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Sample records for aircraft land vehicles

  1. Aircraft landing gear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, John A. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Topics presented include the laboratory simulation of landing gear pitch-plane dynamics, a summary of recent aircraft/ground vehicle friction measurement tests, some recent aircraft tire thermal studies, and an evaluation of critical speeds in high-speed aircraft. Also presented are a review of NASA antiskid braking research, titanium matrix composite landing gear development, the current methods and perspective of aircraft flotation analysis, the flow rate and trajectory of water spray produced by an aircraft tire, and spin-up studies of the Space Shuttle Orbiter main gear tire.

  2. Aircraft landing using GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, David Gary

    The advent of the Global Positioning System (GPS) is revolutionizing the field of navigation. Commercial aviation has been particularly influenced by this worldwide navigation system. From ground vehicle guidance to aircraft landing applications, GPS has the potential to impact many areas of aviation. GPS is already being used for non-precision approach guidance; current research focuses on its application to more critical regimes of flight. To this end, the following contributions were made: (1) Development of algorithms and a flexible software architecture capable of providing real-time position solutions accurate to the centimeter level with high integrity. This architecture was used to demonstrate 110 automatic landings of a Boeing 737. (2) Assessment of the navigation performance provided by two GPS-based landing systems developed at Stanford, the Integrity Beacon Landing System, and the Wide Area Augmentation System. (3) Preliminary evaluation of proposed enhancements to traditional techniques for GPS positioning, specifically, dual antenna positioning and pseudolite augmentation. (4) Introduction of a new concept for positioning using airport pseudolites. The results of this research are promising, showing that GPS-based systems can potentially meet even the stringent requirements of a Category III (zero visibility) landing system. Although technical and logistical hurdles still exist, it is likely that GPS will soon provide aircraft guidance in all phases of flight, including automatic landing, roll-out, and taxi.

  3. 43 CFR 4740.1 - Use of motor vehicles or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Use of motor vehicles or aircraft. 4740.1... FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Motor Vehicles and Aircraft § 4740.1 Use of motor vehicles or aircraft. (a) Motor vehicles and aircraft may be used by the authorized officer in all phases of...

  4. 43 CFR 4740.1 - Use of motor vehicles or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Use of motor vehicles or aircraft. 4740.1... FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Motor Vehicles and Aircraft § 4740.1 Use of motor vehicles or aircraft. (a) Motor vehicles and aircraft may be used by the authorized officer in all phases of...

  5. Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Pamela A.; Stubbs, Sandy M.; Tanner, John A.

    1987-01-01

    The Langley Research Center has recently upgraded the Landing Loads Track (LLT) to improve the capability of low-cost testing of conventional and advanced landing gear systems. The unique feature of the Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF) is the ability to test aircraft landing gear systems on actual runway surfaces at operational ground speeds and loading conditions. A historical overview of the original LLT is given, followed by a detailed description of the new ALDF systems and operational capabilities.

  6. Genesis of the Lunar Landing Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelzer, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The author examines early research regarding return flight from a Moon landing made prior to President Kennedy's 1961 challenge to put men on the Moon before the end of the decade. Organizations involved in early research include NACA, the Flight Research Center (now Dryden) Bell Aircraft Corporation. The discussion focuses on development of a flight simulator to model the Moon's reduced gravity and development of the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle.

  7. 43 CFR 4740.1 - Use of motor vehicles or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of motor vehicles or aircraft. 4740.1... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Motor Vehicles and Aircraft § 4740.1 Use of motor vehicles or...

  8. 19 CFR 122.32 - Aircraft required to land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aircraft required to land. 122.32 Section 122.32... TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Landing Requirements § 122.32 Aircraft required to land. (a) Any aircraft... where aircraft entering the U.S. from a foreign area may land. As such, aircraft must land at...

  9. 19 CFR 122.32 - Aircraft required to land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aircraft required to land. 122.32 Section 122.32... TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Landing Requirements § 122.32 Aircraft required to land. (a) Any aircraft... where aircraft entering the U.S. from a foreign area may land. As such, aircraft must land at...

  10. 19 CFR 122.32 - Aircraft required to land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aircraft required to land. 122.32 Section 122.32... TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Landing Requirements § 122.32 Aircraft required to land. (a) Any aircraft... where aircraft entering the U.S. from a foreign area may land. As such, aircraft must land at...

  11. 19 CFR 122.32 - Aircraft required to land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aircraft required to land. 122.32 Section 122.32... TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Landing Requirements § 122.32 Aircraft required to land. (a) Any aircraft... where aircraft entering the U.S. from a foreign area may land. As such, aircraft must land at...

  12. X-38 research aircraft landing - computer animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In the mid-1990's researchers at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, and Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, began working actively with the sub-scale X-38 prototype crew return vehicle (CRV). This was an unpiloted lifting body designed at 80 percent of the size of a projected emergency crew return vehicle for the International Space Station. The X-38 and the actual CRV are patterned after a lifting-body shape first employed in the Air Force X-23 (SV-5) program in the mid-1960's and the Air Force-NASA X-24A lifting-body project in the early to mid-1970's. Built by Scaled Composites, Inc., in Mojave, California, and outfitted with avionics, computer systems, and other hardware at Johnson Space Center, two X-38 aircraft were involved in flight research at Dryden beginning in July of 1997. Before that, however, Dryden conducted some 13 flights at a drop zone near California City, California. These tests were done with a 1/6-scale model of the X-38 aircraft to test the parafoil concept that would be employed on the X-38 aircraft and the actual CRV. The basic concept is that the actual CRV will use an inertial navigation system together with the Global Positioning System of satellites to guide it from the International Space Station into the earth's atmosphere. A deorbit engine module will redirect the vehicle from orbit into the atmosphere where a series of parachutes and a parafoil will deploy in sequence to bring the vehicle to a landing, possibly in a field next to a hospital. Flight research at NASA Dryden for the X-38 began with an unpiloted captive carry flight in which the vehicle remained attached to its future launch vehicle, the Dryden B-52 008. There were four captive flights in 1997 and three in 1998, plus the first drop test on March 12, 1998, using the parachutes and parafoil. Further captive and drop tests occurred in 1999. Although the X-38 landed safely on the lakebed at Edwards after the March 1998 drop test, there had

  13. Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Original Test Carriage: A carriage catapulted by a hydraulic jet at speeds up to 150 mph for studies of ground loads on high-speed aircraft is in operation at the Langley Research Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. A drop test rig is installed on the carriage, which is catapulted 400 feet in 3.5 seconds. The carriage travels along a track and special instruments record loads data as an aircraft landing gear or other test specimen is dropped on a concrete strip. Five cables attached to a battery of 20 Navy Mark IV arresting gears, stretched across the 2,200-foot track, bring the carriage to a halt after the test run. The carriage, when loaded to its capacity of 20,000 pounds, represents a 50-ton load. The hydraulic catapult consists of a single water jet, which roars from a nozzle at the front end of the L-shaped pressure vessel (center) and is forced into a specially-shaped bucket on the carriage. The water jet, traveling at 660 feet per second, undergoes a 180 degree change of direction and floods out of another opening in the bucket below the incoming jet stream. The momentum change produces a thrust on the carriage of 400,00 pounds.

  14. Research of autonomous landing control of unmanned combat air vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaoyan; Chen, Zongji

    2003-09-01

    This paper is to present a robust controller design method for developing autonomous landing systems of Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle (UCAV). We first analyze the characteristic of autonomous landing of UCAV, and put forward its landing performance specifications. Structure singular value μ| synthesis is used to develop autonomous landing systems to accurately follow the pre-designed ideal landing track or online generated optimal landing track. The robust performance of system is analyzed. The simulation results demonstrate that the designed autonomous landing system satisfies the performance requirements of autonomous landing of UCAV when there are uncertainties of UCAV aircraft model, measurement noises and exogenous disturbances.

  15. Validation of a Flexible Aircraft TakeOff and Landing Analysis /FATOLA/ computer program using flight landing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, H. D.; Mcgehee, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    A multiple-degree-of-freedom takeoff and landing analysis, Flexible Aircraft TakeOff and Landing Analysis computer program (FATOLA), was used to predict the landing behavior of a rigid-body X-24B reentry research vehicle and of a flexible-body modified-delta-wing supersonic YF-12 research aircraft. The analytical predictions were compared with flight test data for both research vehicles. Predicted time histories of vehicle motion and attitude, landing-gear strut stroke, and axial force transmitted from the landing gear to the airframe during the landing impact and rollout compared well with the actual time histories. Based on the comparisons presented, the versatility and validity of the FATOLA program for predicting landing dynamics of aircraft has been demonstrated.

  16. Lunar Landing Research Vehicle

    NASA Video Gallery

    The lunar lander, called a Lunar Excursion Module, or Lunar Module (LM), was designed for vertical landing and takeoff, and was able to briefly hover and fly horizontally before landing. At first g...

  17. Scheduling Aircraft Landings under Constrained Position Shifting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, Hamsa; Chandran, Bala

    2006-01-01

    Optimal scheduling of airport runway operations can play an important role in improving the safety and efficiency of the National Airspace System (NAS). Methods that compute the optimal landing sequence and landing times of aircraft must accommodate practical issues that affect the implementation of the schedule. One such practical consideration, known as Constrained Position Shifting (CPS), is the restriction that each aircraft must land within a pre-specified number of positions of its place in the First-Come-First-Served (FCFS) sequence. We consider the problem of scheduling landings of aircraft in a CPS environment in order to maximize runway throughput (minimize the completion time of the landing sequence), subject to operational constraints such as FAA-specified minimum inter-arrival spacing restrictions, precedence relationships among aircraft that arise either from airline preferences or air traffic control procedures that prevent overtaking, and time windows (representing possible control actions) during which each aircraft landing can occur. We present a Dynamic Programming-based approach that scales linearly in the number of aircraft, and describe our computational experience with a prototype implementation on realistic data for Denver International Airport.

