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Sample records for aircraft in-situ measurements

  1. In situ measurements of Arctic atmospheric trace constituents from an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reck, G. M.; Briehl, D.; Nyland, T. W.

    1977-01-01

    In situ measurements of the ambient concentrations of several atmospheric trace constituents were obtained using instruments installed on board the NASA Convair 990 aircraft at altitudes up to 12.5 kilometers over Alaska and the Arctic Ocean. Concentration data on ozone, carbon monoxide, water vapor, and particles larger than 0.5 micrometer in diameter were acquired.

  2. Model-based aviation advice on distal volcanic ash clouds by assimilating aircraft in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guangliang; Heemink, Arnold; Lu, Sha; Segers, Arjo; Weber, Konradin; Lin, Hai-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    The forecast accuracy of distal volcanic ash clouds is important for providing valid aviation advice during volcanic ash eruption. However, because the distal part of volcanic ash plume is far from the volcano, the influence of eruption information on this part becomes rather indirect and uncertain, resulting in inaccurate volcanic ash forecasts in these distal areas. In our approach, we use real-life aircraft in situ observations, measured in the northwestern part of Germany during the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption, in an ensemble-based data assimilation system combined with a volcanic ash transport model to investigate the potential improvement on the forecast accuracy with regard to the distal volcanic ash plume. We show that the error of the analyzed volcanic ash state can be significantly reduced through assimilating real-life in situ measurements. After a continuous assimilation, it is shown that the aviation advice for Germany, the Netherlands and Luxembourg can be significantly improved. We suggest that with suitable aircrafts measuring once per day across the distal volcanic ash plume, the description and prediction of volcanic ash clouds in these areas can be greatly improved.

  3. In situ ozone measurements within the 1987 Antarctic ozone hole from a high-altitude ER-2 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proffitt, M. H.; Steinkamp, M. J.; Powell, J. A.; Mclaughlin, R. J.; Mills, O. A.; Schmeltekopf, A. L.; Thompson, T. L.; Tuck, A. F.; Tyler, T.; Chan, K. R.

    1989-01-01

    In situ ozone measurements were made from the ER-2 aircraft during the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment both inside and outside the ozone hole. Midday measurements from late August until late September during aircraft ascent near 53 deg S latitude indicate no clear temporal trend in ozone mixing ratio but instead reflect the distance of the measurement from the chemically perturbed region. The measurements made within the ozone hole at 72 deg S show altitude-dependent decreases in ozone of 61 percent at a potential temperature of 425 K down to 39 percent at 365 K. Temporal trends are also calculated at various positions relative to the boundary of the chemically perturbed region to locate the region of large ozone decreases and thereby accurately locate the boundary of the ozone hole.

  4. In situ ozone measurements within the 1987 Antarctic ozone hole from a high-altitude ER-2 aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Proffitt, M.H.; Steinkamp, M.J.; Powell, J.A. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder ); McLaughlin, R.J.; Mills, O.A.; Schmeltekopf, A.L.; Thompson, T.L.; Tuck, A.F.; Tyler, T.; Winkler, R.H. ); Chan, K.R. )

    1989-11-30

    In situ ozone measurements were made from the ER-2 aircraft during the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment both inside and outside the ozone hole. Midday measurements from late August until late September during aircraft ascent near 53{degree}S latitude indicate no clear temporal trend in ozone mixing ratio but instead reflect the distance of the measurement from the chemically perturbed region. The measurements made within the ozone hole at 72{degree}S show altitude dependent decreases in ozone of 61% at a potential temperature of 425 K down to 39% at 365 K. Temporal trends are also calculated at various positions relative to the boundary of the chemically perturbed region to locate the region of large ozone decreases and thereby accurately locate the boundary of the ozone hole.

  5. In-situ Measurements of the Cosmic Radiation on the Aircraft Altitude over Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Park, I.; Lee, J.; Oh, S.; Kim, Y. C.

    2014-12-01

    This study presents the comparison between the measured and modeled cosmic radiation on aircraft altitude over Korean peninsula. We performed the measurement with a radiation spectrometer, Liulin-6K on board a Republic of Korea (ROK) Air Force aircraft accomplishing the high-altitude (above 9 km) flight over Korea, and the modeled data was obtained from the operational modeling program, CARI-6M developed by FAA. A number of measurements for the flight mission at high-altitude have been executed to evaluate the exposed dose of cosmic radiation. Both the measured and the calculated data show that the exposed radiation dose enhances dramatically as the altitude increases. The results reveal that the exposed dose rate of aircrews at high-altitude flight is 2-3 orders of magnitude (1-2 mSv/hour) higher than the exposure rate at sea level. It is inferred that the annual total dose of radiation for the aircrews at high-altitude could be higher than the annually public limit (1 mSv) recommended by ICRP. Finally, since neutrons are the dominant components reflecting among total cosmic radiation above 9 km, we try to analyze the relationship between the neutron count from the neutron monitor on the ground and the effective dose from the on board spectrometer. Based on these results, it is suggested that the annual criterion and the proper managing procedure of exposed dose for the flight aircrews of ROK Air Force should be regulated.

  6. Tunable diode laser in-situ CH4 measurements aboard the CARIBIC passenger aircraft: instrument performance assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyroff, C.; Zahn, A.; Sanati, S.; Christner, E.; Rauthe-Schöch, A.; Schuck, T. J.

    2013-10-01

    A laser spectrometer for automated monthly measurements of methane (CH4) mixing ratios aboard the CARIBIC passenger aircraft is presented. The instrument is based on a commercial Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (FGGA, Los Gatos Res.), which was adapted to meet the requirements imposed by unattended airborne employment. The modified instrument is described. A laboratory characterization was performed to determine the instrument stability, precision, cross sensitivity to H2O, and accuracy. For airborne operation a calibration strategy is described, that utilizes CH4 measurements obtained from flask samples taken during the same flights. The precision of airborne measurements is 2 ppbv for 10 s averages. The accuracy at aircraft cruising altitude is 3.85 ppbv. During aircraft ascent and descent, where no flask samples were obtained, instrumental drifts can be less accurately considered and the uncertainty is estimated to be 12.4 ppbv. A linear humidity bias correction was applied to the CH4 measurements, which was most important in the lower troposphere. On average, the correction bias was around 6.5 ppbv at an altitude of 2 km, and negligible at cruising flight level. Observations from 103 long-distance flights are presented that span a large part of the northern hemispheric upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere (UT/LMS), with occasional crossing of the tropics on flights to southern Africa. These accurate data mark the largest UT/LMS in-situ CH4 dataset worldwide. An example of a tracer-tracer correlation study with ozone is given, highlighting the possibility for accurate cross-tropopause transport analyses.

  7. Tunable diode laser in-situ CH4 measurements aboard the CARIBIC passenger aircraft: instrument performance assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyroff, C.; Zahn, A.; Sanati, S.; Christner, E.; Rauthe-Schöch, A.; Schuck, T. J.

    2014-03-01

    A laser spectrometer for automated monthly measurements of methane (CH4) mixing ratios aboard the CARIBIC passenger aircraft is presented. The instrument is based on a commercial Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (FGGA, Los Gatos Res.), which was adapted to meet the requirements imposed by unattended airborne operation. It was characterised in the laboratory with respect to instrument stability, precision, cross sensitivity to H2O, and accuracy. For airborne operation, a calibration strategy is described that utilises CH4 measurements obtained from flask samples taken during the same flights. The precision of airborne measurements is 2 ppb for 10 s averages. The accuracy at aircraft cruising altitude is 3.85 ppb. During aircraft ascent and descent, where no flask samples were obtained, instrumental drifts can be less accurately determined and the uncertainty is estimated to be 12.4 ppb. A linear humidity bias correction was applied to the CH4 measurements, which was most important in the lower troposphere. On average, the correction bias was around 6.5 ppb at an altitude of 2 km, and negligible at cruising flight level. Observations from 103 long-distance flights are presented that span a large part of the northern hemispheric upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere (UT/LMS), with occasional crossing of the tropics on flights to southern Africa. These accurate data mark the largest UT/LMS in-situ CH4 dataset worldwide. An example of a tracer-tracer correlation study with ozone is given, highlighting the possibility for accurate cross-tropopause transport analyses.

  8. Nitric oxide, water vapor, and ozone in the atmosphere as measured in SITU from an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D.; Ridley, B. A.; Hilsenrath, E.; Schiff, H. I.

    1975-01-01

    As part of the instrument evaluation plan for the NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program, prototype instruments were tested aboard the NASA Convair 990 during four flights in January and February of 1974. All the data were taken in maritime air between Hawaii and San Francisco and between Hawaii and 155 deg W, 35 deg N. A chemiluminescent instrument was used to measure nitric oxide. Water vapor, which was measured by using an aluminum oxide hygrometer, ranged from 5.2 micro g/g to saturation. Ozone was measured by an instrument using the ultraviolet absorption technique and ranged up to 235 ppbv. Typical temporal plots of the concentrations of the three constituents are presented. All the constituents showed considerable spatial and day-to-day variation in concentration at each altitude flown. Measurements of the three constituents were made simultaneously at various altitudes between 7.6 and 12.5 km.

  9. An aircraft instrument design for in situ tropospheric OH measurements by laser induced fluorescence at low pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, William H.; Stevens, Philip S.; Mather, James H.

    1993-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is important for many processes involved in tropospheric chemistry. For instance, it initiates the photochemical degradation of gases that cause global climate change, such as methane and the chlorofluorocarbon substitutes (HCFCs). Because of its reactivity, its abundances are less than 0.1 pptv. Thus, OH has been very difficult to measure accurately, despite its importance. Techniques have evolved, however, so that good measurements of tropospheric OH abundances are now possible. One of these techniques that is adaptable to aircraft measurements is the laser induced fluorescence detection of the OH radical in a detection chamber at low pressures. The current ground-based instrument, which can be readily adapted to aircraft, can detect OH abundances of 1.4 x 10 exp 5 OH molecules/cu cm with S/N = 2 in 30 sec, and 5 x 10 exp 4/cu cm in 5 min.

  10. Study of aerosol microphysical properties profiles retrieved from ground-based remote sensing and aircraft in-situ measurements during a Saharan dust event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Bravo-Aranda, J. A.; Baumgardner, D.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.; Navas-Guzmán, F.; Veselovskii, I.; Lyamani, H.; Valenzuela, A.; Olmo, F. J.; Titos, G.; Andrey, J.; Chaikovsky, A.; Dubovik, O.; Gil-Ojeda, M.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present an analysis of mineral dust optical and microphysical properties obtained from different retrieval techniques applied to active and passive remote sensing measurements, including a comparison with simultaneous in-situ aircraft measurements. Data were collected in a field campaign performed during a mineral dust outbreak a Granada, Spain, experimental site (37.16° N, 3.61° W, 680 m a.s.l.) on the 27 June 2011. Column-integrated properties are provided by sun- and star-photometry which allows a continuous evaluation of the mineral dust optical properties during both day and night-time. Both the Linear Estimation and AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) inversion algorithms are applied for the retrieval of the column-integrated microphysical particle properties. In addition, vertically-resolved microphysical properties are obtained from a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system included in EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network), by using both LIRIC (Lidar Radiometer Inversion Code) algorithm during daytime and an algorithm applied to the Raman measurements based on the regularization technique during night-time. LIRIC retrievals reveal several dust layers between 3 and 5 km a.s.l. with volume concentrations of the coarse spheroid mode up to 60 μm3 cm-3. The combined use of the regularization and LIRIC methods reveals the night-to-day evolution of the vertical structure of the mineral dust microphysical properties and offers complementary information to that from column-integrated variables retrieved from passive remote sensing. Additionally, lidar depolarization profiles and LIRIC retrieved volume concentration are compared with aircraft in-situ measurements. This study presents for the first time a comparison of both volume concentration and dust particle polarization ratios measured with in-situ and remote sensing techniques. Results for the depolarization measurements in the dust layer indicate reasonable agreement within the

  11. Aircraft measurements of bromine monoxide, iodine monoxide, and glyoxal profiles in the tropics: comparison with ship-based and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkamer, R.; Baidar, S.; Campos, T. L.; Coburn, S.; DiGangi, J. P.; Dix, B.; Koenig, T. K.; Ortega, I.; Pierce, B. R.; Reeves, M.; Sinreich, R.; Wang, S.; Zondlo, M. A.; Romashkin, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric chemistry of halogens and organic carbon over tropical oceans modifies ozone and atmospheric aerosols, yet atmospheric models remain largely untested for lack of vertically resolved measurements of bromine monoxide (BrO), iodine monoxide (IO), and small oxygenated hydrocarbons like glyoxal (CHOCHO) in the tropical troposphere. BrO, IO, glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), water vapor (H2O) and O2-O2 collision complexes (O4) were measured by the CU Airborne Multi AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument, in situ aerosol size distributions by an Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS), and in situ H2O by Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser hygrometer (VCSEL). Data are presented from two research flights (RF12, RF17) aboard the NSF/NCAR GV aircraft over the tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean (tEPO) as part of the "Tropical Ocean tRoposphere Exchange of Reactive halogens and Oxygenated hydrocarbons" (TORERO) project. We assess the accuracy of O4 slant column density (SCD) measurements in the presence and absence of aerosols, and find O4-inferred aerosol extinction profiles at 477 nm agree within 5% with Mie calculations of extinction profiles constrained by UHSAS. CU AMAX-DOAS provides a flexible choice of geometry which we exploit to minimize the SCD in the reference spectrum (SCDREF, maximize signal-to-noise), and to test the robustness of BrO, IO, and glyoxal differential SCDs. The RF12 case study was conducted in pristine marine and free tropospheric air. The RF17 case study was conducted above the NOAA RV Ka'imimoana (TORERO cruise, KA-12-01), and provides independent validation data from ship-based in situ Cavity Enhanced- and MAX-DOAS. Inside the marine boundary layer (MBL) no BrO was detected (smaller than 0.5 pptv), and 0.2-0.55 pptv IO and 32-36 pptv glyoxal were observed. The near surface concentrations agree within 20% (IO) and 10% (glyoxal) between ship and aircraft. The BrO concentration strongly

  12. In situ measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, D.E.

    1980-11-24

    A multipurpose in situ underground measurement system comprising a plurality of long electrical resistance elements in the form of rigid reinforcing bars, each having an open loop hairpin configuration of shorter length than the other resistance elements. The resistance elements are arranged in pairs in a unitized structure, and grouted in place in the underground volume. Measurement means are provided for obtaining for each pair the electrical resistance of each element and the difference in electrical resistance of the paired elements, which difference values may be used in analytical methods involving resistance as a function of temperature. A scanner means sequentially connects the resistance-measuring apparatus to each individual pair of elements. A source of heating current is also selectively connectable for heating the elements to an initial predetermined temperature prior to electrical resistance measurements when used as an anemometer.

  13. A comparative study of aerosol microphysical properties retrieved from ground-based remote sensing and aircraft in situ measurements during a Saharan dust event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Granados-Muñoz, María; Bravo-Aranda, Juan Antonio; Baumgardner, Darrel; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Pérez-Ramírez, Daniel; Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Veselovskii, Igor; Lyamani, Hassan; Valenzuela, Antonio; José Olmo, Francisco; Titos, Gloria; Andrey, Javier; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Dubovik, Oleg; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present an analysis of aerosol microphysical properties during a mineral dust event taking advantage of the combination of different state-of-the-art retrieval techniques applied to active and passive remote sensing measurements and the evaluation of some of those techniques using independent data acquired from in situ aircraft measurements. Data were collected in a field campaign performed during a mineral dust outbreak at the Granada, Spain, experimental site (37.16° N, 3.61° W, 680 m a.s.l.) on 27 June 2011. Column-integrated properties are provided by sun- and star-photometry, which allows for a continuous evaluation of the mineral dust optical properties during both day and nighttime. Both the linear estimation and AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) inversion algorithms are applied for the retrieval of the column-integrated microphysical particle properties. In addition, vertically resolved microphysical properties are obtained from a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system included in EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network), by using both LIRIC (Lidar Radiometer Inversion Code) algorithm during daytime and an algorithm applied to the Raman measurements based on the regularization technique during nighttime. LIRIC retrievals reveal the presence of dust layers between 3 and 5 km a.s.l. with volume concentrations of the coarse spheroid mode up to 60 µm3 cm-3. The combined use of the regularization and LIRIC methods reveals the night-to-day evolution of the vertical structure of the mineral dust microphysical properties and offers complementary information to that from column-integrated variables retrieved from passive remote sensing. Additionally, lidar depolarization profiles and LIRIC retrieved volume concentration are compared with aircraft in situ measurements. This study presents for the first time a comparison of the total volume concentration retrieved with LIRIC with independent in situ measurements, obtaining agreement within

  14. Simultaneous, In-situ Measurement of NO3, N2O5 and NO2 via Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy aboard an Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, W. P.; Brown, S. S.; Osthoff, H. D.; Ciciora, S. J.; Paris, M. W.; McLaughlin, R. J.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2006-12-01

    This contribution describes improvements to an existing instrument for aircraft measurements of NO3 and N2O5 in the troposphere via cavity ring-down spectroscopy [Brown, et al., 2002; Dubé, et al., 2006]. The instrument was specifically designed and constructed for operation on the NOAA WP-3. The improvements include the incorporation of two additional cavity ring-down channels, reduced residence time for more rapid sampling and reduced inlet losses; higher reflectivity mirrors to improve instrument sensitivity; and a calibration system based on the conversion of NO3 and N2O5 to NO2. The instrument now consists of a total of four measurement channels, three at 662 nm for measuring NO3, N2O5, and a reference channel to track background changes on a rapid time scale, and one at 532 nm for measurement of NO2 [Osthoff, et al., 2006]. This paper describes the specifics of these design changes, the resultant improvements in the measurement and the performance of the instrument during the TexAQS/GoMACCS campaign in Houston, TX in 2006. Brown, S. S., H. Stark, S. J. Ciciora, R. J. McLaughlin, and A. R. Ravishankara (2002), Simultaneous in-situ detection of atmospheric NO3 and N2O5 via cavity ring-down spectroscopy, Rev. Sci. Instr., 73, 3291-3301. Dube, W. P., S. S. Brown, H. D. Osthoff, M. R. Nunley, S. J. Ciciora, M. W. Paris, R. J. McLaughlin, and A. R. Ravishankara (2006), Aircraft instrument for simultaneous, in-situ measurements of NO3 and N2O5 via cavity ring-down spectroscopy, Rev. Sci. Instr., 77, 034101. Osthoff, H. D., S. S. Brown, T. B. Ryerson, T. J. Fortin, B. M. Lerner, E. J. Williams, A. Pettersson, T. Baynard, W. P. Dube, S. J. Ciciora, and A. R. Ravishankara (2006), Measurement of atmospheric NO2 by pulsed cavity ring-down spectroscopy, J. Geophys. Res., D12305, doi:10.1029/2005JD006942.

  15. In-situ measurements of chlorine activation, nitric acid redistribution and ozone depletion in the Antarctic lower vortex aboard the German research aircraft HALO during TACTS/ESMVal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkat, Tina; Voigt, Christiane; Kaufmann, Stefan; Schlage, Romy; Gottschaldt, Klaus-Dirk; Ziereis, Helmut; Hoor, Peter; Bozem, Heiko; Müller, Stefan; Zahn, Andreas; Schlager, Hans; Oelhaf, Hermann; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Dörnbrack, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In-situ measurements of stratospheric chlorine compounds are rare and exhibit the potential to gain insight into small scale mixing processes where stratospheric air masses of different origin and history interact. In addition, the relationship with chemically stable trace gases helps to identify regions that have been modified by chemical processing on polar stratospheric clouds. To this end, in-situ measurements of ClONO2, HCl, HNO3, NOy, N2O and O3 have been performed in the Antarctic Polar Vortex in September 2012 aboard the German research aircraft HALO (High Altitude and Long Rang research aircraft) during the TACTS/ESMVal (Transport and Composition in the UTLS/Earth System Model Validation) mission. With take-off and landing in Capetown, HALO sampled vortex air with latitudes down to 65°S, at altitudes between 8 and 14.3 km and potential temperatures between 340 and 390 K. Before intering the vortex at 350 K potential temperature, HALO additionally sampled mid-latitude stratospheric air. The trace gas distributions at the edge of the Antarctic polar vortex show distinct signatures of processed upper stratospheric vortex air and chemically different lower stratospheric / upper tropospheric air. Diabatic descend of the vortex transports processed air into the lower stratosphere. Here small scale filaments of only a few kilometers extension form at the lower vortex boundary due to shear stress, ultimately leading to transport and irreversible mixing. Comparison of trace gas relationships with those at the beginning of the polar winter reveals substantial chlorine activation, ozone depletion de- and renitrification with high resolution. Furthermore, the measurements are compared to the chemistry climate models EMAC and supported by ECMWF analysis. Finally, we compare the Antarctic measurements with new measurements of ClONO2, HCl and HNO3 aboard HALO obtained during the Arctic mission POLSTRACC (POLar STratosphere in a Changing Climate) based in Kiruna (Sveden

  16. Aircraft measurements of BrO, IO, glyoxal, NO2, H2O, O2-O2 and aerosol extinction profiles in the tropics: comparison with aircraft-/ship-based in situ and lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkamer, R.; Baidar, S.; Campos, T. L.; Coburn, S.; DiGangi, J. P.; Dix, B.; Eloranta, E. W.; Koenig, T. K.; Morley, B.; Ortega, I.; Pierce, B. R.; Reeves, M.; Sinreich, R.; Wang, S.; Zondlo, M. A.; Romashkin, P. A.

    2015-05-01

    Tropospheric chemistry of halogens and organic carbon over tropical oceans modifies ozone and atmospheric aerosols, yet atmospheric models remain largely untested for lack of vertically resolved measurements of bromine monoxide (BrO), iodine monoxide (IO) and small oxygenated hydrocarbons like glyoxal (CHOCHO) in the tropical troposphere. BrO, IO, glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), water vapor (H2O) and O2-O2 collision complexes (O4) were measured by the University of Colorado Airborne Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument, aerosol extinction by high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL), in situ aerosol size distributions by an ultra high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer (UHSAS) and in situ H2O by vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) hygrometer. Data are presented from two research flights (RF12, RF17) aboard the National Science Foundation/National Center for Atmospheric Research Gulfstream V aircraft over the tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean (tEPO) as part of the "Tropical Ocean tRoposphere Exchange of Reactive halogens and Oxygenated hydrocarbons" (TORERO) project (January/February 2012). We assess the accuracy of O4 slant column density (SCD) measurements in the presence and absence of aerosols. Our O4-inferred aerosol extinction profiles at 477 nm agree within 6% with HSRL in the boundary layer and closely resemble the renormalized profile shape of Mie calculations constrained by UHSAS at low (sub-Rayleigh) aerosol extinction in the free troposphere. CU AMAX-DOAS provides a flexible choice of geometry, which we exploit to minimize the SCD in the reference spectrum (SCDREF, maximize signal-to-noise ratio) and to test the robustness of BrO, IO and glyoxal differential SCDs. The RF12 case study was conducted in pristine marine and free tropospheric air. The RF17 case study was conducted above the NOAA RV Ka'imimoana (TORERO cruise, KA-12-01) and provides independent validation data from ship-based in situ cavity

  17. Aircraft Measurements of BrO, IO, Glyoxal, NO2, H2O, O2-O2 and Aerosol Extinction Profiles in the Tropics: Comparison with Aircraft-/Ship-Based in Situ and Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkamer, R.; Baidar, S.; Campos, T. L.; Coburn, S.; DiGangi, J. P.; Dix, B.; Eloranta, E. W.; Koenig, T. K.; Morley, B.; Ortega, I.; Pierce, B. R.; Reeves, M.; Sinreich, R.; Wang, S.; Zondlo, M. A.; Romashkin, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric chemistry of halogens and organic carbon over tropical oceans modifies ozone and atmospheric aerosols, yet atmospheric models remain largely untested for lack of vertically resolved measurements of bromine monoxide (BrO), iodine monoxide (IO) and small oxygenated hydrocarbons like glyoxal (CHOCHO) in the tropical troposphere. BrO, IO, glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), water vapor (H2O) and O2-O2 collision complexes (O4/ were measured by the University of Colorado Airborne Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAXDOAS) instrument, aerosol extinction by high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL), in situ aerosol size distributions by an ultra high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer (UHSAS) and in situ H2O by vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) hygrometer. Data are presented from two research flights (RF12, RF17) aboard the National Science Foundation/ National Center for Atmospheric Research Gulfstream V aircraft over the tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean (tEPO) as part of the "Tropical Ocean tRoposphere Exchange of Reactive halogens and Oxygenated hydrocarbons" (TORERO) project (January/February 2012). We assess the accuracy of O4 slant column density (SCD) measurements in the presence and absence of aerosols. Our O4-inferred aerosol extinction profiles at 477 nm agree within 6% with HSRL in the boundary layer and closely resemble the renormalized profile shape of Mie calculations constrained by UHSAS at low (sub-Rayleigh) aerosol extinction in the free troposphere. CU AMAX-DOAS provides a flexible choice of geometry, which we exploit to minimize the SCD in the reference spectrum (SCDREF, maximize signal-to-noise ratio) and to test the robustness of BrO, IO and glyoxal differential SCDs. The RF12 case study was conducted in pristine marine and free tropospheric air. The RF17 case study was conducted above the NOAA RV Ka'imimoana (TORERO cruise, KA-12-01) and provides independent validation data from ship-based in situ cavity

  18. In-situ measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, David E.

    1983-01-01

    A multipurpose in situ underground measurement system comprising a plurality of long electrical resistance elements in the form of rigid reinforcing bars, each having an open loop "hairpin" configuration of shorter length than the other resistance elements. The resistance elements are arranged in pairs in a unitized structure, and grouted in place in the underground volume. The electrical resistance of each element and the difference in electrical resistance of the paired elements are obtained, which difference values may be used in analytical methods involving resistance as a function of temperature. A scanner sequentially connects the resistance-measuring apparatus to each individual pair of elements. A source of heating current is also selectively connectable for heating the elements to an initial predetermined temperature prior to electrical resistance measurements when used as an anemometer.

  19. Investigation of ice cloud microphysical properties of DCSs using aircraft in situ measurements during MC3E over the ARM SGP site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingyu; Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike

    2015-04-01

    Six deep convective systems (DCSs) with a total of 5589 five-second samples and a range of temperatures from -41°C to 0°C during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) were selected to investigate the ice cloud microphysical properties of DCSs over the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The ice cloud measurements of the DCS cases were made by the University of North Dakota Citation II research aircraft, and the ice cloud properties were derived through the following processes. First, the instances of supercooled liquid water in the ice-dominated cloud layers of DCSs have been eliminated using multisensor detection, including the Rosemount Icing Detector, King and Cloud Droplet Probes, as well as 2DC and Cloud Imaging Probe images. Then the Nevzorov-measured ice water contents (IWCs) at maximum diameter Dmax < 4000 µm are used as the best estimation to determine a new mass-dimensional relationship. Finally, the newly derived mass-dimensional relationship (a = 0.00365, b = 2.1) has been applied to a full spectrum of particle size distributions (PSDs, 120-30,000 µm) constructed from both 2DC and High-Volume Precipitation Spectrometer measurements to calculate the best-estimated IWCs of DCSs during MC3E. The averages of the total number concentrations (Nt), median mass diameter (Dm), maximum diameter (Dmax), and IWC from six selected cases are 0.035 cm-3, 1666 µm, 8841 µm, and 0.45 g m-3, respectively. The gamma-type-size distributions are then generated matching the observed PSDs (120-30,000 µm), and the fitted gamma parameters are compared with the observed PSDs through multimoment assessments including first moment (Dm), third moment (IWC), and sixth moment (equivalent radar reflectivity, Ze). For application of observed PSDs to the remote sensing community, a series of empirical relationships between fitted parameters and Ze values has been derived, and the bullet rosette

  20. Analysis of in situ measurements of cirrus anvil outflow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederman, J. I.; Whiteway, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The airborne campaign, EMERALD 2 (Egrett Microphysics Experiment with Radiation, Lidar, and Dynamics,) was conducted out of Darwin, Australia in 2002. Objectives included characterization of the dynamics in the cirrus anvil outflow from tropical deep convection. Two aircraft, the Egrett and King Air, were flown in tandem in the upper troposphere (7 km - 15 km) to collect in situ measurements in the anvil outflow from a storm named "Hector" that occurs on a regular basis over the Tiwi Islands north of Darwin during November and December. Turbulence probes mounted on the wings of the Egrett aircraft were used to measure the wind fluctuations across the anvil and along its length with a spatial resolution of 2 meters. The in situ measurements from the Egrett were coincident with lidar measurements of the cloud structure from the King Air aircraft flying directly below. The presentation will show results of the analysis of the measurements with an emphasis on the turbulence, gravity waves, and coherent structures that are particular to the cirrus anvil outflow environment. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics associated with the generation of mammatus formations at the base of the anvil clouds.

  1. Evaluating ammonia (NH3) predictions in the NOAA National Air Quality Forecast Capability (NAQFC) using in situ aircraft, ground-level, and satellite measurements from the DISCOVER-AQ Colorado campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battye, William H.; Bray, Casey D.; Aneja, Viney P.; Tong, Daniel; Lee, Pius; Tang, Youhua

    2016-09-01

    The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is responsible for forecasting elevated levels of air pollution within the National Air Quality Forecast Capability (NAQFC). The current research uses measurements gathered in the DISCOVER-AQ Colorado field campaign and the concurrent Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) to test performance of the NAQFC CMAQ modeling framework for predicting NH3. The DISCOVER-AQ and FRAPPE field campaigns were carried out in July and August 2014 in Northeast Colorado. Model predictions are compared with measurements of NH3 gas concentrations and the NH4+ component of fine particulate matter concentrations measured directly by the aircraft in flight. We also compare CMAQ predictions with NH3 measurements from ground-based monitors within the DISCOVER-AQ Colorado geographic domain, and from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Aura satellite. In situ aircraft measurements carried out in July and August of 2014 suggest that the NAQFC CMAQ model underestimated the NH3 concentration in Northeastern Colorado by a factor of ∼2.7 (NMB = -63%). Ground-level monitors also produced a similar result. Average satellite-retrieved NH3 levels also exceeded model predictions by a factor of 1.5-4.2 (NMB = -33 to -76%). The underestimation of NH3 was not accompanied by an underestimation of particulate NH4+, which is further controlled by factors including acid availability, removal rate, and gas-particle partition. The average measured concentration of NH4+ was close to the average predication (NMB = +18%). Seasonal patterns measured at an AMoN site in the region suggest that the underestimation of NH3 is not due to the seasonal allocation of emissions, but to the overall annual emissions estimate. The underestimation of NH3 varied across the study domain, with the largest differences occurring in a region of intensive agriculture near Greeley, Colorado, and in the vicinity of Denver. The

  2. Chlorine Chemistry of the Lower Stratosphere: Aircraft (ALIAS, ER-2) and Balloon (BLISSs) In-Situ Measurements of HC1,NO(sub 2), andN(sub 2)O for Testing Heterogeneous Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, C.; May, R.; Jaegle, L.; Hu, H.; Scott, D.; Stimpfle, R.; Salawitch, R.; Fahey, D.; Woodbridge, E.; Proffitt, M.; Margitan, J.

    1994-01-01

    Stratospheric concentrations of HC1 measured in the northern hemisphere from the ER-2 aircraft are significantly lower than model predictions using both gas phase and heterogeneous chemistry, but measurements in the southern hemisphere are in much better agreement.

  3. Tropospheric ozone climatology at two southern subtropical sites, (Reunion Island and Irene, South Africa) from ozone sondes, LIDAR, aircraft and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clain, G.; Baray, J. L.; Delmas, R.; Diab, R.; Leclair de Bellevue, J.; Keckhut, P.; Posny, F.; Metzger, J. M.; Cammas, J. P.

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a climatology and trends of tropospheric ozone in the southwestern part of Indian Ocean (Reunion Island) and South Africa (Irene and Johannesburg). This study is based on a multi-instrumental dataset: PTU-O3 radiosoundings, DIAL LIDAR, MOZAIC airborne instrumentation and Dasibi UV ground based measurements. The seasonal profiles of tropospheric ozone at Reunion Island have been calculated from two different data sets: radiosondes and LIDAR. The two climatological profiles are similar, except in austral summer when smaller values for the LIDAR profiles in the free troposphere, and in the upper troposphere for all seasons occur. These results show that the LIDAR profiles are at times not representative of the true ozone climatological value as measurements can be taken only under clear sky conditions, and the upper limit reached depends on the signal. In the lower troposphere, climatological ozone values from radiosondes have been compared to a one year campaign of ground based measurements from a Dasibi instrument located at high altitude site (2150 m) at Reunion Island. The seasonal cycle is comparable for the two datasets, with Dasibi UV values displaying slightly higher values. This suggests that if local dynamical and possibly physico-chemical effects may influence the ozone level, the seasonal cycle can be followed with ground level measurements. Average ground level concentrations measured on the summits of the island seem to be representative of the lower free troposphere ozone concentration at the same altitude (~2000 m) whereas night time data would be representative of tropospheric concentration at a higher altitude (~3000 m) due to the subsidence effect. Finally, linear trends have been calculated from radiosondes data at Reunion and Irene. Considering the whole tropospheric column, the trend is slightly positive for Reunion, and more clearly positive for Irene. Trend calculations have also been made separating the troposphere into

  4. Tropospheric ozone climatology at two Southern Hemisphere tropical/subtropical sites, (Reunion Island and Irene, South Africa) from ozonesondes, LIDAR, and in situ aircraft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clain, G.; Baray, J. L.; Delmas, R.; Diab, R.; Leclair de Bellevue, J.; Keckhut, P.; Posny, F.; Metzger, J. M.; Cammas, J. P.

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents a climatology and trends of tropospheric ozone in the Southwestern Indian Ocean (Reunion Island) and South Africa (Irene and Johannesburg). This study is based on a multi-instrumental dataset: PTU-O3 ozonesondes, DIAL LIDAR and MOZAIC airborne instrumentation. The seasonal profiles of tropospheric ozone at Reunion Island have been calculated from two different data sets: ozonesondes and LIDAR. The two climatological profiles are similar, except in austral summer when the LIDAR profiles show greater values in the free troposphere, and in the upper troposphere when the LIDAR profiles show lower values during all seasons. These results show that the climatological value of LIDAR profiles must be discussed with care since LIDAR measurements can be performed only under clear sky conditions, and the upper limit of the profile depends on the signal strength. In addition, linear trends have been calculated from ozonesonde data at Reunion and Irene. Considering the whole tropospheric column, the trend is slightly positive for Reunion, and more clearly positive for Irene. Trend calculations have also been made separating the troposphere into three layers, and separating the dataset into seasons. Results show that the positive trend for Irene is governed by the lower layer that is affected by industrial pollution and biomass burning. On the contrary, for Reunion Island, the strongest trends are observed in the upper troposphere, and in winter when stratosphere-troposphere exchange is more frequently expected.

  5. Practical application of in situ aerosol measurement

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hern, T.J.; Rader, D.J.

    1993-09-01

    The use of in situ, real-time measurement techniques permits the characterization of airborne droplets and particles under conditions where traditional sampling methods can fail. For example, sampling method rely on the ability to sample and transport particles without biasing the properties of interest, and often are not applicable in harsh environment. Although in situ methods offer unique opportunities in these cases, these techniques introduce new concerns and must be used carefully if accurate measurement are to be made. Several in situ measurement techniques are reviewed here. As the field is rapidly evolving, the discussion is limited to those techniques which: (1) are commercially available, (2) provide real-time output, (3) measure the aerosol size distribution. Discussion is divided between single particle counters (which provide a flux-based or temporal measurement) and ensemble techniques (which provide a concentration-based or spatial measurement). Specific techniques discussed include phase Doppler, Mie scattering, and Fraunhofer diffraction, and commercial instruments based on these techniques.

  6. Autonomous in situ measurements of seawater alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Reggie S; DeGrandpre, Michael D; Beck, James C; Hart, Robert D; Peterson, Brittany; De Carlo, Eric H; Drupp, Patrick S; Hammar, Terry R

    2014-08-19

    Total alkalinity (AT) is an important parameter for describing the marine inorganic carbon system and understanding the effects of atmospheric CO2 on the oceans. Measurements of AT are limited, however, because of the laborious process of collecting and analyzing samples. In this work we evaluate the performance of an autonomous instrument for high temporal resolution measurements of seawater AT. The Submersible Autonomous Moored Instrument for alkalinity (SAMI-alk) uses a novel tracer monitored titration method where a colorimetric pH indicator quantifies both pH and relative volumes of sample and titrant, circumventing the need for gravimetric or volumetric measurements. The SAMI-alk performance was validated in the laboratory and in situ during two field studies. Overall in situ accuracy was -2.2 ± 13.1 μmol kg(-1) (n = 86), on the basis of comparison to discrete samples. Precision on duplicate analyses of a carbonate standard was ±4.7 μmol kg(-1) (n = 22). This prototype instrument can measure in situ AT hourly for one month, limited by consumption of reagent and standard solutions.

  7. Autonomous in situ measurements of seawater alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Reggie S; DeGrandpre, Michael D; Beck, James C; Hart, Robert D; Peterson, Brittany; De Carlo, Eric H; Drupp, Patrick S; Hammar, Terry R

    2014-08-19

    Total alkalinity (AT) is an important parameter for describing the marine inorganic carbon system and understanding the effects of atmospheric CO2 on the oceans. Measurements of AT are limited, however, because of the laborious process of collecting and analyzing samples. In this work we evaluate the performance of an autonomous instrument for high temporal resolution measurements of seawater AT. The Submersible Autonomous Moored Instrument for alkalinity (SAMI-alk) uses a novel tracer monitored titration method where a colorimetric pH indicator quantifies both pH and relative volumes of sample and titrant, circumventing the need for gravimetric or volumetric measurements. The SAMI-alk performance was validated in the laboratory and in situ during two field studies. Overall in situ accuracy was -2.2 ± 13.1 μmol kg(-1) (n = 86), on the basis of comparison to discrete samples. Precision on duplicate analyses of a carbonate standard was ±4.7 μmol kg(-1) (n = 22). This prototype instrument can measure in situ AT hourly for one month, limited by consumption of reagent and standard solutions. PMID:25051401

  8. Measure of Legionella penumophila activity in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Soracco, R.J.; Pope, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    Detection of Legionella pneumophila by serogroup-specific fluorescent antibodies was combined with a tetrazolium dye (INT) to measure electron transport activity. The biological uptake and reduction of the INT dye was studied in pure cultures and in natural water samples with respect to temperature. Uptake was complete within 60 min. Controls inhibited with formaldehyde demonstrated little activity. Both the in vitro and in situ determinations suggested that the electron transport system of Legionella was active over a temperature range of 25 to 60/sup 0/C.

  9. Measure of Legionella pneumophila activity in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Soracco, R.J.; Pope, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    Detection of Legionella pneumophila by serogroup-specific fluorescent antibodies was combined with a tetrazolium dye (INT) to measure electron transport activity. The biological uptake and reduction of the INT dye was studied in pure cultures and in natural water samples with respect to temperature. Uptake was complete within 60 minutes. Controls inhibited with formaldehyde demonstrated little activity. Both the in vitro and in situ determinations suggested that the electron transport system of Legionella was active over a temperature range of 25/sup 0/ to 60/sup 0/C.

  10. In situ PEM fuel cell water measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, Rodney L; Mukundan, Rangachary; Davey, John R; Spendalow, Jacob S

    2008-01-01

    Efficient PEM fuel cell performance requires effective water management. The materials used, their durability, and the operating conditions under which fuel cells run, make efficient water management within a practical fuel cell system a primary challenge in developing commercially viable systems. We present experimental measurements of water content within operating fuel cells. in response to operational conditions, including transients and freezing conditions. To help understand the effect of components and operations, we examine water transport in operating fuel cells, measure the fuel cell water in situ and model the water transport within the fuel cell. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and Neutron imaging (using NIST's facilities) were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells with various conditions, including current density, relative humidity, inlet flows, flow orientation and variable GDL properties. Ice formation in freezing cells was also monitored both during operation and shut-down conditions.

  11. In situ PEM fuel cell water measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, Rodney L; Mukundan, Rangachary; Davey, John R; Spendelow, Jacob S; Hussey, Daniel S; Jacobson, David L; Arif, Muhammad

    2009-01-01

    Efficient PEM (Polymer Electrolyte Membrane) fuel cell performance requires effective water management. To achieve a deeper understanding of water transport and performance issues associated with water management, we have conducted in situ water examinations to help understand the effects of components and operations. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and Neutron imaging were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells, with various conditions, including current density, relative humidity, inlet flows, flow orientation and variable Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) properties. High resolution neutron radiography was used to image fuel cells during a variety of conditions. The effect of specific operating conditions, including flow direction (co-flow or counter-flow) was examined. Counter-flow operation was found to result in higher water content than co-flow operation, which correlates to lower membrane resistivity. A variety of cells were used to quantify the membrane water in situ during exposure to saturated gases, during fuel cell operation, and during hydrogen pump operation. The quantitative results show lower membrane water content than previous results suggested.

  12. WRF/Chem Analyses and Comparisons With In Situ, Aircraft and Satellite Data During MILAGRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Dubey, M. K.; Olsen, S.; Chylek, P.; Fast, J. D.; Tie, X.; de Foy, B.; Molina, L. T.; Boersma, K. F.; Millet, D. B.; Jacob, D. J.

    2006-12-01

    During March 2006, the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) field campaign was conducted over the Mexico City area in collaboration with several national and international agencies. The main objective of MILAGRO was to conduct measurements of Mexico City gaseous pollutants (CO, O3, NOx, SO2, etc.) and aerosol particles (PM2.5, PM10), and to study the atmospheric processes leading to the formation of secondary aerosols from precursor gases, and the transport and transformation of these gases and aerosols on local, regional, and global scales. Coordinated aircraft-based and ground-based measurements were made during MILAGRO supported by extensive satellite observations and modeling activities at various scales. The goal of this study is to examine and compare fully coupled WRF/Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting Chemistry) model simulations at 3-km resolution with in situ, aircraft and satellite data during MILAGRO. Emissions inventories from NCAR and PNNL are used for this study. Preliminary analyses suggest that the model simulations during workdays agree reasonably well with observations in terms of pollutant concentrations and diurnal cycles when the PNNL emissions inventory is used; however, the model tends to overestimate the pollutant concentrations when using the NCAR emissions inventory. On weekends and holidays, appreciable discrepancies are noted between the model simulations and observations using either of the emissions inventories, pointing to the need for weekend and workday specific emissions inventories. Work is underway to constrain Mexico City emissions using formaldehyde (HCHO) and NO2 measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on NASA's EOS-Aura satellite. In this study, we will also discuss emissions control strategies for alleviating pollution problems in Mexico City based on model sensitivity results.

  13. Experimental Measurement of In Situ Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbo, Maria; Milkereit, Bernd; Nasseri, Farzine; Schmitt, Douglas; Young, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The World Stress Map data is determined by stress indicators including earthquake focal mechanisms, in situ measurement in mining, oil and gas boreholes as well as the borehole cores, and geologic data. Unfortunately, these measurements are not only infrequent but sometimes infeasible, and do not provide nearly enough data points with high accuracy to correctly infer stress fields in deep mines around the world. Improvements in stress measurements of Earth's crust is fundamental to several industries such as oil and gas, mining, nuclear waste management, and enhanced geothermal systems. Quantifying the state of stress and the geophysical properties of different rock types is a major complication in geophysical monitoring of deep mines. Most stress measurement techniques involve either the boreholes or their cores, however these measurements usually only give stress along one axis, not the complete stress tensor. The goal of this project is to investigate a new method of acquiring a complete stress tensor of the in situ stress in the Earth's crust. This project is part of a comprehensive, exploration geophysical study in a deep, highly stressed mine located in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, and focuses on two boreholes located in this mine. These boreholes are approximately 400 m long with NQ diameters and are located at depths of about 1300 - 1600 m and 1700 - 2000 m. Two borehole logging surveys were performed on both boreholes, October 2013 and July 2015, in order to perform a time-lapse analysis of the geophysical changes in the mine. These multi-parameter surveys include caliper, full waveform sonic, televiewer, chargeability (IP), and resistivity. Laboratory experiments have been performed on borehole core samples of varying geologies from each borehole. These experiments have measured the geophysical properties including elastic modulus, bulk modulus, P- and S-wave velocities, and density. The apparatus' used for this project are geophysical imaging cells capable

  14. Aircraft-based in-situ calibration of a hot-wire anemometer in a compressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugo, Ronald J.; Nowlin, Scott R.; Hahn, Ila L.; Bishop, Kenneth P.; McCrae, Kimberley A.

    1999-08-01

    High-bandwidth measurements of atmospheric velocity and temperature fluctuations in the high troposphere/low stratosphere using aircraft-based hot-wire anemometers requires calibration. An in-situ calibration characterizing wire sensitivity at high subsonic Mach numbers and relatively low temperatures and pressures was performed. Custom designed constant-temperature and constant-current anemometer equipment has been used for these atmospheric measurements. Two sets of calibration experiments are described, one in a controlled laboratory environment where the Mach number and temperature were varied and the other on board a C-135E aircraft. The aircraft test were conducted by varying the flight Mach number at different pressure altitudes while flying into an upper-level low pressure area, achieving variability in velocity, temperature, and pressure. Results obtained indicate increased sensitivity to velocity while operating the wire at a low overheat ratio. The calibration data was fit to a form of King's law which was found to work well for in-situ calibrations.

  15. WRF/Chem Analyses and Comparisons with In Situ, Aircraft and Satellite Data during MILAGRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Dubey, M. K.; Zavala, M. A.; Olsen, S.; Molina, L. T.; de Foy, B.

    2007-05-01

    During March 2006, the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) field campaign was conducted over the Mexico City area in collaboration with several national and international institutions and agencies. Coordinated aircraft-based and ground-based measurements for gaseous pollutants (CO, O3, NOx, SO2 etc.) and aerosol particles (PM2.5, PM10) were made during MILAGRO supported by extensive satellite observations and modeling activities at various scales. The goal of this study is to examine and compare fully coupled WRF/Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting - Chemistry) model simulations at 3-km resolution with in situ, aircraft and satellite data during MILAGRO. Emissions input data compiled by the Molina Center for Energy and the Environment (MCE2) based on the official emissions inventory for Mexico City in 2004 are used for this study. The emissions rates in this inventory are regarded as representative for typical weekdays in Mexico City. For Saturday and Sunday, the emissions data are obtained by scaling the total emissions rates by 85% and 75%, respectively. For holidays, the emissions data are obtained by scaling the total emissions rates by 90%. Preliminary analyses suggest that the model simulations for gaseous species on weekdays agree reasonably well with observations in terms of pollutant concentrations and diurnal cycles. On weekends and holidays, appreciable discrepancies are noted between the model simulations and the observations, likely reflecting uncertainties in the emissions rates for weekends and holidays. Work is underway to employ the MCE2's newly constructed aerosols emissions data to validate the WRF/Chem simulated aerosol particles and to examine the transport and transformation of aerosols on local and regional scales. In this study, we will also discuss emissions control strategies for alleviating pollution problems in Mexico City based on model sensitivity results.

  16. In Situ Measurements of Meteoric Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Aiken, Arthur C.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Extraterrestrial material is the source of metal ions in the Earth's atmosphere, Each year approx. 10(exp 8) kg of material is intercepted by the Earth. The origin of this material is predominantly solar orbiting interplanetary debris from comets or asteroids that crosses the Earth's orbit. It contains a very small amount of interstellar material. On occasion the Earth passes through enhanced amounts of debris associated with the orbit of a decaying comet. This leads to enhanced meteor shower displays for up to several days. The number flux of shower material is typically several times the average sporadic background influx of material. Meteoric material is some of the earliest material formed in the solar system. By studying the relative elemental abundances of atmospheric metal ions, information can be gained on the chemical composition of cometary debris and the chemical makeup of the early solar system. Using in situ sampling with rocket-borne ion mass spectrometers; there have been approximately 50 flights that made measurements of the metal ion abundances at attitudes between 80 and 130 km. It is this altitude range where incoming meteoric particles am ablated, the larger ones giving rise to visible meteor. displays. In several rocket measurements isotopic ratios of different atomic ion mass components and metal molecular ion concentrations have been determined and used to identify unambiguously the measured species and to investigate the processes controlling the metal ion distributions The composition of the Earth's ionosphere was first sampled by an ion mass spectrometer flown an a rocket in 1956. In 1958 a rocket-borne ion spectrometer identified, fbr the first time, a layer of metal ions near 95 km. These data were interpreted as evidence of an extraterrestrial rather than a terrestrial source. Istomin predicted: "It seems probable that with some improvement in the method that analysis of the ion composition in the E-region may be used for determining

  17. An Intercomparison of In Situ Observations of Cloud Water Content from the NSF Gulfstream V Aircraft During IDEAS 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toohey, D. W.; Kalnajs, L.; Rainwater, B.; Twohy, C. H.; Noone, D. C.; Avallone, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Cloud water contents (CWC) were measured in situ during the IDEAS 2013 campaign by direct absorption infrared laser instruments that employ two different sampling methods on the NCAR Gulfstream-V aircraft. The University of Colorado CLH-2 instrument, mounted under the wing in a canister, employs a fiber-coupled distributed feedback laser (DFL) and direct absorption to quantify total water concentrations within a closed path of known pressure and temperature downstream of a heated inlet. Similarly, the NCAR CVI instrument uses a MayCom compact tunable diode laser (TDL) hygrometer mounted inside the aircraft cabin to measure condensed water evaporated in a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) inlet. These two CWC measurements, which have similar sub-isokinetic particle enhancement characteristics, should differ primarily by the amount of ambient water vapor that is admitted by the CLH-2 inlet, but rejected by the dry counterflow in the CVI. We measured that ambient water vapor with a Picarro cavity ringdown spectrometer sourced by a backward-facing inlet. During a series of flights through a variety of clouds near Broomfield, CO, we were able to intercompare these two methods for measuring CWCs, both of which are capable of high accuracy sampling over a wide range of CWCs from the lower atmosphere to the tropopause. The results help characterize the accuracy, time-response, and precision of the two methods, and they improve our understanding of the new approach for measuring CWC using the canister-mounted CLH-2 instrument on the Gulfstream-V aircraft.

  18. Evaluation of long-term surface-retrieved cloud droplet number concentration with in situ aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kyo-Sun Sunny; Riihimaki, Laura; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Schmid, Beat; Sivaraman, Chitra; Shi, Yan; McFarquhar, Greg M.

    2016-03-01

    A new operational retrieval of cloud droplet number concentration (ND) at cloud base has been produced from surface remote sensors at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site for 13 years from January 1998 to January 2011. The retrieval is based on surface radiometer measurements of cloud optical depth from the multifilter rotating shadow band radiometer and liquid water path from the microwave radiometer (MWR). It is only applicable for single-layered overcast warm (stratus or stratocumulus) clouds. Evaluation with in situ aircraft measurements during the extended-term aircraft field campaign, Routine ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO), shows that the retrieved ND robustly reproduces the primary mode of the in situ measured probability density function (PDF) but produces too wide a distribution, primarily caused by frequent high cloud droplet number concentration. Our analysis shows that the error in the MWR retrievals at low liquid water paths is one possible reason for this deficiency. Modification through the diagnosed liquid water path from the coordinate solution improves not only the PDF of the retrieved ND but also the relationship between the cloud droplet number concentration and cloud droplet effective radius. Consideration of entrainment effects rather than assuming an adiabatic cloud improves the values of the ND retrieval by reducing the magnitude of cloud droplet number concentration. Aircraft measurements and retrieval comparisons suggest that retrieving the vertical distribution of cloud droplet number concentration and effective radius is feasible with an improvement of the parameter representing the mixing effects between environment and clouds and with a better understanding of the effect of mixing degree on cloud properties.

  19. Aircraft Lightning Electromagnetic Environment Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Szatkowski, George N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines a NASA project plan for demonstrating a prototype lightning strike measurement system that is suitable for installation onto research aircraft that already operate in thunderstorms. This work builds upon past data from the NASA F106, FAA CV-580, and Transall C-180 flight projects, SAE ARP5412, and the European ILDAS Program. The primary focus is to capture airframe current waveforms during attachment, but may also consider pre and post-attachment current, electric field, and radiated field phenomena. New sensor technologies are being developed for this system, including a fiber-optic Faraday polarization sensor that measures lightning current waveforms from DC to over several Megahertz, and has dynamic range covering hundreds-of-volts to tens-of-thousands-of-volts. A study of the electromagnetic emission spectrum of lightning (including radio wave, microwave, optical, X-Rays and Gamma-Rays), and a compilation of aircraft transfer-function data (including composite aircraft) are included, to aid in the development of other new lightning environment sensors, their placement on-board research aircraft, and triggering of the onboard instrumentation system. The instrumentation system will leverage recent advances in high-speed, high dynamic range, deep memory data acquisition equipment, and fiber-optic interconnect.

  20. Adaptation of an In Situ Ground-Based Tropospheric OH/HO2 Instrument for Aircraft Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, William H.

    1997-01-01

    In-situ HO(x) (OH and HO2) measurements are an essential part of understanding the photochemistry of aircraft exhaust in the atmosphere. HO(x) affects the partitioning of nitrogen species in the NO(y) family. Its reactions are important sources and sinks for tropospheric ozone, thus providing a link between the NO(x) in aircraft exhaust and tropospheric ozone. OH mixing ratios are enhanced in aircraft wakes due to the photolysis of the HONO that is made close to the engine. Measurements of HO(x) in aircraft wakes, along with NO(x) measurements, thus provides a constraint on chemical models of the engine combustion and exhaust. The development of the Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS) is reported. We designed, developed, and successfully flew this instrument. It was part of the instrument complement on board the NASA DC-8 during SUCCESS, which took place in Kansas in April and May, 1996. ATHOS has a limit-of-detection for OH (S/N = 2) of 10(exp 5) OH molecules cm(exp -3) in less than 150 seconds. While this sensitivity is about 2-3 times less than the initial projections in the proposal, it is more than adequate for good measurements of OH and HO2 from the planetary boundary layer to the stratosphere. Our participation in SUCCESS was to be engineering test flights for ATHOS; however, the high-quality measurements we obtained are being used to study HO(x) photochemistry in contrails, clouds, and the clear air.

  1. In situ measurement of conductivity during nanocomposite film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blattmann, Christoph O.; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2016-05-01

    Flexible and electrically conductive nanocomposite films are essential for small, portable and even implantable electronic devices. Typically, such film synthesis and conductivity measurement are carried out sequentially. As a result, optimization of filler loading and size/morphology characteristics with respect to film conductivity is rather tedious and costly. Here, freshly-made Ag nanoparticles (nanosilver) are made by scalable flame aerosol technology and directly deposited onto polymeric (polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate)) films during which the resistance of the resulting nanocomposite is measured in situ. The formation and gas-phase growth of such flame-made nanosilver, just before incorporation onto the polymer film, is measured by thermophoretic sampling and microscopy. Monitoring the nanocomposite resistance in situ reveals the onset of conductive network formation by the deposited nanosilver growth and sinternecking. The in situ measurement is much faster and more accurate than conventional ex situ four-point resistance measurements since an electrically percolating network is detected upon its formation by the in situ technique. Nevertheless, general resistance trends with respect to filler loading and host polymer composition are consistent for both in situ and ex situ measurements. The time lag for the onset of a conductive network (i.e., percolation) depends linearly on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the host polymer. This is attributed to the increased nanoparticle-polymer interaction with decreasing Tg. Proper selection of the host polymer in combination with in situ resistance monitoring therefore enable the optimal preparation of conductive nanocomposite films.

  2. Aircraft(ER-2) and Balloon In-Situ Measurements of HC1, NO(sub 2), HNO(sub 3), N(sub 2)o, and CH(sub 4) for Testing Heterogeneous Chemistry on PSC's and Sulfate Aerosols in the 1991/92 Arctic Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, C.; May, R.; Scott, D.; Hu, H.

    1995-01-01

    Concentrations of HC1 measured in the 1991/3 northern hemisphere lower stratosphere from the ER-2 aircraft are significantly lower than model predictions using both gas phase and heterogeneous chemistry, but are in much better agreement with model predictions for the 1994 southern hemisphere.

  3. Water vapor in the lower stratosphere measured from aircraft flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.; Guenther, B.; Dunn, P.

    1977-01-01

    Water vapor in the lower stratosphere was measured in situ by two aluminum oxide hygrometers mounted on the nose of an RB57 aircraft. Data were taken nearly continuously from January to May 1974 from an altitude of approximately 11-19 km as the aircraft flew between 70 deg N and 50 deg S over the land areas in the Western Hemisphere. Pseudomeridional cross sections of water vapor and temperature were derived from the flight data and show mixing ratios predominantly between 2 and 4 microg/g with an extreme range of 1-8 microg/g. Measurement precision was estimated by comparing the simultaneously measured values from the two flight hygrometer systems. Accuracy was estimated to be about + or - 40% at 19 km. A height-averaged latitudinal cross section of water vapor indicates symmetry of wet and dry zones. This cross section is compared with other aircraft measurements and relates to meridional circulation models.

  4. IN SITU ELLIPSOMETRY FOR SHOCK COMPRESSION MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bakshi, L.; Eliezer, S.; Appelbaum, G.; Nissim, N.; Perelmutter, L.; Mond, M.

    2009-12-28

    Knowledge about the optical properties of materials at high pressure and high temperature is needed for EOS research. Ellipsometry measures the change in the polarization of a probe beam reflected from a surface. From the change in polarization, the real and imaginary parts of the time dependent complex index of refraction can be extracted. From the measured optical properties, fundamental physical properties of the material, such as emissivity, phase transitions, and electrical conductivity can be extracted. A dynamic ellipsometry measurement system with nanosecond resolution was built in order to measure all four stocks parameters. Gas gun was used to accelerate the impact flyer. Our experiments concentrated on the optical properties of 1020 steel targets with impact pressure range of 40-250 kbar. Although there are intrinsic difficulties with dynamic ellipsometric measurements, distinct changes were observed for 1020 steel under shock compression larger than 130 kbar, the alpha->epsilon phase transition.

  5. In situ measurements of OH and HO{sub 2} in the upper troposphere and stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Wennberg, P.O.; Hanisco, T.F.; Cohen, R.C.

    1995-10-01

    Recent aircraft and balloon borne measurements of OH and HO{sub 2} are reviewed. The authors demonstrate the ability of the laser-induced fluorescence technique to provide accurate, high signal to noise ratio measurements of OH throughout the upper troposphere and stratosphere. HO{sub 2} is measured as OH after gas phase chemical titration with nitric oxide. The addition of the HO{sub x} measurement capability to the suite of instruments aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft has provided a wealth of new information about the processes that determine the concentration of ozone in the lower stratosphere. These simultaneous, in situ measurements provide a unique test of present understanding of the mechanisms that control the odd-hydrogen chemistry of the lower atmosphere. 17 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Recent Advances in the Tempest UAS for In-Situ Measurements in Highly-Dynamic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argrow, B. M.; Frew, E.; Houston, A. L.; Weiss, C.

    2014-12-01

    The spring 2010 deployment of the Tempest UAS during the VORTEX2 field campaign verified that a small UAS, supported by a customized mobile communications, command, and control (C3) architecture, could simultaneously satisfy Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airspace requirements, and make in-situ thermodynamic measurements in supercell thunderstorms. A multi-hole airdata probe was recently integrated into the Tempest UAS airframe and verification flights were made in spring 2013 to collect in-situ wind measurements behind gust fronts produced by supercell thunderstorms in northeast Colorado. Using instantaneous aircraft attitude estimates from the autopilot, the in-situ measurements were converted to inertial wind estimates, and estimates of uncertainty in the wind measurements was examined. To date, the limited deployments of the Tempest UAS have primarily focused on addressing the engineering and regulatory requirements to conduct supercell research, and the Tempest UAS team of engineers and meteorologists is preparing for deployments with the focus on collecting targeted data for meteorological exploration and hypothesis testing. We describe the recent expansion of the operations area and altitude ceiling of the Tempest UAS, engineering issues for accurate inertial wind estimates, new concepts of operation that include the simultaneous deployment of multiple aircraft with mobile ground stations, and a brief description of our current effort to develop a capability for the Tempest UAS to perform autonomous path planning to maximize energy harvesting from the local wind field for increased endurance.

  7. In-situ measurements of lunar heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langseth, M. G.; Keihm, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    During the Apollo program two successful heat flow measurements were made in situ on the lunar surface. At the Apollo 15 site a value of 0.0000031 watts/sqcm was measured and at the Apollo 17 site a value of 0.0000022 watts/sqcm was determined. Both measurements have uncertainty limits of + or - 20% and have been corrected for perturbing topographic effects. The apparent difference between the observations may correlate with observed variations in the surface abundance of thorium. Comparison with earlier determinations of heat flow, using the microwave emission spectrum from the moon, gives support to the high gradients and heat flows observed in situ.

  8. In-situ measurements of lunar heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langseth, M. B.; Keihm, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    During the Apollo program two successful heat flow measurements were made in situ on the lunar surface. At the Apollo 15 site a value of .0000031 W/sq cm was measured, and at the Apollo 17 site a value of .0000022 W/sq cm was determined. Both measurements have uncertainty limits of + or - 20 percent and have been corrected for perturbing topographic effects. The apparent difference between the observations may correlate with observed variations in the surface abundance of thorium. Comparison with earlier determinations of heat flow, using the microwave emission spectrum from the moon, gives support to the high gradients and heat flows observed in situ.

  9. Instrumentation for the in-situ measurement of building envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Grot, R.; Modera, M.; Fang, J.B.; Park, H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses the types of instrumentation that can be used for the in-situ measurement of the thermal resistance of building components. Four types of instrumentation are described: noncontact spot radiometers, contact heat flow transducers, portable calorimeters, and a type of portable guarded hot plate device developed by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, called an envelope thermal testing unit. A brief description of each device is given along with a description of how the device is used to measure in-situ thermal properties of building components. A theoretical justification of the use of long-term averaging of the heat flow and temperature data for estimating the thermal resistance is also presented. The accuracy of each in-situ measurement method is accessed.

  10. In-situ physical properties measurements using crosswell acoustic data

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.A.; Albright, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    Crosswell acoustic surveys enable the in-situ measurements of elastic moduli, Poisson's ratio, porosity, and apparent seismic Q of gas-bearing low-permeability formations represented at the Department of Energy Multi-Well Experiment (MWX) site near Rifle, Colorado. These measurements, except for Q, are compared with laboratory measurements on core taken from the same depths at which the crosswell measurements are made. Seismic Q determined in situ is compared to average values for sandstone. Porosity was determined from crosswell data using the empirical relationship between acoustic velocity, porosity, and effective pressure developed by Domenico. Domenico, S.N., ''Rock Lithology and Porosity Determination from Shear and compressional Wave Velocity,'' Geophysics, Vol. 49, No. 9, Aug. 1984, pp. 1188-1195. In-situ porosities are significantly greater than the core-derived values. Sources of the discrepancy may arise from (i) the underestimation of porosity that can result when Boyle's Law measurements are made on low-permeability core and (ii) the application of Dominico's relationship, which is developed for clean sands, to the mixed sandstone and shale lithologies represented at the MWX site. Values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio derived from crosswell measurements are comparable to values obtained from core. Apparent seismic Q measured in situ between wells is lower than Q measured on core and clearly shows the heterogeneity of sandstone deposited in a fluvial environment. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Aircraft measurements of wave clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Z.; Blyth, A. M.; Bower, K. N.; Crosier, J.; Choularton, T.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, aircraft measurements are presented of liquid phase (ice-free) wave clouds made at temperatures greater than -5°C that formed over Scotland, UK. The horizontal variations of the vertical velocity across wave clouds display a distinct pattern. The maximum updraughts occur at the upshear flanks of the clouds and the strong downdraughts at the downshear flanks. The cloud droplet concentrations were a couple of hundreds per cubic centimetres, and the drops generally had a mean diameter between 15-45 μm. A small proportion of the drops were drizzle. The measurements presented here and in previous recent studies suggest a different interaction of dynamics and microphysics in wave clouds from the accepted model. The results in this paper provide a case for future numerical simulation of wave cloud and the interaction between wave and cloud.

  12. Aircraft measurements of wave cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Z.; Blyth, A. M.; Bower, K. N.; Crosier, J.; Choularton, T.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, aircraft measurements are presented of liquid phase (ice-free) wave clouds made at temperatures greater than -5 °C that formed over Scotland, UK. The horizontal variations of the vertical velocity across wave clouds display a distinct pattern. The maximum updraughts occur at the upshear flanks of the clouds and the strong downdraughts at the downshear flanks. The cloud droplet concentrations were a couple of hundreds per cubic centimetres, and the drops generally had a mean diameter between 15-45 μm. A small proportion of the drops were drizzle. A new definition of a mountain-wave cloud is given, based on the measurements presented here and previous studies. The results in this paper provide a case for future numerical simulation of wave cloud and the interaction between wave and clouds.

  13. Subsurface In situ elemental composition measurements with PING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, A.; McClanahan, T.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.

    This paper describes the Probing In situ with Neutron and Gamma rays (PING) instrument, that can measure the subsurface elemental composition in situ for any rocky body in the solar system without the need for digging into the surface. PING consists of a Pulsed Neutron Generator (PNG), a gamma ray spectrometer and neutron detectors. Subsurface elements are stimulated by high-energy neutrons to emit gamma rays at characteristic energies. This paper will show how the detection of these gamma rays results in a measurement of elemental composition. Examples of the basalt to granite ratios for aluminum and silicon abundance are provided.

  14. Granites: Relation of Properties in situ to Laboratory Measurements.

    PubMed

    Simmons, G; Nur, A

    1968-11-15

    The velocity of compressional waves and electrical resistivity in granite in situ measured in two 3-kilometer boreholes exhibits very little variation with depth, in contrast with the variation predicted from laboratory measurements on dry samples. These observations can be explained either by the absence of small open cracks in the rocks in situ or by the effects of complete saturation with water. The seismic velocities of many granites at shallow depths in the earth's crust may be significantly larger than was previously believed. Other properties are also affected; correction for the effect of cracks on thermal conductivity raises the average heat flow in shield areas by as much as 20 percent.

  15. Subsurface In Situ Elemental Composition Measurements with PING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, Ann; McClanahan, Timothy; Bodnarik, Julia; Evans, Larry; Nowicki, Suzanne; Schweitzer, Jeffrey; Starr, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the Probing In situ with Neutron and Gamma rays (PING) instrument, that can measure the subsurface elemental composition in situ for any rocky body in the solar system without the need for digging into the surface. PING consists of a Pulsed Neutron Generator (PNG), a gamma ray spectrometer and neutron detectors. Subsurface elements are stimulated by high-energy neutrons to emit gamma rays at characteristic energies. This paper will show how the detection of these gamma rays results in a measurement of elemental composition. Examples of the basalt to granite ratios for aluminum and silicon abundance are provided.

  16. In situ observations in aircraft exhaust plumes in the lower stratosphere at midlatitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Keim, E. R.; Woodbridge, E. L.; Gao, R. S.; Boering, K. A.; Daube, B. C.; Wofsy, S. C.; Lohmann, R. P.; Hintsa, E. J.; Dessler, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    Instrumentation on the NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft has been used to observe engine exhaust from the same aircraft while operating in the lower stratosphere. Encounters with the exhaust plume occurred approximately 10 min after emission with spatial scales near 2 km and durations of up to 10 s. Measurements include total reactive nitrogen, NO(y), the component species NO and NO2, CO2, H2O, CO, N2O, condensation nuclei, and meteorological parameters. The integrated amounts of CO2 and H2O during the encounters are consistent with the stoichiometry of fuel combustion (1:1 molar). Emission indices (EI) for NO(x) (= NO + NO2), CO, and N2O are calculated using simultaneous measurements of CO2. EI values for NO(x) near 4 g/(kg fuel) are in good agreement with values scaled from limited ground-based tests of the ER-2 engine. Non-NO(x) species comprise less than about 20% of emitted reactive nitrogen, consistent with model evaluations. In addition to demonstrating the feasibility of aircraft plume detection, these results increase confidence in the projection of emissions from current and proposed supersonic aircraft fleets and hence in the assessment of potential long-term changes in the atmosphere.

