Damage (MSD) in fuselage lap-joints of aging aircraft was assessed

  7. How Tongue Size and Roughness Affect Lapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, M. J.; Hay, K. M.

    2012-10-01

    The biomechanics of domestic cat lapping (Felis catus) and domestic dog lapping (Canis familiaris) is currently under debate. Lapping mechanics in vertebrates with incomplete cheeks, such as cats and dogs, is a balance of inertia and the force of gravity likely optimized for ingestion and physical necessities. Physiology dictates vertebrate mass, which dictates vertebrate tongue size, which dictates lapping mechanics to achieve optimum liquid ingestion; with either touch lapping, scooping, or a hybrid lapping method. The physics of this optimized system then determines how high a column of liquid can be raised before it collapses due to gravity, and therefore, lapping frequency. Through tongue roughness model variation experiments it was found that pore-scale geometrical roughness does not appear to affect lapping or liquid uptake. Through tongue size model variation experiments it was found that there is a critical tongue radius in the range of 25 mm to 35 mm above which touch lapping is no longer an efficient way to uptake liquid. Vertebrates with incomplete cheeks may use a touch lapping method to ingest water if their tongue radius is less than this critical radius and use an alternative ingestion method if their tongue radius is larger.

  8. Residual Strength Prediction of Fuselage Structures with Multiple Site Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chuin-Shan; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent results on simulating full-scale pressure tests of wide body, lap-jointed fuselage panels with multiple site damage (MSD). The crack tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion and the FRANC3D/STAGS software program were used to analyze stable crack growth under conditions of general yielding. The link-up of multiple cracks and residual strength of damaged structures were predicted. Elastic-plastic finite element analysis based on the von Mises yield criterion and incremental flow theory with small strain assumption was used. A global-local modeling procedure was employed in the numerical analyses. Stress distributions from the numerical simulations are compared with strain gage measurements. Analysis results show that accurate representation of the load transfer through the rivets is crucial for the model to predict the stress distribution accurately. Predicted crack growth and residual strength are compared with test data. Observed and predicted results both indicate that the occurrence of small MSD cracks substantially reduces the residual strength. Modeling fatigue closure is essential to capture the fracture behavior during the early stable crack growth. Breakage of a tear strap can have a major influence on residual strength prediction.

  9. The effects of design details on cost and weight of fuselage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. D.; Metschan, S. L.; Morris, M. R.; Kassapoglou, C.

    1993-01-01

    Crown panel design studies showing the relationship between panel size, cost, weight, and aircraft configuration are compared to aluminum design configurations. The effects of a stiffened sandwich design concept are also discussed. This paper summarizes the effect of a design cost model in assessing the cost and weight relationships for fuselage crown panel designs. Studies were performed using data from existing aircraft to assess the effects of different design variables on the cost and weight of transport fuselage crown panel design. Results show a strong influence of load levels, panel size, and material choices on the cost and weight of specific designs. A design tool being developed under the NASA ACT program is used in the study to assess these issues. The effects of panel configuration comparing postbuckled and buckle resistant stiffened laminated structure is compared to a stiffened sandwich concept. Results suggest some potential economy with stiffened sandwich designs for compression dominated structure with relatively high load levels.

  10. Mechanical and analytical screening of braided composites for transport fuselage applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedro, Mark J.; Gunther, Christian; Ko, Frank K.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanics of materials progress in support of the goal of understanding the application of braided composites in a transport aircraft fuselage are summarized. Composites consisting of both 2-D and 3-D braid patterns are investigated. Both consolidation of commingled graphite/PEEK and resin transfer molding of graphite-epoxy braided composite processes are studied. Mechanical tests were used to examine unnotched tension, open hole tension, compression, compression after impact, in-plane shear, out-of-plane tension, bearing, and crippling. Analytical methods are also developed and applied to predict the stiffness and strengths of test specimens. A preliminary study using the test data and analytical results is performed to assess the applicability of braided composites to a commercial aircraft fuselage.

  11. Residual Strength Pressure Tests and Nonlinear Analyses of Stringer- and Frame-Stiffened Aluminum Fuselage Panels with Longitudinal Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard D.; Rouse, Marshall; Ambur, Damodar R.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The results of residual strength pressure tests and nonlinear analyses of stringer- and frame-stiffened aluminum fuselage panels with longitudinal cracks are presented. Two types of damage are considered: a longitudinal crack located midway between stringers, and a longitudinal crack adjacent to a stringer and along a row of fasteners in a lap joint that has multiple-site damage (MSD). In both cases, the longitudinal crack is centered on a severed frame. The panels are subjected to internal pressure plus axial tension loads. The axial tension loads are equivalent to a bulkhead pressure load. Nonlinear elastic-plastic residual strength analyses of the fuselage panels are conducted using a finite element program and the crack-tip-opening-angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. Predicted crack growth and residual strength results from nonlinear analyses of the stiffened fuselage panels are compared with experimental measurements and observations. Both the test and analysis results indicate that the presence of MSD affects crack growth stability and reduces the residual strength of stiffened fuselage shells with long cracks.

  12. A coupled rotor-fuselage vibration analysis for helicopter rotor system fault detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mao

    original vibration time-history. The imbalanced mass fault causes higher 1/rev roll vibration that is insensitive to the airspeed. The misadjusted trim-tab fault induced 1/rev vertical vibration increases with airspeed. The misadjusted pitch-control rod fault causes high vibration at hover. A parametric study was conducted to identify key factors that affect the fault-induced fuselage vibration. Analysis show that elastic fuselage model and precise hub modeling (inclusion of vibration absorbers) are essential to the vibration pre diction. The analysis shows that a compound fault can be expressed as a linear combination of individual faults involved. Aircraft operational parameters, such as gross-weight; center of gravity location, flight speed, flight path and aircraft configuration, have significant impact on the fault-induced 1/rev vibration. Prediction show that there are certain patterns in the fault-induced 1/rev hub-loads. Thus measuring both fuselage vibration and hub loads may benefit rotor system fault detection.

  13. Simulation of propfan noise impact on a fuselage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, A. B.

    1983-04-01

    The modification of aircraft fuselage structures to withstand and shield against strong acoustic waves generated by propfan engines presents major difficulties in that a full-size propfan has yet to be built. The present paper describes a siren that may be used for the ground-based or in-flight simulation of propfan noise in the development of suitable fuselage structures. The siren is powered by compressed air, and is configured in such a way that the ejected air generates a rotating acoustic wave that is much like the rotating rave attached to a two-bladed propfan. In contrast to the conventional high-energy siren, the rotating-wave-pattern siren can simulate the propfan and its high-speed (up to supersonic) blade rotation. The new device is capable of providing sound pressure levels equal to those projected for an advanced propfan design, yet is economical to build and maintain, requiring only mechanical parts operating at speeds well below sonic.

  14. Crash Simulation of a Vertical Drop Test of a B737 Fuselage Section with Overhead Bins and Luggage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2004-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to describe a crash simulation of a 30-ft/s vertical drop test of a Boeing 737 (B737) fuselage section. The drop test of the 10-ft. long fuselage section of a B737 aircraft was conducted in November of 2000 at the FAA Technical Center in Atlantic City, NJ. The fuselage section was outfitted with two different commercial overhead stowage bins. In addition, 3,229-lbs. of luggage were packed in the cargo hold to represent a maximum take-off weight condition. The main objective of the test was to evaluate the response and failure modes of the overhead stowage bins in a narrow-body transport fuselage section when subjected to a severe, but survivable, impact. A secondary objective of the test was to generate experimental data for correlation with the crash simulation. A full-scale 3-dimensional finite element model of the fuselage section was developed and a crash simulation was conducted using the explicit, nonlinear transient dynamic code, MSC.Dytran. Pre-test predictions of the fuselage and overhead bin responses were generated for correlation with the drop test data. A description of the finite element model and an assessment of the analytical/experimental correlation are presented. In addition, suggestions for modifications to the model to improve correlation are proposed.

  15. Effects of floor location on response of composite fuselage frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, Huey D.; Jones, Lisa E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental and analytical results are presented which show the effect of floor placement on the structural response and strength of circular fuselage frames constructed of graphite-epoxy composite material. The research was conducted to study the behavior of conventionally designed advanced composite aircraft components. To achieve desired new designs which incorporate improved energy absorption capabilities requires an understanding of how these conventional designs behave under crash type loadings. Data are presented on the static behavior of the composite structure through photographs of the frame specimen, experimental strain distributions, and through analytical data from composite structural models. An understanding of this behavior can aid dynamist in predicting the crash behavior of these structures and may assist the designer achieve improved designs for energy absorption and crash behavior of future structures.

  16. Effects of floor location on response of composite fuselage frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, Huey D.; Jones, Lisa E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and analytical results are presented which show the effect of floor placement on the structural response and strength of circular fuselage frames constructed of graphite-epoxy composite material. The research was conducted to study the behavior of conventionally designed advanced composite aircraft components. To achieve desired new designs which incorporate improved energy absorption capabilities requires an understanding of how these conventional designs behave under crash type loadings. Data are presented on the static behavior of the composite structure through photographs of the frame specimen, experimental strain distributions, and through analytical data from composite structural models. An understanding of this behavior can aid the dynamist in predicting the crash behavior of these structures and may assist the designer in achieving improved designs for energy absorption and crash behavior of future structures.

  17. Noise control mechanisms of inside aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zverev, A. Ya.

    2016-07-01

    World trends in the development of methods and approaches to noise reduction in aircraft cabins are reviewed. The paper discusses the mechanisms of passive and active noise and vibration control, application of "smart" and innovative materials, new approaches to creating all fuselage-design elements, and other promising directions of noise control inside aircraft.

  18. Noise Control in Propeller-Driven Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rennison, D. C.; Wilby, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical model predicts noise levels inside propeller-driven aircraft during cruise at mach 0.8. Double wall sidewalls minimize interior noise and weight. Model applied to three aircraft with fuselages of different size (wide-body, narrow-body, and small-diameter) to determine noise reductions required to achieve A-weighted sound level not to exceed 80 dB.

  19. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross-section (circular and elliptical) and structural arrangement (integral and nonintegral tanks) on the performance of actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles was evaluated. It was found that integrally machined stiffening of the tank walls, while providing the most weight-efficient use of materials, results in higher production costs. Fatigue and fracture mechanics appeared to have little effect on the weight of the three study aircraft. The need for thermal strain relief through insulation is discussed. Aircraft size and magnitude of the internal pressure are seen to be significant factors in tank design.

  20. An examination of faying surface fretting in single lap splices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Adam

    While fretting damage in mechanically fastened joints is widely acknowledged as a common source of crack nucleation, little work is available in the open literature on the role that fretting damage plays in the fatigue life of a riveted joint. To expand on the limited knowledge available, a study was undertaken on fretting fatigue in thin-sheet riveted fuselage lap joints. In joints constructed out of 1 mm thick 2024-T3 aluminum sheet the rivet forming load was found to have a significant effect on the location of fretting damage and crack nucleation. This effect was observed for splices riveted with machine countersunk and with universal rivets. The shift in the location of peak fretting damage and crack nucleation with changing rivet forming loads was investigated through numerical and experimental methods. A predictive model based on the critical plane Smith-Watson-Topper strain life equation was applied to the complex geometry of the single lap splice and was shown to be effective in predicting the fretting fatigue life as well as the location of fretting-induced crack nucleation. Basing this model on an explicit finite element simulation allowed for the inclusion of compressive residual stresses generated during rivet forming. Key to the proper functionality of the predictive model was to have a validated finite element model from which results for the stress and strain field in the loaded component could be obtained. In addition to the predictive model, a series of splice coupon and simplified geometry fretting fatigue tests were performed. The tests showed that, at higher rivet forming loads, crack nucleation is on the faying surface away from the hole edge and that the type of surface condition is important to the fretting fatigue life of the splice. The discovery of this variation with surface treatment at high rivet forming loads is important as more research is showing the benefit of using load-controlled rivet forming and higher rivet forming loads in

  1. Full scale GLARE fuselage panel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vercammen, Roland W. A.; Ottens, Harold H.

    1996-01-01

    A GLARE fuselage panel, representative of the crown section of the Fokker 100 fuselage in front of the wing, was tested. The panels were loaded by air pressure resulting in tangential stress in the panel by axial loading, representative of both the cabin pressure and the fuselage bending due to taxiing and gust loading. A fatigue test, simulating 180000 flights, followed by static tests were performed. The panel was loaded to failure at 1.32 ultimate load. The test set-up, the uniform strain distribution of the panel, and the fatigue loads applied at high test frequency are described. The use of GLARE leads to a substantial weight reduction without affecting the fatigue static strength.

  2. A NASTRAN model of a large flexible swing-wing bomber. Volume 4: NASTRAN model development-fuselage structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mock, W. D.; Latham, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The NASTRAN model plan for the fuselage structure was expanded in detail to generate the NASTRAN model for this substructure. The grid point coordinates were coded for each element. The material properties and sizing data for each element were specified. The fuselage substructure model was thoroughly checked out for continuity, connectivity, and constraints. This substructure was processed for structural influence coefficients (SIC) point loadings and the deflections were compared to those computed for the aircraft detail model. Finally, a demonstration and validation processing of this substructure was accomplished using the NASTRAN finite element program. The bulk data deck, stiffness matrices, and SIC output data were delivered.

  3. A three-dimensional, compressible, laminar boundary-layer method for general fuselages. Volume 1: Numerical method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Yong-Sun

    1990-01-01

    A procedure for calculating 3-D, compressible laminar boundary layer flow on general fuselage shapes is described. The boundary layer solutions can be obtained in either nonorthogonal 'body oriented' coordinates or orthogonal streamline coordinates. The numerical procedure is 'second order' accurate, efficient and independent of the cross flow velocity direction. Numerical results are presented for several test cases, including a sharp cone, an ellipsoid of revolution, and a general aircraft fuselage at angle of attack. Comparisons are made between numerical results obtained using nonorthogonal curvilinear 'body oriented' coordinates and streamline coordinates.

  4. Interactive Inverse Design Optimization of Fuselage Shape for Low-Boom Supersonic Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Shields, Elwood; Le, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces a tool called BOSS (Boom Optimization using Smoothest Shape modifications). BOSS utilizes interactive inverse design optimization to develop a fuselage shape that yields a low-boom aircraft configuration. A fundamental reason for developing BOSS is the need to generate feasible low-boom conceptual designs that are appropriate for further refinement using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based preliminary design methods. BOSS was not developed to provide a numerical solution to the inverse design problem. Instead, BOSS was intended to help designers find the right configuration among an infinite number of possible configurations that are equally good using any numerical figure of merit. BOSS uses the smoothest shape modification strategy for modifying the fuselage radius distribution at 100 or more longitudinal locations to find a smooth fuselage shape that reduces the discrepancies between the design and target equivalent area distributions over any specified range of effective distance. For any given supersonic concept (with wing, fuselage, nacelles, tails, and/or canards), a designer can examine the differences between the design and target equivalent areas, decide which part of the design equivalent area curve needs to be modified, choose a desirable rate for the reduction of the discrepancies over the specified range, and select a parameter for smoothness control of the fuselage shape. BOSS will then generate a fuselage shape based on the designer's inputs in a matter of seconds. Using BOSS, within a few hours, a designer can either generate a realistic fuselage shape that yields a supersonic configuration with a low-boom ground signature or quickly eliminate any configuration that cannot achieve low-boom characteristics with fuselage shaping alone. A conceptual design case study is documented to demonstrate how BOSS can be used to develop a low-boom supersonic concept from a low-drag supersonic concept. The paper also contains a study

  5. Impact of Fuselage Cross Section on the Stability of a Generic Fighter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    Many traditional data bases, which involved smooth-sided forebodies, are no longer relevant for designing advanced aircraft. The current work provides data on the impact of chined-shaped fuselage cross section on the stability of a generic fighter configuration. Two different chined-shaped fuselages were tested upright and inverted. It was found that a fuselage with a 30" included chine angle resulted in significantly higher values of fuselage with a 100" included chine angle. This difference was attributed to the more beneficial vortical interaction between the stronger forebody vortices coming off of the sharper chine edges and the wing vortices. The longitudinal stability of the configuration with the sharper chine angle was also better because, based on pressures and flow visualization, the vortex burst over the wing was delayed until significantly higher values of a. Unstable rolling moment derivatives were also delayed to higher values of a for the sharper chine angle cross section. Furthermore, it was found that directional stability of both of the upright configurations, which had larger lofts in cross section above the chine lines than below the chine lines. was better than for the inverted configurations.

  6. Textile composite fuselage structures development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Anthony C.; Barrie, Ronald E.; Chu, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Phase 2 of the NASA ACT Contract (NAS1-18888), Advanced Composite Structural Concepts and Materials Technology for Transport Aircraft Structures, focuses on textile technology, with resin transfer molding or powder coated tows. The use of textiles has the potential for improving damage tolerance, reducing cost and saving weight. This program investigates resin transfer molding (RTM), as a maturing technology for high fiber volume primary structures and powder coated tows as an emerging technology with a high potential for significant cost savings and superior structural properties. Powder coated tow technology has promise for significantly improving the processibility of high temperature resins such as polyimides.

  7. Quadruple Lap Shear Processing Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Tony N.; McCool, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Thiokol, Science and Engineering Huntsville Operations (SEHO) Laboratory has previously experienced significant levels of variation in testing Quadruple Lap Shear (QLS) specimens. The QLS test is used at Thiokol / Utah for the qualification of Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle flex bearing materials. A test was conducted to verify that process changes instituted by SEHO personnel effectively reduced variability, even with normal processing variables introduced. A test matrix was designed to progress in a series of steps; the first establishing a baseline, then introducing additional solvents or other variables. Variables included normal test plan delay times, pre-bond solvent hand-wipes and contaminants. Each condition tested utilized standard QLS hardware bonded with natural rubber, two separate technicians and three replicates. This paper will report the results and conclusions of this investigation.

  8. Advanced technology composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Walker, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Work performed during the 25th month on NAS1-18889, Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures, is summarized. The main objective of this program is to develop an integrated technology and demonstrate a confidence level that permits the cost- and weight-effective use of advanced composite materials in primary structures of future aircraft with the emphasis on pressurized fuselages. The period from 1-31 May 1991 is covered.

  9. Design and Evaluation of Composite Fuselage Panels Subjected to Combined Loading Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Rouse, Marshall

    1998-01-01

    Methodologies used in industry for designing transport aircraft composite fuselage structures are discussed. Several aspects of the design methodologies are based on assumptions from metallic fuselage technology which requires that full-scale structures be tested with the actual loading conditions to validate the designs. Composite panels which represent crown and side regions of a fuselage structure are designed using this approach and tested in biaxial tension. Descriptions of the state-of-the-art test facilities used for this structural evaluation are presented. These facilities include a pressure-box test machine and a D-box test fixture in a combined loads test machine which are part of a Combined Loads Test System (COLTS). Nonlinear analysis results for a reference shell and a stiffened composite panel tested in the pressure-box test machine with and without damage are presented. The analytical and test results are compared to assess the ability of the pressure-box test machine to simulate a shell stress state with and without damage. A combined loads test machine for testing aircraft primary structures is described. This test machine includes a D-box test fixture to accommodate curved stiffened panels and the design features of this test fixture are presented. Finite element analysis results for a curved panel to be tested in the D-box test fixture are also discussed.

  10. Study of utilization of advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. C.; Campion, M. C.; Pei, G.

    1984-01-01

    The effort required by the transport aircraft manufacturers to support the introduction of advanced composite materials into the fuselage structure of future commercial and military transport aircraft is investigated. Technology issues, potential benefits to military life cycle costs and commercial operating costs, and development plans are examined. The most urgent technology issues defined are impact dynamics, acoustic transmission, pressure containment and damage tolerance, post-buckling, cutouts, and joints and splices. A technology demonstration program is defined and a rough cost and schedule identified. The fabrication and test of a full-scale fuselage barrel section is presented. Commercial and military benefits are identified. Fuselage structure weight savings from use of advanced composites are 16.4 percent for the commercial and 21.8 percent for the military. For the all-composite airplanes the savings are 26 percent and 29 percent, respectively. Commercial/operating costs are reduced by 5 percent for the all-composite airplane and military life cycle costs by 10 percent.

  11. Influence of fuselage on propeller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troller, Theodor

    1928-01-01

    In the present paper I shall not consider the problem of the best arrangement of airplane and propeller, but only a simple method for designing a propeller for a given arrangement of airplane parts. The inflow to the propeller and hence the efficiency of the propeller is affected most by the fuselage.

  12. On the Strength of Box Type Fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathar, J

    1929-01-01

    The present investigation relates to a box-type fuselage with sides consisting of thin smooth sheet metal, stiffened by longitudinal members riveted to the flanged channel-section bulkheads or transverse frames and to the semicircular corrugated corner stiffenings. The results obtained in this particular case can be applied to a great number of similar structures.

  13. Summary of AH-1G flight vibration data for validation of coupled rotor-fuselage analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dompka, R. V.; Cronkhite, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    Under a NASA research program designated DAMVIBS (Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS), four U. S. helicopter industry participants (Bell Helicopter, Boeing Vertol, McDonnell Douglas Helicopter, and Sikorsky Aircraft) are to apply existing analytical methods for calculating coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations of the AH-1G helicopter for correlation with flight test data from an AH-1G Operational Load Survey (OLS) test program. Bell Helicopter, as the manufacturer of the AH-1G, was asked to provide pertinent rotor data and to collect the OLS flight vibration data needed to perform the correlations. The analytical representation of the fuselage structure is based on a NASTRAN finite element model (FEM) developed by Bell which has been extensively documented and correlated with ground vibration tests.The AH-1G FEM was provided to each of the participants for use in their coupled rotor-fuselage analyses. This report describes the AH-1G OLS flight test program and provides the flight conditions and measured vibration data to be used by each participant in their correlation effort. In addition, the mechanical, structural, inertial and aerodynamic data for the AH-1G two-bladed teetering main rotor system are presented. Furthermore, modifications to the NASTRAN FEM of the fuselage structure that are necessary to make it compatible with the OLS test article are described. The AH-1G OLS flight test data was found to be well documented and provide a sound basis for evaluating currently existing analysis methods used for calculation of coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations.

  14. The Effect of Surface Irregularities on Wing Drag. II - Lap Joints. 2; Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Manley J.

    1938-01-01

    Tests have been made in the NACA 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel of the drag caused by four types of lap joint. The tests were made on an airfoil of NACA 23012 section and 5-foot chord and covered in a range of speeds from 80 to 500 miles per hour and lift coefficients from 0 to 0.30. The increases in profile drag caused by representative arrangements of laps varied from 4 to 9%. When there were protruding rivet heads on the surface, the addition of laps increased the drag only slightly. Laps on the forward part of a wing increased the drag considerably more than those farther back.

  15. Experimental and analytical investigations of fuselage modal characteristics and structural-acoustic coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Myles A.; Mathur, Gopal P.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements conducted on a DC-9 aircraft test section to define the shell and cavity modes of the fuselage, understand its structural-acoustic coupling characteristics, and measure its response to different types of acoustic and vibration excitations are reported. The data were processed to generate spatial plots and wavenumber maps of the shell acceleration and cabin acoustic pressure field. Analysis and interpretation of the spatial plots and wavenumber maps showed that the only structural-acoustic coupling occurred at 105 Hz between the N=2 circumferential structural mode and the (n=2, p=0) circumferential cavity mode. The fuselage response to vibration excitation was found to be dominated by modes whose order increases with frequency.

  16. Unsteady transonic potential flow over a flexible fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, Michael D.

    1993-01-01

    A flexible fuselage capability has been developed and implemented within version 1.2 of the CAP-TSD code. The capability required adding time dependent terms to the fuselage surface boundary conditions and the fuselage surface pressure coefficient. The new capability will allow modeling the effect of a flexible fuselage on the aeroelastic stability of complex configurations. To assess the flexible fuselage capability several steady and unsteady calculations have been performed for slender fuselages with circular cross-sections. Steady surface pressures are compared with experiment at transonic flight conditions. Unsteady cross-sectional lift is compared with other analytical results at a low subsonic speed and a transonic case has been computed. The comparisons demonstrate the accuracy of the flexible fuselage modifications.

  17. Impact damage resistance of composite fuselage structure, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dost, Ernest F.; Finn, Scott R.; Murphy, Daniel P.; Huisken, Amy B.

    1993-01-01

    The strength of laminated composite materials may be significantly reduced by foreign object impact induced damage. An understanding of the damage state is required in order to predict the behavior of structure under operational loads or to optimize the structural configuration. Types of damage typically induced in laminated materials during an impact event include transverse matrix cracking, delamination, and/or fiber breakage. The details of the damage state and its influence on structural behavior depend on the location of the impact. Damage in the skin may act as a soft inclusion or affect panel stability, while damage occurring over a stiffener may include debonding of the stiffener flange from the skin. An experiment to characterize impact damage resistance of fuselage structure as a function of structural configuration and impact threat was performed. A wide range of variables associated with aircraft fuselage structure such as material type and stiffener geometry (termed, intrinsic variables) and variables related to the operating environment such as impactor mass and diameter (termed, extrinsic variables) were studied using a statistically based design-of-experiments technique. The experimental design resulted in thirty-two different 3-stiffener panels. These configured panels were impacted in various locations with a number of impactor configurations, weights, and energies. The results obtained from an examination of impacts in the skin midbay and hail simulation impacts are documented. The current discussion is a continuation of that work with a focus on nondiscrete characterization of the midbay hail simulation impacts and discrete characterization of impact damage for impacts over the stiffener.

  18. Solar powered aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, W.H.

    1983-11-15

    A cruciform wing structure for a solar powered aircraft is disclosed. Solar cells are mounted on horizontal wing surfaces. Wing surfaces with spanwise axis perpendicular to surfaces maintain these surfaces normal to the sun's rays by allowing aircraft to be flown in a controlled pattern at a large bank angle. The solar airplane may be of conventional design with respect to fuselage, propeller and tail, or may be constructed around a core and driven by propeller mechanisms attached near the tips of the airfoils.

  19. Simulator study of flight characteristics of a large twin-fuselage cargo transport airplane during approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, W. D.; Deal, P. L.; Keyser, G. L., Jr.; Smith, P. M.

    1983-01-01

    A six degree-of-freedom, ground-based simulator study was conducted to evaluate the low speed flight characteristics of a twin fuselage cargo transport airplane and to compare these characteristics with those of a large, single fuselage (reference) transport configuration which was similar to the Lockheed C-5C airplane. The primary piloting task was the approach and landing. The results indicated that in order to achieve "acceptable' low speed handling qualities on the twin fuselage concept, considerable stability and control augmentation was required, and although the augmented airplane could be landed safely under adverse conditions, the roll performance of the aircraft had to be improved appreciably before the handling qualities were rated as being "satisfactory.' These ground-based simulation results indicated that a value of t sub phi = 30 (time required to bank 30 deg) less than 6 sec should result in "acceptable' roll response characteristics, and when t sub phi = 30 is less than 3.8 sec, "satisfactory' roll response should be attainable on such large and unusually configured aircraft as the subject twin fuselage cargo transport concept.

  20. Multicrack growth monitoring at riveted lap joints using piezoelectric patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihn, Jeong-Beom; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2002-06-01

    A built-in cost-effective diagnostic system is being developed to monitor fatigue crack growth in aircraft structures. The proposed system consists of a SMART Layer by Acellent Technologies with an embedded network of distributed piezoelectric sensors/actuators, a diagnostic unit, and software. Multi-riveted aluminum lap joints (936 x 462 mm) were tested for a constant amplitude fatigue test under tensile loading to monitor crack growth at rivet holes. A SMART Layer was designed as a strip and surface-mounted to the critical area of lap joints where crack initiation and growth were suspected. The SMART Layer installed between the two rivet rows was used as an actuator strip and the other layer located below the rivets was used as a sensor strip. Using the software, pre-selected diagnostic signals from a designated piezoelectric actuator to its neighboring sensors were generated by the diagnostic unit. A corresponding sensor signals were recorded and compared to a previously recorded baseline reference. The signal processing technique and interpretation algorithm were developed and implemented for extracting features related to crack growth condition at the time of measurement. The results of estimates were compared with non-destructive testing (NDT) data taken from the experiments, which were conducted during the course of the investigation. The probability of damage detection, compared to conventional NDT techniques, was evaluated.

  1. Large-Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degeorge, C. L.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been directed toward improving aircraft fuel efficiency. Analytical studies and research with wind tunnel models have demonstrated that the high inherent efficiency of low speed turboprop propulsion systems may now be extended to the Mach .8 flight regime of today's commercial airliners. This can be accomplished with a propeller, employing a large number of thin highly swept blades. The term Prop-Fan has been coined to describe such a propulsion system. In 1983 the NASA-Lewis Research Center contracted with Hamilton Standard to design, build and test a near full scale Prop-Fan, designated the Large Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP). This report provides a detailed description of the LAP program. The assumptions and analytical procedures used in the design of Prop-Fan system components are discussed in detail. The manufacturing techniques used in the fabrication of the Prop-Fan are presented. Each of the tests run during the course of the program are also discussed and the major conclusions derived from them stated.

  2. LAPS Grid generation and adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliantini, Cecilia; Delzanno, Gia Luca; Guo, Zehua; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xianzhu; Chacon, Luis

    2011-10-01

    LAPS uses a common-data framework in which a general purpose grid generation and adaptation package in toroidal and simply connected domains is implemented. The initial focus is on implementing the Winslow/Laplace-Beltrami method for generating non-overlapping block structured grids. This is to be followed by a grid adaptation scheme based on Monge-Kantorovich optimal transport method [Delzanno et al., J. Comput. Phys,227 (2008), 9841-9864], that equidistributes application-specified error. As an initial set of applications, we will lay out grids for an axisymmetric mirror, a field reversed configuration, and an entire poloidal cross section of a tokamak plasma reconstructed from a CMOD experimental shot. These grids will then be used for computing the plasma equilibrium and transport in accompanying presentations. A key issue for Monge-Kantorovich grid optimization is the choice of error or monitor function for equi-distribution. We will compare the Operator Recovery Error Source Detector (ORESD) [Lapenta, Int. J. Num. Meth. Eng,59 (2004) 2065-2087], the Tau method and a strategy based on the grid coarsening [Zhang et al., AIAA J,39 (2001) 1706-1715] to find an ``optimal'' grid. Work supported by DOE OFES.

  3. Novel Composites for Wing and Fuselage Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, J. A.; Buttitta, C.

    1996-01-01

    Design development was successfully completed for textile preforms with continuous cross-stiffened epoxy panels with cut-outs. The preforms developed included 3-D angle interlock weaving of graphite structural fibers impregnated by resin film infiltration (RFI) and shown to be structurally suitable under conditions requiring minimum acquisition costs. Design guidelines/analysis methodology for such textile structures are given. The development was expanded to a fuselage side-panel component of a subsonic commercial airframe and found to be readily scalable. The successfully manufactured panel was delivered to NASA Langley for biaxial testing. This report covers the work performed under Task 3 -- Cross-Stiffened Subcomponent; Task 4 -- Design Guidelines/Analysis of Textile-Reinforced Composites; and Task 5 -- Integrally Woven Fuselage Panel.

  4. Composite fuselage technology (summary of year 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Michael J.; Lagace, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of this work is to identify and understand, via directed experimentation and analysis, the mechanisms which control the structural behavior of fuselages in their response to damage (resistance, tolerance, and arrest). A further objective is to develop straightforward design methodologies which can be employed by structural designers in preliminary design stages to make intelligent choices concerning the material, layup, and structural configuration so that a more efficient structure with structural integrity can be designed and built.

  5. Airborne Synthetic Aperature Radar (AIRSAR) on left rear fuselage of DC-8 Airborne Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A view of the Airborne Synthetic Aperature Radar (AIRSAR) antenna on the left rear fuselage of the DC-8. The AIRSAR captures images of the ground from the side of the aircraft and can provide precision digital elevation mapping capabilities for a variety of studies. The AIRSAR is one of a number of research systems that have been added to the DC-8. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  6. Propeller aircraft interior noise model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, L. D.; Wilby, E. G.; Wilby, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical model was developed to predict the interior noise of propeller-driven aircraft. The fuselage model is that of a cylinder with a structurally-integral floor. The cabin sidewall is stiffened by stringers and ring frames, and the floor by longitudinal beams. The cabin interior is covered with a sidewall treatments consisting of layers of porous material and an impervious trim septum. Representation of the propeller pressure field is utilized as input data in the form of the propeller noise signature at a series of locations on a grid over the fuselage structure. Results obtained from the analytical model are compared with test data measured by NASA in a scale model cylindrical fuselage excited by a model propeller.

  7. Secondary Wing System for Use on an Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brian E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A secondary wing system for use on an aircraft augments the lift, stability, and control of the aircraft at subsonic speeds. The secondary wing system includes a mechanism that allows the canard to be retracted within the contour of the aircraft fuselage from an operational position to a stowed position. The top surface of the canard is exposed to air flow in the stowed position, and is contoured to integrate aerodynamically and smoothly within the contour of the fuselage when the canard is retracted for high speed flight. The bottom portion of the canard is substantially flat for rotation into a storage recess within the fuselage. The single canard rotates about a vertical axis at its spanwise midpoint. The canard can be positioned between a range of sweep angles during flight and a stowed position in which its span is substantially parallel to the aircraft fuselage. The canard can be deployed and retracted during flight. The deployment mechanism includes a circular mounting ring and drive mechanism that connects the canard with the fuselage and permits it to rotate and to change incidence. The deployment mechanism further includes retractable fairings which serve to streamline the wing when it is retracted into the top of the fuselage.

  8. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Active cooling system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross section and structural arrangement on the performance of actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles are investigated. An active cooling system which maintains the aircraft's entire surface area at temperatures below 394 K at Mach 6 is developed along with a hydrogen fuel tankage thermal protection system. Thermodynamic characteristics of the actively cooled thermal protection systems established are summarized. Design heat loads and coolant flowrate requirements are defined for each major structural section and for the total system. Cooling system weights are summarized at the major component level. Conclusions and recommendations are included.

  9. Nonlinear and progressive failure aspects of transport composite fuselage damage tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Tom; Ilcewicz, L.; Murphy, Dan; Dopker, Bernhard

    1993-01-01

    The purpose is to provide an end-user's perspective on the state of the art in life prediction and failure analysis by focusing on subsonic transport fuselage issues being addressed in the NASA/Boeing Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structure (ATCAS) contract and a related task-order contract. First, some discrepancies between the ATCAS tension-fracture test database and classical prediction methods is discussed, followed by an overview of material modeling work aimed at explaining some of these discrepancies. Finally, analysis efforts associated with a pressure-box test fixture are addressed, as an illustration of modeling complexities required to model and interpret tests.