  18. Concentric circles based simple optical landing aid for vertical takeoff and landing aircrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murshid, Syed H.; Enaya, Rayan; Lovell, Gregory L.

    2014-09-01

    Vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircrafts such as helicopters and drones, add a flexible degree of operation to airborne vehicles. In order to operate these devices in low light situations, where it is difficult to determine slope of the landing surface, a lightweight and standalone device is proposed here. This small optical device can be easily integrated into current VTOL systems. An optical projector consisting of low power, light weight, solid state laser along with minimal optics is utilized to illuminate the landing surface with donut shaped circles and coaxial centralized dot. This device can placed anywhere on the aircraft and a properly placed fiber system can be used to illuminate the surface beneath the bottom of the VTOL aircraft in a fashion that during operation, when the aircraft is parallel to the landing surface, the radius between the central dot and outer ring(s) are equidistant for the entire circumference; however, when there the landing surface of the VTOL aircraft is not parallel to the landing strip, the radial distance between two opposite sides of the circle and central dot will be unequal. The larger this distortion, the greater the difference will be between the opposite sides of the circle. Visual confirmation or other optical devices can be used to determine relative alignment of the projector output allowing the pilot to make proper adjustments as they approach the landing surface to ensure safe landings. Simulated and experimental results from a prototype optical projector are presented here.

  19. 19 CFR 122.32 - Aircraft required to land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Landing Requirements § 122.32 Aircraft required to land. (a) Any aircraft... designation are required for aircraft and/or airspace safety as directed by the Federal Aviation... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aircraft required to land. 122.32 Section...

  20. AGFATL- ACTIVE GEAR FLEXIBLE AIRCRAFT TAKEOFF AND LANDING ANALYSIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    The Active Gear, Flexible Aircraft Takeoff and Landing Analysis program, AGFATL, was developed to provide a complete simulation of the aircraft takeoff and landing dynamics problem. AGFATL can represent an airplane either as a rigid body with six degrees of freedom or as a flexible body with multiple degrees of freedom. The airframe flexibility is represented by the superposition of up to twenty free vibration modes on the rigid-body motions. The analysis includes maneuver logic and autopilots programmed to control the aircraft during glide slope, flare, landing, and takeoff. The program is modular so that performance of the aircraft in flight and during landing and ground maneuvers can be studied separately or in combination. A program restart capability is included in AGFATL. Effects simulated in the AGFATL program include: (1) flexible aircraft control and performance during glide slope, flare, landing roll, and takeoff roll under conditions of changing winds, engine failures, brake failures, control system failures, strut failures, restrictions due to runway length, and control variable limits and time lags; (2) landing gear loads and dynamics for up to five gears; (3) single and multiple engines (maximum of four) including selective engine reversing and failure; (4) drag chute and spoiler effects; (5) wheel braking (including skid-control) and selective brake failure; (6) aerodynamic ground effects; (7) aircraft carrier operations; (8) inclined runways and runway perturbations; (9) flexible or rigid airframes; 10) rudder and nose gear steering; and 11) actively controlled landing gear shock struts. Input to the AGFATL program includes data which describe runway roughness; vehicle geometry, flexibility and aerodynamic characteristics; landing gear(s); propulsion; and initial conditions such as attitude, attitude change rates, and velocities. AGFATL performs a time integration of the equations of motion and outputs comprehensive information on the airframe

  1. Open Vehicle Sketch Pad Aircraft Modeling Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Andrew S.

    2013-01-01

    Geometric modeling of aircraft during the Conceptual design phase is very different from that needed for the Preliminary or Detailed design phases. The Conceptual design phase is characterized by the rapid, multi-disciplinary analysis of many design variables by a small engineering team. The designer must walk a line between fidelity and productivity, picking tools and methods with the appropriate balance of characteristics to achieve the goals of the study, while staying within the available resources. Identifying geometric details that are important, and those that are not, is critical to making modeling and methodology choices. This is true for both the low-order analysis methods traditionally used in Conceptual design as well as the highest-order analyses available. This paper will highlight some of Conceptual design's characteristics that drive the designer s choices as well as modeling examples for several aircraft configurations using the open source version of the Vehicle Sketch Pad (Open VSP) aircraft Conceptual design geometry modeler.

  2. Emergency Landing Planning for Damaged Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meuleau, Nicolas; Plaunt, Christian John; Smith, David E.

    2008-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made over the last 15 years on building adaptive control systems to assist pilots in flying damaged aircraft. Once a pilot has regained control of a damaged aircraft, the next problem is to determine the best site for an emergency landing. In general, the decision depends on many factors including the actual control envelope of the aircraft, distance to the site, weather en route, characteristics of the approach path, characteristics of the runway or landing site, and emergency facilities at the site. All of these influence the risk to the aircraft, to the passengers and crew, and to people and property on the ground. We describe an ongoing project to build and demonstrate an emergency landing planner that takes these various factors into consideration and proposes possible routes and landing sites to the pilot, ordering them according to estimated risk. We give an overview of the system architecture and input data, describe our preliminary modeling of risk, and describe how we search the space of landing sites and routes.

  3. Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    In this 1965 NASA Flight Reserch Center photograph the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) is shown at near maximum altitude over the south base at Edwards Air Force Base. When Apollo planning was underway in 1960, NASA was looking for a simulator to profile the descent to the moon's surface. Three concepts surfaced: an electronic simulator, a tethered device, and the ambitious Dryden contribution, a free-flying vehicle. All three became serious projects, but eventually the NASA Flight Research Center's (FRC) Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) became the most significant one. Hubert M. Drake is credited with originating the idea, while Donald Bellman and Gene Matranga were senior engineers on the project, with Bellman, the project manager. Simultaneously, and independently, Bell Aerosystems Company, Buffalo, N.Y., a company with experience in vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft, had conceived a similar free-flying simulator and proposed their concept to NASA headquarters. NASA Headquarters put FRC and Bell together to collaborate. The challenge was; to allow a pilot to make a vertical landing on earth in a simulated moon environment, one sixth of the earth's gravity and with totally transparent aerodynamic forces in a 'free flight' vehicle with no tether forces acting on it. Built of tubular aluminum like a giant four-legged bedstead, the vehicle was to simulate a lunar landing profile from around 1500 feet to the moon's surface. To do this, the LLRV had a General Electric CF-700-2V turbofan engine mounted vertically in gimbals, with 4200 pounds of thrust. The engine, using JP-4 fuel, got the vehicle up to the test altitude and was then throttled back to support five-sixths of the vehicle's weight, simulating the reduced gravity of the moon. Two hydrogen-peroxide lift rockets with thrust that could be varied from 100 to 500 pounds handled the LLRV's rate of descent and horizontal translations. Sixteen smaller hydrogen-peroxide rockets, mounted in pairs

  4. Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    In this 1965 NASA Flight Reserch Center photograph the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) number 1 is shown in flight. When Apollo planning was underway in 1960, NASA was looking for a simulator to profile the descent to the moon's surface. Three concepts surfaced: an electronic simulator, a tethered device, and the ambitious Dryden contribution, a free-flying vehicle. All three became serious projects, but eventually the NASA Flight Research Center's (FRC) Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) became the most significant one. Hubert M. Drake is credited with originating the idea, while Donald Bellman and Gene Matranga were senior engineers on the project, with Bellman, the project manager. Simultaneously, and independently, Bell Aerosystems Company, Buffalo, N.Y., a company with experience in vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft, had conceived a similar free-flying simulator and proposed their concept to NASA headquarters. NASA Headquarters put FRC and Bell together to collaborate. The challenge was; to allow a pilot to make a vertical landing on earth in a simulated moon environment, one sixth of the earth's gravity and with totally transparent aerodynamic forces in a 'free flight' vehicle with no tether forces acting on it. Built of tubular aluminum like a giant four-legged bedstead, the vehicle was to simulate a lunar landing profile from around 1500 feet to the moon's surface. To do this, the LLRV had a General Electric CF-700-2V turbofan engine mounted vertically in gimbals, with 4200 pounds of thrust. The engine, using JP-4 fuel, got the vehicle up to the test altitude and was then throttled back to support five-sixths of the vehicle's weight, simulating the reduced gravity of the moon. Two hydrogen-peroxide lift rockets with thrust that could be varied from 100 to 500 pounds handled the LLRV's rate of descent and horizontal translations. Sixteen smaller hydrogen-peroxide rockets, mounted in pairs, gave the pilot control in pitch, yaw, and roll. On the

  5. Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    An inflight view from the left side of the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle, is shown in this 1964 NASA Flight Research Center photograph. The photograph was taken in front of the old NACA hangar located at the South Base, Edwards Air Force Base. When Apollo planning was underway in 1960, NASA was looking for a simulator to profile the descent to the moon's surface. Three concepts surfaced: an electronic simulator, a tethered device, and the ambitious Dryden contribution, a free-flying vehicle. All three became serious projects, but eventually the NASA Flight Research Center's (FRC) Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) became the most significant one. Hubert M. Drake is credited with originating the idea, while Donald Bellman and Gene Matranga were senior engineers on the project, with Bellman, the project manager. Simultaneously, and independently, Bell Aerosystems Company, Buffalo, N.Y., a company with experience in vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft, had conceived a similar free-flying simulator and proposed their concept to NASA headquarters. NASA Headquarters put FRC and Bell together to collaborate. The challenge was; to allow a pilot to make a vertical landing on earth in a simulated moon environment, one sixth of the earth's gravity and with totally transparent aerodynamic forces in a 'free flight' vehicle with no tether forces acting on it. Built of tubular aluminum like a giant four-legged bedstead, the vehicle was to simulate a lunar landing profile from around 1500 feet to the moon's surface. To do this, the LLRV had a General Electric CF-700-2V turbofan engine mounted vertically in gimbals, with 4200 pounds of thrust. The engine, using JP-4 fuel, got the vehicle up to the test altitude and was then throttled back to support five-sixths of the vehicle's weight, simulating the reduced gravity of the moon. Two hydrogen-peroxide lift rockets with thrust that could be varied from 100 to 500 pounds handled the LLRV's rate of descent and horizontal