  17. In situ spectrophotometric measurement of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liua, Xuewu; Byrne, Robert H.; Adornato, Lori; Yates, Kimberly K.; Kaltenbacher, Eric; Ding, Xiaoling; Yang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous in situ sensors are needed to document the effects of today’s rapid ocean uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (e.g., ocean acidification). General environmental conditions (e.g., biofouling, turbidity) and carbon-specific conditions (e.g., wide diel variations) present significant challenges to acquiring long-term measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) with satisfactory accuracy and resolution. SEAS-DIC is a new in situ instrument designed to provide calibrated, high-frequency, long-term measurements of DIC in marine and fresh waters. Sample water is first acidified to convert all DIC to carbon dioxide (CO2). The sample and a known reagent solution are then equilibrated across a gas-permeable membrane. Spectrophotometric measurement of reagent pH can thereby determine the sample DIC over a wide dynamic range, with inherent calibration provided by the pH indicator’s molecular characteristics. Field trials indicate that SEAS-DIC performs well in biofouling and turbid waters, with a DIC accuracy and precision of ∼2 μmol kg–1 and a measurement rate of approximately once per minute. The acidic reagent protects the sensor cell from biofouling, and the gas-permeable membrane excludes particulates from the optical path. This instrument, the first spectrophotometric system capable of automated in situ DIC measurements, positions DIC to become a key parameter for in situ CO2-system characterizations.

  18. In situ spectrophotometric measurement of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuewu; Byrne, Robert H; Adornato, Lori; Yates, Kimberly K; Kaltenbacher, Eric; Ding, Xiaoling; Yang, Bo

    2013-10-01

    Autonomous in situ sensors are needed to document the effects of today's rapid ocean uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (e.g., ocean acidification). General environmental conditions (e.g., biofouling, turbidity) and carbon-specific conditions (e.g., wide diel variations) present significant challenges to acquiring long-term measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) with satisfactory accuracy and resolution. SEAS-DIC is a new in situ instrument designed to provide calibrated, high-frequency, long-term measurements of DIC in marine and fresh waters. Sample water is first acidified to convert all DIC to carbon dioxide (CO2). The sample and a known reagent solution are then equilibrated across a gas-permeable membrane. Spectrophotometric measurement of reagent pH can thereby determine the sample DIC over a wide dynamic range, with inherent calibration provided by the pH indicator's molecular characteristics. Field trials indicate that SEAS-DIC performs well in biofouling and turbid waters, with a DIC accuracy and precision of ∼2 μmol kg(-1) and a measurement rate of approximately once per minute. The acidic reagent protects the sensor cell from biofouling, and the gas-permeable membrane excludes particulates from the optical path. This instrument, the first spectrophotometric system capable of automated in situ DIC measurements, positions DIC to become a key parameter for in situ CO2-system characterizations.

  19. In situ Measurements of Phytoplankton Fluorescence Using Low Cost Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Leeuw, Thomas; Boss, Emmanuel S.; Wright, Dana L.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorometry has long been used as a method to study phytoplankton in the ocean. In situ fluorometry is used frequently in oceanography to provide depth-resolved estimates of phytoplankton biomass. However, the high price of commercially manufactured in situ fluorometers has made them unavailable to some individuals and institutions. Presented here is an investigation into building an in situ fluorometer using low cost electronics. The goal was to construct an easily reproducible in situ fluorometer from simple and widely available electronic components. The simplicity and modest cost of the sensor makes it valuable to students and professionals alike. Open source sharing of architecture and software will allow students to reconstruct and customize the sensor on a small budget. Research applications that require numerous in situ fluorometers or expendable fluorometers can also benefit from this study. The sensor costs US$150.00 and can be constructed with little to no previous experience. The sensor uses a blue LED to excite chlorophyll a and measures fluorescence using a silicon photodiode. The sensor is controlled by an Arduino microcontroller that also serves as a data logger. PMID:23783738

  20. IN SITU Device for Real-Time Catalyst Deactivation Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fossil Energy Research

    2008-03-31

    SCR catalyst management has become an important operations and maintenance activity for coal-fired utility boilers in the United States. To facilitate this activity, a method to determine Catalyst Activity in situ is being developed. This report describes the methodology and presents the results of a two ozone season demonstration conducted at Alabama Power Company's Gorgas Unit 10 during the 2005 and 2006 ozone seasons. The results showed that the in situ measurements are in good agreement with the laboratory measurements and the technique has some advantages over the traditional laboratory method of determining Catalyst Activity and Reactor Potential. SCR Performance is determined by the overall Reactor Potential (the product of the Catalyst Activity and the available surface area per unit of flue gas). The in situ approach provides a direct measurement of Reactor Potential under actual operating conditions, whereas laboratory measurements of Catalyst Activity need to be coupled with estimates of catalyst pluggage and flue gas flowrate in order to assess Reactor Potential. The project also showed that the in situ activity results can easily be integrated into catalyst management software to aid in making informed catalyst decisions.

  1. In situ sensors for measurements in the global trosposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saeger, M. L.; Eaton, W. C.; Wright, R. S.; White, J. H.; Tommerdahl, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    Current techniques available for the in situ measurement of ambient trace gas species, particulate composition, and particulate size distribution are reviewed. The operational specifications of the various techniques are described. Most of the techniques described are those that have been used in airborne applications or show promise of being adaptable to airborne applications. Some of the instruments described are specialty items that are not commercially-available. In situ measurement techniques for several meteorological parameters important in the study of the distribution and transport of ambient air pollutants are discussed. Some remote measurement techniques for meteorological parameters are also discussed. State-of-the-art measurement capabilities are compared with a list of capabilities and specifications desired by NASA for ambient measurements in the global troposphere.

  2. Measurement of In-Flight Aircraft Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokoloski, M.; Arnold, C.; Rider, D.; Beer, R.; Worden, H.; Glavich, T.

    1995-01-01

    Aircraft engine emission and their chemical and physical evolution can be measured in flight using high resolution infrared spectroscopy. The Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES), designed for remote measure- ments of atmosphere emissions from an airborne platform, is an ideal tool for the evaluation of aircraft emissions and their evolution. Capabilities of AES will be discussed. Ground data will be given.

  3. Water vapor in the lower stratosphere measured from aircraft flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.; Guenther, B.; Dunn, P.

    1976-01-01

    Water vapor in the lower stratosphere was measured in situ by two aluminum oxide hygrometers mounted on the nose of an RB57 aircraft. Data were taken nearly continuously from January to May 1974 from an altitude of approximately 11 km to 19 km as the aircraft flew between 70 deg N and 50 deg S over the land areas in the Western Hemisphere. Pseudomeridional cross sections of water vapor and temperature are derived from the flight data and show mixing ratios predominantly between 2 and 4 micron gm/gm with an extreme range of 1 to 8 micron gm/gm. Measurement precision is estimated by comparing the simultaneously measured values from the two flight hygrometer systems. Accuracy is estimated to be about + or - 40 percent at 19 km. A height-averaged latitudinal cross section of water vapor shows symmetry of wet and dry zones.

  4. In-situ measurements of the radioactive fallout deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korun, M.; Martinčič, R.; Pucelj, B.

    1991-02-01

    An improved method to determine radionuclide concentrations in soil and the radioactive fallout deposit is presented. The approach is based on in-situ gamma-ray spectrometric measurements performed with a portable high resolution gamma spectrometer and on calculations of the depth distribution based on the energy dependence of the attenuation of gamma rays in soil. The results are compared with laboratory analysis of collected soil samples.

  5. In situ correlative measurements for the ultraviolet differential absorption lidar and the high spectral resolution lidar air quality remote sensors: 1980 PEPE/NEROS program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Beck, S. M.; Mathis, J. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    In situ correlative measurements were obtained with a NASA aircraft in support of two NASA airborne remote sensors participating in the Environmental Protection Agency's 1980persistent elevated pollution episode (PEPE) and Northeast regional oxidant study (NEROS) field program in order to provide data for evaluating the capability of two remote sensors for measuring mixing layer height, and ozone and aerosol concentrations in the troposphere during the 1980 PEPE/NEROS program. The in situ aircraft was instrumented to measure temperature, dewpoint temperature, ozone concentrations, and light scattering coefficient. In situ measurements for ten correlative missions are given and discussed. Each data set is presented in graphical and tabular format aircraft flight plans are included.

  6. Measuring in situ primary and competitive hybridization events on microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milam, Valeria; Hardin, James

    2012-02-01

    Understanding hybridization events at surfaces is crucial for optimizing nucleic acid detection platforms as well as DNA-mediated colloidal assembly. We used flow cytometry to measure time-dependent primary and competitive hybridization events of perfectly matched and mismatched targets on microsphere surfaces. In addition to more conventional sample preparation involving multiple wash and resuspension steps prior to measurement, we sampled the reaction volume directly for in situ measurements to minimize potential dissociation events between weaker partner strands during wash steps. Similar to prior reports for oligonucletide solutions, the nearly identical rates for primary hybridization events on microsphere surfaces were independent of target sequence and reached an equilibrium value within 30 min. The extent of in situ primary hybridization events for immobilized probes, however, deviated from solution model predictions. In situ competitive hybridization events were at least 100-fold slower than primary hybridization events and did not appear to reach equilibrium. The kinetics of competitive hybridization events on microspheres are consistent with predicted effects stemming from toehold effects or base length differences between primary and secondary targets.

  7. In-Situ Load System for Calibrating and Validating Aerodynamic Properties of Scaled Aircraft in Ground-Based Aerospace Testing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Commo, Sean A. (Inventor); Lynn, Keith C. (Inventor); Landman, Drew (Inventor); Acheson, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An In-Situ Load System for calibrating and validating aerodynamic properties of scaled aircraft in ground-based aerospace testing applications includes an assembly having upper and lower components that are pivotably interconnected. A test weight can be connected to the lower component to apply a known force to a force balance. The orientation of the force balance can be varied, and the measured forces from the force balance can be compared to applied loads at various orientations to thereby develop calibration factors.

  8. In-situ aircraft observations of ice supersaturation and cirrus clouds in global field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, M.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Clouds play important roles in the Earth's climate and weather system, and the net forcing of all clouds results in a cooling effect on the Earth's surface. However, clouds remain one of the largest uncertainties in climate models. The IPCC AR4 report shows that both the magnitude and sign of the changes in cloud radiative forcing in response to anthropogenic aerosols are highly uncertain. Cirrus clouds are a type of ice clouds that occur at 235-185K with a net warming effect on the Earth surface. Cirrus cloud formation requires ice supersaturation (ISS), i.e., relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) greater than 100%. Because ISS is critically related to the ice nucleation processes, it is also an indicator of any changes of ice nucleation and cirrus cloud formation. Here we use the in-situ 1 Hz aircraft observations by the Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) hygrometer on board the NSF Gulfstream-V research aircraft to analyze the differences of ISS distribution between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres (NH and SH). Our dataset is based on five deployments of the NSF Hiaper Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) Global field campaigns, including nine Pole-to-Pole transects from the year of 2009 to 2011, extending from 87°N to 67°S, covering four seasons, and the Stratosphere-Troposphere Analyses of Regional Transport (START08) campaign over North America region in April-June 2008. The flight track was mostly over the mid-Pacific Ocean, and also parts of the North America and Australia. We found that the frequency of ISS is much higher in NH than SH for the clear-sky conditions, while the in-cloud conditions show no significant difference between the two hemispheres. Our conclusion is in sharp contrast to the previous aircraft observations which concluded that the SH has higher frequency of ISS for clear-sky conditions based on two flight campaigns at Prestwick, Scotland (55°N) and Punta Arenas, Chile (55°S). We propose a method to separate

  9. Polarized Imaging Nephelometer for in situ airborne measurements of aerosol light scattering.

    PubMed

    Dolgos, Gergely; Martins, J Vanderlei

    2014-09-01

    Global satellite remote sensing of aerosols requires in situ measurements to enable the calibration and validation of algorithms. In order to improve our understanding of light scattering by aerosol particles, and to enable routine in situ airborne measurements of aerosol light scattering, we have developed an instrument, called the Polarized Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph). We designed and built the PI-Neph at the Laboratory for Aerosols, Clouds and Optics (LACO) of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). This portable instrument directly measures the ambient scattering coefficient and phase matrix elements of aerosols, in the field or onboard an aircraft. The measured phase matrix elements are the P(11), phase function, and P(12). Lasers illuminate the sampled ambient air and aerosol, and a wide field of view camera detects scattered light in a scattering angle range of 3° to 176°. The PI-Neph measures an ensemble of particles, supplying the relevant quantity for satellite remote sensing, as opposed to particle-by-particle measurements that have other applications. Comparisons with remote sensing measurements will have to consider aircraft inlet effects. The PI-Neph first measured at a laser wavelength of 532nm, and was first deployed successfully in 2011 aboard the B200 aircraft of NASA Langley during the Development and Evaluation of satellite ValidatiOn Tools by Experimenters (DEVOTE) project. In 2013, we upgraded the PI-Neph to measure at 473nm, 532nm, and 671nm nearly simultaneously. LACO has deployed the PI-Neph on a number of airborne field campaigns aboard three different NASA aircraft. This paper describes the PI-Neph measurement approach and validation by comparing measurements of artificial spherical aerosols with Mie theory. We provide estimates of calibration uncertainties, which show agreement with the small residuals between measurements of P(11) and -P(12)/P(11) and Mie theory. We demonstrate the capability of the PI-Neph to measure

  10. Polarized Imaging Nephelometer for in situ airborne measurements of aerosol light scattering.

    PubMed

    Dolgos, Gergely; Martins, J Vanderlei

    2014-09-01

    Global satellite remote sensing of aerosols requires in situ measurements to enable the calibration and validation of algorithms. In order to improve our understanding of light scattering by aerosol particles, and to enable routine in situ airborne measurements of aerosol light scattering, we have developed an instrument, called the Polarized Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph). We designed and built the PI-Neph at the Laboratory for Aerosols, Clouds and Optics (LACO) of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). This portable instrument directly measures the ambient scattering coefficient and phase matrix elements of aerosols, in the field or onboard an aircraft. The measured phase matrix elements are the P(11), phase function, and P(12). Lasers illuminate the sampled ambient air and aerosol, and a wide field of view camera detects scattered light in a scattering angle range of 3° to 176°. The PI-Neph measures an ensemble of particles, supplying the relevant quantity for satellite remote sensing, as opposed to particle-by-particle measurements that have other applications. Comparisons with remote sensing measurements will have to consider aircraft inlet effects. The PI-Neph first measured at a laser wavelength of 532nm, and was first deployed successfully in 2011 aboard the B200 aircraft of NASA Langley during the Development and Evaluation of satellite ValidatiOn Tools by Experimenters (DEVOTE) project. In 2013, we upgraded the PI-Neph to measure at 473nm, 532nm, and 671nm nearly simultaneously. LACO has deployed the PI-Neph on a number of airborne field campaigns aboard three different NASA aircraft. This paper describes the PI-Neph measurement approach and validation by comparing measurements of artificial spherical aerosols with Mie theory. We provide estimates of calibration uncertainties, which show agreement with the small residuals between measurements of P(11) and -P(12)/P(11) and Mie theory. We demonstrate the capability of the PI-Neph to measure

  11. In situ measurement of tritium permeation through stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Walter G. Luscher; David J. Senor; Kevin K. Clayton; Glen R. Longhurst

    2013-06-01

    The TMIST-2 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory to evaluate tritium permeation through Type 316 stainless steel (316 SS). The interior of a 316 SS seamless tube specimen was exposed to a 4He carrier gas mixed with a specified quantity of tritium (T2) to yield partial pressures of 0.1, 5, and 50 Pa at 292 degrees C and 330 degrees C. In situ tritium permeation measurements were made by passing a He-Ne sweep gas over the outer surface of the specimen to carry the permeated tritium to a bubbler column for liquid scintillation counting. Results from in situ permeation measurements were compared with predictions based on an ex-reactor permeation correlation in the literature. In situ permeation data were also used to derive an in-reactor permeation correlation as a function of temperature and pressure over the ranges considered in this study. In addition, the triton recoil contribution to tritium permeation, which results from the transmutation of 3He to T, was also evaluated by introducing a 4He carrier gas mixed with 3He at a partial pressure of 1013 Pa at 330 degrees C. Less than 3% of the tritium resulting from 3He transmutation contributed to tritium permeation.

  12. Comparison between S. T. radar and in situ balloon measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalaudier, F.; Barat, J.; Bertin, F.; Brun, E.; Crochet, M.; Cuq, F.

    1986-01-01

    A campaign for simultaneous in situ and remote observation of both troposphere and stratosphere took place near Aire-sur-l'Adour (in southeastern France) on May 4, 1984. The aim of this campaign was a better understanding of the physics of radar echoes. The backscattered signal obtained with a stratosphere-troposphere radar both at the vertical and 15 deg. off vertical is compared with the velocity and temperature measurements made in the same region (about 10 km north of the radar site) by balloon-borne ionic anenometers and temperature sensors. In situ measurements clearly indicate that the temperature fluctuations are not always consistent with the standard turbulent theory. Nevertheless, the assumptions generally made (isotropy and turbulent field in k) and the classical formulation so derived for radar reflectivity are able to reproduce the shape of the radar return power profiles in oblique directions. Another significant result is the confirmation of the role played by the atmospheric stratification in the vertical echo power. It is important to develop these simultaneous in situ and remote experiments for a better description of the dynamical and thermal structure of the atmosphere and for a better understanding of the mechanisms governing clear-air radar reflectivity.

  13. Combining Remote Sensing with in situ Measurements for Riverine Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calantoni, J.; Palmsten, M. L.; Simeonov, J.; Dobson, D. W.; Zarske, K.; Puleo, J. A.; Holland, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    At the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory we are employing a wide variety of novel remote sensing techniques combined with traditional in situ sampling to characterize riverine hydrodynamics and morphodynamics. Surface currents were estimated from particle image velocimetry (PIV) using imagery from visible to infrared bands, from both fixed and airborne platforms. Terrestrial LIDAR has been used for subaerial mapping from a fixed platform. Additionally, LIDAR has been combined with hydrographic surveying (multibeam) in mobile scanning mode using a small boat. Hydrographic surveying (side scan) has also been performed using underwater autonomous vehicles. Surface drifters have been deployed in combination with a remotely operated, floating acoustic Doppler current profiler. Other fixed platform, in situ sensors, such as pencil beam and sector scanning sonars, acoustic Doppler velocimeters, and water level sensors have been deployed. We will present an overview of a variety of measurements from different rivers around the world focusing on validation examples of remotely sensed quantities with more traditional in situ measurements. Finally, we will discuss long-term goals to use remotely sensed data within an integrated environmental modeling framework.

  14. In situ measurement of tritium permeation through stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin K.; Longhurst, Glen R.

    2013-06-01

    The TMIST-2 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory to evaluate tritium permeation through Type 316 stainless steel (316 SS). The interior of a 316 SS seamless tube specimen was exposed to a 4He carrier gas mixed with a specified quantity of tritium (T2) to yield partial pressures of 0.1, 5, and 50 Pa at 292 °C and 330 °C. In situ tritium permeation measurements were made by passing a He-Ne sweep gas over the outer surface of the specimen to carry the permeated tritium to a bubbler column for liquid scintillation counting. Results from in situ permeation measurements were compared with predictions based on an ex-reactor permeation correlation in the literature. In situ permeation data were also used to derive an in-reactor permeation correlation as a function of temperature and pressure over the ranges considered in this study. In addition, the triton recoil contribution to tritium permeation, which results from the transmutation of 3He to T, was also evaluated by introducing a 4He carrier gas mixed with 3He at a partial pressure of 1013 Pa at 330 °C. Less than 3% of the tritium resulting from 3He transmutation contributed to tritium permeation.

  15. Summary of aircraft results for 1978 southeastern Virginia urban plume measurement study of ozone, nitrogen oxides, and methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Wornom, D. E.; Mathis, J. J., Jr.; Sebacher, D. I.

    1980-01-01

    Ozone production was determined from aircraft and surface in situ measurements, as well as from an airborne laser absorption spectrometer. Three aircraft and approximately 10 surface stations provided air-quality data. Extensive meteorological, mixing-layer-height, and ozone-precursor data were also measured. Approximately 50 hrs (9 flight days) of data from the aircraft equipped to monitor ozone, nitrogen oxides, dewpoint temperature, and temperature are presented. In addition, each experiment conducted is discussed.

  16. Small Aircraft RF Interference Path Loss Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.; Mielnik, John J.; Salud, Maria Theresa P.

    2007-01-01

    Interference to aircraft radio receivers is an increasing concern as more portable electronic devices are allowed onboard. Interference signals are attenuated as they propagate from inside the cabin to aircraft radio antennas mounted on the outside of the aircraft. The attenuation level is referred to as the interference path loss (IPL) value. Significant published IPL data exists for transport and regional category airplanes. This report fills a void by providing data for small business/corporate and general aviation aircraft. In this effort, IPL measurements are performed on ten small aircraft of different designs and manufacturers. Multiple radio systems are addressed. Along with the typical worst-case coupling values, statistical distributions are also reported that could lead to more meaningful interference risk assessment.

  17. IN-SITU MEASUREMENT OF TRITIUM PERMEATION THROUGH STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin; Longhurst, Glen R.

    2013-06-01

    The TMIST-2 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory to evaluate tritium permeation through Type 316 stainless steel (316 SS). The interior of a 316 SS seamless tube specimen was exposed to a 4He carrier gas mixed with a specified quantity of tritium (T2) to yield partial pressures of 0.1, 5, and 50 Pa at 292° and 330°C. In-situ tritium permeation measurements were made by passing a He-Ne sweep gas over the outer surface of the specimen to carry the permeated tritium to a bubbler column for liquid scintillation counting. An irradiation enhancement factor (IEF) was determined by comparing in-situ permeation data with a correlation for ex-reactor hydrogen permeation through austenitic stainless steel developed from literature data and reported by Le Claire. Nominal values for the IEF ranged between 3 and 5 for 316 SS. In-situ permeation data were also used to derive an in-reactor permeation correlation as a function of temperature and pressure. In addition, the triton recoil contribution to tritium permeation, which results from the transmutation of 3He to T, was also evaluated by introducing a 4He carrier gas mixed with 3He at a partial pressure of 1013 Pa at 330°C. Less than 3% of the tritium resulting from 3He transmutation contributed to tritium permeation.

  18. In Situ Measurement of Tritium Permeation Through Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin; Longhurst, Glen

    2013-06-01

    The TMIST-2 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory to evaluate tritium permeation through Type 316 stainless steel (316 SS). The interior of a 316 SS seamless tube specimen was exposed to a 4He carrier gas mixed with a specified quantity of tritium (T2) to yield partial pressures of 0.1, 5, and 50 Pa at 292° and 330°C. In-situ tritium permeation measurements were made by passing a He-Ne sweep gas over the outer surface of the specimen to carry the permeated tritium to a bubbler column for liquid scintillation counting. An irradiation enhancement factor (IEF) was determined by comparing in-situ permeation data with a correlation for ex-reactor hydrogen permeation through austenitic stainless steel developed from literature data and reported by Le Claire. Nominal values for the IEF ranged between 3 and 5 for 316 SS. In-situ permeation data were also used to derive an in-reactor permeation correlation as a function of temperature and pressure. In addition, the triton recoil contribution to tritium permeation, which results from the transmutation of 3He to T, was also evaluated by introducing a 4He carrier gas mixed with 3He at a partial pressure of 1013 Pa at 330°C. Less than 3% of the tritium resulting from 3He transmutation contributed to tritium permeation.

  19. Dissolved-oxygen quenching of in-situ fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudyk, Wayne; Tonaszuck, David; Pohlig, Kenneth

    1993-04-01

    In-situ fluorescence measurements of aromatic organic ground water contaminants do not always agree with gas chromatographic methods. Dissolved oxygen quenching of fluorescence may be an interferant in field measurements. Two standard fluorescent aromatics, quinine sulfate and naphthalene, were evaluated in this study. Over the range of dissolved oxygen concentrations expected to be encountered in the field, no effects of oxygen quenching on fluorescence of these compounds was observed. Quenching of quinine sulfate fluorescence by sodium chloride was observed using this system. Sodium chloride quenching was shown to follow the Stern-Volmer relation.

  20. In-Situ Dust Measurements in Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Gruen, E.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-04-01

    Jupiter's ring system -- the archetype of ethereal ring systems -- consists of at least three components: the main ring, the vertically extended halo and the gossamer ring(s). The small moonlets Thebe and Amalthea orbit Jupiter within the gossamer ring region and structure in the intensity obtained from imaging observations indicates that these moons are the dominant sources of the gossamer ring material. The current picture implies that particles ejected from a source moon evolve inward under the Poynting-Robertson drag. Beyond Thebe's orbit, a very faint outward extension of the gossamer ring has also been observed which is not yet explained. Typical grain radii derived from optical imaging are a few micrometers. In November 2002 the Galileo spacecraft traversed the gossamer ring for the first time and had a close flyby at Amalthea. With the in-situ dust detector on board, dust measurements were collected throughout the gossamer ring and close to Amalthea. Several hundred impacts of dust grains were recorded and the data sets (impact charges, rise times, impact directions, etc.) of about 70 impacts were transmitted to Earth. In-situ dust measurements provide information about the physical properties of the dust environment not accessible with imaging techniques. They directly provide dust spatial densities along the spacecraft trajectory as well as grain sizes and impact speeds. This allows to test and refine current models of ring particle dynamics (see D. P. Hamilton et al., this conference). In particular, the direct measurement of grain sizes and dust spatial density in different regions of the gossamer ring allow to better constrain the forces dominating the grains' dynamics. The Galileo measurements in Jupiter's gossamer ring pave the way towards the in-situ dust measurements with Cassini in Saturn's E ring beginning in 2004.

  1. Galileo in-situ dust measurements in Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Grün, E.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-05-01

    Jupiter's ring system -- the archetype of ethereal ring systems -- consists of at least three components: the main ring, the vertically extended halo and the gossamer ring(s). The small moonlets Thebe and Amalthea orbit Jupiter within the gossamer ring region and structure in the intensity obtained from imaging observations indicates that these moons are the dominant sources of the gossamer ring material. The current picture implies that particles ejected from a source moon evolve inward under the Poynting-Robertson drag. Beyond Thebe's orbit, a very faint outward extension of the gossamer ring has also been observed which is not yet explained. Typical grain radii derived from optical imaging are a few micrometers. In November 2002 the Galileo spacecraft traversed the gossamer ring for the first time and had a close flyby at Amalthea. With the in-situ dust detector on board, dust measurements were collected throughout the gossamer ring and close to Amalthea. Several hundred impacts of dust grains were recorded and the data sets (impact charges, rise times, impact directions, etc.) of about 90 impacts were transmitted to Earth. In-situ dust measurements provide information about the physical properties of the dust environment not accessible with imaging techniques. They directly provide dust spatial densities along the spacecraft trajectory as well as grain sizes and impact speeds. This allows to test and refine current models of ring particle dynamics (see D. P. Hamilton et al., this conference). In particular, the direct measurement of grain sizes and dust spatial density in different regions of the gossamer ring allow to better constrain the forces dominating the grains' dynamics. The Galileo measurements in Jupiter's gossamer ring pave the way towards the in-situ dust measurements with Cassini in Saturn's E ring beginning in 2004.

  2. Development of in-situ micro-debris measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Maki; Kitazawa, Yukihito; Matsumoto, Haruhisa; Okudaira, Osamu; Hanada, Toshiya; Sakurai, Akira; Funakoshi, Kunihiro; Yasaka, Tetsuo; Hasegawa, Sunao; Kobayashi, Masanori

    2015-08-01

    The in-situ debris environment awareness system has been developed. The objective of the system is to measure small debris (between 100 μm and several cm) in orbit. The orbital distribution and the size distribution of the debris are not well understood. The size distribution is difficult to measure from the ground, although the size distribution is very important for the risk evaluation of the impact of debris on spacecraft. The in-situ measurement of the size distribution is useful for: (1) verification of meteoroid and debris environment models, (2) verification of meteoroid and debris environment evolution models, (3) real time detection of unexpected events, such as explosions and/or collisions on an orbit. This paper reports the development study of the in-situ debris measurement system and shows demonstration experiments and their results to describe the performance of the micro-debris sensor system. The sensor system for monitoring micro-debris with sizes ranging from 100 μm to a few mm must have a large detection area, while the constraints of space deployment require that these systems be low in mass, low in power, robust and have low telemetry requirements. For this reason, we have been developing a simple trans-film sensor. Thin and conductive stripes (copper) are formed with fine pitch (100 μm) on a thin film of nonconductive material (12.5-μm thick polyimide). A hypervelocity micro-particle impact is detected when one or more stripes are severed by perforation of the film. We designed a debris detector specialized for measuring the micro-debris size and collision rate. We then manufactured and calibrated the detector.

  3. Instrument for Aircraft-Icing and Cloud-Physics Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilie, Lyle; Bouley, Dan; Sivo, Chris

    2006-01-01

    The figure shows a compact, rugged, simple sensor head that is part of an instrumentation system for making measurements to characterize the severity of aircraft-icing conditions and/or to perform research on cloud physics. The quantities that are calculated from measurement data acquired by this system and that are used to quantify the severity of icing conditions include sizes of cloud water drops, cloud liquid water content (LWC), cloud ice water content (IWC), and cloud total water content (TWC). The sensor head is mounted on the outside of an aircraft, positioned and oriented to intercept the ambient airflow. The sensor head consists of an open housing that is heated in a controlled manner to keep it free of ice and that contains four hot-wire elements. The hot-wire sensing elements have different shapes and sizes and, therefore, exhibit different measurement efficiencies with respect to droplet size and water phase (liquid, frozen, or mixed). Three of the hot-wire sensing elements are oriented across the airflow so as to intercept incoming cloud water. For each of these elements, the LWC or TWC affects the power required to maintain a constant temperature in the presence of cloud water.

  4. Quantifying Stratospheric Ozone in the Upper Troposphere Using in situ Measurements of HCl

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, C S; Bergmann, D J; Marcy, T P; Fahey, D W; Gao, R S; Popp, P J; Richard, E C; Thompson, T L; Rosenlof, K H; Ray, E A; Salawitch, R J; Ridley, B A; . Weinheimer, A J; Loewenstein, M; Weinstock, E M; Mahoney, M J

    2004-03-08

    A chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) technique has been developed for precise in situ measurements of hydrochloric acid (HCl) from a high-altitude aircraft. In measurements at subtropical latitudes, minimum HCl values found in the upper troposphere (UT) are often near or below the 0.005-ppbv detection limit of the measurements, indicating that background HCl values are much lower than a global mean estimate. However, significant abundances of HCl were observed in many UT air parcels as a result of stratosphere-to-troposphere transport events. A method for diagnosing the amount of stratospheric ozone in these UT parcels was developed using the compact linear correlation of HCl with ozone found throughout the lower stratosphere (LS). Expanded use of this method will lead to improved quantification of cross-tropopause transport events and validation of global chemical transport models.

  5. Validation of AIRS Retrievals of CO2 via Comparison to In Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Edward T.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Chen, Luke L.; Jiang, Xun; Pagano, Thomas S.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2008-01-01

    Topics include AIRS on Aqua, 2002-present with discussion about continued operation to 2011 and beyond and background, including spectrum, weighting functions, and initialization; comparison with aircraft and FTIR measurements in Masueda (CONTRAIL) JAL flask measurements, Park Falls, WI FTIR, Bremen, GDF, and Spitsbergen, Norway; AIRS retrievals over addition FTIR sites in Darwin, AU and Lauder, NZ; and mid-tropospheric carbon dioxide weather and contribution from major surface sources. Slide titles include typical AIRS infrared spectrum, AIRS sensitivity for retrieving CO2 profiles, independence of CO2 solution with respect to the initial guess, available in situ measurements for validation and comparison, comparison of collocated V1.5x AIRS CO2 (N_coll greater than or equal to 9) with INTEX-NA and SPURT;

  6. A Transport Analysis of In Situ Airborne Ozone Measurements from the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkinson, H. L.; Brent, L. C.; He, H.; Loughner, C.; Stehr, J. W.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    Baltimore and Washington are currently designated as nonattainment areas with respect to the 2008 EPA National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for 8-hour Ozone (O3). Tropospheric O3 is the dominant component of summertime photochemical smog, and at high levels, has deleterious effects on human health, ecosystems, and materials. The University of Maryland (UMD) Regional Atmospheric Measurement Modeling and Prediction Program (RAMMPP) strives to improve understanding of air quality in the Mid-Atlantic States and to elucidate contributions of pollutants such as O3 from regional transport versus local sources through a combination of modeling and in situ measurements. The NASA Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) project investigates the connection between column measurements and surface conditions to explore the potential of remote sensing observations in diagnosing air quality at ground level where pollutants can affect human health. During the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ field campaign, in situ airborne measurements of trace gases and aerosols were performed along the Interstate 95 corridor between Baltimore and Washington from the NASA P3B aircraft. To augment this data and provide regional context, measurements of trace gases and aerosols were also performed by the RAMMPP Cessna 402B aircraft over nearby airports in Maryland and Virginia. This work presents an analysis of O3 measurements made by the Ultraviolet (UV) Photometric Ambient O3 Analyzer on the RAMMPP Cessna 402B and by the NCAR 4-Channel Chemiluminescence instrument on the NASA P3B. In this analysis, spatial and temporal patterns of O3 data are examined within the context of forward and backward trajectories calculated from 12-km North American Mesoscale (NAM) meteorological data using the NOAA Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) Model and from a high resolution Weather Research and

  7. Two Decades of in situ Halocarbon Trace Gas Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, G.; Nance, J. D.; Elkins, J. W.; Hall, B.; Thompson, T.

    2006-12-01

    Motivated by the signing of the Montreal Protocol in 1987 and interests in greenhouse gases, the NOAA Halocarbons and other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) group (now in the ESRL/GMD laboratory) focused on frequently measuring some of the regulated ozone depleting gases such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11 and CFC-12), methyl chloroform (CH3CCl3), and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). The original HATS in situ program, the Radiatively Important Trace Species (RITS) program, measured these four gases and nitrous oxide (N2O) using gas chromatographic (GC) techniques. The RITS GCs were deployed at the NOAA baseline observatories and a cooperative research station where they remained in operation for the next 13 years. Throughout the 1990s, the HATS in situ and flask programs documented the steady decline in global growth rates of the major chlorinated solvents and chlorofluorocarbons as a result of the Montreal Protocol. Widespread use of the replacement compounds to the now banned CFCs prompted improvements to the HATS in situ program. The RITS instruments were replaced from 1998-2000 by the four-channel Chromatograph for Atmospheric Trace Species (CATS) GCs. In addition to the gases measured by RITS, the CATS GCs added nine compounds including halon-1211, methyl chloride (CH3Cl) and CFC alternatives such as HFC-142b and HCFC-22. Since the RITS instruments have been taken offline, efforts have been focused on finalizing this important data set. A number of calibration scale changes from and improvements with the data reduction algorithms have facilitated comparing and combining the RITS and CATS data sets. In particular, the RITS calibration gas concentration tables were updated to reflect the most recent calibration scale changes. Ratios of calibration gas concentrations were fitted to ratios of RITS system responses to those gases in order to derive a detector response nonlinearity factor for each compound measured. The residuals of these fits were used to

  8. In situ measurements of the mesosphere and stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosky, C.

    1976-01-01

    The operation of a subsonic, Gerdien condenser probe for in situ measurements of the mesosphere and stratosphere is presented. The inclusion of a flashing Lyman alpha ultraviolet source provides an artifically produced ionization of particular constituents. Detailed theory of operation is presented and the data results from two flights are shown. A great deal of fine structure in mobility is observed due to the presence of various hydrated positive ions. The effect of the Lyman alpha source in the 35 km region was to dissociate a light hydrate ion rather than produce additional ionization. At the 70 km region, photodissociation of the heaviest ions (probably ice crystals) was also observed.

  9. In situ measurements of magnetic nanoparticles after placenta perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Robert; Gläser, Marcus; Göhner, Claudia; Seyfarth, Lydia; Schleussner, Ekkehard; Hofmann, Andreas; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) present promising tools for medical applications. However, the investigation of their spatial and temporal distribution is hampered by missing in-situ particle detection and quantification technologies. The placenta perfusion experiment represents an interesting model for the study of the particle distribution at a biological barrier. It allows the ex-vivo investigation of the permeability of the placenta for materials of interest. We introduce an approach based on a magnetic system for an in situ measurement of the concentration of magnetic NPs in such an experiment. A previously off-line utilized magnetic readout device (sensitivity of ≈10-8 Am2) was used for long term measurements of magnetic NP of 100-150 nm size range in a closed circuit of a placenta perfusion. It represents a semiquantitative approach. The behavior of particles in the placenta and in the measurement system was studied, as well as the influence of particle surface modifications. The results suggest a transfer of a low amount of particles from the maternal to the fetal blood circuit.

  10. In situ measurement requirements for a solar probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, D. A.; Gosling, J. T.

    1997-01-01

    We present the rationale and in situ measurement requirements for a near-Sun mission intended to answer the central questions of the heating of the corona and the acceleration of the solar wind. These conclusions are based on panel discussions and presentations at the Marlboro workshop. We have in mind not a ``minimum'' mission [1], but rather one that is constrained but feasible within the current mass and telemetry rate restrictions. To distinguish between thermal, wave-driven, and microflare-driven models, the measurements must determine wave levels in a broad range of frequencies, resolve fine-scale structures, find the energetic particle content and its variations, and determine the bulk properties of a few species with detailed distributions for at least electrons and protons. We find that the in situ measurements needed to answer the main questions are similar to those proposed previously [4] (magnetic field, plasma, high-energy particles, and plasma wave instruments) but without neutron and dust experiments. Telemetry and mass constraints will be significant but should not be prohibitive.

  11. Development of Techniques for the In Situ Observation of OH and HO2 for Studies of the Impact of High-Altitude Supersonic Aircraft on the Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James G.

    1994-01-01

    This three-year project supported the construction, calibration, and deployment of a new instrument to measure the OH and HO2 radicals on the NASA ER-2 aircraft. The instrument has met and exceeded all of its design goals. The instrumentation represents a true quantum leap in performance over that achieved in previous HO(x) instruments built in our group. Sensitivity for OH was enhanced by over two orders of magnitude as the weight fell from approximately 1500 to less than 200 Kg. Reliability has been very high: HO(x) data are available for all flights during the first operational mission, the Stratospheric Photochemistry, Aerosols, and Dynamics Expedition (SPADE). The results of that experiment have been reported in the scientific literature and at conferences. Additionally, measurements of H2O and O3 were made and have been reported in the scientific literature. The measurements demonstrate the important role that OH and HO2 play in determining the concentration of ozone in the lower stratosphere. During the SPADE campaign, the measurements demonstrate that the catalytic removal is dominated by processes involving the odd-hydrogen and halogen radical extremely important constraint for photochemical models that are being used to assess the potential deleterious effects of super-sonic aircraft effluent on the burden of stratospheric ozone. A list of the papers that came from this research are included, along with a copy of the paper, 'Aircraft-borne, laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the in situ detection of hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals'.

  12. Statistical modeling of in situ hiss amplitudes using ground measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, D. I.; Spasojevic, M.; Li, W.; Nishimura, Y.

    2012-05-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss is a naturally occurring extremely low frequency electromagnetic emission that is often observed within the Earth's plasmasphere. Plasmaspheric hiss plays a major role in the scattering and loss of electrons from the Earth's radiation belts, thereby contributing to the maintenance of the slot region between the inner and outer electron belt. Traditionally, in situ satellite observations have been the measurement modality of choice for studies of plasmaspheric hiss due to their ability to directly measure the hiss source region. However, satellite studies are relatively short-lived and very few satellite receivers remain operational for an entire 11-year solar cycle. Ground stations, in contrast, may collect multiple solar cycles' worth of data during their lifetime, yet they cannot directly measure the hiss source region. This study aims to determine the extent to which measurements of hiss at midlatitude ground stations may be used to predict the mean amplitude of in situ measurements of plasmaspheric hiss. We use coincident measurements between Palmer Station, Antarctica (L = 2.4, 50°S invariant latitude) and the THEMIS spacecraft from June 2008 through May 2010, during solar minimum. Using an autoregressive multiple regression model, we show that in the local time sector from 00 < MLT < 12, when the ionosphere above Palmer Station is in darkness and hiss is observed at Palmer, the amplitude of plasmaspheric hiss observed by the THEMIS spacecraft is 1.4 times higher than when hiss is not observed at Palmer. In the same local time sector when the ground station is in daylight and hiss is observed, the THEMIS observed amplitudes are not significantly different from those when hiss is not observed on the ground. A stronger relationship is found in the local time sector from 12 < MLT < 24 where, when Palmer is in daylight and hiss is observed, THEMIS plasmaspheric hiss amplitudes are 2 times higher compared to when hiss is not observed at Palmer

  13. In situ Micrometeorological Measurements during RxCADRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, C. B.; Hiers, J. K.; Strenfel, S. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Prescribed Fire Combustion and Atmospheric Dynamics Research Experiment (RxCADRE) was a collaborative research project designed to fully instrument prescribed fires in the Southeastern United States. Data were collected on pre-burn fuel loads, post burn consumption, ambient weather, in situ atmospheric dynamics, plume dynamics, radiant heat release (both from in-situ and remote sensors), in-situ fire behavior, and select fire effects. The sampling was conducted at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, and the Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center in Newton, Georgia, from February 29 to March 6, 2008. Data were collected on 5 prescribed burns, totaling 4458 acres. The largest aerial ignition totaled 2,290 acres and the smallest ground ignition totaled 104 acres. Quantifying fire-atmospheric interactions is critical for understanding wildland fire dynamics and enhancing modeling of smoke plumes. During Rx-CADRE, atmospheric soundings using radiosondes were made at each burn prior to ignition. In situ micrometeorological measurements were made within each burn unit using five portable, 10-m towers equipped with sonic and prop anemometers, fine-wire thermocouples, and a carbon dioxide probes. The towers were arranged within the burn units to capture the wind and temperature fields as the fire front and plume passed the towers. Due to the interaction of fire lines following ignition, several of the fire fronts that passed the towers were backing fires and thus less intense. Preliminary results indicate that the average vertical velocities associated with the fire front passage were on the order of 3-5 m s-1 and average plume temperatures were on the order of 30-50 °C above ambient. During two of the experimental burns, radiosondes were released into the fire plumes to determine the vertical structure of the plume temperature, humidity, and winds. A radiosonde released into the plume during the burn conducted on 3 March 2008 indicated a definite plume boundary in the

  14. Use of automated in-situ measurements for sensor harmonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, K. J.; Wenny, B. N.; Czapla-Myers, J.

    2015-12-01

    Vicarious calibration approaches using in-situ measurements saw first use in the early 1980s and have since improved to keep pace with the evolution of the sensors that are being calibrated. The advantage to in-situ measurements is that they lead to a well-demonstrated and traceable accuracy. The drawbacks are the costs and labor-intensive nature of those approaches. The development of multi-platform constellations and the need to ensure radiometric consistency across them has led to the implementation of automated ground sites and the accuracy of the results from these automated sites make them suitable for harmonizing the radiometric output from multiple sensors. The results shown here applied to instruments from NASA's Terra platform as well as Landsats 7 and 8 demonstrate the utility of automated sites as well as the feasibility of making the data from such sites more widely available to the instrument teams. The accuracy of the calibration for a single sensor typically meets the calibration requirements for most earth imagers and harmonization to better than 1% is feasible.

  15. In-situ magnetic gauge measurements in Kel-F

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, S.A.; Alcon, R.R.

    1991-01-01

    In-situ gauge measurements have been made in Kel-F using multiple, embedded Lagrangian particle velocity and impulse gauges to measure shock attributes. Shock stresses attained were between 0.9 and 11 GPa. At the lower stresses, we were looking for the effects of a subtle phase transformation to be manifested in the form of a multiple wave structure. Clear evidence of this transformation was not observed but the shape of the transmitted waves indicated the viscoplastic nature of this material. This effect was nearly gone at 2.6 GPa. At the highest stress condition (11 GPa), the waveforms suggest that the single-crystal sapphire impactor was starting to yield, indicating that sapphire is not elastic all the way to 12 GPa, as had been previously thought. Rarefaction speed measurements at shock conditions were obtained from each experiment but it was not possible to obtain accurate estimates of the Gruneisen parameter. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. In Situ Airborne Instrumentation: Addressing and Solving Measurement Problems in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Kok, Greg; Avallone, L.; Bansemer, A.; Borrmann, S.; Brown, P.; Bundke, U.; Chuang, P. Y.; Cziczo, D.; Field, P.; Gallagher, M.; Gayet, J. -F.; Korolev, A.; Kraemer, M.; McFarquhar, G.; Mertes, S.; Moehler, O.; Lance, S.; Lawson, P.; Petters, M. D.; Pratt, K.; Roberts, G.; Rogers, D.; Stetzer, O.; Stith, J.; Strapp, W.; Twohy, C.; Wendisch, M.

    2012-02-01

    A meeting of 31 international experts on in situ measurements from aircraft was held to identify unresolved questions concerning ice formation and evolution in ice clouds, assess the current state of instrumentation that can address these problems, introduce emerging technology that may overcome current measurement issues and recommend future courses of action that can improve our understanding of ice cloud microphysical processes and their impact on the environment. The meeting proceedings and outcome has been described in detail in a manuscript submitted to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS) on March 24, 2011. This paper is currently under review. The remainder of this summary, in the following pages, is the text of the BAMS article. A technical note that will be published by the National Center for Atmospheric Research is currently underway and is expected to be published before the end of the year.

  17. In Situ Airborne Instrumentation: Addressing and Solving Measurement Problems in Ice Clouds

    DOE PAGES

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Kok, Greg; Avallone, L.; Bansemer, A.; Borrmann, S.; Brown, P.; Bundke, U.; Chuang, P. Y.; Cziczo, D.; Field, P.; et al

    2012-02-01

    A meeting of 31 international experts on in situ measurements from aircraft was held to identify unresolved questions concerning ice formation and evolution in ice clouds, assess the current state of instrumentation that can address these problems, introduce emerging technology that may overcome current measurement issues and recommend future courses of action that can improve our understanding of ice cloud microphysical processes and their impact on the environment. The meeting proceedings and outcome has been described in detail in a manuscript submitted to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS) on March 24, 2011. This paper is currently undermore » review. The remainder of this summary, in the following pages, is the text of the BAMS article. A technical note that will be published by the National Center for Atmospheric Research is currently underway and is expected to be published before the end of the year.« less

  18. In-situ aircraft observations of ice concentrations within clouds over the Antarctic Peninsula and Larsen Ice Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosvenor, D. P.; Choularton, T. W.; Lachlan-Cope, T.; Gallagher, M. W.; Crosier, J.; Bower, K. N.; Ladkin, R. S.; Dorsey, J. R.

    2012-07-01

    In-situ aircraft observations of ice crystal concentrations in Antarctic clouds are presented for the first time. Orographic, layer and wave clouds around the Antarctic Peninsula and Larsen Ice shelf regions were penetrated by the British Antarctic Survey's Twin Otter Aircraft, which was equipped with modern cloud physics probes. The clouds studied were mostly in the free troposphere and hence ice crystals blown from the surface are unlikely to have been a major source for the ice phase. The temperature range covered by the experiments was 0 to -21°C. The clouds were found to contain supercooled liquid water in most regions and at heterogeneous ice formation temperatures ice crystal concentrations (60 s averages) were often less than 0.07 l-1, although values up to 0.22 l-1 were observed. Estimates of observed aerosol concentrations were used as input into the DeMott et al., 2010 ice nuclei (IN) parameterisation. The observed ice crystal number concentrations were generally in broad agreement with the IN predictions, although on the whole the predicted values were higher. Possible reasons for this are discussed and include the lack of IN observations in this region with which to characterise the parameterisation, and/or problems in relating ice concentration measurements to IN concentrations. Other IN parameterisations significantly overestimated the number of ice particles. Generally ice particle concentrations were much lower than found in clouds in middle latitudes for a given temperature. Higher ice crystal concentrations were sometimes observed at temperatures warmer than -9 °C, with values of several per litre reached. These were attributable to secondary ice particle production by the Hallett Mossop process. Even in this temperature range it was observed that there were regions with little or no ice that were dominated by supercooled liquid water. It is likely that in some cases this was due to a lack of seeding ice crystals to act as rimers to initiate

  19. In-situ aircraft observations of ice concentrations within clouds over the Antarctic Peninsula and Larsen Ice Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosvenor, D. P.; Choularton, T. W.; Lachlan-Cope, T.; Gallagher, M. W.; Crosier, J.; Bower, K. N.; Ladkin, R. S.; Dorsey, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    In-situ aircraft observations of ice crystal concentrations in Antarctic clouds are presented for the first time. Orographic, layer and wave clouds around the Antarctic Peninsula and Larsen Ice shelf regions were penetrated by the British Antarctic Survey's Twin Otter aircraft, which was equipped with modern cloud physics probes. The clouds studied were mostly in the free troposphere and hence ice crystals blown from the surface are unlikely to have been a major source for the ice phase. The temperature range covered by the experiments was 0 to -21 °C. The clouds were found to contain supercooled liquid water in most regions and at heterogeneous ice formation temperatures ice crystal concentrations (60 s averages) were often less than 0.07 l-1, although values up to 0.22 l-1 were observed. Estimates of observed aerosol concentrations were used as input into the DeMott et al. (2010) ice nuclei (IN) parameterisation. The observed ice crystal number concentrations were generally in broad agreement with the IN predictions, although on the whole the predicted values were higher. Possible reasons for this are discussed and include the lack of IN observations in this region with which to characterise the parameterisation, and/or problems in relating ice concentration measurements to IN concentrations. Other IN parameterisations significantly overestimated the number of ice particles. Generally ice particle concentrations were much lower than found in clouds in middle latitudes for a given temperature. Higher ice crystal concentrations were sometimes observed at temperatures warmer than -9 °C, with values of several per litre reached. These were attributable to secondary ice particle production by the Hallett Mossop process. Even in this temperature range it was observed that there were regions with little or no ice that were dominated by supercooled liquid water. It is likely that in some cases this was due to a lack of seeding ice crystals to act as rimers to initiate

  20. In Situ Observations and Sampling of Volcanic Emissions with Unmanned Aircraft: A NASA/UCR Case Study at Turrialba Volcano, Costa Rica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieri, David; Diaz, Jorge Andres; Bland, Geoffrey; Fladeland, Matthew; Madrigal, Yetty; Corrales, Ernesto; Alan, Alfredo; Alegria, Oscar; Realmuto, Vincent; Miles, Ted

    2011-01-01

    Burgeoning new technology in the design and development of robotic aircraft-unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)-presents unprecedented opportunities for the volcanology community to observe, measure, and sample eruption plumes and drifting volcanic clouds in situ. While manned aircraft can sample dilute parts of such emissions, demonstrated hazards to air breathing, and most particularly turbine, engines preclude penetration of the zones of highest ash concentrations. Such areas within plumes are often of highest interest with respect to boundary conditions of applicable mass-loading retrieval models, as well as Lagrangian, Eulerian, and hybrid transport models used by hazard responders to predict plume trajectories, particularly in the context of airborne hazards. Before the 2010 Ejyafyallajokull eruption in Iceland, ICAO zero-ash-tolerance rules were typically followed, particularly for relatively uncrowded Pacific Rim airspace, and over North and South America, where often diversion of aircraft around ash plumes and clouds was practical. The 2010 eruption in Iceland radically changed the paradigm, in that critical airspace over continental Europe and the United Kingdom were summarily shut by local civil aviation authorities and EURO CONTROL. A strong desire emerged for better real-time knowledge of ash cloud characteristics, particularly ash concentrations, and especially for validation of orbital multispectral imaging. UAV platforms appear to provide a viable adjunct, if not a primary source, of such in situ data for volcanic plumes and drifting volcanic clouds from explosive eruptions, with prompt and comprehensive application to aviation safety and to the basic science of volcanology. Current work is underway in Costa Rica at Turrialba volcano by the authors, with the goal of developing and testing new small, economical UAV platforms, with miniaturized instrument payloads, within a volcanic plume. We are underway with bi-monthly deployments of tethered SO2-sondes

  1. Epoxy and acrylate sterolithography resins: in-situ property measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Chambers, R.S.; Hinnerichs, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    Stereolithography is a rapid prototyping method that is becoming an important product realization and concurrent engineering tool, with applications in advanced and agile manufacturing. During the build process, material behavior plays a significant role in the mechanics leading to internal stresses and, potentially, to distortion (curling) of parts. The goal of the ``Stereolithography Manufacturing Process Modeling and Optimization`` LDRD program was to develop engineering tools for improving overall part accuracy during the stereolithography build process. These tools include phenomenological material models of solidifying stereolithography photocurable resins and a 3D finite element architecture that incorporates time varying material behavior, laser path dependence, and structural linkage. This SAND report discusses the in situ measurement of shrinkage and force relaxation behavior of two photocurable resins, and the measurement of curl in simple cantilever beams. These studies directly supported the development of phenomenological material models for solidifying resins and provided experimental curl data to compare to model predictions.

  2. In-situ impurity measurements in PDX Edge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Staib, P.; Dylla, H.F.; Rossnagel, S.M.

    1980-07-01

    The surface analysis station of PDX combines several surface analysis techniques (AES, XPS, SIMS) for in-situ measurement of impurity fluxes in the edge-plasma. The major impurities deposited on a sample surface during nondiverted PDX discharges are oxygen, titanium (limiter material) and chlorine. The impurity fluxes measured at different radial positions decreased by a factor of ten from the plasma edge to the wall. The sample surface collecting the impurity ions is located behind a circular aperture. The observed broadening of the deposition profile of Ti relative to the aperture diameter enables an estimate to be made of the ratio of charge state/energy of Ti ions in the edge plasma. Time-resolved analyses of the deposited impurities are presented which indicate that the time behavior for various impurities may be quite different for different impurity species. This aspect is discussed in relation to probable impurity release mechanisms.

  3. Comparisons of Arctic In-Situ Snow and Ice Data with Airborne Passive Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markus, T.; Cavalien, D. J.; Gasiewski, A.; Sturm, M.; Klein, M.; Maslanik, J.; Stroeve, J.; Heinrichs, J.; Holmgren, J.; Irisov, V.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the AMSR-E sea ice validation campaign in March 2003, aircraft flights over the Arctic sea ice were coordinated with ground measurements of snow and sea ice properties. The surface-based measurements were in the vicinity of Barrow, AK, and at a Navy ice camp located in the Beaufort Sea. The NASA P-3 aircraft was equipped with the NOAA ETL PSR microwave radiometer that has the same frequencies as the AMSR-E sensor. The goal was to validate the standard AMSR-E products ice temperature and snow depth on sea ice. Ground measurements are the only way to validate these parameters. The higher spatial resolution of the PSR instrument (between 30 and 500 m, depending on altitude) enables a better comparison between ground measurements and microwave data because of the expected smaller spatial variability. Maps of PSR data can then be used for further down-scaling to AMSR-E pixel areas. Initial results show a good qualitative agreement between the in-situ snow depths and the PSR data. Detailed studies are underway and latest results will be presented.

  4. Galileo In-Situ Dust Measurements in Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Hamilton, D. P.; Gruen, E.

    Jupiter's ring system consists of at least three components: the inner main ring, the vertically extended halo and the gossamer ring(s) further out. The small moons Thebe and Amalthea orbit Jupiter within the gossamer ring and are believed to be the sources of gossamer ring material. A very faint ring extension has also been observed beyond Thebe's orbit. On 5 November 2002 the Galileo spacecraft traversed Jupiter's gossamer ring system for the first time. High-resolution dust data were obtained with the dust detector on board down to 2.33 R_J , i.e. well inside Amalthea's orbit. A second ring passage occurred on 21 September 2003, a few hours before Galileo impacted Jupiter. This time, dust data were successfully received down to Amalthea's orbit at 2.5 R_J , however, with much reduced time-resolution. Several thousand dust impacts were counted during both ring passages, and the full data sets (impact charges, rise times, impact directions, etc.) of about 90 dust impacts were transmitted to Earth. In-situ dust measurements provide information about the physical properties of the dust environment not accessible with imaging techniques. They directly measure dust spatial densities along the spacecraft trajectory as well as grain sizes and impact speeds. Our as yet preliminary analysis %of the gossamer ring data implies particle sizes in the sub-micron and micron range. The size distribution -- increasing towards smaller particles -- is similar in the Thebe ring and the ring's outer extension, whereas in the Amalthea ring it is steeper. Dust number densities are about 104 - 106 km-3 . Our dust data allow for the first time to compare in-situ measurements with the results optical obtained from the inversion of optical images. It appears that small sub-micron grains dominate the number density whereas larger particles with at least a few micron radii contribute most to the optical depth. The dust density shows previously unrecognised fine-structure in the ring between

  5. Contact sponge water absorption test implemented for in situ measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggero, Laura; Scrivano, Simona

    2016-04-01

    The contact sponge method is a non-destructive in-situ methodology used to estimate a water uptake coefficient. The procedure, unlike other in-situ measurement was proven to be directly comparable to the water uptake laboratory measurements, and was registered as UNI 11432:2011. The UNI Normal procedure requires to use a sponge with known density, soaked in water, weighed, placed on the material for 1 minute (UNI 11432, 2011; Pardini & Tiano, 2004), then weighed again. Difficulties arise in operating on test samples or on materials with porosity varied for decay. While carrying on the test, fluctuations in the bearing of the environmental parameters were negligible, but not the pressure applied to the surface, that induced the release of different water amounts towards the material. For this reason we designed a metal piece of the same diameter of the plate carrying the sponge, to be screwed at the tip of a pocket penetrometer. With this instrument the sponge was kept in contact with the surface for 1 minute applying two different loads, at first pushed with 0.3 kg/cm2 in order to press the sponge, but not its holder, against the surface. Then, a load of 1.1 kg/ cm2 was applied, still avoiding deviating the load to the sponge holder. We applied both the current and our implemented method to determine the water absorption by contact sponge on 5 fresh rock types (4 limestones: Fine - and Coarse grained Pietra di Vicenza, Rosso Verona, Breccia Aurora, and the silicoclastic Macigno sandstone). The results show that 1) the current methodology imply manual skill and experience to produce a coherent set of data; the variable involved are in fact not only the imposed pressure but also the compression mechanics. 2) The control on the applied pressure allowed reproducible measurements. Moreover, 3) the use of a thicker sponge enabled to apply the method even on rougher surfaces, as the device holding the sponge is not in contact with the tested object. Finally, 4) the

  6. Recommendations for field measurements of aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Specific recommendations for environmental test criteria, data acquisition procedures, and instrument performance requirements for measurement of noise levels produced by aircraft in flight are provided. Recommendations are also given for measurement of associated airplane and engine parameters and atmospheric conditions. Recommendations are based on capabilities which were available commercially in 1981; they are applicable to field tests of aircraft flying subsonically past microphones located near the surface of the ground either directly under or to the side of a flight path. Aircraft types covered by the recommendations include fixed-wing airplanes powered by turbojet or turbofan engines or by propellers. The recommended field-measurement procedures are consistent with assumed requirements for data processing and analysis.

  7. Recommendations for field measurements of aircraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, A. H.

    1982-04-01

    Specific recommendations for environmental test criteria, data acquisition procedures, and instrument performance requirements for measurement of noise levels produced by aircraft in flight are provided. Recommendations are also given for measurement of associated airplane and engine parameters and atmospheric conditions. Recommendations are based on capabilities which were available commercially in 1981; they are applicable to field tests of aircraft flying subsonically past microphones located near the surface of the ground either directly under or to the side of a flight path. Aircraft types covered by the recommendations include fixed-wing airplanes powered by turbojet or turbofan engines or by propellers. The recommended field-measurement procedures are consistent with assumed requirements for data processing and analysis.

  8. In situ observations and model calculations of black carbon emission by aircraft at cruise altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzold, A.; DöPelheuer, A.; Brock, C. A.; Schröder, F.

    1999-09-01

    The exhaust aerosol of two aircraft at cruise was extensively characterized in the size range from 0.003 to 2 μm for plume ages ≤2 s. The black carbon (BC) exhaust aerosol of an older technology engine (Rolls-Royce/Snecma M45H Mk501) consisted of a primary BC mode with a modal diameter of 0.035 μm and a mode of coagulated BC particles with a peak near 0.15-0.16 μm in diameter. The total number density at the nozzle exit plane was 3×107 cm-3. In contrast, a modern technology engine (CFM International CFM56-3B1) emitted far smaller BC particles with a primary mode at 0.025 μm and a coagulated mode at 0.15 μm, as well as fewer particles by number with a concentration of 9×106 cm-3. The single-scattering albedo of the jet exhaust aerosol was 0.035 ± 0.02 inside the plume, indicating a dominant contribution of ultrafine (D<0.1 μm) BC particles to light extinction. Black carbon number emission indices EI(N) varied from 3.5×1014 (CFM56-3B1) to 1.7×1015 kg-1 (M45H Mk501) with corresponding mass emission indices EI(BC) of 0.011 and 0.1 g kg-1. Previously reported corresponding values for a CF6-80C2A2 engine were 6×1014 kg-1 and 0.023 g kg-1, respectively. A comparison between EI(BC) values calculated by a new correlation method and measured data shows an excellent agreement, with deviations <10% at cruise conditions. By extending the EI(BC) calculation method to a globally operating aircraft fleet, a fleet-averaged emission index EI(BC) = 0.038 g kg-1 is calculated.

  9. In situ measurements of the NO x distribution and variability over the eastern North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziereis, H.; Schlager, H.; Schulte, P.; KöHler, I.; Marquardt, R.; Feigl, C.

    1999-07-01

    Between 1994 and 1996 the research aircraft Falcon of the Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt was used to probe the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere over the eastern North Atlantic. In situ measurements of NO, NO2, and O3 were performed during 32 flights. The measurements were carried out during five aircraft campaigns in summer and late autumn, respectively, based from Shannon, Ireland, and Prestwick, Scotland. Most of the flights were conducted in the region of the North Atlantic flight corridor. Main objectives of these measurements included the study of the large-scale distribution of NO and NOx and the development of reliable monthly mean values for different seasons in a region of the atmosphere that is strongly affected by aircraft emissions. Substantial variability of NO and NOx volume mixing ratios was observed in the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere. In spite of this variability a significant seasonal dependence was found. NO mean values (averages over all measurements made during one campaign) at altitudes between 10,500 and 11,500 m, where most of the data have been obtained, ranged between about 0.1 and 0.14 ppbv in summer and 0.03 and 0.10 ppbv in late autumn. NO and NOx did not show a significant gradient across the tropopause. The correlation between NOx and O3 in the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere was only very weak. The present measurements represent a suitable data set for comparison with predictions of the NOx distribution in the upper troposphere over the eastern North Atlantic by three-dimensional models. A comparison with the NOx fields simulated with the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Hamburg Version 3 (ECHAM 3) climate model extended by a simplified NOx chemistry reveals good agreement for summer and autumn conditions.

  10. Carbon Dioxide and Methane Column Abundances Retrieved from Ground-Based Near-Infrared Solar Spectra and Comparison with In Situ Aircraft Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Toon, G. C.; Blavier, J.; Wennberg, P. O.; Yang, Z.; Vay, S. A.; Sachse, G. W.; Blake, D. R.; Matross, D. M.; Gerbig, C.

    2004-12-01

    We have developed an automated observatory for measuring ground-based column abundances of CO2, CH4, CO, N2O, O2, H2O, and HF. Near-infrared spectra of the direct sun are measured between 3,900 - 15,600 cm-1 (0.67 - 2.56 μ m) by a Bruker 125HR Fourier Transform Spectrometer. This is the first laboratory in a proposed network of ground-based solar observatories that will be used for carbon cycle studies and validation of spaceborne column measurements of greenhouse gases. The laboratory was assembled in Pasadena, California and then permanently deployed to northern Wisconsin during May 2004. It is located in the heavily forested Chequamegon National Forest at the WLEF Tall Tower site, 14 km east of Park Falls, Wisconsin. This site was chosen because NOAA CMDL and other groups conduct intensive measurements in the area, including continuous monitoring of CO2 at six heights on the 447-m tall tower. CO2 and CH4 column abundances for May - November 2004 demonstrate ˜0.1% precision. The seasonal drawdown of CO2 is recognizable within the late-May column abundances. As part of the INTEX and COBRA campaigns, the DC-8 or King Air recorded in situ measurements during profiles over the WLEF site during five dates in July and August 2004. We will compare the column abundances of CO2, CH4, and CO with these in situ aircraft measurements.

  11. Regular, Fast and Accurate Airborne In-Situ Methane Measurements Around the Tropopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyroff, Christoph; Rauthe-Schöch, Armin; Schuck, Tanja J.; Zahn, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    We present a laser spectrometer for automated monthly measurements of methane (CH4) mixing ratios aboard the CARIBIC passenger aircraft. The instrument is based on a commercial fast methane analyzer (FMA, Los Gatos Res.), which was modified for fully unattended employment. A laboratory characterization was performed and the results with emphasis on the precision, cross sensitivity to H2O, and accuracy are presented. An in-flight calibration strategy is described, that utilizes CH4 measurements obtained from flask samples taken during the same flights. By statistical comparison of the in-situ measurements with the flask samples we derive a total uncetrainty estimate of ~ 3.85 ppbv (1?) around the tropopause, and ~ 12.4 ppbv (1?) during aircraft ascent and descent. Data from the first two years of airborne operation are presented that span a large part of the northern hemispheric upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere, with occasional crossings of the tropics on flights to southern Africa. With its high spatial resolution and high accuracy this data set is unprecedented in the highly important atmospheric layer of the tropopause.

  12. Holistic aerosol evaluation using synthesized aerosol aircraft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson-Parris, Duncan; Reddington, Carly; Schutgens, Nick; Stier, Philip; Carslaw, Ken; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James; Coe, Hugh

    2016-04-01

    Despite ongoing efforts there are still large uncertainties in aerosol concentrations and loadings across many commonly used GCMs. This in turn leads to large uncertainties in the contributions of the direct and indirect aerosol forcing on climate. However, constraining these fields using earth observation data, although providing global coverage, is problematic for many reasons, including the large uncertainties in retrieving aerosol loadings. Additionally, the inability to retrieve aerosols in or around cloudy scenes leads to further sampling biases (Gryspeerdt 2015). Many in-situ studies have used regional datasets to attempt to evaluate the model uncertainties, but these are unable to provide an assessment of the models ability to represent aerosols properties on a global scale. Within the Global Aerosol Synthesis and Science Project (GASSP) we have assembled the largest collection of quality controlled, in-situ aircraft observations ever synthesized to a consistent format. This provides a global set of in-situ measurements of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) and Black Carbon (BC), amongst others. In particular, the large number of vertical profiles provided by this aircraft data allows us to investigate the vertical structure of aerosols across a wide range of regions and environments. These vertical distributions are particularly valuable when investigating the dominant processes above or below clouds where remote sensing data is not available. Here we present initial process-based assessments of the BC lifetimes and vertical distributions of CCN in the HadGEM-UKCA and ECHAM-HAM models using this data. We use point-by-point based comparisons to avoid the sampling issues associated with comparing spatio-temporal aggregations.

  13. In-Situ Measurements of Graphene Mechanics During Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Aaron; de Alba, Roberto; Sebastian, Abhilash; Parpia, Jeevak

    Graphene shows great potential as a material for a new generation of mechanical nanodevices. However, current methodologies used for fabricating graphene structures involve polymer resists for transfer and patterning, which degrades mechanical performance. To improve surface quality, high current or high temperature annealing of graphene is commonly employed. Previous studies of graphene mechanics have focused on performance after annealing or temperature-dependent behavior from 4K-300K. Here we present real-time, in-situ measurements of graphene mechanical resonance during high temperature annealing from 300K-600K. Upon heating, reversible changes in mechanical frequency are indicative of graphene thermal contraction. Discontinuous and irreversible changes are also seen, corresponding to graphene slipping and mass desorption. Both reversible and irreversible changes in quality factor are also observed. Characterizing the effects of annealing on the structural properties of graphene will enable more precise engineering for particular applications, such as mass sensing.

  14. In-situ measurements of velocity structure within turbidity currents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, J. P.; Noble, M.A.; Rosenfeld, L.K.

