Science.gov

Sample records for aircraft hydraulic fluid

  1. Ultrasonic Measurement of Aircraft Strut Hydraulic Fluid Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.

    2002-01-01

    An ultrasonic method is presented for non-intrusively measuring hydraulic fluid level in aircraft struts in the field quickly and easily without modifying the strut or aircraft. The technique interrogates the strut with ultrasonic waves generated and received by a removable ultrasonic transducer hand-held on the outside of the strut in a fashion that is in the presence or absence of hydraulic fluid inside the strut. This technique was successfully demonstrated on an A-6 aircraft strut on the carriage at the Aircraft Landing Dynamics Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. Conventional practice upon detection of strut problem symptoms is to remove aircraft from service for extensive maintenance to determine fluid level. No practical technique like the method presented herein for locating strut hydraulic fluid level is currently known to be used.

  2. Assessment of the Flammability of Aircraft Hydraulic Fluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    plates of different compositions (e.g., Hastelloy Alloy X, stainless steels, titanium, aluminum alloys , and others) to determine the effect of metal...propagation properties , and heats of combustion of a number of aircraft fluids. These included currently used (cont’d) FtORM DD I JAN 7 1473 EDITION...and other apparatus for the determi- nation of ignitability anc flame propagation properties and heats of combustion of a number of aircraft fluids

  3. Hydraulic fluids and jet engine oil: pyrolysis and aircraft air quality.

    PubMed

    van Netten, C; Leung, V

    2001-01-01

    Incidents of smoke in aircraft cabins often result from jet engine oil and/or hydraulic fluid that leaks into ventilation air, which can be subjected to temperatures that exceed 500 degrees C. Exposed flight-crew members have reported symptoms, including dizziness, nausea, disorientation, blurred vision, and tingling in the legs and arms. In this study, the authors investigated pyrolysis products of one jet engine oil and two hydraulic fluids at 525 degrees C. Engine oil was an important source of carbon monoxide. Volatile agents and organophosphate constituents were released from all the agents tested; however, the neurotoxin trimethyl propane phosphate was not found. The authors hypothesized that localized condensation of pyrolysis products in ventilation ducts, followed by mobilization when cabin heat demand was high, accounted for mid-flight incidents. The authors recommended that carbon monoxide data be logged continuously to capture levels during future incidents.

  4. Exposure of aircraft maintenance technicians to organophosphates from hydraulic fluids and turbine oils: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Birgit Karin; Koslitz, Stephan; Weiss, Tobias; Broding, Horst Christoph; Brüning, Thomas; Bünger, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fluids and turbine oils contain organophosphates like tricresyl phosphate isomers, triphenyl phosphate and tributyl phosphate from very small up to high percentages. The aim of this pilot study was to determine if aircraft maintenance technicians are exposed to relevant amounts of organophosphates. Dialkyl and diaryl phosphate metabolites of seven organophosphates were quantified in pre- and post-shift spot urine samples of technicians (N=5) by GC-MS/MS after solid phase extraction and derivatization. Pre- and post shift values of tributyl phosphate metabolites (dibutyl phosphate (DBP): median pre-shift: 12.5 μg/L, post-shift: 23.5 μg/L) and triphenyl phosphate metabolites (diphenyl phosphate (DPP): median pre-shift: 2.9 μg/L, post-shift: 3.5 μg/L) were statistically higher than in a control group from the general population (median DBP: <0.25 μg/L, median DPP: 0.5 μg/L). No tricresyl phosphate metabolites were detected. The aircraft maintenance technicians were occupationally exposed to tributyl and triphenyl phosphate but not to tricresyl phosphate, tri-(2-chloroethyl)- and tri-(2-chloropropyl)-phosphate. Further studies are necessary to collect information on sources, routes of uptake and varying exposures during different work tasks, evaluate possible health effects and to set up appropriate protective measures.

  5. Multi-elemental analysis of jet engine lubricating oils and hydraulic fluids and their implication in aircraft air quality incidents.

    PubMed

    van Netten, C

    1999-05-07

    The flight crews of aircraft often report symptoms including dizziness, nausea, disorientation, blurred vision and tingling in legs and arms. Many of these incidents have been traced to contamination of cabin air with lubricating oil, as well as hydraulic fluid, constituents. Considering that these air contaminants are often subjected to temperatures in excess of 500 degrees C, a large number of different exposures can be expected. Although the reported symptoms are most consistent with exposures to volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, and the organophosphate constituents in these oils and fluids, the involvement of these agents has not been clearly demonstrated. Possible exposure to toxic elements, such as lead, mercury, thallium and others, have not been ruled out. In order to assess the potential of exposure to toxic elements a multi-elemental analysis was done on two hydraulic fluids and three lubricating oils which have been implicated in a number of air quality incidents. A secondary objective was to establish if the multi-elemental concentrations of the fluids tested are different enough to allow such an analysis to be used as a possible method of identifying the source of exposure that might have been present during aircraft air quality incidents. No significant concentrations of toxic elements were identified in any of the oils or hydraulic fluids. The elemental compositions of the samples were different enough to be used for identification purposes and the measurement of only three elements was able to achieve this. Whether these findings have an application, in aircraft air quality incident investigations, needs to be established with further studies.

  6. Aircraft hydraulic systems. Third edition

    SciTech Connect

    Neese, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    The first nine chapters concern hydraulic components including: tubing, hoses, fittings, seals, pumps, valves, cylinders, and motors. General hydraulic system considerations are included in chapters five and nine, while pneumatic systems are covered in chapter ten. Chapters eleven through fifteen are devoted to aircraft-specific systems such as: landing gear, flight controls, brakes, etc. The material is rounded out with excerpts from the Canadair Challenger 601 training guide to illustrate the use of hydraulic systems in a specific aircraft application.

  7. Aircraft Hydraulic Systems Dynamic Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    technical report has been reviewed and is approved for publication. Project Engineer 0 Acting Technical Area Manager FOR THE COMMANDER STEPHEN P...by the McDonnell Aircraft Company, Design Engineering Power and Fluid Subsystem Department, McDonnell Douglas Corporation under contract F33615-74-C...34 (Pennsylvania State University Graduate School of Mechanical Engineering , June 1970), gave predicted variation in the fluid velocity at three different

  8. Complex Fluids and Hydraulic Fracturing.

    PubMed

    Barbati, Alexander C; Desroches, Jean; Robisson, Agathe; McKinley, Gareth H

    2016-06-07

    Nearly 70 years old, hydraulic fracturing is a core technique for stimulating hydrocarbon production in a majority of oil and gas reservoirs. Complex fluids are implemented in nearly every step of the fracturing process, most significantly to generate and sustain fractures and transport and distribute proppant particles during and following fluid injection. An extremely wide range of complex fluids are used: naturally occurring polysaccharide and synthetic polymer solutions, aqueous physical and chemical gels, organic gels, micellar surfactant solutions, emulsions, and foams. These fluids are loaded over a wide range of concentrations with particles of varying sizes and aspect ratios and are subjected to extreme mechanical and environmental conditions. We describe the settings of hydraulic fracturing (framed by geology), fracturing mechanics and physics, and the critical role that non-Newtonian fluid dynamics and complex fluids play in the hydraulic fracturing process.

  9. Fluid Power/Basic Hydraulics. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanbery, Richard

    This guide is designed to assist industrial vocational instructors in teaching a course on fluid power and basic hydraulics. Covered in the unit on the basics of fluid power and hydraulics are the following topics: the fundamentals of fluid power and hydraulics, basic hydraulic circuits, and servicing a hydraulic jack. The second unit, consisting…

  10. Hydraulic fluid generator

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, D.P.; Tully, L.E.

    1981-08-18

    Two sources of water with a temperature differential of say 20/sup 0/F flow alternately through heat exchanger tubes to expand and contract a working liquid that has a high coefficient of thermal expansion, the whole working cycle being carried out below the boiling point of the working liquid. With check valves preventing reverse flow, the expansion and contraction of the working liquid provides a high pressure hydraulic output which may be used to drive a hydraulic motor. To provide substantially steady output flow, four banks of heat exchangers may be operated sequentially with hydraulic accumulator means smoothing out the flow pulsations. Each bank has a four-stage operating cycle and electrical circuitry controls the four banks simultaneously to cause the four different stages to occur in certain of the four different banks in staggered relation for producing a substantially constant overall hydraulic output.

  11. CRITICALITY CURVES FOR PLUTONIUM HYDRAULIC FLUID MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    WITTEKIND WD

    2007-10-03

    This Calculation Note performs and documents MCNP criticality calculations for plutonium (100% {sup 239}Pu) hydraulic fluid mixtures. Spherical geometry was used for these generalized criticality safety calculations and three geometries of neutron reflection are: {sm_bullet}bare, {sm_bullet}1 inch of hydraulic fluid, or {sm_bullet}12 inches of hydraulic fluid. This document shows the critical volume and critical mass for various concentrations of plutonium in hydraulic fluid. Between 1 and 2 gallons of hydraulic fluid were discovered in the bottom of HA-23S. This HA-23S hydraulic fluid was reported by engineering to be Fyrquel 220. The hydraulic fluid in GLovebox HA-23S is Fyrquel 220 which contains phosphorus. Critical spherical geometry in air is calculated with 0 in., 1 in., or 12 inches hydraulic fluid reflection.

  12. Hot Surface Ignition Tests of Aircraft Fluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    commionly f~und in aircraft engine components, JP-4 and JP-8 fuels, Mil-H-5606 and Mil-H-83282 hydraulic fluids and Mil-L-7808 lubricating oil , were tested in...4 and JP-8 fuels and Nil-L-7808 lubricating oil ) using an air- heated bleed-air du:t in a high realism test article. First, tests were conducted on a...JP-4 and JP-8 fuels, Mil-H.- 5606 and Mil-H-83282 hydraulic "J.,tids and Mil-L-7806 lubricating oil were injected as spray or streuins clto various

  13. Importance of mechanical testing of hydraulic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Reichel, J.

    1997-12-31

    Anti-wear properties of hydraulic fluids are important because hydraulic pump and motor wear is costly. Hydraulic fluid performance specifications represent minimum requirements. International hydraulic fluid performance standards are being developed by ISO/TC28/SC4 committee as draft (ISO DIS 11158 ``Specifications for Mineral Oil Hydraulic Fluids``). Performance specifications for non-mineral oil hydraulic fluids are also being developed. Typically, both the user and fluid manufacturer have insufficient information relating to the anti-wear properties of a new fluid to be used in hydraulic equipment, such as axial piston pumps, vane pumps or radial piston motors. Therefore, pump lubrication and operation requirements, preferably pre-existing in pump manufacturer`s specifications, must be determined. The required fluid lubrication properties may be determined by either laboratory pump tests or by a field trial, often at the expense of the customer. More preferably, the lubrication properties of the hydraulic fluid should be determined under mechanical conditions equivalent to field practice. In this paper, the use of both the vane pump test and the FZG Gear Test to predetermine the recommended hydraulic fluid lubrication performance will be discussed. In this way, fluid performance may be determined at significantly lower cost than more expensive large scale hydraulic pump and motor tests which are slower and more energy consuming.

  14. Fire Resistant Aircraft Hydraulic System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    Fluid per PIL-H-5606 273,300 Synthetic Hydrocarbon per MIL-H-83282 274,200 Deep Dewaxed Hydrocarbon per M IL-H- 27601 278,700 Silicate Ester Fluid M2V...05 7.3/70.0 (+859%) MIL-H-5606 ɘ.1 lb .02/.05 14.4/20.6 (+43%) MIL-H-83282 ɘ.1 lb .05/.01 15.7/15.8 (+0.6%) MIL-H- 27601 ɘ.1 lb 0.0/0.0 14.8/15.0

  15. 110. TUBING FOR HYDRAULIC FLUID AT BACK OF HYDRAULIC CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    110. TUBING FOR HYDRAULIC FLUID AT BACK OF HYDRAULIC CONTROL PANEL IN UMBILICAL MAST PUMP ROOM (109), LSB (BLDG. 770) ACCUMULATOR FOR MAST RETRACTION ON LEFT. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  16. 128. TUBING FOR HYDRAULIC FLUID AT BACK OF HYDRAULIC CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    128. TUBING FOR HYDRAULIC FLUID AT BACK OF HYDRAULIC CONTROL PANEL IN UMBILICAL MAST PUMP ROOM (209), LSB (BLDG. 751). PUMP ON RIGHT; ACCUMULATOR FOR MAST RETRACTION ON LEFT. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  17. Theory and applications of drilling fluid hydraulics

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, A.

    1985-01-01

    A reference on drilling fluid hydraulics, this text provides information, nomenclature and equations. Chapter 1 introduces the basic principles of fluid properties. Chapter 2 discusses the general principles, models and measurements related to fluid flow. Newtonian, Bingham, Power Law, Casson, Robertson-Stiff and Herschel-Bulkley models are all discussed. Chapters 3 through 10 analyze hydraulic problems specific to drilling fluids and the drilling process including: viscometric measurements, pressure losses, swab and surge pressures, cuttings transport, and hydraulics optimization. Each chapter concludes with a bibliography. For consistency, nomenclature remains constant and SI units are used throughout the text. All key equations using oilfield units are listed in the appendices.

  18. Theory and application of drilling fluid hydraulics

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, A.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives of this book are (1) to serve as a reasonably comprehensive text on the subject of drilling hydraulics and (2) to provide the field geologist with a quick reference to drilling hydraulics calculations. Chapter 1 introduces the basic principles of fluid properties, and Chapter 2 presents the general principles of fluid hydraulics. Chapters 3 through 10 analyze specific hydraulic considerations of the drilling process, such as viscometric measurements, pressure losses, swab and surge pressures, cuttings transport and hydraulic optimization. The units and nomenclature are consistent throughout the manual. Equations are given generally in consistent S.I. units; some common expressions are also given in oilfield units. Nomenclature is explained after every equation when necessary, and a comprehensive list of the nomenclature used is given in Appendix A. Units are listed in Appendix B. In Appendix C, all the important equations are given in both S.I. and oilfield units. Appendix D contains example hydraulics calculations.

  19. Proposed hydraulic pump testing for hydraulic fluid qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Melief, H.M.

    1997-12-31

    The current ASTM D-2882 hydraulic vane pump test does not provide the necessary correlation required for the prediction of the lubricating properties of a hydraulic fluid in various piston pump operations. All too often, a fluid will exhibit excellent wear properties in the Vickers V-104 vane pump used in the ASTM D-2882 test, yet produce catastrophic failure at various wear interfaces in a piston pump which may consist of different material pairs, contact loading, configuration or speed. In this paper, a new piston pump test, which is conducted under cycled pressure testing conditions, is proposed. The new test will provide an excellent assessment of the lubricating properties of a hydraulic fluid under a wide variety of wear conditions.

  20. 46 CFR 58.30-10 - Hydraulic fluid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... AND RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-10 Hydraulic fluid. (a) The requirements... vessels subject to inspection. (b) The fluid used in hydraulic power transmission systems shall have a... hydraulic fluid shall be suitable for operation of the hydraulic system through the entire temperature...

  1. 46 CFR 58.30-10 - Hydraulic fluid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... AND RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-10 Hydraulic fluid. (a) The requirements... vessels subject to inspection. (b) The fluid used in hydraulic power transmission systems shall have a... hydraulic fluid shall be suitable for operation of the hydraulic system through the entire temperature...

  2. 46 CFR 58.30-10 - Hydraulic fluid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydraulic fluid. 58.30-10 Section 58.30-10 Shipping... AND RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-10 Hydraulic fluid. (a) The requirements... vessels subject to inspection. (b) The fluid used in hydraulic power transmission systems shall have...

  3. 46 CFR 58.30-10 - Hydraulic fluid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydraulic fluid. 58.30-10 Section 58.30-10 Shipping... AND RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-10 Hydraulic fluid. (a) The requirements... vessels subject to inspection. (b) The fluid used in hydraulic power transmission systems shall have...

  4. 46 CFR 58.30-10 - Hydraulic fluid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydraulic fluid. 58.30-10 Section 58.30-10 Shipping... AND RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-10 Hydraulic fluid. (a) The requirements... vessels subject to inspection. (b) The fluid used in hydraulic power transmission systems shall have...

  5. Determination of Chloride in Hydraulic Fluids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    chloride stock solution (1000 mg/L) was prepared by dissolv- ing sodium chloride in deionized distilled water. A 5M sodium nitrate solu- tion was used as...electrode as the reference electrode. Calibration curves were prepared by measuring the potentials (millivolts) of standard chloride solution (1, 10, 100...Therefore, it is recommended that only 10% (v/v) hydraulic fluid ( ehtylene glycol) solutions be used for analysis. The electrode must not stay in the

  6. 49 CFR 173.172 - Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank. 173.172 Section 173.172 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.172 Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank. Aircraft hydraulic power...

  7. 49 CFR 173.172 - Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank. 173.172 Section 173.172 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.172 Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank. Aircraft hydraulic power...

  8. 49 CFR 173.172 - Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank. 173.172 Section 173.172 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.172 Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank. Aircraft hydraulic power...

  9. 49 CFR 173.172 - Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank. 173.172 Section 173.172 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.172 Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank. Aircraft hydraulic power...

  10. FTIR quantification of industrial hydraulic fluids in perchloroethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Narinder K.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this summer research project was to investigate whether perchloroethylene can be used as a solvent for the quantitative analysis of industrial hydraulic fluids by infrared spectroscopy employing Beer's law. Standard calibration curves using carbon-hydrogen stretching (generic) and ester absorption peaks were prepared for a series of standard dilutions at low ppm levels of concentration of seven hydraulic fluids in perchloroethylene. The absorbance spectras were recorded with 1.5-10 mm fixed and variable path length sample cells made of potassium bromide. The results indicate that using ester infrared spectral peak, it is possible to detect about 20 ppm of the hydraulic fluid in perchloroethylene.

  11. Disclosure of hydraulic fracturing fluid chemical additives: analysis of regulations.

    PubMed

    Maule, Alexis L; Makey, Colleen M; Benson, Eugene B; Burrows, Isaac J; Scammell, Madeleine K

    2013-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is used to extract natural gas from shale formations. The process involves injecting into the ground fracturing fluids that contain thousands of gallons of chemical additives. Companies are not mandated by federal regulations to disclose the identities or quantities of chemicals used during hydraulic fracturing operations on private or public lands. States have begun to regulate hydraulic fracturing fluids by mandating chemical disclosure. These laws have shortcomings including nondisclosure of proprietary or "trade secret" mixtures, insufficient penalties for reporting inaccurate or incomplete information, and timelines that allow for after-the-fact reporting. These limitations leave lawmakers, regulators, public safety officers, and the public uninformed and ill-prepared to anticipate and respond to possible environmental and human health hazards associated with hydraulic fracturing fluids. We explore hydraulic fracturing exemptions from federal regulations, as well as current and future efforts to mandate chemical disclosure at the federal and state level.

  12. Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Analysis for Regulatory Parameters - A Progress Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation is a progress report on the analysis of Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids for regulatory compounds outlined in the various US EPA methodologies. Fracturing fluids vary significantly in consistency and viscosity prior to fracturing. Due to the nature of the fluids the analytical challenges will have to be addressed. This presentation also outlines the sampling issues associated with the collection of dissolved gas samples.

  13. 13. Detail of hydraulic fluid piping, east wall of bay ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail of hydraulic fluid piping, east wall of bay - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  14. Method to Estimate the Dissolved Air Content in Hydraulic Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to verify the air content in hydraulic fluid, an instrument was needed to measure the dissolved air content before the fluid was loaded into the system. The instrument also needed to measure the dissolved air content in situ and in real time during the de-aeration process. The current methods used to measure the dissolved air content require the fluid to be drawn from the hydraulic system, and additional offline laboratory processing time is involved. During laboratory processing, there is a potential for contamination to occur, especially when subsaturated fluid is to be analyzed. A new method measures the amount of dissolved air in hydraulic fluid through the use of a dissolved oxygen meter. The device measures the dissolved air content through an in situ, real-time process that requires no additional offline laboratory processing time. The method utilizes an instrument that measures the partial pressure of oxygen in the hydraulic fluid. By using a standardized calculation procedure that relates the oxygen partial pressure to the volume of dissolved air in solution, the dissolved air content is estimated. The technique employs luminescent quenching technology to determine the partial pressure of oxygen in the hydraulic fluid. An estimated Henry s law coefficient for oxygen and nitrogen in hydraulic fluid is calculated using a standard method to estimate the solubility of gases in lubricants. The amount of dissolved oxygen in the hydraulic fluid is estimated using the Henry s solubility coefficient and the measured partial pressure of oxygen in solution. The amount of dissolved nitrogen that is in solution is estimated by assuming that the ratio of dissolved nitrogen to dissolved oxygen is equal to the ratio of the gas solubility of nitrogen to oxygen at atmospheric pressure and temperature. The technique was performed at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The technique could be theoretically carried out at higher pressures and elevated

  15. Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelbrecht, Nancy; And Others

    These instructional materials provide an orientation to hydraulics for use at the postsecondary level. The first of 12 sections presents an introduction to hydraulics, including discussion of principles of liquids, definitions, liquid flow, the two types of hydraulic fluids, pressure gauges, and strainers and filters. The second section identifies…

  16. 30 CFR 75.1107-2 - Approved fire-resistant hydraulic fluids; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approved fire-resistant hydraulic fluids... Protection Fire Suppression Devices and Fire-Resistant Hydraulic Fluids on Underground Equipment § 75.1107-2 Approved fire-resistant hydraulic fluids; minimum requirements. Fire-resistant hydraulic fluids...

  17. 30 CFR 75.1107-2 - Approved fire-resistant hydraulic fluids; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approved fire-resistant hydraulic fluids... Protection Fire Suppression Devices and Fire-Resistant Hydraulic Fluids on Underground Equipment § 75.1107-2 Approved fire-resistant hydraulic fluids; minimum requirements. Fire-resistant hydraulic fluids...

  18. 30 CFR 75.1107-2 - Approved fire-resistant hydraulic fluids; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Approved fire-resistant hydraulic fluids... Protection Fire Suppression Devices and Fire-Resistant Hydraulic Fluids on Underground Equipment § 75.1107-2 Approved fire-resistant hydraulic fluids; minimum requirements. Fire-resistant hydraulic fluids...

  19. Application study of magnetic fluid seal in hydraulic turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z. Y.; Zhang, W.

    2012-11-01

    The waterpower resources of our country are abundant, and the hydroelectric power is developed, but at present the main shaft sealing device of hydraulic turbine is easy to wear and tear and the leakage is great. The magnetic fluid seal has the advantages of no contact, no wear, self-healing, long life and so on. In this paper, the magnetic fluid seal would be used in the main shaft of hydraulic turbine, the sealing structure was built the model, meshed the geometry, applied loads and solved by using MULTIPHYSICS in ANSYS software, the influence of the various sealing structural parameters such as tooth width, height, slot width, sealing gap on the sealing property were analyzed, the magnetic fluid sealing device suitable for large-diameter shaft and sealing water was designed, the sealing problem of the hydraulic turbine main shaft was solved effectively which will bring huge economic benefits.

  20. Water-glycol hydraulic fluid maintenance -- Pump wear implications and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Totten, G.E.; Bishop, R.J. Jr.; Wachter, D.A.

    1995-07-01

    The performance of all hydraulic fluids in general, and water glycol hydraulic fluids specifically, is dependent on both fluid cleanliness and fluid composition. In fact, fluid cleanliness (and contamination) can exhibit dramatic increases in pump wear, even for new fluids, if inadequate filtration is used or if contamination occurs. Since fluid composition can also similarly affect war rates, it is also essential that compositional changes during use be minimized. The impact of improper fluid maintenance on hydraulic fluid performance will be discussed and recommended fluid maintenance procedures for water-glycol hydraulic fluids will be provided.

  1. A New Type of Hydraulic Actuator Using Electrorheological Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, Eckhard; Büsing, Klaus W.

    Electrorheological Fluids (ERF) are usually used in semi active damping elements, e.g. shock absorbers or engine mounts because of their continuously controllable shear stress. A totally new field of application may be achieved, if an ERF is used as a hydraulic fluid and not only as a control medium. In this case a fundamental need is the capability to produce a volume flow by using normal hydraulic pumps, e.g. gear pumps. The ERF and the hydraulic components both must have a long lifetime without unusual wear. Bayer AG has developed an ERF based on soft crosslinked PU-particles dispersed in silicone oil. These ERF are characterised by a low basic viscosity, a high ER-effect and a moderate conductivity. Compared with previous ERF where hard inorganic particles were used, the new fluid is not abrasive. It is foremostly this characteristic which gives the possibility of using the ERF in hydraulic systems with high shear rates and high shear stresses. The usage of ERF as hydraulic fluid allows the construction of proportional valves without mechanically driven parts. The control of the pressure drop over the valves is realised directly by an electrical signal. It is possible to realise actuators with very fast response times since the reaction time of ERF is within milliseconds. For demonstration purpose Bayer AG has built an actuator which is controlled by an electrorheological valve-block. The calculation of the dimension of this actuator and the valves will be shown and the realised response time will be demonstrated.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED TITANIUM ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FOR USE AS HYDRAULIC FLUIDS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    HYDRAULIC FLUIDS, *METALORGANIC COMPOUNDS, *TITANATES, *TITANIUM COMPOUNDS, ALKYL RADICALS, CATALYSTS , CHLORIDES, COMPLEX COMPOUNDS, FLUIDS, PHOSPHORIC ACIDS, PROPYL RADICALS, VISCOSITY, ZINC COMPOUNDS

  3. Constraints on Upward Migration of Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid and Brine

    PubMed Central

    Flewelling, Samuel A; Sharma, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Recent increases in the use of hydraulic fracturing (HF) to aid extraction of oil and gas from black shales have raised concerns regarding potential environmental effects associated with predictions of upward migration of HF fluid and brine. Some recent studies have suggested that such upward migration can be large and that timescales for migration can be as short as a few years. In this article, we discuss the physical constraints on upward fluid migration from black shales (e.g., the Marcellus, Bakken, and Eagle Ford) to shallow aquifers, taking into account the potential changes to the subsurface brought about by HF. Our review of the literature indicates that HF affects a very limited portion of the entire thickness of the overlying bedrock and therefore, is unable to create direct hydraulic communication between black shales and shallow aquifers via induced fractures. As a result, upward migration of HF fluid and brine is controlled by preexisting hydraulic gradients and bedrock permeability. We show that in cases where there is an upward gradient, permeability is low, upward flow rates are low, and mean travel times are long (often >106 years). Consequently, the recently proposed rapid upward migration of brine and HF fluid, predicted to occur as a result of increased HF activity, does not appear to be physically plausible. Unrealistically high estimates of upward flow are the result of invalid assumptions about HF and the hydrogeology of sedimentary basins. PMID:23895673

  4. Constraints on upward migration of hydraulic fracturing fluid and brine.

    PubMed

    Flewelling, Samuel A; Sharma, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Recent increases in the use of hydraulic fracturing (HF) to aid extraction of oil and gas from black shales have raised concerns regarding potential environmental effects associated with predictions of upward migration of HF fluid and brine. Some recent studies have suggested that such upward migration can be large and that timescales for migration can be as short as a few years. In this article, we discuss the physical constraints on upward fluid migration from black shales (e.g., the Marcellus, Bakken, and Eagle Ford) to shallow aquifers, taking into account the potential changes to the subsurface brought about by HF. Our review of the literature indicates that HF affects a very limited portion of the entire thickness of the overlying bedrock and therefore, is unable to create direct hydraulic communication between black shales and shallow aquifers via induced fractures. As a result, upward migration of HF fluid and brine is controlled by preexisting hydraulic gradients and bedrock permeability. We show that in cases where there is an upward gradient, permeability is low, upward flow rates are low, and mean travel times are long (often >10⁶  years). Consequently, the recently proposed rapid upward migration of brine and HF fluid, predicted to occur as a result of increased HF activity, does not appear to be physically plausible. Unrealistically high estimates of upward flow are the result of invalid assumptions about HF and the hydrogeology of sedimentary basins.

  5. Aerobic biodegradation of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids.

    PubMed

    Kekacs, Daniel; Drollette, Brian D; Brooker, Michael; Plata, Desiree L; Mouser, Paula J

    2015-07-01

    Little is known of the attenuation of chemical mixtures created for hydraulic fracturing within the natural environment. A synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid was developed from disclosed industry formulas and produced for laboratory experiments using commercial additives in use by Marcellus shale field crews. The experiments employed an internationally accepted standard method (OECD 301A) to evaluate aerobic biodegradation potential of the fluid mixture by monitoring the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from an aqueous solution by activated sludge and lake water microbial consortia for two substrate concentrations and four salinities. Microbial degradation removed from 57 % to more than 90 % of added DOC within 6.5 days, with higher removal efficiency at more dilute concentrations and little difference in overall removal extent between sludge and lake microbe treatments. The alcohols isopropanol and octanol were degraded to levels below detection limits while the solvent acetone accumulated in biological treatments through time. Salinity concentrations of 40 g/L or more completely inhibited degradation during the first 6.5 days of incubation with the synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid even though communities were pre-acclimated to salt. Initially diverse microbial communities became dominated by 16S rRNA sequences affiliated with Pseudomonas and other Pseudomonadaceae after incubation with the synthetic fracturing fluid, taxa which may be involved in acetone production. These data expand our understanding of constraints on the biodegradation potential of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids under aerobic conditions in the event that they are accidentally released to surface waters and shallow soils.

  6. High-water-base hydraulic fluid-irradiation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.C.; Meacham, S.A.

    1981-10-01

    A remote system for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies is being designed under the direction of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP). The design incorporates a dual hydraulic fluid actuation system in which only one of the fluids, a high-water-base (HWBF), would be exposed to ionizing radiation and radioactive contamination. A commercially available synthetic, solution-type HWBF was selected as the reference. Single-sample irradiation experiments were conducted with three commercial fluids over a range of irradiation exposures. The physical and chemical properties of the irradiated HWBFs were analyzed and compared with unirradiated samples. In general, the results of the analyses showed increasing degradation of fluid properties with increasing irradiation dose. The results also indicated that a synthetic solution-type HWBF would perform satisfactorily in the remote shear system where irradiation doses up to 10/sup 6/ Gy (10/sup 8/ rad) are expected.

  7. Kerogen-Hydraulic Fracture Fluid Interactions: Reactivity and Contaminant Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dustin, M. K.; Jew, A. D.; Harrison, A. L.; Joe-Wong, C. M.; Thomas, D.; Maher, K.; Brown, G. E.; Bargar, J.

    2015-12-01

    The use of hydraulic fracturing of tight shales to produce oil and natural gas has grown significantly in recent years, yet it remains relatively inefficient, recovering only an estimated 5% and 25% of the oil and gas present, respectively. The need to improve efficiency and diminish environmental impact has prompted research into fundamental geochemical reactions occurring in shales. In particular, reactions between kerogen and fracture fluid components are poorly understood. Kerogen is the precursor of these hydrocarbons and contains metals in addition to organic material; it is also electron rich and therefore susceptible to oxidation and release of a variety of elements. Although some mineral phases in the shales are expected to undergo dissolution-precipitation reactions, kerogen is generally considered to be relatively unreactive [1]. Here we have investigated reactions between isolated kerogen and a hydraulic fracturing fluid typical of that used in the Marcellus shale. These experiments show that kerogen, as well as redox-sensitive minerals within shales, react with fracture fluid. In particular, kerogen exhibited more extensive release of certain metals (e.g. Al, Ba, Cu, among others) than was observed for bulk shale under the same experimental conditions. This evidence suggests that kerogen may be far more reactive to fracture fluids than previously thought. In particular, these results suggest that kerogen may significantly impact the compositions of produced waters, which have previously been attributed solely to mineral reactions. They also emphasize the need for further characterization of kerogen and its reactions with complex hydraulic fracturing fluids. [1] Vandenbroucke and Largeau (2007) Org. Geochem.

  8. 30 CFR 75.1107-2 - Approved fire-resistant hydraulic fluids; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... concentrates required to be employed in the hydraulic system of underground equipment in accordance with the... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approved fire-resistant hydraulic fluids... Protection Fire Suppression Devices and Fire-Resistant Hydraulic Fluids on Underground Equipment §...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1107-2 - Approved fire-resistant hydraulic fluids; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... concentrates required to be employed in the hydraulic system of underground equipment in accordance with the... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approved fire-resistant hydraulic fluids... Protection Fire Suppression Devices and Fire-Resistant Hydraulic Fluids on Underground Equipment §...

  10. Standardized hydraulic fluid testing -- An overview and history

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.M.; Marty, S.D.

    1997-12-31

    In order for a hydraulic fluid to be approved by the various pump manufacturers for use in their products, it must qualify for acceptance according to certain test methods. Chief among these tests are the Denison HF-0, the Vickers 35VQ25, and the John Deere Sundstrand piston pump test. The Denison HF-0 test evaluates hydraulic fluid performance based on flow, deposits, and wear in both a Denison P46 axial piston pump and a Denison T5D vane pump. Both pumps are run for 100 hours and are periodically disassembled for inspection. Obtaining satisfactory pump results is the largest step in the process for a fluid to qualify under the HF-0 Standard. In the past, the P46 and T5D pumps could be tested separately or bootstrapped with a 46 series motor to reduce horsepower requirements. The Vickers 35VQ25 test measures the anti-wear characteristics of a hydraulic oil according to cam ring and vane weight loss in a 35VQ25 vane pump. A minimum of three cartridges are tested for 50 hours each. The first three, or four of five cartridges, must perform satisfactorily in order for a fluid to pass this test. The John Deere piston pump test screens oils that cause corrosion of copper containing metals. A Sundstrand 22 series axial piston pump is operated for 25 hours. Water is then added to the test oil. The test is then run for 200 more hours. Over this time multiple parameters are monitored to determine the effect of the added water.

  11. Design of a Magnetostrictive-Hydraulic Actuator Considering Nonlinear System Dynamics and Fluid-Structure Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, John Philip

    Smart material electro-hydraulic actuators (EHAs) utilize fluid rectification via one-way check valves to amplify the small, high-frequency vibrations of certain smart materials into large motions of a hydraulic cylinder. Although the concept has been demonstrated in previously, the operating frequency of smart material EHA systems has been limited to a small fraction of the available bandwidth of the driver materials. The focus of this work is to characterize and model the mechanical performance of a magnetostrictive EHA considering key system components: rectification valves, smart material driver, and fluid-system components, leading to an improved actuator design relative to prior work. The one-way valves were modeled using 3-D finite element analysis, and their behavior was characterized experimentally by static and dynamic experimental measurement. Taking into account the effect of the fluid and mechanical conditions applied to the valves within the pump, the dynamic response of the valve was quantified and applied to determine rectification bandwidth of different valve configurations. A novel miniature reed valve, designed for a frequency response above 10~kHz, was fabricated and tested within a magnetostrictive EHA. The nonlinear response of the magnetostrictive driver, including saturation and hysteresis effects, was modeled using the Jiles-Atherton approach to calculate the magnetization and the resulting magnetostriction based on the applied field calculated within the rod from Maxwell's equations. The dynamic pressure response of the fluid system components (pumping chamber, hydraulic cylinder, and connecting passages) was measured over a range of input frequencies. For the magnetostrictive EHA tested, the peak performance frequency was found to be limited by the fluid resonances within the system. A lumped-parameter modeling approach was applied to model the overall behavior of a magnetostrictive EHA, incorporating models for the reed valve response

  12. Imbibition of hydraulic fracturing fluids into partially saturated shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsell, Daniel T.; Rajaram, Harihar; Lackey, Greg

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that imbibition of hydraulic fracturing fluids into partially saturated shale is an important mechanism that restricts their migration, thus reducing the risk of groundwater contamination. We present computations of imbibition based on an exact semianalytical solution for spontaneous imbibition. These computations lead to quantitative estimates of an imbibition rate parameter (A) with units of LT-1/2 for shale, which is related to porous medium and fluid properties, and the initial water saturation. Our calculations suggest that significant fractions of injected fluid volumes (15-95%) can be imbibed in shale gas systems, whereas imbibition volumes in shale oil systems is much lower (3-27%). We present a nondimensionalization of A, which provides insights into the critical factors controlling imbibition, and facilitates the estimation of A based on readily measured porous medium and fluid properties. For a given set of medium and fluid properties, A varies by less than factors of ˜1.8 (gas nonwetting phase) and ˜3.4 (oil nonwetting phase) over the range of initial water saturations reported for the Marcellus shale (0.05-0.6). However, for higher initial water saturations, A decreases significantly. The intrinsic permeability of the shale and the viscosity of the fluids are the most important properties controlling the imbibition rate.

  13. Laboratory imaging of stimulation fluid displacement from hydraulic fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Tidwell, V.; Parker, M.

    1996-11-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to physically investigate the processes governing stimulation fluid displacement from hydraulic fractures. Experiments were performed on two scales: meter-scale in a 1500 cm{sup 2} sand pack and core-scale in a 65 cm{sup 2} API linear conductivity cell. High-resolution light transmission imaging was employed at the meter-scale to visualize and quantify processes governing fluid displacement. For comparison, complimentary tests were performed using an API conductivity cell under ambient test conditions and at elevated closure stress. In these experiments viscous fingering and gravity drainage were identified as the dominant processes governing fluid displacement. Fluid viscosity was found to dictate the relative importance of the competing displacement processes and ultimately determine the residual liquid saturation of the sand pack. The process by which fluid displacement occurs was seen to effect the shape of both the gas and liquid phase relative permeability functions. Knowledge of such viscosity/relative permeability relationships may prove useful in bounding predictions of post-stimulation recovery of gels from the fracture pack.

  14. Anaerobic biodegradation of aircraft deicing fluid in UASB reactors.

    PubMed

    Tham, P T Pham thi; Kennedy, K J Kevin J

    2004-05-01

    A central composite design was employed to methodically investigate anaerobic treatment of aircraft deicing fluid (ADF) in bench-scale Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors. A total of 23 runs at 17 different operating conditions (0.8% 1.6% ADF (6000-12,000mg/L COD), 12-56h HRT, and 18-36gVSS/L) were conducted in continuous mode. The development of four empirical models describing process responses (i.e. COD removal efficiency, biomass-specific acetoclastic activity, methane production rate, and methane production potential) as functions of ADF concentration, hydraulic retention time, and biomass concentration is presented. Model verification indicated that predicted responses (COD removal efficiencies, biomass-specific acetoclastic activity, and methane production rates and potential) were in good agreement with experimental results. Biomass-specific acetoclastic activity was improved two-fold from 0.23gCOD/gVSS/d for inoculum to a maximum of 0.55gCOD/gVSS/d during ADF treatment in UASB reactors. For the design window, COD removal efficiencies were higher than 90%. The predicted methane production potentials were close to theoretical values, and methane production rates increased as the organic loading rate is increased. ADF toxicity effects were evident for 1.6% ADF at medium organic loadings (SOLR above 0.5gCOD/gVSS/d). In contrast, good reactor stability and excellent COD removal efficiencies were achieved at 1.2% ADF for reactor loadings approaching that of highly loaded systems (0.73gCOD/gVSS/d).

  15. Aircraft Hydraulic System Leakage Detection and Servicing Recommendations Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-02

    accumulators, filters, and consumers, that include all the actuators connected to the hydraulic power such as flight controls , brake and landing...Conference, October 4-8 Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Merrit, H. E., (1967), Hydraulic Control Systems. New York: John Willey & Sons. Vianna, W. O. L...2008), Modelagem e Análise do Sistema Hidráulico de uma Aeronave Comercial Regional. M.Sc. Thesis. Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, São José

  16. Aircraft Fuel, Hydraulic and Pneumatic Systems (Course Outlines), Aviation Mechanics 3 (Air Frame): 9067.01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This document presents an outline for a 135-hour course designed to familiarize the student with the operation, inspection, and repair of aircraft fuel, hydraulic, and pneumatic systems. It is designed to help the trainee master the knowledge and skills necessary to become an aviation airframe mechanic. The aviation airframe maintenance technician…

  17. The coupled effect of fiber volume fraction and void fraction on hydraulic fluid absorption of quartz/BMI laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurdelbrink, Keith R.; Anderson, Jacob P.; Siddique, Zahed; Altan, M. Cengiz

    2016-03-01

    Bismaleimide (BMI) resin with quartz (AQ581) fiber reinforcement is a composite material frequently used in aerospace applications, such as engine cowlings and radomes. Various composite components used in aircrafts are exposed to different types of hydraulic fluids, which may lead to anomalous absorption behavior over the service life of the composite. Accurate predictive models for absorption of liquid penetrants are particularly important as the composite components are often exposed to long-term degradation due to absorbed moisture, hydraulic fluids, or similar liquid penetrants. Microstructural features such as fiber volume fraction and void fraction can have a significant effect on the absorption behavior of fiber-reinforced composites. In this paper, hydraulic fluid absorption characteristics of quartz/BMI laminates fabricated from prepregs preconditioned at different relative humidity and subsequently cured at different pressures are presented. The composite samples are immersed into hydraulic fluid at room temperature, and were not subjected to any prior degradation. To generate process-induced microvoids, prepregs were conditioned in an environmental chamber at 2% or 99% relative humidity at room temperature for a period of 24 hours prior to laminate fabrication. To alter the fiber volume fraction, the laminates were fabricated at cure pressures of 68.9 kPa (10 psi) or 482.6 kPa (70 psi) via a hot-press. The laminates are shown to have different levels of microvoids and fiber volume fractions, which were observed to affect the absorption dynamics considerably and exhibited clear non-Fickian behavior. A one-dimensional hindered diffusion model (HDM) was shown to be successful in predicting the hydraulic fluid absorption. Model prediction indicates that as the fabrication pressure increased from 68.9 kPa to 482.6 kPa, the maximum fluid content (M∞) decreased from 8.0% wt. to 1.0% wt. The degree of non-Fickian behavior, measured by hindrance coefficient (

  18. Overview of Chronic Oral Toxicity Values for Chemicals Present in Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids, Flowback and Produced Waters

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    as part of EPA's Hydraulic Fracturing Drinking Water Assessment, EPA is summarizing existing toxicity data for chemicals reported to be used in hydraulic fracturing fluids and/or found in flowback or produced waters from hydraulically fractured wells

  19. Assessing Microbial Activity in Marcellus Shale Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wishart, J. R.; Morono, Y.; Itoh, M.; Ijiri, A.; Hoshino, T.; Inagaki, F.; Verba, C.; Torres, M. E.; Colwell, F. S.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (HF) produces millions of gallons of waste fluid which contains a microbial community adapted to harsh conditions such as high temperatures, high salinities and the presence of heavy metals and radionuclides. Here we present evidence for microbial activity in HF production fluids. Fluids collected from a Marcellus shale HF well were supplemented with 13C-labeled carbon sources and 15N-labeled ammonium at 25°C under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Samples were analyzed for 13C and 15N incorporation at sub-micrometer scale by ion imaging with the JAMSTEC NanoSIMS to determine percent carbon and nitrogen assimilation in individual cells. Headspace CO2 and CH4 were analyzed for 13C enrichment using irm-GC/MS. At 32 days incubation carbon assimilation was observed in samples containing 1 mM 13C-labeled glucose under aerobic and anaerobic conditions with a maximum of 10.4 and 6.5% total carbon, respectively. Nitrogen assimilation of 15N ammonium observed in these samples were 0.3 and 0.8% of total nitrogen, respectively. Head space gas analysis showed 13C enrichment in CH4 in anaerobic samples incubated with 1mM 13C-labeled bicarbonate (2227 ‰) or methanol (98943 ‰). Lesser 13C enrichment of CO2 was observed in anaerobic samples containing 1 mM 13C-labeled acetate (13.7 ‰), methanol (29.9 ‰) or glucose (85.4 ‰). These results indicate metabolic activity and diversity in microbial communities present in HF flowback fluids. The assimilation of 13C-labeled glucose demonstrates the production of biomass, a critical part of cell replication. The production of 13CO2 and 13CH4 demonstrate microbial metabolism in the forms of respiration and methanogenesis, respectively. Methanogenesis additionally indicates the presence of an active archaeal community. This research shows that HF production fluid chemistry does not entirely inhibit microbial activity or growth and encourages further research regarding biogeochemical processes occurring in

  20. Fluid-dynamic design optimization of hydraulic proportional directional valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirante, Riccardo; Catalano, Luciano Andrea; Poloni, Carlo; Tamburrano, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    This article proposes an effective methodology for the fluid-dynamic design optimization of the sliding spool of a hydraulic proportional directional valve: the goal is the minimization of the flow force at a prescribed flow rate, so as to reduce the required opening force while keeping the operation features unchanged. A full three-dimensional model of the flow field within the valve is employed to accurately predict the flow force acting on the spool. A theoretical analysis, based on both the axial momentum equation and flow simulations, is conducted to define the design parameters, which need to be properly selected in order to reduce the flow force without significantly affecting the flow rate. A genetic algorithm, coupled with a computational fluid dynamics flow solver, is employed to minimize the flow force acting on the valve spool at the maximum opening. A comparison with a typical single-objective optimization algorithm is performed to evaluate performance and effectiveness of the employed genetic algorithm. The optimized spool develops a maximum flow force which is smaller than that produced by the commercially available valve, mainly due to some major modifications occurring in the discharge section. Reducing the flow force and thus the electromagnetic force exerted by the solenoid actuators allows the operational range of direct (single-stage) driven valves to be enlarged.

  1. Field Demonstration of Bio-based Hydraulic Fluids for Military Construction Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-24

    Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Committed to Excellence 21-24 May 2007 2 Outline Background Federal Biobased Products Preferred Procurement Program New...Biodegradable/ Biobased Hydraulic Fluid Specification Field Demonstration-Final results Conclusions Committed to Excellence 21-24 May 2007 3 Background...Developing and Promoting Biobased Products and Bioenergy U.S. Army has issued a Biodegradable Hydraulic Fluid (BHF) Specification to accept Bio-based Fluids

  2. 30 CFR 75.1107-1 - Fire-resistant hydraulic fluids and fire suppression devices on underground equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fire-resistant hydraulic fluids and fire...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection Fire Suppression Devices and Fire-Resistant Hydraulic Fluids on Underground Equipment § 75.1107-1 Fire-resistant hydraulic fluids and fire suppression devices on...

  3. 30 CFR 35.4 - Types of hydraulic fluid for which certificates of approval may be granted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Types of hydraulic fluid for which certificates..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS FIRE-RESISTANT HYDRAULIC FLUIDS General Provisions § 35.4 Types of hydraulic fluid for which certificates of approval may be...

  4. 30 CFR 35.4 - Types of hydraulic fluid for which certificates of approval may be granted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Types of hydraulic fluid for which certificates..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS FIRE-RESISTANT HYDRAULIC FLUIDS General Provisions § 35.4 Types of hydraulic fluid for which certificates of approval may be...

  5. 30 CFR 75.1107-1 - Fire-resistant hydraulic fluids and fire suppression devices on underground equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fire-resistant hydraulic fluids and fire...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection Fire Suppression Devices and Fire-Resistant Hydraulic Fluids on Underground Equipment § 75.1107-1 Fire-resistant hydraulic fluids and fire suppression devices on...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1107-1 - Fire-resistant hydraulic fluids and fire suppression devices on underground equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fire-resistant hydraulic fluids and fire...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection Fire Suppression Devices and Fire-Resistant Hydraulic Fluids on Underground Equipment § 75.1107-1 Fire-resistant hydraulic fluids and fire suppression devices on...

  7. 30 CFR 35.4 - Types of hydraulic fluid for which certificates of approval may be granted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Types of hydraulic fluid for which certificates..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS FIRE-RESISTANT HYDRAULIC FLUIDS General Provisions § 35.4 Types of hydraulic fluid for which certificates of approval may be...

  8. 30 CFR 35.4 - Types of hydraulic fluid for which certificates of approval may be granted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Types of hydraulic fluid for which certificates..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS FIRE-RESISTANT HYDRAULIC FLUIDS General Provisions § 35.4 Types of hydraulic fluid for which certificates of approval may be...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1107-1 - Fire-resistant hydraulic fluids and fire suppression devices on underground equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fire-resistant hydraulic fluids and fire...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection Fire Suppression Devices and Fire-Resistant Hydraulic Fluids on Underground Equipment § 75.1107-1 Fire-resistant hydraulic fluids and fire suppression devices on...

  10. 30 CFR 35.4 - Types of hydraulic fluid for which certificates of approval may be granted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Types of hydraulic fluid for which certificates..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS FIRE-RESISTANT HYDRAULIC FLUIDS General Provisions § 35.4 Types of hydraulic fluid for which certificates of approval may be...

  11. Dynamic, Hot Surface Ignition of Aircraft Fuels and Hydraulic Fluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    alloys involved the formation of surface catalysts in the form of oxides of the parent metal, iron, nickel, and chromium , on the heated surfaces. Some...stainless steels and inconel X, the formed oxides or spinels (e.g. (FeO) 0 . 2 5 (Cr 2 03 ) 1 . 7 5 ) were quite stable and while protecting the heated

  12. High-order computational fluid dynamics tools for aircraft design

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z. J.

    2014-01-01

    Most forecasts predict an annual airline traffic growth rate between 4.5 and 5% in the foreseeable future. To sustain that growth, the environmental impact of aircraft cannot be ignored. Future aircraft must have much better fuel economy, dramatically less greenhouse gas emissions and noise, in addition to better performance. Many technical breakthroughs must take place to achieve the aggressive environmental goals set up by governments in North America and Europe. One of these breakthroughs will be physics-based, highly accurate and efficient computational fluid dynamics and aeroacoustics tools capable of predicting complex flows over the entire flight envelope and through an aircraft engine, and computing aircraft noise. Some of these flows are dominated by unsteady vortices of disparate scales, often highly turbulent, and they call for higher-order methods. As these tools will be integral components of a multi-disciplinary optimization environment, they must be efficient to impact design. Ultimately, the accuracy, efficiency, robustness, scalability and geometric flexibility will determine which methods will be adopted in the design process. This article explores these aspects and identifies pacing items. PMID:25024419

  13. Interstitial hydraulic conductivity and interstitial fluid pressure for avascular or poorly vascularized tumors.

    PubMed

    Liu, L J; Schlesinger, M

    2015-09-07

    A correct description of the hydraulic conductivity is essential for determining the actual tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) distribution. Traditionally, it has been assumed that the hydraulic conductivities both in a tumor and normal tissue are constant, and that a tumor has a much larger interstitial hydraulic conductivity than normal tissue. The abrupt transition of the hydraulic conductivity at the tumor surface leads to non-physical results (the hydraulic conductivity and the slope of the TIFP are not continuous at tumor surface). For the sake of simplicity and the need to represent reality, we focus our analysis on avascular or poorly vascularized tumors, which have a necrosis that is mostly in the center and vascularization that is mostly on the periphery. We suggest that there is an intermediary region between the tumor surface and normal tissue. Through this region, the interstitium (including the structure and composition of solid components and interstitial fluid) transitions from tumor to normal tissue. This process also causes the hydraulic conductivity to do the same. We introduce a continuous variation of the hydraulic conductivity, and show that the interstitial hydraulic conductivity in the intermediary region should be monotonically increasing up to the value of hydraulic conductivity in the normal tissue in order for the model to correspond to the actual TIFP distribution. The value of the hydraulic conductivity at the tumor surface should be the lowest in value.

  14. Analysis and compensation of an aircraft simulator control loading system with compliant linkage. [using hydraulic equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. R.; Bardusch, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    A hydraulic control loading system for aircraft simulation was analyzed to find the causes of undesirable low frequency oscillations and loading effects in the output. The hypothesis of mechanical compliance in the control linkage was substantiated by comparing the behavior of a mathematical model of the system with previously obtained experimental data. A compensation scheme based on the minimum integral of the squared difference between desired and actual output was shown to be effective in reducing the undesirable output effects. The structure of the proposed compensation was computed by use of a dynamic programing algorithm and a linear state space model of the fixed elements in the system.