  10. Hybrid Wing-Body (HWB) Pressurized Fuselage Modeling, Analysis, and Design for Weight Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the interim progress for an in-house study that is directed toward innovative structural analysis and design of next-generation advanced aircraft concepts, such as the Hybrid Wing-Body (HWB) and the Advanced Mobility Concept-X flight vehicles, for structural weight reduction and associated performance enhancement. Unlike the conventional, skin-stringer-frame construction for a cylindrical fuselage, the box-type pressurized fuselage panels in the HWB undergo significant deformation of the outer aerodynamic surfaces, which must be minimized without significant structural weight penalty. Simple beam and orthotropic plate theory is first considered for sizing, analytical verification, and possible equivalent-plate analysis with appropriate simplification. By designing advanced composite stiffened-shell configurations, significant weight reduction may be possible compared with the sandwich and ribbed-shell structural concepts that have been studied previously. The study involves independent analysis of the advanced composite structural concepts that are presently being developed by The Boeing Company for pressurized HWB flight vehicles. High-fidelity parametric finite-element models of test coupons, panels, and multibay fuselage sections, were developed for conducting design studies and identifying critical areas of potential failure. Interim results are discussed to assess the overall weight/strength advantages.

  11. Airbag system and method for facilitating emergency egress from an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Blaine K. (Inventor); Hawley, Arthur V. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An airbag system for elevating the fuselage of an aircraft off a landing surface a sufficient degree to allow for emergency egress of passengers and crew through ventral emergency exit doors. An airbag assembly made up of a plurality of independent airbags is disposed within the aircraft. When activated, the airbag system deploys the airbags external of the aircraft that elevate the fuselage of the aircraft a sufficient degree to allow for utilizing the ventral emergency exit doors on the fuselage to enable evacuating the passengers and crew. An activation mechanism is connected to the inflation.devices associated with each of the airbags. The activation mechanism generates an electrical signal which activates the inflation devices, which in turn fill the airbags with a compressed fluid, thus expanding the airbags and lifting the fuselage. A crew member initiates the activation of the airbag system through one or more switches.

  12. LAPS discretization and solution of plasma equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missanelli, Maria; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Guo, Zehua; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xianzhu

    2011-10-01

    LAPS provides spectral element discretization for solving steady state plasma profiles. Our initial focus is on its implementation for two dimensional open magnetic field equilibria in linear and toroidal geometries. The linear geometry is an axisymmetric magnetic mirror with anisotropic pressure. The toroidal case is a tokamak scrape-off layer plasma. Structured grids are produced by the grid generation package in LAPS. The spectral element discretization uses modal bases over quadrilateral elements. A Newton-Krylov solver implemented with the Portable, Extensible Toolkits for Scientific Computing PETSc is applied to iteratively converge the solution. Care has been taken in the code design to separate the grid generation, spectral element discretization, and (non)linear solver from the user-specified equilibrium equations, so the LAPS infrastructure can be easily used for different applications. Work supported by DOE OFES.

  13. An orientation-selective orthogonal lapped transform.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Dietmar

    2008-08-01

    A novel critically sampled orientation-selective orthogonal lapped transform called the lapped Hartley transform (LHT) is derived. In a first step, overlapping basis functions are generated by modulating basis functions of a 2-D block Hartley transform by a cosine wave. To achieve invertibility and orthogonality, an iterative filter is applied as prefilter in the analysis and as postfilter in the synthesis operation, respectively. Alternatively, filtering can be restricted to analysis or synthesis, ending up with a biorthogonal transform (LHT-PR, LHT-PO). A statistical analysis based on a 4000-image data base shows that the LHT and LHT-PO have better redundancy removal properties than other block or lapped transforms. Finally, image compression and noise removal examples are given, showing the advantages of the LHT especially in images containing oriented textures.

  14. Experimental study of lap splice bolted connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dehui; Tian, Lishan; Jiang, Wenqiang; An, Liqiang; Zhang, Ziyang

    2017-01-01

    The bolted connection is prone to slip under external load in the lattice transmission tower, which will affect the internal forces and deformation of tower. In order to better simulate the effect of bolt connection slippage on transmission tower, the load deformation relationship should be established. In this paper, the single lap splice bolt connection under tension load is tested and the load displacement curve is obtained. Furthermore, the existing model of single lap splice bolted connection is modified, which will plays an important role in the influence of the bolt slippage of the transmission lines towers more accurately and reasonably.

  15. Wireless Local Area Network Performance Inside Aircraft Passenger Cabins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whetten, Frank L.; Soroker, Andrew; Whetten, Dennis A.; Whetten, Frank L.; Beggs, John H.

    2005-01-01

    An examination of IEEE 802.11 wireless network performance within an aircraft fuselage is performed. This examination measured the propagated RF power along the length of the fuselage, and the associated network performance: the link speed, total throughput, and packet losses and errors. A total of four airplanes: one single-aisle and three twin-aisle airplanes were tested with 802.11a, 802.11b, and 802.11g networks.

  16. 14 CFR 45.25 - Location of marks on fixed-wing aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Location of marks on fixed-wing aircraft... Location of marks on fixed-wing aircraft. (a) The operator of a fixed-wing aircraft shall display the..., horizontally on both sides of the fuselage between the trailing edge of the wing and the leading edge of...

  17. 14 CFR 45.25 - Location of marks on fixed-wing aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Location of marks on fixed-wing aircraft... Location of marks on fixed-wing aircraft. (a) The operator of a fixed-wing aircraft must display the..., horizontally on both sides of the fuselage between the trailing edge of the wing and the leading edge of...

  18. 14 CFR 45.25 - Location of marks on fixed-wing aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location of marks on fixed-wing aircraft... Location of marks on fixed-wing aircraft. (a) The operator of a fixed-wing aircraft shall display the..., horizontally on both sides of the fuselage between the trailing edge of the wing and the leading edge of...

  19. 14 CFR 45.25 - Location of marks on fixed-wing aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Location of marks on fixed-wing aircraft... Location of marks on fixed-wing aircraft. (a) The operator of a fixed-wing aircraft must display the..., horizontally on both sides of the fuselage between the trailing edge of the wing and the leading edge of...

  20. 14 CFR 45.25 - Location of marks on fixed-wing aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Location of marks on fixed-wing aircraft... Location of marks on fixed-wing aircraft. (a) The operator of a fixed-wing aircraft must display the..., horizontally on both sides of the fuselage between the trailing edge of the wing and the leading edge of...

  1. 49 CFR 230.30 - Lap-joint seam boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lap-joint seam boilers. 230.30 Section 230.30..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Inspection and Repair § 230.30 Lap-joint seam boilers. Every boiler having lap-joint longitudinal...

  2. 49 CFR 230.30 - Lap-joint seam boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lap-joint seam boilers. 230.30 Section 230.30..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Inspection and Repair § 230.30 Lap-joint seam boilers. Every boiler having lap-joint longitudinal...

  3. 49 CFR 230.30 - Lap-joint seam boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lap-joint seam boilers. 230.30 Section 230.30..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Inspection and Repair § 230.30 Lap-joint seam boilers. Every boiler having lap-joint longitudinal...

  4. 49 CFR 230.30 - Lap-joint seam boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lap-joint seam boilers. 230.30 Section 230.30..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Inspection and Repair § 230.30 Lap-joint seam boilers. Every boiler having lap-joint longitudinal...

  5. 49 CFR 230.30 - Lap-joint seam boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lap-joint seam boilers. 230.30 Section 230.30..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Inspection and Repair § 230.30 Lap-joint seam boilers. Every boiler having lap-joint longitudinal...

  6. Enhancing pulsed eddy current for inspection of P-3 Orion lap-joint structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, D. M.; Underhill, P. R.; Krause, T. W.

    2016-02-01

    During flight, aircraft are subjected to cyclic loading. In the Lockheed P-3 Orion airframe, this cyclic loading can lead to development of fatigue cracks at steel fastener locations in the top and second layers of aluminum wing skin lap-joints. An inspection method that is capable of detecting these cracks, without fastener removal, is desirable as this can minimize aircraft downtime, while subsequently reducing the risk of collateral damage. The ability to detect second layer cracks has been demonstrated using a Pulsed Eddy Current (PEC) probe design that utilizes the ferrous fastener as a flux conduit. This allows for deeper penetration of flux into the lap-joint second layer and consequently, sensitivity to the presence of cracks. Differential pick-up coil pairs are used to sense the eddy current response due to the presence of a crack. The differential signal obtained from pick-up coils on opposing sides of the fastener is analyzed using a Modified Principal Components Analysis (MPCA). This is followed by a cluster analysis of the resulting MPCA scores to separate fastener locations with cracks from those without. Probe design features, data acquisition system parameters and signal post-processing can each have a strong impact on crack detection. Physical probe configurations and signal analysis processes, used to enhance the PEC system for detection of cracks in P-3 Orion lap-joint structures, are investigated and an enhanced probe design is identified.

  7. A 0.15-scale study of configuration effects on the aerodynamic interaction between main rotor and fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trept, Ted

    1984-01-01

    Hover and forward flight tests were conducted to investigate the mutual aerodynamic interaction between the main motor and fuselage of a conventional helicopter configuration. A 0.15-scale Model 222 two-bladed teetering rotor was combined with a 0.15-scale model of the NASA Ames 40x80-foot wind tunnel 1500 horsepower test stand fairing. Configuration effects were studied by modifying the fairing to simulate a typical helicopter forebody. Separation distance between rotor and body were also investigated. Rotor and fuselage force and moment as well as pressure data are presented in graphical and tabular format. Data was taken over a range of thrust coefficients from 0.002 to 0.007. In forward flight speed ratio was varied from 0.1 to 0.3 with shaft angle varying from +4 to -12 deg. The data show that the rotors effect on the fuselage may be considerably more important to total aircraft performance than the effect of the fuselage on the rotor.

  8. VIEW OF BOEING 737200 FUSELAGE FROM TOP LEVEL OF TAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BOEING 737-200 FUSELAGE FROM TOP LEVEL OF TAIL DOCK AND. A NEW SAFETY CABLE FROM THE TAIL DOCK WILL ALLOW INSPECTORS TO WALK UP AND DOWN THE FUSELAGE TO CHECK FOR CRACKS OR MISSING FASTENERS. - Greater Buffalo International Airport, Maintenance Hangar, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  9. Static Aeroelasticity in Combat Aircraft.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    aircraft design. Fuselage flexibility is, in general , a secondary consideration. The relatively high density of this structural component, designed to...representation of the structure. An effective beam representation of the total panel stiffness is generally applicable and appropriate for these needs and...loading effect Is to produce zero wing lift, but a large leading-edge-up wing torque. Aeroelastically, a significant wing lift is generated as the

  10. Evaluation of a Composite Sandwich Fuselage Side Panel with Damage and Subjected to Internal Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, Marshall; Ambur, Damodar R.; Bodine, Jerry; Dopker, Bernhard

    1997-01-01

    The results from an experimental and analytical study of a composite sandwich fuselage side panel for a transport aircraft are presented. The panel has two window cutouts and three frames, and has been evaluated with internal pressure loads that generate biaxial tension loading conditions. Design limit load and design ultimate load tests have been performed on the graphite-epoxy sandwich panel with the middle frame removed to demonstrate the suitability of this two-frame design for supporting the prescribed biaxial loading conditions with twice the initial frame spacing of 20 inches. The two-frame panel was damaged by cutting a notch that originates at the edge of a cutout and extends in the panel hoop direction through the window-belt area. This panel with a notch was tested in a combined-load condition to demonstrate the structural damage tolerance at the design limit load condition. The two panel configurations successfully satisfied all design load requirements in the experimental part of the study, and the three-frame and two-frame panel responses are fully explained by the analysis results. The results of this study suggest that there is potential for using sandwich structural concepts with greater than the usual 20-in.-wide frame spacing to further reduce aircraft fuselage structural weight.

  11. Global Cost and Weight Evaluation of Fuselage Side Panel Design Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polland, D. R.; Finn, S. R.; Griess, K. H.; Hafenrichter, J. L.; Hanson, C. T.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Metschan, S. L.; Scholz, D. B.; Smith, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents preliminary design trades conducted under NASA contracts NAS1 18889 (Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures, ATCAS) and NAS1-19349 (Task 3, Pathfinder Shell Design) for a subsonic wide body commercial aircraft fuselage side panel section utilizing composite materials. Included in this effort were (1) development of two complete design concepts, (2) generation of cost and weight estimates, (3) identification of technical issues and potential design enhancements, and (4) selection of a single design to be further developed. The first design concept featured an open-section stringer stiffened skin configuration while the second was based on honeycomb core sandwich construction. The trade study cost and weight results were generated from comprehensive assessment of each structural component comprising the fuselage side panel section from detail fabrication through airplane final assembly. Results were obtained in three phases: (1) for the baseline designs, (2) after global optimization of the designs, and (3) the results anticipated after detailed design optimization. A critical assessment of both designs was performed to determine the risk associated with each concept, that is the relative probability of achieving the cost and weight projections. Seven critical technical issues were identified as the first step towards side panel detailed design optimization.

  12. Use of nondestructive inspection and fiber optic sensing for damage characterization in carbon fiber fuselage structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neidigk, Stephen; Le, Jacqui; Roach, Dennis; Duvall, Randy; Rice, Tom

    2014-04-01

    To investigate a variety of nondestructive inspection technologies and assess impact damage characteristics in carbon fiber aircraft structure, the FAA Airworthiness Assurance Center, operated by Sandia National Labs, fabricated and impact tested two full-scale composite fuselage sections. The panels are representative of structure seen on advanced composite transport category aircraft and measured approximately 56"x76". The structural components consisted of a 16 ply skin, co-cured hat-section stringers, fastened shear ties and frames. The material used to fabricate the panels was T800 unidirectional pre-preg (BMS 8-276) and was processed in an autoclave. Simulated hail impact testing was conducted on the panels using a high velocity gas gun with 2.4" diameter ice balls in collaboration with the University of California San Diego (UCSD). Damage was mapped onto the surface of the panels using conventional, hand deployed ultrasonic inspection techniques, as well as more advanced ultrasonic and resonance scanning techniques. In addition to the simulated hail impact testing performed on the panels, 2" diameter steel tip impacts were used to produce representative impact damage which can occur during ground maintenance operations. The extent of impact damage ranges from less than 1 in2 to 55 in2 of interply delamination in the 16 ply skin. Substructure damage on the panels includes shear tie cracking and stringer flange disbonding. It was demonstrated that the fiber optic distributed strain sensing system is capable of detecting impact damage when bonded to the backside of the fuselage.

  13. Nucleation kinetics, growth and characterization of dLAP, dLAP:KF and dLAP:NaN 3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, A. S. Haja; Ravi, G.; Jayavel, R.; Ramasamy, P.

    2003-03-01

    The nucleation parameters, such as interfacial tension, radius of the critical nucleus and critical free energy change have been estimated for deuterated L-arginine phosphate (dLAP), potassium fluoride mixed dLAP and sodium azide mixed dLAP single crystals. Pure and additive mixed dLAP single crystals are grown by slow cooling technique. The effect of microbial contamination and colouration on the growth solutions has been studied. The crystalline powder of the grown crystals has been examined by X-ray diffraction and thermal analyses in order to estimate the lattice parameters and study thermal properties respectively.

  14. Recommendations for numerical solution of reinforced-panel and fuselage-ring problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoff, N J; Libby, Paul A

    1949-01-01

    Procedures are recommended for solving the equations of equilibrium of reinforced panels and isolated fuselage rings as represented by the external loads and the operations table established according to Southwell's method. From the solution of these equations the stress distribution can be easily determined. The method of systematic relaxations, the matrix-calculus method, and several other methods applicable in special cases are discussed. Definite recommendations are made for obtaining the solution of reinforced-panel problems which are generally designated as shear lag problems. The procedures recommended are demonstrated in the analysis of a number of panels. In the case of fuselage rings it is not possible to make definite recommendations for the solution of the equilibrium equations for all rings and loadings. However, suggestions based on the latest experience are made and demonstrated on several rings.

  15. Low-speed stability and control characteristics of a transport model with aft-fuselage-mounted advanced turboprops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applin, Z. T.; Coe, P. L., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A limited experimental investigation was conducted in the Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel to explore the effects of aft-fuselage-mounted advanced turboprop installations on the low-speed stability and control characteristics of a representative transport aircraft in a landing configuration. In general, the experimental results indicate that the longitudinal and lateral-directional stability characteristics for the aft-fuselage-mounted single-rotation tractor and counter-rotation pusher propeller configurations tested during this investigation are acceptable aerodynamically. For the single-rotation tractor configuration, the propeller-induced aerodynamics are significantly influenced by the interaction of the propeller slipstream with the pylon and nacelle. The stability characteristics for the counter-rotation pusher configuration are strongly influenced by propeller normal forces. The longitudinal and directional control effectiveness, engine-out characteristics, and ground effects are also presented. In addition, a tabulated presentation of all aerodynamic data presented in this report is included as an appendix.

  16. Aerodynamic Interaction Effects of a Helicopter Rotor and Fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, David D., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A three year Cooperative Research Agreements made in each of the three years between the Subsonic Aerodynamics Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Va. Tech) has been completed. This document presents results from this three year endeavor. The goal of creating an efficient method to compute unsteady interactional effects between a helicopter rotor and fuselage has been accomplished. This paper also includes appendices to support these findings. The topics are: 1) Rotor-Fuselage Interactions Aerodynamics: An Unsteady Rotor Model; and 2) Rotor/Fuselage Unsteady Interactional Aerodynamics: A New Computational Model.

  17. Large-Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) pitch change actuator and control design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.; Carvalho, P.; Cutler, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been directed toward improving aircraft fuel consumption. Studies have shown that the high inherent efficiency previously demonstrated by low speed turboprop propulsion systems may now be extended to today's higher speed aircraft if advanced high-speed propeller blades having thin airfoils and aerodynamic sweep are utilized. Hamilton Standard has designed a 9-foot diameter single-rotation Large-Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) which will be tested on a static test stand, in a high speed wind tunnel and on a research aircraft. The major objective of this testing is to establish the structural integrity of large-scale Prop-Fans of advanced construction in addition to the evaluation of aerodynamic performance and aeroacoustic design. This report describes the operation, design features and actual hardware of the (LAP) Prop-Fan pitch control system. The pitch control system which controls blade angle and propeller speed consists of two separate assemblies. The first is the control unit which provides the hydraulic supply, speed governing and feather function for the system. The second unit is the hydro-mechanical pitch change actuator which directly changes blade angle (pitch) as scheduled by the control.

  18. Homologs of the LapD-LapG c-di-GMP Effector System Control Biofilm Formation by Bordetella bronchiseptica

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosis, Nicolás; Boyd, Chelsea D.; O´Toole, George A.; Fernández, Julieta; Sisti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation is important for infection by many pathogens. Bordetella bronchiseptica causes respiratory tract infections in mammals and forms biofilm structures in nasal epithelium of infected mice. We previously demonstrated that cyclic di-GMP is involved in biofilm formation in B. bronchiseptica. In the present work, based on their previously reported function in Pseudomonas fluorescens, we identified three genes in the B. bronchiseptica genome likely involved in c-di-GMP-dependent biofilm formation: brtA, lapD and lapG. Genetic analysis confirmed a role for BrtA, LapD and LapG in biofilm formation using microtiter plate assays, as well as scanning electron and fluorescent microscopy to analyze the phenotypes of mutants lacking these proteins. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that the protease LapG of B. bronchiseptica cleaves the N-terminal domain of BrtA, as well as the LapA protein of P. fluorescens, indicating functional conservation between these species. Furthermore, while BrtA and LapG appear to have little or no impact on colonization in a mouse model of infection, a B. bronchiseptica strain lacking the LapG protease has a significantly higher rate of inducing a severe disease outcome compared to the wild type. These findings support a role for c-di-GMP acting through BrtA/LapD/LapG to modulate biofilm formation, as well as impact pathogenesis, by B. bronchiseptica PMID:27380521

  19. Design of a spanloader cargo aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisshaar, Terrence A.

    1989-01-01

    The design features of an aircraft capable of fulfilling a long haul, high capacity cargo mission are described. This span-loading aircraft, or flying wing, is capable of carrying extremely large payloads and is expected to be in demand to replace the slow-moving cargo ships currently in use. The spanloader seeks to reduce empty weight by eliminating the aircraft fuselage. Disadvantages are the thickness of the cargo-containing wing, and resulting stability and control problems. The spanloader presented here has a small fuselage, low-aspect ratio wings, winglets, and uses six turbofan engines for propulsion. It will have a payload capacity of 300,000 pounds plus 30 first class passengers and 6 crew members. Its projected market is transportation of freight from Europe and the U.S.A. to countries in the Pacific Basin. Cost estimates support its economic feasibility.

  20. Dogs lap using acceleration-driven open pumping

    PubMed Central

    Gart, Sean; Socha, John J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-01-01

    Dogs lap because they have incomplete cheeks and cannot suck. When lapping, a dog’s tongue pulls a liquid column from the bath, suggesting that the hydrodynamics of column formation are critical to understanding how dogs drink. We measured lapping in 19 dogs and used the results to generate a physical model of the tongue’s interaction with the air–fluid interface. These experiments help to explain how dogs exploit the fluid dynamics of the generated column. The results demonstrate that effects of acceleration govern lapping frequency, which suggests that dogs curl the tongue to create a larger liquid column. Comparing lapping in dogs and cats reveals that, despite similar morphology, these carnivores lap in different physical regimes: an unsteady inertial regime for dogs and steady inertial regime for cats. PMID:26668382

  1. Dogs lap using acceleration-driven open pumping.

    PubMed

    Gart, Sean; Socha, John J; Vlachos, Pavlos P; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-12-29

    Dogs lap because they have incomplete cheeks and cannot suck. When lapping, a dog's tongue pulls a liquid column from the bath, suggesting that the hydrodynamics of column formation are critical to understanding how dogs drink. We measured lapping in 19 dogs and used the results to generate a physical model of the tongue's interaction with the air-fluid interface. These experiments help to explain how dogs exploit the fluid dynamics of the generated column. The results demonstrate that effects of acceleration govern lapping frequency, which suggests that dogs curl the tongue to create a larger liquid column. Comparing lapping in dogs and cats reveals that, despite similar morphology, these carnivores lap in different physical regimes: an unsteady inertial regime for dogs and steady inertial regime for cats.

  2. Systematic Construction of Real Lapped Tight Frame Transforms

    PubMed Central

    Sandryhaila, Aliaksei; Chebira, Amina; Milo, Christina; Kovčcević, Jelena; Püschel, Markus

    2010-01-01

    We present a constructive algorithm for the design of real lapped equal-norm tight frame transforms. These transforms can be efficiently implemented through filter banks and have recently been proposed as a redundant counterpart to lapped orthogonal transforms, as well as an infinite-dimensional counterpart to harmonic tight frames. The proposed construction consists of two parts: First, we design a large class of new real lapped orthogonal transforms derived from submatrices of the discrete Fourier transform. Then, we seed these to obtain real lapped tight frame transforms corresponding to tight, equal-norm frames. We identify those frames that are maximally robust to erasures, and show that our construction leads to a large class of new lapped orthogonal transforms as well as new lapped tight frame transforms. PMID:20607116

  3. Analysis and Testing of a Composite Fuselage Shield for Open Rotor Engine Blade-Out Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Emmerling, William; Seng, Silvia; Frankenberger, Charles; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Revilock, Duane M.; Carney, Kelly S.

    2015-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration is working with the European Aviation Safety Agency to determine the certification base for proposed new engines that would not have a containment structure on large commercial aircraft. Equivalent safety to the current fleet is desired by the regulators, which means that loss of a single fan blade will not cause hazard to the Aircraft. The NASA Glenn Research Center and The Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), China Lake, collaborated with the FAA Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program to design and test lightweight composite shields for protection of the aircraft passengers and critical systems from a released blade that could impact the fuselage. In the test, two composite blades were pyrotechnically released from a running engine, each impacting a composite shield with a different thickness. The thinner shield was penetrated by the blade and the thicker shield prevented penetration. This was consistent with pre-test predictions. This paper documents the live fire test from the full scale rig at NAWC China Lake and describes the damage to the shields as well as instrumentation results.

  4. Analysis and Testing of a Composite Fuselage Shield for Open Rotor Engine Blade-Out Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Emmerling, William; Seng, Silvia; Frankenberger, Charles; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Revilock, Duane M.; Carney, Kelly S.

    2016-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration is working with the European Aviation Safety Agency to determine the certification base for proposed new engines that would not have a containment structure on large commercial aircraft. Equivalent safety to the current fleet is desired by the regulators, which means that loss of a single fan blade will not cause hazard to the Aircraft. The NASA Glenn Research Center and The Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), China Lake, collaborated with the FAA Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program to design and test lightweight composite shields for protection of the aircraft passengers and critical systems from a released blade that could impact the fuselage. LS-DYNA® was used to predict the thickness of the composite shield required to prevent blade penetration. In the test, two composite blades were pyrotechnically released from a running engine, each impacting a composite shield with a different thickness. The thinner shield was penetrated by the blade and the thicker shield prevented penetration. This was consistent with pre-test LS-DYNA predictions. This paper documents the analysis conducted to predict the required thickness of a composite shield, the live fire test from the full scale rig at NAWC China Lake and describes the damage to the shields as well as instrumentation results.

  5. Advanced emergency openings for commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.; Schimmel, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    Explosively actuated openings in composite panels are proposed to enhance passenger survivability within commercial aircraft by providing improvements in emergency openings, fuselage venting, and fuel dump. The concept is to embed a tiny, highly stable explosive cord in the periphery of a load-carrying composite panel; on initiation of the cord, the panel is fractured to create a well-defined opening. The panel would be installed in the sides of the fuselage for passenger egress, in the top of the fuselage for smoke venting, and in the bottoms of the fuel cells for fuel dump. Described are the concerns with the use of explosive systems, safety improvements, advantages, experimental results, and recommended approach to gain acceptance and develop this concept.

  6. Aircraft interior noise reduction by alternate resonance tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, Donald B.; Gottwald, James A.; Srinivasan, Ramakrishna; Gustaveson, Mark B.

    1990-01-01

    Existing interior noise reduction techniques for aircraft fuselages perform reasonably well at higher frequencies, but are inadequate at lower frequencies, particularly with respect to the low blade passage harmonics with high forcing levels found in propeller aircraft. A method is being studied which considers aircraft fuselage lined with panels alternately tuned to frequencies above and below the frequency that must be attenuated. Adjacent panels would oscillate at equal amplitude, to give equal source strength, but with opposite phase. Provided these adjacent panels are acoustically compact, the resulting cancellation causes the interior acoustic modes to become cutoff, and therefore be non-propagating and evanescent. This interior noise reduction method, called Alternate Resonance Tuning (ART), is currently being investigated both theoretically and experimentally. This new concept has potential application to reducing interior noise due to the propellers in advanced turboprop aircraft as well as for existing aircraft configurations.

  7. An improved source model for aircraft interior noise studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, J. R.; Fuller, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    There is concern that advanced turboprop engines currently being developed may produce excessive aircraft cabin noise level. This concern has stimulated renewed interest in developing aircraft interior noise reduction methods that do not significnatly increase take off weight. An existing analytical model for noise transmission into aircraft cabins was utilized to investigate the behavior of an improved propeller source model for use in aircraft interior noise studies. The new source model, a virtually rotating dipole, is shown to adequately match measured fuselage sound pressure distributions, including the correct phase relationships, for published data. The virtually rotating dipole is used to study the sensitivity of synchrophasing effectiveness to the fuselage sound pressure trace velocity distribution. Results of calculations are presented which reveal the importance of correctly modeling the surface pressure phase relations in synchrophasing and other aircraft interior noise studies.

  8. An improved source model for aircraft interior noise studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, J. R.; Fuller, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    There is concern that advanced turboprop engines currently being developed may produce excessive aircraft cabin noise levels. This concern has stimulated renewed interest in developing aircraft interior noise reduction methods that do not significantly increase take off weight. An existing analytical model for noise transmission into aircraft cabins was utilized to investigate the behavior of an improved propeller source model for use in aircraft interior noise studies. The new source model, a virtually rotating dipole, is shown to adequately match measured fuselage sound pressure distributions, including the correct phase relationships, for published data. The virtually rotating dipole is used to study the sensitivity of synchrophasing effectiveness to the fuselage sound pressure trace velocity distribution. Results of calculations are presented which reveal the importance of correctly modeling the surface pressure phase relations in synchrophasing and other aircraft interior noise studies.

  9. Computer Controller Optical Surfacing (CCOS) lap pressure control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenleaf

    1985-09-01

    A rotary lapping system and process is disclosed for producing a controlled pressure gradient, including positive and negative lift, when lapping a workpiece coated with an abrasive slurry liquid with a plurality of grinding pads mounted beneath a rotating lap substrate. To obtain positive and negative lift, the grinding pads are tilted with respectively a positive and negative angle of attack, which hydrodynamically reacts with the abrasive slurry liquid to produce the desired lift. The controlled pressure gradient is further varied by decentering the rotation of lap substrate.

  10. Al-to-Cu Friction Stir Lap Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzdor, Vahid; Kou, Sindo

    2012-01-01

    Recently, friction stir welding (FSW) has been used frequently to join dissimilar metals, for instance, Al to Mg, Cu, and steel. The formation of brittle intermetallic compounds often severely limits the strength and ductility of the resultant welds. In the present study, Al-to-Cu lap FSW was studied by welding 6061 Al to commercially pure Cu. Conventional lap FSW was modified by butt welding a small piece of Al to the top of Cu, with a slight pin penetration into the bottom of Al. At travel speeds up to 127 mm/min (5 ipm), the modified welds were about twice the joint strength and five to nine times the ductility of the conventional lap welds. In the conventional lap welds, voids were present along the Al-Cu interface, and fracture occurred along the interface in tensile testing. No such voids were observed in the modified lap welds, and fracture occurred through Cu. Thus, as in the case of Al-to-Mg lap FSW recently studied by the authors, modified lap FSW significantly improved the weld quality in Al-to-Cu lap FSW. At the relatively high travel speed of 203 mm/min (8 ipm), however, modified lap FSW was no longer superior because of channel formation.

  11. Rotor-Fuselage Interaction: Analysis and Validation with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.; Bettschart, Nicolas

    1997-01-01

    The problem of rotor-fuselage aerodynamic interaction has to be considered in industry applications from various aspects. First, in order to increase helicopter speed and reduce operational costs, rotorcraft tend to be more and more compact, with a main rotor closer to the fuselage surface. This creates significant perturbations both on the main rotor and on the fuselage, including steady and unsteady effects due to blade and wake passage and perturbed inflow at the rotor disk. Furthermore,the main rotor wake affects the tail boom, empennage and anti-torque system. This has important consequences for helicopter control and vibrations at low speeds and also on tail rotor acoustics (main rotor wake-tail rotor interactions). This report describes the US Army-France MOD cooperative work on this problem from both the theoretical and experimental aspects. Using experimental 3D velocity field and fuselage surface pressure measurements, three codes that model the interactions of a helicopter rotor with a fuselage are compared. These comparisons demonstrate some of the strengths and weaknesses of current models for the combined rotor-fuselage analysis.

  12. Diamond machine tool face lapping machine

    DOEpatents

    Yetter, H.H.

    1985-05-06

    An apparatus for shaping, sharpening and polishing diamond-tipped single-point machine tools. The isolation of a rotating grinding wheel from its driving apparatus using an air bearing and causing the tool to be shaped, polished or sharpened to be moved across the surface of the grinding wheel so that it does not remain at one radius for more than a single rotation of the grinding wheel has been found to readily result in machine tools of a quality which can only be obtained by the most tedious and costly processing procedures, and previously unattainable by simple lapping techniques.

  13. Characterization of lap joints laser beam welding of thin AA 2024 sheets with Yb:YAG disk-laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiazzo, Fabrizia; Alfieri, Vittorio; Cardaropoli, Francesco; Sergi, Vincenzo

    2012-06-01

    Lap joints obtained by overlapping two plates are widely diffused in aerospace industry. Nevertheless, because of natural aging, adhesively bonded and riveted aircraft lap joints may be affected by cracks from rivets, voids or corrosion. Friction stir welding has been proposed as a valid alternative, although large heat affected zones are produced both in the top and the bottom plate due to the pin diameter. Interest has therefore been shown in studying laser lap welding as the laser beam has been proved to be competitive since it allows to concentrate the thermal input and increases productivity and quality. Some challenges arise as a consequence of aluminum low absorptance and high thermal conductivity; furthermore, issues are due to metallurgical challenges such as both micro and macro porosity formation and softening in the fused zone. Welding of AA 2024 thin sheets in a lap joint configuration is discussed in this paper: tests are carried out using a recently developed Trumpf TruDisk 2002 Yb:YAG disk-laser with high beam quality which allows to produce beads with low plates distortion and better penetration. The influence of the processing parameters is discussed considering the fused zone extent and the bead shape. The porosity content as well as the morphological features of the beads have been examined.

  14. Analytical model for investigation of interior noise characteristics in aircraft with multiple propellers including synchrophasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    A simplified analytical model of transmission of noise into the interior of propeller-driven aircraft has been developed. The analysis includes directivity and relative phase effects of the propeller noise sources, and leads to a closed form solution for the coupled motion between the interior and exterior fields via the shell (fuselage) vibrational response. Various situations commonly encountered in considering sound transmission into aircraft fuselages are investigated analytically and the results obtained are compared to measurements in real aircraft. In general the model has proved successful in identifying basic mechanisms behind noise transmission phenomena.

  15. Interior noise control ground test studies for advanced turboprop aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Myles A.; Cannon, Mark R.; Burge, Paul L.; Boyd, Robert P.

    1989-01-01

    The measurement and analysis procedures are documented, and the results of interior noise control ground tests conducted on a DC-9 aircraft test section are summarized. The objectives of these tests were to study the fuselage response characteristics of treated and untreated aircraft with aft-mount advanced turboprop engines and to analyze the effectiveness of selected noise control treatments in reducing passenger cabin noise on these aircraft. The results of fuselage structural mode surveys, cabin cavity surveys and sound intensity surveys are presented. The performance of various structural and cabin sidewall treatments is assessed, based on measurements of the resulting interior noise levels under simulated advanced turboprop excitation.

  16. How dogs lap: open pumping driven by acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gart, Sean; Socha, John; Vlachos, Pavlos; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-11-01

    Dogs drink by lapping because they have incomplete cheeks and cannot suck fluids into the mouth. When lapping, a dog's tongue pulls a liquid column from a bath, which is then swallowed, suggesting that the hydrodynamics of column formation are critical to understanding how dogs drink. We measured the kinematics of lapping from nineteen dogs and used the results to generate a physical model of the tongue's interaction with the air-fluid interface. These experiments with an accelerating rod help to explain how dogs exploit the fluid dynamics of the generated column. The results suggest that effects of acceleration govern lapping frequency, and that dogs curl the tongue ventrally (backwards) and time their bite on the column to increase fluid intake per lap. Comparing lapping in dogs and cats reveals that though they both lap with the same frequency scaling with respect to body mass and have similar morphology, these carnivores lap in different physical regimes: a high-acceleration regime for dogs and a low-acceleration regime for cats.