    2004-01-01

    Turbidity currents are thought to be the main mechanism to move ???500,000 m3 of sediments annually from the head of the Monterey Submarine Canyon to the deep-sea fan. Indirect evidence has shown frequent occurrences of such turbidity currents in the canyon, but the dynamic properties of the turbidity currents such as maximum speed, duration, and dimensions are still unknown. Here we present the first-ever in-situ measurements of velocity profiles of four turbidity currents whose maximum along-canyon velocity reached 190 cm/s. Two turbidity currents coincided with storms that produced the highest swells and the biggest stream flows during the year-long deployment. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Evaporation Measured In Situ by Sensible Heat Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitman, Josh; Xiao, Xinhua; Sauer, Thomas; Ren, Tusheng; Horton, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Measurement of evaporation independent from evapotranspiration remains a major challenge for quantifying water fluxes in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Methodology based on soil sensible heat balance (SHB) has been developed to measure in situ, sub-surface soil water evaporation with heat-pulse sensors. Soil sensible heat flux and change in heat storage are measured at multiple depths near the soil surface, and a simple energy balance calculation is applied to determine latent heat flux (i.e., evaporation) as a residual. For bare surface conditions, comparison of SHB to micrometerological (Bowen ratio) and micro-lysimeter approaches indicates strong correlation (r2 = 0.96) with near 1:1 relationship and root mean square error of 0.2 mm/d. Recent efforts to apply SHB methodology in row-crop (maize) and vineyard systems demonstrate the potential for quantifying evaporation separate from evapotranspiration. For the maize system, SHB evaporation estimates differed from micro-lysimeters by < 0.2 mm/d. The SHB approach is one of very few measurement approaches that may be applied to partition evaporation from evapotranspiration.

  16. In-situ permittivity measurements using ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzaro, Gregory J.

    2012-06-01

    Proper development of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) technology requires a unique understanding of the electromagnetic (EM) properties of targets and background media. Thus, electromagnetic characterization of targets and backgrounds is fundamental to the success or failure of UWB GPR as a threat detection technique. In many cases, threats are buried in soil. Soil properties directly affect the radar signature of targets and determine the depth at which they can be detected by radar. One such property is permittivity. A portable system recently developed at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory measures permittivity in-situ with minimal disturbance of the dielectric sample. The measurement technique uses ring resonators. Design equations and physical dimensions are presented for fabricating resonators at frequencies between 600 MHz and 2 GHz. Only a handheld vector network analyzer, coaxial cabling, and the ring resonators are necessary for each measurement. Lookup curves generated in simulation are referenced to calculate the complex permittivity of the sample. The permittivity measurement is explained step-by-step, and data is presented for samples of soils from Ft. Irwin, California and Yuma, Arizona.

  17. In Situ Measurements of Meteoric Ions. Chapter 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Aikin, Arthur C.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Metal ions found in the atmosphere above 60 km are the result of incoming meteoroid atmospheric ablation. Layers of metal ions are detected by sounding rocket in situ mass spectrometric sampling in the 80 to 130 km region, which coincides with the altitude region where meteors are observed. Enhancements of metal ion concentrations occur during meteor showers. Even outside of shower periods, the metal ion altitude profiles vary from measurement to measurement. Double layers are frequent at middle latitudes. More than 40 different meteoric atomic and molecular ions, including isotopes, have been detected. Atmospheric metal ions on average have an abundance that matches chrondritic material, the same composition as the early solar system. However there are frequently local departures from this composition due to differential ablation, species dependent chemistry and mass dependent ion transport. Metal ions react with atmospheric O2, O, O3, H2O and H2O2 to form oxygenated and hydrogenated ionic compounds. Metal atomic ions at high altitudes have long lifetimes. As a result, these ions, in the presence of Earth's magnetic field, are transported over long distances by upper atmospheric winds and ionospheric electric fields. Satellite measurements have detected metal ions as high as, approximately 1000 km and have revealed circulation of the ions on a global scale.

  18. In Situ Magnetic Field Measurement using the Hanle Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jarom; Durfee, Dallin

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a simple method of in situ magnetic field mapping near zero points in magnetic fields. It is ideal for measuring trapping parameters such the field gradient and curvature, and should be applicable in most experiments with a magneto-optical trap (MOT) or similar setup. This method works by probing atomic transitions in a vacuum, and is based on the Hanle effect, which alters the polarization of spontaneous emission in the presence of a magnetic field. Unlike most techniques based on the Hanle effect, however, we look only at intensity. Instead of measuring polarization we use the change in directional radiation patterns caused by a magnetic field. Using one of the cooling beams for our MOT, along with a linear polarizer, a narrow slit, and an inexpensive webcam, we measure the three dimensional position of a magnetic field zero point within our vacuum to within +/-1 mm and the gradient through the zero point to an accuracy of 4%. This work was supported by NSF Grant Number PHY-1205736.

  19. Neutral beam species measurements using in situ Rutherford backscatter spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H.W.; Kaita, R.; Gammel, G.; Williams, M.D.

    1984-12-01

    This work describes a new in situ method for measuring the neutral particle fractions in high power deuterium neutral beams, used to heat magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Deuterium beams, of variable energies, pulse lengths, and powers up to 47 keV, 100 msec, 1.6 MW, were Rutherford backscattered at 135/sup 0/ from TiC inner neutral beam armor of the PDX, and detected using an electrostatic analyzer with microchannel plates. Complete energy scans were made every 20 msec and data were obtained simultaneously from five different positions across the beam profile. The neutral particle fractions were measured to be D/sup 0/(E):D/sup 0/(E/2):D/sup 0/(E/3)=53:32:15. The corresponding neutral power fractions were P/sup 0/(E):P/sup 0/(E/2):P/sup 0/(E/3)=72:21:7, and the associated ionic fractions at the output of the ion source were D/sub 1//sup +/(E):D/sub 2//sup +/(E):D/sub 3//sup +/(E)=74:20:6. The measured neutral particle fractions were relatively constant over more than 70% of the beam power distribution. A decrease in the yield of the full energy component in the outer regions of the beam was observed. Other possible experimental configurations and geometries are discussed.

  20. Neutral beam species measurements using in situ Rutherford backscatter spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H.W.; Kaita, R.; Gammel, G.; Williams, M.D.

    1985-05-01

    This work describes a new in situ method for measuring the neutral particle fractions in high-power deuterium neutral beams, used to heat magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Deuterium beams, of variable energies, pulse lengths, and powers up to 47 keV, 100 ms, 1.6 MW, were Rutherford backscattered at 135/sup 0/ from the TiC inner neutral beam armor of the PDX, and detected using an electrostatic analyzer with a microchannel plate. Complete energy scans were made every 20 ms and data were obtained simultaneously from five different positions across the beam profile. The neutral particle fractions were measured to be D/sup 0/(E):D/sup 0/(E/2):D/sup 0/(E/3) = 53:32:15. The corresponding neutral power fractions were P/sup 0/(E):P/sup 0/(E/2):P/sup 0/(E/3) = 72:21:7, and the associated ionic fractions at the output of the ion source were D/sup +//sub 1/ (E):D/sup +//sub 2/ (E):D/sup +//sub 3/ (E) = 74:20:6. The measured neutral particle fractions were relatively constant over more than 70% of the beam power distribution. A decrease in the yield of the full-energy component in the outer regions of the beam was observed.

  1. Neutral beam species measurements using in situ Rutherford backscatter spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugel, H. W.; Kaita, R.; Gammel, G.; Williams, M. D.

    1985-05-01

    This work describes a new in situ method for measuring the neutral particle fractions in high-power deuterium neutral beams, used to heat magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Deuterium beams, of variable energies, pulse lengths, and powers up to 47 keV, 100 ms, 1.6 MW, were Rutherford backscattered at 135° from the TiC inner neutral beam armor of the PDX, and detected using an electrostatic analyzer with a microchannel plate. Complete energy scans were made every 20 ms and data were obtained simultaneously from five different positions across the beam profile. The neutral particle fractions were measured to be D0(E):D0(E/2):D0(E/3)=53:32:15. The corresponding neutral power fractions were P0(E):P0(E/2):P0(E/3)=72:21:7, and the associated ionic fractions at the output of the ion source were D+1 (E):D+2 (E):D+3 (E)=74:20:6. The measured neutral particle fractions were relatively constant over more than 70% of the beam power distribution. A decrease in the yield of the full-energy component in the outer regions of the beam was observed.

  2. In situ measurement of inelastic light scattering in natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chuanmin

    Variation in the shape of solar absorption (Fraunhofer) lines are used to study the inelastic scattering in natural waters. In addition, oxygen absorption lines near 689nm are used to study the solar stimulated chlorophyll fluorescence. The prototype Oceanic Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (OFLD) has been further developed and improved by using a well protected fiber optic - wire conductor cable and underwater electronic housing. A Monte-Carlo code and a simple code have been modified to simulate the Raman scattering, DOM fluorescence and chlorophyll fluorescence. A series of in situ measurements have been conducted in clear ocean waters in the Florida Straits, in the turbid waters of Florida Bay, and in the vicinity of a coral reef in the Dry Tortugas. By comparing the reduced data with the model simulation results, the Raman scattering coefficient, b r with an excitation wavelength at 488nm, has been verified to be 2.6 × 10-4m-1 (Marshall and Smith, 1990), as opposed to 14.4 × 10- 4m-1 (Slusher and Derr, 1975). The wavelength dependence of b r cannot be accurately determined from the data set as the reported values (λ m-4 to λ m- 5) have an insignificant effect in the natural underwater light field. Generally, in clear water, the percentage of inelastic scattered light in the total light field at /lambda < 510nm is negligible for the whole water column, and this percentage increases with depth at /lambda > 510nm. At low concentrations (a y(/lambda = 380nm) less than 0.1m-1), DOM fluorescence plays a small role in the inelastic light field. However, chlorophyll fluorescence is much stronger than Raman scattering at 685nm. In shallow waters where a sea bottom affects the ambient light field, inelastic light is negligible for the whole visible band. Since Raman scattering is now well characterized, the new OFLD can be used to measure the solar stimulated in situ fluorescence. As a result, the fluorescence signals of various bottom surfaces, from coral to

  3. Airborne In Situ and Ground-based Polarimetric Radar Measurements of Tropical Convection in Support of CRYSTAL-FACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poellot, Michael R.; Kucera, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the work performed by the University of North Dakota (UND) under NASA Grant NAG5-11509, titled Airborne In Situ and Ground-based Polarimetric Radar Measurements of Tropical Convection in Support of CRYSTAL-FACE. This work focused on the collection of data by two key platforms: the UND Citation II research aircraft and the NASA NPOL radar system. The CRYSTAL-FACE (C-F) mission addresses several key issues from the NASA Earth System Enterprise, including the variability of water in the atmosphere, the forcing provided by tropical cirrus and the response of the Earth system to this forcing. In situ measurements and radar observations of tropical convection, cirrus clouds and their environment are core elements of C-F. One of the primary issues that C-F is addressing is the relationship of tropical cirrus anvils to precipitating deep convection. The in situ measurements from C-F are being used to validate remote sensing of Earth-Atmosphere properties, increase our knowledge of upper tropospheric water vapor and its distribution, and increase our knowledge of tropical cirrus cloud morphology and composition. Radar measurements, especially polarimetric diversity observations available fiom the NASA NPOL radar, are providing essential information about the initiation, modulation, and dissipation of convective cores and the generation of associated anvils in tropical convection. Specifically, NPOL radar measurements contain information about convective intensity and its vertical structure for comparison with thermodynamic and kinematic environmental measurements observed from soundings. Because of the polarimetric diversity of MOL, statistics on bulk microphysical properties can be retrieved and compared to the other characteristics of convection and associated cirrus anvils. In summary, the central objectives of this proposal were to deploy the UND Citation research aircraft as an in situ sensing platform for this mission and to provide collaborative

  4. Long-term greenhouse gas measurements from aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karion, A.; Sweeney, C.; Wolter, S.; Newberger, T.; Chen, H.; Andrews, A.; Kofler, J.; Neff, D.; Tans, P.

    2012-10-01

    deployment. This stability is not affected by variation in pressure or temperature during flight. Biases and standard deviations of comparisons with flask samples suggest that atmospheric variability, flask-to-flask variability, and possible flask sampling biases may be driving biases in the comparison between flasks and in-situ CRDS measurements.

  5. Hybrid-type temperature sensor for in situ measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Iuchi, Tohru; Hiraka, Kensuke

    2006-11-15

    A hybrid-type surface temperature sensor combines the contact and noncontact methods, which allows us to overcome the shortcomings of both methods. The hybrid-type surface thermometer is composed mainly of two components: a metal film sheet that makes contact with an object and a radiometer that is used to detect the radiance of the rear surface of the metal film, which is actually a modified radiation thermometer. Temperature measurement using the hybrid-type thermometer with a several tens micrometer thick Hastelloy sheet, a highly heat and corrosion resistant alloy, is possible with a systematic error of -0.5 K and random errors of {+-}0.5 K, in the temperature range from 900 to 1000 K. This thermometer provides a useful means for calibration of in situ temperature measurement in various processes, especially in the silicon semiconductor industry. This article introduces the basic idea of the hybrid-type surface sensor, presents experimental results and discussions, and finally describes some applications.

  6. KISAP: New in situ seafloor velocity measurement tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gil Young; Park, Ki Ju; Kyo Seo, Young; Lee, Gwang Soo; Kim, Seong Pil

    2015-04-01

    The KISAP (KIGAM Seafloor Acoustic Prober) is an instrument developed to obtain in situ compressional wave velocity and attenuation profiles for upper several meters of sedimentary layer at the sediment-seawater interface. This instrument consists of independent recording channels (NI cDAQ-9132, National Instruments) with a linear array of receivers (5 Hz-20 kHz, GeoSpectrum Technologies Inc) with depth below acoustic source (acoustic pinger, 1-50 kHz frequency, GeoSpectrum Technologies Inc). It provides in situ recording of full waveforms to determine interval velocity and attenuation. The system can be attached to a corer (gravity and/or piston corer) or to a specially designed prober. The experiments for in situ test were carried out in east coast of Korea and Songjeong beach, Pusan, Korea. We collected good waveform data to be calculated in situ velocity from KISAP test. Therefore KISAP can be used to collect in situ acoustic data. In addition, it can be effectively used to calibrate previous laboratory data to in situ data.

  7. Factors influencing in situ gamma-ray measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loonstra, E. H.; van Egmond, F. M.

    2009-04-01

    Introduction In situ passive gamma-ray sensors are very well suitable for mapping physical soil properties. In order to make a qualitative sound soil map, high quality input parameters for calibration are required. This paper will focus on the factors that affect the output of in situ passive gamma-ray sensors, the primary source, soil, not taken into account. Factors The gamma-ray spectrum contains information of naturally occurring nuclides 40K, 238U and 232Th and man-made nuclides like 137Cs, as well as the total count rate. Factors that influence the concentration of these nuclides and the count rate can be classified in 3 categories. These are sensor design, environmental conditions and operational circumstances. Sensor design The main elements of an in situ gamma-ray sensor that influence the outcome and quality of the output are the crystal and the spectrum analysis method. Material and size of the crystal determine the energy resolution. Though widely used, NaI crystals are not the most efficient capturer of gamma radiation. Alternatives are BGO and CsI. BGO has a low peak resolution, which prohibits use in cases where man-made nuclides are subject of interest. The material is expensive and prone to temperature instability. CsI is robust compared to NaI and BGO. The density of CsI is higher than NaI, yielding better efficiency, especially for smaller crystal sizes. More volume results in higher energy efficiency. The reduction of the measured spectral information into concentration of radionuclides is mostly done using the Windows analysis method. In Windows, the activities of the nuclides are found by summing the intensities of the spectrum found in a certain interval surrounding a peak. A major flaw of the Windows method is the limited amount of spectral information that is incorporated into the analysis. Another weakness is the inherent use of ‘stripping factors' to account for contributions of radiation from nuclide A into the peak of nuclide B. This

  8. Measuring auroral precipitation parameters without in situ microchannel plate instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, K. A.; Hampton, D. L.; Zettergren, M. D.; Conde, M.; Lessard, M.; Michell, R.; Samara, M.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in groundbased detector technology have resulted in accurate, high-sensitivity, emission-line filtered images of aurora with sub- to a few- km resolution over a few 100 km region collected at a few second to a few Hz cadence. By combining these images with information from other groundbased instrumentation (ISR, remote photometers, and FPIs) and using well-documented empirical relationships between intensity and precipitating electron characteristics, these images hold the potential for providing an accurate, mesoscale, 2-D time history of the key parameters (characteristic energy and energy flux) of the precipitating electrons that caused the optical aurora within the imager's field of view. In situ measurements can be more accurate, but they are limited to highly localized 1-D line trajectories and are of limited use for meso-scale modeling. However, a limitation of the groundbased technique is that subvisual (low energy) precipitation is not captured. Onboard measurements of total number flux provide low resource measurements capturing specific boundary crossings and gradients as well as net precipitation including the portion not observed optically. The combination of minimal onboard instrumentation supplementing rigorous groundbased inversions can provide an optimal set of inputs for ionospheric modelling tools. Thus we are investigating the capabilities and limitations of using inversions of groundbased observations in the place of in situ precipitation monitors. While several inversion techniques are possible we will discuss two methods used in the analysis of recent rocket experiments. The first, used for the Cascades2 rocket, compares measured altitude profiles of auroral emissions to those from a 1-D electron transport code to confirm optically that two arcs transited by the rocket were produced by significantly different electron spectra. The second method, for the MICA rocket, uses the 2-D temperature maps from the Scanning Doppler

  9. Temporal Evolution and Atmospheric Impacts of Tropospheric Volcanic Emissions from In-Situ Measurements and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Tjarda

    2010-05-01

    Assessment of the impact of tropospheric volcanic gas and aerosol emissions requires integration of observation and modelling. Knowledge and understanding is rapidly advancing in both areas, particularly due to the development of kinetic plume models of reactive halogen chemistry, and due to recent advances in measurement techniques for collecting in situ measurements of plume physico-chemical properties (i.e. using meteorological balloon and aircraft platforms), as well as a proliferation of remote sensing DOAS measurements. Here, we demonstrate this synergic relationship through model-observation plume studies. Volcanoes are a large natural source of SO2 and sulphate to the atmosphere, as is well demonstrated from both observational and model studies. In a recent study that deployed quasi-Lagrangian balloons in emissions at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, both H2O(g) and SO2(g) were measured in situ, in the downwind plume. The observations showed periods of both correlation and anti-correlation between SO2 and water-vapour, implying the occurrence of both source and sink processes. Co-emission of volcanic H2O with SO2 accounts for the correlation. We use a thermodynamic model along the plume transect to assess how H2O-sulphate interactions might account for H2O anti-correlation with SO2 within the plume to elucidate in-plume sulphate formation, both near-vent (as predicted by high-T thermodynamic models) and downwind (as predicted by kinetic models). Volcanoes are a source of halogens (HBr, HCl) to the atmosphere, and volcanic plumes are highly reactive zones, not only in the high-temperature region near the vent, but also in the downwind plume where autocatalytic chemistry cycles produce reactive halogens such as BrO, first discovered from DOAS observations. The rapid formation of BrO can be reproduced through modelling which predicts high concentrations (reaching ppbv) on short formation timescales (minutes). Simulations using the PlumeChem model (developed to analyse

  10. Comparison of ozone measurement techniques using aircraft, balloon, and ground-based measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D.; Reck, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    In order to verify the ultraviolet absorption technique used in the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program, two flight experiments were conducted employing several techniques, both in situ and remote, for measuring atmospheric ozone. The first experiment used the NASA CV-990 equipped with an ultraviolet absorption ozone monitor and an ultraviolet spectrophotometer, a balloon ozonesonde, and a Dobson station for determining and comparing the ozone concentration data. A second experiment compared ozone data from an automated sampling system aboard a B-747 with data from a manned system installed on the NASA CV-990 during a cross-country flight with both aircraft following the same flight path separated by 32 kilometers.

  11. In situ measurements of ice saturation in young contrails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Stefan; Voigt, Christiane; Jeßberger, Philipp; Jurkat, Tina; Schlager, Hans; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Klingebiel, Marcus; Thornberry, Troy

    2014-01-01

    Relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) is a major factor controlling the evolution of aircraft contrails. High-resolution airborne H2O measurements in and near contrails were made at a rate of 4.2 Hz using the novel water vapor mass spectrometer AIMS-H2O with in-flight calibration during the CONtrail, volcano, and Cirrus ExpeRimenT (CONCERT) 2011. Three 2 min old contrails were sampled near 11 km altitude. Independent of the ambient supersaturation or subsaturation over ice, the mean of the RHi frequency distribution within each contrail is shifted toward ice saturation. This shift can be explained by the high ice surface area densities with corresponding RHi relaxation times on the order of 20 s, which lead to the fast equilibration of H2O between the vapor and ice phase. Understanding the interaction of water vapor with ice particles is essential to investigate the life cycle of contrails and cirrus.

  12. Sulfur Dioxide Measurements Near Point Sources Using Ultraviolet Spectroscopy From Aircraft During ICARTT-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melamed, M. L.; Langford, A. O.; Daniel, J. S.; Miller, H. L.; Portmann, R. W.; Schofield, R.; Solomon, S.

    2005-12-01

    Accurate measurements of sulfur dioxide are important in urban air pollution studies due to the role sulfur dioxide plays in atmospheric processes such as acid rain and particle formation. We will show slant column sulfur dioxide abundances that were derived using the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique with ultraviolet spectrograph measurements taken aboard the NOAA WP-3D aircraft during ICARTT-2004. The spectrograph has zenith and nadir fields of view allowing for measurements of the pollution plume independent of the aircraft altitude and the height and uniformity of the boundary layer. A short integration time yields a high frequency measurement in order to distinguish localized pollution plumes from surrounding air. The sulfur dioxide slant column abundances show good qualitative agreement when compared to sulfur dioxide in-situ measurements aboard the same aircraft.

  13. Remote measurement of pollution from aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, H. G., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This paper discusses the problem of the remote measurement of tropospheric air pollution from aircraft platforms. Following a discussion of the energy sources available for passive remote sensing and the location of the absorption bands of the gases, it describes the spectral resolution that would be required and the relative merits of the shorter and longer infrared wavelengths. It then traces the evolution of one instrument concept (the gas filter correlation radiometer) to its present state, and describes flight results that show the technique to be capable of measuring carbon monoxide over water. A new instrument is described that will allow the measurements to be extended to areas over land.

  14. Tracking aerosol plumes: lidar, modeling, and in situ measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calhoun, Ron J.; Heap, Robert; Sommer, Jeffrey; Princevac, Marko; Peccia, Jordan; Fernando, H.

    2004-09-01

    The authors report on recent progress of on-going research at Arizona State University for tracking aerosol plumes using remote sensing and modeling approaches. ASU participated in a large field experiment, Joint Urban 2003, focused on urban and suburban flows and dispersion phenomena which took place in Oklahoma City during summer 2003. A variety of instruments were deployed, including two Doppler-lidars. ASU deployed one lidar and the Army Research deployed the other. Close communication and collaboration has produced datasets which will be available for dual Doppler analysis. The lidars were situated in a way to provide insight into dynamical flow structures caused by the urban core. Complementary scanning by the two lidars during the July 4 firework display in Oklahoma City demonstrated that smoke plumes could be tracked through the atmosphere above the urban area. Horizontal advection and dispersion of the smoke plumes were tracked on two horizontal planes by the ASU lidar and in two vertical planes with a similar lidar operated by the Army Research Laboratory. A number of plume dispersion modeling systems are being used at ASU for the modeling of plumes in catastrophic release scenarios. Progress using feature tracking techniques and data fusion approaches is presented for utilizing single and dual radial velocity fields from coherent Doppler lidar to improve dispersion modeling. The possibility of producing sensor/computational tools for civil and military defense applications appears worth further investigation. An experiment attempting to characterize bioaerosol plumes (using both lidar and in situ biological measurements) associated with the application of biosolids on agricultural fields is in progress at the time of writing.

  15. In Situ Measurements of Microphysical and Radiative Properties of Cirrus and Anvil Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, P.; Baker, B.; Pilson, B.

    2003-12-01

    In situ microphysical and radiative properties of mid-latitude cirrus, anvil and tropical anvil clouds, based on research flights conducted with the SPEC Learjet, the NASA WB-57 and DC-8, and the University of North Dakota Citation research aircraft, are presented. The measurements were collected in Colorado, Utah, Oklahoma, Florida and Kwajalein. All of the research aircraft were equipped with a standard complement of microphysical sensors and optical probes, plus a cloud particle imager (CPI), which produces high-definition (2.3 micron pixel) digital images of ice particles. The CPI data provide improved measurements of particle shape and size, facilitating better calculations of radiative properties of cirrus and anvil clouds. Based on the measurements, average mid-latitude cirrus, and mid-latitude and tropical cirrus microphysical properties of particle size distribution, crystal habit, ice water content, extinction coefficient, effective radius and optical depth are derived. The data show a distinct difference between particle characteristics in mid-latitude cirrus and anvil clouds. In cirrus, the predominate crystal type (weighted by area or mass) is the bullet rosette, a polycrystalline structure typical of crystal formation at temperatures colder than -30 C. Conversely, although anvils occur at temperatures similar to cirrus, bullet rosettes are very rare in anvils. Instead crystal types in anvils are typical of those formed at temperatures warmer than - 30 C. There is also a notable difference in microphysical and radiative characteristics between mid-latitude, Florida, and tropical (Kwajalein) anvils. Tropical anvils are comprised mainly of single crystals, mostly irregular blocky-shapes. In mid-latitude and Florida anvils, there are more aggregates and often chains of small particles that may be formed as a result of the higher electric fields in continental clouds. The impact of crystal type on calculations of radiative transfer are also considered.

  16. Methods for Validation and Intercomparison of Remote Sensing and In situ Ice Water Measurements: Case Studies from CRYSTAL-FACE and Model Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayres, D.S.; Pittman, J. V.; Smith, J. B.; Weinstock, E. M.; Anderson, J. G.; Heymsfield, G.; Li, L.; Fridlind, A.; Ackerman, A. S.

    2004-01-01

    Remote sensing observations, such as those from AURA, are necessary to understand the role of cirrus in determining the radiative and humidity budgets of the upper troposphere. Using these measurements quantitatively requires comparisons with in situ measurements that have previously been validated. However, a direct comparison of remote and in situ measurements is difficult due to the requirement that the spatial and temporal overlap be sufficient in order to guarantee that both instruments are measuring the same air parcel. A difficult as this might be for gas phase intercomparisons, cloud inhomogeneities significantly exacerbate the problem for cloud ice water content measurements. The CRYSTAL-FACE mission provided an opportunity to assess how well such intercomparisons can be performed and to establish flight plans that will be necessary for validation of future satellite instruments. During CRYSTAL-FACE, remote and in situ instruments were placed on different aircraft (NASA's ER-2 and WB-59, and the two planes flew in tandem so that the in situ payload flew in the field of view of the remote instruments. We show here that, even with this type of careful flight planning, it is not always possible to guarantee that remote and in situ instruments are viewing the same air parcel. We use ice water data derived from the in situ Harvard Total Water (HV-TW) instrument, and the remote Goddard Cloud Radar System (CRS) and show that agreement between HV-TW and CRS is a strong function of the horizontal separation and the time delay between the aircraft transects. We also use a cloud model to simulate possible trajectories through a cloud and evaluate the use of statistical analysis in determining the agreement between the two instruments. This type of analysis should guide flight planning for future intercomparison efforts, whether for aircraft or satellite-borne instrumentation.

  17. Long-term greenhouse gas measurements from aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karion, A.; Sweeney, C.; Wolter, S.; Newberger, T.; Chen, H.; Andrews, A.; Kofler, J.; Neff, D.; Tans, P.

    2013-03-01

    -flight calibrations, provided ground calibrations and testing were performed regularly. Comparisons between in situ CRDS measurements and flask measurements are consistent with expected measurement uncertainties for CH4 and CO, but differences are larger than expected for CO2. Biases and standard deviations of comparisons with flask samples suggest that atmospheric variability, flask-to-flask variability, and possible flask sampling biases may be driving the observed flask versus in situ CO2 differences rather than the CRDS measurements.

  18. Huygens Probe In-Situ Measurements : An Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2015-04-01

    The global Titan perspective afforded by ongoing Cassini observations, and prospects for future in-situ exploration, have prompted a re-examination of Huygens data, yielding a number of recent new results. Gravity waves have been detected (Lorenz, Ferri and Young, Icarus, 2014) in the HASI descent temperature data, with ~2K amplitude. These waves are seen above about 60km, and analysis suggests they may therefore be controlled by interaction of upward-propagating waves with the zonal wind field. A curious cessation of detection of sound pulses by a Surface Science Package ultrasound instrument about 15 minutes after the probe landed appears to be best explained (Lorenz et al., Planetary and Space Science, 2014) by an accumulation of polyatomic vapors such as ethane, sweated out of the ground by the warm probe. Such gases have high acoustic attenuation, and were independently measured by the probe GCMS. The Huygens probe carried two radar altimeters. While their principal function was merely to trigger observation sequences at specific altitudes on the science instruments, the surface range history, and the Automatic Gain Control (AGC) housekeeping data, provide some useful information on Titan's surface (Lorenz et al., submitted). Small-scale topographic variations, and the surface radar reflectivity characteristics implied by the AGC variation with height, are discussed. A new integrated timeline product, which arranges second-by-second measurements from several Huygens sensors on a convenient, common tabulation, has been recently archived on the PDS Atmospheres node. Finally, a troubling discrepancy exists between radio occultation and infrared soundings from Cassini, and Huygens methane and temperature measurements in the lower stratosphere. The interdependence of these parameters will be discussed. In particular the possible role of the assumed probe mass history (depending on the unmeasured ablation from the heat shield) and the assumed zonal wind profile on

  19. The international soil moisture network: A data hosting facility for global in situ soil moisture measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In situ measurements of soil moisture are invaluable for calibrating and validating land surface models and satellite-based soil moisture retrievals. In addition, long-term time series of in situ soil moisture measurements themselves can reveal trends in the water cycle related to climate or land co...

  20. Solar irradiance measurements from a research aircraft.

    PubMed

    Thekaekara, M P; Kruger, R; Duncan, C H

    1969-08-01

    Measurements of the solar constant and solar spectrum were made from a research aircraft flying at 11.58 km, above almost all of the highly variable and absorbing constituents of the atmosphere. A wide range of solar zenith angles was covered during six flights for over 14 h of observation. Results are presented from nine different instruments which complemented each other in measuring techniques and wavelength range and were calibrated and operated by different experimenters. A new value of the solar constant, 135.1 mW cm(-2), has been derived, as well as a revised solar spectral irradiance curve for zero air mass.

  1. Radiation exposure measurement onboard civil aircraft.

    PubMed

    Beaujean, R; Burmeister, S; Petersen, F; Reitz, G

    2005-01-01

    The active dosemeter DOSTEL based on two silicon planar detectors was flown on civil aircraft flights to study the radiation exposure of air crew members. The altitude and latitude dependence of count and dose rates as well as long-term variations are measured. After calibration of the DOSTEL response against measurements of a TEPC instrument, total dose-equivalent values for various flights are compared with H*(10) calculations by EPCARD yielding a ratio of 1.02 +/- 0.09 (standard variation).

  2. Novel Sensor for the In Situ Measurement of Uranium Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, Kirk

    2015-02-10

    The goal of this project was to develop a sensor that incorporates the field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter to provide direct in situ measures of flux for uranium and groundwater in porous media. Measurable contaminant fluxes [J] are essentially the product of concentration [C] and groundwater flux or specific discharge [q ]. The sensor measures [J] and [q] by changes in contaminant and tracer amounts respectively on a sorbent. By using measurement rather than inference from static parameters, the sensor can directly advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. The sensor was deployed in conjunction with DOE in obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. Project results have expanded our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in fluxes of uranium, groundwater and salient electron donor/acceptors are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. The coupling between uranium, various nutrients and micro flora can be used to estimate field-scale rates of uranium attenuation and field-scale transitions in microbial communities. This research focuses on uranium (VI), but the sensor principles and design are applicable to field-scale fate and transport of other radionuclides. Laboratory studies focused on sorbent selection and calibration, along with sensor development and validation under controlled conditions. Field studies were conducted at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. These studies were closely coordinated with existing SBR (formerly ERSP) projects to complement data collection. Small field tests were conducted during the first two years that focused on evaluating field-scale deployment procedures and validating sensor performance under

  3. Continuous measurement of aircraft wing icing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Stephen S. C.

    1994-01-01

    Ice formation on the wings of aircraft is a problem that has plagued air travel since its inception. Several recent incidents have been attributed to ice formation on the lifting surfaces of wings. This paper describes a SBIR Phase 1 research effort on the use of small flat dielectric sensors in detecting a layer of ice above the sensor. The sensors are very small, lightweight, and inexpensive. The electronics package that controls the sensor is also small, and could be even smaller using commonly available miniaturization technologies. Thus, several sensors could be placed on a surface such that a representative ice thickness profile could be measured. The benefits offered by developing this technology go beyond the safety improvements realized by monitoring ice formation on the wings of an aircraft. Continuous monitoring of anti-icing fluid concentrations on the ground would warn the pilot of impending fluid failure as well as allowing the stations to use less de-icing solution per aircraft. This in turn would increase the safety of takeoffs and reduce the overall discharge of de-icing solution into the environment, thus reducing the biohazard of the de-icing procedure.

  4. In situ monitoring of the integrity of bonded repair patches on aircraft and civil infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amrita; Roach, Dennis; Beard, Shawn; Qing, Xinlin; Hannum, Robert

    2006-03-01

    Monitoring the continued health of aircraft subsystems and identifying problems before they affect airworthiness has been a long-term goal of the aviation industry. Because in-service conditions and failure modes experienced by structures are generally complex and unknown, conservative calendar-based or usage-based scheduled maintenance practices are overly time-consuming, labor-intensive and expensive. Metal structures such as helicopters and other transportation systems are likely to develop fatigue cracks under cyclic loads and corrosive service environments. Early detection of cracks is a key element to prevent catastrophic failure and prolong structural life. Furthermore, as structures age, maintenance service frequency and costs increase while performance and availability decrease. Current non-destructive inspection (NDI) techniques that can potentially be used for this purpose typically involve complex, time-intensive procedures, which are labor-intensive and expensive. Most techniques require access to the damaged area on at least one side, and sometimes on both sides. This can be very difficult for monitoring of certain inaccessible regions. In those cases, inspection may require removal of access panels or even structural disassembly. Once access has been obtained, automated inspection techniques likely will not be practical due to the bulk of the required equipment. Results obtained from these techniques may also be sensitive to the sweep speed, tool orientation, and downward pressure. This can be especially problematic for hand-held inspection tools where none of these parameters is mechanically controlled. As a result, data can vary drastically from one inspection to the next, from one technician to the next, and even from one sweep to the next. Structural health monitoring (SHM) offers the promise of a paradigm shift from schedule-driven maintenance to condition-based maintenance (CBM) of assets. Sensors embedded permanently in aircraft safety

  5. Comparison of wind and turbulence measurements from Doppler lidar and instrumented aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, K. H.; Frost, W.; Ringnes, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    Wind fields were measured with the ground based lidar, NOAA Wave Propagation Laboratory and with the NASA B-57B instrumented aircraft. The remotely sensed winds are compared with the in situ aircraft measurements. Three flight plans were carried out during the two different field programs. At NASA/MSFC the aircraft circled while the lidar scanned conically and the aircraft flew 6 deg approach path along the fixed lidar beam. The aircraft flew an approach along the lidar beam directed south-north (parallel to the mountain range) and a climbout along the lidar beam which alternately shifted east-west (perpendicular to the mountain range). Turbulence intensities and spectra were calculated from the temporal fluctuations in the lidar-measured radial wind speed component. These field tests provided unique sets of data to examine the mean wind and turbulence measurements made by remote sensing instruments. The comparison of aircraft measured turbulence intensities and spectra with lidar time histories of radial wind speed were in good agreement.

  6. Atmospheric Balloon Swarms for Persistent In-Situ Measurements in Hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneghello, G.; Bewley, T.

    2015-12-01

    Real-time measurements within hurricanes are essential to improve forecasts, protect property and save lives. Current methods for obtaining in-situ data, including radar and satellite imagery as well as drop-sondes deployed from repeated aircraft flights above or even within the hurricane itself, are costly, dangerous and limited in duration or resolution. We demonstrate how a swarm of inexpensive, buoyancy-controlled, sensor-laden balloons can be deployed from altitude or from sea-level within a hurricane flow field, and coordinated autonomously in an energetically-efficient fashion to persistently and continuously monitor relevant properties (pressure, humidity, temperature, windspeed) of a hurricane for days at a time. Rather than fighting the gale-force winds in the storm, the strong, predictable stratification of these winds is leveraged to disperse the balloons into a favorable, time-evolving distribution and to follow the hurricane track as it moves. Certain target orbits of interest in the hurricane can be continuously sampled by some balloons, while other balloons make continuous sweeps between the eye and the spiral rain bands. We expect the acquired data to complement current measurement methods and to be instrumental in improving the numerical models' forecast skills.

  7. Cooperative Mobile Sensing Systems for In Situ Measurements in Hazardous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argrow, B.

    2005-12-01

    Sondes are typically deployed from manned aircraft or taken to altitude by a balloon before they are dropped. There are obvious safety and physical limitations that dictate where and how sondes are deployed. These limitations have severely constrained sonde deployment into highly dynamic and dangerous environments. Additionally, conventional parachute dropsondes provide no means for active control. The "smartsonde" idea is to integrate miniature sonde packages into micro air vehicles (MAVs). These MAVs will be ferried into the hard to reach and hazardous environments to provide in situ measurements in regions that have been heretofore out of reach. Once deployed, the MAV will provide some means of control of the sonde, to enable it to remain aloft and to provide some measure of directional control. Preliminary smartsonde communications experiments have been completed. These experiments focused on characterizing the capabilities of the 802.11.4 wireless protocol. Range measurements with 60-mW, 2.4-GHz radios showed 100% throughput rate over 2.7 km during air to ground tests. The experiments also demonstrated the integration of an in-house distributed computing system that provides the interface between the sensors, UAV flight computers, and the telemetry system. The University of Colorado's Research and Engineering Center for Unmanned Vehicles (RECUV) is developing an engineering system that integrates small mobile sensor attributes into flexible mobile sensor infrastructures to be deployed for in situ sensing in hazardous environments. There are three focus applications: 1) Wildfire, to address sensing, communications, situational awareness, and safety needs to support fire-fighting operations and to increase capabilities for dynamic data acquisition for modeling and prediction; 2) Polar, where heterogeneous mixes of platforms and sensors will provide in-situ data acquisition from beneath the ocean surface into the troposphere; 3) Storm, to address the challenges

  8. Kinematic analysis of in situ measurement during chemical mechanical planarization process.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongkai; Wang, Tongqing; Zhao, Qian; Meng, Yonggang; Lu, Xinchun

    2015-10-01

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is the most widely used planarization technique in semiconductor manufacturing presently. With the aid of in situ measurement technology, CMP tools can achieve good performance and stable productivity. However, the in situ measurement has remained unexplored from a kinematic standpoint. The available related resources for the kinematic analysis are very limited due to the complexity and technical secret. In this paper, a comprehensive kinematic analysis of in situ measurement is provided, including the analysis model, the measurement trajectory, and the measurement time of each zone of wafer surface during the practical CMP process. In addition, a lot of numerical calculations are performed to study the influences of main parameters on the measurement trajectory and the measurement velocity variation of the probe during the measurement process. All the efforts are expected to improve the in situ measurement system and promote the advancement in CMP control system.

  9. Kinematic analysis of in situ measurement during chemical mechanical planarization process

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongkai; Wang, Tongqing; Zhao, Qian; Meng, Yonggang; Lu, Xinchun

    2015-10-15

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is the most widely used planarization technique in semiconductor manufacturing presently. With the aid of in situ measurement technology, CMP tools can achieve good performance and stable productivity. However, the in situ measurement has remained unexplored from a kinematic standpoint. The available related resources for the kinematic analysis are very limited due to the complexity and technical secret. In this paper, a comprehensive kinematic analysis of in situ measurement is provided, including the analysis model, the measurement trajectory, and the measurement time of each zone of wafer surface during the practical CMP process. In addition, a lot of numerical calculations are performed to study the influences of main parameters on the measurement trajectory and the measurement velocity variation of the probe during the measurement process. All the efforts are expected to improve the in situ measurement system and promote the advancement in CMP control system.

  10. The Coupling of ClONO2, ClO, and NO2 in the Lower Stratosphere From in Situ Observations Using the NASA ER-2 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stimpfle, R. E.; Cohen, R. C.; Bonne, G. P.; Voss, P. B.; Perkins, K. K.; Koch, L. C.; Anderson, J. G.; Salawitch, R. J.; Gao, R. S.

    1999-01-01

    The first in situ measurements of ClONO2 in the lower stratosphere, acquired using the NASA ER-2 aircraft during the Polar Ozone Loss in the Arctic Region in Summer (POLARIS) mission, are combined with simultaneous measurements of ClO, NO2, temperature, pressure, and the calculated photolysis rate coefficient (J(sub ClONO2)) to examine the balance between production and loss of ClONO2. The observations demonstrate the ClONO2 photochemical steady state measurement, [ClONO2](sup PSS) = k[ClO][No2]/J(sub ClONO2), is in good agreement with the direct measurement, [ClONO2](sup MEAS). For the bulk of the data (80%), where T > 220 K and latitudes > 45 N, [ClONO2](sup PPS) = 1.15 +/- 0.36(1-sigma)[ClONO2](sup MEAS), while for T< 220 K and latitudes < 45 N, the result is somewhat less at 1.01 +/- 0.30. The cause of the temperature and/or latitude trend is unidentified. These results are independent of solar zenith angle and air density, thus there is no evidence in support of a pressure-dependent quantum yield for photodissociation of ClONO2 at wavelengths > 300 nm. These measurements confirm the mechanism by which active nitrogen (NOx = NO + NO2) controls the abundance of active chlorine (Clx = ClO + Cl) in the stratosphere.

  11. Measurements of neutron radiation in aircraft.

    PubMed

    Vuković, B; Poje, M; Varga, M; Radolić, V; Miklavcić, I; Faj, D; Stanić, D; Planinić, J

    2010-12-01

    Radiation environment is a complex mixture of charged particles of the solar and galactic origin, as well as of secondary particles created in an interaction of galactic cosmic particles with the nuclei of the Earth's atmosphere. A radiation field at aircraft altitude consists of different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. In order to measure a neutron component of the cosmic radiation, we investigated a few combinations of a track etch detector (CR-39, LR-115) with a plastic converter or boron foil. Detector calibration was performed on neutrons coming from the nuclear reactor, as well as in the CERN-EU high-energy Reference Field (CERF) facility. From November 2007 to September 2008, the neutron dose equivalent was measured by the track detectors during five aircraft flights, in the north geographical latitude from 21° to 58°; the respective average dose rate, determined by using the D-4 detector (CR-39/B), was Ḣ(n)=5.9 μSv/h. The photon dose rate, measured by the electronic dosimeter RAD-60 SE, had the average value of Ḣ(f)=1.4 μSv/h.

  12. Measurement of aircraft speed and altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gracey, W.

    1980-01-01

    Problems involved in measuring speed and altitude with pressure-actuated instruments (altimeter, airspeed indicator, true-airspeed indicator, Machmeter, and vertical-speed indicator) are examined. Equations relating total pressure and static pressure to the five flight quantities are presented, and criteria for the design of total and static pressure tubes are given. Calibrations of typical static pressure installations (fuselage nose, wing tip, vertical fin, and fuselage vent) are presented, various methods for flight calibration of these installations are described, and the calibration of a particular installation by two of the methods is described in detail. Equations are given for estimating the effects of pressure lag and leaks. Test procedures for the laboratory calibration of the five instruments are described, and accuracies of mechanical and electrical instruments are presented. Operational use of the altimeter for terrain clearance and vertical separation of aircraft is discussed, along with flight technical errors and overall altitude errors of aircraft in cruise operations. Altitude-measuring techniques based on a variety of properties of the Earth and the atmosphere are included. Two appendixes present airspeed and altitude tables and sample calculations for determining the various flight parameters from measured total and static pressures.

  13. Comparing Cirrus Cloud Formation and Evolution Using in Situ Aircraft Observations and a Cloud Resolving Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, M.; Jensen, J. B.; Bryan, G. H.; Morrison, H.; Stern, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    Cirrus clouds, covering ~30% of the Earth, play important roles in Earth's climate and weather. As a major uncertainty in climate models, cirrus clouds' radiative forcing (cooling or warming) is influenced by both the microphysical properties (such as ice crystal concentration and size) and the larger scale structure (such as horizontal and vertical extent). Recent studies (Diao et al. 2013; Diao et al. 2014), based on in situ observations with ~200 m horizontal resolution, showed that the initial conditions of cirrus formation - ice supersaturated regions (ISSRs, where ISS is spatially continuous) - occur mostly at horizontal scales around 1 km, in contrast to the ~100 km scales by previous observations (Gierens et al. 2000). Yet it is still unknown whether current cloud resolving models can capture these small-scale ISSR features. In this work, we compare the observed characteristics of the ice supersaturation (ISS) with an idealized, cloud-resolving simulation of a squall line (Bryan and Morrison, 2012). The model (CM1) was run with 250 m grid spacing using a double-moment microphysics scheme (Morrison et al. 2005). Our comparisons show that the CM1 model has captured the majority of the small-scale ISSRs (~1 km). In addition, the simulated ISSRs are dominated by water vapor horizontal heterogeneities (~90%) as opposed to temperature heterogeneities (~10%). This result is comparable to the observed values of ~88% and ~9%, respectively. However, when comparing the evolution phases of cirrus clouds (clear-sky ISS, nucleation/freezing, growth and sedimentation/sublimation; Diao et al. 2013), the CM1 simulation does not have sufficient amount of ISS in clear-sky and nucleation phases. This disagreement indicates a shortcoming of the idealized model setup. Overall, the observations show more ISS at higher magnitude (up to ~150% of RHi) than CM1 (~up to 130% of RHi). Also the largest ISSRs in the observations are up to ~100 km, compared with those in CM1 of up to ~10

  14. In-situ Measurements of Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grün, E.

    2008-09-01

    Dust is finely dispersed solid material in interplanetary space. It derives from a number of sources: larger meteoroids, comets, asteroids, the planets, and satellites, and there is interstellar dust sweeping through the solar system. These dust particles range in size from assemblages of a few molecules to tenth millimetre-sized grains. Dust particles absorb and scatter solar radiation and emit thermal radiation giving rise to Zodiacal light at visible and thermal emission at infrared wavelengths. Astronomical observations of both emissions provide information on the average properties of very large number of particles and their spatial distribution. Information on the physical and chemical properties and the orbital motion is obtained by direct methods. Direct methods include: (1) collection of dust particles (Fig. 1) on collectors on spacecraft returned to Earth and on airplanes in the stratosphere, (2) investigations of dust impacts craters on lunar samples and manmade impact plates returned from space, and (3) insitu measurements of individual particles by instruments on board satellites and space probes. Dust particles collected in the upper atmosphere provide the morphology and chemical and mineralogical composition of extraterrestrial particles of 5 to 50 microns in diameter but no information on the source of these particles is obtained. The NASA Stardust mission was the first space mission that returned dust from a comet. The study of impact craters on man-made and lunar surface samples exposed to space is used to characterize the flux of interplanetary micrometeoroids and their size distribution. Microcraters have been found ranging from 0.02 μm to millimetres in diameter. In-situ detectors on board of satellites and spaceprobes for the measurement of interplanetary dust have been used in the ecliptic plane from inside Mercury's orbit to the Kuiper belt and in space above and below the solar poles. Penetration detectors have a detection threshold of

  15. Savannah River Site Experiences in In Situ Field Measurements of Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, F.S.

    1999-10-07

    This paper discusses some of the field gamma-ray measurements made at the Savannah River Site, the equipment used for the measurements, and lessons learned during in situ identification and characterization of radioactive materials.

  16. In-situ Balloon Measurements of Small Ice Particles in High-Latitude Cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, T.; Heymsfield, A.

    2015-12-01

    Thin cirrus clouds at high latitudes are often composed of small ice particles not larger than 100 μm. Cirrus clouds reflect incoming solar radiation, creating a cooling effect. At the same time these clouds absorb the infrared radiation from Earth, creating a greenhouse effect. The net effect, crucial for radiative transfer, depends on the cirrus microphysical properties, such as particle size distributions (PSD) and particle shapes. Knowledge of these cloud properties is also needed for calibrating/validating passive and active remote sensors. We report on a series of balloon-borne in-situ measurements that is carried out at a high-latitude location, Kiruna in northern Sweden (68N 21E). The measurements target upper tropospheric, cold cirrus clouds. The measurements are ongoing, and the method and first results are presented here. Ice particles in these clouds are predominantly very small, with a median size of measured particles of around 50 μm. Ice particles at these sizes are inherently difficult to measure with aircraft-mounted probes due to issues with resolution, sizing, and size-dependent sampling volume. These probes also suffer from problems with shattering of larger ice particles at the typically high aircraft speeds. The method used here avoids these issues. Furthermore, with a balloon-borne instrument data are collected as vertical profiles, more useful for calibrating or evaluating remote sensing measurements than data collected along horizontal traverses. Particles are collected on an oil-coated film at a sampling speed given directly by the ascending rate of the balloon, 4 m s-1. The collecting film is advanced uniformly inside the instrument so that an always un-used section of the film is exposed to ice particles, which are measured by imaging shortly after sampling. The high optical resolution of about 4 μm together with a pixel resolution of 1.65 μm allows particle detection at sizes of 10 μm and larger. For particles that are 20 μm (12

  17. In situ measurements of NO(x) in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Mary Anne; Montzka, Denise D.; Hubler, Gerhard; Kelly, Kenneth K.; Gregory, Gerald L.

    1990-01-01

    In situ measurements of NO and NO2 were made simultaneously from the NASA DC-8 aircraft as part of the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition. Mixing ratios of NO(x) (NO + NO2) were typically higher in the arctic troposphere than in the stratosphere, with median values of 59 and 40 pptv, respectively. In the stratosphere, there tended to be a positive correlation between NO(x) and water vapor and negative correlations between NO(x) and ozone and between NO(x) and total reactive odd-nitrogen, NO(y). The ratio of NO(x) to NO(y), in conjunction with NO(y), appears to be an excellent tracer of tropospheric or stratospheric air at northern latitudes during winter. Tropospheric NO(x) was typically 10 to 50 percent of gas-phase NO(y), while in the stratosphere, NO(x) was typically less than 10 percent, and frequently less than 5 percent of gas-phase NO(y).

  18. First Results from the COFFEE Instrument: Airborne In-Situ Measurements of Formaldehyde over California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iraci, L. T.; St Clair, J.; Marrero, J. E.; Gore, W.; Swanson, A. K.; Hanisco, T. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Compact Formaldehyde Fluorescence Experiment (COFFEE) instrument uses Non-Resonant Laser Induced Fluorescence (NR-LIF) to detect trace concentrations of formaldehyde as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) payload. COFFEE, developed at NASA-GSFC, has a sensitivity of 100 pptv (1 sec) and can operate over a wide range of altitudes from the boundary layer to the lower stratosphere. It is mounted in an external wing pod on the Alpha Jet aircraft based at NASA-ARC, which can access altitudes from the surface up to 40,000 ft. We will present results from test flights performed in Fall 2015 over the Central Valley of California. Targets include an oil field, agricultural areas, and highways. Formaldehyde is one of the few urban pollutants that can be measured from space, and we will present plans to compare COFFEE in-situ data with space-based formaldehyde observations such as those from OMI (Aura) and OMPS (SuomiNPP).

  19. Wind estimates from cloud motions: Preliminary results from phases 1, 2, and 3 of an in situ aircraft verification experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.; Shenk, W. E.; Skillman, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    Low level aircraft equipped with Inertial Navigation Systems (INS) were used to define the vertical extent and horizontal motion of a cloud and to measure the ambient wind field. A high level aircraft, also equipped with an INS, took photographs to describe the horizontal extent of the cloud field and to measure cloud motion. The aerial photographs were also used to make a positive identification in a satellite picture of the cloud observed by the low level aircraft. The experiment was conducted over the tropical oceans in the vicinity of Florida, Puerto Rico, Panama and in the Western Gulf of Mexico. Results for tropical cumulus clouds indicate excellent agreement between the cloud motion and the wind at the cloud base. The magnitude of the vector difference between the cloud motion and the cloud base wind is less than 1.3 m/sec for 67% of the cases with track lengths of 1 hour or longer. The cirrus cloud motions agreed best with the mean wind in the cloud layer with a vector difference of about 1.6 m/sec.

  20. Power Measurement Errors on a Utility Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    2002-01-01

    Extensive flight test data obtained from two recent performance tests of a UH 60A aircraft are reviewed. A power difference is calculated from the power balance equation and is used to examine power measurement errors. It is shown that the baseline measurement errors are highly non-Gaussian in their frequency distribution and are therefore influenced by additional, unquantified variables. Linear regression is used to examine the influence of other variables and it is shown that a substantial portion of the variance depends upon measurements of atmospheric parameters. Correcting for temperature dependence, although reducing the variance in the measurement errors, still leaves unquantified effects. Examination of the power difference over individual test runs indicates significant errors from drift, although it is unclear how these may be corrected. In an idealized case, where the drift is correctable, it is shown that the power measurement errors are significantly reduced and the error distribution is Gaussian. A new flight test program is recommended that will quantify the thermal environment for all torque measurements on the UH 60. Subsequently, the torque measurement systems will be recalibrated based on the measured thermal environment and a new power measurement assessment performed.

  1. Measurement of hydrogen peroxide from aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) is an important species in both the homogeneous and the heterogeneous chemistry of the troposphere. Measurement of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ from aircraft provides information on the distribution of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in the troposphere and provides a great deal of additional information which cannot be obtained from ground-based measurements. Three analytical techniques for atmospheric H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ are available. Two of these are colorimetric methods involving the formation of a colored complex with titanium salt. In 1978, a chemiluminescent method for the determination of atmospheric H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ was introduced. This method involves the reaction of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ with luminol in the presence of a copper catalyst, with the chemiluminescence serving as the basis of the analytical reaction.

  2. Aspects regarding vertical distribution of greenhouse gases resulted from in situ airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscornea, Andreea; Sorin Vajaiac, Nicolae; Ardelean, Magdalena; Benciu, Silviu Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In the last decades the air quality, as well as other components of the environment, has been severely affected by uncontrolled emissions of gases - most known as greenhouse gases (GHG). The main role of GHG is given by the direct influence on the Earth's radiative budget, through Sun light scattering and indirectly by participating in cloud formation. Aldo, many efforts were made for reducing the high levels of these pollutants, e.g., International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) initiatives, Montreal Protocol, etc., this issue is still open. In this context, this study aims to present several aspects regarding the vertical distribution in the lower atmosphere of some greenhouse gases: water vapours, CO, CO2 and methane. Bucharest and its metropolitan area is one of the most polluted regions of Romania due to high traffic. For assessing the air quality of this area, in situ measurements of water vapours, CO, CO2 and CH4 were performed using a Britten Norman Islander BN2 aircraft equipped with a Picarro gas analyser, model G2401-mc, able to provide precised, continuous and accurate data in real time. This configuration consisting in aircraft and airborne instruments was tested for the first time in Romania. For accomplishing the objectives of the measurement campaign, there were proposed several flight strategies which included vertical and horizontal soundings from 105 m to 3300 m and vice-versa around Clinceni area (20 km West of Bucharest). During 5 days (25.08.2015 - 31.08.2015) were performed 7 flights comprising 10h 18min research flight hours. The measured concentrations of GHS ranged between 0.18 - 2.2 ppm for water vapours with an average maximum value of 1.7 ppm, 0.04 - 0.53 ppm for CO with an average maximum value of 0.21 ppm, 377 - 437.5 ppm for CO2 with an average maximum value of 397 ppm and 1.7 - 6.1 ppm for CH4 with an average maximum value of 2.195 ppm. It was noticed that measured concentrations of GHG are decreasing for high values of sounding

  3. Burst mode trigger of STEREO in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, L. K.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Curtis, D.; Schroeder, P.

    2013-06-01

    Since the launch of the STEREO spacecraft, the in situ instrument suites have continued to modify their burst mode trigger in order to optimize the collection of high-cadence magnetic field, solar wind, and suprathermal electron data. This report reviews the criteria used for the burst mode trigger and their evolution with time. From 2007 to 2011, the twin STEREO spacecraft observed 236 interplanetary shocks, and 54% of them were captured by the burst mode trigger. The capture rate increased remarkably with time, from 30% in 2007 to 69% in 2011. We evaluate the performance of multiple trigger criteria and investigate why some of the shocks were missed by the trigger. Lessons learned from STEREO are useful for future missions, because the telemetry bandwidth needed to capture the waveforms of high frequency but infrequent events would be unaffordable without an effective burst mode trigger.

  4. Airborne In-Situ Measurements of Formaldehyde over California: First Results from the COFFEE Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, Josette; St. Clair, Jason; Yates, Emma; Swanson, Andrew; Gore, Warren; Iraci, Laura; Hanisco, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is one of the most abundant oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere, playing a role multiple atmospheric processes. Measurements of HCHO can be used to help quantify convective transport, the abundance of VOCs, and ozone production in urban environments. The Compact Formaldehyde FluorescencE Experiment (COFFEE) instrument uses Non-Resonant Laser Induced Fluorescence (NR-LIF) to detect trace concentrations of HCHO as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) payload. Developed at NASA GSFC, COFFEE is a small, low maintenance instrument with a sensitivity of 100 pptv and a quick response time (1 sec). The COFFEE instrument has been customized to fit in an external wing pod on the Alpha Jet aircraft based at NASA ARC. The instrument can operate over a broad range of altitudes, from boundary layer to lower stratosphere, making it well suited for the Alpha Jet, which can access altitudes from the surface up to 40,000 ft. We will present results from flights performed over the Central Valley of California, including boundary layer measurements and vertical profiles in the tropospheric column. This region is of particular interest, due to its elevated levels of HCHO, revealed in satellite images, as well as its high ozone concentrations. In addition to HCHO, the AJAX payload includes measurements of atmospheric ozone, methane, and carbon dioxide. These results will be presented in conjunction with formaldehyde. Targets in the Central Valley consist of an oil field, agricultural areas, and highways, each of which can emit HCHO primarily and generate HCHO through secondary production. Formaldehyde is one of the few urban pollutants that can be measured from space. Plans to compare in-situ COFFEE data with satellite-based HCHO observations such as those from OMI (Aura) and OMPS (SuomiNPP) will also be presented.

  5. 15 years of upper tropospheric relative humidity in-situ measurements by the MOZAIC programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neis, Patrick; Smit, Herman G. J.; Alteköster, Lukas; Rohs, Susanne; Wahner, Andreas; Spichtinger, Peter; Petzold, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Water vapour is a major parameter in weather prediction and climate research. However, the interaction between water vapour in the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere (UT/LS) and tropopause dynamics are not well understood. Furthermore, the knowledge about potential trends and feedback mechanisms of upper troposphere/lower stratosphere water vapour is low because of the large variability of observations and relatively short data records. A continuous measurement of upper tropospheric humidity (UTH) is still difficult because the abundance of UTH is highly variable on spatial and temporal scales, which cannot be resolved, neither by the global radiosondes network nor by satellites. Since 1994, UTH data with high spatial and temporal resolution are provided by the in-situ measurements aboard civil passenger aircraft from the MOZAIC/IAGOS-programme (www.iagos.org). The measurement system is based on a capacitive hygrometer with a simultaneous temperature measurement installed in a conventional Rosemount housing. In recent studies the MOZAIC Capacitive Hygrometer (MCH) and its improved successor IAGOS Capacitive Hygrometer (ICH) are compared against research-grade water vapour instruments during airborne field studies. The qualification of the Capacitive Hygrometer for the use in long-term observation programmes is successfully demonstrated and the continuation of high data quality is confirmed for the transition from MCH to ICH. After the reanalysis of the relative humidity data from 1994 to 2009, this extensive and unique data set is examined by criteria of continuity, homogeneity and quantity of data coverage, to identify global regions suitable for UTH climatology and trend analyses. For the identified target regions time series and climatologies of, e.g., relative humidity with respect to ice, temperature, and absolute humidity are investigated. First results of this study will be presented.

  6. Validation of satellite overland retrievals of AOD at northern high latitudes with coincident measurements from airborne sunphotometer, lidar, and in situ sensors during ARCTAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, J. M.; Shinozuka, Y.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Ramachandran, S.; Johnson, R. R.; Clarke, A. D.; Howell, S. G.; McNaughton, C.; Freitag, S.; Kapustin, V. N.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Torres, O.; Veefkind, P.; Remer, L. A.; Mattoo, S.; Levy, R. C.; Chu, A. D.; Kahn, R. A.; Davis, M. R.

    2009-12-01

    The 2008 Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) field campaign presented a unique opportunity for validation of satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) over a variety of surfaces at northern high latitudes. In particular, the 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) was operated together with a variety of in-situ and other remote sensors aboard the NASA P-3B research aircraft during both the spring and summer phases of ARCTAS. Among the in-situ sensors were a nephelometer and particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) operated by University of Hawaii Group for Environmental Aerosol Research (HIGEAR). P-3B science missions included several coincident underflights of the Terra and A-Train satellites during a variety of aerosol loading conditions, including Arctic haze and smoke plumes from boreal forest fires. In this presentation, we will compare AATS-14 AOD spectra, adjusted for the contribution from the layer below the aircraft using the HiGEAR scattering and absorption measurements, with full column AOD retrievals from coincident measurements by satellite sensors such as MISR, MODIS, OMI, and POLDER. We also intend to show comparisons of aerosol extinction derived from AATS-14 measurements during P-3B vertical profiles with coincident measurements from CALIOP aboard the CALIPSO satellite and from the high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) flown aboard the NASA B-200 aircraft.

  7. Guide to measurement of winds with instrumented aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Walter; Paige, Terry S.; Nelius, Andrew E.

    1991-01-01

    Aircraft measurement techniques are reviewed. Review of past and present applications of instrument aircraft to atmospheric observations is presented. Questions to be answered relative to measuring mean wind profiles as contrasted to turbulence measurements are then addressed. Requirements of instrumentation and accuracy, data reduction, data acquisition, and theoretical and certainty analysis are considered.

  8. Airborne in-situ investigations of the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash plume on Iceland and over north-western Germany with light aircrafts and optical particle counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, K.; Eliasson, J.; Vogel, A.; Fischer, C.; Pohl, T.; van Haren, G.; Meier, M.; Grobéty, B.; Dahmann, D.

    2012-03-01

    During the time period of the eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in April/May 2010 the Duesseldorf University of Applied Sciences has performed 14 research flights in situations with and without the volcanic ash plume over Germany. In parallel to the research flights in Germany three measurement flights have been performed by the University of Iceland in May 2010 over the western part of Iceland. During two of these flights the outskirts of the eruption plume were entered directly, delivering most direct measurements within the eruption plume during this eruptive event. For all the measurement flights reported here, light durable piston-motor driven aircrafts were used, which were equipped with optical particle counters for in-situ measurements. Real-time monitoring of the particle concentrations was possible during the flights. As different types of optical particle counters have been used in Iceland and Germany, the optical particle counters have been re-calibrated after the flights to the same standard using gravimetric reference methods and original Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash samples. In-situ measurement results with high spatial resolution, directly from the eruption plume in Iceland as well as from the dispersed and several days old plume over Germany, are therefore presented here for the first time. They are normalized to the same ash concentration calibration standard. Moreover, airborne particles could be sampled directly out of the eruption plume in Iceland as well as during the flights over Germany. During the research flights over Iceland from 9 May 2011 to 11 May 2011 the ash emitted from the vent of the volcano turned out to be concentrated in a narrow well-defined plume of about 10 km width at a distance of 45-60 km away from the vent. Outside this plume the airborne ash concentrations could be proved to be below 50 μg m -3 over western Iceland. However, by entering the outskirts of the plume directly the research aircraft could

  9. Insights from In-situ Measurements of Black Carbon During the Marine Stratus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoleni, C.; Dubey, M.; Chylek, P.; Arnott, P. W.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Varutbangkul, V.; Murphy, S. M.; Sorooshian, A.; Rissman, T. A.; Jonsson, H. H.; Buzorius, G.

    2005-12-01

    As part of DOE's marine stratus experiment (MASE) field campaign in Marina, CA a photoacoustic (PA) aerosol absorption instrument was deployed on the CIRPAS (Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies) Twin Otter during July 2005. The aim of these measurements was to elucidate aerosol processes regulating marine stratus clouds. Marine stratus play a dominant role in the Earth's radiative balance and improved stratus microphysical parameterizations are needed to quantify indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on climate. In particular, the effects of black carbon on clouds physical and optical properties are still poorly understood, and in-situ, real-time measurements can be used to improve our physical and chemical understanding. The PA instrument developed at the Desert Research Institute of Reno, NV was installed on board the Twin Otter airplane and flown over the Pacific Ocean near Monterey, CA in proximity of the California coast, where marine stratus are a common occurrence. The instrument measured simultaneously aerosol absorption and ~180° integrated scattering at 870nm. The aircraft carried other instrumentation that measured microphysical and chemical properties of aerosols and clouds. We report here a preliminary analysis of absorption and scattering measurements together with data from other on-board instruments. The aerosol absorption was often low and indistinguishable from instrumental noise (~0.6 Mm-1 for 2 minutes averages), indicating clean conditions resulting from the offshore flow and an extensive marine stratus deck. However, we sampled interesting short-term events with higher absorption and scattering values during almost every flight. Often these episodes were related to ship tracks and/or anthropogenic pollution from land. Our simultaneous measurements of absorption and scattering yielded a single scattering albedo (SSA) of about 0.75 to 1, which is consistent with previous studies. SSA values can give information

  10. In situ ozone data for comparison with laser absorption remote sensor: 1980 PEPE/NEROS program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, D. S.; Lee, R. B., III; Bendura, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Several sets of in situ ozone (O3) measurements were made by a NASA aircraft in support of the laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) remote sensor. These measurements were designed to provide comparative O3 data for the LAS sensor. The LAS, which was flown on a second aircraft, remotely measured the vertical burden of O3 from the aircraft to the surface. In situ results of the air quality (O3 and B sub scat) and meteorological (temperature and dewpoint) parameters for three correlative missions are presented. The aircraft flight plans, in situ concentration profiles and vertical burdens, and measurement errors are summarized.

  11. Comparison of Pandora spectrometer NO2 measurements to aircraft, satellite, and ground measurements during the DISCOVER-AQ Texas campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judd, L.; Lefer, B. L.; Herman, J. R.; Abuhassan, N.; Cede, A.; Cohen, R. C.; Janz, S. J.; Ren, X.; Luke, W. T.; Long, R.

    2014-12-01

    Pandora spectrometer measurements are compared to other remotely sensed and in-situ NO2 measurements in the Houston, TX region during the third deployment of the DISCOVER-AQ campaign in September 2013. The network of freeways, petrochemical facilities, and related industries contribute to an ongoing pollution problem in the Houston region with the direct emissions of NOx and VOCs producing secondary pollutants such as ozone and PM2.5. The goal of this work is to determine how the Pandora spectrometer column measurements of NO2 compare to in-situ derived and other remotely sensed columns, as well as with ground measurements during this deployment of DISCOVER-AQ. UC Berkeley's LIF measurements of NO2 aboard the NASA P-3B at each spiral site are used to create the aircraft derived profiles of NO2. The aircraft measured profiles include upwind, source, and receptor sites in the region, three times a day, at eight different locations. In addition, we investigate how the NO2 profile shape changes both spatially and temporally, with a focus on the difference between the boundary layer and free troposphere distributions. Pandora measurements are also compared to column measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument and ACAM aboard the B200 aircraft. Where available, surface measurements are included to supplement aircraft profiles and are correlated to the Pandora column measurements to determine the relationship between the total NO2 column and ground concentrations. Understanding of how these measurements compare spatially and temporally will aid both future Pandora deployments and satellite retrievals.

  12. In situ-based effects measures: considerations for improving methods and approaches.

    PubMed

    Liber, Karsten; Goodfellow, William; den Besten, Pieter; Clements, Will; Galloway, Tamara; Gerhardt, Almut; Green, Andrew; Simpson, Stuart

    2007-04-01

    In situ-based effects measures have gained increased acceptance as a means to improve the link between cause and effect in aquatic ecotoxicological studies. These approaches have primarily been employed where more conventional laboratory tests with field collected samples and routine in-field community surveys have failed to provide reasonable answers with respect to causes of toxicity, primary routes of contaminant exposure, and what constitutes ecotoxicologically relevant contaminant levels, at least at a site-specific level. One of the main advantages provided by in situ tests compared to more conventional field-based monitoring approaches is that they provide better control over stressor exposure to a defined population of test animals under natural or near-natural field conditions. In situ techniques can also be used to avoid artifacts related to sampling, transport and storage of contaminated water and sediment intended for laboratory-based toxicity assessment. In short, they can reduce the need for laboratory to field extrapolation and, when conducted properly, in situ tests can provide improved diagnostic ability and high ecological relevance. This paper provides suggestions and considerations for designing in situ studies, choosing test species and test endpoints, avoiding or minimizing test artifacts, best addressing some of the limitations of in situ test techniques, and generally improving the overall quality of the in situ approach chosen.