  15. Nonflammable Hydraulic Power System for Tactical Aircraft. Volume 1. Aircraft System Definition, Design and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    200- 00400 8.00 12.00 16.00 20.00 24.100 28.00 32.00 36.00 40.00 44.00 48.00 Distance - in. Figure 54. Abex - Pump Staning Wave Pressure Plot at 3350...37,100 lb)’ 33,000 lb TENSION pecification LOAD -. Performance0 (lbs) -10.. Test System Performance(1,5 lb Neutral LOAD (lbs) 3.92 in.3.2i. 0...ALIF RIchrgoTub* WmWr. Oierrido | F V .Poi bon 7~ Ir.icutct ( RED ) 2225u Figure 97. Parker Metal Bellows - Reservoir Detail Drawing 5.5.3 Hydraulic

  16. Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Robert L.; Kirby, Klane

    This curriculum guide contains a course in hydraulics to train entry-level workers for automotive mechanics and other fields that utilize hydraulics. The module contains 14 instructional units that cover the following topics: (1) introduction to hydraulics; (2) fundamentals of hydraulics; (3) reservoirs; (4) lines, fittings, and couplers; (5)…

  17. Effect of hydraulic fluid (MIL-H-83282) on selected commercial O-ring compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, T. E.; Stone, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    Acrylonitrile and fluorocarbon compounds were evaluated at various temperatures and time intervals in samples of the fluid obtained from three qualified suppliers. It was concluded that both polymers can function in hydraulic fluids within the conditions defined by this study. Hydraulic fluid from each manufacturer was similar in its effect upon each given O-ring material, with one exception. Similarly, there were no striking differences in the resistance of O-rings of the same generic rubber type when provided by the different manufacturers.

  18. Investigating the Fate of Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid in Shale Gas Formations Through Two-Phase Numerical Modelling of Fluid Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, R.; Doster, F.; Celia, M. A.; Bandilla, K.

    2015-12-01

    The process of hydraulic fracturing in shale gas formations typically involves the injection of large quantities of water-based fluid (2×107L typical) into the shale formations in order to fracture the rock. A large proportion of the fracturing fluids injected into shale gas wells during hydraulic fracturing does not return out of the well once production begins. The percentage of water returning varies within and between different shale plays, but is generally around 30%. The large proportion of the fluid that does not return raises the possibility that it could migrate out of the target shale formation and potentially toward aquifers and the surface through pathways such as the created hydraulic fractures, faults and adjacent wells. A leading hypothesis for the fate of the remaining fracturing fluid is that it is spontaneously imbibed from the hydraulic fractures into the shale rock matrix due to the low water saturation and very high capillary pressure in the shale. The imbibition hypothesis is assessed using numerical modeling of the two-phase flow of fracturing fluid and gas in the shale during injection. The model incorporates relevant two-phase physical phenomena such as capillarity and relative permeability, including hysteretic behavior in both. Modeling scenarios for fracturing fluid injection were assessed under varying conditions for shale reservoir parameters and spatial heterogeneities in permeability and wettability. The results showed that the unaccounted fracturing fluid may plausibly be imbibed into the shale matrix under certain conditions, and that significant small-scale spatial heterogeneity in the shale permeability likely plays an important role in imbibing the fracturing fluid.

  19. Evaluation of Aircraft Platforms for SOFIA by Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotz, S. P.; Srinivasan, G. R.; VanDalsem, William (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The selection of an airborne platform for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is based not only on economic cost, but technical criteria, as well. Technical issues include aircraft fatigue, resonant characteristics of the cavity-port shear layer, aircraft stability, the drag penalty of the open telescope bay, and telescope performance. Recently, two versions of the Boeing 747 aircraft, viz., the -SP and -200 configurations, were evaluated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for their suitability as SOFIA platforms. In each configuration the telescope was mounted behind the wings in an open bay with nearly circular aperture. The geometry of the cavity, cavity aperture, and telescope was identical in both platforms. The aperture was located on the port side of the aircraft and the elevation angle of the telescope, measured with respect to the vertical axis, was 500. The unsteady, viscous, three-dimensional, aerodynamic and acoustic flow fields in the vicinity of SOFIA were simulated by an implicit, finite-difference Navier-Stokes flow solver (OVERFLOW) on a Chimera, overset grid system. The computational domain was discretized by structured grids. Computations were performed at wind-tunnel and flight Reynolds numbers corresponding to one free-stream flow condition (M = 0.85, angle of attack alpha = 2.50, and sideslip angle beta = 0 degrees). The computational domains consisted of twenty-nine(29) overset grids in the wind-tunnel simulations and forty-five(45) grids in the simulations run at cruise flight conditions. The maximum number of grid points in the simulations was approximately 4 x 10(exp 6). Issues considered in the evaluation study included analysis of the unsteady flow field in the cavity, the influence of the cavity on the flow across empennage surfaces, the drag penalty caused by the open telescope bay, and the noise radiating from cavity surfaces and the cavity-port shear layer. Wind-tunnel data were also available to compare

  20. Generating Inviscid and Viscous Fluid-Flow Simulations over an Aircraft Surface Using a Fluid-Flow Mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, David L. (Inventor); Sturdza, Peter (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Fluid-flow simulation over a computer-generated aircraft surface is generated using inviscid and viscous simulations. A fluid-flow mesh of fluid cells is obtained. At least one inviscid fluid property for the fluid cells is determined using an inviscid fluid simulation that does not simulate fluid viscous effects. A set of intersecting fluid cells that intersects the aircraft surface are identified. One surface mesh polygon of the surface mesh is identified for each intersecting fluid cell. A boundary-layer prediction point for each identified surface mesh polygon is determined. At least one boundary-layer fluid property for each boundary-layer prediction point is determined using the at least one inviscid fluid property of the corresponding intersecting fluid cell and a boundary-layer simulation that simulates fluid viscous effects. At least one updated fluid property for at least one fluid cell is determined using the at least one boundary-layer fluid property and the inviscid fluid simulation.

  1. Influence of Concentration and Salinity on the Biodegradability of Organic Additives in Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouser, P. J.; Kekacs, D.

    2014-12-01

    One of the risks associated with the use of hydraulic fracturing technologies for energy development is the potential release of hydraulic fracturing-related fluids into surface waters or shallow aquifers. Many of the organic additives used in hydraulic fracturing fluids are individually biodegradable, but little is know on how they will attenuate within a complex organic fluid in the natural environment. We developed a synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid based on disclosed recipes used by Marcellus shale operators to evaluate the biodegradation potential of organic additives across a concentration (25 to 200 mg/L DOC) and salinity gradient (0 to 60 g/L) similar to Marcellus shale injected fluids. In aerobic aqueous solutions, microorganisms removed 91% of bulk DOC from low SFF solutions and 57% DOC in solutions having field-used SFF concentrations within 7 days. Under high SFF concentrations, salinity in excess of 20 g/L inhibited organic compound biodegradation for several weeks, after which time the majority (57% to 75%) of DOC remained in solution. After SFF amendment, the initially biodiverse lake or sludge microbial communities were quickly dominated (>79%) by Pseudomonas spp. Approximately 20% of added carbon was converted to biomass while the remainder was respired to CO2 or other metabolites. Two alcohols, isopropanol and octanol, together accounted for 2-4% of the initial DOC, with both compounds decreasing to below detection limits within 7 days. Alcohol degradation was associated with an increase in acetone at mg/L concentrations. These data help to constrain the biodegradation potential of organic additives in hydraulic fracturing fluids and guide our understanding of the microbial communities that may contribute to attenuation in surface waters.

  2. Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Robert L.

    Designed for use in courses where students are expected to become proficient in the area of hydraulics, including diesel engine mechanic programs, this curriculum guide is comprised of fourteen units of instruction. Unit titles include (1) Introduction, (2) Fundamentals of Hydraulics, (3) Reservoirs, (4) Lines, Fittings, and Couplers, (5) Seals,…

  3. Effect of rock rheology on fluid leak- off during hydraulic fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarushina, V. M.; Bercovici, D.; Oristaglio, M. L.

    2012-04-01

    In this communication, we evaluate the effect of rock rheology on fluid leak­off during hydraulic fracturing of reservoirs. Fluid leak-off in hydraulic fracturing is often nonlinear. The simple linear model developed by Carter (1957) for flow of fracturing fluid into a reservoir has three different regions in the fractured zone: a filter cake on the fracture face, formed by solid additives from the fracturing fluid; a filtrate zone affected by invasion of the fracturing fluid; and a reservoir zone with the original formation fluid. The width of each zone, as well as its permeability and pressure drop, is assumed to remain constant. Physical intuition suggests some straightforward corrections to this classical theory to take into account the pressure dependence of permeability, the compressibility or non-Newtonian rheology of fracturing fluid, and the radial (versus linear) geometry of fluid leak­off from the borehole. All of these refinements, however, still assume that the reservoir rock adjacent to the fracture face is non­deformable. Although the effect of poroelastic stress changes on leak-off is usually thought to be negligible, at the very high fluid pressures used in hydraulic fracturing, where the stresses exceed the rock strength, elastic rheology may not be the best choice. For example, calculations show that perfectly elastic rock formations do not undergo the degree of compaction typically seen in sedimentary basins. Therefore, pseudo-elastic or elastoplastic models are used to fit observed porosity profiles with depth. Starting from balance equations for mass and momentum for fluid and rock, we derive a hydraulic flow equation coupled with a porosity equation describing rock compaction. The result resembles a pressure diffusion equation with the total compressibility being a sum of fluid, rock and pore-space compressibilities. With linear elastic rheology, the bulk formation compressibility is dominated by fluid compressibility. But the possibility

  4. New Isotopic Tracers for Shale Gas and Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The combined application of geochemistry, stable isotopes (δ18O, δ2H), strontium isotopes (87Sr/86Sr), boron isotopes (δ11B), and radium isotopes (228Ra/226Ra) provides a unique methodology for tracing and monitoring shale gas and fracking fluids in the environment.

  5. Evaluation of Biobased Hydraulic Fluids in Military Construction Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-31

    instead of the petroleum sources. Their biodegradability is comparable to vegetable oils and the lubrication properties are very similar to mineral ...Ni, Mg, Cu, and Zn) were analyzed. Unlike the petroleum based fluids, the BHFs evaluated did not contain organo - metal additives. However, field

  6. Anaerobic co-digestion of aircraft deicing fluid and municipal wastewater sludge.

    PubMed

    Zitomer, D; Ferguson, N; McGrady, K; Schilling, J

    2001-01-01

    At many airports, aircraft deicing fluid and precipitation mix, becoming aircraft deicing runoff having a 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) of 10(2) to 10(6) mg/L. Publicly owned treatment works can be used for aerobic biological treatment; however, it may be more economical to use anaerobic digesters to codigest a mixture of aircraft deicing fluid and sludge. The objectives of this investigation were to determine benefits and appropriate propylene glycol aircraft deicing fluid loadings to anaerobic codigesters. Results demonstrate aircraft deicing fluid can be successfully codigested to produce methane; supernatant BOD5 and Kjeldahl nitrogen concentration were not higher in codigesters compared to a conventional digester. Aircraft deicing fluid loadings as high as 1.6 g chemical oxygen demand (COD)/L x d were sustainable in codigesters, whereas system fed only aircraft deicing fluid with nutrients and alkalinity achieved a loading of 0.65 g COD/L x d. The sludge used increased digester alkalinity and provided nitrogen, iron, nickel, cobalt, and biomass required for methanogenesis. The deicer provides organics for increased methane production.

  7. Fluid Compressibility Effects during Hydraulic Fracture: an Opportunity for Gas Fracture Revival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mighani, S.; Boulenouar, A.; Moradian, Z.; Evans, J. B.; Bernabe, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing results when internal pore pressure is increased above a critical value. As the fracture extends, the fluid flows to the crack tip. The fracturing process depends strongly on the physical properties of both the porous solid and the fluid (e.g. porosity and elastic moduli for the solid, viscosity and compressibility for the fluid). It is also affected by the in-situ stress and pore pressure conditions. Here, we focus on the effect of fluid properties on hydraulic fracturing under conventional triaxial loading. Cylinders of Solnhofen limestone (a fine-grained, low permeability rock) were prepared with a central borehole through which different pressurized fluids such as oil, water or argon, were introduced. Preliminary experiments were performed using a confining pressure of 5 MPa and axial stress of 7 MPa. Our goal was to monitor fracture extension using strain gauges, acoustic emissions (AE) recording and ultrasonic velocity measurements. We also tried to compare the data with analytical models of fracture propagation. Initial tests showed that simple bi-wing fractures form when the fracturing fluid is relatively incompressible. With argon as pore fluid, a complex fracture network was formed. We also observed that the breakdown pressure was higher with argon than with less compressible fluids. After fracturing occurred, we cycled fluid pressure for several times. During the first cycles, re-opening of the fracture was associated with additional propagation. In general, it took 4 cycles to inhibit further propagation. Analytical models suggest that initial fractures occurring with compressible fluids tend to stabilize. Hence, formation and extension of additional fractures may occur, leading to a more complex morphology. Conversely, fractures formed by incompressible fluids remain critically stressed as they extend, thus producing a simple bi-wing fracture. Using compressible fracturing fluids could be a suitable candidate for an efficient

  8. Comparison of soil extraction techniques for organophosphorous hydraulic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    David, M.D.; Seiber, J.N.

    1996-10-01

    The efficiencies of three soil extraction techniques for removal of non-pesticidal organophosphates were compared. Traditional soxhlet extraction is compared to supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and a high-pressure, elevated temperature, low solvent volume technique referred to here as HPSE (high-pressure solvent extraction). SFE methods were optimized by varying parameters of temperature, pressure and methanol polarity modifier. SFE recoveries under optimum conditions were at least 90% as efficient as Soxhlet in the extraction of OPs from both spiked and native soils. HPSE experiments showed efficiency and consistency of recovery over a range of temperatures up to 200{degrees} and pressures up to 2000psi, with average recoveries superior to those of Soxhlet extraction. HPSE and SFE provide extraction efficiencies comparable to Soxhlet with substantial savings of time and cost.

  9. A Geochemical Framework for Evaluating Shale-Hydraulic Fracture Fluid Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, A. L.; Jew, A. D.; Dustin, M. K.; Joe-Wong, C. M.; Thomas, D.; Maher, K.; Brown, G. E.; Bargar, J.; Bill, M.; Conrad, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    The development of shale oil and gas reservoirs has increased dramatically due to the application of hydraulic fracturing techniques. Fracture fluids contain dissolved oxygen and numerous chemical additives [1] that are out of equilibrium with the reducing conditions in shale reservoirs and could react extensively with shale minerals and alter porosity. Yet, the complex dissolution-precipitation reactions in shales along with the poorly constrained characteristics of many fracture fluid additives hinder predictive modeling based on established reaction kinetics and thermodynamic constants [2]. Here, we are developing a reaction framework to better predict reaction progress and porosity evolution upon exposure of shales to hydraulic fracturing fluids. To this end, the reactive transport model CrunchFlow [3] was applied to the results of batch reactor experiments containing shales of different mineralogical and organic compositions exposed to simulated fracturing fluid. Despite relatively good agreement between modeled and experimental data for pH and aqueous Ca concentrations, which are strongly governed by carbonate dissolution, the model is presently unable to reproduce observed trends in aqueous Fe concentration. This is largely attributable to the dearth of thermodynamic data for certain fracture fluid components and the complex interactions between multiple Fe-bearing mineral phases. Experimental results revealed that the presence of organic fracture fluid components strongly influenced the precipitation of Fe-bearing phases, which are speculated to coat fracture fluid polymers that formed in the reactors. The incorporation of these effects in our reactive transport model will permit improved prediction of reservoir permeability evolution and metal release during hydraulic fracturing operations. [1] Stringfellow et al. (2014) J. Hazard. Mater. [2] Carroll et al. (2013) Environ. Sci. Technol. [3] Steefel and Maher (2009) Rev. Mineral. Geochem.

  10. Stimuli Responsive/Rheoreversible Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids for Enhanced Geothermal Energy Production (Part II)

    SciTech Connect

    Bonneville, Alain; Jung, Hun Bok; Shao, Hongbo; Kabilan, Senthil; Um, Wooyong; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Varga, Tamas; Suresh, Niraj; Stephens, Sean A.; Fernandez, Carlos A.

    2014-12-14

    We have used an environmentally friendly and recyclable hydraulic fracturing fluid - diluted aqueous solutions of polyallylamine or PAA – for reservoir stimulation in Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). This fluid undergoes a controlled and large volume expansion with a simultaneous increase in viscosity triggered by CO2 at EGS temperatures. We are presenting here the results of laboratory-scale hydraulic fracturing experiment using the fluid on small cylindrical rock cores (1.59 cm in diameter and 5.08 cm in length) from the Coso geothermal field in California. Rock samples consisted of Mesozoic diorite metamorphosed to greenschist facies. The experiments were conducted on 5 samples for realistic ranges of pressures (up to 275 bar) and temperatures (up to 210 °C) for both the rock samples and the injected fluid. After fracturing, cores were subjected to a CO2 leakage test, injection of KI solution, and X-ray microtomography (XMT) scanning to examine the formation and distribution of fractures. The design and conduct of these experiments will be presented and discussed in details. Based on the obtained XMT images, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were then performed to visualize hydraulic fractures and compute the bulk permeability. OpenFOAM (OpenCFD Ltd., Reading, UK), was used to solve the steady state simulation. The flow predictions, based upon the laminar, 3-D, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for fluid mass and momentum, show the remarkable stimulation of the permeability in the core samples and demonstrate the efficiency of such a CO2 triggered fluid in EGS.

  11. Failure Analysis of T-38 Aircraft Burst Hydraulic Aileron Return Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, J. E.; Figert, J. D.; Paton, R. M.; Nguyen, S. D.; Flint, A.

    2012-01-01

    During maintenance troubleshooting for fluctuating hydraulic pressures, a technician found that a right hand aileron return line, on the flight hydraulic side, was ruptured (Fig. 1, 2). This tubing is part of the Hydraulic Flight Control Aileron Return Reducer to Aileron Manifold and is suspected to be original to the T-38 Talon trainer aircraft. Ailerons are small hinged sections on the outboard portion of a wing used to generate rolling motion thereby banking the aircraft. The ailerons work by changing the effective shape of the airfoil of the outer portion of the wing [1]. The drawing, Northrop P/N 3-43033-55 (6/1960), specifies that the line is made from 0.375 inch OD, aluminum 5052-0 tubing with a 0.049 inch wall thickness. WW-T-787 requires the tube shall be seamless and uniform in quality and temper [2]. The test pressure for this line is 3000 psi, and the operational pressure for this line is estimated to be between 45 psi and 1500 psi based on dynamic loading during flight. Examination of the fracture surface found evidence of arrest bands originating on the inner diameter (Fig 3). Ductile dimples are observed on the tube fractures (Fig. 4). The etched cross-section revealed thinning and work-hardening in the burst region (Fig. 5). The wall thickness just outside the work-hardened fracture region measured 0.035". Barlow's Formula: P = 2St/D, where P is burst pressure, S is allowable stress, t is wall thickness and D is the outer diameter of tube. Using the ultimate tensile strength of 28 ksi and a measured wall thickness of 0.035 inches at burst, P = 5.2 ksi (burst pressure). Using the yield of 13 ksi (YS) for aluminum 5052-0, plastic deformation will happen at P = 2.4 ksi suggesting plastic deformation occurred at a proof pressure of 3.0 ksi. Conclusion: The burst resulted from high stress, low-cycle fatigue. Evidence of arrest bands originating on the inner diameter. Fracture is predominately shear dimples, characteristic of high load ductile fractures

  12. Potential Impacts of Spilled Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Chemicals on Water Resources: Types, volumes, and physical-chemical properties of chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic fracturing (HF) fluid chemicals spilled on-site may impact drinking water resources. While chemicals generally make up <2% of the total injected fluid composition by mass, spills may have undiluted concentrations. HF fluids typically consist of a mixture of base flui...

  13. Modeling Studies to Constrain Fluid and Gas Migration Associated with Hydraulic Fracturing Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, H.; Birdsell, D.; Lackey, G.; Karra, S.; Viswanathan, H. S.; Dempsey, D.

    2015-12-01

    The dramatic increase in the extraction of unconventional oil and gas resources using horizontal wells and hydraulic fracturing (fracking) technologies has raised concerns about potential environmental impacts. Large volumes of hydraulic fracturing fluids are injected during fracking. Incidents of stray gas occurrence in shallow aquifers overlying shale gas reservoirs have been reported; whether these are in any way related to fracking continues to be debated. Computational models serve as useful tools for evaluating potential environmental impacts. We present modeling studies of hydraulic fracturing fluid and gas migration during the various stages of well operation, production, and subsequent plugging. The fluid migration models account for overpressure in the gas reservoir, density contrast between injected fluids and brine, imbibition into partially saturated shale, and well operations. Our results highlight the importance of representing the different stages of well operation consistently. Most importantly, well suction and imbibition both play a significant role in limiting upward migration of injected fluids, even in the presence of permeable connecting pathways. In an overall assessment, our fluid migration simulations suggest very low risk to groundwater aquifers when the vertical separation from a shale gas reservoir is of the order of 1000' or more. Multi-phase models of gas migration were developed to couple flow and transport in compromised wellbores and subsurface formations. These models are useful for evaluating both short-term and long-term scenarios of stray methane release. We present simulation results to evaluate mechanisms controlling stray gas migration, and explore relationships between bradenhead pressures and the likelihood of methane release and transport.

  14. Microbial community changes in hydraulic fracturing fluids and produced water from shale gas extraction.

    PubMed

    Murali Mohan, Arvind; Hartsock, Angela; Bibby, Kyle J; Hammack, Richard W; Vidic, Radisav D; Gregory, Kelvin B

    2013-11-19

    Microbial communities associated with produced water from hydraulic fracturing are not well understood, and their deleterious activity can lead to significant increases in production costs and adverse environmental impacts. In this study, we compared the microbial ecology in prefracturing fluids (fracturing source water and fracturing fluid) and produced water at multiple time points from a natural gas well in southwestern Pennsylvania using 16S rRNA gene-based clone libraries, pyrosequencing, and quantitative PCR. The majority of the bacterial community in prefracturing fluids constituted aerobic species affiliated with the class Alphaproteobacteria. However, their relative abundance decreased in produced water with an increase in halotolerant, anaerobic/facultative anaerobic species affiliated with the classes Clostridia, Bacilli, Gammaproteobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, Bacteroidia, and Fusobacteria. Produced water collected at the last time point (day 187) consisted almost entirely of sequences similar to Clostridia and showed a decrease in bacterial abundance by 3 orders of magnitude compared to the prefracturing fluids and produced water samplesfrom earlier time points. Geochemical analysis showed that produced water contained higher concentrations of salts and total radioactivity compared to prefracturing fluids. This study provides evidence of long-term subsurface selection of the microbial community introduced through hydraulic fracturing, which may include significant implications for disinfection as well as reuse of produced water in future fracturing operations.

  15. Microbial Community Changes in Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Produced Water from Shale Gas Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Bibby, Kyle J; Hammack, Richard W; Vidic, Radisav D; Gregory, Kelvin B

    2013-11-19

    Microbial communities associated with produced water from hydraulic fracturing are not well understood, and their deleterious activity can lead to significant increases in production costs and adverse environmental impacts. In this study, we compared the microbial ecology in prefracturing fluids (fracturing source water and fracturing fluid) and produced water at multiple time points from a natural gas well in southwestern Pennsylvania using 16S rRNA gene-based clone libraries, pyrosequencing, and quantitative PCR. The majority of the bacterial community in prefracturing fluids constituted aerobic species affiliated with the class Alphaproteobacteria. However, their relative abundance decreased in produced water with an increase in halotolerant, anaerobic/facultative anaerobic species affiliated with the classes Clostridia, Bacilli, Gammaproteobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, Bacteroidia, and Fusobacteria. Produced water collected at the last time point (day 187) consisted almost entirely of sequences similar to Clostridia and showed a decrease in bacterial abundance by 3 orders of magnitude compared to the prefracturing fluids and produced water samplesfrom earlier time points. Geochemical analysis showed that produced water contained higher concentrations of salts and total radioactivity compared to prefracturing fluids. This study provides evidence of long-term subsurface selection of the microbial community introduced through hydraulic fracturing, which may include significant implications for disinfection as well as reuse of produced water in future fracturing operations.

  16. Determination of tailless aircraft tumbling and stability characteristics through computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saephan, Syta

    Tailless aircraft configurations such as flying wings are susceptible to tumbling. Tumbling involves an autorotative pitching motion primarily about an axis parallel to the aircraft's lateral axis combined with planar translation. Tumbling is the suspected cause of a tailless aircraft (Northrop YB-49) crash in the late 1940s and is a potential problem for future flying wing and blended wing body aircraft. It may be difficult if not impossible for a tailless aircraft to escape the tumbling motion once it begins. It is therefore important for aircraft designers to know the causes of tumbling in order to prevent its onset. Tumbling has been demonstrated in qualitative free-flight wind tunnel experiments, but few have attempted to quantify the motion using computational fluid dynamics. The purpose of this research is to use computational fluid dynamics to study the tumbling characteristics of a tailless aircraft and then determine dynamic stability information from the simulations. Specifically, the effects of initial conditions, degrees-of-freedom, Reynolds number, and aircraft static margin will be investigated. Lumped pitch damping derivatives will be determined from the simulations.

  17. Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Company, Washington, DC Boeing Commercial Aircraft Division, Seattle, WA and Long Beach, CA Boeing Military Aircraft and Missile Division, St. Louis, MO and... aircraft ; military fixed-wing aircraft ; rotorcraft (helicopters and tiltrotor aircraft ); and aircraft jet engines. Two companies dominate the commercial... aircraft business, Boeing and Airbus. Four companies dominate the military fixed-wing market, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, BAE Systems, and European

  18. Coupled Mineral Dissolution and Precipitation Reactions in Shale-Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joe-Wong, C. M.; Harrison, A. L.; Thomas, D.; Dustin, M. K.; Jew, A. D.; Brown, G. E.; Maher, K.; Bargar, J.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing of low-permeability, hydrocarbon-rich shales has recently become an important energy source in the United States. However, hydrocarbon recovery rates are low and drop rapidly after a few months. Hydraulic fracture fluids, which contain dissolved oxygen and numerous organic additives, induce dissolution and precipitation reactions that change the porosity and permeability of the shale. To investigate these reactions, we studied the interactions of four shales (Eagle Ford, Barnett, Marcellus, and Green River) with a simulated hydraulic fracture fluid in batch reactors at 80 °C. The shales were chosen for both economic viability and chemical variety, allowing us to explore the reactivities of different components. The Eagle Ford shale is carbonate rich, and the Green River shale contains significant siderite and kerogen. The Barnett shale also has a high organic content, while the Marcellus shale has the highest fractions of clay and pyrite. Our experiments show that hydrochloric acid in the fluid promotes carbonate mineral dissolution, rapidly raising the pH from acidic to circumneutral levels for the Eagle Ford and Green River shales. Dissolution textures in the Green River shale and large cavities in the Barnett shale indicate significant mineralogical and physical changes in the reacted rock. Morphological changes are not readily apparent in the Eagle Ford and Marcellus shales. For all shales, ongoing changes to the solution Al: Si ratio suggest incongruent aluminosilicate dissolution. Siderite or pyrite dissolution occurs within days and is followed by the formation of secondary Fe precipitates in suspension and coating the walls of the reactor. However, little evidence of any coatings on shale surfaces was found. The net effect of these reactions on porosity and permeability and their influence on the long-term efficacy of oil and gas recovery after hydraulic fracturing are critical to the energy landscape of the United States.

  19. Biocides in hydraulic fracturing fluids: a critical review of their usage, mobility, degradation, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kahrilas, Genevieve A; Blotevogel, Jens; Stewart, Philip S; Borch, Thomas

    2015-01-06

    Biocides are critical components of hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") fluids used for unconventional shale gas development. Bacteria may cause bioclogging and inhibit gas extraction, produce toxic hydrogen sulfide, and induce corrosion leading to downhole equipment failure. The use of biocides such as glutaraldehyde and quaternary ammonium compounds has spurred a public concern and debate among regulators regarding the impact of inadvertent releases into the environment on ecosystem and human health. This work provides a critical review of the potential fate and toxicity of biocides used in hydraulic fracturing operations. We identified the following physicochemical and toxicological aspects as well as knowledge gaps that should be considered when selecting biocides: (1) uncharged species will dominate in the aqueous phase and be subject to degradation and transport whereas charged species will sorb to soils and be less bioavailable; (2) many biocides are short-lived or degradable through abiotic and biotic processes, but some may transform into more toxic or persistent compounds; (3) understanding of biocides' fate under downhole conditions (high pressure, temperature, and salt and organic matter concentrations) is limited; (4) several biocidal alternatives exist, but high cost, high energy demands, and/or formation of disinfection byproducts limits their use. This review may serve as a guide for environmental risk assessment and identification of microbial control strategies to help develop a sustainable path for managing hydraulic fracturing fluids.

  20. Replacement of petroleum based hydraulic fluids with a soybean-based alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, B.; Rivera, P.

    1998-05-01

    Despite the best preventative measures, ruptured hoses, spills and leaks occur with use of all hydraulic equipment. Although these releases do not usually produce a RCRA regulated waste, they are often a reportable occurrence. Clean-up and subsequent administrative procedure involves additional costs, labor and work delays. Concerns over these releases, especially related to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) vehicles hauling waste on public roads prompted Fleet Services (FS) to seek an alternative to the standard petroleum based hydraulic fluid. Since 1996 SNL has participated in a pilot program with the University of Iowa (UNI) and selected vehicle manufacturers, notably John Deere, to field test hydraulic fluid produced from soybean oil in twenty of its vehicles. The vehicles included loaders, graders, sweepers, forklifts and garbage trucks. Research was conducted for several years at UNI to modify and market soybean oils for industrial uses. Soybean oil ranks first in worldwide production of vegetable oils (29%), and represents a tremendous renewable resource. Initial tests with soybean oil showed excellent lubrication and wear protection properties. Lack of oxidative stability and polymerization of the oil were concerns. These concerns were being addressed through genetic alteration, chemical modification and use of various additives, and the improved lubricant is in the field testing stage.

  1. New tracers identify hydraulic fracturing fluids and accidental releases from oil and gas operations.

    PubMed

    Warner, N R; Darrah, T H; Jackson, R B; Millot, R; Kloppmann, W; Vengosh, A

    2014-11-04

    Identifying the geochemical fingerprints of fluids that return to the surface after high volume hydraulic fracturing of unconventional oil and gas reservoirs has important applications for assessing hydrocarbon resource recovery, environmental impacts, and wastewater treatment and disposal. Here, we report for the first time, novel diagnostic elemental and isotopic signatures (B/Cl, Li/Cl, δ11B, and δ7Li) useful for characterizing hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids (HFFF) and distinguishing sources of HFFF in the environment. Data from 39 HFFFs and produced water samples show that B/Cl (>0.001), Li/Cl (>0.002), δ11B (25-31‰) and δ7Li (6-10‰) compositions of HFFF from the Marcellus and Fayetteville black shale formations were distinct in most cases from produced waters sampled from conventional oil and gas wells. We posit that boron isotope geochemistry can be used to quantify small fractions (∼0.1%) of HFFF in contaminated fresh water and likely be applied universally to trace HFFF in other basins. The novel environmental application of this diagnostic isotopic tool is validated by examining the composition of effluent discharge from an oil and gas brine treatment facility in Pennsylvania and an accidental spill site in West Virginia. We hypothesize that the boron and lithium are mobilized from exchangeable sites on clay minerals in the shale formations during the hydraulic fracturing process, resulting in the relative enrichment of boron and lithium in HFFF.

  2. Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Reaction with Shale in Experiments at Unconventional Gas Reservoir Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paukert, A. N.; Hakala, A.; Jarvis, K. B.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the marked increase in hydraulic fracturing for unconventional natural gas production over the past decade, reactions between hydraulic fracturing fluids (HFF) and shale reservoirs remain poorly reported in the scientific literature. Shale-HFF interaction could cause mineral dissolution, releasing matter from the shale, or mineral precipitation that degrades reservoir permeability. Furthermore, data are limited on whether scale inhibitors are effective at preventing mineral precipitation and whether these inhibitors adversely affect reservoir fluid chemistry and permeability. To investigate HFF-rock interaction within shale reservoirs, we conducted flow-through experiments exposing Marcellus Shale to synthetic HFF at reservoir conditions (66oC, 20MPa). Outcrop shale samples were cored, artificially fractured, and propped open with quartz sand. Synthetic HFFs were mixed with chemical additives similar to those used for Marcellus Shale gas wells in Ohio and Southwestern Pennsylvania (FracFocus.org). We evaluated differences between shale reactions with HFF made from natural freshwater and reactions with HFF made from synthetic produced water (designed to simulate produced water that is diluted and re-used for subsequent hydraulic fracturing). We also compared reactions with HFFs including hydrochloric acid (HCl) to represent the initial acid stage, and HFFs excluding HCl. Reactions were determined through changes in fluid chemistry and X-ray CT and SEM imaging of the shale before and after experiments. Results from experiments with HFF containing HCl showed dissolution of primary calcite, as expected. Experiments using HFF made from synthetic produced water had significant mineral precipitation, particularly of barium and calcium sulfates. X-ray CT images from these experiments indicate precipitation of minerals occurred either along the main fracture or within smaller splay fractures, depending on fluid composition. These experiments suggest that HFF

  3. Hydraulic modeling of unsteady debris-flow surges with solid-fluid interactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.

    1997-01-01

    Interactions of solid and fluid constituents produce the unique style of motion that typifies debris flows. To simulate this motion, a new hydraulic model represents debris flows as deforming masses of granular solids variably liquefied by viscous pore fluid. The momentum equation of the model describes how internal and boundary forces change as coarse-grained surge heads dominated by grain-contact friction grade into muddy debris-flow bodies more strongly influenced by fluid viscosity and pressure. Scaling analysis reveals that pore-pressure variations can cause flow resistance in surge heads to surpass that in debris-flow bodies by orders of magnitude. Numerical solutions of the coupled momentum and continuity equations provide good predictions of unsteady, nonuniform motion of experimental debris flows from initiation through deposition.

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Support of the SNS Liquid Mercury Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Siman-Tov, M.; Wendel, M.W.; Yoder, G.L.

    1999-11-14

    Experimental and computational thermal-hydraulic research is underway to support the liquid mercury target design for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility. The SNS target will be subjected to internal nuclear heat generation that results from pulsed proton beam collisions with the mercury nuclei. Recirculation and stagnation zones within the target are of particular concern because of the likelihood that they will result in local hot spots and diminished heat removal from the target structure. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are being used as a part of this research. Recent improvements to the 3D target model include the addition of the flow adapter which joins the inlet/outlet coolant pipes to the target body and an updated heat load distribution at the new baseline proton beam power level of 2 MW. Two thermal-hydraulic experiments are planned to validate the CFD model.

  5. Determination of hydraulic fracture parameters using a non-stationary fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valov, A. V.; Golovin, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, one provides a theoretical justification of the possibility of hydraulic fracture parameters determination by using a non-stationary fluid injection. It is assumed that the fluid is pumped into the fractured well with the time-periodic flow rate. It is shown that there is a phase shift between waves of fluid pressure and velocity. For the modelling purposes, the length and width of the fracture are assumed to be fixed. In the case of infinite fracture, one constructs an exact solution that ensures analytical determination of the phase shift in terms of the physical parameters of the problem. In the numerical calculation, the phase shift between pressure and velocity waves is found for a finite fracture. It is shown that the value of the phase shift depends on the physical parameters and on the fracture geometry. This makes it possible to determine parameters of hydraulic fracture, in particular its length, by the experimental measurement of the time shift and comparison with the numerical solution.

  6. Quantifying Hydraulic Conductivity and Fluid Pressures in the Alpine Fault Hanging-Wall Using DFDP-2 Data and Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coussens, J. P.; Woodman, N. D.; Menzies, C. D.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Sutherland, R.; Capova, L.; Cox, S.; Upton, P.; Townend, J.; Toy, V.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid flow can play an important role in fault failure, due to the influence of pore pressure on effective confining stress and through chemical and thermal alteration of the fault zone. Rocks of the Alpine Fault Zone, both exposed at the surface and recovered in cores, show evidence for significant alteration by fluids. However, the fluid flow regime in the region is poorly constrained and its relationship with the behaviour of the fault is uncertain. In 2014 the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) drilled the DFDP-2B borehole, penetrating 893 m into the hanging-wall of the Alpine Fault. Prior to drilling, a set of hydrogeological models for the Whataroa Valley region, encompassing the DFDP-2B drill site, were constructed using the modelling software FEFLOW. Models were constructed for a range of plausible hydraulic conductivity structures for the region. They predicted strongly artesian hydraulic heads of 50-150 m above surface elevation and temperatures exceeding 100 °C within 1 km depth in bedrock beneath the DFDP-2 drill site, with the exact hydraulic and thermal gradients dependent on the hydraulic conductivity structure chosen. During the drilling project hydraulic and thermal data from the borehole was collected. This included 33 slug test datasets, carried out at a range of borehole depths throughout the project. Estimates for hydraulic conductivity were obtained by analysis of slug test data. Steady state hydraulic heads for the borehole, across a range of depths, were estimated from the slug test measurements. Depth profiles of hydraulic head show rapid increases in hydraulic head with depth, in line with model predictions. Results show fluid pressures greatly exceeding hydrostatic pressure in the shallow crust, reflecting significant upward flow of groundwater beneath the Whataroa Valley. Hydraulic conductivity estimates provide constraints on the hydraulic conductivity structure of the region. All hydraulic conductivity structures modelled thus far

  7. Overview of Chronic Oral Toxicity Values for Chemicals Present in Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids, Flowback, and Produced Waters.

    PubMed

    Yost, Erin E; Stanek, John; DeWoskin, Robert S; Burgoon, Lyle D

    2016-05-03

    Concerns have been raised about potential public health effects that may arise if hydraulic fracturing-related chemicals were to impact drinking water resources. This study presents an overview of the chronic oral toxicity values-specifically, chronic oral reference values (RfVs) for noncancer effects, and oral slope factors (OSFs) for cancer-that are available for a list of 1173 chemicals that the United States (U.S.) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identified as being associated with hydraulic fracturing, including 1076 chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing fluids and 134 chemicals detected in flowback or produced waters from hydraulically fractured wells. The EPA compiled RfVs and OSFs using six governmental and intergovernmental data sources. Ninety (8%) of the 1076 chemicals reported in hydraulic fracturing fluids and 83 (62%) of the 134 chemicals reported in flowback/produced water had a chronic oral RfV or OSF available from one or more of the six sources. Furthermore, of the 36 chemicals reported in hydraulic fracturing fluids in at least 10% of wells nationwide (identified from EPA's analysis of the FracFocus Chemical Disclosure Registry 1.0), 8 chemicals (22%) had an available chronic oral RfV. The lack of chronic oral RfVs and OSFs for the majority of these chemicals highlights the significant knowledge gap that exists to assess the potential human health hazards associated with hydraulic fracturing.

  8. Cost and Performance Report Enhanced Biological Attenuation of Aircraft Deicing Fluid Runoff Using Constructed Wetlands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    During winter months at Department of Defense (DOD) air bases, large amounts of aircraft deicing and anti-icing fluids (ADF) (primarily propylene ... glycol , ethylene glycol, and various additives) are used to ensure flight safety during certain adverse weather conditions. Standard practices at both

  9. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of hydraulics and sedimentation in process reactors during aeration tank settling.

    PubMed

    Jensen, M D; Ingildsen, P; Rasmussen, M R; Laursen, J

    2006-01-01

    Aeration tank settling is a control method allowing settling in the process tank during high hydraulic load. The control method is patented. Aeration tank settling has been applied in several waste water treatment plants using the present design of the process tanks. Some process tank designs have shown to be more effective than others. To improve the design of less effective plants, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling of hydraulics and sedimentation has been applied. This paper discusses the results at one particular plant experiencing problems with partly short-circuiting of the inlet and outlet causing a disruption of the sludge blanket at the outlet and thereby reducing the retention of sludge in the process tank. The model has allowed us to establish a clear picture of the problems arising at the plant during aeration tank settling. Secondly, several process tank design changes have been suggested and tested by means of computational fluid dynamics modelling. The most promising design changes have been found and reported.

  10. Assessment of the Acute and Chronic Health Hazards of Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids.

    PubMed

    Wattenberg, Elizabeth V; Bielicki, Jeffrey M; Suchomel, Ashley E; Sweet, Jessica T; Vold, Elizabeth M; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy

    2015-01-01

    There is growing concern about how hydraulic fracturing affects public health because this activity involves handling large volumes of fluids that contain toxic and carcinogenic constituents, which are injected under high pressure through wells into the subsurface to release oil and gas from tight shale formations. The constituents of hydraulic fracturing fluids (HFFs) present occupational health risks because workers may be directly exposed to them, and general public health risks because of potential air and water contamination. Hazard identification, which focuses on the types of toxicity that substances may cause, is an important step in the complex health risk assessment of hydraulic fracturing. This article presents a practical and adaptable tool for the hazard identification of HFF constituents, and its use in the analysis of HFF constituents reported to be used in 2,850 wells in North Dakota between December 2009 and November 2013. Of the 569 reported constituents, 347 could be identified by a Chemical Abstract Service Registration Number (CASRN) and matching constituent name. The remainder could not be identified either because of trade secret labeling (210) or because of an invalid CASRN (12). Eleven public databases were searched for health hazard information on thirteen health hazard endpoints for 168 identifiable constituents that had at least 25 reports of use. Health hazard counts were generated for chronic and acute endpoints, including those associated with oral, inhalation, ocular, and dermal exposure. Eleven of the constituents listed in the top 30 by total health hazard count were also listed in the top 30 by reports of use. This includes naphthalene, which along with benzyl chloride, has the highest health hazard count. The top 25 constituents reportedly used in North Dakota largely overlap with those reported for Texas and Pennsylvania, despite different geologic formations, target resources (oil vs. gas), and disclosure requirements

  11. Effects of hydraulic frac fluids and formation waters on groundwater microbial communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Núria; Krüger, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Shale gas is being considered as a complementary energy resource to other fossil fuels. Its exploitation requires using advanced drilling techniques and hydraulic stimulation (fracking). During fracking operations, large amounts of fluids (fresh water, proppants and chemicals) are injected at high pressures into the formations, to create fractures and fissures, and thus to release gas from the source rock into the wellbore. The injected fluid partly remains in the formation, while up to 40% flows back to the surface, together with reservoir waters, sometimes containing dissolved hydrocarbons, high salt concentrations, etc. The aim of our study was to investigate the potential impacts of frac or geogenic chemicals, frac fluid, formation water or flowback on groudnwater microbial communities. Laboratory experiments under in situ conditions (i.e. at in situ temperatures, with high pressure, etc.) were conducted using groundwater samples from three different locations. Series of microcosms (3 of each kind) containing R2 broth medium or groundwater spiked with either single frac chemicals (including biocides), frac fluids, artificial reservoir water, NaCl, or different mixtures of reservoir water and frac fluid (to simulate flowback) were incubated in the dark. Controls included non-amended and non-inoculated microcosms. Classical microbiological methods and molecular analyses were used to assess changes in the microbial abundance, community structure and function in response to the different treatments. Microbial communities were quite halotolerant and their growth benefited from low concentrations of reservoir waters or salt, but they were negatively affected by higher concentrations of formation waters, salt, biocides, frac fluids or flowback. Changes on the microbial community structure could be detected by T-RFLP. Single frac components like guar gum or choline chloride could be used as substrates, while the effects of others like triethanolamine or light oil

  12. Environmentally Friendly, Rheoreversible, Hydraulic-fracturing Fluids for Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Hongbo; Kabilan, Senthil; Stephens, Sean A.; Suresh, Niraj; Beck, Anthon NR; Varga, Tamas; Martin, Paul F.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong; Bonneville, Alain; Heldebrant, David J.; Carroll, KC; Moore, Joseph; Fernandez, Carlos A.

    2015-07-01

    Cost-effective creation of high-permeability reservoirs inside deep crystalline bedrock is the primary challenge for the feasibility of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). Current reservoir stimulation entails adverse environmental impacts and substantial economic costs due to the utilization of large volumes of water “doped” with chemicals including rheology modifiers, scale and corrosion inhibitors, biocides, friction reducers among others where, typically, little or no information of composition and toxicity is disclosed. An environmentally benign, CO2-activated, rheoreversible fracturing fluid has recently been developed that significantly enhances rock permeability at effective stress significantly lower than current technology. We evaluate the potential of this novel fracturing fluid for application on geothermal sites under different chemical and geomechanical conditions, by performing laboratory-scale fracturing experiments with different rock sources under different confining pressures, temperatures, and pH environments. The results demonstrate that CO2-reactive aqueous solutions of environmentally amenable Polyallylamine (PAA) represent a highly versatile fracturing fluid technology. This fracturing fluid creates/propagates fracture networks through highly impermeable crystalline rock at significantly lower effective stress as compared to control experiments where no PAA was present, and permeability enhancement was significantly increased for PAA compared to conventional hydraulic fracturing controls. This was evident in all experiments, including variable rock source/type, operation pressure and temperature (over the entire range for EGS applications), as well as over a wide range of formation-water pH values. This versatile novel fracturing fluid technology represents a great alternative to industrially available fracturing fluids for cost-effective and competitive geothermal energy production.

  13. Demonstrate a Low Biochemical Oxygen Demand Aircraft Deicing Fluid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    viscosity and increase the freezing point at higher fluid concentrations. Given budget and schedule constraints, the project team acknowledged that...product that comes from bio-fuel production. Limitations of EcoFlo and EcoFlo II include higher viscosity , reduced freezing point depression...PG. The EcoFlo II formulation is anticipated to have a LOUT closer to that of PG. Also, the higher surface tension and higher viscosity of EcoFlo did

  14. Welded Permanent Fittings for Titanium Hydraulic Tubing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FITTINGS, *HYDRAULIC EQUIPMENT, RIVETED JOINTS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, PIPES , JET TRANSPORT AIRCRAFT, COLD WORKING, PRESSURE, RUPTURE, ARC WELDING , INERT...GAS WELDING , RADIOGRAPHY, STRESS RELIEVING, SUPERSONIC AIRCRAFT, COMMERCIAL AIRCRAFT.

  15. Characterization of the Oriskany and Berea Sandstones: Evaluating Biogeochemical Reactions of Potential Sandstone–Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Verba, Circe; Harris, Aubrey

    2016-07-07

    The Marcellus shale, located in the mid-Atlantic Appalachian Basin, has been identified as a source for natural gas and targeted for hydraulic fracturing recovery methods. Hydraulic fracturing is a technique used by the oil and gas industry to access petroleum reserves in geologic formations that cannot be accessed with conventional drilling techniques (Capo et al., 2014). This unconventional technique fractures rock formations that have low permeability by pumping pressurized hydraulic fracturing fluids into the subsurface. Although the major components of hydraulic fracturing fluid are water and sand, chemicals, such as recalcitrant biocides and polyacrylamide, are also used (Frac Focus, 2015). There is domestic concern that the chemicals could reach groundwater or surface water during transport, storage, or the fracturing process (Chapman et al., 2012). In the event of a surface spill, understanding the natural attenuation of the chemicals in hydraulic fracturing fluid, as well as the physical and chemical properties of the aquifers surrounding the spill site, will help mitigate potential dangers to drinking water. However, reports on the degradation pathways of these chemicals are limited in existing literature. The Appalachian Basin Marcellus shale and its surrounding sandstones host diverse mineralogical suites. During the hydraulic fracturing process, the hydraulic fracturing fluids come into contact with variable mineral compositions. The reactions between the fracturing fluid chemicals and the minerals are very diverse. This report: 1) describes common minerals (e.g. quartz, clay, pyrite, and carbonates) present in the Marcellus shale, as well as the Oriskany and Berea sandstones, which are located stratigraphically below and above the Marcellus shale; 2) summarizes the existing literature of the degradation pathways for common hydraulic fracturing fluid chemicals [polyacrylamide, ethylene glycol, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), glutaraldehyde

  16. Genome-Centric Analysis of Microbial Populations Enriched by Hydraulic Fracture Fluid Additives in a Coal Bed Methane Production Well.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Steven J; Evans, Paul N; Parks, Donovan H; Golding, Suzanne D; Tyson, Gene W

    2016-01-01

    Coal bed methane (CBM) is generated primarily through the microbial degradation of coal. Despite a limited understanding of the microorganisms responsible for this process, there is significant interest in developing methods to stimulate additional methane production from CBM wells. Physical techniques including hydraulic fracture stimulation are commonly applied to CBM wells, however the effects of specific additives contained in hydraulic fracture fluids on native CBM microbial communities are poorly understood. Here, metagenomic sequencing was applied to the formation waters of a hydraulically fractured and several non-fractured CBM production wells to determine the effect of this stimulation technique on the in-situ microbial community. The hydraulically fractured well was dominated by two microbial populations belonging to the class Phycisphaerae (within phylum Planctomycetes) and candidate phylum Aminicenantes. Populations from these phyla were absent or present at extremely low abundance in non-fractured CBM wells. Detailed metabolic reconstruction of near-complete genomes from these populations showed that their high relative abundance in the hydraulically fractured CBM well could be explained by the introduction of additional carbon sources, electron acceptors, and biocides contained in the hydraulic fracture fluid.

  17. Genome-Centric Analysis of Microbial Populations Enriched by Hydraulic Fracture Fluid Additives in a Coal Bed Methane Production Well

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Steven J.; Evans, Paul N.; Parks, Donovan H.; Golding, Suzanne D.; Tyson, Gene W.

    2016-01-01

    Coal bed methane (CBM) is generated primarily through the microbial degradation of coal. Despite a limited understanding of the microorganisms responsible for this process, there is significant interest in developing methods to stimulate additional methane production from CBM wells. Physical techniques including hydraulic fracture stimulation are commonly applied to CBM wells, however the effects of specific additives contained in hydraulic fracture fluids on native CBM microbial communities are poorly understood. Here, metagenomic sequencing was applied to the formation waters of a hydraulically fractured and several non-fractured CBM production wells to determine the effect of this stimulation technique on the in-situ microbial community. The hydraulically fractured well was dominated by two microbial populations belonging to the class Phycisphaerae (within phylum Planctomycetes) and candidate phylum Aminicenantes. Populations from these phyla were absent or present at extremely low abundance in non-fractured CBM wells. Detailed metabolic reconstruction of near-complete genomes from these populations showed that their high relative abundance in the hydraulically fractured CBM well could be explained by the introduction of additional carbon sources, electron acceptors, and biocides contained in the hydraulic fracture fluid. PMID:27375557

  18. Radium and barium removal through blending hydraulic fracturing fluids with acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Kondash, Andrew J; Warner, Nathaniel R; Lahav, Ori; Vengosh, Avner

    2014-01-21

    Wastewaters generated during hydraulic fracturing of the Marcellus Shale typically contain high concentrations of salts, naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), and metals, such as barium, that pose environmental and public health risks upon inadequate treatment and disposal. In addition, fresh water scarcity in dry regions or during periods of drought could limit shale gas development. This paper explores the possibility of using alternative water sources and their impact on NORM levels through blending acid mine drainage (AMD) effluent with recycled hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids (HFFFs). We conducted a series of laboratory experiments in which the chemistry and NORM of different mix proportions of AMD and HFFF were examined after reacting for 48 h. The experimental data combined with geochemical modeling and X-ray diffraction analysis suggest that several ions, including sulfate, iron, barium, strontium, and a large portion of radium (60-100%), precipitated into newly formed solids composed mainly of Sr barite within the first ∼ 10 h of mixing. The results imply that blending AMD and HFFF could be an effective management practice for both remediation of the high NORM in the Marcellus HFFF wastewater and beneficial utilization of AMD that is currently contaminating waterways in northeastern U.S.A.

  19. Kinematical measurement of hydraulic tortuosity of fluid flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Y.; Dong, J. B.; Li, X.; Wu, Y.

    2015-07-01

    It is hard to experimentally or analytically derive the hydraulic tortuosity (τ) of porous media flow because of their complex microstructures. In this work, we propose a kinematical measurement method for τ by introducing the concept of local tortuosity, which is defined as the ratio of fluid particle velocity to its component along the macro flow. And then, the calculation model of τ is analytically deduced in terms of that τ is the mean value of the local tortuosity. To avoid the impact from the singularity of local tortuosity, the velocity is normalized, and τ is then approximated by the ratio of the mean normalized velocity to the average value of its component along the macro-flow direction. The new estimation method is verified by flow through different types of porous media via the lattice Boltzmann method, and the relationships between permeabilities and tortuosities obtained by different methods are examined. The numerical results show that tortuosity by the novel approach is in good agreement with the existing theory, and the kinematic definition of hydraulic tortuosity is also proven.

  20. Kinematical measurement of hydraulic tortuosity of fluid flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Y.; Dong, J. B.; Li, X.; Wu, Y.