  6. Automatic detection of aircraft emergency landing sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yu-Fei; Rahman, Zia-ur; Krusienski, Dean; Li, Jiang

    2011-06-01

    An automatic landing site detection algorithm is proposed for aircraft emergency landing. Emergency landing is an unplanned event in response to emergency situations. If, as is unfortunately usually the case, there is no airstrip or airfield that can be reached by the un-powered aircraft, a crash landing or ditching has to be carried out. Identifying a safe landing site is critical to the survival of passengers and crew. Conventionally, the pilot chooses the landing site visually by looking at the terrain through the cockpit. The success of this vital decision greatly depends on the external environmental factors that can impair human vision, and on the pilot's flight experience that can vary significantly among pilots. Therefore, we propose a robust, reliable and efficient algorithm that is expected to alleviate the negative impact of these factors. We present only the detection mechanism of the proposed algorithm and assume that the image enhancement for increased visibility, and image stitching for a larger field-of-view have already been performed on the images acquired by aircraftmounted cameras. Specifically, we describe an elastic bound detection method which is designed to position the horizon. The terrain image is divided into non-overlapping blocks which are then clustered according to a "roughness" measure. Adjacent smooth blocks are merged to form potential landing sites whose dimensions are measured with principal component analysis and geometric transformations. If the dimensions of the candidate region exceed the minimum requirement for safe landing, the potential landing site is considered a safe candidate and highlighted on the human machine interface. At the end, the pilot makes the final decision by confirming one of the candidates, also considering other factors such as wind speed and wind direction, etc. Preliminary results show the feasibility of the proposed algorithm.

  7. Empirical Prediction of Aircraft Landing Gear Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Robert A. (Technical Monitor); Guo, Yue-Ping

    2005-01-01

    This report documents a semi-empirical/semi-analytical method for landing gear noise prediction. The method is based on scaling laws of the theory of aerodynamic noise generation and correlation of these scaling laws with current available test data. The former gives the method a sound theoretical foundation and the latter quantitatively determines the relations between the parameters of the landing gear assembly and the far field noise, enabling practical predictions of aircraft landing gear noise, both for parametric trends and for absolute noise levels. The prediction model is validated by wind tunnel test data for an isolated Boeing 737 landing gear and by flight data for the Boeing 777 airplane. In both cases, the predictions agree well with data, both in parametric trends and in absolute noise levels.

  8. Commercial Aircraft Integrated Vehicle Health Management Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Evans, Joni K.; Jones, Sharon Monica; Kurtoglu, Tolga; Leone, Karen M.; Sandifer, Carl E.; Thomas, Megan A.

    2010-01-01

    Statistical data and literature from academia, industry, and other government agencies were reviewed and analyzed to establish requirements for fixture work in detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and mitigation for IVHM related hardware and software. Around 15 to 20 percent of commercial aircraft accidents between 1988 and 2003 involved inalftfnctions or failures of some aircraft system or component. Engine and landing gear failures/malfunctions dominate both accidents and incidents. The IVI vl Project research technologies were found to map to the Joint Planning and Development Office's National Research and Development Plan (RDP) as well as the Safety Working Group's National Aviation Safety Strategic. Plan (NASSP). Future directions in Aviation Technology as related to IVHlvl were identified by reviewing papers from three conferences across a five year time span. A total of twenty-one trend groups in propulsion, aeronautics and aircraft categories were compiled. Current and ftiture directions of IVHM related technologies were gathered and classified according to eight categories: measurement and inspection, sensors, sensor management, detection, component and subsystem monitoring, diagnosis, prognosis, and mitigation.

  9. Landing Energy Dissipation for Manned Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Loyd. L.

    1960-01-01

    The film shows experimental investigations to determine the landing-energy-dissipation characteristics for several types of landing gear for manned reentry vehicles. The landing vehicles are considered in two categories: those having essentially vertical-descent paths, the parachute-supported vehicles, and those having essentially horizontal paths, the lifting vehicles. The energy-dissipation devices include crushable materials such as foamed plastics and honeycomb for internal application in couch-support systems, yielding metal elements as part of the structure of capsules or as alternates for oleos in landing-gear struts, inflatable bags, braking rockets, and shaped surfaces for water impact.

  10. Aircraft Conceptual Design Using Vehicle Sketch Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredericks, William J.; Antcliff, Kevin R.; Costa, Guillermo; Deshpande, Nachiket; Moore, Mark D.; Miguel, Edric A. San; Snyder, Alison N.

    2010-01-01

    Vehicle Sketch Pad (VSP) is a parametric geometry modeling tool that is intended for use in the conceptual design of aircraft. The intent of this software is to rapidly model aircraft configurations without expending the expertise and time that is typically required for modeling with traditional Computer Aided Design (CAD) packages. VSP accomplishes this by using parametrically defined components, such as a wing that is defined by span, area, sweep, taper ratio, thickness to cord, and so on. During this phase of frequent design builds, changes to the model can be rapidly visualized along with the internal volumetric layout. Using this geometry-based approach, parameters such as wetted areas and cord lengths can be easily extracted for rapid external performance analyses, such as a parasite drag buildup. At the completion of the conceptual design phase, VSP can export its geometry to higher fidelity tools. This geometry tool was developed by NASA and is freely available to U.S. companies and universities. It has become integral to conceptual design in the Aeronautics Systems Analysis Branch (ASAB) here at NASA Langley Research Center and is currently being used at over 100 universities, aerospace companies, and other government agencies. This paper focuses on the use of VSP in recent NASA conceptual design studies to facilitate geometry-centered design methodology. Such a process is shown to promote greater levels of creativity, more rapid assessment of critical design issues, and improved ability to quickly interact with higher order analyses. A number of VSP vehicle model examples are compared to CAD-based conceptual design, from a designer perspective; comparisons are also made of the time and expertise required to build the geometry representations as well.

  11. Aircraft operability methods applied to space launch vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D.

    1997-01-01

    The commercial space launch market requirement for low vehicle operations costs necessitates the application of methods and technologies developed and proven for complex aircraft systems. The {open_quotes}building in{close_quotes} of reliability and maintainability, which is applied extensively in the aircraft industry, has yet to be applied to the maximum extent possible on launch vehicles. Use of vehicle system and structural health monitoring, automated ground systems and diagnostic design methods derived from aircraft applications support the goal of achieving low cost launch vehicle operations. Transforming these operability techniques to space applications where diagnostic effectiveness has significantly different metrics is critical to the success of future launch systems. These concepts will be discussed with reference to broad launch vehicle applicability. Lessons learned and techniques used in the adaptation of these methods will be outlined drawing from recent aircraft programs and implementation on phase 1 of the X-33/RLV technology development program. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Aircraft operability methods applied to space launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Douglas

    1997-01-01

    The commercial space launch market requirement for low vehicle operations costs necessitates the application of methods and technologies developed and proven for complex aircraft systems. The ``building in'' of reliability and maintainability, which is applied extensively in the aircraft industry, has yet to be applied to the maximum extent possible on launch vehicles. Use of vehicle system and structural health monitoring, automated ground systems and diagnostic design methods derived from aircraft applications support the goal of achieving low cost launch vehicle operations. Transforming these operability techniques to space applications where diagnostic effectiveness has significantly different metrics is critical to the success of future launch systems. These concepts will be discussed with reference to broad launch vehicle applicability. Lessons learned and techniques used in the adaptation of these methods will be outlined drawing from recent aircraft programs and implementation on phase 1 of the X-33/RLV technology development program.

  13. Landing Energy Dissipation for Manned Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    Landing Energy Dissipation for Manned Reentry Vehicles. The film shows experimental investigations to determine the landing-energy-dissipation characteristics for several types of landing gear for manned reentry vehicles. The landing vehicles are considered in two categories: those having essentially vertical-descent paths, the parachute-supported vehicles, and those having essentially horizontal paths, the lifting vehicles. The energy-dissipation devices include crushable materials such as foamed plastics and honeycomb for internal application in couch-support systems, yielding metal elements as part of the structure of capsules or as alternates for oleos in landing-gear struts, inflatable bags, braking rockets, and shaped surfaces for water impact. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030945. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  14. Occupant Protection during Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle Landings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernhardt, Michael L.; Jones, J. A.; Granderson, B. K.; Somers, J. T.

    2009-01-01

    The constellation program is evaluating current vehicle design capabilities for nominal water landings and contingency land landings of the Orion Crew Exploration vehicle. The Orion Landing Strategy tiger team was formed to lead the technical effort for which associated activities include the current vehicle design, susceptibility to roll control and tip over, reviewing methods for assessing occupant injury during ascent / aborts /landings, developing an alternate seat/attenuation design solution which improves occupant protection and operability, and testing the seat/attenuation system designs to ensure valid results. The EVA physiology, systems and Performance (EPSP) project is leading the effort under the authority of the Tiger Team Steering committee to develop, verify, validate and accredit biodynamics models using a variety of crash and injury databases including NASCAR, Indy Car and military aircraft. The validated biodynamics models will be used by the Constellation program to evaluate a variety of vehicle, seat and restraint designs in the context of multiple nominal and off-nominal landing scenarios. The models will be used in conjunction with Acceptable Injury Risk definitions to provide new occupant protection requirements for the Constellation Program.