  13. Relating aerosol absorption due to soot, organic carbon, and dust to emission sources determined from in-situ chemical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazorla, A.; Bahadur, R.; Suski, K. J.; Cahill, J. F.; Chand, D.; Schmid, B.; Ramanathan, V.; Prather, K. A.

    2013-09-01

    Estimating the aerosol contribution to the global or regional radiative forcing can take advantage of the relationship between the spectral aerosol optical properties and the size and chemical composition of aerosol. Long term global optical measurements from observational networks or satellites can be used in such studies. Using in-situ chemical mixing state measurements can help us to constrain the limitations of such estimates. In this study, the Absorption Ångström Exponent (AAE) and the Scattering Ångström Exponent (SAE) derived from 10 operational AERONET sites in California are combined for deducing chemical speciation based on wavelength dependence of the optical properties. In addition, in-situ optical properties and single particle chemical composition measured during three aircraft field campaigns in California between 2010 and 2011 are combined in order to validate the methodology used for the estimates of aerosol chemistry using spectral optical properties. Results from this study indicate a dominance of mixed types in the classification leading to an underestimation of the primary sources, however secondary sources are better classified. The distinction between carbonaceous aerosols from fossil fuel and biomass burning origins is not clear, since their optical properties are similar. On the other hand, knowledge of the aerosol sources in California from chemical studies help to identify other misclassification such as the dust contribution.

  14. Measurements of wave-cloud microphysical properties with two new aircraft probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, H.; Twohy, Cynthia H.; Gandrud, Bruce; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; DeMott, Paul J.; Rogers, David C.

    Measurements of ice water content (IWC) and mean ice-crystal size and concentration made by two in-situ probes, CVI and PVM, were compared on the DC-8 aircraft during SUCCESS flights in orographic ice clouds. The comparison of IWC in these wave clouds, that formed at temperatures of about -38 °C on April 30 and -62 °C on May 2, 1996, showed good agreement. The comparison of ice crystal concentrations agreed better for the April-30 clouds than for the May-2 clouds; and the effective radius compared for both probes and for remote retrievals from aircraft and satellite for a segment of the Berthoud wave cloud (May 2) agreed within 30%. The measured parameters of the ice crystals were similar to earlier measurements and recent modeling of cold wave clouds.

  15. Preliminary measurements of aircraft airframe noise with the NASA CV-990 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, K. C.; Lasagna, P. L.; Putnam, T. W.

    1976-01-01

    Flight tests were conducted in a CV-990 jet transport with engines at idle power to investigate aircraft airframe noise. Test results showed that airframe noise was measured for the aircraft in the landing configuration. The results agreed well with the expected variation with the fifth power of velocity. For the aircraft in the clean configuraton, it was concluded that airframe noise was measured only at higher airspeeds with engine idle noise present at lower speeds. The data show that landing gear and flaps make a significant contribution to airframe noise.

  16. In situ attosecond pulse characterization techniques to measure the electromagnetic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanner, M.; Bertrand, J. B.; Villeneuve, D. M.

    2016-08-01

    A number of techniques have been developed to characterize the attosecond emission from high-order-harmonic sources. These techniques are broadly classified as ex situ, where the attosecond pulse train photoionizes a target gas in the presence of an infrared field, and in situ, where the measurement takes place in the medium in which the attosecond pulses are generated. It is accepted that ex situ techniques measure the characteristics of the electromagnetic field, including the phase of the recombination transition moment of the emitting atom or molecule, when the phase of the second medium is known. However, there is debate about whether in situ techniques measure the electromagnetic field, or only the characteristics of the recolliding electron before recombination occurs. We show numerically that in situ measurements are not sensitive to the recombination phase, when implemented in the perturbative regime as originally envisioned, and that they do not measure the electromagnetic phase of the emission.

  17. Evaluation of Terms in the Water Vapor Budget Using Airborne Dial and In Situ Measurements from the Southern Great Plans 1997 Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senff, Christoph J.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Lenschow, Donald H.; Browell, Edward V.; Ismail, Syed

    1998-01-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP97) field experiment was conducted in Oklahoma during June and July 1997 primarily to validate soil moisture retrieval algorithms using microwave radiometer measurements from aircraft as well as in situ surface measurements. One important objective of the SGP97 experiment plan was to examine the effect of soil moisture on the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and clouds over the Southern Great Plains during the warm season. To support boundary layer studies during SGP97. the NASA Langley Research Center's Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) was flown on a NASA-P3 aircraft in conjunction with the Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR). The LASE instrument is an airborne, downward-looking differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system capable of measuring water vapor concentration as well as aerosol backscatter with high horizontal and vertical resolution in the ABL. Here, we will demonstrate how the LASE data can be used to determine water vapor statistics and most of the water vapor budget terms in the ABL. This information can then be related to spatial variations in soil moisture and the surface energy budget. The extensive surface and aircraft in situ measurements conducted during SGP97 provide information on the ABL that cannot be retrieved from the LASE data alone and also offer an excellent opportunity to validate the remote water vapor budget measurements with LASE.

  18. In situ CTE measurements and damage detection using optical metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, Satish; Cuadra, Jefferson; Saralaya, Raghav; Bartoli, Ivan; Kontsos, Antonios

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a methodology to make coefficient of thermal expansion measurements through the combined use of two non-contact and full field optical metrology methods including digital image correlation and infrared thermography. In this context, active Infrared Thermography techniques combined with contact and non-contact deformation measurement methods have already been reported to measure materials’ thermal expansion. In addition, such techniques have been reported to be capable to detect surface and subsurface defects from changes in homogenous heat diffusion due to damage. Based on this knowledge, it is hypothesized in this article that the material response induced by thermal loading and quantified by coefficient of thermal expansion measurements could be further used as an indicator of damage. To validate the hypothesis three measurements were performed. The first established the effectiveness of using deformation and thermal full field data for coefficient of thermal expansion measurements. The second intended to demonstrate the advantage of using such full field data in order to provide site-specific measurements of thermal expansion. Finally damage was a priori induced to a metallic specimen, and the measured variations of local CTE confirmed the potential of using the described approach as a means of damage quantification in materials and structures.

  19. In situ measurements of IO and reactive iodine aboard the RV Sonne during SHIVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, Dwayne; Walker, Hannah; Ingham, Trevor; Huang, Ru-Jin; Wittrock, Folker

    2013-04-01

    Halogenated very short-lived substances (VSLS) are emitted from the oceans by marine species such as macroalgae and phytoplankton and contribute to halogen loading in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) project combined ship-borne, aircraft-based and ground-based measurements in and over the South China Sea and the Sulu Sea, and around the coast of Malaysian Borneo. In this paper we present measurements of IO radicals in coastal and open ocean regions made onboard the German research vessel RV Sonne in November 2011 between Singapore and Manila, via the northern coast of Malaysian Borneo (South China Sea) and the Sulu Sea. In situ measurements of IO were made on 12 days by the University of Leeds laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instrument, with a detection limit of 0.3 pptv for a 30 minute averaging period. The cruise average IO concentration was found to be 1.2 pptv, with a maximum concentration of 2.4 pptv in the middle of the Sulu Sea, an area known for high biological activity. Only a weak diurnal profile was observed, with IO detected above the detection limit on 10 out of the 11 nights when the LIF instrument was operational. Measurements of IO at night in the open ocean have not previously been reported and indicate the presence of gas phase or heterogeneous mechanisms that recycle iodine species without requiring light. There was reasonable agreement for IO concentrations measured by the University of Leeds LIF and the University of Bremen MAX-DOAS instruments, for which a comparison will be presented. I2, ICl and HOI were measured by the University of Mainz using a coupled diffusion denuder system followed by analysis using gas chromatography coupled with ion trap mass spectroscopy, with a detection of 0.17 pptv for 30 mins (I2). The cruise average I2 concentration was found to be 2.0 pptv, with a maximum concentration observed during one night of 12.7 pptv on the northern coast

  20. Overview Of Haze And Smoke Measurements in Northern High Latitudes And California During ARCTAS Using The NASA Ames Airborne Sunphotometer And Associated In Situ And Remote Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, P. B.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Ramachandran, S.; Johnson, R. R.; Clarke, A. D.; Howell, S. G.; McNaughton, C.; Holben, B.; O'Neill, N.; McArthur, B.; Reid, E.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.

    2009-12-01

    The 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) operated in a suite of remote and in-situ sensors aboard the NASA P-3 aircraft during the 2008 Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) field campaign. Included were 8 Spring flights in the Arctic and 13 Summer flights (3 in California and 10 in Canada), each coordinated with one or more satellite overpasses, other aircraft (e.g., NASA B-200 and DC-8, NOAA P-3), and/or ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements. This presentation gives an overview of AATS-14 aerosol optical depth (AOD) spectra and related parameters such as Angstrom exponent and fine mode fraction. We quantify the mutual consistency of AODs calculated from measurements by AATS-14, by the HiGEAR (University of Hawaii Group for Environmental Aerosol Research) suite of P-3 in-situ optical instruments, and by AERONET . The vertical integral of the HiGEAR in-situ scattering and absorption coefficients recorded during spiral profiles typically falls within 10% ± 0.02 of the AATS-14 AOD values interpolated to 450, 550 and 700 nm. Corresponding Angstrom exponents typically differ by ~0.1. AATS-14 AODs adjusted for the contribution of the layer below the aircraft (estimated with HiGEAR data) generally agree with the full column AERONET values to within the combined uncertainties. Example results from multi-platform comparisons are also shown. These results provide context for the more detailed AATS-14 results in other presentations, e.g., by Redemann et al. (focusing on the multi-platform, multi-sensor smoke case of 30 Jun 2008), Livingston et al. (comparisons to MODIS, MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIPSO, and airborne lidar), and Shinozuka et al. (relationship to cloud condensation nuclei and other measurements).

  1. A model-based framework for the quality assessment of surface albedo in situ measurement protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Jennifer; Gobron, Nadine; Widlowski, Jean-Luc; Mio, Corrado

    2016-09-01

    Satellite-based retrievals of land surface albedo are essential for climate and environmental modelling communities. To be of use, satellite-retrievals are required to comply to given accuracy requirements, mainly achieved through comparison with in situ measurements. Differences between in situ and satellite-based retrievals depend on their actual difference and their associated uncertainties. It is essential that these uncertainties can be computed to properly understand the differences between satellite-based and in situ measurements of albedo, however quantifying the individual contributions of uncertainty is difficult. This study introduces a model-based framework for assessing the quality of in situ albedo measurements. A 3D Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) radiative transfer model is used to simulate field measurements of surface albedo, and is able to identify and quantify potential sources of error in the field measurement. Compliance with the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) requirement for 3% accuracy is tested. 8 scenarios were investigated, covering a range of ecosystem types and canopy structures, seasons, illumination angles and tree heights. Results indicate that height of measurement above the canopy is the controlling factor in accuracy, with each canopy scenario reaching the WMO requirement at different heights. Increasing canopy heterogeneity and tree height noticeably reduces the accuracy, whereas changing seasonality from summer to winter in a deciduous forest increases accuracy. For canopies with a row structure, illumination angle can significantly impact accuracy as a result of shadowing effects. Tests were made on the potential use of multiple in situ measurements, indicating considerably increased accuracy if two or more in situ measurements can be made.

  2. Acoustic backscattering by deepwater fish measured in situ from a manned submersible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.; Au, Whitlow W. L.; Kelley, Christopher D.; Taylor, Christopher

    2003-02-01

    An outstanding problem in fisheries acoustics is the depth dependence of scattering characteristics of swimbladder-bearing fish, and the effects of pressure on the target strength of physoclistous fish remain unresolved. In situ echoes from deepwater snappers were obtained with a sonar transducer mounted on a manned submersible next to a low-light video camera, permitting simultaneous echo recording and identification of species, fish size and orientation. The sonar system, consisting of a transducer, single board computer, hard disk, and analog-to-digital converter, used a 80 μs, broadband signal (bandwidth 35 kHz, center frequency 120 kHz). The observed relationship between fish length and in situ target strength shows no difference from the relationship measured at the surface. No differences in the species-specific temporal echo characteristics were observed between surface and in situ measures. This indicates that the size and shape of the snappers' swimbladders are maintained both at the surface and at depths of up to 250 m. Information obtained through controlled backscatter measurements of tethered, anesthetized fish at the surface can be applied to free-swimming fish at depth. This is the first published account of the use of a manned submersible to measure in situ scattering from identified, individual animals with known orientations. The distinct advantage of this technique compared with other in situ techniques is the ability to observe the target fish, obtaining accurate species, size, and orientation information.

  3. In-Situ Measurements of Fabric Thickness Evolution During Draping

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, D. S.; Van Gestel, C.; Lomov, S. V.; Verpoest, I.

    2011-05-04

    The paper presents results of experimental program aimed at measuring fabric thickening while draping. The thickness evolution is important factor in resin infusion manufacturing where the resultant composite thickness is not controlled. The measurements are conducted by means of laser distance sensors adapted to the picture frame testing. Several carbon fabrics of very different architectures have been tested. Additionally, the pretension of the carbon fabric due to the gripping has been estimated by means of digital image correlation technique and an attempt to discuss the results obtained on different set-ups is made.

  4. Identifying a Sea Breeze Circulation Pattern Over the Los Angeles Basin Using Airborne In Situ Carbon Dioxide Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannan, A. L.; Schill, S.; Trousdell, J.; Heath, N.; Lefer, B. L.; Yang, M. M.; Bertram, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Los Angeles Basin in Southern California is an optimal location for a circulation study, due to its location between the Pacific Ocean to the west and the Santa Monica and San Gabriel mountain ranges to the east, as well as its booming metropolitan population. Sea breeze circulation carries air at low altitudes from coastal to inland regions, where the air rises and expands before returning back towards the coast at higher altitudes. As a result, relatively clean air is expected at low altitudes over coastal regions, but following the path of sea breeze circulation should increase the amount of anthropogenic influence. During the 2014 NASA Student Airborne Research Program, a highly modified DC-8 aircraft completed flights from June 23 to 25 in and around the LA Basin, including missed approaches at four local airports—Los Alamitos and Long Beach (coastal), Ontario and Riverside (inland). Because carbon dioxide (CO2) is chemically inert and well-suited as a conserved atmospheric tracer, the NASA Langley Atmospheric Vertical Observations of CO2 in the Earth's Troposphere (AVOCET) instrument was used to make airborne in situ carbon dioxide measurements. Combining measured wind speed and direction data from the aircraft with CO2 data shows that carbon dioxide can be used to trace the sea breeze circulation pattern of the Los Angeles basin.

  5. Aircraft water vapor measurements utilizing an aluminum oxide hygrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.

    1973-01-01

    A hygrometer for water vapor measurements from an aircraft has been developed. An aluminum oxide hygrometer mounted in an aircraft Rosemount air temperature scoop was flown on NASA and USAF aircraft. Water vapor measurements were conducted up to 40,000 feet with penetration into the stratosphere. Good agreement was obtained with simultaneously flown remote sounders of water vapor. During transcontinental flights the hygrometer demonstrated adequate response to measure the natural variability of water vapor near the tropopause. Rapid response was demonstrated in pursuit of the jet wake of an F-104 at 35,000 feet.

  6. Aircraft water vapor measurements utilizing an aluminum oxide hygrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.

    1974-01-01

    A hygrometer for water vapor measurements from an aircraft was developed. An aluminum oxide hygrometer mounted in an aircraft Rosemount air temperature scoop was flown on the NASA Convair 990 and on a USAF B-57 aircraft. Water vapor measurements from the Convair 990 were conducted up to 40,000 ft with penetration into the stratosphere. Good agreement was obtained with simultaneously flown remote sounders of water vapor. During transcontinental flights the hygrometer demonstrated adequate response to measure the natural variability of water vapor near the tropopause. Rapid response was demonstrated in pursuit of the jet wake of an F-104 at 35,000 ft.

  7. Aircraft-borne, laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the in situ detection of hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wennberg, P. O.; Cohen, R. C.; Hazen, N. L.; Lapson, L. B.; Allen, N. T.; Hanisco, T. F.; Oliver, J. F.; Lanham, N. W.; Demusz, J. N.; Anderson, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    The odd-hydrogen radicals OH and HO2 are central to most of the gas-phase chemical transformations that occur in the atmosphere. Of particular interest is the role that these species play in controlling the concentration of stratospheric ozone. This paper describes an instrument that measures both of these species at volume mixing ratios below one part in 10(exp 14) in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The hydroxyl radical (OH) is measured by laser induced fluorescence at 309 nm. Tunable UV light is used to pump OH to the first electric state near 282 nm. the laser light is produced by a high-repetition rate pulsed dye-laser powered with all solid-state pump lasers. HO2 is measured as OH after gas-phase titration with nitric oxide. Measurements aboard a NASA ER-2 aircraft demonstrate the capability of this instrument to perform reliably with very high signal-to-noise ratios (greater than 30) achieved in short integration times (less than 20 sec).

  8. Disassembling "evapotranspiration" in-situ with a complex measurement tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chormanski, Jaroslaw; Kleniewska, Malgorzata; Berezowski, Tomasz; Sporak-Wasilewska, Sylwia; Okruszko, Tomasz; Szatylowicz, Jan; Batelaan, Okke

    2014-05-01

    In this work we present a complex tool for measuring water fluxes in wetland ecosystems. The tool was designed to quantify processes related to interception storage on plants leafs. The measurements are conducted by combining readings from various instruments, including: eddy covariance tower (EC), field spectrometer, SapFlow system, rain gauges above and under canopy, soil moisture probes and other. The idea of this set-up is to provide continuous measurement of overall water flux from the ecosystem (EC tower), intercepted water volume and timing (field spectrometers), through-fall (rain gauges above and under canopy), transpiration (SapFlow), evaporation and soil moisture (soil moisture probes). Disassembling the water flux to the above components allows giving more insight to the interception related processes and differentiates them from the total evapotranspiration. The measurements are conducted in the Upper Biebrza Basin (NE Poland). The study area is part of the valley and is covered by peat soils (mainly peat moss with the exception of areas near the river) and receives no inundations waters of the Biebrza. The plant community of Agrostietum-Carici caninae has a dominant share here creating an up to 0.6 km wide belt along the river. The area is covered also by Caricion lasiocarpae as well as meadows and pastures Molinio-Arrhenatheretea, Phragmitetum communis. Sedges form a hummock pattern characteristic for the sedge communities in natural river valleys with wetland vegetation. The main result of the measurement set-up will be the analyzed characteristics and dynamics of interception storage for sedge ecosystems and a developed methodology for interception monitoring by use spectral reflectance technique. This will give a new insight to processes of evapotranspiration in wetlands and its components transpiration, evaporation from interception and evaporation from soil. Moreover, other important results of this project will be the estimation of energy and

  9. Aircraft body-axis rotation measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowdin, K. T. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A two gyro four gimbal attitude sensing system having gimbal lock avoidance is provided with continuous azimuth information, rather than roll information, relative to the magnetic cardinal headings while in near vertical attitudes to allow recovery from vertical on a desired heading. The system is comprised of a means for stabilizing an outer roll gimbal that is common to a vertical gyro and a directional gyro with respect to the aircraft platform which is being angularly displaced about an axis substantially parallel to the outer roll gyro axis. A means is also provided for producing a signal indicative of the magnitude of such displacement as an indication of aircraft heading. Additional means are provided to cause stabilization of the outer roll gimbal whenever the pitch angle of the aircraft passes through a threshold prior to entering vertical flight and destabilization of the outer roll gimbal upon passing through the threshold when departing vertical flight.

  10. Remote measurements of the structure of midwest thunderstorm tops and anvils from high altitude aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Fulton, Richard

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from observations by a visible and IR scanning radiometer, a scanning passive microwave radiometer, and a nadir-viewing cloud lidar system (CLS), carried out from ER-2 overflights for two midwest severe weather events both of which presented following phenomena: (1) a group of severe thunderstorms which later transformed into a linear mesoscale convective system, and (2) a severe thunderstorm which produced large hail. Most of the aircraft in situ and remote measurements pointed to a deep subsidence region and gravity waves downstream of the overshooting cloud tops. The observations do not support a radiative explanation for the warm areas in the anvil.

  11. Instrumentation of sampling aircraft for measurement of launch vehicle effluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wornom, D. E.; Woods, D. C.; Thomas, M. E.; Tyson, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    An aircraft was selected and instrumented to measure effluents emitted from large solid propellant rockets during launch activities. The considerations involved in aircraft selection, sampling probes, and instrumentation are discussed with respect to obtaining valid airborne measurements. Discussions of the data acquisition system used, the instrument power system, and operational sampling procedures are included. Representative measurements obtained from an actual rocket launch monitoring activity are also presented.

  12. In situ granular charge measurement by free-fall videography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waitukaitis, S. R.; Jaeger, H. M.

    2013-02-01

    We present the design and performance characterization of a new experimental technique for measuring individual particle charges in large ensembles of macroscopic grains. The measurement principle is qualitatively similar to that used in determining the elementary charge by Millikan in that it follows individual particle trajectories. However, by taking advantage of new technology we are able to work with macroscopic grains and achieve several orders of magnitude better resolution in charge to mass ratios. By observing freely falling grains accelerated in a horizontal electric field with a co-falling, high-speed video camera, we dramatically increase particle tracking time and measurement precision. Keeping the granular medium under vacuum, we eliminate air drag, leaving the electrostatic force as the primary source of particle accelerations in the co-moving frame. Because the technique is based on direct imaging, we can distinguish between different particle types during the experiment, opening up the possibility of studying charge transfer processes between different particle species. For the ˜300 μm diameter grains reported here, we achieve an average acceleration resolution of ˜0.008 m/s2, a force resolution of ˜500 pN, and a median charge resolution ˜6× 104 elementary charges per grain (corresponding to surface charge densities ˜1 elementary charges per μm2). The primary source of error is indeterminacy in the grain mass, but with higher resolution cameras and better optics this can be further improved. The high degree of resolution and the ability to visually identify particles of different species or sizes with direct imaging make this a powerful new tool to characterize charging processes in granular media.

  13. In situ granular charge measurement by free-fall videography.

    PubMed

    Waitukaitis, S R; Jaeger, H M

    2013-02-01

    We present the design and performance characterization of a new experimental technique for measuring individual particle charges in large ensembles of macroscopic grains. The measurement principle is qualitatively similar to that used in determining the elementary charge by Millikan in that it follows individual particle trajectories. However, by taking advantage of new technology we are able to work with macroscopic grains and achieve several orders of magnitude better resolution in charge to mass ratios. By observing freely falling grains accelerated in a horizontal electric field with a co-falling, high-speed video camera, we dramatically increase particle tracking time and measurement precision. Keeping the granular medium under vacuum, we eliminate air drag, leaving the electrostatic force as the primary source of particle accelerations in the co-moving frame. Because the technique is based on direct imaging, we can distinguish between different particle types during the experiment, opening up the possibility of studying charge transfer processes between different particle species. For the ∼300 μm diameter grains reported here, we achieve an average acceleration resolution of ∼0.008 m/s(2), a force resolution of ∼500 pN, and a median charge resolution ∼6× 10(4) elementary charges per grain (corresponding to surface charge densities ∼1 elementary charges per μm(2)). The primary source of error is indeterminacy in the grain mass, but with higher resolution cameras and better optics this can be further improved. The high degree of resolution and the ability to visually identify particles of different species or sizes with direct imaging make this a powerful new tool to characterize charging processes in granular media.

  14. In-situ Ground-Based and Airborne Formaldehyde Measurements in the Houston Area During TexAQS-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappenglueck, B.; Byun, D.; Alvarez, S.; Buhr, M.; Coarfa, V.; Czader, B.; Dasgupta, P.; Estes, M.; Kim, S.; Leuchner, M.; Luke, W.; Shauck, M.; Zanin, G.

    2007-12-01

    Formaldehyde is considered to play a significant role in summertime photochemistry in the Houston area, in particular it is considered an important source for radicals. Secondary formation seems to be the most important fraction of ambient HCHO. Enhanced nighttime values may indicate primary sources. Potential sources may include mobile sources such as traffic exhaust, in particular not well maintained Diesel engines. Other possible sources may include point sources such as coffee roasting and flares from refineries. In this study we focused on the TexAQS-II continuous in-situ formaldehyde data set based on Hantzsch reaction which was obtained in the Ship Channel area (HRM3 and Lynchburg Ferry site) and at the Moody Tower for several weeks. We also include in-situ HCHO measurements obtained with the same technique aboard the Baylor aircraft during TexAQS-II flight missions. Formaldehyde data was compared to several trace gases that are supposed to be coemitted including CO (traffic), ethylene (flares), and SO2 (industry). In order to keep photochemical processes at a minimum special focus was on nighttime data. Case studies will be discussed where meteorological conditions including recirculation and boundary layer developments seem to play a major role in the redistribution of HCHO. Observations will be compared to CMAQ model studies.

  15. Measuring Wildfires From Aircraft And Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brass, J. A.; Arvesen, J. C.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Riggan, P. J.; Meyers, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    Aircraft and satellite systems yield wide-area views, providing total coverage of affected areas. System developed for use aboard aircraft includes digital scanner that records data in 12 channels. Transmits data to ground station for immediate use in fighting fires. Enables researchers to estimate gaseous and particulate emissions from fires. Provides information on temperatures of flame fronts and soils, intensities and rate of spread of fires, characteristics of fuels and smoke plumes, energy-release rates, and concentrations and movements of trace gases. Data relates to heating and cooling of soils, loss of nutrients, and effects on atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic systems.

  16. Recommended procedures for measuring aircraft noise and associated parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, A. H.

    1977-01-01

    Procedures are recommended for obtaining experimental values of aircraft flyover noise levels (and associated parameters). Specific recommendations are made for test criteria, instrumentation performance requirements, data-acquisition procedures, and test operations. The recommendations are based on state-of-the-art measurement capabilities available in 1976 and are consistent with the measurement objectives of the NASA Aircraft Noise Prediction Program. The recommendations are applicable to measurements of the noise produced by an airplane flying subsonically over (or past) microphones located near the surface of the ground. Aircraft types covered by the recommendations are fixed-wing airplanes powered by turbojet or turbofan engines and using conventional aerodynamic means for takeoff and landing. Various assumptions with respect to subsequent data processing and analysis were made (and are described) and the recommended measurement procedures are compatible with the assumptions. Some areas where additional research is needed relative to aircraft flyover noise measurement techniques are also discussed.

  17. First in-situ lattice strains measurements under load at VULCAN

    SciTech Connect

    An, Ke; Skorpenske, Harley David; Stoica, Alexandru Dan; Wang, Xun-Li; Cakmak, Ercan

    2011-01-01

    The engineering materials diffractometer, VULCAN, at the Spallation Neutron Source began commissioning on June 26, 2009. This instrument is designed for materials science and engineering studies. In situ lattice strain measurements of a model metallic material under monotonic tensile load have been performed on VULCAN. The tensile load was applied under two different strain rates, and neutron diffraction measurements were carried out in both high-intensity and high-resolution modes. These experiments demonstrated VULCAN's in situ study capability of deformation behaviors even during the early phases of commissioning.

  18. Assessment of accuracy of in-situ methods for measuring building-envelope thermal resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, J.B.; Grot, R.A.; Park, H.S.

    1986-03-01

    A series of field and laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the accuracy of in-situ thermal-resistance-measurement techniques. The results of thermal-performance evaluation of the exterior walls of six thermal mass test houses situated in Gaithersburg, Maryland are presented. The wall construction of these one-room houses includes insulated light-weight wood frame, uninsulated light-weight wood frame, insulated masonry with outside mass, uninsulated masonry, log, and insulated masonry with inside mass. In-situ measurements of heat transfer through building envelopes were made with heat flux transducers and portable calorimeters.

  19. Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements for in Situ Characterization of Lunar Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oder, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic separation is a viable method for concentration of components of lunar soils and rocks for use as feedstocks for manufacture of metals, oxygen, and for recovery of volatiles such as He-3. Work with lunar materials indicates that immature soils are the best candidates for magnetic beneficiation. The magnetic susceptibility at which selected soil components such as anorthite, ilmenite, or metallic iron are separated is not affected by soil maturity, but the recovery of the concentrated components is. Increasing soil maturity lowers recovery. Mature soils contain significant amounts of glass-encased metallic iron. Magnetic susceptibility, which is sensitive to metallic iron content, can be used to measure soil maturity. The relationship between the ratio of magnetic susceptibility and iron oxide and the conventional maturity parameter, I(sub s)/FeO, ferromagnetic resonant intensity divided by iron oxide content is given. The magnetic susceptibilities were determined using apparatus designed for magnetic separation of the lunar soils.

  20. In-situ dust measurements by a lunar lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srama, Ralf; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Horanyi, Mihaly; Gruen, Eberhard; Krueger, Harald; Laufer, Rene; Roeser, Hans-Peter; Postberg, Frank; Kempf, Sascha; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Mocker, Anna; Fiege, Katherina; Li, Yanwei

    2012-07-01

    Charged dust grains on the lunar surface impact our future exploration of the moon. Serious problems for exploration activities were revealed by the Apollo missions. Dust shows strong adhesion to equipment and clothes and makes breathing difficult within a spacecraft. The micron- and submicron sized grains are embedded in the lunar plasma environment and their physical properties determine their dynamics. The solar wind, UV light and shadows lead to temporal effects in plasma densities and dust grain charging states. The dust populations relevant for the processes on the surface are: interplanetary and interstellar dust, levitated dust and, especially, dust ejecta generated by primary impacts on the surface. A dust instrument on the surface shall distinguish the three populations and characterize their charging state, size, speed and directionality distribution. Dust measurements shall be performed in conjunction with surface plasma and surface electric field characterizations.

  1. Column Closure Studies of Lower Tropospheric Aerosol and Water Vapor During ACE-Asia Using Airborne Sunphotometer, Airborne In-Situ and Ship-Based Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B.; Hegg, A.; Wang, J.; Bates, D.; Redemann, J.; Russells, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Jonsson, H. H.; Welton, E. J.; Seinfield, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    We assess the consistency (closure) between solar beam attenuation by aerosols and water vapor measured by airborne sunphotometry and derived from airborne in-situ, and ship-based lidar measurements during the April 2001 Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia). The airborne data presented here were obtained aboard the Twin Otter aircraft. Comparing aerosol extinction o(550 nm) from four different techniques shows good agreement for the vertical distribution of aerosol layers. However, the level of agreement in absolute magnitude of the derived aerosol extinction varied among the aerosol layers sampled. The sigma(550 nm) computed from airborne in-situ size distribution and composition measurements shows good agreement with airborne sunphotometry in the marine boundary layer but is considerably lower in layers dominated by dust if the particles are assumed to be spherical. The sigma(550 nm) from airborne in-situ scattering and absorption measurements are about approx. 13% lower than those obtained from airborne sunphotometry during 14 vertical profiles. Combining lidar and the airborne sunphotometer measurements reveals the prevalence of dust layers at altitudes up to 10 km with layer aerosol optical depth (from 3.5 to 10 km altitude) of approx. 0.1 to 0.2 (500 nm) and extinction-to-backscatter ratios of 59-71 sr (523 nm). The airborne sunphotometer aboard the Twin Otter reveals a relatively dry atmosphere during ACE- Asia with all water vapor columns less than 1.5 cm and water vapor densities w less than 12 g/cu m. Comparing layer water vapor amounts and w from the airborne sunphotometer to the same quantities measured with aircraft in-situ sensors leads to a high correlation (r(sup 3)=0.96) but the sunphotometer tends to underestimate w by 7%.

  2. Public transit bus ramp slopes measured in situ.

    PubMed

    Bertocci, Gina; Frost, Karen; Smalley, Craig

    2014-05-01

    Abstract Purpose: The slopes of fixed-route bus ramps deployed for wheeled mobility device (WhMD) users during boarding and alighting were assessed. Measured slopes were compared to the proposed Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) maximum allowable ramp slope. Methods: A ramp-embedded inclinometer measured ramp slope during WhMD user boarding and alighting on a fixed-route transit bus. The extent of bus kneeling was determined for each ramp deployment. In-vehicle video surveillance cameras captured ramp deployment level (street versus sidewalk) and WhMD type. Results: Ramp slopes ranged from -4° to 15.5° with means of 4.3° during boarding (n = 406) and 4.2° during alighting (n = 405). Ramp slope was significantly greater when deployed to street level. During boarding, the proposed ADA maximum allowable ramp slope (9.5°) was exceeded in 66.7% of instances when the ramp was deployed to street level, and in 1.9% of instances when the ramp was deployed to sidewalk level. During alighting, the proposed ADA maximum allowable slope was exceeded in 56.8% of instances when the ramp was deployed to street level and in 1.4% of instances when the ramp was deployed to sidewalk level. Conclusions: Deployment level, built environment and extent of bus kneeling can affect slope of ramps ascended/descended by WhMD users when accessing transit buses. Implications for Rehabilitation Since public transportation services are critical for integration of wheeled mobility device (WhMD) users into the community and society, it is important that they, as well as their therapists, are aware of conditions that may be encountered when accessing transit buses. Knowledge of real world ramp slope conditions that may be encountered when accessing transit buses will allow therapists to better access capabilities of WhMD users in a controlled clinical setting. Real world ramp slope conditions can be recreated in a clinical setting to allow WhMD users to develop and practice necessary

  3. In-situ measurement of the substorm onset instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, K. R.; Rae, J.; Watt, C.; Forsyth, C.; Mann, I. R.; Yao, Z.; Kalmoni, N.

    2015-12-01

    The substorm is arguably the major mode of variability in near-Earth Space which unpredictably dissipates a considerable and variable amount of energy into the near-Earth magnetosphere and ionosphere. What process or processes determine when this energy is released is uncertain, although it is evident that both near-Earth plasma instability and magnetotail reconnection play a role in this energy release. Much emphasis has recently been placed on the role of magnetic reconnection in substorms, we focus here on observations of the unmistakeable signs of a plasma instability acting at substorm onset. Using data from the THEMIS spacecraft, we show that electromagnetic waves grow in the magnetotail at the expense of the local electron and ion thermal energy. The wave growth in space is the direct counterpart to the wave growth seen at the substorm onset location at the ionosphere, as measured by the CARISMA and THEMIS magnetometers and THEMIS all-sky-imagers. We present evidence that the free energy source for the instability is associated with the electron and ion thermal energy, and not the local electron or ion flow energy.

  4. In situ pressure measurements in small gettered volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemanic, Vincenc; Zumer, Marko; Zajec, Bojan

    2002-11-01

    In modern small optoelectronic devices like field emitter displays, miniature cathode ray tubes (CRTs), channel photomultipliers, etc., the vacuum requirements are much more stringent than in conventional electron beam devices. As there should be a pressure in the ultrahigh vacuum region and the volume is only a few cm3, a direct measurement is not feasible and is often estimated on the basis of the expected pumping speed of the getter. The present study was arranged to investigate the pressure in small CRTs (25 cm3) during a period of several months, namely after the conventional pumping and bakeout procedure, immediately after the activation of Ba getters and after the accumulation of some months. All the CRTs were equipped by a spinning rotor gauge ball. Two barium getter sizes were studied: St15/AM/O/9.5 and St15/AM/O/5, both made by SAES. After the evaporation by the prescribed procedure the pressure did not drop, but increased from papprox1 x10-5 mbar up to papprox1 x10-3 mbar, showing that the pumping speed was completely suppressed by forming of a nongetterable gas. When the same experiments were repeated inside identical glass bulbs connected with a valve to a quadrupole mass spectrometer, a formation of methane was observed. The initial rate just after the activation was Qapprox10-8 mbar l s-1, but even after several hours it was still as high as Qapprox10-9 mbar l s-1. By switching-on the cathode heater, methane was pumped by the getter after a precedent cracking procedure. The virtual pumping speed was directly related to the heater power, but independent of the getter area. Therefore, within the cathode warm-up period, methane was "pumped" and did not represent a harmful gaseous contaminant in a small electron beam device with a thermionic cathode. copyright 2002 American Vacuum Society.

  5. Ultrasonic Measurement of Aircraft Strut Hydraulic Fluid Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.

    2002-01-01

    An ultrasonic method is presented for non-intrusively measuring hydraulic fluid level in aircraft struts in the field quickly and easily without modifying the strut or aircraft. The technique interrogates the strut with ultrasonic waves generated and received by a removable ultrasonic transducer hand-held on the outside of the strut in a fashion that is in the presence or absence of hydraulic fluid inside the strut. This technique was successfully demonstrated on an A-6 aircraft strut on the carriage at the Aircraft Landing Dynamics Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. Conventional practice upon detection of strut problem symptoms is to remove aircraft from service for extensive maintenance to determine fluid level. No practical technique like the method presented herein for locating strut hydraulic fluid level is currently known to be used.

  6. Quantitative Imaging and In Situ Concentration Measurements of Quantum Dot Nanomaterials in Variably Saturated Porous Media

    DOE PAGES

    Uyuşur, Burcu; Snee, Preston T.; Li, Chunyan; Darnault, Christophe J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the fate and transport of nanoparticles in the subsurface environment is limited, as techniques to monitor and visualize the transport and distribution of nanoparticles in porous media and measure their in situ concentrations are lacking. To address these issues, we have developed a light transmission and fluorescence method to visualize and measure in situ concentrations of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles in variably saturated environments. Calibration cells filled with sand as porous medium and various known water saturation levels and QD concentrations were prepared. By measuring the intensity of the light transmitted through porous media exposed to fluorescent lightmore » and by measuring the hue of the light emitted by the QDs under UV light exposure, we obtained simultaneously in situ measurements of water saturation and QD nanoparticle concentrations with high spatial and temporal resolutions. Water saturation was directly proportional to the light intensity. A linear relationship was observed between hue-intensity ratio values and QD concentrations for constant water saturation levels. The advantages and limitations of the light transmission and fluorescence method as well as its implications for visualizing and measuring in situ concentrations of QDs nanoparticles in the subsurface environment are discussed.« less

  7. Upper Mississippi embayment shallow seismic velocities measured in situ

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Huaibao P.; Hu, Y.; Dorman, J.; Chang, T.-S.; Chiu, J.-M.

    1997-01-01

    for shallow sediment obtained from reflection, refraction, crosshole and downhole techniques have been obtained for sites at the northern end of the embayment basin. The present borehole data, however, are measured from sites representative of large areas in the Mississippi embayment. Therefore, they fill a gap in information needed for modeling the response of the embayment to destructive seismic shaking.

  8. Using an A-10 Aircraft for Airborne measurements of TGFs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.; Christian, Hugh, J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Grove, J. Eric; Chektman, Alexandre; Jonsson, Haflidi; Detwiler, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    Plans are underway to convert an A-10 combat attack aircraft into a research aircraft for thunderstorm research. This aircraft would be configured and instrumented for flights into large, convective thunderstorms. It would have the capabilities of higher altitude performance and protection for thunderstorm conditions that exceed those of aircraft now in use for this research. One area of investigation for this aircraft would be terrestrial gamma ]ray flashes (TGFs), building on the pioneering observations made by the Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE) project several years ago. A new and important component of the planned investigations are the continuous, detailed correlations of TGFs with the electric fields near the aircraft, as well as detailed measurements of nearby lightning discharges. Together, the x-and gamma-radiation environments, the electric field measurements, and the lightning observations (all measured on microsecond timescales) should provide new insights into this TGF production mechanism. The A -10 aircraft is currently being modified for thunderstorm research. It is anticipated that the initial test flights for this role will begin next year.

  9. Use of In Situ Cloud Condensation Nuclei, Extinction, and Aerosol Size Distribution Measurements to Test a Method for Retrieving Cloud Condensation Nuclei Profiles From Surface Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghan, Stephen J.; Rissman, Tracey A.; Ellman, Robert; Ferrare, Richard A.; Turner, David; Flynn, Connor; Wang, Jian; Ogren, John; Hudson, James; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; VanReken, Timothy; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2006-01-01

    If the aerosol composition and size distribution below cloud are uniform, the vertical profile of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration can be retrieved entirely from surface measurements of CCN concentration and particle humidification function and surface-based retrievals of relative humidity and aerosol extinction or backscatter. This provides the potential for long-term measurements of CCN concentrations near cloud base. We have used a combination of aircraft, surface in situ, and surface remote sensing measurements to test various aspects of the retrieval scheme. Our analysis leads us to the following conclusions. The retrieval works better for supersaturations of 0.1% than for 1% because CCN concentrations at 0.1% are controlled by the same particles that control extinction and backscatter. If in situ measurements of extinction are used, the retrieval explains a majority of the CCN variance at high supersaturation for at least two and perhaps five of the eight flights examined. The retrieval of the vertical profile of the humidification factor is not the major limitation of the CCN retrieval scheme. Vertical structure in the aerosol size distribution and composition is the dominant source of error in the CCN retrieval, but this vertical structure is difficult to measure from remote sensing at visible wavelengths.

  10. Stratospheric free chlorine measured by balloon-borne in situ resonance fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. G.; Grassl, H. J.; Shetter, R. E.; Margitan, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    Eight balloon-borne in situ measurements of ClO in the stratosphere are analyzed and are compared with recent model calculations. While the use of in situ stratospheric studies of free radicals to test models by comparing observed and predicted concentration profiles is essential for a prognosis of changes in stratospheric ozone, resulting from future changes in stratospheric ozone, such studies provide only limited insight into the nature of stratospheric photochemistry, because natural variability and the large number of fast reactions which compete in the coupling among the key radicals frustrate a detailed comparison between a mean distribution provided by the models and an instantaneous distribution provided by a single observation.

  11. Radioactivity measurements in the aquatic environment using in-situ and laboratory gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriou, G; Tsabaris, C; Androulakaki, E G; Patiris, D L; Kokkoris, M; Kalfas, C A; Vlastou, R

    2013-12-01

    The in-situ underwater gamma-ray spectrometry method is validated by inter-comparison with laboratory method. Deployments of the spectrometer KATERINA on a submarine spring and laboratory measurements of water samples with HPGe detector were performed. Efficiency calibrations, Monte Carlo simulations and the Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) estimations were realized. MDAs varied from 0.19 to 10.4 (lab) and 0.05 to 0.35 (in-situ) Bq/L, while activity concentrations differed from 7% (for radon progenies) up to 10% (for (40)K), between the two methods. PMID:24103707

  12. Utilizing The Synergy of Airborne Backscatter Lidar and In-Situ Measurements for Evaluating CALIPSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekeri, Alexandra; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marenco, Franco; Marinou, Eleni; Rosenberg, Phil; Solomos, Stavros; Trembath, Jamie; Allan, James; Bacak, Asan; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-06-01

    Airborne campaigns dedicated to satellite validation are crucial for the effective global aerosol monitoring. CALIPSO is currently the only active remote sensing satellite mission, acquiring the vertical profiles of the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients. Here we present a method for CALIPSO evaluation from combining lidar and in-situ airborne measurements. The limitations of the method have to do mainly with the in-situ instrumentation capabilities and the hydration modelling. We also discuss the future implementation of our method in the ICE-D campaign (Cape Verde, August 2015).

  13. Molecular recognition in gas sensing: Results from acoustic wave and in-situ FTIR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hierlemann, A.; Ricco, A.J.; Bodenhoefer, K.; Goepel, W.

    1998-06-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) measurements were combined with direct, in-situ molecular spectroscopy to understand the interactions of surface-confined sensing films with gas-phase analytes. This was accomplished by collecting Fourier-transform infrared external-reflectance spectra (FTIR-ERS) on operating SAW devices during dosing of their specifically coated surfaces with key analytes.

  14. In-situ measurement of the electrical conductivity of aluminum oxide in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; White, D.P.; Snead, L.L.

    1996-10-01

    A collaborative DOE/Monbusho irradiation experiment has been completed which measured the in-situ electrical resistivity of 12 different grades of aluminum oxide during HFIR neutron irradiation at 450{degrees}C. No evidence for bulk RIED was observed following irradiation to a maximum dose of 3 dpa with an applied dc electric field of 200 V/mm.

  15. MEASURING VERTICAL PROFILES OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY WITH IN SITU DIRECT-PUSH METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) staff developed a field procedure to measure hydraulic conductivity using a direct-push system to obtain vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity. Vertical profiles were obtained using an in situ field device-composed of a
    Geopr...

  16. In-situ Measurements of Colloid Transport and Retention Using Synchroton X-ray Fluorescence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The physics regarding the retention and mobilization of colloids in saturated and unsaturated conditions remains poorly understood, partially due to the inability to measure colloid concentrations in-situ. In this study, we attached Cd+2 ions to clay colloids, and used synchrotron x-rays to cause th...

  17. IN SITU APPARENT CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENTS AND MICROBIAL POPULATION DISTRIBUTION AT A HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATED SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the bulk electrical conductivity and microbial population distribution in sediments at a site contaminated with light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL). The bulk conductivity was measured using in situ vertical resistivity probes, while the most probable number met...

  18. Passive microwave remote and in situ measurements of Arctic and subarctic snow covers in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. K.; Chang, A. T. C.; Foster, J. L.; Sturm, M.; Chacho, E.; Benson, C. S.; Garbeil, H.

    1991-01-01

    Airborne and satellite passive microwave measurements acquired simultaneously with ground measurements of depth, density, and stratigraphy of the snow in central and northern Alaska between March 11 and 19, 1988, are reported. A good correspondence in brightness temperature (TB) trends between the aircraft and satellite data was found. An expected inverse correlation between depth hoar thickness and TB was not found to be strong. A persistent TB minimum in both the aircraft and the satellite data was detected along the northern foothills of the Brooks Range. In an area located at about 68 deg 60 min N, 149 deg 20 min W, the TB as recorded from the aircraft microwave sensor dropped by 55 K. Satellite microwave measurements showed a TB decrease of up to 45 K at approximately the same location. An examination of microwave satellite data from 1978 to 1987 revealed that similar low late-winter values were found in approximately the same locations as those observed in March 1988.

  19. Measurement and analysis of aircraft far-field aerodynamic noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Healy, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    A systematic investigation of aircraft far-field radiated, aerodynamically generated noise was conducted. The test phase of the original program involved the measurement of the noise produced by five gliding aircraft in an aerodynamically clean configuration during low altitude flyovers. These aircraft had gross weights that ranged from 5785 to 173 925N (1300 to 39,000 pounds), fly-by velocities from 30 to 98.5m/sec (58 to 191.5 knots or 98 to 323 ft/sec) and wing aspect ratios from 6.59 to 18.25. The results of these measurements were used to develop an equation relating aerodynamic noise to readily evaluated physical and operational parameters of the aircraft. A non-dimensional frequency spectrum, based on the mean wing thickness, was also developed.

  20. Aircraft Wake Vortex Measurement with Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songhua; Liu, Bingyi; Liu, Jintao

    2016-06-01

    Aircraft vortices are generated by the lift-producing surfaces of the aircraft. The variability of near-surface conditions can change the drop rate and cause the cell of the wake vortex to twist and contort unpredictably. The pulsed Coherent Doppler Lidar Detection and Ranging is an indispensable access to real aircraft vortices behavior which transmitting a laser beam and detecting the radiation backscattered by atmospheric aerosol particles. Experiments for Coherent Doppler Lidar measurement of aircraft wake vortices has been successfully carried out at the Beijing Capital International Airport (BCIA). In this paper, the authors discuss the Lidar system, the observation modes carried out in the measurements at BCIA and the characteristics of vortices.

  1. Inferring water vapor amounts with solar spectral irradiance: Measurements, modeling, and comparisons with in situ water vapor profiles in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere from ATTREX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindel, B. C.; Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, S.; Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, D. W.; LeBlanc, S. E.; Bui, T. V.

    2013-12-01

    The Airborne Tropical TRopopause Experiment (ATTREX) flew six science missions on the NASA Global Hawk aircraft from NASA Dryden, California to the Pacific tropics to sample the upper troposphere, lower stratosphere (UTLS) during February and March of 2013. After transit to the tropics, the aircraft performed a series of vertical profiles from the cruising altitude of about 18 km down to 14 km sampling the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). A science focus of ATTREX is to examine water vapor and its transport through the TTL. The extremely cold temperatures found in the TTL act to limit the transport of water vapor from the troposphere to stratosphere, making this region critical to the water vapor budget of the stratosphere. Here we investigate the use of the strong water bands centered at 1400 and 1900 nm in the telluric solar spectrum to infer the small water vapor amounts through the TTL. Measurements of spectral irradiance from the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) at the top and bottom of the aircraft profiles are used to produce transmission spectra. These are compared with atmospheric radiative transfer calculations of transmission through the layer. The measured water vapor profile from the NOAA water vapor instrument, as well as temperature and pressure, were used in the modeling, providing a rare opportunity to compare water vapor amount inferred from solar transmittance to in situ measurements. Prospects for the use of these bands for determining the total column water vapor amount from the UTLS to the top of the atmosphere from aircraft are also discussed.

  2. In situ radiation measurements at the former Soviet Nuclear Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, W.J.

    1996-06-01

    A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted a series of in situ radiological measurements at the former Soviet Nuclear Test Site near Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan, during the period of July 21-30, 1994. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at selected areas on the site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. The survey was part of a cooperative effort between the United States team and teams of radiation scientists from the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan and the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. In addition to in situ radiation measurements made by the United States and Russian teams, soil samples were collected and analyzed by the Russian and Kazakhstani teams. All teams conducted their measurements at ten locations within the test site. The United States team also made a number of additional measurements to locate and verify the positions of three potential fallout plumes containing plutonium contamination from nonnuclear tests. In addition, the United States team made several measurements in Kurchatov City, the housing area used by personnel and their families who work(ed) at the test sites. Comparisons between the United States and Russian in situ measurements and the soil sample results are presented as well as comparisons with a Soviet aerial survey conducted in 1990-1991. The agreement between the different types of measurements made by all three countries was quite good.

  3. In situ measurement of CuPt alloy ordering using strain anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    France, Ryan M.; McMahon, William E.; Kang, Joongoo; Steiner, Myles A.; Geisz, John F.

    2014-02-07

    The optical and electrical properties of many III-V alloys change with the degree of CuPt atomic ordering, which is very sensitive to growth conditions. The bulk ordered alloy is elongated along the normal to the ordered planes, and is asymmetrically strained when coherent to a cubic substrate. Here, we demonstrate in situ measurement of the anisotropic strain due to ordering using two-dimensional wafer curvature. The measurement is sensitive to bulk anisotropies, and so is complementary to other in situ measurements that are sensitive to surface anisotropies. Using ab initio calculations, we determine a maximum strain anisotropy of 0.27% between [110] and [1{sup ¯}10] when perfectly ordered single-variant GaInP{sub 2} is coherent to a (001) cubic substrate. We relate the in situ measurement of strain anisotropy on various GaInP{sub 2} samples to ex situ measurements of the order parameter to validate the measurement and confirm the capability to predict material properties. The measurement monitors change in ordering during growth, useful for quickly determining the growth condition dependence of ordering or monitoring order-disorder transitions. More generally, this measurement technique could, in principle, be used to monitor phase changes in any epitaxial system for which the strain anisotropy of the two phases differs.

  4. Characterization of a Photoacoustic Aerosol Absorption Spectrometer for Aircraft-based Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. J.; Wagner, N. L.; Richardson, M.; Brock, C. A.; Murphy, D. M.; Adler, G.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol directly impacts the Earth's climate through extinction of incoming and outgoing radiation. The optical extinction is due to both scattering and absorption. In situ measurements of aerosol extinction and scattering are well established and have uncertainties less than 5%. However measurements of aerosol absorption typically have uncertainties of 20-30%. Development and characterization of more accurate and precise instrumentation for measurement of aerosol absorption will enable a deeper understand of significance and spatial distribution of black and brown carbon aerosol, the effect of atmospheric processes on aerosol optical properties, and influence of aerosol optical properties on direct radiative forcing. Here, we present a detailed characterization of a photoacoustic aerosol absorption spectrometer designed for deployment aboard research aircraft. The spectrometer operates at three colors across the visible spectrum and is calibrated in the field using ozone. The field calibration is validated in the laboratory using synthetic aerosol and simultaneous measurements of extinction and scattering. In addition, the sensitivity of the instrument is characterized under conditions typically encountered during aircraft sampling e.g. as a function of changing pressure. We will apply this instrument characterization to ambient aerosol absorption data collected during the SENEX and SEAC4RS aircraft based field campaigns.

  5. Initial in Situ Measurements of Perennial Meltwater Storage in the Greenland Firn Aquifer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Lora S.; Miege, Clement; Forster, Richard R.; Brucker, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    A perennial storage of water in a firn aquifer was discovered in southeast Greenland in 2011. We present the first in situ measurements of the aquifer, including densities and temperatures. Water was present at depths between approx. 12 and 37m and amounted to 18.7 +/- 0.9 kg in the extracted core. The water filled the firn to capacity at approx. 35m. Measurements show the aquifer temperature remained at the melting point, representing a large heat reservoir within the firn. Using model results of liquid water extent and aquifer surface depth from radar measurements, we extend our in situ measurements to the Greenland ice sheet. The estimated water volume is 140 +/- 20 Gt, representing approx. 0.4mm of sea level rise (SLR). It is unknown if the aquifer temporary buffers SLR or contributes to SLR through drainage and/or ice dynamics.

  6. Using in situ airborne measurements to evaluate three cloud phase products derived from CALIPSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesana, G.; Chepfer, H.; Winker, D.; Getzewich, B.; Cai, X.; Jourdan, O.; Mioche, G.; Okamoto, H.; Hagihara, Y.; Noel, V.; Reverdy, M.

    2016-05-01

    We compare the cloud detection and cloud phase determination of three independent climatologies based on Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) to airborne in situ measurements. Our analysis of the cloud detection shows that the differences between the satellite and in situ measurements mainly arise from three factors. First, averaging CALIPSO Level l data along track before cloud detection increases the estimate of high- and low-level cloud fractions. Second, the vertical averaging of Level 1 data before cloud detection tends to artificially increase the cloud vertical extent. Third, the differences in classification of fully attenuated pixels among the CALIPSO climatologies lead to differences in the low-level Arctic cloud fractions. In another section, we compare the cloudy pixels detected by colocated in situ and satellite observations to study the cloud phase determination. At midlatitudes, retrievals of homogeneous high ice clouds by CALIPSO data sets are very robust (more than 94.6% of agreement with in situ). In the Arctic, where the cloud phase vertical variability is larger within a 480 m pixel, all climatologies show disagreements with the in situ measurements and CALIPSO-General Circulation Models-Oriented Cloud Product (GOCCP) report significant undefined-phase clouds, which likely correspond to mixed-phase clouds. In all CALIPSO products, the phase determination is dominated by the cloud top phase. Finally, we use global statistics to demonstrate that main differences between the CALIPSO cloud phase products stem from the cloud detection (horizontal averaging, fully attenuated pixels) rather than the cloud phase determination procedures.

  7. Estimates of total organic and inorganic chlorine in the lower stratosphere from in situ and flask measurements during AASE 2

    SciTech Connect

    Woodbridge, E.L.; Elkins, J.W.; Fahey, D.W.; Heidt, L.E.; Solomon, S.; Baring, T.J.; Gilpin, T.M.; Pollack, W.H.; Schauffler, S.M.; Atlas, E.L. ||

    1995-02-01

    Aircraft sampling has provided extensive in situ and flask measurements of organic chlorine species in the lower stratosphere. The recent Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition 2 (AASE 2) included two independent measurements of organic chlorine species using whole air sample and real-time techniques. From the whole air sample measurements we derive directly the burden of total organic chlorine (CCl(y)) in the lower stratosphere. From the more limited real-time measurements we estimate the CCl(y) burden using mixing ratios and growth rates of the principal CCl(y) species in the troposphere in conjunction with results from a two-dimensional photochemical model. Since stratospheric chlorine is tropospheric in origin and tropospheric mixing ratios are increasing, it is necessary to establish the average age of a stratospheric air parcel to assess its total chlorine (Cl(sub Total)) abundance. Total inorganic chlorine (Cl(y)) in the parcel is then estimated by the simple difference, Cl(y) = Cl(sub Total) - CCl(y). The consistency of the results from these two quite different techniques suggests that we can determine the CCl(y) and Cl(y) in the lower stratosphere with confidence. Such estimates of organic and inorganic chlorine are crucial in evaluating the photochemistry controlling chlorine partitioning and hence ozone loss processes in the lower stratosphere.

  8. Estimates of total organic and inorganic chlorine in the lower stratosphere from in situ and flask measurements during AASE 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodbridge, E. L.; Elkins, J. W.; Fahey, D. W.; Heidt, L. E.; Solomon, S.; Baring, T. J.; Gilpin, T. M.; Pollack, W. H.; Schauffler, S. M.; Atlas, E. L.

    1995-01-01

    Aircraft sampling has provided extensive in situ and flask measurements of organic chlorine species in the lower stratosphere. The recent Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition 2 (AASE 2) included two independent measurements of organic chlorine species using whole air sample and real-time techniques. From the whole air sample measurements we derive directly the burden of total organic chlorine (CCl(y)) in the lower stratosphere. From the more limited real-time measurements we estimate the CCl(y) burden using mixing ratios and growth rates of the principal CCl(y) species in the troposphere in conjunction with results from a two-dimensional photochemical model. Since stratospheric chlorine is tropospheric in origin and tropospheric mixing ratios are increasing, it is necessary to establish the average age of a stratospheric air parcel to assess its total chlorine (Cl(sub Total)) abundance. Total inorganic chlorine (Cl(y)) in the parcel is then estimated by the simple difference, Cl(y) = Cl(sub Total) - CCl(y). The consistency of the results from these two quite different techniques suggests that we can determine the CCl(y) and Cl(y) in the lower stratosphere with confidence. Such estimates of organic and inorganic chlorine are crucial in evaluating the photochemistry controlling chlorine partitioning and hence ozone loss processes in the lower stratosphere.

  9. Ultraviolet spectrophotometer for measuring columnar atmospheric ozone from aircraft.

    PubMed

    Hanser, F A; Sellers, B; Briehl, D C

    1978-05-15

    An ultraviolet spectrophotometer (UVS) to measure downward solar fluxes from an aircraft or other high altitude platform is described. The UVS uses an ultraviolet diffuser to obtain large angular response with no aiming requirement, a twelve-position filter wheel with narrow (2-nm) and broad (20-nm) bandpass filters, and an ultraviolet photodiode. The columnar atmospheric ozone above the UVS (aircraft) is calculated from the ratios of the measured ultraviolet fluxes. Comparison with some Dobson station measurements gives agreement to 2%. Some UVS measured ozone profiles over the Pacific Ocean for November 1976 are shown to illustrate the instrument's performance.

  10. Measuring Level Alignment at the Metal–Molecule Interface by In Situ Electrochemical 13C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Zelakiewicz, Brian S.; Allison, Thomas C.; Tong, Yu ye J.

    2015-03-16

    A new technique to measure energy-level alignment at a metal–molecule interface between the Fermi level of the metal and the frontier orbitals of the molecule is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The method, which combines the electrochemistry of organo-ligand-stabilized Au nanoparticles with 13C NMR spectroscopy (i.e. in situ electrochemical NMR), enables measuring both occupied and unoccupied states.

  11. In situ measurements of flocculated suspended matter with a video multi sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, A.

    1996-09-01

    During the intercalibration experiment WIMS in the Elbe estuary near Brunsbüttel a new configured Video Multi Sensor System was used to measure floc size, shape and concentration in correlation to tide signals such as current velocity and salinity. The results indicate the problems caused by time-and depth-dependent interference between the parameters. In situ measurements from a floating ship have been conducted, because special efforts are necessary to avoid any destructive influence on the fragile flocs.

  12. Radon in soil gas--exhalation tests and in situ measurements.

    PubMed

    Lindmark, A; Rosen, B

    1985-10-01

    Radon in soil can move into buildings resulting in high radon daughter concentrations. The foundation of a dwelling should be adapted to the radon "risk" which is determined by the radon concentration and the air permeability of the soil. Different measuring procedures are discussed in this paper, both in situ measurements of radon content and laboratory tests on radon exhalation from different types of soils at different water contents. PMID:4081740

  13. In situ recording of particle network formation in liquids by ion conductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Pfaffenhuber, Christian; Sörgel, Seniz; Weichert, Katja; Bele, Marjan; Mundinger, Tabea; Göbel, Marcus; Maier, Joachim

    2011-09-21

    The formation of fractal silica networks from a colloidal initial state was followed in situ by ion conductivity measurements. The underlying effect is a high interfacial lithium ion conductivity arising when silica particles are brought into contact with Li salt-containing liquid electrolytes. The experimental results were modeled using Monte Carlo simulations and tested using confocal fluorescence laser microscopy and ζ-potential measurements.

  14. Digital Holography for in Situ Real-Time Measurement of Plasma-Facing-Component Erosion

    SciTech Connect

    ThomasJr., C. E.; Granstedt, E. M.; Biewer, Theodore M; Baylor, Larry R; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Meitner, Steven J; Hillis, Donald Lee; Majeski, R.; Kaita, R.

    2014-01-01

    In situ, real time measurement of net plasma-facing-component (PFC) erosion/deposition in a real plasma device is challenging due to the need for good spatial and temporal resolution, sufficient sensitivity, and immunity to fringe-jump errors. Design of a high-sensitivity, potentially high-speed, dual-wavelength CO2 laser digital holography system (nominally immune to fringe jumps) for PFC erosion measurement is discussed.

  15. Deriving an atmospheric budget of total organic bromine using airborne in-situ measurements from the Western Pacific during SHIVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, S.; Bönisch, H.; Keber, T.; Oram, D. E.; Mills, G.; Engel, A.

    2014-02-01

    During the SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) project an extensive dataset of all halogen species relevant for the atmospheric budget of total organic bromine has been collected in the West Pacific region using the FALCON aircraft operated by the German Aerospace agency DLR (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt) covering a vertical range from the planetary boundary layer up to the ceiling altitude of the aircraft of 13 km. In total, more than 700 measurements were performed with the newly developed fully-automated in-situ instrument GHOST-MS (Gas cHromatograph for the Observation of Tracers - coupled with a Mass Spectrometer) by the Goethe University of Frankfurt (GUF) and with the onboard whole-air sampler WASP with subsequent ground based state-of-the-art GC/MS analysis by the University of East Anglia (UEA). Both instruments yield good agreement for all major (CHBr3 and CH2Br2) and minor (CHBrCl, CHBrCl2 and CHBr2Cl) VSLS (very short-lived substances), at least at the level of their 2 σ measurement uncertainties. In contrast to the suggestion that the Western Pacific could be a major source region for VSLS (Pyle et al., 2011), we found only slightly enhanced mixing ratios of brominated halogen source gases relative to the levels reported in Montzka et al. (2011) for other tropical regions. A budget for total organic bromine, including all four halons,CH3Br and the VSLS, is derived for the upper troposphere, the input region for the TTL and thus also for the stratosphere, compiled from the SHIVA dataset. With exception of the two minor VSLS CHBrCl2 and CHBr2Cl, excellent agreement with the values reported in Montzka et al. (2011) is found, while being slightly higher than previous studies from our group based on balloon-borne measurements.

  16. Observing cirrus halos to constrain in-situ measurements of ice crystal size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, T. J.; Kimball, M. B.; Mace, G. G.; Baumgardner, D. G.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, characteristic optical sizes of ice crystals in synoptic cirrus are determined using airborne measurements of ice crystal size distributions, optical extinction and water content. The measurements are compared with coincident visual observations of ice cloud optical phenomena, in particular the 22° and 46° halos. In general, the scattering profiles derived from the in-situ cloud probe measurements are consistent with the observed halo characteristics. It is argued that this implies that the measured ice crystals were small, probably with characteristic optical radii between 10 and 20 μm. There is a current contention that in-situ measurements of high concentrations of small ice crystals reflect artifacts from the shattering of large ice crystals on instrument inlets. Significant shattering cannot be entirely excluded using this approximate technique, but it is not indicated. On the basis of the in-situ measurements, a parameterization is provided that relates the optical effective radius of ice crystals to the temperature in mid-latitude synoptic cirrus.

  17. Comparison of MTI satellite-derived surface water temperatures and in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzeja, Robert J.; Pendergast, Malcolm M.; Villa-Aleman, Eliel; Garrett, Alfred J.

    2002-01-01

    Temperatures of the water surface of a cold, mid-latitude lake and the tropical Pacific Ocean were determined from MTI images and from in situ concurrent measurements. In situ measurements were obtained at the time of the MTI image with a floating, anchored platform, which measured the surface and bulk water temperatures and relevant meteorological variables, and also from a boat moving across the target area. Atmospheric profiles were obtained from concurrent radiosonde soundings. Radiances at the satellite were calculated with the Modtran radiative transfer model. The MTI infrared radiances were within 1% of the calculated values at the Pacific Ocean site but were 1-2% different over the mid-latitude lake.

  18. Combining Space-Based and In-Situ Measurements to Track Flooding in Thailand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Doubleday, Joshua; Mclaren, David; Tran, Daniel; Tanpipat, Veerachai; Chitradon, Royal; Boonya-aaroonnet, Surajate; Thanapakpawin, Porranee; Khunboa, Chatchai; Leelapatra, Watis; Plermkamon, Vichian; Raghavendra, Cauligi; Mandl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We describe efforts to integrate in-situ sensing, space-borne sensing, hydrological modeling, active control of sensing, and automatic data product generation to enhance monitoring and management of flooding. In our approach, broad coverage sensors and missions such as MODIS, TRMM, and weather satellite information and in-situ weather and river gauging information are all inputs to track flooding via river basin and sub-basin hydrological models. While these inputs can provide significant information as to the major flooding, targetable space measurements can provide better spatial resolution measurements of flooding extent. In order to leverage such assets we automatically task observations in response to automated analysis indications of major flooding. These new measurements are automatically processed and assimilated with the other flooding data. We describe our ongoing efforts to deploy this system to track major flooding events in Thailand.

  19. In Situ Field Measurement of Leaf Water Potential Using Thermocouple Psychrometers 1

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Michael J.; Wiebe, Herman H.; Cass, Alfred

    1983-01-01

    Thermocouple psychrometers are the only instruments which can measure the in situ water potential of intact leaves, and which can possibly be used to monitor leaf water potential. Unfortunately, their usefulness is limited by a number of difficulties, among them fluctuating temperatures and temperature gradients within the psychrometer, sealing of the psychrometer chamber to the leaf, shading of the leaf by the psychrometer, and resistance to water vapor diffusion by the cuticle when the stomates are closed. Using Citrus jambhiri, we have tested several psychrometer design and operational modifications and showed that in situ psychrometric measurements compared favorably with simultaneous Scholander pressure chamber measurements on neighboring leaves when the latter were corrected for the osmotic potential. PMID:16663267

  20. Comparison of MTI Satellite-Derived Surface Water Temperatures and In-Situ Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.

    2001-07-26

    Temperatures of the water surface of a cold, mid-latitude lake and the tropical Pacific Ocean were determined from MTI images and from in situ concurrent measurements. In situ measurements were obtained at the time of the MTI image with a floating, anchored platform, which measured the surface and bulk water temperatures and relevant meteorological variables, and also from a boat moving across the target area. Atmospheric profiles were obtained from concurrent radiosonde soundings. Radiances at the satellite were calculated with the Modtran radiative transfer model. The MTI infrared radiances were within 1 percent of the calculated values at the Pacific Ocean site but were 1-2 percent different over the mid-latitude lake.

  1. In situ measurements of scattering from contaminated optics in the Vacuum Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Linton, Roger C.; Whitaker, Ann F.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's In Situ Contamination Effects Facility has been used to measure the time dependence of the angular reflectance from molecularly contaminated optical surfaces in the vacuum ultraviolet. The light scattering measurements are accomplished in situ on optical surfaces in real time during deposition of molecular contaminants. The measurements are taken using noncoherent VUV sources with the predominant wavelengths being the krypton resonance lines at 1236 and 1600 angstroms. Detection of the scattered light is accomplished using a set of three solar blind VUV photomultipliers. An in-plane VUV BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function) experiment is described and details of the on-going program to characterize optical materials exposed to the space environment is reported.

  2. Fibre Bragg grating sensors for in-situ measurement of resin pressure in curing composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathi, A. S.; Maheshwari, Muneesh; Joshi, Sunil C.; Chen, Zhong; Asundi, Anand; Tjin, Swee Chuan

    2015-03-01

    A fibre optic sensor was developed for in-situ pressure measurement based on the principle of differential pressure in liquids. This sensor system is very simple and consists of fibre Bragg grating (FBG) done on a fibre with core diameter of 9 μm. A calibration study was carried out with a water column and the pressure sensitivity was found to be 1.636 × 10-2MPa-1. The results show that response of FBG to the rise of water level is linear and agrees well with the theoretical results. The reliability of the sensors is confirmed by repeating the measurements for three times. The sensor is useful in applications that involve in-situ resin pressure measurement in manufacturing of laminated composite materials.