  17. Learning Activity Package, Chemistry I, (LAP) Study 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Naomi

    Presented is a Learning Activity Package (LAP) study concerned with carbon and its compounds. This LAP in chemistry includes a rationale for studying the chemical element of carbon, a list of student objectives (stated in behavioral terms), of activities (reading, laboratory experiments, model construction, etc.), a two-page worksheet, a…

  18. Lapping: Polishing and shear mode grinding

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.J.

    1990-02-01

    It is the thesis of this paper that shear mode grinding (SMG), (ductile grinding, nanogrinding, fractureless grinding) is just a particular form of polishing. It may be unique in that it can involve a hard wheel of very precise dimensions compared to the soft laps usually used in polishing. Such a wheel would permit the fabrication of a precision surface on a brittle material such as glass at a precisely located and oriented position on a part. The technological and economic consequences of such a process seem important but the technical obstacles to implementing the technique are for the moment formidable. It is in production in Japan. This paper provides a bit of understanding of that process obtained by making an end run around the obstacles to view the process from the vantage point of lapping. The paper will lay out some of the concepts and terminology necessary to understand the papers that have supplied the real labor to get us to this point. It will refer to parts of this work briefly in passing so the reader who needs the details knows where to look, and for what, in the bibliography appended. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  19. How cats lap: water uptake by Felis catus.

    PubMed

    Reis, Pedro M; Jung, Sunghwan; Aristoff, Jeffrey M; Stocker, Roman

    2010-11-26

    Animals have developed a range of drinking strategies depending on physiological and environmental constraints. Vertebrates with incomplete cheeks use their tongue to drink; the most common example is the lapping of cats and dogs. We show that the domestic cat (Felis catus) laps by a subtle mechanism based on water adhesion to the dorsal side of the tongue. A combined experimental and theoretical analysis reveals that Felis catus exploits fluid inertia to defeat gravity and pull liquid into the mouth. This competition between inertia and gravity sets the lapping frequency and yields a prediction for the dependence of frequency on animal mass. Measurements of lapping frequency across the family Felidae support this prediction, which suggests that the lapping mechanism is conserved among felines.

  20. Analysis of aircraft wing-mounted antenna patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marhefka, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    High frequency radiation patterns of aircraft wing mounted antennas are analyzed. Basic antenna types using ray optical techniques are studied. The aircraft is modelled in its most basic form so that this study is applicable to general type aircraft. The fuselage is modelled as a perfectly conducting finite elliptic cylinder. The wings and horizontal and vertical stabilizers are modelled as perfectly conducting "n" sided flat plates that can be arbitrarily attached to the fuselage or to themselves. The antenna locations are assumed to be on the surfaces of the wings at locations removed from engines and stores such that these effects are negligible. Volumetric patterns are calculated for several aircraft. The validity of the solution is shown by comparing the results against scale model measurements. The application of this solution to practical airborne antenna problems has shown its versatility in designing antennas and predicting their radiation patterns in an accurate and efficient manner.

  1. Advanced methods of structural and trajectory analysis for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, Mark D.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the efforts in two areas: (1) development of advanced methods of structural weight estimation, and (2) development of advanced methods of trajectory optimization. The majority of the effort was spent in the structural weight area. A draft of 'Analytical Fuselage and Wing Weight Estimation of Transport Aircraft', resulting from this research, is included as an appendix.

  2. Development of Novel Skin Materials for Morphing Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-19

    EAU i L ii ∫= (4) (Note: L is an arbitrary...length of yarn, generally one twist) Substituting equation (1) in equation (4): ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) L u L EAU yy yyyy i δ αεσαεα...conditions. These configuration changes can take place in any part of the aircraft, e.g. fuselage, wing, engine, and tail. Wing morphing is naturally

  3. Surface grid generation for wing-fuselage bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.; Kudlinski, R. A.; Pitts, J. I.

    1984-01-01

    In the application of finite-difference methods to obtain numerical solutions of viscous compressible fluid flow about wing-fuselage bodies, it is advantageous to transform the governing equations to an idealized boundary-fitted coordinate system. The advantages are reduced computational complexity and added accuracy in the application of boundary conditions. The solution process requires that a grid be superimposed on the physical solution domain which corresponds to a uniform grid on a rectangular computational domain (uniform rectangular parallel-epiped). Grid generation is the determination of a one to one relationship between grid points in the physical domain and grid points in the computational domain. A technique for computing wing-fuselage surface grids using the Harris geometry and software for smooth-surface representation is described. Grid spacing control concepts which govern the relationship between the wing-fuselage surface and the computational grid are also presented.

  4. Tubular lap joints for wind turbine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, E.D. Jr.; Guess, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    A combined analytical/experimental study of the strength of thick- walled, adhesively bonded PMMA-to-aluminum and E-glass/epoxy composite-to-aluminum tubular lap joints under axial load has been conducted. Test results include strength and failure mode data. Moreover, strain gages placed along the length of the outer tubular adherend characterize load transfer from one adherend to the other. The strain gage data indicate that load transfer is nonuniform and that the relatively compliant PMMA has the shorter load transfer length. Strains determined by a finite element analysis of the tested joints are in excellent agreement with those measured. Calculated bond stresses are highest in the region of observed failure, and extensive bond yielding is predicted in the E- glass/epoxy composite-to-aluminum joint prior to joint failure. 4 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  5. On a global aerodynamic optimization of a civil transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savu, G.; Trifu, O.

    1991-01-01

    An aerodynamic optimization procedure developed to minimize the drag to lift ratio of an aircraft configuration: wing - body - tail, in accordance with engineering restrictions, is described. An algorithm developed to search a hypersurface with 18 dimensions, which define an aircraft configuration, is discussed. The results, when considered from the aerodynamic point of view, indicate the optimal configuration is one that combines a lifting fuselage with a canard.

  6. Closeup oblique view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up oblique view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery looking forward and starboard with the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME) and Orbiter Maneuvering System/Reaction Control System pods removed. The openings for the SSMEs have been covered with a flexible barrier to create a positive pressure envelope inside of the aft fuselage. This image was taken inside the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  7. Detail view of the starboard side of the aft fuselage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the starboard side of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery in the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center with the Orbiter Maneuvering/Reaction Control Systems Pod removed and exposing the insulating foil used to protect the orbiter structure from the heat generated by the maneuvering and reaction control engines. Also note in the view that the aft fuselage access door has bee removed and also note the ground support equipment attached to the T-0 umbilical plate in the lower left of the view. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  8. Closeup oblique view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up oblique view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery looking forward and port with the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME) and Orbiter Maneuvering System/Reaction Control System pods still in place. However. the heat shields have been removed from the SSMEs providing a good view toward the interior of the aft fuselage. This image was taken inside the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  9. Closeup oblique view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up oblique view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery looking forward and starboard with the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME) and Orbiter Maneuvering System/Reaction Control System pods still in place. However. the heat shields have been removed from the SSMEs providing a good view toward the interior of the aft fuselage. This image was taken inside the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  10. Detail view of the port side of the aft fuselage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the port side of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery in the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center with a lifting frame attached to the aft attach points of the orbiter. In this view, the Orbiter Maneuvering/Reaction Control Systems pod is in place. Also note the darker-colored trapezoidal aft fuselage access door and the T-0 umbilical panel to its right in the view. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  11. Flaw Tolerance In Lap Shear Brazed Joints. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Len; Flom, Yury

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents results of the second part of an on-going effort to gain better understanding of defect tolerance in braze joints. In the first part of this three-part series, we mechanically tested and modeled the strength of the lap joints as a function of the overlap distance. A failure criterion was established based on the zone damage theory, which predicts the dependence of the lap joint shear strength on the overlap distance, based on the critical size of a finite damage zone or an overloaded region in the joint. In this second part of the study, we experimentally verified the applicability of the damage zone criterion on prediction of the shear strength of the lap joint and introduced controlled flaws into the lap joints. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the lap joint strength as a function of flaw size and its location through mechanical testing and nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) employing damage zone criterion for definition of failure. The results obtained from the second part of the investigation confirmed that the failure of the ductile lap shear brazed joints occurs when the damage zone reaches approximately 10% of the overlap width. The same failure criterion was applicable to the lap joints containing flaws.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation methodology for the reliabilty of aircraft structures under damage tolerance considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambalakos, Andreas

    Current federal aviation regulations in the United States and around the world mandate the need for aircraft structures to meet damage tolerance requirements through out the service life. These requirements imply that the damaged aircraft structure must maintain adequate residual strength in order to sustain its integrity that is accomplished by a continuous inspection program. The multifold objective of this research is to develop a methodology based on a direct Monte Carlo simulation process and to assess the reliability of aircraft structures. Initially, the structure is modeled as a parallel system with active redundancy comprised of elements with uncorrelated (statistically independent) strengths and subjected to an equal load distribution. Closed form expressions for the system capacity cumulative distribution function (CDF) are developed by expanding the current expression for the capacity CDF of a parallel system comprised by three elements to a parallel system comprised with up to six elements. These newly developed expressions will be used to check the accuracy of the implementation of a Monte Carlo simulation algorithm to determine the probability of failure of a parallel system comprised of an arbitrary number of statistically independent elements. The second objective of this work is to compute the probability of failure of a fuselage skin lap joint under static load conditions through a Monte Carlo simulation scheme by utilizing the residual strength of the fasteners subjected to various initial load distributions and then subjected to a new unequal load distribution resulting from subsequent fastener sequential failures. The final and main objective of this thesis is to present a methodology for computing the resulting gradual deterioration of the reliability of an aircraft structural component by employing a direct Monte Carlo simulation approach. The uncertainties associated with the time to crack initiation, the probability of crack detection, the

  13. Roll plane analysis of on-aircraft antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnside, W. D.; Marhefka, R. J.; Byu, C. L.

    1974-01-01

    Roll plane radiation patterns of on-aircraft antennas are analyzed using high frequency solutions. Aircraft-antenna pattern performance in which the aircraft is modelled in its most basic form is presented. The fuselage is assumed to be a perfectly conducting elliptic cylinder with the antennas mounted near the top or bottom. The wings are simulated by arbitrarily many sided flat plates and the engines by circular cylinders. The patterns in each case are verified by measured results taken on simple models as well as scale models of actual aircraft.

  14. The cetaceopteryx: A global range military transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brivkalns, Chad; English, Nicole; Kazemi, Tahmineh; Kopel, Kim; Kroger, Seth; Ortega, ED

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a design of a military transport aircraft capable of carrying 800,000 lbs of payload from any point in the United States to any other point in the world. Such massive airlift requires aggressive use of advanced technology and a unique configuration. The Cetaceopteyx features a joined wing, canard and six turbofan engines. The aircraft has a cost 1.07 billion (1993) dollars each. This paper presents in detail the mission description, preliminary sizing, aircraft configuration, wing design, fuselage design, empennage design, propulsion system, landing gear design, structures, drag, stability and control, systems layout, and cost analysis of the aircraft.

  15. 14 CFR 27.549 - Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon... Requirements § 27.549 Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures. (a) Each fuselage, landing gear, and... accelerated flight and landing conditions, including engine torque. (Secs. 604, 605, 72 Stat. 778, 49...

  16. 14 CFR 27.549 - Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon... Requirements § 27.549 Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures. (a) Each fuselage, landing gear, and... accelerated flight and landing conditions, including engine torque. (Secs. 604, 605, 72 Stat. 778, 49...

  17. Numerical Investigation of Rotorcraft Fuselage Drag Reduction Using Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Schaeffler, Norman W.

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of unsteady zero-net-mass-flux jets for fuselage drag reduction was evaluated numerically on a generic rotorcraft fuselage in forward flight with a rotor. Previous efforts have shown significant fuselage drag reduction using flow control for an isolated fuselage by experiment and numerical simulation. This work will evaluate a flow control strategy, that was originally developed on an isolated fuselage, in a more relevant environment that includes the effects of a rotor. Evaluation of different slot heights and jet velocity ratios were performed. Direct comparisons between an isolated fuselage and rotor/fuselage simulations were made showing similar flow control performance at a -3deg fuselage angle-of-attack condition. However, this was not the case for a -5deg angle-of-attack condition where the performance between the isolated fuselage and rotor/fuselage were different. The fuselage flow control resulted in a 17% drag reduction for a peak C(sub mu) of 0.0069 in a forward flight simulation where mu = 0:35 and CT/sigma = 0:08. The CFD flow control results also predicted a favorable 22% reduction of the fuselage download at this same condition, which can have beneficial compounding effects on the overall performance of the vehicle. This numerical investigation was performed in order to provide guidance for a future 1/3 scale wind tunnel experiment to be performed at the NASA 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel.

  18. 14 CFR 27.549 - Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon... Requirements § 27.549 Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures. (a) Each fuselage, landing gear, and... accelerated flight and landing conditions, including engine torque. (Secs. 604, 605, 72 Stat. 778, 49...

  19. 14 CFR 27.549 - Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon... Requirements § 27.549 Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures. (a) Each fuselage, landing gear, and... accelerated flight and landing conditions, including engine torque. (Secs. 604, 605, 72 Stat. 778, 49...

  20. 14 CFR 27.549 - Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures. 27.549 Section 27.549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Requirements § 27.549 Fuselage, landing gear, and rotor pylon structures. (a) Each fuselage, landing gear,...

  1. Taxiing, Take-Off, and Landing Simulation of the High Speed Civil Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reaves, Mercedes C.; Horta, Lucas G.

    1999-01-01

    The aircraft industry jointly with NASA is studying enabling technologies for higher speed, longer range aircraft configurations. Higher speeds, higher temperatures, and aerodynamics are driving these newer aircraft configurations towards long, slender, flexible fuselages. Aircraft response during ground operations, although often overlooked, is a concern due to the increased fuselage flexibility. This paper discusses modeling and simulation of the High Speed Civil Transport aircraft during taxiing, take-off, and landing. Finite element models of the airframe for various configurations are used and combined with nonlinear landing gear models to provide a simulation tool to study responses to different ground input conditions. A commercial computer simulation program is used to numerically integrate the equations of motion and to compute estimates of the responses using an existing runway profile. Results show aircraft responses exceeding safe acceptable human response levels.

  2. The Influences of Lamination Angles on the Interior Noise Levels of an Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernholz, Christian M.; Robinson, Jay H.

    1996-01-01

    The feasibility of reducing the interior noise levels of an aircraft passenger cabin through optimization of the composite lay up of the fuselage is investigated. MSC/NASTRAN, a commercially available finite element code, is used to perform the dynamic analysis and subsequent optimization of the fuselage. The numerical calculation of sensitivity of acoustic pressure to lamination angle is verified using a simple thin, cylindrical shell with point force excitations as noise sources. The thin shell used represents a geometry similar to the fuselage and analytic solutions are available for the cylindrical thin shell equations of motion. Optimization of lamination angle for the reduction of interior noise is performed using a finite element model of an actual aircraft fuselage. The aircraft modeled for this study is the Beech Starship. Point forces simulate the structure borne noise produced by the engines and are applied to the fuselage at the wing mounting locations. These forces are the noise source for the optimization problem. The acoustic pressure response is reduced at a number of points in the fuselage and over a number of frequencies. The objective function is minimized with the constraint that it be larger than the maximum sound pressure level at the response points in the passenger cabin for all excitation frequencies in the range of interest. Results from the study of the fuselage model indicate that a reduction in interior noise levels is possible over a finite frequency range through optimal configuration of the lamination angles in the fuselage. Noise reductions of roughly 4 dB were attained. For frequencies outside the optimization range, the acoustic pressure response may increase after optimization. The effects of changing lamination angle on the overall structural integrity of the airframe are not considered in this study.

  3. The 737 aircraft flammability testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bricker, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The FAA requested approximately 20 component and full-scale tests in a 737 fuselage to provide validation data or indicate changes that need to be made to a fire math model (Dayton Aircraft Cabin Fire Model) developed for the FAA. Some preliminary tests were conducted to evaluate the adequacy of planned instrumentation. The objectives of the program were met in that it was verified that propagation of a fire could be determined from the sequential response of thermocouples located on a test specimen(such as a seat), and continuous weighing of the specimen during the test was accomplished. Two differenct techniques for measuring smoke density were found to be comparable.

  4. Cast Aluminum Primary Aircraft Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    ABSTRAC R A A A357 cast aluminum alloy forward fuselage pressure bulkhead has been developed and manufactured for the AMST-YC-14 aircraft. This work...urring in castings. Test coupons were! removed from castings containing defU-ts and subjected to repeated loads. The shift of the S-N curve for A357 ...selected for the casting is A357 . The cast bulkhead (Fig 2) measures approximately 2.29 m (7.5 ft) by 1.37 m (4.5 ft). It is designed to replace the

  5. RWF rotor-wake-fuselage code software reference guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.

    1991-01-01

    The RWF (Rotor-Wake-Fuselage) code was developed from first principles to compute the aerodynamics associated with the complex flow field of helicopter configurations. The code is sized for a single, multi-bladed main rotor and any configuration of non-lifting fuselage. The mathematical model for the RWF code is based on the integration of the momentum equations and Green's theorem. The unknowns in the problem are the strengths of prescribed singularity distributions on the boundaries of the flow. For the body (fuselage) a surface of constant strength source panels is used. For the rotor blades and rotor wake a surface of constant strength doublet panels is used. The mean camber line of the rotor airfoil is partitioned into surface panels. The no-flow boundary condition at the panel centroids is modified at each azimuthal step to account for rotor blade cyclic pitch variation. The geometry of the rotor wake is computers at each time step of the solution. The code produces rotor and fuselage surface pressures, as well as the complex geometry of the evolving rotor wake.

  6. An oblique view of the forward fuselage and starboard side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    An oblique view of the forward fuselage and starboard side of the Orbiter Discovery while mounted atop the 76-wheeled orbiter transfer system as it is being rolled from the Orbiter Processing Facility to the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  7. An oblique view of the forward fuselage and port side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    An oblique view of the forward fuselage and port side of the Orbiter Discovery while mounted atop the 76-wheeled orbiter transfer system as it is being rolled from the Orbiter Processing Facility to the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  8. Manufacturing scale-up of composite fuselage crown panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willden, Kurtis; Gessel, M.; Grant, Carroll G.; Brown, T.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of the Boeing effort under the NASA ACT program is to reduce manufacturing costs of composite fuselage structure. Materials, fabrication of complex subcomponents and assembly issues are expected to drive the costs of composite fuselage structure. Several manufacturing concepts for the crown section of the fuselage were evaluated through the efforts of a Design Build Team (DBT). A skin-stringer-frame intricate bond design that required no fasteners for the panel assembly was selected for further manufacturing demonstrations. The manufacturing processes selected for the intricate bond design include Advanced Tow Placement (ATP) for multiple skin fabrication, resin transfer molding (RTM) of fuselage frames, innovative cure tooling, and utilization of low-cost material forms. Optimization of these processes for final design/manufacturing configuration was evaluated through the fabrication of several intricate bond panels. Panels up to 7 ft. by 10 ft. in size were fabricated to simulate half scale production parts. The qualitative and quantitative results of these manufacturing demonstrations were used to assess manufacturing risks and technology readiness for production.

  9. Fuselage structure using advanced technology fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. K.; Tomlinson, H. M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fuselage structure is described in which the skin is comprised of layers of a matrix fiber reinforced composite, with the stringers reinforced with the same composite material. The high strength to weight ratio of the composite, particularly at elevated temperatures, and its high modulus of elasticity, makes it desirable for use in airplane structures.

  10. 14 CFR 29.549 - Fuselage and rotor pylon structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... flight conditions, must be considered. (c) Each engine mount and adjacent fuselage structure must be designed to withstand the loads occurring under accelerated flight and landing conditions, including engine torque. (d) (e) If approval for the use of 21/2-minute OEI power is requested, each engine mount...

  11. INTERIOR OF WEST SPAN LOOKING WEST (SHADOW OF VERTICAL LAPS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF WEST SPAN LOOKING WEST (SHADOW OF VERTICAL LAPS PLACED ON ZONE III; ASPHALT ZONE IX) - Honey Run Bridge, Spanning Butte Creek, bypassed section of Honey Run Road (originally Carr Hill Road), Paradise, Butte County, CA

  12. 15 CFR 285.5 - Termination of a LAP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ACCREDITATION AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAMS NATIONAL VOLUNTARY LABORATORY ACCREDITATION PROGRAM § 285.5 Termination of a LAP. (a) The Chief of NVLAP...

  13. Mechanical properties of a lap joint under uniform clamping pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diller, S. V.; Metherell, A. F.

    1969-01-01

    Equations were derived for the load deflection relations, the energy dissipation per cycle, and the instantaneous rate of dissipation for a lap joint idealized as two overlapping plates clamped together under a uniform clamping pressure.

  14. FRICTION STIR LAP WELDING OF ALUMINUM - POLYMER USING SCRIBE TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2015-02-16

    Friction Stir Scribe (FSS) technology is a relatively new variant of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) which enables lap joining of dissimilar material with very different melting points and different high temperature flow behaviors. The cutter scribe attached at the tip of FSW tool pin effectively cuts the high melting point material such that a mechanically interlocking feature is created between the dissimilar materials. The geometric shape of this interlocking feature determines the shear strength attained by the lap joint. This work presents first use of scribe technology in joining polymers to aluminum alloy. Details of the several runs of scribe welding performed in lap joining of ~3.175mm thick polymers including HDPE, filled and unfilled Nylon 66 to 2mm thick AA5182 are presented. The effect of scribe geometry and length on weld interlocking features is presented along with lap shear strength evaluations.

  15. 13. Detail closeup view of wooden peg fastenings; note lapped ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail close-up view of wooden peg fastenings; note lapped joint fastened with iron bolts using washers fashioned from oxen shoes. - Mormon Tabernacle, Temple Square, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  16. Fire-resistant aircraft materials development and evaluation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bricker, R. W.; Stuckey, R. N.

    1974-01-01

    The overall objectives of this program are to provide a more fire-resistant commercial aircraft interior and to improve the fuselage insulation barrier between the cabin interior and an exterior fuel fire. Significant secondary objectives are to reduce the smoke and toxic gas production of the materials and to meet the end item use requirements pertaining to wearability, color fastness, and aesthetic appeal. It is shown that the fuselage insulation materials must meet stringent requirements pertaining to acoustic attenuation, low density, and water repellency.

  17. Concept for a large multi-mission amphibian aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, J. C., III; Earl, T. D.

    1979-01-01

    A very large aircraft has been proposed for meeting both civil cargo and military transport needs for 1995 and beyond. The concept includes a wide noncircular fuselage cross section with a low wing, thick inner wing section, fuselage-mounted engines, and an air cushion landing gear. The civil freighter operates independently of congested passenger airports, using sheltered water as a runway and a waterfront land site for parking and ground operations. The military transport can operate from a wide variety of surfaces and temporary bases. The air cushion landing gear weighs substantially less than conventional gear and permits the use of extended takeoff distance resulting in improved payload/gross weight ratio.

  18. Structureborne noise measurements on a small twin-engine aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, J. E., III; Martini, K. F.

    1988-01-01

    Structureborne noise measurements performed on a twin-engine aircraft (Beechcraft Baron) are reported. There are two overall objectives of the test program. The first is to obtain data to support the development of analytical models of the wing and fuselage, while the second is to evaluate effects of structural parameters on cabin noise. Measurements performed include structural and acoustic responses to impact excitation, structural and acoustic loss factors, and modal parameters of the wing. Path alterations include added mass to simulate fuel, variations in torque of bolts joining wing and fuselage, and increased acoustic absorption. Conclusions drawn regarding these measurements are presented.

  19. Structureborne noise measurements on a small twin-engine aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, J. E., III; Martini, K. F.

    1988-06-01

    Structureborne noise measurements performed on a twin-engine aircraft (Beechcraft Baron) are reported. There are two overall objectives of the test program. The first is to obtain data to support the development of analytical models of the wing and fuselage, while the second is to evaluate effects of structural parameters on cabin noise. Measurements performed include structural and acoustic responses to impact excitation, structural and acoustic loss factors, and modal parameters of the wing. Path alterations include added mass to simulate fuel, variations in torque of bolts joining wing and fuselage, and increased acoustic absorption. Conclusions drawn regarding these measurements are presented.

  20. Aircraft control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisoski, Derek L. (Inventor); Kendall, Greg T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A solar rechargeable, long-duration, span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing's top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn, pitch and yaw. The wing is configured to deform under flight loads to position the propellers such that the control can be achieved. Each of five segments of the wing has one or more motors and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other segments, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface.

  1. Adhesive-bonded scarf and stepped-lap joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Continuum mechanics solutions are derived for the static load-carrying capacity of scarf and stepped-lap adhesive-bonded joints. The analyses account for adhesive plasticity and adherend stiffness imbalance and thermal mismatch. The scarf joint solutions include a simple algebraic formula which serves as a close lower bound, within a small fraction of a per cent of the true answer for most practical geometries and materials. Digital computer programs were developed and, for the stepped-lap joints, the critical adherend and adhesive stresses are computed for each step. The scarf joint solutions exhibit grossly different behavior from that for double-lap joints for long overlaps inasmuch as that the potential bond shear strength continues to increase with indefinitely long overlaps on the scarf joints. The stepped-lap joint solutions exhibit some characteristics of both the scarf and double-lap joints. The stepped-lap computer program handles arbitrary (different) step lengths and thickness and the solutions obtained have clarified potentially weak design details and the remedies. The program has been used effectively to optimize the joint proportions.

  2. Correlation-based imaging technique for fatigue monitoring of riveted lap-joint structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaegebeur, N.; Ostiguy, P. C.; Masson, P.

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, a correlation-based imaging technique called Excitelet is assessed to monitor fatigue crack propagation in a riveted aluminum lap-joint, representative of an aircraft component. For this purpose, a micro-machined piezoceramic array is used to generate guided waves into the structure and measure the reflections induced by potential damage. The method uses a propagation model to correlate measured signals with a bank of signals and imaging is performed using a round-robin procedure (full-matrix capture). This allows taking into account the transducer dynamics and finite dimensions, multi-modal and dispersive characteristics of the guided wave propagation and complex interaction between with damage. Experimental validation has been conducted on an aluminum lap-joint instrumented with a compact linear piezoceramic array of 8 circular elements of 3 mm diameter each. The imaging technique is applied to detect crack propagation after fatigue cycling. Imaging results obtained using A0 mode at 300 and 450 kHz are presented for different crack sizes. It is demonstrated that crack detection and localization can be achieved, while the correlation level indicates the level of reflected energy, and thus damage severity. An accuracy below 5 mm on damage location can be achieved, demonstrating the potential of the correlation-based imaging technique for damage monitoring of complex aerospace structures.

  3. Computational fire modeling for aircraft fire research

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolette, V.F.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Sandia National Laboratories for the Federal Aviation Administration. The technical issues involved in fire modeling for aircraft fire research are identified, as well as computational fire tools for addressing those issues, and the research which is needed to advance those tools in order to address long-range needs. Fire field models are briefly reviewed, and the VULCAN model is selected for further evaluation. Calculations are performed with VULCAN to demonstrate its applicability to aircraft fire problems, and also to gain insight into the complex problem of fires involving aircraft. Simulations are conducted to investigate the influence of fire on an aircraft in a cross-wind. The interaction of the fuselage, wind, fire, and ground plane is investigated. Calculations are also performed utilizing a large eddy simulation (LES) capability to describe the large- scale turbulence instead of the more common k-{epsilon} turbulence model. Additional simulations are performed to investigate the static pressure and velocity distributions around a fuselage in a cross-wind, with and without fire. The results of these simulations provide qualitative insight into the complex interaction of a fuselage, fire, wind, and ground plane. Reasonable quantitative agreement is obtained in the few cases for which data or other modeling results exist Finally, VULCAN is used to quantify the impact of simplifying assumptions inherent in a risk assessment compatible fire model developed for open pool fire environments. The assumptions are seen to be of minor importance for the particular problem analyzed. This work demonstrates the utility of using a fire field model for assessing the limitations of simplified fire models. In conclusion, the application of computational fire modeling tools herein provides both qualitative and quantitative insights into the complex problem of aircraft in fires.

  4. Flaw Tolerance in Lap Shear Brazed Joints. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Wang, Li-Qin

    2003-01-01

    Furnace brazing is a joining process used in the aerospace and other industries to produce strong permanent and hermetic structural joints. As in any joining process, brazed joints have various imperfections and defects. At the present time, our understanding of the influence of the internal defects on the strength of the brazed joints is not adequate. The goal of this 3-part investigation is to better understand the properties and failure mechanisms of the brazed joints containing defects. This study focuses on the behavior of the brazed lap shear joints because of their importance in manufacturing aerospace structures. In Part 1, an average shear strength capability and failure modes of the single lap joints are explored. Stainless steel specimens brazed with pure silver are tested in accordance with the AWS C3.2 standard. Comparison of the failure loads and the ultimate shear strength with the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of the same specimens as a function of the overlap widths shows excellent correlation between the experimental and calculated values for the defect-free lap joints. A damage zone criterion is shown to work quite well in understanding the failure of the braze joints. In Part 2, the findings of the Part 1 will be verified on the larger test specimens. Also, various flaws will be introduced in the test specimens to simulate lack of braze coverage in the lap joints. Mechanical testing and FEA will be performed on these joints to verify that behavior of the flawed ductile lap joints is similar to joints with a reduced braze area. Finally, in Part 3, the results obtained in Parts 1 and 2 will be applied to the actual brazed structure to evaluate the load-carrying capability of a structural lap joint containing discontinuities. In addition, a simplified engineering procedure will be offered for the laboratory testing of the lap shear specimens.

  5. Modified Convair-240 aircraft at Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Convair-240 aircraft modified to fill role of a Space Shuttle is parked outside aircraft hangar at Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California. Space shuttle side hatch mockup is incorporated in fuselage (visible toward the aft section of the aircraft). Convair-240 aircraft is part of November crew escape system (CES) testing of a candidate concept developed to provide crew egress capability during Space Shuttle controlled gliding flight. Tractor rocket testing using the Convair-240 will begin 11-20-87. Life-like dummies will be pulled by the rockets from the modified aircraft's side hatch mockup.

  6. Use of two-dimensional transmission photoelastic models to study stresses in double-lap bolted joints: Load transfer and stresses in the inner lap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    The determination of the stress distribution in the inner lap of double-lap, double-bolt joints using photoelastic models of the joint is discussed. The principal idea is to fabricate the inner lap of a photoelastic material and to use a photoelastically sensitive material for the two outer laps. With this setup, polarized light transmitted through the stressed model responds principally to the stressed inner lap. The model geometry, the procedures for making and testing the model, and test results are described.

  7. Computing induced velocity perturbations due to a helicopter fuselage in a free stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.; Althoff, Susan L.

    1989-01-01

    The velocity field of a representative helicopter fuselage in a free stream is computed. Perturbation velocities due to the fuselage are computed in a plan above the location of the helicopter rotor (rotor removed). The velocity perturbations computed by a source-panel model of the fuselage are compared with experimental measurements taken with a laser velocimeter. Three paneled fuselage models are studied: fuselage shape, fuselage shape with hub shape, and a body of revolution. The velocity perturbations computed for both fuselage shape models agree well with the measured velocity field except in the close vicinity of the rotor hub. In the hub region, without knowing the extent of separation, modeling of the effective source shape is difficult. The effects of the fuselage perturbations are not well-predicted with a simplified ellipsoid fuselage. The velocity perturbations due to the fuselage at the plane of the measurements have magnitudes of less than 8 percent of free-stream velocity. The velocity perturbations computed by the panel method are tabulated for the same locations at which previously reported rotor-inflow velocity measurements were made.

  8. Aerodynamic analysis of a helicopter fuselage with rotating rotor head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reß, R.; Grawunder, M.; Breitsamter, Ch.

    2015-06-01

    The present paper describes results of wind tunnel experiments obtained during a research programme aimed at drag reduction of the fuselage of a twin engine light helicopter configuration. A 1 : 5 scale model of a helicopter fuselage including a rotating rotor head and landing gear was investigated in the low-speed wind tunnel A of Technische Universität a München (TUM). The modelled parts of the helicopter induce approxiu mately 80% of the total parasite drag thus forming a major potential for shape optimizations. The present paper compares results of force and moment measurements of a baseline configuration and modified variants with an emphasis on the aerodynamic drag, lift, and yawing moment coefficients.

  9. Algebraic grid generation for wing-fuselage bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.; Everton, E. L.; Kudlinski, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    An algebraic procedure for the generation of boundary-fitted grids about wing-fuselage configurations is presented. A wing-fuselage configuration is specified by cross sections and mathematically represented by Coons' patches. A configuration is divided into sections so that several grid blocks that either adjoin each other or partially overlap each other can be generated, and each grid has six surfaces that map into a computational cube. Grids are first determined on the six boundary surfaces and then in the interior. Grid curves that are on the surface of the configuration are derived using plane-patch intersections, and single-valued functions relating approximate arc lengths along the curves to computational coordinates define the distribution of grid points. The two-boundary technique and transfinite interpolation are used to determine the boundary surface grids that are not on the configuration, and transfinite interpolation with linear blending functions is used to determine the interior grids.

  10. Detailed view inside the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detailed view inside the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery showing the network of supply, distribution and feed lines to deliver fuel, oxidizer and other vital gasses and fluids to the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs). This photograph was taken in the Orbiter Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  11. General view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery looking forward showing Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs) installed in positions one and three and an SSME on the process of being installed in position two. This photograph was taken in the Orbiter Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  12. View of the forward fuselage and the reinforced carboncarbon nose ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the forward fuselage and the reinforced carbon-carbon nose of the Orbiter Discovery looking aft while mounted atop the 76-wheeled orbiter transfer system as it is being rolled from the Orbiter Processing Facility to the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  13. LAP5 and LAP6 Encode Anther-Specific Proteins with Similarity to Chalcone Synthase Essential for Pollen Exine Development in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Dobritsa, Anna A.; Lei, Zhentian; Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Huhman, David V.; Preuss, Daphne; Sumner, Lloyd W.