    2014-07-01

    It is hard to experimentally or analytically derive the hydraulic tortuosity (τ) of porous media flow because of their complex microstructures. In this work, we propose a kinematical measurement method for τ by introducing the concept of local tortuosity, which is defined as the ratio of fluid particle velocity to its component along the macro flow. And then, the calculation model of τ is analytically deduced in terms of that τ is the mean value of the local tortuosity. To avoid the impact from the singularity of local tortuosity, the velocity is normalized, and τ is then approximated by the ratio of the mean normalized velocity to the average value of its component along the macro-flow direction. The new estimation method is verified by flow through different types of porous media via the lattice Boltzmann method, and the relationships between permeabilities and tortuosities obtained by different methods are examined. The numerical results show that tortuosity by the novel approach is in good agreement with the existing theory, and the kinematic definition of hydraulic tortuosity is also proven.

  1. The role of fluid-structure interaction for safety and life time prediction in hydraulic machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, B.; Weber, W.; Seidel, U.

    2016-11-01

    Reliable assessments of dynamic phenomena in hydraulic machinery require the consideration of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) if natural frequencies or damping properties of submerged structural parts clearly change due to the surrounding water or if the interaction may cause instabilities. Exemplarily, three different applications of strongly coupled FSI are presented which all have a high impact on operational safety or dynamic stresses and fatigue life. At first, flow induced damping effects at a Francis runner exhibit a strong dependency on operating condition and mode shape. Secondly, if a rotating disc is submerged, a splitting of natural frequencies is observed for mode shapes with different spinning direction. Finally, a hydroelastic instabilitiy is identified in a bypass valve at small opening.

  2. Tribological properties of hydraulic fluids modified by peat-based additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionov, V. V.; Larionov, S. A.; Sarkisov, Ju S.; Kopanica, N. O.; Gorchkova, A. V.; Gorlenko, N. P.; Tzevtkov, N. A.; Ikonnikova, K. V.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents physicochemical investigations of the structure and properties of a nano-modifier synthesized from peat, the local raw material subjected to pyrolysis in air-free conditions. This nano-modifying additive is a combination of various forms of nanocarbon and polar and non-polar adsorbing materials such as silica (SiO2), calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and carbon (C). Different nanocarbon forms (nanotubes, fullerenes, nanodiamonds, nanofiber, nanodispersed carbon) used in different proportions with micro and macro peat components give multifunctional properties to the synthesized nano-modifier and the ability to positively change tribological properties of hydraulic fluids and oil lubricants. Test results of type TMT-600 show that its different percentage is required to modify tribological properties of the steel tribocouple under different loading conditions. At 0.5 wt.% content of this nano-modifier, stabilization of the friction ratio and an increase of seizure load are observed.

  3. Third International Symposium on Environmental Hydraulics with a Special Theme on Urban Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, Don

    2002-01-01

    This is to report on the use of the funds provided by NASA to support the 'Third International Symposium on Environmental Hydraulics with a Special Theme on Urban Fluid Dynamics'. The Symposium was held on the campus of Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona, USA, from 5-8 December 2001. It proved to be a forum for the discussion of a wide range of applied and basic research being conducted in the general areas of water and air resources, with the latter focusing on air quality in urban areas associated with complex terrain. This aspect of the Symposium was highlighted by twelve invited papers given by distinguished international scientists and roughly three hundred contributed manuscripts. Owing primarily to the current international situation, roughly 20% of the authors canceled their plans to attend the Symposium; while this was unfortunate, the Symposium went ahead with the enthusiastic participation of more than 250 scientists from forty nations.

  4. Acoustic emission in a fluid saturated heterogeneous porous layer with application to hydraulic fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, J.T. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1988-11-01

    A theoretical model for acoustic emission in a vertically heterogeneous porous layer bounded by semi-infinite solid regions is developed using linearized equations of motion for a fluid/solid mixture and a reflectivity method. Green's functions are derived for both point loads and moments. Numerically integrated propagators represent solutions for intermediate heterogeneous layers in the porous region. These are substituted into a global matrix for solution by Gaussian elimination and back-substitution. Fluid partial stress and seismic responses to dislocations associated with fracturing of a layer of rock with a hydraulically conductive fracture network are computed with the model. A constitutive model is developed for representing the fractured rock layer as a porous material, using commonly accepted relationships for moduli. Derivations of density, tortuosity, and sinuosity are provided. The main results of the model application are the prediction of a substantial fluid partial stress response related to a second mode wave for the porous material. The response is observable for relatively large distances, on the order of several tens of meters. The visco-dynamic transition frequency associated with parabolic versus planar fluid velocity distributions across micro-crack apertures is in the low audio or seismic range, in contrast to materials with small pore size, such as porous rocks, for which the transition frequency is ultrasonic. Seismic responses are predicted for receiver locations both in the layer and in the outlying solid regions. In the porous region, the seismic response includes both shear and dilatational wave arrivals and a second-mode arrival. The second-mode arrival is not observable outside of the layer because of its low velocity relative to the dilatational and shear wave propagation velocities of the solid region.

  5. 49 CFR 173.172 - Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Packaging for Hazardous Materials Other Than... fuel tanks containing a mixture of anhydrous hydrazine and monomethyl hydrazine (M86 fuel) and designed for installation as complete units in aircraft are excepted from the specification...

  6. Evaluation of activated sludge for biodegradation of propylene glycol as an aircraft deicing fluid.

    PubMed

    Delorit, Justin D; Racz, LeeAnn

    2014-04-01

    Aircraft deicing fluid used at airport facilities is often collected for treatment or disposal in order to prevent serious ecological threats to nearby surface waters. This study investigated lab scale degradation of propylene glycol, the active ingredient in a common aircraft deicing fluid, by way of a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor containing municipal waste water treatment facility activated sludge performing simultaneous organic carbon oxidation and nitrification. The ability of activated sludge to remove propylene glycol was evaluated by studying the biodegradation and sorption characteristics of propylene glycol in an activated sludge medium. The results indicate sorption may play a role in the fate of propylene glycol in AS, and the heterotrophic bacteria readily degrade this compound. Therefore, a field deployable bioreactor may be appropriate for use in flight line applications.

  7. Nonflammable Hydraulic Power System for Tactical Aircraft. Volume 2. Equipment and Systems Test and Evaluation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    long fatigue life. Redundancy management has been addressed with proven techniques such as multiple systems, reservoir level sensing shutoff valves and...pressure operated shuttle valves . With expanded interest in airframe powered engine nozzle actuators, the program included several actuators designed...gpm Hydraulic Pump ..... ........... 6 2.4.2 MC 4 Way, 3 Position Solenoid Valve .... ........ 7 2.5 CTFE TOXICITY ISSUE AND CONSIDERATIONS

  8. Effects of Hydraulic Frac Fluids on Subsurface Microbial Communities in Gas Shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Núria; Krüger, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Shale gas is being considered as a complementary energy resource to coal or other fossil fuels. The exploitation of unconventional gas reservoirs requires the use of advanced drilling techniques and hydraulic stimulation (fracking). During fracking operations, large amounts of fluids (fresh water, proppants and chemical additives) are injected at high pressures into the formations, to produce fractures and fissures, and thus to release gas from the source rock into the wellbore. The injected fluids partly remain in the formation, while about 20 to 40% of the originally injected fluid flows back to the surface, together with formation waters, sometimes containing dissolved hydrocarbons, high salt concentrations, etc. The overall production operation will likely affect and be affected by subsurface microbial communities associated to the shale formations. On the one hand microbial activity (like growth, biofilm formation) can cause unwanted processes like corrosion, clogging, etc. On the other hand, the introduction of frac fluids could either enhance microbial growth or cause toxicity to the shale-associated microbial communities. To investigate the potential impacts of changing environmental reservoir conditions, like temperature, salinity, oxgen content and pH, as well as the introduction of frac or geogenic chemicals on subsurface microbial communities, laboratory experiments under in situ conditions (i.e. high temperatures and pressures) are being conducted. Enrichment cultures with samples from several subsurface environments (e.g. shale and coal deposits, gas reservoirs, geothermal fluids) have been set up using a variety of carbon sources, including hydrocarbons and typical frac chemicals. Classical microbiological and molecular analysis are used to determine changes in the microbial abundance, community structure and function after the exposure to different single frac chemicals, "artificial" frac fluids or production waters. On the other hand, potential

  9. Downhole Transformation of the Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Biocide Glutaraldehyde: Implications for Flowback and Produced Water Quality.

    PubMed

    Kahrilas, Genevieve A; Blotevogel, Jens; Corrin, Edward R; Borch, Thomas

    2016-10-18

    Hydraulic fracturing fluid (HFF) additives are used to enhance oil and gas extraction from unconventional shale formations. Several kilometers downhole, these organic chemicals are exposed to temperatures up to 200 °C, pressures above 10 MPa, high salinities, and a pH range from 5-8. Despite this, very little is known about the fate of HFF additives under these extreme conditions. Here, stainless steel reactors are used to simulate the downhole chemistry of the commonly used HFF biocide glutaraldehyde (GA). The results show that GA rapidly (t1/2 < 1 h) autopolymerizes, forming water-soluble dimers and trimers, and eventually precipitates out at high temperatures (∼140 °C) and/or alkaline pH. Interestingly, salinity was found to significantly inhibit GA transformation. Pressure and shale did not affect GA transformation and/or removal from the bulk fluid. On the basis of experimental pseudo-second-order rate constants, a kinetic model for GA downhole half-life predictions for any combination of these conditions within the limits tested was developed. These findings illustrate that the biocidal GA monomer has limited time to control microbial activity in hot and/or alkaline shales, and may return along with its aqueous transformation products to the surface via flowback and produced water in cooler, more acidic, and saline shales.

  10. Aircraft Hydraulic System Dynamic Analysis. Volume I. - Transient Analysis (HYTRAN) Computer Program User Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    AIRCRAFT COMPANY MCDONNELL DOUGLAS CORPORATION ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI February 1977 TECHNICAL REPORT AFAPL-TR-76-43, VOLUME I D D C This document has been...is not to be regarded by implication or otherwise as in any manner licensing the holder or any other person or corporation , or conveying any rights or...Douglas Corporation , under contract P3615-74-C-2016. The effort was sponsored by the Air Force Aero Propulsion Laboratory, Air Force Systems Command, Wright

  11. Numerical Model of Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Transport in the Subsurface with Pressure Transient, Density Effects, and Imbibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsell, D.; Rajaram, H.; Dempsey, D.; Viswanathan, H.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the transport of hydraulic fracturing (HF) fluid that is injected into the deep subsurface for shale gas extraction is important to ensure that shallow drinking water aquifers are not contaminated from an environmental and public health perspective and to understand formation damage from an oil and gas production perspective. Upward pressure gradients, permeable pathways such as faults or improperly abandoned wellbores, and the density contrast of the HF fluid to the surrounding brine encourages upward HF fluid migration. In contrast, the very low shale permeability and the imbibition of water into partially-saturated shale may sequester much of the HF fluid. Using the Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code (FEHM), single-phase flow and transport simulations are performed to quantify how much HF fluid is removed via the wellbore as flowback and produced water and how much reaches overlying aquifers; imbibition is calculated with a semi-analytical one-dimensional solution and treated as a sink term. The travel time for HF fluid to reach the shallow aquifers is highly dependent on the amount of water imbibed and the suction applied to the well. If imbibition rates and suction are small, the pressure transient due to injection and the density contrast allows rapid upward plume migration at early times. The density contrast diminishes considerably within tens to hundreds of years as mixing occurs. We present estimates of HF fluid migration to shallow aquifers during the first 1,000 years after hydraulic fracturing begins for ranges of subsurface properties.

  12. Lewis icing research tunnel test of the aerodynamic effects of aircraft ground deicing/anti-icing fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runyan, L. James; Zierten, Thomas A.; Hill, Eugene G.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of the effect of aircraft ground deicing/anti-icing fluids on the aerodynamic characteristics of a Boeing 737-200ADV airplane was conducted. The test was carried out in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel. Fluids tested include a Newtonian deicing fluid, three non-Newtonian anti-icing fluids commercially available during or before 1988, and eight new experimental non-Newtonian fluids developed by four fluid manufacturers. The results show that fluids remain on the wind after liftoff and cause a measurable lift loss and drag increase. These effects are dependent on the high-lift configuration and on the temperature. For a configuration with a high-lift leading-edge device, the fluid effect is largest at the maximum lift condition. The fluid aerodynamic effects are related to the magnitude of the fluid surface roughness, particularly in the first 30 percent chord. The experimental fluids show a significant reduction in aerodynamic effects.

  13. Generating a Simulated Fluid Flow Over an Aircraft Surface Using Anisotropic Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, David L. (Inventor); Sturdza, Peter (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A fluid-flow simulation over a computer-generated aircraft surface is generated using a diffusion technique. The surface is comprised of a surface mesh of polygons. A boundary-layer fluid property is obtained for a subset of the polygons of the surface mesh. A pressure-gradient vector is determined for a selected polygon, the selected polygon belonging to the surface mesh but not one of the subset of polygons. A maximum and minimum diffusion rate is determined along directions determined using a pressure gradient vector corresponding to the selected polygon. A diffusion-path vector is defined between a point in the selected polygon and a neighboring point in a neighboring polygon. An updated fluid property is determined for the selected polygon using a variable diffusion rate, the variable diffusion rate based on the minimum diffusion rate, maximum diffusion rate, and angular difference between the diffusion-path vector and the pressure-gradient vector.

  14. Degradation of glycol based aircraft deicing fluids under anaerobic methanogenic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veltman, Shawn Herbert

    2000-11-01

    Large quantities of aircraft deicing fluid (ADF) comprised mainly of ethylene glycol (EG) and propylene glycol (PG) are used for aircraft deicing/anti-icing during cold weather operations at airports throughout the world. Several different formulations of ADF have been developed and are used. Type I solutions are commonly employed to remove snow and ice from aircraft surfaces (deicing), and Type IV solutions are commonly applied to prevent ice from reforming (anti-icing). The runoff from aircraft deicing operations is known to have a high oxygen demand. As a consequence, deicing wastes are often collected at airports for treatment. ADF products also contain small amounts of colorants, corrosion inhibitors, and thickeners, and these compounds may pose a greater environmental concern than oxygen depletion. Several studies have been completed to compare the relative toxicity of the pure glycols (EG and PG) vs. ADF using Microtox RTM assays and other aquatic tests, and it has been reported that ADF is significantly more inhibitory than the pure glycols. With growing concern over the environmental consequences of deicing there has been interest in developing anaerobic technology to treat deicing waste. In this dissertation a survey, a deicing waste characterization study, and research efforts employing serum bottles and bench scale laboratory reactors were used to demonstrate that ADF may be degraded effectively and efficiently in an anaerobic methanogenic environment. The factors that may affect this degradation are examined and discussed.

  15. Chemical hazards in aeromedical aircraft.

    PubMed

    Tupper, C R

    1989-01-01

    Several potentially hazardous chemicals are required to make modern military aircraft fly. With each airevac mission, the possibility exists for structural failure of a fluid system, resulting in contamination to flight/medical crews, patients, and passengers. Aeromedical Evacuation Crewmembers (AECMs) need to be aware of the hazardous chemicals used in aircraft and areas where there is an increased risk to those in and around the aircraft. This study identified potential areas for chemical leakage, such as refuel receptacles, hydraulic reservoirs, hydraulic motors, doors, ramps, engines, and more. Further, it identified the basic first aid procedures to perform on people contaminated with jet fuel, hydraulic fluid, engine oil, fire extinguisher agents, LOX and other fluids. First aid procedures are basic and can be performed with supplies and equipment on a routine aeromedical evacuation mission, AECMs trained in a basic awareness of hazardous aircraft chemicals will result in crews better prepared to cope with the unique risks of transporting patients in a complicated military aircraft.

  16. Electrochemical determination of water in environmental hydraulic fluids using the karl Fischer reaction.

    PubMed

    Cedergren, A; Lundström, M

    1997-10-01

    Different procedures based on the Karl Fischer reaction were investigated with respect to their applicability for water determinations in environmental hydraulic fluids:  (i) continuous coulometry using a recently described diaphragm-free cell; (ii) on-line stripping of water at elevated temperature using either continuous coulometry or direct potentiometry for detection of the liberated water. Except for one of the oils, Statoil PA, which is a poly(α-olefin) with certain polymers added, no significant difference was found among coulometry using an optimized imidazole-buffered methanolic reagent containing 75% (v/v) chloroform, the two different stripping techniques (working in the temperature interval 100-110 °C), and the commercially available Hydranal Coulomat AG-H. The high stability and sensitivity of the coulometric technique described made it possible to work with sample amounts in the low milligram-range, and this is shown to increase the reliability of the coulometric method as compared to normally used procedures.

  17. Gravity-Dependent Combustion and Fluids Research - From Drop Towers to Aircraft to the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.; Singh, Bhim S.; Kohl, Fred J.

    2007-01-01

    Driven by the need for knowledge related to the low-gravity environment behavior of fluids in liquid fuels management, thermal control systems and fire safety for spacecraft, NASA embarked on a decades long research program to understand, accommodate and utilize the relevant phenomena. Beginning in the 1950s, and continuing through to today, drop towers and aircraft were used to conduct an ever broadening and increasingly sophisticated suite of experiments designed to elucidate the underlying gravity-dependent physics that drive these processes. But the drop towers and aircraft afford only short time periods of continuous low gravity. Some of the earliest rocket test flights and manned space missions hosted longer duration experiments. The relatively longer duration low-g times available on the space shuttle during the 1980s and 1990s enabled many specialized experiments that provided unique data for a wide range of science and engineering disciplines. Indeed, a number of STS-based Spacelab missions were dedicated solely to basic and applied microgravity research in the biological, life and physical sciences. Between 1980 and 2000, NASA implemented a vigorous Microgravity Science Program wherein combustion science and fluid physics were major components. The current era of space stations from the MIR to the International Space Station have opened up a broad range of opportunities and facilities that are now available to support both applied research for technologies that will help to enable the future exploration missions and for a continuation of the non-exploration basic research that began over fifty years ago. The ISS-based facilities of particular value to the fluid physics and combustion/fire safety communities are the Fluids and Combustion Facility Combustion Integrated Rack and the Fluids Integrated Rack.

  18. Arterial mechanics in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Mechanical properties, hydraulic conductivity, and two-phase (solid/fluid) finite element models.

    PubMed

    Gaballa, M A; Raya, T E; Simon, B R; Goldman, S

    1992-07-01

    To characterize the interaction between mechanical and fluid transport properties in hypertension, we measured in vivo elastic material constants and hydraulic conductivity in intact segments of carotid arteries in normal and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). With the use of a finite element model, the arterial wall was modeled as a large-deformation, two-phase (solid/fluid) medium, which accounts for the existence and motion of the tissue fluid. Measurements of internal diameter and transmural pressures were obtained during continuous increases in pressure from 0 to 200 mm Hg. Strain and stress components were calculated based on a pseudostrain exponential energy density function. To measure the hydraulic conductivity, segments of the carotid artery were isolated, filled with a 4% oxygenated albumin-Tyrode's solution, and connected to a capillary tube. The movement of the meniscus of the capillary tube represented the fluid filtration across the artery. To study the influence of transmural pressure on hydraulic conductivity, measurement of fluid filtration across the arterial wall was obtained at transmural pressures of 50 and 100 mm Hg. The material constants in the SHR (n = 9) were higher (p less than 0.05 for all variables) than in normal rats (n = 10): c = 1,343 +/- 96 versus 1,158 +/- 65 mm Hg, b1 = 1.84 +/- 0.24 versus 1.22 +/- 0.22, b2 = 0.769 +/- 0.114 versus 0.616 +/- 0.11, b3 = 0.017 +/- 0.005 versus 0.0065 +/- 0.002, b4 = 0.206 +/- 0.04 versus 0.083 +/- 0.03, b5 = 0.0594 +/- 0.007 versus 0.0217 +/- 0.006, and b6 = 0.22 +/- 0.09 versus 0.123 +/- 0.02, respectively. The hydraulic conductivity of the total wall, calculated from the filtration data, was lower (p less than 0.05) at both 50 and 100 mm Hg in the SHR (n = 6) compared with normal rats (n = 7): 1.12 +/- 0.31 x 10(-8) and 0.72 +/- 0.23 x 10(-8) versus 1.95 +/- 0.53 x 10(-8) and 1.35 +/- 0.47 x 10(-8) cm/(sec.mm Hg), respectively. The intergroup comparisons between 50 and 100 mm Hg in both SHR

  19. Determination of airborne trialkyl and triaryl organophosphates originating from hydraulic fluids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Development of methodology for combined aerosol and vapor sampling.

    PubMed

    Solbu, K; Thorud, S; Hersson, M; Ovrebø, S; Ellingsen, D G; Lundanes, E; Molander, P

    2007-08-17

    Methodology for personal occupational exposure assessment of airborne trialkyl and triaryl organophosphates originating from hydraulic fluids by active combined aerosol and vapor sampling at 1.5L/min is presented. Determination of the organophosphates was performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Combinations of adsorbents (Anasorb 747, Anasorb CSC, Chromosorb 106, XAD-2 and silica gel) with an upstream cassette with glass fiber or PTFE filters and different desorption/extraction solvents (CS(2), CS(2)-dimethylformamide (50:1, v/v), toluene, dichloromethane, methyl-t-butyl ether and methanol) have been evaluated for optimized combined vapor and aerosol air sampling of the organophosphates tri-isobutyl, tri-n-butyl, triphenyl, tri-o-cresyl, tri-m-cresyl and tri-p-cresyl phosphates. The combination of Chromosorb 106 and 37 mm filter cassette with glass fiber filter and dichloromethane as desorption/extraction solvent was the best combination for mixed phase air sampling of the organophosphates originating from hydraulic fluids. The triaryl phosphates were recovered solely from the filter, while the trialkyl phosphates were recovered from both the filter and the adsorbent. The total sampling efficiency on the combined sampler was in the range 92-101% for the studied organophosphates based on spiking experiments followed by pulling air through the sampler. Recoveries after 28 days storage were 98-102% and 99-101% when stored at 5 and -20 degrees C, respectively. The methodology was further evaluated in an exposure chamber with generated oil aerosol atmospheres with both synthetic and mineral base oils with added organophosphates in various concentrations, yielding total sampling efficiencies in close comparison to the spiking experiments. The applicability of the method was demonstrated by exposure measurements in a mechanical workshop where system suitability tests are performed on different aircraft components in a test bench, displaying tricresyl phosphate

  20. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, B.D.; Lissaman, P.B.S.; Morgan, W.R.; Radkey, R.L.

    1998-09-22

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing`s top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gases for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well. 31 figs.

  1. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, Bart D.; Lissaman, Peter B. S.; Morgan, Walter R.; Radkey, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing's top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gasses for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well.

  2. The hydraulic separator Multidune: preliminary tests on fluid-dynamic features and plastic separation feasibility.

    PubMed

    De Sena, Giulia; Nardi, Camillo; Cenedese, Antonio; La Marca, Floriana; Massacci, Paolo; Moroni, Monica

    2008-01-01

    Recycling of plastic materials is a rapidly developing discipline because of environmental awareness, the need to conserve materials and energy, and the growing demand to increase the production economy. The main problem in plastics recovery and recycling is related to the variety of plastic wastes, even if selective collection occurs. Therefore, plastic materials can be recycled either as mixtures or as single types, separating the different typologies by their physical (size, specific mass, etc.) and/or chemical properties. However, separation of plastics in single typologies by traditional processes and devices is difficult due to their typical low variability in properties. This paper presents a new research development for recycling industry: the Multidune separator. This is a device constructed from a sequence of parallel semi-cylindrical tubes of transparent plastic welded together in a plane. The lower half is shifted laterally and then fixed relative to the upper half. Flow is then induced in the lateral direction normal to the axis of the tubes, creating a main flow channel and two recirculation zones. This apparatus creates a differential transport of particles of low specific mass, near to 1g/cm3, allowing their separation. The flow field in the Multidune separator is studied via Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV). Eulerian analysis of the data is performed to gather information about the fluid-dynamics features established by different hydraulic heads at the inlet of the Multidune. Preliminary tests on monomaterial samples have been performed, varying several operative parameters to determine the best set of values. Therefore, separation tests have been executed on composite samples, obtaining satisfactory results in terms of plastic separation feasibility.

  3. Modelling of a hydraulic engine mount with fluid-structure interaction finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, Wen-Bin; Lu, Zhen-Hua

    2004-08-01

    Hydraulic engine mount (HEM) is now widely used as a highly effective vibration isolator in automotive powertrain. A lumped parameter (LP) model is a traditional model for modelling the dynamic characteristics of HEM, in which the system parameters are usually obtained by experiments. In this paper, a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) finite element analysis (FEA) method and a non-linear FEA technology are used to determine the system parameters, and a fully coupled FSI model is developed for modelling the static and lower-frequency performance of an HEM. A FSI FEA technique is used to estimate the parameters of volumetric compliances, equivalent piston area, inertia and resistance of the fluid in the inertia track and the decoupler of an HEM. A non-linear FEA method is applied to determine the dynamic stiffness of rubber spring of the HEM. The system parameters predicated by FEA are compared favorably with experimental data and/or analytical solutions. A numerical simulation for an HEM with an inertia track and a free decoupler is performed based on the FSI model and the LP model along with the estimated system parameters, and again the simulation results are compared with experimental data. The calculated time histories of some variables in the model, such as the pressure in the upper chamber, the displacement of the free decoupler and the volume flow through the inertia track and the decoupler, under different excitations, elucidate the working mechanism of the HEM. The pressure distribution calculated with the FSI model in the chambers of the HEM validates the assumption that the pressure distribution in the upper and lower chamber is uniform in the LP model. The work conducted in the paper demonstrates that the methods for estimating the system parameters in the LP model and the FSI model for modelling HEM are effective, with which the dynamic characteristic analysis and design optimization of an HEM can be performed before its prototype development, and this

  4. Potential Impacts of Spilled Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Chemicals on Water Resources: Types, Volumes, and Physical-chemical Properties of Chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knightes, C. D.; Daiss, R.; Williams, L.; Singer, A.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (HF) fluid chemicals spilled on-site may impact drinking water resources. While chemicals generally make up <2% of the total injected fluid composition by mass, spills may have undiluted concentrations. HF fluids typically consist of a mixture of base fluid, proppant, and additives. Additives, comprised of one or more chemicals, are serve a specific engineering purpose (e.g., friction reducer, scale inhibitor, biocide). As part of the USEPA's Draft Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing for Oil and Gas on Drinking Water Resources, we investigated the different types, volumes injected, and physical-chemical properties of HF fluid chemicals. The USEPA identified 1,076 chemicals used in HF fluids, based on 10 sources covering chemical use from 2005 to 2013. These chemicals fall into different classes: acids, alcohols, aromatic hydrocarbons, bases, hydrocarbon mixtures, polysaccharides, and surfactants. The physical-chemical properties of these chemicals vary, which affects their movement through the environment if spilled. Properties range from fully miscible to insoluble, from highly hydrophobic to highly hydrophilic. Most of these chemicals are not volatile. HF fluid composition varies from site to site depending on a range of factors. No single chemical or set of chemicals are used at every site. A median of 14 chemicals are used per well, with a range of four to 28 (5th and 95th percentiles). Methanol was the chemical most commonly reported in FracFocus 1.0 (72% of disclosures), and hydrotreated light petroleum distillates and hydrochloric acid were both reported in over half the disclosures. Operators store chemicals on-site, often in multiple containers (typically in 760 to 1,500 L totes). We estimated that the total volume of all chemicals used per well ranges from approximately 10,000 to 110,000 L. The views expressed here are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views or policies of the USEPA.

  5. Infrared thermographic diagnostic aid to aircraft maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delo, Michael; Delo, Steve

    2007-04-01

    Thermographic data can be used as a supplement to aircraft maintenance operations in both back shop and flight line situations. Aircraft systems such as electrical, propulsion, environmental, pitot static and hydraulic/pneumatic fluid, can be inspected using a thermal infrared (IR) imager. Aircraft systems utilize electro-hydraulic, electro-mechanical, and electro-pneumatic mechanisms, which, if accessible, can be diagnosed for faults using infrared technology. Since thermographs are images of heat, rather than light, the measurement principle is based on the fact that any physical object (radiating energy at infrared wavelengths within the IR portion of the electro-magnetic spectrum), can be imaged with infrared imaging equipment. All aircraft systems being tested with infrared are required to be energized for troubleshooting, so that valuable baseline data from fully operational aircraft can be collected, archived and referenced for future comparisons.

  6. A reactive transport modelling approach to assess the leaching potential of hydraulic fracturing fluids associated with coal seam gas extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallants, Dirk; Simunek, Jirka; Gerke, Kirill

    2015-04-01

    Coal Seam Gas production generates large volumes of "produced" water that may contain compounds originating from the use of hydraulic fracturing fluids. Such produced water also contains elevated concentrations of naturally occurring inorganic and organic compounds, and usually has a high salinity. Leaching of produced water from storage ponds may occur as a result of flooding or containment failure. Some produced water is used for irrigation of specific crops tolerant to elevated salt levels. These chemicals may potentially contaminate soil, shallow groundwater, and groundwater, as well as receiving surface waters. This paper presents an application of scenario modelling using the reactive transport model for variably-saturated media HP1 (coupled HYDRUS-1D and PHREEQC). We evaluate the fate of hydraulic fracturing chemicals and naturally occurring chemicals in soil as a result of unintentional release from storage ponds or when produced water from Coal Seam Gas operations is used in irrigation practices. We present a review of exposure pathways and relevant hydro-bio-geo-chemical processes, a collation of physico-chemical properties of organic/inorganic contaminants as input to a set of generic simulations of transport and attenuation in variably saturated soil profiles. We demonstrate the ability to model the coupled processes of flow and transport in soil of contaminants associated with hydraulic fracturing fluids and naturally occurring contaminants.

  7. A systematic evaluation of chemicals in hydraulic-fracturing fluids and wastewater for reproductive and developmental toxicity.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Elise G; Ettinger, Adrienne S; Leaderer, Brian P; Bracken, Michael B; Deziel, Nicole C

    2017-01-01

    Hydraulic-fracturing fluids and wastewater from unconventional oil and natural gas development contain hundreds of substances with the potential to contaminate drinking water. Challenges to conducting well-designed human exposure and health studies include limited information about likely etiologic agents. We systematically evaluated 1021 chemicals identified in hydraulic-fracturing fluids (n=925), wastewater (n=132), or both (n=36) for potential reproductive and developmental toxicity to triage those with potential for human health impact. We searched the REPROTOX database using Chemical Abstract Service registry numbers for chemicals with available data and evaluated the evidence for adverse reproductive and developmental effects. Next, we determined which chemicals linked to reproductive or developmental toxicity had water quality standards or guidelines. Toxicity information was lacking for 781 (76%) chemicals. Of the remaining 240 substances, evidence suggested reproductive toxicity for 103 (43%), developmental toxicity for 95 (40%), and both for 41 (17%). Of these 157 chemicals, 67 had or were proposed for a federal water quality standard or guideline. Our systematic screening approach identified a list of 67 hydraulic fracturing-related candidate analytes based on known or suspected toxicity. Incorporation of data on potency, physicochemical properties, and environmental concentrations could further prioritize these substances for future drinking water exposure assessments or reproductive and developmental health studies.

  8. Testing of molded high temperature plastic actuator road seals for use in advanced aircraft hydraulic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waterman, A. W.; Huxford, R. L.; Nelson, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    Molded high temperature plastic first and second stage rod seal elements were evaluated in seal assemblies to determine performance characteristics. These characteristics were compared with the performance of machined seal elements. The 6.35 cm second stage Chevron seal assembly was tested using molded Chevrons fabricated from five molding materials. Impulse screening tests conducted over a range of 311 K to 478 K revealed thermal setting deficiencies in the aromatic polyimide molding materials. Seal elements fabricated from aromatic copolyester materials structurally failed during impulse cycle calibration. Endurance testing of 3.85 million cycles at 450 K using MIL-H-83283 fluid showed poorer seal performance with the unfilled aromatic polyimide material than had been attained with seals machined from Vespel SP-21 material. The 6.35 cm first stage step-cut compression loaded seal ring fabricated from copolyester injection molding material failed structurally during impulse cycle calibration. Molding of complex shape rod seals was shown to be a potentially controllable technique, but additional molding material property testing is recommended.

  9. Physical Controls on Potential Upward Migration of Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid and Brine from Tight Oil and Gas Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flewelling, S. A.; Tymchak, M. P.; Sharma, M.

    2013-12-01

    The widespread use of hydraulic fracturing (HF) has raised concerns about potential upward migration of HF fluid and brine through the rocks that overlay tight oil and gas formations (permeability ≤ 10-16 m2). The pathways along which potential fluid migration might occur include the primary porosity, induced and natural fractures, and preexisting faults. In this presentation, we evaluate the physical mechanisms that control whether HF fluid and brine can migrate upward along these pathways and, if so, the approximate magnitude of the fluxes and timescales over which such migration might occur. Our analysis focuses first on potential hydraulic communication between tight formations and shallow potable aquifers via induced fractures and preexisting faults. We developed a relationship that predicts maximum fracture height as a function of HF fluid volume and compared these predictions to the vertical extent of microseismicity from over 12,000 HF stimulations across North America. Virtually all microseisms were within the bounds of the theoretical relationship (a simple power law). The microseismic data were also used to estimate the size of shear displacement areas (including along preexisting faults), which were on the order of 10 m or less. These findings suggest that fracture heights are limited by HF fluid volume regardless of whether the fluid interacts with faults and that direct hydraulic communication between tight formations and shallow potable groundwater via induced fractures and preexisting faults is not a realistic expectation. Apart from these pathways, the only other avenue for fluid migration is through the unmodified overlying rock. Due to the low permeability of targeted formations and surrounding strata, the pressure pulse applied during an HF stimulation is localized to the immediate vicinity of the fracture network and unable to drive large scale vertical flow. Thus, upward flow, if it occurs, would be controlled by the preexisting distribution

  10. Analysis of Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Data from the FracFocus Chemical Disclosure Registry 1 (PDF)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA analyzed data from the FracFocus Chemical Disclosure Registry 1.0 to better understand the chemicals and water used to hydraulically fracture oil and gas production wells across the United States.

  11. Analysis of Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Data from the FracFocus Chemical Disclosure Registry 1

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA analyzed data from the FracFocus Chemical Disclosure Registry 1.0 to better understand the chemicals and water used to hydraulically fracture oil and gas production wells across the United States.

  12. A decision analysis framework for estimating the potential hazards for drinking water resources of chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing fluids.

    PubMed

    Yost, Erin E; Stanek, John; Burgoon, Lyle D

    2017-01-01

    Despite growing concerns over the potential for hydraulic fracturing to impact drinking water resources, there are limited data available to identify chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing fluids that may pose public health concerns. In an effort to explore these potential hazards, a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) framework was employed to analyze and rank selected subsets of these chemicals by integrating data on toxicity, frequency of use, and physicochemical properties that describe transport in water. Data used in this analysis were obtained from publicly available databases compiled by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as part of a larger study on the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water. Starting with nationwide hydraulic fracturing chemical usage data from EPA's analysis of the FracFocus Chemical Disclosure Registry 1.0, MCDAs were performed on chemicals that had either noncancer toxicity values (n=37) or cancer-specific toxicity values (n=10). The noncancer MCDA was then repeated for subsets of chemicals reported in three representative states (Texas, n=31; Pennsylvania, n=18; and North Dakota, n=20). Within each MCDA, chemicals received scores based on relative toxicity, relative frequency of use, and physicochemical properties (mobility in water, volatility, persistence). Results show a relative ranking of these chemicals based on hazard potential, and provide preliminary insight into chemicals that may be more likely than others to impact drinking water resources. Comparison of nationwide versus state-specific analyses indicates regional differences in the chemicals that may be of more concern to drinking water resources, although many chemicals were commonly used and received similar overall hazard rankings. Several chemicals highlighted by these MCDAs have been reported in groundwater near areas of hydraulic fracturing activity. This approach is intended as a preliminary analysis, and represents one

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of C-ether formulations for use as high temperature lubricants and hydraulic fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, F. S.; Green, R. L.; Miller, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    The formulation and evaluation of C-ether fluids for use in the hydraulic and lubrication systems of the space shuttle and advanced air breathing engines were studied to lower the pour point of a reference C-ether from -29 C to -40 C without changing its evaporation loss. Use of disiloxanes mixed with C-ethers gave a -40 C pour point fluid with little change in the desired evaporation loss or in oxidative stability. A second -40 C pour point fluid containing only C-ethers was also developed. A screening program tested lubrication additives for C-ethers and the new fluids. Six additive packages were chosen for evaluation in 316 C bearing tests, two for evaluation in 260 C pump tests. The goal of the bearing test was a 100 hour run. The rig was a specially designed 80-mm axially loaded ball bearing. The C-ether base fluid ran only one hour at 316 C before cage wear failure occurred. The best additive blends ran 47, 94 and 100 hours. The 96 hour test gave excessive deposits. The 100 hour test had no wear failures; an unexplained loss of cage silver occurred from areas of direct fluid impingement on the cage.

  14. Fluid-loss control for high-permeability rocks in hydraulic fracturing under realistic shear conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Navarrete, R.C.; Mitchell, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    A study is presented on the effectiveness of different combinations of fluid and fluid-loss additives to control fluid loss in high-permeability formations under high shear rates. The impact on matrix damage and proppant-pack damage is also studied. Borate-crosslinked guars, hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) and a surfactant water-base gravel packing fluid were investigated. The fluid-loss additive considered was silica flour. All fluid-loss tests were run in dynamic fluid-loss cells. To properly test high-permeability cores, new long core dynamic fluid-loss cells were used. The matrix damage caused by the invasion of the fluid was determined using pressure taps along the core. Conductivity tests were also run to determine the damage to the proppant pack. Results show that the effectiveness of particulate fluid-loss additives under dynamic conditions is strongly dependent on the initial leakoff rate, which depends on the pressure gradient across the core, permeability of the core and viscosity of the invading fluid. The use of silica flour helps matrix flowback, and it has a minimal effect on proppant-pack conductivity in clean fluids (e.g., surfactant water-base gravel packing fluid). With the exception of the borate-crosslinked guar with no fluid-loss additive, the variety of fluids used in these tests (with and without silica flour) have a negligible effect on postproduction.

  15. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of transport and deposition of pesticides in an aircraft cabin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Mazumdar, Sagnik; George, Pradeep; Wei, Binnian; Jones, Byron; Weisel, Clifford P.

    2013-04-01

    Spraying of pesticides in aircraft cabins is required by some countries as part of a disinsection process to kill insects that pose a public health threat. However, public health concerns remain regarding exposures of cabin crew and passengers to pesticides in aircraft cabins. While large scale field measurements of pesticide residues and air concentrations in aircraft cabins scenarios are expensive and time consuming, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models provide an effective alternative for characterizing concentration distributions and exposures. This study involved CFD modeling of a twin-aisle 11 row cabin mockup with heated manikins, mimicking a part of a fully occupied Boeing 767 cabin. The model was applied to study the flow and deposition of pesticides under representative scenarios with different spraying patterns (sideways and overhead) and cabin air exchange rates (low and high). Corresponding spraying experiments were conducted in the cabin mockup, and pesticide deposition samples were collected at the manikin's lap and seat top for a limited set of five seats. The CFD model performed well for scenarios corresponding to high air exchange rates, captured the concentration profiles for middle seats under low air exchange rates, and underestimated the concentrations at window seats under low air exchange rates. Additionally, both the CFD and experimental measurements showed no major variation in deposition characteristics between sideways and overhead spraying. The CFD model can estimate concentration fields and deposition profiles at very high resolutions, which can be used for characterizing the overall variability in air concentrations and surface loadings. Additionally, these model results can also provide a realistic range of surface and air concentrations of pesticides in the cabin that can be used to estimate potential exposures of cabin crew and passengers to these pesticides.

  16. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of transport and deposition of pesticides in an aircraft cabin.

    PubMed

    Isukapalli, Sastry S; Mazumdar, Sagnik; George, Pradeep; Wei, Binnian; Jones, Byron; Weisel, Clifford P

    2013-04-01

    Spraying of pesticides in aircraft cabins is required by some countries as part of a disinsection process to kill insects that pose a public health threat. However, public health concerns remain regarding exposures of cabin crew and passengers to pesticides in aircraft cabins. While large scale field measurements of pesticide residues and air concentrations in aircraft cabins scenarios are expensive and time consuming, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models provide an effective alternative for characterizing concentration distributions and exposures. This study involved CFD modeling of a twin-aisle 11 row cabin mockup with heated manikins, mimicking a part of a fully occupied Boeing 767 cabin. The model was applied to study the flow and deposition of pesticides under representative scenarios with different spraying patterns (sideways and overhead) and cabin air exchange rates (low and high). Corresponding spraying experiments were conducted in the cabin mockup, and pesticide deposition samples were collected at the manikin's lap and seat top for a limited set of five seats. The CFD model performed well for scenarios corresponding to high air exchange rates, captured the concentration profiles for middle seats under low air exchange rates, and underestimated the concentrations at window seats under low air exchange rates. Additionally, both the CFD and experimental measurements showed no major variation in deposition characteristics between sideways and overhead spraying. The CFD model can estimate concentration fields and deposition profiles at very high resolutions, which can be used for characterizing the overall variability in air concentrations and surface loadings. Additionally, these model results can also provide a realistic range of surface and air concentrations of pesticides in the cabin that can be used to estimate potential exposures of cabin crew and passengers to these pesticides.

  17. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of transport and deposition of pesticides in an aircraft cabin

    PubMed Central

    Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Mazumdar, Sagnik; George, Pradeep; Wei, Binnian; Jones, Byron; Weisel, Clifford P.

    2015-01-01

    Spraying of pesticides in aircraft cabins is required by some countries as part of a disinsection process to kill insects that pose a public health threat. However, public health concerns remain regarding exposures of cabin crew and passengers to pesticides in aircraft cabins. While large scale field measurements of pesticide residues and air concentrations in aircraft cabins scenarios are expensive and time consuming, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models provide an effective alternative for characterizing concentration distributions and exposures. This study involved CFD modeling of a twin-aisle 11 row cabin mockup with heated manikins, mimicking a part of a fully occupied Boeing 767 cabin. The model was applied to study the flow and deposition of pesticides under representative scenarios with different spraying patterns (sideways and overhead) and cabin air exchange rates (low and high). Corresponding spraying experiments were conducted in the cabin mockup, and pesticide deposition samples were collected at the manikin’s lap and seat top for a limited set of five seats. The CFD model performed well for scenarios corresponding to high air exchange rates, captured the concentration profiles for middle seats under low air exchange rates, and underestimated the concentrations at window seats under low air exchange rates. Additionally, both the CFD and experimental measurements showed no major variation in deposition characteristics between sideways and overhead spraying. The CFD model can estimate concentration fields and deposition profiles at very high resolutions, which can be used for characterizing the overall variability in air concentrations and surface loadings. Additionally, these model results can also provide a realistic range of surface and air concentrations of pesticides in the cabin that can be used to estimate potential exposures of cabin crew and passengers to these pesticides. PMID:25642134

  18. Numerical Modeling of a Thermal-Hydraulic Loop and Test Section Design for Heat Transfer Studies in Supercritical Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Daniel

    A numerical tool for the simulation of the thermal dynamics of pipe networks with heat transfer has been developed with the novel capability of modeling supercritical fluids. The tool was developed to support the design and deployment of two thermal-hydraulic loops at Carleton University for the purpose of heat transfer studies in supercritical and near-critical fluids. First, the system was characterized based on its defining features; the characteristic length of the flow path is orders of magnitude larger than the other characteristic lengths that define the system's geometry; the behaviour of the working fluid in the supercritical thermodynamic state. An analysis of the transient thermal behaviour of the model's domains is then performed to determine the accuracy and range of validity of the modeling approach for simulating the transient thermal behaviour of a thermal-hydraulic loop. Preliminary designs of three test section geometries, for the purpose of heat transfer studies, are presented in support of the overall design of the Carleton supercritical thermal-hydraulic loops. A 7-rod-bundle, annular and tubular geometries are developed with support from the new numerical tool. Materials capable of meeting the experimental requirements while operating in supercritical water are determined. The necessary geometries to satisfy the experimental goals are then developed based on the material characteristics and predicted heat transfer behaviour from previous simulation results. An initial safety analysis is performed on the test section designs, where they are evaluated against the ASME Boiler, Pressure Vessel, and Pressure Piping Code standard, required for safe operation and certification.

  19. Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    national power. But with the recent events such as the war with Iraq, the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak, some major carriers... TITLE AND SUBTITLE 2003 Industry Studies: Aircraft 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  20. Artificial feel system using magneto-rheological fluid on aircraft control stick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, Vignesh; Kim, Daewon

    2016-04-01

    The conventional feel system in aircraft occupies large space in the cockpit and has complicated designs. The primary objective of this research is to develop an artificial feel force system that can overcome some drawbacks of the current system. A novel feel system using magneto-rheological (MR) fluid is constructed to precisely control the shear stress under the magnetic field. To validate the functionality of the MR artificial feel system, the final system is fabricated and multiple tests are performed to acquire force-velocity characteristics that are compared to the mathematical model derived. In addition, the PID closed loop control algorithm is developed to simulate the dynamic system model. Both experimental and simulation results are compared to validate the derived system model. The system response time and sampling rates are evaluated and compared to the conventional system at the end. It is concluded that the developed artificial feel system can precisely control and acts as a fail proof system when incorporated with a modern fly-by-wire aircraft system.

  1. Actuation fluid adapter for hydraulically-actuated electronically-controlled fuel injector and engine using same

    DOEpatents

    Keyster, Eric S.; Merchant, Jack A.

    2002-01-01

    A fuel injector adapter consists of a block defining a pressure communication passage therethrough and an actuation fluid passage. The actuation fluid passage includes three separate branches that open through an outer surface of the block at three separate locations.

  2. Electrical and Hydraulic Properties of Humified Bog Peat as a Function of Pore-fluid Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comas, X.; Slater, L.

    2003-12-01

    The electrical properties of organic sediments and their relationship to physical properties are poorly understood. A simple approach to relate electrical properties to physical properties commonly applied to inorganic sediments is to model the electrolytic conductivity and the surface conductivity as parallel conduction paths. Low-frequency electrical measurements were made in conjunction with hydraulic conductivity measurements on peat samples from an 11 m section collected in a large freshwater peatland. The electrical and hydraulic measurements were made as a function of NaCl concentration and depth of burial. In all cases, the electrical conductivity of the peat was not well modeled by the parallel conduction path model, with the model yielding formation factor values close to one. Sample measurements along the section suggest a slight increase in the formation factor and surface conductivity values with depth. Hydraulic conductivity measured by constant head method shows a marked increase with increasing NaCl concentration, which we believe results from expansion of macropore porosity by chemical dilation as proposed by others. Attempts to return the samples to their original conditions by decreasing the salinity only partially restored the hydraulic conductivity values, indicating a permanent disruption of the hydraulic properties of the peat. The increase of surface electrical conductivity and hydraulic conductivity with depth may indicate a close correlation with the high cation exchange capacity of organic matter and its tendency for chemical dilation as decomposition of organic matter increases with depth. We propose that the electrical conductivity of peat cannot be modeled by an electrolytic and a surface conduction path in parallel. The increase in the electrolytic conduction causes ionic accumulation and dispersion processes, expanding the macropore porosity and hence inducing a decrease in the formation factor values. A proper electrical model for

  3. Fracture Propagation, Fluid Flow, and Geomechanics of Water-Based Hydraulic Fracturing in Shale Gas Systems and Electromagnetic Geophysical Monitoring of Fluid Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jihoon; Um, Evan; Moridis, George

    2014-12-01

    We investigate fracture propagation induced by hydraulic fracturing with water injection, using numerical simulation. For rigorous, full 3D modeling, we employ a numerical method that can model failure resulting from tensile and shear stresses, dynamic nonlinear permeability, leak-off in all directions, and thermo-poro-mechanical effects with the double porosity approach. Our numerical results indicate that fracture propagation is not the same as propagation of the water front, because fracturing is governed by geomechanics, whereas water saturation is determined by fluid flow. At early times, the water saturation front is almost identical to the fracture tip, suggesting that the fracture is mostly filled with injected water. However, at late times, advance of the water front is retarded compared to fracture propagation, yielding a significant gap between the water front and the fracture top, which is filled with reservoir gas. We also find considerable leak-off of water to the reservoir. The inconsistency between the fracture volume and the volume of injected water cannot properly calculate the fracture length, when it is estimated based on the simple assumption that the fracture is fully saturated with injected water. As an example of flow-geomechanical responses, we identify pressure fluctuation under constant water injection, because hydraulic fracturing is itself a set of many failure processes, in which pressure consistently drops when failure occurs, but fluctuation decreases as the fracture length grows. We also study application of electromagnetic (EM) geophysical methods, because these methods are highly sensitive to changes in porosity and pore-fluid properties due to water injection into gas reservoirs. Employing a 3D finite-element EM geophysical simulator, we evaluate the sensitivity of the crosswell EM method for monitoring fluid movements in shaly reservoirs. For this sensitivity evaluation, reservoir models are generated through the coupled flow

  4. Estimation of changes in dynamic hydraulic force in a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with transient computational fluid dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, Toru; Ohta, Akiko; Tanaka, Nobuatu; Qian, Yi; Tsukiya, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the hydraulic force on magnetically levitated (maglev) pumps should be studied carefully to improve the suspension performance and the reliability of the pumps. A maglev centrifugal pump, developed at Ibaraki University, was modeled with 926 376 hexahedral elements for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. The pump has a fully open six-vane impeller with a diameter of 72.5 mm. A self-bearing motor suspends the impeller in the radial direction. The maximum pressure head and flow rate were 250 mmHg and 14 l/min, respectively. First, a steady-state analysis was performed using commercial code STAR-CD to confirm the model's suitability by comparing the results with the real pump performance. Second, transient analysis was performed to estimate the hydraulic force on the levitated impeller. The impeller was rotated in steps of 1 degrees using a sliding mesh. The force around the impeller was integrated at every step. The transient analysis revealed that the direction of the radial force changed dynamically as the vane's position changed relative to the outlet port during one circulation, and the magnitude of this force was about 1 N. The current maglev pump has sufficient performance to counteract this hydraulic force. Transient CFD analysis is not only useful for observing dynamic flow conditions in a centrifugal pump but is also effective for obtaining information about the levitation dynamics of a maglev pump.

  5. Remaining useful life measurements of diesel engine oils, automotive engine oils, hydraulic fluids, and greases using cyclic voltammetric methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.E.

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents the results of research designed to develop a remaining useful life evaluation rig (RULER) from cyclic voltammetric methods for diesel engine oils, automotive engine oils, hydraulic fluids, and greases. The RULER requires less than one millimeter of sample, less than one minute to perform, and very little technical expertise. Samples of laboratory-stressed and authentic-used oils, fluids, and greases were used in the development of the RULER. The results of this research demonstrate that remaining useful life measurements made by the RULER can be used by oil analysis programs to quantify antioxidant levels of incoming and stored supplies, to predict and extend oil change intervals for normally operating equipment, and to detect abnormally operating equipment prior to malfunction. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  6. The Effects of Temperature, Humidity and Aircraft Fluid Exposure on T800H/3900-2 Composites Bonded with AF-555M Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, Gilda A.; Hou, Tan-Hung; Lowther, Sharon E.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Connell, John W.; Blasini, Sheila Roman

    2010-01-01

    Fiber reinforced resin matrix composites and structural adhesives have found increased usage on commercial and military aircraft in recent years. Due to the lack of service history of these relatively new material systems, their long-term aging performance has not been well established. In this study, single lap shear specimens (SLS) were fabricated by secondary bonding of Scotch-Weld(TradeMark) AF-555M between pre-cured adherends comprised of T800H/3900-2 uni-directional laminates. The adherends were co-cured with wet peel-ply for surface preparation. Each bond-line of the SLS specimen was measured to determine thickness and inspected visually using an optical microscope for voids. A three-year environmental aging plan for the SLS specimens at 82 C (180 F) and 85% relative humidity was initiated. SLS strengths were measured for both controls and aged specimens at room temperature and 82 C. The effect of this exposure on lap shear strength and failure modes to date is reported. In addition, the effects of water, saline water, deicing fluid, JP-5 jet fuel and hydraulic fluid on both the composite material and the adhesive bonds were investigated. The up to date results on the effects of these exposures will be discussed.