  3. Aircraft measurements and analysis of severe storms: 1976 field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, P. C.

    1982-01-01

    Severe storm aircraft measurements are documented, as well as the instrumentation and operational features of aircraft mobility capabilities. The measurements and data analyses indicate that the concept of a highly mobile research aircraft capability for obtaining detailed measurements of wind, temperature, moisture, spherics, etc., near and within severe storm systems, forecast 48 hours in advance in a 1000 nm operating radius, is feasible, and was successfully demonstrated. The measurements and analyses reveal several severe storm features and insights with respect to storm air flow circulations and inflow-outflow orientation. Precipitation downdraft air is recirculated back into the updraft core below the scud cloud in both back and front feeder type storms. In a back feeder type storm, the downdraft outflow air ahead of the storm is also recirculated back into the updraft region near cloud base.

  4. Aircraft measurements and analysis of severe storms: 1975 field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, P. C.

    1976-01-01

    Three aircraft and instrumentation systems were acquired in support of the severe storm surveillance program. The data results indicate that the original concept of a highly mobile research aircraft capability for obtaining detailed measurements of wind, temperature, dew point, etc., near and within specifically designated severe storms is entirely feasible and has been demonstrated for the first time by this program. This program is unique in that it is designed to be highly mobile in order to move to and/or with the developing storm systems to obtain the necessary measurements. Previous programs have all been fixed to a particular location and therefore have had to wait for the storms to come within their network. The present research is designed around a highly mobile aircraft measurements group in order to maximize the storm cases during the field measurements program.

  5. In situ multiproperty measurements of individual nanomaterials in SEM and correlation with their atomic structures.

    PubMed

    Ning, Z Y; Fu, M Q; Shi, T W; Guo, Y; Wei, X L; Gao, S; Chen, Q

    2014-07-11

    The relationship between property and structure is one of the most important fundamental questions in the field of nanomaterials and nanodevices. Understanding the multiproperties of a given nano-object also aids in the development of novel nanomaterials and nanodevices. In this paper, we develop for the first time a comprehensive platform for in situ multiproperty measurements of individual nanomaterials using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Mechanical, electrical, electromechanical, optical, and photoelectronic properties of individual nanomaterials, with lengths that range from less than 200 nm to 20 μm, can be measured in situ with an SEM on the platform under precisely controlled single-axial strain and environment. An individual single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was measured on the platform. Three-terminal electronic measurements in a field effect transistor structure showed that the SWCNT was semiconducting and agreed with the structure characterization by transmission electron microscopy after the in situ measurements. Importantly, we observed a bandgap increase of this SWCNT with increasing axial strain, and for the first time, the experimental results quantitatively agree with theoretical predictions calculated using the chirality of the SWCNT. The vibration performance of the SWCNT, a double-walled CNT, and a triple-walled CNT were also studied as a function of axial strain, and were proved to be in good agreement with classical beam theory, although the CNTs only have one, two, or three atomic layers, respectively. Our platform has wide applications in correlating multiproperties of the same individual nanostructures with their atomic structures.

  6. A snapshot of the UK net greenhouse gas flux using a mass balance approach with aircraft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G.; Pitt, J. R.; Palmer, P. I.; Percival, C.; Mead, M. I.; Lee, J. D.; Le Breton, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present airborne observations of high-precision in-situ and remotely sensed CO2, CH4 and other trace gases made from the NERC Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft during Spring and Summer months in 2014 and 2015. Measurements were recorded during the GAUGE (Greenhouse gAs Uk and Global Emissions) aircraft field campaign, based out of Cranfield, UK, with sampling around and over the UK Mainland and Ireland. We derive Lagrangian mass-balanced net surface fluxes of CO2, CH4, CO, and N2O from a large surface footprint of England based on data collected during a flight in May 2015 by combining in-situ and remote-sensed concentration measurements and measured boundary layer thermodynamic profiles. By employing an advective box model for the volume enclosed by the flight-tracks and combining aircraft-measured winds and along-track Lagrangian back-trajectory modelling, we examine the sensitivity of total flux uncertainty to atmospheric transport and measurement errors using error propagation implicit in the mass balancing method. Finally, we compare the measured snapshot net fluxes to those reported in the current UK emissions inventory (weighted for surface footprint) and to previous UK-regional greenhouse gas top-down assessments.

  7. IAGOS : operational start of atmospheric measurements on commercial Airbus aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelec, P.

    2011-12-01

    AUTHORS : Philippe Nedelec 1, Jean-Pierre Cammas 1, Gilles Athier 1, Damien Boulanger 1, Jean-Marc Cousin 1., Andreas Volz-Thomas 2. 1. Laboratoire d' Aerologie, CNRS and University of Toulouse, Toulouse, France. 2. FZ Jülich, Jülich, Germany The MOZAIC program (http://mozaic.aero.obs-mip.fr) measures atmospheric parameters since August 1994, on board 5 commercial Airbus A340 aircraft operated by European airlines, with about 33 000 flights up to present. Three aircraft are still in operation and a new project has been sponsored by the European Community, and French and German national budgets. This project is called IAGOS for "In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing system" and can be considered as an update of Mozaic systems, increasing the performances and the measuring capacity. Plans are to equip 10-20 aircraft in the coming years to ensure a global coverage of the observations. Instrumentation has been developed by the participating partners and has been certified for installation on commercial passenger aircraft. The basic instrumentation includes O3, CO, H2O and clouds sensors, as well as the position and meteorological parameters acquired by the aircraft. One of the optional equipment can also be installed: NOx or NOy or CO2/CH4 or Aerosols. Data measured during flight are automatically transmitted after aircraft landing to CNRS reception centre in Toulouse, France, and made available to scientist some days later. The installation on a Lufthansa Airbus A340 has been finalised and certified by EASA (European Aviation Safety Agency) on July 7th, 2011 and operations started the following day, with data transmitted every landing to the CNRS centre. We will present technical details of the IAGOS aeronautic installation, measuring instruments of the basic system and some results of the first months of IAGOS operation.

  8. Integrated Airborne and In-Situ Measurements over Land-Fast Ice near Barrow, AK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozena, J. M.; Gardner, J. M.; Liang, R.; Ball, D.; Richter-Menge, J.; Claffey, K. J.; Abelev, A.; Hebert, D. A.; Jones, K.

    2014-12-01

    During March of 2014, the Naval Research Laboratory and the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory collected an integrated set of airborne and in-situ measurements over two areas of floating, but land-fast ice near the coast of Barrow, AK. The near-shore site was just north of Point Barrow, and the "offshore" site was ~ 20 km east of Point Barrow. The in-situ data provided ground-truth for airborne measurements from a scanning LiDAR (Riegl Q 560i), digital photogrammetry (Applanix DSS-439) and a snow radar procured from the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets of the University of Kansas. The objective of the survey was to aid our understanding of the use of the airborne data to calibrate/validate Cryosat-2 data. Sampling size or "footprint" plays a critical role in the attempt to compare in-situ measurements with airborne (or satellite) measurements. Thus the in-situ data were arranged to minimize aliasing. Ground measurements were collected along transects at both sites consisting of a 2 km long profile of snow depth and ice thickness measurements with periodic boreholes. A 60 m x 400 m swath of snow depth measurements was centered on this profile. Airborne data were collected on five overflights of the two transect areas. The LiDAR measured total freeboard (ice + snow) referenced to leads in the ice, and produced swaths 200-300 m wide. The radar measured snow thickness. The freeboard and snow thickness measurements are used to estimate ice thickness via isostasy and density estimates. The central swath of in situ snow depth data allows examination of the effects of cross-track variations considering the relatively large footprint of the snow radar. Assuming a smooth, flat surface the radar range resolution in air is < 4 cm, but the along-track sampling distance is ~ 3 m after unfocussed SAR processing. The width of the footprint varies from ~ 9 m up to about 40 m (beam-limited) for uneven surfaces. However, the radar could not resolve snow thickness

  9. Fuel retention measurements in Alcator C-Mod using accelerator-based in situ materials surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Zachary S.; Barnard, Harold S.; Sorbom, Brandon N.; Lanza, Richard C.; Lipschultz, Bruce; Stahle, Peter W.; Whyte, Dennis G.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the first in situ time- and space-resolved measurements of deuterium (D) fuel retention in plasma-facing component (PFC) surfaces using Accelerator-based In-situ Materials Surveillance (AIMS) on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. AIMS is a novel in situ materials diagnostic technique based on the spectroscopic analysis of nuclear reaction products induced in PFC surfaces using an ∼MeV beam of deuterons from a compact linear accelerator in between plasma shots. AIMS measurements of D retention on inner wall PFCs were acquired during diverted and limited plasma operations and during wall conditioning experiments. Intershot measurements demonstrate the local erosion and codeposition of boron films on PFC surfaces with a constant D / B ratio. This is consistent with previous results suggesting that D codeposition with boron is insufficient to account for the net retention observed in Alcator C-Mod. Changes in deuterium concentration during boronization, electron cyclotron and glow cleanings were also measured.

  10. Micro weather stations for in situ measurements in the Martian planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, D.; Kaiser, W. J.; Kenny, T. W.; Vanzandt, T. R.; Tillman, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    Viking Lander meteorology measurements show that the Martian planetary boundary layer (PBL) has large diurnal and seasonal variations in pressure, wind velocity, relative humidity, and airborne dust loading. An even larger range of conditions was inferred from remote sensing observations acquired by the Mariner 9 and Viking orbiters. Numerical models indicate that these changes may be accompanied by dramatic vertical and horizontal wind shears (100 m/s/km) and rapid changes in the static stability. In-situ measurements from a relatively small number surface stations could yield global constraints on the Martian climate and atmospheric general circulation by providing ground truth for remote sensing instruments on orbiters. A more complete understanding of the meteorology of the PBL is an essential precursor to manned missions to Mars because this will be their working environment. In-situ measurements are needed for these studies because the spatial and temporal scales that characterize the important meteorological processes near the surface cannot be resolved from orbit. The Mars Environmental Survey (MESUR) Program will provide the first opportunity to deploy a network of surface weather stations for a comprehensive investigation of the Martian PBL. The feasibility and utility of a network of micro-weather stations for making in-situ meteorological measurements in the Martian PBL are assessed.

  11. In situ measurement of leaf chlorophyll concentration: analysis of the optical/absolute relationship.

    PubMed

    Parry, Christopher; Blonquist, J Mark; Bugbee, Bruce

    2014-11-01

    In situ optical meters are widely used to estimate leaf chlorophyll concentration, but non-uniform chlorophyll distribution causes optical measurements to vary widely among species for the same chlorophyll concentration. Over 30 studies have sought to quantify the in situ/in vitro (optical/absolute) relationship, but neither chlorophyll extraction nor measurement techniques for in vitro analysis have been consistent among studies. Here we: (1) review standard procedures for measurement of chlorophyll; (2) estimate the error associated with non-standard procedures; and (3) implement the most accurate methods to provide equations for conversion of optical to absolute chlorophyll for 22 species grown in multiple environments. Tests of five Minolta (model SPAD-502) and 25 Opti-Sciences (model CCM-200) meters, manufactured from 1992 to 2013, indicate that differences among replicate models are less than 5%. We thus developed equations for converting between units from these meter types. There was no significant effect of environment on the optical/absolute chlorophyll relationship. We derive the theoretical relationship between optical transmission ratios and absolute chlorophyll concentration and show how non-uniform distribution among species causes a variable, non-linear response. These results link in situ optical measurements with in vitro chlorophyll concentration and provide insight to strategies for radiation capture among diverse species.

  12. Intercomparison of MODIS Albedo Retrievals and In Situ Measurements Across the Global FLUXNET Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cescatti, Alessandro; Marcolla, Barbara; Vannan, Suresh K. Santhana; Pan, Jerry Yun; Roman, Miguel O.; Yang, Xiaoyuan; Ciais, Philippe; Cook, Robert B.; Law, Beverly E.; Matteucci, Girogio; Migliavacca, Mirco; Moors, Eddy; Richardson, Andrew D.; Seufert, Guenther; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2012-01-01

    Surface albedo is a key parameter in the Earth's energy balance since it affects the amount of solar radiation directly absorbed at the planet surface. Its variability in time and space can be globally retrieved through the use of remote sensing products. To evaluate and improve the quality of satellite retrievals, careful intercomparisons with in situ measurements of surface albedo are crucial. For this purpose we compared MODIS albedo retrievals with surface measurements taken at 53 FLUXNET sites that met strict conditions of land cover homogeneity. A good agreement between mean yearly values of satellite retrievals and in situ measurements was found (R(exp 2)= 0.82). The mismatch is correlated to the spatial heterogeneity of surface albedo, stressing the relevance of land cover homogeneity when comparing point to pixel data. When the seasonal patterns of MODIS albedo is considered for different plant functional types, the match with surface observation is extremely good at all forest sites. On the contrary, in non-forest sites satellite retrievals underestimate in situ measurements across the seasonal cycle. The mismatch observed at grasslands and croplands sites is likely due to the extreme fragmentation of these landscapes, as confirmed by geostatistical attributes derived from high resolution scenes.

  13. Fast-response airborne in situ measurements of HNO3 during the Texas 2000 Air Quality Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuman, J. A.; Huey, L. G.; Dissly, R. W.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Flocke, F.; Holecek, J. C.; Holloway, J. S.; Hübler, G.; Jakoubek, R.; Nicks, D. K.; Parrish, D. D.; Ryerson, T. B.; Sueper, D. T.; Weinheimer, A. J.

    2002-10-01

    Nitric acid (HNO3) was measured from an aircraft in the planetary boundary layer and free troposphere up to 7 km on 14 flights during the Texas Air Quality Study in August and September 2000. HNO3 mixing ratios were measured at 1 Hz using a fast-response chemical ionization mass spectrometer with SiF5- reagent ions. HNO3 measurement using this highly selective ion chemistry is insensitive to water vapor and is not degraded by interferences from other species. Rapid time response (1 s) was achieved using a heated Teflon inlet. In-flight standard addition calibrations from a HNO3 permeation source were used to determine the instrument sensitivity of 1.1 ± 0.1 ion counts pptv-1 s-1 over the duration of the study. Contributions to the HNO3 signal from instrument artifacts were accounted for by regularly performing in-flight instrument background checks, where HNO3 was removed from the ambient air sample by diverting the sampled air though a nylon wool scrubber. Measurement inaccuracy, which is determined from uncertainties in the standard addition calibrations, was ±10%. Measurement precision at low HNO3 levels was ±25 pptv (1σ) for the 1 Hz data and ±9 pptv for 10 s averages of the 1 s measurements. Coincident in situ measurements of other reactive nitrogen species are used to examine NOy partitioning and HNO3 formation during this month long measurement campaign. The sum of the individually measured reactive nitrogen species is shown to be in agreement with the measured NOy. HNO3 formation in plumes from electric utility power plants, urban areas, and petrochemical facilities was studied. The observed differences in the fractional contribution of HNO3 to NOy in plumes from different anthropogenic source types are discussed.

  14. In situ azimuthal rotation device for linear dichroism measurements in scanning transmission x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Cruz, D.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Tyliszczak, T.; Rousseau, M.-E.; Pézolet, M.

    2007-03-01

    A novel miniature rotation device used in conjunction with a scanning transmission x-ray microscope is described. It provides convenient in situ sample rotation to enable measurements of linear dichroism at high spatial resolution. The design, fabrication, and mechanical characterization are presented. This device has been used to generate quantitative maps of the spatial distribution of the orientation of proteins in several different spider and silkworm silks. Specifically, quantitative maps of the dichroic signal at the C 1s→π*amide transition in longitudinal sections of the silk fibers give information about the spatial orientation, degree of alignment, and spatial distribution of protein peptide bonds. A new approach for analyzing the dichroic signal to extract orientation distributions, in addition to magnitudes of aligned components, is presented and illustrated with results from Nephila clavipes dragline spider silk measured using the in situ rotation device.

  15. Nitride-MBE system for in situ synchrotron X-ray measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Takuo; Ishikawa, Fumitaro; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Takahasi, Masamitu

    2016-05-01

    A molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) chamber dedicated to nitride growth was developed at the synchrotron radiation facility SPring-8. This chamber has two beryllium windows for incident and outgoing X-rays, and is directly connected to an X-ray diffractometer, enabling in situ synchrotron X-ray measurements during the nitride growth. Experimental results on initial growth dynamics in GaN/SiC, AlN/SiC, and InN/GaN heteroepitaxy were presented. We achieved high-speed and high-sensitivity reciprocal space mapping with a thickness resolution of atomic-layer scale. This in situ measurement using the high-brilliance synchrotron light source will be useful for evaluating structural variations in the initial growth stage of nitride semiconductors.

  16. Spatially resolved, in situ potential measurements through porous electrodes as applied to fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Hess, Katherine C; Epting, William K; Litster, Shawn

    2011-12-15

    We report the development and use of a microstructured electrode scaffold (MES) to make spatially resolved, in situ, electrolyte potential measurements through the thickness of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) electrode. This new approach uses a microfabricated apparatus to analyze the coupled transport and electrochemical phenomena in porous electrodes at the microscale. In this study, the MES allows the fuel cell to run under near-standard operating conditions, while providing electrolyte potential measurements at discrete distances through the electrode's thickness. Here we use spatial distributions of electrolyte potential to evaluate the effects of Ohmic and mass transport resistances on the through-plane reaction distribution for various operating conditions. Additionally, we use the potential distributions to estimate the ionic conductivity of the electrode. Our results indicate the in situ conductivity is higher than typically estimated for PEFC electrodes based on bulk polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) conductivity.

  17. Chemical isolation of quartz for measurement of in-situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, C. P.; Nishiizumi, K.

    1992-01-01

    An isolation method relying totally on chemical steps was developed to separate large quantities (10-200 g) of clean mono-minerallic quartz samples from a variety of terrestrial rocks and soils for the purpose of measuring Be-10 (t1/2 = 1.5 Myr) and Al-26 (t1/2 = 0.705 Myr) produced by cosmic rays in situ in the quartz phase. The procedure consists of grinding the sample, heating it in HCl, and treating it with a series of leaches using a dilute HF/HNO3 mixture in a heated ultrasonic tank. The purified quartz was also used for the measurements of in situ cosmic-ray-produced Ne-21 and C-14 (t1/2 = 5730 yr). The method is applicable to any problem requiring purified quartz on a large scale.

  18. Optical measurements of degradation in aircraft boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelsall, D.

    1980-01-01

    Visible wavelength measurements of the degradation of optical beams when transmitted through the thin aerodynamic boundary layers around an aircraft are reviewed. The measured results indicated degradation levels for the KC-135 airplanes between 0.10 to 0.13 lambda increasing to 0.18 lambda (rms wavefront distortion). For the Lear Jet, degradation with a 25 mm diameter optics was roughly 0.07 lambda. The corresponding infinite aperture degradation levels are also calculated. The corresponding measured correlation lengths of roughly 12 mm for the KC-135 aircraft and 6 mm for the Lear Jet scale to roughly 20 and 25 mm, respectively, for infinite apertures. These boundary layer correlation lengths do not appear to reflect the different boundary layer thicknesses on the two different aircraft.

  19. Apparatus for in-situ calibration of instruments that measure fluid depth

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, M.D.

    1994-01-11

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for in-situ calibration of distance measuring equipment. The method comprises obtaining a first distance measurement in a first location, then obtaining at least one other distance measurement in at least one other location of a precisely known distance from the first location, and calculating a calibration constant. The method is applied specifically to calculating a calibration constant for obtaining fluid level and embodied in an apparatus using a pressure transducer and a spacer of precisely known length. The calibration constant is used to calculate the depth of a fluid from subsequent single pressure measurements at any submerged position. 8 figures.

  20. Apparatus for in-situ calibration of instruments that measure fluid depth

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Melvin D.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for in-situ calibration of distance measuring equipment. The method comprises obtaining a first distance measurement in a first location, then obtaining at least one other distance measurement in at least one other location of a precisely known distance from the first location, and calculating a calibration constant. The method is applied specifically to calculating a calibration constant for obtaining fluid level and embodied in an apparatus using a pressure transducer and a spacer of precisely known length. The calibration constant is used to calculate the depth of a fluid from subsequent single pressure measurements at any submerged position.

  1. Pilot Workload Measurement and Experience on Supersonic Cruise Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rezek, T. W.

    1978-01-01

    Aircraft parameters and physiological parameters most indicative of crew workload were investigated. Recommendations were used to form the basis for a continuing study in which variations of the interval between heart beats are used as a measure of nonphysical workload. Preliminary results are presented and current efforts in further defining this physiological measure are outlined.

  2. Development of novel sol-gel indicators (SGI`s) for in-situ environmental measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.R.; Wicks, G.G.; Baylor, L.C.; Whitaker, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    Organic indicator molecules have been incorporated in a porous sol- gel matrix coated on the end of a fiber-optic lens assembly to create sensors for in situ environmental measurements. Probes have been made that are sensitive to pH and uranyl concentration. The use of fiber optics allows the probe to be lowered into a well or bore hole, while support equipment such as a spectrophotometer and computer may be situated hundreds of meters away.

  3. Quantitative measurements in in situ straining experiments in transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pettinari, F; Couret, A; Caillard, D; Molénat, G; Clément, N; Coujou, A

    2001-07-01

    Several examples of recent studies by in situ straining experiments in a transmission electron microscope performed in the Toulouse group (France) are presented. In particular, quantitative measurements of the features of the dislocation motion are described. These examples deal with individual or collective propagation of dislocations, which are submitted to various types of obstacle. Different metallic materials are investigated: magnesium, intermetallics, aluminium alloys and gamma phase of a superalloy. PMID:11454154

  4. Experimental Development of a Novel Stress Sensor for in situ Stress Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Polsky, Yarom; Lance, Michael J; Mattus, Catherine H; Daniels, Ryan J

    2016-01-01

    This paper will describe ongoing work to adapt a previously demonstrated method for measuring stress in ceramics to develop a borehole deployed in situ stress sensor. The method involves the use of a cementitious material which exhibits a strong piezo-spectroscopic stress response as a downhole stress gage. A description of the conceptual approach will be provided along with preliminary analysis and proof-of-concept laboratory results.

  5. The IAGOS Information System: From the aircraft measurements to the users.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulanger, Damien; Thouret, Valérie; Cammas, Jean-Pierre; Petzold, Andreas; Volz-Thomas, Andreas; Gerbig, Christoph; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A. M.

    2013-04-01

    IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System, http://www.iagos.org) aims at the provision of long-term, frequent, regular, accurate, and spatially resolved in-situ observations of atmospheric chemical composition throughout the troposphere and in the UTLS. It builds on almost 20 years of scientific and technological expertise gained in the research projects MOZAIC (Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapour on Airbus In-service Aircraft) and CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container). The European consortium includes research centres, universities, national weather services, airline operators and aviation industry. IAGOS consists of two complementary building blocks proving a unique global observation system: IAGOS-CORE deploys newly developed instrumentation for regular in-situ measurements of atmospheric chemical species both reactive and greenhouse gases (O3, CO, NOx, NOy, H2O, CO2, CH4), aerosols and cloud particles. In IAGOS-CARIBIC a cargo container is deployed monthly as a flying laboratory aboard one aircraft. Involved airlines ensure global operation of the network. Today, 5 aircraft are flying with the MOZAIC (3) or IAGOS-CORE (2) instrumentation namely 3 aircraft from Lufthansa, 1 from Air Namibia, and 1 from China Airlines Taiwan. A main improvement and new aspect of the IAGOS-CORE instrumentation compared to MOZAIC is to deliver the raw data in near real time (i.e. as soon as the aircraft lands data are transmitted). After a first and quick validation of the O3 and CO measurements, preliminary data are made available in the central database for both the MACC project (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) and scientific research groups. In addition to recorded measurements, the database also contains added-value products such as meteorological information (tropopause height, air mass backtrajectories) and lagrangian model outputs (FLEXPART). Data access is handled by open

  6. Ionospheric scintillations and in-situ measurements at an auroral location in the European sector

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, S.; Basu, S.; MacKenzie, E.; Weimer, D.

    1987-05-01

    The orbiting HiLat satellite offered a unique opportunity for studying the ionospheric scintillation parameters in relation to the in-situ measurements of ionization density, drift velocity, field-aligned current, and particle precipitation during the sunspot minimum period. This paper discusses the results of such a morphological study based on observations at the auroral-oval station of Tromso, Norway. The dynamics of the spatial and temporal extent of this region are illustrated in the invariant latitude/magnetic local time grid. The geometrical enhancement of scintillations observed during the alignment of the propagation path with the local magnetic L-shell is shown to be the most consistent and conspicuous feature of scintillations in the nighttime auroral oval. The steepening of phase spectral slope in this region is indicative of the presence of L-shell aligned sheet-like irregularities at long scale lengths. The seasonal variational of total electron content (TEC) determined from the differential Doppler measurements of HiLat transmissions is discussed in relation to the in-situ density measurements at 830 km. The results are also utilized to illustrate the dependence of ionospheric structure parameters on short-term variability of solar activity during the sunspot minimum period. Special effort is made to illustrate that the joint study of scintillation/TEC and in-situ parameters provides an insight into the nature of magnetospheric coupling with the high-latitude ionosphere.

  7. Chemical isolation of quartz for measurement of in-situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, C.P.; Nishiizumi, K. )

    1992-09-01

    Measurement of cosmogenic nuclides produced in situ in terrestrial samples shows great potential as a tool for quantifying continental erosion rates, determining exposure ages of rocks, dating various geologic events, and elucidating past climates. An isolation method relying totally on chemical steps was developed to separate large quantities (10-200 g) of clean mono-minerallic quartz samples from a variety of terrestrial rocks and soils for the purpose of measuring [sup 10]Be (t[sub 1/2] = 1.5 Myr) and [sup 26]Al (t[sub 1/2] = 0.705 Myr) produced by cosmic rays in situ in the quartz phase. The procedure consists of grinding the sample, heating it in HCl, and treating it with a series of leaches using a dilute HF/HNO[sub 3] mixture in a heated ultrasonic tank. The purified quartz was also used for the measurements of in-situ-cosmic-ray-produced [sup 21]Ne and [sup 14]C (t[sub 1/2] = 5,730 yr). The method is applicable to any problem requiring purified quartz on a large scale.

  8. Analysis of CO2 convection mechanisms associated to surface heating, by combining remote sensing data and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tello, Marivi; Curcoll, Roger; Font, Anna; Morgu, Josep Anton; Rod, Xavier

    Assessing the mechanisms involved in the variability of carbon fluxes is crucial for the under-standing of the changing earth dynamics. In that sense, the aim of this work is to analyze CO2 convection mechanisms at a regional scale in the boundary layer and the lower troposphere by means of cross correlation of land surface temperature data, radio-soundings, wind speeds and in situ measurements of CO2 atmospheric mixing ratios. Since data is easier to acquire, ground level horizontal CO2 fluxes have been widely studied. In the contrary, vertical ones are still subject to uncertainties, even if they are necessary to understand 3D CO2 variability in the atmosphere. In particular, this paper focuses on the relationship between surface heating, convection and CO2 concentrations at different heights and, more generally, on the energy transfer between the surface and the air. The monitored area corresponds to a region on the North Eastern Iberian Peninsula, mainly devoted to agricultural activities. Different types of land covers are observed. On the one hand, in situ data has been collected by several flights during 2007 along the parallel 42o N following the "Crown" aircraft sampling approach [1] that integrates CO2 data obtained through horizontal transects and vertical profiles. This particular configuration is especially well suited for the evaluation of both horizontal and vertical CO2 fluxes. On the other hand, the radiometric land surface temperatures are obtained from the MODIS instrument onboard the Terra and the Aqua satellites. Besides, a flight campaign with an airborne sensor along the same transect in the parallel 42o N has been proposed in the scope of the MIDAS-6 project recently submitted. This project plans to improve soil moisture and ocean salinity products of the SMOS sensor recently launched and to demonstrate its applications. This will allow the study of moisture patterns in the monitored area at two different scales: that of the data collected

  9. The Arctic polar stratospheric cloud aerosol - Aircraft measurements of reactive nitrogen, total water, and particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S. R.; Fahey, D. W.; Kelly, K. K.; Dye, J. E.; Baumgardner, D.; Gandrud, B. W.; Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. R.

    1992-01-01

    In situ aircraft measurements in the lower stratosphere are used to investigate the reactive nitrogen, NO(y), total water, and particle components of the polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) aerosol in the Arctic. The results are compared to findings from the Antarctic derived using similar measurements and interpretive techniques. The Arctic data show that particle volume well above background values is present at temperatures above the frostpoint, confirming the result from the Antarctic that the observed PSCs are not water ice particles. NO(y) measurements inside a PSC are enhanced above ambient values consistent with anisokinetic sampling of particles containing NO(y). In the Arctic data over long segments of several flights, calculations show saturation with respect to nitric acid trihydrate without significant PSC particle growth above background.

  10. Comparison of cloud properties observed from in situ and satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, S. R.; Hudson, J. G.

    2013-12-01

    Climate is influenced by clouds reflecting radiation. Adjustments in cloud properties occur with changes to the cloud environment such as changes in aerosol or vertical velocity. These adjustments change the cloud radiative forcing. Three ways exist to study cloud properties: in situ observations, satellite observations, and modeling of cloud properties. Data sets from in situ measurements in field campaigns such as Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST) (Hudson et al. 2010; Hudson and Noble 2013) provide good resolution of local cloud properties but are not extensive over time or globally. Satellites provide data coverage on a global scale and over long times but at infrequent periods locally. Uncertainties arise between these two methods when attempting to understand cloud properties and effects on radiative forcing. To understand these uncertainties, we compared MODIS data to vertical cloud pass data from the POST field campaign. Data from 9 in situ slant passes were compared to data from 9 satellite passes on 8 days. Figure 1 shows these comparisons of effective radius (re) (black) and cloud optical depth (COD) (red). COD from the satellite passes compares well with in situ data near the 1:1 line. The correlation coefficient (R) for COD is 0.95 with a slope (k) of 1.05. However, re is not near the 1:1 line and shows a steep k of 2.36, which suggests an over-prediction by the satellite observations, while R is only 0.57. Satellite re compared better to maximum in situ re which yielded a flatter k of 1.44 but an R of 0.59. Maximum re occurred a few meters below stratus cloud top that may suggest larger droplets dominate over cloud thickness in satellite observations. The satellite also over-predicts liquid water path (LWP, not shown) with a k of 1.42 and an R of 0.90. Because satellite re is over-predicting, calculations of environmental precursors become more difficult. However, COD is more related to albedo and observations compare well, which appears to validate

  11. In-Situ Silver Acetylide Silver Nitrate Explosive Deposition Measurements Using X-Ray Fluorescence.

    SciTech Connect

    Covert, Timothy Todd

    2014-09-01

    The Light Initiated High Explosive facility utilized a spray deposited coating of silver acetylide - silver nitrate explosive to impart a mechanical shock into targets of interest. A diagnostic was required to measure the explosive deposition in - situ. An X - ray fluorescence spectrometer was deployed at the facility. A measurement methodology was developed to measure the explosive quantity with sufficient accuracy. Through the use of a tin reference material under the silver based explosive, a field calibration relationship has been developed with a standard deviation of 3.2 % . The effect of the inserted tin material into the experiment configuration has been explored.

  12. In situ exhaust cloud measurements. [particle size distribution and cloud physics of rocket exhaust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wornom, D.

    1980-01-01

    Airborne in situ exhaust cloud measurements were conducted to obtain definitions of cloud particle size range, Cl2 content, and HCl partitioning. Particle size distribution data and Cl2 measurements were made during the May, August, and September 1977 Titan launches. The measurements of three basic effluents - HCl, NO sub X, and particles - against minutes after launch are plotted. The maximum observed HCl concentration to the maximum Cl2 concentration are compared and the ratios of the Cl2 to the HCl is calculated.

  13. A Method to Measure the Flatness of the LSST Focal Plane Assembly in Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Langeveld, Willy; /SLAC

    2005-10-26

    In this note I describe an inexpensive and simple laser-based method to measure the flatness of the LSST focal plane assembly (FPA) in situ, i.e. while the FPA is inside its cryostat, at -100 C and under vacuum. The method may also allow measurement of the distance of the FPA to lens L3, and may be sensitive enough to measure gravity- and pressure-induced deformations of L3 as well. The accuracy of the method shows promise to be better than 1 micron.

  14. In situ global method for measurement of oxygen demand and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Lundbaeck, K.M.O.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1997-05-01

    Two aerobic microorganisms, Saccharomycopsis lipolytica and Brevibacterium lactofermentum, have been used in a study of mass transfer and oxygen uptake from a global perspective using a closed gas system. Oxygen concentrations in the gas and liquid were followed using oxygen electrodes, and the results allowed for easy calculation of in situ oxygen transport. The cell yields on oxygen for S. lipolytica and B. lactofermentum were 1.01 and 1.53 g/g respectively. The mass transfer coefficient was estimated as 10 h{sup {minus}1} at 500 rpm for both fermentations. The advantages with this method are noticeable since the use of model systems may be avoided, and the in situ measurements of oxygen demand assure reliable data for scale-up.

  15. In Situ Thermal Characterization of Cooling/Crystallising Lavas During Rheology Measurement.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolzenburg, S.; Giordano, D.; Cimarelli, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Transport properties of silicate melts at super-liquidus temperatures are reasonably well understood. Migration and transport of silicate melts in the earth's crust and at its surface generally occur at sub-liquidus temperature regimes where they are subject to non-isothermal and non-equilibrium crystallization. To date, rheological data at sub-liquidus temperatures are scarce. In such dynamic situations heat capacities, latent heats of phase changes, viscous heating, thermal advection and thermal inertia of the apparatus are all potential factors in determining the thermal regime. Yet thermal characterisation of non- equilibrium conditions are absent, hampered by the inconvenience of recording in situ sample temperature during dynamic rheological measurements. Here we present a new experimental setup for in situ sample temperature monitoring in high temperature rheometry. We overcome the limitation of hardwired thermocouples during sample deformation by employing wireless data transmitters directly mounted onto the rotating spindle, immersed in the sample. This adaptation enables in situ, real-time, observations of the thermal regime of crystallising, deforming lava samples under the transient and non-equilibrium crystallization conditions expected in lava flows in nature. We present the apparatus calibration procedure, assess the experimental uncertainty in viscosity measurements and discuss experimental data investigating the dynamic, rheologic and thermal evolution of lavas in both temperature step and continuous cooling experiments.

  16. Outlet-glacier flow dynamics estimation combining in-situ and spaceborne SAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohner, Christoph; Henke, Daniel; Small, David; Mercenier, Rémy; Lüthi, Martin; Vieli, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Terminus retreat and flow acceleration changes of ocean-terminating outlet glaciers contribute significantly to the current mass loss of the Greenland Ice Sheet and therefore to global sea level rise. In order to constrain models ice dynamics, detailed knowledge of geometry, ice-flow velocity and strain fields of such calving glaciers is needed. Of specific importance is the near terminus flow dynamics, as the flow fields there are highly influential on the glacier's calving rate. With the current temporal resolution of spaceborne radar systems, it is difficult to accurately capture the near terminus flow fields for fast moving outlet glaciers glaciers, while in-situ measurements using ground based radar interferometers are limited in coverage and constrained by distance and geometric shading of the glacier. We present and analyze the combined continuous velocity fields from a ground based, portable radar system as well as from spaceborne SAR scenes for Eqip Sermia, a medium-sized ocean terminating outlet glacier in western Greenland. The flow fields for the spaceborne data are calculated using feature tracking with a temporal resolution of 12 and 24 days for Sentinel-1 (Interferometric Wide Swath) and RADARSAT-2 (Ultra Fine/Fine Quad) respectively. The in-situ terrestrial radar data were recorded at one minute intervals were additionally processed using interferometry. The combination of in-situ and spaceborne radar enables a spatially continuous assessment of the strain fields of the ocean terminating outlet glacier. An assimilation of the data based on areas with both in-situ and spaceborne measurements is carried out and the results are compared to historical strain field data sets. These data ultimately provide constraints for a physical fracture and damage model.

  17. In situ measurements of organic matter dynamics during a storm event in an agricultural watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellerin, B. A.; Saraceno, J.; Downing, B. D.; Bachand, P. A.; Bergamaschi, B. A.

    2008-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the breakdown of plant and animal material is a significant concern for drinking water quality in California due to the potential formation of carcinogenic disinfection byproducts during treatment. Winter storms are important forcing events on the California landscape, but the extent to which they impart rapid changes in DOM and other biogeochemical variables is poorly understood. In situ optical measurements are useful as they can be made autonomously at high temporal resolution, aiding in the quantification of rapid changes in the DOM pool. We collected in situ and discrete samples during a storm event period (Feb 22-March 3, 2008) at the mouth of the 415 km2 agricultural Willow Slough watershed. The watershed is characterized by steep grasslands in the headwaters and agriculture (largely in alfalfa, rice, tomato, grasses and orchard) in the valley. The in situ optical measurements included turbidity, chromophoric DOM fluorescence (cDOM), and nitrate (NO3-) concentrations, along with a suite of ancillary parameters. Discharge and turbidity were strongly correlated at peak flow and increased by over two orders of magnitude, while the peak cDOM lagged the peak in turbidity by ten hours. The cDOM values increased by nearly 4 fold and were highly correlated with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations (r2=0.97), providing a highly resolved proxy for DOC throughout the flow event. Specific UV absorbance (an indicator of DOM aromaticity) doubled at the DOC peak, while decreases in both the spectral slope (a proxy for DOM molecular weight) and δ13C-DOM during the same period support terrestrially- derived DOM contributions at peak flows. The lag to peak cDOM behind peak discharge presumably reflects the draining of watershed soils and delayed surface runoff of natural and agricultural landscapes. Together, laboratory and in situ data provide insights into the timing and magnitude of changes in DOM quantity and quality during

  18. Oceanographic lidar profiles compared with estimates from in situ optical measurements.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jennifer H; Churnside, James H; Marchbanks, Richard D; Donaghay, Percy L; Sullivan, James M

    2013-02-01

    Oceanographic lidar profiles measured in an aerial survey were compared with in situ measurements of water optical properties made from a surface vessel. Experimental data were collected over a two-week period in May 2010 in East Sound, Washington. Measured absorption and backscatter coefficients were used with the volume-scattering function in a quasi-single-scattering model to simulate an idealized lidar return, and this was convolved with the measured instrument response to accurately reproduce the measured temporal behavior. Linear depth-dependent depolarization from the water column and localized depolarization from scattering layers are varied to fine tune the simulated lidar return. Sixty in situ measurements of optical properties were correlated with nearly collocated and coincident lidar profiles; our model yielded good matches (±3 dB to a depth of 12 m) between simulated and measured lidar profiles for both uniform and stratified waters. Measured attenuation was slightly higher (5%) than diffuse attenuation for the copolarized channel and slightly lower (8%) for the cross-polarized channel.

  19. Highly accurate isotope measurements of surface material on planetary objects in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedo, Andreas; Neuland, Maike; Meyer, Stefan; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Studies of isotope variations in solar system objects are of particular interest and importance. Highly accurate isotope measurements provide insight into geochemical processes, constrain the time of formation of planetary material (crystallization ages) and can be robust tracers of pre-solar events and processes. A detailed understanding of the chronology of the early solar system and dating of planetary materials require precise and accurate measurements of isotope ratios, e.g. lead, and abundance of trace element. However, such measurements are extremely challenging and until now, they never have been attempted in space research. Our group designed a highly miniaturized and self-optimizing laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometer for space flight for sensitive and accurate measurements of the elemental and isotopic composition of extraterrestrial materials in situ. Current studies were performed by using UV radiation for ablation and ionization of sample material. High spatial resolution is achieved by focusing the laser beam to about Ø 20μm onto the sample surface. The instrument supports a dynamic range of at least 8 orders of magnitude and a mass resolution m/Δm of up to 800—900, measured at iron peak. We developed a measurement procedure, which will be discussed in detail, that allows for the first time to measure with the instrument the isotope distribution of elements, e.g. Ti, Pb, etc., with a measurement accuracy and precision in the per mill and sub per mill level, which is comparable to well-known and accepted measurement techniques, such as TIMS, SIMS and LA-ICP-MS. The present instrument performance offers together with the measurement procedure in situ measurements of 207Pb/206Pb ages with the accuracy for age in the range of tens of millions of years. Furthermore, and in contrast to other space instrumentation, our instrument can measure all elements present in the sample above 10 ppb concentration, which offers versatile applications

  20. Integrated Airborne and In-Situ Measurements Over Land-Fast Ice Near Barrow, AK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, J. M.; Brozena, J. M.; Richter-Menge, J.; Abelev, A.; Liang, R.; Ball, D.; Claffey, K. J.; Hebert, D. A.; Jones, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory has collected two field seasons of integrated airborne and in-situ measurements over multiple sites of floating, but land-fast ice north of Barrow, AK. During the first season in March of 2014 the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory led the on-ice group including NRL personnel and Naval Academy midshipmen. The second season (March 2015) included only NRL scientists and midshipmen. The in-situ data provided ground-truth for airborne measurements from a scanning LiDAR (Riegl Q 560i), digital photogrammetry (Applanix DSS-439), a low-frequency SAR (P-band in 2014 and P and L bands in 2015) and a snow/Ku radar procured from the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets of the University of Kansas. The CReSIS radar was updated in 2015 to integrate the snow and Ku radars into a single continuous chirp, thus improving resolution. The objective of the survey was to aid our understanding of the use of the airborne data to calibrate/validate Cryosat-2 data. Sampling size or "footprint" plays a critical role in the attempt to compare in-situ measurements with airborne (or satellite) measurements. Thus the in-situ data were arranged to minimize aliasing. Ground measurements were collected along transects a sites generally consisting of a 2 km long profile of Magnaprobe and EM31 measurements with periodic boreholes. A 60 m x 400 m swath of Magnaprobe measurements was centered on this profile. Airborne data were collected on multiple overflights of the transect areas. The LiDAR measured total freeboard (ice + snow) referenced to leads in the ice, and produced swaths 200-300 m wide. The SAR imaged the ice beneath the snow and the snow/Ku radar measured snow thickness. The freeboard measurements and snow thickness are used to estimate ice thickness via isostasy and density estimates. Comparisons and processing methodology will be shown. The results of this ground-truth experiment will inform our analysis of grids of airborne data collected

  1. A comparison of vertical velocity in cirrus obtained from aircraft and lidar divergence measurements during FIRE. [First ISCCP Regional Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gultepe, Ismail; Heymsfield, A. J.; Lenschow, D. H.

    1990-01-01

    Techniques are presented to obtain vertical velocity in cirrus clouds from in situ aircraft lateral wind measurements and from ground-based remote Doppler lidar measurements. The approach used is to calculate w from the integral of the divergence of the horizontal velocity around a closed path. Divergence measurements from both aircraft and Doppler lidar are discussed. The principal errors in the calculation of w from aircraft lateral wind measurements are bias in the lateral wind, ground speed errors, and error due to vertical shear of the horizontal wind. For Doppler lidar measurements the principal errors are in the estimate of mean terminal velocity and the zeroth order coefficients of the Fourier series that is fitted to the data. The technique is applied to a cirrus cloud investigated during the FIRE (First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Regional Experiment) Cirrus Intensive Field Observation Program. The results indicate that the error in w is about + or - 14 cm/s from the aircraft technique; this can be reduced to about + or - 2 to 3 cm/s with technical improvements in both ground speed and lateral velocity measurements. The error in w from Doppler lidar measurements, which is about + or - 8 cm/s, can be reduced to about + or - 5 cm/s by improvements in the Doppler velocity measurements with technology that is currently available.

  2. 3D shape measurements with a single interferometric sensor for in-situ lathe monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuschmierz, R.; Huang, Y.; Czarske, J.; Metschke, S.; Löffler, F.; Fischer, A.

    2015-05-01

    Temperature drifts, tool deterioration, unknown vibrations as well as spindle play are major effects which decrease the achievable precision of computerized numerically controlled (CNC) lathes and lead to shape deviations between the processed work pieces. Since currently no measurement system exist for fast, precise and in-situ 3d shape monitoring with keyhole access, much effort has to be made to simulate and compensate these effects. Therefore we introduce an optical interferometric sensor for absolute 3d shape measurements, which was integrated into a working lathe. According to the spindle rotational speed, a measurement rate of 2,500 Hz was achieved. In-situ absolute shape, surface profile and vibration measurements are presented. While thermal drifts of the sensor led to errors of several mµm for the absolute shape, reference measurements with a coordinate machine show, that the surface profile could be measured with an uncertainty below one micron. Additionally, the spindle play of 0.8 µm was measured with the sensor.

  3. Quantifying precision of in situ length and weight measurements of fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutreuter, S.; Krzoska, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    We estimated and compared errors in field-made (in situ) measurements of lengths and weights of fish. We made three measurements of length and weight on each of 33 common carp Cyprinus carpio, and on each of a total of 34 bluegills Lepomis macrochirus and black crappies Pomoxis nigromaculatus. Maximum total lengths of all fish were measured to the nearest 1 mm on a conventional measuring board. The bluegills and black crappies (85–282 mm maximum total length) were weighed to the nearest 1 g on a 1,000-g spring-loaded scale. The common carp (415–600 mm maximum total length) were weighed to the nearest 0.05 kg on a 20-kg spring-loaded scale. We present a statistical model for comparison of coefficients of variation of length (Cl ) and weight (Cw ). Expected Cl was near zero and constant across mean length, indicating that length can be measured with good precision in the field. Expected Cw decreased with increasing mean length, and was larger than expected Cl by 5.8 to over 100 times for the bluegills and black crappies, and by 3 to over 20 times for the common carp. Unrecognized in situ weighing errors bias the apparent content of unique information in weight, which is the information not explained by either length or measurement error. We recommend procedures to circumvent effects of weighing errors, including elimination of unnecessary weighing from routine monitoring programs. In situ weighing must be conducted with greater care than is common if the content of unique and nontrivial information in weight is to be correctly identified.

  4. Analysis of In Situ Thermal Ion Measurements from the MICA Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, P. A.; Lynch, K. A.; Zettergren, M. D.; Hampton, D. L.; Fisher, L. E.; Powell, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    The MICA sounding rocket launched on 19 Feb. 2012 into several discrete, localized arcs in the wake of a westward traveling surge. In situ and ground-based observations provide a measured response of the ionosphere to preflight and localized auroral drivers. Initial analysis of the in situ thermal ion data indicate possible measurement of an ion conic at low altitude (< 325 km). In the low-energy regime, the response of the instrument varies from the ideal because the measured thermal ion population is sensitive to the presence of the instrument. The plasma is accelerated in the frame of the instrument due to flows, ram, and acceleration through the sheath which forms around the spacecraft. The energies associated with these processes are large compared to the thermal energy. Correct interpretation of thermal plasma measurements requires accounting for all of these plasma processes and the non-ideal response of the instrument in the low-energy regime. This is an experimental and modeling project which involves thorough analysis of ionospheric thermal ion data from the MICA campaign. Analysis includes modeling and measuring the instrument response in the low-energy regime as well as accounting for the complex sheath formed around the instrument. This results in a forward model in which plasma parameters of the thermal plasma are propagated through the sheath and instrument models, resulting in an output which matches the in situ measurement. In the case of MICA, we are working toward answering the question of the initiating source processes that result, at higher altitudes, in well-developed conics and outflow on auroral field lines.

  5. Fast In Situ Airborne Measurement of Ammonia Using a Mid-Infrared Off-Axis ICOS Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Leen, J. Brian; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Gupta, Manish; Baer, Douglas S.; Hubbe, John M.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Hubbell, Mike R.

    2013-08-23

    A new ammonia (NH3) analyzer was developed based on off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy. Its feasibility was demonstrated by making tropospheric measurements in flights aboard the Department of Energy Gulfstream-1 aircraft. The ammonia analyzer consists of an optical cell, quantum-cascade laser, gas sampling system, control and data acquisition electronics, and analysis software. The NH3 mixing ratio is determined from high-resolution absorption spectra obtained by tuning the laser wavelength over the NH3 fundamental vibration band near 9.67 μm. Excellent linearity is obtained over a wide dynamic range (0–101 ppbv) with a response rate (1/e) of 2 Hz and a precision of ±90 pptv (1σ in 1 s). Two research flights were conducted over the Yakima Valley in Washington State. In the first flight, the ammonia analyzer was used to identify signatures of livestock from local dairy farms with high vertical and spatial resolution under low wind and calm atmospheric conditions. In the second flight, the analyzer captured livestock emission signals under windy conditions. Finally, our results demonstrate that this new ammonia spectrometer is capable of providing fast, precise, and accurate in situ observations of ammonia aboard airborne platforms to advance our understanding of atmospheric compositions and aerosol formation.

  6. Fast in situ airborne measurement of ammonia using a mid-infrared off-axis ICOS spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Leen, J Brian; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Gupta, Manish; Baer, Douglas S; Hubbe, John M; Kluzek, Celine D; Tomlinson, Jason M; Hubbell, Mike R

    2013-09-17

    A new ammonia (NH3) analyzer was developed based on off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy. Its feasibility was demonstrated by making tropospheric measurements in flights aboard the Department of Energy Gulfstream-1 aircraft. The ammonia analyzer consists of an optical cell, quantum-cascade laser, gas sampling system, control and data acquisition electronics, and analysis software. The NH3 mixing ratio is determined from high-resolution absorption spectra obtained by tuning the laser wavelength over the NH3 fundamental vibration band near 9.67 μm. Excellent linearity is obtained over a wide dynamic range (0-101 ppbv) with a response rate (1/e) of 2 Hz and a precision of ±90 pptv (1σ in 1 s). Two research flights were conducted over the Yakima Valley in Washington State. In the first flight, the ammonia analyzer was used to identify signatures of livestock from local dairy farms with high vertical and spatial resolution under low wind and calm atmospheric conditions. In the second flight, the analyzer captured livestock emission signals under windy conditions. Our results demonstrate that this new ammonia spectrometer is capable of providing fast, precise, and accurate in situ observations of ammonia aboard airborne platforms to advance our understanding of atmospheric compositions and aerosol formation. PMID:23869496

  7. Wind shear detection using measurement of aircraft total energy change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joppa, R. G.

    1976-01-01

    Encounters with wind shears are of concern and have caused major accidents, particularly during landing approaches. Changes in the longitudinal component of the wind affect the aircraft by changing its kinetic energy with respect to the air. It is shown that an instrument which will measure and display the rate of change of total energy of the aircraft with respect to the air will give a leading indication of wind shear problems. The concept is outlined and some instrumentation and display considerations are discussed.

  8. Airborne Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth and Columnar Water Vapor During the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment, and Comparison with Land, Aircraft, and Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, John M.; Russell, Philip B.; Reid, Jeffrey; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Allen, Duane A.; Torres, Omar; Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Holben, Brent N.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Analyses of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and columnar water vapor (CWV) measurements obtained with the six-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) mounted on a twin-engine aircraft during the summer 2000 Puerto Rico Dust Experiment are presented. In general, aerosol extinction values calculated from AATS-6 AOD measurements acquired during aircraft profiles up to 5 km ASL reproduce the vertical structure measured by coincident aircraft in-situ measurements of total aerosol number and surface area concentration. Calculations show that the spectral dependence of AOD was small (mean Angstrom wavelength exponents of approximately 0.20) within three atmospheric layers defined as the total column beneath the top of each aircraft profile, the region beneath the trade wind inversion, and the region within the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) above the trade inversion. This spectral behavior is consistent with attenuation of incoming solar radiation by large dust particles or by dust plus sea salt. Values of CWV calculated from profile measurements by AATS-6 at 941.9 nm and from aircraft in-situ measurements by a chilled mirror dewpoint hygrometer agree to within approximately 4% (0.13 g/sq cm). AATS-6 AOD values measured on the ground at Roosevelt Roads Naval Air Station and during low altitude aircraft runs over the adjacent Cabras Island aerosol/radiation ground site agree to within 0.004 to 0.030 with coincident data obtained with an AERONET Sun/sky Cimel radiometer located at Cabras Island. For the same observation times, AERONET retrievals of CWV exceed AATS-6 values by a mean of 0.74 g/sq cm (approximately 21 %) for the 2.9-3.9 g/sq cm measured by AATS-6. Comparison of AATS-6 aerosol extinction values obtained during four aircraft ascents over Cabras Island with corresponding values calculated from coincident aerosol backscatter measurements by a ground-based micro-pulse lidar (MPL-Net) located at Cabras yields a similar vertical structure above the trade

  9. Estimation of Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects from Satellite and In Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Russell, Philip B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; McIntosh, Dawn

    2000-01-01

    Ames researchers have combined measurements from satellite, aircraft, and the surface to estimate the effect of airborne particles (aerosols) on the solar radiation over the North Atlantic region. These aerosols (which come from both natural and pollution sources) can reflect solar radiation, causing a cooling effect that opposes the warming caused by carbon dioxide. Recently, increased attention has been paid to aerosol effects to better understand the Earth climate system.

  10. Validation of Land Surface Temperature products in arid climate regions with permanent in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goettsche, F.; Olesen, F.; Trigo, I.; Hulley, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is operationally obtained from several space-borne sensors, e.g. from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) onboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) by the Land Surface Analysis - Satellite Application Facility (LSA-SAF) and from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on EOS-Terra by the MODIS Land Team. The relative accuracy of LST products can be assessed by cross-validating different products. Alternatively, the so-called 'radiance based validation' can be used to compare satellite-retrieved LST with results from radiative transfer models: however, this requires precise a priori knowledge of land surface emissivity (LSE) and atmospheric conditions. Ultimately, in-situ measurements (';ground truth') are needed for validating satellite LST&E products. Therefore, the LST product derived by LSA-SAF is validated with independent in-situ measurements (';temperature based validation') at permanent validation stations located in different climate regions on the SEVIRI disk. In-situ validation is largely complicated by the spatial scale mismatch between satellite sensors and ground based sensors, i.e. areas observed by ground radiometers usually cover about 10 m2, whereas satellite measurements in the thermal infrared typically cover between 1 km2 and 100 km2. Furthermore, an accurate characterization of the surface is critical for all validation approaches, but particularly over arid regions, as shown by in-situ measurements revealing that LSE products can be wrong by more than 3% [1]. The permanent stations near Gobabeb (Namibia; hyper-arid desert climate) and Dahra (Senegal; hot-arid steppe-prairie climate) are two of KIT's four dedicated LST validation stations. Gobabeb station is located on vast and flat gravel plains (several 100 km2), which are mainly covered by coarse gravel, sand, and desiccated grass. The gravel plains are highly homogeneous in space and time, which makes them ideal for

  11. In situ measurements of volatile aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation rates in groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, I.M.; Bekins, B.A.; Eganhouse, R.P.; Warren, E.; Essaid, H.I.

    2010-01-01

    Benzene and alkylbenzene biodegradation rates and patterns were measured using an in situ microcosm in a crude-oil contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota. Benzene-D6, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-, m- and p-xylenes and four pairs of C3- and C4-benzenes were added to an in situ microcosm and studied over a 3-year period. The microcosm allowed for a mass-balance approach and quantification of hydrocarbon biodegradation rates within a well-defined iron-reducing zone of the anoxic plume. Among the BTEX compounds, the apparent order of persistence is ethylbenzene > benzene > m,p-xylenes > o-xylene ≥ toluene. Threshold concentrations were observed for several compounds in the in situ microcosm, below which degradation was not observed, even after hundreds of days. In addition, long lag times were observed before the onset of degradation of benzene or ethylbenzene. The isomer-specific degradation patterns were compared to observations from a multi-year study conducted using data collected from monitoring wells along a flowpath in the contaminant plume. The data were fit with both first-order and Michaelis-Menten models. First-order kinetics provided a good fit for hydrocarbons with starting concentrations below 1 mg/L and Michaelis-Menten kinetics were a better fit when starting concentrations were above 1 mg/L, as was the case for benzene. The biodegradation rate data from this study were also compared to rates from other investigations reported in the literature.

  12. Simulated plasma facing component measurements for an in situ surface diagnostic on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Z. S.; Whyte, D. G.

    2010-10-01

    The ideal in situ plasma facing component (PFC) diagnostic for magnetic fusion devices would perform surface element and isotope composition measurements on a shot-to-shot (˜10 min) time scale with ˜1 μm depth and ˜1 cm spatial resolution over large areas of PFCs. To this end, the experimental adaptation of the customary laboratory surface diagnostic—nuclear scattering of MeV ions—to the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is being guided by ACRONYM, a Geant4 synthetic diagnostic. The diagnostic technique and ACRONYM are described, and synthetic measurements of film thickness for boron-coated PFCs are presented.

  13. Measurement of 3-D hydraulic conductivity in aquifer cores at in situ effective stresses.

    PubMed

    Wright, Martin; Dillon, Peter; Pavelic, Paul; Peter, Paul; Nefiodovas, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    An innovative and nondestructive method to measure the hydraulic conductivity of drill core samples in horizontal and vertical directions within a triaxial cell has been developed. This has been applied to characterizing anisotropy and heterogeneity of a confined consolidated limestone aquifer. Most of the cores tested were isotropic, but hydraulic conductivity varied considerably and the core samples with lowest values were also the most anisotropic. Hydraulic conductivity decreased with increasing effective stress due to closure of microfractures caused by sampling for all core samples. This demonstrates the importance of replicating in situ effective stresses when measuring hydraulic conductivity of cores of deep aquifers in the laboratory. PMID:12236264

  14. In-situ x-ray measurements of pit solutions during localized corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, J.H.; Davenport, A.J.; Isaacs, H.S.

    1991-01-01

    In this work, in-situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements of the ion concentrations within an artificial pit are presented to study the ionic species present and mass transport phenomena during localized corrosion taking place on metal surfaces. The x-ray absorption by an element in a sample is markedly greater at an energy just above than just below one of its absorption edges and the energy of this edge is characteristic of the absorbing element. A pair of measurement above and below the edge serves to determine both the presence and the amount of the element sought. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  15. In situ measurement of group refractive index using tandem low-coherence interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Sasaki, K.; Hirai, A.

    2006-10-01

    The group refractive index of BK-7 glass material is accurately measured using a tandem low-coherence interferometer, which is composed of a Mychelson interferometer and a Fizeau interferometer, within a combined standard uncertainty of 8.4 ppm. The experimental results are compared with the value calculated from the conventional data base on the phase refractive index, within a difference of about 4.7 ppm. This new method is applicable to in situ measurement due to the principle of its common optical path.

  16. The in-situ 3D measurement system combined with CNC machine tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huijie; Jiang, Hongzhi; Li, Xudong; Sui, Shaochun; Tang, Limin; Liang, Xiaoyue; Diao, Xiaochun; Dai, Jiliang

    2013-06-01

    With the development of manufacturing industry, the in-situ 3D measurement for the machining workpieces in CNC machine tools is regarded as the new trend of efficient measurement. We introduce a 3D measurement system based on the stereovision and phase-shifting method combined with CNC machine tools, which can measure 3D profile of the machining workpieces between the key machining processes. The measurement system utilizes the method of high dynamic range fringe acquisition to solve the problem of saturation induced by specular lights reflected from shiny surfaces such as aluminum alloy workpiece or titanium alloy workpiece. We measured two workpieces of aluminum alloy on the CNC machine tools to demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed measurement system.

  17. In situ gas analysis for high pressure applications using property measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, J.; Span, R.; Fieback, T.

    2013-10-01

    As the production, distribution, and storage of renewable energy based fuels usually are performed under high pressures and as there is a lack of in situ high pressure gas analysis instruments on the market, the aim of this work was to develop a method for in situ high pressure gas analysis of biogas and hydrogen containing gas mixtures. The analysis is based on in situ measurements of optical, thermo physical, and electromagnetic properties in gas mixtures with newly developed high pressure sensors. This article depicts the calculation of compositions from the measured properties, which is carried out iteratively by using highly accurate equations of state for gas mixtures. The validation of the method consisted of the generation and measurement of several mixtures, of which three are presented herein: a first mixture of 64.9 mol. % methane, 17.1 mol. % carbon dioxide, 9 mol. % helium, and 9 mol. % ethane at 323 K and 423 K in a pressure range from 2.5 MPa to 17 MPa; a second mixture of 93.0 mol. % methane, 4.0 mol. % propane, 2.0 mol. % carbon dioxide, and 1.0 mol. % nitrogen at 303 K, 313 K, and 323 K in a pressure range from 1.2 MPa to 3 MPa; and a third mixture of 64.9 mol. % methane, 30.1 mol. % carbon dioxide, and 5.0 mol. % nitrogen at 303 K, 313 K, and 323 K in a pressure range from 2.5 MPa to 4 MPa. The analysis of the tested gas mixtures showed that with measured density, velocity of sound, and relative permittivity the composition can be determined with deviations below 1.9 mol. %, in most cases even below 1 mol. %. Comparing the calculated compositions with the generated gas mixture, the deviations were in the range of the combined uncertainty of measurement and property models.

  18. Methyl mercury dynamics in a tidal wetland quantified using in situ optical measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergamaschi, B.A.; Fleck, J.A.; Downing, B.D.; Boss, E.; Pellerin, B.; Ganju, N.K.; Schoellhamer, D.H.; Byington, A.A.; Heim, W.A.; Stephenson, M.; Fujii, R.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed monomethylmercury (MeHg) dynamics in a tidal wetland over three seasons using a novel method that employs a combination of in situ optical measurements as concentration proxies. MeHg concentrations measured over a single spring tide were extended to a concentration time series using in situ optical measurements. Tidal fluxes were calculated using modeled concentrations and bi-directional velocities obtained acoustically. The magnitude of the flux was the result of complex interactions of tides, geomorphic features, particle sorption, and random episodic events such as wind storms and precipitation. Correlation of dissolved organic matter quality measurements with timing of MeHg release suggests that MeHg is produced in areas of fluctuating redox and not limited by buildup of sulfide. The wetland was a net source of MeHg to the estuary in all seasons, with particulate flux being much higher than dissolved flux, even though dissolved concentrations were commonly higher. Estimated total MeHg yields out of the wetland were approximately 2.5 μg m?2 yr?1—4—40 times previously published yields—representing a potential loading to the estuary of 80 g yr?1, equivalent to 3% of the river loading. Thus, export from tidal wetlands should be included in mass balance estimates for MeHg loading to estuaries. Also, adequate estimation of loads and the interactions between physical and biogeochemical processes in tidal wetlands might not be possible without long-term, high-frequency in situ measurements.

  19. In situ method for real time measurement of dielectric film thickness in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Sung-Ho; Kim, Gun-Ho; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-01-15

    An in situ thickness measurement method of dielectric films (dual frequency method) was developed, and the thicknesses were measured in an inductively coupled plasma. This method uses a small ac bias voltage with two frequencies for thickness measurement. The dielectric thickness is obtained from measuring the amplitudes of the two frequency ac currents through a sensor, as well as using an equivalent circuit model describing impedance of the dielectric film and the plasma sheath. In the experiment, the thicknesses of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film could be accurately measured in real time. To check the measurement reliability, the dual frequency method was compared with reflection spectrophotometry as a technique for optical thickness diagnostics. It was found that the dual frequency method agrees closely with reflection spectrophotometry at various rf powers and pressures. In addition, this method is very simple and can be installed anywhere in plasma reactors, in contrast with optical methods; therefore, it is expected to be applied to in situ surface diagnostics for various processing plasmas.

  20. Measurements from aircraft to characterize watersheds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, B. J.

    1972-01-01

    Remote sensor measurements of the Southern Plains watershed, an 1130 sq mile segment of the Washita River basin in the Texas Panhandle, are discussed. Soil moisture measurements are emphasized, along with rainfall storage capacity of the soil. Indicators of pond water quality, geologic sources of sediment or salt, and rapid methods of mapping seepage are being searched for through remote sensing.

  1. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, B.D.; Lissaman, P.B.S.; Morgan, W.R.; Radkey, R.L.

    1998-09-22

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing`s top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gases for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well. 31 figs.

  2. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, Bart D.; Lissaman, Peter B. S.; Morgan, Walter R.; Radkey, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing's top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gasses for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well.

  3. Validation of AIRS/AMSU-A water vapor and temperature data with in situ aircraft observations from the surface to UT/LS from 87°N-67°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Minghui; Jumbam, Loayeh; Sheffield, Justin; Wood, Eric F.; Zondlo, Mark A.

    2013-06-01

    Validation of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A) data set with in situ observations provides useful information on its application to climate and weather studies. However, different space/time averaging windows have been used in past studies, and questions remain on the variation of errors in space, such as between land/ocean and the Northern/Southern Hemispheres. In this study, in situ aircraft measurements of water vapor and temperature are compared with the AIRS/AMSU-A retrievals (Version 5 Level 2) from 87°N to 67°S and from the surface to the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS). By using a smaller comparison window (1 h and 22.5 km) than previous studies, we show that the absolute percentage difference of water vapor (|dH2Operc|) is ~20-60% and the absolute temperature difference (|dTemp|) is ~1.0-2.5 K. The land retrievals show improvements versus Version 4 by ~5% in water vapor concentration and ~0.2 K in temperature at 200-800 mbar. The land (ocean) retrievals are colder and drier (warmer and moister) than the in situ observations in the boundary layer, warmer and drier (warmer and moister) at the UT/LS. No significant differences between hemispheres are noted. Overall, future comparisons are suggested to be done within 4 h and 100 km in order to keep the errors from window sizes within ~10%. To constrain the uncertainties in previous validation results, we show that every 22.5 km (or 1 h) increment in window sizes contributes to ~2% |dH2Operc| and ~0.1 K |dTemp| increases.

  4. Ultrasonic techniques for aircraft ice accretion measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Kirby, Mark S.; Lichtenfelts, Fred

    1990-01-01

    Results of tests to measure ice growth in natural (flight) and artificial (icing wind tunnel) icing conditions are presented. Ice thickness is measured using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. Two icing regimes, wet and dry ice growth, are identified and the unique ultrasonic signal characteristics associated with these different types of ice growth are described. Ultrasonic measurements of ice growth on cylinders and airfoils exposed to artificial and natural icing conditions are presented. An accuracy of plus or minus 0.5 mm is achieved for ice thickness measurement using the pulse-echo technique. The performance of two-probe type ice detectors is compared to the surface mounted ultrasonic system. The ultrasonically measured ice accretion rates and ice surface condition (wet or dry) are used to compare the heat transfer characteristics for flight and icing wind tunnel environments. In general the heat transfer coefficient is inferred to be higher in the wind tunnel environment, not likely due to higher freestream turbulence levels. Finally, preliminary results of tests to measure ice growth on airfoil using an array of ultrasonic transducers are described. Ice profiles obtained during flight in natural icing conditions are shown and compared with mechanical and stereo image measurements.

  5. ExoCube: In-Situ Measurement of Composition in the Exosphere, Thermosphere and Topside Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noto, J.; Waldrop, L.; Paschalidis, N.; Taylor, C.; Gardner, D. D.; Jones, S.; Rodriguez, M.; Nossal, S. M.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Puig-Suari, J.; Kerr, R.

    2014-12-01

    Quantification of neutral species densities in the upper thermosphere and lower exosphere remains elusive despite the analytical theories established by the pioneers of Aeronomy roughly fifty years ago, despite the evident requirements of Space Weather modeling, and despite the pragmatic reality of manned and unmanned spacecraft exploitation of the region. In fact, [O], [He] and [N2] have not been measured in-situ in the upper atmosphere since the era of DE-2, and then for only 18 months from 1981-1983 (near solar maximum). Prior to that, the Atmospheric Explorer program (AE-A launched in 1963, AE-E ended in 1980) provided the neutral density information upon which the MSIS model is largely based. No instrument has measured [H] in-situ, which is instead derived in MSIS by solution of the proton continuity equation.The ExoCube satellite provides a long-overdue benchmark for the densities of significant neutral and ionized species in the upper atmosphere, on a global scale, for the Space Weather and Aeronomy communities. These will be the first in-situ global neutral density data since DE-2, including the first direct measurements of [H] using a mass spectrometer technique. Since roughly half of the total electron column content (TEC) arises from photoionization of H, reliable knowledge of exospheric [H] is a crucial requirement of realistic Space Weather modeling of TEC. To insure that this project has enduring impact beyond the projected two-year duration of the satellite mission, experimental interaction with ground-based ISR and optical facilities is integrated. The simultaneous collection of ion and neutral densities will facilitate the use of ExoCube data for studies of charge exchange processes. Overpasses with observatories will enable ExoCube measurements to be used as a constraint for retrieval of density information from forward modeling of ground-based observations. Presented here will be the first post-launch mission status and operations.