    2010-01-01

    Pollen grains of land plants have evolved remarkably strong outer walls referred to as exine that protect pollen and interact with female stigma cells. Exine is composed of sporopollenin, and while the composition and synthesis of this biopolymer are not well understood, both fatty acids and phenolics are likely components. Here, we describe mutations in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) LESS ADHESIVE POLLEN (LAP5) and LAP6 that affect exine development. Mutation of either gene results in abnormal exine patterning, whereas pollen of double mutants lacked exine deposition and subsequently collapsed, causing male sterility. LAP5 and LAP6 encode anther-specific proteins with homology to chalcone synthase, a key flavonoid biosynthesis enzyme. lap5 and lap6 mutations reduced the accumulation of flavonoid precursors and flavonoids in developing anthers, suggesting a role in the synthesis of phenolic constituents of sporopollenin. Our in vitro functional analysis of LAP5 and LAP6 using 4-coumaroyl-coenzyme A yielded bis-noryangonin (a commonly reported derailment product of chalcone synthase), while similar in vitro analyses using fatty acyl-coenzyme A as the substrate yielded medium-chain alkyl pyrones. Thus, in vitro assays indicate that LAP5 and LAP6 are multifunctional enzymes and may play a role in both the synthesis of pollen fatty acids and phenolics found in exine. Finally, the genetic interaction between LAP5 and an anther gene involved in fatty acid hydroxylation (CYP703A2) demonstrated that they act synergistically in exine production. PMID:20442277

  14. Compromise - An effective approach for conceptual aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mistree, Farrokh; Marinopoulos, Stergios; Jackson, david; Shupe, Jon

    1987-01-01

    The Decision Support Problem (DSP) technique for aircraft design is presently demonstrated through the development of a compromise DSP template for the conceptual design of subsonic transport aircraft. System variables are wing span and area, fuselage diameter and length, takeoff weight, and installed thrust. Such system constraints as range and wing loading are represented algebraically using standard subsonic aircraft theory, and economic efficiency is modeled in terms of rates-of-return. The DSP template thus obtained has been tested and validated using the known mission requirements and design constants of the B 727-200 airliner.

  15. Flaw Tolerance in Lap Shear Brazed Joints. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Wang, Liqin; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Vacuum brazing is a viable process to achieve strong permanent and hermetic joints in space. As in any joining process, brazed Joints have various imperfections and defects. It is important to understand the impact that flaws have on the load carrying capacity and performance of the brazed joints. This study focuses on the behavior of lap shear joints due to their engineering importance in brazed aerospace structures. In Part 1 an average shear strength capabilitY and failure modes of the single lap joints are explored. Specimens comprised of 0.090 inch thick 347 stainless steel sheet brazed with pure silver are tested in accordance with the AWS C3.2 standard. Comparison of the measured loads and average shear stresses at failure with the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of the same specimens as a function of the overlap lengths shows excellent correlation between the experimental and calculated values for the defect-free lap joints. In Part 2, various flaws will be introduced in the test specimens to simulate lack of braze coverage in the lap joints. Mechanical testing and FEA will be performed on these joints to verify if behavior of ductile ]appoints containing flaws is similar to the joints with the reduced braze area. Finally, in Part 3, the results obtained in Part 1 and 2 will be applied to the brazed assembly to evaluate a load carrying capability of the structural lap joint containing defects.

  16. Structural integrity of fuselage panels with multisite damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jai H.; Singh, Ripudaman; Pyo, Chang R.; Atluris, Satya N.

    1995-05-01

    Structural integrity assessment of aging flight vehicles is extremely important to ensure their economic and safe operation. A two-step analytical approach, developed to estimate the residual strength of pressurized fuselage stiffened shell panels with multi-bay fatigue cracking is presented in this article. Conventional finite element analysis of the damaged multibay panel is first carried out to obtain the load flow pattern through it. The Schwartz-Neumann alternating method is then applied to the fuselage skin with multiple site damage, to obtain stresses and the relevant crack tip parameters that govern the onset of fracture. Fracture mechanics as well as net section yield criteria are used to evaluate the static residual strength. The presence of holes with or without multisite damage ahead of a dominant crack is found to significantly degrade the capacity of the fuselage shell panels to sustain static internal pressure. An elastic-plastic alternating method is newly developed and applied to evaluate the residual strength of flat panels with multiple cracks. The computational methodologies presented herein are marked improvements to the present state-of-the-art, and are extremely efficient, both from engineering manpower as well as computational costs point of view. Once verified, they can very well complement the experimental requirements, reducing the cost of structural integrity assessment programs.

  17. Skin, Stringer, and Fastener Loads in Buckled Fuselage Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The results of a numerical study to assess the effect of skin buckling on the internal load distribution in a stiffened fuselage panel, with and without longitudinal cracks, are presented. In addition, the impact of changes in the internal loads on the fatigue life and residual strength of a fuselage panel is assessed. A generic narrow-body fuselage panel is considered. The entire panel is modeled using shell elements and considerable detail is included to represent the geometric-nonlinear response of the buckled skin, cross section deformation of the stiffening components, and details of the skin-string attachment with discrete fasteners. Results are presented for a fixed internal pressure and various combinations of axial tension or compression loads. Results illustrating the effect of skin buckling on the stress distribution in the skin and stringer, and fastener loads are presented. Results are presented for the pristine structure, and for cases where damage is introduced in the form of a longitudinal crack adjacent to the stringer, or failed fastener elements. The results indicate that axial compression loads and skin buckling can have a significant effect on the circumferential stress in the skin, and fastener loads, which will influence damage initiation, and a comparable effect on stress intensity factors for cases with cracks. The effects on stress intensity factors will influence damage propagation rates and the residual strength of the panel.

  18. Test results from large wing and fuselage panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madan, Ram C.; Voldman, Mike

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the first results in an assessment of the strength, stiffness, and damage tolerance of stiffened wing and fuselage subcomponents. Under this NASA funded program, 10 large wing and fuselage panels, variously fabricated by automated tow placement and dry-stitched preform/resin transfer molding, are to be tested. The first test of an automated tow placement six-longeron fuselage panel under shear load was completed successfully. Using NASTRAN finite-element analysis the stiffness of the panel in the linear range prior to buckling was predicted within 3.5 percent. A nonlinear analysis predicted the buckling load within 10 percent and final failure load within 6 percent. The first test of a resin transfer molding six-stringer wing panel under compression was also completed. The panel failed unexpectedly in buckling because of inadequate supporting structure. The average strain was 0.43 percent with a line load of 20.3 kips per inch of width. This strain still exceeds the design allowable strains. Also, the stringers did not debond before failure, which is in contrast to the general behavior of unstitched panels.

  19. Acoustic measurements of F-4E aircraft operating in hush house, NSN 4920-02-070-2721

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, V. R.; Plzak, G. A.; Chinn, J. M.

    1981-09-01

    The primary purpose of this test program was to measure the acoustic environment in the hush house facility located at Kelly Air Force Base, Texas, during operation of the F-4E aircraft to ensure that aircraft structural acoustic design limits were not exceeded. The acoustic measurements showed that sonic fatigue problems are anticipated with the F-4E aircraft aft fuselage structure during operation in the hush house. The measured acoustic levels were less than those measured in an F-4E aircraft water cooled hush house at Hill AFB in the lower frequencies, but were increased over that measured during ground run up on some areas of the aircraft. It was recommended that the acoustic loads measured in this program should be specified in the structural design criteria for aircraft which will be subjected to hush house operation or defining requirements for associated equipment. Recommendations were also made to increase the fatigue life of the aft fuselage.

  20. Correlation of forebody pressures and aircraft yawing moments on the X-29A aircraft at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Richwine, David M.; Landers, Stephen

    1992-01-01

    In-flight pressure distributions are presented at angles of attack from 15 deg to 66 deg and at Mach numbers from 0.22 to 0.60 at four fuselage stations on the forebody of the X-29A aircraft. Forebody yawing moments are obtained from the integrated pressure distributions and the results are correlated with the overall aircraft yawing moments. Yawing moments created by the forebody were not significant until an angle of attack of 50 deg or above and correlated well with the aircraft left yawing moment.

  1. Structureborne noise in aircraft: Modal tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevenson, S. A.; Metcalf, V. L.

    1986-01-01

    As part of an investigation to develop measurement techniques for structureborne noise, three modal surveys have been conducted on an OV-10A aircraft and the results have been presented. The purpose of the modal surveys was to identify suitable locations for mounting accelerometer and strain gages in subsequent tests in which transfer functions relating wing vibration to interior noise were to be determined. These surveys are as follows:(1) wing/fuselage modal survey utilizing one shaker under the right wing; (2) complete wing modal survey utilizing two shakers, one under each wing; and (3) fuselage side panel modal survey utilizing a small instrumented hammer. The predominant frequencies and damping ratios for each analysis were listed in tables. The primary mode shapes at the lower frequencies and at frequencies near the expected engine driving frequencies have been shown for each survey.

  2. Lap time optimisation of a racing go-kart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lot, Roberto; Dal Bianco, Nicola

    2016-02-01

    The minimum lap time optimal control problem has been solved for a go-kart model. The symbolic algebra software Maple has been used to derive equations of motion and an indirect method has been adopted to solve the optimal control problem. Simulation has been successfully performed on a full track lap with a multibody model endowed with seven degrees of freedom. Geometrical and mechanical characteristics of a real kart have been measured by a lab test to feed the mathematical model. Telemetry recorded in an entire lap by a professional driver has been compared to simulation results in order to validate the model. After the reliability of the optimal control model was proved, the simulation has been used to study the peculiar dynamics of go-karts and focus to tyre slippage dynamics, which is highly affected by the lack of differential.

  3. Loose abrasive lapping hardness of optical glasses and its interpretation.

    PubMed

    Lambropoulos, J C; Xu, S; Fang, T

    1997-03-01

    We present an interpretation of the lapping hardness of commercially available optical glasses in terms of a micromechanics model of material removal by subsurface lateral cracking. We analyze data on loose abrasive microgrinding, or lapping at fixed nominal pressure, for many commercially available optical glasses in terms of this model. The Schott and Hoya data on lapping hardness are correlated with the results of such a model. Lapping hardness is a function of the mechanical properties of the glass: The volume removal rate increases approximately linearly with Young's modulus, and it decreases with fracture toughness and (approximately) the square of the Knoop hardness. The microroughness induced by lapping depends on the plastic and elastic properties of the glass, depending on abrasive shape. This is in contrast to deterministic microgrinding (fixed infeed rate), where it is determined from the plastic and fracture properties of the glass. We also show that Preston's coefficient has a similar dependence as lapping hardness on glass mechanical properties, as well as a linear dependence on abrasive size for the case of brittle material removal. These observations lead to the definition of an augmented Preston coefficient during brittle material removal. The augmented Preston coefficient does not depend on glass material properties or abrasive size and thus describes the interaction of the glass surface with the coolant-immersed abrasive grain and the backing plate. Numerical simulations of indentation are used to locate the origin of subsurface cracks and the distribution of residual surface and subsurface stresses, known to cause surface (radial) and subsurface (median, lateral) cracks.

  4. Wind tunnel investigation of helicopter-rotor wake effects on three helicopter fuselage models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Mineck, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of rotor wake on helicopter fuselage aerodynamic characteristics were investigated in the Langley V/STOL tunnel. Force, moment, and pressure data were obtained on three fuselage models at various combinations of windspeed, sideslip angle, and pitch angle. The data show that the influence of rotor wake on the helicopter fuselage yawing moment imposes a significant additional thrust requirement on the tail rotor of a single-rotor helicopter at high sideslip angles.

  5. Adaptive support for aircraft panel testing: New method and its experimental verification on a beam structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachau, Delf; Baschke, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    Acoustic transmissibility of aircraft panels is measured in full-scale test rigs. The panels are supported at their frames. These boundary conditions do not take into account the dynamic influence of the fuselage, which is significant in the frequency range below 300 Hz. This paper introduces a new adaptive boundary system (ABS). It combines accelerometers and electrodynamic shakers with real-time signal processing. The ABS considers the dynamic effect of the fuselage on the panel. The frames are dominating the dynamic behaviour of a fuselage in the low-frequency range. Therefore, the new method is applied to a beam representing a frame of the aircraft structure. The experimental results are evaluated and the precision of the ABS is discussed. The theoretical apparent mass representing the cut-off part of a frame is calculated and compared with the apparent mass, as provided by the ABS. It is explained how the experimental set-up limits the precision of the ABS.

  6. Damage detection in aircraft structures using dynamically measured static flexibility matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, N.A.; Peterson, L.D.; James, G.H.; Doebling, S.W.

    1996-02-01

    Two methods for detecting the location of structural damage in an aircraft fuselage using modal test data are presented. Both methods use the dynamically measured static flexibility matrix, which is assembled from a combination of measured modal vectors, frequencies, and driving point residual flexibilities. As a consequence, neither method requires a mode-to-mode correlation, and both avoid tedious modal discrimination and selection. The first method detects damage as a softening in the point flexibility components, which are the diagonal entries in the flexibility matrix. The second method detects damage from the disassembled elemental stiffnesses as determined using a presumed connectivity. Vibration data from a laser vibrometer is used to measure the modal mechanics of a DC9 aircraft fuselage before and after induced weakening in a longitudinal stringer. Both methods are shown to detect the location of the damage, primarily because the normal stiffness of the reinforced shell of the fuselage is localized to a few square centimeters.

  7. Seam-Tracking for Friction Stir Welded Lap Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Paul A.; Hendricks, Christopher E.; Cook, George E.; Wilkes, D. M.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Lammlein, David H.

    2010-11-01

    This article presents a method for automatic seam-tracking in friction stir welding (FSW) of lap joints. In this method, tracking is accomplished by weaving the FSW tool back-and-forth perpendicular to the direction of travel during welding and monitoring force and torque signals. Research demonstrates the ability of this method to automatically track weld seam positions. Additionally, tensile and S-bend test result comparisons demonstrate that weaving most likely does not reduce weld quality. Finally, benefits of this weave-based method to FSW of lap joints are discussed and methods for incorporating it into existing friction stir welding control algorithms (such as axial load control) are examined.

  8. V/STOL tilt rotor aircraft study mathematical model for a real time simulation of a tilt rotor aircraft (Boeing Vertol Model 222), volume 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenstein, H.; Mcveigh, M. A.; Mollenkof, P. A.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical model for a real time simulation of a tilt rotor aircraft was developed. The mathematical model is used for evaluating aircraft performance and handling qualities. The model is based on an eleven degree of freedom total force representation. The rotor is treated as a point source of forces and moments with appropriate response time lags and actuator dynamics. The aerodynamics of the wing, tail, rotors, landing gear, and fuselage are included.

  9. Analysis and Design of Fuselage Structures Including Residual Strength Prediction Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this research project is to develop and assess methodologies for the design and analysis of fuselage structures accounting for residual strength. Two primary objectives are included in this research activity: development of structural analysis methodology for predicting residual strength of fuselage shell-type structures; and the development of accurate, efficient analysis, design and optimization tool for fuselage shell structures. Assessment of these tools for robustness, efficient, and usage in a fuselage shell design environment will be integrated with these two primary research objectives.

  10. Static and fatigue testing of full-scale fuselage panels fabricated using a Therm-X(R) process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinicola, Albert J.; Kassapoglou, Christos; Chou, Jack C.

    1992-01-01

    Large, curved, integrally stiffened composite panels representative of an aircraft fuselage structure were fabricated using a Therm-X process, an alternative concept to conventional two-sided hard tooling and contour vacuum bagging. Panels subsequently were tested under pure shear loading in both static and fatigue regimes to assess the adequacy of the manufacturing process, the effectiveness of damage tolerant design features co-cured with the structure, and the accuracy of finite element and closed-form predictions of postbuckling capability and failure load. Test results indicated the process yielded panels of high quality and increased damage tolerance through suppression of common failure modes such as skin-stiffener separation and frame-stiffener corner failure. Finite element analyses generally produced good predictions of postbuckled shape, and a global-local modelling technique yielded failure load predictions that were within 7% of the experimental mean.

  11. 15 CFR 285.4 - Establishment of laboratory accreditation programs (LAPs) within NVLAP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ACCREDITATION AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAMS NATIONAL VOLUNTARY LABORATORY ACCREDITATION PROGRAM § 285.4 Establishment of laboratory accreditation programs (LAPs) within NVLAP. NVLAP establishes LAPs in response to... accreditation programs (LAPs) within NVLAP. 285.4 Section 285.4 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations...

  12. Auto Mechanics I. Learning Activity Packets (LAPs). Section D--Suspension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains six learning activity packets (LAPs) that outline the study activities for the "suspension" instructional area for an Auto Mechanics I course. The six LAPs cover the following topics: wheel bearings, tires and wheels, wheel balancing, suspension system, steering system, and wheel alignment. Each LAP contains a…

  13. Auto Mechanics I. Learning Activity Packets (LAPs). Section C--Engine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains five learning activity packets (LAPs) that outline the study activities for the "engine" instructional area for an Auto Mechanics I course. The five LAPs cover the following topics: basic engine principles, cooling system, engine lubrication system, exhaust system, and fuel system. Each LAP contains a cover sheet…

  14. In-flight measurement of propeller noise on the fuselage of an airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G.; Ranaudo, Richard; Woodward, Richard P.

    1989-01-01

    In-flight measurements of propeller noise on the fuselage of an OV-10A aircraft were obtained using a horizontal and a vertical microphone array. A wide range of flight conditions were tested including changes in angle of attack, sideslip angle, power coefficient, helical tip Mach number and advance ratio, and propeller direction of rotation. Results show a dependence of the level and directivity of the tones on the angle of attack and on the sideslip angle with the propeller direction of rotation, which is similar to results obtained in wind tunnel tests with advanced propeller designs. The level of the tones at each microphone increases with increasing angle of attack for inboard-down propeller rotation and decreases for inboard-up rotation. The level also increases with increasing slideslip angle for both propeller directions of rotation. Increasing the power coefficient results in a slight increase in the level of the tones. A strong shock wave is generated by the propeller blades even at relatively low helical tip Mach numbers resulting in high harmonic levels. As the helical tip Mach number and the advance ratio are increased, the level of the higher harmonics increases much faster than the level of the blade passage frequency.

  15. In-flight measurement of propeller noise on the fuselage of an airplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla, Frederic G.; Ranaudo, Richard; Woodward, Richard P.

    1989-07-01

    In-flight measurements of propeller noise on the fuselage of an OV-10A aircraft were obtained using a horizontal and a vertical microphone array. A wide range of flight conditions were tested including changes in angle of attack, sideslip angle, power coefficient, helical tip Mach number and advance ratio, and propeller direction of rotation. Results show a dependence of the level and directivity of the tones on the angle of attack and on the sideslip angle with the propeller direction of rotation, which is similar to results obtained in wind tunnel tests with advanced propeller designs. The level of the tones at each microphone increases with increasing angle of attack for inboard-down propeller rotation and decreases for inboard-up rotation. The level also increases with increasing slideslip angle for both propeller directions of rotation. Increasing the power coefficient results in a slight increase in the level of the tones. A strong shock wave is generated by the propeller blades even at relatively low helical tip Mach numbers resulting in high harmonic levels. As the helical tip Mach number and the advance ratio are increased, the level of the higher harmonics increases much faster than the level of the blade passage frequency.

  16. An analytic modeling and system identification study of rotor/fuselage dynamics at hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Steven W.; Curtiss, H. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A combination of analytic modeling and system identification methods have been used to develop an improved dynamic model describing the response of articulated rotor helicopters to control inputs. A high-order linearized model of coupled rotor/body dynamics including flap and lag degrees of freedom and inflow dynamics with literal coefficients is compared to flight test data from single rotor helicopters in the near hover trim condition. The identification problem was formulated using the maximum likelihood function in the time domain. The dynamic model with literal coefficients was used to generate the model states, and the model was parametrized in terms of physical constants of the aircraft rather than the stability derivatives resulting in a significant reduction in the number of quantities to be identified. The likelihood function was optimized using the genetic algorithm approach. This method proved highly effective in producing an estimated model from flight test data which included coupled fuselage/rotor dynamics. Using this approach it has been shown that blade flexibility is a significant contributing factor to the discrepancies between theory and experiment shown in previous studies. Addition of flexible modes, properly incorporating the constraint due to the lag dampers, results in excellent agreement between flight test and theory, especially in the high frequency range.

  17. Cost model relationships between textile manufacturing processes and design details for transport fuselage elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metschan, Stephen L.; Wilden, Kurtis S.; Sharpless, Garrett C.; Andelman, Rich M.

    1993-01-01

    Textile manufacturing processes offer potential cost and weight advantages over traditional composite materials and processes for transport fuselage elements. In the current study, design cost modeling relationships between textile processes and element design details were developed. Such relationships are expected to help future aircraft designers to make timely decisions on the effect of design details and overall configurations on textile fabrication costs. The fundamental advantage of a design cost model is to insure that the element design is cost effective for the intended process. Trade studies on the effects of processing parameters also help to optimize the manufacturing steps for a particular structural element. Two methods of analyzing design detail/process cost relationships developed for the design cost model were pursued in the current study. The first makes use of existing databases and alternative cost modeling methods (e.g. detailed estimating). The second compares design cost model predictions with data collected during the fabrication of seven foot circumferential frames for ATCAS crown test panels. The process used in this case involves 2D dry braiding and resin transfer molding of curved 'J' cross section frame members having design details characteristic of the baseline ATCAS crown design.

  18. Validated Feasibility Study of Integrally Stiffened Metallic Fuselage Panels for Reducing Manufacturing Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, R. G.; Wang, J. J.; Toh, C.

    2000-01-01

    The continual need to reduce airframe cost and the emergence of high speed machining and other manufacturing technologies has brought about a renewed interest in large-scale integral structures for aircraft applications. Applications have been inhibited, however, because of the need to demonstrate damage tolerance, and by cost and manufacturing risks associated with the size and complexity of the parts. The Integral Airframe Structures (IAS) Program identified a feasible integrally stiffened fuselage concept and evaluated performance and manufacturing cost compared to conventional designs. An integral skin/stiffener concept was produced both by plate hog-out and near-net extrusion. Alloys evaluated included 7050-T7451 plate, 7050-T74511 extrusion, 6013-T6511 extrusion, and 7475-T7351 plate. Mechanical properties, structural details, and joint performance were evaluated as well as repair, static compression, and two-bay crack residual strength panels. Crack turning behavior was characterized through panel tests and improved methods for predicting crack turning were developed. Manufacturing cost was evaluated using COSTRAN. A hybrid design, made from high-speed machined extruded frames that are mechanically fastened to high-speed machined plate skin/stringer panels, was identified as the most cost-effective manufacturing solution. Recurring labor and material costs of the hybrid design are up to 61 percent less than the current technology baseline.

  19. An analytic modeling and system identification study of rotor/fuselage dynamics at hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Steven W.; Curtiss, H. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A combination of analytic modeling and system identification methods have been used to develop an improved dynamic model describing the response of articulated rotor helicopters to control inputs. A high-order linearized model of coupled rotor/body dynamics including flap and lag degrees of freedom and inflow dynamics with literal coefficients is compared to flight test data from single rotor helicopters in the near hover trim condition. The identification problem was formulated using the maximum likelihood function in the time domain. The dynamic model with literal coefficients was used to generate the model states, and the model was parametrized in terms of physical constants of the aircraft rather than the stability derivatives, resulting in a significant reduction in the number of quantities to be identified. The likelihood function was optimized using the genetic algorithm approach. This method proved highly effective in producing an estimated model from flight test data which included coupled fuselage/rotor dynamics. Using this approach it has been shown that blade flexibility is a significant contributing factor to the discrepancies between theory and experiment shown in previous studies. Addition of flexible modes, properly incorporating the constraint due to the lag dampers, results in excellent agreement between flight test and theory, especially in the high frequency range.

  20. Generation of a multi-component aircraft grid system using NGP and Begger

    SciTech Connect

    Lijewski, L.E.; Belk, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    Generation of a multiple component aircraft grid system is presented. A hybrid system of blocked and overset grids axe generated using NGP and overlap communications established with the Beggar code. Techniques for gridding wing-flap and fuselage-flap gap regions axe discussed. Steady-state subsonic flow solutions are presented.

  1. Highly Porous and Compositionally Intermediate Ordinary Chondrite LAP 031047

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, A.; Kring, D. A.; Friedrich, J. M.; Troiano, J.; Macke, R. J.; Britt, D. T.; Swindle, T. D.; Weirich, J. R.; Rumble, D.

    2010-03-01

    LAP 031047 is a highly porous ordinary chondrite with a very young Ar-Ar age, and oxygen isotopic, and bulk and silicate mineral composition intermediate between H- and L-chondrites: Shock-lithified debris of a distinct ordinary chondrite asteroid?

  2. Learning Activity Package, Physical Science 92, LAPs 1-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, G. J.

    This set of nine teacher-prepared Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) for individualized instruction in physical science covers the topics of scientific equipment and procedures; measure of time, length, area, and volume; water; oxygen and oxidation; atmospheric pressure; motion; machines; carbon; and light and sound. Each unit contains a rationale…

  3. Learning Activity Package, Algebra 124, LAPs 46-55.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Bill

    A series of 10 teacher-prepared Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) in advanced algebra and trigonometry, these units cover absolute value, inequalities, exponents, radicals, and complex numbers; functions; higher degree equations and the derivative; the trigonometric functions; graphs and applications of the trigonometric functions; sequences and…

  4. Insights: A LAP on Moles: Teaching an Important Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihde, John

    1985-01-01

    Describes a learning activity packet (LAP) designed to help students understand the basic concept of the mole as a chemical unit; know relationships between the mole and atomic weights in the periodic table; and solve basic conversion problems involving moles, atoms, and molecules. (JN)

  5. Closeup view of the underside of the forward fuselage of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the underside of the forward fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery looking at the nose landing-gear and into the landing-gear well. The vehicle is elevated and supported by jack stands attached to the hoist attach points and the rear External Tank attach points on the propellant disconnect plate assemblies. This photo was taken inside the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  6. Closeup view of the aft fuselage looking forward along the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the aft fuselage looking forward along the approximate centerline of the Orbiter Discovery looking at the expansion nozzles of the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME) and the Orbiter Maneuvering System. Also in the view is the orbiter's body flap with a protective covering over the High-temperature Reusable Surface Insulation tiles on the surface facing the SSMEs. This image was taken inside the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  7. Closeup view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery on the starboard side looking forward. This view is of the attach surface for the Orbiter Maneuvering System/Reaction Control System (OMS/RCS) Pod. The OMS/RCS pods are removed for processing and reconditioning at another facility. This view was taken from a service platform in the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  8. Probabilistic evaluation of fuselage-type composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael C.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology is developed to computationally simulate the uncertain behavior of composite structures. The uncertain behavior includes buckling loads, natural frequencies, displacements, stress/strain etc., which are the consequences of the random variation (scatter) of the primitive (independent random) variables in the constituent, ply, laminate and structural levels. This methodology is implemented in the IPACS (Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures) computer code. A fuselage-type composite structure is analyzed to demonstrate the code's capability. The probability distribution functions of the buckling loads, natural frequency, displacement, strain and stress are computed. The sensitivity of each primitive (independent random) variable to a given structural response is also identified from the analyses.

  9. Rapid Parameterization Schemes for Aircraft Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu

    2012-01-01

    A rapid shape parameterization tool called PROTEUS is developed for aircraft shape optimization. This tool can be applied directly to any aircraft geometry that has been defined in PLOT3D format, with the restriction that each aircraft component must be defined by only one data block. PROTEUS has eight types of parameterization schemes: planform, wing surface, twist, body surface, body scaling, body camber line, shifting/scaling, and linear morphing. These parametric schemes can be applied to two types of components: wing-type surfaces (e.g., wing, canard, horizontal tail, vertical tail, and pylon) and body-type surfaces (e.g., fuselage, pod, and nacelle). These schemes permit the easy setup of commonly used shape modification methods, and each customized parametric scheme can be applied to the same type of component for any configuration. This paper explains the mathematics for these parametric schemes and uses two supersonic configurations to demonstrate the application of these schemes.

  10. Preliminary measurement of the noise from the 2/9 scale model of the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller, SR-7A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Noise data on the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller model SR-7A were taken into the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel. The maximum blade passing tone decreases from the peak level when going to higher helical tip Mach numbers. This noise reduction points to the use of higher propeller speeds as a possible method to reduce airplane cabin noise while maintaining high flight speed and efficiency. Comparison of the SR-7A blade passing noise with the noise of the similarly designed SR-3 propeller shows good agreement as expected. The SR-7A propeller is slightly noisier than the SR-3 model in the plane of rotation at the cruise condition. Projections of the tunnel model data are made to the full-scale LAP propeller mounted on the test bed aircraft and compared with design predictions. The prediction method is conservative in the sense that it overpredicts the projected model data.

  11. Cruise noise of the 2/9 scale model of the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller, SR-7A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Stang, David B.

    1987-10-01

    Noise data on the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller model SR-7A were taken in the NASA Lewis Research Center 8 x 6 foot Wind Tunnel. The maximum blade passing tone noise first rises with increasing helical tip Mach number to a peak level, then remains the same or decreases from its peak level when going to higher helical tip Mach numbers. This trend was observed for operation at both constant advance ratio and approximately equal thrust. This noise reduction or, leveling out at high helical tip Mach numbers, points to the use of higher propeller tip speeds as a possible method to limit airplane cabin noise while maintaining high flight speed and efficiency. Projections of the tunnel model data are made to the full scale LAP propeller mounted on the test bed aircraft and compared with predictions. The prediction method is found to be somewhat conservative in that it slightly overpredicts the projected model data at the peak.

  12. Cruise noise of the 2/9 scale model of the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller, SR-7A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Stang, David B.

    1987-01-01

    Noise data on the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller model SR-7A were taken in the NASA Lewis Research Center 8 x 6 foot Wind Tunnel. The maximum blade passing tone noise first rises with increasing helical tip Mach number to a peak level, then remains the same or decreases from its peak level when going to higher helical tip Mach numbers. This trend was observed for operation at both constant advance ratio and approximately equal thrust. This noise reduction or, leveling out at high helical tip Mach numbers, points to the use of higher propeller tip speeds as a possible method to limit airplane cabin noise while maintaining high flight speed and efficiency. Projections of the tunnel model data are made to the full scale LAP propeller mounted on the test bed aircraft and compared with predictions. The prediction method is found to be somewhat conservative in that it slightly overpredicts the projected model data at the peak.

  13. Cruise noise of the 2/9th scale model of the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller, SR-7A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Stang, David B.

    1987-01-01

    Noise data on the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller model SR-7A were taken in the NASA Lewis Research Center 8 x 6 foot Wind Tunnel. The maximum blade passing tone noise first rises with increasing helical tip Mach number to a peak level, then remains the same or decreases from its peak level when going to higher helical tip Mach numbers. This trend was observed for operation at both constant advance ratio and approximately equal thrust. This noise reduction or, leveling out at high helical tip Mach numbers, points to the use of higher propeller tip speeds as a possible method to limit airplane cabin noise while maintaining high flight speed and efficiency. Projections of the tunnel model data are made to the full scale LAP propeller mounted on the test bed aircraft and compared with predictions. The prediction method is found to be somewhat conservative in that it slightly overpredicts the projected model data at the peak.

  14. Preliminary measurement of the noise from the 2/9 scale model of the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller, SR-7A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, J. H.

    1985-09-01

    Noise data on the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller model SR-7A were taken into the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel. The maximum blade passing tone decreases from the peak level when going to higher helical tip Mach numbers. This noise reduction points to the use of higher propeller speeds as a possible method to reduce airplane cabin noise while maintaining high flight speed and efficiency. Comparison of the SR-7A blade passing noise with the noise of the similarly designed SR-3 propeller shows good agreement as expected. The SR-7A propeller is slightly noisier than the SR-3 model in the plane of rotation at the cruise condition. Projections of the tunnel model data are made to the full-scale LAP propeller mounted on the test bed aircraft and compared with design predictions. The prediction method is conservative in the sense that it overpredicts the projected model data.

  15. Cruise noise of the 2/9th scale model of the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller, SR-7A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Stang, David B.

    1987-09-01

    Noise data on the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller model SR-7A were taken in the NASA Lewis Research Center 8 x 6 foot Wind Tunnel. The maximum blade passing tone noise first rises with increasing helical tip Mach number to a peak level, then remains the same or decreases from its peak level when going to higher helical tip Mach numbers. This trend was observed for operation at both constant advance ratio and approximately equal thrust. This noise reduction or, leveling out at high helical tip Mach numbers, points to the use of higher propeller tip speeds as a possible method to limit airplane cabin noise while maintaining high flight speed and efficiency. Projections of the tunnel model data are made to the full scale LAP propeller mounted on the test bed aircraft and compared with predictions. The prediction method is found to be somewhat conservative in that it slightly overpredicts the projected model data at the peak.

  16. Grid generation on and about a cranked-wing fighter aircraft configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert E.; Pitts, Joan I.; Eriksson, Lars-Erik; Wiese, Michael R.

    1988-01-01

    Experiences at the NASA Langley Research Center generating grids about a cranked wing fighter aircraft configuration is described. A single block planar grid about the fuselage and canard used with a finite difference Navier-Stokes solver is also described. A dual block nonplanar grid about the complete configuration and used with a finite volume Euler solver is presented. The very important aspect of computing the aircraft surface grid, starting with a standardized model description, is also presented.

  17. Dynamic deformation measurement and analysis of active stressed lap using optical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qican; Su, Xianyu; Liu, Yuankun; Xiang, Liqun

    2007-12-01

    The active stressed lap is the heart of polishing process. A novel non-contact optical method of dynamic deformation measurement and analysis of an active stressed lap is put forward. This method, based on structured illumination, is able to record full-field information of the bending and rotating stressed lap dynamically and continuously, while its profile is changed under computer control, and restore the whole process of lap deformation varied with time at different position and rotating angle. It has been verified by experiments that this proposed method will be helpful to the opticians to ensure the stressed lap as expected.

  18. Behavior Of Aircraft Components Under Crash-Type Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, Huey D.; Boitnott, Richard L.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    1993-01-01

    Report presents overview of research involving use of concepts of aircraft elements and substructures not necessarily designed or optimized with respect to energy-absorption or crash-loading considerations. Experimental and analytical data presented in report indicate some general trends in failure behaviors of class of composite-material structures including individual fuselage frames, skeleton subfloors with stringers and floor beams but without skin covering, and subfloors with skin added to frame/stringer arrangement.

  19. Preliminary design studies of an advanced general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Preliminary design studies are presented for an advanced general aviation aircraft. Advanced guidance and display concepts, laminar flow, smart structures, fuselage and wing structural design and manufacturing, and preliminary configuration design are discussed. This project was conducted as a graduate level design class under the auspices of the KU/NASA/USRA Advanced Design Program in Aeronautics. The results obtained during the fall semester of 1990 (Phase 1) and the spring semester of 1991 (Phase 2) are presented.