  7. Evaluation of MS-6 Fire-Resistant Fluid for 8000 PSI Lightweight Hydraulic Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-10

    results were compared to data previously obtained with MIL-H- 27601 and MIL-H-83282 fluids, References 2, 3, and 4. Viscosity and bulk modulus of MS-6...for operation with MIL-H- 27601 and MIL-H-83282 fluids. Rated output at 4000 rpm and +240OF inlet fluid temperature is 14 gpm at 7850 psi. The test...increased from 3000 psi using MIL-Ii-5606 fluid to 8000 psi using MIL-H- 27601 (a shear stable hydrocarbon base fluid) The F-14 horizontal stabilizer

  8. Degradation of phosphate ester hydraulic fluid in power station turbines investigated by a three-magnet unilateral magnet array.

    PubMed

    Guo, Pan; He, Wei; García-Naranjo, Juan C

    2014-04-14

    A three-magnet array unilateral NMR sensor with a homogeneous sensitive spot was employed for assessing aging of the turbine oils used in two different power stations. The Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence and Inversion Recovery-prepared CPMG were employed for measuring the ¹H-NMR transverse and longitudinal relaxation times of turbine oils with different service status. Two signal components with different lifetimes were obtained by processing the transverse relaxation curves with a numeric program based on the Inverse Laplace Transformation. The long lifetime components of the transverse relaxation time T₂eff and longitudinal relaxation time T₁ were chosen to monitor the hydraulic fluid aging. The results demonstrate that an increase of the service time of the turbine oils clearly results in a decrease of T₂eff,long and T₁,long. This indicates that the T₂eff,long and T₁,long relaxation times, obtained from the unilateral magnetic resonance measurements, can be applied as indices for degradation of the hydraulic fluid in power station turbines.

  9. Computational fluid dynamics-based hydraulic and hemolytic analyses of a novel left ventricular assist blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Chen; Zhang, Yan; Gui, Xing-Min; Hu, Sheng-Shou

    2011-10-01

    The advent of various technologies has allowed mechanical blood pumps to become more reliable and versatile in recent decades. In our study group, a novel structure of axial flow blood pump was developed for assisting the left ventricle. The design point of the left ventricular assist blood pump 25 (LAP-25) was chosen at 4 Lpm with 100 mm Hg according to our clinical practice. Computational fluid dynamics was used to design and analyze the performance of the LAP-25. In order to obtain a required hydraulic performance and a satisfactory hemolytic property in the LAP-25 of a smaller size, a novel structure was developed including an integrated shroud impeller, a streamlined impeller hub, and main impeller blades with splitter blades; furthermore, tandem cascades were introduced in designing the diffuser. The results of numerical simulation show the LAP-25 can generate flow rates of 3-5 Lpm at rotational speeds of 8500-10,500 rpm, producing pressure rises of 27.5-148.3 mm Hg with hydraulic efficiency points ranging from 13.4 to 27.5%. Moreover, the fluid field and the hemolytic property of the LAP-25 were estimated, and the mean hemolysis index of the pump was 0.0895% with Heuser's estimated model. In conclusion, the design of the LAP-25 shows an acceptable result.

  10. Degradation of Phosphate Ester Hydraulic Fluid in Power Station Turbines Investigated by a Three-Magnet Unilateral Magnet Array

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Pan; He, Wei; García-Naranjo, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    A three-magnet array unilateral NMR sensor with a homogeneous sensitive spot was employed for assessing aging of the turbine oils used in two different power stations. The Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence and Inversion Recovery-prepared CPMG were employed for measuring the 1H-NMR transverse and longitudinal relaxation times of turbine oils with different service status. Two signal components with different lifetimes were obtained by processing the transverse relaxation curves with a numeric program based on the Inverse Laplace Transformation. The long lifetime components of the transverse relaxation time T2eff and longitudinal relaxation time T1 were chosen to monitor the hydraulic fluid aging. The results demonstrate that an increase of the service time of the turbine oils clearly results in a decrease of T2eff,long and T1,long. This indicates that the T2eff,long and T1,long relaxation times, obtained from the unilateral magnetic resonance measurements, can be applied as indices for degradation of the hydraulic fluid in power station turbines. PMID:24736132

  11. Bacterial communities associated with hydraulic fracturing fluids in thermogenic natural gas wells in North Central Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Struchtemeyer, Christopher G; Elshahed, Mostafa S

    2012-07-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is used to increase the permeability of shale gas formations and involves pumping large volumes of fluids into these formations. A portion of the frac fluid remains in the formation after the fracturing process is complete, which could potentially contribute to deleterious microbially induced processes in natural gas wells. Here, we report on the geochemical and microbiological properties of frac and flowback waters from two newly drilled natural gas wells in the Barnett Shale in North Central Texas. Most probable number studies showed that biocide treatments did not kill all the bacteria in the fracturing fluids. Pyrosequencing-based 16S rRNA diversity analyses indicated that the microbial communities in the flowback waters were less diverse and completely distinct from the communities in frac waters. These differences in frac and flowback water communities appeared to reflect changes in the geochemistry of fracturing fluids that occurred during the frac process. The flowback communities also appeared well adapted to survive biocide treatments and the anoxic conditions and high temperatures encountered in the Barnett Shale.

  12. Fate and toxicity of aircraft deicing fluid additives through anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Gruden, C L; Dow, S M; Hernandez, M T

    2001-01-01

    Benzotriazole derivatives are widely used corrosion inhibitors and their fate during wastewater treatment processes is unknown. The purpose of this research was to study the toxic effects and fate of the two commercially significant benzotriazole isomers used in aircraft deicing fluids (4-, and 5-, methylbenzotriazole [MeBT]) during anaerobic digestion. Experiments were executed in microcosms using mesophilic anaerobic biomass co-digesting wastewater sludge and propylene glycol. Sorption of MeBT to digesting solids could be approximated with a Freundlich model, and no anaerobic breakdown of either MeBT isomer was detected. Digesters fed more than 300 mg/L MeBT responded with a significant decrease in methanogenic microbial activity and volatile solids production and a concomitant increase in accumulation of volatile fatty acids. Direct microscopic measurements using fluorescent phylogenetic probes applied to digesting biomass revealed that members of both Archaea and Bacteria domains were sensitive to MeBT. Granular activated carbon (GAC) (volatile solids: GAC = 10%) reduced the apparent toxic effects of MeBT; GAC addition nearly restored the baseline activity of digesters fed MeBT (500 to 1000 mg/L).

  13. Anaerobic digestion of aircraft deicing fluid wastes: interactions and toxicity of corrosion inhibitors and surfactants.

    PubMed

    Gruden, Cyndee L; Hernandez, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Corrosion inhibitors and surfactants are present in aircraft deicing fluids (ADFs) at significant concentrations (> 1% w/w). The purpose of this research was to study the interactions of a common nonionic surfactant with the commercially significant corrosion inhibitors used in modern ADF (4- and 5-methylbenzotriazole [MeBT]), and to determine the effects of their mixture on the conventional anaerobic digestion process. In mesophilic anaerobic microcosms codigesting wastewater solids, propylene glycol, and MeBT, increasing surfactant levels resulted in enhanced MeBT sorption on digester solids. As judged by anaerobic toxicity assays, responses from digesters containing surfactant concentrations below their critical micelle concentration (CMC) suggested that low nonionic surfactant concentrations could facilitate a reduction in the apparent toxicity of MeBT. In microcosms exposed to surfactant concentrations above their CMC, no increase in MeBT solubility was observed, and the anaerobic toxicity response corresponded to control systems not containing surfactant. Direct microscopic measurements of digesting biomass using fluorescent phylogenetic probes (fluorescent in situ hybridization) revealed that members of the domain Bacteria were more sensitive to MeBT in the presence of surfactant than were members of the domain Archaea.

  14. Pulsation dampening device for super critical fluid expansion engine, hydraulic engine or pump in cryogenic service

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, L.A.

    1989-11-07

    This patent describes a surge bottle or pressure pulsation dampening device for cryogenic services. It comprises: a liquid sump section, wherein the liquid sump section is comprised of an enclosed area containing a volume of an incompressible fluid; a warm gas volume section, wherein the warm gas volume section is comprised of an enclosed area containing a volume of a compressible warm gas; and a laminar flow section which connects and allows for communication between the liquid sump section and the warm gas volume section. The laminar flow section is comprised of a number of small bore, thin walled tubes which contain the incompressible fluid in the end connected to the liquid sump section and the compressible warm gas in the end connected to the warm gas volume section wherein the bore of the tubes are such that any movement of the either the compressible warm gas or the incompressible fluid would be laminar flow. During operation, the incompressible fluid and the warm compressible gas within the small bore, thin walled tubes move or oscillate a short distance in each of the tubes with minimal intermixing of the incompressible fluid and the warm compressible gas thereby minimizing heat leak from the warm gas volume section to the liquid sump section into the liquid in the sump.

  15. Patient-Specific Relationship Between Hydraulic Permeability of Microvasculature and the Extent of Burden of Excess Fluid in Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Yashiro, Masatomo; Ochiai, Miyuki; Yanai, Yuko; Kotera, Hirohisa; Iehara, Noriyuki

    2016-10-01

    We have reported a significant correlation between hydraulic permeability of microvasculature adjusted with ultrafiltration rate (AdjLpst) and excess fluid divided by dry weight (ExF/DW) in a cross-sectional study of hemodialysis patients. We aimed to study longitudinally whether a similar relationship between them exists in each patient. Twelve hemodialysis (HD) patients in whom AdjLpst and ExF/DW had been measured more than four times (total of 85 measurements) were enrolled. AdjLpst was calculated by monitoring blood volume during HD. ExF was calculated from the fluid volume measured via bioimpedance spectroscopy. The borders of overhydration were 1.66 mL/mm Hg per min for AdjLpst and a positive value for ExF/DW. There was a significant correlation between AdjLpst and ExF/DW (r = 0.517). When the 85 measurements were classified into four quadrants according to ExF/DW and AdjLpst, the evaluations of fluid status agreed in 66 measurements. In six patients, significant positive correlations were found. In nine patients, equal to or more than 80.0% of evaluations by AdjLpst and those by ExF/DW agreed. In only one patient was there neither significant correlation nor agreement. AdjLpst of two patients suffering from chronic heart failure and microscopic polyangiitis was reduced compared with that of others loaded with the same extent of excess fluid. We concluded that there was a significant correlation between AdjLpst and ExF/DW and high agreement between evaluation by AdjLpst and evaluation by ExF/DW in the majority of patients. However, the relationship between them was patient-specific to some extent.

  16. Integrated Experimental and Computational Study of Hydraulic Fracturing and the Use of Alternative Fracking Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, H.; Carey, J. W.; Karra, S.; Porter, M. L.; Rougier, E.; Zhang, D.; Makedonska, N.; Middleton, R. S.; Currier, R.; Gupta, R.; Lei, Z.; Kang, Q.; O'Malley, D.; Hyman, J.

    2014-12-01

    Shale gas is an unconventional fossil energy resource that is already having a profound impact on US energy independence and is projected to last for at least 100 years. Production of methane and other hydrocarbons from low permeability shale involves hydrofracturing of rock, establishing fracture connectivity, and multiphase fluid-flow and reaction processes all of which are poorly understood. The result is inefficient extraction with many environmental concerns. A science-based capability is required to quantify the governing mesoscale fluid-solid interactions, including microstructural control of fracture patterns and the interaction of engineered fluids with hydrocarbon flow. These interactions depend on coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes over scales from microns to tens of meters. Determining the key mechanisms in subsurface THMC systems has been impeded due to the lack of sophisticated experimental methods to measure fracture aperture and connectivity, multiphase permeability, and chemical exchange capacities at the high temperature, pressure, and stresses present in the subsurface. This project uses innovative high-pressure microfluidic and triaxial core flood experiments on shale to explore fracture-permeability relations and the extraction of hydrocarbon. These data are integrated with simulations including lattice Boltzmann modeling of pore-scale processes, finite-element/discrete element models of fracture development in the near-well environment, discrete-fracture modeling of the reservoir, and system-scale models to assess the economics of alternative fracturing fluids. The ultimate goal is to make the necessary measurements to develop models that can be used to determine the reservoir operating conditions necessary to gain a degree of control over fracture generation, fluid flow, and interfacial processes over a range of subsurface conditions.

  17. Identifying chemicals of concern in hydraulic fracturing fluids used for oil production.

    PubMed

    Stringfellow, William T; Camarillo, Mary Kay; Domen, Jeremy K; Sandelin, Whitney L; Varadharajan, Charuleka; Jordan, Preston D; Reagan, Matthew T; Cooley, Heather; Heberger, Matthew G; Birkholzer, Jens T

    2017-01-01

    Chemical additives used for hydraulic fracturing and matrix acidizing of oil reservoirs were reviewed and priority chemicals of concern needing further environmental risk assessment, treatment demonstration, or evaluation of occupational hazards were identified. We evaluated chemical additives used for well stimulation in California, the third largest oil producing state in the USA, by the mass and frequency of use, as well as toxicity. The most frequently used chemical additives in oil development were gelling agents, cross-linkers, breakers, clay control agents, iron and scale control agents, corrosion inhibitors, biocides, and various impurities and product stabilizers used as part of commercial mixtures. Hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids, used for matrix acidizing and other purposes, were reported infrequently. A large number and mass of solvents and surface active agents were used, including quaternary ammonia compounds (QACs) and nonionic surfactants. Acute toxicity was evaluated and many chemicals with low hazard to mammals were identified as potentially hazardous to aquatic environments. Based on an analysis of quantities used, toxicity, and lack of adequate hazard evaluation, QACs, biocides, and corrosion inhibitors were identified as priority chemicals of concern that deserve further investigation.

  18. Anaerobic degradation of aircraft deicing fluid (ADF) in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors and the fate of ADF additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Thi Tham

    2002-11-01

    A central composite design was employed to methodically investigate anaerobic treatment of aircraft deicing fluid (ADF) in bench-scale Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors. A total of 23 runs at 17 different operating conditions were conducted in continuous mode. The development of four empirical models describing process responses (i.e., chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency, biomass specific acetoclastic activity, methane production rate, and methane production potential) as functions of ADF concentration, hydraulic retention time (HRT), and biomass concentration is presented. Model verification indicated that predicted responses (COD removal efficiencies, biomass specific acetoclastic activity, and methane production rates and potential) were in good agreement with experimental results. Biomass specific acetoclastic activity was improved by almost two-fold during ADF treatment in UASB reactors. For the design window, COD removal efficiencies were higher than 90%. Predicted methane production potentials were close to theoretical values, and methane production rates increased as the organic loading rate (OLR) was increased. ADF toxicity effects were evident for 1.6% ADF at medium specific organic loadings (SOLR above 0.5 g COD/g VSS/d). In contrast, good reactor stability and excellent removal efficiencies were achieved at 1.2% ADF for reactor loadings approaching that of highly loaded systems (0.73 g COD/g VSS/d). Acclimation to ADF resulted in an initial reduction in the biomass settling velocity. The fate of ADF additives was also investigated. There was minimal sorption of benzotriazole (BT), 5-methyl-1 H-benzotriazole (MeBT), and 5,6-dimethyl-1 H-benzotriazole (DiMeBT) to anaerobic granules. A higher sorption capacity was measured for NP. Active transport may be one of the mechanisms for NP sorption. Ethylene glycol degradation experiments indicated that BT, MeBT, DiMeBT, and the nonionic surfactant Tergitol NP-4 had no significant

  19. EM Earthquake Precursor Detection Associated with Fluid Injection for Hydraulic Fracturing and Tectonic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kenneth B., II

    2015-04-01

    , Texas field sites, a proactive detection approach was taken, due to the heavy presence of hydraulic fracturing activity for regional hydrocarbon extraction, which appeared to be causing several rare M4.0+ earthquakes. As a result, detailed Southern California and Timpson, Texas field studies led to the improved design of two newer, prototype antennae and the first ever earthquake epicenter map. With more antennae and continuous monitoring, more fracture cycles can be established well ahead of the next earthquake. In addition, field data could be ascertained longer by the proper authorities and lead to significantly improved earthquake forecasting. The EM precursor determined by this method appears to surpass all prior precursor claims, and the general public may finally receive long overdue forecasting.

  20. Improvement of aircraft maintenance methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, N. I.

    The papers presented in this volume provide an overview of recent theoretical and experimental research aimed at improving the maintenance of aircraft, developing advanced diagnostic techniques, and increasing the efficiency and safety of flight operations. Topics discussed include design characteristics of the functional systems of aircraft and prediction of their technical condition, a probability analysis of a method for diagnosing gas turbine engines on the basis of thermogasdynamic parameters, characteristics of fatigue crack growth under the service-spectrum loading of the tail boom, and the accuracy of nonparametric reliability estimates under varying operation conditions. Papers are also presented on ways of reducing the aeration of hydraulic fluids in aircraft, evaluation of the efficiency of the pilot's control activity in a flight simulator, and using control charts for the analysis of the performance of aviation specialists. (For individual items see A93-18327 to A93-18351)

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Simulations of a Humvee Airdropped from Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Phillip M.

    Military airdrop is a means of transporting and delivering cargo to inaccessible locales faster and more efficiently. The Humvee, an all-terrain truck, is one such payload that the U.S. Army drops routinely. Here, interesting physics occurs both structurally and aerodynamically. From a fluid dynamics and trajectory standpoint, determining the aerodynamic forces and moments acting on the parachute and payload is crucial particularly for trajectory prediction. This study primarily used Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to simulate the aerodynamics of an airdrop Humvee model in two regimes of fall, namely, right after clearing the aircraft ramp, and during descent under parachute. This study was performed at a Reynolds number of 3.07x10. 6 and at an airspeedof 9.144m/s (30ft/s). The first humvee part of the study analyzed the aerodynamic coefficients drag, lift, and pitching moment over a 360 degree range of pitch angles for the Humvee configured for extraction. The second set of humvee simulations focused on the aerodynamic coefficients at pitch angles of -40 degrees to +40 degrees with the platform and vehicle configured for descent under parachute. The Humvee after ramp tip-off has a parachute pack on its hood, but lacks one during the descent phase. The numerical data was compared with the results of geometries from previous studies. These geometries include: the flat plate, Type-V LVADS and 10K-JPADS containers, and a cargo-carrying platform outfitted with a bumper. Our results clearly show the effects of the many angular features that characterize the shape of a Humvee in comparison to those of a simple cuboid, particularly with regards to the loss of lift in a sub-range of pitch angle (-45 degrees to -180 degrees). First, the aerodynamic coefficients were calculated over one full-revolution of the humvee (-180 degrees to +180 degrees static pitch angles with respect to the humvee's platform) best matched in lift, drag, and moment those of the type V LVADS

  2. Fiber optical sensors for aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechstedt, Ralf D.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper selected fiber optical point sensors that are of potential interest for deployment in aircraft are discussed. The operating principles together with recent measurement results are described. Examples include a high-temperature combined pressure and temperature sensor for engine health, hydraulics and landing gear monitoring, an ultra-high sensitive pressure sensor for oil, pneumatic and fluid aero systems applications and a combined acceleration and temperature sensor for condition monitoring of rotating components.

  3. Flowing fluid electrical conductivity logging of a deep borehole during and following drilling: estimation of transmissivity, water salinity and hydraulic head of conductive zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, Christine; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Rosberg, Jan-Erik; Juhlin, Christopher; Dobson, Patrick F.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2016-11-01

    Flowing fluid electrical conductivity (FFEC) logging is a hydrogeologic testing method that is usually conducted in an existing borehole. However, for the 2,500-m deep COSC-1 borehole, drilled at Åre, central Sweden, it was done within the drilling period during a scheduled 1-day break, thus having a negligible impact on the drilling schedule, yet providing important information on depths of hydraulically conductive zones and their transmissivities and salinities. This paper presents a reanalysis of this set of data together with a new FFEC logging data set obtained soon after drilling was completed, also over a period of 1 day, but with a different pumping rate and water-level drawdown. Their joint analysis not only results in better estimates of transmissivity and salinity in the conducting fractures intercepted by the borehole, but also yields the hydraulic head values of these fractures, an important piece of information for the understanding of hydraulic structure of the subsurface. Two additional FFEC logging tests were done about 1 year later, and are used to confirm and refine this analysis. Results show that from 250 to 2,000 m depths, there are seven distinct hydraulically conductive zones with different hydraulic heads and low transmissivity values. For the final test, conducted with a much smaller water-level drawdown, inflow ceased from some of the conductive zones, confirming that their hydraulic heads are below the hydraulic head measured in the wellbore under non-pumped conditions. The challenges accompanying 1-day FFEC logging are summarized, along with lessons learned in addressing them.

  4. Flowing fluid electrical conductivity logging of a deep borehole during and following drilling: estimation of transmissivity, water salinity and hydraulic head of conductive zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, Christine; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Rosberg, Jan-Erik; Juhlin, Christopher; Dobson, Patrick F.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2017-03-01

    Flowing fluid electrical conductivity (FFEC) logging is a hydrogeologic testing method that is usually conducted in an existing borehole. However, for the 2,500-m deep COSC-1 borehole, drilled at Åre, central Sweden, it was done within the drilling period during a scheduled 1-day break, thus having a negligible impact on the drilling schedule, yet providing important information on depths of hydraulically conductive zones and their transmissivities and salinities. This paper presents a reanalysis of this set of data together with a new FFEC logging data set obtained soon after drilling was completed, also over a period of 1 day, but with a different pumping rate and water-level drawdown. Their joint analysis not only results in better estimates of transmissivity and salinity in the conducting fractures intercepted by the borehole, but also yields the hydraulic head values of these fractures, an important piece of information for the understanding of hydraulic structure of the subsurface. Two additional FFEC logging tests were done about 1 year later, and are used to confirm and refine this analysis. Results show that from 250 to 2,000 m depths, there are seven distinct hydraulically conductive zones with different hydraulic heads and low transmissivity values. For the final test, conducted with a much smaller water-level drawdown, inflow ceased from some of the conductive zones, confirming that their hydraulic heads are below the hydraulic head measured in the wellbore under non-pumped conditions. The challenges accompanying 1-day FFEC logging are summarized, along with lessons learned in addressing them.

  5. Evaluation of the Toxic Effects of a 90-Day Continuous Exposure of Rats to Water-In-Oil Hydraulic Fluid Emulsion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    not request copies of this report from the Harry G. Armstrong Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory. Additional copies may be purchased from: National...evaluate ite poter , t! t-cs from a 9C-aay continuous exposure of water-in-oil hydraulic fluid aeroso; to rats in Thomas Dome innalation chambers An air... Harry G Armstrong Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH Kimmel, E.C. and H.F. Leahy. 1991 A High Pressure

  6. Constant-Pressure Hydraulic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, C. W.

    1982-01-01

    Constant output pressure in gas-driven hydraulic pump would be assured in new design for gas-to-hydraulic power converter. With a force-multiplying ring attached to gas piston, expanding gas would apply constant force on hydraulic piston even though gas pressure drops. As a result, pressure of hydraulic fluid remains steady, and power output of the pump does not vary.

  7. An approximate solution for a penny-shaped hydraulic fracture that accounts for fracture toughness, fluid viscosity and leak-off

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This paper develops a closed-form approximate solution for a penny-shaped hydraulic fracture whose behaviour is determined by an interplay of three competing physical processes that are associated with fluid viscosity, fracture toughness and fluid leak-off. The primary assumption that permits one to construct the solution is that the fracture behaviour is mainly determined by the three-process multiscale tip asymptotics and the global fluid volume balance. First, the developed approximation is compared with the existing solutions for all limiting regimes of propagation. Then, a solution map, which indicates applicability regions of the limiting solutions, is constructed. It is also shown that the constructed approximation accurately captures the scaling that is associated with the transition from any one limiting solution to another. The developed approximation is tested against a reference numerical solution, showing that accuracy of the fracture width and radius predictions lie within a fraction of a per cent for a wide range of parameters. As a result, the constructed approximation provides a rapid solution for a penny-shaped hydraulic fracture, which can be used for quick fracture design calculations or as a reference solution to evaluate accuracy of various hydraulic fracture simulators. PMID:28083110

  8. An approximate solution for a penny-shaped hydraulic fracture that accounts for fracture toughness, fluid viscosity and leak-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dontsov, E. V.

    2016-12-01

    This paper develops a closed-form approximate solution for a penny-shaped hydraulic fracture whose behaviour is determined by an interplay of three competing physical processes that are associated with fluid viscosity, fracture toughness and fluid leak-off. The primary assumption that permits one to construct the solution is that the fracture behaviour is mainly determined by the three-process multiscale tip asymptotics and the global fluid volume balance. First, the developed approximation is compared with the existing solutions for all limiting regimes of propagation. Then, a solution map, which indicates applicability regions of the limiting solutions, is constructed. It is also shown that the constructed approximation accurately captures the scaling that is associated with the transition from any one limiting solution to another. The developed approximation is tested against a reference numerical solution, showing that accuracy of the fracture width and radius predictions lie within a fraction of a per cent for a wide range of parameters. As a result, the constructed approximation provides a rapid solution for a penny-shaped hydraulic fracture, which can be used for quick fracture design calculations or as a reference solution to evaluate accuracy of various hydraulic fracture simulators.

  9. Hydraulic tool

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, J.T.

    1988-04-05

    A hydraulic force-delivering tool including a cylinder, a piston slidable in the cylinder and a hydraulic pump to deliver fluid under pressure to the cylinder the hydraulic pump is described, comprising: a pump body; means forming a cylindrical chamber in the pump body; at least one inlet port opening into one end of the chamber from outside the body; means forming an outlet port at the other end of the chamber; a check valve in the outlet port enabling outward flow only; a pump rod plunger reciprocable through a given stroke in the chamber; inner and outer concentric cylindrical surfaces in the chamber and on the plunger, respectively; an annular shoulder on the chamber inner cylindrical surface facing toward the other end of the chamber; an annular seal member slidable along the pump rod and conditioned to seal against the shoulder; and spring means biasing the seal member toward the shoulder.

  10. Overview of Chronic Oral Toxicity Values for Chemicals Present in Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids, Flowback and Produced Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the use of hydraulic fracturing has increased, concerns have been raised about potential public health effects that may arise if hydraulic fracturing-related chemicals were to impact drinking water resources. This study presents an overview of the chronic oral toxicity values—...

  11. Data regarding hydraulic fracturing distributions and treatment fluids, additives, proppants, and water volumes applied to wells drilled in the United States from 1947 through 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallegos, Tanya J.; Varela, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive, published, and publicly available data regarding the extent, location, and character of hydraulic fracturing in the United States are scarce. The objective of this data series is to publish data related to hydraulic fracturing in the public domain. The spreadsheets released with this data series contain derivative datasets aggregated temporally and spatially from the commercial and proprietary IHS database of U.S. oil and gas production and well data (IHS Energy, 2011). These datasets, served in 21 spreadsheets in Microsoft Excel (.xlsx) format, outline the geographical distributions of hydraulic fracturing treatments and associated wells (including well drill-hole directions) as well as water volumes, proppants, treatment fluids, and additives used in hydraulic fracturing treatments in the United States from 1947 through 2010. This report also describes the data—extraction/aggregation processing steps, field names and descriptions, field types and sources. An associated scientific investigation report (Gallegos and Varela, 2014) provides a detailed analysis of the data presented in this data series and comparisons of the data and trends to the literature.

  12. Enhanced Biological Attenuation of Aircraft Deicing Fluid Runoff Using Constructed Wetlands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    Colorado have demonstrated the ability of a constructed subsurface flow (SSF) treatment wetland to reduce the negative environmental effects of aircraft...constructed treatment wetlands can provide a cost- effective alternative to conventional treatment in a mechanical wastewater treatment facility. The use of...2004 will reflect the effect of that increased coverage. Due to the increased deicing activity during the demonstration period and the associated

  13. Aircraft Pneudraulic Repairman, 2-4. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    These military-developed curriculum materials consist of four volumes of individualized, self-paced texts and workbooks for use by those studying to become aircraft pneudraulic repairmen. Covered in the individual volumes are the following topics: pneudraulic functions and career program (housekeeping and safety practices, hydraulic fluids and…

  14. User's guide for ENSAERO: A multidisciplinary program for fluid/structural/control interaction studies of aircraft (release 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1994-01-01

    Strong interactions can occur between the flow about an aerospace vehicle and its structural components resulting in several important aeroelastic phenomena. These aeroelastic phenomena can significantly influence the performance of the vehicle. At present, closed-form solutions are available for aeroelastic computations when flows are in either the linear subsonic or supersonic range. However, for aeroelasticity involving complex nonlinear flows with shock waves, vortices, flow separations, and aerodynamic heating, computational methods are still under development. These complex aeroelastic interactions can be dangerous and limit the performance of aircraft. Examples of these detrimental effects are aircraft with highly swept wings experiencing vortex-induced aeroelastic oscillations, transonic regime at which the flutter speed is low, aerothermoelastic loads that play a critical role in the design of high-speed vehicles, and flow separations that often lead to buffeting with undesirable structural oscillations. The simulation of these complex aeroelastic phenomena requires an integrated analysis of fluids and structures. This report presents a summary of the development, applications, and procedures to use the multidisciplinary computer code ENSAERO. This code is based on the Euler/Navier-Stokes flow equations and modal/finite-element structural equations.

  15. 46 CFR 28.405 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.405 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system... than four times the system maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped with...) All material in a hydraulic system must be suitable for use with the hydraulic fluid used and must...

  16. 46 CFR 28.880 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.880 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system must be... times the system's maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped with at least... material in a hydraulic system must be suitable for use with the hydraulic fluid used and must be of...

  17. 46 CFR 28.405 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.405 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system... than four times the system maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped with...) All material in a hydraulic system must be suitable for use with the hydraulic fluid used and must...

  18. 46 CFR 28.880 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.880 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system must be... times the system's maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped with at least... material in a hydraulic system must be suitable for use with the hydraulic fluid used and must be of...

  19. Downhole hydraulic seismic generator

    DOEpatents

    Gregory, Danny L.; Hardee, Harry C.; Smallwood, David O.

    1992-01-01

    A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole.

  20. An Experimental Study of the Corrosion Behavior of Nickel Tungsten Carbide in Some Water-Glycol Hydraulic Fluids for Subsea Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lei; Neville, Anne; Gledhill, Andrew; Johnston, David

    2010-02-01

    Corrosion failures of components in electro-hydraulic control systems can have serious consequences for the operation of an entire subsea oil recovery system, especially in water depths more than 150 m (Fleming, Meas. Control, 2000, 33(7), p 207-213). An acceptable reason for this is that seawater ingress can have a great effect on stainless steel 316L, the most commonly used material for the failed components of the direction control valves, since chloride irons destabilize the passive film [Malik et al., Corros. Sci., 1992, 33(11), p 1809-1827; Desalination, 1994, 97(1-3), p 189-197; Al-Malahy and Hodgkiess, Desalination, 2003, 158(1-3), p 35-42]. Other materials, claimed to be seawater tolerant, are starting to be used in this system. However, problems can still exist due to the complex factors relating to the corrosion process and how the environmental parameters affect the corrosion mechanisms. In this work, the corrosion behavior of a nickel tungsten carbide cermet, one of the proposed materials, is compared with stainless steel 316L, in four different water-glycol hydraulic fluids and 50% hydraulic fluid/50% seawater solutions using an electrochemical test methodology. Systematic fluid analysis, which includes GC-MS for organic components and ICP-MS analysis for ionic content, and surface analysis of the material are carried out to assess the corrosion mechanisms. Detailed conclusions are then made to summarize the advantages and disadvantages of nickel tungsten carbide being used in this system. The effects of each factor on the corrosion rates and mechanisms are discussed.

  1. Reliability-based aeroelastic optimization of a composite aircraft wing via fluid-structure interaction of high fidelity solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikbay, M.; Fakkusoglu, N.; Kuru, M. N.

    2010-06-01

    We consider reliability based aeroelastic optimization of a AGARD 445.6 composite aircraft wing with stochastic parameters. Both commercial engineering software and an in-house reliability analysis code are employed in this high-fidelity computational framework. Finite volume based flow solver Fluent is used to solve 3D Euler equations, while Gambit is the fluid domain mesh generator and Catia-V5-R16 is used as a parametric 3D solid modeler. Abaqus, a structural finite element solver, is used to compute the structural response of the aeroelastic system. Mesh based parallel code coupling interface MPCCI-3.0.6 is used to exchange the pressure and displacement information between Fluent and Abaqus to perform a loosely coupled fluid-structure interaction by employing a staggered algorithm. To compute the probability of failure for the probabilistic constraints, one of the well known MPP (Most Probable Point) based reliability analysis methods, FORM (First Order Reliability Method) is implemented in Matlab. This in-house developed Matlab code is embedded in the multidisciplinary optimization workflow which is driven by Modefrontier. Modefrontier 4.1, is used for its gradient based optimization algorithm called NBI-NLPQLP which is based on sequential quadratic programming method. A pareto optimal solution for the stochastic aeroelastic optimization is obtained for a specified reliability index and results are compared with the results of deterministic aeroelastic optimization.

  2. Analysis of 6-year fluid electric conductivity logs to evaluate the hydraulic structure of the deep drill hole at Outokumpu, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Kukkonen, Ilmo T.; Niemi, Auli

    2016-07-01

    Over the last two decades, the flowing fluid electric conductivity (FFEC) logging method has been applied in boreholes in the well-testing mode to evaluate the transmissivity, hydraulic head, and formation water electrical conductivity as a function of depth with a resolution of about 10-20 cm. FFEC profiles along the borehole are obtained under both shut-in and pumping conditions in a logging procedure that lasts only 3 or 4 days. A method for analyzing these FFEC logs has been developed and successfully employed to obtain formation parameters in a number of field studies. The present paper concerns the analysis of a unique set of FFEC logs that were taken from a deep borehole reaching down to 2.5 km at Outokumpu, Finland, over a 6-year time period. The borehole intersects paleoproterozoic metasedimentary, granitoid, and ophiolite-derived rocks. After the well was drilled, completed, and cleaned up, FFEC logs were obtained after 7, 433, 597, 948, and 2036 days. In analyzing these five profiles, we discovered the need to account for salinity diffusion from water in the formation to the borehole. Analysis results include the identification of 15 hydraulically conducting zones along the borehole, the calculation of flow rates associated with these 15 zones, as well as the estimation of the variation of formation water electrical conductivity as a function of depth. The calculated flow rates were used to obtain the tentative hydraulic conductivity values at these 15 depth levels.

  3. The effects of aircraft fuel and fluids on the strength properties of Resin Transfer Molded (RTM) composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falcone, Anthony; Dow, Marvin B.

    1993-01-01

    The resin transfer molding (RTM) process offers important advantages for cost-effective composites manufacturing, and consequently has become the subject of intense research and development efforts. Several new matrix resins have been formulated specifically for RTM applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. For successful use on aircraft, composite materials must withstand exposure to the fluids in common use. The present study was conducted to obtain comparative screening data on several state-ofthe-art RTM resins after environmental exposures were performed on RTM composite specimens. Four graphite/epoxy composites and one graphite/bismaleimide composite were tested; testing of two additional graphite epoxy composites is in progress. Zero-deg tension tests were conducted on specimens machined from eight-ply (+45-deg, -45-deg) laminates, and interlaminar shear tests were conducted on 32-ply 0-deg laminate specimens. In these tests, the various RTM resins demonstrated widely different strengths, with 3501-6 epoxy being the strongest. As expected, all of the matrix resins suffered severe strength degradation from exposure to methylene chloride (paint stripper). The 3501-6 epoxy composites exhibited about a 30 percent drop in tensile strength in hot, wet tests. The E905-L epoxy exhibited little loss of tensile strength (less than 8 percent) after exposure to water. The CET-2 and 862 epoxies as well as the bismaleimide exhibited reduced strengths at elevated temperature after exposure to oils and fuel. In terms of the percentage strength reductions, all of the RTM matrix resins compared favorably with 3501-6 epoxy.

  4. Determination of depth, permeability, and fluid pressure of hydraulically active fractures in the COSC-1 borehole and their correlation with chemical and geophysical logging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Doughty, Christine; Rosberg, Jan-Erik; Berthet, Theo; Juhlin, Christopher; Niemi, Auli

    2016-04-01

    The Flowing Fluid Electricity Conductivity (FFEC) logging method has been applied to the 2.5-km fully-cored COSC-1 borehole in Sweden, both during and after the drilling period. The method is based on the fact that the drilling fluid has a lower electric conductivity (EC) value (about 200 μS/cm) compared to the formation water. Thus, by scanning several times along the borehole while it is being pumped at a low rate, Q, the locations of inflow zones can be identified as EC peaks at these depths. An analysis of the shape of the EC peaks will yield the local inflow rates and the formation water EC at each of the inflow zones. Further, by conducting the logging more than once with two values of Q, the initial or inherent fluid pressure at each inflow zone can be calculated. In the case of the COSC-1 borehole, the method has identified nine discrete inflow zones between 250 m depth and the borehole bottom of 2500 m depth. The permeability values are small and spread over more than one order of magnitude. The fluid pressures in the inflow zones show two groups of similar values with the shallow inflow zones having a higher pressure than those in the deeper part of the borehole. Correlation of the FFEC logging results with other information and data from the COSC-1 borehole are underway. First, rock cores were carefully examined at the depths of the inflow zones identified by FFEC logging. We were able to identify the fractures which may be responsible for the flow. It appears that each inflow zone can be correlated with one single fracture. The cores with these hydraulically active fractures have been transferred to the laboratory for detailed study. Second, COSC-1 fracture logs were reviewed. The majority of the fractures in the borehole are not hydraulically active and the active ones represent only about 1-2 % of the total number of fractures, consistent with previous statistical studies of fractures in crystalline rocks. Breakout logs were also studied and it

  5. 14 CFR 33.72 - Hydraulic actuating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hydraulic actuating systems. 33.72 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.72 Hydraulic actuating systems. Each hydraulic actuating system must function properly under all conditions in which...

  6. 14 CFR 33.72 - Hydraulic actuating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hydraulic actuating systems. 33.72 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.72 Hydraulic actuating systems. Each hydraulic actuating system must function properly under all conditions in which...

  7. 14 CFR 33.72 - Hydraulic actuating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hydraulic actuating systems. 33.72 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.72 Hydraulic actuating systems. Each hydraulic actuating system must function properly under all conditions in which...

  8. 14 CFR 33.72 - Hydraulic actuating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hydraulic actuating systems. 33.72 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.72 Hydraulic actuating systems. Each hydraulic actuating system must function properly under all conditions in which...

  9. 14 CFR 33.72 - Hydraulic actuating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hydraulic actuating systems. 33.72 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.72 Hydraulic actuating systems. Each hydraulic actuating system must function properly under all conditions in which...

  10. Aircraft Hydraulic Systems Dynamic Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-01

    F 400 RP . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 : 68 InternaJ Case Pressure 77-2 CIS Turn-Off Tranei•-nt S130’F 400(, RPM...62 73 Internal Case Pressure 2-77 CIS Turn-On Transient 130*F 4000 RPM ............... ........................ ... 63...77 Control Pressure 2-38.5 CIS Turn-On Transient 130*F 4000 RPM ............... ....................... ... 66 78 Internal Case

  11. Thermally Actuated Hydraulic Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack; Ross, Ronald; Chao, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Thermally actuated hydraulic pumps have been proposed for diverse applications in which direct electrical or mechanical actuation is undesirable and the relative slowness of thermal actuation can be tolerated. The proposed pumps would not contain any sliding (wearing) parts in their compressors and, hence, could have long operational lifetimes. The basic principle of a pump according to the proposal is to utilize the thermal expansion and contraction of a wax or other phase-change material in contact with a hydraulic fluid in a rigid chamber. Heating the chamber and its contents from below to above the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to expand significantly, thus causing a substantial increase in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid out of the chamber. Similarly, cooling the chamber and its contents from above to below the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to contract significantly, thus causing a substantial decrease in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid into the chamber. The displacement of the hydraulic fluid could be used to drive a piston. The figure illustrates a simple example of a hydraulic jack driven by a thermally actuated hydraulic pump. The pump chamber would be a cylinder containing encapsulated wax pellets and containing radial fins to facilitate transfer of heat to and from the wax. The plastic encapsulation would serve as an oil/wax barrier and the remaining interior space could be filled with hydraulic oil. A filter would retain the encapsulated wax particles in the pump chamber while allowing the hydraulic oil to flow into and out of the chamber. In one important class of potential applications, thermally actuated hydraulic pumps, exploiting vertical ocean temperature gradients for heating and cooling as needed, would be used to vary hydraulic pressures to control buoyancy in undersea research

  12. Investigation of Respiratory and Dermal Symptoms Associated with Metal Working Fluids at an Aircraft Engine Manufacturing Facility

    PubMed Central

    Meza, Francisco; Chen, Lilia; Hudson, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    Background Each year, 1.2 million metalworkers are exposed to metalworking fluids (MWFs), which can cause dermal and respiratory disease. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a health hazard evaluation of MWF exposures at an aircraft engine manufacturing facility. The objectives were to determine employee exposures to endotoxin and MWFs in the air, characterize symptoms experienced by employees working with MWFs, compare them to symptoms of employees unexposed to MWFs, and make recommendations for reducing exposures based on results. Methods 407 workers were categorized as MWF exposed or MWF unexposed and completed questionnaires. Estimated prevalence ratios (PR) of dermatitis, asthma, and work-related asthma (WRA) symptoms were calculated. Airborne concentrations of MWF and endotoxin were measured, and work practices observed. Results MWF exposed workers had a significantly higher prevalence of dermatitis on wrists/forearms (PR 2.59; 95% CI 1.22, 5.46), asthma symptoms (PR 1.49; 95% CI 1.05, 2.13) and WRA symptoms (PR 2.10; 95% CI 1.22, 3.30) than unexposed workers. Airborne concentrations of MWF were below the NIOSH recommended exposure limit (REL) for MWF aerosols (thoracic particulate mass). Conclusions Despite MWF exposures below the NIOSH REL, exposed workers had a higher prevalence of asthma, WRA, and dermatitis symptoms than unexposed workers. Recommendations to reduce exposure included configuring mist collectors to automatically turn on when the machine is in use, and enforcing enclosure use. PMID:24122918

  13. Trends in hydraulic fracturing distributions and treatment fluids, additives, proppants, and water volumes applied to wells drilled in the United States from 1947 through 2010: data analysis and comparison to the literature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallegos, Tanya J.; Varela, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is presently the primary stimulation technique for oil and gas production in low-permeability, unconventional reservoirs. Comprehensive, published, and publicly available information regarding the extent, location, and character of hydraulic fracturing in the United States is scarce. This national spatial and temporal analysis of data on nearly 1 million hydraulically fractured wells and 1.8 million fracturing treatment records from 1947 through 2010 (aggregated in Data Series 868) is used to identify hydraulic fracturing trends in drilling methods and use of proppants, treatment fluids, additives, and water in the United States. These trends are compared to the literature in an effort to establish a common understanding of the differences in drilling methods, treatment fluids, and chemical additives and of how the newer technology has affected the water use volumes and areal distribution of hydraulic fracturing. Historically, Texas has had the highest number of records of hydraulic fracturing treatments and associated wells in the United States documented in the datasets described herein. Water-intensive horizontal/directional drilling has also increased from 6 percent of new hydraulically fractured wells drilled in the United States in 2000 to 42 percent of new wells drilled in 2010. Increases in horizontal drilling also coincided with the emergence of water-based “slick water” fracturing fluids. As such, the most current hydraulic fracturing materials and methods are notably different from those used in previous decades and have contributed to the development of previously inaccessible unconventional oil and gas production target areas, namely in shale and tight-sand reservoirs. Publicly available derivative datasets and locations developed from these analyses are described.

  14. Monitoring the interaction of hydraulic fracturing fluid with Marcellus Shale using Sr isotopes: a comparison of laboratory experiments with field scale observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, A. J.; Hakala, A.; Marcon, V.; Joseph, C.

    2013-12-01

    Strontium isotopes have the potential to be an effective tool for differentiating Marcellus Shale derived-fluids from other sources in surface and ground waters (Chapman et al. 2012, doi: 10.1021/es204005g). Water that is co-produced during gas extraction is likely influenced by fluid/rock interactions during hydraulic fracturing (HF) and monitoring changes in Sr isotope ratios can provide insight into reactions occurring within the shale formation. However, questions persist as to what controls the Sr isotopic composition of Marcellus Shale fluids, especially during HF. Here we compare laboratory experiments, simulating the dissolution of the Marcellus Shale during HF, with a time-series of water samples taken from a Marcellus Shale gas wells after HF has occurred. For the laboratory experiments, a core sample of Marcellus Shale from Greene County, PA was crushed and placed into a high P and T reaction vessel. Solutions were added in two different experiments: one with synthetic brine, and another using brine+HF fluid. The HF fluid was made up of components listed on fracfocus.org. Experiments were run for ~16 days at 27.5 MPa and 130oC. Aqueous samples were periodically removed for analysis and Sr isotope ratios were measured by MC-ICP-MS. Using just brine, the pH of the solution decreased from 7.6 to 5.3 after 24 hrs, then reached a steady state at ~6.1. Sr/Ca molar ratios in the fluid started at 2.3 after 24 hours and decreased to 1.8 over ~16 days. During this time only 6% of the total inorganic carbon (TIC) dissolved from the shale. The ɛSr values started at +43.2 and decreased to +42.4. In the experiment using brine+HF fluid, the pH started at 1.8 and rose slowly to a steady value of 5.6 by day 6. The Sr and Ca concentrations were higher than the brine experiment, but the Sr/Ca ratios remained lower at ~0.3 through the experiment. The increased Ca release, as well as the dissolution of over 60% of the TIC, suggests the dissolution of a carbonate mineral

  15. Small hydraulic turbine drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W. A.

    1970-01-01

    Turbine, driven by the fluid being pumped, requires no external controls, is completely integrated into the flow system, and has bearings which utilize the main fluid for lubrication and cooling. Torque capabilities compare favorably with those developed by positive displacement hydraulic motors.

  16. Adsorption of hydraulic fracturing fluid components 2-butoxyethanol and furfural onto granular activated carbon and shale rock.

    PubMed

    Manz, Katherine E; Haerr, Gregory; Lucchesi, Jessica; Carter, Kimberly E

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the adsorption ability of a surfactant and a non-surfactant chemical additive used in hydraulic fracturing onto shale and GAC. Experiments were performed at varying temperatures and sodium chloride concentrations to establish these impacts on the adsorption of the furfural (a non-surfactant) and 2-Butoxyethanol (2-BE) (a surfactant). Experiments were carried out in continuously mixed batch experiments with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm modeling. The results of the experiments showed that adsorption of these compounds onto shale does not occur, which may allow these compounds to return to the surface in flowback and produced waters. The adsorption potential for these chemicals onto GAC follows the assumptions of the Langmuir model more strongly than those of the Freundlich model. The results show uptake of furfural and 2-BE occurs within 23 h in the presence of DI water, 0.1 mol L(-1) sodium chloride, and in lab synthesized hydraulic fracturing brine. Based on the data, 83% of the furfural and 62% of the 2-BE was adsorbed using GAC.

  17. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.

    2000-01-01

    A compact high pressure hydraulic pump having no moving mechanical parts for converting electric potential to hydraulic force. The electrokinetic pump, which can generate hydraulic pressures greater than 2500 psi, can be employed to compress a fluid, either liquid or gas, and manipulate fluid flow. The pump is particularly useful for capillary-base systems. By combining the electrokinetic pump with a housing having chambers separated by a flexible member, fluid flow, including high pressure fluids, is controlled by the application of an electric potential, that can vary with time.

  18. Stimuli-Responsive/Rheoreversible Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids as a Greener Alternative to Support Geothermal and Fossil Energy Production

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hun Bok; Carroll, KC; Kabilan, Senthil; Heldebrant, David J.; Hoyt, David W.; Zhong, Lirong; Varga, Tamas; Stephens, Sean A.; Adams, Lexor; Bonneville, Alain; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Fernandez, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Cost-effective yet safe creation of high-permeability reservoirs within deep bedrock is the primary challenge for the viability of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) and unconventional oil/gas recovery. Although fracturing fluids are commonly used for oil/gas, standard fracturing methods are not developed or proven for EGS temperatures and pressures. Furthermore, the environmental impacts of currently used fracturing methods are only recently being determined. Widespread concerns about the environmental contamination have resulted in a number of regulations for fracturing fluids advocating for greener fracturing processes. To enable EGS feasibility and lessen environmental impact of reservoir stimulation, an environmentally benign, CO2-activated, rheoreversible fracturing fluid that enhances permeability through fracturing (at significantly lower effective stress than standard fracturing fluids) due to in situ volume expansion and gel formation is investigated herein. The chemical mechanism, stability, phase-change behavior, and rheology for a novel polyallylamine (PAA)-CO2 fracturing fluid was characterized at EGS temperatures and pressures. Hydrogel is formed upon reaction with CO2 and this process is reversible (via CO2 depressurization or solubilizing with a mild acid) allowing removal from the formation and recycling, decreasing environmental impact. Rock obtained from the Coso geothermal field was fractured in laboratory experiments under various EGS temperatures and pressures with comparison to standard fracturing fluids, and the fractures were characterized with imaging, permeability measurement, and flow modeling. This novel fracturing fluid and process may vastly reduce water usage and the environmental impact of fracturing practices and effectively make EGS production and unconventional oil/gas exploitation cost-effective and cleaner.

  19. Start Up Research Effort in Fluid Mechanics. Advanced Methods for Acoustic and Thrust Benefits for Aircraft Engine Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Samuel G.; Gilinsky, Mikhail M.

    1997-01-01

    In accordance with the project plan for the report period in the proposal titled above, HU and FML teams investigated two sets of concepts for reduction of noise and improvement in efficiency for jet exhaust nozzles of aircraft engines and screws for mixers, fans, propellers and boats. The main achievements in the report period are: (a) Publication of the paper in the AIAA Journal, which described our concepts and some results. (b) The Award in the Civil Research and Development Foundation (CRDF) competition. This 2 year grant for Hampton University (HU) and Central AeroHydrodynamic Institute (TSAGI, Moscow, Russia) supports the research implementation under the current NASA FAR grant. (c) Selection for funding by NASA HQ review panel of the Partnership Awards Concept Paper. This two year grant also will support our current FAR grant. (d) Publication of a Mobius Strip concept in NASA Technical Briefs, June, 1996, and a great interest of many industrial companies in this invention. Successful experimental results with the Mobius shaped screw for mixers, which save more than 30% of the electric power by comparison with the standard screws. Creation of the scientific-popular video-film which can be used for commercial and educational purposes. (e) Organization work, joint meetings and discussions of the NASA LARC JNL Team and HU professors and administration for the solution of actual problems and effective work of the Fluid Mechanics Laboratory at Hampton University. In this report the main designs are enumerated. It also contains for both concept sets: (1) the statement of the problem for each design, some results, publications, inventions, patents, our vision for continuation of this research, and (2) present and expected problems in the future.

  20. Seismic monitoring of hydraulic fracturing: techniques for determining fluid flow paths and state of stress away from a wellbore

    SciTech Connect

    Fehler, M.; House, L.; Kaieda, H.

    1986-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has gained in popularity in recent years as a way to determine the orientations and magnitudes of tectonic stresses. By augmenting conventional hydraulic fracturing measurements with detection and mapping of the microearthquakes induced by fracturing, we can supplement and idependently confirm information obtained from conventional analysis. Important information obtained from seismic monitoring includes: the state of stress of the rock, orientation and spacing of the major joint sets, and measurements of rock elastic parameters at locations distant from the wellbore. While conventional well logging operations can provide information about several of these parameters, the zone of interrogation is usually limited to the immediate proximity of the borehole. The seismic waveforms of the microearthquakes contain a wealth of information about the rock in regions that are otherwise inaccessible for study. By reliably locating the hypocenters of many microearthquakes, we have inferred the joint patterns in the rock. We observed that microearthquake locations do not define a simple, thin, planar distribution, that the fault plane solutions are consistent with shear slippage, and that spectral analysis indicates that the source dimensions and slip along the faults are small. Hence we believe that the microearthquakes result from slip along preexisting joints, and not from tensile extension at the tip of the fracture. Orientations of the principal stresses can be estimated by using fault plane solutions of the larger microearthquakes. By using a joint earthquake location scheme, and/or calibrations with downhole detonators, rock velocities and heterogeneities thereof can be investigated in rock volumes that are far enough from the borehole to be representative of intrincis rock properties.

  1. Hydraulic pump

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, P.R.; Jantzen, D.E.