  15. Development of systems and techniques for landing an aircraft using onboard television

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, S. W.; Carr, P. C.; Winter, W. R.; Manke, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    A flight program was conducted to develop a landing technique with which a pilot could consistently and safely land a remotely piloted research vehicle (RPRV) without outside visual reference except through television. Otherwise, instrumentation was standard. Such factors as the selection of video parameters, the pilot's understanding of the television presentation, the pilot's ground cockpit environment, and the operational procedures for landing were considered. About 30 landings were necessary for a pilot to become sufficiently familiar and competent with the test aircraft to make powered approaches and landings with outside visual references only through television. When steep approaches and landings were made by remote control, the pilot's workload was extremely high. The test aircraft was used as a simulator for the F-15 RPRV, and as such was considered to be essential to the success of landing the F-15 RPRV.

  16. Wet runways. [aircraft landing and directional control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.

    1975-01-01

    Aircraft stopping and directional control performance on wet runways is discussed. The major elements affecting tire/ground traction developed by jet transport aircraft are identified and described in terms of atmospheric, pavement, tire, aircraft system and pilot performance factors or parameters. Research results are summarized, and means for improving or restoring tire traction/aircraft performance on wet runways are discussed.

  17. X-38 research aircraft - First drop flight and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the mid-1990's researchers at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, and Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, began working actively with the sub-scale X-38 prototype crew return vehicle (CRV). This was an unpiloted lifting body designed at 80 percent of the size of a projected emergency crew return vehicle for the International Space Station. The X-38 and the actual CRV are patterned after a lifting-body shape first employed in the Air Force X-23 (SV-5) program in the mid-1960's and the Air Force-NASA X-24A lifting-body project in the early to mid-1970's. Built by Scaled Composites, Inc., in Mojave, California, and outfitted with avionics, computer systems, and other hardware at Johnson Space Center, two X-38 aircraft were involved in flight research at Dryden beginning in July of 1997. Before that, however, Dryden conducted some 13 flights at a drop zone near California City, California. Those tests were done with a 1/6-scale model of the X-38 aircraft to test the parafoil concept that would be employed on the X-38 and the actual CRV. The basic concept is that the actual CRV will use an inertial navigation system together with the Global Positioning System of satellites to guide it from the International Space Station into the Earth's atmosphere. A deorbit engine module will redirect the vehicle from orbit into the atmosphere where a series of parachutes and a parafoil will deploy in sequence to bring the vehicle to a landing, possibly in a field next to a hospital. Flight research at NASA Dryden for the X-38 began with an unpiloted captive carry flight in which the vehicle remained attached to its future launch vehicle the Dryden B-52 008. There were four captive flights in 1997 and three in 1998, plus the first drop test on March 12, 1998, using the parachutes and parafoil. Further captive and drop tests occurred in 1999. Although the X-38 landed safely on the lakebed at Edwards after the March 1998 drop test, there had been some

  18. Longitudinal handling qualities during approach and landing of a powered lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Innis, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Longitudinal handling qualities evaluations were conducted on the Ames Research Center Flight Simulator for Advanced Aircraft (FSAA) for the approach and landing tasks of a powered lift STOL research aircraft. The test vehicle was a C-8A aircraft modified with a new wing incorporating internal blowing over an augmentor flap. The investigation included: (1) use of various flight path and airspeed control techniques for the basic vehicle; (2) assessment of stability and command augmentation schemes for pitch attitude and airspeed control; (3) determination of the influence of longitudinal and vertical force coupling for the power control; (4) determination of the influence of pitch axis coupling with the thrust vector control; and (5) evaluations of the contribution of stability and command augmentation to recovery from a single engine failure. Results are presented in the form of pilot ratings and commentary substantiated by landing approach time histories.

  19. Landing Energy Dissipation for Manned Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lloyd J., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations have been made to determine the landing-energy-dissipation characteristics for several types of landing gear for manned reentry vehicles. The landing vehicles are considered in two categories: those having essentially vertical-descent paths, the parachute-supported vehicles, and those having essentially horizontal paths, the lifting vehicles. The energy-dissipation devices discussed are crushable materials such as foamed plastics and honeycomb for internal application in couch-support systems, yielding metal elements as part of the structure of capsules or as alternates for oleos in landing-gear struts, inflatable bags, braking rockets, and shaped surfaces for water impact. It appears feasible to readily evaluate landing-gear systems for internal or external application in hard-surface or water landings by using computational procedures and free-body landing techniques with dynamic models. The systems investigated have shown very interesting energy-dissipation characteristics over a considerable range of landing parameters. Acceptable gear can be developed along lines similar to those presented if stroke requirements and human-tolerance limits are considered.

  20. Evaluation of HiMAT aircraft landing approach lateral control gearing using simulation and a visual display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarrafian, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    The utility of a visual display when studying the influence of changes in lateral stick gearing gains on the Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology (HiMAT) vehicle handling qualities during simulated approaches and landings is investigated. The visual display improved the validity of the simulation and provided improved roll response cues for the HiMAT aircraft landing approach. A range of acceptable constant lateral stick gearing gains is found that provides adequate maneuverability and allows for precision moments.

  1. Aircraft and Ground Vehicle Winter Runway Friction Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    Some background information is given together with the scope and objectives of a 5-year, Joint Winter Runway Friction Measurement Program between the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA), Transport Canada (TC), and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The primary objective of this effort is to perform instrumented aircraft and ground vehicle tests aimed at identifying a common number that all the different ground vehicle devices would report. This number, denoted the International Runway Friction Index (IRFI), will be related to all types of aircraft stopping performance. The range of test equipment, the test sites, test results and accomplishments, the extent of the substantial friction database compiled, and future test plans will be described. Several related studies have also been implemented including the effects of contaminant type on aircraft impingement drag, and the effectiveness of various runway and aircraft de-icing chemical types, and application rates.

  2. X-38 vehicle #131R arrives at NASA Dryden via NASA'S Super Guppy transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Super Guppy transport aircraft landed at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. on July 11, 2000, to deliver the latest version of the X-38 drop vehicle to Dryden. The X-38s are intended as prototypes for a possible 'crew lifeboat' for the International Space Station. The X-38 vehicle 131R will demonstrate a huge 7,500 square-foot parafoil that will that will enable the potential crew return vehicle to land on the length of a football field after returning from space. The crew return vehicle is intended to serve as a possible emergency transport to carry a crew to safety in the event of problems with the International Space Station. The Super Guppy evolved from the 1960s-vintage Pregnant Guppy, used for transporting outsized sections of the Apollo moon rocket. The Super Guppy was modified from 1950s-vintage Boeing C-97. NASA acquired its Super Guppy from the European Space Agency in 1997.

  3. Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility - A unique facility with new capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, P. A.; Stubbs, S. M.; Tanner, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF), formerly called the Landing Loads Track, is described. The paper gives a historical overview of the original NASA Langley Research Center Landing Loads Track and discusses the unique features of this national test facility. Comparisons are made between the original track characteristics and the new capabilities of the Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility following the recently completed facility update. Details of the new propulsion and arresting gear systems are presented along with the novel features of the new high-speed carriage. The data acquisition system is described and the paper concludes with a review of future test programs.

  4. Aircraft and Ground Vehicle Winter Runway Friction Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    Some background information is given together with the scope and objectives of a 5-year, Joint Winter Runway Friction Measurement Program between the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA), Transport Canada (TC), and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Participants recently completed the fourth winter season of testing. The primary objective of this effort is to perform instrumented aircraft and ground vehicle tests aimed at identifying a common number that all the different ground vehicle devices would report. This number, denoted the International Runway Friction Index (IRFI) will be related to all types of aircraft stopping performance. The range of test equipment, the test sites, test results and accomplishments, the extent of the substantial friction database compiled, and future test plans will be described. Several related studies have also been implemented including the effects of contaminant type on aircraft impingement drag and the effectiveness of various runway and aircraft de-icing chemical types and application rates. New equipment and techniques to measure surface frictional properties are also described. The status of an international friction index calibration device for use in ensuring accuracy of ground vehicle friction measurements will also be discussed. NASA considers the success of this joint program critical in terms of ensuring adequate ground handling capability in adverse weather conditions for future aircraft being designed and developed as well as improving the safety of current aircraft ground operations.

  5. Carbon monoxide exposure from aircraft fueling vehicles.

    PubMed

    McCammon, C S; Halperin, W F; Lemen, R A

    1981-01-01

    Investigators from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health observed deficiencies in maintenance of fueling trucks at an international airport. The exhaust system is vented under the front bumper, a standard design on fueling trucks which is intended to minimize the proximity of the exhaust system to the jet fuel in the vehicles. Carbon monoxide levels were measured in the cabs of 17 fueling trucks with windows closed, heaters on, and in different positions relative to the wind. One truck had an average CO level of 300 ppm, two exceeded 100 ppm, five others exceeded 50 ppm, while levels in the other nine averaged less than or equal to 500 ppm. Levels of CO depended on the mechanical condition of the vehicle and the vehicle's orientation to the wind. Stringent maintenance is required as the exhaust design is not fail-safe. PMID:6166254

  6. 19 CFR 148.32 - Vehicles, aircraft, boats, teams and saddle horses taken abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vehicles, aircraft, boats, teams and saddle horses... for Returning Residents § 148.32 Vehicles, aircraft, boats, teams and saddle horses taken abroad. (a) Admission free of duty. Automobiles and other vehicles, aircraft, boats, teams and saddle horses,...