  20. Propeller aircraft interior noise model utilization study and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    Utilization and validation of a computer program designed for aircraft interior noise prediction is considered. The program, entitled PAIN (an acronym for Propeller Aircraft Interior Noise), permits (in theory) predictions of sound levels inside propeller driven aircraft arising from sidewall transmission. The objective of the work reported was to determine the practicality of making predictions for various airplanes and the extent of the program's capabilities. The ultimate purpose was to discern the quality of predictions for tonal levels inside an aircraft occurring at the propeller blade passage frequency and its harmonics. The effort involved three tasks: (1) program validation through comparisons of predictions with scale-model test results; (2) development of utilization schemes for large (full scale) fuselages; and (3) validation through comparisons of predictions with measurements taken in flight tests on a turboprop aircraft. Findings should enable future users of the program to efficiently undertake and correctly interpret predictions.

  1. Numerical Investigation of a Fuselage Boundary Layer Ingestion Propulsion Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Fredericks, William J.; Guynn, Mark D.; Campbell, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, a numerical assessment of the performance of fuselage boundary layer ingestion (BLI) propulsion techniques was conducted. This study is an initial investigation into coupling the aerodynamics of the fuselage with a BLI propulsion system to determine if there is sufficient potential to warrant further investigation of this concept. Numerical simulations of flow around baseline, Boundary Layer Controlled (BLC), and propelled boundary layer controlled airships were performed. Computed results showed good agreement with wind tunnel data and previous numerical studies. Numerical simulations and sensitivity analysis were then conducted on four BLI configurations. The two design variables selected for the parametric study of the new configurations were the inlet area and the inlet to exit area ratio. Current results show that BLI propulsors may offer power savings of up to 85% over the baseline configuration. These interim results include the simplifying assumption that inlet ram drag is negligible and therefore likely overstate the reduction in power. It has been found that inlet ram drag is not negligible and should be included in future analysis.

  2. Helicopter anti-torque system using fuselage strakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Henry L. (Inventor); Wilson, John C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The improvement of the helicopter torque control system is discussed. At low to medium forward speeds helicopter performance is limited by the effectiveness of the means for counteracting main rotor torque and controlling sideslip airloads. These problems may be overcome by mounting strakes on the aft fuselage section. For single rotor helicopters whose main rotor rotates counter-clockwise as viewed from above, one of the strakes would be mounted in the upper lefthand quadrant and the second in the lower left hand quadrant. The strakes alter the air flow around the fuselage by separating the flow so as to produce lateral airloads on the tail boom which oppose main-rotor torque. The upper strake operates in a right crosswind to oppose main rotor torque, and the lower strake has effect in left crosswinds. The novelty of this invention resides in the simple and economical manner in which the helicopter tail boom may be modified by the addition of strakes in order to increase torque control, and reduce the need for supplemental mechanical means of torque control.

  3. Algebraic grid generation about wing-fuselage bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    An algebraic procedure for the generation of boundary-fitted grids about wing-fuselage configurations is presented. A wing-fuselage configuration is specified by cross sections and mathematically represented by Coons' patches. A configuration is divided into sections so that several grid blocks that either adjoin each other or partially overlap each other can be generated. Each grid has six exterior surfaces that map into a computational cube. Grids are first determined on the six boundary surfaces and then in the interior. Grid curves that are on the surface of the configuration are derived from the intersection of planes with the Coons' patch definition. Single-valued functions relating approximate arc lengths along the grid curves to a computational coordinate define the distribution of grid points. The two-boundary technique and transfinite interpolation are used to determine the boundary surface grids that are not on the configuration, and transfinite interpolation with linear blending functions is used to determine the interior grid.

  4. Local design optimization for composite transport fuselage crown panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. D.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Walker, T. H.; Graesser, D.; Tuttle, M.; Zabinsky, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Composite transport fuselage crown panel design and manufacturing plans were optimized to have projected cost and weight savings of 18 percent and 45 percent, respectively. These savings are close to those quoted as overall NASA ACT program goals. Three local optimization tasks were found to influence the cost and weight of fuselage crown panels. This paper summarizes the effect of each task and describes in detail the task associated with a design cost model. Studies were performed to evaluate the relationship between manufacturing cost and design details. A design tool was developed to aid in these investigations. The development of the design tool included combining cost and performance constraints with a random search optimization algorithm. The resulting software was used in a series of optimization studies that evaluated the sensitivity of design variables, guidelines, criteria, and material selection on cost. The effect of blending adjacent design points in a full scale panel subjected to changing load distributions and local variations was shown to be important. Technical issues and directions for future work were identified.

  5. Correlation of AH-1G airframe flight vibration data with a coupled rotor-fuselage analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sangha, K.; Shamie, J.

    1990-01-01

    The formulation and features of the Rotor-Airframe Comprehensive Analysis Program (RACAP) is described. The analysis employs a frequency domain, transfer matrix approach for the blade structural model, a time domain wake or momentum theory aerodynamic model, and impedance matching for rotor-fuselage coupling. The analysis is applied to the AH-1G helicopter, and a correlation study is conducted on fuselage vibration predictions. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the state-of-the-art in helicopter fuselage vibration prediction technology. The fuselage vibration predicted using RACAP are fairly good in the vertical direction and somewhat deficient in the lateral/longitudinal directions. Some of these deficiencies are traced to the fuselage finite element model.

  6. Study on utilization of advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.; Thomson, L. W.; Wilson, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    The potential for utilizing advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports was assessed. Six fuselage design concepts were selected and evaluated in terms of structural performance, weight, and manufacturing development and costs. Two concepts were selected that merit further consideration for composite fuselage application. These concepts are: (1) a full depth honeycomb design with no stringers, and (2) an I section stringer stiffened laminate skin design. Weight reductions due to applying composites to the fuselages of commercial and military transports were calculated. The benefits of applying composites to a fleet of military transports were determined. Significant technology issues pertinent to composite fuselage structures were identified and evaluated. Program plans for resolving the technology issues were developed.

  7. The mechanics and tribology of fretting fatigue with application to riveted lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szolwinski, Matthew Paul

    Fretting is the synergistic combination of wear, corrosion, and fatigue damage mechanisms driven by the partial slip of contacting surfaces. The surface microslip and near-surface contact stresses associated with fretting can lead to severe reduction in service lifetimes of contacting components as diversified as bearings, turbine blades and mechanically-fastened joints, both structural and biological. This tribologically induced degradation has come under close scrutiny by those responsible for maintaining aging fleets of both commercial and military aircraft. Thus a critical need exists for predicting fretting crack nucleation in riveted aluminum. aircraft joints. Fulfilling this need requires characterizing both the near-surface mechanics and intimately-related tribology of fretting. To this end, a well characterized experimental setup has been developed to generate carefully controlled and monitored fretting contacts to investigate the nature of the near-surface conditions. Included in this investigation were in-situ observations of the fretting contact stress field via a non-invasive thermal imaging technique and a characterization of the evolution of friction under partial slip conditions. With specific qualitative and quantitative understanding of these near-surface conditions, a series of fretting fatigue experiments have been conducted to validate a mechanics-based model for predicting fretting fatigue crack nucleation. Finally, efforts have been directed toward extending this understanding of fretting crack nucleation to riveted aircraft structure through modeling of the riveting process and a related experimental program designed to link riveting process parameters and fretting damage in single-lap joint structures. This work focuses specifically on determination of the residual stresses induced during rivet installation and the morphological characterization of fretting fatigue damage in the riveted test specimens manufactured under controlled

  8. Material characterization of structural adhesives in the lap shear mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sancaktar, E.; Schenck, S. C.

    1983-01-01

    A general method for characterizing structual adhesives in the bonded lap shear mode is proposed. Two approaches in the form of semiempirical and theoretical approaches are used. The semiempirical approach includes Ludwik's and Zhurkov's equations to describe respectively, the failure stresses in the constant strain rate and constant stress loading modes with the inclusion of the temperature effects. The theoretical approach is used to describe adhesive shear stress-strain behavior with the use of viscoelastic or nonlinear elastic constitutive equations. Two different model adhesives are used in the single lap shear mode with titanium adherends. These adhesives (one of which was developed at NASA Langley Research Center) are currently considered by NASA for possible aerospace applications. Use of different model adhesives helps in assessment of the generality of the method.

  9. Analytical and experimental investigation of fatigue in lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Daniel V.; Chih-Chien, Chia; Derber, Thomas G.

    A finite element model is presented that can simulate crack growth in layered structures such as lap joints. The layers can be joined either by rivets or adhesives. The crack is represented discretely in the mesh, and automatic remeshing is performed as the crack grows. Because of the connections between the layers, load is transferred to the uncracked layer as the crack grows. This reduces the stress intensity and slows the crack growth rate. The model is used to analyze tests performed on a section of a wing spanwise lap joint. The crack was initiated at a rivet and grown under constant amplitude cyclic loads. Both experimentally observed crack growth rates and the analysis show the retardation that occurs as a result of load transfer between layers. A good correlation is obtained between predicted and observed crack growth rates for the fullly developed through-thickness crack.

  10. FRICTION-STIR-LAP-WELDS OF AA6111 ALUMINUM ALLOY

    SciTech Connect

    Yadava, Manasij; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Chen, Y. L.; Gayden, X.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2007-01-09

    Lap joints of 1 mm thick AA6111 aluminum sheets were made by friction stir welding, using robotic and conventional machines. Welds were made for advancing as well as retreating side loading. Thinning in welds was quantified. Lap shear test of welds was conducted in as-welded and paint-baked conditions. Conventional machine welds showed less thinning and better strength than robotic machine welds. Process forces in conventional machine welding were higher. Paint bake treatment improved the weld strength; but the improvement varied with process parameters. Advancing side loaded welds achieved higher strength than the retreating side loaded welds. Fracture location was found to occur on the loaded side of the weld and along the thinning defect.

  11. Aircraft wing structure detail design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, Garrett L.; Roberts, Ron; Mallon, Bob; Alameri, Mohamed; Steinbach, Bill

    1993-01-01

    The provisions of this project call for the design of the structure of the wing and carry-through structure for the Viper primary trainer, which is to be certified as a utility category trainer under FAR part 23. The specific items to be designed in this statement of work were Front Spar, Rear Spar, Aileron Structure, Wing Skin, and Fuselage Carry-through Structure. In the design of these parts, provisions for the fuel system, electrical system, and control routing were required. Also, the total weight of the entire wing planform could not exceed 216 lbs. Since this aircraft is to be used as a primary trainer, and the SOW requires a useful life of 107 cycles, it was decided that all of the principle stresses in the structural members would be kept below 10 ksi. The only drawback to this approach is a weight penalty.

  12. Chronic Mammalian Toxicological Effects of LAP (Load, Assemble, and Pack).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    samples were extracted and cleaned up according to official AOAC methods .- The extracts were analyzed for chlorinated organic *; pesticides using glass...Weight Variation From Control Males . . .... 54 4. Percent Body Weight Variation From Control Females .. ...... 55 . 6 *%1% 6? LIST OF TABLES 1. Pesticides...corn oil with acetone added and removed in the same manner as for the LAP samples. Stability studies using this method showed that diets mixed once every

  13. Nonlinear Analysis of Bonded Composite Tubular Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oterkus, E.; Madenci, E.; Smeltzer, S. S., III; Ambur, D. R.

    2005-01-01

    The present study describes a semi-analytical solution method for predicting the geometrically nonlinear response of a bonded composite tubular single-lap joint subjected to general loading conditions. The transverse shear and normal stresses in the adhesive as well as membrane stress resultants and bending moments in the adherends are determined using this method. The method utilizes the principle of virtual work in conjunction with nonlinear thin-shell theory to model the adherends and a cylindrical shear lag model to represent the kinematics of the thin adhesive layer between the adherends. The kinematic boundary conditions are imposed by employing the Lagrange multiplier method. In the solution procedure, the displacement components for the tubular joint are approximated in terms of non-periodic and periodic B-Spline functions in the longitudinal and circumferential directions, respectively. The approach presented herein represents a rapid-solution alternative to the finite element method. The solution method was validated by comparison against a previously considered tubular single-lap joint. The steep variation of both peeling and shearing stresses near the adhesive edges was successfully captured. The applicability of the present method was also demonstrated by considering tubular bonded lap-joints subjected to pure bending and torsion.

  14. Residual Strength Analyses of Riveted Lap-Splice Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, B. R.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to analyze the crack-linkup behavior in riveted-stiffened lap-splice joint panels with small multiple-site damage (MSD) cracks at several adjacent rivet holes. Analyses are based on the STAGS (STructural Analysis of General Shells) code with the critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. To account for high constraint around a crack front, the "plane strain core" option in STAGS was used. The importance of modeling rivet flexibility with fastener elements that accurately model load transfer across the joint is discussed. Fastener holes are not modeled but rivet connectivity is accounted for by attaching rivets to the sheet on one side of the cracks that simulated both the rivet diameter and MSD cracks. Residual strength analyses made on 2024-T3 alloy (1.6-mm thick) riveted-lap-splice joints with a lead crack and various size MSD cracks were compared with test data from Boeing Airplane Company. Analyses were conducted for both restrained and unrestrained buckling conditions. Comparison of results from these analyses and results from lap-splice-joint test panels, which were partially restrained against buckling indicate that the test results were bounded by the failure loads predicted by the analyses with restrained and unrestrained conditions.

  15. Investigation into Interface Lifting Within FSW Lap Welds

    SciTech Connect

    K. S. Miller; C. R. Tolle; D. E. Clark; C. I. Nichol; T. R. McJunkin; H. B. Smartt

    2008-06-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is rapidly penetrating the welding market in many materials and applications, particularly in aluminum alloys for transportation applications. As this expansion outside the research laboratory continues, fitness for service issues will arise, and process control and NDE methods will become important determinants of continued growth. The present paper describes research into FSW weld nugget flaw detection within aluminum alloy lap welds. We present results for two types of FSW tool designs: a smooth pin tool and a threaded pin tool. We show that under certain process parameters (as monitored during welding with a rotating dynamometer that measures x, y, z, and torque forces) and tooling designs, FSW lap welds allow significant nonbonded interface lifting of the lap joint, while forming a metallurgical bond only within the pin region of the weld nugget. These lifted joints are often held very tightly together even though unbonded, and might be expected to pass cursory NDE while representing a substantial compromise in joint mechanical properties. The phenomenon is investigated here via radiographic and ultrasonic NDE techniques, with a copper foil marking insert (as described elsewhere) and by the tensile testing of joints. As one would expect, these results show that tool design and process parameters significantly affect plactic flow and this lifted interface. NDE and mechanical strength ramifications of this defect are discussed.

  16. Closeup oblique view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up oblique view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery looking forward and starboard as the last Space Shuttle Main Engine is being removed, it can be seen on the right side of the image frame. Note that one of the Orbiter Maneuvering System/ Reaction Control System has been removed while one of them remains. Also note that the body flap, below the engine positions has a protective covering to prevent damage to the High-temperature Reusable Surface Insulation tiles. This image was taken inside the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  17. Closeup oblique view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up oblique view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery looking forward and port as the last Space Shuttle Main Engine is being removed, it can be seen on the left side of the image frame. Note that one of the Orbiter Maneuvering System/ Reaction Control System has been removed while one of them remains. Also note that the body flap, below the engine positions has a protective covering to prevent damage to the High-temperature Reusable Surface Insulation tiles. This image was taken inside the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  18. Noise transmission characteristics of a large scale composite fuselage model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyer, Todd B.; Silcox, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    Results from an experimental test undertaken to study the basic noise transmission characteristics of a realistic, built-up composite fuselage model are presented. The floor-equipped stiffened composite cylinder was exposed to a number of different exterior noise source configurations in a large anechoic chamber. These exterior source configurations included two point sources located in the same plane on opposite sides of the cylinder, a single point source and a propeller simulator. The results indicate that the interior source field is affected strongly by exterior noise source phasing. Sidewall treatment is seen to reduce the overall interior sound pressure levels and dampen dominant acoustic resonances so that other acoustic modes can affect interior noise distribution.

  19. Propeller aircraft interior noise model: User's manual for computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilby, E. G.; Pope, L. D.

    1985-01-01

    A computer program entitled PAIN (Propeller Aircraft Interior Noise) has been developed to permit calculation of the sound levels in the cabin of a propeller-driven airplane. The fuselage is modeled as a cylinder with a structurally integral floor, the cabin sidewall and floor being stiffened by ring frames, stringers and floor beams of arbitrary configurations. The cabin interior is covered with acoustic treatment and trim. The propeller noise consists of a series of tones at harmonics of the blade passage frequency. Input data required by the program include the mechanical and acoustical properties of the fuselage structure and sidewall trim. Also, the precise propeller noise signature must be defined on a grid that lies in the fuselage skin. The propeller data are generated with a propeller noise prediction program such as the NASA Langley ANOPP program. The program PAIN permits the calculation of the space-average interior sound levels for the first ten harmonics of a propeller rotating alongside the fuselage. User instructions for PAIN are given in the report. Development of the analytical model is presented in NASA CR 3813.

  20. Inadequate harnesses as a cause of death in two light aircraft accidents.

    PubMed

    Hill, I R

    1980-09-01

    In the two accidents described, both fatalities occurred because the victims were wearing only lap belts. One of the victims was piloting an aircraft. These were survivable aircraft accidents and illustrate the inadequacy of this type of harness. Recently promulgated legislation in the United Kingdom should mean that front seat incidents of this nature will become a rarity. The dangers will still exist for those in rear passenger seats, however, because they are not covered by the new laws.

  1. Identifying Combination of Friction Stir Welding Parameters to Maximize Strength of Lap Joints of AA2014-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendrana, C.; Srinivasan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Balaji, H.; Selvaraj, P.

    2017-01-01

    AA2014 aluminum alloy (Al-Cu alloy) has been widely utilized in fabrication of lightweight structures like aircraft structures, demanding high strength to weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. The fusion welding of these alloys will lead to solidification problems such as hot cracking. Friction stir welding is a new solid state welding process, in which the material being welded does not melt and recast. Lot of research works have been carried out by many researchers to optimize process parameters and establish empirical relationships to predict tensile strength of friction stir welded butt joints of aluminum alloys. However, very few investigations have been carried out on friction stir welded lap joints of aluminum alloys. Hence, in this investigation, an attempt has been made to optimize friction stir lap welding (FSLW) parameters to attain maximum tensile strength using statistical tools such as design of experiment (DoE), analysis of variance (ANOVA), response graph and contour plots. By this method, it is found that maximum tensile shear fracture load of 12.76 kN can be achieved if a joint is made using tool rotational speed of 900 rpm, welding speed of 110 mm/min, tool shoulder diameter of 12 mm and tool tilt angle of 1.5°.

  2. Consideration of some factors affecting low-frequency fuselage noise transmission for propeller aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, J. S.; Roussos, L. A.

    1986-01-01

    Possible reasons for disagreement between measured and predicted trends of sidewall noise transmission at low frequency are investigated using simplified analysis methods. An analytical model combining incident plane acoustic waves with an infinite flat panel is used to study the effects of sound incidence angle, plate structural properties, frequency, absorption, and the difference between noise reduction and transmission loss. Analysis shows that these factors have significant effects on noise transmission but they do not account for the differences between measured and predicted trends at low frequencies. An analytical model combining an infinite flat plate with a normally incident acoustic wave having exponentially decaying magnitude along one coordinate is used to study the effect of a localized source distribution such as is associated with propeller noise. Results show that the localization brings the predicted low-frequency trend of noise transmission into better agreement with measured propeller results. This effect is independent of low-frequency stiffness effects that have been previously reported to be associated with boundary conditions.

  3. Assembly of lipopolysaccharide in Escherichia coli requires the essential LapB heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Klein, Gracjana; Kobylak, Natalia; Lindner, Buko; Stupak, Anna; Raina, Satish

    2014-05-23

    Here, we describe two new heat shock proteins involved in the assembly of LPS in Escherichia coli, LapA and LapB (lipopolysaccharide assembly protein A and B). lapB mutants were identified based on an increased envelope stress response. Envelope stress-responsive pathways control key steps in LPS biogenesis and respond to defects in the LPS assembly. Accordingly, the LPS content in ΔlapB or Δ(lapA lapB) mutants was elevated, with an enrichment of LPS derivatives with truncations in the core region, some of which were pentaacylated and exhibited carbon chain polymorphism. Further, the levels of LpxC, the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of lipid A synthesis, were highly elevated in the Δ(lapA lapB) mutant. Δ(lapA lapB) mutant accumulated extragenic suppressors that mapped either to lpxC, waaC, and gmhA, or to the waaQ operon (LPS biosynthesis) and lpp (Braun's lipoprotein). Increased synthesis of either FabZ (3-R-hydroxymyristoyl acyl carrier protein dehydratase), slrA (novel RpoE-regulated non-coding sRNA), lipoprotein YceK, toxin HicA, or MurA (UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase) suppressed some of the Δ(lapA lapB) defects. LapB contains six tetratricopeptide repeats and, at the C-terminal end, a rubredoxin-like domain that was found to be essential for its activity. In pull-down experiments, LapA and LapB co-purified with LPS, Lpt proteins, FtsH (protease), DnaK, and DnaJ (chaperones). A specific interaction was also observed between WaaC and LapB. Our data suggest that LapB coordinates assembly of proteins involved in LPS synthesis at the plasma membrane and regulates turnover of LpxC, thereby ensuring balanced biosynthesis of LPS and phospholipids consistent with its essentiality.

  4. Full-scale flammability test data for validation of aircraft fire mathematical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuminecz, J. F.; Bricker, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-five large scale aircraft flammability tests were conducted in a Boeing 737 fuselage at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The objective of this test program was to provide a data base on the propagation of large scale aircraft fires to support the validation of aircraft fire mathematical models. Variables in the test program included cabin volume, amount of fuel, fuel pan area, fire location, airflow rate, and cabin materials. A number of tests were conducted with jet A-1 fuel only, while others were conducted with various Boeing 747 type cabin materials. These included urethane foam seats, passenger service units, stowage bins, and wall and ceiling panels. Two tests were also included using special urethane foam and polyimide foam seats. Tests were conducted with each cabin material individually, with various combinations of these materials, and finally, with all materials in the cabin. The data include information obtained from approximately 160 locations inside the fuselage.

  5. Interior noise control prediction study for high-speed propeller-driven aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rennison, D. C.; Wilby, J. F.; Marsh, A. H.; Wilby, E. G.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical model was developed to predict the noise levels inside propeller-driven aircraft during cruise at M = 0.8. The model was applied to three study aircraft with fuselages of different size (wide body, narrow body and small diameter) in order to determine the noise reductions required to achieve the goal of an A-weighted sound level which does not exceed 80 dB. The model was then used to determine noise control methods which could achieve the required noise reductions. Two classes of noise control treatments were investigated: add-on treatments which can be added to existing structures, and advanced concepts which would require changes to the fuselage primary structure. Only one treatment, a double wall with limp panel, provided the required noise reductions. Weight penalties associated with the treatment were estimated for the three study aircraft.

  6. Noise-reduction measurements of stiffened and unstiffened cylindrical models of an airplane fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, C. M.; Mayes, W. H.

    1984-01-01

    Noise-reduction measurements are presented for a stiffened and an unstiffened model of an airplane fuselage. The cylindrical models were tested in a reverberant-field noise environment over a frequency range from 20 Hz to 6 kHz. An unstiffened metal fuselage provided more noise reduction than a fuselage having the same sidewall weight divided between skin and stiffening stringers and ring frames. The addition of acoustic insulation to the models tended to smooth out the interior-noise spectrum by reducing or masking the noise associated with the structural response at some of the resonant frequencies.

  7. Crystal structure of XoLAP, a leucine aminopeptidase, from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Kwang; Natarajan, Sampath; Park, Hanseul; Huynh, Kim-Hung; Lee, Sang Hee; Kim, Jeong-Gu; Ahn, Yeh-Jin; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2013-10-01

    Aminopeptidases are metalloproteinases that degrade N-terminal residues from protein and play important roles in cell growth and development by controlling cell homeostasis and protein maturation. We determined the crystal structure of XoLAP, a leucyl aminopeptidase, at 2.6 Å resolution from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, causing the destructive rice disease of bacterial blight. It is the first crystal structure of aminopeptidase from phytopathogens as a drug target. XoLAP existed as a hexamer and the monomer structure consisted of an N-terminal cap domain and a C-terminal peptidase domain with two divalent zinc ions. XoLAP structure was compared with BlLAP and EcLAP (EcPepA) structures. Based on the structural comparison, the molecular model of XoLAP in complex with the natural aminopeptidase inhibitor of microginin FR1 was proposed. The model structure will be useful to develop a novel antibacterial drug against Xoo.

  8. Apparatus and method for lapping an edge surface of an object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossi, Vito N. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus for lapping an edge surface of an object comprises a block having a side adapted to engage a wide surface of an object, adjustable spacers disposed on the block and adapted to engage a lap plate, and a weighted spring disposed on the block for urging the spacers and the object edge surface towards the lap plate. A method for lapping comprises setting surfaces of adjustable spacers disposed on a block to be substantially the same distance from the block, affixing a wide surface of an object to the block, urging an edge surface of the object and the spacers towards a lap plate, lapping the edge of the object, inspecting the edge for parallelism to a reference line, resetting the spacers and relapping the edge surface.

  9. An overview of the crash dynamics failure behavior of metal and composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, Huey D.; Boitnott, Richard L.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jones, Lisa E.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of failure behavior results is presented from some of the crash dynamics research conducted with concepts of aircraft elements and substructure not necessarily designed or optimized for energy absorption or crash loading considerations. Experimental and analytical data are presented that indicate some general trends in the failure behavior of a class of composite structures that includes fuselage panels, individual fuselage sections, fuselage frames, skeleton subfloors with stringers and floor beams without skin covering, and subfloors with skin added to the frame stringer structure. Although the behavior is complex, a strong similarity in the static/dynamic failure behavior among these structures is illustrated through photographs of the experimental results and through analytical data of generic composite structural models.

  10. Interior noise considerations for powered-lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, C. K.

    1975-01-01

    Powered-lift configurations which are currently under development for future use on STOL aircraft involve impingement of the jet engine exhaust onto wing and flap surfaces. Previous studies have suggested that the impinging jet produces higher noise levels at lower frequencies than does the jet alone. These higher levels, together with the close proximity of the engine and flap noise sources to the fuselage sidewall, suggest that the noise levels in these aircraft may be high enough to interfere with passenger comfort. To investigate this possibility, interior noise levels were estimated for both an upper surface blown (USB) and an externally blown flap (EBF) configuration. This paper describes the procedure used to estimate the interior noise levels and compares these levels with levels on existing jet aircraft and on ground transportation vehicles. These estimates indicate high levels in the STOL aircraft; therefore, areas of possible improvements in technology for control of STOL interior noise are also discussed.

  11. Aircraft propeller induced structure-borne noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unruh, James F.

    1989-01-01

    A laboratory-based test apparatus employing components typical of aircraft construction was developed that would allow the study of structure-borne noise transmission due to propeller induced wake/vortex excitation of in-wake structural appendages. The test apparatus was employed to evaluate several aircraft installation effects (power plant placement, engine/nacelle mass loading, and wing/fuselage attachment methods) and several structural response modifications for structure-borne noise control (the use of wing blocking mass/fuel, wing damping treaments, and tuned mechanical dampers). Most important was the development of in-flight structure-borne noise transmission detection techniques using a combination of ground-based frequency response function testing and in-flight structural response measurement. Propeller wake/vortex excitation simulation techniques for improved ground-based testing were also developed to support the in-flight structure-borne noise transmission detection development.

  12. Method of vibration isolating an aircraft engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, Stanley I. (Inventor); Butler, Lawrence (Inventor); Dawes, Peter W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method for coupling an engine to a support frame for mounting to a fuselage of an aircraft using a three point vibration isolating mounting system in which the load reactive forces at each mounting point are statically and dynamically determined. A first vibration isolating mount pivotably couples a first end of an elongated support beam to a stator portion of an engine with the pivoting action of the vibration mount being oriented such that it is pivotable about a line parallel to a center line of the engine. An aft end of the supporting frame is coupled to the engine through an additional pair of vibration isolating mounts with the mounts being oriented such that they are pivotable about a circumference of the engine. The aft mounts are symmetrically spaced to each side of the supporting frame by 45 degrees. The relative orientation between the front mount and the pair of rear mounts is such that only the rear mounts provide load reactive forces parallel to the engine center line, in support of the engine to the aircraft against thrust forces. The forward mount is oriented so as to provide only radial forces to the engine and some lifting forces to maintain the engine in position adjacent a fuselage. Since each mount is connected to provide specific forces to support the engine, forces required of each mount are statically and dynamically determinable.

  13. Experimental effects of fuselage camber on longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a series of wing-fuselage configurations at a Mach number of 1.41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollyhigh, S. M.; Morris, O. A.; Adams, M. S.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate a method for the integration of a fighter-type fuselage with a theoretical wing to preserve desirable wing aerodynamic characteristics for efficient maneuvering. The investigation was conducted by using semispan wing fuselage models mounted on a splitter plate. The models were tested through an angle of attack range at a Mach number of 1.41. The wing had a leading edge sweep angle of 50 deg and an aspect ratio of 2.76; the wing camber surface was designed for minimum drag due to lift and was to be self trimming at a lift coefficient of 0.2 and at a Mach number of 1.40. A series of five fuselages of various camber was tested on the wing.

  14. Evaluation of Pressurization Fatigue Life of 1441 Al-li Fuselage Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, R. Keith; Dicus, Dennis I.; Fridlyander, Joseph; Davydov, Valentin

    1999-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the pressurization fatigue life of fuselage panels with skins fabricated from 1441 Al-Li, an attractive new Russian alloy. The study indicated that 1441 Al-Li has several advantages over conventional aluminum fuselage skin alloy with respect to fatigue behavior. Smooth 1441 Al-Li sheet specimens exhibited a fatigue endurance limit similar to that for 1163 Al (Russian version of 2024 Al) sheet. Notched 1441 Al-Li sheet specimens exhibited greater fatigue strength and longer fatigue life than 1163 Al. In addition, Tu-204 fuselage panels fabricated by Tupolev Design Bureau using Al-Li skin and ring frames with riveted 7000-series aluminum stiffeners had longer pressurization fatigue lives than did panels constructed from conventional aluminum alloys. Taking into account the lower density of this alloy, the results suggest that 1441 Al-Li has the potential to improve fuselage performance while decreasing structural weight.

  15. Coupled rotor-flexible fuselage vibration reduction using open loop higher harmonic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papavassiliou, I.; Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.

    1991-01-01

    A fundamental study of vibration prediction and vibration reduction in helicopters using active controls was performed. The nonlinear equations of motion for a coupled rotor/flexible fuselage system have been derived using computer algebra on a special purpose symbolic computer facility. The trim state and vibratory response of the helicopter are obtained in a single pass by applying the harmonic balance technique and simultaneously satisfying the trim and the vibratory response of the helicopter for all rotor and fuselage degrees of freedom. The influence of the fuselage flexibility on the vibratory response is studied. It is shown that the conventional single frequency higher harmonic control is capable of reducing either the hub loads or only the fuselage vibrations but not both simultaneously. It is demonstrated that for simultaneous reduction of hub shears and fuselae vibrations a new scheme called multiple higher harmonic control is required.

  16. Vertical drop test of a transport fuselage section located forward of the wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. S.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    A Boeing 707 fuselage section was drop tested at the NASA Langley Research Center to measure structural, seat, and occupant response to vertical crack loads. Post-test inspection showed that the section bottom collapsed inward approximately 2 ft. Preliminary data traces indicated maximum normal accelerations of 20 g on the fuselage bottom, 10 to 12 g on the cabin floor, and 6.5 to 8 g in the pelvises of the anthropomorphic dummies.

  17. Wind-Tunnel Tests of a Submerged-Engine Fuselage Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1940-10-01

    pursuit-type fuselage with a practicable internal dust arrangement deralgned to meet all of the air requirements of a 1000-horsepower radial en%ine... radial type, it was de- cided to include two tail outlets in this investigation even though they could obvlouslr not be used ~lth a Pusher. propeller...the bmslo streamline body. 3. Because of the low 10CR1 velocities over the noee shapes tested, the criticnl comprese ~billty speed of the fuselage

  18. Active Aerodynamic Load Reduction on a Rotorcraft Fuselage With Rotor Effects: A CFD Validation Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Schaeffler, Norman W.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Wong, Oliver D.; Tanner, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    A rotorcraft fuselage is typically designed with an emphasis on operational functionality with aerodynamic efficiency being of secondary importance. This results in a significant amount of drag during high-speed forward flight that can be a limiting factor for future high-speed rotorcraft designs. To enable higher speed flight, while maintaining a functional fuselage design (i.e., a large rear cargo ramp door), the NASA Rotary Wing Project has conducted both experimental and computational investigations to assess active flow control as an enabling technology for fuselage drag reduction. This paper will evaluate numerical simulations of a flow control system on a generic rotorcraft fuselage with a rotor in forward flight using OVERFLOW, a structured mesh Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver developed at NASA. The results are compared to fuselage forces, surface pressures, and PN flow field data obtained in a wind tunnel experiment conducted at the NASA Langley 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel where significant drag and download reductions were demonstrated using flow control. This comparison showed that the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver was unable to predict the fuselage forces and pressure measurements on the ramp for the baseline and flow control cases. While the CFD was able to capture the flow features, it was unable to accurately predict the performance of the flow control.

  19. Pressure Distribution Over the Fuselage of a PW-9 Pursuit Airplane in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhode, Richard V; Lundquist, Eugene E

    1932-01-01

    This report presents the results obtained from pressure distribution tests on the fuselage of a PW-9 pursuit airplane in a number of conditions of flight. The investigation was made to determine the contribution of the fuselage to the total lift in conditions considered critical for the wing structure, and also to determine whether the fuselage loads acting simultaneously with the maximum tail loads were of such a character as to be of concern with respect to the structural design of other parts of the airplane. The results show that the contribution of the fuselage toward the total lift is small on this airplane. Aerodynamic loads on the fuselage are, in general, unimportant from the structural viewpoint, and in most cases they are of such character that, if neglected, a conservative design results. In spins, aerodynamic forces on the fuselage produce diving moments of appreciable magnitude and yawing moments of small magnitude, but opposing the rotation of the airplane. A table of cowling pressures for various maneuvers is included in the report.

  20. Progressive damage in single lap countersunk composite joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chishti, Maajid; Wang, Chun Hui; Thomson, Rodney S.; Orifici, Adrian

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental and computational investigation of the influences of countersink and bolt torque on the progressive failure of single-lap composite joint. Using the Abaqus® software, delamination damage and ply fracture are modelled using cohesive element approach and continuum damage mechanics method, respectively. The model is first validated against a filled-hole tension test to calibrate the composite damage model. Comparison with the experimental results indicates that the computational model is capable of accurately predicting the joint strength and the damage progression process.