  6. Advanced Soil Moisture Network Technologies; Developments in Collecting in situ Measurements for Remote Sensing Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, M.; Silva, A. R. D.; Akbar, R.; Clewley, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil moisture Sensing Controller And oPtimal Estimator (SoilSCAPE) wireless sensor network has been developed to support Calibration and Validation activities (Cal/Val) for large scale soil moisture remote sensing missions (SMAP and AirMOSS). The technology developed here also readily supports small scale hydrological studies by providing sub-kilometer widespread soil moisture observations. An extensive collection of semi-sparse sensor clusters deployed throughout north-central California and southern Arizona provide near real time soil moisture measurements. Such a wireless network architecture, compared to conventional single points measurement profiles, allows for significant and expanded soil moisture sampling. The work presented here aims at discussing and highlighting novel and new technology developments which increase in situ soil moisture measurements' accuracy, reliability, and robustness with reduced data delivery latency. High efficiency and low maintenance custom hardware have been developed and in-field performance has been demonstrated for a period of three years. The SoilSCAPE technology incorporates (a) intelligent sensing to prevent erroneous measurement reporting, (b) on-board short term memory for data redundancy, (c) adaptive scheduling and sampling capabilities to enhance energy efficiency. A rapid streamlined data delivery architecture openly provides distribution of in situ measurements to SMAP and AirMOSS cal/val activities and other interested parties.

  7. Feasibility of an in situ measurement device for bubble size and distribution

    PubMed Central

    Maciejak, Walter; Darnell, Branson; Lester, Michael; Pollack, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The feasibility of in situ measurement device for bubble size and distribution was explored. A novel in situ probe measurement system, the EnviroCam™, was developed. Where possible, this probe incorporated strengths, and minimized weaknesses of historical and currently available real-time measurement methods for bubbles. The system was based on a digital, high-speed, high resolution, modular camera system, attached to a stainless steel shroud, compatible with standard Ingold ports on fermenters. Still frames and/or video were produced, capturing bubbles passing through the notch of the shroud. An LED light source was integral with the shroud. Bubbles were analyzed using customized commercially available image analysis software and standard statistical methods. Using this system, bubble sizes were measured as a function of various operating parameters (e.g., agitation rate, aeration rate) and as a function of media properties (e.g., viscosity, antifoam, cottonseed flour, and microbial/animal cell broths) to demonstrate system performance and its limitations. For selected conditions, mean bubble size changes qualitatively compared favorably with published relationships. Current instrument measurement capabilities were limited primarily to clear solutions that did not contain large numbers of overlapping bubbles. PMID:17566786

  8. Comparison of the aerosol optical properties and size distribution retrieved by sun photometer with in situ measurements at midlatitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvigné, Aurélien; Sellegri, Karine; Hervo, Maxime; Montoux, Nadège; Freville, Patrick; Goloub, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Aerosols influence the Earth radiative budget through scattering and absorption of solar radiation. Several methods are used to investigate aerosol properties and thus quantify their direct and indirect impacts on climate. At the Puy de Dôme station, continuous high-altitude near-surface in situ measurements and low-altitude ground-based remote sensing atmospheric column measurements give the opportunity to compare the aerosol extinction measured with both methods over a 1-year period. To our knowledge, it is the first time that such a comparison is realised with continuous measurements of a high-altitude site during a long-term period. This comparison addresses to which extent near-surface in situ measurements are representative of the whole atmospheric column, the aerosol mixing layer (ML) or the free troposphere (FT). In particular, the impact of multi-aerosol layers events detected using lidar backscatter profiles is analysed. A good correlation between in situ aerosol extinction coefficient and aerosol optical depth (AOD) measured by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer is observed with a correlation coefficient around 0.80, indicating that the in situ measurements station is representative of the overall atmospheric column. After filtering for multilayer cases and correcting for each layer optical contribution (ML and FT), the atmospheric structure seems to be the main factor influencing the comparison between the two measurement techniques. When the site lies in the ML, the in situ extinction represents 45 % of the sun photometer ML extinction while when the site lies within the FT, the in situ extinction is more than 2 times higher than the FT sun photometer extinction. Moreover, the assumption of a decreasing linear vertical aerosol profile in the whole atmosphere has been tested, significantly improving the instrumental agreement. Remote sensing retrievals of the aerosol particle size distributions (PSDs) from the sun photometer

  9. CBSIT 2009: Airborne Validation of Envisat Radar Altimetry and In Situ Ice Camp Measurements Over Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connor, Laurence; Farrell, Sinead; McAdoo, David; Krabill, William; Laxon, Seymour; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline; Markus, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    with (1) Envisat RA-2 returns retracked optimally for sea ice and (2) in situ measurements of sea ice thickness and snow depth gathered from ice camp surveys. Particular attention is given to lead identification and classification using the continuous photo-imaging system along the Envisat underflight as well as the performance of the snow radar over the ice camp survey lines.

  10. Validation of the large-scale Lagrangian cirrus model CLaMS-Ice by in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Anja; Rolf, Christian; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Afchine, Armin; Spelten, Nicole; Dreiling, Volker; Zöger, Martin; Krämer, Martina

    2015-04-01

    Cirrus clouds are an element of uncertainty in the climate system and have received increasing attention since the last IPCC reports. The interaction of varying freezing meachanisms, sedimentation rates, temperature and updraft velocity fluctuations and other factors that lead to the formation of those clouds is still not fully understood. During the ML-Cirrus campaign 2014 (Germany), the new cirrus cloud model CLaMS-Ice (see Rolf et al., EGU 2015) has been used for flight planning to direct the research aircraft HALO into interesting cirrus cloud regions. Now, after the campaign, we use our in-situ aircraft measurements to validate and improve this model - with the long-term goal to enable it to simulate cirrus cloud cover globally, with reasonable computing times and sufficient accuracy. CLaMS-Ice consists of a two-moment bulk model established by Spichtinger and Gierens (2009a, 2009b), which simulates cirrus clouds along trajectories that the Lagrangian model CLaMS (McKenna et al., 2002 and Konopka et al. 2007) derived from ECMWF data. The model output covers temperature, pressure, relative humidity, ice water content (IWC), and ice crystal numbers (Nice). These parameters were measured on board of HALO by the following instruments: temperature and pressure by BAHAMAS, total and gas phase water by the hygrometers FISH and SHARC (see Meyer et al 2014, submitted to ACP), and Nice as well as ice crystal size distributions by the cloud spectrometer NIXE-CAPS (see also Krämer et al., EGU 2015). Comparisons of the model results with the measurements yield that cirrus clouds can be successfully simulated by CLaMS-Ice. However, there are sections in which the model's relative humidity and Nice deviate considerably from the measured values. This can be traced back to e.g. the initialization of total water from ECMWF data. The simulations are therefore reinitiated with the total water content measured by FISH. Other possible sources of uncertainties are investigated, as

  11. Comparison of NOAA-9 ERBE measurements with Cirrus IFO satellite and aircraft measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, Steven A.; Chung, Hyosang; Cox, Stephen K.; Herman, Leroy; Smith, William L.; Wylie, Donald P.

    1990-01-01

    Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) measurements onboard the NOAA-9 are compared for consistency with satellite and aircraft measurements made during the Cirrus Intensive Field Observation (IFO) of October 1986. ERBE scene identification is compared with NOAA-9 TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) cloud retrievals; results from the ERBE spectral inversion algorithms are compared with High resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS) measurements; and ERBE radiant existance measurements are compared with aircraft radiative flux measurements.

  12. The International Soil Moisture Network: a data hosting facility for global in situ soil moisture measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorigo, W. A.; Wagner, W.; Hohensinn, R.; Hahn, S.; Paulik, C.; Xaver, A.; Gruber, A.; Drusch, M.; Mecklenburg, S.; van Oevelen, P.; Robock, A.; Jackson, T.

    2011-05-01

    In situ measurements of soil moisture are invaluable for calibrating and validating land surface models and satellite-based soil moisture retrievals. In addition, long-term time series of in situ soil moisture measurements themselves can reveal trends in the water cycle related to climate or land cover change. Nevertheless, on a worldwide basis the number of meteorological networks and stations measuring soil moisture, in particular on a continuous basis, is still limited and the data they provide lack standardization of technique and protocol. To overcome many of these limitations, the International Soil Moisture Network (ISMN; http://www.ipf.tuwien.ac.at/insitu) was initiated to serve as a centralized data hosting facility where globally available in situ soil moisture measurements from operational networks and validation campaigns are collected, harmonized, and made available to users. Data collecting networks share their soil moisture datasets with the ISMN on a voluntary and no-cost basis. Incoming soil moisture data are automatically transformed into common volumetric soil moisture units and checked for outliers and implausible values. Apart from soil water measurements from different depths, important metadata and meteorological variables (e.g., precipitation and soil temperature) are stored in the database. These will assist the user in correctly interpreting the soil moisture data. The database is queried through a graphical user interface while output of data selected for download is provided according to common standards for data and metadata. Currently (status May 2011), the ISMN contains data of 19 networks and more than 500 stations located in North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. The time period spanned by the entire database runs from 1952 until the present, although most datasets have originated during the last decade. The database is rapidly expanding, which means that both the

  13. The International Soil Moisture Network: a data hosting facility for global in situ soil moisture measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorigo, W. A.; Wagner, W.; Hohensinn, R.; Hahn, S.; Paulik, C.; Drusch, M.; Mecklenburg, S.; van Oevelen, P.; Robock, A.; Jackson, T.

    2011-02-01

    In situ measurements of soil moisture are invaluable for calibrating and validating land surface models and satellite-based soil moisture retrievals. In addition, long-term time series of in situ soil moisture measurements themselves can reveal trends in the water cycle related to climate or land cover change. Nevertheless, on a worldwide basis the number of meteorological networks and stations measuring soil moisture, in particular on a continuous basis, is still limited and the data they provide lack standardization of technique and protocol. To overcome many of these limitations, the International Soil Moisture Network (ISMN; http://www.ipf.tuwien.ac.at/insitu) was initiated to serve as a centralized data hosting facility where globally available in situ soil moisture measurements from operational networks and validation campaigns are collected, harmonized, and made available to users. Data collecting networks share their soil moisture datasets with the ISMN on a voluntary and no-cost basis. Incoming soil moisture data are automatically transformed into common volumetric soil moisture units and checked for outliers and implausible values. Apart from soil water measurements from different depths, important metadata and meteorological variables (e.g., precipitation and soil temperature) are stored in the database. These will assist the user in correctly interpreting the soil moisture data. The database is queried through a graphical user interface while output of data selected for download is provided according to common standards for data and metadata. Currently (status January 2011), the ISMN contains data of 16 networks and more than 500 stations located in the North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. The time period spanned by the entire database runs from 1952 until the present, although most datasets have originated during the last decade. The database is rapidly expanding, which means that

  14. Ultrasonic techniques for aircraft ice accretion measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Kirby, Mark S.; Lichtenfelts, Fred

    1988-01-01

    Ultrasonic pulse-echo measurements of ice growth on cylinders and airfoils exposed to both artificial (icing wind tunnel) and natural (flight) icing conditions are presented. An accuracy of + or - 0.5 mm is achieved with the present method. The ultrasonic signal characteristics associated with each of the two types of icing regimes identified, wet and dry ice growth, are discussed. Heat transfer coefficients are found to be higher in the wind tunnel environment than in flight. Results for ice growth on airfoils have also been obtained using an array of ultrasonic transducers. Icing profiles obtained during flight are compared with mechanical and stereo image measurements.

  15. Aircraft attitude measurement using a vector magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peitila, R.; Dunn, W. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of a vector magnetometer system was investigated by developing a technique to determine attitude given magnetic field components. Sample calculations are then made using the earth's magnetic field data acquired during actual flight conditions. Results of these calculations are compared graphically with measured attitude data acquired simultaneously with the magnetic data. The role and possible implementation of various reference angles are discussed along with other pertinent considerations. Finally, it is concluded that the earth's magnetic field as measured by modern vector magnetometers can play a significant role in attitude control systems.

  16. Aircraft measurements of O3, HNO3, and N2O in the winter Arctic lower stratosphere during the Stratosphere-Troposphere Experiment by Aircraft Measurements (STREAM) 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, A.; van Velthoven, P. F. J.; Wienhold, F. G.; Fischer, H.; Zenker, T.; Waibel, A.; Frenzel, A.; Arnold, F.; Harris, G. W.; Bolder, M. J. A.; Lelieveld, J.

    1995-06-01

    Simultaneous in situ measurements of O3, HNO3, and N2O were performed in the Arctic (68°-74°N) lower stratosphere during February 1993 on board a Cessna Citation aircraft up to 12.5 km altitude, during the first Stratosphere-Troposphere Experiment by Aircraft Measurements (STREAM) campaign. Strong variations in the concentrations, distributions, and ratios of these trace gases were found from the maximum altitude down to the tropopause. Close to the tropopause, vortex air was present with relatively low N2O concentrations. The observed N2O-HNO3 relation agrees with earlier measurements of total nitrogen and N2O inside the vortex, suggesting subsidence of vortex air across the bottom of the vortex. This air also contained low O3 concentrations relative to N2O, indicating enhanced O3 loss by chemical reactions involving stratospheric particles. Based on trajectory calculations and assuming a potential temperature cooling rate of 0.6 K d-1, we estimate an O3 loss of 4-7 ppbv d-1 (0.9-1.2% d-1), in the Arctic lower stratosphere for the period January-February 1993. Air parcels originating from middle latitudes, containing relatively low O3 and N2O concentrations, may have originated from the vortex earlier in the winter. In addition, the results also show high HNO3 concentrations relative to O3 and N2O. Air parcels originating from high latitudes may have been enriched in HNO3 by sedimentation and evaporation of nitric acid containing particles, which would explain the relatively high HNO3 concentrations and HNO3/O3 ratios measured. Heterogeneous chemistry on sulfuric acid particles, probably enhanced in concentration by gravitational settling of the Pinatubo aerosol, is the most plausible explanation for the observed high HNO3 concentrations relative to N2O in air parcels originating from midlatitudes.

  17. Return glider radiosonde for in situ upper-air research measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kräuchi, Andreas; Philipona, Rolf

    2016-06-01

    Upper-air balloon soundings for weather predictions have been made since the beginning of the 20th century. New radiosonde instruments for in situ humidity-, radiation- and gas-profile measurements in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere, were introduced in recent years for atmospheric research and climate monitoring, but such instruments are often expensive and it is desired they be reused on multiple flights. Recovering instruments that freely descend with parachutes is time consuming, sometimes difficult and even dangerous. Here, we introduce the return glider radiosonde (RGR), which enables flying and retrieving valuable in situ upper-air instruments. The RGR is lifted with weather balloons similar to traditional radiosondes to a preset altitude, at which time a release mechanism cuts the tether string, and a built-in autopilot flies the glider autonomously back to the launch site or a desired preprogrammed location. Once the RGR reaches the landing coordinates it circles down and releases a parachute 100 m above ground for landing. The motivation for this project was to measure radiation profiles throughout the atmosphere with the same instrument multiple times and with a rapid turn-around time. The paper describes technical aspects of the return glider radiosonde and the built-in radiation instruments and shows test flights up to 24 km altitude that are analyzed in terms of flight performance and maximal distances covered. Several successive flights measuring radiation profiles demonstrate the reliability and the operational readiness of the RGR, allowing new ways for atmospheric in situ research and monitoring with payloads up to several kg depending on the specific size of the glider.

  18. Airborne In-Situ Measurements of Formaldehyde over California: First Results from the Compact Formaldehyde Fluorescence Experiment (COFFEE) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrero, Josette; St. Clair, Jason; Yates, Emma L.; Gore, Warren; Swanson, Andrew K.; Iraci, Laura T.; Hanisco, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is one of the most abundant oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere, playing a role multiple atmospheric processes. Measurements of HCHO can be used to help quantify convective transport, the abundance of VOCs, and ozone production in urban environments. The Compact Formaldehyde FluorescencE Experiment (COFFEE) instrument uses Non-Resonant Laser Induced Fluorescence (NR-LIF) to detect trace concentrations of HCHO as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) payload. Developed at NASA GSFC, COFFEE is a small, low maintenance instrument with a sensitivity of 100 pptv and a quick response time (1 sec). The COFFEE instrument has been customized to fit in an external wing pod on the Alpha Jet aircraft based at NASA ARC. The instrument can operate over a broad range of altitudes, from boundary layer to lower stratosphere, making it well suited for the Alpha Jet, which can access altitudes from the surface up to 40,000 ft. Results of the first COFFEE science flights preformed over the California's Central Valley will be presented. Boundary layer measurements and vertical profiles in the tropospheric column will both be included. This region is of particular interest, due to its elevated levels of HCHO, revealed in satellite images, as well as its high ozone concentrations. In addition to HCHO, the AJAX payload includes measurements of atmospheric ozone, methane, and carbon dioxide. Formaldehyde is one of the few urban pollutants that can be measured from space. Plans to compare in-situ COFFEE data with satellite-based HCHO observations such as those from OMI (Aura) and OMPS (SuomiNPP) will also be presented.

  19. Airborne In-Situ Measurements of Formaldehyde Over California: First Results from the Compact Formaldehyde Fluorescence Experiment (COFFEE) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrero, Josette Elizabeth; Saint Clair, Jason; Yates, Emma L.; Gore, Warren; Swanson, Andrew K.; Iraci, Laura T.; Hanisco, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is one of the most abundant oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere, playing a role multiple atmospheric processes. Measurements of HCHO can be used to help quantify convective transport, the abundance of VOCs, and ozone production in urban environments. The Compact Formaldehyde FluorescencE Experiment (COFFEE) instrument uses Non-Resonant Laser Induced Fluorescence (NR-LIF) to detect trace concentrations of HCHO as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) payload. Developed at NASA GSFC, COFFEE is a small, low maintenance instrument with a sensitivity of 100 pptv and a quick response time (1 sec). The COFFEE instrument has been customized to fit in an external wing pod on the Alpha Jet aircraft based at NASA ARC. The instrument can operate over a broad range of altitudes, from boundary layer to lower stratosphere, making it well suited for the Alpha Jet, which can access altitudes from the surface up to 40,000 ft. Results of the first COFFEE science flights preformed over the California's Central Valley will be presented. Boundary layer measurements and vertical profiles in the tropospheric column will both be included. This region is of particular interest, due to its elevated levels of HCHO, revealed in satellite images, as well as its high ozone concentrations. In addition to HCHO, the AJAX payload includes measurements of atmospheric ozone, methane, and carbon dioxide. Formaldehyde is one of the few urban pollutants that can be measured from space. Plans to compare in-situ COFFEE data with satellite-based HCHO observations such as those from OMI (Aura) and OMPS (SuomiNPP) will also be presented.

  20. A load-lock compatible system for in situ electrical resistivity measurements during thin film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, J. J.; Diot, Y.; Guerin, Ph.; Lamongie, B.; Berneau, F.; Michel, A.; Jaouen, C.; Abadias, G.

    2016-02-01

    An experimental setup designed for in situ electrical resistance measurement during thin film growth is described. The custom-built sample holder with a four-point probe arrangement can be loaded into a high-vacuum magnetron sputter-deposition chamber through a load-lock transfer system, allowing measurements on series of samples without venting the main chamber. Electrical contact is ensured with circular copper tracks inserted in a Teflon plate on a mounting holder station inside the deposition chamber. This configuration creates the possibility to measure thickness-dependent electrical resistance changes with sub-monolayer resolution and is compatible with use of sample rotation during growth. Examples are presented for metallic films with high adatom mobility growing in a Volmer-Weber mode (Ag and Pd) as well as for refractory metal (Mo) with low adatom mobility. Evidence for an amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition at a film thickness of 2.6 nm is reported during growth of Mo on an amorphous Si underlayer, supporting previous findings based on in situ wafer curvature measurements.

  1. In situ methods for measuring thermal properties and heat flux on planetary bodies

    PubMed Central

    Kömle, Norbert I.; Hütter, Erika S.; Macher, Wolfgang; Kaufmann, Erika; Kargl, Günter; Knollenberg, Jörg; Grott, Matthias; Spohn, Tilman; Wawrzaszek, Roman; Banaszkiewicz, Marek; Seweryn, Karoly; Hagermann, Axel

    2011-01-01

    The thermo-mechanical properties of planetary surface and subsurface layers control to a high extent in which way a body interacts with its environment, in particular how it responds to solar irradiation and how it interacts with a potentially existing atmosphere. Furthermore, if the natural temperature profile over a certain depth can be measured in situ, this gives important information about the heat flux from the interior and thus about the thermal evolution of the body. Therefore, in most of the recent and planned planetary lander missions experiment packages for determining thermo-mechanical properties are part of the payload. Examples are the experiment MUPUS on Rosetta's comet lander Philae, the TECP instrument aboard NASA's Mars polar lander Phoenix, and the mole-type instrument HP3 currently developed for use on upcoming lunar and Mars missions. In this review we describe several methods applied for measuring thermal conductivity and heat flux and discuss the particular difficulties faced when these properties have to be measured in a low pressure and low temperature environment. We point out the abilities and disadvantages of the different instruments and outline the evaluation procedures necessary to extract reliable thermal conductivity and heat flux data from in situ measurements. PMID:21760643

  2. A load-lock compatible system for in situ electrical resistivity measurements during thin film growth.

    PubMed

    Colin, J J; Diot, Y; Guerin, Ph; Lamongie, B; Berneau, F; Michel, A; Jaouen, C; Abadias, G

    2016-02-01

    An experimental setup designed for in situ electrical resistance measurement during thin film growth is described. The custom-built sample holder with a four-point probe arrangement can be loaded into a high-vacuum magnetron sputter-deposition chamber through a load-lock transfer system, allowing measurements on series of samples without venting the main chamber. Electrical contact is ensured with circular copper tracks inserted in a Teflon plate on a mounting holder station inside the deposition chamber. This configuration creates the possibility to measure thickness-dependent electrical resistance changes with sub-monolayer resolution and is compatible with use of sample rotation during growth. Examples are presented for metallic films with high adatom mobility growing in a Volmer-Weber mode (Ag and Pd) as well as for refractory metal (Mo) with low adatom mobility. Evidence for an amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition at a film thickness of 2.6 nm is reported during growth of Mo on an amorphous Si underlayer, supporting previous findings based on in situ wafer curvature measurements. PMID:26931861

  3. In situ strain and temperature measurement and modelling during arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Miller, Roger G.; Feng, Zhili

    2014-12-26

    In this study, experiments and numerical models were applied to investigate the thermal and mechanical behaviours of materials adjacent to the weld pool during arc welding. In the experiment, a new high temperature strain measurement technique based on digital image correlation (DIC) was developed and applied to measure the in situ strain evolution. In contrast to the conventional DIC method that is vulnerable to the high temperature and intense arc light involved in fusion welding processes, the new technique utilised a special surface preparation method to produce high temperature sustaining speckle patterns required by the DIC algorithm as well as a unique optical illumination and filtering system to suppress the influence of the intense arc light. These efforts made it possible for the first time to measure in situ the strain field 1 mm away from the fusion line. The temperature evolution in the weld and the adjacent regions was simultaneously monitored by an infrared camera. Finally and additionally, a thermal–mechanical finite element model was applied to substantiate the experimental measurement.

  4. In situ strain and temperature measurement and modelling during arc welding

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Miller, Roger G.; Feng, Zhili

    2014-12-26

    In this study, experiments and numerical models were applied to investigate the thermal and mechanical behaviours of materials adjacent to the weld pool during arc welding. In the experiment, a new high temperature strain measurement technique based on digital image correlation (DIC) was developed and applied to measure the in situ strain evolution. In contrast to the conventional DIC method that is vulnerable to the high temperature and intense arc light involved in fusion welding processes, the new technique utilised a special surface preparation method to produce high temperature sustaining speckle patterns required by the DIC algorithm as well asmore » a unique optical illumination and filtering system to suppress the influence of the intense arc light. These efforts made it possible for the first time to measure in situ the strain field 1 mm away from the fusion line. The temperature evolution in the weld and the adjacent regions was simultaneously monitored by an infrared camera. Finally and additionally, a thermal–mechanical finite element model was applied to substantiate the experimental measurement.« less

  5. Development of a Flight Instrument for in situ Measurements of Ethane and Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson, J. P.; Sayres, D. S.; Anderson, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Methane emissions data for natural gas and oil fields have high uncertainty. Better quantifying these emissions is crucial to establish an accurate methane budget for the United States. One obstacle is that these emissions often occur in areas near livestock facilities where biogenic methane abounds. Measuring ethane, which has no biogenic source, along with methane can tease these sources apart. However, ethane is typically measured by taking whole-air samples. This tactic has lower spatial resolution than making in situ measurements and requires the measurer to anticipate the location of emission plumes. This leaves unexpected plumes uncharacterized. Using Re-injection Mirror Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (RIM-ICOS), we can measure both methane and ethane in flight, allowing us to establish more accurate fugitive emissions data that can more readily distinguish between different sources of this greenhouse gas.

  6. Airborne passive remote sensing of large-scale methane emissions from oil fields in California's San Joaquin Valley and validation by airborne in-situ measurements - Initial results from COMEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerilowski, Konstantin; Krautwurst, Sven; Kolyer, Richard W.; Thompson, David R.; Jonsson, Haflidi; Krings, Thomas; Horstjann, Markus; Leifer, Ira; Eastwood, Michael; Green, Robert O.; Vigil, Sam; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Fladeland, Matthew; Burrows, John P.; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2015-04-01

    On several flights performed over the Kern River, Kern Front, and Poso Creek Oil Fields in California between June 3 and September 4, 2014, in the framework of the CO2 and MEthane Experiment (COMEX) - a NASA and ESA funded campaign in support of the HyspIRI and CarbonSat mission definition activities - the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) remote sensing instrument (operated by the University of Bremen in cooperation with the German Research Centre for Geosciences - GFZ) detected large-scale, high-concentration, methane plumes. MAMAP was installed for the flights aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft, together with a Picarro fast in-situ greenhouse gas (GHG) analyzer (operated by the NASA Ames Research Center, ARC), a 5-hole turbulence probe and an atmospheric measurement package (operated by CIRPAS), measuring aerosols, temperature, dew-point, and other atmospheric parameters. Some of the flights were accompanied by the next generation of the Airborne Visible InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG), operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, installed aboard a second Twin Otter aircraft (operated by Twin Otter International). Data collected with the in-situ GHG analyzer were used for validation of the MAMAP and AVIRIS-NG remotely sensed data. The in-situ measurements were acquired in vertical cross sections of the discovered plumes at fixed distances downwind of the sources. Emission rates are estimated from both the remote and in-situ data using wind information from the turbulence probe together with ground-based wind data from the nearby airport. Remote sensing and in-situ data as well as initial flux estimates for selected flights will be presented.

  7. Measurements of HONO, NO, NOy and SO2 in aircraft exhaust plumes at cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkat, T.; Voigt, C.; Arnold, F.; Schlager, H.; Kleffmann, J.; Aufmhoff, H.; Schäuble, D.; Schaefer, M.; Schumann, U.

    2011-05-01

    Measurements of gaseous nitrogen and sulfur oxide emissions in young aircraft exhaust plumes give insight into chemical oxidation processes inside aircraft engines. Particularly, the OH-induced formation of nitrous acid (HONO) from nitrogen oxide (NO) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) from sulfur dioxide (SO2) inside the turbine which is highly uncertain, need detailed analysis to address the climate impact of aviation. We report on airborne in situ measurements at cruise altitudes of HONO, NO, NOy, and SO2 in 9 wakes of 8 different types of modern jet airliners, including for the first time also an A380. Measurements of HONO and SO2 were made with an ITCIMS (Ion Trap Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer) using a new ion-reaction scheme involving SF5- reagent ions. The measured molar ratios HONO/NO and HONO/NOy with averages of 0.038 ± 0.010 and 0.027 ± 0.005 were found to decrease systematically with increasing NOx emission-index (EI NOx). We calculate an average EI HONO of 0.31 ± 0.12 g NO2 kg-1. Using reliable measurements of HONO and NOy, which are less adhesive than H2SO4 to the inlet walls, we derive the OH-induced conversion fraction of fuel sulfur to sulfuric acid $\\varepsilon$ with an average of 2.2 ± 0.5 %. $\\varepsilon$ also tends to decrease with increasing EI NOx, consistent with earlier model simulations. The lowest HONO/NO, HONO/NOy and $\\varepsilon$ was observed for the largest passenger aircraft A380.

  8. Development of scalable cook-off models using real-time in situ measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Robert Gerard; Renlund, Anita Mariana; Erikson, William Wilding; Kaneshige, Michael Jiro

    2003-07-01

    Scalable thermal runaway models for cook-off of energetic materials (EMs) require realistic temperature- and pressure-dependent chemical reaction rates. The Sandia Instrumented Thermal Ignition apparatus was developed to provide in situ small-scale test data that address this model requirement. Spatially and temporally resolved internal temperature measurements have provided new insight into the energetic reactions occurring in PBX 9501, LX-10-2, and PBXN-109. The data have shown previously postulated reaction steps to be incorrect and suggest previously unknown reaction steps. Model adjustments based on these data have resulted in better predictions at a range of scales.

  9. Development of Scalable Cook-Off Models Using Real-Time In Situ Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneshige, M. J.; Renlund, A. M.; Schmitt, R. G.; Erikson, W. W.

    2004-07-01

    Scalable thermal runaway models for cook-off of energetic materials (EMs) require realistic temperature- and pressure-dependent chemical reaction rates. The Sandia Instrumented Thermal Ignition apparatus was developed to provide in situ small-scale test data that address this model requirement. Spatially and temporally resolved internal temperature measurements have provided new insight into the energetic reactions occurring in PBX 9501, LX-10-2, and PBXN-109. The data have shown previously postulated reaction steps to be incorrect and suggest previously unknown reaction steps. Model adjustments based on these data have resulted in better predictions at a range of scales.

  10. Dynamic in situ measurement of ablation rate in a composite rocket nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Peter D.; Subbarao, E. R.; Smith, Marian

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the development and calibration of an acoustic probe for dynamic in situ measurements of ablation rate in a composite rocket nozzle. The probe, which is to be inserted radially into the nozzle, is designed so that its end melts as the nozzle ablates. An ultrasonic transducer is used to launch an acoustic wave in the probe, and the length of the remaining probe is determined by analyzing the reflected pulses. The paper describes the probe test equipment, the criteria for material selection, the preliminary tests, and the analysis methodology. Results of experimental tests are presented.

  11. In-situ measurement of processing properties during fabrication in a production tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, D. E.; Haverty, P.; Hoff, M.; Loos, A. C.

    1988-01-01

    Progress is reported on the use of frequency-dependent electromagnetic measurements (FDEMs) as a single, convenient technique for continuous in situ monitoring of polyester cure during fabrication in a laboratory and manufacturing environment. Preliminary FDEM sensor and modeling work using the Loss-Springer model in order to develop an intelligent closed-loop, sensor-controlled cure process is described. FDEMs using impedance bridges in the Hz to MHz region is found to be ideal for automatically monitoring polyester processing properties continuously throughout the cure cycle.

  12. In situ measurements of thermospheric composition, temperature, and winds by mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, N. W.; Carignan, G. R.

    1988-01-01

    Mass spectrometry, in which a beam of electrons ionizes a sample of atmospheric gas and then analyses the ions thus produced to determine the concentration of each species in the sample, is presently evaluated as a basis for the study of earth atmosphere and other planetary atmospheres' properties. Recent applications of in situ mass spectrometry have measured thermospheric neutral gas composition, temperatures, and winds, with a spatial resolution sufficiently high to reveal previously unsuspected atmospheric variability. It is expected that analyses of these data will lead to a more detailed understanding of the deposition processes governing the thermosphere's highly variable structure.

  13. Measuring the in situ Kd of a genetically encoded Ca2+ sensor.

    PubMed

    Park, J Genevieve; Palmer, Amy E

    2015-01-05

    The use of genetically encoded Ca(2+) sensors (GECIs) for long-term monitoring of intracellular Ca(2+) has become increasingly common in the last decade. Emission-ratiometric GECIs, such as those in the Yellow Cameleon family, can be used to make quantitative measurements, meaning that their fluorescence signals can be converted to free Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]free). This conversion is only as accurate as the sensor's apparent dissociation constant for Ca(2+) (K'd), which depends on temperature, pH, and salt concentration. This protocol describes a method for performing a titration, in living cells (in situ), of cytosolic, nuclear, or mitochondrial sensors.

  14. Rapid In-Situ Measurement of Gamma Activity in Soil for Environmental Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeycutt, T. K.

    2003-12-01

    In-situ measurements of gamma radiation in soil are used as a rapid, low-cost, non-intrusive alternative to conventional sampling and analysis methods in the preliminary assessment of environmental impacts to watersheds at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The method resolves the ambient gamma-radiation field near ground surface into background and residual components and provides radionuclide-specific soil activity determination. The efficacy of the method has been evaluated and compares favorably with conventional gamma-PHA soil analyses and aerial survey data. The method has garnered regulatory approval and is being successfully deployed to evaluate the impact of Cs-137 contamination from CERCLA sites.

  15. In situ measurements constraining the role of sulphate aerosols in mid-latitude ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Woodbridge, E. L.; Tin, P.; Wilson, J. C.; Jonsson, H. H.; Dye, J. E.; Baumgardner, D.; Borrmann, S.; Toohey, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    In situ measurements of stratospheric sulphate aerosol, reactive nitrogen and chlorine concentrations at middle latitudes confirm the importance of aerosol surface reactions that convert active nitrogen to a less active, reservoir form. This makes mid-latitude stratospheric ozone less vulnerable to active nitrogen and more vulnerable to chlorine species. The effect of aerosol reactions on active nitrogen depends on gas phase reaction rates, so that increases in aerosol concentration following volcanic eruptions will have only a limited effect on ozone depletion at these latitudes.

  16. MEASURING THE PLASTIC RESPONSE IN POLYCRSYTALLINE MATERIALS USING IN-SITU X-RAY DIFFRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hawreliak, J; Butterfield, M; El-Dasher, B; McNaney, J; Lorenzana, H

    2008-10-01

    The insight provided by ultra-fast lattice level measurements during high strain rate high pressure experiments is key to understanding kinetic material properties like plasticity. In-situ x-ray diffraction provides a diagnostic technique which can be used to study the governing physical phenomena of plasticity at the relevant time and spatial scale. Here we discuss the recent development of a geometry capable of investigating plasticity in polycrystalline foils. We also present some preliminary data of investigations into shock compressed rolled copper foils.

  17. F4TCNQ-Induced Exciton Quenching Studied by Using in-situ Photoluminescence Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Lu, Min; Wu, Bo; Hou, Xiao-Yuan

    2012-09-01

    The role of F4TCNQ as an exciton quenching material in thin organic light-emitting films is investigated by means of in situ photoluminescence measurements. C60 was used as another quenching material in the experiment for comparison, with Alq3 as a common organic light-emitting material. The effect of the growth sequence of the materials on quenching was also examined. It is found that the radius of Förster energy transfer between F4TCNQ and Alq3 is close to 0 nm and Dexter energy transfer dominates in the quenching process.

  18. COMET: a planned airborne mission to simultaneously measure CO2 and CH4 columns using airborne remote sensing and in-situ techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fix, A.; Amediek, A.; Büdenbender, C.; Ehret, G.; Wirth, M.; Quatrevalet, M.; Rapp, M.; Gerilowski, K.; Bovensmann, H.; Gerbig, C.; Pfeilsticker, K.; Zöger, M.; Giez, A.

    2013-12-01

    To better predict future trends in the cycles of the most important anthropogenic greenhouse gases, CO2 and CH4, there is a need to measure and understand their distribution and variation on various scales. To address these requirements it is envisaged to deploy a suite of state-of-the-art airborne instruments that will be capable to simultaneously measure the column averaged dry-air mixing ratios (XGHG) of both greenhouse gases along the flight path. As the measurement platform serves the research aircraft HALO, a modified Gulfstream G550, operated by DLR. This activity is dubbed CoMet (CO2 and Methane Mission). The instrument package of CoMet will consist of active and passive remote sensors as well as in-situ instruments to complement the column measurements by highly-resolved profile information. As an active remote sensing instrument CHARM-F, the integrated-path differential absorption lidar currently under development at DLR, will provide both, XCO2 and XCH4, below flight altitude. The lidar instrument will be complemented by MAMAP which is a NIR/SWIR absorption spectrometer developed by University of Bremen and which is also capable to derive XCH4 and XCO2. As an additional passive instrument, mini-DOAS operated by University of Heidelberg will contribute with additional context information about the investigated air masses. In order to compare the remote sensing instruments with integrated profile information, in-situ instrumentation is indispensable. The in-situ package will therefore comprise wavelength-scanned Cavity-Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) for the detection of CO2, CH4, CO and H2O and a flask sampler for collection of atmospheric samples and subsequent laboratory analysis. Furthermore, the BAsic HALO Measurement And Sensor System (BAHAMAS) will provide an accurate set of meteorological and aircraft state parameters for each scientific flight. Within the frame of the first CoMet mission scheduled for the 2015 timeframe it is planned to concentrate

  19. In situ stratospheric ozone measurements by long path UV absorption - Developments and interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstock, E. M.; Schiller, C. M.; Anderson, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    A high-sensitivity, in situ UV absorption ozone sensor has been developed for use in the stratosphere. The instrument couples 254-nm radiation from a low-pressure mercury discharge lamp into a 40-pass White cell to attain a high-sensitivity ozone absorption measurement. Preflight/postflight laboratory tests utilizing an ozone source coupled to a laboratory UV ozone photometer in a fast-flow system as well as in-flight diagnostics verify the successful operation of the instrument. Evidence is presented to verify that in situ UV absorption ozone photometers can measure stratospheric ozone with better than 3 percent precision and 5 percent accuracy, provided proper attention is given to both the thermal field surrounding the gondola and the ambient pressure measurements. Ozone data are compared with modeled profiles in the 28- to 40-km region. An assessment of the disagreement between observations and modeled profiles is given along with suggestions for future experiments designed to constrain photochemical models.

  20. Atmospheric methane at Zeppelin Station in Ny-Alesund: presentation and analysis of in situ measurements.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Ine-Therese; Holmen, Kim; Hermansen, Ove

    2005-05-01

    In situ methane (CH(4)) measurement techniques and data from the Zeppelin Station in Ny-Alesund on Svalbard (N 78 degrees 54' E 11 degrees 53') on Mt. Zeppelin (475 m.a.s.l) are presented. The data span the time period from October 1998 to December 2003, though not continuously. The daily mean was calculated from 96 samples per day which are analysed by gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection. Details of the experimental methods and procedures are given. A harmonic function is fitted to the data with a constant trend and seasonal amplitude. The data are also presented in a regression plot showing the difference between the in situ measurements and flask measurements from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of the Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (NOAA/CMDL) in Boulder, Colorado (http://www.cmdl.noaa.gov/). The Zeppelin data show typical Arctic air characteristics with wintertime pollution episodes from Europe and Russia and a relatively calm summer state. PMID:15877171

  1. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; et al

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, andmore » presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.« less

  2. Atmospheric methane at Zeppelin Station in Ny-Alesund: presentation and analysis of in situ measurements.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Ine-Therese; Holmen, Kim; Hermansen, Ove

    2005-05-01

    In situ methane (CH(4)) measurement techniques and data from the Zeppelin Station in Ny-Alesund on Svalbard (N 78 degrees 54' E 11 degrees 53') on Mt. Zeppelin (475 m.a.s.l) are presented. The data span the time period from October 1998 to December 2003, though not continuously. The daily mean was calculated from 96 samples per day which are analysed by gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection. Details of the experimental methods and procedures are given. A harmonic function is fitted to the data with a constant trend and seasonal amplitude. The data are also presented in a regression plot showing the difference between the in situ measurements and flask measurements from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of the Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (NOAA/CMDL) in Boulder, Colorado (http://www.cmdl.noaa.gov/). The Zeppelin data show typical Arctic air characteristics with wintertime pollution episodes from Europe and Russia and a relatively calm summer state.

  3. Image correlation method for measuring flow and diameter changes in contracting mesenteric microlymphatics in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, J. Brandon; Cote, Gerard; Gashev, Anatoly; Greiner, Steven; Moore, James; Zawieja, David

    2006-02-01

    Collecting microlymphatics play a vital role in promoting lymph flow from the initial lymphatics in the interstitial spaces to the large transport lymph ducts. In most tissues, the primary mechanism for producing this flow is the spontaneous contractions of the lymphatic wall. Individual units, known as lymphangion, are separated by valves that help prevent backflow when the vessel contracts, thus promoting flow through the lymphatic network. Lymphatic contractile activity is inhibited by flow in isolated lymphatics, however there are virtually no in situ measurements of lymph flow in these vessels. One of the difficulties associated with obtaining such measurements is the time consuming methods of manual particle tracking used previously by our group. Using an in situ preparation with mesenteric microlymphatics (~ 100 μm in diameter) and a high speed imaging system (500 fps), we have developed an image correlation method to measure lymphatic flow with a standard error of prediction of 0.3 mm/sec when compared with manual particle tracking.

  4. Testing coordinate measuring arms with a geometric feature-based gauge: in situ field trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, E.; Alvarez, B. J.; Patiño, H.; Telenti, A.; Barreiro, J.

    2016-05-01

    This work describes in detail the definition of a procedure for calibrating and evaluating coordinate measuring arms (AACMMs or CMAs). CMAs are portable coordinate measuring machines that have been widely accepted in industry despite their sensitivity to the skill and experience of the operator in charge of the inspection task. The procedure proposed here is based on the use of a dimensional gauge that incorporates multiple geometric features, specifically designed for evaluating the measuring technique when CMAs are used, at company facilities (workshops or laboratories) and by the usual operators who handle these devices in their daily work. After establishing the procedure and manufacturing the feature-based gauge, the research project was complemented with diverse in situ field tests performed with the collaboration of companies that use these devices in their inspection tasks. Some of the results are presented here, not only comparing different operators but also comparing different companies. The knowledge extracted from these experiments has allowed the procedure to be validated, the defects of the methodologies currently used for in situ inspections to be detected, and substantial improvements for increasing the reliability of these portable instruments to be proposed.

  5. In situ water vapor and ozone measurements in Lhasa and Kunming during the Asian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Jianchun; Pan, Laura L.; Paulik, Laura; Vömel, Holger; Chen, Hongbin; Lu, Daren

    2012-10-01

    The Asian summer monsoon (ASM) anticyclone circulation system is recognized to be a significant transport pathway for water vapor and pollutants to enter the stratosphere. The observational evidence, however, is largely based on satellite retrievals. We report the first coincident in situ measurements of water vapor and ozone within the ASM anticyclone. The combined water vapor and ozonesondes were launched from Kunming, China in August 2009 and Lhasa, China in August 2010. In total, 11 and 12 sondes were launched in Kunming and Lhasa, respectively. We present the key characteristics of these measurements, and provide a comparison to similar measurements from an equatorial tropical location, during the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4) campaign in July and August of 2007. Results show that the ASM anticyclone region has higher water vapor and lower ozone concentrations in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere than the TC4 observations. The results also show that the cold point tropopause in the ASM region has a higher average height and potential temperature. The in situ observations therefore support the satellite-based conclusion that the ASM is an effective transport pathway for water vapor to enter stratosphere.

  6. Method for local temperature measurement in a nanoreactor for in situ high-resolution electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vendelbo, S B; Kooyman, P J; Creemer, J F; Morana, B; Mele, L; Dona, P; Nelissen, B J; Helveg, S

    2013-10-01

    In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of solids under reactive gas conditions can be facilitated by microelectromechanical system devices called nanoreactors. These nanoreactors are windowed cells containing nanoliter volumes of gas at ambient pressures and elevated temperatures. However, due to the high spatial confinement of the reaction environment, traditional methods for measuring process parameters, such as the local temperature, are difficult to apply. To address this issue, we devise an electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) method that probes the local temperature of the reaction volume under inspection by the electron beam. The local gas density, as measured using quantitative EELS, is combined with the inherent relation between gas density and temperature, as described by the ideal gas law, to obtain the local temperature. Using this method we determined the temperature gradient in a nanoreactor in situ, while the average, global temperature was monitored by a traditional measurement of the electrical resistivity of the heater. The local gas temperatures had a maximum of 56 °C deviation from the global heater values under the applied conditions. The local temperatures, obtained with the proposed method, are in good agreement with predictions from an analytical model. PMID:23831940

  7. Optical closure in marine waters from in situ inherent optical property measurements.

    PubMed

    Lefering, Ina; Bengil, Fethi; Trees, Charles; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Bowers, David; Nimmo-Smith, Alex; Schwarz, Jill; McKee, David

    2016-06-27

    Optical closure using radiative transfer simulations can be used to determine the consistency of in situ measurements of inherent optical properties (IOPs) and radiometry. Three scattering corrections are applied to in situ absorption and attenuation profile data for a range of coastal and oceanic waters, but are found to have only very limited impact on subsequent closure attempts for these stations. Best-fit regressions on log-transformed measured and modelled downwards irradiance, Ed, and upwards radiance, Lu, profiles have median slopes between 0.92 - 1.24, revealing a tendency to underestimate Ed and Lu with depth. This is only partly explained by non-inclusion of fluorescence emission from CDOM and chlorophyll in the simulations. There are several stations where multiple volume scattering function related data processing steps perform poorly which suggests the potential existence of unresolved features in the modelling of the angular distribution of scattered photons. General optical closure therefore remains problematic, even though there are many cases in the data set where the match between measured and modelled radiometric data is within 25% RMS%E. These results are significant for applications that rely on optical closure e.g. assimilating ocean colour data into coupled physical-ecosystem models. PMID:27410565

  8. In Situ Roughness Measurements for the Solar Cell Industry Using an Atomic Force Microscope

    PubMed Central

    González-Jorge, Higinio; Alvarez-Valado, Victor; Valencia, Jose Luis; Torres, Soledad

    2010-01-01

    Areal roughness parameters always need to be under control in the thin film solar cell industry because of their close relationship with the electrical efficiency of the cells. In this work, these parameters are evaluated for measurements carried out in a typical fabrication area for this industry. Measurements are made using a portable atomic force microscope on the CNC diamond cutting machine where an initial sample of transparent conductive oxide is cut into four pieces. The method is validated by making a comparison between the parameters obtained in this process and in the laboratory under optimal conditions. Areal roughness parameters and Fourier Spectral Analysis of the data show good compatibility and open the possibility to use this type of measurement instrument to perform in situ quality control. This procedure gives a sample for evaluation without destroying any of the transparent conductive oxide; in this way 100% of the production can be tested, so improving the measurement time and rate of production. PMID:22319338

  9. In situ roughness measurements for the solar cell industry using an atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    González-Jorge, Higinio; Alvarez-Valado, Victor; Valencia, Jose Luis; Torres, Soledad

    2010-01-01

    Areal roughness parameters always need to be under control in the thin film solar cell industry because of their close relationship with the electrical efficiency of the cells. In this work, these parameters are evaluated for measurements carried out in a typical fabrication area for this industry. Measurements are made using a portable atomic force microscope on the CNC diamond cutting machine where an initial sample of transparent conductive oxide is cut into four pieces. The method is validated by making a comparison between the parameters obtained in this process and in the laboratory under optimal conditions. Areal roughness parameters and Fourier Spectral Analysis of the data show good compatibility and open the possibility to use this type of measurement instrument to perform in situ quality control. This procedure gives a sample for evaluation without destroying any of the transparent conductive oxide; in this way 100% of the production can be tested, so improving the measurement time and rate of production. PMID:22319338

  10. MISR Browse Images: Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-13

    ... MISR Browse Images: Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS)   These ... of the region observed during the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) field campaign. CLAMS focused on ...

  11. Climatology of 15 years of North Atlantic upper tropospheric relative humidity in-situ measurements by the MOZAIC programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neis, Patrick; Smit, Herman G. J.; Rohs, Susanne; Berkes, Florian; Boulanger, Damien; Nedelec, Philippe; Konopka, Paul; Hoor, Peter; Spichtinger, Peter; Petzold, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Water vapour is a major parameter in weather prediction and climate research. However, the interaction between water vapour in the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere (UTLS) and tropopause dynamics are not well understood. Furthermore, the knowledge about potential trends and feedback mechanisms of upper troposphere/lower stratosphere water vapour is low because of the large variability of observations and relatively short data records. Since 1994, upper tropospheric humidity (UTH) data with high spatial and temporal resolution are provided by the in-situ measurements aboard civil passenger aircraft from the MOZAIC/IAGOS-programme (www.iagos.org). The measurement system is based on a capacitive hygrometer with a simultaneous temperature measurement. Comparison studies against research-grade water vapour instruments demonstrated successfully the qualification of the MOZAIC Capacitive Hygrometer (MCH) and its improved successor IAGOS Capacitive Hygrometer (ICH) for the use in long-term observation programmes. Moreover, the continuation of high data quality is confirmed for the transition from MCH to ICH (see P. Neis et al., 2015). After the reanalysis of the relative humidity data from 1994 to 2009 (see H. Smit et al., 2014), this extensive and unique data set is examined by criteria of continuity, homogeneity and quantity of data coverage, to identify global regions suitable for UTH climatology and trend analyses. For the identified target region above the North Atlantic time series and climatologies of, e.g., relative humidity with respect to ice, temperature, and absolute humidity are investigated. Different data sets selected according to geographic and atmospheric dynamics criteria and different tropopause definitions are compared for the robustness of the obtained results.

  12. An airborne infrared laser spectrometer for in-situ trace gas measurements: application to tropical convection case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catoire, V.; Krysztofiak, G.; Robert, C.; Chartier, M.; Jacquet, P.; Guimbaud, C.; Hamer, P. D.; Marécal, V.

    2015-09-01

    A three-channel laser absorption spectrometer called SPIRIT (SPectromètre InfraRouge In situ Toute altitude) has been developed for airborne measurements of trace gases in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. More than three different species can be measured simultaneously with high time resolution (each 1.6 s) using three individual CW-DFB-QCLs (Continuous Wave Distributed FeedBack Quantum Cascade Lasers) coupled to a single Robert multipass optical cell. The lasers are operated in a time-multiplexed mode. Absorption of the mid-infrared radiations occur in the cell (2.8 L with effective path lengths of 134 to 151 m) at reduced pressure, with detection achieved using a HgCdTe detector cooled by Stirling cycle. The performances of the instrument are described, in particular precisions of 1, 1 and 3 %, and volume mixing ratio (vmr) sensitivities of 0.4, 6 and 2.4 ppbv are determined at 1.6 s for CO, CH4 and N2O, respectively (at 1σ confidence level). Estimated accuracies without calibration are about 6 %. Dynamic measuring ranges of about four decades are established. The first deployment of SPIRIT was realized aboard the Falcon-20 research aircraft operated by DLR (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt) within the frame of the SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) European project in November-December 2011 over Malaysia. The convective outflows from two large convective systems near Borneo Island (6.0° N-115.5° E and 5.5° N-118.5° E) were sampled above 11 km in altitude on 19 November and 9 December, respectively. Correlated enhancements in CO and CH4 vmr were detected when the aircraft crossed the outflow anvil of both systems. These enhancements were interpreted as the fingerprint of transport from the boundary layer up through the convective system and then horizontal advection in the outflow. Using these observations, the fraction of boundary layer air contained in fresh convective outflow was calculated to range

  13. Deriving an atmospheric budget of total organic bromine using airborne in situ measurements from the western Pacific area during SHIVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, S.; Bönisch, H.; Keber, T.; Oram, D. E.; Mills, G.; Engel, A.

    2014-07-01

    During the recent SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) project an extensive data set of all halogen species relevant for the atmospheric budget of total organic bromine was collected in the western Pacific region using the Falcon aircraft operated by the German Aerospace agency DLR (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt) covering a vertical range from the planetary boundary layer up to the ceiling altitude of the aircraft of 13 km. In total, more than 700 measurements were performed with the newly developed fully automated in situ instrument GHOST-MS (Gas chromatograph for the Observation of Tracers - coupled with a Mass Spectrometer) by the Goethe University of Frankfurt (GUF) and with the onboard whole-air sampler WASP with subsequent ground-based state-of-the-art GC / MS analysis by the University of East Anglia (UEA). Both instruments yield good agreement for all major (CHBr3 and CH2Br2) and minor (CH2BrCl, CHBrCl2 and CHBr2Cl) VSLS (very short-lived substances), at least at the level of their 2σ measurement uncertainties. In contrast to the suggestion that the western Pacific could be a region of strongly increased atmospheric VSLS abundance (Pyle et al., 2011), we found only in the upper troposphere a slightly enhanced amount of total organic bromine from VSLS relative to the levels reported in Montzka and Reimann et al. (2011) for other tropical regions. From the SHIVA observations in the upper troposphere, a budget for total organic bromine, including four halons (H-1301, H-1211, H-1202, H-2402), CH3Br and the VSLS, is derived for the level of zero radiative heating (LZRH), the input region for the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and thus also for the stratosphere. With the exception of the two minor VSLS CHBrCl2 and CHBr2Cl, excellent agreement with the values reported in Montzka and Reimann et al. (2011) is found, while being slightly higher than previous studies from our group based on balloon-borne measurements.

  14. In situ calibrated defocusing PTV for wall-bounded measurement volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, T.; Hain, R.; Kähler, C. J.

    2016-08-01

    In many situations, 3D velocity measurements in thin (∼1 mm) but wide (∼100  ×  100 mm2) flow channels is an important task. To resolve the in-plane and out-of-plane velocity gradients properly, a precise calibration is required, since 3D measurement approaches rely strongly on the accuracy of the calibration procedure. It is likely that calibration targets do not fit domains with small depths, due to their size. Furthermore, in fields where such measurements are of interest, the accessibility of the measurement volume is often limited or even impossible. To overcome these drawbacks, this paper introduces an in situ calibrated defocusing particle tracking velocimetry approach for wall-bounded measurement domains with depths in the low millimeter range. The calibration function for the particle depth location is directly derived from the particle image geometries and their displacements between two frames. Employing only a single camera, this defocusing approach is capable of measuring the air flow between two parallel glass plates at a distance of 1 mm with an average uncertainty of 2.43% for each track, relative to the maximum velocity. A tomographic particle tracking velocimetry measurement, serving as a benchmark for the single camera technique, reaches an average uncertainty of 1.59%. Altogether, with its straightforward set-up and without requiring a calibration target, this in situ calibrated defocusing approach opens new areas of application for optical flow velocimetry. In particular, for measurement domains with small optical windows and a lack of accessibility.

  15. Probing the impact of different aerosol sources on cloud microphysics and precipitation through in-situ measurements of chemical mixing state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, K. A.; Suski, K.; Cazorla, A.; Cahill, J. F.; Creamean, J.; Collins, D. B.; Heymsfield, A.; Roberts, G. C.; DeMott, P. J.; Sullivan, R. C.; Rosenfeld, D.; Comstock, J. M.; Tomlinson, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol particles play a crucial role in affecting cloud processes by serving as cloud nuclei. However, our understanding of which particles actually form cloud and ice nuclei limits our ability to treat aerosols properly in climate models. In recent years, it has become possible to measure the chemical composition of individual cloud nuclei within the clouds using on-line mass spectrometry. In-situ high time resolution chemistry can now be compared with cloud physics measurements to directly probe the impact of aerosol chemistry on cloud microphysics. This presentation will describe results from two recent field campaigns, CalWater in northern California and ICE-T in the western Caribbean region. Ground-based and aircraft measurements will be presented of aerosol mixing state, cloud microphysics, and meteorology. Results from single particle mass spectrometry will show the sources of the cloud seeds, including dust, biomass burning, sea spray, and biological particles. Details will be provided on how we are now able to probe the sources and cycling of atmospheric aerosols by measuring individual aerosols, cloud nuclei, and precipitation chemistry. The important role of dust, both Asian and African, and bioparticles in forming ice nuclei will be discussed. Finally, a summary will be provided discussing how these new in-situ measurements are being used to advance our understanding of complex atmospheric processes, and improve our understanding of aerosol impacts on climate.

  16. Measurement of static pressure on aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gracey, William

    1958-01-01

    Existing data on the errors involved in the measurement of static pressure by means of static-pressure tubes and fuselage vents are presented. The errors associated with the various design features of static-pressure tubes are discussed for the condition of zero angle of attack and for the case where the tube is inclined to flow. Errors which result from variations in the configuration of static-pressure vents are also presented. Errors due to the position of a static-pressure tube in the flow field of the airplane are given for locations ahead of the fuselage nose, ahead of the wing tip, and ahead of the vertical tail fin. The errors of static-pressure vents on the fuselage of an airplane are also presented. Various methods of calibrating static-pressure installations in flight are briefly discussed.

  17. Airborne aerosol in situ measurements during TCAP: A closure study of total scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Sedlacek, Arthur; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail; Barnard, James; Chand, Duli; Flynn, Connor; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Schmid, Beat; Shilling, John; et al

    2015-07-31

    We present a framework for calculating the total scattering of both non-absorbing and absorbing aerosol at ambient conditions from aircraft data. Our framework is developed emphasizing the explicit use of chemical composition data for estimating the complex refractive index (RI) of particles, and thus obtaining improved ambient size spectra derived from Optical Particle Counter (OPC) measurements. The feasibility of our framework for improved calculations of total scattering is demonstrated using three types of data collected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) aircraft during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Namely, these data types are: (1) size distributions measured by amore » suite of OPC’s; (2) chemical composition data measured by an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and a Single Particle Soot Photometer; and (3) the dry total scattering coefficient measured by a integrating nephelometer and scattering enhancement factor measured with a humidification system. We demonstrate that good agreement (~10%) between the observed and calculated scattering can be obtained under ambient conditions (RH < 80%) by applying chemical composition data for the RI-based correction of the OPC-derived size spectra. We also demonstrate that ignoring the RI-based correction or using non-representative RI values can cause a substantial underestimation (~40%) or overestimation (~35%) of the calculated scattering, respectively.« less

  18. Airborne aerosol in situ measurements during TCAP: A closure study of total scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Sedlacek, Arthur; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail; Barnard, James; Chand, Duli; Flynn, Connor; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Schmid, Beat; Shilling, John; Tomlinson, Jason; Fast, Jerome

    2015-07-31

    We present a framework for calculating the total scattering of both non-absorbing and absorbing aerosol at ambient conditions from aircraft data. Our framework is developed emphasizing the explicit use of chemical composition data for estimating the complex refractive index (RI) of particles, and thus obtaining improved ambient size spectra derived from Optical Particle Counter (OPC) measurements. The feasibility of our framework for improved calculations of total scattering is demonstrated using three types of data collected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) aircraft during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Namely, these data types are: (1) size distributions measured by a suite of OPC’s; (2) chemical composition data measured by an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and a Single Particle Soot Photometer; and (3) the dry total scattering coefficient measured by a integrating nephelometer and scattering enhancement factor measured with a humidification system. We demonstrate that good agreement (~10%) between the observed and calculated scattering can be obtained under ambient conditions (RH < 80%) by applying chemical composition data for the RI-based correction of the OPC-derived size spectra. We also demonstrate that ignoring the RI-based correction or using non-representative RI values can cause a substantial underestimation (~40%) or overestimation (~35%) of the calculated scattering, respectively.

  19. A Nanoplasmonic Strategy for Precision in-situ Measurements of Tip-enhanced Raman and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingyan; Sun, Mengtao; Chen, Jianing; Yang, Zhilin

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate an optimized tip-film system that supports in-situ measurement of tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and tip-enhanced fluorescence (TEF) of dye molecules. A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is proposed to precisely control the tip-film distance, and thus in-situ measurement of TERS and TEF can be realized utilizing the specific surface plasmon resonance (SPR) properties of the tip-film system. Our calculations show that the optimized tip-film distance of 2 nm suggests a possibility of efficient acquisition of TERS and TEF in-situ. The calculated spatial resolution of TERS and spectral resolution of TEF can be down to 6.5 nm and 10 nm, respectively. Our theoretical results may find promising application in developing multiple functional nano-spectroscopy through which Raman and fluorescence can be measured in-situ at the nanoscale level. PMID:26780882

  20. The NASA Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX):High-Altitude Aircraft Measurements in the Tropical Western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, E. J.; Pfister, L.; Jordan, D. E.; Bui, T. V.; Ueyama, R.; Singh, H. B.; Lawson, P.; Thornberry, T.; Diskin, G.; McGill, M.; Pittman, J.; Atlas, E.; Kim, J.

    2016-01-01

    The February through March 2014 deployment of the NASA Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) provided unique in situ measurements in the western Pacific Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). Six flights were conducted from Guam with the long-range, high-altitude, unmanned Global Hawk aircraft. The ATTREX Global Hawk payload provided measurements of water vapor, meteorological conditions, cloud properties, tracer and chemical radical concentrations, and radiative fluxes. The campaign was partially coincident with the CONTRAST and CAST airborne campaigns based in Guam using lower-altitude aircraft The ATTREX dataset is being used for investigations of TTL cloud, transport, dynamical, and chemical processes as well as for evaluation and improvement of global-model representations of TTL processes.

  1. Using continuous in-situ measurements to adaptively trigger urban storm water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, B. P.; Kerkez, B.

    2015-12-01

    Until cost-effective in-situ sensors are available for biological parameters, nutrients and metals, automated samplers will continue to be the primary source of reliable water quality measurements. Given limited samples bottles, however, autosamplers often obscure insights on nutrient sources and biogeochemical processes which would otherwise be captured using a continuous sampling approach. To that end, we evaluate the efficacy a novel method to measure first-flush nutrient dynamics in flashy, urban watersheds. Our approach reduces the number of samples required to capture water quality dynamics by leveraging an internet-connected sensor node, which is equipped with a suite of continuous in-situ sensors and an automated sampler. To capture both the initial baseflow as well as storm concentrations, a cloud-hosted adaptive algorithm analyzes the high-resolution sensor data along with local weather forecasts to optimize a sampling schedule. The method was tested in a highly developed urban catchment in Ann Arbor, Michigan and collected samples of nitrate, phosphorus, and suspended solids throughout several storm events. Results indicate that the watershed does not exhibit first flush dynamics, a behavior that would have been obscured when using a non-adaptive sampling approach.

  2. In situ growth rate measurement and nucleation enhancement for microwave plasma CVD of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoner, B. R.; Williams, B. E.; Wolter, S. D.; Nishimura, K.; Glass, J. T.

    1992-02-01

    Laser reflection interferometry (LRI) has been shown to be a useful in situ technique for measuring growth rate of diamond during microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). Current alternatives to LRI usually involve ex situ analysis such as cross-sectional SEM or profilometry. The ability to measure the growth rate in 'real-time' has allowed the variation of processing parameters during a single deposition and thus the extraction of much more information in a fraction of the time. In situ monitoring of growth processes also makes it possible to perform closed loop process control with better reproducibility and quality control. Unfortunately, LRI requires a relatively smooth surface to avoid surface scattering and the commensurate drop in reflected intensity. This problem was remedied by greatly enhancing the diamond particle nucleation via the deposition of an intermediate carbon layer using substrate biasing. When an unscratched silicon wafer is pretreated by biasing negatively relative to ground while in a methane-hydrogen plasma, nucleation densities much higher than those achieved on scratched silicon wafers are obtained. The enhanced nucleation allows a complete film composed of small grains to form in a relatively short time, resulting in a much smoother surface than is obtained from a film grown at lower nucleation densities.

  3. In-situ Stress Measurement of MOVPE Growth of High Efficiency Lattice-Mismatched Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Geisz, J. F.; Levander, A. X.; Norman, A. G.; Jones, K. M.; Romero, M. J.

    2007-04-01

    We have recently reported high efficiencies in a monolithic III-V triple-junction solar cell design that is grown inverted with a metamorphic 1.0 eV bottom In{sub .27}Ga{sub .73}As junction. The biaxial stress and strain grown into this highly lattice-mismatched junction can be controlled by varying the design of a step-graded Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}P buffer layer, in which most, but not all, of the 1.9% misfit strain is relieved. A multi-beam optical stress sensor (MOSS) is a convenient tool for in situ measurement of stress during metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) for the optimization of solar cell performance. The analysis of stress from curvature data is complicated by significant temperature effects due to relatively small thermal gradients in our atmospheric-pressure MOVPE reactor. These temperature effects are discussed and approximations made to allow practical analysis of the data. The results show excellent performance of inverted In{sub .27}Ga{sub .73}. As solar cells grown with slight compressive stress, but degradation under tensile stress. The best devices had a V{sub oc} of 0.54 V and a dislocation density in the low 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}. The in situ stress data is also compared with ex situ strain data derived from X-ray diffraction measurements.

  4. Quantitative electrochemical measurements using in situ ec-S/TEM devices.

    PubMed

    Unocic, Raymond R; Sacci, Robert L; Brown, Gilbert M; Veith, Gabriel M; Dudney, Nancy J; More, Karren L; Walden, Franklin S; Gardiner, Daniel S; Damiano, John; Nackashi, David P

    2014-04-01

    Insight into dynamic electrochemical processes can be obtained with in situ electrochemical-scanning/transmission electron microscopy (ec-S/TEM), a technique that utilizes microfluidic electrochemical cells to characterize electrochemical processes with S/TEM imaging, diffraction, or spectroscopy. The microfluidic electrochemical cell is composed of microfabricated devices with glassy carbon and platinum microband electrodes in a three-electrode cell configuration. To establish the validity of this method for quantitative in situ electrochemistry research, cyclic voltammetry (CV), choronoamperometry (CA), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed using a standard one electron transfer redox couple [Fe(CN)6]3-/4--based electrolyte. Established relationships of the electrode geometry and microfluidic conditions were fitted with CV and chronoamperometic measurements of analyte diffusion coefficients and were found to agree with well-accepted values that are on the order of 10-5 cm2/s. Influence of the electron beam on electrochemical measurements was found to be negligible during CV scans where the current profile varied only within a few nA with the electron beam on and off, which is well within the hysteresis between multiple CV scans. The combination of experimental results provides a validation that quantitative electrochemistry experiments can be performed with these small-scale microfluidic electrochemical cells provided that accurate geometrical electrode configurations, diffusion boundary layers, and microfluidic conditions are accounted for.

  5. Remote sensing of a comet nucleus with Rosetta/ROSINA in-situ coma measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhooghe, Frederik; De Keyser, Johan

    2013-04-01

    Rosetta will rendez-vous with comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014 and will, among other tasks, study the physicochemical evolution of the cometary coma from onset of activity at large solar distances through perihelion at 1.2 AU. The Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) allows the determination of both neutrals and positive ions in the coma. This research effort is focused on using in situ gas density measurements at small distances from the nucleus to get information about gas production rates and volatile composition at the nucleus, which reveals information about the nucleus and its origin. Furthermore, if sufficient data is available, a 2D activity map of the nucleus surface can be created and inputs concerning the nucleus surface can be valuable to assist in finding a suitable landing location for Philae, the Rosetta lander. The volatile outgassing rate and the surface composition at the nucleus can be accurately determined from in situ coma composition measurements provided accurate information is available concerning solar activity, the flow field and reactions that transform the neutral gas as it expands outward (e.g. photo-ionization). This contribution describes the principle of the data inversion technique and illustrates it with model data.

  6. Theoretical and Experimental Errors for In Situ Measurements of Plant Water Potential 1

    PubMed Central

    Shackel, Kenneth A.

    1984-01-01

    Errors in psychrometrically determined values of leaf water potential caused by tissue resistance to water vapor exchange and by lack of thermal equilibrium were evaluated using commercial in situ psychrometers (Wescor Inc., Logan, UT) on leaves of Tradescantia virginiana (L.). Theoretical errors in the dewpoint method of operation for these sensors were demonstrated. After correction for these errors, in situ measurements of leaf water potential indicated substantial errors caused by tissue resistance to water vapor exchange (4 to 6% reduction in apparent water potential per second of cooling time used) resulting from humidity depletions in the psychrometer chamber during the Peltier condensation process. These errors were avoided by use of a modified procedure for dewpoint measurement. Large changes in apparent water potential were caused by leaf and psychrometer exposure to moderate levels of irradiance. These changes were correlated with relatively small shifts in psychrometer zero offsets (−0.6 to −1.0 megapascals per microvolt), indicating substantial errors caused by nonisothermal conditions between the leaf and the psychrometer. Explicit correction for these errors is not possible with the current psychrometer design. PMID:16663701

  7. In-situ multi-information measurement system for preparing gallium nitride photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiao-Qian; Chang, Ben-Kang; Qian, Yun-Sheng; Zhang, Jun-Ju

    2012-03-01

    We introduce the first domestic in-situ multi-information measurement system for a gallium nitride (GaN) photocathode. This system can successfully fulfill heat cleaning and activation for GaN in an ultrahigh vacuum environment and produce a GaN photocathode with a negative electron affinity (NEA) status. Information including the heat cleaning temperature, vacuum degree, photocurrent, electric current of cesium source, oxygen source, and the most important information about the spectral response, or equivalently, the quantum efficiency (QE) can be obtained during preparation. The preparation of a GaN photocathode with this system indicates that the optimal heating temperature in a vacuum is about 700 °C. We also develop a method of quickly evaluating the atomically clean surface with the vacuum degree versus wavelength curve to prevent possible secondary contamination when the atomic level cleaning surface is tested with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The photocurrent shows a quick enhancement when the current ratio between the cesium source and oxygen source is 1.025. The spectral response of the GaN photocathode is flat in a wavelength range from 240 nm to 365 nm, and an abrupt decline is observed at 365 nm, which demonstrates that with the in-situ multi-information measurement system the NEA GaN photocathode can be successfully prepared.