  7. 19 CFR 148.32 - Vehicles, aircraft, boats, teams and saddle horses taken abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vehicles, aircraft, boats, teams and saddle horses... for Returning Residents § 148.32 Vehicles, aircraft, boats, teams and saddle horses taken abroad. (a) Admission free of duty. Automobiles and other vehicles, aircraft, boats, teams and saddle horses,...

  8. 19 CFR 148.32 - Vehicles, aircraft, boats, teams and saddle horses taken abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vehicles, aircraft, boats, teams and saddle horses... for Returning Residents § 148.32 Vehicles, aircraft, boats, teams and saddle horses taken abroad. (a) Admission free of duty. Automobiles and other vehicles, aircraft, boats, teams and saddle horses,...

  9. 19 CFR 148.32 - Vehicles, aircraft, boats, teams and saddle horses taken abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vehicles, aircraft, boats, teams and saddle horses... for Returning Residents § 148.32 Vehicles, aircraft, boats, teams and saddle horses taken abroad. (a) Admission free of duty. Automobiles and other vehicles, aircraft, boats, teams and saddle horses,...

  10. 19 CFR 148.32 - Vehicles, aircraft, boats, teams and saddle horses taken abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vehicles, aircraft, boats, teams and saddle horses... for Returning Residents § 148.32 Vehicles, aircraft, boats, teams and saddle horses taken abroad. (a) Admission free of duty. Automobiles and other vehicles, aircraft, boats, teams and saddle horses,...

  11. Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) engine test firing on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    This 1964 NASA Flight Reserch Center photograph shows a ground engine test underway on the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) number 1. When Apollo planning was underway in 1960, NASA was looking for a simulator to profile the descent to the moon's surface. Three concepts surfaced: an electronic simulator, a tethered device, and the ambitious Dryden contribution, a free-flying vehicle. All three became serious projects, but eventually the NASA Flight Research Center's (FRC) Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) became the most significant one. Hubert M. Drake is credited with originating the idea, while Donald Bellman and Gene Matranga were senior engineers on the project, with Bellman, the project manager. Simultaneously, and independently, Bell Aerosystems Company, Buffalo, N.Y., a company with experience in vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft, had conceived a similar free-flying simulator and proposed their concept to NASA headquarters. NASA Headquarters put FRC and Bell together to collaborate. The challenge was; to allow a pilot to make a vertical landing on earth in a simulated moon environment, one sixth of the earth's gravity and with totally transparent aerodynamic forces in a 'free flight' vehicle with no tether forces acting on it. Built of tubular aluminum like a giant four-legged bedstead, the vehicle was to simulate a lunar landing profile from around 1500 feet to the moon's surface. To do this, the LLRV had a General Electric CF-700-2V turbofan engine mounted vertically in gimbals, with 4200 pounds of thrust. The engine, using JP-4 fuel, got the vehicle up to the test altitude and was then throttled back to support five-sixths of the vehicle's weight, simulating the reduced gravity of the moon. Two hydrogen-peroxide lift rockets with thrust that could be varied from 100 to 500 pounds handled the LLRV's rate of descent and horizontal translations. Sixteen smaller hydrogen-peroxide rockets, mounted in pairs, gave the pilot control in pitch, yaw

  12. Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) sitting on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    In this 1966 NASA Flight Reserch Center photograph, the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) number 2 sitting on the ramp. When Apollo planning was underway in 1960, NASA was looking for a simulator to profile the descent to the moon's surface. Three concepts surfaced: an electronic simulator, a tethered device, and the ambitious Dryden contribution, a free-flying vehicle. All three became serious projects, but eventually the NASA Flight Research Center's (FRC) Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) became the most significant one. Hubert M. Drake is credited with originating the idea, while Donald Bellman and Gene Matranga were senior engineers on the project, with Bellman, the project manager. Simultaneously, and independently, Bell Aerosystems Company, Buffalo, N.Y., a company with experience in vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft, had conceived a similar free-flying simulator and proposed their concept to NASA headquarters. NASA Headquarters put FRC and Bell together to collaborate. The challenge was; to allow a pilot to make a vertical landing on earth in a simulated moon environment, one sixth of the earth's gravity and with totally transparent aerodynamic forces in a 'free flight' vehicle with no tether forces acting on it. Built of tubular aluminum like a giant four-legged bedstead, the vehicle was to simulate a lunar landing profile from around 1500 feet to the moon's surface. To do this, the LLRV had a General Electric CF-700-2V turbofan engine mounted vertically in gimbals, with 4200 pounds of thrust. The engine, using JP-4 fuel, got the vehicle up to the test altitude and was then throttled back to support five-sixths of the vehicle's weight, simulating the reduced gravity of the moon. Two hydrogen-peroxide lift rockets with thrust that could be varied from 100 to 500 pounds handled the LLRV's rate of descent and horizontal translations. Sixteen smaller hydrogen-peroxide rockets, mounted in pairs, gave the pilot control in pitch, yaw, and roll. On

  13. Experiences in teleoperation of land vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    McGovern, D.E.

    1987-10-01

    Teleoperation of land vehicles allows the removal of the operator from the vehicle to a remote location. This can greatly increase operator safety and comfort in applications such as security patrol or military combat. The cost includes system complexity and reduced system performance. All feedback on vehicle performance and on environmental conditions must pass through sensors, a communications channel, and displays. In particular, this requires vision to be transmitted by closed circuit television (CCTV), with a consequent degradation of information content. Vehicular teleoperation, as a result, places severe demands on the operator. Teleoperated land vehicles have been built and tested by many organizations including Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The SNL fleet presently includes eight vehicles of varying capability. These vehicles have been operated using different types of controls, displays, and visual systems. Experimentation studying the effects of vision-system characteristics on off-road, remote driving has been performed for conditions of fixed camera versus steering coupled camera and color versus black and white video display. Additionally, much experience has been gained through system demonstrations and hardware development trials. This paper discusses the preliminary experimental findings and the results of the accumulated operational experience.

  14. Experiences in teleoperation of land vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgovern, Douglas E.

    1989-01-01

    Teleoperation of land vehicles allows the removal of the operator from the vehicle to a remote location. This can greatly increase operator safety and comfort in applications such as security patrol or military combat. The cost includes system complexity and reduced system performance. All feedback on vehicle performance and on environmental conditions must pass through sensors, a communications channel, and displays. In particular, this requires vision to be transmitted by close-circuit television with a consequent degradation of information content. Vehicular teleoperation, as a result, places severe demands on the operator. Teleoperated land vehicles have been built and tested by many organizations, including Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The SNL fleet presently includes eight vehicles of varying capability. These vehicles have been operated using different types of controls, displays, and visual systems. Experimentation studying the effects of vision system characteristics on off-road, remote driving was performed for conditions of fixed camera versus steering-coupled camera and of color versus black and white video display. Additionally, much experience was gained through system demonstrations and hardware development trials. The preliminary experimental findings and the results of the accumulated operational experience are discussed.

  15. Realistic localizer courses for aircraft instrument landing simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    The realistic instrument landing simulator (ILS) course structures for use in aircraft simulators are described. Software developed for data conversion and translation of ILS course structure measurements and calcomp plots of the courses provided are described. A method of implementing the ILS course structure data in existing aircraft simulators is outlined. A cockpit used in the lab to review the digitized ILS course structures is displayed.

  16. Aerodynamic penalties of heavy rain on a landing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, P. A.; Luers, J. K.

    1982-01-01

    The aerodynamic penalties of very heavy rain on landing aircraft were investigated. Based on severity and frequency of occurrence, the rainfall rates of 100 mm/hr, 500 mm/hr, and 2000 mm/hr were designated, respectively, as heavy, severe, and incredible. The overall and local collection efficiencies of an aircraft encountering these rains were calculated. The analysis was based on raindrop trajectories in potential flow about an aircraft. All raindrops impinging on the aircraft are assumed to take on its speed. The momentum loss from the rain impact was later used in a landing simulation program. The local collection efficiency was used in estimating the aerodynamic roughness of an aircraft in heavy rain. The drag increase from this roughness was calculated. A number of landing simulations under a fixed stick assumption were done. Serious landing shortfalls were found for either momentum or drag penalties and especially large shortfalls for the combination of both. The latter shortfalls are comparable to those found for severe wind shear conditions.

  17. Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Water Landing Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.; Lawrence, Charles; Carney, Kelly S.

    2007-01-01

    Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) water splashdowns were simulated in order to find maximum acceleration loads on the astronauts and spacecraft under various landing conditions. The acceleration loads were used in a Dynamic Risk Index (DRI) program to find the potential risk for injury posed on the astronauts for a range of landing conditions. The DRI results showed that greater risks for injury occurred for two landing conditions; when the vertical velocity was large and the contact angle between the spacecraft and the water impact surface was zero, and when the spacecraft was in a toe down configuration and both the vertical and horizontal landing velocities were large. Rollover was also predicted to occur for cases where there is high horizontal velocity and low contact angles in a toe up configuration, and cases where there was a high horizontal velocity with high contact angles in a toe down configuration.

  18. Application of tire dynamics to aircraft landing gear design analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    The tire plays a key part in many analyses used for design of aircraft landing gear. Examples include structural design of wheels, landing gear shimmy, brake whirl, chatter and squeal, complex combination of chatter and shimmy on main landing gear (MLG) systems, anti-skid performance, gear walk, and rough terrain loads and performance. Tire parameters needed in the various analyses are discussed. Two tire models are discussed for shimmy analysis, the modified Moreland approach and the von Schlippe-Dietrich approach. It is shown that the Moreland model can be derived from the Von Schlippe-Dietrich model by certain approximations. The remaining analysis areas are discussed in general terms and the tire parameters needed for each are identified. Accurate tire data allows more accurate design analysis and the correct prediction of dynamic performance of aircraft landing gear.