  1. Micro topography of different material surface by solid abrasive lapped at high speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Chunlin; Yang, Jiandong; Fan, Jingfeng; Zhou, Huawen

    2007-12-01

    The principle of solid abrasives lapping is that the abrasives are fixed and made into a special lapping tool; the workpiece is lapped in high speed lapping machine tool. It possesses many advantages compared with traditional low speed lapping with particulate abrasives, e.g. high machining efficiency, low machining cost, high and stable machining accuracy. So the highly efficient lapping method has been paid close attention to. This paper made a study on surface micro topography of different material by solid abrasive lapped at high speed. In experiments the lapping technique parameter is fixed, and different workpiece which are made by T10 steel, carbide, ceramic glass and alumina ceramics are lapped. The surface micro topography is measured by SEM, from the measuring result, it can be known that there is some shallow scribe on the surface of T10 steel, and the obvious plastic deformation can be observed. The SEM pictures show that there is some scribe on the surface of ceramics glass after lapped, with more magnification times many micro cracking and some plastic hump can be observed on the scribe. These scribes and humps are first cause of depressing surface quality, and these micro cracking can result in a lot of diffuse reflection on workpiece surface, it decreases the glossiness of mirror surface. On the surface of alumina ceramics there are a lot of defects, the size of such defect is more than the scribe of abrasive, it can be sure that the defect is not produced by lapping, so the material quality is an important effect fact to surface macro topography. On the surface of carbide there are a little of scribe and air cavity, and the scribe is very shallow; the defect of powder metallurgy martial is the primary reason.

  2. Deep-Stall Aerodynamic Characteristics of T-Tail Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Robert T.; Ray, Edward J.

    1965-01-01

    A wind-tunnel research program has been under-taken by the NASA to study the aerodynamic characteristics of T-tail aircraft at high angles of attack. The program was designed to show the effects on longitudinal stability and control of several configuration variables. The results to date do not allow the formulation of general design rules, but the effects of several configuration variables have been noted to have a prime influence on the post-stall characteristics. An increase in tail size, changes in the location of fuselage-mounted engine nacelles, and reduced fuselage-forebody lift were all found to have a beneficial effect on static longitudinal stability at high angles of attack.

  3. Interference drag in a simulated wing-fuselage juncture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubendran, L. R.; Mcmahon, H.; Hubbartt, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    The interference drag in a wing fuselage juncture as simulated by a flat plate and a body of constant thickness having a 1.5:1 elliptical leading edge is evaluated experimentally. The experimental measurements consist of mean velocity data taken with a hot wire at a streamwise location corresponding to 16 body widths downstream of the body leading edge. From these data, the interference drag is determined by calculating the total momentum deficit (momentum area) in the juncture and also in the two dimensional turbulent boundary layers on the flat plate and body at locations sufficiently far from the juncture flow effect. The interference drag caused by the juncture drag as measured at this particular streamwise station is -3% of the total drag due to the flat plate and body boundary layers in isolation. If the body is considered to be a wing having a chord and span equal to 16 body widths, the interference drag due to the juncture is only -1% of the frictional drag of one surface of such a wing.

  4. Closeup view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery looking at the thrust structure that supports the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs). In this view, SSME number two position is on the left and SSME number three position is on the right. The thrust structure transfers the forces produce by the engines into and through the airframe of the orbiter. The thrust structure includes the SSMEs load reaction truss structure, engine interface fittings and the hydraulic-actuator support structure. The propellant feed lines are the plugged and capped orifices within the engine bays. Note that SSME position two is rotated ninety degrees from position three and one. This was needed to enable enough clearance for the engines to fit and gimbal. Note in engine bay three is a clear view of the actuators that control the gambling of that engine. This view was taken from a service platform in the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  5. Flying qualities and control system characteristics for superaugmented aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, T. T.; Mcruer, D. T.; Johnston, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    Aircraft-alone dynamics and superaugmented control system fundamental regulatory properties including stability and regulatory responses of the basic closed-loop systems; fundamental high and low frequency margins and governing factors; and sensitivity to aircraft and controller parameters are addressed. Alternative FCS mechanizations, and mechanizational side effects are also discussed. An overview of flying qualities considerations encompasses general pilot operations as a controller in unattended, intermittent and trim, and full-attention regulatory or command control; effective vehicle primary and secondary response properties to pilot inputs and disturbances; pilot control architectural possibilities; and comparison of superaugmented and conventional aircraft path responses for different forms of pilot control. Results of a simple experimental investigation into pilot dynamic behavior in attitude control of superaugmented aircraft configurations with high frequency time laps and time delays are presented.

  6. Development of Textile Reinforced Composites for Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. Benson

    1998-01-01

    NASA has been a leader in development of composite materials for aircraft applications during the past 25 years. In the early 1980's NASA and others conducted research to improve damage tolerance of composite structures through the use of toughened resins but these resins were not cost-effective. The aircraft industry wanted affordable, robust structures that could withstand the rigors of flight service with minimal damage. The cost and damage tolerance barriers of conventional laminated composites led NASA to focus on new concepts in composites which would incorporate the automated manufacturing methods of the textiles industry and which would incorporate through-the-thickness reinforcements. The NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program provided the resources to extensively investigate the application of textile processes to next generation aircraft wing and fuselage structures. This paper discusses advanced textile material forms that have been developed, innovative machine concepts and key technology advancements required for future application of textile reinforced composites in commercial transport aircraft. Multiaxial warp knitting, triaxial braiding and through-the-thickness stitching are the three textile processes that have surfaced as the most promising for further development. Textile reinforced composite structural elements that have been developed in the NASA ACT Program are discussed. Included are braided fuselage frames and window-belt reinforcements, woven/stitched lower fuselage side panels, stitched multiaxial warp knit wing skins, and braided wing stiffeners. In addition, low-cost processing concepts such as resin transfer molding (RTM), resin film infusion (RFI), and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) are discussed. Process modeling concepts to predict resin flow and cure in textile preforms are also discussed.

  7. LAP (NF-IL-6), a tissue-specific transcriptional activator, is an inhibitor of hepatoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Buck, M; Turler, H; Chojkier, M

    1994-01-01

    During postnatal liver development, LAP (NF-IL-6, C/EBP beta) expression and hepatocyte proliferation are mutually exclusive. In addition to transactivating liver-specific genes, LAP, but not C/EBP alpha, arrests the cell cycle before the G1/S boundary in hepatoma cells. LIP, a liver-inhibitory protein, which is translated from LAP mRNA lacking the activation domain of LAP, is not only ineffective in blocking hepatoma cell proliferation but also antagonizes the effect of LAP on the cell cycle. Deletion analysis indicated that this effect of LIP required only the DNA-binding and leucine zipper domains. In addition we found that integrity of the LAP dimerization and activation domains is indispensable for the arrest of cell proliferation induced by LAP. Thus, hepatocyte differentiation and its characteristic quiescent state may be modulated by the LAP/LIP ratio. Images PMID:7906646

  8. Analysis of the ’Joggle-Lap’ Joint for Automotive Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    An analytical model is developed to describe the response of the ’ joggle -lap’ joint to both tensile and bending loads. The model consists of a non...8217 joggle -lap’ joint due to tensile loads was verified through experimental testing and ultimate loads were accurately predicted within experimental error

  9. Machine Shop I. Learning Activity Packets (LAPs). Section B--Basic and Related Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains eight learning activity packets (LAPs) for the "basic and related technology" instructional area of a Machine Shop I course. The eight LAPs cover the following topics: basic mathematics, blueprints, rules, micrometer measuring tools, Vernier measuring tools, dial indicators, gaging and inspection tools, and…

  10. Nonlinear Analysis of Bonded Composite Single-LAP Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oterkus, E.; Barut, A.; Madenci, E.; Smeltzer, S. S.; Ambur, D. R.

    2004-01-01

    This study presents a semi-analytical solution method to analyze the geometrically nonlinear response of bonded composite single-lap joints with tapered adherend edges under uniaxial tension. The solution method provides the transverse shear and normal stresses in the adhesive and in-plane stress resultants and bending moments in the adherends. The method utilizes the principle of virtual work in conjunction with von Karman s nonlinear plate theory to model the adherends and the shear lag model to represent the kinematics of the thin adhesive layer between the adherends. Furthermore, the method accounts for the bilinear elastic material behavior of the adhesive while maintaining a linear stress-strain relationship in the adherends. In order to account for the stiffness changes due to thickness variation of the adherends along the tapered edges, their in-plane and bending stiffness matrices are varied as a function of thickness along the tapered region. The combination of these complexities results in a system of nonlinear governing equilibrium equations. This approach represents a computationally efficient alternative to finite element method. Comparisons are made with corresponding results obtained from finite-element analysis. The results confirm the validity of the solution method. The numerical results present the effects of taper angle, adherend overlap length, and the bilinear adhesive material on the stress fields in the adherends, as well as the adhesive, of a single-lap joint

  11. Ultrasonic guided wave inspection of Inconel 625 brazed lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comot, Pierre; Bocher, Philippe; Belanger, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The aerospace industry has been investigating the use of brazing for structural joints, as a mean of reducing cost and weight. There therefore is a need for a rapid, robust, and cost-effective non-destructive testing method for evaluating the structural integrity of the joints. The mechanical strength of brazed joints depends mainly on the amount of brittle phases in their microstructure. Ultrasonic guided waves offer the possibility of detecting brittle phases in joints using spatio-temporal measurements. Moreover, they offer the opportunity to inspect complex shape joints. This study focused on the development of a technique based on ultrasonic guided waves for the inspection of Inconel 625 lap joints brazed with BNi-2 filler metal. A finite element model of a lap joint was used to optimize the inspection parameters and assess the feasibility of detecting the amount of brittle phases in the joint. A finite element parametric study simulating the input signal shape, the center frequency, and the excitation direction was performed. The simulations showed that the ultrasonic guided wave energy transmitted through, and reflected from, the joints was proportional to the amount of brittle phases in the joint.

  12. Edge effect modeling and experiments on active lap processing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haitao; Wu, Fan; Zeng, Zhige; Fan, Bin; Wan, Yongjian

    2014-05-05

    Edge effect is regarded as one of the most difficult technical issues for fabricating large primary mirrors, especially for large polishing tools. Computer controlled active lap (CCAL) uses a large size pad (e.g., 1/3 to 1/5 workpiece diameters) to grind and polish the primary mirror. Edge effect also exists in the CCAL process in our previous fabrication. In this paper the material removal rules when edge effects happen (i.e. edge tool influence functions (TIFs)) are obtained through experiments, which are carried out on a Φ1090-mm circular flat mirror with a 375-mm-diameter lap. Two methods are proposed to model the edge TIFs for CCAL. One is adopting the pressure distribution which is calculated based on the finite element analysis method. The other is building up a parametric equivalent pressure model to fit the removed material curve directly. Experimental results show that these two methods both effectively model the edge TIF of CCAL.

  13. Lap Shear Testing of Candidate Radiator Panel Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David; Briggs, Maxwell; McGowan, Randy

    2013-01-01

    During testing of a subscale radiator section used to develop manufacturing techniques for a full-scale radiator panel, the adhesive bonds between the titanium heat pipes and the aluminum face sheets failed during installation and operation. Analysis revealed that the thermal expansion mismatch between the two metals resulted in relatively large shear stresses being developed even when operating the radiator at moderate temperatures. Lap shear testing of the adhesive used in the original joints demonstrated that the two-part epoxy adhesive fell far short of the strength required. A literature review resulted in several candidate adhesives being selected for lap shear joint testing at room temperature and 398 K, the nominal radiator operating temperature. The results showed that two-part epoxies cured at room and elevated temperatures generally did not perform well. Epoxy film adhesives cured at elevated temperatures, on the other hand, did very well with most being sufficiently strong to cause yielding in the titanium sheet used for the joints. The use of an epoxy primer generally improved the strength of the joint. Based upon these results, a new adhesive was selected for the second subscale radiator section.

  14. Chaotic and ambient vibration analysis of composite lap joint damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecora, Lou; Nichols, Jon; Seaver, Mark; Trickey, Steve; Motley, Sara

    2007-04-01

    We examined strain time series from fiber Bragg gratings sensors located in various positions on a composite material beam attached to a steel plate by a lap joint. The beam was vibrated using both broad-band chaotic signals (Lorenz system), and a narrow band signal conforming to the Pierson-Moskowitz frequency distribution for wave height (ambient excitation). The system was damaged by decreasing the torque on instrumented bolts in the lap joint from very tight all the way through to a joint with a gap and slippage. We analyzed the strain data by reconstructing the attractor of the system in the case of chaotic forcing and a pseudo-attractor in the case of sea-wave forcing. Using the highest torque case as an "undamaged" baseline, we calculated the continuity statistic between the baseline attractor and the attractors of the various damage levels for both forcing cases. We show where one can and cannot say that the functional relationship between the attractors changes and how those changes are related to damage levels.

  15. Behavioral comparison of sucrose and l-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4) tastes in rats: does L-AP4 have a sweet taste?

    PubMed

    Eschle, B K; Eddy, M C; Spang, C H; Delay, E R

    2008-08-13

    Even though it is generally thought that umami stimuli such as monosodium glutamate (MSG) and sweet stimuli such as sucrose are detected by different taste receptors, these stimuli appear to share taste qualities when amiloride (a sodium channel blocker) is present to reduce the sodium taste. Single fiber recording studies of the facial and glossopharyngeal nerves have shown that encoding of L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4), a potent mGluR4 agonist that elicits a taste quite similar to MSG, may occur in the same fibers that also encode sweet stimuli. This suggests that L-AP4 and sweet substances may activate common receptors or afferent signaling mechanisms. We report results of behavioral experiments that test this hypothesis. In the first study, rats conditioned to avoid sucrose or L-AP4 generalized the aversion to the opposite substance, indicating that both substances elicited similar tastes. However, two taste discrimination experiments showed that rats easily discriminated between sucrose and L-AP4 over a wide range of concentrations, even when the cue function of sodium associated with L-AP4 was reduced by amiloride and neutralized by adding equimolar concentrations of NaCl to sucrose. These data suggest that even though L-AP4 and sucrose elicit similar taste qualities, one or both substances also elicit other taste qualities not shared by the opposite substance. They also suggest that the taste-mGluR4 receptor and the signal pathway activated by L-AP4 are not the same as those activated by sucrose. These data, when combined with fiber recording data, suggest that there is convergence of L-AP4 and sucrose signals at some point early in the gustatory pathway.

  16. Role of LAP+CD4+ T cells in the tumor microenvironment of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wu; Jiang, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Jia-Hao; Wang, Shi-Jun; Liao, Cun; Cai, Bin; Chen, Li-Sheng; Zhang, Sen; Guo, Yun; Cao, Yun-Fei; Gao, Feng

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the abundance and potential functions of LAP+CD4+ T cells in colorectal cancer (CRC). METHODS Proportions of LAP+CD4+ T cells were examined in peripheral blood and tumor/paratumor tissues of CRC patients and healthy controls using flow cytometry. Expression of phenotypic markers such as forkhead box (Fox)p3, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein (CTLA)-4, chemokine CC receptor (CCR)4 and CCR5 was measured using flow cytometry. LAP-CD4+ and LAP+CD4+ T cells were isolated using a magnetic cell-sorting system and cell purity was analyzed by flow cytometry. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure expression of cytokines interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. RESULTS The proportion of LAP+CD4+ T cells was significantly higher in peripheral blood from patients (9.44% ± 3.18%) than healthy controls (1.49% ± 1.00%, P < 0.001). Among patients, the proportion of LAP+CD4+ T cells was significantly higher in tumor tissues (11.76% ± 3.74%) compared with paratumor tissues (3.87% ± 1.64%, P < 0.001). We also observed positive correlations between the proportion of LAP+CD4+ T cells and TNM stage (P < 0.001), distant metastasis (P < 0.001) and serum level of carcinoembryonic antigen (P < 0.05). Magnetic-activated cell sorting gave an overall enrichment of LAP+CD4+ T cells (95.02% ± 2.87%), which was similar for LAP-CD4+ T cells (94.75% ± 2.76%). In contrast to LAP-CD4+ T cells, LAP+CD4+ T cells showed lower Foxp3 expression but significantly higher levels of CTLA-4, CCR4 and CCR5 (P < 0.01). LAP+CD4+ T cells expressed significantly larger amounts of IL-10 and TGF-β but lower levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-17 and interferon-γ, compared with LAP-CD4+ T cells. CONCLUSION LAP+CD4+ T cells accumulated in the tumor microenvironment of CRC patients and were involved in immune evasion mediated by IL-10 and TGF-β. PMID:28210081

  17. LapF and Its Regulation by Fis Affect the Cell Surface Hydrophobicity of Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Lahesaare, Andrio; Ainelo, Hanna; Teppo, Annika; Kivisaar, Maia; Heipieper, Hermann J.; Teras, Riho

    2016-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to regulate cell surface hydrophobicity is important for the adaptation to different environmental conditions. The hydrophobicity of cell surface can be determined by several factors, including outer membrane and surface proteins. In this study, we report that an adhesin LapF influences cell surface hydrophobicity of Pseudomonas putida. Cells lacking LapF are less hydrophobic than wild-type cells in stationary growth phase. Moreover, the overexpression of the global regulator Fis decreases surface hydrophobicity by repressing the expression of lapF. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that bacteria producing LapF are more viable when confronted with methanol (a hydrophilic compound) but are more susceptible to 1-octanol (a hydrophobic compound). Thus, these results revealed that LapF is the hydrophobicity factor for the cell surface of P. putida. PMID:27812186

  18. Aircraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H. (Inventor); Uden, Edward (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention is an aircraft wing design that creates a bell shaped span load, which results in a negative induced drag (induced thrust) on the outer portion of the wing; such a design obviates the need for rudder control of an aircraft.

  19. The Teacher's Lap--A Site of Emotional Well-Being for the Younger Children in Day-Care Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hännikäinen, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on a particular relationship between teachers and one- to three-year-old children: the child in the teacher's lap. When, in what situations, does this happen? Who are the children in the teacher's lap? Why are they there? How do children express emotional well-being when in the teacher's lap? Relational, sociocultural and…

  20. Distribution of adipocyte-derived leucine aminopeptidase (A-LAP)/ER-aminopeptidase (ERAP)-1 in human uterine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Daijiro; Ando, Hisao; Iwase, Akira; Nagasaka, Tetsuro; Hattori, Akira; Tsujimoto, Masafumi; Mizutani, Shigehiko

    2004-09-01

    Adipocyte-derived leucine aminopeptidase (A-LAP, endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase ERAP1) is specialized to produce peptides presented on the class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) by trimming epitopes to eight or nine residues, in addition to its enzymatic activity to degrade angiotensin II. Previously we identified placental leucine aminopeptidase (P-LAP), another member of the oxytocinase subfamily of aminopeptidases, in human uterine endometrial epithelial cells. Here we analyzed the distribution of A-LAP in human cyclic endometrium. Western blotting analysis showed that A-LAP was present in the endometrial tissue throughout the menstrual cycle. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of A-LAP showed a similar distribution to that of P-LAP. A-LAP was localized predominantly in the endometrial glands and the luminal surface epithelium. However, the intracellular localization change that accompanied apocrine secretion, which was observed in P-LAP, was not shown in A-LAP. Subcellular localization of A-LAP, demonstrated by immunofluorescence, was ER in the cultured glandular epithelial cells. Our results indicate that A-LAP may fit the endometrial localization as an antigen-presenting ER aminopeptidase. Further understanding of the function(s) of A-LAP in the endometrium appear likely to yield insights into the cyclic changes during the normal endometrial cycle.

  1. C/EBPβ-LAP*/LAP Expression Is Mediated by RSK/eIF4B-Dependent Signalling and Boosted by Increased Protein Stability in Models of Monocytic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Christmann, Martin; Friesenhagen, Judith; Westphal, Andreas; Pietsch, Daniel; Brand, Korbinian

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor C/EBPβ plays a key role in monocytic differentiation and inflammation. Its small isoform LIP is associated with proliferation at early premonocytic developmental stages and regulated via mTOR-dependent signalling. During later stages of (pre)monocytic differentiation there is a considerable increase in the large C/EBPβ isoforms LAP*/LAP which inhibit proliferation thus supporting terminal differentiation. Here, we showed in different models of monocytic differentiation that this dramatic increase in the LAP*/LAP protein and LAP/LIP ratio was accompanied by an only modest/retarded mRNA increase suggesting an important role for (post)translational mechanisms. We found that LAP*/LAP formation was induced via MEK/RSK-dependent cascades, whereas mTOR/S6K1 were not involved. Remarkably, LAP*/LAP expression was dependent on phosphorylated eIF4B, an acceleratory protein of RNA helicase eIF4A. PKR inhibition reduced the expression of eIF4B and C/EBPβ in an eIF2α-independent manner. Furthermore, under our conditions a marked stabilisation of LAP*/LAP protein occurred, accompanied by reduced chymotrypsin-like proteasome/calpain activities and increased calpastatin levels. Our study elucidates new signalling pathways inducing LAP*/LAP expression and indicates new alternative PKR functions in monocytes. The switch from mTOR- to RSK-mediated signalling to orchestrate eIF4B-dependent LAP*/LAP translation, accompanied by increased protein stability but only small mRNA changes, may be a prototypical example for the regulation of protein expression during selected processes of differentiation/proliferation. PMID:26646662

  2. A Survey of Aircraft Structural-Life Management Programs in the U.S. Navy, the Canadian Forces, and the U.S. Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    the fuselage, wing , empennage , landing gear, control systems, engine section, nacelles, air induction, weapon mounts, engine mounts, structural ...managing and executing the program. The military standard includes require- ments for design , analysis, and test procedures to establish structural ...strength-based design concept, in which the aircraft structure was designed to prevent structural failure resulting from a single application of a load

  3. Assessment of Damage Containment Features of a Full-Scale PRSEUS Fuselage Panel Through Test and Teardown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergan, Andrew C.; Bakuckas, John G., Jr.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Jegley, Dawn C.; Awerbuch, Jonathan; Tan, Tein-Min

    2012-01-01

    An area that shows promise in enhancing structural integrity of aircraft and aerospace structures is the integrally stitched composite technology. The most recent generation of this technology is the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept developed by Boeing Research and Technology and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. A joint test program on the assessment of damage containment capabilities of the PRSEUS concept for curved fuselage structures was conducted recently at the Federal Aviation Administration William J. Hughes Technical Center. The panel was subjected to axial tension, internal pressure, and combined axial tension and internal pressure load conditions up to fracture, with a through-the-thickness, two-bay notch severing the central stiffener. For the purpose of future progressive failure analysis development and verification, extensive post failure nondestructive and teardown inspections were conducted. Detailed inspections were performed directly ahead of the notch tip where stable damage progression was observed. These examinations showed: 1) extensive delaminations developed ahead of the notch tip, 2) the extent and location of damage, 3) the typical damage mechanisms observed in composites, and 4) the role of stitching and warp-knitting in the failure mechanisms. The objective of this paper is to provide a summary of results from these posttest inspections.

  4. Crash tests of four low-wing twin-engine airplanes with truss-reinforced fuselage structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. S.; Fasanella, E. L.

    1982-01-01

    Four six-place, low-wing, twin-engine, general aviation airplane test specimens were crash tested under controlled free flight conditions. All airplanes were impacted on a concrete test surface at a nomial flight path velocity of 27 m/sec. Two tests were conducted at a -15 deg flight path angle (0 deg pitch angle and 15 deg pitch angle), and two were conducted at a -30 deg flight path angle (-30 deg pitch angle). The average acceleration time histories (crash pulses) in the cabin area for each principal direction were calculated for each crash test. In addition, the peak floor accelerations were calculated for each test as a function of aircraft fuselage longitudinal station number. Anthropomorphic dummy accelerations were analyzed using the dynamic response index and severity index (SI) models. Parameters affecting the dummy restraint system were studied; these parameters included the effect of no upper torso restraint, measurement of the amount of inertia-reel strap pullout before locking, measurement of dummy chest forward motion, and loads in the restraints. With the SI model, the dummies with no shoulder harness received head impacts above the concussive threshold.

  5. Use of nose cap and fuselage pressure orifices for determination of air data for space shuttle orbiter below supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, T. J.; Siemers, P. M., III

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel pressure measurements were acquired from orifices on a 0.1 scale forebody model of the space shuttle orbiter that were arranged in a preliminary configuration of the shuttle entry air data system (SEADS). Pressures from those and auxiliary orifices were evaluated for their ability to provide air data at subsonic and transonic speeds. The orifices were on the vehicle's nose cap and on the sides of the forebody forward of the cabin. The investigation covered a Mach number range of 0.25 to 1.40 and an angle of attack range from 4 deg. to 18 deg. An air data system consisting of nose cap and forebody fuselage orifices constitutes a complete and accurate air data system at subsonic and transonic speeds. For Mach numbers less than 0.80 orifices confined to the nose cap can be used as a complete and accurate air data system. Air data systems that use only flush pressure orifices can be used to determine basic air data on other aircraft at subsonic and transonic speeds.

  6. Nonlinear coupled rotor-fuselage helicopter vibration studies with higher harmonic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.; Papavassiliou, I.

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of vibration prediction and vibration reduction in helicopters by means of active control methodologies. The nonlinear equations of a coupled rotor/flexible-fuselage system have been derived using computer algebra, thus relegating this tedious task to the computer. In the solution procedure the trim state and vibratory response of the helicopter are obtained in a single pass by using a harmonic balance technique and simultaneously satisfying the trim and the vibratory response of the helicopter in all the rotor and fuselage degrees of freedom. Using this solution procedure, the influence of the fuselage flexibility on the vibratory response is studied. In addition, it is shown that the conventional single frequency HHC is capable of reducing either the hub loads or only the fuselage vibrations but not both simultaneously. A new scheme called MHHC, having multiple higher harmonic pitch inputs, was used to accomplish this task of simultaneously reducing both the vibratory hub loads and fuselage vibratory response. In addition, the uniqueness of this MHHC scheme is explained in detail.

  7. Flow visualization studies of VTOL aircraft models during Hover in ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mourtos, Nikos J.; Couillaud, Stephane; Carter, Dale; Hange, Craig; Wardwell, Doug; Margason, Richard J.

    1995-01-01

    A flow visualization study of several configurations of a jet-powered vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft model during hover in ground effect was conducted. A surface oil flow technique was used to observe the flow patterns on the lower surfaces of the model. There were significant configuration effects. Wing height with respect to fuselage, the presence of an engine inlet duct beside the fuselage, and nozzle pressure ratio are seen to have strong effects on the surface flow angles on the lower surface of the wing. This test was part of a program to improve the methods for predicting the hot gas ingestion (HGI) for jet-powered vertical/short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) aircraft. The tests were performed at the Jet Calibration and Hover Test (JCAHT) Facility at Ames Research Center.

  8. Evaluation of structural design concepts for an arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Davis, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical study was performed to determine the best structural approach for design of primary wing and fuselage structure of a Mach 2.7 arrow wing supersonic cruise aircraft. Concepts were evaluated considering near term start of design. Emphasis was placed on the complex interactions between thermal stress, static aeroelasticity, flutter, fatigue and fail safe design, static and dynamic loads, and the effects of variations in structural arrangements, concepts and materials on these interactions. Results indicate that a hybrid wing structure incorporating low profile convex beaded and honeycomb sandwich surface panels of titanium alloy 6Al-4V were the most efficient. The substructure includes titanium alloy spar caps reinforced with boron polyimide composites. The fuselage shell consists of hat stiffened skin and frame construction of titanium alloy 6Al-4V. A summary of the study effort is presented, and a discussion of the overall logic, design philosophy and interaction between the analytical methods for supersonic cruise aircraft design are included.

  9. Aircraft Wing for Over-The-Wing Mounting of Engine Nacelle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Andrew S. (Inventor); Kinney, David J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An aircraft wing has an inboard section and an outboard section. The inboard section is attached (i) on one side thereof to the aircraft's fuselage, and (ii) on an opposing side thereof to an inboard side of a turbofan engine nacelle in an over-the-wing mounting position. The outboard section's leading edge has a sweep of at least 20 degrees. The inboard section's leading edge has a sweep between -15 and +15 degrees, and extends from the fuselage to an attachment position on the nacelle that is forward of an index position defined as an imaginary intersection between the sweep of the outboard section's leading edge and the inboard side of the nacelle. In an alternate embodiment, the turbofan engine nacelle is replaced with an open rotor engine nacelle.

  10. Diagnostics and Active Control of Aircraft Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.

    1998-01-01

    This project deals with developing advanced methods for investigating and controlling interior noise in aircraft. The work concentrates on developing and applying the techniques of Near Field Acoustic Holography (NAH) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to the aircraft interior noise dynamic problem. This involves investigating the current state of the art, developing new techniques and then applying them to the particular problem being studied. The knowledge gained under the first part of the project was then used to develop and apply new, advanced noise control techniques for reducing interior noise. A new fully active control approach based on the PCA was developed and implemented on a test cylinder. Finally an active-passive approach based on tunable vibration absorbers was to be developed and analytically applied to a range of test structures from simple plates to aircraft fuselages.

  11. QCGAT aircraft/engine design for reduced noise and emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanson, L.; Terrill, K. M.

    1980-01-01

    The high bypass ratio QCGAT engine played an important role in shaping the aircraft design. The aircraft which evolved is a sleek, advanced design, six-place aircraft with 3538 kg (7,800 lb) maximum gross weight. It offers a 2778 kilometer (1500 nautical mile) range with cruise speed of 0.5 Mach number and will take-off and land on the vast majority of general aviation airfields. Advanced features include broad application of composite materials and a supercritical wing design with winglets. Full-span fowler flaps were introduced to improve landing capability. Engines are fuselage-mounted with inlets over the wing to provide shielding of fan noise by the wing surfaces. The design objectives, noise, and emission considerations, engine cycle and engine description are discussed as well as specific design features.

  12. Structural Integrity Evaluation of the Lear Fan 2100 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, H. P.; Dyer, T. A.

    1996-01-01

    An in-situ nondestructive inspection was conducted to detect manufacturing and assembly induced defects in the upper two wing surfaces (skin s) and upper fuselage skin of the Lear Fan 2100 aircraft E009. The effects of the defects, detected during the inspection, on the integrity of the structure was analytically evaluated. A systematic evaluation was also conducted to determine the damage tolerance capability of the upper wing skin against impact threats and assembly induced damage. The upper wing skin was divided into small regions for damage tolerance evaluations. Structural reliability, margin of safety, allowable strains, and allowable damage size were computed. The results indicated that the impact damage threat imposed on composite military aircraft structures is too severe for the Lear Fan 2100 upper wing skin. However, the structural integrity is not significantly degraded by the assembly induced damage for properly assembled structures, such as the E009 aircraft.

  13. Large-Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) blade design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Violette, John A.; Sullivan, William E.; Turnberg, Jay E.

    1984-01-01

    This report covers the design analysis of a very thin, highly swept, propeller blade to be used in the Large-Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) test program. The report includes: design requirements and goals, a description of the blade configuration which meets requirements, a description of the analytical methods utilized/developed to demonstrate compliance with the requirements, and the results of these analyses. The methods described include: finite element modeling, predicted aerodynamic loads and their application to the blade, steady state and vibratory response analyses, blade resonant frequencies and mode shapes, bird impact analysis, and predictions of stalled and unstalled flutter phenomena. Summarized results include deflections, retention loads, stress/strength comparisons, foreign object damage resistance, resonant frequencies and critical speed margins, resonant vibratory mode shapes, calculated boundaries of stalled and unstalled flutter, and aerodynamic and acoustic performance calculations.

  14. Volatile compounds in fruits of Peucedanum cervaria (Lap.) L.

    PubMed

    Skalicka-Wozniak, Krystyna; Los, Renata; Glowniak, Kazimierz; Malm, Anna

    2009-07-01

    The volatile compounds from Peucedanum cervaria (Lap.) L. were obtained by hydrodistillation (HD) and headspace solid-phase microextraction techniques (HS-SPME), and then analyzed by GC/MS methods. The composition of samples from a botanical garden was compared with plants collected in the wild. The main compounds of the essential oils of P. cervaria were identified as alpha-pinene, sabinene, and beta-pinene (more than 80% of oil). The content of beta-myrcene, limonene+beta-phellandrene, and germacrene D was higher than 1%. The in vitro antibacterial activity of the essential oil was evaluated by the agar dilution method against ten reference strains of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  15. Fatigue strength of a single lap joint SPR-bonded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Franco, G.; Fratini, L.; Pasta, A.

    2011-05-01

    In the last years, hybrid joints, meaning with this the joints which consist in combining a traditional mechanical joint to a layer of adhesive, are gradually attracting the attention of various sectors of the construction of vehicles and transportation industries, for their better performance compared to just mechanical joints (self-piercing riveting SPR, riveting, and so on) or just to bonded joints. The paper investigates the fatigue behavior of a single lap joint self-piercing riveted (SPR) and bonded throughout fatigue tests. The considered geometric configuration allowed the use of two rivets placed longitudinally; an epoxy resin was used as adhesive. In the first part of the work static characterization of the joints was carried out through tensile tests. Then fatigue tests were made with the application of different levels of load. The fatigue curves were also obtained at the varying the distance between the two rivets in order to better assess the joint strength for a given length of overlap.

  16. Testing composite-to-metal tubular lap joints

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Reedy, E.D. Jr.; Slavin, A.M.

    1993-11-01

    Procedures were developed to fabricate, nondestructively evaluate, and mechanically test composite-to-metal tubular joints. The axially loaded tubular lap joint specimen consisted of two metal tubes bonded within each end of a fiberglass composite tube. Joint specimens with both tapered and untapered aluminum adherends and a plain weave E-glass/epoxy composite were tested in tension, compression, and flexure. Other specimens with tapered and untapered steel adherends and a triaxially reinforced E-glass/epoxy composite were tested in tension and compression. Test results include joint strength and failure mode data. A finite element analysis of the axially loaded joints explains the effect of adherend geometry and material properties on measured joint strength. The flexural specimen was also analyzed; calculated surface strains are in good agreement with measured values, and joint failure occurs in the region of calculated peak peel stress.

  17. How dogs lap: ingestion and intraoral transport in Canis familiaris.

    PubMed

    Crompton, A W; Musinsky, Catherine

    2011-12-23

    It has recently been suggested that the mechanism for lifting liquid from a bowl into the oral cavity during lapping is fundamentally different in cats and dogs: cats use adhesion of liquid to the tongue tip while dogs 'scoop' with their backwardly curled tongue. High-speed light videos and X-ray videos show that on the contrary, both cats and dogs use the mechanism of adhesion. Liquid is transported through the oral cavity to the oesophagus, against gravity, on the surface of the tongue as it is drawn upwards, then a tight contact between the tongue surface and palatal rugae traps liquid and prevents its falling out as the tongue is protruded. At least three cycles are needed for intraoral transport of liquid in the dog.