    1984-05-15

    This invention relates to an improved pump jack characterized by a hollow piston rod which telescopes down over the sucker rod to which it is clamped for reciprocating motion. The cylinder, in turn, is fastened in fixed position directly to the upper exposed end of the well casing. As fluid is introduced into the lower end of the cylinder it raises the piston into engagement with a pushrod housed in the upper cylinder head that lifts switch-actuating means associated therewith into a position operative to actuate a switch located adjacent thereto thereby causing the latter to change state and actuate a multi-function solenoid valve so as to cut off fluid flow to the cylinder. As gravity lowers the sucker rod and piston exhausting the hydraulic fluid therebeneath, an adjustable stop engages the pushrod from above so as to return it together with the switch-actuating means associated therewith to their original positions thereby resetting the switch to complete the operating cycle.

  2. HYDRAULIC SERVO CONTROL MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Hussey, R.B.; Gottsche, M.J. Jr.

    1963-09-17

    A hydraulic servo control mechanism of compact construction and low fluid requirements is described. The mechanism consists of a main hydraulic piston, comprising the drive output, which is connected mechanically for feedback purposes to a servo control piston. A control sleeve having control slots for the system encloses the servo piston, which acts to cover or uncover the slots as a means of controlling the operation of the system. This operation permits only a small amount of fluid to regulate the operation of the mechanism, which, as a result, is compact and relatively light. This mechanism is particuiarly adaptable to the drive and control of control rods in nuclear reactors. (auth)

  3. Electokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.

    2000-01-01

    A compact high pressure hydraulic system having no moving parts for converting electric potential to hydraulic force and for manipulating fluids. Electro-osmotic flow is used to provide a valve and means to compress a fluid or gas in a capillary-based system. By electro-osmotically moving an electrolyte between a first position opening communication between a fluid inlet and outlet and a second position closing communication between the fluid inlet and outlet the system can be configured as a valve. The system can also be used to generate forces as large as 2500 psi that can be used to compress a fluid, either a liquid or a gas.

  4. Hydraulic Actuator Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-11-01

    Hydraulic Actuator Project Stakeholder meeting held 7- 8 October in Los Angeles; 58 attendees representing aircraft and actuator OEMs, seal...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Research Laboratory,4555 Overlook Ave., SW ,Washington,DC,20375 8 . PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT...unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8 -98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Actuator JTP: Coupon Testing Substrate

  5. Remotely Adjustable Hydraulic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouns, H. H.; Gardner, L. D.

    1987-01-01

    Outlet pressure adjusted to match varying loads. Electrohydraulic servo has positioned sleeve in leftmost position, adjusting outlet pressure to maximum value. Sleeve in equilibrium position, with control land covering control port. For lowest pressure setting, sleeve shifted toward right by increased pressure on sleeve shoulder from servovalve. Pump used in aircraft and robots, where hydraulic actuators repeatedly turned on and off, changing pump load frequently and over wide range.

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL HYDRAULICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The thermal, chemical, and biological quality of water in rivers, lakes, reservoirs, and near coastal areas is inseparable from a consideration of hydraulic engineering principles: therefore, the term environmental hydraulics. In this chapter we discuss the basic principles of w...

  7. The Process of Hydraulic Fracturing

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hydraulic fracturing, know as fracking or hydrofracking, produces fractures in a rock formation by pumping fluids (water, proppant, and chemical additives) at high pressure down a wellbore. These fractures stimulate the flow of natural gas or oil.

  8. Integration in Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sworder, Steven C.

    This paper presents an application of integration to the field of hydraulics. An integral relation for the time required to drop the fluid contained in a cylindrical tank from one level to another using a hole in the tank wall is derived. Procedures for constructing the experimental equipment and procedures for determining the coefficient of…

  9. Hydraulically actuated well shifting tool

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, B.A.

    1992-10-20

    This patent describes a hydraulically actuated shifting tool for actuating a sliding member in a well tool. It comprises: a housing having a hydraulic fluid bore therein; shifting dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the housing; locking dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the body; shifting dog hydraulic actuating means in fluid communication with the bore for causing engagement of the shifting dogs with the sliding member; locking dog hydraulic actuating means in communication with the bore for causing engagement of the locking dogs with the locking means; and hydraulic shifting means in communication with the bore for causing relative movement between the shifting dog means and the locking dog means for shifting the sliding sleeve.

  10. Mechanics of Hydraulic Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detournay, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic fractures represent a particular class of tensile fractures that propagate in solid media under pre-existing compressive stresses as a result of internal pressurization by an injected viscous fluid. The main application of engineered hydraulic fractures is the stimulation of oil and gas wells to increase production. Several physical processes affect the propagation of these fractures, including the flow of viscous fluid, creation of solid surfaces, and leak-off of fracturing fluid. The interplay and the competition between these processes lead to multiple length scales and timescales in the system, which reveal the shifting influence of the far-field stress, viscous dissipation, fracture energy, and leak-off as the fracture propagates.

  11. Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses of Heat Transfer Fluid Requirements and Characteristics for Coupling A Hydrogen Production Plant to a High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    C. B. Davis; C. H. Oh; R. B. Barner; D. F. Wilson

    2005-06-01

    The Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the hightemperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant, may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. Seven possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermalhydraulic and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermalhydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were also determined. The

  12. Laboratory-scale evaluation of a combined soil amendment for the enhanced biodegradation of propylene glycol-based aircraft de-icing fluids.

    PubMed

    Libisch, Balázs; French, Helen K; Hartnik, Thomas; Anton, Attila; Biró, Borbála

    2012-01-01

    A combined soil amendment was tested in microcosm experiments with an aim to enhance the aerobic biodegradation of propylene glycol (PG)-based aircraft de-icing fluids during and following the infiltration of contaminated snowmelt. A key objective under field conditions is to increase degradation of organic pollutants in the surface soil where higher microbial activity and plant rhizosphere effects may contribute to a more efficient biodegradation of PG, compared to subsoil ground layers, where electron acceptors and nutrients are often depleted. Microcosm experiments were set up in Petri dishes using 50 g of soil mixed with appropriate additives. The samples contained an initial de-icing fluid concentration of 10,000 mg/kg soil. A combined amendment using calcium peroxide, activated carbon and 1 x Hoagland solution resulted in significantly higher degradation rates for PG both at 4 and 22 degrees C. Most probable numbers of bacteria capable of utilizing 10,000 mg/kg de-icing fluid as a sole carbon source were about two orders of magnitude higher in the amended soil samples compared to unamended controls at both temperatures. The elevated numbers of such bacteria in surface soil may be a source of cells transported to the subsoil by snowmelt infiltration. The near-surface application of amendments tested here may enhance the growth of plants and plant roots in the contaminated area, as well as microbes to be found at greater depth, and hence increase the degradation of a contaminant plume present in the ground.

  13. HYDRAULIC SERVO

    DOEpatents

    Wiegand, D.E.

    1962-05-01

    A hydraulic servo is designed in which a small pressure difference produced at two orifices by an electrically operated flapper arm in a constantly flowing hydraulic loop is hydraulically amplified by two constant flow pumps, two additional orifices, and three unconnected ball pistons. Two of the pistons are of one size and operate against the additional orifices, and the third piston is of a different size and operates between and against the first two pistons. (AEC)

  14. Integrated hydraulic cooler and return rail in camless cylinder head

    DOEpatents

    Marriott, Craig D [Clawson, MI; Neal, Timothy L [Ortonville, MI; Swain, Jeff L [Flushing, MI; Raimao, Miguel A [Colorado Springs, CO

    2011-12-13

    An engine assembly may include a cylinder head defining an engine coolant reservoir, a pressurized fluid supply, a valve actuation assembly, and a hydraulic fluid reservoir. The valve actuation assembly may be in fluid communication with the pressurized fluid supply and may include a valve member displaceable by a force applied by the pressurized fluid supply. The hydraulic fluid reservoir may be in fluid communication with the valve actuation assembly and in a heat exchange relation to the engine coolant reservoir.

  15. Downhole hydraulic actuated pump

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, G.K.

    1988-09-06

    This patent describes a downhole hydraulically actuated pump assembly of the type having a main housing within which an engine and pump is enclosed; a connecting rod, an engine piston, a pump plunger, means by which the engine and connecting rod reciprocate the pump plunger and thereby produces fluid; the main housing has a lower end having a formation fluid inlet; and upper end having a power fluid inlet; and, a produced fluid outlet; the plunger divides one marginal end of the housing into upper and lower production chambers; the lower end of the connecting rod is hollow and extends through the plunger into fluid communication with the formation fluid inlet to provide a source of formation fluid for the upper and lower production chambers; a traveling value assembly contained within the plunger and arranged to transfer formation fluid from the hollow rod, through the plunger, and into the upper and lower production chambers, respectively, as the plunger upstrokes and downstrokes; produced fluid valve means by which fluid flows from the upper and lower production chambers and through the produced fluid outlet.

  16. Investigation into Hydraulic Gear Pump Efficiencies during the First Few Hours of the Pumps’ Lives and a Comparative Study of Accelerated Life Test Methods on Hydraulic Fluid Power Gear Pumps. Parts 1 and 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-12

    Institute Doug Gerber, Associate Technical Fellow, Fluid Power Institute Dave Jaccobuci, Associate Technical Fellow, Fluid Power Institute Harry Marquass...FLUID POtER INSTITUTE IIILWAUKE[ SCHOL OF [;iGI:1EERIIN j "LT Omega Iron- Constantan PROJECT ,jn. 50560 -- - . . ..hermocouple Calibration DAT.: 10

  17. Studies of the environmental fate and effect of aircraft deicing fluids: Detection of 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cancilla, Devon A.; Baird, J.C.; Geis, S.W.; Corsi, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a number of field and laboratory studies to evaluate the environmental impact of aircraft deicing and anti-icing fluids (ADAFs) on aquatic systems. Both 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole (5-MeBt) and 4-methyl-1H-benzotriazole (4-MeBt), known additives to ADAFs, were found in whole-tissue extracts from minnows placed downstream of an effluent outfall that receives ADAF contaminated runoff from General Mitchell International Airport (Milwaukee, WI, USA). Neither of these compounds was detected in tissues from minnows placed upstream from the airport. A toxicity assessment of water collected during the minnow exposure studies utilizing Hyalella azteca, Pimephales promelas, and Ceriodaphnia dubia showed greater toxicity in a secondary airport outfall containing ADAFs when compared to upstream non-ADAF-contaminated samples. In two 28-d static renewal tests using 5-MeBt laboratory-fortified waters, 5-MeBt was detected in whole-tissue extracts of minnows at all concentrations tested. In studies using laboratory water fortified with 5-MeBt, the median lethal concentration (LC50) of 5-MeBt for P. promelas was found to be 22.0 mg/L. The LC50 for C. dubia to 5-MeBt laboratory-fortified water was found to be 81.3 mg/L. The 25% inhibition concentration (IC25) of 5-MeBt for the green alga Selenastrum capricornutum was 23.2 mg/L, and the average median effective concentration (EC50) for Microtox was 4.25 mg/L. The results of these field and lab studies indicate that additives, other than glycols, used in aircraft deicing fluids can be found in aquatic systems and may be of greater risk than previously believed.

  18. Aircraft Ground Operation, Servicing, Fluid Lines and Fittings, Mechanics Privileges and Limitations, and Maintenance Publications, Forms and Records (Course Outline), Aviation Mechanics 1 (Power and Frame): 9073.02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline consists of five instructional blocks of several units each: (1) Aircraft Ground Operation and Servicing; (2) Fluid Lines and Fittings; (3) Mechanics Requirements, Privileges and Limitations; (4) Maintenance Publications; and, (5) Maintenance forms and Records. It is a basic course of knowledge and skills necessary to any…

  19. Fire-Resistant Hydraulic Fluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-15

    emulsion droplet undergoes combustion, heat is tranferred from the surrounding diffusion flame to the drop. Sufficient superheating may occur so that...after the method used in earlier work. (5) A small amount of the 1005 oil was added and the mixture heated to 150°C to evaporate the solvents. When a...inhibit or prevent combustion would perhaps be even somewhat less understood. Clearly though, the heat involved in the combustion process is sufficient to

  20. Bio-based Hydraulic Fluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-17

    currently formulated with vegetable oils (i.e., rapeseed, sun flower, corn , soybean, canola, coconut, etc.) and synthetic ester, such as polyol ester...DEHULL, FLAKE HEXANE EXTRACTION PRESS HEXANE DISTILLATION CRUDE OIL 0.1-3% phosphatides 1% fatty acids 1 ppm chlorophyll DEGUM (H2 O, H3 PO4...2008 Vegetable Oil • Excellent lubrication • Nontoxic • Biodegradable • Derived from renewable resources such as rapeseed, sunflower, corn

  1. Testing of improved polyimide actuator rod seals at high temperature and under vacuum conditions for use in advanced aircraft hydraulic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellereite, B. K.; Waterman, A. W.; Nelson, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    Polyimide second-stage rod seals were evaluated to determine their suitability for applications in space station environments. The 6.35-cm (2.5-in.)K-section seal was verified for thermal cycling operation between room temperature and 478 K (400 F) and for operation in a 133 micron PA(0.000001 mm Hg) vacuum environment. The test seal completed the scheduled 96 thermal cycles and 1438 hr in vacuum with external rod seal leakage well within the maximum allowable of two drops per 25 actuation cycles. At program completion, the seals showed no signs of structural degradation. Posttest inspection showed the seals retained a snug fit against the shaft and housing walls, indicating additional wear life capability. Evaluation of a molecular flow section during vacuum testing, to inhibit fluid loss through vaporization, showed it to be beneficial with MIL-H-5606, a petroleum-base fluid, in comparison with MIL-H-83282, a synthetic hydrocarbon-base fluid.

  2. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.; Arnold, Don W.; Hencken, Kenneth R.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Neyer, David W.

    2003-06-03

    An electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic pump for manipulating fluids in capillary-based system. The pump uses electro-osmotic flow to provide a high pressure hydraulic system, having no moving mechanical parts, for pumping and/or compressing fluids, for providing valve means and means for opening and closing valves, for controlling fluid flow rate, and manipulating fluid flow generally and in capillary-based systems (microsystems), in particular. The compact nature of the inventive high pressure hydraulic pump provides the ability to construct a micro-scale or capillary-based HPLC system that fulfills the desire for small sample quantity, low solvent consumption, improved efficiency, the ability to run samples in parallel, and field portability. Control of pressure and solvent flow rate is achieved by controlling the voltage applied to an electrokinetic pump.

  3. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.; Arnold, Don W.; Hencken, Kenneth R.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Neyer, David W.

    2001-01-01

    An electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic pump for manipulating fluids in capillary-based systems. The pump uses electro-osmotic flow to provide a high pressure hydraulic system, having no moving mechanical parts, for pumping and/or compressing fluids, for providing valve means and means for opening and closing valves, for controlling fluid flow rate, and manipulating fluid flow generally and in capillary-based systems (Microsystems), in particular. The compact nature of the inventive high pressure hydraulic pump provides the ability to construct a micro-scale or capillary-based HPLC system that fulfills the desire for small sample quantity, low solvent consumption, improved efficiency, the ability to run samples in parallel, and field portability. Control of pressure and solvent flow rate is achieved by controlling the voltage applied to an electrokinetic pump.

  4. Engine with hydraulic fuel injection and ABS circuit using a single high pressure pump

    DOEpatents

    Bartley, Bradley E.; Blass, James R.; Gibson, Dennis H.

    2001-01-01

    An engine system comprises a hydraulically actuated fuel injection system and an ABS circuit connected via a fluid flow passage that provides hydraulic fluid to both the fuel injection system and to the ABS circuit. The hydraulically actuated system includes a high pressure pump. The fluid control passage is in fluid communication with an outlet from the high pressure pump.

  5. Mineral Dilution and Shallow Groundwater Dynamics as Motor to Drive Fluid Migration in the Deep Crystalline Crust - Interpretation of Hydraulic Investigations From the 9,101 m Super Deep German Continental Drillhole -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessels, W.; Graesle, W.

    2002-12-01

    The results of 16 years of research at the scientific drilling test site KTB Oberpfalz show that fluid flow and open hydraulic fractures exist down to 9,101m (Kessels, 1991; Huenges et. al., 1997). This means that in this seismically low active area, crustal dynamics produces stress accumulation and related fracturing (Zoback et. al. 1993). Two major fractured fault zones cross the KTB main hole at about 4,000 m and 7,100m depth. Hydraulic communication between the KTB main hole and the 4,000 m deep pilot hole shows that the upper 400 m thick fracture zone has a good transmissivity and a very low fracture porosity (Kessels and KÂ\\x81ck, 1995). The distance between both holes was 200m. The isotopic components of the fluid recovered from this zone indicate a west - east fluid flow from a topographic lower sedimentary area to the higher hilly area of the KTB site (M”ller et. al. 1997). To explain this phenomenon, the existence of a permanent, density driven dilution motor pushing such a flow is suggested. With such a system it is possible to explain fluid flow in the deep crust against the higher potential of the groundwater surface. By means of a simple convection model it can be shown that the density driven dilution motor can create a more effective hydraulic potential than a motor driven by precipitation and the related hydraulic head of the groundwater surface. Furthermore, with common geothermal gradients, the geothermal convection motor is weak compared with the fluid density effects discussed here. References: KESSELS, W. (1991): Objectives and execution of hydraulic experiments in the KTB-Oberpfalz borehole within the long-term measurement and test programme, Scientific Drilling 2, S. 287-298. ZOBACK, D., APEL, R., BAUMGÂŽRTNER, J., BRUDY, M., EMMERMANN, R, ENGESER, B., FUCHS, K., KESSELS, W., RISCHMšLLER, H., RUMMEL, F., VERNIK, L. (1993): Upper-crustal strength inferred from stress measurements to 6 km depth in the KTB borehole, Nature, 365, S

  6. Design of hydraulic output Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toscano, W. M.; Harvey, A. C.; Lee, K.

    1983-01-01

    A hydraulic output system for the RE-1000 free piston stirling engine (FPSE) was designed. The hydraulic output system can be readily integrated with the existing hot section of RE-1000 FPSE. The system has two simply supported diaphragms which separate the engine gas from the hydraulic fluid, a dynamic balance mechanism, and a novel, null center band hydraulic pump. The diaphragms are designed to endure more than 10 billion cycles, and to withstand the differential pressure load as high as 14 MPa. The projected thermodynamic performance of the hydraulic output version of RE-1000 FPSE is 1.87 kW at 29/7 percent brake efficiency.

  7. Hydraulic catworks system

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.L.

    1981-03-03

    A hydraulic catworks system is described for use on a well drilling rig for making up and breaking out a drill string which includes a hydraulic makeup piston and cylinder assembly for actuating a makeup line connected to the makeup tongs, and a breakout piston and cylinder assembly connected to a breakout line for actuating the breakout tongs. A makeup hydraulic control valve controls hydraulic fluid to first and second lines connected to the makeup assembly with the first line connected for extending the makeup line and the second line connected for retracting the makeup line. A breakout hydraulic control valve controls fluid to third and fourth lines with the third line connected for extending the breakout line and the fourth line connected for retracting the breakout line. Manual air control means are provided for selectively actuating the makeup and breakout control valves. A variable pressure control is connected to the second line for controlling the makeup torque. Preferably, the makeup and breakout assemblies are vertically connected to the legs of the drilling rig and rollers are positioned horizontally with the makeup and breakout tongs and connected to the breakout and makeup lines. Preferably, a sheave is connected to the makeup assembly and the makeup line passes over the sheave with its free end fixedly secured. A re-generative system is provided on the makeup assembly for increasing the speed of the makeup line extension. Preferably the makeup and breakout cylinders are of the same cross-sectional area with the stroke of the breakout cylinder being less than the stroke of the makeup cylinder.

  8. Hydraulic fracture monitoring in hard rock at 410 m depth with an advanced fluid-injection protocol and extensive sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, A.; Stephansson, O.; Stenberg, L.; Plenkers, K.; Specht, S.; Milkereit, C.; Schill, E.; Kwiatek, G.; Dresen, G.; Zimmermann, G.; Dahm, T.; Weber, M.

    2016-11-01

    In this article, an underground experiment at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) is described. Main goal is optimizing geothermal heat exchange in crystalline rock mass at depth by multi-stage hydraulic fracturing with minimal impact on the environment, i.e. seismic events. For this, three arrays with acoustic emission, microseismicity and electromagnetic sensors are installed mapping hydraulic fracture initiation and growth. Fractures are driven by three different water injection schemes (continuous, progressive, pulse pressurization). After a brief review of hydraulic fracture operations in crystalline rock mass at mine scale, the site geology and the stress conditions at Äspö HRL are described. Then, the continuous, single-flow rate and alternative, multiple-flow rate fracture breakdown tests in a horizontal borehole at depth level 410 m are described together with the monitoring networks and sensitivity. Monitoring results include the primary catalogue of acoustic emission hypocenters obtained from four hydraulic fractures with the in situ trigger and localizing network. The continuous versus alternative water injection schemes are discussed in terms of the fracture breakdown pressure, the fracture pattern from impression packer result and the monitoring at the arrays. An example of multi-stage hydraulic fracturing with several phases of opening and closing of fracture walls is evaluated using data from acoustic emissions, seismic broadband recordings and electromagnetic signal response. Based on our limited amount of in situ tests (six) and evaluation of three tests in Ävrö granodiorite, in the multiple-flow rate test with progressively increasing target pressure, the acoustic emission activity starts at a later stage in the fracturing process compared to the conventional fracturing case with continuous water injection. In tendency, also the total number and magnitude of acoustic events is found to be smaller in the progressive treatment with frequent

  9. Hydraulic fracture monitoring in hard rock at 410 m depth with an advanced fluid-injection protocol and extensive sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Arno; Stephansson, Ove; Stenberg, Leif; Plenkers, Katrin; Specht, Sebastian; Milkereit, Claus; Schill, Eva; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Dresen, Georg; Zimmermann, Günter; Dahm, Torsten; Weber, Michael

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, an underground experiment at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) is described. Main goal is optimizing geothermal heat exchange in crystalline rock mass at depth by multistage hydraulic fracturing with minimal impact on the environment, that is, seismic events. For this, three arrays with acoustic emission, microseismicity and electromagnetic sensors are installed mapping hydraulic fracture initiation and growth. Fractures are driven by three different water injection schemes (continuous, progressive and pulse pressurization). After a brief review of hydraulic fracture operations in crystalline rock mass at mine scale, the site geology and the stress conditions at Äspö HRL are described. Then, the continuous, single-flow rate and alternative, multiple-flow rate fracture breakdown tests in a horizontal borehole at depth level 410 m are described together with the monitoring networks and sensitivity. Monitoring results include the primary catalogue of acoustic emission hypocentres obtained from four hydraulic fractures with the in situ trigger and localizing network. The continuous versus alternative water injection schemes are discussed in terms of the fracture breakdown pressure, the fracture pattern from impression packer result and the monitoring at the arrays. An example of multistage hydraulic fracturing with several phases of opening and closing of fracture walls is evaluated using data from acoustic emissions, seismic broad-band recordings and electromagnetic signal response. Based on our limited amount of in situ tests (six) and evaluation of three tests in Ävrö granodiorite, in the multiple-flow rate test with progressively increasing target pressure, the acoustic emission activity starts at a later stage in the fracturing process compared to the conventional fracturing case with continuous water injection. In tendency, also the total number and magnitude of acoustic events are found to be smaller in the progressive treatment with

  10. Hydraulic Diagnostics and Fault Isolation Test Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-13

    and Fault Isolation Test Program was to demonstrate and evaluate the practicality of a fault detection and isolation system on an aircraft. The...system capable of fault detection and isolation in a hydraulic subsystem through the use of sensors and a microprocessor (Fig. 1). The microprocessor...DISCUSSION 2.1 DESCRIPTION OF HYDRAULIC SYSTEM SIMULATOR The fault detection and isolation test arrangement consisted of a high pressure, lightweight

  11. Hydraulic friction heat generator

    SciTech Connect

    McMurtry, R.V.

    1987-08-11

    A hydraulic friction heat generator filled with hydraulic heat transfer fluid is described which consists of: a cylindrical housing with a central axis through its interior and with end plates generally normal to the central axis, the generator having an inlet conduit means and an outlet conduit means located at opposite ends of the cylindrical housing thereof; a drive shaft bearingly mounted in each of the end plates in coaxial alignment with the central axis and passing through one of the end plates to extend outwardly therefrom; an external power source joined to the extended shaft for rotating the shaft; and smooth-surfaced thin discs with outer generally annular peripheral edges closely-spaced from the inner wall of the cylindrical housing, the discs being fixedly mounted in axially spaced relationship on the drive shaft to be rotated thereby in a single direction, with no stationary elements interposed between the discs, each disc having at least two radially-oriented slits partially transecting the disc to extend inward from the disc peripheral edges, and the discs having a portion of each disc on one side of the slit feathered outward from the plane of the disc to form a vane for turbulently forcing the hydraulic fluid axially toward the outlet conduit means.

  12. Gas-to-hydraulic power converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, C. W. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A gas piston driven hydraulic piston pump is described in which the gas cycle is of high efficiency by injecting the gas in slugs at the beginning of each power stroke. The hydraulic piston is disposed to operate inside the as piston, and the two pistons, both slidably but nonrotatably mounted, are coupled together with a rotating but non-sliding motion transfer ring extending into antifriction grooves in the sidewalls of the two pistons. To make the hydraulic piston move at a constant speed during constant hydraulic horsepower demand and thus exert a constant pressure on the hydraulic fluid, these grooves are machined with variable pitches and one is the opposite of the other, i.e., the gas piston groove increases in pitch during its power stroke while the hydraulic piston groove decreases. Any number of piston assembly sets may be used to obtain desired hydraulic horsepower.

  13. Simulation of fluid distributions observed at a crude oil spill site incorporating hysteresis, oil entrapment, and spatial variability of hydraulic properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Essaid, H.I.; Herkelrath, W.N.; Hess, K.M.

    1993-01-01

    Subsurface oil, water, and air saturation distributions were determined using 146 samples collected from seven boreholes along a 120-m transect at a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, Minnesota. The field data, collected 10 years after the spill, show a clearly defined oil body that has an oil saturation distribution that appears to be influenced by sediment heterogeneities and water table fluctuations. The center of the oil body has depressed the water-saturated zone boundary and the oil appears to have migrated laterally within the capillary fringe. A multiphase cross-sectional flow model was developed and used to simulate the movement of oil and water at the spill site. Comparisons between observed and simulated oil saturation distributions serve as an indicator of the appropriateness of using such models to predict the actual spread of organic immiscible liquids at spill sites. Sediment hydraulic properties used in the model were estimated from particle size data. The general large-scale features of the observed oil body were reproduced only when hysteresis with oil entrapment and representations of observed spatial variability of hydraulic properties were incorporated into the model. The small-scale details of the observed subsurface oil distribution were not reproduced in the simulations. The discrepancy between observed and simulated oil distributions reflects the considerable uncertainty in model parameter estimates and boundary conditions, three-phase capillary pressure-saturation-relative permeability functions, representations of spatial variability of hydraulic properties, and hydrodynamics of the groundwater flow system at the study site.

  14. Advanced aerospace hydraulic systems and components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-07-01

    The present volume discusses the development of a viable hydraulic circuit breaker, the electromodulated control of supply pressure in hydraulic systems, the flight control actuation system for the B-2 advanced technology bomber, and the B747-400 upper rudder control system with triple tandem valve. Also discussed are a total-flexibility cartridge-valve porting via innovative sealing technology, the A320 pilots' autothrust survey, an all-digital electrohydrostatic servoactuator, and a concurrent design/analysis tool for aircraft hydraulic systems. (For individual items see A93-21841 to A93-21844)

  15. Method for directional hydraulic fracturing

    DOEpatents

    Swanson, David E.; Daly, Daniel W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for directional hydraulic fracturing using borehole seals to confine pressurized fluid in planar permeable regions, comprising: placing a sealant in the hole of a structure selected from geologic or cemented formations to fill the space between a permeable planar component and the geologic or cemented formation in the vicinity of the permeable planar component; making a hydraulic connection between the permeable planar component and a pump; permitting the sealant to cure and thereby provide both mechanical and hydraulic confinement to the permeable planar component; and pumping a fluid from the pump into the permeable planar component to internally pressurize the permeable planar component to initiate a fracture in the formation, the fracture being disposed in the same orientation as the permeable planar component.

  16. Hydraulic fracturing system and method

    DOEpatents

    Ciezobka, Jordan; Salehi, Iraj

    2017-02-28

    A hydraulic fracturing system and method for enhancing effective permeability of earth formations to increase hydrocarbon production, enhance operation efficiency by reducing fluid entry friction due to tortuosity and perforation, and to open perforations that are either unopened or not effective using traditional techniques, by varying a pump rate and/or a flow rate to a wellbore.

  17. Tree Hydraulics: How Sap Rises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Trees transport water from roots to crown--a height that can exceed 100 m. The physics of tree hydraulics can be conveyed with simple fluid dynamics based upon the Hagen-Poiseuille equation and Murray's law. Here the conduit structure is modelled as conical pipes and as branching pipes. The force required to lift sap is generated mostly by…

  18. On the Versatility of Rheoreversible, Stimuli-responsive Hydraulic-Fracturing Fluids for Enhanced Geothermal Systems: Effect of Reservoir pH

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Carlos A.; Shao, Hongbo; Bonneville, Alain; Varga, Tamas; Zhong, Lirong

    2016-04-25

    Abstract The primary challenge for the feasibility of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) is to cost-effectively create high-permeability reservoirs inside deep crystalline bedrock. Although fracturing fluids are commonly used for oil/gas, standard fracturing methods are not developed or proven for EGS temperatures and pressures. Furthermore, the environmental impacts of currently used fracturing methods are only recently being determined. These authors recently reported an environmentally benign, CO2-activated, rheoreversible fracturing fluid that enhances permeability through fracturing due to in situ volume expansion and gel formation. The potential of this novel fracturing fluid is evaluated in this work towards its application at geothermal sites under different pH conditions. Laboratory-scale fracturing experiments using Coso Geothermal rock cores under different pH environments were performed followed by X-ray microtomography characterization. The results demonstrate that CO2-reactive aqueous solutions of environmentally amenable polyallylamine (PAA) consistently and reproducibly creates/propagates fracture networks through highly impermeable crystalline rock from Coso EGS sites at considerably lower effective stress as compared to conventional fracturing fluids. In addition, permeability was significantly enhanced in a wide range of formation-water pH values. This effective, and environmentally-friendly fracturing fluid technology represents a potential alternative to conventional fracturing fluids.

  19. Power Efficient Hydraulic Systems. Volume 1. Study Phase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    AIRCRAFT SUBSYSTEMS TABLE 14. Baseline aircraft systems o HYDRAULIC SYSTEM o ELECTRICAL SYSTEM o 8000 PSI, 3 INDEPENDENT SYSTEMS o HVDC POWER o APU...valve (pump) HM hinge moment hp horsepower hr hour HVDC high voltage direct current Hz Hertz (cycles per second) IAP integrated actuator package I.D

  20. A methanol/oxygen burning combustor for an aircraft auxiliary emergency power unit

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, E.; Todd, H. , Burnley, Lancashire )

    1989-01-01

    The development of advanced single-engine aircraft with reduced stability and Fly-by-Wire control systems requires the provision of emergency hydraulic and electrical power from a stored energy system. The desire to achieve this objective using readily available fluids of low toxicity has led to the development of a methanol/oxygen burning combustor to provide a hot gas stream to drive a small turbine. The paper describes the performance of a 300 kW output combustor, which is cooled by the methanol consumed.

  1. Vehicle hydraulic system that provides heat for passenger compartment

    DOEpatents

    Bartley, Bradley E.; Blass, James R.; Gibson, Dennis H.

    2001-01-01

    A vehicle includes a vehicle housing which defines a passenger compartment. Attached to the vehicle housing is a hydraulic system, that includes a hydraulic fluid which flows through at least one passageway within the hydraulic system. Also attached to the vehicle housing is a passenger compartment heating system. The passenger compartment heating system includes a heat exchanger, wherein a portion of the heat exchanger is a segment of the at least one passageway of the hydraulic system.

  2. Development of small diameter hydraulic coiled tubing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfill, K. E.; Olsen, R. R.

    1981-06-01

    The objective of this program was to develop design equations for coiled tubing as a helical extension or compression spring which has the capability of acting as a flexible fluid connector in aircraft hydraulic systems. The purpose of the coiled tube is to replace hose, swivels, or extension units on moving hydraulic actuator barrels which have linear or limited angle rotary motion. The use of 3A1-2.5V titanium cold worked stress relieved tubing is recommended for coiled tubing applications. Also recommendations are made for wall thickness for three titanium tube alloys for operating pressures of 1500, 3000, and 8000 psig. Design nomographs are provided to allow use in establishing coil tube design parameters such as number of coils and force at maximum deflection. Four coiled tube assemblies in tow configurations were subjected to a 100,000 cycle endurance test at 100% deflection of the coils. There were no failures. A vibration survey was made to determine natural frequencies and transmissibility with a random input vibration spectrum.

  3. Hydraulic fracturing-1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book contains papers on hydraulic fracturing. Topics covered include: An overview of recent advances in hydraulic fracturing technology; Containment of massive hydraulic fracture; and Fracturing with a high-strength proppant.

  4. The analysis on nonlinear control of the aircraft arresting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jinchun; Du, Tianrong

    2005-12-01

    The aircraft arresting system is a complicated nonlinear system. This paper analyzes the mechanical-hydraulic structure of aircraft arresting system composed of electro hydraulic valve and establishes the dynamic equation of the aircraft arresting system. Based on the state-feedback linearization of nonlinear system, a PD-based controller is synthesized. Simulation studies indicate, while arresting the different type aircraft, the proposed controller has fast response, good tracking performance and strong robustness. By tuning the parameters of the PD controller, a satisfactory control performance can be guaranteed.

  5. Development of Design Technology on Thermal-Hydraulic Performance in Tight-Lattice Rod Bundle: IV Large Paralleled Simulation by the Advanced Two-fluid Model Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Takeharu; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Akimoto, Hajime

    In Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), the Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) has been developed. For thermal design of FLWR, it is necessary to develop analytical method to predict boiling transition of FLWR. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been developing three-dimensional two-fluid model analysis code ACE-3D, which adopts boundary fitted coordinate system to simulate complex shape channel flow. In this paper, as a part of development of ACE-3D to apply to rod bundle analysis, introduction of parallelization to ACE-3D and assessments of ACE-3D are shown. In analysis of large-scale domain such as a rod bundle, even two-fluid model requires large number of computational cost, which exceeds upper limit of memory amount of 1 CPU. Therefore, parallelization was introduced to ACE-3D to divide data amount for analysis of large-scale domain among large number of CPUs, and it is confirmed that analysis of large-scale domain such as a rod bundle can be performed by parallel computation with keeping parallel computation performance even using large number of CPUs. ACE-3D adopts two-phase flow models, some of which are dependent upon channel geometry. Therefore, analyses in the domains, which simulate individual subchannel and 37 rod bundle, are performed, and compared with experiments. It is confirmed that the results obtained by both analyses using ACE-3D show agreement with past experimental result qualitatively.

  6. Space shuttle recommendations based on aircraft maintenance experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spears, J. M.; Fox, C. L.

    1972-01-01

    Space shuttle design recommendations based on aircraft maintenance experience are developed. The recommendations are specifically applied to the landing gear system, nondestructive inspection techniques, hydraulic system design, materials and processes, and program support.

  7. Hydraulically controlled discrete sampling from open boreholes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater sampling from open boreholes in fractured-rock aquifers is particularly challenging because of mixing and dilution of fluid within the borehole from multiple fractures. This note presents an alternative to traditional sampling in open boreholes with packer assemblies. The alternative system called ZONFLO (zonal flow) is based on hydraulic control of borehole flow conditions. Fluid from discrete fractures zones are hydraulically isolated allowing for the collection of representative samples. In rough-faced open boreholes and formations with less competent rock, hydraulic containment may offer an attractive alternative to physical containment with packers. Preliminary test results indicate a discrete zone can be effectively hydraulically isolated from other zones within a borehole for the purpose of groundwater sampling using this new method.

  8. Free-piston regenerative hot gas hydraulic engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beremand, D. G. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A displacer piston which is driven pneumatically by a high-pressure or low-pressure gas is included in a free-piston regenerative hydraulic engine. Actuation of the displacer piston circulates the working fluid through a heater, a regenerator and a cooler. The present invention includes an inertial mass such as a piston or a hydraulic fluid column to effectively store and supply energy during portions of the cycle. Power is transmitted from the working fluid to a hydraulic fluid across a diaphragm or lightweight piston to achieve a hydraulic power out-put. The displacer piston of the present invention may be driven pneumatically, hydraulically or electromagnetically. In addition, the displacer piston and the inertial mass of the present invention may be positioned on the same side of the diaphragm member or may be separated by the diaphragm member.

  9. Hydraulic Presses,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-09

    flow of metal ( piercing in the ring, etc.) - 20-30 kgf/mm2. The efficiency of press, which considers losses to fluid friction in the conduit/manifold...the strong wear of the friction surfaces, have the low coefficient of friction , be - inert with respect to the material of mating members and working...stump or knock, impregnated with grease. Such sealings/packings/compactions have the <. high coefficient of friction , require rapid the suspenders and

  10. Hydraulic engine valve actuation system including independent feedback control

    DOEpatents

    Marriott, Craig D

    2013-06-04

    A hydraulic valve actuation assembly may include a housing, a piston, a supply control valve, a closing control valve, and an opening control valve. The housing may define a first fluid chamber, a second fluid chamber, and a third fluid chamber. The piston may be axially secured to an engine valve and located within the first, second and third fluid chambers. The supply control valve may control a hydraulic fluid supply to the piston. The closing control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the second fluid chamber to the supply control valve. The opening control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the supply control valve to the second fluid chamber.

  11. Aircraft surface coatings study: Verification of selected materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Three liquid coatings and four films that might improve and/or maintain the smoothness of transport aircraft surfaces are considered. Laboratory tests were performed on the liquid coatings (elastomeric polyurethanes) exposed to synthetic type hydraulic fluid, with and without a protective topcoat. Results were analyzed of a 14-month flight service evaluation of coatings applied to leading edges of an airline 727. Two additional airline service evaluations were initiated. Labortory tests were conducted on the films, bonded to aluminum substrate with various adhesives, to determine the best film/adhesive combinations. A cost/benefits analysis was performed and recommendations made for future work toward the application of this technology to commercial transports.

  12. The development of new, low-cost perfluoroalkylether fluids with excellent low and high-temperature properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bierschenk, Thomas R.; Kawa, Hajimu; Juhlke, Timothy J.; Lagow, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    A series of perfluoroalkylether (PFAE) fluids were synthesized by direct fluorination. Viscosity-temperature properties, oxidation stabilities, oxidation-corrosion properties, and lubricity were determined. The fluids were tested in the presence of common elastomers to check for compatibility. The bulk modulus of each was measured to determine if any could be used as nonflammable aircraft hydraulic fluid. It was determined that as the carbon to oxygen ratio decreases, the viscometric properties improve, the fluids may become poor lubricants, the bulk modulus increases, the surface tension increases, and the fluid density increases. The presence of difluoromethylene oxide units in the polymer does not seriously lower the oxidation and oxidation-corrosion stabilities as long as the difluoromethylene oxide units are separated by other units.

  13. Engine having hydraulic and fan drive systems using a single high pressure pump

    DOEpatents

    Bartley, Bradley E.; Blass, James R.; Gibson, Dennis H.

    2000-01-01

    An engine comprises a hydraulic system attached to an engine housing that includes a high pressure pump and a hydraulic fluid flowing through at least one passageway. A fan drive system is also attached to the engine housing and includes a hydraulic motor and a fan which can move air over the engine. The hydraulic motor includes an inlet fluidly connected to the at least one passageway.

  14. Anisotropic hydraulic permeability in compressed articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Boris; Quinn, Thomas M

    2006-01-01

    The extent to which articular cartilage hydraulic permeability is anisotropic is largely unknown, despite its importance for understanding mechanisms of joint lubrication, load bearing, transport phenomena, and mechanotransduction. We developed and applied new techniques for the direct measurement of hydraulic permeability within statically compressed adult bovine cartilage explant disks, dissected such that disk axes were perpendicular to the articular surface. Applied pressure gradients were kept small to minimize flow-induced matrix compaction, and fluid outflows were measured by observation of a meniscus in a glass capillary under a microscope. Explant disk geometry under radially unconfined axial compression was measured by direct microscopic observation. Pressure, flow, and geometry data were input to a finite element model where hydraulic permeabilities in the disk axial and radial directions were determined. At less than 10% static compression, near free-swelling conditions, hydraulic permeability was nearly isotropic, with values corresponding to those of previous studies. With increasing static compression, hydraulic permeability decreased, but the radially directed permeability decreased more dramatically than the axially directed permeability such that strong anisotropy (a 10-fold difference between axial and radial directions) in the hydraulic permeability tensor was evident for static compression of 20-40%. Results correspond well with predictions of a previous microstructurally-based model for effects of tissue mechanical deformations on glycosaminoglycan architecture and cartilage hydraulic permeability. Findings inform understanding of structure-function relationships in cartilage matrix, and suggest several biomechanical roles for compression-induced anisotropic hydraulic permeability in articular cartilage.

  15. Fluid Power Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2008-01-01

    Fluid power technicians, sometimes called hydraulic and pneumatic technicians, work with equipment that utilizes the pressure of a liquid or gas in a closed container to transmit, multiply, or control power. Working under the supervision of an engineer or engineering staff, they assemble, install, maintain, and test fluid power equipment.…

  16. Investigation of High-Pressure Hydraulic Vortex Rate Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    stability - augmentation system . The feasibility of low-pressure fluid stabilization systems was demonstrated. The primary component that requires development for implementation in a high pressure system is the vortex rate sensor. The high-pressure hydraulic vortex rate sensor has an on-board built-in supply of hydraulic fluid which is used in the primary hydro-mechanical flight control of the vehicle. A small amount of hydraulic fluid under high pressure can be diverted from the main system to the vortex rate sensor, used to perform a sensing function, and

  17. Evaluation and Analysis of Environmental Performance and Benefit of Environmentally-Advantaged Aircraft Deicing Fluids: Development of the Decision Support Methodology and Case Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-18

    concentration reported for your purchased product, if available. Line 11 – 48-hour aquatic toxicity (LC50) for daphnia (mg/L). Enter the concentration...organism other than fathead minnows or daphnia , enter the name of the organism here. Evaluation Worksheet Instructions Alternative Aircraft...minnows (mg/L). Enter the concentration reported for the alternative deicer named in Line 34. Line 40 – 48-hour aquatic toxicity (LC50) for daphnia

  18. Transport efficiency and dynamics of hydraulic fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique

    2015-08-01

    Intermittent fluid pulses in the Earth's crust can explain a variety of geological phenomena, for instance the occurrence of hydraulic breccia. Fluid transport in the crust is usually modeled as continuous darcian flow, ignoring that sufficient fluid overpressure can cause hydraulic fractures as fluid pathways with very dynamic behavior. Resulting hydraulic fracture networks are largely self-organized: opening and healing of hydraulic fractures depends on local fluid pressure, which is, in turn, largely controlled by the fracture network. We develop a crustal-scale 2D computer model designed to simulate this process. To focus on the dynamics of the process we chose a setup as simple as possible. Control factors are constant overpressure at a basal fluid source and a constant 'viscous' parameter controlling fracture-healing. Our results indicate that at large healing rates hydraulic fractures are mobile, transporting fluid in intermittent pulses to the surface and displaying a 1/fα behavior. Low healing rates result in stable networks and constant flow. The efficiency of the fluid transport is independent from the closure dynamics of veins or fractures. More important than preexisting fracture networks is the distribution of fluid pressure. A key requirement for dynamic fracture networks is the presence of a fluid pressure gradient.

  19. Hybrid Composite Response to Hydraulic Ram

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-20

    braided E-Glass 1/8-inch diameter, braided Additional materials Styrofoam 2 lb/ft3 , closed cell Self- vulcanizing rubber 1/8 thick 7 JTCG/AS-86-T-001...conducted under the Survivable Composite Structures program funded by the JTCG/AS Structures and Materials Subcommittee. Under this project, NWC (Naval...Weapons Center), China Lake, Calif. was tasked with developing struc- tural and material techniques for reducing hydraulic ram damage to composite aircraft

  20. Space Shuttle Upgrades Advanced Hydraulic Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Three Auxiliary Power Units (APU) on the Space Shuttle Orbiter each provide 145 hp shaft power to a hydraulic pump which outputs 3000 psi hydraulic fluid to 41 hydraulic actuators. A hydrazine fuel powered APU utilized throughout the Shuttle program has undergone many improvements, but concerns remain with flight safety, operational cost, critical failure modes, and hydrazine related hazards. The advanced hydraulic power system (AHPS), also known as the electric APU, is being evaluated as an upgrade to replace the hydrazine APU. The AHPS replaces the high-speed turbine and hydrazine fuel supply system with a battery power supply and electric motor/pump that converts 300 volt electrical power to 3000 psi hydraulic power. AHPS upgrade benefits include elimination of toxic hydrazine propellant to improve flight safety, reduction in hazardous ground processing operations, and improved reliability. Development of this upgrade provides many interesting challenges and includes development of four hardware elements that comprise the AHPS system: Battery - The battery provides a high voltage supply of power using lithium ion cells. This is a large battery that must provide 28 kilowatt hours of energy over 99 minutes of operation at 300 volts with a peak power of 130 kilowatts for three seconds. High Voltage Power Distribution and Control (PD&C) - The PD&C distributes electric power from the battery to the EHDU. This 300 volt system includes wiring and components necessary to distribute power and provide fault current protection. Electro-Hydraulic Drive Unit (EHDU) - The EHDU converts electric input power to hydraulic output power. The EHDU must provide over 90 kilowatts of stable, output hydraulic power at 3000 psi with high efficiency and rapid response time. Cooling System - The cooling system provides thermal control of the Orbiter hydraulic fluid and EHDU electronic components. Symposium presentation will provide an overview of the AHPS upgrade, descriptions of the four

  1. Using electrical impedance tomography to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity

    DOEpatents

    Berryman, James G.; Daily, William D.; Ramirez, Abelardo L.; Roberts, Jeffery J.

    2000-01-01

    The use of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity. EIT can be used to map hydraulic conductivity in the subsurface where measurements of both amplitude and phase are made. Hydraulic conductivity depends on at least two parameters: porosity and a length scale parameter. Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) measures and maps electrical conductivity (which can be related to porosity) in three dimensions. By introducing phase measurements along with amplitude, the desired additional measurement of a pertinent length scale can be achieved. Hydraulic conductivity controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the surface. Thus inexpensive maps of hydraulic conductivity would improve planning strategies for subsequent remediation efforts. Fluid permeability is also of importance for oil field exploitation and thus detailed knowledge of fluid permeability distribution in three-dimension (3-D) would be a great boon to petroleum reservoir analysts.

  2. Aircraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H. (Inventor); Uden, Edward (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention is an aircraft wing design that creates a bell shaped span load, which results in a negative induced drag (induced thrust) on the outer portion of the wing; such a design obviates the need for rudder control of an aircraft.

  3. Hydraulically actuated fuel injector including a pilot operated spool valve assembly and hydraulic system using same

    DOEpatents

    Shafer, Scott F.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to hydraulic systems including hydraulically actuated fuel injectors that have a pilot operated spool valve assembly. One class of hydraulically actuated fuel injectors includes a solenoid driven pilot valve that controls the initiation of the injection event. However, during cold start conditions, hydraulic fluid, typically engine lubricating oil, is particularly viscous and is often difficult to displace through the relatively small drain path that is defined past the pilot valve member. Because the spool valve typically responds slower than expected during cold start due to the difficulty in displacing the relatively viscous oil, accurate start of injection timing can be difficult to achieve. There also exists a greater difficulty in reaching the higher end of the cold operating speed range. Therefore, the present invention utilizes a fluid evacuation valve to aid in displacement of the relatively viscous oil during cold start conditions.

  4. TAIL SECTION TEST STAND, SUSTAINER HYDRAULIC SYSTEM, DECAY CHARACTERISTICS AND FAILURE INVESTIGATION. BOOK III.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ENGINEERING DRAWINGS, STAGING , CONTROL SYSTEMS, MATHEMATICAL MODELS, PRESSURE, ATTENUATION....LEAKAGE(FLUID), * SUSTAINER ENGINES, HYDRAULIC EQUIPMENT, SURFACE TO SURFACE MISSILES, PERFORMANCE(ENGINEERING), FAILURE(MECHANICS), CAPTIVE TESTS

  5. Hydraulic Fracturing for Oil and Gas: Impacts from the ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This final report provides a review and synthesis of available scientific information concerning the relationship between hydraulic fracturing activities and drinking water resources in the United States. The report is organized around activities in the hydraulic fracturing water cycle and their potential to impact drinking water resources.  The stages include: (1) acquiring water to be used for hydraulic fracturing (Water Acquisition), (2) mixing the water with chemical additives to prepare hydraulic fracturing fluids (Chemical Mixing), (3) injecting the hydraulic fracturing fluids into the production well to create fractures in the targeted production zone (Well Injection), (4) collecting the wastewater that returns through the well after injection (Produced Water Handling), and (5) managing the wastewater via disposal or reuse methods (Wastewater Disposal and Reuse). EPA found scientific evidence that hydraulic fracturing activities can impact drinking water resources under some circumstances. The report identifies certain conditions under which impacts from hydraulic fracturing activities can be more frequent or severe: Water withdrawals for hydraulic fracturing in times or areas of low water availability, particularly in areas with limited or declining groundwater resources; Spills during the handling of hydraulic fracturing fluids and chemicals or produced water that result in large volumes or high concentrations of chem

  6. Electrorheological fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, T.C.; Martin, J.E.

    1993-10-01

    An electrorheological fluid is a substance whose form changes in the presence of electric fields. Depending on the strength of the field to which it is subjected, an electrorheological fluid can run freely like water, ooze like honey or solidify like gelatin. Indeed, the substance can switch from ne state to another within a few milliseconds. Electrorheological fluids are easy to make; they consist of microscopic particles suspended in an insulating liquid. Yet they are not ready for most commercial applications. They tend to suffer from a number of problems, including structural weakness as solids, abrasiveness as liquids and chemical breakdown, especially at high temperatures. Automotive engineers could imagine, for instance, constructing an electrorheological clutch. It was also hoped that electrorheological fluids would lead to valveless hydraulic systems, in which solidifying fluid would shut off flow through a thin section of pipe. Electrorheological fluids also offer the possibility of a shock absorber that provides response times of milliseconds and does not require mechanical adjustments. 3 refs.

  7. Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Hydraulic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Hydraulic Fluid Buildings, Northeast of Looking Glass Avenue at southwest side of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  8. Control rod drive hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Ose, Richard A.

    1992-01-01

    A hydraulic system for a control rod drive (CRD) includes a variable output-pressure CR pump operable in a charging mode for providing pressurized fluid at a charging pressure, and in a normal mode for providing the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure, less than the charging pressure. Charging and purge lines are disposed in parallel flow between the CRD pump and the CRD. A hydraulic control unit is disposed in flow communication in the charging line and includes a scram accumulator. An isolation valve is provided in the charging line between the CRD pump and the scram accumulator. A controller is operatively connected to the CRD pump and the isolation valve and is effective for opening the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a charging mode for charging the scram accumulator, and closing the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a normal mode for providing to the CRD through the purge line the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure lower than the charging pressure.

  9. Dentin permeability: determinants of hydraulic conductance.

    PubMed

    Reeder, O W; Walton, R E; Livingston, M J; Pashley, D H

    1978-02-01

    A technique is described which permits measurements of the ease with which fluid permeates dentin. This value, the hydraulic conductance of dentin, increased as surface area increases and/or as dentin thickness decreases. It increased 32-fold when dentin was acid etched due to removal of surface debris occluding the tubules.

  10. Aircraft Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-19

    NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 AIRCRAFT STEELS by E. U. Lee R. Taylor C. Lei H. C. Sanders 19 February 2009...MARYLAND NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 19 February 2009 AIRCRAFT STEELS by E. U. Lee R. Taylor C. Lei H. C. Sanders...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 ii SUMMARY Five high strength and four stainless steels have been studied, identifying their

  11. Tree hydraulics: how sap rises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Trees transport water from roots to crown—a height that can exceed 100 m. The physics of tree hydraulics can be conveyed with simple fluid dynamics based upon the Hagen-Poiseuille equation and Murray's law. Here the conduit structure is modelled as conical pipes and as branching pipes. The force required to lift sap is generated mostly by transpiration or capillary action; we investigate the effectiveness of both these forces for the two conduit architectures considered. The level of analysis is appropriate for undergraduates. The subject is of broad interest because it provides a naturally-occurring example of an unusual metastable state of matter: liquid under tension.