  8. In situ current voltage measurements for optimization of a novel fullerene acceptor in bulk heterojunction photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Shuttle, Christopher G.; Treat, Neil D.; Fan, Jian; Varotto, Alessandro; Hawker, Craig J.; Wudl, Fred; Chabinyc, Michael L.

    2011-10-31

    The evaluation of the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of new materials for organic bulk heterojunction (BHJ) photovoltaics is difficult due to the large number of processing parameters possible. An efficient procedure to determine the optimum conditions for thermal treatment of polymer-based bulk heterojunction photovoltaic devices using in situ current-voltage measurements is presented. The performance of a new fullerene derivative, 1,9-dihydro-64,65-dihexyloxy-1,9-(methano[1,2] benzomethano)fullerene[60], in BHJ photovolatics with poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) was evaluated using this methodology. The device characteristics of BHJs obtained from the in situ method were found to be in good agreement with those from BHJs annealed using a conventional process. This fullerene has similar performance to 1-(3-methoxycarbonyl)propyl-1-phenyl-[6,6]-methano fullerene in BHJs with P3HT after thermal annealing. For devices with thickness of 70 nm, the short circuit current was 6.24 mA/cm² with a fill factor of 0.53 and open circuit voltage of 0.65 V. The changes in the current-voltage measurements during thermal annealing suggest that the ordering process in P3HT dominates the improvement in power conversion efficiency.

  9. Review of measurement and testing problems. [of aircraft emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Good instrumentation was required to obtain reliable and repeatable baseline data. Problems that were encountered in developing such a total system were: (1) accurate airflow measurement, (2) precise fuel flow measurement, and (3) the instrumentation used for pollutant measurement was susceptible to frequent malfunctions. Span gas quality had a significant effect on emissions test results. The Spindt method was used in the piston aircraft emissions program. The Spindt method provided a comparative computational procedure for fuel/air ratio based on measured emissions concentrations.

  10. Correlations between in situ sensor measurements and trace organic pollutants in urban streams.

    PubMed

    Henjum, Michael B; Hozalski, Raymond M; Wennen, Christine R; Arnold, William; Novak, Paige J

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of organic and microbial pollutant loading is expensive and labor-intensive because collection and analysis of grab samples are needed. Instruments are available, however, for in situ analysis of basic water quality parameters at high temporal resolution. Throughout the late summer and fall of 2008 a two-node water quality monitoring network was deployed to measure turbidity, specific conductance, pH, depth, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and nitrate at high frequencies in two urban streams in the Minneapolis, MN metropolitan area. Grab samples also were collected at 2 h intervals for 22 h during two dry periods and five rain events and analyzed for organic and microbial pollutants. This study investigated the viability of using in situ near real-time sensors to predict fecal coliforms, prometon (a residential herbicide), atrazine (an agricultural herbicide), and caffeine (a wastewater indicator) concentrations. Such pollutants can be used as indicators of sources that contribute to what is often termed "urban stream syndrome." At one stream, linear correlations were observed between nitrate and caffeine (R(2) = 0.66), turbidity and prometon (R(2) = 0.91), and discharge and prometon (R(2) = 0.92). At another location, caffeine linearly correlated with specific conductance (R(2) = 0.64). A lack of correlation with sensed water quality parameters was also observed with some of the pollutants. When one considers that error is estimated to be as high as 200% when using monthly grab samples to estimate pollutant loading in streams, even moderate correlations, such as the ones found in this study, can provide better loading estimates if frequently sensed parameters can be used for load estimation. Therefore, such site-specific relationships can be used to estimate the loading of specific pollutants in near real-time until robust low-cost technologies to analyze these pollutants in situ become available.

  11. Development of a Cone Penetrometer for Measuring Spectral Characteristics of Soils in Situ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Landris T., Jr.; Malone, Philip G.

    1993-01-01

    A patent was recently granted to the U.S. Army for an adaptation of a soil cone penetrometer that can be used to measure the spectral characteristics (fluorescence or reflectance) of soils adjacent to the penetrometer rod. The system can use a variety of light sources and spectral analytical equipment. A laser induced fluorescence measuring system has proven to be of immediate use in mapping the distribution of oil contaminated soil at waste disposal and oil storage areas. The fiber optic adaptation coupled with a cone penetrometer permits optical characteristics of the in-situ soil to be measured rapidly, safely, and inexpensively. The fiber optic cone penetrometer can be used to gather spectral data to a depth of approximately 25 to 30 m even in dense sands or stiff clays and can investigate 300 m of soil per day. Typical detection limits for oil contamination in sand is on the order of several hundred parts per million.

  12. Development of an in situ thermal conductivity measurement system for exploration of the shallow subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirila, Marian Andrei; Christoph, Benjamin; Vienken, Thomas; Dietrich, Peter; Bumberger, Jan

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we attempted to develop an in situ thermal conductivity measurement system that can be used for subsurface thermal exploration. A new thermal probe was developed for mapping both the spatial and temporal variability of thermal conductivity, via direct push methods in the unconsolidated shallow subsurface. A robust, hollow cylindrical probe was constructed and its performance was tested by carrying out thermal conductivity measurements on materials with known properties. The thermal conductivity of the investigated materials can be worked out by measuring the active power consumption (in alternating current system) and temperature of the probe over fixed time intervals. A calibration method was used to eliminate any undesired thermal effects regarding the size of the probe, based on mobile thermal analyzer thermal conductivity values. Using the hollow cylindrical probe, the thermal conductivity results obtained had an error of less than 2.5% for solid samples (such as Teflon, Agar Jelly and Nylatron).

  13. Sub-Kelvin magnetic and electrical measurements in a diamond anvil cell with in situ tunability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, A.; Silevitch, D. M.; Feng, Yejun; Wang, Yishu; Jaramillo, R.; Banerjee, A.; Ren, Y.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2015-09-01

    We discuss techniques for performing continuous measurements across a wide range of pressure-field-temperature phase space, combining the milli-Kelvin temperatures of a helium dilution refrigerator with the giga-Pascal pressures of a diamond anvil cell and the Tesla magnetic fields of a superconducting magnet. With a view towards minimizing remnant magnetic fields and background magnetic susceptibility, we characterize high-strength superalloy materials for the pressure cell assembly, which allows high fidelity measurements of low-field phenomena such as superconductivity below 100 mK at pressures above 10 GPa. In situ tunability and measurement of the pressure permit experiments over a wide range of pressure, while at the same time making possible precise steps across abrupt phase transitions such as those from insulator to metal.

  14. In situ measurements of the sub-surface gamma dose from Chernobyl fallout.

    PubMed

    Timms, D N; Smith, J T; Coe, E; Kudelsky, A V; Yankov, A I

    2005-06-01

    Methods of estimating external radiation exposure of soil-dwelling organisms are currently of much research and regulatory interest. In this paper, we report the first in situ measurements of the sub-surface gamma dose rate for 137Cs contaminated land that quantify variation in dose rate with depth. Two contrasting sites have been investigated. The first site comprised a mineral type soil with a low percentage of organic matter and the second site chosen was in a peat-bog. The different soil compositions afford different 137Cs mobility and this results in variations in the measured gamma dose-rate with soil depth. For each site the paper reports the measured dose rates, the 137Cs activity depth profile, the 137Cs inventory and a description of the soil-characteristics. It is suggested that these data can be used to produce estimates of the sub-surface gamma dose rate in other sites of 137Cs contamination. PMID:15799871

  15. In situ measurements of contributions to the global electrical circuit by a thunderstorm in southeastern Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J.N.; Holzworth, R.H.; McCarthy, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    The global electrical circuit, which maintains a potential of about 280??kV between the earth and the ionosphere, is thought to be driven mainly by thunderstorms and lightning. However, very few in situ measurements of electrical current above thunderstorms have been successfully obtained. In this paper, we present dc to very low frequency electric fields and atmospheric conductivity measured in the stratosphere (30-35??km altitude) above an active thunderstorm in southeastern Brazil. From these measurements, we estimate the mean quasi-static conduction current during the storm period to be 2.5 ?? 1.25??A. Additionally, we examine the transient conduction currents following a large positive cloud-to-ground (+ CG) lightning flash and typical - CG flashes. We find that the majority of the total current is attributed to the quasi-static thundercloud charge, rather than lightning, which supports the classical Wilson model for the global electrical circuit.

  16. In Situ Stress Measurements in the NPR Hole, Volume I - Results and Interpretations

    SciTech Connect

    Moos, D.

    2001-10-15

    This report presents the results of an investigation of the magnitudes and orientations of the in situ stresses in basement rocks beneath the Savannah River Site (SRS). Stress magnitudes were measured using the hydraulic fracturing technique. Stress orientations were obtained from the orientation of stress-induced wellbore breakouts and hydraulically-induced fractures. The measurements reported here were carried out in the New Production Reactor (NPR) hole, drilled to a total depth of 4000 feet near the center of the Savannah River Site, at roughly the location of the proposed NPR. The results obtained in this study are compared to previous stress measurements made using the same techniques in a series of shallower holes on the SRS, and discussed in the context of the regional stress field and potential seismic hazard.

  17. In situ Measurements of Irradiation-Induced Creep of Nanocrystalline Copper at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özerİnç, Sezer; Averback, Robert S.; King, William P.

    2016-08-01

    We have measured irradiation-induced creep on nanocrystalline copper micropillars at elevated temperatures. The micropillars, which were ≈1 µm in diameter and ≈2 µm in height, were fabricated from magnetron-sputtered nanocrystalline copper films. The micropillars were compressed during 2.0 MeV Ar+ bombardment and the deformation measured in situ by laser interferometry. The creep rate was measured over the stress range 10-120 MPa at ≈200°C. The results show linear relationships of creep rate with both applied stress and displacement rate, yielding a creep compliance of 0.07 dpa-1 GPa-1 (dpa:displacement per atom). The findings are in good agreement with the previous results obtained using a bulge test on free-standing thin film specimens.

  18. Sub-Kelvin magnetic and electrical measurements in a diamond anvil cell with in situ tunability.

    PubMed

    Palmer, A; Silevitch, D M; Feng, Yejun; Wang, Yishu; Jaramillo, R; Banerjee, A; Ren, Y; Rosenbaum, T F

    2015-09-01

    We discuss techniques for performing continuous measurements across a wide range of pressure-field-temperature phase space, combining the milli-Kelvin temperatures of a helium dilution refrigerator with the giga-Pascal pressures of a diamond anvil cell and the Tesla magnetic fields of a superconducting magnet. With a view towards minimizing remnant magnetic fields and background magnetic susceptibility, we characterize high-strength superalloy materials for the pressure cell assembly, which allows high fidelity measurements of low-field phenomena such as superconductivity below 100 mK at pressures above 10 GPa. In situ tunability and measurement of the pressure permit experiments over a wide range of pressure, while at the same time making possible precise steps across abrupt phase transitions such as those from insulator to metal. PMID:26429451

  19. Note: In situ measurement of vacuum window birefringence by atomic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Andreas; Alt, Wolfgang; Genske, Maximilian; Meschede, Dieter; Robens, Carsten; Alberti, Andrea

    2013-12-15

    We present an in situ method to measure the birefringence of a single vacuum window by means of microwave spectroscopy on an ensemble of cold atoms. Stress-induced birefringence can cause an ellipticity in the polarization of an initially linearly polarized laser beam. The amount of ellipticity can be reconstructed by measuring the differential vector light shift of an atomic hyperfine transition. Measuring the ellipticity as a function of the linear polarization angle allows us to infer the amount of birefringence Δn at the level of 10{sup −8} and identify the orientation of the optical axes. The key benefit of this method is the ability to separately characterize each vacuum window, allowing the birefringence to be precisely compensated in existing vacuum apparatuses.

  20. Sub-Kelvin magnetic and electrical measurements in a diamond anvil cell with in situ tunability

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, A; Silevitch, D M; Feng, Yejun; Wang, Y; Jaramillo, R.; Banerjee, A.; Ren, Y.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2015-09-01

    We discuss techniques for performing continuous measurements across a wide range of pressure–field–temperature phase space, combining the milli-Kelvin temperatures of a helium dilution refrigerator with the giga-Pascal pressures of a diamond anvil cell and the Tesla magnetic fields of a superconducting magnet. With a view towards minimizing remnant magnetic fields and background magnetic susceptibility, we characterize high-strength superalloy materials for the pressure cell assembly, which allows high fidelity measurements of low-field phenomena such as superconductivity below 100 mK at pressures above 10 GPa. In situ tunability and measurement of the pressure permit experiments over a wide range of pressure, while at the same time making possible precise steps across abrupt phase transitions such as those from insulator to metal.

  1. Sub-Kelvin magnetic and electrical measurements in a diamond anvil cell with in situ tunability.

    PubMed

    Palmer, A; Silevitch, D M; Feng, Yejun; Wang, Yishu; Jaramillo, R; Banerjee, A; Ren, Y; Rosenbaum, T F

    2015-09-01

    We discuss techniques for performing continuous measurements across a wide range of pressure-field-temperature phase space, combining the milli-Kelvin temperatures of a helium dilution refrigerator with the giga-Pascal pressures of a diamond anvil cell and the Tesla magnetic fields of a superconducting magnet. With a view towards minimizing remnant magnetic fields and background magnetic susceptibility, we characterize high-strength superalloy materials for the pressure cell assembly, which allows high fidelity measurements of low-field phenomena such as superconductivity below 100 mK at pressures above 10 GPa. In situ tunability and measurement of the pressure permit experiments over a wide range of pressure, while at the same time making possible precise steps across abrupt phase transitions such as those from insulator to metal.

  2. In situ measurements of KZ and ɛ compared to numerical models in the Gulf of Lion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Andrea; Doglioli, Andrea; Dekeyser, Ivan; Jullion, Loic; Malengros, Deny; Petrenko, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Vertical diffusivity and turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate play an essential role in the parametrization of physical and biogeochemical models. Coastal environment is particularly important because expected to contribute in a substantial way to the balance of kinetic energy in the ocean. In situ measurements have a crucial importance in driving the models. We present a multi-annual dataset performed with SCAMP (Self Contained Autonomous Profiler) field measurements of KZ and ɛ in a variety of meteorological and oceanic conditions in the Gulf of Lion (Mediterranean Sea). The results are compared with respect to similar measurements in coastal waters described in literature. Moreover, a comparison to numerical circulation models is proposed in order to show the dependency of the depth of the mixing layer on the wind forcing.

  3. Passive remote sensing of large-scale methane emissions from Oil Fields in California's San Joaquin Valley and validation by airborne in-situ measurements - Results from COMEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerilowski, Konstantin; Krautwurst, Sven; Thompson, David R.; Thorpe, Andrew K.; Kolyer, Richard W.; Jonsson, Haflidi; Krings, Thomas; Frankenberg, Christian; Horstjann, Markus; Leifer, Ira; Eastwood, Michael; Green, Robert O.; Vigil, Sam; Fladeland, Matthew; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Burrows, John P.; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2016-04-01

    The CO2 and MEthane EXperiment (COMEX) was a NASA and ESA funded campaign in support of the HyspIRI and CarbonSat mission definition activities. As a part of this effort, seven flights were performed between June 3 and September 4, 2014 with the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) remote sensing instrument (operated by the University of Bremen in cooperation with the German Research Centre for Geosciences - GFZ) over the Kern River, Kern Front, and Poso Creek Oil Fields located in California's San Joaquin Valley. MAMAP was installed for the flights aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft, together with: a Picarro fast in-situ greenhouse gas (GHG) analyzer operated by the NASA Ames Research Center, ARC; a 5-hole turbulence probe; and an atmospheric measurement package operated by CIRPAS measuring aerosols, temperature, dew-point, and other atmospheric parameters. Three of the flights were accompanied by the Next Generation Airborne Visual InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG), operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, installed aboard a second Twin Otter aircraft. Large-scale, high-concentration CH4 plumes were detected by the MAMAP instrument over the fields and tracked over several kilometers. The spatial distribution of the MAMAP observed plumes was compared to high spatial resolution CH4 anomaly maps derived by AVIRIS-NG imaging spectroscopy data. Remote sensing data collected by MAMAP was used to infer CH4 emission rates and their distributions over the three fields. Aggregated emission estimates for the three fields were compared to aggregated emissions inferred by subsequent airborne in-situ validation measurements collected by the Picarro instrument. Comparison of remote sensing and in-situ flux estimates will be presented, demonstrating the ability of airborne remote sensing data to provide accurate emission estimates for concentrations above the

  4. Satellite (Timed, Aura, Aqua) and In Situ (Meteorological Rockets, Balloons) Measurement Comparability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidlin, F. J.; Goldberg, Richard A.; Feofilov, A.; Rose, R.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements using the inflatable falling sphere often are requested to provide density data in support of special sounding rocket launchings into the mesosphere and thermosphere. To insure density measurements within narrow time frames and close in space, the inflatable falling sphere is launched within minutes of the major test. Sphere measurements are reliable for the most part, however, availability of these rocket systems has become more difficult and, in fact, these instruments no longer are manufactured resulting in a reduction of the meager stockpile of instruments. Sphere measurements also are used to validate remotely measured temperatures and have the advantage of measuring small-scale atmospheric features. Even so, with the dearth of remaining falling spheres perhaps it is time to consider whether the remote measurements are mature enough to stand alone. Presented are two field studies, one in 2003 from Northern Sweden and one in 2010 from the vicinity of Kwajalein Atoll that compare temperature retrievals between satellite and in situ failing spheres. The major satellite instruments employed are SABER, MLS, and AIRS. The comparisons indicate that remotely measured temperatures mimic the sphere temperature measurements quite well. The data also confirm that satellite retrievals, while not always at the exact location required for individual studies, are adaptable enough and highly useful. Although the falling sphere will provide a measurement at a specific location and time, satellites only pass a given location daily or less often. This report reveals that averaged satellite measurements can provide temperatures and densities comparable to the falling sphere.

  5. Satellite (Timed, Aura, Aqua) and In Situ (Meteorological Rockets, Balloons) Measurement Comparability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidlin, F. J.; Goldberg, R. A.; Feofilov, A.; Rose, R.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements using the inflatable falling sphere often are requested to provide density data in support of special sounding rocket launchings into the mesosphere and thermosphere. To insure density measurements within narrow time frames and close in space, the inflatable falling sphere is launched within minutes of the major test. Sphere measurements are reliable for the most part, however, availability of these rocket systems has become more difficult and, in fact, these instruments no longer are manufactured resulting in a reduction of the meager stockpile of instruments. Sphere measurements also are used to validate remotely measured temperatures and have the advantage of measuring small-scale atmospheric features. Even so, with the dearth of remaining falling spheres perhaps it is time to consider whether the remote measurements are mature enough to stand alone. Presented are two field studies, one in 2003 from Northern Sweden and one in 2010 from the vicinity of Kwajalein Atoll that compare temperature retrievals between satellite and in situ falling spheres. The major satellite instruments employed are SABER, MLS, and AIRS. The comparisons indicate that remotely measured temperatures mimic the sphere temperature measurements quite well. The data also confirm that satellite retrievals, while not always at the exact location required for individual studies, are adaptable enough and highly useful. Although the falling sphere will provide a measurement at a specific location and time, satellites only pass a given location daily or less often. This report reveals that averaged satellite measurements can provide temperatures and densities comparable to the falling sphere.

  6. In-Situ Measurement of Hall Thruster Erosion Using a Fiber Optic Regression Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt; Korman, Valentin

    2009-01-01

    One potential life-limiting mechanism in a Hall thruster is the erosion of the ceramic material comprising the discharge channel. This is especially true for missions that require long thrusting periods and can be problematic for lifetime qualification, especially when attempting to qualify a thruster by analysis rather than a test lasting the full duration of the mission. In addition to lifetime, several analytical and numerical models include electrode erosion as a mechanism contributing to enhanced transport properties. However, there is still a great deal of dispute over the importance of erosion to transport in Hall thrusters. The capability to perform an in-situ measurement of discharge channel erosion is useful in addressing both the lifetime and transport concerns. An in-situ measurement would allow for real-time data regarding the erosion rates at different operating points, providing a quick method for empirically anchoring any analysis geared towards lifetime qualification. Erosion rate data over a thruster s operating envelope would also be useful in the modeling of the detailed physics inside the discharge chamber. There are many different sensors and techniques that have been employed to quantify discharge channel erosion in Hall thrusters. Snapshots of the wear pattern can be obtained at regular shutdown intervals using laser profilometry. Many non-intrusive techniques of varying complexity and sensitivity have been employed to detect the time-varying presence of erosion products in the thruster plume. These include the use quartz crystal microbalances, emission spectroscopy, laser induced flourescence, and cavity ring-down spectroscopy. While these techniques can provide a very accurate picture of the level of eroded material in the thruster plume, it is more difficult to use them to determine the location from which the material was eroded. Furthermore, none of the methods cited provide a true in-situ measure of erosion at the channel surface while

  7. Galileo in-situ dust measurements and the sculpting of Jupiter's gossamer rings by its shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Harald; Hamilton, Douglas P.; Moissl, Richard; Grün, Eberhard

    2008-09-01

    Galileo was the first articfiial satellite to orbit Jupiter. During its late orbital mission the spacecraft made two passages through the giant planet's gossamer ring system. The highly sensitive impact-ionization dust detector on board successfully recorded dust impacts during both ring passages and provided the first in-situ measurements from a dusty planetary ring. During the first passage { on 5 November 2002 while Galileo was approaching Jupiter - dust measurements were collected until a spacecraft anomaly at 2:33RJ (Jupiter radii) just 16 min after a close flyby of Amalthea put the spacecraft into a safing mode. The second ring passage on 21 September 2003 provided ring dust measurements down to about 2:5RJ and the Galileo spacecraft was destroyed shortly thereafter in a planned impact with Jupiter. In all, a few thousand dust impacts were counted with the instrument accumulators during both ring passages, but only a total of 110 complete data sets of dust impacts were transmitted to Earth (Krüger et al, Icarus, submitted). Detected particle sizes range from about 0.2 to 5 μm, extending the known size distribution by an order of magnitude towards smaller particles than previously derived from optical imaging (Showalter et al., Icarus 2008). The grain size distribution increases towards smaller particles and shows an excess of these tiny motes in the Amalthea gossamer ring compared to the Thebe ring. The size distribution for the Amalthea ring derived from our in-situ measurements for the small grains agrees very well with the one obtained from images for large grains. Our analysis shows that particles contributing most to the optical cross-section are approximately 5 μm in radius, in agreement with imaging results. The measurements indicate a large drop in particle ux immediately interior to Thebe's orbit and some detected particles seem to be on highly-tilted orbits with inclinations up to 20°. Finally, the faint Thebe ring extension was detected out to

  8. Aircraft measurements of aerosol properties during GoAmazon - G1 and HALO inter-comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Cecchini, M. A.; Wang, J.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Comstock, J. M.; Hubbe, J. M.; Pekour, M. S.; Machado, L.; Wendisch, M.; Longo, K.; Martin, S. T.; Schmid, B.; Weinzierl, B.; Krüger, M. L.; Zöger, M.

    2015-12-01

    Currently, the indirect effects of atmospheric aerosols remain the most uncertain components in forcing of climate change over the industrial period (IPCC, 2013). This large uncertainty is partially a result of our incomplete understanding of the ability of particles to form cloud droplets under atmospherically relevant supersaturations. One objective of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Green Ocean Amazon Project (GoAmazon2014/5) is to understand the influence of the emission from Manaus, a tropical megacity, on aerosol size, concentration, and chemical composition, and their impact on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectrum. The GoAmazon2014/5 study was an international campaign with the collaboration efforts from US, Brazil and Germany. During the intensive operation period, in the dry season (Sep. 1st - Oct. 10th, 2014), aerosol concentration, size distributions, and CCN spectra, both under pristine conditions and inside the Manaus plume, were characterized in-situ from the DOE Gulfstream-1 (G-1) research aircraft and German HALO aircraft during 4 coordinated flights on Sep. 9th, Sep. 16th, Sep 21st and Oct. 1st, 2014. During those four flights, aerosol number concentrations and CCN concentrations at two supersaturations (0.25% and 0.5%) were measured by condensation particle counters (CPCs) and a DMT dual column CCN counter onboard both G-1 and HALO. Aerosol size distribution was also measured by a Fast Integrated Mobility Spectrometer (FIMS) aboard the G-1 and is compared with the size distribution from Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer - Airborne (UHSAS-A, DMT), which were deployed both on the G-1 and the HALO. Good agreement between the aerosol properties measured from the two aircraft has been achieved. The vertical profiles of aerosol size distribution and CCN spectrum will be discussed.

  9. Developments in laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy for quantitative in situ measurements of free radicals in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, Dwayne

    2015-04-01

    Photo-oxidation in the troposphere is highly complex, being initiated by short lived free radical species, in the daytime dominated by the hydroxyl radical, OH. Chemical oxidation cycles, which also involve peroxy radicals (HO2 and RO2), remove natural or anthropogenic emissions (for example methane) and generate a range of secondary products, for example ozone, nitrogen dioxide, acidic and multifunctional organic species, and secondary organic aerosol, which impact on human health and climate. Owing to their short lifetime in the atmosphere, the abundance of radicals is determined solely by their rate of chemical production and loss, and not by transport. Field measurements of the concentrations of radicals and comparison with calculations using a numerical model therefore constitutes one of the very best ways to test whether the chemistry in each of these locations is understood and accurately represented in the model. Validation of the chemistry is important, as the predictions of climate and air quality models containing this chemistry are used to drive the formulation of policy and legislation. However, in situ measurements of radical species, owing to their very low abundance (often sub part per trillion) and short lifetimes (< 1 second for OH), remain extremely challenging. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIF) has enjoyed considerable success worldwide for the quantitative detection of radicals in a range of environments. The radicals are either excited directly by the laser (e.g. OH, IO) or are first chemically converted to OH prior to detection (e.g. HO2, RO2). Recent developments in the LIF technique for radical detection, which uses a supersonic expansion with detection at low pressure and multi kHz pulse repetition rate tunable laser systems, will be discussed, together with calibration methods to make signals absolute, and identification of potential interferences. LIF instruments have been operated on ground, ship and aircraft platforms at a

  10. Experimental measurement of structural power flow on an aircraft fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental technique is used to measure the structural power flow through an aircraft fuselage with the excitation near the wing attachment location. Because of the large number of measurements required to analyze the whole of an aircraft fuselage, it is necessary that a balance be achieved between the number of measurement transducers, the mounting of these transducers, and the accuracy of the measurements. Using four transducers mounted on a bakelite platform, the structural intensity vectors at locations distributed throughout the fuselage are measured. To minimize the errors associated with using a four transducers technique the measurement positions are selected away from bulkheads and stiffeners. Because four separate transducers are used, with each transducer having its own drive and conditioning amplifiers, phase errors are introduced in the measurements that can be much greater than the phase differences associated with the measurements. To minimize these phase errors two sets of measurements are taken for each position with the orientation of the transducers rotated by 180 deg and an average taken between the two sets of measurements. Results are presented and discussed.

  11. European measurements of aircraft crew exposure to cosmic radiation.

    PubMed

    Menzel, H G; O'Sullivan, D; Beck, P; Bartlett, D

    2000-11-01

    For more than 5 y, the European Commission has supported research into scientific and technical aspects of cosmic-ray dosimetry at flight altitudes in civil radiation. This has been in response to legislation to regard exposure of aircraft crew as occupational, following the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection in Publication 60. The response to increased public interest and concern, and in anticipation of European and national current work, within a total of three multi-national, multi-partner research contracts, is based on a comprehensive approach including measurements with dosimetric and spectrometric instruments during flights, at high-mountain altitudes, and in a high-energy radiation reference field at CERN, as well as cosmic-ray transport calculations. The work involves scientists in the fields of neutron physics, cosmic-ray physics, and general dosimetry. A detailed set of measurements has been obtained by employing a wide range of detectors on several routes, both on subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Many of the measurements were made simultaneously by several instruments allowing the intercomparison of results. This paper presents a brief overview of results obtained. It demonstrates that the knowledge about radiation fields and on exposure data has been substantially consolidated and that the available data provide an adequate basis for dose assessments of aircraft crew, which will be legally required in the European Union after 13 May 2000.

  12. In situ measurement of methane oxidation in groundwater by using natural-gradient tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Howes, B.L.; Garabedian, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    Methane oxidation was measured in an unconfined sand and gravel aquifer (Cape Cod, Mass.) by using in situ natural-gradient tracer tests at both a pristine, oxygenated site and an anoxic, sewage-contaminated site. The tracer sites were equipped with multilevel sampling devices to create target grids of sampling points; the injectate was prepared with groundwater from the tracer site to maintain the same geochemical conditions. Methane oxidation was calculated from breakthrough curves of methane relative to halide and inert gas (hexafluoroethane) tracers and was confirmed by the appearance of 13C-enriched carbon dioxide in experiments in which 13C-enriched methane was used as the tracer. A V(max) for methane oxidation could be calculated when the methane concentration was sufficiently high to result in zero-order kinetics throughout the entire transport interval. Methane breakthrough curves could be simulated by modifying a one-dimensional advection-dispersion transport model to include a Michaelis-Menten-based consumption term for methane oxidation. The K(m) values for methane oxidation that gave the best match for the breakthrough curve peaks were 6.0 and 9.0 ??M for the uncontaminated and contaminated sites, respectively. Natural-gradient tracer tests are a promising approach for assessing microbial processes and for testing in situ bioremediation potential in groundwater systems.

  13. A rapid in situ respiration test for measuring aerobic biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in soil.

    PubMed

    Hinchee, R E; Ong, S K

    1992-10-01

    An in situ test method to measure the aerobic biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in contaminated soil is presented. The test method provides an initial assessment of bioventing as a remediation technology for hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. The in situ respiration test consists of ventilating the contaminated soil of the unsaturated zone with air and periodically monitoring the depletion of oxygen (O2) and production of carbon dioxide (CO2) over time after the air is turned off. The test is simple to implement and generally takes about four to five days to complete. The test was applied at eight hydrocarbon-contaminated sites of different geological and climatic conditions. These sites were contaminated with petroleum products or petroleum fuels, except for two sites where the contaminants were primarily polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Oxygen utilization rates for the eight sites ranged from 0.02 to 0.99 percent O2/hour. Estimated biodegradation rates ranged from 0.4 to 19 mg/kg of soil/day. These rates were similar to the biodegradation rates obtained from field and pilot studies using mass balance methods. Estimated biodegradation rates based on O2 utilization were generally more reliable (especially for alkaline soils) than rates based on CO2 production. CO2 produced from microbial respiration was probably converted to carbonate under alkaline conditions.

  14. In situ measurement of methane oxidation in groundwater by using natural-gradient tracer tests.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R L; Howes, B L; Garabedian, S P

    1991-01-01

    Methane oxidation was measured in an unconfined sand and gravel aquifer (Cape Cod, Mass.) by using in situ natural-gradient tracer tests at both a pristine, oxygenated site and an anoxic, sewage-contaminated site. The tracer sites were equipped with multilevel sampling devices to create target grids of sampling points; the injectate was prepared with groundwater from the tracer site to maintain the same geochemical conditions. Methane oxidation was calculated from breakthrough curves of methane relative to halide and inert gas (hexafluroethane) tracers and was confirmed by the appearance of 13C-enriched carbon dioxide in experiments in which 13C-enriched methane was used as the tracer. A Vmax for methane oxidation could be calculated when the methane concentration was sufficiently high to result in zero-order kinetics throughout the entire transport interval. Methane breakthrough curves could be simulated by modifying a one-dimensional adevection-dispersion transport model to include a Michaelis-Menten-based consumption term for methane oxidation. The Km values for methane oxidation that gave the best match for the breakthrough curve peaks were 6.0 and 9.0 microM for the uncontaminated and contaminated sites, respectively. Natural-gradient tracer tests are a promising approach for assessing microbial processes and for testing in situ bioremediation potential in groundwater systems. PMID:1892389

  15. Structureborne noise measurements on a small twin-engine aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, J. E., III; Martini, K. F.

    1988-01-01

    Structureborne noise measurements performed on a twin-engine aircraft (Beechcraft Baron) are reported. There are two overall objectives of the test program. The first is to obtain data to support the development of analytical models of the wing and fuselage, while the second is to evaluate effects of structural parameters on cabin noise. Measurements performed include structural and acoustic responses to impact excitation, structural and acoustic loss factors, and modal parameters of the wing. Path alterations include added mass to simulate fuel, variations in torque of bolts joining wing and fuselage, and increased acoustic absorption. Conclusions drawn regarding these measurements are presented.

  16. Accurate aircraft wind measurements using the global positioning system (GPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Dobosy, R.J.; Crawford, T.L., McMillen, R.T., Dumas, E.J.

    1996-11-01

    High accuracy measurements of the spatial distribution of wind speed are required in the study of turbulent exchange between the atmosphere and the earth. The use of a differential global positioning system (GPS) to determine the sensor velocity vector component of wind speed is discussed in this paper. The results of noise and rocking testing are summarized, and fluxes obtained from the GPS-based methods are compared to those measured from systems on towers and airplanes. The GPS-based methods provided usable measurements that compared well with tower and aircraft data at a significantly lower cost. 21 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  17. In Situ Measurements of Natural Radioactivity in Selected Igneous Rocks of the Opava Mountain Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dżaluk, Agnieszka; Malczewski, Dariusz; Żaba, Jerzy; Dziurowicz, Maria

    2014-09-01

    In situ gamma-ray measurements of four igneous rocks were taken in the Opava Mountains (Eastern Sudetes, Poland). The activity of naturally occurring radionuclides was measured using a portable GX3020 gamma-ray spectrometry workstation. The activity concentrations of 40K varied from 914 ± 17 Bqkg-1 (gneiss, Kamienna Góra) to 2019 ± 37 Bqkg-1 (weathered granite, Sławniowice), while those of 232Th from 7.5 ± 0.6 Bqkg-1 (weathered granite, Sławniowice) to 68 ± 0.9 Bqkg-1 (migmatitic gneiss, Nadziejów). The activities associated with 238U decay series ranged from 10 ± 0.4 Bqkg-1 (weathered granite, Sławniowice) to 62 ± 1.6 Bqkg-1 (gneiss, Kamienna Góra). The results will be used in compiling Radiological Atlas of the Sudetes

  18. Comparison of in situ stratospheric ozone measurements obtained during the MAP/GLOBUS 1983 campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aimedieu, P.; Matthews, W. A.; Attmannspacher, W.; Hartmannsgruber, R.; Cisneros, J.; Komhyr, W.; Robbins, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    Data from five types of in situ ozone sensors flown aboard ballons during the MAP/GLOBUS 1983 campaign were found to agree to within 5 percent uncertainty throughout the middle atmosphere. A description of the individual techniques and the error budget is given in addition to explanations for the discrepancies found at higher and lower altitudes. In comparison to UV photometry values, results from two electrochemical techniques were found to be greater in the lower atmosphere and to be lower in the upper atmosphere. In general, olefin chemiluminescence results were within 8 percent of the UV photometry results. Ozone column contents measured by the indigo colorization technique for two altitude regions of about 6 km height were greater than measurements from other techniques by 52 and 17 percent, respectively.

  19. Versatile variable temperature insert at the DEIMOS beamline for in situ electrical transport measurements.

    PubMed

    Joly, L; Muller, B; Sternitzky, E; Faullumel, J G; Boulard, A; Otero, E; Choueikani, F; Kappler, J P; Studniarek, M; Bowen, M; Ohresser, P

    2016-05-01

    The design and the first experiments are described of a versatile cryogenic insert used for its electrical transport capabilities. The insert is designed for the cryomagnet installed on the DEIMOS beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron dedicated to magnetic characterizations through X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. This development was spurred by the multifunctional properties of novel materials such as multiferroics, in which, for example, the magnetic and electrical orders are intertwined and may be probed using XAS. The insert thus enables XAS to in situ probe this interplay. The implementation of redundant wiring and careful shielding also enables studies on operating electronic devices. Measurements on magnetic tunnel junctions illustrate the potential of the equipment toward XAS studies of in operando electronic devices.

  20. Chromosome translocations measured by fluorescence in-situ hybridization: A promising biomarker

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.

    1995-10-01

    A biomarker for exposure and risk assessment would be most useful if it employs an endpoint that is highly quantitative, is stable with time, and is relevant to human risk. Recent advances in chromosome staining using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) facilitate fast and reliable measurement of reciprocal translocations, a kind of DNA damage linked to both prior exposure and risk. In contrast to other biomarkers available, the frequency of reciprocal translocations in individuals exposed to whole-body radiation is stable with time post exposure, has a rather small inter-individual variability, and can be measured accurately at the low levels. Here, the authors discuss results from their studies demonstrating that chromosome painting can be used to reconstruct radiation dose for workers exposed within the dose limits, for individuals exposed a long time ago, and even for those who have been diagnosed with leukemia but not yet undergone therapy.

  1. In Situ Frequency Measurement of Inidividual Nanostructures Using Fiber Optical Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Duden, Thomas; Duden, Thomas; Radmilovic, Velimir

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we describe a setup for the resonance frequency measurement of nanocantilevers, which displays both high spatial selectivity and sensitivity to specimen vibrations by utilizing a tapered uncoated fiber tip. The spatial selectivity is determined by the tip geometry, the high sensitivity to vibrations stems from interference of wave fronts reflected on the specimen and on the fiber tip itself. No reference plane on the specimen is needed, as demonstrated with the example of a freestanding silicon nitride cantilever. The resulting system is integrated in the DB-235 dual beam FIB system, thus allowing the measurement of sample responses in-situ, during observation in SEM mode. By combining optical interferometry and narrow band RF amplification and detection, we demonstrate an exceptional vibrational sensitivity at high spatial resolution.

  2. Porous silicon structural evolution from in-situ luminescence and Raman measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, D.R.; Kelly, M.J.; Guilinger, T.R.; Simpson, R.L.

    1996-05-01

    The authors performed in-situ photoluminescence and Raman measurements on an anodized silicon surface in the HF/ethanol solution used for anodization. The porous silicon thereby produced, while resident in HF/ethanol, does not immediately exhibit intense photoluminescence. Intense photoluminescence develops spontaneously in HF/ethanol after 18--24 hours or with replacement of the HF/ethanol with water. These results support a quantum confinement mechanism in which exciton migration to traps and nonradiative recombination dominates the de-excitation pathways until silicon nanocrystallites are physically separated and energetically decoupled by hydrofluoric acid etching or surface oxidation. The porous silicon surface, as produced by anodization, shows large differences in photoluminescence intensity and peak wavelength over millimeter distances. Parallel Raman measurements implicate nanometer-size silicon particles in the photoluminescence mechanism.

  3. In Situ Thermal Ion Temperature Measurements in the E Region Ionosphere: Techniques, Results, and Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchill, J. K.; Archer, W. E.; Clemmons, J. H.; Knudsen, D. J.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    In situ measurements of thermal ion temperature are rare at E region altitudes, which are too low for satellites. Here we present ion temperature measurements from a Thermal Ion Imager (TII) that flew on NASA sounding rocket 36.234 (the "Joule-2" mission) into the nightside E region ionosphere on 19 January 2007 from Poker Flat, AK. The TII is an electrostatic ion energy/angle imager that provides 2D ion distributions at 8 ms resolution. Ion temperatures are derived at altitudes between 100 km and 190 km by modelling the detector total count rate versus ion bulk flow angle with respect to the plane of the imager's field of view. Modelling this count rate spin profile shows that the analysis technique is robust against a number of error sources, including variability in payload floating potential, ion upflow, and aperture widening due to reflections from electrode surfaces. A significant uncertainty is associated with the average mass of the ions, which is not measured independently. Using the International Reference Ionosphere model to estimate ion mass, we obtain an ion temperature of 1300 K at 125 km, increasing to more than 3000 K at 180 km. These temperatures are much larger than neutral temperatures obtained from an ionization gauge on the same rocket (Tn˜500 K at 125 km, ˜600 K at 180 km), and do not agree with incoherent scatter radar observations in the vicinity of the rocket. These anomalous ion temperatures are, however, consistent with results from an independent analysis of the shape of the ion distribution images from a similar instrument on a separate payload flown 10 minutes earlier [Archer, MSc Thesis, University of Calgary, 2009]. We conclude that the high ion temperature readings are an artifact related to the environment in the vicinity of the probe, and investigate mechanisms for the cause. We discuss the implications of this effect for future in situ attempts to measure ion temperature in the E region ionosphere.

  4. Comparison of in-situ measurements and satellite-derived surface emissivity over Italian volcanic areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, Malvina; Musacchio, Massimo; Cammarano, Diego; Fabrizia Buongiorno, Maria; Amici, Stefania; Piscini, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    In this work we compare ground measurements of emissivity collected during dedicated fields campaign on Mt. Etna and Solfatara of Pozzuoli volcanoes and acquired by means of Micro-FTIR (Fourier Thermal Infrared spectrometer) instrument with the emissivity obtained by using single ASTER data (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer, ASTER 05) and the ASTER emissivity map extract from ASTER Global Emissivity Database (GED), released by LP DAAC on April 2, 2014. The database was developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology. The database includes land surface emissivity derived from ASTER data acquired over the contiguous United States, Africa, Arabian Peninsula, Australia, Europe, and China. Through this analysis we want to investigate the differences existing between the ASTER-GED dataset (average from 2000 to 2008 seasoning independent) and fall in-situ emissivity measurement. Moreover the role of different spatial resolution characterizing ASTER and MODIS, 90mt and 1km respectively, by comparing them with in situ measurements, is analyzed. Possible differences can be due also to the different algorithms used for the emissivity estimation, Temperature and Emissivity Separation algorithm for ASTER TIR band( Gillespie et al, 1998) and the classification-based emissivity method (Snyder and al, 1998) for MODIS. Finally land surface temperature products generated using ASTER-GED and ASTER 05 emissivity are also analyzed. Gillespie, A. R., Matsunaga, T., Rokugawa, S., & Hook, S. J. (1998). Temperature and emissivity separation from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) images. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 36, 1113-1125. Snyder, W.C., Wan, Z., Zhang, Y., & Feng, Y.-Z. (1998). Classification-based emissivity for land surface temperature measurement from space. International Journal of Remote Sensing, 19

  5. Proof-of-principle tests of the REKA method for in situ thermophysical property measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Danko, G.; Emert, G.

    1995-12-01

    It would be advantageous to measure rock thermophysical properties at Yucca Mountain around the exploratory drifts at some 500-1000 points in standard rockbolt holes. The in situ values, being primary site characteristics, would be applicable to (1) validate highly speculative empirical models for rockmass effects, (2) analyze the variability of rock properties at low cost, (3) identify initial convective effects, (4) monitor rock dryout due to ventilation, and (5) support hydrothermal site characterization. A scaled version of the thermal probe method, called REKA (Rapid Evaluation of K and Alpha) has been tested in the Mackay School of Mines Thermophysical Laboratory under different, controlled conditions in order to evaluate its application potential for field measurements when rockmass effects are present. The REKA method involves a single borehole probe with a heater and temperature measurement section. An elliptical temperature field is generated by the heater, and the temperature distribution along the length of the probe is recorded at several locations and at given time intervals for a period of 24 hours. The scaled REKA probe requires an approximately 0.9 m-deep (3 ft) hole which is 0.013 m (1/2 in) in diameter. The full-size probe version that has been used in underground mines requires approximately 1.8 m-deep (6 ft) hole with (0.045 m 1 3/4 in) diameter. Other probe sizes can also be selected in order to apply the method to the standard drillholes that are used for rockbolt installations. Three laboratory test series were conducted using different, controlled conditions in two host test beds to determine the response of the REKA probe to conditions that may be present during actual in situ measurements.

  6. In-Situ Measurement of Hall Thruster Erosion Using a Fiber Optic Regression Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzink, Kurt A.; Korman, Valentin

    2008-01-01

    One potential life-limiting mechanism in a Hall thruster is the erosion of the ceramic material comprising the discharge channel. This is especially true for missions that require long thrusting periods and can be problematic for lifetime qualification, especially when attempting to qualify a thruster by analysis rather than a test lasting the full duration of the mission. In addition to lifetime, several analytical and numerical models include electrode erosion as a mechanism contributing to enhanced transport properties. However, there is still a great deal of dispute over the importance of erosion to transport in Hall thrusters. The capability to perform an in-situ measurement of discharge channel erosion is useful in addressing both the lifetime and transport concerns. An in-situ measurement would allow for real-time data regarding the erosion rates at different operating points, providing a quick method for empirically anchoring any analysis geared towards lifetime qualification. Erosion rate data over a thruster's operating envelope would also be useful in the modeling of the detailed physics inside the discharge chamber. A recent fundamental sensor development effort has led to a novel regression, erosion, and ablation sensor technology (REAST). The REAST sensor allows for measurement of real-time surface erosion rates at a discrete surface location. The sensor was tested using a linear Hall thruster geometry, which served as a means of producing plasma erosion of a ceramic discharge chamber. The mass flow rate, discharge voltage, and applied magnetic field strength could be varied, allowing for erosion measurements over a broad thruster operating envelope. Results are presented demonstrating the ability of the REAST sensor to capture not only the insulator erosion rates but also changes in these rates as a function of the discharge parameters.

  7. Mars dayside temperature from airglow limb profiles : comparison with in situ measurements and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, Jean-Claude; Bougher, Stephen; Montmessin, Franck; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Stiepen, A.

    The thermal structure of the Mars upper atmosphere is the result of the thermal balance between heating by EUV solar radiation, infrared heating and cooling, conduction and dynamic influences such as gravity waves, planetary waves, and tides. It has been derived from observations performed from different spacecraft. These include in situ measurements of orbital drag whose strength depends on the local gas density. Atmospheric temperatures were determined from the altitude variation of the density measured in situ by the Viking landers and orbital drag measurements. Another method is based on remote sensing measurements of ultraviolet airglow limb profiles obtained over 40 years ago with spectrometers during the Mariner 6 and 7 flybys and from the Mariner 9 orbiter. Comparisons with model calculations indicate that they both reflect the CO_2 scale height from which atmospheric temperatures have been deduced. Upper atmospheric temperatures varying over the wide range 270-445 K, with a mean value of 325 K were deduced from the topside scale height of the airglow vertical profile. We present an analysis of limb profiles of the CO Cameron (a(3) Pi-X(1) Sigma(+) ) and CO_2(+) doublet (B(2) Sigma_u(+) - X(2) PiΠ_g) airglows observed with the SPICAM instrument on board Mars Express. We show that the temperature in the Mars thermosphere is very variable with a mean value of 270 K, but values ranging between 150 and 400 K have been observed. These values are compared to earlier determinations and model predictions. No clear dependence on solar zenith angle, latitude or season is apparent. Similarly, exospheric variations with F10.7 in the SPICAM airglow dataset are small over the solar minimum to moderate conditions sampled by Mars Express since 2005. We conclude that an unidentified process is the cause of the large observed temperature variability, which dominates the other sources of temperature variations.

  8. Evapotranspiration partitioning through in-situ oxygen isotope measurements in an oasis cropland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xue-Fa

    2016-04-01

    The oxygen isotope compositions of ecosystem water pools and fluxes are useful tracers in the water cycle. As part of the Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (HiWATER) program, high-frequency and near-continuous in situ measurements of 18O composition of atmospheric vapor (δv) and of evapotranspiration (δET) were made with the flux-gradient method using a cavity ring-down spectroscopy water vapor isotope analyzer. At the sub-daily scale, we found, in conjunction with intensive isotopic measurements of other ecosystem water pools, that the differences between 18O composition of transpiration (δT) and of xylem water (δx) were negligible in early afternoon (13:00-15:00 Beijing time) when ET approached the daytime maximum, indicating isotopic steady state. At the daily scale, for the purpose of flux partitioning, δT was approximated by δx at early afternoon hours, and the 18O composition of soil evaporation (δE) was obtained from the Craig-Gordon model with a moisture-dependent soil resistance. The relative contribution of transpiration to evapotranspiration ranged from 0.71 to 0.96 with a mean of 0.87 ± 0.052 for the growing season according to the isotopic labeling, which was good agreement with soil lysimeter measurements showing a mean transpiration fraction of 0.86 ± 0.058. At the growing season scale, the predicted18O composition of runoff water was within the range of precipitation and irrigation water according to the isotopic mass conservation. The 18O mass conservation requires that the decreased δ18O of ET should be balanced by enhanced δ18O of runoff water. (Wen, XF*, Yang, B, Sun, XM, Lee, X. 2015. Evapotranspiration partitioning through in-situ oxygen isotope measurements in an oasis cropland. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology , doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2015.12.003).

  9. In Situ Water Vapor and Ozone Measurements in Lhasa and Kunming during the Asian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, L.; Bian, J.; Paulik, L.; Voemel, H.; Lu, D.; Chen, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Asian summer monsoon (ASM) anticyclone circulation system is recognized to be a significant transport pathway for water vapor and pollutants to enter the stratosphere. The observational evidence, however, is largely based on satellite retrievals. We report the first coincident in situ measurements of water vapor and ozone within the ASM anticyclone. The combined water vapor and ozonesondes were launched from Kunming, China in August 2009 and Lhasa, China in August 2010. Total of 11 and 12 sondes were launched in Kunming and Lhasa, respectively. We present the key characteristics of these measurements, and provide a comparison to similar measurements from Alajuela, Costa Rica, an equatorial tropical location, during the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4) campaign in July and August of 2007. Results show that the ASM anticyclone region has higher water vapor and lower ozone concentrations in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere than the TC4 observations. The results also show that the cold point tropopause in the ASM region has a higher average height and potential temperature. The in situ observations therefore support the satellite-based conclusions that the ASM is an effective transport pathway for water vapor to enter stratosphere. The data also show that the vertical structures of the region in and around the anticyclone are different: while the estimated level of main convective outflow is higher in Lhasa (~13 km, or 358 K) than in Kunming (~11.5 km, 354 K), the Kunming measurements, owing to its position of near the edge of the anticyclone, show influence of extreme convective events in air masses transported from remote western Pacific.

  10. Comparison of in-situ measurements and satellite-derived surface emissivity over Italian volcanic areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, Malvina; Musacchio, Massimo; Cammarano, Diego; Fabrizia Buongiorno, Maria; Amici, Stefania; Piscini, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    In this work we compare ground measurements of emissivity collected during dedicated fields campaign on Mt. Etna and Solfatara of Pozzuoli volcanoes and acquired by means of Micro-FTIR (Fourier Thermal Infrared spectrometer) instrument with the emissivity obtained by using single ASTER data (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer, ASTER 05) and the ASTER emissivity map extract from ASTER Global Emissivity Database (GED), released by LP DAAC on April 2, 2014. The database was developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology. The database includes land surface emissivity derived from ASTER data acquired over the contiguous United States, Africa, Arabian Peninsula, Australia, Europe, and China. Through this analysis we want to investigate the differences existing between the ASTER-GED dataset (average from 2000 to 2008 seasoning independent) and fall in-situ emissivity measurement. Moreover the role of different spatial resolution characterizing ASTER and MODIS, 90mt and 1km respectively, by comparing them with in situ measurements, is analyzed. Possible differences can be due also to the different algorithms used for the emissivity estimation, Temperature and Emissivity Separation algorithm for ASTER TIR band( Gillespie et al, 1998) and the classification-based emissivity method (Snyder and al, 1998) for MODIS. Finally land surface temperature products generated using ASTER-GED and ASTER 05 emissivity are also analyzed. Gillespie, A. R., Matsunaga, T., Rokugawa, S., & Hook, S. J. (1998). Temperature and emissivity separation from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) images. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 36, 1113‑1125. Snyder, W.C., Wan, Z., Zhang, Y., & Feng, Y.-Z. (1998). Classification-based emissivity for land surface temperature measurement from space. International Journal of Remote Sensing

  11. Improved Beam Diagnostic Spatial Calibration Using In-Situ Measurements of Beam Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrystal, C.; Burrell, K. H.; Pace, D. C.; Grierson, B. A.; Pablant, N. A.

    2014-10-01

    A new technique has been developed for determining the measurement geometry of the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic (CER) on DIII-D. This technique removes uncertainty in the measurement geometry related to the position of the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This has been accomplished by combining standard measurements that use in-vessel calibration targets with spectroscopic measurements of Doppler shifted and Stark split beam emission to fully describe the neutral beam positions and CER views. A least squares fitting routine determines the measurement geometry consistent with all the calibration data. The use of beam emission measurements allows the position of the neutral beams to be determined in-situ by the same views that makeup the CER diagnostic. Results indicate that changes in the measurement geometry are required to create a consistent set of calibration measurements. However, changes in quantities derived from the geometry, e.g. ion temperature gradient and poloidal rotation, are small. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-07ER54917, DE-FC02-04ER54698, and DE-AC02-09H11466.

  12. In situ measurements of the oblique incidence sound absorption coefficient for finite sized absorbers.

    PubMed

    Ottink, Marco; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Fernandez-Grande, Efren; Trojgaard, Per; Tiana-Roig, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Absorption coefficients are mostly measured in reverberation rooms or with impedance tubes. Since these methods are only suitable for measuring the random incidence and the normal incidence absorption coefficient, there exists an increasing need for absorption coefficient measurement of finite absorbers at oblique incidence in situ. Due to the edge diffraction effect, oblique incidence methods considering an infinite sample fail to measure the absorption coefficient at large incidence angles of finite samples. This paper aims for the development of a measurement method that accounts for the finiteness of the absorber. A sound field model, which accounts for scattering from the finite absorber edges, assuming plane wave incidence is derived. A significant influence of the finiteness on the radiation impedance and the corresponding absorption coefficient is found. A finite surface method, which combines microphone array measurements over a finite sample with the sound field model in an inverse manner, is proposed. Besides, a temporal subtraction method, a microphone array method, impedance tube measurements, and an equivalent fluid model are used for validation. The finite surface method gives promising agreement with theory, especially at near grazing incidence. Thus, the finite surface method is proposed for further measurements at large incidence angles. PMID:26827003

  13. Quantitatively Measuring In situ Flows using a Self-Contained Underwater Velocimetry Apparatus (SCUVA)

    PubMed Central

    Katija, Kakani; Colin, Sean P.; Costello, John H.; Dabiri, John O.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to directly measure velocity fields in a fluid environment is necessary to provide empirical data for studies in fields as diverse as oceanography, ecology, biology, and fluid mechanics. Field measurements introduce practical challenges such as environmental conditions, animal availability, and the need for field-compatible measurement techniques. To avoid these challenges, scientists typically use controlled laboratory environments to study animal-fluid interactions. However, it is reasonable to question whether one can extrapolate natural behavior (i.e., that which occurs in the field) from laboratory measurements. Therefore, in situ quantitative flow measurements are needed to accurately describe animal swimming in their natural environment. We designed a self-contained, portable device that operates independent of any connection to the surface, and can provide quantitative measurements of the flow field surrounding an animal. This apparatus, a self-contained underwater velocimetry apparatus (SCUVA), can be operated by a single scuba diver in depths up to 40 m. Due to the added complexity inherent of field conditions, additional considerations and preparation are required when compared to laboratory measurements. These considerations include, but are not limited to, operator motion, predicting position of swimming targets, available natural suspended particulate, and orientation of SCUVA relative to the flow of interest. The following protocol is intended to address these common field challenges and to maximize measurement success. PMID:22064442

  14. Airborne Sunphotometer Studies of Aerosol Properties and Effects, Including Closure Among Satellite, Suborbital Remote, and In situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russlee, Philip B.; Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J. M.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Ramirez, S. A.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Airborne sunphotometry has been used to measure aerosols from North America, Europe, and Africa in coordination with satellite and in situ measurements in TARFOX (1996), ACE-2 (1997), PRIDE (2000), and SAFARI 2000. Similar coordinated measurements of Asian aerosols are being conducted this spring in ACE-Asia and are planned for North American aerosols this summer in CLAMS. This paper summarizes the approaches used, key results, and implications for aerosol properties and effects, such as single scattering albedo and regional radiative forcing. The approaches exploit the three-dimensional mobility of airborne sunphotometry to access satellite scenes over diverse surfaces (including open ocean with and without sunglint) and to match exactly the atmospheric layers sampled by airborne in situ measurements and other radiometers. These measurements permit tests of the consistency, or closure, among such diverse measurements as aerosol size-resolved chemical composition; number or mass concentration; light extinction, absorption, and scattering (total, hemispheric back and 180 deg.); and radiative fluxes. In this way the airborne sunphotometer measurements provide a key link between satellite and in situ measurements that helps to understand any discrepancies that are found. These comparisons have led to several characteristic results. Typically these include: (1) Better agreement among different types of remote measurements than between remote and in situ measurements. (2) More extinction derived from transmission measurements than from in situ measurements. (3) Larger aerosol absorption inferred from flux radiometry than from in situ measurements. Aerosol intensive properties derived from these closure studies have been combined with satellite-retrieved fields of optical depth to produce fields of regional radiative forcing. We show results for the North Atlantic derived from AVHRR optical depths and aerosol intensive properties from TARFOX and ACE-2. Companion papers

  15. Diel Variability in Dissolved Organic Matter Composition Determined by in-situ Optical Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, R. G.; Pellerin, B. A.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Downing, B. D.; Kraus, T. E.; Hernes, P. J.

    2006-12-01

    Annual and interannual variability in DOM concentration and composition in rivers has been well documented however few studies have evaluated changes in DOM over short time scales such as diel cycles. Recent research has shown that concentrations of dissolved oxygen, inorganic nitrogen and trace metals for example vary considerably over diel cycles in streams and rivers due to a combination of biological, physical and chemical processes. In this study DOM variability was investigated over the diel cycle under stable riverine summer flow conditions in the San Joaquin River (California, U.S.A.) to evaluate if high resolution in-situ optical measurements revealed changes in DOM concentration and composition. Bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations showed no clear trend over diel cycles but in contrast the absorption coefficient of chromophoric DOM (CDOM) measured in situ at 350nm (a350 m-1 showed a clear diurnal pattern with CDOM maxima in the late evening and minima in the early morning. Similar diurnal patterns were recorded at a254 m- 1 and a440 m-1, absorbance wavelengths which have also been referred too as proxies for DOC quality and quantity. Chlorophyll-a fluorescence showed the same diurnal pattern as CDOM absorbance with early evening maxima and early morning minima in concentrations and previous studies indicate that phytoplankton is the primary source of organic matter in the San Joaquin River during summer months. In situ DOM fluorescence (measured at excitiation 370 nm, emission 450 nm) and spectral slope (S) calculated using a non-linear fit of an exponential function to the absorption spectrum in the range of 290 - 350 nm both showed clear diurnal patterns. With respect to DOM fluorescence and S290-350 maxima were recorded in the morning and minima in the late evening and so were out of phase with CDOM absorbance and chlorophyll-a fluorescence. This asynchronous pattern in DOM fluorescence and absorption coefficients over diel cycles in our

  16. Using STOQS and stoqstoolbox for in situ Measurement Data Access in Matlab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Castejón, F.; Schlining, B.; McCann, M. P.

    2012-12-01

    This poster presents the stoqstoolbox, an extension to Matlab that simplifies the loading of in situ measurement data directly from STOQS databases. STOQS (Spatial Temporal Oceanographic Query System) is a geospatial database tool designed to provide efficient access to data following the CF-NetCDF Discrete Samples Geometries convention. Data are loaded from CF-NetCDF files into a STOQS database where indexes are created on depth, spatial coordinates and other parameters, e.g. platform type. STOQS provides consistent, simple and efficient methods to query for data. For example, we can request all measurements with a standard_name of sea_water_temperature between two times and from between two depths. Data access is simpler because the data are retrieved by parameter irrespective of platform or mission file names. Access is more efficient because data are retrieved via the index on depth and only the requested data are retrieved from the database and transferred into the Matlab workspace. Applications in the stoqstoolbox query the STOQS database via an HTTP REST application programming interface; they follow the Data Access Object pattern, enabling highly customizable query construction. Data are loaded into Matlab structures that clearly indicate latitude, longitude, depth, measurement data value, and platform name. The stoqstoolbox is designed to be used in concert with other tools, such as nctoolbox, which can load data from any OPeNDAP data source. With these two toolboxes a user can easily work with in situ and other gridded data, such as from numerical models and remote sensing platforms. In order to show the capability of stoqstoolbox we will show an example of model validation using data collected during the May-June 2012 field experiment conducted by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) in Monterey Bay, California. The data are available from the STOQS server at http://odss.mbari.org/canon/stoqs_may2012/query/. Over 14 million data points of

  17. TEPC reference measurements at aircraft altitudes during a solar storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, P.; Latocha, M.; Rollet, S.; Stehno, G.

    The Sun goes through cycles of high and low activity that repeats approximately every 11 years. The solar activity is correlated to the number of dark spots on the Sun which are sources of sudden, sporadic eruptions, releasing energetic particles into space. This can directly affect the ionosphere and radio communications around the Earth. A spectacular and unusually high sunspot activity occurred during October and November 2003, commonly referred to as the Halloween Storms. The increased radiation exposure at aircraft altitudes during such an event is of major concern to international aviation organizations, airlines, governmental authorities and aircraft crew as well as flight passengers. Here, we report radiation exposure measurements made by ARC Seibersdorf research (ARCS) onboard commercial aircraft using a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). A unique set of long-term measurements was collected before, during and after the storm at flight altitudes. The results of these investigations give an understanding of the combined effects of magnetic field disturbances and solar particle fluence due to a solar storm, showing a 70% variation in the radiation exposure at typical flight altitudes. Whilst several predictive codes exist the radiation exposure to aircrew during a solar storm is difficult to predict by calculation models. These calculation models are still struggling with the high uncertainty of spectral input data provided by satellites during a solar storm. A reliable dose assessment concept to assess the radiation exposure to aircrew caused by a solar storm using a network of dosimeter instruments on-board several aircraft can be achieved. Such a proposal has been already introduced by experts of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS).

  18. Airborne Aerosol In situ Measurements during TCAP: A Closure Study of Total Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Flynn, Connor J.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Chand, Duli; Shilling, John E.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Barnard, James C.; Sedlacek, Art; Schmid, Beat

    2015-07-31

    We present here a framework for calculating the total scattering of both non-absorbing and absorbing aerosol at ambient conditions from aircraft data. The synergistically employed aircraft data involve aerosol microphysical, chemical, and optical components and ambient relative humidity measurements. Our framework is developed emphasizing the explicit use of the complementary chemical composition data for estimating the complex refractive index (RI) of particles, and thus obtaining improved ambient size spectra derived from Optical Particle Counter (OPC) measurements. The feasibility of our framework for improved calculations of total aerosol scattering is demonstrated for different ambient conditions with a wide range of relative humidities (from 5 to 80%) using three types of data collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft during the recent Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Namely, these three types of data employed are: (1) size distributions measured by an Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS; 0.06-1 µm), a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer (PCASP; 0.1-3 µm) and a Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS; 0.6- >10 µm), (2) chemical composition data measured by an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS; 0.06-0.6 µm) and a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2; 0.06-0.6 µm), and (3) the dry total scattering coefficient measured by a TSI integrating nephelometer at three wavelengths (0.45, 0.55, 0.7 µm) and scattering enhancement factor measured with a humidification system at three RHs (near 45%, 65% and 90%) at a single wavelength (0.525 µm). We demonstrate that good agreement (~10% on average) between the observed and calculated scattering at these three wavelengths can be obtained using the best available chemical composition data for the RI-based correction of the OPC-derived size spectra. We also demonstrate that ignoring the RI-based correction and using non-representative RI values can cause a substantial underestimation (~40

  19. Mercury dynamics in a San Francisco estuary tidal wetland: assessing dynamics using in situ measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Fleck, Jacob A.; Downing, Bryan D.; Boss, Emmanuel; Pellerin, Brian A.; Ganju, Neil K.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Byington, Amy A.; Heim, Wesley A.; Stephenson, Mark; Fujii, Roger

    2012-01-01

    We used high-resolution in situ measurements of turbidity and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) to quantitatively estimate the tidally driven exchange of mercury (Hg) between the waters of the San Francisco estuary and Browns Island, a tidal wetland. Turbidity and FDOM—representative of particle-associated and filter-passing Hg, respectively—together predicted 94 % of the observed variability in measured total mercury concentration in unfiltered water samples (UTHg) collected during a single tidal cycle in spring, fall, and winter, 2005–2006. Continuous in situ turbidity and FDOM data spanning at least a full spring-neap period were used to generate UTHg concentration time series using this relationship, and then combined with water discharge measurements to calculate Hg fluxes in each season. Wetlands are generally considered to be sinks for sediment and associated mercury. However, during the three periods of monitoring, Browns Island wetland did not appreciably accumulate Hg. Instead, gradual tidally driven export of UTHg from the wetland offset the large episodic on-island fluxes associated with high wind events. Exports were highest during large spring tides, when ebbing waters relatively enriched in FDOM, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and filter-passing mercury drained from the marsh into the open waters of the estuary. On-island flux of UTHg, which was largely particle-associated, was highest during strong winds coincident with flood tides. Our results demonstrate that processes driving UTHg fluxes in tidal wetlands encompass both the dissolved and particulate phases and multiple timescales, necessitating longer term monitoring to adequately quantify fluxes.

  20. Water quality monitoring of Al-Habbaniyah Lake using remote sensing and in situ measurements.

    PubMed

    Al-Fahdawi, Ahmed A H; Rabee, Adel M; Al-Hirmizy, Shaheen M

    2015-06-01

    The use of remote sensing and GIS in water monitoring and management has been long recognized. This paper, however discusses the application of remote sensing and GIS specifically in monitoring water quality parameters in Al-Habbaniyah Lake, and the results were compared with in situ measurements. Variations of different parameters under investigation were as follows: temperature (15-33°C), pH (7-9), dissolved oxygen (6-11 mg/L), BOD5 (0.5-1.8), electrical conductivity (200-2280 μS/cm), TDS (147-1520 mg/L), TSS (68-3200), turbidity (5-51), nitrate (0.7-20 mg/l), phosphate (77-220 μg/l), and chlorophyll-a (0.9-130 μg/l). Remote sensing results revealed that the band 5 was most likely significantly correlated with turbidity in the winter. Band 2 and 3 was most likely significantly correlated with TDS in autumn and summer, while band 2 was most likely significantly correlated with TSS in autumn, band 2 is most likely significantly correlated with chlorophyll-a in autumn. The current study results demonstrated convergence between in situ and remote sensing readings. The models were used to explore the values of each of chlorophyll-a, TSS,TDS, and turbidity did not deviate much from the values actually measured in the three seasons. Nevertheless, they were very useful in anticipating all seasons of the study due to the insignificant deviation between the remotely sensed values and actual measured values.

  1. Galileo In-Situ Dust Measurements and the Physics of Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Hamilton, D. P.; Moissl, R.; Gruen, E.