  18. Mammalian Toxicological Evaluation of TNT Wastewaters. Volume II. Acute and Subacute Mammalian Toxicity of TNT and LAP Mixture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    synthesis assay ; UDS assay . 20 ABSTRACT (Continued) ,LAP and LAP(I) produced conjunctivitis, iritis, and/or corneal opacity In rabbit eyes; the...and 0.38 (mildly irritating) for LAP(I). j j: In the maximization ,egt, LAP ane LAP(I) produced mild reactions in 67 and 70%, respectively, of the sites...of guinea pigs challenged with the material; these •alues classify both as strong allergens. "’In in vitro microbial assays using microsomal

  19. Secondary bending effects in progressively damaged single-lap, single-bolt composite joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Libin; Xin, An; Liu, Fengrui; Zhang, Jianyu; Hu, Ning

    Static tensile experiments and progressive failure simulations of single-bolt, single- and double-lap joints were carried out to comparatively investigate secondary bending effects, which present significant eccentric-loading phenomena in single-lap joints but are almost non-existent in symmetric double-lap joints. Progressive damage models of single-lap and double-lap joints were established, from which the numerical predictions were found to be in good agreement with the experimental outcomes. Experimental macro-scope failure patterns and seven numerical micro-scope failure modes obtained from the progressive damage analyses were presented for the two types of joints. The effects of secondary bending on the mechanical degradation and failure mechanism of single-lap joints were revealed. Some characterizations of secondary bending in the joints, such as a characterized parameter on the AGARD points, joint deformations and contact states, were quantitatively traced during the total progressive damage process. All these characterizations increased the understanding of the effects of secondary bending on the failure process of a single-bolt, single-lap joint.

  20. Thrust Vectoring for Advanced Fighter Aircraft - High Angle of Attack Intake Investigations -

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    radius Tt total temperature Numerical flow calculations ( CFD ) were to be performed to WAT normalized engine mass flow support the analysis of the... CFD ) investigations will be but could also result in damages of the engine and/or aircraft detailed. Results and comparisons between flows at small...dominated measured, by the shielding of the fuselage and the canard. 4.4 Data analysis During all the testing the intake lip position has been held fixed at

  1. Noniterative grid generation using parabolic difference equations for fuselage-wing flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, S.

    1982-01-01

    A fast method for generating three-dimensional grids for fuselage-wing transonic flow calculations using parabolic difference equations is described. No iterative scheme is used in the three-dimensional sense; grids are generated from one grid surface to the next starting from the fuselage surface. The computational procedure is similar to the iterative solution of the two-dimensional heat conduction equation. The proposed method is at least 10 times faster than the elliptic grid generation method and has much smaller memory requirements. Results are presented for a fuselage and wing of NACA-0012 section and thickness ratio of 10 percent. Although only H-grids are demonstrated, the present technique should be applicable to C-grids and O-grids in three dimensions.

  2. Multi-Terrain Impact Testing and Simulation of a Composite Energy Absorbing Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Sparks, Chad E.; Sareen, Ashish K.

    2004-01-01

    Comparisons of the impact performance of a 5-ft diameter crashworthy composite fuselage section were investigated for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts. The fuselage concept, which was originally designed for impacts onto a hard surface only, consisted of a stiff upper cabin, load bearing floor, and an energy absorbing subfloor. Vertical drop tests were performed at 25-ft/s onto concrete, soft-soil, and water at NASA Langley Research Center. Comparisons of the peak acceleration values, pulse durations, and onset rates were evaluated for each test at specific locations on the fuselage. In addition to comparisons of the experimental results, dynamic finite element models were developed to simulate each impact condition. Once validated, these models can be used to evaluate the dynamic behavior of subfloor components for improved crash protection for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts.

  3. Multi-Terrain Impact Testing and Simulation of a Composite Energy Absorbing Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Lyle, Karen H.; Sparks, Chad E.; Sareen, Ashish K.

    2007-01-01

    Comparisons of the impact performance of a 5-ft diameter crashworthy composite fuselage section were investigated for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts. The fuselage concept, which was originally designed for impacts onto a hard surface only, consisted of a stiff upper cabin, load bearing floor, and an energy absorbing subfloor. Vertical drop tests were performed at 25-ft/s onto concrete, soft-soil, and water at NASA Langley Research Center. Comparisons of the peak acceleration values, pulse durations, and onset rates were evaluated for each test at specific locations on the fuselage. In addition to comparisons of the experimental results, dynamic finite element models were developed to simulate each impact condition. Once validated, these models can be used to evaluate the dynamic behavior of subfloor components for improved crash protection for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts.

  4. XSECT: A computer code for generating fuselage cross sections - user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, K. R.

    1982-01-01

    A computer code, XSECT, has been developed to generate fuselage cross sections from a given area distribution and wing definition. The cross sections are generated to match the wing definition while conforming to the area requirement. An iterative procedure is used to generate each cross section. Fuselage area balancing may be included in this procedure if desired. The code is intended as an aid for engineers who must first design a wing under certain aerodynamic constraints and then design a fuselage for the wing such that the contraints remain satisfied. This report contains the information necessary for accessing and executing the code, which is written in FORTRAN to execute on the Cyber 170 series computers (NOS operating system) and produces graphical output for a Tektronix 4014 CRT. The LRC graphics software is used in combination with the interface between this software and the PLOT 10 software.

  5. The Low-Noise Potential of Distributed Propulsion on a Catamaran Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posey, Joe W.; Tinetti, A. F.; Dunn, M. H.

    2006-01-01

    The noise shielding potential of an inboard-wing catamaran aircraft when coupled with distributed propulsion is examined. Here, only low-frequency jet noise from mid-wing-mounted engines is considered. Because low frequencies are the most difficult to shield, these calculations put a lower bound on the potential shielding benefit. In this proof-of-concept study, simple physical models are used to describe the 3-D scattering of jet noise by conceptualized catamaran aircraft. The Fast Scattering Code is used to predict noise levels on and about the aircraft. Shielding results are presented for several catamaran type geometries and simple noise source configurations representative of distributed propulsion radiation. Computational analyses are presented that demonstrate the shielding benefits of distributed propulsion and of increasing the width of the inboard wing. Also, sample calculations using the FSC are presented that demonstrate additional noise reduction on the aircraft fuselage by the use of acoustic liners on the inboard wing trailing edge. A full conceptual aircraft design would have to be analyzed over a complete mission to more accurately quantify community noise levels and aircraft performance, but the present shielding calculations show that a large acoustic benefit could be achieved by combining distributed propulsion and liner technology with a twin-fuselage planform.

  6. Acoustic measurements of F-16 aircraft operating in hush house, NSN 4920-02-070-2721

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, V. R.; Plzak, G. A.; Chinn, J. M.

    1981-09-01

    The purpose of this test program was to measure the acoustic environment in the hush house facility located at Kelly Air Force Base, Texas, during operation of the F-16 aircraft to ensure that aircraft structural acoustic design limits were not exceeded. The acoustic measurements showed that no sonic fatigue problems are anticipated with the F-16 aircraft aft fuselage structure during operation in the hush house. The measured acoustic levels were less than those measured in an F-16 aircraft water cooled hush house at Hill AFB, but were increased over that measured during ground run up. It was recommended that the acoustic loads measured in this program should be specified in the structural design criteria for aircraft which will be subjected to hush house operation or defining requirements for associated equipment.

  7. Quantitative thermal imaging of aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Howell, Patricia A.; Syed, Hazari I.

    1995-03-01

    Aircraft structural integrity is a major concern for airlines and airframe manufacturers. To remain economically competitive, airlines are looking at ways to retire older aircraft, not when some fixed number of flight hours or cycles has been reached, but when true structural need dictates. This philosophy is known as `retirement for cause.' The need to extend the life of commercial aircraft has increased the desire to develop nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques capable of detecting critical flaws such as disbonding and corrosion. These subsurface flaws are of major concern in bonded lap joints. Disbonding in such a joint can provide an avenue for moisture to enter the structure leading to corrosion. Significant material loss due to corrosion can substantially reduce the structural strength, load bearing capacity and ultimately reduce the life of the structure. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center has developed a thermal NDE system designed for application to disbonding and corrosion detection in aircraft skins. By injecting a small amount of heat into the front surface of an aircraft skin, and recording the time history of the resulting surface temperature variations using an infrared camera, quantitative images of both bond integrity and material loss due to corrosion can be produced. This paper presents a discussion of the development of the thermal imaging system as well as the techniques used to analyze the resulting thermal images. The analysis techniques presented represent a significant improvement in the information available over conventional thermal imaging due to the inclusion of data from both the heating and cooling portion of the thermal cycle. Results of laboratory experiments on fabricated disbond and material loss samples are presented to determine the limitations of the system. Additionally, the results of actual aircraft inspections are shown, which help to establish the field applicability for this

  8. Recent advances in active control of aircraft cabin noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Gopal; Fuller, Christopher

    2002-11-01

    Active noise control techniques can provide significant reductions in aircraft interior noise levels without the structural modifications or weight penalties usually associated with passive techniques, particularly for low frequency noise. Our main objective in this presentation is to give a review of active control methods and their applications to aircraft cabin noise reduction with an emphasis on recent advances and challenges facing the noise control engineer in the practical application of these techniques. The active noise control method using secondary acoustic sources, e.g., loudspeakers, as control sources for tonal noise reduction is first discussed with results from an active noise control flight test demonstration. An innovative approach of applying control forces directly to the fuselage structure using piezoelectric actuators, known as active structural acoustic control (ASAC), to control cabin noise is then presented. Experimental results from laboratory ASAC tests conducted on a full-scale fuselage and from flight tests on a helicopter will be discussed. Finally, a hybrid active/passive noise control approach for achieving significant broadband noise reduction will be discussed. Experimental results of control of broadband noise transmission through an aircraft structure will be presented.

  9. Use of two-dimensional transmission photoelastic models to study stresses in double-lap bolted joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Liu, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The stress distribution in two hole connectors in a double lap joint configuration was studied. The following steps are described: (1) fabrication of photoelastic models of double lap double hole joints designed to determine the stresses in the inner lap; (2) assessment of the effects of joint geometry on the stresses in the inner lap; and (3) quantification of differences in the stresses near the two holes. The two holes were on the centerline of the joint and the joints were loaded in tension, parallel to the centerline. Acrylic slip fit pins through the holes served as fasteners. Two dimensional transmission photoelastic models were fabricated by using transparent acrylic outer laps and a photoelastic model material for the inner laps. It is concluded that the photoelastic fringe patterns which are visible when the models are loaded are due almost entirely to stresses in the inner lap.

  10. Analytical and experimental investigation of aircraft metal structures reinforced with filamentary composites. Phase 3: Major component development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, L. L.; Mccarty, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations, performed to establish the feasibility of reinforcing metal aircraft structures with advanced filamentary composites, are reported. Aluminum-boron-epoxy and titanium-boron-epoxy were used in the design and manufacture of three major structural components. The components were representative of subsonic aircraft fuselage and window belt panels and supersonic aircraft compression panels. Both unidirectional and multidirectional reinforcement concepts were employed. Blade penetration, axial compression, and inplane shear tests were conducted. Composite reinforced structural components designed to realistic airframe structural criteria demonstrated the potential for significant weight savings while maintaining strength, stability, and damage containment properties of all metal components designed to meet the same criteria.

  11. Correlation of forebody pressures and aircraft yawing moments on the X-29A aircraft at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Richwine, David M.; Landers, Stephen

    1992-01-01

    In-flight pressure distributions at four fuselage stations on the forebody of the X-29A aircraft have been reported at angles of attack from 15 to 66 deg and at Mach numbers from 0.22 to 0.60. At angles of attack of 20 deg and higher, vortices shed from the nose strake caused suction peaks in the pressure distributions that generally increased in magnitude with angle of attack. Above 30 deg-angle of attack, the forebody pressure distributions became asymmetrical at the most forward station, while they remained nearly symmetrical until 50 to 55 deg-angle of attack for the aft stations. Between 59 to 66 deg-angle of attack, the asymmetry of the pressure distributions changed direction. Yawing moments for the forebody alone were obtained by integrating the forebody pressure distributions. At 45 deg-angle of attack, the aircraft yaws to the right and at 50 deg and higher, the aircraft yaws to the left. The forebody yawing moments correlated well with the aircraft left yawing moment at an angle of attack of 50 deg or higher. At a 45 deg-angle of attack, the forebody yawing moments did not correlate well with the aircraft yawing moment, but it is suggested that this was due to asymmetric pressures on the cockpit region of the fuselage which was not instrumented. The forebody was also shown to provide a positive component of directional stability of the aircraft at angles of attack of 25 deg or higher. A Mach number effect was noted at angles of attack of 30 deg or higher at the station where the nose strake was present. At this station, the suction peaks in the pressure distributions at the highest Mach number were reduced and much more symmetrical as compared to the lower Mach number pressure distributions.

  12. The effect of diamond powder characteristics on lapping of sintered silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosczyk, Benjamin; Burkam, Eric; Titov, Artem; Onyenemezu, Clement; Benea, Ion C.

    2015-10-01

    In Automotive applications, sintered Silicon Carbide has been used in applications such as seal pump faces. The surface of sintered SiC, when lapped or polished for sealing to another surface, must be free of blemishes and mechanical defects. Lapping and polishing processes therefore must be well defined and controlled assuring minimal variation and production scrap. In this study, we related the characteristics of different diamond powders (particle size distribution, particle shape and surface) to their performance in lapping of sintered silicon carbide material, expressed as removal rate and surface finish.

  13. Machine imparting complex rotary motion for lapping a spherical inner diameter

    DOEpatents

    Carroll, Thomas A.; Yetter, Harold H.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus for imparting complex rotary motion is used to lap an inner spherical diameter surface of a workpiece. A lapping tool consists of a dome and rod mounted along the dome's vertical axis. The workpiece containing the lapping tool is held in a gimbal which uses power derived from a secondary takeoff means to impart rotary motion about a horizontal axis. The gimbal is rotated about a vertical axis by a take means while mounted at a radially outward position on a rotating arm.

  14. Machine imparting complex rotary motion for lapping a spherical inner diameter

    DOEpatents

    Carroll, T.A.; Yetter, H.H.

    1985-01-30

    An apparatus for imparting complex rotary motion is used to lap an inner spherical diameter surface of a workpiece. A lapping tool consists of a dome and rod mounted along the dome's vertical axis. The workpiece containing the lapping tool is held in a gimbal which uses power derived from a secondary takeoff means to impart rotary motion about a horizontal axis. The gimbal is rotated about a vertical axis by a take means while mounted at a radially outward position on a rotating arm.

  15. Global-Local Finite Element Analysis of Bonded Single-Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilic, Bahattin; Madenci, Erdogan; Ambur, Damodar R.

    2004-01-01

    Adhesively bonded lap joints involve dissimilar material junctions and sharp changes in geometry, possibly leading to premature failure. Although the finite element method is well suited to model the bonded lap joints, traditional finite elements are incapable of correctly resolving the stress state at junctions of dissimilar materials because of the unbounded nature of the stresses. In order to facilitate the use of bonded lap joints in future structures, this study presents a finite element technique utilizing a global (special) element coupled with traditional elements. The global element includes the singular behavior at the junction of dissimilar materials with or without traction-free surfaces.

  16. 78 FR 68775 - Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A350-900 Series Airplane; Composite Fuselage In-Flight Fire...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ...; Composite Fuselage In-Flight Fire/Flammability Resistance AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... associated with the in-flight fire and flammability resistance of the composite fuselage. Experience has... fire test criteria for insulation films directly relating to the resistance of in-flight...

  17. Interference of Wing and Fuselage from Tests of 209 Combinations in the NACA Variable-Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N; Ward, Kenneth E

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests of 209 simple wing-fuselage combinations made in the NACA variable-density wind tunnel to provide information regarding the effects of aerodynamic interference between wings and fuselages at a large value of Reynolds number.

  18. Aircraft Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-19

    NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 AIRCRAFT STEELS by E. U. Lee R. Taylor C. Lei H. C. Sanders 19 February 2009...MARYLAND NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 19 February 2009 AIRCRAFT STEELS by E. U. Lee R. Taylor C. Lei H. C. Sanders...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 ii SUMMARY Five high strength and four stainless steels have been studied, identifying their

  19. Computational Assessment of the Benefits of Boundary Layer Ingestion for the D8 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Shishir A.; Uranga, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    To substantially reduce the fuel burn of future commercial transportation aircraft, the boundary layer ingestion idea is investigated. The idea is that an engine placed in the wake of the aircraft it is propelling is more efficient than a conventional engine placement under the wing or on pods mounted to the rear of the fuselage. The top, rear of the fuselage is thus designed to act as a diffuser such that the engines can be placed there with a minimal nacelle. The boundary layer thickens over the rear of the fuselage such that a large portion of it is ingested by the fan. To assess whether the boundary layer ingesting (BLI) engine placement is indeed advantageous, a study of the nacelle aerodynamics is carried out using Overflow, a viscous CFD flow solver that uses overset meshes. The computed forces and moments are compared to a wind tunnel experiment for validation. Some aspects of the design are verified using the simulation results. Finally, the effect of the nacelle placement is assessed by comparing the BLI nacelle configuration to a podded nacelle configuration and to the unpowered (without nacelles) aircraft.

  20. Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) Fuselage Structural Design for Weight Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, V.

    2005-01-01

    Structural analysis and design of efficient pressurized fuselage configurations for the advanced Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) flight vehicle is a challenging problem. Unlike a conventional cylindrical pressurized fuselage, stress level in a box type BWB fuselage is an order of magnitude higher, because internal pressure primarily results in bending stress instead of skin-membrane stress. In addition, resulting deformation of aerodynamic surface could significantly affect performance advantages provided by lifting body. The pressurized composite conformal multi-lobe tanks of X-33 type space vehicle also suffered from similar problem. In the earlier BWB design studies, Vaulted Ribbed Shell (VLRS), Flat Ribbed Shell (FRS); Vaulted shell Honeycomb Core (VLHC) and Flat sandwich shell Honeycomb Core (FLHC) concepts were studied. The flat and vaulted ribbed shell concepts were found most efficient. In a recent study, a set of composite sandwich panel and cross-ribbed panel were analyzed. Optimal values of rib and skin thickness, rib spacing, and panel depth were obtained for minimal weight under stress and buckling constraints. In addition, a set of efficient multi-bubble fuselage (MBF) configuration concept was developed. The special geometric configuration of this concept allows for balancing internal cabin pressure load efficiently, through membrane stress in inner-stiffened shell and inter-cabin walls, while the outer-ribbed shell prevents buckling due to external resultant compressive loads. The initial results from these approximate finite element analyses indicate progressively lower maximum stresses and deflections compared to the earlier study. However, a relative comparison of the FEM weight per unit floor area of the segment unit indicates that the unit weights are still relatively higher that the conventional B777 type cylindrical or A380 type elliptic fuselage design. Due to the manufacturing concern associated with multi-bubble fuselage, a Y braced box

  1. Wind tunnel investigation of helicopter rotor wake effects on three helicopter fuselage models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Mineck, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of rotor downwash on helicopter fuselage aerodynamic characteristics were investigated. A rotor model for generating the downwash was mounted close to each of three fuselage models. The main report presents the force and moment data in both graphical and tabular form and the pressure data in graphical form. This supplement presents the pressure data in tabular form. Each run or parameter sweep is identified by a unique run number. The data points in each run are identified by a point number. The pressure data can be matched to the force data by matching the run and point number.

  2. Study of methane fuel for subsonic transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, L. K.; Davis, G. W.; Versaw, E. F.; Cunnington, G. R., Jr.; Daniels, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    The cost and performance were defined for commercial transport using liquid methane including its fuel system and the ground facility complex required for the processing and storage of methane. A cost and performance comparison was made with Jet A and hydrogen powered aircraft of the same payload and range capability. Extensive design work was done on cryogenic fuel tanks, insulation systems as well as the fuel system itself. Three candidate fuel tank locations were evaluated, i.e., fuselage tanks, wing tanks or external pylon tanks.

  3. Computation of Engine Noise Propagation and Scattering Off an Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, J.; Stanescu, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Farassat, F.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents a comparison of experimental noise data measured in flight on a two-engine business jet aircraft with Kulite microphones placed on the suction surface of the wing with computational results. Both a time-domain discontinuous Galerkin spectral method and a frequency-domain spectral element method are used to simulate the radiation of the dominant spinning mode from the engine and its reflection and scattering by the fuselage and the wing. Both methods are implemented in computer codes that use the distributed memory model to make use of large parallel architectures. The results show that trends of the noise field are well predicted by both methods.

  4. Development of stitched/RTM primary structures for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Arthur V.

    1993-01-01

    This report covers work accomplished in the Innovative Composite Aircraft Primary Structure (ICAPS) program. An account is given of the design criteria and philosophy that guides the development. Wing and fuselage components used as a baseline for development are described. The major thrust of the program is to achieve a major cost breakthrough through development of stitched dry preforms and resin transfer molding (RTM), and progress on these processes is reported. A full description is provided on the fabrication of the stitched RTM wing panels. Test data are presented.

  5. A characterization of the LAP Aquarius Phantom for external LAP laser alignment and magnetic resonance geometric distortion verification for stereotactic radiation surgery patient simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Daniel

    The Thesis explores additional applications of LAP's Aquarius external laser alignment verification Phantom by examining geometric accuracy of magnetic resonance images commonly used for planning intracranial stereotactic radiation surgery (ICSRS) cases. The scans were performed with MRI protocols used for ICSRS, and head and neck diagnosis, and their images fused to computerized tomographic (CT) images. The geometric distortions (GDs) were measured against the CT in all axial, sagittal, and coronal directions at different levels. Using the Aquarius Phantom, one is able to detect GD in ICSRS planning MRI acquisitions, and align the external LAP patient alignment lasers, by following the LAP QA protocol. GDs up to about 2 mm are observed at the distal regions of the longitudinal axis in the SRS treatment planning MR images. Based on the results, one may recommend the use of the Aquarius Phantom to determine if margins should be included for SRS treatment planning.

  6. Alteration of Sulphides in the Rumuruti Chondrite La Paz Icefield (LAP) 031275

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, E. D.; Treiman, A. H.

    2014-09-01

    Pyrrhotite in LAP 03175 (R5) has altered to a fine-grained mineral mixture. New data (optical, chemical, and Raman) suggest the mixture includes violarite and tochilinite, but not (as suggested earlier) graphite, hematite, and/or jarosite.

  7. Drag Reduction Devices for Aircraft (Latest Citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the modeling, application, testing, and development of drag reduction devices for aircraft. Slots, flaps, fences, large-eddy breakup (LEBU) devices, vortex generators and turbines, Helmholtz resonators, and winglets are among the devices discussed. Contour shaping to ensure laminar flow, control boundary layer transition, or minimize turbulence is also covered. Applications include the wings, nacelles, fuselage, empennage, and externals of aircraft designed for high-lift, subsonic, or supersonic operation. The design, testing, and development of directional grooves, commonly called riblets, are covered in a separate bibliography.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Crystal structure, spectroscopic and thermal properties of [Zn(Lap)2(DMF)(H2O)] and isomorphous [M(Lap)2]n (M: Cd, Mn) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfán, R. A.; Espíndola, J. A.; Gomez, M. I.; de Jiménez, M. C. L.; Piro, O. E.; Castellano, E. E.; Martínez, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    The solid state structure of the lapacholate (Lap-) complexes with Zn(II), Cd(II) and Mn(II) were determined by X-ray diffraction methods. [Zn(Lap)2(DMF)(H2O)] crystallizes in the triclinic space group P 1 bar with a = 10.5051(4), b = 12.8020(4), c = 13.0394(4) Å, α = 60.418(2), β = 83.904(2), γ = 86.206(2)°, and Z = 2 molecules per unit cell. The isomorphous complexes [M(Lap)2]n (M: Cd, Mn) crystallize in the tetragonal space group P43212 with a = b = 13.5770(6) Å, c = 14.5730(6) Å (Cd), and a = b = 13.3539(4), c = 14.7148(4) Å (Mn), and Z = 4. In [Zn(Lap)2(DMF)(H2O)] the Zn(II) ion is in a distorted octahedral environment coordinated to two different and nearly perpendicular Lap- molecules acting as bidentate ligands through their adjacent carbonyl and phenol oxygen atoms. The remaining two cis-coordination sites are occupied by water and DMF molecules. [M(Lap)2]n (M: Cd, Mn) isomorphous complexes are also octahedral and present a supra-molecular arrangement in the lattice. There is only one independent Lap- molecule that coordinates the metal through all three ligand binding sites, giving rise to a 3-D structure of [M(Lap)2]n complexes that extends throughout the crystal lattice. The lapachol binding to metal is also revealed by the IR spectra. In fact, the carbonyl Cdbnd O stretching frequency is appreciable red-shifted in the complexes as compared to uncoordinated lapachol ligand. As expected, the IR and UV-Vis spectra of the isomorphous pair of complexes closely resemble to each other. Up to above 300 °C there are significant differences in the TGA of the Zn complex when compared with the isomorphous pair: while the former shows the loss of the secondary ligands (water and DMF), the latter exhibits a plateau signaling the lesser labile character of the lapacholate ligand.

  9. Mechanisms of Active Aerodynamic Load Reduction on a Rotorcraft Fuselage With Rotor Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffler, Norman W.; Allan, Brian G.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Bartram, Scott M.; Mace, W. Derry; Wong, Oliver D.; Tanner, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    The reduction of the aerodynamic load that acts on a generic rotorcraft fuselage by the application of active flow control was investigated in a wind tunnel test conducted on an approximately 1/3-scale powered rotorcraft model simulating forward flight. The aerodynamic mechanisms that make these reductions, in both the drag and the download, possible were examined in detail through the use of the measured surface pressure distribution on the fuselage, velocity field measurements made in the wake directly behind the ramp of the fuselage and computational simulations. The fuselage tested was the ROBIN-mod7, which was equipped with a series of eight slots located on the ramp section through which flow control excitation was introduced. These slots were arranged in a U-shaped pattern located slightly downstream of the baseline separation line and parallel to it. The flow control excitation took the form of either synthetic jets, also known as zero-net-mass-flux blowing, and steady blowing. The same set of slots were used for both types of excitation. The differences between the two excitation types and between flow control excitation from different combinations of slots were examined. The flow control is shown to alter the size of the wake and its trajectory relative to the ramp and the tailboom and it is these changes to the wake that result in a reduction in the aerodynamic load.

  10. Hybrid-Wing-Body Vehicle Composite Fuselage Analysis and Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in the structural analysis of a Hybrid Wing-Body (HWB) fuselage concept is presented with the objective of structural weight reduction under a set of critical design loads. This pressurized efficient HWB fuselage design is presently being investigated by the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project in collaboration with the Boeing Company, Huntington Beach. The Pultruded Rod-Stiffened Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) composite concept, developed at the Boeing Company, is approximately modeled for an analytical study and finite element analysis. Stiffened plate linear theories are employed for a parametric case study. Maximum deflection and stress levels are obtained with appropriate assumptions for a set of feasible stiffened panel configurations. An analytical parametric case study is presented to examine the effects of discrete stiffener spacing and skin thickness on structural weight, deflection and stress. A finite-element model (FEM) of an integrated fuselage section with bulkhead is developed for an independent assessment. Stress analysis and scenario based case studies are conducted for design improvement. The FEM model specific weight of the improved fuselage concept is computed and compared to previous studies, in order to assess the relative weight/strength advantages of this advanced composite airframe technology

  11. A Short Method of Calculating Torsional Stresses in an Airplane Fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younger, John E

    1924-01-01

    This report deals with an investigation carried out in the Civil Engineering Laboratory of the University of California, to determine the accuracy of existing methods of computing the stresses in an airplane fuselage when subjected to torsion, and to derive a simple approximate formula for the rapid calculation of these stresses.

  12. Study of multiple cracks in airplane fuselage by micromechanics and complex variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denda, Mitsunori; Dong, Y. F.

    1994-01-01

    Innovative numerical techniques for two dimensional elastic and elastic-plastic multiple crack problems are presented using micromechanics concepts and complex variables. The simplicity and the accuracy of the proposed method will enable us to carry out the multiple-site fatigue crack propagation analyses for airplane fuselage by incorporating such features as the curvilinear crack path, plastic deformation, coalescence of cracks, etc.

  13. Transonic perturbation analysis of wing-fuselage-nacelle-pylon configurations with powered jet exhausts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wai, J. C.; Sun, C. C.; Yoshihara, H.

    1982-01-01

    A method using a transonic small disturbance code with successive line over-relaxation is described for treating wing/fuselage configurations with a nacelle/pylon/powered jet. Examples illustrating its use for the NASA transport research model are given. Reasonable test/theory comparisons were obtained.

  14. Fatigue strength of a single lap joint SPR-bonded

    SciTech Connect

    Di Franco, G.; Fratini, L.; Pasta, A.

    2011-05-04

    In the last years, hybrid joints, meaning with this the joints which consist in combining a traditional mechanical joint to a layer of adhesive, are gradually attracting the attention of various sectors of the construction of vehicles and transportation industries, for their better performance compared to just mechanical joints (self-piercing riveting SPR, riveting, and so on) or just to bonded joints.The paper investigates the fatigue behavior of a single lap joint self-piercing riveted (SPR) and bonded throughout fatigue tests. The considered geometric configuration allowed the use of two rivets placed longitudinally; an epoxy resin was used as adhesive. In the first part of the work static characterization of the joints was carried out through tensile tests. Then fatigue tests were made with the application of different levels of load. The fatigue curves were also obtained at the varying the distance between the two rivets in order to better assess the joint strength for a given length of overlap.

  15. Molten pool characterization of laser lap welded copper and aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhiqing; Hu, Shengsun; Zuo, Di; Cai, Wayne; Lee, Dongkyun; Elijah, Kannatey-Asibu, Jr.

    2013-12-01

    A 3D finite volume simulation model for laser welding of a Cu-Al lap joint was developed using ANSYS FLUENT to predict the weld pool temperature distribution, velocity field, geometry, alloying element distribution and transition layer thickness—all key attributes and performance characteristics for a laser-welded joint. Melting and solidification of the weld pool was simulated with an enthalpy-porosity formulation. Laser welding experiments and metallographic examination by SEM and EDX were performed to investigate the weld pool features and validate the simulated results. A bowl-shaped temperature field and molten pool, and a unique maximum fusion zone width were observed near the Cu-Al interface. Both the numerical simulation and experimental results indicate an arch-shaped intermediate layer of Cu and Al, and a gradual transition of Cu concentration from the aluminum plate to the copper plate with high composition gradient. For the conditions used, welding with Cu on top was found to result in a better weld joint.

  16. Innovative Concept for a Heavy-Load Aircraft Utilizing a Two-Dimensional Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. Leroy

    2007-01-01

    Heavy-load aircraft of conventional wing-body-tail design have become very large. Excessive size of such aircraft may present problems in the manufacturing process. In addition, large wing spans may cause some difficulties in ground handling. Increasing lift loads on large span cantilever wings will also increase the strength of the wing tip vortex. The concept presented herein proposes a means for substantially increasing the lift load capability of an aircraft without increasing the overall length and span of the configuration. The concept has a rectangular wing with a relatively low span and a large chord to provide the area required for high lift. Large fuselages are attached at each wing tip to provide the volume required for heavy loading. The fuselages serve as endplates for the wing and should preclude tip flow so that two-dimensional flow might be established on the wing. Elimination of the wing tip flow should prevent the formation of a tip vortex and eliminate the tip vortex hazard to trailing aircraft. Exploratory wind tunnel tests of such an aircraft concept have been conducted. Lessons learned from these tests are discussed herein in an effort to determine the validity of the concept.

  17. Water Impact Test and Simulation of a Composite Energy Absorbing Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Sparks, Chad; Sareen, Ashish

    2003-01-01

    In March 2002, a 25-ft/s vertical drop test of a composite fuselage section was conducted onto water. The purpose of the test was to obtain experimental data characterizing the structural response of the fuselage section during water impact for comparison with two previous drop tests that were performed onto a rigid surface and soft soil. For the drop test, the fuselage section was configured with ten 100-lb. lead masses, five per side, that were attached to seat rails mounted to the floor. The fuselage section was raised to a height of 10-ft. and dropped vertically into a 15-ft. diameter pool filled to a depth of 3.5-ft. with water. Approximately 70 channels of data were collected during the drop test at a 10-kHz sampling rate. The test data were used to validate crash simulations of the water impact that were developed using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic codes, MSC.Dytran and LS-DYNA. The fuselage structure was modeled using shell and solid elements with a Lagrangian mesh, and the water was modeled with both Eulerian and Lagrangian techniques. The fluid-structure interactions were executed using the fast general coupling in MSC.Dytran and the Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) coupling in LS-DYNA. Additionally, the smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) meshless Lagrangian technique was used in LS-DYNA to represent the fluid. The simulation results were correlated with the test data to validate the modeling approach. Additional simulation studies were performed to determine how changes in mesh density, mesh uniformity, fluid viscosity, and failure strain influence the test-analysis correlation.

  18. LAPS Lidar Measurements at the ARM Alaska Northslope Site (Support to FIRE Project)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philbrick, C. Russell; Lysak, Daniel B., Jr.; Petach, Tomas M.; Esposito, Steven T.; Mulik, Karoline R.

    1998-01-01

    This report consists of data summaries of the results obtained during the May 1998 measurement period at Barrow Alaska. This report does not contain any data interpretation or analysis of the results which will follow this activity. This report is forwarded with a data set on magnetic media which contains the reduced data from the LAPS lidar in 15 minute intervals. The data was obtained during the period 15-30 May 1998. The measurement period overlapped with several aircraft flights conducted by NASA as part of the FIRE project. The report contains a summary list of the data obtained plus figures that have been prepared to help visualize the measurement periods. The order of the presentation is as follows: Section 1. A copy of the Statement of Work for the planned activity of the second measurement period at the ARM Northslope site is provided. Section 2. A list of the data collection periods shows the number of one minute data records stored during each hour of operation and the corresponding size (Mbytes) of the one hour data folders. The folder and file names are composed from the year, month, day, hour and minute. The date/time information is given in UTC for easier comparison with other data sets. Section 3. A set of 4 comparisons between the LAPS lidar results and the sondes released by the ARM scientists from a location nearby the lidar. The lidar results show the +/- 1 sigma statistical error on each of the independent 75 m altitude bins of the data. This set of 4 comparisons was used to set and validate the calibration value which was then used for the complete data set. Section 4. A set of false color figures with up to 10 hours of specific humidity measurements are shown in each graph. Two days of measurements are shown on each page. These plots are crude representations of the data and permit a survey which indicates when the clouds were very low or where interesting events may occur in the results. These plots are prepared using the real time sequence

  19. Aircraft cybernetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The use of computers for aircraft control, flight simulation, and inertial navigation is explored. The man-machine relation problem in aviation is addressed. Simple and self-adapting autopilots are described and the assets and liabilities of digital navigation techniques are assessed.