  12. CFD Aided Design and Production of Hydraulic Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Alper; Cetinturk, Huseyin; Demirel, Gizem; Ayli, Ece; Celebioglu, Kutay; Aradag, Selin; ETU Hydro Research Center Team

    2014-11-01

    Hydraulic turbines are turbo machines which produce electricity from hydraulic energy. Francis type turbines are the most common one in use today. The design of these turbines requires high engineering effort since each turbine is tailor made due to different head and discharge. Therefore each component of the turbine is designed specifically. During the last decades, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has become very useful tool to predict hydraulic machinery performance and save time and money for designers. This paper describes a design methodology to optimize a Francis turbine by integrating theoretical and experimental fundamentals of hydraulic machines and commercial CFD codes. Specific turbines are designed and manufactured with the help of a collaborative CFD/CAD/CAM methodology based on computational fluid dynamics and five-axis machining for hydraulic electric power plants. The details are presented in this study. This study is financially supported by Turkish Ministry of Development.

  13. A combined hydraulic and biological SBR model.

    PubMed

    Alex, J; Rönner-Holm, S G E; Hunze, M; Holm, N C

    2011-01-01

    A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) model was developed consisting of six continuous stirred tank reactors which describe the hydraulic flow patterns occurring in different SBR phases. The model was developed using the results of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation studies of an SBR reactor under a selection of dynamic operational phases. Based on the CFD results, the model structure was refined and a simplified 'driver' model to allow one to mimic the flow pattern driven by the external operational conditions (influent, aeration, mixing) was derived. The resulting model allows the modeling of biological processes, settlement and hydraulic conditions of cylindrical SBRs.

  14. Model for polygonal hydraulic jumps.

    PubMed

    Martens, Erik A; Watanabe, Shinya; Bohr, Tomas

    2012-03-01

    We propose a phenomenological model for the polygonal hydraulic jumps discovered by Ellegaard and co-workers [Nature (London) 392, 767 (1998); Nonlinearity 12, 1 (1999); Physica B 228, 1 (1996)], based on the known flow structure for the type-II hydraulic jumps with a "roller" (separation eddy) near the free surface in the jump region. The model consists of mass conservation and radial force balance between hydrostatic pressure and viscous stresses on the roller surface. In addition, we consider the azimuthal force balance, primarily between pressure and viscosity, but also including nonhydrostatic pressure contributions from surface tension in light of recent observations by Bush and co-workers [J. Fluid Mech. 558, 33 (2006); Phys. Fluids 16, S4 (2004)]. The model can be analyzed by linearization around the circular state, resulting in a parameter relationship for nearly circular polygonal states. A truncated but fully nonlinear version of the model can be solved analytically. This simpler model gives rise to polygonal shapes that are very similar to those observed in experiments, even though surface tension is neglected, and the condition for the existence of a polygon with N corners depends only on a single dimensionless number φ. Finally, we include time-dependent terms in the model and study linear stability of the circular state. Instability occurs for sufficiently small Bond number and the most unstable wavelength is expected to be roughly proportional to the width of the roller as in the Rayleigh-Plateau instability.

  15. Gravity-Driven Hydraulic Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germanovich, L. N.; Garagash, D.; Murdoch, L. C.; Robinowitz, M.

    2014-12-01

    This study is motived by a new method for disposing of nuclear waste by injecting it as a dense slurry into a hydraulic fracture that grows downward to great enough depth to permanently isolate the waste. Disposing of nuclear waste using gravity-driven hydraulic fractures is mechanically similar to the upward growth of dikes filled with low density magma. A fundamental question in both applications is how the injected fluid controls the propagation dynamics and fracture geometry (depth and breadth) in three dimensions. Analog experiments in gelatin [e.g., Heimpel and Olson, 1994; Taisne and Tait, 2009] show that fracture breadth (the short horizontal dimension) remains nearly stationary when the process in the fracture "head" (where breadth is controlled) is dominated by solid toughness, whereas viscous fluid dissipation is dominant in the fracture tail. We model propagation of the resulting gravity-driven (buoyant or sinking), finger-like fracture of stationary breadth with slowly varying opening along the crack length. The elastic response to fluid loading in a horizontal cross-section is local and can be treated similar to the classical Perkins-Kern-Nordgren (PKN) model of hydraulic fracturing. The propagation condition for a finger-like crack is based on balancing the global energy release rate due to a unit crack extension with the rock fracture toughness. It allows us to relate the net fluid pressure at the tip to the fracture breadth and rock toughness. Unlike the PKN fracture, where breadth is known a priori, the final breadth of a finger-like fracture is a result of processes in the fracture head. Because the head is much more open than the tail, viscous pressure drop in the head can be neglected leading to a 3D analog of Weertman's hydrostatic pulse. This requires relaxing the local elasticity assumption of the PKN model in the fracture head. As a result, we resolve the breadth, and then match the viscosity-dominated tail with the 3-D, toughness

  16. Aircraft cybernetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The use of computers for aircraft control, flight simulation, and inertial navigation is explored. The man-machine relation problem in aviation is addressed. Simple and self-adapting autopilots are described and the assets and liabilities of digital navigation techniques are assessed.

  17. NASA's Aircraft Icing Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the NASA ongoing efforts to develop an aircraft icing analysis capability is presented. Discussions are included of the overall and long term objectives of the program as well as current capabilities and limitations of the various computer codes being developed. Descriptions are given of codes being developed to analyze two and three dimensional trajectories of water droplets, airfoil ice accretion, aerodynamic performance degradation of components and complete aircraft configurations, electrothermal deicer, fluid freezing point depressant antideicer and electro-impulse deicer. The need for bench mark and verification data to support the code development is also discussed, and selected results of experimental programs are presented.

  18. Turbulent Motion of Liquids in Hydraulic Resistances with a Linear Cylindrical Slide-Valve.

    PubMed

    Velescu, C; Popa, N C

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the motion of viscous and incompressible liquids in the annular space of controllable hydraulic resistances with a cylindrical linear slide-valve. This theoretical study focuses on the turbulent and steady-state motion regimes. The hydraulic resistances mentioned above are the most frequent type of hydraulic resistances used in hydraulic actuators and automation systems. To study the liquids' motion in the controllable hydraulic resistances with a linear cylindrical slide-valve, the report proposes an original analytic method. This study can similarly be applied to any other type of hydraulic resistance. Another purpose of this study is to determine certain mathematical relationships useful to approach the theoretical functionality of hydraulic resistances with magnetic controllable fluids as incompressible fluids in the presence of a controllable magnetic field. In this report, we established general analytic equations to calculate (i) velocity and pressure distributions, (ii) average velocity, (iii) volume flow rate of the liquid, (iv) pressures difference, and (v) radial clearance.

  19. Turbulent Motion of Liquids in Hydraulic Resistances with a Linear Cylindrical Slide-Valve

    PubMed Central

    Velescu, C.; Popa, N. C.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the motion of viscous and incompressible liquids in the annular space of controllable hydraulic resistances with a cylindrical linear slide-valve. This theoretical study focuses on the turbulent and steady-state motion regimes. The hydraulic resistances mentioned above are the most frequent type of hydraulic resistances used in hydraulic actuators and automation systems. To study the liquids' motion in the controllable hydraulic resistances with a linear cylindrical slide-valve, the report proposes an original analytic method. This study can similarly be applied to any other type of hydraulic resistance. Another purpose of this study is to determine certain mathematical relationships useful to approach the theoretical functionality of hydraulic resistances with magnetic controllable fluids as incompressible fluids in the presence of a controllable magnetic field. In this report, we established general analytic equations to calculate (i) velocity and pressure distributions, (ii) average velocity, (iii) volume flow rate of the liquid, (iv) pressures difference, and (v) radial clearance. PMID:26167532

  20. Effects of distance from the pulp and thickness on the hydraulic conductance of human radicular dentin.

    PubMed

    Fogel, H M; Marshall, F J; Pashley, D H

    1988-11-01

    The purposes of this study were: (1) to measure the effect of distance from the pulp on the hydraulic conductance of human radicular dentin; (2) to determine the influence of dentin thickness on the rates of fluid flow; and (3) to attempt to correlate dentinal tubule densities and diameters with root dentin hydraulic conductance. Dentin slabs prepared from extracted, unerupted, human third molar teeth were placed in a split-chamber device to permit quantitation of fluid filtration rate (hydraulic conductance). In the SEM portion of the study, dentinal tubule numbers and diameters were recorded. The results indicated that radicular dentin hydraulic conductance decreased with distance from the pulp and with increasing dentin thickness. Tubule density and diameter correlated well with the measured hydraulic conductances. The relatively low hydraulic conductance of outer root dentin makes it a significant barrier to fluid movement across root structure.

  1. Large Scale Geologic Controls on Hydraulic Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLennan, J. D.; Bhide, R.

    2014-12-01

    When simulating a hydraulic fracturing, the analyst has historically prescribed a single planar fracture. Originally (in the 1950s through the 1970s) this was necessitated by computational restrictions. In the latter part of the twentieth century, hydraulic fracture simulation evolved to incorporate vertical propagation controlled by modulus, fluid loss, and the minimum principal stress. With improvements in software, computational capacity, and recognition that in-situ discontinuities are relevant, fully three-dimensional hydraulic simulation is now becoming possible. Advances in simulation capabilities enable coupling structural geologic data (three-dimensional representation of stresses, natural fractures, and stratigraphy) with decision making processes for stimulation - volumes, rates, fluid types, completion zones. Without this interaction between simulation capabilities and geological information, low permeability formation exploitation may linger on the fringes of real economic viability. Comparative simulations have been undertaken in varying structural environments where the stress contrast and the frequency of natural discontinuities causes varying patterns of multiple, hydraulically generated or reactivated flow paths. Stress conditions and nature of the discontinuities are selected as variables and are used to simulate how fracturing can vary in different structural regimes. The basis of the simulations is commercial distinct element software (Itasca Corporation's 3DEC).

  2. Analysis of a Proposal to Consolidate Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    A Page 2 APPENDIX B NEC COMMONALITY of NAS NORTH ISLAND and NAS MIRAMAR AIRCRAFT INTERMEDIATE MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENTS RATE PNEC PRINCIPLE NEC...TOTAL: 5 2 AMH GENERAL HYDRAULICS 7 12 AMH 7212 STATIONARY HYDRAULICS TEST STAND OPERATOR 23 31 AMH TOTAL: 30 43 Appendix B Page 1 RATE PNEC PRINCIPLE...TECH 14 AT 6623 CI ASA-27 SACE TEST BENCH TECH 2 AT 6625 USM-449(V) AAI & 5500 SERIES ATE TECH 1 Appendix B Page 2 RATE PNEC PRINCIPLE NEC

  3. Effect of Natural Fractures on Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben, Y.; Wang, Y.; Shi, G.

    2012-12-01

    Hydraulic Fracturing has been used successfully in the oil and gas industry to enhance oil and gas production in the past few decades. Recent years have seen the great development of tight gas, coal bed methane and shale gas. Natural fractures are believed to play an important role in the hydraulic fracturing of such formations. Whether natural fractures can benefit the fracture propagation and enhance final production needs to be studied. Various methods have been used to study the effect of natural fractures on hydraulic fracturing. Discontinuous Deformation Analysis (DDA) is a numerical method which belongs to the family of discrete element methods. In this paper, DDA is coupled with a fluid pipe network model to simulate the pressure response in the formation during hydraulic fracturing. The focus is to study the effect of natural fractures on hydraulic fracturing. In particular, the effect of rock joint properties, joint orientations and rock properties on fracture initiation and propagation will be analyzed. The result shows that DDA is a promising tool to study such complex behavior of rocks. Finally, the advantages of disadvantages of our current model and future research directions will be discussed.

  4. Aircraft Corrosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    chlore mais dans une proportion semblable b cells d’une eau de vil)e ; - lea solides, d’aprbs lea analyses chimique et criatallographique, paraissaiont...IATA member airlines at $100 million based on 1976 operations. Thus the numbers are large, but detailed analyses on specific aircraft types, in known...demonstrate this in any quantitative way with accurate figures. Better information is required on the cost of corrosion, together with analyses of the

  5. Aircraft Ducting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Templeman Industries developed the Ultra-Seal Ducting System, an environmental composite air duct with a 50 percent weight savings over current metallic ducting, but could not find a commercial facility with the ability to test it. Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a structural evaluation of the duct, equivalent to 86 years of take-offs and landings in an aircraft. Boeing Commercial Airplane Group and McDonnell Douglas Corporation are currently using the ducts.

  6. New hydraulic downhole pump offers several advantages

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    A self-contained, hydraulically operated plunger pump is available to replace conventional equipment in troublesome producing situations. The Soderberg pump from EMI Pump Systems uses an oscillating hydraulic fluid column to energize the plunger, thus eliminating the need for sucker rods and pump jacks or submersible motors. An advantage to the pump's design is that it will stroke only when the pump chamber has been vented of gasses and is filled with well liquids. This reduces energy consumption. Other advantages are discussed. The new pump consists of 4 basic sections including an upper subassembly that contains the pump's intelligence, a chamber to receive well fluids, a plunger and a pressurized nitrogen gas chamber that stores energy for the pump's return stroke.

  7. Fluid technology (selected components, devices, and systems): A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Developments in fluid technology and hydraulic equipment are presented. The subjects considered are: (1) the use of fluids in the operation of switches, amplifiers, and servo devices, (2) devices and data for laboratory use in the study of fluid dynamics, and (3) the use of fluids as controls and certain methods of controlling fluids.

  8. Hydraulic pressure energy harvester enhanced by Helmholtz resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skow, Ellen; Koontz, Zachary; Cunefare, Kenneth; Erturk, Alper

    2015-04-01

    Hydraulic pressure energy harvesters (HPEH) are devices that convert the dynamic pressure within hydraulic systems into usable electrical power through axially loaded piezoelectric stacks excited off-resonance by the fluid. Within hydraulic systems, the dominant frequency is typically a harmonic of the pump operating frequency. The pressure fluctuations coupled with the piezoelectric stack can be amplified by creating a housing design that includes a Helmholtz resonator tuned to the dominant frequency of the fluid excitation. A Helmholtz resonator is an acoustic device that consists of a cavity coupled to a fluid medium via a neck, or in this case a port connection to the fluid flow, that acts as an amplifier when within the bandwidth of its resonance. The implementation of a piezoelectric stack within the HPEH allows for a Helmholtz resonator to be included within the fluidic environment despite the significantly higher than air static pressures typical of fluid hydraulic systems (on the order of one to tens of MPa). The resistive losses within the system, such as from energy harvesting and viscous losses, can also be used to increase the bandwidth of the resonance; thus increasing the utility of the device. This paper investigates the design, modeling, and performance of hydraulic pressure energy harvesters utilizing a Helmholtz resonator design.

  9. Hydraulic Fracturing Mineback Experiment in Complex Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, S. J.; McLennan, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (or "fracking") for the recovery of gas and liquids from tight shale formations has gained much attention. This operation which involves horizontal well drilling and massive hydraulic fracturing has been developed over the last decade to produce fluids from extremely low permeability mudstone and siltstone rocks with high organic content. Nearly thirteen thousand wells and about one hundred and fifty thousand stages within the wells were fractured in the US in 2011. This operation has proven to be successful, causing hundreds of billions of dollars to be invested and has produced an abundance of natural gas and is making billions of barrels of hydrocarbon liquids available for the US. But, even with this commercial success, relatively little is clearly known about the complexity--or lack of complexity--of the hydraulic fracture, the extent that the newly created surface area contacts the high Reservoir Quality rock, nor the connectivity and conductivity of the hydraulic fractures created. To better understand this phenomena in order to improve efficiency, a large-scale mine-back experiment is progressing. The mine-back experiment is a full-scale hydraulic fracture carried out in a well-characterized environment, with comprehensive instrumentation deployed to measure fracture growth. A tight shale mudstone rock geologic setting is selected, near the edge of a formation where one to two thousand feet difference in elevation occurs. From the top of the formation, drilling, well logging, and hydraulic fracture pumping will occur. From the bottom of the formation a horizontal tunnel will be mined using conventional mining techniques into the rock formation towards the drilled well. Certain instrumentation will be located within this tunnel for observations during the hydraulic fracturing. After the hydraulic fracturing, the tunnel will be extended toward the well, with careful mapping of the created hydraulic fracture. Fracturing fluid will be

  10. Microfluidic parallel circuit for measurement of hydraulic resistance.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungyoung; Lee, Myung Gwon; Park, Je-Kyun

    2010-08-31

    We present a microfluidic parallel circuit that directly compares the test channel of an unknown hydraulic resistance with the reference channel with a known resistance, thereby measuring the unknown resistance without any measurement setup, such as standard pressure gauges. Many of microfluidic applications require the precise transport of fluid along a channel network with complex patterns. Therefore, it is important to accurately characterize and measure the hydraulic resistance of each channel segment, and determines whether the device principle works well. However, there is no fluidic device that includes features, such as the ability to diagnose microfluidic problems by measuring the hydraulic resistance of a microfluidic component in microscales. To address the above need, we demonstrate a simple strategy to measure an unknown hydraulic resistance, by characterizing the hydraulic resistance of microchannels with different widths and defining an equivalent linear channel of a microchannel with repeated patterns of a sudden contraction and expansion.

  11. Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Original Test Carriage: A carriage catapulted by a hydraulic jet at speeds up to 150 mph for studies of ground loads on high-speed aircraft is in operation at the Langley Research Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. A drop test rig is installed on the carriage, which is catapulted 400 feet in 3.5 seconds. The carriage travels along a track and special instruments record loads data as an aircraft landing gear or other test specimen is dropped on a concrete strip. Five cables attached to a battery of 20 Navy Mark IV arresting gears, stretched across the 2,200-foot track, bring the carriage to a halt after the test run. The carriage, when loaded to its capacity of 20,000 pounds, represents a 50-ton load. The hydraulic catapult consists of a single water jet, which roars from a nozzle at the front end of the L-shaped pressure vessel (center) and is forced into a specially-shaped bucket on the carriage. The water jet, traveling at 660 feet per second, undergoes a 180 degree change of direction and floods out of another opening in the bucket below the incoming jet stream. The momentum change produces a thrust on the carriage of 400,00 pounds.

  12. Fluid imbalance

    MedlinePlus

    ... up in the body. This is called fluid overload (volume overload). This can lead to edema (excess fluid in ... Water imbalance; Fluid imbalance - dehydration; Fluid buildup; Fluid overload; Volume overload; Loss of fluids; Edema - fluid imbalance; ...

  13. Helical coil thermal hydraulic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramello, M.; Bertani, C.; De Salve, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-11-01

    A model has been developed in Matlab environment for the thermal hydraulic analysis of helical coil and shell steam generators. The model considers the internal flow inside one helix and its associated control volume of water on the external side, both characterized by their inlet thermodynamic conditions and the characteristic geometry data. The model evaluates the behaviour of the thermal-hydraulic parameters of the two fluids, such as temperature, pressure, heat transfer coefficients, flow quality, void fraction and heat flux. The evaluation of the heat transfer coefficients as well as the pressure drops has been performed by means of the most validated literature correlations. The model has been applied to one of the steam generators of the IRIS modular reactor and a comparison has been performed with the RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code applied to an inclined straight pipe that has the same length and the same elevation change between inlet and outlet of the real helix. The predictions of the developed model and RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code are in fairly good agreement before the dryout region, while the dryout front inside the helical pipes is predicted at a lower distance from inlet by the model.

  14. Thermal hydraulics development for CASL

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrie, Robert B

    2010-12-07

    This talk will describe the technical direction of the Thermal-Hydraulics (T-H) Project within the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Department of Energy Innovation Hub. CASL is focused on developing a 'virtual reactor', that will simulate the physical processes that occur within a light-water reactor. These simulations will address several challenge problems, defined by laboratory, university, and industrial partners that make up CASL. CASL's T-H efforts are encompassed in two sub-projects: (1) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), (2) Interface Treatment Methods (ITM). The CFD subproject will develop non-proprietary, scalable, verified and validated macroscale CFD simulation tools. These tools typically require closures for their turbulence and boiling models, which will be provided by the ITM sub-project, via experiments and microscale (such as DNS) simulation results. The near-term milestones and longer term plans of these two sub-projects will be discussed.

  15. Hydraulically amplified PZT mems actuator

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.

    2004-11-02

    A hydraulically amplified microelectromechanical systems actuator. A piece of piezoelectric material or stacked piezo bimorph is bonded or deposited as a thin film. The piece is operatively connected to a primary membrane. A reservoir is operatively connected to the primary membrane. The reservoir contains a fluid. A membrane is operatively connected to the reservoir. In operation, energizing the piezoelectric material causing the piezoelectric material to bow. Bowing of the piezoelectric material causes movement of the primary membrane. Movement of the primary membrane results in a force in being transmitted to the liquid in the reservoir. The force in the liquid causes movement of the membrane. Movement of the membrane results in an operating actuator.

  16. Efficient pressure-transformer for fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morando, J. A.

    1970-01-01

    Fluid transformer utilizes fluid under pressure at one level to drive series of free pistons in positive displacement pump. Pump in turn delivers hydraulic fluid at different pressure level to a load. Transformer is constructed of corrosion resistant materials and is extremely light and compact in relation to capacity.

  17. Process modeling KC-135 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    Instrumentation will be provided for KC-135 aircraft which will provide a quantitative measure of g-level variation during parabolic flights and its effect on experiments which demonstrate differences in results obtained with differences in convective flow. The flight apparatus will provide video recording of the effects of the g-level variations on varying fluid samples. The apparatus will be constructed to be available to fly on the KC-135 during most missions.

  18. Active Aircraft Pylon Noise Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Czech, Michael J (Inventor); Elmiligui, Alaa A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active pylon noise control system for an aircraft includes a pylon structure connecting an engine system with an airframe surface of the aircraft and having at least one aperture to supply a gas or fluid therethrough, an intake portion attached to the pylon structure to intake a gas or fluid, a regulator connected with the intake portion via a plurality of pipes, to regulate a pressure of the gas or fluid, a plenum chamber formed within the pylon structure and connected with the regulator, and configured to receive the gas or fluid as regulated by the regulator, and a plurality of injectors in communication with the plenum chamber to actively inject the gas or fluid through the plurality of apertures of the pylon structure.

  19. Portable Hydraulic Powerpack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. A.; Henry, R. L.; Fedor, O. H.; Owens, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    Rechargeable hydraulic powerpack functions as lightweight, compact source of mechanical energy. Self-contained hydraulic powerpack derives energy from solid chemical charge. Combustion of charge initiated by small hammer, and revolving feeder replaces charges expended. Combustion gases cool during expansion in turbine and not too hot for release to atmosphere. Unit has applications driving wheelchairs and operating drills, winches, and other equipment in remote areas. Also replaces electric motors and internal-combustion engines as source of power in explosive atmospheres.

  20. FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Subhash Shah

    2000-08-01

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

  1. Educating with Aircraft Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Hobie

    1976-01-01

    Described is utilization of aircraft models, model aircraft clubs, and model aircraft magazines to promote student interest in aerospace education. The addresses for clubs and magazines are included. (SL)

  2. Ram air turbine driving a variable displacement hydraulic pump

    SciTech Connect

    Dickes, G.E.; Brekhus, R.D.; Seidel, W.E.

    1992-09-08

    This patent describes a ram air turbine for use in generating power for an aircraft by driving a load with an airstream intercepting blades of the turbine as the aircraft moves through the air with the turbine applying power to the load during rotation of the blades in a first rotational velocity range and during rotation of the blades in a second rotational velocity range which is lower than the first rotational velocity. It comprises a variable displacement hydraulic pump; and a reduced power output.

  3. Hydraulic valve control system for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, T.J.; LoRusso, J.A.; Kaufman, W.F.

    1992-07-07

    This patent describes a hydraulic engine valve actuating assembly for use in an internal combustion engine cylinder head having a poppet valve which is axially shiftable therein by a rotary camshaft, the hydraulic engine valve actuating assembly. It comprises a housing having a mounted surface to attach to the cylinder head immediately above the poppet valve, a master piston cooperating with the camshaft and sealingly engaging the first cavity; a slave piston cooperating with the poppet valve and sealingly engaging the housing second cavity; a hydraulic energy and fluid storage accumulator assembly affixed and sealingly engaged relative to the housing and being provided with a fluid port coupled with the housing fluid passageway; valve means; the housing including a third cavity coaxially aligned with the poppet valve; and the valve means including a reciprocal valve piston sealingly engaged within the third cavity.

  4. Improving energy efficiency in robot limbs through hydraulic dangle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, Julian S.; Meller, Mike; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2015-03-01

    Animals often allow their limbs to swing passively under their own inertia. For example, about 40% of a human walking gait consists of the primarily passive swing phase. Current hydraulic robots employ traditional actuation methods in which fluid power is expended for all limb movements, even when passive dynamics could be utilized. "Dangle" is the ability to allow a hydraulic actuator to freely sway in response to external loads, in which both sides of the actuator are disconnected from pressure and connected to the tank. Dangle offers the opportunity for efficiency gains by enabling the use of momentum, gravity, and external loads to move a limb without expending fluid power. To demonstrate these efficiency gains, this paper presents an experiment that compares the fluid power consumed to actuate a two degree of freedom hydraulic leg following a human walking gait cycle trajectory in both a traditional manner and utilizing dangle. It was shown that the use of dangle can decrease fluid power consumption by 20% by utilizing pendular dynamics during the swing phase. At speeds higher than the free dangling rate, more power must be used to maintain the desired trajectory due to damping inherent in the configuration. The use of dangle as a power saving method when driving hydraulic limbs could increase operation time for untethered hydraulic walking robots.

  5. Method for use of hydraulically or electrically controlled solenoids under failed on conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bolenbaugh, Jonathan M.; Naqi, Syed

    2014-07-08

    A method to operate a clutch device in an electro-mechanical transmission mechanically-operatively coupled to an internal combustion engine and at least one electric machine includes, in response to a failure condition detected within a flow control device configured to facilitate flow of hydraulic fluid for operating the clutch device, selectively preventing the flow of hydraulic fluid from entering the flow control device and feeding the clutch device. Synchronization of the clutch device is initiated when the clutch device is intended for activation, and only if the clutch device is synchronized, the flow of hydraulic fluid is selectively permitted to enter the flow control device to activate the clutch device.

  6. A 6-DOF vibration isolation system for hydraulic hybrid vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, The; Elahinia, Mohammad; Olson, Walter W.; Fontaine, Paul

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents the results of vibration isolation analysis for the pump/motor component of hydraulic hybrid vehicles (HHVs). The HHVs are designed to combine gasoline/diesel engine and hydraulic power in order to improve the fuel efficiency and reduce the pollution. Electric hybrid technology is being applied to passenger cars with small and medium engines to improve the fuel economy. However, for heavy duty vehicles such as large SUVs, trucks, and buses, which require more power, the hydraulic hybridization is a more efficient choice. In function, the hydraulic hybrid subsystem improves the fuel efficiency of the vehicle by recovering some of the energy that is otherwise wasted in friction brakes. Since the operation of the main component of HHVs involves with rotating parts and moving fluid, noise and vibration are an issue that affects both passengers (ride comfort) as well as surrounding people (drive-by noise). This study looks into the possibility of reducing the transmitted noise and vibration from the hydraulic subsystem to the vehicle's chassis by using magnetorheological (MR) fluid mounts. To this end, the hydraulic subsystem is modeled as a six degree of freedom (6-DOF) rigid body. A 6-DOF isolation system, consisting of five mounts connected to the pump/motor at five different locations, is modeled and simulated. The mounts are designed by combining regular elastomer components with MR fluids. In the simulation, the real loading and working conditions of the hydraulic subsystem are considered and the effects of both shock and vibration are analyzed. The transmissibility of the isolation system is monitored in a wide range of frequencies. The geometry of the isolation system is considered in order to sustain the weight of the hydraulic system without affecting the design of the chassis and the effectiveness of the vibration isolating ability. The simulation results shows reduction in the transmitted vibration force for different working cycles of

  7. Layered clustering multi-fault diagnosis for hydraulic piston pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jun; Wang, Shaoping; Zhang, Haiyan

    2013-04-01

    Efficient diagnosis is very important for improving reliability and performance of aircraft hydraulic piston pump, and it is one of the key technologies in prognostic and health management system. In practice, due to harsh working environment and heavy working loads, multiple faults of an aircraft hydraulic pump may occur simultaneously after long time operations. However, most existing diagnosis methods can only distinguish pump faults that occur individually. Therefore, new method needs to be developed to realize effective diagnosis of simultaneous multiple faults on aircraft hydraulic pump. In this paper, a new method based on the layered clustering algorithm is proposed to diagnose multiple faults of an aircraft hydraulic pump that occur simultaneously. The intensive failure mechanism analyses of the five main types of faults are carried out, and based on these analyses the optimal combination and layout of diagnostic sensors is attained. The three layered diagnosis reasoning engine is designed according to the faults' risk priority number and the characteristics of different fault feature extraction methods. The most serious failures are first distinguished with the individual signal processing. To the desultory faults, i.e., swash plate eccentricity and incremental clearance increases between piston and slipper, the clustering diagnosis algorithm based on the statistical average relative power difference (ARPD) is proposed. By effectively enhancing the fault features of these two faults, the ARPDs calculated from vibration signals are employed to complete the hypothesis testing. The ARPDs of the different faults follow different probability distributions. Compared with the classical fast Fourier transform-based spectrum diagnosis method, the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can diagnose the multiple faults, which occur synchronously, with higher precision and reliability.

  8. Smart magnetic markers use in hydraulic fracturing.

    PubMed

    Zawadzki, Jarosław; Bogacki, Jan

    2016-11-01

    One of the main challenges and unknowns during shale gas exploration is to assess the range and efficiency of hydraulic fracturing. It is also essential to assess the distribution of proppant, which keeps the fracture pathways open. Solving these problems may considerably increase the efficiency of the shale gas extraction. Because of that, the idea of smart magnetic marker, which can be detected when added to fracturing fluid, has been considered for a long time. This study provides overview of the possibilities of magnetic marker application for shale gas extraction. The imaging methods using electromagnetic markers, are considered or developed in two directions. The first possibility is the markers' electromagnetic activity throughout the whole volume of the fracturing fluid. Thus, it can be assumed that the whole fracturing fluid is the marker. Among these type of hydraulic fracturing solutions, ferrofluid could be considered. The second possibility is marker, which is just one of many components of the fracturing fluid. In this case feedstock magnetic materials, ferrites and nanomaterials could be considered. Magnetic properties of magnetite could be too low and ferrofluids' or nanomaterials' price is unacceptably high. Because of that, ferrites, especially ZnMn ferrites seems to be the best material for magnetic marker. Because of the numerous applications in electronics, it is cheap and easily available, although the price is higher, then that of magnetite. The disadvantage of using ferrite, could be too small mechanical strength. It creates an essential need for combining magnetic marker with proppant into magnetic-ceramic composite.

  9. Energy harvesting from hydraulic pressure fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunefare, K. A.; Skow, E. A.; Erturk, A.; Savor, J.; Verma, N.; Cacan, M. R.

    2013-02-01

    State-of-the-art hydraulic hose and piping systems employ integral sensor nodes for structural health monitoring to avoid catastrophic failures. Energy harvesting in hydraulic systems could enable self-powered wireless sensor nodes for applications such as energy-autonomous structural health monitoring and prognosis. Hydraulic systems inherently have a high energy intensity associated with the mean pressure and flow. Accompanying the mean pressure is the dynamic pressure ripple, which is caused by the action of pumps and actuators. Pressure ripple is a deterministic source with a periodic time-domain behavior conducive to energy harvesting. An energy harvester prototype was designed for generating low-power electricity from pressure ripples. The prototype employed an axially-poled off-the-shelf piezoelectric stack. A housing isolated the stack from the hydraulic fluid while maintaining a mechanical coupling allowing for dynamic-pressure-induced deflection of the stack. The prototype exhibited an off-resonance energy harvesting problem since the fundamental resonance of the piezoelectric stack was much higher than the frequency content of the pressure ripple. The prototype was designed to provide a suitable power output for powering sensors with a maximum output of 1.2 mW. This work also presents electromechanical model simulations and experimental characterization of the piezoelectric power output from the pressure ripple in terms of the force transmitted into the harvester.

  10. Computational analysis of hypersonic airbreathing aircraft flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwoyer, Douglas L.; Kumar, Ajay

    1987-01-01

    The general problem of calculating the flow fields associated with hypersonic airbreathing aircraft is presented. Unique aspects of hypersonic aircraft aerodynamics are introduced and their demands on computational fluid dynamics are outlined. Example calculations associated with inlet/forebody integration and hypersonic nozzle design are presented to illustrate the nature of the problems considered.

  11. Hydraulic Fracturing and the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayatollahy Tafti, T.; Aminzadeh, F.; Jafarpour, B.; de Barros, F.

    2013-12-01

    In this presentation, we highlight two key environmental concerns of hydraulic fracturing (HF), namely induced seismicity and groundwater contamination (GC). We examine the induced seismicity (IS) associated with different subsurface fluid injection and production (SFIP) operations and the key operational parameters of SFIP impacting it. In addition we review the key potential sources for possible water contamination. Both in the case of IS and GC we propose modeling and data analysis methods to quantify the risk factors to be used for monitoring and risk reduction. SFIP include presents a risk in hydraulic fracturing, waste water injection, enhanced oil recovery as well as geothermal energy operations. Although a recent report (NRC 2012) documents that HF is not responsible for most of the induced seismicities, we primarily focus on HF here. We look into vaious operational parameters such as volume and rate of water injection, the direction of the well versus the natural fracture network, the depth of the target and the local stress field and fault system, as well as other geological features. The latter would determine the potential for triggering tectonic related events by small induced seismicity events. We provide the building blocks for IS risk assessment and monitoring. The system we propose will involve adequate layers of complexity based on mapped seismic attributes as well as results from ANN and probabilistic predictive modeling workflows. This leads to a set of guidelines which further defines 'safe operating conditions' and 'safe operating zones' which will be a valuable reference for future SFIP operations. We also illustrate how HF can lead to groundwater aquifer contamination. The source of aquifer contamination can be the hydrocarbon gas or the chemicals used in the injected liquid in the formation. We explore possible pathways of contamination within and discuss the likelihood of contamination from each source. Many of the chemical compounds used

  12. High bulk modulus of ionic liquid and effects on performance of hydraulic system.

    PubMed

    Kambic, Milan; Kalb, Roland; Tasner, Tadej; Lovrec, Darko

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years ionic liquids have gained in importance, causing a growing number of scientists and engineers to investigate possible applications for these liquids because of their unique physical and chemical properties. Their outstanding advantages such as nonflammable liquid within a broad liquid range, high thermal, mechanical, and chemical stabilities, low solubility for gases, attractive tribological properties (lubrication), and very low compressibility, and so forth, make them more interesting for applications in mechanical engineering, offering great potential for new innovative processes, and also as a novel hydraulic fluid. This paper focuses on the outstanding compressibility properties of ionic liquid EMIM-EtSO4, a very important physical chemically property when IL is used as a hydraulic fluid. This very low compressibility (respectively, very high Bulk modulus), compared to the classical hydraulic mineral oils or the non-flammable HFDU type of hydraulic fluids, opens up new possibilities regarding its usage within hydraulic systems with increased dynamics, respectively, systems' dynamic responses.

  13. High Bulk Modulus of Ionic Liquid and Effects on Performance of Hydraulic System

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Roland; Tasner, Tadej

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years ionic liquids have gained in importance, causing a growing number of scientists and engineers to investigate possible applications for these liquids because of their unique physical and chemical properties. Their outstanding advantages such as nonflammable liquid within a broad liquid range, high thermal, mechanical, and chemical stabilities, low solubility for gases, attractive tribological properties (lubrication), and very low compressibility, and so forth, make them more interesting for applications in mechanical engineering, offering great potential for new innovative processes, and also as a novel hydraulic fluid. This paper focuses on the outstanding compressibility properties of ionic liquid EMIM-EtSO4, a very important physical chemically property when IL is used as a hydraulic fluid. This very low compressibility (respectively, very high Bulk modulus), compared to the classical hydraulic mineral oils or the non-flammable HFDU type of hydraulic fluids, opens up new possibilities regarding its usage within hydraulic systems with increased dynamics, respectively, systems' dynamic responses. PMID:24526900

  14. Characterizing hydraulically fractured reservoirs using induced microearthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Fehler, M.

    1991-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a common method employed to increase the production of oil and gas fields. Recently, there has been increased interest in monitoring the microearthquakes induced by hydraulic fracturing as a means of obtaining data to characterize reservoir changeS induced by the injection. Two types of microearthquakes have been observed during hydraulic fracturing. Tensile events have been observed and modeled as the parting of the surfaces of a fracture. A majority of the events observed have been shear-slip events, where two sides of a fault plane slip parallel to each other but in opposite directions. The locations of the microearthquakes can be analyzed to determine regions where significant seismic energy was released, which presumably are regions where injected fluid penetrated into the rock along pre-existing fractures or zones of weakness. The spatial patterns in the locations can be analyzed to fine regions where events cluster along planes, which are interpreted to be the dominant fluid flow paths. Imaging methods can also be applied to the travel time and waveform data to obtain direct evidence for the locations of the fractures or fracture zones. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  15. X-15 hydraulic-system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culleton, R J

    1958-01-01

    Despite the exacting requirements and conditions of the X-15 including much higher temperature, high horsepower, and extreme vibration and duty cycles, the hydraulic flight control systems compare favorably, weightwise, with preceding models. Although some items, such as the pumps, are heavier, the total system, excluding actuators, weighs approximately 195 pounds as compared with 196 pounds for the F-107A airplane. Use of the new piggy-back pump, with its low flow during most of the operating time, also permitted a reduction in fluid capacity of the hydraulic reservoirs and the total systems, even though the volume of some of the actuators is quite large. This effected a considerable saving in fluid weight. Complete ground-support equipment is available and this equipment, as well as the airplane systems, contains means for complete 5- to 15- micron filtration under controlled temperature conditions. By use of advanced engineering techniques and extensive laboratory testing, it has been possible to provide a sound, lightweight hydraulic system for this advanced, high-performance airplane. (author)

  16. Feasibility of a Single Common Powertrain Lubricant: Hydraulic System Investigations at Low Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-31

    effects of operation of a hydraulic system when using engine oils that have a higher low temperature viscosity than dedicated hydraulic fluid...General information was first obtained on the effects of high viscosity oil at low temperatures in a hydraulic system. The primary effect was found to...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED vii The current arctic oil has a slightly higher kinematic viscosity than the previous arctic oil and performed marginally

  17. Aircraft Electric Secondary Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Technologies resulted to aircraft power systems and aircraft in which all secondary power is supplied electrically are discussed. A high-voltage dc power generating system for fighter aircraft, permanent magnet motors and generators for aircraft, lightweight transformers, and the installation of electric generators on turbine engines are among the topics discussed.

  18. Osteoblast hydraulic conductivity is regulated by calcitonin and parathyroid hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillsley, M. V.; Frangos, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    It is our hypothesis that osteoblasts play a major role in regulating bone (re)modeling by regulating interstitial fluid (ISF) flow through individual bone compartments. We hypothesize that osteoblasts of the blood-bone membrane lining the bone surfaces are capable of regulating transosseous fluid flow. This regulatory function of the osteoblasts was tested in vitro by culturing a layer of rat calvarial osteoblasts on porous membranes. Such a layer of osteoblasts subjected to 7.3 mm Hg of hydrostatic pressure posed a significant resistance to fluid flow across the cell layer similar in magnitude to the resistance posed by endothelial monolayers in vitro. The hydraulic conductivity, the volumetric fluid flux per unit pressure drop, of the osteoblast layer was altered in response to certain hormones. Hydraulic conductivity decreased approximately 40% in response to 33 nM parathyroid hormone, while it exhibited biphasic behavior in response to calcitonin: increased 40% in response to 100 nM calcitonin and decreased 40% in response to 1000 nM calcitonin. Further, activation of adenylate cyclase by forskolin dramatically increased the hydraulic conductivity, while elevation of intracellular calcium, [Ca2+]i, by the calcium ionophore A23187 initially decreased the hydraulic conductivity at 5 minutes before increasing conductivity by 30 minutes. These results suggest that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and [Ca2+]i may mediate changes in the osteoblast hydraulic conductivity. The increase in hydraulic conductivity in response to 100 nM calcitonin and the decrease in response to PTH suggest that the stimulatory and inhibitory effects on bone formation of calcitonin and parathyroid hormone, respectively, may be due in part to alterations in bone fluid flow.

  19. Experimental investigation of the hydraulic and heat-transfer properties of artificially fractured granite.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jin; Zhu, Yongqiang; Guo, Qinghai; Tan, Long; Zhuang, Yaqin; Liu, Mingliang; Zhang, Canhai; Xiang, Wei; Rohn, Joachim

    2017-01-05

    In this paper, the hydraulic and heat-transfer properties of two sets of artificially fractured granite samples are investigated. First, the morphological information is determined using 3D modelling technology. The area ratio is used to describe the roughness of the fracture surface. Second, the hydraulic properties of fractured granite are tested by exposing samples to different confining pressures and temperatures. The results show that the hydraulic properties of the fractures are affected mainly by the area ratio, with a larger area ratio producing a larger fracture aperture and higher hydraulic conductivity. Both the hydraulic apertureand the hydraulic conductivity decrease with an increase in the confining pressure. Furthermore, the fracture aperture decreases with increasing rock temperature, but the hydraulic conductivity increases owing to a reduction of the viscosity of the fluid flowing through. Finally, the heat-transfer efficiency of the samples under coupled hydro-thermal-mechanical conditions is analysed and discussed.

  20. Experimental investigation of the hydraulic and heat-transfer properties of artificially fractured granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jin; Zhu, Yongqiang; Guo, Qinghai; Tan, Long; Zhuang, Yaqin; Liu, Mingliang; Zhang, Canhai; Xiang, Wei; Rohn, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the hydraulic and heat-transfer properties of two sets of artificially fractured granite samples are investigated. First, the morphological information is determined using 3D modelling technology. The area ratio is used to describe the roughness of the fracture surface. Second, the hydraulic properties of fractured granite are tested by exposing samples to different confining pressures and temperatures. The results show that the hydraulic properties of the fractures are affected mainly by the area ratio, with a larger area ratio producing a larger fracture aperture and higher hydraulic conductivity. Both the hydraulic apertureand the hydraulic conductivity decrease with an increase in the confining pressure. Furthermore, the fracture aperture decreases with increasing rock temperature, but the hydraulic conductivity increases owing to a reduction of the viscosity of the fluid flowing through. Finally, the heat-transfer efficiency of the samples under coupled hydro-thermal-mechanical conditions is analysed and discussed.

  1. An Experimental Investigation into the Effects of the Anisotropy of Shale on Hydraulic Fracture Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chong; He, Jianming; Li, Xiao; Wan, Xiaole; Zheng, Bo

    2017-03-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a key technology in the exploitation of shale gas. Shale formations are a type of typical transverse isotropic material. The mechanisms that generate complex fracture networks during the fracturing process are of vital importance to hydraulic fracturing design. In this article, in order to analyze the effects of the anisotropic characteristics on the propagation of hydraulic fractures in shale formations, a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments were carried out with different stress conditions and injection rates. The effects of the anisotropic structure on the propagation of hydraulic fractures were revealed. The results show that the breakdown pressure increases with an increase in the injection rate of the fracturing fluid. It is suggested that the bedding plane angle of the shale formation has a great influence on the fracturing results. Additionally, as the deviator stress increases, the breakdown pressure decreases. From macroscopic observation of the fractures, different hydraulic fracture morphologies and hydraulic fracture propagation patterns were observed.

  2. Experimental investigation of the hydraulic and heat-transfer properties of artificially fractured granite

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jin; Zhu, Yongqiang; Guo, Qinghai; Tan, Long; Zhuang, Yaqin; Liu, Mingliang; Zhang, Canhai; Xiang, Wei; Rohn, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the hydraulic and heat-transfer properties of two sets of artificially fractured granite samples are investigated. First, the morphological information is determined using 3D modelling technology. The area ratio is used to describe the roughness of the fracture surface. Second, the hydraulic properties of fractured granite are tested by exposing samples to different confining pressures and temperatures. The results show that the hydraulic properties of the fractures are affected mainly by the area ratio, with a larger area ratio producing a larger fracture aperture and higher hydraulic conductivity. Both the hydraulic apertureand the hydraulic conductivity decrease with an increase in the confining pressure. Furthermore, the fracture aperture decreases with increasing rock temperature, but the hydraulic conductivity increases owing to a reduction of the viscosity of the fluid flowing through. Finally, the heat-transfer efficiency of the samples under coupled hydro-thermal-mechanical conditions is analysed and discussed. PMID:28054594

  3. Hydraulic Fracturing: Paving the Way for a Sustainable Future?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiangang; Al-Wadei, Mohammed H.; Kennedy, Rebekah C. M.; Terry, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    With the introduction of hydraulic fracturing technology, the United States has become the largest natural gas producer in the world with a substantial portion of the production coming from shale plays. In this review, we examined current hydraulic fracturing literature including associated wastewater management on quantity and quality of groundwater. We conclude that proper documentation/reporting systems for wastewater discharge and spills need to be enforced at the federal, state, and industrial level. Furthermore, Underground Injection Control (UIC) requirements under SDWA should be extended to hydraulic fracturing operations regardless if diesel fuel is used as a fracturing fluid or not. One of the biggest barriers that hinder the advancement of our knowledge on the hydraulic fracturing process is the lack of transparency of chemicals used in the practice. Federal laws mandating hydraulic companies to disclose fracturing fluid composition and concentration not only to federal and state regulatory agencies but also to health care professionals would encourage this practice. The full disclosure of fracturing chemicals will allow future research to fill knowledge gaps for a better understanding of the impacts of hydraulic fracturing on human health and the environment. PMID:24790614

  4. Hydraulic fracturing: paving the way for a sustainable future?

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiangang; Al-Wadei, Mohammed H; Kennedy, Rebekah C M; Terry, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    With the introduction of hydraulic fracturing technology, the United States has become the largest natural gas producer in the world with a substantial portion of the production coming from shale plays. In this review, we examined current hydraulic fracturing literature including associated wastewater management on quantity and quality of groundwater. We conclude that proper documentation/reporting systems for wastewater discharge and spills need to be enforced at the federal, state, and industrial level. Furthermore, Underground Injection Control (UIC) requirements under SDWA should be extended to hydraulic fracturing operations regardless if diesel fuel is used as a fracturing fluid or not. One of the biggest barriers that hinder the advancement of our knowledge on the hydraulic fracturing process is the lack of transparency of chemicals used in the practice. Federal laws mandating hydraulic companies to disclose fracturing fluid composition and concentration not only to federal and state regulatory agencies but also to health care professionals would encourage this practice. The full disclosure of fracturing chemicals will allow future research to fill knowledge gaps for a better understanding of the impacts of hydraulic fracturing on human health and the environment.

  5. CFD for applications to aircraft aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1989-01-01

    Strong interactions of structures and fluids are common in many engineering environments. Such interactions can give rise to physically important phenomena such as those occurring for aircraft due to aeroelasticity. Aeroelasticity can significantly influence the safe performance of aircraft. At present exact methods are available for making aeroelastic computations when flows are in either the linear subsonic or supersonic range. However, for complex flows containing shock waves, vortices and flow separations, computational methods are still under development. Several phenomena that can be dangerous and limit the performance of an aircraft occur due to the interaction of these complex flows with flexible aircraft components such as wings. For example, aircraft with highly swept wings experience vortex induced aeroelastic oscillations. Correct understanding of these complex aeroelastic phenomena requires direct coupling of fluids and structural equations. Here, a summary is presented of the development of such coupled methods and applications to aeroelasticity since about 1978 to present. The successful use of the transonic small perturbation theory (TSP) coupled with structures is discussed. This served as a major stepping stone for the current stage of aeroelasticity using computational fluid dynamics. The need for the use of more exact Euler/Navier-Stokes (ENS) equations for aeroelastic problems is explained. The current development of unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic procedures based on the ENS equations are discussed. Aeroelastic results computed using both TSP and ENS equations are discussed.

  6. Hydraulically interconnected vehicle suspension: background and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nong; Smith, Wade A.; Jeyakumaran, Jeku

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for the frequency domain analysis of a vehicle fitted with a general hydraulically interconnected suspension (HIS) system. Ideally, interconnected suspensions have the capability, unique among passive systems, to provide stiffness and damping characteristics dependent on the all-wheel suspension mode in operation. A basic, lumped-mass, four-degree-of-freedom half-car model is used to illustrate the proposed methodology. The mechanical-fluid boundary condition in the double-acting cylinders is modelled as an external force on the mechanical system and a moving boundary on the fluid system. The fluid system itself is modelled using the hydraulic impedance method, in which the relationships between the dynamic fluid states, i.e. pressures and flows, at the extremities of a single fluid circuit are determined by the transfer matrix method. A set of coupled, frequency-dependent equations, which govern the dynamics of the integrated half-car system, are then derived and the application of these equations to both free and forced vibration analysis is explained. The fluid system impedance matrix for the two general wheel-pair interconnection types-anti-synchronous and anti-oppositional-is also given. To further outline the application of the proposed methodology, the paper finishes with an example using a typical anti-roll HIS system. The integrated half-car system's free vibration solutions and frequency response functions are then obtained and discussed in some detail. The presented approach provides a scientific basis for investigating the dynamic characteristics of HIS-equipped vehicles, and the results offer further confirmation that interconnected suspension schemes can provide, at least to some extent, individual control of modal stiffness and damping characteristics.

  7. Engine having a high pressure hydraulic system and low pressure lubricating system

    DOEpatents

    Bartley, Bradley E.; Blass, James R.; Gibson, Dennis H.

    2000-01-01

    An engine includes a high pressure hydraulic system having a high pressure pump and at least one hydraulically-actuated device attached to an engine housing. A low pressure engine lubricating system is attached to the engine housing and includes a circulation conduit fluidly connected to an outlet from the high pressure pump.

  8. Investigation of Pressure Surges in Aircraft Hydraulic Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1952-03-01

    RESTRICTED Figure 2 TEST APPARATUS FOR CLOSED-END TUBE SYSTEM TESTS , r WADC TR52-37 10 SECURITY INFORMATION-RESTRICTED SECURITY INFORMATION -R ESTR ICTED...simplified circuitto--decrease the labor involved in circuit solutions by manual calculation. The circuit developed for the basic accumulator, valve

  9. Long Life Elastomeric Aircraft Hydraulic Seals. Part I2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-01

    extruded material would be too small to cause an unacceptable reduction or deformation of the plastic back-up rinp /s cross section. The extrusion was to...reduce the imbalanced force causing the lateral shift of the cast-iron back-up ring. A small indentation which the intermediate rinp would cause

  10. Design and flight test of the Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) flight control system on the NASA F-15 test aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Edward A.; Urnes, James M., Sr.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the design, development and flight testing of the Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) flight control system performed at McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA), St. Louis, Missouri and at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards Air Force Base, California. This research and development program was conducted by MDA and directed by NASA through the Dryden Flight Research Facility for the period beginning January 1991 and ending December 1993. A propulsion steering backup to the aircraft conventional flight control system has been developed and flight demonstrated on a NASA F-15 test aircraft. The Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) flight system utilizes collective and differential thrust changes to steer an aircraft that experiences partial or complete failure of the hydraulically actuated control surfaces. The PCA flight control research has shown that propulsion steering is a viable backup flight control mode and can assist the pilot in safe landing recovery of a fighter aircraft that has damage to or loss of the flight control surfaces. NASA, USAF and Navy evaluation test pilots stated that the F-15 PCA design provided the control necessary to land the aircraft. Moreover, the feasibility study showed that PCA technology can be directly applied to transport aircraft and provide a major improvement in the survivability of passengers and crew of controls damaged aircraft.