  19. Experiences in teleoperation of land vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    McGovern, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Teleoperation of land vehicles allows the removal of the operator from the vehicle to a remote location. This can greatly increase operator safety and comfort in applications such as security patrol or military combat. The cost includes system complexity and reduced system performance. All feedback on vehicle performance and on environmental conditions must pass through sensors, a communications channel, and displays. In particular, this requires vision to be transmitted by closed circuit television (CCTV), with a consequent degradation of information content. Vehicular teleoperation, as a result, places severe demands on the operator. Experimentation studying the effects of vision-system characteristics on off-road, remote driving has been performed for conditions of fixed camera versus steering coupled camera and color versus black and white video display. Additionally, much experience has been gained through system demonstrations and hardware development trials. This paper discusses the preliminary experimental findings and the results of the accumulated operational experience.

  20. TAKEOFF AND LANDING PERFORMANCE CAPABILITIES OF TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRCRAFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, W. E.

    1994-01-01

    One of the most important considerations in the design of a commercial transport aircraft is the aircraft's performance during takeoff and landing operations. The aircraft must be designed to meet field length constraints in accordance with airworthiness standards specified in the Federal Aviation Regulations. In addition, the noise levels generated during these operations must be within acceptable limits. This computer program provides for the detailed analysis of the takeoff and landing performance capabilities of transport category aircraft. The program calculates aircraft performance in accordance with the airworthiness standards of the Federal Aviation Regulations. The aircraft and flight constraints are represented in sufficient detail to permit realistic sensitivity studies in terms of either configuration modifications or changes in operational procedures. This program provides for the detailed performance analysis of the takeoff and landing capabilities of specific aircraft designs and allows for sensitivity studies. The program is not designed to synthesize configurations or to generate aerodynamic, propulsion, or structural characteristics. This type of information must be generated externally to the program and then input as data. The program's representation of the aircraft data is extensive and includes realistic limits on engine and aircraft operational boundaries and maximum attainable lift coefficients. The takeoff and climbout flight-path is generated by a stepwise integration of the equation of motion. Special features include options for nonstandard-day operation, for balanced field length, for derated throttle to meet a given field length for off-loaded aircraft, and for throttle cutback during climbout for community noise alleviation. Advanced takeoff procedures for noise alleviation such as programmed throttle and control flaps may be investigated with the program. Approach profiles may incorporate advanced procedures such as two segment

  1. Improving Student Naval Aviator Aircraft Carrier Landing Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Thomas H.; Foster, T. Chris

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the use of human performance technology (HPT) to improve qualification rates for learning to land onboard aircraft carriers. This project started as a request for a business case analysis and evolved into a full-fledged performance improvement project, from mission analysis through evaluation. The result was a significant…

  2. Method and device for landing aircraft dependent on runway occupancy time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghalebsaz Jeddi, Babak (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A technique for landing aircraft using an aircraft landing accident avoidance device is disclosed. The technique includes determining at least two probability distribution functions; determining a safe lower limit on a separation between a lead aircraft and a trail aircraft on a glide slope to the runway; determining a maximum sustainable safe attempt-to-land rate on the runway based on the safe lower limit and the probability distribution functions; directing the trail aircraft to enter the glide slope with a target separation from the lead aircraft corresponding to the maximum sustainable safe attempt-to-land rate; while the trail aircraft is in the glide slope, determining an actual separation between the lead aircraft and the trail aircraft; and directing the trail aircraft to execute a go-around maneuver if the actual separation approaches the safe lower limit. Probability distribution functions include runway occupancy time, and landing time interval and/or inter-arrival distance.

  3. Preliminary design of a supersonic Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL) fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian; Borchers, Paul; Gomer, Charlie; Henderson, Dean; Jacobs, Tavis; Lawson, Todd; Peterson, Eric; Ross, Tweed, III; Bellmard, Larry

    1990-01-01

    The preliminary design study of a supersonic Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL) fighter is presented. A brief historical survey of powered lift vehicles was presented, followed by a technology assessment of the latest supersonic STOVL engine cycles under consideration by industry and government in the U.S. and UK. A survey of operational fighter/attack aircraft and the modern battlefield scenario were completed to develop, respectively, the performance requirements and mission profiles for the study. Three configurations were initially investigated with the following engine cycles: a hybrid fan vectored thrust cycle, a lift+lift/cruise cycle, and a mixed flow vectored thrust cycle. The lift+lift/cruise aircraft configuration was selected for detailed design work which consisted of: (1) a material selection and structural layout, including engine removal considerations, (2) an aircraft systems layout, (3) a weapons integration model showing the internal weapons bay mechanism, (4) inlet and nozzle integration, (5) an aircraft suckdown prediction, (6) an aircraft stability and control analysis, including a takeoff, hover, and transition control analysis, (7) a performance and mission capability study, and (8) a life cycle cost analysis. A supersonic fighter aircraft with STOVL capability with the lift+lift/cruise engine cycle seems a viable option for the next generation fighter.

  4. Actively Controlled Landing Gear for Aircraft Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Daugherty, Robert H.; Martinson, Veloria J.

    1999-01-01

    Concepts for long-range air travel are characterized by airframe designs with long, slender, relatively flexible fuselages. One aspect often overlooked is ground induced vibration of these aircraft. This paper presents an analytical and experimental study of reducing ground-induced aircraft vibration loads using actively controlled landing gears. A facility has been developed to test various active landing gear control concepts and their performance. The facility uses a NAVY A6-intruder landing gear fitted with an auxiliary hydraulic supply electronically controlled by servo valves. An analytical model of the gear is presented including modifications to actuate the gear externally and test data is used to validate the model. The control design is described and closed-loop test and analysis comparisons are presented.

  5. 19 CFR 162.5 - Search of arriving vehicles and aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Search of arriving vehicles and aircraft. 162.5...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Inspection, Examination, and Search § 162.5 Search of arriving vehicles and aircraft. A customs officer may stop any vehicle and board...

  6. 19 CFR 162.5 - Search of arriving vehicles and aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Search of arriving vehicles and aircraft. 162.5...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Inspection, Examination, and Search § 162.5 Search of arriving vehicles and aircraft. A customs officer may stop any vehicle and board...

  7. 19 CFR 162.5 - Search of arriving vehicles and aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Search of arriving vehicles and aircraft. 162.5...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Inspection, Examination, and Search § 162.5 Search of arriving vehicles and aircraft. A customs officer may stop any vehicle and board...

  8. 19 CFR 162.5 - Search of arriving vehicles and aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Search of arriving vehicles and aircraft. 162.5...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Inspection, Examination, and Search § 162.5 Search of arriving vehicles and aircraft. A customs officer may stop any vehicle and board...

  9. 19 CFR 162.5 - Search of arriving vehicles and aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Search of arriving vehicles and aircraft. 162.5...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Inspection, Examination, and Search § 162.5 Search of arriving vehicles and aircraft. A customs officer may stop any vehicle and board...

  10. Lunar Cold Trap Contamination by Landing Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipley, Scott T.; Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Tools have been developed to model and simulate the effects of lunar landing vehicles on the lunar environment (Metzger, 2011), mostly addressing the effects of regolith erosion by rocket plumes and the fate of the ejected lunar soil particles (Metzger, 2010). These tools are being applied at KSC to predict ejecta from the upcoming Google Lunar X-Prize Landers and how they may damage the historic Apollo landing sites. The emerging interest in lunar mining poses a threat of contamination to pristine craters at the lunar poles, which act as "cold traps" for water and may harbor other valuable minerals Crider and Vondrak (2002). The KSC Granular Mechanics and Regolith Operations Lab tools have been expanded to address the probability for contamination of these pristine "cold trap" craters.

  11. Comparison of Predictive Modeling Methods of Aircraft Landing Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diallo, Ousmane H.

    2012-01-01

    Expected increases in air traffic demand have stimulated the development of air traffic control tools intended to assist the air traffic controller in accurately and precisely spacing aircraft landing at congested airports. Such tools will require an accurate landing-speed prediction to increase throughput while decreasing necessary controller interventions for avoiding separation violations. There are many practical challenges to developing an accurate landing-speed model that has acceptable prediction errors. This paper discusses the development of a near-term implementation, using readily available information, to estimate/model final approach speed from the top of the descent phase of flight to the landing runway. As a first approach, all variables found to contribute directly to the landing-speed prediction model are used to build a multi-regression technique of the response surface equation (RSE). Data obtained from operations of a major airlines for a passenger transport aircraft type to the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport are used to predict the landing speed. The approach was promising because it decreased the standard deviation of the landing-speed error prediction by at least 18% from the standard deviation of the baseline error, depending on the gust condition at the airport. However, when the number of variables is reduced to the most likely obtainable at other major airports, the RSE model shows little improvement over the existing methods. Consequently, a neural network that relies on a nonlinear regression technique is utilized as an alternative modeling approach. For the reduced number of variables cases, the standard deviation of the neural network models errors represent over 5% reduction compared to the RSE model errors, and at least 10% reduction over the baseline predicted landing-speed error standard deviation. Overall, the constructed models predict the landing-speed more accurately and precisely than the current state-of-the-art.

  12. Potential for Landing Gear Noise Reduction on Advanced Aircraft Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Nickol, Craig L.; Burley, Casey L.; Guo, Yueping

    2016-01-01

    The potential of significantly reducing aircraft landing gear noise is explored for aircraft configurations with engines installed above the wings or the fuselage. An innovative concept is studied that does not alter the main gear assembly itself but does shorten the main strut and integrates the gear in pods whose interior surfaces are treated with acoustic liner. The concept is meant to achieve maximum noise reduction so that main landing gears can be eliminated as a major source of airframe noise. By applying this concept to an aircraft configuration with 2025 entry-into-service technology levels, it is shown that compared to noise levels of current technology, the main gear noise can be reduced by 10 EPNL dB, bringing the main gear noise close to a floor established by other components such as the nose gear. The assessment of the noise reduction potential accounts for design features for the advanced aircraft configuration and includes the effects of local flow velocity in and around the pods, gear noise reflection from the airframe, and reflection and attenuation from acoustic liner treatment on pod surfaces and doors. A technical roadmap for maturing this concept is discussed, and the possible drag increase at cruise due to the addition of the pods is identified as a challenge, which needs to be quantified and minimized possibly with the combination of detailed design and application of drag reduction technologies.