    2007-12-01

    During its late orbital mission about Jupiter, the Galileo spacecraft flew twice through the giant planet's gossamer ring system. The dusty ring material is produced when interplanetary impactors collide with embedded moonlets. Optical images imply that the rings are constrained both horizontally and vertically by the orbits of the moons Amalthea and Thebe with the exception of a faint outward protrusion called the Thebe Extension. During the ring passages, the Galileo impact-ionization dust detector counted a few thousand impacts but only about 100 complete data sets of dust impacts (i.e. impact time, impact speed, mass, impact direction, etc.) were successfully transmitted to Earth. The instrument verified the outward extension of the gossamer ring beyond Thebe's orbit and measured a major reduction in particle ring material interior to Thebe's orbit. The existence of this partially evacuated gap in ring material is also indirectly confirmed by Galileo in-situ energetic particle measurements (Norbert Krupp, priv. comm.). Detected particle sizes range from about 0.2 to 4 micron, extending the size distribution by an order of magnitude towards smaller particles than previously derived from optical imaging (Showalter et al., Icarus 2007). The grain size distribution increases towards smaller grains, showing a much higher proportion of small particles in the Amalthea gossamer ring than in the Thebe ring and the Thebe Extension. Our analysis shows that particles contributing most to the optical cross-section are about 4 micron in radius, in agreement with imaging results. Finally, Galileo also detected some micron and sub-micron grains on highly inclined orbits with inclinations up to 20 degrees. Recent modelling (Hamilton & Krueger, Nature, submitted) shows that time variable electromagnetic effects can account for all of these surprising results. In particular, when the ring particles travel through Jupiter's shadow, dust grain electric charges vary systematically

  2. A miniature all-solid-state calcium electrode applied to in situ seawater measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui; Wang, You; Luo, Zhiyuan; Pan, Yiwen

    2013-12-01

    An all-solid-state miniature calcium ion selective electrode (ISE) based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT(PSS)) for continuous in situ measurement in seawater was studied. The electrode substrate was a platinum (Pt) wire of 0.5 mm diameter and PEDOT(PSS) was electropolymerized on one end of the Pt wire to act as the solid contact of this calcium ISE. The PEDOT(PSS) layer was covered with a calcium-selective poly(vinyl chloride) membrane, which contained ETH129 as calcium ionophore, potassium tetrakis-(p-chlorophenyl)borate as lipophilic anion and bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate as the plasticizer. Experiments using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and reversed chronopotentiometry illustrated that electropolymerized PEDOT(PSS) decreased the resistance and improved the stability of the electrode. The sensors can work stably in the calcium ion concentration range of 10-6-10-1 mol L-1 with the slope of 27.7 mV/decade. Also Na+, K+ and Mg2+ can hardly interfere with the performance of the electrode. This electrode was applied to measure the calcium ion concentration of seawater samples. The experimental data showed that the electrode can resist the corrosion of seawater and its reproducibility was good (SD < 0.1 mM kg-1). The lifetime of such an electrode was at least six months. Because of the wire-shape and the small size of such a liquid junction free calcium electrode, it is pressure-resistant and easy to package and seal, therefore it is suitable for use in underwater equipment for in situ seawater measurement.

  3. Comparison of vertical aerosol extinction coefficients from in-situ and LIDAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, B.; Herrmann, E.; Bucci, S.; Fierli, F.; Cairo, F.; Gysel, M.; Tillmann, R.; Größ, J.; Gobbi, G. P.; Di Liberto, L.; Di Donfrancesco, G.; Wiedensohler, A.; Weingartner, E.; Virtanen, A.; Mentel, T. F.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-07-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties were explored in a case study near the San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) ground station during the PEGASOS Po Valley campaign in the summer of 2012. A Zeppelin NT airship was employed to investigate the effect of the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer at altitudes between ~ 50-800 m above ground. Determined properties included the aerosol size distribution, the hygroscopic growth factor, the effective index of refraction and the light absorption coefficient. The first three parameters were used to retrieve the light scattering coefficient. Simultaneously, direct measurements of both the scattering and absorption coefficient were carried out at the SPC ground station. Additionally, a LIDAR system provided aerosol extinction coefficients for a vertically resolved comparison between in-situ and remote sensing results. First, the airborne results at low altitudes were validated with the ground measurements. Agreement within approximately ±25 and ±20% was found for the dry scattering and absorption coefficient, respectively. The single scattering albedo, ranged between 0.83 to 0.95, indicating the importance of the absorbing particles in the Po Valley region. A clear layering of the atmosphere was observed during the beginning of the flight (until ~ 10 local time) before the mixed layer (ML) was fully developed. Highest extinction coefficients were found at low altitudes, in the new ML, while values in the residual layer, which could be probed at the beginning of the flight at elevated altitudes, were lower. At the end of the flight (after ~ 12 local time) the ML was fully developed, resulting in constant extinction coefficients at all altitudes measured on the Zeppelin NT. LIDAR results captured these dynamic features well and good agreement was found for the extinction coefficients compared to the in-situ results, using fixed LIDAR ratios (LR) between 30 and 70 sr for the altitudes probed with the Zeppelin. These LR are

  4. Southern Ocean variability derived from GRACE retrievals, model simulations and in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böning, C.; Timmermann, R.; Macrander, A.; Schröter, J.; Boebel, O.

    2009-04-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) provides estimates of the Earth's static and time-variant gravity field. Solutions from various processing centres (GFZ, CSR, GRGS, JPL etc.) enable us to determine mass redistributions on the globe. Given that land signals are generally large compared to anomalies over the ocean, an assessment of the latter requires a particularly careful filtering of the data. We utilized the Finite Element Sea-Ice Ocean Model (FESOM) to develop a filtering algorithm which relies on the spatial coherency of ocean bottom pressure (OBP) anomalies. Taking large-scale circulation patterns into account, the new filter yields an improved representation of OBP (i.e. ocean mass) variability in the filtered GRACE data. In order to investigate the representation of Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) variability in the pattern-filtered GRACE retrievals, an analysis of OBP anomalies in FESOM results and in-situ measurements has been performed. A bottom pressure recorder array in the ACC region south of Africa (36°S-58°S, 1°W-7°E) provides data from 2002-2008. Based on anomalies of OBP gradients between individual instruments, these in-situ measurements give an estimate of the overall transport variability as well as of the movement of ACC fronts and transport redistribution between different sectors of the ACC. The validation of simulated and satellite-derived OBP anomaly gradients against these data yields a measure for the representation of this variability in FESOM and GRACE. Furthermore, model simulations are used to assess the relation between transport variations in individual filaments of the Southern Ocean and total transport variability in this and other sectors of the ACC.

  5. In situ measurement of atmospheric krypton and xenon on Mars with Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, P. G.; Malespin, C. A.; Franz, H. B.; Pepin, R. O.; Trainer, M. G.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Atreya, S. K.; Freissinet, C.; Jones, J. H.; Manning, H.; Owen, T.; Pavlov, A. A.; Wiens, R. C.; Wong, M. H.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2016-11-01

    Mars Science Laboratory's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation has measured all of the stable isotopes of the heavy noble gases krypton and xenon in the martian atmosphere, in situ, from the Curiosity Rover at Gale Crater, Mars. Previous knowledge of martian atmospheric krypton and xenon isotope ratios has been based upon a combination of the Viking mission's krypton and xenon detections and measurements of noble gas isotope ratios in martian meteorites. However, the meteorite measurements reveal an impure mixture of atmospheric, mantle, and spallation contributions. The xenon and krypton isotopic measurements reported here include the complete set of stable isotopes, unmeasured by Viking. The new results generally agree with Mars meteorite measurements but also provide a unique opportunity to identify various non-atmospheric heavy noble gas components in the meteorites. Kr isotopic measurements define a solar-like atmospheric composition, but deviating from the solar wind pattern at 80Kr and 82Kr in a manner consistent with contributions originating from neutron capture in Br. The Xe measurements suggest an intriguing possibility that isotopes lighter than 132Xe have been enriched to varying degrees by spallation and neutron capture products degassed to the atmosphere from the regolith, and a model is constructed to explore this possibility. Such a spallation component, however, is not apparent in atmospheric Xe trapped in the glassy phases of martian meteorites.

  6. Simultaneous infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance measurements for in situ studies of the metal/atmosphere interface

    SciTech Connect

    Aastrup, T.; Leygraf, C.

    1997-09-01

    A new experimental setup for in situ studies of the metal/atmosphere interface has been developed based on simultaneous infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements of a metal surface. It consists of an in situ chamber in which the metal can be exposed to a well-controlled atmosphere. Four external devices are connected to the in situ chamber; a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer with external optical compartments, a QCM sensor probe with a frequency counter, a corrosive air generator, and a corrosive air analyzing system. In order to demonstrate the capability of the IRAS/QCM setup, copper was exposed to purified air at 80% relative humidity and 25 C. Under these exposure conditions, the interface between copper and air consists of cuprous oxide and water physisorbed on the oxide. The kinetics of the cuprous oxide formation could be followed in situ with both techniques. The combined IRAS/QCM results show excellent agreement with previous combined IRAS and cathodic reduction measurements and with optical calculations of the IRAS response. Under these conditions, the detection limit in terms of an equivalent Cu{sub 2}O film thickness is 10 {angstrom} for IRAS in situ analysis and 2 {angstrom} for QCM in situ analysis, respectively.

  7. Spatio-Temporal Variability of Atmospheric CO2 as Observed from In-Situ Measurements over North America during NASA Field Campaigns (2004-2008)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Yonghoon; Vay, Stephanie A.; Woo, Jung-Hun; Choi, Kichul; Diskin, Glenn S.; Sachse, G. W.; Vadrevu, Krishna P.; Czech, E.

    2009-01-01

    Regional-scale measurements were made over the eastern United States (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment - North America (INTEX-NA), summer 2004); Mexico (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO), March 2006); the eastern North Pacific and Alaska (INTEX-B May 2006); and the Canadian Arctic (Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS), spring and summer 2008). For these field campaigns, instrumentation for the in situ measurement of CO2 was integrated on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft providing high-resolution (1 second) data traceable to the WMO CO2 mole fraction scale. These observations provide unique and definitive data sets via their intermediate-scale coverage and frequent vertical profiles (0.1 - 12 km) for examining the variability CO2 exhibits above the Earth s surface. A bottom-up anthropogenic CO2 emissions inventory (1deg 1deg) and processing methodology has also been developed for North America in support of these airborne science missions. In this presentation, the spatio-temporal distributions of CO2 and CO column values derived from the campaign measurements will be examined in conjunction with the emissions inventory and transport histories to aid in the interpretation of the CO2 observations.

  8. Application of laser velocimetry to aircraft wake-vortex measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciffone, D. L.; Orloff, K. L.

    1977-01-01

    The theory and use of a laser velocimeter that makes simultaneous measurements of vertical and longitudinal velocities while rapidly scanning a flow field laterally are described, and its direct application to trailing wake-vortex research is discussed. Pertinent measurements of aircraft wake-vortex velocity distributions obtained in a wind tunnel and water towing tank are presented. The utility of the velocimeter to quantitatively assess differences in wake velocity distributions due to wake dissipating devices and span loading changes on the wake-generating model is also demonstrated.

  9. A Fiber-Optic Aircraft Lightning Current Measurement Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.

    2013-01-01

    A fiber-optic current sensor based on the Faraday Effect is developed for aircraft installations. It can measure total lightning current amplitudes and waveforms, including continuing current. Additional benefits include being small, lightweight, non-conducting, safe from electromagnetic interference, and free of hysteresis and saturation. The Faraday Effect causes light polarization to rotate in presence of magnetic field in the direction of light propagation. Measuring the total induced light polarization change yields the total current enclosed. The system operates at 1310nm laser wavelength and can measure approximately 300 A - 300 kA, a 60 dB range. A reflective polarimetric scheme is used, where the light polarization change is measured after a round-trip propagation through the fiber. A two-detector setup measures the two orthogonal polarizations for noise subtraction and improved dynamic range. The current response curve is non-linear and requires a simple spline-fit correction. Effects of high current were achieved in laboratory using combinations of multiple fiber and wire loops. Good result comparisons against reference sensors were achieved up to 300 kA. Accurate measurements on a simulated aircraft fuselage and an internal structure illustrate capabilities that maybe difficult with traditional sensors. Also tested at a commercial lightning test facility from 20 kA to 200 kA, accuracy within 3-10% was achieved even with non-optimum setups.

  10. Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Overview and In-Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.; Campbell, Charles H.; Garske, Michael T.; Saucedo, Luis A.; Kinder, Gerald R.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment (BLT FE) Project, a manufactured protuberance tile was installed on the port wing of Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery for the flights of STS-119, STS-128 and STS-131. Additional instrumentation was installed in order to obtain more spatially resolved measurements downstream of the protuberance. This paper provides an overview of the BLT FE Project. Significant efforts were made to place the protuberance at an appropriate location on the Orbiter and to design the protuberance to withstand the expected environments. A high-level overview of the in-situ flight data is presented, along with a summary of the comparisons between pre- and post-flight analysis predictions and flight data. Comparisons show that predictions for boundary layer transition onset time closely match the flight data, while predicted temperatures were significantly higher than observed flight temperatures.

  11. IN SITU INFRARED MEASUREMENTS OF FREE-FLYING SILICATE DURING CONDENSATION IN THE LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizuka, Shinnosuke; Kimura, Yuki; Sakon, Itsuki

    2015-04-20

    We developed a new experimental system for infrared (IR) measurements on free-flying nucleating nanoparticles in situ and applied it to studies on silicate particles. We monitored the condensation of magnesium-bearing silicate nanoparticles from thermally evaporated magnesium and silicon monoxide vapor under an atmosphere of oxygen and argon. The IR spectrum of newly condensed particles showed a spectral feature for non-crystalline magnesium-bearing silicate that is remarkably consistent with the IR spectrum of astronomically observed non-crystalline silicate around oxygen-rich evolved stars. The silicate crystallized at <500 K and eventually developed a high crystallinity. Because of the size effects of nanoparticles, the silicate would be expected to be like a liquid at least during the initial stages of nucleation and growth. Our experimental results therefore suggest decreasing the possible formation temperature of crystalline silicates in dust formation environments with relatively higher pressure.

  12. In Situ Measurements of the Flow around a Single Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownstein, Ian; Araya, Daniel; Kinzel, Matthias; Dabiri, John

    2014-11-01

    Laboratory studies of model vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs) are typically unable to match both the Reynolds number (Re) and tip speed ratio (TSR) of full-scale wind turbines. In order to match both relevant parameters, a quantitative flow visualization method was developed to take in situ measurements of the flow around full-scale VAWTs. An apparatus was constructed to deploy a horizontal sheet of smoke upstream of the turbine at the mid-span of the rotor. Quantitative results were obtained by tracking the evolution of this smoke sheet using a PIV algorithm. This method will be demonstrated through a comparative study of three- and five-bladed VAWTs at the Field Laboratory for Optimized Wind Energy (FLOWE) in Lancaster, CA. Additionally, results will be presented in comparison with previous laboratory studies to help determine the dependence of the flow physics on Re and TSR.

  13. In situ observation and measurement of composites subjected to extremely high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xufei; Yu, Helong; Zhang, Guobing; Su, Hengqiang; Tang, Hongxiang; Feng, Xue

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we develop an instrument to study the ablation and oxidation process of materials such as C/SiC (carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide composites) and ultra-high temperature ceramic in extremely high temperature environment. The instrument is integrated with high speed cameras with filtering lens, infrared thermometers and water vapor generator for image capture, temperature measurement, and humid atmosphere, respectively. The ablation process and thermal shock as well as the temperature on both sides of the specimen can be in situ monitored. The results show clearly the dynamic ablation and liquid oxide flowing. In addition, we develop an algorithm for the post-processing of the captured images to obtain the deformation of the specimens, in order to better understand the behavior of the specimen subjected to high temperature.

  14. In situ observation and measurement of composites subjected to extremely high temperature.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xufei; Yu, Helong; Zhang, Guobing; Su, Hengqiang; Tang, Hongxiang; Feng, Xue

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we develop an instrument to study the ablation and oxidation process of materials such as C/SiC (carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide composites) and ultra-high temperature ceramic in extremely high temperature environment. The instrument is integrated with high speed cameras with filtering lens, infrared thermometers and water vapor generator for image capture, temperature measurement, and humid atmosphere, respectively. The ablation process and thermal shock as well as the temperature on both sides of the specimen can be in situ monitored. The results show clearly the dynamic ablation and liquid oxide flowing. In addition, we develop an algorithm for the post-processing of the captured images to obtain the deformation of the specimens, in order to better understand the behavior of the specimen subjected to high temperature.

  15. Monte Carlo based calibration of scintillation detectors for laboratory and in situ gamma ray measurements.

    PubMed

    van der Graaf, E R; Limburg, J; Koomans, R L; Tijs, M

    2011-03-01

    The calibration of scintillation detectors for gamma radiation in a well characterized setup can be transferred to other geometries using Monte Carlo simulations to account for the differences between the calibration and the other geometry. In this study a calibration facility was used that is constructed from bricks of well-known activity concentrations of ⁴⁰K and of radionuclides from the ²³⁸U- and ²³²Th-series. Transfer of the calibration was attempted to a Marinelli beaker geometry with the detector inside a lead shield and to an in situ application with the detector positioned on a sand bed. In general this resulted in good correspondence (within 5-10%) between the activity concentrations derived using the transferred calibration and activities that were derived by independent measurements. Some discrepancies were identified that were attributed to coincident summing in the natural decay series and interference of radon. PMID:21251733

  16. Indoor and outdoor in situ high-resolution gamma radiation measurements in urban areas of Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Svoukis, E; Tsertos, H

    2007-01-01

    In situ, high-resolution, gamma-ray spectrometry of a total number of 70 outdoor and 20 indoor representative measurements were performed in preselected, common locations of the main urban areas of Cyprus. Specific activities and gamma absorbed dose rates in air due to the naturally occurring radionuclides of (232)Th and (238)U series, and (40)K are determined and discussed. Effective dose rate to the Cyprus population due to terrestrial gamma radiation is derived directly from this work. The results obtained outdoors match very well with those derived previously by high-resolution gamma spectrometry of soil samples, which were collected from the main island bedrock surface. This implies that the construction and building materials in urban areas do not affect the external gamma dose rate; thus they are mostly of local origin. Finally, the indoor/outdoor gamma dose ratio was found to be 1.4 +/- 0.5. PMID:17065195

  17. In Situ Infrared Measurements of Free-flying Silicate during Condensation in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, Shinnosuke; Kimura, Yuki; Sakon, Itsuki

    2015-04-01

    We developed a new experimental system for infrared (IR) measurements on free-flying nucleating nanoparticles in situ and applied it to studies on silicate particles. We monitored the condensation of magnesium-bearing silicate nanoparticles from thermally evaporated magnesium and silicon monoxide vapor under an atmosphere of oxygen and argon. The IR spectrum of newly condensed particles showed a spectral feature for non-crystalline magnesium-bearing silicate that is remarkably consistent with the IR spectrum of astronomically observed non-crystalline silicate around oxygen-rich evolved stars. The silicate crystallized at <500 K and eventually developed a high crystallinity. Because of the size effects of nanoparticles, the silicate would be expected to be like a liquid at least during the initial stages of nucleation and growth. Our experimental results therefore suggest decreasing the possible formation temperature of crystalline silicates in dust formation environments with relatively higher pressure.

  18. In situ measurements of the radiation stability of amino acids at 15-140 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.; Moore, Marla H.; Bell, Jan-Luca

    2012-08-01

    We present new kinetics data on the radiolytic destruction of amino acids measured in situ with infrared spectroscopy. Samples were irradiated at 15, 100, and 140 K with 0.8-MeV protons, and amino-acid decay was followed at each temperature with and without H2O present. Observed radiation products included CO2 and amines, consistent with amino-acid decarboxylation. The half-lives of glycine, alanine, and phenylalanine were estimated for various extraterrestrial environments. Infrared spectral changes demonstrated the conversion from the non-zwitterion structure NH2sbnd CH2(R)sbnd COOH at 15 K to the zwitterion structure +NH3sbnd CH2(R)sbnd COO- at 140 K for each amino acid studied.

  19. In situ measurement of interstellar silicon carbide in two CM chondrite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Swan, P.; Walker, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    The first in situ observations of isotopically anomalous SiC are reported. The grains were found by X-ray mapping of polished sections of two chondritic meteorites, Cold Bokkeveld and Murchison. Ion microprobe measurements showed C-13 enrichments, delta C-13, from 199 to 2800 per mil, proving that the grains are indigenous. SiC grains are revealed only as isolated matrix particles, ruling out the possibility that SiC grains were brought into the solar system as inclusions in larger grains, which protected them from destruction in the solar nebula. Several of the SiC grains are cracked, suggesting that the etching treatment may result in size distributions biased toward smaller grains.

  20. In-Situ Measurements of the Radiation Stability of Amino Acids at 15-140 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.; Moore, Marla H.; Bell, Jan-Luca

    2012-01-01

    We present new kinetics data on the radiolytic destruction of amino acids measured in situ with infrared spectroscopy. Samples were irradiated at 15, 100, and 140 K with D.8-MeV protons, and amino-acid decay was followed at each temperature with and without H2O present. Observed radiation products included CO2 and amines, consistent with amino-acid decarboxylation. The half-lives of glycine, alanine, and phenylalanine were estimated for various extraterrestrial environments. Infrared spectral changes demonstrated the conversion from the non-zwitterion structure NH2-CH2(R)-COOH at 15 K to the zwitterion structure +NH3-CH2(R)-COO- at 140 K for each amino acid studied.

  1. In situ electrical conductivity measurements of H2O under static pressure up to 28 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bao; Gao, Yang; Han, Yonghao; Ma, Yanzhang; Gao, Chunxiao

    2016-08-01

    The in situ electrical conductivity measurements on water in both solid state and liquid state were performed under pressure up to 28 GPa and temperature from 77 K to 300 K using a microcircuit fabricated on a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Water chemically ionization mainly contributes to electrical conduction in liquid state, which is in accord with the results obtained under dynamic pressure. Energy band theory of liquid water was used to understand effect of static pressure on electrical conduction of water. The electric conductivity of H2O decreased discontinuously by four orders of magnitude at 0.7-0.96 GPa, indicating water frozen at this P-T condition. Correspondingly, the conduction of H2O in solid state is determined by arrangement and bending of H-bond in ice VI and ice VII. Based on Jaccard theory, we have concluded that the charge carriers of ice are already existing ions and Bjerrum defects.

  2. Dynamics of graphite fiber intercalation: In situ resistivity measurements with a four point probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The dynamics of ferric chloride intercalation of single graphite fibers were studied, in situ, using a four point dc bridge. Measurements before, during and after the intercalation showed that the intercalation occurred within minutes at 200 C. Changes in fiber resistivity after exposure to air suggested hydration of the graphite intercalation compound. Deintercalation of the ferric chloride was initiated at temperatures in excess of 400 C. cycling the intercalant into and out of the graphite fiber gave no improvements in fiber resistivity. The activation energy of the ferric chloride intercalation reaction was found to be 17 + or - 4 kcal/mol 1 consistent with the concept of a preliminary nucleation step in the intercalation reaction.

  3. In situ time-resolved measurements of carbon nanotube and nanohorn growth

    SciTech Connect

    Geohegan, David B; Puretzky, Alexander A; Styers-Barnett, David J; Hu, Hui; Zhao, Bin; Cui, Hongtao; Rouleau, Christopher M; Eres, Gyula; Jackson, Jeremy Joseph; Wood, Richard F; Pannala, Sreekanth; Wells, Jack C

    2007-01-01

    Growth mechanisms of carbon nanotubes are investigated and compared for both high- and low-temperature synthesis methods through experiments utilizing time-resolved, in situ imaging and spectros-copy. High-speed videography and pyrometry measured the timeframes for growth for single-wall car-bon nanotubes (SWNTs) and nanohorns (SWNHs) by laser vaporization (LV) at 1150 C, revealing that C can self-assemble at high temperatures preferentially into SWNH structures without catalyst assistance at rates comparable to catalyst-assisted SWNT growth by either laser vaporization or chemical vapor depo-sition (CVD). Laser interferometry and videography reveal the coordinated growth of vertically-aligned nanotube arrays (VANTAs) by CVD at 550-900 C.

  4. Applications of in situ optical measurements in ecological and biogeochemical studies - a framework for a user-driven national network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamaschi, B. A.; Pellerin, B. A.; Downing, B. D.; Saraceno, J.; Aiken, G.; Stumpner, P.

    2010-12-01

    A critical challenge for understanding the dynamics between water quality, and ecological processes is obtaining data at time scales in which changes occur. Traditional, discrete sampling, approaches for data collection are often limited by analytical and field costs, site access, and logistical challenges, for long-term sampling at a large number of sites. The timescales of change, however, are often minutes, hours, or years. In situ optical (absorbance and fluorescence) instruments offer opportunities to help overcome these difficulties by directly or indirectly measuring constituents of interest. In situ optical instrumentation have been in use in oceanographic studies for well over 50 years, and as advances in the science, engineering and technology of these sensors have improved, optical sensors have become more commercially viable and available for research. We present several examples that highlight applications of in situ optical measurements for understanding dynamics in stream, river, and estuary systems. Examples illustrate the utility of in situ optical sensors for studies over short-duration events of days to weeks (diurnal cycles, tidal cycles, storm events and snowmelt periods) as well as longer-term continuous monitoring for months to years. We also highlight applied in situ optical measurements as proxies for constituents that are difficult and expensive to measure at high spatiotemporal resolution, for example, dissolved organic carbon, dissolved organic nitrogen, mercury and methylmercury, trihalomethane precursors, harmful algal blooms, and others. We propose that relatively simple absorbance and fluorescence measurements made in situ could be incorporated into short and long-term ecological research and monitoring programs, resulting in advanced understanding of sources that contribute to water quality improvements or degradation, contaminant and carbon cycling, and the occurrence and persistence of harmful algal blooms. Linking these efforts

  5. The gravity anomaly field in the Gulf of Bothnia spatially characterized from satellite altimetry and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noréus, J. P.; Nyborg, M. R.; Hayling, K. L.

    1997-06-01

    The gravity anomaly field in the Gulf of Bothnia has been investigated using (1) in situ high-precision measurements conducted on the sea ice during cold winters, and (2) gravity anomaly profiles computed from collinear satellite radar altimeter data from the Geosat ERM and the Topex/Poseidon missions. The in situ measurements were obtained from a collaboration between the Finnish Geodetic Institute, the Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU) and the National Survey of Sweden (LMV), and were processed with the geostatistical method called kriging. These data were used to calibrate the altimetric gravity. Altimetry generally resolves features of 20 km wavelength or longer, and in some cases detects shorter features when a sampling interval of 10 Hz is used. The precision of the along-track one-dimensional altimetric profiles corresponds to a gravity uncertainty of 2-3 mGal, and comparison with in situ measured gravity show 4 mGal discrepancy. The precision of the in situ measurements is better. However, depending on the sampling distance, the estimation uncertainty interior the in situ data areas may be up to 5 mGal between neighbouring data points. In regions with in situ data gaps, the estimation uncertainty of the in situ gravity measurements is rapidly increasing to a maximum of 9 mGal. An improved estimation uncertainty of 4-9 mGal was obtained in the same data gap regions with the support of satellite altimetry. Altimetric gravity is therefore used to estimate the gravity field in such regions, and to spatially characterize the gravity field in the Gulf of Bothnia.

  6. In situ measurement of tissue impedance using an inductive coupling interface circuit.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hung-Wei; Chuang, Jia-min; Lu, Chien-Chi; Lin, Wei-Tso; Lin, Chii-Wann; Lin, Mu-Lien

    2013-06-01

    In this work, a method of an inductive coupling impedance measurement (ICIM) is proposed for measuring the nerve impedance of a dorsal root ganglion (DRG) under PRF stimulation. ICIM provides a contactless interface for measuring the reflected impedance by an impedance analyzer with a low excitation voltage of 7 mV. The paper develops a calibration procedure involving a 50-Ω reference resistor to calibrate the reflected resistance for measuring resistance of the nerve in the test. A de-embedding technique to build the equivalent transformer circuit model for the ICIM circuit is also presented. A batteryless PRF stimulator with ICIM circuit demonstrated good accuracy for the acute measurement of DRG impedance both in situ and in vivo. Besides, an in vivo animal experiment was conducted to show that the effectiveness of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) stimulation in relieving pain gradually declined as the impedance of the stimulated nerve increased. The experiment also revealed that the excitation voltage for measuring impedance below 25 mV can prevent the excitation of a nonlinear response of DRG.

  7. Comparison of different methods for the in situ measurement of forest litter moisture content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunk, C.; Ruth, B.; Leuchner, M.; Wastl, C.; Menzel, A.

    2015-06-01

    Dead fine fuel (e.g. litter) moisture content is an important parameter for both forest fire and ecological applications as it is related to ignitability, fire behavior as well as soil respiration. However, the comprehensive literature review in this paper shows that there is no easy-to-use method for automated measurements available. This study investigates the applicability of four different sensor types (permittivity and electrical resistance measuring principles) for this measurement. Comparisons were made to manual gravimetric reference measurements carried out almost daily for one fire season and overall agreement was good (highly significant correlations with 0.792 ≦ r ≦ 0.947). Standard deviations within sensor types were linearly correlated to daily sensor mean values; however, above a certain threshold they became irregular, which may be linked to exceedance of the working ranges. Thus, measurements with irregular standard deviations were considered unusable and calibrations of all individual sensors were compared for useable periods. A large drift in the sensor raw value-litter moisture-relationship became obvious from drought to drought period. This drift may be related to installation effects or settling and decomposition of the litter layer throughout the fire season. Because of the drift and the in situ calibration necessary, it cannot be recommended to use the methods presented here for monitoring purposes. However, they may be interesting for scientific studies when some manual fuel moisture measurements are made anyway. Additionally, a number of potential methodological improvements are suggested.

  8. In-situ membrane resistance measurements in PEFC by fast current pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Buechi, F.N.; Scherer, G.G.; Marek, A.

    1994-12-31

    A solid-state current pulse generator for in situ membrane resistance measurements by superimposed square current pulses in polymer electrolyte fuel cells was designed and built. The choice of the measuring technique and of parameters of the instrumentation was based on a critical analysis of the relevant electrochemical and physical processes. The last stage of the generator is located in an active head directly attached to the fuel cell. This permits the generation of 5 A pulses with extremely fast and clean trailing edges (decay time {le} 5 ns), which in turn makes it possible to measure the voltage transient induced by the current decay, with GHz resolution. By measurements in this time window it is possible to accurate separate of the ohmic series resistance of the cell (membrane resistance) from the polarization of the electrochemical interfaces. Because the pulse current path is independent of the d.c. loop, the resistance can be measured independently of the d.c. value, i.e. under high current density conditions. The instrument was tested and the results analyzed for accuracy. Resistances down to 2 m{Omega} can be measured with an error of < 5%.

  9. Reactor for in situ measurements of spatially resolved kinetic data in heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Horn, R; Korup, O; Geske, M; Zavyalova, U; Oprea, I; Schlögl, R

    2010-06-01

    The present work describes a reactor that allows in situ measurements of spatially resolved kinetic data in heterogeneous catalysis. The reactor design allows measurements up to temperatures of 1300 degrees C and 45 bar pressure, i.e., conditions of industrial relevance. The reactor involves reactants flowing through a solid catalyst bed containing a sampling capillary with a side sampling orifice through which a small fraction of the reacting fluid (gas or liquid) is transferred into an analytical device (e.g., mass spectrometer, gas chromatograph, high pressure liquid chromatograph) for quantitative analysis. The sampling capillary can be moved with microm resolution in or against flow direction to measure species profiles through the catalyst bed. Rotation of the sampling capillary allows averaging over several scan lines. The position of the sampling orifice is such that the capillary channel through the catalyst bed remains always occupied by the capillary preventing flow disturbance and fluid bypassing. The second function of the sampling capillary is to provide a well which can accommodate temperature probes such as a thermocouple or a pyrometer fiber. If a thermocouple is inserted in the sampling capillary and aligned with the sampling orifice fluid temperature profiles can be measured. A pyrometer fiber can be used to measure the temperature profile of the solid catalyst bed. Spatial profile measurements are demonstrated for methane oxidation on Pt and methane oxidative coupling on Li/MgO, both catalysts supported on reticulated alpha-Al(2)O(3) foam supports. PMID:20590252

  10. Solar Radiation Measurements Onboard the Research Aircraft HALO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, I.; Bohn, B.; Werner, F.; Ehrlich, A.; Wendisch, M.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne measurements of the separated upward and downward components of solar spectral actinic flux densities for the determination of photolysis frequencies and of upward nadir spectral radiance were performed with the HALO Solar Radiation (HALO-SR) instrument package onboard the High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft (HALO). The instrumentation of HALO-SR is characterized and first measurement data from the Next-generation Aircraft Remote-Sensing for Validation Studies (NARVAL) campaigns in 2013 and 2014 are presented. The measured data are analyzed in the context of the retrieved microphysical and optical properties of clouds which were observed underneath the aircraft. Detailed angular sensitivities of the two optical actinic flux receivers were determined in the laboratory. The effects of deviations from the ideal response are investigated using radiative transfer calculations of atmospheric radiance distributions under various atmospheric conditions and different ground albedos. Corresponding correction factors are derived. Example photolysis frequencies are presented, which were sampled in the free troposphere and lower stratosphere over the Atlantic Ocean during the 2013/14 HALO NARVAL campaigns. Dependencies of photolysis frequencies on cloud cover, flight altitude and wavelength range of the photolysis process are investigated. Calculated actinic flux densities in the presence of clouds benefit from the measured spectral radiances. Retrieved cloud optical thicknesses and effective droplet radii are used as model input for the radiative transfer calculations. By comparison with the concurrent measurements of actinic flux densities the retrieval approach is validated. Acknowledgements: Funding by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft within the priority program HALO (BO 1580/4-1, WE 1900/21-1) is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. A microchip integrating cell array positioning with in situ single-cell impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoliang; Zhu, Rong; Zong, Xianli

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a novel microarray chip integrating cell positioning with in situ, real-time and long-time impedance measurement on a single cell. The microchip integrates a plurality of quadrupole-electrode units (termed positioning electrodes) patterned into an array with pairs of planar electrodes (termed measuring electrodes) located at the centers of each quadrupole-electrode unit. The positioning electrodes are utilized to trap and position living cells onto the measuring electrodes based on negative dielectrophoresis (nDEP), while the measuring electrodes are used to measure impedances of the trapped single cells. Each measuring electrode has a small footprint area of 7 × 7 μm(2) to ensure inhabiting only one single cell on it. However, the electrode with a small surface area has a low double-layer capacitance when it is immersed in a liquid solution, thus generating a large double-layer impedance, which reduces the sensitivity for impedance measurement on the single cell. To enlarge the effective surface areas of the measuring electrodes, a novel surface-modification process is proposed to controllably construct gold nanostructures on the surfaces of the measuring electrodes while the positioning electrodes are unstained. The double layer capacitances of the modified electrodes are increased by about one order after surface-modification. The developed microchip is used to monitor the adhering behavior of a single HeLa cell by measuring its impedance spectra in real time. The measured impedance is analyzed and used to extract cellular electrical parameters, which demonstrated that the cell compresses the electrical double layer in the process of adherence and adheres onto the measuring electrodes after 4-5 hours. PMID:26282920

  12. A microchip integrating cell array positioning with in situ single-cell impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoliang; Zhu, Rong; Zong, Xianli

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a novel microarray chip integrating cell positioning with in situ, real-time and long-time impedance measurement on a single cell. The microchip integrates a plurality of quadrupole-electrode units (termed positioning electrodes) patterned into an array with pairs of planar electrodes (termed measuring electrodes) located at the centers of each quadrupole-electrode unit. The positioning electrodes are utilized to trap and position living cells onto the measuring electrodes based on negative dielectrophoresis (nDEP), while the measuring electrodes are used to measure impedances of the trapped single cells. Each measuring electrode has a small footprint area of 7 × 7 μm(2) to ensure inhabiting only one single cell on it. However, the electrode with a small surface area has a low double-layer capacitance when it is immersed in a liquid solution, thus generating a large double-layer impedance, which reduces the sensitivity for impedance measurement on the single cell. To enlarge the effective surface areas of the measuring electrodes, a novel surface-modification process is proposed to controllably construct gold nanostructures on the surfaces of the measuring electrodes while the positioning electrodes are unstained. The double layer capacitances of the modified electrodes are increased by about one order after surface-modification. The developed microchip is used to monitor the adhering behavior of a single HeLa cell by measuring its impedance spectra in real time. The measured impedance is analyzed and used to extract cellular electrical parameters, which demonstrated that the cell compresses the electrical double layer in the process of adherence and adheres onto the measuring electrodes after 4-5 hours.

  13. Stable water isotope and surface heat flux simulation using ISOLSM: Evaluation against in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Mick Y.; Wang, Lixin; Parkes, Stephen D.; Strauss, Josiah; McCabe, Matthew F.; Evans, Jason P.; Griffiths, Alan D.

    2015-04-01

    The stable isotopes of water are useful tracers of water sources and hydrological processes. Stable water isotope-enabled land surface modeling is a relatively new approach for characterizing the hydrological cycle, providing spatial and temporal variability for a number of hydrological processes. At the land surface, the integration of stable water isotopes with other meteorological measurements can assist in constraining surface heat flux estimates and discriminate between evaporation (E) and transpiration (T). However, research in this area has traditionally been limited by a lack of continuous in-situ isotopic observations. Here, the National Centre for Atmospheric Research stable isotope-enabled Land Surface Model (ISOLSM) is used to simulate the water and energy fluxes and stable water isotope variations. The model was run for a period of one month with meteorological data collected from a coastal sub-tropical site near Sydney, Australia. The modeled energy fluxes (latent heat and sensible heat) agreed reasonably well with eddy covariance observations, indicating that ISOLSM has the capacity to reproduce observed flux behavior. Comparison of modeled isotopic compositions of evapotranspiration (ET) against in-situ Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measured bulk water vapor isotopic data (10 m above the ground), however, showed differences in magnitude and temporal patterns. The disparity is due to a small contribution from local ET fluxes to atmospheric boundary layer water vapor (∼1% based on calculations using ideal gas law) relative to that advected from the ocean for this particular site. Using ISOLSM simulation, the ET was partitioned into E and T with 70% being T. We also identified that soil water from different soil layers affected T and E differently based on the simulated soil isotopic patterns, which reflects the internal working of ISOLSM. These results highlighted the capacity of using the isotope-enabled models to discriminate

  14. DeepPIV: Measuring in situ Biological-Fluid Interactions from the Surface to Benthos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katija, K.; Sherman, A.; Graves, D.; Kecy, C. D.; Klimov, D.; Robison, B. H.

    2015-12-01

    The midwater region of the ocean (below the euphotic zone and above the benthos) is one of the largest ecosystems on our planet, yet it remains one of the least explored. Little known marine organisms that inhabit midwater have developed strategies for swimming and feeding that ultimately contributes to their evolutionary success, and may inspire engineering solutions for societally relevant challenges. Fluid mechanics governs the interactions that midwater organisms have with their physical environment, but limited access to midwater depths and lack of non-invasive methods to measure in situ small-scale fluid motions prevent these interactions from being better understood. Significant advances in underwater vehicle technologies have only recently improved access to midwater. Unfortunately, in situ small-scale fluid mechanics measurement methods are still lacking in the oceanographic community. Here we present DeepPIV, an instrumentation package that can be affixed to remotely operated underwater vehicles that quantifies small-scale fluid motions from the surface of the ocean down to 4000 m depths. Utilizing ambient, suspended particulate in the coastal regions of Monterey Bay, fluid-structure interactions are evaluated on a range of marine organisms in midwater. Initial science targets include larvaceans, biological equivalents of flapping flexible foils, that create mucus houses to filter food. Little is known about the structure of these mucus houses and the function they play in selectively filtering particles, and these dynamics can serve as particle-mucus models for human health. Using DeepPIV, we reveal the complex structures and flows generated within larvacean mucus houses, and elucidate how these structures function.

  15. An in-situ electropolymerization based sensor for measuring salt content in crude oil.

    PubMed

    Aleisa, Rashed M; Akmal, Naim

    2015-01-01

    Determining salt content is a vital procedure in the petroleum industry during the process of crude oil transportation, refining and production. Monitoring the salinity value using a fast and direct technique can substantially lower the cost of crude oil in its processing and its production stages. In the present work, a novel analytical method was developed to detect the amount of salt present in crude oil in a quick and reliable manner. The measurement is based on the rate of in-situ electropolymerization of a monomer such as aniline in association with the salt content in the crude oil. The salt dispersed in the hydrocarbon matrix is used as an electrolyte in the electrolytic system to induce an electropolymerization reaction upon the induction of voltages, in which the salt content is measured corresponding to the polymeric film formation on the working electrode surface. Acetonitrile and N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) were used in the electrochemical cell as solvents, and cyclic voltammetry tests were performed for Arabian crude oil solutions in the presence of aniline. The method has shown an excellent detection response for very low concentrations of salt. Four Arabian crude oils with salt concentrations of 34.2, 28.5, 14.3 and 5.71 mg L(-1) have produced current intensity of 180.1, 172.6, 148.1 and 134.2 µA at an applied current potential of 1.75 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), respectively. A Calibration curve was obtained in the range of 5-35 mg L(-1), giving limits of detection and quantitation at 1.98 and 5.95 mg L(-1), respectively. The in-situ electropolymerization based sensor has significant advantages over the existing techniques of salt monitoring in crude oil such as fast response, temperature independency, electrode stability, and minimum sample preparation.

  16. Comparison of Water Potentials Measured by In Situ Psychrometry and Pressure Chamber in Morphologically Different Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Neil C.; Spurway, R. A.; Schulze, E.-D.

    1984-01-01

    Leaf water potentials measured by in situ psychrometry were compared with leaf water potentials measured by the pressure chamber technique at various values of water potential in Helianthus annuus, Helianthus nuttallii, Vigna unguiculata, Nerium oleander, Pistacia vera, and Corylus avellana. In V. unguiculata, the leaf water potentials measured by the in situ psychrometer oscillated at the same periodicity as, and proportional to, the leaf conductance. In all species, potentials measured by in situ psychrometers operating in the psychrometric mode were linearly correlated with potentials measured with the pressure chamber. However, the in situ psychrometers underestimated the leaf water potential in the two Helianthus species at low water potentials and overestimated the water potential in P. vera, N. oleander, and C. avellana. The underestimation in the two Helianthus species at low water potentials resulted from differences in water potential across the leaf. The overestimation in P. vera, N. oleander, and C. avellana was considered to arise from low epidermal conductances in these species even after abrasion of the cuticle. Pressure-volume studies with Lycopersicon esculentum showed that less water was expressed from distal than proximal leaflets when the whole leaf was slowly pressurized. The implication of this for water relations characteristics obtained by pressure-volume techniques is discussed. We conclude that in situ psychrometers are suitable for following dynamic changes in leaf water potential, but should be used with caution on leaves with low epidermal conductances. PMID:16663415

  17. A high sampling rate digital holographic imager instrument for the in situ measurements of hydrometeors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaikkonen, Ville A.; Mäkynen, Anssi J.

    2016-06-01

    A novel digital in-line holographic imaging instrument designed for acquiring properties of individual hydrometeors in situ is presented. The instrument has a large measurement volume of 670 cm3. This combined with fast frame rate imaging and software controlled multi-exposure capabilities results in a representative sampling of rain and snowfall events. Hydrometeors are measured and analyzed from the in-focus images with microscopic resolution, and their 3D locations inside the measurement volume are determined. The instrument is designed to operate in cold climates and to produce reliable measurements also during strong winds. The imaging rate of the instrument was designed to be adequately high to observe the dynamic nature of rain and snow falls. By recording multi-exposure holograms, the effective frame rate can be increased. This allows the measurements of the velocities of the fast-falling hydrometeors. The instrument and the hologram processing are described; as well as results from laboratory tests and the first field measurements are shown. As a result, the resolving power of the instrument was measured to vary between 11 and 18 microns inside the measurement volume near the center of the field-of-view. Velocity vectors were measured both from multi-exposure and high frame rate holograms. The measured velocities ranged from 0.1 to 4 m/s. In addition, the projections of a flat-shaped and rotating snowflake imaged at different locations inside the measurement volume demonstrated the possibility to estimate the shape of the hydrometeor from multiple viewing angles.

  18. Fiber-Optic Sensor for Aircraft Lightning Current Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George G.; Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.; Snyder, Gary P.

    2012-01-01

    An electric current sensor based on Faraday rotation effect in optical fiber was developed for measuring aircraft lightning current. Compared to traditional sensors, the design has many advantages including the ability to measure total current and to conform to structure geometries. The sensor is also small, light weight, non-conducting, safe from interference, and free of hysteresis and saturation. Potential applications include characterization of lightning current waveforms, parameters and paths, and providing environmental data for aircraft certifications. In an optical fiber as the sensing medium, light polarization rotates when exposed to a magnetic field in the direction of light propagation. By forming closed fiber loops around a conductor and applying Ampere s law, measuring the total light rotation yields the enclosed current. A reflective polarimetric scheme is used, where polarization change is measured after the polarized light travels round-trip through the sensing fiber. The sensor system was evaluated measuring rocket-triggered lightning over the 2011 summer. Early results compared very well against a reference current shunt resistor, demonstrating the sensor s accuracy and feasibility in a lightning environment. While later comparisons show gradually increasing amplitude deviations for an undetermined cause, the overall waveforms still compared very well.

  19. Fiber-Optic Sensor for Aircraft Lightning Current Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George G.; Mata, Carlos T.; Mata,Angel G.; Snyder, Gary P.

    2012-01-01

    An electric current sensor based on Faraday rotation effect in optical fiber was developed for measuring aircraft lightning current. Compared to traditional sensors, the design has many advantages including the ability to measure total current and to conform to structure geometries. The sensor is also small, light weight, non-conducting, safe from interference, and free of hysteresis and saturation. Potential applications include characterization of lightning current waveforms, parameters and paths, and providing environmental data for aircraft certifications. In an optical fiber as the sensing medium, light polarization rotates when exposed to a magnetic field in the direction of light propagation. By forming closed fiber loops around a conductor and applying Ampere s law, measuring the total light rotation yields the enclosed current. A reflective polarimetric scheme is used, where polarization change is measured after the polarized light travels round-trip through the sensing fiber. The sensor system was evaluated measuring rocket-triggered lightning over the 2011 summer. Early results compared very well against a reference current shunt resistor, demonstrating the sensor's accuracy and feasibility in a lightning environment. While later comparisons show gradually increasing amplitude deviations for an undetermined cause, the overall waveforms still compared very well.

  20. Spatial and temporal variation in CO over Alberta using measurements from satellites, aircraft, and ground stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marey, H. S.; Hashisho, Z.; Fu, L.; Gille, J.

    2015-04-01

    Alberta is Canada's largest oil producer, and its oil sands deposits comprise 30% of the world's oil reserves. The process of bitumen extraction and upgrading releases trace gases and aerosols to the atmosphere. In this study we present satellite-based analysis to explore, for the first time, various contributing factors that affect tropospheric carbon monoxide (CO) levels over Alberta. The multispectral product that uses both near-infrared (NIR) and the thermal-infrared (TIR) radiances for CO retrieval from the Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) is examined for the 12-year period from 2002 to 2013. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) thermal anomaly product from 2001 to 2013 is employed to investigate the seasonal and temporal variations in forest fires. Additionally, in situ CO measurements at industrial and urban sites are compared to satellite data. Furthermore, the available MOZAIC/IAGOS (Measurement of Ozone, Water Vapor, Carbon Monoxide, Nitrogen Oxide by Airbus In-Service Aircraft/In service Aircraft for Global Observing System) aircraft CO profiles (April 2009-December 2011) are used to validate MOPITT CO data. The climatological time curtain plot and spatial maps for CO over northern Alberta indicate the signatures of transported CO for two distinct biomass burning seasons: summer and spring. Distinct seasonal patterns of CO at the urban sites (Edmonton and Calgary) point to the strong influence of traffic. Meteorological parameters play an important role in the CO spatial distribution at various pressure levels. Northern Alberta shows a stronger upward lifting motion which leads to larger CO total column values, while the poor dispersion in central and southern Alberta exacerbates the surface CO pollution. Interannual variations in satellite data depict a slightly decreasing trend for both regions, while the decline trend is more evident from ground observations, especially at the urban sites. MOPITT CO vertical

  1. Spatial and temporal variation of CO over Alberta using measurements from satellite, aircrafts, and ground stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marey, H. S.; Hashisho, Z.; Fu, L.; Gille, J.

    2014-12-01

    Alberta is Canada's largest oil producer and its oil sand deposits comprise 30% of the world's oil reserves. The process of bitumen extraction and upgrading releases trace gases and aerosols to the atmosphere. In this study we present satellite-based analysis to explore, for the first time, various contributing factors that affect tropospheric carbon monoxide (CO) levels over Alberta. The multispectral product that uses both near-infrared (NIR) and the thermal-infrared (TIR) radiances for CO retrieval from the Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) are examined for the 12 year period from 2002-2013. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) thermal anomaly product from 2001 to 2013 is employed to investigate the seasonal and temporal variations of forest fires. Additionally, in situ CO measurements at industrial and urban sites are compared to satellite data. Furthermore, the available MOZAIC/IAGOS (Measurement of Ozone, Water Vapor, Carbon Monoxide, Nitrogen Oxide by Airbus In-Service Aircraft/In service Aircraft for Global Observing System) aircraft CO profiles (April 2009-December 2011) are used to validate MOPITT CO data. The climatological time curtain plot and spatial maps for CO over northern Alberta indicate the signatures of transported CO for two distinct biomass burning seasons, summer and spring. Distinct seasonal patterns of CO at the urban site s (Edmonton and Calgary cities) point to the strong influence of traffic. Meteorological parameters play an important role on the CO spatial distribution at various pressure levels. Northern Alberta shows stronger upward lifting motion which leads to larger CO total column values while the poor dispersion in central and south Alberta exacerbates the surface CO pollution. Inter-annual variations of satellite data depict a slightly decreasing trend for both regions while the decline trend is more evident from ground observations, especially at the urban sites. MOPITT CO vertical

  2. The Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William L., Jr.; Charlock, Thomas; Wielicki, Bruce; Kahn, Ralph; Martins, J. Vanderlei; Gatebe, Charles; Hobbs, Peter V.; Purgold, G. Carl; Redemann, Jens; Remer, Lorraine

    2004-01-01

    NASA has developed an Earth Observing System (EOS) consisting of a series of satellites designed to study global change from space. The EOS flagship is the EOS TERRA satellite, launched in December 1999, equipped with five unique sensors to monitor and study the Earth s heat budget and many of the key controlling variables governing the Earth's climate system. CLAMS, the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites field campaign was conducted from NASA Wallops Flight Facility and successfully executed over the middle Atlantic eastern seaboard from July 10 August 2, 2001. CLAMS is primarily a shortwave closure experiment designed to validate and improve EOS TERRA satellite data products being derived from three sensors: CERES (Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System), MISR (Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer) and MODIS (MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). CLAMS is jointly sponsored by the CERES, MISR and MODIS instrument teams and the NASA GEWEX Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP). CLAMS primary objectives are to validate satellite-based retrievals of aerosol properties and vertical profiles of radiative flux, temperature and water vapor. Central to CLAMS measurement strategy is the Chesapeake Lighthouse, a stable sea platform located in the Atlantic Ocean, 13 miles east of Virginia Beach near the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay and the site of an ongoing CERES Ocean Validation Experiment (COVE). Six research aircraft were deployed to make detailed measurements of the atmosphere and ocean surface in the vicinity of COVE, over the surrounding ocean, over nearby NOAA buoys and over a few land sites. The measurements are used to validate and provide ground truth for simultaneous products being derived from TERRA data, a key step toward an improved understanding and ability to predict changes in the Earth's climate. One of the two CERES instruments on-board TERRA was programmed for Rotating Azimuth Plane Scans (RAPS) during CLAMS

  3. In Situ Measurements of Spectral Emissivity of Materials for Very High Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    G. Cao; S. J. Weber; S. O. Martin; T. L. Malaney; S. R. Slattery; M. H. Anderson; K. Sridharan; T. R. Allen

    2011-08-01

    An experimental facility for in situ measurements of high-temperature spectral emissivity of materials in environments of interest to the gas-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR) has been developed. The facility is capable of measuring emissivities of seven materials in a single experiment, thereby enhancing the accuracy in measurements due to even minor systemic variations in temperatures and environments. The system consists of a cylindrical silicon carbide (SiC) block with seven sample cavities and a deep blackbody cavity, a detailed optical system, and a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The reliability of the facility has been confirmed by comparing measured spectral emissivities of SiC, boron nitride, and alumina (Al2O3) at 600 C against those reported in literature. The spectral emissivities of two candidate alloys for VHTR, INCONEL{reg_sign} alloy 617 (INCONEL is a registered trademark of the Special Metals Corporation group of companies) and SA508 steel, in air environment at 700 C were measured.

  4. Martian Chronology and Atmospheric Composition: In Situ Measurements versus Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.

    2008-01-01

    I examine two significant issues of martian science from the point of view of in situ measurements by robotic spacecraft versus sample return and analysis in terrestrial labs. (1) To define martian history, ages of geological processes and surface features are required. Estimated ages from surface crater densities have limitations, and the ages measured for martian meteorites cannot be associated with specific martian locales. Whereas returned martian rocks could be accurately dated, some have suggested sending a robotic spacecraft to Mars to measure rock ages using the classical K- Ar-40 technique, considered the easiest to implement. (2) To understand the evolution of the martian atmosphere and its interactions with the surface, requires precise measurements of atmospheric composition. A significant amount of information has derived from measurements by Viking and of martian meteorites. Instrumentation on the Mars Science Lander (MSL) spacecraft to be launched in the near future promises to determine atmospheric composition even more precisely. If MSL is successful, which questions about atmospheric composition will remain and thus will require atmospheric sample return to answer?

  5. In situ measurement of low-Z material coating thickness on high Z substrate for tokamaks.

    PubMed

    Mueller, D; Roquemore, A L; Jaworski, M; Skinner, C H; Miller, J; Creely, A; Raman, P; Ruzic, D

    2014-11-01

    Rutherford backscattering of energetic particles can be used to determine the thickness of a coating of a low-Z material over a heavier substrate. Simulations indicate that 5 MeV alpha particles from an (241)Am source can be used to measure the thickness of a Li coating on Mo tiles between 0.5 and 15 μm thick. Using a 0.1 mCi source, a thickness measurement can be accomplished in 2 h of counting. This technique could be used to measure any thin, low-Z material coating (up to 1 mg/cm(2) thick) on a high-Z substrate, such as Be on W, B on Mo, or Li on Mo. By inserting a source and detector on a moveable probe, this technique could be used to provide an in situ measurement of the thickness of Li coating on NSTX-U Mo tiles. A test stand with an alpha source and an annular solid-state detector was used to investigate the measurable range of low-Z material thicknesses on Mo tiles.

  6. In-situ turbulence measurement technique using state-of-the-art kite/blimp platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsley, Ben B.; Jensen, Michael L.; Frehlich, Rod G.; Eaton, Frank D.; Bishop, Kenneth P.; Hugo, Ronald J.

    1999-08-01

    Results of a campaign to measure boundary layer/lower troposphere turbulence quantities over New Mexico's Tularosa basin are described in a companion paper. The present contribution outlines the technical developments that enabled these measurements. Basically, instrumented 'payloads' were carried aloft using either a relatively large aerodynamic blimp or a large parafoil kite. The choice between these platforms was dictated by wind velocity. The kite size was determined by the payload weight and the wind velocity. In addition to providing a brief history in CU involvement in kite/blimp atmospheric measurements, we will outline launching methods, tether winching techniques, and payload attachment schemes that were used during the WSMR campaign. Although very low wind conditions during the New Mexico test precluded the use of payloads up and down the kite tether under reasonable wind conditions. We also describe (1) the instrument package designed to measure in- situ temperature and velocity fluctuations, and (2) the 'basic payload' that measures standard atmospheric variables. System operation is illustrated via examples of the resulting data set.

  7. MEMS needle-type sensor array for in situ measurements of dissolved oxygen and redox potential.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hwan; Seo, Youngwoo; Lim, Tae-Sun; Bishop, Paul L; Papautsky, Ian

    2007-11-15

    Microelectrodes are among the most accurate and reliable monitoring devices for measuring the dynamics of biofilm processes. This paper describes a novel needle-type microelectrode array (MEA) for simultaneous in situ measurements of dissolved oxygen (DO) and oxidation reduction potential (ORP) fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. The MEA exhibits fast response times for both DO and ORP measurements and shows a substantial increase in DO sensitivity. To demonstrate the versatility of the new sensor, it was applied to the measurement of DO and ORP microprofiles in a multispecies biofilm. This work demonstrates that the MEA is able to monitor local concentration changes with a high spatial resolution and provide the versatility of the microelectrode technique needed for biofilm studies as well as the capability for repetitive measurements. In addition, the use of MEMS technologies and batch fabrication approaches enables integration, high consistency, high yields, and mass production. With further development, it may be possible to add additional sensors to the MEA (e.g., pH, phosphate) and integrate them with a reference electrode. PMID:18075099

  8. In situ measurement of low-Z material coating thickness on high Z substrate for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, D. Roquemore, A. L.; Jaworski, M.; Skinner, C. H.; Miller, J.; Creely, A.; Raman, P.; Ruzic, D.

    2014-11-15

    Rutherford backscattering of energetic particles can be used to determine the thickness of a coating of a low-Z material over a heavier substrate. Simulations indicate that 5 MeV alpha particles from an {sup 241}Am source can be used to measure the thickness of a Li coating on Mo tiles between 0.5 and 15 μm thick. Using a 0.1 mCi source, a thickness measurement can be accomplished in 2 h of counting. This technique could be used to measure any thin, low-Z material coating (up to 1 mg/cm{sup 2} thick) on a high-Z substrate, such as Be on W, B on Mo, or Li on Mo. By inserting a source and detector on a moveable probe, this technique could be used to provide an in situ measurement of the thickness of Li coating on NSTX-U Mo tiles. A test stand with an alpha source and an annular solid-state detector was used to investigate the measurable range of low-Z material thicknesses on Mo tiles.

  9. In situ Gas Measurements in Five Experimental Waste Rock Piles, Antamina Mine, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singurindy, O.; Blackmore, S. R.; Wild, A.; Mayer, K. U.; Beckie, R. D.; Smith, L.

    2009-12-01

    At the Antamina mine (Peru), a skarn deposit consisting of a quartz-monzonite porphyry hosted in limestone is mined for copper, zinc, lead, and molybdenum. Five (5) experimental waste rock piles were constructed at Antamina and instrumented to evaluate processes controlling metal release under neutral-pH drainage conditions. The piles were built over a 3-year period and each contains approximately 25,000 tonnes of waste rock classified as ‘slightly reactive’ (Pile 1 -2007), ‘reactive’ (Pile 2 and 3 - 2008), or a combination of rock of variable reactivity (Pile 4 and 5 - 2009). All waste rock, reactive to non-reactive, contains variable amounts of sulphide and carbonate minerals. Oxidation of sulphide minerals consumes O2 and generates low-pH conditions, which promotes carbonate dissolution and elevates CO2 concentrations. Sampling of the piles’ 64 in situ gas lines, using a portable gas analyzing system, revealed numerous CO2-enriched and O2-depleted zones. Piles constructed of the most reactive and fine-grained rock (Pile 2 and 3) show the highest CO¬2 concentrations (≥ 20,000 ppm), with Piles 1, 4 and 5 showing lower maximum concentrations of 1,600 ppm, 1,100 ppm, 2,900 ppm, respectively. The highest CO2 concentrations are located in the interior and near the bottom of the piles. Of the gas lines sampled from Pile 2 and 3, 88% and 95%, respectively are CO2-enriched (defined as > 2 x ambient values). The younger and less reactive piles (Pile 4 and 5) show CO2-enriched values in 3% and 17% of gas lines measured. The exothermic reaction of sulphide oxidation is also monitored by 12 in situ thermistors. Pile 2 and 3 temperatures are the highest at 9 - 10 oC. These temperatures are significantly warmer than ambient conditions (i.e., ~ 6 oC, June average) and correlate well with pockets of high CO2 concentrations. The gradational decline of CO2 concentrations with depth supports the notion that gas transport is dominated by vertical movement, while

  10. In-situ calibration of pulsed eddy current detection of cracks at fasteners in CP-140 aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underhill, Ross; Stott, Colette; Krause, Thomas W.

    2016-02-01

    The use of the Smallest Half Volume (SHV) robust statistics method and the Mahalanobis distance to blindly distinguish fasteners with cracks from fasteners without is examined. Pulsed eddy current data obtained from CP140 Aurora wing structures is used to test the approach. It is shown that the method can achieve levels of detection very close to those obtained when the same measurement technique is applied with full knowledge of which fasteners have no cracks. The method is applicable to a broad range of similar situations when an objective hit/miss criterion is used.

  11. A miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer for in situ elemental and isotopic composition measurements of planetary rocks and soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuland, M. B.; Mezger, K.; Riedo, A.; Tulej, M.; Wurz, P.

    2014-04-01

    A miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer (LMS) is presented. The LMS is designed as a flight instrument for planetary and space research and optimised for in situ measurements of the chemical composition of rocks and soils on a planetary surface. By means of measurements of standard reference materials, minerals and a sample of the Allende meteorite it is demonstrated that LMS is an suitable instrument for in situ measurements of elemental and isotopic composition with high precision and accuracy. Furthermore, it is shown that LMS data allows a derivation of the material mineralogy, petrology with high spatial resolution.

  12. The Probing In-Situ With Neutron and Gamma Rays (PING) Instrument for Planetary Composition Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.

    2012-01-01

    The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument (formerly named PNG-GRAND) [I] experiment is an innovative application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth over many decades. The objective of our active neutron-gamma ray technology program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) is to bring PING to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Venus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets and measure their bulk surface and subsurface elemental composition without the need to drill into the surface. Gamma-Ray Spectrometers (GRS) have been incorporated into numerous orbital planetary science missions. While orbital measurements can map a planet, they have low spatial and elemental sensitivity due to the low surface gamma ray emission rates reSUlting from using cosmic rays as an excitation source, PING overcomes this limitation in situ by incorporating a powerful neutron excitation source that permits significantly higher elemental sensitivity elemental composition measurements. PING combines a 14 MeV deuterium-tritium Pulsed Neutron Generator (PNG) with a gamma ray spectrometer and two neutron detectors to produce a landed instrument that can determine the elemental composition of a planet down to 30 - 50 cm below the planet's surface, The penetrating nature of .5 - 10 MeV gamma rays and 14 MeV neutrons allows such sub-surface composition measurements to be made without the need to drill into or otherwise disturb the planetary surface, thus greatly simplifying the lander design, We are cun'ently testing a PING prototype at a unique outdoor neutron instrumentation test facility at NASA/GSFC that provides two large (1.8 m x 1.8 m x ,9 m) granite and basalt test formations placed outdoors in an empty field, Since an independent trace elemental analysis has been performed on both these

  13. Polarized Imaging Nephelometer for Field and Aircraft Measurements of Aerosol Phase Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgos, G.; Martins, J.

    2012-12-01

    -Neph measurement plus a 0.63 1/mM offset, with a scatter around the linear fit smaller than 4 1/mM. Further analysis of the DEVOTE and DC3 flight data is underway. At LACO our goal is to enable systematic in-situ and eventually inlet-free measurements of aerosol phase function that can be compared to AERONET and satellite retrievals to enhance the quality of our global view of aerosols from ground and space. Figure 1. Comparison of the phase function measured by the PI-Neph aboard the NASA Langley King Air B200 aircraft and retrieved from AERONET sky radiance measurements

  14. Development of ``Smart Sediments'' to Conduct In-Situ Measurements within Mobile Bed Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, D. P.; Foster, D.; Chou, P.

    2010-12-01

    Observing the motion of sediment beds in nearshore environments has been previously limited by technological capabilities. Experiments utilizing both optical and acoustic techniques have provided great insight into the hydrodynamics within the bottom boundary and mobile bed layers. However, most previous technologies were not capable of in-situ investigations of the morphodynamics within these layers because they are generally thin, within 1-100 grain diameters. In-situ measurements of the mobile bed layer will be made with new state-of-the-art micro-electronic machines (MEM’s). These mobile nodes are 13x11x7 mm and are equipped with tri-axial accelerometers, temperature and pressure sensors, in addition to, a wireless transmitter and micro-processor. In this generation, the ceramic enclosure is comparable in size to coarse gravel. The device has the same physical properties as quartz and should provide significant insight into incipient motion and sediment transport under oscillatory flow fields in the nearshore environment. The mobile nodes will first be tested at a field-scale laboratory wave facility before being used in the nearshore. The morphodynamics of heterogeneous sediments will also be explored. The overarching goal of this project is to enhance the scientific community’s understanding of the hydrodynamics and morphodynamics within the wave-dominated bottom boundary layer environment through technological development of the “smart sediments”. In particular, we seek to test the hypothesis that in unsteady flow where the sediment may be heterogeneous, the incipient motion of a sediment bed results from a combination of the shear stress gradient and pressure gradient. The goal of this presentation is to evaluate the sensors on their physical properties such as moment of inertia and radio frequency transmission.

  15. Development of techniques for the in situ observation of OH and HO2 for studies of the impact of high-altitude supersonic aircraft on the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James G.

    1994-01-01

    This three-year project supported the construction, calibration, and deployment of a new instrument to measure the OH and HO2 radicals on the NASA ER-2 aircraft. The instrument has met and exceeded all of its design goals. The instrumentation represents a true quantum leap in performance over that achieved in previous HO(x) instruments built in our group. Sensitivity for OH was enhanced by over two orders of magnitude as the weight fell from approximately 1500 to less than 200 Kg. Reliability has been very high: HO(x) data are available for all flights during the first operational mission, the Stratospheric Photochemistry, Aerosols, and Dynamics Expedition (SPADE). The results of that experiment have been reported in the scientific literature and at conferences. Additionally, measurements of H2O and O3 were made and have been reported in the scientific literature. The measurements demonstrated the important role that OH and HO2 play in determining the concentration of ozone in the lower stratosphere. During the SPADE, campaign the measurements demonstrated that the catalytic removal is dominated by processes involving the odd-hydrogen and halogen radicals-and extremely important constraint for photochemical models that are being used to assess the potential deleterious effects of super-sonic aircraft effluent on the burden of stratospheric ozone.

  16. Development of techniques for the In Situ observation of OH and HO2 for studies of the impact of high-altitude supersonic aircraft on the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James G.

    1994-01-01

    This three-year project supported the construction, calibration, and deployment of a new instrument to measure the OH and HO2 radicals on the NASA Er-2 aircraft. The instrument has met and exceeded all of its design goals. The instrumentation represents a true quantum leap in performance over that achieved in previous HO(x) instruments built in our group. Sensitivity of OH was enhanced by over two orders of magnitude as the weight fell from approximately 1500 to less than 200 Kg. Reliability has been very high: HO(x) data are available for all flights during the first operational mission, the Stratospheric Photochemistry, aerosols, and Dynamics Expedition (SPADE). The results of that experiment have been reported in the scientific literature and at conferences. Additionally, measurements of H2O and O3 were made and have been reported in the scientific literature. The measurements demonstrate the important role that OH and HO2 play in determining the concentration of ozone in the lower stratosphere. During the SPADE campaign, the measurements demonstrate that the catalytic removal is dominated by processes involving the odd-hydrogen and halogen radicals-an extremely important constraint for photochemical models that are being used to assess the potential deleterious effects of super-sonic aircraft effluent on the burden of stratospheric ozone.

  17. In-situ measurement of the temporal evolution of the thermal conductivity of alpine snow layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, S.; Domine, F.; Arnaud, L.; Picard, G.; Jacobi, H.; Willemet, J.

    2009-12-01

    We report on a 3-months long time series of in-situ measurements of the thermal conductivity (kT) of snow in 6 different layers in an alpine snowpack in the Mont-Blanc moutain range, France, at an altitude of 2400 m. Automatic measurements were carried out every two days using the heated-needle probe technique. Results show consistent patterns of thermal conductivity increase throughout the measurements campaign. The temporal rate of change of kTvaries up to 0.01 W m-1 K-1 dy-1, with maximum values just after snowfall. Temporal rates of kTincrease are compared with results from laboratory experiments under controlled conditions and with published theoretical assessments. A case where kT decreased over time in a given snow layer was documented both in the field and in the laboratory. Possible reasons for such a behaviour are discussed. A cursory comparison of the field measured kTvalues with the prediction of the snowpack model CROCUS shows that at first order the model performs satisfactorily. However, a quantitative understanding and modeling of the variations of kT over time would require an in-depth assessment of physical processes occurring during snow metamorphism.

  18. In situ measurement of fixed charge evolution at silicon surfaces during atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Ling; Watt, Morgan R.; Strandwitz, Nicholas C.

    2015-02-09

    Interfacial fixed charge or interfacial dipoles are present at many semiconductor-dielectric interfaces and have important effects upon device behavior, yet the chemical origins of these electrostatic phenomena are not fully understood. We report the measurement of changes in Si channel conduction in situ during atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide using trimethylaluminum and water to probe changes in surface electrostatics. Current-voltage data were acquired continually before, during, and after the self-limiting chemical reactions that result in film growth. Our measurements indicated an increase in conductance on p-type samples with p{sup +} ohmic contacts and a decrease in conductance on analogous n-type samples. Further, p{sup +} contacted samples with n-type channels exhibited an increase in measured current and n{sup +} contacted p-type samples exhibited a decrease in current under applied voltage. Device physics simulations, where a fixed surface charge was parameterized on the channel surface, connect the surface charge to changes in current-voltage behavior. The simulations and analogous analytical relationships for near-surface conductance were used to explain the experimental results. Specifically, the changes in current-voltage behavior can be attributed to th