  11. Water Treatment Technology - Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on hydraulics provides instructional materials for three competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: head loss in pipes in series, function loss in…

  12. High Speed Strain Measurements Surrounding Hydraulic Fracture in Brittle Hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Will; Rubinstein, Shmuel

    2015-11-01

    Hydraulic fractures of oil and gas shales occur miles underground, below complex, layered rocks, making measurements of their dynamics, extent, or structure difficult to impossible. Rocks are heterogeneous at a wide range of length scales, and investigating how these non-uniformities affect the propagation and extent of fractures is vital to improving both the safety and efficiency of hydraulic fracturing operations. To study these effects we have developed a model system using brittle, heavily cross-linked hydrogels that we can fracture with fluids and observe with a fast camera. By embedding tracer particles within the gel and using laser sheet microscopy, we obtain three dimensional stress and strain maps of the zone surrounding a hydraulic fracture tip. Gels can also be set in layers or interfaces with tunable strengths or with designed heterogeneities, allowing us to understand the fundamental science of hydraulic fractures and investigate the dynamics of controllably complex materials.

  13. Cradle modification for hydraulic ram

    SciTech Connect

    Koons, B.M.

    1995-03-02

    The analysis of the cradle hydraulic system considers stress, weld strength, and hydraulic forces required to lift and support the cradle/pump assembly. The stress and weld strength of the cradle modifications is evaluated to ensure that they meet the requirements of the American Institute for Steel Construction (AISC 1989). The hydraulic forces are evaluated to ensure that the hydraulic system is capable of rotating the cradle and pump assembly to the vertical position (between 70{degrees} and 90{degrees}).

  14. Simulation Packages Expand Aircraft Design Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    In 2001, NASA released a new approach to computational fluid dynamics that allows users to perform automated analysis on complex vehicle designs. In 2010, Palo Alto, California-based Desktop Aeronautics acquired a license from Ames Research Center to sell the technology. Today, the product assists organizations in the design of subsonic aircraft, space planes, spacecraft, and high speed commercial jets.

  15. HYDRAULIC AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF MCU SALTSTONE

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K; Mark Phifer, M

    2008-03-19

    The Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF), located in the Z-Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), is used for the disposal of low-level radioactive salt solution. The SDF currently contains two vaults: Vault 1 (6 cells) and Vault 4 (12 cells). Additional disposal cells are currently in the design phase. The individual cells of the saltstone facility are filled with saltstone., Saltstone is produced by mixing the low-level radioactive salt solution, with blast furnace slag, fly ash, and cement or lime to form a dense, micro-porous, monolithic, low-level radioactive waste form. The saltstone is pumped into the disposal cells where it subsequently solidifies. Significant effort has been undertaken to accurately model the movement of water and contaminants through the facility. Key to this effort is an accurate understanding of the hydraulic and physical properties of the solidified saltstone. To date, limited testing has been conducted to characterize the saltstone. The primary focus of this task was to estimate the hydraulic and physical properties of MCU (Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit) saltstone relative to two permeating fluids. These fluids included simulated groundwater equilibrated with vault concrete and simulated saltstone pore fluid. Samples of the MCU saltstone were prepared by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and allowed to cure for twenty eight days prior to testing. These samples included two three-inch diameter by six inch long mold samples and three one-inch diameter by twelve inch long mold samples.

  16. Low-power microfluidic electro-hydraulic pump (EHP).

    PubMed

    Lui, Clarissa; Stelick, Scott; Cady, Nathaniel; Batt, Carl

    2010-01-07

    Low-power electrolysis-based microfluidic pumps utilizing the principle of hydraulics, integrated with microfluidic channels in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates, are presented. The electro-hydraulic pumps (EHPs), consisting of electrolytic, hydraulic and fluidic chambers, were investigated using two types of electrodes: stainless steel for larger volumes and annealed gold electrodes for smaller-scale devices. Using a hydraulic fluid chamber and a thin flexible PDMS membrane, this novel prototype successfully separates the reagent fluid from the electrolytic fluid, which is particularly important for biological and chemical applications. The hydraulic advantage of the EHP device arises from the precise control of flow rate by changing the electrolytic pressure generated, independent of the volume of the reagent chamber, mimicking the function of a hydraulic press. Since the reservoirs are pre-filled with reagents and sealed prior to testing, external fluid coupling is minimized. The stainless steel electrode EHPs were manufactured with varying chamber volume ratios (1 : 1 to 1 : 3) as a proof-of-concept, and exhibited flow rates of 1.25 to 30 microl/min with electrolysis-based actuation at 2.5 to 10 V(DC). The miniaturized gold electrode EHPs were manufactured with 3 mm diameters and 1 : 1 chamber volume ratios, and produced flow rates of 1.24 to 7.00 microl/min at 2.5 to 10 V(AC), with a higher maximum sustained pressure of 343 KPa, suggesting greater device robustness using methods compatible with microfabrication. The proposed technology is low-cost, low-power and disposable, with a high level of reproducibility, allowing for ease of fabrication and integration into existing microfluidic lab-on-a-chip and analysis systems.

  17. Nonclassical Flight Control for Unhealthy Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ping

    1997-01-01

    This research set out to investigate flight control of aircraft which has sustained damage in regular flight control effectors, due to jammed control surfaces or complete loss of hydraulic power. It is recognized that in such an extremely difficult situation unconventional measures may need to be taken to regain control and stability of the aircraft. Propulsion controlled aircraft (PCA) concept, initiated at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. represents a ground-breaking effort in this direction. In this approach, the engine is used as the only flight control effector in the rare event of complete loss of normal flight control system. Studies and flight testing conducted at NASA Dryden have confirmed the feasibility of the PCA concept. During the course of this research (March 98, 1997 to November 30, 1997), a comparative study has been done using the full nonlinear model of an F-18 aircraft. Linear controllers and nonlinear controllers based on a nonlinear predictive control method have been designed for normal flight control system and propulsion controlled aircraft. For the healthy aircraft with normal flight control, the study shows that an appropriately designed linear controller can perform as well as a nonlinear controller. On the other hand. when the normal flight control is lost and the engine is the only available means of flight control, a nonlinear PCA controller can significantly increase the size of the recoverable region in which the stability of the unstable aircraft can be attained by using only thrust modulation. The findings and controller design methods have been summarized in an invited paper entitled.

  18. Fluid-loss control

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, C.W.; Trittipo, B.L. ); Hutchinson, B.H. )

    1989-08-01

    Acid fluid loss is extremely difficult to control and is generally considered to be the major factor limiting the effectiveness of acid fracturing treatments. Chemical erosion of fracture faces and the development of wormholes are largely responsible for the reduced efficiency of acid fracturing fluids. The creation of acid wormholes increases the effective area from which leakoff occurs, thus reducing the acid hydraulic efficiency. Once wormholes form, most acid fluid loss originates from these wormholes rather than penetrating uniformly into the fracture face. Methods of acid fluid-loss control are discussed and evaluated with an improved fluid-loss test procedure. This procedure uses limestone cores of sufficient length to contain wormhole growth. Studies demonstrate that if wormhole growth can be controlled, acid fluid loss approaches that of nonreactive fluids. An improved acid fracturing fluid having unique rheological characteristics is described. This acid has a low initial viscosity but temporarily becomes extremely viscous during leakoff. This high leakoff viscosity blocks wormhole development and prevents acid entry into natural fractures. After the treatment, spent-acid viscosity declines rapidly to ensure easier cleanup.

  19. Propulsion controlled aircraft computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogan, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A low-cost, easily retrofit Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) system for use on a wide range of commercial and military aircraft consists of an propulsion controlled aircraft computer that reads in aircraft data including aircraft state, pilot commands and other related data, calculates aircraft throttle position for a given maneuver commanded by the pilot, and then displays both current and calculated throttle position on a cockpit display to show the pilot where to move throttles to achieve the commanded maneuver, or is automatically sent digitally to command the engines directly.

  20. Reactivation of a Propped Hydraulic Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvaramini, E.; Garagash, D.

    2014-12-01

    The problem of massive fluid injection into a pre-existing fracture has many applications in petroleum industry including underground liquid waste disposal and waterflooding to increase recovery from a hydrocarbon reservoir. Understanding the conditions leading to the re-activation of pre-existing fractures and ensuing propagation is critical for a successful injection project design, and it may also help to mitigate potential environmental hazards, such as contamination of underground aquifers and induced seismicity. The problem of injection of a low viscosity fluid into a permeable formation can be distinguished from conventional hydraulic fracture by the mechanism of fluid leak-off. In conventional fracturing, high viscosity and cake building properties of injected fluid limit leak-off to a 1-D boundary layer incasing the crack. In the case of injection of low viscosity fluid into a fracture, leak-off and related pore fluid diffusion will take place over wider range of scales, from 1-D to 2 or 3-D. We consider a pre-existing stationary propped hydraulic fracture with constrained height into which a fluid is injected under constant flow rate. Although the net effective stress on the crack is initially compressive, the proppant keeps the crack open. It is worthwhile to note that during injection and related pressurization of a propped crack, the fracture breakdown is to be achieved prior to the fracture re-opening. Therefore, the effect of the change of the propped fracture storage on the pressurization dynamics can be neglected. The objective of this work is to study the transient pressurization and the onset of the propagation for a propped fracture. To the end, we formulate and solve a general problem of injection into a fracture accounting for viscous dissipation (i.e. non-uniform pressure distribution). We quantify how the fracture breakdown condition depends upon the rock and fluid properties, the in-situ stress and the fluid injection rate. We also

  1. Alternative aircraft anti-icing formulations with reduced aquatic toxicity and biochemical oxygen demand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gold, Harris; Joback, Kevin; Geis, Steven; Bowman, George; Mericas, Dean; Corsi, Steven R.; Ferguson, Lee

    2010-01-01

    The current research was conducted to identify alternative aircraft and pavement deicer and anti-icer formulations with improved environmental characteristics compared to currently used commercial products (2007). The environmental characteristics of primary concern are the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and aquatic toxicity of the fully formulated products. Except when the distinction among products is necessary for clarity, “deicer” will refer to aircraft-deicing fluids (ADFs), aircraft anti-icing fluids (AAFs), and pavementdeicing materials (PDMs).

  2. Hydraulic manipulator research at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F.; Love, L.J.

    1997-03-01

    Recently, task requirements have dictated that manipulator payload capacity increase to accommodate greater payloads, greater manipulator length, and larger environmental interaction forces. General tasks such as waste storage tank cleanup and facility dismantlement and decommissioning require manipulator life capacities in the range of hundreds of pounds rather than tens of pounds. To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned once again to hydraulics as a means of actuation. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem), sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a history of projects that incorporate hydraulics technology, including mobile robots, teleoperated manipulators, and full-scale construction equipment. In addition, to support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators, ORNL has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The purpose of this article is to describe the past hydraulic manipulator developments and current hydraulic manipulator research capabilities at ORNL. Included are example experimental results from ORNL`s flexible/prismatic test stand.

  3. Micromechanical Aspects of Hydraulic Fracturing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-torres, S. A.; Behraftar, S.; Scheuermann, A.; Li, L.; Williams, D.

    2014-12-01

    A micromechanical model is developed to simulate the hydraulic fracturing process. The model comprises two key components. Firstly, the solid matrix, assumed as a rock mass with pre-fabricated cracks, is represented by an array of bonded particles simulated by the Discrete Element Model (DEM)[1]. The interaction is ruled by the spheropolyhedra method, which was introduced by the authors previously and has been shown to realistically represent many of the features found in fracturing and communition processes. The second component is the fluid, which is modelled by the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM). It was recently coupled with the spheropolyhedra by the authors and validated. An advantage of this coupled LBM-DEM model is the control of many of the parameters of the fracturing fluid, such as its viscosity and the injection rate. To the best of the authors' knowledge this is the first application of such a coupled scheme for studying hydraulic fracturing[2]. In this first implementation, results are presented for a two-dimensional situation. Fig. 1 shows one snapshot of the LBM-DEM coupled simulation for the hydraulic fracturing where the elements with broken bonds can be identified and the fracture geometry quantified. The simulation involves a variation of the underground stress, particularly the difference between the two principal components of the stress tensor, to explore the effect on the fracture path. A second study focuses on the fluid viscosity to examine the effect of the time scales of different injection plans on the fracture geometry. The developed tool and the presented results have important implications for future studies of the hydraulic fracturing process and technology. references 1. Galindo-Torres, S.A., et al., Breaking processes in three-dimensional bonded granular materials with general shapes. Computer Physics Communications, 2012. 183(2): p. 266-277. 2. Galindo-Torres, S.A., A coupled Discrete Element Lattice Boltzmann Method for the

  4. Fluid Power, Rate Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, DC.

    Fundamentals of hydraulics and pneumatics are presented in this manual, prepared for regular navy and naval reserve personnel who are seeking advancement to Petty Officer Third Class. The history of applications of compressed fluids is described in connection with physical principles. Selection of types of liquids and gases is discussed with a…

  5. Hydraulically actuated artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meller, M. A.; Tiwari, R.; Wajcs, K. B.; Moses, C.; Reveles, I.; Garcia, E.

    2012-04-01

    Hydraulic Artificial Muscles (HAMs) consisting of a polymer tube constrained by a nylon mesh are presented in this paper. Despite the actuation mechanism being similar to its popular counterpart, which are pneumatically actuated (PAM), HAMs have not been studied in depth. HAMs offer the advantage of compliance, large force to weight ratio, low maintenance, and low cost over traditional hydraulic cylinders. Muscle characterization for isometric and isobaric tests are discussed and compared to PAMs. A model incorporating the effect of mesh angle and friction have also been developed. In addition, differential swelling of the muscle on actuation has also been included in the model. An application of lab fabricated HAMs for a meso-scale robotic system is also presented.

  6. The hydraulic windmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browing, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    An hydraulic windmill is described. It pumps pressurized oil from rotor shaft level to the ground where a motor generator produces electricity. Alternatively, the useful output may be heat. Rotor speed is governed by a flow valve. Over pressure, the result of high wind velocity, rotates the tail to move the rotor blades out-of-the-wind. Loss of oil pressure causes a brake to close as well as to swing the tail to its maximum distance from the rotor plane.

  7. Hydraulic coupling for generating electrical power inside a high-voltage accelerator terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumbar, Edmund; Vermeulen, F. E.; Lawson, R. P. W.

    1985-04-01

    A hydraulic apparatus used to generate electrical power inside a 280-kV ion accelerator terminal is described. In this system, pressurized hydraulic oil flows through insulating hoses, transferring fluid power between ground and the high-voltage terminal. A maximum of 750 W was generated with the present equipment. Leakage current along the hydraulic-fluid lines was recorded as a function of time for an applied voltage of 280 kV. This current initially rose at an average rate of about 8 μA/min, reaching a maximum of about 760 μA within 2 h. Beyond 2 h, leakage current slowly decreased with time.

  8. Roller follower hydraulic tappet

    SciTech Connect

    Buente, S.M.; Clark, D.P.

    1986-08-26

    A hydraulic lash adjusting tappet is described for use in the valve gear of an internal combustion engine comprising: (a) body means having the outer periphery thereof adapted for sliding movement in a bore provided in the engine, the bore of the type supplied by an oil passage communicating therewith; (b) roller follower means rotatably received on one end of the body means, the roller follower means adapted for rolling contact with an engine camshaft; (c) registration surface means adapted for moveable registration thereagainst comprising at least one especially configured surface formed on the body means remote from the follower means and adapted for registration thereagainst for orienting the body means in the bore for ensuring proper alignment of the roller means with the engine camshaft; (d) plunger means, including hydraulic lash adjusting means, the plunger means moveably received in a cavity formed in the body means, the plunger formed to interfit the cavity so as to form a hydraulic pressure chamber and define precision leakdown surfaces.

  9. Apparatus for controlling an engine in a hydraulically driven vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Kitada, T.

    1987-01-27

    An apparatus is described for controlling the internal combustion engine of a hydraulically driven vehicle comprising: a transmission mechanism for transmitting the operation of a fuel control lever to a governor control lever and having a loose spring mechanism with a loose spring therein: a hydraulic decelerator cylinder connected to the transmission mechanism and having a spring and piston therein. The deceleration cylinder spring has a slightly larger spring force than the loose spring in the loose spring mechanism and applies a force absorbing action, in the absence of hydraulic force acting on the piston, to set the governor control lever in its deceleration position when the fuel control lever is moved to its full engine speed position and for moving the governor control lever to its full engine speed position when hydraulic force is applied to the piston; an electromagnetic valve for applying fluid pressure from a control pump driven by the engine to the piston in the decelerator cylinder and releasing the fluid pressure; and an electric circuit including switches operationally associated with levers for operating a hydraulic valve.

  10. Hydraulic and acoustic investigation of sintered glass beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueven, Ibrahim; Luding, Stefan; Steeb, Holger

    2013-06-01

    In the present contribution, we are focussing on the hydraulical and acoustical charcterization of sintered glass beads. For the experiments sintered mono-and weakly polydisperse glass bead samples were applied. Depending on the particle size, degree of particle dispersion and sample treatment during the sintering process, the produced cylindircal samples exhibit different hydraulic and acoustic properties. The more general focus of our research lies on the physical behaviour of oil-water emulsions in porous media by means of combined electromagnetic and acoustic wave propagation. For this purpose, a hydraulic multi-task measuring cell was developed. This cell allows carrying out simple hydraulic permeability and challenging ultrasound experiments in porous materials saturated with Pickering emulsions. In the first phase of our experiments, hydraulical and acoustical measurements of cylindrical sintered glass bead samples were performed in order to determine their intrinsic permeabilities and effective ultrasound velocities. The intrinsic permeability ks, a coupling parameter between the solid matrix and the pore fluid, has a huge influence on wave propagation in fluid-saturated porous media. For the assessment of permeabilities, particle size distributions and porosities of the investigated glass beads were determined.

  11. Hydraulic radial piston pump intake porting arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.T.

    1987-06-16

    This patent describes a hydraulic radial piston pump having a slider block mounted on an eccentric of a rotary shaft in a hydraulic fluid supplied cavity. A piston is mounted in a cylinder disposed radially to the shaft. The piston has a flat working face at one end operating in the cylinder and a flat pad at an opposite end slidably engaged by a flat face of the slider block so as to force the piston outward on a compression stroke on shaft rotation. A yoke retains the piston to the slider block so as to retract the piston inward on an intake stroke on shaft rotation characterized by intake porting means for communicating the cavity with the working end of the piston. It comprises an intake passage extending centrally and axially through the piston from the working end to the pad resulting in an annular face at both piston ends. An elongated intake slot in the face of the slider block extends from a point continuously open to the cavity to a point that opens to the intake passage at the pad end on relative movement of the slider block during the intake stroke to just prior to the compression stroke. The annular faces at the working and pad ends of the piston having substantially equal areas to prevent hydraulic film from developing between the slider block and pad and thereby prevent their separation during compression.

  12. Unmanned aircraft systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unmanned platforms have become increasingly more common in recent years for acquiring remotely sensed data. These aircraft are referred to as Unmanned Airborne Vehicles (UAV), Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA), Remotely Piloted Vehicles (RPV), or Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), the official term used...

  13. Geological evidence for fluid overpressure, hydraulic fracturing and strong heating during maturation and migration of hydrocarbons in Mesozoic rocks of the northern Neuquén Basin, Mendoza Province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanella, Alain; Cobbold, Peter R.; Ruffet, Gilles; Leanza, Hector A.

    2015-10-01

    In the northern Neuquén Basin of Argentina (especially in Mendoza Province), there is strong geological evidence for fluid overpressure in the past. The evidence takes the form of bitumen veins and bedding-parallel veins of fibrous calcite ('beef'). Such veins are widespread in the fold-and-thrust belt of the Malargűe area, where bitumen mining has been active for a century or so. So as to collect information on the development of fluid overpressure in this part of the Neuquén Basin, several old mines were visited and studied in the Malargűe area. Here the bitumen veins have intruded mainly the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous Mendoza Group, but also the Late Cretaceous Neuquén Group. The veins have the forms of bedding-parallel sills or dykes and they are especially thick within anticlines, forming saddle-reefs in several places. Beef veins are also numerous in the Malargűe area. They contain bitumen and therefore seem to have formed at the same time as the bitumen veins. Near many outcrops of bitumen and beef, we have found fine-grained volcanic intrusive bodies. The best examples are from the La Valenciana syncline. According to 39Ar-40Ar dating, these bodies are mainly of Mid-Miocene age. More generally, volcanism, deformation and maturation of source rocks seem to have reached a climax in Miocene times, when the subducting Pacific slab became relatively flat.

  14. Aircraft landing gear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, John A. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Topics presented include the laboratory simulation of landing gear pitch-plane dynamics, a summary of recent aircraft/ground vehicle friction measurement tests, some recent aircraft tire thermal studies, and an evaluation of critical speeds in high-speed aircraft. Also presented are a review of NASA antiskid braking research, titanium matrix composite landing gear development, the current methods and perspective of aircraft flotation analysis, the flow rate and trajectory of water spray produced by an aircraft tire, and spin-up studies of the Space Shuttle Orbiter main gear tire.

  15. Basics of Physical Modeling in Coastal and Hydraulic Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    tsunami wave runup due to edge waves traveling around an island. HYDRAULIC SIMILITUDE: The purpose of hydraulic similitude is to ensure that the...model reproduces the behavior of the prototype as much as possible (Goda 1985; Hughes 1993; Young et al. 1997). This similar behavior includes velocity ...instance, fluid velocity (V) has dimensions of length (L) divided by time (t), so the velocity scale (NV) is given by     / / p p p m L V m m p tm L

  16. 78 FR 21189 - Agency Requests for Approval of a New Information Collection: Motor Vehicle Brake Fluids

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... as packagers of hydraulic system mineral oils. The information to be collected will be used to and/or... performance and design requirements for motor vehicle brake fluids and hydraulic system mineral oils. Section... packagers of hydraulic system mineral oils. The information on the label of a container of motor...

  17. Gas Transfer in Hydraulic Jumps.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    gas transfer based on measurements made in a hydraulic model. 5. Hydraulic jumps are flow phenomena that are part of the energy dissipation design at...gas transfer to energy dissipation. In a hydraulic jump, the energy loss is related to the Froude number of incoming flow. Fig- ures 15, 16, and 17...number in a similar manner for each of the unit discharges tested. As energy dissipation and Froude number in- creased, gas loss increased for a

  18. Small transport aircraft technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    Information on commuter airline trends and aircraft developments is provided to upgrade the preliminary findings of a NASA-formed small transport aircraft technology (STAT) team, established to determine whether the agency's research and development programs could help commuter aircraft manufacturers solve technical problems related to passenger acceptance and use of 19- to 50-passenger aircraft. The results and conclusions of the full set of completed STAT studies are presented. These studies were performed by five airplane manufacturers, five engine manufacturers, and two propeller manufacturers. Those portions of NASA's overall aeronautics research and development programs which are applicable to commuter aircraft design are summarized. Areas of technology that might beneficially be expanded or initiated to aid the US commuter aircraft manufacturers in the evolution of improved aircraft for the market are suggested.

  19. Fireproof Hydraulic Brake System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    UC C C U L 77 L D-R163 542 FIREPROOF HYDRAULIC DRAKE SYSTEN(U) BOEING NILITARY 21𔃾 AIRPLANE CO SEATTLE MA 0 M NULING ET AL. OCT 85 RFURL-TR-85-2072...aFrom reference 2, Appendix A A Table 3.2 bModulus of elasticity = 28,000,000 lb/in 2 CBulk modulus = 16,000 lb/in2 118...a CRT, line printer and other peripheral equipment. Figure C.2 shows the relationships and communication links between the elements within the

  20. Hydraulic mining method

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, Lester H.; Knoke, Gerald S.

    1985-08-20

    A method of hydraulically mining an underground pitched mineral vein comprising drilling a vertical borehole through the earth's lithosphere into the vein and drilling a slant borehole along the footwall of the vein to intersect the vertical borehole. Material is removed from the mineral vein by directing a high pressure water jet thereagainst. The resulting slurry of mineral fragments and water flows along the slant borehole into the lower end of the vertical borehole from where it is pumped upwardly through the vertical borehole to the surface.

  1. [Acidity and temperature effect on the fluorescence characteristics of hydraulic oils and lubricants].

    PubMed

    Deng, Hu; Zhou, Xun; Shang, Li-ping; Zhang, Ze-lin; Wang, Shun-li

    2014-12-01

    By analyzing HyJet V phosphate ester hydraulic oil environmental impacts (oil, etc.) and confounding factors (pH, temperature, etc.), the feasibility was studied for the fluorescence detection of aircraft hydraulic oil leaks. By using the fluorescence spectrophotometer at various acidities and temperatures, the fluorescence properties of HyJet V phosphate ester hydraulic oil, Jet Oil II lubricant and 2197 lubricant were gained. The experimental results are shown as following: The fluorescence peaks of HyJet V phosphate ester hydraulic oil, Jet Oil II lubricant and 2197 lubricant are at 362, 405 and 456 nm, respectively. The impact of temperature on HyJet V phosphate ester hydraulic oil is less effective; Jet Oil II lubricant and 2197 lubricant fluorescence intensity decreases with increasing temperature. When acidity increases, the fluorescence peak of HyJet V phosphate ester hydraulic oil gradient shifts from 370 to 362 nm, and the fluorescence intensity decreases; the fluorescence peak of Jet Oil II lubricant is always 405 nm, while the fluorescence intensity decreases; the fluorescence peak of 2197 lubricant at 456 nm red shifts to 523 nm, and double fluorescence peaks appeare. The results are shown as following: under the influence of the environment and interference factors, the fluorescence characteristics of HyJet V phosphate ester hydraulic oil remain unchanged, and distinguish from Jet Oil II lubricant and 2197 lubricant. Therefore, the experiments indicate that the detection of HyJet V phosphate ester hydraulic oil leak is feasible by using fluorescence method.

  2. Walter C. Williams Research Aircraft Integration Facility (RAIF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA-Dryden Integrated Test Facility (ITF), also known as the Walter C. Williams Research Aircraft Integration Facility (RAIF), provides an environment for conducting efficient and thorough testing of advanced, highly integrated research aircraft. Flight test confidence is greatly enhanced by the ability to qualify interactive aircraft systems in a controlled environment. In the ITF, each element of a flight vehicle can be regulated and monitored in real time as it interacts with the rest of the aircraft systems. Testing in the ITF is accomplished through automated techniques in which the research aircraft is interfaced to a high-fidelity real-time simulation. Electric and hydraulic power are also supplied, allowing all systems except the engines to function as if in flight. The testing process is controlled by an engineering workstation that sets up initial conditions for a test, initiates the test run, monitors its progress, and archives the data generated. The workstation is also capable of analyzing results of individual tests, comparing results of multiple tests, and producing reports. The computers used in the automated aircraft testing process are also capable of operating in a stand-alone mode with a simulation cockpit, complete with its own instruments and controls. Control law development and modification, aerodynamic, propulsion, guidance model qualification, and flight planning -- functions traditionally associated with real-time simulation -- can all be performed in this manner. The Remotely Augmented Vehicles (RAV) function, now located in the ITF, is a mainstay in the research techniques employed at Dryden. This function is used for tests that are too dangerous for direct human involvement or for which computational capacity does not exist onboard a research aircraft. RAV provides the researcher with a ground-based computer that is radio linked to the test aircraft during actual flight. The Ground Vibration Testing (GVT) system, formerly housed

  3. Performance and safety aspects of the XV-15 tilt rotor research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernicke, K. G.

    1977-01-01

    Aircraft performance is presented illustrating the flexibility and capability of the XV-15 to conduct its planned proof-of-concept flight research in the areas of dynamics, stability and control, and aerodynamics. Additionally, the aircraft will demonstrate mission-type performance typical of future operational aircraft. The aircraft design is described and discussed with emphasis on the safety and fail-operate features of the aircraft and its systems. Two or more levels of redundancy are provided in the dc and ac electrical systems, hydraulics, conversion, flaps, landing gear extension, SCAS, and force-feel. RPM is maintained by a hydro-electrical blade pitch governor that consists of a primary and standby governor with a cockpit wheel control for manual backup. The two engines are interconnected for operation on a single engine. In the event of total loss of power, the aircraft can enter autorotation starting from the airplane as well as the helicopter mode of flight.

  4. Modeling of Propagation of Interacting Cracks Under Hydraulic Pressure Gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hai; Mattson, Earl Douglas; Podgorney, Robert Karl

    2015-04-01

    A robust and reliable numerical model for fracture initiation and propagation, which includes the interactions among propagating fractures and the coupling between deformation, fracturing and fluid flow in fracture apertures and in the permeable rock matrix, would be an important tool for developing a better understanding of fracturing behaviors of crystalline brittle rocks driven by thermal and (or) hydraulic pressure gradients. In this paper, we present a physics-based hydraulic fracturing simulator based on coupling a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) for deformation and fracturing with conjugate lattice network flow model for fluid flow in both fractures and porous matrix. Fracturing is represented explicitly by removing broken bonds from the network to represent microcracks. Initiation of new microfractures and growth and coalescence of the microcracks leads to the formation of macroscopic fractures when external and/or internal loads are applied. The coupled DEM-network flow model reproduces realistic growth pattern of hydraulic fractures. In particular, simulation results of perforated horizontal wellbore clearly demonstrate that elastic interactions among multiple propagating fractures, fluid viscosity, strong coupling between fluid pressure fluctuations within fractures and fracturing, and lower length scale heterogeneities, collectively lead to complicated fracturing patterns.

  5. Unsteady flow analysis of a two-phase hydraulic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, N.; Kwak, M.; Lee, W. J.; Moshfeghi, M.; Chang, C.-S.; Kang, N.-W.

    2016-06-01

    Hydraulic couplings are being widely used for torque transmitting between separate shafts. A mechanism for controlling the transmitted torque of a hydraulic system is to change the amount of working fluid inside the system. This paper numerically investigates three-dimensional turbulent flow in a real hydraulic coupling with different ratios of charged working fluid. Working fluid is assumed to be water and the Realizable k-ɛ turbulence model together with the VOF method are used to investigate two-phase flow inside the wheels. Unsteady simulations are conducted using the sliding mesh technique. The primary wheel is rotating at a fixed speed of 1780 rpm and the secondary wheel rotates at different speeds for simulating different speed ratios. Results are investigated for different blade angles, speed ratios and also different water volume fractions, and are presented in the form of flow patterns, fluid average velocity and also torques values. According to the results, blade angle severely affects the velocity vector and the transmitted torque. Also in the partially-filled cases, air is accumulated in the center of the wheel forming a toroidal shape wrapped by water and the transmitted torque sensitively depends on the water volume fraction. In addition, in the fully-filled case the transmitted torque decreases as the speed ration increases and the average velocity associated with lower speed ratios are higher.

  6. Effects of Microneedle Design Parameters on Hydraulic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Hood, R Lyle; Kosoglu, Mehmet A; Parker, Matthew; Rylander, Christopher G

    2011-09-01

    Microneedles have been an expanding medical technology in recent years due to their ability to penetrate tissue and deliver therapy with minimal invasiveness and patient discomfort. Variations in design have allowed for enhanced fluid delivery, biopsy collection, and the measurement of electric potentials. Our novel microneedle design attempts to combine many of these functions into a single length of silica tubing capable of both light and fluid delivery terminating in a sharp tip of less than 100 microns in diameter. This manuscript focuses on the fluid flow aspects of the design, characterizing the contributions to hydraulic resistance from the geometric parameters of the microneedles. Experiments consisted of measuring the volumetric flow rate of de-ionized water at set pressures (ranging from 69-621 kPa) through a relevant range of tubing lengths, needle lengths, and needle tip diameters. Data analysis showed that the silica tubing (~150 micron bore diameter) adhered to within ±5% of the theoretical prediction by Poiseuille's Law describing laminar internal pipe flow at Reynolds numbers less than 700. High hydraulic resistance within the microneedles correlated with decreasing tip diameter. The hydraulic resistance offered by the silica tubing preceding the microneedle taper was approximately 1-2 orders of magnitude less per unit length, but remained the dominating resistance in most experiments as the tubing length was >30 mm. These findings will be incorporated into future design permutations to produce a microneedle capable of both efficient fluid transfer and light delivery.

  7. Estimation of glycol air emissions from aircraft deicing

    SciTech Connect

    McCready, D.

    1998-12-31

    Ethylene glycol (EG) and propylene glycol (PG)-based fluids (collectively referred to as glycol) are recognized as effective in removing and preventing snow and ice contamination on aircraft before take-off. Although much work has been done to develop an understanding of the potential impact of spent fluid run-off to water bodies, little attention has been paid to the potential environmental impact, if any, due to air emissions. In order to determine potential impact from air emissions, it is necessary to develop a protocol for estimating the glycol emissions during deicing operations. This paper presents two approaches for estimating glycol air emissions from aircraft deicing fluids (ADF) and aircraft anti-icing fluids (AAF). The first simple approach is based on emission factors and the quantity of fluid applied. The second approach estimates emissions for a typical deicing event based on site-specific parameters. Sample calculations are presented. The predicted glycol evaporation rates are quite low. Calculated emissions from ethylene glycol-based fluids are lower than emissions from PG-based fluids. The calculated air emissions for a typical event are less than a pound for EG-based fluids. The emission rate from PG-based fluids can be two times greater.

  8. Design, test and model of a hybrid magnetostrictive hydraulic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Anirban; Yoo, Jin-Hyeong; Wereley, Norman M.

    2009-08-01

    The basic operation of hybrid hydraulic actuators involves high frequency bi-directional operation of an active material that is converted to uni-directional motion of hydraulic fluid using valves. A hybrid actuator was developed using magnetostrictive material Terfenol-D as the driving element and hydraulic oil as the working fluid. Two different lengths of Terfenol-D rod, 51 and 102 mm, with the same diameter, 12.7 mm, were used. Tests with no load and with load were carried out to measure the performance for uni-directional motion of the output piston at different pumping frequencies. The maximum no-load flow rates were 24.8 cm3 s-1 and 22.7 cm3 s-1 with the 51 mm and 102 mm long rods respectively, and the peaks were noted around 325 Hz pumping frequency. The blocked force of the actuator was close to 89 N in both cases. A key observation was that, at these high pumping frequencies, the inertial effects of the fluid mass dominate over the viscous effects and the problem becomes unsteady in nature. In this study, we also develop a mathematical model of the hydraulic hybrid actuator in the time domain to show the basic operational principle under varying conditions and to capture phenomena affecting system performance. Governing equations for the pumping piston and output shaft were obtained from force equilibrium considerations, while compressibility of the working fluid was taken into account by incorporating the bulk modulus. Fluid inertia was represented by a lumped parameter approach to the transmission line model, giving rise to strongly coupled ordinary differential equations. The model was then used to calculate the no-load velocities of the actuator at different pumping frequencies and simulation results were compared with experimental data for model validation.

  9. Aircraft and Pavement Deicer and Anti-Icer Forensics: Which Formulations Reach the Receiving Water and What are Their Potential Impacts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To characterize the effects from runoff of aircraft deicer and anti-icer fluid (ADAF) and pavement deicer formulations (PDF) on receiving water, multiple deicing and anti-icing formulations must be considered. ADAF formulations used on aircraft include Type I fluids (deicers) and Type IV fluids (an...

  10. Slip flow coefficient analysis in water hydraulics gear pump for environmental friendly application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, A. A.; Wasbari, F.; Zakaria, M. S.; Ibrahim, M. Q.

    2013-12-01

    Water hydraulics is the sustainable option in developing fluid power systems with environmental friendly approach. Therefore, an investigation on water-based external gear pump application is being conducted, as a low cost solution in the shifting effort of using water, instead of traditional oil hydraulics in fluid power application. As the gear pump is affected by fluid viscosity, an evaluation has been conducted on the slip flow coefficient, in order to understand to what extent the spur gear pump can be used with water-based hydraulic fluid. In this paper, the results of a simulated study of variable-speed fixed displacement gear pump are presented. The slip flow coefficient varies from rotational speed of 250 RPM to 3500 RPM, and provides volumetric efficiency ranges from 9 % to 97% accordingly.

  11. Tractor Hydraulics. A Teaching Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Vocational Instructional Materials, Athens, GA.

    The manual was developed to help provide a better understanding of how and why hydraulic principles serve the purposes of weight reduction, increase of physical effort, and more precise control to machines of all types. The four components that are necessary to have a workable hydraulic system--a reservoir, a pump, a valve, and a motor (cylinder)…

  12. Hydraulics. FOS: Fundamentals of Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John Deere Co., Moline, IL.

    This manual on hydraulics is one of a series of power mechanics texts and visual aids for training in the servicing of agricultural and industrial machinery. Focus is on oil hydraulics. Materials provide basic information and illustrations for use by vocational students and teachers as well as shop servicemen and laymen. The twelve chapters focus…

  13. Variable Geometry Aircraft Pylon Structure and Related Operation Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Parthiv N. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An aircraft control structure can be utilized for purposes of drag management, noise control, or aircraft flight maneuvering. The control structure includes a high pressure engine nozzle, such as a bypass nozzle or a core nozzle of a turbofan engine. The nozzle exhausts a high pressure fluid stream, which can be swirled using a deployable swirl vane architecture. The control structure also includes a variable geometry pylon configured to be coupled between the nozzle and the aircraft. The variable geometry pylon has a moveable pylon section that can be deployed into a deflected state to maintain or alter a swirling fluid stream (when the swirl vane architecture is deployed) for drag management purposes, or to assist in the performance of aircraft flight maneuvers.

  14. Evaluation of all-electric secondary power for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, W. E.; Feiner, L. J.; Flores, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    This report covers a study by Douglas Aircraft Company (DAC) of electrical power systems for advanced transport aircraft based upon an all-electric design concept. The concept would eliminate distributed hydraulic and pneumatic secondary power systems, and feature an expanded secondary electrical power system redesigned to supply power to the loads customarily supplied by hydraulic or pneumatic power. The initial study was based on an advanced 20-kHz electrical power transmission and distribution system, using a system architecture supplied by NASA-Lewis Research Center for twin-engine aircraft with many advanced power conversion concepts. NASA-LeRC later requested DAC to refocus the study on 400-Hz secondary power distribution. Subsequent work was based on a three-engine MD-11 aircraft, selected by DAC as a baseline system design that would provide data for the comparative cost/benefit analysis. The study concluded that the 20-kHz concept produced many expected benefits, and that the all-electric trijet weight savings on hardware redesign would be 2,304 pounds plus a 2.1-percent fuel reduction and resized for a total weight reduction of 11,000 pounds. Cost reductions for a fleet of 800 aircraft in a 15-year production program were estimated at $76.71 million for RDT&E; $2.74 million per aircrat for production; $9.84 million for nonrecurring expenses; $120,000 per aircraft for product support; and $300,000 per aircraft per year for operating and maintenance costs, giving a present value of $1.914 billion saved or a future value of $10.496 billion saved.

  15. Raptors and aircraft

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.G.; Ellis, D.H.; Johnson, T.H.; Glinski, Richard L.; Pendleton, Beth Giron; Moss, Mary Beth; LeFranc, Maurice N.=; Millsap, Brian A.; Hoffman, Stephen W.

    1988-01-01

    Less than 5% of all bird strikes of aircraft are by raptor species, but damage to airframe structure or jet engine dysfunction are likely consequences. Beneficial aircraft-raptor interactions include the use of raptor species to frighten unwanted birds from airport areas and the use of aircraft to census raptor species. Many interactions, however, modify the raptor?s immediate behavior and some may decrease reproduction of sensitive species. Raptors may respond to aircraft stimuli by exhibiting alarm, increased heart rate, flushing or fleeing and occasionally by directly attacking intruding aircraft. To date, most studies reveal that raptor responses to aircraft are brief and do not limit reproduction; however, additional study is needed.

  16. Coarse coal hydraulic transport

    SciTech Connect

    Petry, E.F.

    1982-10-01

    Discusses the development of coarse coal pipeline technology requiring a minimum of product size reduction. Initial concentration on continuous face haulage and later on mainline haulage areas led eventually to the system in operation at Loveridge mine in West Virginia. Key features of the hydraulic transport system (as shown in diagram) include the pump house, vertical hoisting, overland slurry lines, a preparation/ dewatering plant, a continuous miner, a coal crusher/injection vehicle, a flexible hose hauler, a rigid slurry line, a longwall injection station, and a slurry storage/reclaim system. Explains that the system was built primarily to serve a longwall face, but it also handles coal from 2 continuous miners on longwall development work.

  17. Aircraft Survivability. Spring 2009

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Surviving an Aircraft Crash with Airbag Restraintsby Thomas Barth Inflatable restraint solutions have improved the survivability of commercial...Surviving an Aircraft Crash with Airbag Restraints by Thomas Barth Transport Aircraft Interiors The AmSafe Aviation Airbag entered service on commercial...all night.” Keithley also noted that, in his early days at BRL, Walt teamed up with a group of like-minded innovators, including Jim Foulk, Roland

  18. Lightning effects on aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Direct and indirect effects of lightning on aircraft were examined in relation to aircraft design. Specific trends in design leading to more frequent lightning strikes were individually investigated. These trends included the increasing use of miniaturized, solid state components in aircraft electronics and electric power systems. A second trend studied was the increasing use of reinforced plastics and other nonconducting materials in place of aluminum skins, a practice that reduces the electromagnetic shielding furnished by a conductive skin.

  19. Advances in Protective Coatings and Their Application to Ageing Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-04-01

    Materials for the Structure f Aging Aircraft [les Nouveaux Materiaux metalliques pour les structures des aeronefs d’ancienne generation] To order the...corrosion through design, the selection of military and civil aircraft during the last thirty years. Research materials that are resistant to corrosion and...fluid resistance and greater flexibility. New methods of paint stripping and novel processes for the 2.1 Design repair of pre-treatments and metal

  20. Hypersonic aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkamhawi, Hani; Greiner, Tom; Fuerst, Gerry; Luich, Shawn; Stonebraker, Bob; Wray, Todd

    1990-01-01

    A hypersonic aircraft is designed which uses scramjets to accelerate from Mach 6 to Mach 10 and sustain that speed for two minutes. Different propulsion systems were considered and it was decided that the aircraft would use one full scale turbofan-ramjet. Two solid rocket boosters were added to save fuel and help the aircraft pass through the transonic region. After considering aerodynamics, aircraft design, stability and control, cooling systems, mission profile, and landing systems, a conventional aircraft configuration was chosen over that of a waverider. The conventional design was chosen due to its landing characteristics and the relative expense compared to the waverider. Fuel requirements and the integration of the engine systems and their inlets are also taken into consideration in the final design. A hypersonic aircraft was designed which uses scramjets to accelerate from Mach 6 to Mach 10 and sustain that speed for two minutes. Different propulsion systems were considered and a full scale turbofan-ramjet was chosen. Two solid rocket boosters were added to save fuel and help the aircraft pass through the transonic reqion. After the aerodynamics, aircraft design, stability and control, cooling systems, mission profile, landing systems, and their physical interactions were considered, a conventional aircraft configuration was chosen over that of a waverider. The conventional design was chosen due to its landing characteristics and the relative expense compared to the waverider. Fuel requirements and the integration of the engine systems and their inlets were also considered in the designing process.

  1. Structureborne noise in aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevenson, S. A.; Metcalf, V. L.

    1987-01-01

    The amount of noise reaching an aircraft's interior by structureborne paths, when high levels of other noises are present, involves the measurement of transfer functions between vibrating levels on the wing and interior noise. The magnitude of the structureborne noise transfer function is established by exciting the aircraft with an electrodynamic shaker; a second transfer function is measured using the same sensor locations with the aircraft engines operating. Attention is given to the case of a twin-turboprop OV-10A aircraft; the resulting transfer function values at the discrete frequencies corresponding to the propeller blade passage frequency and its first four harmonics are tabulated and illustrated.

  2. Impact of ductility on hydraulic fracturing in shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMinn, Chris; Auton, Lucy

    2016-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a method for extracting natural gas and oil from low-permeability rocks such as shale via the high-pressure injection of fluid into the bulk of the rock. The goal is to initiate and propagate fractures that will provide hydraulic access deeper into the reservoir, enabling gas or oil to be collected from a larger region of the rock. Fracture is the tensile failure of a brittle material upon reaching a threshold tensile stress, but some shales have a high clay content and may yield plastically before fracturing. Plastic deformation is the shear failure of a ductile material, during which stress relaxes through irreversible rearrangements of the particles of the material. Here, we investigate the impact of the ductility of shales on hydraulic fracturing. We first consider a simple, axisymmetric model for radially outward fluid injection from a wellbore into a ductile porous rock. We use this model to show that plastic deformation greatly reduces the maximum tensile stress, and that this maximum stress does not always occur at the wellbore. We then complement these results with laboratory experiments in an analogue system, and with numerical simulations based on the discrete element method (DEM), both of which suggest that ductile failure can indeed dramatically change the resulting deformation pattern. These results imply that hydraulic fracturing may fail in ductile rocks, or that the required injection rate for fracking may be much larger than the rate predicted from models that assume purely elastic mechanical behavior.

  3. Impact of ductility on hydraulic fracturing in shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auton, Lucy; MacMinn, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a method for extracting natural gas and oil from low-permeability rocks such as shale via the injection of fluid at high pressure. This creates fractures in the rock, providing hydraulic access deeper into the reservoir and enabling gas to be collected from a larger region of the rock. Fracture is the tensile failure of a brittle material upon reaching a threshold tensile stress, but some shales have a high clay content and may yield plastically before fracturing. Plastic deformation is the shear failure of a ductile material, during which stress relaxes through irreversible rearrangements of the particles of the material. Here, we investigate the impact of the ductility of shales on hydraulic fracturing. We consider a simple, axisymmetric model for radially outward fluid injection from a wellbore into a ductile porous rock. We solve the model semi-analytically at steady state, and numerically in general. We find that plastic deformation greatly reduces the maximum tensile stress, and that this maximum stress does not always occur at the wellbore. These results imply that hydraulic fracturing may fail in ductile rocks, or that the required injection rate for fracking may be much larger than the rate predicted from purely elastic models.

  4. Aircraft Survivability: Susceptibility Reduction, Summer 2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    established during the Vietnam War. 12 IR Photonic Bandgap Fibers for Missile Defense by Ishwar D . Aggarwal, Lynda E. Busse, Jas S. Sanghera, and L. Brandon...labora- tory (12 years) and at Sikorsky Aircraft (4 years) he was a key contributor and leader in the development and application of survivability...explosive and surrounding air are mod- eled as fluids in an Eulerian domain . The warhead structures, including frag- ments and end caps, are modeled in

  5. Longitudinal dynamics of a perching aircraft concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickenheiser, Adam; Garcia, Ephrahim; Waszak, Martin

    2005-05-01

    This paper introduces a morphing aircraft concept whose purpose is to demonstrate a new bio-inspired flight capability: perching. Perching is a maneuver that utilizes primarily aerodynamics -- as opposed to thrust generation -- to achieve a vertical or short landing. The flight vehicle that will accomplish this is described herein with particular emphasis on its addition levels of actuation beyond the traditional aircraft control surfaces. A computer model of the aircraft is developed in order to predict the changes in applied aerodynamic loads as it morphs and transitions through different flight regimes. The analysis of this model is outlined, including a lifting-line-based analytical technique and a trim and stability analysis. These analytical methods -- compared to panel or computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods -- are considered desirable for the analysis of a large number of vehicle configurations and flight conditions. The longitudinal dynamics of this aircraft are studied, and several interesting results are presented. Of special interest are the changes in vehicle dynamics as the aircraft morphs from a cruise configuration to initiate the perching maneuver. Changes in trim conditions and stability are examined as functions of vehicle geometry. The time response to changes in vehicle configuration is also presented.

  6. 14 CFR 125.123 - Propeller deicing fluid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller deicing fluid. 125.123 Section...,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Special Airworthiness Requirements § 125.123 Propeller deicing fluid. If combustible fluid is used for propeller deicing,...

  7. Design considerations for attaining 250-knot test velocities at the aircraft landing dynamics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, C. E., Jr.; Snyder, R. E.; Taylor, J. T.; Cires, A.; Fitzgerald, A. L.; Armistead, M. F.

    1980-01-01

    Preliminary design studies are presented which consider the important parameters in providing 250 knot test velocities at the Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility. Four major components of this facility are: the hydraulic jet catapult, the test carriage structure, the reaction turning bucket, and the wheels. Using the hydraulic-jet catapult characteristics, a target design point was selected and a carriage structure was sized to meet the required strength requirements. The preliminary design results indicate that to attain 250 knot test velocities for a given hydraulic jet catapult system, a carriage mass of 25,424 kg (56,000 lbm.) cannot be exceeded.

  8. Amniotic fluid

    MedlinePlus

    ... carefully. Removing a sample of the fluid through amniocentesis can provide information about the sex, health, and development of the fetus. Images Amniocentesis Amniotic fluid Polyhydramnios Amniotic fluid References Cunningham FG, ...

  9. Transonics and fighter aircraft: Challenges and opportunities for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Luis R.

    1989-01-01

    The application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to fighter aircraft design and development is discussed. Methodology requirements for the aerodynamic design of fighter aircraft are briefly reviewed. The state-of-the-art of computational methods for transonic flows in the light of these requirements is assessed and the techniques found most adequate for the subject application are identified. Highlights from some proof-of-feasibility Euler and Navier-Stokes computations about a complete fighter aircraft configuration are presented. Finally, critical issues and opportunities for design application of CFD are discussed.

  10. Vehicle having hydraulic and power steering systems using a single high pressure pump

    DOEpatents

    Bartley, Bradley E.; Blass, James R.; Gibson, Dennis H.

    2001-06-22

    A vehicle comprises a plurality of wheels attached to a vehicle housing. Also attached to the vehicle housing is a power steering system, including a fluid flow circuit, which is operably coupled to a number of the wheels. An internal combustion engine attached to the vehicle housing is connected to a hydraulically actuated system that includes a high pressure pump. An outlet of the high pressure pump is in fluid communication with the fluid flow circuit.

  11. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolites.

    PubMed

    Oren, A Hakan; Ozdamar, Tuğçe

    2013-06-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of compacted zeolites were investigated as a function of compaction water content and zeolite particle size. Initially, the compaction characteristics of zeolites were determined. The compaction test results showed that maximum dry unit weight (γ(dmax)) of fine zeolite was greater than that of granular zeolites. The γ(dmax) of compacted zeolites was between 1.01 and 1.17 Mg m(-3) and optimum water content (w(opt)) was between 38% and 53%. Regardless of zeolite particle size, compacted zeolites had low γ(dmax) and high w(opt) when compared with compacted natural soils. Then, hydraulic conductivity tests were run on compacted zeolites. The hydraulic conductivity values were within the range of 2.0 × 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 1.1 × 10(-7) cm s(-1). Hydraulic conductivity of all compacted zeolites decreased almost 50 times as the water content increased. It is noteworthy that hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite was strongly dependent on the zeolite particle size. The hydraulic conductivity decreased almost three orders of magnitude up to 39% fine content; then, it remained almost unchanged beyond 39%. Only one report was found in the literature on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite, which is in agreement with the findings of this study.

  12. Hydraulic pump with in-ground filtration and monitoring capability

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Charles D.; Livingston, Ronald R.; Toole, Jr., William R.

    1996-01-01

    A hydraulically operated pump for in-ground filtering and monitoring of ws or other fluid sources, including a hollow cylindrical pump housing with an inlet and an outlet, filtering devices positioned in the inlet and the outlet, a piston that fits slidably within the pump housing, and an optical cell in fluid communication with the pump housing. A conduit within the piston allows fluid communication between the exterior and one end of the piston. A pair of o-rings form a seal between the inside of the pump housing and the exterior of the piston. A flow valve positioned within the piston inside the conduit allows fluid to flow in a single direction. In operation, fluid enters the pump housing through the inlet, flows through the conduit and towards an end of the pump housing. The piston then makes a downward stroke closing the valve, thus forcing the fluid out from the pump housing into the optical cell, which then takes spectrophotometric measurements of the fluid. A spring helps return the piston back to its starting position, so that a new supply of fluid may enter the pump housing and the downward stroke can begin again. The pump may be used independently of the optical cell, as a sample pump to transport a sample fluid from a source to a container for later analysis.

  13. Hydraulic pump with in-ground filtration and monitoring capability

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, C.D.; Livingston, R.R.; Toole, W.R. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    A hydraulically operated pump is described for in-ground filtering and monitoring of wells or other fluid sources, including a hollow cylindrical pump housing with an inlet and an outlet, filtering devices positioned in the inlet and the outlet, a piston that fits slidably within the pump housing, and an optical cell in fluid communication with the pump housing. A conduit within the piston allows fluid communication between the exterior and one end of the piston. A pair of O-rings form a seal between the inside of the pump housing and the exterior of the piston. A flow valve positioned within the piston inside the conduit allows fluid to flow in a single direction. In operation, fluid enters the pump housing through the inlet, flows through the conduit and towards an end of the pump housing. The piston then makes a downward stroke closing the valve, thus forcing the fluid out from the pump housing into the optical cell, which then takes spectrophotometric measurements of the fluid. A spring helps return the piston back to its starting position, so that a new supply of fluid may enter the pump housing and the downward stroke can begin again. The pump may be used independently of the optical cell, as a sample pump to transport a sample fluid from a source to a container for later analysis.