  13. Lockheed ER-2 #806 high altitude research aircraft during landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    ER-2 tail number 806, is one of two Airborne Science ER-2s used as science platforms by Dryden. The aircraft are platforms for a variety of high-altitude science missions flown over various parts of the world. They are also used for earth science and atmospheric sensor research and development, satellite calibration and data validation. The ER-2s are capable of carrying a maximum payload of 2,600 pounds of experiments in a nose bay, the main equipment bay behind the cockpit, two wing-mounted superpods and small underbody and trailing edges. Most ER-2 missions last about six hours with ranges of about 2,200 nautical miles. The aircraft typically fly at altitudes above 65,000 feet. On November 19, 1998, the ER-2 set a world record for medium weight aircraft reaching an altitude of 68,700 feet. The aircraft is 63 feet long, with a wingspan of 104 feet. The top of the vertical tail is 16 feet above ground when the aircraft is on the bicycle-type landing gear. Cruising speeds are 410 knots, or 467 miles per hour, at altitude. A single General Electric F-118 turbofan engine rated at 17,000 pounds thrust powers the ER-2.

  14. Machine vision-based night landing aids for aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterji, Gano Broto

    The development of machine vision based pilot aids to help reduce night approach and landing accidents is explored in this thesis. The techniques developed in this thesis are motivated by the desire to use the available information sources for navigation such as the airport lighting layout, attitude sensors and Global Positioning System to derive more precise aircraft position and orientation information. The fact that airport lighting geometry is known and that images of airport lighting can be acquired by the camera, has lead to the synthesis of machine vision based algorithms for runway relative aircraft position and orientation estimation. The main contribution of this research is the synthesis of seven navigation algorithms based on two broad families of solutions. The first family of solution methods consists of techniques that reconstruct the airport lighting layout from the camera image and then estimate the aircraft position components by comparing the reconstructed lighting layout geometry with the known model of the airport lighting layout geometry. The second family of methods is comprised of techniques that synthesize the image of the airport lighting layout using a camera model and estimate the aircraft position and orientation by comparing this image with the actual image of the airport lighting acquired by the camera. Algorithms I through IV belong to the first family of solutions while Algorithms V through VII belong to the second family of solutions. Algorithms I and II are parameter optimization methods, Algorithms III and IV are feature correspondence methods and Algorithms V through VII are Kalman filter centered algorithms. In order to take advantage of the aircraft dynamics and the multiple images available along the glide path, the position estimates provided by Algorithms I through IV are used for driving a six-state Kalman filter for providing improved estimates of the aircraft position and inertial velocity components. Algorithms V

  15. Deployable Landing Leg Concept for Crew Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Charles; Solano, Paul; Bartos, Karen

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Exploration program is investigating the merits of land landing concepts for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Four options are under investigation: retro-rockets which fire and slow the vehicle before contact with the landing surface, deployable crushable material which deploys just before landing and crushes during land contact, airbags which deploy just before landing and deflate during land contact, and deployable legs which deploy before landing and contain material that absorbs energy during land contact. The purpose of the present work is to determine the effectiveness of the deployable leg concept. To accomplish this goal, structural models of the deployable leg concept are integrated with the Crew Model (CM) and computational simulations are performed to determine vehicle and component loadings and acceleration levels. Details of the modeling approach, deployable leg design, and resulting accelerations are provided.

  16. 40 CFR 85.1715 - Aircraft meeting the definition of motor vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... (b) The standards, requirements, and prohibitions of 40 CFR part 86 do not apply for aircraft or aircraft engines. Standards apply separately to certain aircraft engines, as described in 40 CFR part 87. ... motor vehicle. 85.1715 Section 85.1715 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  17. 40 CFR 85.1715 - Aircraft meeting the definition of motor vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... (b) The standards, requirements, and prohibitions of 40 CFR part 86 do not apply for aircraft or aircraft engines. Standards apply separately to certain aircraft engines, as described in 40 CFR part 87. ... motor vehicle. 85.1715 Section 85.1715 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  18. KSC firefighters support recent firefighting efforts with an aircraft rescue firefighting vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A Kennedy Space Center aircraft rescue firefighting vehicle supports heavy traffic at the Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville, Florida, where aircraft capable of carrying water were staged during the recent brushfires throughout Florida. Aircraft were supporting firefighting efforts in Brevard, Volusia, and Flagler counties.

  19. 40 CFR 85.1715 - Aircraft meeting the definition of motor vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... (b) The standards, requirements, and prohibitions of 40 CFR part 86 do not apply for aircraft or aircraft engines. Standards apply separately to certain aircraft engines, as described in 40 CFR part 87. ... motor vehicle. 85.1715 Section 85.1715 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  20. 40 CFR 85.1715 - Aircraft meeting the definition of motor vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (b) The standards, requirements, and prohibitions of 40 CFR part 86 do not apply for aircraft or aircraft engines. Standards apply separately to certain aircraft engines, as described in 40 CFR part 87. ... motor vehicle. 85.1715 Section 85.1715 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  1. 32 CFR 700.834 - Care of ships, aircraft, vehicles and their equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Care of ships, aircraft, vehicles and their... The Commanding Officer Commanding Officers in General § 700.834 Care of ships, aircraft, vehicles and... necessary, to ensure the proper preservation, repair, maintenance and operation of any ship,...

  2. X-38 Vehicle #132 Landing on First Free Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The X-38, a research vehicle built to help develop technology for an emergency Crew Return Vehicle (CRV), flares for its lakebed landing at the end of a March 1999 test flight at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used on the X-38 thermal tiles to make them more durable than those used on the space shuttles. The X-38 itself was an unpiloted

  3. Runway Independent Aircraft Extremely Short Takeoff and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David W.; Pasman, Renee

    2004-01-01

    This report Summarizes the work done is support of NASA/Ames Runway Independent Aircraft Research during the summer of 2003. This work centered on the tasks laid out by the Statement of Work, which was to: Identify and assess operational scenarios including airport air and ground operations and how RIA operations would interface; 2) Identify critical technologies and create a list of technologies that might be pushed to provide a quantum jump in operating economy, reliability, and safety should sufficient finding be available; 3) Create public domain powered high lift methodologies; and 4) Identify and assess vehicle concepts that provide innovative approaches to RIA operations. All these tasks were accomplished, with certain areas needing additional exploration in future grant work. Three designs were analyzed to provide strawman configurations for the RIA operations. All three aircraft carried 60 passengers, with a stage length of 1,000 nautical miles. They were capable of operating with a balanced field length of 2000 feet or less. Three different technology approaches were explored. The first, the Model 115, was a mid-wing USB design, developed as a near-term, low risk concept. The second aircraft, the EMAX, used a directed thrust system, was a far-term, high-risk approach. The third configuration was the Model 114, whose development began in summer 2002. In addition, further research was conducted on issues related to STOL operations, such as noise concerns, SNI operations, and other areas of interest.

  4. Capabilities of unmanned aircraft vehicles for low altitude weed detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflanz, Michael; Nordmeyer, Henning

    2014-05-01

    Sustainable crop production and food security require a consumer and environmental safe plant protection. It is recently known, that precise weed monitoring approaches could help apply pesticides corresponding to field variability. In this regard the site-specific weed management may contribute to an application of herbicides with higher ecologically aware and economical savings. First attempts of precision agriculture date back to the 1980's. Since that time, remote sensing from satellites or manned aircrafts have been investigated and used in agricultural practice, but are currently inadequate for the separation of weeds in an early growth stage from cultivated plants. In contrast, low-cost image capturing at low altitude from unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAV) provides higher spatial resolution and almost real-time processing. Particularly, rotary-wing aircrafts are suitable for precise path or stationary flight. This minimises motion blur and provides better image overlapping for stitching and mapping procedures. Through improved image analyses and the recent increase in the availability of microcontrollers and powerful batteries for UAVs, it can be expected that the spatial mapping of weeds will be enhanced in the future. A six rotors microcopter was equipped with a modified RGB camera taking images from agricultural fields. The hexacopter operates within predefined pathways at adjusted altitudes (from 5 to 10 m) by using GPS navigation. Different scenarios of optical weed detection have been carried out regarding to variable altitude, image resolution, weed and crop growth stages. Our experiences showed high capabilities for site-specific weed control. Image analyses with regard to recognition of weed patches can be used to adapt herbicide application to varying weed occurrence across a field.