  20. A study of methods of prediction and measurement of the transmission sound through the walls of light aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forssen, B.; Wang, Y. S.; Crocker, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    Several aspects were studied. The SEA theory was used to develop a theoretical model to predict the transmission loss through an aircraft window. This work mainly consisted of the writing of two computer programs. One program predicts the sound transmission through a plexiglass window (the case of a single partition). The other program applies to the case of a plexiglass window window with a window shade added (the case of a double partition with an air gap). The sound transmission through a structure was measured in experimental studies using several different methods in order that the accuracy and complexity of all the methods could be compared. Also, the measurements were conducted on the simple model of a fuselage (a cylindrical shell), on a real aircraft fuselage, and on stiffened panels.

  1. SRB/SLEEC (Solid Rocket Booster/Shingle Lap Extendible Exit Cone) feasibility study, volume 2. Appendix A: Design study for a SLEEC actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    The results are presented of a design feasibility study of a self-contained (powered) actuation system for a Shingle Lap Extendible Exit Cone (SLEEC) for Transportation System (STS). The evolution of the SLEEC actuation system design is reviewed, the final design concept is summarized, and the results of the detailed study of the final concept of the actuation system are treated. A conservative design using proven mechanical components was established as a major program priority. The final mechanical design has a very low development risk since the components, which consist of ballscrews, gearing, flexible shaft drives, and aircraft cables, have extensive aerospace applications and a history of proven reliability. The mathematical model studies have shown that little or no power is required to deploy the SLEEC actuation system because acceleration forces and internal pressure from the rocket plume provide the required energies. A speed control brake is incorporated in the design in order to control the rate of deployment.

  2. Virtual sensor for failure detection, identification and recovery in the transition phase of a morphing aircraft.

    PubMed

    Heredia, Guillermo; Ollero, Aníbal

    2010-01-01

    The Helicopter Adaptive Aircraft (HADA) is a morphing aircraft which is able to take-off as a helicopter and, when in forward flight, unfold the wings that are hidden under the fuselage, and transfer the power from the main rotor to a propeller, thus morphing from a helicopter to an airplane. In this process, the reliable folding and unfolding of the wings is critical, since a failure may determine the ability to perform a mission, and may even be catastrophic. This paper proposes a virtual sensor based Fault Detection, Identification and Recovery (FDIR) system to increase the reliability of the HADA aircraft. The virtual sensor is able to capture the nonlinear interaction between the folding/unfolding wings aerodynamics and the HADA airframe using the navigation sensor measurements. The proposed FDIR system has been validated using a simulation model of the HADA aircraft, which includes real phenomena as sensor noise and sampling characteristics and turbulence and wind perturbations.

  3. Virtual Sensor for Failure Detection, Identification and Recovery in the Transition Phase of a Morphing Aircraft

    PubMed Central

    Heredia, Guillermo; Ollero, Aníbal

    2010-01-01

    The Helicopter Adaptive Aircraft (HADA) is a morphing aircraft which is able to take-off as a helicopter and, when in forward flight, unfold the wings that are hidden under the fuselage, and transfer the power from the main rotor to a propeller, thus morphing from a helicopter to an airplane. In this process, the reliable folding and unfolding of the wings is critical, since a failure may determine the ability to perform a mission, and may even be catastrophic. This paper proposes a virtual sensor based Fault Detection, Identification and Recovery (FDIR) system to increase the reliability of the HADA aircraft. The virtual sensor is able to capture the nonlinear interaction between the folding/unfolding wings aerodynamics and the HADA airframe using the navigation sensor measurements. The proposed FDIR system has been validated using a simulation model of the HADA aircraft, which includes real phenomena as sensor noise and sampling characteristics and turbulence and wind perturbations. PMID:22294922

  4. Actively Controlled Landing Gear for Aircraft Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Daugherty, Robert H.; Martinson, Veloria J.

    1999-01-01

    Concepts for long-range air travel are characterized by airframe designs with long, slender, relatively flexible fuselages. One aspect often overlooked is ground induced vibration of these aircraft. This paper presents an analytical and experimental study of reducing ground-induced aircraft vibration loads using actively controlled landing gears. A facility has been developed to test various active landing gear control concepts and their performance. The facility uses a NAVY A6-intruder landing gear fitted with an auxiliary hydraulic supply electronically controlled by servo valves. An analytical model of the gear is presented including modifications to actuate the gear externally and test data is used to validate the model. The control design is described and closed-loop test and analysis comparisons are presented.

  5. Aircraft Engine Noise Scattering - A Discontinuous Spectral Element Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanescu, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Farassat, F.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a time-domain method for computation of sound radiation from aircraft engine sources to the far-field. The effects of nonuniform flow around the aircraft and scattering of sound by fuselage and wings are accounted for in the formulation. Our approach is based on the discretization of the inviscid flow equations through a collocation form of the Discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method. An isoparametric representation of the underlying geometry is used in order to take full advantage of the spectral accuracy of the method. Largescale computations are made possible by a parallel implementation based on message passing. Results obtained for radiation from an axisymmetric nacelle alone are compared with those obtained when the same nacelle is installed in a generic con.guration, with and without a wing.

  6. Emergency in-flight egress opening for general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    In support of a stall/spin research program, an emergency in-flight egress system is being installed in a light general aviation airplane. To avoid a major structural redesign for a mechanical door, an add-on 11.2 kg pyrotechnic-actuated system was developed to create an opening in the existing structure. The airplane skin will be explosively severed around the side window, across a central stringer, and down to the floor, creating an opening of approximately 76 by 76 cm. The severed panel will be jettisoned at an initial velocity of approximately 13.7 m/sec. System development included a total of 68 explosive severance tests on aluminum material using small samples, small and full scale flat panel aircraft structural mock-ups, and an actual aircraft fuselage. These tests proved explosive sizing/severance margins, explosive initiation, explosive product containment, and system dynamics.

  7. Light Absorbing Particle (LAP) Measurements in the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, D.; Raga, G. B.; Anderson, B.; Diskin, G.; Sachse, G.; Kok, G.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation covers the capabilities and design of the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP-2), and reviews its role on the Sage III Ozone Loss Validation Experiment (SOLVE II) field campaign during 2003. On SOLVE II the SP-2 was carried into the Arctic onboard a DC-8 aircraft, in order to determine the size distribution of light-absorbing and non light-absorbing particles in the stratosphere. Graphs and tables relate some of the results from SOLVE II.

  8. A Study of Vehicle Structural Layouts in Post-WWII Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sensmeier, Mark D.; Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, results of a study of structural layouts of post-WWII aircraft are presented. This study was undertaken to provide the background information necessary to determine typical layouts, design practices, and industry trends in aircraft structural design. Design decisions are often predicated not on performance-related criteria, but rather on such factors as manufacturability, maintenance access, and of course cost. For this reason, a thorough understanding of current best practices in the industry is required as an input for the design optimization process. To determine these best practices and industry trends, a large number of aircraft structural cutaway illustrations were analyzed for five different aircraft categories (commercial transport jets, business jets, combat jet aircraft, single engine propeller aircraft, and twin-engine propeller aircraft). Several aspects of wing design and fuselage design characteristics are presented here for the commercial transport and combat aircraft categories. A great deal of commonality was observed for transport structure designs over a range of eras and manufacturers. A much higher degree of variability in structural designs was observed for the combat aircraft, though some discernable trends were observed as well.

  9. Multiple-site-damage fatigue of riveted joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schijve, J.

    1992-04-01

    Results of fatigue tests in riveted lap joints, including fractographic observations, are presented and analyzed. They indicate that the load transmission in a riveted lap joint is a rather complex phenomenon, as confirmed by quite different crack initiation mechanisms. It may not be expected that fracture mechanics predicts early crack growth with a practically useful degree of accuracy. Most important, the fractographic analysis reveals, that if there are visible cracks in a riveted lap joint, there are many small cracks at most rivet holes in the same critical row of rivets. A multiple site damage situation is present. The conclusion also applies to fuselage lap joints. Scatter in laboratory tests in riveted lap joint specimens is relatively low. However, scatter of riveted joints in a fleet of aircraft may be larger for several reasons. Crack growth in riveted lap joints may be sufficiently slow to allow a timely detection in service. For aging aircraft this should be confirmed by full scale testing.

  10. Aerodynamic interference effects on tilting proprotor aircraft. [using the Green function method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soohoo, P.; Morino, L.; Noll, R. B.; Ham, N. D.

    1977-01-01

    The Green's function method was used to study tilting proprotor aircraft aerodynamics with particular application to the problem of the mutual interference of the wing-fuselage-tail-rotor wake configuration. While the formulation is valid for fully unsteady rotor aerodynamics, attention was directed to steady state aerodynamics, which was achieved by replacing the rotor with the actuator disk approximation. The use of an actuator disk analysis introduced a mathematical singularity into the formulation; this problem was studied and resolved. The pressure distribution, lift, and pitching moment were obtained for an XV-15 wing-fuselage-tail rotor configuration at various flight conditions. For the flight configurations explored, the effects of the rotor wake interference on the XV-15 tilt rotor aircraft yielded a reduction in the total lift and an increase in the nose-down pitching moment. This method provides an analytical capability that is simple to apply and can be used to investigate fuselage-tail rotor wake interference as well as to explore other rotor design problem areas.

  11. Large-scale Advanced Prop-fan (LAP) high speed wind tunnel test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William A.; Wainauski, Harold S.; Arseneaux, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    High Speed Wind Tunnel testing of the SR-7L Large Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) is reported. The LAP is a 2.74 meter (9.0 ft) diameter, 8-bladed tractor type rated for 4475 KW (6000 SHP) at 1698 rpm. It was designated and built by Hamilton Standard under contract to the NASA Lewis Research Center. The LAP employs thin swept blades to provide efficient propulsion at flight speeds up to Mach .85. Testing was conducted in the ONERA S1-MA Atmospheric Wind Tunnel in Modane, France. The test objectives were to confirm that the LAP is free from high speed classical flutter, determine the structural and aerodynamic response to angular inflow, measure blade surface pressures (static and dynamic) and evaluate the aerodynamic performance at various blade angles, rotational speeds and Mach numbers. The measured structural and aerodynamic performance of the LAP correlated well with analytical predictions thereby providing confidence in the computer prediction codes used for the design. There were no signs of classical flutter throughout all phases of the test up to and including the 0.84 maximum Mach number achieved. Steady and unsteady blade surface pressures were successfully measured for a wide range of Mach numbers, inflow angles, rotational speeds and blade angles. No barriers were discovered that would prevent proceeding with the PTA (Prop-Fan Test Assessment) Flight Test Program scheduled for early 1987.

  12. Distribution of pressure on fuselage of airplane model: communication from Rijks-Studiedienst voor de Luchtvaart of Amsterdam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1922-01-01

    In order to study the distribution of the pressure on the surfaces of a fuselage and the influence of the wing on the air flow along these surfaces, we have made tests pertaining to the bottom and one side.

  13. Aircraft Corrosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    chlore mais dans une proportion semblable b cells d’une eau de vil)e ; - lea solides, d’aprbs lea analyses chimique et criatallographique, paraissaiont...IATA member airlines at $100 million based on 1976 operations. Thus the numbers are large, but detailed analyses on specific aircraft types, in known...demonstrate this in any quantitative way with accurate figures. Better information is required on the cost of corrosion, together with analyses of the

  14. Aircraft Ducting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Templeman Industries developed the Ultra-Seal Ducting System, an environmental composite air duct with a 50 percent weight savings over current metallic ducting, but could not find a commercial facility with the ability to test it. Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a structural evaluation of the duct, equivalent to 86 years of take-offs and landings in an aircraft. Boeing Commercial Airplane Group and McDonnell Douglas Corporation are currently using the ducts.

  15. Aircraft integrated design and analysis: A classroom experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisshaar, Terrence A.

    1989-01-01

    AAE 451 is the capstone course required of all senior undergraduates in the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Purdue University. During the past year the first steps of a long evolutionary process were taken to change the content and expectations of this course. These changes are the result of the availability of advanced computational capabilities and sophisticated electronic media availability at Purdue. This presentation will describe both the long range objectives and this year's experience using the High Speed Commercial Transport design, the AIAA Long Duration Aircraft design and RPV design proposal as project objectives. The central goal of these efforts is to provide a user-friendly, computer-software-based environment to supplement traditional design course methodology. The Purdue University Computer Center (PUCC), the Engineering Computer Network (ECN) and stand-alone PC's are being used for this development. This year's accomplishments center primarily on aerodynamics software obtained from NASA/Langley and its integration into the classroom. Word processor capability for oral and written work and computer graphics were also blended into the course. A total of ten HSCT designs were generated, ranging from twin-fuselage aircraft, forward swept wing aircraft to the more traditional delta and double-delta wing aircraft. Four Long Duration Aircraft designs were submitted, together with one RPV design tailored for photographic surveillance.

  16. High energy radiation from aircraft-triggered lightning and thunderstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochkin, Pavlo; van Deursen, Alexander P. J.; de Boer, Alte I.; Bardet, Michiel; Boissin, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    In-flight Lightning Strike Damage Assessment System (ILDAS http://ildas.nlr.nl/) was developed in an EU FP6 project to provide information on threat that lightning poses to aircraft. The system contains one E-field and eight H-field sensors distributed over the fuselage. It has recently been extended to include two LaBr3 scintillation detectors. The scintillation detectors are sensitive to x-ray photons above 30 keV. The entire system is installed on an A-350 aircraft. When triggered by lightning and digitizes data synchronously with 10 ns intervals. Twelve continuously monitoring photon energy channels were implemented for X-ray detectors operating at slower rate (15 ms, pulse counting). In spring of 2014 and 2015 the aircraft flew through thunderstorm cells recording the data from the sensors. Total of 93 lightning strikes to the aircraft are recorded. Eighteen of them are also detected by WWLLN network. One strike consists of six individual strokes within 200 ms that were all synchronously identified by WWLLN. The WWLLN inter-stroke distance is much larger than the aircraft movement. Three of these strokes generated X-ray bursts. One exceptionally bright X-ray pulse of more than 8 MeV has been detected in association with another strike; it probably saturated the detector's photomultiplier. Neither long gamma-ray glow, nor positron annihilation have been detected during the campaign. An explanation is sought in the typical altitude profile of these test flights.

  17. B-52 Launch Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet.

  18. Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Air Load Distribution on Two Combinations of LIfting Surface and Fuselage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1947-05-01

    angles of yaw of ±10°, ± 5 °, and 0°. The unsymmetric distribution of fuselage orifices necessitated tests at equal positive and negative angles of yaw...measured drag. The fuselage pressure distribution for different angles of attack and yaw for configurations F and FWST are shown in figures 3 to 5 . The...configurations F. and FW drawn for the vertical plane of symmetry and for a parallel plane displaced 5 inches. The total difference_ in the areas of

  19. Analysis, Design and Optimization of Non-Cylindrical Fuselage for Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, V.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.; Kosaka, I.; Quinn, G.; Charpentier, C.

    2002-01-01

    Initial results of an investigation towards finding an efficient non-cylindrical fuselage configuration for a conceptual blended-wing-body flight vehicle were presented. A simplified 2-D beam column analysis and optimization was performed first. Then a set of detailed finite element models of deep sandwich panel and ribbed shell construction concepts were analyzed and optimized. Generally these concepts with flat surfaces were found to be structurally inefficient to withstand internal pressure and resultant compressive loads simultaneously. Alternatively, a set of multi-bubble fuselage configuration concepts were developed for balancing internal cabin pressure load efficiently, through membrane stress in inner-stiffened shell and inter-cabin walls. An outer-ribbed shell was designed to prevent buckling due to external resultant compressive loads. Initial results from finite element analysis appear to be promising. These concepts should be developed further to exploit their inherent structurally efficiency.

  20. Implementation and verification of a comprehensive helicopter coupled rotor - Fuselage analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, E. R.; Banerjee, D.; Shamie, J.; Straub, F.; Dinyavari, M. A. H.

    1985-01-01

    The analytical basis and the application of a Rotor/Airframe Comprehensive Aeroelastic Program (RACAP) are described in detail. The rationale behind each analytical choice is outlined and the modular procedure is described. The program is verified by application to the AH-1G helicopter. The applicability of various airload prediction models is examined, and both the steady and vibratory responses of the blade are compared with flight test data. Reasonable correlation is found between measured and calculated blade response, with excellent correlation for vibration amplitudes at various locations on the fuselage such as engine, pilot seat, and gunner. Within the analytical model, comparisons are drawn between an isolated blade analysis and a coupled rotor/fuselage model. The deficiency of the former in the context of the AH-1G is highlighted.

  1. STAGS Developments for Residual Strength Analysis Methods for Metallic Fuselage Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    A summary of advances in the Structural Analysis of General Shells (STAGS) finite element code for the residual strength analysis of metallic fuselage structures, that were realized through collaboration between the structures group at NASA Langley, and Dr. Charles Rankin is presented. The majority of the advancements described were made in the 1990's under the NASA Airframe Structural Integrity Program (NASIP). Example results from studies that were conducted using the STAGS code to develop improved understanding of the nonlinear response of cracked fuselage structures subjected to combined loads are presented. An integrated residual strength analysis methodology for metallic structure that models crack growth to predict the effect of cracks on structural integrity is demonstrated

  2. Nondestructive inspection of bonded composite doublers for aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, Dennis P.; Moore, David; Walkington, Phillip D.

    1996-11-01

    One of the major thrusts established under the FAA's National Aging Aircraft Research Program is to foster new technologies associated with civil aircraft maintenance. Recent DOD and other government developments in the use of bonded composite doublers on metal structures has supported the need for research and validation of such doubler applications on US certificated airplanes. Composite doubler technology is rapidly maturing and shows promise of cost savings on aging aircraft. While there have been numerous studies and military aircraft installations of composite doublers, the technology has not been certified for use on commercial aircraft. Before the use of composite doublers can be accepted by the civil aviation industry, it is imperative that methods be developed which can quickly and reliably assess the integrity of the doubler. In this study, a specific composite application was chosen on an L-1011 aircraft in order to focus the tasks on application and operation issues. Primary among inspection requirements for these doublers is the identification of disbonds, between the composite laminate and aluminum parent material, and delaminations in the composite laminate. Surveillance of cracks or corrosion in the inspection (NDI) method can inspect for every flaw type, therefore it is important to be aware of available NDI techniques and to properly address their capabilities and limitations. This paper reports on a series of NDI tests which have been conducted on laboratory test structures and on a fuselage section cut from a retired L-1011 aircraft. Specific challenges, unique to bonded composite doubler applications, will be highlighted. In order to quickly integrate this technology into existing aircraft maintenance depots, the use of conventional NDI, ultrasonics, x-ray, and eddy current, is stressed. The application of these NDI technique to composite doublers and the results from test specimens, which were loaded to provide a changing flaw profile, are

  3. Coupled rotor/fuselage dynamic analysis of the AH-1G helicopter and correlation with flight vibrations data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, J. C.; Cronkhite, J. D.; Dompka, R. V.; Perry, K. S.; Rogers, J. P.; Sadler, S. G.

    1989-01-01

    Under a research program designated Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS (DAMVIBS), existing analytical methods are used for calculating coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations of the AH-1G helicopter for correlation with flight test data from an AH-1G Operational Load Survey (OLS) test program. The analytical representation of the fuselage structure is based on a NASTRAN finite element model (FEM), which has been developed, extensively documented, and correlated with ground vibration test. One procedure that was used for predicting coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations using the advanced Rotorcraft Flight Simulation Program C81 and NASTRAN is summarized. Detailed descriptions of the analytical formulation of rotor dynamics equations, fuselage dynamic equations, coupling between the rotor and fuselage, and solutions to the total system of equations in C81 are included. Analytical predictions of hub shears for main rotor harmonics 2p, 4p, and 6p generated by C81 are used in conjunction with 2p OLS measured control loads and a 2p lateral tail rotor gearbox force, representing downwash impingement on the vertical fin, to excite the NASTRAN model. NASTRAN is then used to correlate with measured OLS flight test vibrations. Blade load comparisons predicted by C81 showed good agreement. In general, the fuselage vibration correlations show good agreement between anslysis and test in vibration response through 15 to 20 Hz.

  4. The propeller tip vortex. A possible contributor to aircraft cabin noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, B. A.; Dittmar, J. H.; Jeracki, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Although the assumption is generally made that cabin noise levels are governed by the transmission of propeller generated noise through the fuselage sidewall, it was postulated that the propeller wake striking the wing, in particular pressure disturbances generated downstream of the propeller by the action of the propeller tip vortex, could be strong enough to excite the aircraft structure and contribute to the cabin noise level. Tests conducted to measure the strength of the propeller tip vortex support this hypothesis. It was found that the propeller tip vortex can produce a fluctuation pressure on a simulated wing surface in the wake of a propeller that exceeds by more than 15 dB the maximum direct noise that would strike the fuselage. Wing surface response to propeller tip vortex induced excitations, and the effectiveness of this response in radiating noise to the cabin interior, must be established to assess the full significance of these results.

  5. Nacelle Integration to Reduce the Sonic Boom of Aircraft Designed to Cruise at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    An empirical method for integrating the engine nacelles on a wing-fuselage-fin(s) configuration has been described. This method is based on Whitham theory and Seebass and George sonic-boom minimization theory, With it, both reduced sonic-boom as well as high aerodynamic efficiency methods can be applied to the conceptual design of a supersonic-cruise aircraft. Two high-speed civil transport concepts were used as examples to illustrate the application of this engine-nacelle integration methodology: (1) a concept with engine nacelles mounted on the aft-fuselage, the HSCT-1OB; and (2) a concept with engine nacelles mounted under an extended-wing center section, the HSCT-11E. In both cases, the key to a significant reduction in the sonic-boom contribution from the engine nacelles was to use the F-function shape of the concept as a guide to move the nacelles further aft on the configuration.

  6. Vertical drop test of a transport fuselage center section including the wheel wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. S.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    A Boeing 707 fuselage section was drop tested to measure structural, seat, and anthropomorphic dummy response to vertical crash loads. The specimen had nominally zero pitch, roll and yaw at impact with a sink speed of 20 ft/sec. Results from this drop test and other drop tests of different transport sections will be used to prepare for a full-scale crash test of a B-720.

  7. STS-40 Commander O'Connor with trainer outside JSC's Full Fuselage Trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-40 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Commander Bryan D. O'Connor reviews instructions with training personnel as he fastens a clip on his launch and entry helmet (LEH). Wearing his launch and entry suit (LES), O'Connor is ready to begin emergency egress exercises from the side hatch of the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT) (in background). The FFT is located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A.

  8. Slender body theory programmed for bodies with arbitrary cross section. [including fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, J.; Krenkel, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program developed for determining the subsonic pressure, force, and moment coefficients for a fuselage-type body using slender body theory is described. The program is suitable for determining the angle of attack and sideslipping characteristics of such bodies in the linear range where viscous effects are not predominant. Procedures developed which are capable of treating cross sections with corners or regions of large curvature are outlined.

  9. Automatic computation of Euler-marching and subsonic grids for wing-fuselage configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, Raymond L.; Adams, Mary S.; Krishnan, Ramki R.

    1994-01-01

    Algebraic procedures are described for the automatic generation of structured, single-block flow computation grids for relatively simple configurations (wing, fuselage, and fin). For supersonic flows, a quasi two-dimensional grid for Euler-marching codes is developed, and some sample results in graphical form are included. A type of grid for subsonic flow calculation is also described. The techniques are algebraic and are based on a generalization of the method of transfinite interpolation.

  10. Simulation of transonic viscous wing and wing-fuselage flows using zonal methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, Jolen

    1987-01-01

    The thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are coupled with a zonal scheme (or domain-decomposition method) to develop the Transonic Navier-Stokes (TNS) wing-alone code. The TNS has a total of 4 zones and is extended to a total of 16 zones for the wing-fuselage version of the code. Results are compared on the Cray X-MP-48 and compared with experimental data.

  11. Development of Advanced Methods of Structural and Trajectory Analysis for Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, Mark D.

    1996-01-01

    In this report the author describes: (1) development of advanced methods of structural weight estimation, and (2) development of advanced methods of flight path optimization. A method of estimating the load-bearing fuselage weight and wing weight of transport aircraft based on fundamental structural principles has been developed. This method of weight estimation represents a compromise between the rapid assessment of component weight using empirical methods based on actual weights of existing aircraft and detailed, but time-consuming, analysis using the finite element method. The method was applied to eight existing subsonic transports for validation and correlation. Integration of the resulting computer program, PDCYL, has been made into the weights-calculating module of the AirCraft SYNThesis (ACSYNT) computer program. ACSYNT bas traditionally used only empirical weight estimation methods; PDCYL adds to ACSYNT a rapid, accurate means of assessing the fuselage and wing weights of unconventional aircraft. PDCYL also allows flexibility in the choice of structural concept, as well as a direct means of determining the impact of advanced materials on structural weight.

  12. Grain decoration in aluminum oxynitride (ALON) from polishing on bound abrasive laps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Leslie L.; Marino, Anne E.; Hayes, Jennifer C.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2004-01-01

    Aluminum oxynitride (ALON) is a polycrystalline material that has proven difficult to polish due to its grain structure. Bound abrasives are an effective means for polishing ALON, and work is being done with them to obtain good surfaces, with reasonable removal rates. Laps consisting of abrasives bound in epoxy matrices were created for polishing ALON. The effects of varying abrasive type, abrasive concentration, lap shape, coolant and load were studied. Metrology procedures were developed to monitor different aspects of the grain structure and numerically evaluate grain boundary decoration. Strategies were developed to polish ALON at acceptable rates with reasonably good surface quality. Work is directed toward finding optimal bound abrasive lap formulations that can be fabricated into ring and/or contour tools for testing on CNC machining platforms.

  13. Grain decoration in aluminum oxynitride (ALON) from polishing on bound abrasive laps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Anne E.; Hayes, Jennifer; Gregg, Leslie L.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2003-05-01

    Aluminum oxynitride (ALON) is a material with desirable qualities for a variety of applications that has proven difficult to polish because of its grain structure. Bound abrasives may prove to be an effective means of polishing it, and work is being done with them to obtain good surfaces on ALON, with reasonable removal rates. Laps consisting of abrasives bound in epoxy matrices have been created for polishing ALON. The effects of varying abrasive type, abrasive concentration, lap shape, coolant and load are being studied. Metrology procedures are being developed to monitor different aspects of the grain structure and numerically evaluate its decoration. Strategies have been developed to polish ALON at acceptable rates with reasonably good surface quality. Work is directed toward finding optimal bound abrasive lap formulations that can be fabricated into ring and/or contour tools for testing on CNC machining platforms.

  14. Large-scale Advanced Prop-fan (LAP) technology assessment report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degeorge, C. L.

    1988-01-01

    The technologically significant findings and accomplishments of the Large Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) program in the areas of aerodynamics, aeroelasticity, acoustics and materials and fabrication are described. The extent to which the program goals related to these disciplines were achieved is discussed, and recommendations for additional research are presented. The LAP program consisted of the design, manufacture and testing of a near full-scale Prop-Fan or advanced turboprop capable of operating efficiently at speeds to Mach .8. An aeroelastically scaled model of the LAP was also designed and fabricated. The goal of the program was to acquire data on Prop-Fan performance that would indicate the technology readiness of Prop-Fans for practical applications in commercial and military aviation.

  15. Study on active lap tool influence function in grinding 1.8 m primary mirror.

    PubMed

    Haitao, Liu; Zhige, Zeng; Fan, Wu; Bin, Fan; Yongjian, Wan

    2013-11-01

    We present a theoretical modeling method to predict the ring tool influence function (TIF) based on the computer-controlled active lap process. The gap on the lap-grinding layer is considered, and its influence on the ring TIF is analyzed too. The relationship between the shape of the ring TIF and the lap-workpiece rotation speed ratio is discussed in this paper. The recipe for calculating dwell time for axisymmetric fabrication is discussed. The grinding process of a 1.8 m primary mirror is improved based on these results. The grinding process is accomplished after 30 circles of grinding, and the surface shape error is from PV 82 μm RMS 16.4 μm reduced to PV 13.5 μm RMS 2.5 μm.

  16. Failure strength prediction for adhesively bonded single lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Niat Mahmud

    For adhesively bonded joint, failure strength depends on many factors such as material properties (both adhesive and adherend), specimen geometries, test environments, surface preparation procedures, etc. Failure occurs inside constitutive materials or along joint interfaces. Based on location, adhesively bonded failure mode can be classified as adhesive failure mode, cohesive failure mode and adherend failure mode. Failure mode directly affects the failure strength of joint. For last eight decades, researchers have developed analytical, empirical or semi-empirical methods capable of predicting failure strength for adhesively bonded joints generating either cohesive failure or adherend failure. Applicability of most of the methods is limited to particular cases. In this research, different failure modes for single lap joints (SLJs) were generated experimentally using epoxy based paste adhesive. Based on experimental data and analytical study, simplified failure prediction methods were developed for each failure mode. For adhesive failure mode, it is observed that peel stress distributions concur along interface near crack initiation points. All SLJs for this test endured consistent surface treatments. Geometric parameters of the joints were varied to study their effect on failure strength. Peel stress distributions were calculated using finite analysis (FEA). Based on peel stress distribution near crack initiation point, a failure model is proposed. Numerous analytical, empirical and semi-empirical models are available for predicting failure strengths of SLJs generating cohesive failures. However, most of the methods in the literature failed to capture failure behavior of SLJs having thickness of adhesive layer as variable. Cohesive failure mode was generated experimentally using aluminum as adherend and epoxy adhesive considering thickness of adhesive layers as variable within SLJs. Comparative study was performed among various methods. It was observed that

  17. Comparison of Hard Surface and Soft Soil Impact Performance of a Crashworthy Composite Fuselage Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sareen, Ashish K.; Sparks, Chad; Mullins, B. R., Jr.; Fasanella, Edwin; Jackson, Karen

    2002-01-01

    A comparison of the soft soil and hard surface impact performance of a crashworthy composite fuselage concept has been performed. Specifically, comparisons of the peak acceleration values, pulse duration, and onset rate at specific locations on the fuselage were evaluated. In a prior research program, the composite fuselage section was impacted at 25 feet per second onto concrete at the Impact Dynamics Research Facility (IDRF) at NASA Langley Research Center. A soft soil test was conducted at the same impact velocity as a part of the NRTC/RITA Crashworthy and Energy Absorbing Structures project. In addition to comparisons of soft soil and hard surface test results, an MSC. Dytran dynamic finite element model was developed to evaluate the test analysis correlation. In addition, modeling parameters and techniques affecting test analysis correlation are discussed. Once correlated, the analytical methodology will be used in follow-on work to evaluate the specific energy absorption of various subfloor concepts for improved crash protection during hard surface and soft soil impacts.

  18. Multi-terrain Vertical Drop Tests of a Composite Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sotirios, Kellas; Jackson, Karen E.

    2008-01-01

    A 5-ft-diameter composite fuselage section was retrofitted with four identical blocks of deployable honeycomb energy absorber and crash tested on two different surfaces: soft soil, and water. The drop tests were conducted at the 70-ft. drop tower at the Landing and Impact Research (LandIR) Facility of NASA Langley. Water drop tests were performed into a 15-ft-diameter pool of water that was approximately 42-in. deep. For the soft soil impact, a 15-ft-square container filled with fine-sifted, unpacked sand was located beneath the drop tower. All drop tests were vertical with a nominally flat attitude with respect to the impact surface. The measured impact velocities were 37.4, and 24.7-fps for soft soil and water, respectively. A fuselage section without energy absorbers was also drop tested onto water to provide a datum for comparison with the test, which included energy absorbers. In order to facilitate this type of comparison and to ensure fuselage survivability for the no-energy-absorber case, the velocity of the water impact tests was restricted to 25-fps nominal. While all tests described in this paper were limited to vertical impact velocities, the implications and design challenges of utilizing external energy absorbers during combined forward and vertical impact velocities are discussed. The design, testing and selection of a honeycomb cover, which was required in soft surface and water impacts to transmit the load into the honeycomb cell walls, is also presented.

  19. Multi-Terrain Vertical Drop Tests of a Composite Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Jackson, Karen E.

    2008-01-01

    A 5-ft-diameter composite fuselage section was retrofitted with four identical blocks of deployable honeycomb energy absorber and crash tested on two different surfaces: soft soil, and water. The drop tests were conducted at the 70-ft. drop tower at the Landing and Impact Research (LandIR) Facility of NASA Langley. Water drop tests were performed into a 15-ft-diameter pool of water that was approximately 42-in. deep. For the soft soil impact, a 15-ft-square container filled with fine-sifted, unpacked sand was located beneath the drop tower. All drop tests were vertical with a nominally flat attitude with respect to the impact surface. The measured impact velocities were 37.4, and 24.7-fps for soft soil and water, respectively. A fuselage section without energy absorbers was also drop tested onto water to provide a datum for comparison with the test, which included energy absorbers. In order to facilitate this type of comparison and to ensure fuselage survivability for the no-energy-absorber case, the velocity of the water impact tests was restricted to 25-fps nominal. While all tests described in this paper were limited to vertical impact velocities, the implications and design challenges of utilizing external energy absorbers during combined forward and vertical impact velocities are discussed. The design, testing and selection of a honeycomb cover, which was required in soft surface and water impacts to transmit the load into the honeycomb cell walls, is also presented.

  20. Sound Transmission Loss Prediction of the Composite Fuselage with Different Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chongxin; Bergsma, Otto; Beukers, Adriaan

    2012-12-01

    Increase of sound transmission loss(TL) of the fuselage is vital to build a comfortable cabin environment. In this paper, to find a convenient and accurate means for predicting the fuselage TL, the fuselage is modeled as a composite cylinder, and its TL is predicted with the analytical, the statistic energy analysis (SEA) and the hybrid FE&SEA method. The TL results predicted by the three methods are compared to each other and they show good agreement, but in terms of model building the SEA method is the most convenient one. Therefore, the parameters including the layup, the materials, the geometry, and the structure type are studied with the SEA method. It is observed that asymmetric laminates provide better sound insulation in general. It is further found that glass fiber laminates result in the best sound insulation as compared with graphite and aramid fiber laminates. In addition, the cylinder length has little influence on the sound insulation, while an increase of the radius considerably reduces the TL at low frequencies. Finally, by a comparison among an unstiffened laminate, a sandwich panel and a stiffened panel, the sandwich panel presents the largest TL at high frequencies and the stiffened panel demonstrates the poorest sound insulation at all frequencies.