  14. Hydraulic pump with in-ground filtration and monitoring capability

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, C.D.; Livingston, R.R.; Toole, W.R. Jr.

    1996-10-29

    A hydraulically operated pump is described for in-ground filtering and monitoring of waters or other fluid sources, includes a hollow cylindrical pump housing with an inlet and an outlet, filtering devices positioned in the inlet and the outlet, a piston that fits slidably within the pump housing, and an optical cell in fluid communication with the pump housing. A conduit within the piston allows fluid communication between the exterior and one end of the piston. A pair of o-rings form a seal between the inside of the pump housing and the exterior of the piston. A flow valve positioned within the piston inside the conduit allows fluid to flow in a single direction. In operation, fluid enters the pump housing through the inlet, flows through the conduit and towards an end of the pump housing. The piston then makes a downward stroke closing the valve, thus forcing the fluid out from the pump housing into the optical cell, which then takes spectrophotometric measurements of the fluid. A spring helps return the piston back to its starting position, so that a new supply of fluid may enter the pump housing and the downward stroke can begin again. The pump may be used independently of the optical cell, as a sample pump to transport a sample fluid from a source to a container for later analysis. 5 figs.

  15. General Aviation Aircraft Reliability Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Duane; Turnbull, Andrew; Roelant, Henk A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This reliability study was performed in order to provide the aviation community with an estimate of Complex General Aviation (GA) Aircraft System reliability. To successfully improve the safety and reliability for the next generation of GA aircraft, a study of current GA aircraft attributes was prudent. This was accomplished by benchmarking the reliability of operational Complex GA Aircraft Systems. Specifically, Complex GA Aircraft System reliability was estimated using data obtained from the logbooks of a random sample of the Complex GA Aircraft population.

  16. Advanced geothermal hydraulics model -- Phase 1 final report, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    W. Zheng; J. Fu; W. C. Maurer

    1999-07-01

    An advanced geothermal well hydraulics model (GEODRIL) is being developed to accurately calculate bottom-hole conditions in these hot wells. In Phase 1, real-time monitoring and other improvements were added to GEODRIL. In Phase 2, GEODRIL will be integrated into Marconi's Intelligent Drilling Monitor (IDM) that will use artificial intelligence to detect lost circulation, fluid influxes and other circulation problems in geothermal wells. This software platform has potential for significantly reducing geothermal drilling costs.

  17. Hydraulic forces caused by annular pressure seals in centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iino, T.; Kaneko, H.

    1980-01-01

    The hydraulic forces caused by annular pressure seals were investigated. The measured inlet and exit loss coefficients of the flow through the seals were much smaller than the conventional values. The results indicate that the damping coefficient and the inertia coefficient of the fluid film in the seal are not affected much by the rotational speed or the eccentricity of the rotor, though the stiffness coefficient seemed to be influenced by the eccentricity.

  18. Mathematical modeling of hydraulic fracturing in coal seams

    SciTech Connect

    Olovyanny, A.G.

    2005-02-01

    Hydraulic fracturing of coal seam is considered as a process of development of discontinuities in rock mass elements due to change in hydrogeomechanical situation on filtration of fluid under pressure. Failure is associated with excess of the effective stresses over the rock tension strength. The problem on filtration and failure of massif is solved by the finite-element method using the procedure of fictitious nodal forces.

  19. Hydraulic design of Three Gorges right bank powerhouse turbine for improvement of hydraulic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Q.

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents the hydraulic design of Three Gorges Right Bank Powerhouse turbine for improvement of hydraulic stability. The technical challenges faced in the hydraulic design of the turbine are given. The method of hydraulic design for improving the hydraulic stability and particularly for eliminating the upper part load pressure pulsations is clarified. The final hydraulic design results of Three Gorges Right Bank Powerhouse turbine based on modern hydraulic design techniques are presented.

  20. Hydraulic fracturing in granite under geothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solberg, P.; Lockner, D.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental hydraulic fracturing of granite under geothermal conditions produces tensile fracture at rapid fluid injection rates and shear fracture at slow injection rates and elevated differential stress levels. A sudden burst of acoustic emission activity accompanies tensile fracture formation whereas the acoustic emission rate increases exponentially prior to shear fracture. Temperature does not significantly affect the failure mechanism, and the experimental results have not demonstrated the occurrence of thermal fracturing. A critical result of these experiments is that fluid injection at intermediate rates and elevated differential stress levels increases permeability by more than an order of magnitude without producing macroscopic fractures, and low-level acoustic emission activity occurs simultaneously near the borehole and propagates outward into the specimen with time. Permeability measurements conducted at atmospheric pressure both before and after these experiments show that increased permeability is produced by permanent structural changes in the rock. Although results of this study have not demonstrated the occurrence of thermal fracturing, they suggest that fluid injection at certain rates in situ may markedly increase local permeability. This could prove critical to increasing the efficiency of heat exchange for geothermal energy extraction from hot dry rock. ?? 1980.

  1. Unsaturated hydraulic properties determined from geocentrifuge tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, H.; Mattson, E. D.; Stadler, A. T.

    2003-12-01

    The geocentrifuge is a useful tool for studying flow in unsaturated soil under well-controlled, repeatable conditions. The high-gravity field generated by the geocentrifuge increases the self-weight of pore fluids to produce: (1) very low saturation conditions at high capillary pressures, (2) a wide range of saturation profiles in multi-dimension, and (3) enhanced seepage velocities. Geocentrifuge experiments can be used to generate experimental data to validate mathematical models. However, if an unsaturated flow experiment is performed in the elevated gravity environment of the geocentrifuge, the unsaturated hydraulic properties must first be obtained at the target centrifugal acceleration. This information can be determined from relatively simple, one-dimensional column experiments and will provide the unsaturated hydraulic properties required as input into mathematical models. These one-dimensional column experiments will also provide insight into the influence of gravity on the flow field. In this study, a series of one-dimensional column experiments was performed to obtain the water retention characteristics of a uniform fine sand. Cumulative outflow and temporal changes of capillary pressures were measured during gravity driven drainage. The measured data were used as input data for an inverse analysis using HYDRUS 1-D to obtain unsaturated permeability and saturation-pressure parameters of the tested sand. The geocentrifuge experimental measurements were also compared with data obtained independently from conventional hanging-column tests. The suitability of the centrifuge test method was evaluated by comparing results from the two different experimental methods. In addition, the centrifuge experiments were conducted in different gravity fields to verify the scale similitude of the hydraulic properties in elevated gravity environments.

  2. Review of computational thermal-hydraulic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, R.H.; Keeton, L.W.

    1995-12-31

    Corrosion of heat transfer tubing in nuclear steam generators has been a persistent problem in the power generation industry, assuming many different forms over the years depending on chemistry and operating conditions. Whatever the corrosion mechanism, a fundamental understanding of the process is essential to establish effective management strategies. To gain this fundamental understanding requires an integrated investigative approach that merges technology from many diverse scientific disciplines. An important aspect of an integrated approach is characterization of the corrosive environment at high temperature. This begins with a thorough understanding of local thermal-hydraulic conditions, since they affect deposit formation, chemical concentration, and ultimately corrosion. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can and should play an important role in characterizing the thermal-hydraulic environment and in predicting the consequences of that environment,. The evolution of CFD technology now allows accurate calculation of steam generator thermal-hydraulic conditions and the resulting sludge deposit profiles. Similar calculations are also possible for model boilers, so that tests can be designed to be prototypic of the heat exchanger environment they are supposed to simulate. This paper illustrates the utility of CFD technology by way of examples in each of these two areas. This technology can be further extended to produce more detailed local calculations of the chemical environment in support plate crevices, beneath thick deposits on tubes, and deep in tubesheet sludge piles. Knowledge of this local chemical environment will provide the foundation for development of mechanistic corrosion models, which can be used to optimize inspection and cleaning schedules and focus the search for a viable fix.

  3. The evolution of an applied hydraulic fracture project, Frontier Formation Moxa Arch, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Harkrider, J.D.; Aud, W.W.; Cipolla, C.L.; Hansen, J.T.

    1994-12-31

    This paper demonstrates a methodical approach in the implementation of current hydraulic fracturing technologies. Specific examples illustrating the evolution of a consistent reservoir/hydraulic fracturing interpretation are presented in a case history of three GRI-Industry Technology Transfer wells. Detailed modeling of these project wells provided an overall reservoir and hydraulic fracture description that was consistent with respect to all observations. Based on identification of the fracturing mechanisms occurring, the second and third project wells show the capabilities of real-time diagnostics in the implementation of hydraulic fracture treatments. By optimizing the pad volume and fluid integrity to avoid premature screenouts, significant cost savings and improved proppant placement were achieved. The production and pressure build-up response in the first project well verifies the overall interpretation of the reservoir/hydraulic fracture model and provides the basis for eliminating the use of moderate strength/higher cost proppant over sand in low permeability/higher closure stress environments.

  4. Alluvial channel hydraulics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackers, Peter

    1988-07-01

    The development and utilisation of water resources for irrigation, hydropower and public supply can be severely affected by sediment. Where there is a mature and well vegetated landscape, sediment problems may be relatively minor; but where slopes are steep and vegetation sparse, the yield of sediment from the catchment gives high concentrations in the rivers. In utilising these resources, for whatever purpose, an understanding of the hydraulics of alluvial channels is vital. The regime of any conveyance channel in alluvium depends on the interrelationships of sediment transport, channel resistance and bank stability. The regime concept was originally based on empirical relations obtained from observations from canal systems in the Indian subcontinent, and for many years was surrounded by a certain degree of mystique and much scepticism from academics. In more recent years the unabashed empiricism of the original method has been replaced by process-based methods, which have also served as broad confirmation of the classic regime formulae, including their extension to natural channels and meandering channels. The empirical approach to the hydraulics of alluvial channels has thus been updated by physically based formulae for sediment transport and resistance, though there remains some uncertainty about the third function to complete the definition of slope and geometry. Latest thoughts in this respect are that the channel seeks a natural optimum state. Physical modelling using scaled down representations of rivers and estuaries has been used for almost a century, but it requires the correct simulation of the relevant processes. The coming of a better understanding of the physics of sediment transport and the complexity of alluvial channel roughness leads to the conclusion that only in very restricted circumstances can scale models simulate closely the full-size condition. However, the quantification of these processes has been instrumental in the development of

  5. Cable Tensiometer for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The invention is a cable tensiometer that can be used on aircraft for real-time, in-flight cable tension measurements. The invention can be used on any aircraft cables with high precision. The invention is extremely light-weight, hangs on the cable being tested and uses a dual bending beam design with a high mill-volt output to determine tension.

  6. Lightning protection of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, F. A.; Plumer, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The current knowledge concerning potential lightning effects on aircraft and the means that are available to designers and operators to protect against these effects are summarized. The increased use of nonmetallic materials in the structure of aircraft and the constant trend toward using electronic equipment to handle flight-critical control and navigation functions have served as impetus for this study.

  7. Aircraft landing control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambregts, Antonius A. (Inventor); Hansen, Rolf (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Upon aircraft landing approach, flare path command signals of altitude, vertical velocity and vertical acceleration are generated as functions of aircraft position and velocity with respect to the ground. The command signals are compared with corresponding actual values to generate error signals which are used to control the flight path.

  8. Predicting Aircraft Availability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    ENS- GRP -13-J-2 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio...AFIT-ENS- GRP -13-J-2 PREDICTING AIRCRAFT AVAILABILITY GRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT Presented to the Faculty Department of Operational...APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT-ENS- GRP -13-J-2 PREDICTING AIRCRAFT AVAILABILITY Mark A. Chapa

  9. Tunneling of the blocked wave in a circular hydraulic jump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.

    2017-02-01

    The formation of a circular hydraulic jump in a thin liquid layer involves the creation of a horizon where the incoming wave (surface ripples) is blocked by the fast flowing fluid. That there is a jump at the horizon is due to the viscosity of the fluid which is not relevant for the horizon formation. By using a tunneling formalism developed for the study of the Hawking radiation from black holes, we explicitly show that there will be an exponentially small tunneling of the blocked wave across the horizons as anticipated in studies of "analog gravity".

  10. Hydraulic supports for polishing TMT M3MP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haifei; Qi, Erhui; Cole, Glen; Hu, Haixiang; Luo, Xiao; Ford, Virginia; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-10-01

    For polishing the ultra-thin TMT M3MP, a polishing support system with 18 hydraulic supports (HS) is introduced. This work focuses on the designing and testing of these HSs. Firstly the design concept of HS system is discussed; then mechanical implementation of the HS structure is carried out, with special consideration of fluid cycling, work pressurization and the weight component. Afterward the piping installation and the de-gas process for the working fluid are implemented. Pressurization and stiffness are well checked before system integration for the single HS unit. Finally the support system is integrated for the polishing process.

  11. Effects of cyclic hydraulic pressure on osteocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Zhao, Yan; Cheung, Wing-Yee; Gandhi, Ronak; Wang, Liyun; You, Lidan

    2010-05-01

    Bone is able to adapt its composition and structure in order to suit its mechanical environment. Osteocytes, bone cells embedded in the calcified matrix, are believed to be the mechanosensors and responsible for orchestrating the bone remodeling process. Recent in vitro studies have shown that osteocytes are able to sense and respond to substrate strain and fluid shear. However the capacity of osteocytes to sense cyclic hydraulic pressure (CHP) associated with physiological mechanical loading is not well understood. In this study, we subjected osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells to controlled CHP of 68 kPa at 0.5 Hz, and investigated the effects of CHP on intracellular calcium concentration, cytoskeleton organization, mRNA expression of genes related to bone remodeling, and osteocyte apoptosis. We found that osteocytes were able to sense CHP and respond by increased intracellular calcium concentration, altered microtubule organization, a time-dependent increase in COX-2 mRNA level and RANKL/OPG mRNA ratio, and decreased apoptosis. These findings support the hypothesis that loading induced cyclic hydraulic pressure in bone serves as a mechanical stimulus to osteocytes and may play a role in regulating bone remodeling in vivo.

  12. [Hydraulic fracturing - a hazard for drinking water?].

    PubMed

    Ewers, U; Gordalla, B; Frimmel, F

    2013-11-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (fracking) is a technique used to release and promote the extraction of natural gas (including shale gas, tight gas, and coal bed methane) from deep natural gas deposits. Among the German public there is great concern with regard to the potential environmental impacts of fracking including the contamination of ground water, the most important source of drinking water in Germany. In the present article the risks of ground water contamination through fracking are discussed. Due to the present safety requirements and the obligatory geological and hydrogeological scrutiny of the underground, which has to be performed prior to fracking, the risk of ground water contamination by fracking can be regarded as very low. The toxicity of chemical additives of fracking fluids is discussed. It is recommended that in the future environmental impact assessment and approval of fracs should be performed by the mining authorities in close cooperation with the water authorities. Furthermore, it is recommended that hydraulic fracturing in the future should be accompanied by obligatory ground water monitoring.

  13. Control Reallocation Strategies for Damage Adaptation in Transport Class Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundy-Burlet, Karen; Krishnakumar, K.; Limes, Greg; Bryant, Don

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the feasibility, potential benefits and implementation issues associated with retrofitting a neural-adaptive flight control system (NFCS) to existing transport aircraft, including both cable/hydraulic and fly-by-wire configurations. NFCS uses a neural network based direct adaptive control approach for applying alternate sources of control authority in the presence of damage or failures in order to achieve desired flight control performance. Neural networks are used to provide consistent handling qualities across flight conditions, adapt to changes in aircraft dynamics and to make the controller easy to apply when implemented on different aircraft. Full-motion piloted simulation studies were performed on two different transport models: the Boeing 747-400 and the Boeing C-17. Subjects included NASA, Air Force and commercial airline pilots. Results demonstrate the potential for improving handing qualities and significantly increased survivability rates under various simulated failure conditions.

  14. Why aircraft disinsection?

    PubMed

    Gratz, N G; Steffen, R; Cocksedge, W

    2000-01-01

    A serious problem is posed by the inadvertent transport of live mosquitoes aboard aircraft arriving from tropical countries where vector-borne diseases are endemic. Surveys at international airports have found many instances of live insects, particularly mosquitoes, aboard aircraft arriving from countries where malaria and arboviruses are endemic. In some instances mosquito species have been established in countries in which they have not previously been reported. A serious consequence of the transport of infected mosquitoes aboard aircraft has been the numerous cases of "airport malaria" reported from Europe, North America and elsewhere. There is an important on-going need for the disinsection of aircraft coming from airports in tropical disease endemic areas into nonendemic areas. The methods and materials available for use in aircraft disinsection and the WHO recommendations for their use are described.

  15. Why aircraft disinsection?

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, N. G.; Steffen, R.; Cocksedge, W.

    2000-01-01

    A serious problem is posed by the inadvertent transport of live mosquitoes aboard aircraft arriving from tropical countries where vector-borne diseases are endemic. Surveys at international airports have found many instances of live insects, particularly mosquitoes, aboard aircraft arriving from countries where malaria and arboviruses are endemic. In some instances mosquito species have been established in countries in which they have not previously been reported. A serious consequence of the transport of infected mosquitoes aboard aircraft has been the numerous cases of "airport malaria" reported from Europe, North America and elsewhere. There is an important on-going need for the disinsection of aircraft coming from airports in tropical disease endemic areas into nonendemic areas. The methods and materials available for use in aircraft disinsection and the WHO recommendations for their use are described. PMID:10994283

  16. Aircraft operations management manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA aircraft operations program is a multifaceted, highly diverse entity that directly supports the agency mission in aeronautical research and development, space science and applications, space flight, astronaut readiness training, and related activities through research and development, program support, and mission management aircraft operations flights. Users of the program are interagency, inter-government, international, and the business community. This manual provides guidelines to establish policy for the management of NASA aircraft resources, aircraft operations, and related matters. This policy is an integral part of and must be followed when establishing field installation policy and procedures covering the management of NASA aircraft operations. Each operating location will develop appropriate local procedures that conform with the requirements of this handbook. This manual should be used in conjunction with other governing instructions, handbooks, and manuals.

  17. Hypersonic reconnaissance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulk, Tim; Chiarini, David; Hill, Kevin; Kunszt, Bob; Odgen, Chris; Truong, Bon

    1992-01-01

    A conceptual design of a hypersonic reconnaissance aircraft for the U.S. Navy is discussed. After eighteen weeks of work, a waverider design powered by two augmented turbofans was chosen. The aircraft was designed to be based on an aircraft carrier and to cruise 6,000 nautical miles at Mach 4;80,000 feet and above. As a result the size of the aircraft was only allowed to have a length of eighty feet, fifty-two feet in wingspan, and roughly 2,300 square feet in planform area. Since this is a mainly cruise aircraft, sixty percent of its 100,000 pound take-off weight is JP fuel. At cruise, the highest temperature that it will encounter is roughly 1,100 F, which can be handled through the use of a passive cooling system.

  18. Laboratory Visualization of Hydraulic Fracture Propagation and Interaction with a Network of Preexisting Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, S.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Borglin, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    We present optical visualization experiments of hydraulic fracture propagation within transparent rock-analogue samples containing a network of preexisting fractures. Natural fractures and heterogeneities in rock have a great impact on hydraulic fracture propagation and resulting improvements in reservoir permeability. In recent years, many sophisticated numerical simulations on hydraulic fracturing have been conducted. Laboratory experiments on hydraulic fracturing are often performed with acoustic emission (Micro Earthquake) monitoring, which allows detection and location of fracturing and fracture propagation. However, the detected fractures are not necessarily hydraulically produced fractures which provide permeable pathways connected to the injection (and production) well. The primary objectives of our visualization experiments are (1) to obtain quantitative visual information of hydraulic fracture propagation affected by pre-existing fractures and (2) to distinguish fractures activated by the perturbed stress field away from the injected fluid and hydraulically produced fractures. The obtained data are also used to develop and validate a new numerical modeling technique (TOUGH-RBSN [Rigid-Body-Spring-Network] model) for hydraulic fracturing simulations, which is presented in a companion paper. The experiments are conducted using transparent soda-lime glass cubes (10 cm × 10 cm × 10 cm) containing either (1) 3D laser-engraved artificial fractures and fracture networks or (2) a random network of fractures produced by rapid thermal quenching. The strength (and also the permeability for the latter) of the fractures can be altered to examine their impact on hydraulic fracturing. The cubes are subjected to true-triaxial stress within a polyaxial loading frame, and hydraulic fractures are produced by injecting fluids with a range of viscosity into an analogue borehole drilled in the sample. The visual images of developing fractures are obtained both through a port

  19. Interaction between injection points during hydraulic fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hals, Kjetil M. D.; Berre, Inga

    2012-11-01

    We study the geomechanical stress interaction between two injection points during hydraulic fracturing (hydrofracking) and how this interaction in combination with disorder influences the fracturing process. To this end, we develop an effective continuum model of the hydrofracking of heterogeneous poroelastic media that captures the coupled dynamics of the fluid pressure and the fractured rock matrix and models both the tensile and shear failure of the rock. For injection points that are separated by less than a critical correlation length, our numerical simulations show that the fracturing process around each point is strongly correlated with the position of the neighboring point. The magnitude of the correlation length depends on the degree of heterogeneity of the rock and is on the order of 30-45 m for rocks with low permeabilities. In the strongly correlated regime, we predict a novel effective fracture force that attracts the fractures toward the neighboring injection point.

  20. Hydraulic release oil tool

    SciTech Connect

    Mims, M.G.; Mueller, M.D.; Ehlinger, J.C.

    1992-03-11

    This patent describes a hydraulic release tool. It comprises a setting assembly; a coupling member for coupling to drill string or petroleum production components, the coupling member being a plurality of sockets for receiving the dogs in the extended position and attaching the coupling member the setting assembly; whereby the setting assembly couples to the coupling member by engagement of the dogs in the sockets of releases from and disengages the coupling member in movement of the piston from its setting to its reposition in response to a pressure in the body in exceeding the predetermined pressure; and a relief port from outside the body into its bore and means to prevent communication between the relief port and the bore of the body axially of the piston when the piston is in the setting position and to establish such communication upon movement of the piston from the setting position to the release position and reduce the pressure in the body bore axially of the piston, whereby the reduction of the pressure signals that the tool has released the coupling member.

  1. Diesel Fuels Hydraulic Fracturing (DFHF)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This webpage provides information on how hydraulic fracturing is regulated by the Underground Injection Control Program. It includes information about what owners and operators need to do to be in compliance and guidance for EPA Class II permit writers.

  2. Hydraulic drive system prevents backlash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acord, J. D.

    1965-01-01

    Hydraulic drive system uses a second drive motor operating at reduced torque. This exerts a relative braking action which eliminates the normal gear train backlash that is intolerable when driving certain heavy loads.

  3. 46 CFR 28.880 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydraulic equipment. 28.880 Section 28.880 Shipping... INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.880 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system must be... times the system's maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped with at...

  4. 14 CFR 23.1435 - Hydraulic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hydraulic systems. 23.1435 Section 23.1435... § 23.1435 Hydraulic systems. (a) Design. Each hydraulic system must be designed as follows: (1) Each hydraulic system and its elements must withstand, without yielding, the structural loads expected...

  5. 46 CFR 28.405 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydraulic equipment. 28.405 Section 28.405 Shipping... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.405 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system... than four times the system maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped...

  6. 46 CFR 28.405 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydraulic equipment. 28.405 Section 28.405 Shipping... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.405 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system... than four times the system maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped...

  7. 14 CFR 29.1435 - Hydraulic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hydraulic systems. 29.1435 Section 29.1435... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 29.1435 Hydraulic systems. (a) Design. Each hydraulic system must be designed as follows: (1) Each element of the hydraulic system...

  8. 46 CFR 28.880 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydraulic equipment. 28.880 Section 28.880 Shipping... INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.880 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system must be... times the system's maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped with at...

  9. 46 CFR 28.880 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydraulic equipment. 28.880 Section 28.880 Shipping... INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.880 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system must be... times the system's maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped with at...

  10. 46 CFR 28.405 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydraulic equipment. 28.405 Section 28.405 Shipping... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.405 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system... than four times the system maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped...

  11. 14 CFR 23.1435 - Hydraulic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hydraulic systems. 23.1435 Section 23.1435... § 23.1435 Hydraulic systems. (a) Design. Each hydraulic system must be designed as follows: (1) Each hydraulic system and its elements must withstand, without yielding, the structural loads expected...

  12. 14 CFR 23.1435 - Hydraulic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hydraulic systems. 23.1435 Section 23.1435... § 23.1435 Hydraulic systems. (a) Design. Each hydraulic system must be designed as follows: (1) Each hydraulic system and its elements must withstand, without yielding, the structural loads expected...

  13. 14 CFR 29.1435 - Hydraulic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hydraulic systems. 29.1435 Section 29.1435... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 29.1435 Hydraulic systems. (a) Design. Each hydraulic system must be designed as follows: (1) Each element of the hydraulic system...

  14. 14 CFR 29.1435 - Hydraulic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hydraulic systems. 29.1435 Section 29.1435... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 29.1435 Hydraulic systems. (a) Design. Each hydraulic system must be designed as follows: (1) Each element of the hydraulic system...

  15. Multiplexed hydraulic valve actuation using ionic liquid filled soft channels and Braille displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Wei; Chen, Hao; Tung, Yi-Chung; Meiners, Jens-Christian; Takayama, Shuichi

    2007-01-01

    Pneumatic actuation with multilayer soft lithography enables operation of up to thousands of valves in parallel using far fewer control lines. However, it is dependent on macroscopic switches and external pressure sources that require interconnects and limit portability. The authors present a more portable and multiplexed valve actuation strategy that uses a grid of mechanically actuated Braille pins to hydraulically, rather than pneumatically, deform elastic actuation channels that act as valves. Experimental and theoretical analyses show that the key to reliable operation of the hydraulic system is the use of nonvolatile ionic liquids as the hydraulic fluid.

  16. Determining the distribution of hydraulic conductivity in a fractured limestone aquifer by simultaneous injection and geophysical logging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, R.H.; Hess, A.E.; Paillet, Frederick L.

    1988-01-01

    A field technique for assessing the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity in an aquifer was applied to a fractured carbonate formation in southeastern Nevada. The technique combines the simultaneous use of fluid injection and geophysical logging to measure in situ vertical distributions of fluid velocity and hydraulic head down the borehole; these data subsequently are analyzed to arrive at quantitative estimates of hydraulic conductivity across discrete intervals in the aquifer. The results of this analysis identified the contact margin between the Anchor and Dawn Members of the Monte Cristo Limestone as being the dominant transmissive unit. -from Authors

  17. FOREWORD: 26th IAHR Symposium on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yulin; Wang, Zhengwei; Liu, Shuhong; Yuan, Shouqi; Luo, Xingqi; Wang, Fujun

    2012-11-01

    was molded into a polytechnic institute focusing on engineering in the nationwide restructuring of universities and colleges undertaken in 1952. At present, the university has 14 schools and 56 departments with faculties in science, engineering, humanities, law, medicine, history, philosophy, economics, management, education and art. The University now has over 25 900 students, including 13 100 undergraduates and 12 800 graduate students. As one of China's most renowned universities, Tsinghua has become an important institution for fostering talents and scientific research. The International Association of Hydro-Environment Engineering and Research (IAHR) particularly promotes the advancement and exchange of knowledge through working groups, specialty symposia, congresses, and publications on water resources, river and coastal hydraulics, risk analysis, energy, environment, disaster prevention, and industrial processes. The IAHR Committee on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems deals with the advancement of technology associated with the understanding of steady and unsteady flow characteristics in hydraulic machinery and conduit systems connected to the machinery. The technology elements include the fluid behaviour within machine components, hydro-elastic behaviour of machine components, cavitation and two phase flow in turbines and pumps, hydraulic machine and plant control systems, the use of hydraulic machines to improve water quality, and even considerations to improve fish survival in their passage through hydro plants. The main emphases of the IAHR Committee on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems are to stimulate research and understanding of the technologies associated with hydraulic machinery and to promote interaction between the machine designers, machine users, the academic community, and the community as a whole. Hydraulic machinery is both cost effective and environmentally friendly. The goals of the IAHR Committee on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems are to improve

  18. Cold regions hydrology and hydraulics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, W.L. ); Crissman, R.D. )

    1990-01-01

    This monograph addresses a narrow aspect of cold regions engineering, namely the effects of cold weather on the traditional civil engineering disciplines of hydrology and hydraulics. Hydrologic and hydraulic considerations in the design, construction, and operation of civil works are very important. Many of the problems encountered in the design and construction of buildings, transportation systems, water supply facilities, waste treatment facilities, and hazardous waste disposal facilities, for example are closely tied to the characteristics of the site hydrology.

  19. Production Hydraulic Packer Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Schneller, Tricia; Salas, Jose

    2000-06-30

    In October 1999, the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Halliburton Energy Services cooperated on a field test of Halliburton's new Production Hydraulic Packer technology on Well 46-TPX-10 at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 near Casper, WY. Performance of the packer was evaluated in set and unset operations. The packer's ability to seal the annulus between the casing and tubing was hydraulically tested and the results were recorded.

  20. Advanced Performance Hydraulic Wind Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Bruce, Allan; Lam, Adrienne S.

    2013-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, has developed a novel advanced hydraulic wind energy design, which has up to 23% performance improvement over conventional wind turbine and conventional hydraulic wind energy systems with 5 m/sec winds. It also has significant cost advantages with levelized costs equal to coal (after carbon tax rebate). The design is equally applicable to tidal energy systems and has passed preliminary laboratory proof-of-performance tests, as funded by the Department of Energy.

  1. Hydraulics Graphics Package. Users Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    Engineering Center, Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, as the origin of the program(s). IT, i HGP -3!OO Ju ’ ŕ Dlst! 3pbo.i:, HYDRAULICS GRAPHICS...Davis, California 95616 (916) 551-1748 (FTS) 460-1748 HGP Hydraulics Graphics Package Users Manual TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter Subject Page 1 Introduction...5 2.4 Use of Disk Files ........ ................ 6 3 HGP Free Format User Input 3.1 Command Language Syntax ...... ............. 8 3.2

  2. Electric versus hydraulics versus pneumatics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This book presents a collection of papers from a conference which considered the advantages and disadvantages of electric, hydraulic and pneumatic drives and actuators. The volume follows on the success of the 1983 conference on electric and hydraulic drives. Topics considered include fork lift trucks - an ideal application for regenerative transmissions; a hybrid-electric power system with hydrostatic transmission; electrics and hydraulics on roadheader machinery; hydraulic, electrical, pneumatic control - which way to go. an electrically-powered servo to drive the two axes of a missile launching platform - pros and cons when compared with the traditional hydraulic solution; the encapsulation of a novel intrinsically safe displacement transducer; mobile cryogenic pumping systems; automation of a wood-turning machine, hydraulic or electric. The choice of a servo motor for a specific application; developments in the design and control of pneumatic linear actuators; compressed air purification for instrumentation in the high technology industries; trends in prime mover choice for powered hand tools; and choosing the drive system for the right application.

  3. 14 CFR 25.863 - Flammable fluid fire protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Fire Protection § 25... fluids, including effects of any combustible or absorbing materials. (3) Possible ignition sources..., fireproof containment, or use of extinguishing agents. (5) Ability of airplane components that are...

  4. 14 CFR 25.863 - Flammable fluid fire protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Fire Protection § 25... fluids, including effects of any combustible or absorbing materials. (3) Possible ignition sources..., fireproof containment, or use of extinguishing agents. (5) Ability of airplane components that are...

  5. 14 CFR 25.863 - Flammable fluid fire protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Fire Protection § 25... fluids, including effects of any combustible or absorbing materials. (3) Possible ignition sources..., fireproof containment, or use of extinguishing agents. (5) Ability of airplane components that are...

  6. 14 CFR 25.863 - Flammable fluid fire protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Fire Protection § 25... fluids, including effects of any combustible or absorbing materials. (3) Possible ignition sources..., fireproof containment, or use of extinguishing agents. (5) Ability of airplane components that are...

  7. Mixed-mode Mechanism of Hydraulic Fracture Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurt, R. S.; Germanovich, L.; Wu, R.

    2006-12-01

    Mixed-mode I+III loading is one of the primary causes of fracture front segmentation. Although such segmented fractures have been observed both in nature and laboratory, we are not aware of direct laboratory experiments on the mode III mechanism of segmentation of hydraulically induced fractures. In this work, we developed a laboratory technique and a theoretical model for studying not only the effect of mode III loading on the onset of hydraulic fracture segmentation, but also the effect of segmentation on the subsequent growth of hydraulic fractures. In quasi-brittle materials, even a small mode III component may cause fracture segmentation due to a tensile stress field induced near the fracture front [Rice, 1968]. Previously, this has been confirmed in experiments with non-hydraulic fractures [Knauss, 1970; Cooke and Pollard, 1996]. In one occasion, quasi-hydraulic fractures propagated in fast, uncontrollable manner [Sommer, 1969]. This is why, we focused on controlled hydraulic fractures with a rather small KIII/KI ratio (1-10 %). For mixed mode I+III experiments, we used transparent, cylindrical PMMA samples with circular internal fractures perpendicular to the sample axis. Fracture orientation was controlled by thermoelastic stresses induced in each sample by preheating it before creating a fracture. In order to apply mode III loading to the initial fracture, a constant torque was applied to the specimen while fluid was injected into the fracture at a constant rate to pressurize it and to induce mode I loading. The velocity of fracture propagation was constrained by controlling the rate of fluid injection. In spite of a small magnitude of the mode III component, we observed segmented fracture fronts in all tested samples. The segments had similar dimensions and shape elongated around the perimeter of the initial fracture. When the fractures were further pressurized by injecting additional fluid into the sample, second-order segments developed along the fronts

  8. Subcritical growth of natural hydraulic fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garagash, D.

    2014-12-01

    Joints are the most common example of brittle tensile failure in the crust. Their genesis at depth is linked to the natural hydraulic fracturing, which requires pore fluid pressure in excess of the minimum in situ stress [Pollard and Aidyn, JSG1988]. Depending on the geological setting, high pore pressure can result form burial compaction of interbedded strata, diagenesis, or tectonics. Common to these loading scenarios is slow build-up of pore pressure over a geological timescale, until conditions for initiation of crack growth are met on favorably oriented/sized flaws. The flaws can vary in size from grain-size cracks in igneous rocks to a fossil-size flaws in clastic rock, and once activated, are inferred to propagate mostly subcritically [Segall JGR 1984; Olson JGR 1993]. Despite many observational studies of natural hydraulic fractures, the modeling attempts appear to be few [Renshaw and Harvey JGR 1994]. Here, we use boundary integral formulation for the pore fluid inflow from the permeable rock into a propagating joint [Berchenko et al. IJRMMS 1997] coupled with the criteria for subcritical propagation assisted by the environmental effects of pore fluid at the crack tip to solve for the evolution of a penny-shape joint, which, in interbedded rock, may eventually evolve to short-blade geometry (propagation confined to a bed). Initial growth is exceedingly slow, paced by the stress corrosion reaction kinetics at the crack tip. During this stage the crack is fully-drained (i.e. the fluid pressure in the crack is equilibrated with the ambient pore pressure). This "slow" stage is followed by a rapid acceleration, driven by the increase of the mechanical stress intensity factor with the crack length, towards the terminal joint velocity. We provide an analytical expression for the latter as a function of the rock diffusivity, net pressure loading at the initiation (or flaw lengthscale), and parameters describing resistance to fracture growth. Due to a much slower

  9. Predicting Visibility of Aircraft

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Andrew; Ramirez, Cesar V.; Salud, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Visual detection of aircraft by human observers is an important element of aviation safety. To assess and ensure safety, it would be useful to be able to be able to predict the visibility, to a human observer, of an aircraft of specified size, shape, distance, and coloration. Examples include assuring safe separation among aircraft and between aircraft and unmanned vehicles, design of airport control towers, and efforts to enhance or suppress the visibility of military and rescue vehicles. We have recently developed a simple metric of pattern visibility, the Spatial Standard Observer (SSO). In this report we examine whether the SSO can predict visibility of simulated aircraft images. We constructed a set of aircraft images from three-dimensional computer graphic models, and measured the luminance contrast threshold for each image from three human observers. The data were well predicted by the SSO. Finally, we show how to use the SSO to predict visibility range for aircraft of arbitrary size, shape, distance, and coloration. PMID:19462007

  10. Predicting visibility of aircraft.

    PubMed

    Watson, Andrew; Ramirez, Cesar V; Salud, Ellen

    2009-05-20

    Visual detection of aircraft by human observers is an important element of aviation safety. To assess and ensure safety, it would be useful to be able to be able to predict the visibility, to a human observer, of an aircraft of specified size, shape, distance, and coloration. Examples include assuring safe separation among aircraft and between aircraft and unmanned vehicles, design of airport control towers, and efforts to enhance or suppress the visibility of military and rescue vehicles. We have recently developed a simple metric of pattern visibility, the Spatial Standard Observer (SSO). In this report we examine whether the SSO can predict visibility of simulated aircraft images. We constructed a set of aircraft images from three-dimensional computer graphic models, and measured the luminance contrast threshold for each image from three human observers. The data were well predicted by the SSO. Finally, we show how to use the SSO to predict visibility range for aircraft of arbitrary size, shape, distance, and coloration.

  11. Automated Tetrahedral Mesh Generation for CFD Analysis of Aircraft in Conceptual Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ordaz, Irian; Li, Wu; Campbell, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    The paper introduces an automation process of generating a tetrahedral mesh for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of aircraft configurations in early conceptual design. The method was developed for CFD-based sonic boom analysis of supersonic configurations, but can be applied to aerodynamic analysis of aircraft configurations in any flight regime.

  12. Introduction to the aerodynamics of flight. [including aircraft stability, and hypersonic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talay, T. A.

    1975-01-01

    General concepts of the aerodynamics of flight are discussed. Topics considered include: the atmosphere; fluid flow; subsonic flow effects; transonic flow; supersonic flow; aircraft performance; and stability and control.

  13. Electrokinetic coupling in hydraulic fracture propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuevas, Nestor Herman

    2009-12-01

    Electrokinetic coupling is the most popular mechanism proposed to explain observed electromagnetic signals associated with the hydraulic fracturing of rocks. Measurements in both controlled laboratory and in situ conditions show clear evidence of the phenomenon. However there have been no reports on the description of the source mechanism, its relationship to a propagating crack, nor the electromagnetic field distribution due to such a source advancing through an electrically conductive medium. In this work it is shown that a surface electric current density arising on the walls of a fluid driven propagating crack can explain the measurements of electric streaming potential recorded during hydraulic fracturing experiments. The properties of the streaming current source are studied at the microscopic scale in light of the electrokinetic coupling expected at the outermost grains of the crack's surface. Expressions are derived for the average macroscopic transport equations describing the coupled fluid, and electrical current flow, at the interface between a fluid continuum and a homogeneous porous medium, where a Darcy flow regime (porous medium) competes with a rather Poiseuille type (fracture channels). The properties of the electrokinetic boundary sources are analyzed in light of the average electrical current density arising on the interface, as the fluid electrolyte flows in both the porous media and the adjacent fluid continuum. It is found that two coupling coefficients are required to describe the streaming current density. Indeed the flow is driven by both, a tangential pressure gradient, as well as by forward momentum transfer across the permeable boundary. The coupling coefficients are obtained from the spatial average of the tangential stress exerted on the pore surfaces, and they are found to be position dependent, as the tangential stress transitions from that on the porous conduits, to that on the surface of the outer most grains. Furthermore each

  14. Some fighter aircraft trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, L.

    1985-01-01

    Some basic trends in fighters are traced from the post World II era. Beginning with the first operational jet fighter, the P-80, the characteristics of subsequent fighter aircraft are examined for performance, mission capability, effectiveness, and cost. Characteristics presented include: power loading, wing loading, maximum speed, rate of climb, turn rate, weight and weight distribution, cost and cost distribution. The characteristics of some USSR aircraft are included for comparison. The trends indicate some of the rationale for certain fighter designs and some likely characteristics to be sought in future fighter aircraft designs.

  15. Loftin Collection - Boeing Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1933-01-01

    Either a F2B-1 or F3B-1, both aircraft were built by Boeing and both were powered by Pratt and Whitney Wasp engines. These fighters were intended for Navy shipboard use. Boeing F3B-1: While most Boeing F3B-1s served the U. S. Navy aircraft carriers the Lexington and the Saratoga, this example flew in NACA hands at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in the late 1920's. Also known as the Boeing Model 77, the aircraft was the next to last F3B-1 build in November 1928.

  16. Tropospheric sampling with aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Daum, P.H.; Springston, S.R.

    1991-03-01

    Aircraft constitute a unique environment which places stringent requirements on the instruments used to measure the concentrations of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. Some of these requirements such as minimization of size, weight, and power consumption are general; others are specific to individual techniques. This review presents the basic principles and considerations governing the deployment of trace gas and aerosol instrumentation on an aircraft. An overview of common instruments illustrates these points and provides guidelines for designing and using instruments on aircraft-based measurement programs.

  17. Microwave imaging of aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Bernard D.

    1988-12-01

    Three methods of imaging aircraft from the ground with microwave radar with quality suitable for aircraft target recognition are described. The imaging methods are based on a self-calibration procedure called adaptive beamforming that compensates for the severe geometric distortion inherent in any imaging system that is large enough to achieve the high angular resolution necessary for two-dimensional target imaging. The signal processing algorithm is described and X-band (3-cm)-wavelength experiments demonstrate its success on commercial aircraft flying into Philadelphia International Airport.

  18. Aircraft compass characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John B; Smith, Clyde W

    1937-01-01

    A description of the test methods used at the National Bureau of Standards for determining the characteristics of aircraft compasses is given. The methods described are particularly applicable to compasses in which mineral oil is used as the damping liquid. Data on the viscosity and density of certain mineral oils used in United States Navy aircraft compasses are presented. Characteristics of Navy aircraft compasses IV to IX and some other compasses are shown for the range of temperatures experienced in flight. Results of flight tests are presented. These results indicate that the characteristic most desired in a steering compass is a short period and, in a check compass, a low overswing.

  19. OVRhyp, Scramjet Test Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslan, J.; Bisard, T.; Dallinga, S.; Draper, K.; Hufford, G.; Peters, W.; Rogers, J.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary design for an unmanned hypersonic research vehicle to test scramjet engines is presented. The aircraft will be launched from a carrier aircraft at an altitude of 40,000 feet at Mach 0.8. The vehicle will then accelerate to Mach 6 at an altitude of 100,000 feet. At this stage the prototype scramjet will be employed to accelerate the vehicle to Mach 10 and maintain Mach 10 flight for 2 minutes. The aircraft will then decelerate and safely land.

  20. Testing Aircraft Instruments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-11

    AD-A095 680 ARMY TEST AND EVALUATION COMMAND ABERDEEN PROVING GRO--ETC F/S 1/4 TESTING AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENTS .(U) FEB 81 CLASSIFIED TOP-6-3-013 ML I...Test and Evaluation Command -?Final 7, Ts .to .. eg----- ( -4_ Fia - / + I ORG REPORT STesting Aircraft Instruments , j P I- I. AUTHOR(es) S. CONTRACT...Identify by block number) This document presents information and procedures for testing aircraft flight and systems performance instruments in the functional

  1. Coupling Hydraulic Fracturing Propagation and Gas Well Performance for Simulation of Production in Unconventional Shale Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Winterfeld, P. H.; Wu, Y. S.; Wang, Y.; Chen, D.; Yin, C.; Pan, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing combined with horizontal drilling has made it possible to economically produce natural gas from unconventional shale gas reservoirs. An efficient methodology for evaluating hydraulic fracturing operation parameters, such as fluid and proppant properties, injection rates, and wellhead pressure, is essential for the evaluation and efficient design of these processes. Traditional numerical evaluation and optimization approaches are usually based on simulated fracture properties such as the fracture area. In our opinion, a methodology based on simulated production data is better, because production is the goal of hydraulic fracturing and we can calibrate this approach with production data that is already known. This numerical methodology requires a fully-coupled hydraulic fracture propagation and multi-phase flow model. In this paper, we present a general fully-coupled numerical framework to simulate hydraulic fracturing and post-fracture gas well performance. This three-dimensional, multi-phase simulator focuses on: (1) fracture width increase and fracture propagation that occurs as slurry is injected into the fracture, (2) erosion caused by fracture fluids and leakoff, (3) proppant subsidence and flowback, and (4) multi-phase fluid flow through various-scaled anisotropic natural and man-made fractures. Mathematical and numerical details on how to fully couple the fracture propagation and fluid flow parts are discussed. Hydraulic fracturing and production operation parameters, and properties of the reservoir, fluids, and proppants, are taken into account. The well may be horizontal, vertical, or deviated, as well as open-hole or cemented. The simulator is verified based on benchmarks from the literature and we show its application by simulating fracture network (hydraulic and natural fractures) propagation and production data history matching of a field in China. We also conduct a series of real-data modeling studies with different combinations of

  2. Influence of Hydraulic Fracturing on Overlying Aquifers in the Presence of Leaky Abandoned Wells.

    PubMed

    Brownlow, Joshua W; James, Scott C; Yelderman, Joe C

    2016-11-01

    The association between hydrocarbon-rich reservoirs and organic-rich source rocks means unconventional oil and gas plays usually occur in mature sedimentary basins-where large-scale conventional development has already taken place. Abandoned wells in proximity to hydraulic fracturing could be affected by increased fluid pressures and corresponding newly generated fractures that directly connect (frac hit) to an abandoned well or to existing fractures intersecting an abandoned well. If contaminants migrate to a pathway hydraulically connected to an abandoned well, upward leakage may occur. Potential effects of hydraulic fracturing on upward flow through a particular type of leaky abandoned well-abandoned oil and gas wells converted into water wells were investigated using numerical modeling. Several factors that affect flow to leaky wells were considered including proximity of a leaky well to hydraulic fracturing, flowback, production, and leaky well abandonment methods. The numerical model used historical records and available industry data for the Eagle Ford Shale play in south Texas. Numerical simulations indicate that upward contaminant migration could occur through leaky converted wells if certain spatial and hydraulic conditions exist. Upward flow through leaky converted wells increased with proximity to hydraulic fracturing, but decreased when flowback and production occurred. Volumetric flow rates ranged between 0 and 0.086 m(3) /d for hydraulic-fracturing scenarios. Potential groundwater impacts should be paired with plausible transport mechanisms, and upward flow through leaky abandoned wells could be unrelated to hydraulic fracturing. The results also underscore the need to evaluate historical activities.

  3. 7 CFR 3201.28 - Stationary equipment hydraulic fluids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information for the BioPreferred... whether or not the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and... materials as items for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs....

  4. 7 CFR 2902.28 - Stationary equipment hydraulic fluids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information for the BioPreferred Web... not the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance... materials as items for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs....

  5. 7 CFR 2902.10 - Mobile equipment hydraulic fluids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information for the BioPreferred... recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the...

  6. 7 CFR 3201.10 - Mobile equipment hydraulic fluids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information for the BioPreferred... recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the...

  7. 7 CFR 3201.10 - Mobile equipment hydraulic fluids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information for the BioPreferred... recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the...

  8. 7 CFR 2902.28 - Stationary equipment hydraulic fluids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information for the BioPreferred Web... not the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance... materials as items for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs....

  9. 7 CFR 3201.10 - Mobile equipment hydraulic fluids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information for the BioPreferred... recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the...

  10. 7 CFR 3201.28 - Stationary equipment hydraulic fluids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information for the BioPreferred... whether or not the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and... materials as items for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs....

  11. 7 CFR 2902.10 - Mobile equipment hydraulic fluids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information for the BioPreferred... recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance standards against which the...

  12. 7 CFR 3201.28 - Stationary equipment hydraulic fluids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying biobased products provide information for the BioPreferred... whether or not the product contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and... materials as items for which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs....

  13. Feasibility Study: Hollow Plastic Spheres to Increase Hydraulic Fluid Compressibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    MICROMECHANICS FAILURE CRITERIA FOR COMPOSITES ; AUTHOR: GREESCZUK, LONCIN, B. 5. POISSON’S RATIO FOR RIGID PLASTIC FOAMS; AUTHOR: RINDE...S.A. Thuysbaert A.Stevens N4 Schwartz SPRL Schulmon Plastics SA Polytexco PVBA Polyform SA Plastiques Manufactures Plastimetal PVBA S.A...Plastics Corp. Plastiques GM Ltd. Rochevert, Inc. Polysar Limited, Kayson Plastics Div. Canlew Chemicals, Ltd. 4th Fl., 8-1, Hong Chou S. Rd., Sec. 1

  14. A Technique for Evaluating Fuel and Hydraulic Fluid Ballistic Vulnerability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-01

    only. III. BALLISTIC FACILITIES The experimental ballistic range had four major sections: a 20-mm Mann rifle assembly; a projectile velocity-measuritig...clad, sand-filled wall. The 20- mm Mann rifle assembly was located under an open shed. The rifle barrel was mounted in a rigid universal cradle. All...Weatherford, W.D., Jr., and Schaekel, F.W., "U.S. Army Helicopter Modified Fuel Development Program-Review of Emulsified and Gelled Fuel Studies," U.S

  15. Solar thermal aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2007-09-18

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  16. Aircraft parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.

    1987-01-01

    The aircraft parameter estimation problem is used to illustrate the utility of parameter estimation, which applies to many engineering and scientific fields. Maximum likelihood estimation has been used to extract stability and control derivatives from flight data for many years. This paper presents some of the basic concepts of aircraft parameter estimation and briefly surveys the literature in the field. The maximum likelihood estimator is discussed, and the basic concepts of minimization and estimation are examined for a simple simulated aircraft example. The cost functions that are to be minimized during estimation are defined and discussed. Graphic representations of the cost functions are given to illustrate the minimization process. Finally, the basic concepts are generalized, and estimation from flight data is discussed. Some of the major conclusions for the simulated example are also developed for the analysis of flight data from the F-14, highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT), and space shuttle vehicles.

  17. Laminar Flow Aircraft Certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Various topics telative to laminar flow aircraft certification are discussed. Boundary layer stability, flaps for laminar flow airfoils, computational wing design studies, manufacturing requirements, windtunnel tests, and flow visualization are among the topics covered.

  18. Pollution reducing aircraft propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, R. M.

    1985-05-28

    Aircraft engine exhaust is mixed with air and fuel and recombusted. Air is drawn into the secondary combustion chamber from suction surfaces on wings. Exhaust of the secondary combustion chamber is blown over wing and fuselage surfaces.

  19. The Aircraft Morphing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wlezien, R. W.; Horner, G. C.; McGowan, A. R.; Padula, S. L.; Scott, M. A.; Silcox, R. J.; Simpson, J. O.

    1998-01-01

    In the last decade smart technologies have become enablers that cut across traditional boundaries in materials science and engineering. Here we define smart to mean embedded actuation, sensing, and control logic in a tightly coupled feedback loop. While multiple successes have been achieved in the laboratory, we have yet to see the general applicability of smart devices to real aircraft systems. The NASA Aircraft Morphing program is an attempt to couple research across a wide range of disciplines to integrate smart technologies into high payoff aircraft applications. The program bridges research in seven individual disciplines and combines the effort into activities in three primary program thrusts. System studies are used to assess the highest- payoff program objectives, and specific research activities are defined to address the technologies required for development of smart aircraft systems. In this paper we address the overall program goals and programmatic structure, and discuss the challenges associated with bringing the technologies to fruition.

  20. Aircraft electromagnetic compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Clifton A.; Larsen, William E.

    1987-01-01

    Illustrated are aircraft architecture, electromagnetic interference environments, electromagnetic compatibility protection techniques, program specifications, tasks, and verification and validation procedures. The environment of 400 Hz power, electrical transients, and radio frequency fields are portrayed and related to thresholds of avionics electronics. Five layers of protection for avionics are defined. Recognition is given to some present day electromagnetic compatibility weaknesses and issues which serve to reemphasize the importance of EMC verification of equipment and parts, and their ultimate EMC validation on the aircraft. Proven standards of grounding, bonding, shielding, wiring, and packaging are laid out to help provide a foundation for a comprehensive approach to successful future aircraft design and an understanding of cost effective EMC in an aircraft setting.