  5. A new approach to complete aircraft landing gear noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Leonard V.

    This thesis describes a new landing gear noise prediction system developed at The Pennsylvania State University, called Landing Gear Model and Acoustic Prediction code (LGMAP). LGMAP is used to predict the noise of an isolated or installed landing gear geometry. The predictions include several techniques to approximate the aeroacoustic and aerodynamic interactions of landing gear noise generation. These include (1) a method for approximating the shielding of noise caused by the landing gear geometry, (2) accounting for local flow variations due to the wing geometry, (3) the interaction of the landing gear wake with high-lift devices, and (4) a method for estimating the effect of gross landing gear design changes on local flow and acoustic radiation. The LGMAP aeroacoustic prediction system has been created to predict the noise generated by a given landing gear. The landing gear is modeled as a set of simple components that represent individual parts of the structure. Each component, ranging from large to small, is represented by a simple geometric shape and the unsteady flow on the component is modeled based on an individual characteristic length, local flow velocity, and the turbulent flow environment. A small set of universal models is developed and applied to a large range of similar components. These universal models, combined with the actual component geometry and local environment, give a unique loading spectrum and acoustic field for each component. Then, the sum of all the individual components in the complete configuration is used to model the high level of geometric complexity typical of current aircraft undercarriage designs. A line of sight shielding algorithm based on scattering by a two-dimensional cylinder approximates the effect of acoustic shielding caused by the landing gear. Using the scattering from a cylinder in two-dimensions at an observer position directly behind the cylinder, LGMAP is able to estimate the reduction in noise due to shielding

  6. CV-990 Landing Systems Research Aircraft (LSRA) flight #145 drilling of shuttle tire using Tire Assa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Created from a 1/16th model of a German World War II tank, the TAV (Tire Assault Vehicle) was an important safety feature for the Convair 990 Landing System Research Aircraft, which tested space shuttle tires. It was imperative to know the extreme conditions the shuttle tires could tolerate at landing without putting the shuttle and its crew at risk. In addition, the CV990 was able to land repeatedly to test the tires. The TAV was built from a kit and modified into a radio controlled, video-equipped machine to drill holes in aircraft test tires that were in imminent danger of exploding because of one or more conditions: high air pressure, high temperatures, and cord wear. An exploding test tire releases energy equivalent to two and one-half sticks of dynamite and can cause severe injuries to anyone within 50 ft. of the explosion, as well as ear injury - possibly permanent hearing loss - to anyone within 100 ft. The degree of danger is also determined by the temperature pressure and cord wear of a test tire. The TAV was developed by David Carrott, a PRC employee under contract to NASA.

  7. Status report on the land processes aircraft science management operations working group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, James G.; Mann, Lisa J.

    1991-01-01

    Since its inception three years ago, the Land Processes Aircraft Science Management Operations Working Group (MOWG) provided recommendations on the optimal use of the Agency's aircraft in support of the Land Processes Science Program. Recommendations covered topics such as aircraft and sensor usage, development of long-range plans, Multisensor Airborne Campaigns (MAC), program balance, aircraft sensor databases, new technology and sensor development, and increased University scientist participation in the program. Impacts of these recommendations improved the efficiency of various procedures including the flight request process, tracking of flight hours, and aircraft usage. The group also created a bibliography focused on publications produced by Land Processes scientists from the use of the aircraft program, surveyed NASA funded PI's on their participation in the aircraft program, and developed a planning template for multi-sensor airborne campaigns. Benefits from these activities are summarized.

  8. Wideband Patch Antenna for Land based Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangwar, R. P. S.; Dutt, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, an irregular pentagon shaped patch antenna has been presented. The proposed antenna operates over a wide band in frequency range from 12 to 26 GHz with VSWR < 2. It has a partial ground plane with two-inverted L and one I shaped slots in the radiation patch to attain wide bandwidth. The antenna consists of FR4 epoxy as a dielectric substrate with dielectric constant 4.4 and loss tangent 0.002. The size of the antenna is 30 × 30 × 1.57 mm3 and is fed by the microstrip line. The size of the fabricated proposed antenna is smaller than that of the antenna under reference (elliptical radiating patch with defected ground plane). The simulation has been done using high frequency structure simulator (HFSS) which is a finite element method (FEM) based tool. The proposed antenna exhibits the return loss of 21.85, 28.03 and 29.14 dB and gain of 6.6, 5.67 and 7.0 dB at resonant frequencies 16.7, 19.00 and 21.4 GHz, respectively. The bandwidth of the antenna is 10 GHz with normalized radiation efficiencies of 65, 69 and 70 % at corresponding resonant frequencies. The measured results of the fabricated proposed antenna have been compared with the simulated results and there has been a close agreement between both the results. Also the simulated results of the proposed antenna have been compared with the antenna under reference and it is found that the performance of the proposed antenna is far better. The proposed antenna can be used for land based vehicles in both Ku-band (12-18 GHz) and K-band (18-26 GHz).

  9. Full color hybrid display for aircraft simulators. [landing aids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, W. D. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A full spectrum color monitor, connected to the camera and lens system of a television camera supported by a gantry frame over a terrain model simulating an aircraft landing zone, projects the monitor image onto a lens or screen visually accessible to a trainee in the simulator. A digital computer produces a pattern corresponding to the lights associated with the landing strip onto a monochromatic display, and an optical system projects the calligraphic image onto the same lens so that it is superposed on the video representation of the landing field. The optical system includes a four-color wheel which is rotated between the calligraphic display and the lens, and an apparatus for synchronizing the generation of a calligraphic pattern with the color segments on the color wheel. A servo feedback system responsive to the servo motors on the gantry frame produces an input to the computer so that the calligraphically generated signal corresponds in shape, size and location to the video signal.

  10. Multivariable control of VTOL aircraft for shipboard landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodson, M.; Athans, M.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of the automatic landing of VTOL aircraft on small ships is considered. Linear quadratic optimal control theory is used to design a VTOL ship motion tracking controller. Optimal root-loci and step responses are obtained to study the dynamics of the closed-loop system. Standard deviations of the ship motion tracking errors, and of the VTOL control amplitudes are computed, illustrating the tradeoff between accurate tracking, and limited control authority. Multivariable robustness margins are also obtained. The tracking of the vertical motion presents the difficulty of requiring large variations of the VTOL total thrust, a control which is limited both in amplitude and in bandwidth. Lateral controls are less restricted, but the motions are strongly coupled, with some adverse couplings in the ship motions, and in the aircraft dynamics. The advantage of the LQ control theory is demonstrated however, by its ability to account for these couplings in a robust manner, and, when possible, to use them to limit the control amplitudes.

  11. Altus I aircraft in flight, retracting landing gear after takeoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The landing gear of the remotely piloted Altus I aircraft retracts into the fuselage after takeoff from Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The short series of test flights sponsored by the Naval Postgraduate School in early August, 1997, was designed to demonstrate the ability of the experimental craft to cruise at altitudes above 40,000 feet for sustained durations. On its final flight Aug. 15, the Altus I reached an altitude of 43,500 feet. The Altus I and its sister ship, the Altus II, are variants of the Predator surveillance drone built by General Atomics/Aeronautical Systems, Inc. They are designed for high-altitude, long-duration scientific sampling missions. The Altus I incorporates a single-stage turbocharger, while the Altus II, built for NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology project, sports a two-stage turbocharger to enable the craft to fly at altitudes above 55,000 feet.

  12. 50 CFR 35.5 - Commercial enterprises, roads, motor vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM WILDERNESS PRESERVATION AND MANAGEMENT General... of Congress as a unit of the National Wilderness Preservation System. ... vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft, mechanical transport, structures, and...

  13. 50 CFR 35.5 - Commercial enterprises, roads, motor vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM WILDERNESS PRESERVATION AND MANAGEMENT General... of Congress as a unit of the National Wilderness Preservation System. ... vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft, mechanical transport, structures, and...

  14. 50 CFR 35.5 - Commercial enterprises, roads, motor vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM WILDERNESS PRESERVATION AND MANAGEMENT General... of Congress as a unit of the National Wilderness Preservation System. ... vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft, mechanical transport, structures, and...

  15. 50 CFR 35.5 - Commercial enterprises, roads, motor vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM WILDERNESS PRESERVATION AND MANAGEMENT General... of Congress as a unit of the National Wilderness Preservation System. ... vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft, mechanical transport, structures, and...

  16. 50 CFR 35.5 - Commercial enterprises, roads, motor vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM WILDERNESS PRESERVATION AND MANAGEMENT General... of Congress as a unit of the National Wilderness Preservation System. ... vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft, mechanical transport, structures, and...

  17. Unmanned Aircraft Systems for Monitoring Department of the Interior Lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutt, M. E.; Quirk, B.

    2013-12-01

    Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) technology is quickly evolving and will have a significant impact on Earth science research. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting an operational test and evaluation of UAS to see how this technology supports the mission of the Department of the Interior (DOI). Over the last 4 years, the USGS, working with many partners, has been actively conducting proof of concept UAS operations, which are designed to evaluate the potential of UAS technology to support the mandated DOI scientific, resource and land management missions. UAS technology is being made available to monitor environmental conditions, analyze the impacts of climate change, respond to natural hazards, understand landscape change rates and consequences, conduct wildlife inventories and support related land management and law enforcement missions. Using small UAS (sUAS), the USGS is able to tailor solutions to meet project requirements by obtaining very high resolution video data, acquiring thermal imagery, detecting chemical plumes, and generating digital terrain models at a fraction of the cost of conventional surveying methods. UAS technology is providing a mechanism to collect timely remote sensing data at a low cost and at low risk over DOI lands that can be difficult to monitor and consequently enhances our ability to provide unbiased scientific information to better enable decision makers to make informed decisions. This presentation describes the UAS technology and infrastructure being employed, the application projects already accomplished, lessons learned and future of UAS within the DOI. We fully expect that by 2020 UAS will emerge as a primary platform for all DOI remote sensing applications. Much like the use of Internet technology, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Global Positioning Systems (GPS), UAS have the potential of enabling the DOI to be better stewards of the land.

  18. Altus I aircraft landing on Edwards lakebed runway 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The remotely-piloted Altus I aircraft lands on Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The short series of test flights sponsored by the Naval Postgraduate School in early August, 1997, were designed to demonstrate the ability of the experimental craft to cruise at altitudes above 40,000 feet for sustained durations. On its final flight Aug. 15, the Altus I reached an altitude of 43,500 feet. The Altus I and its sister ship, the Altus II, are variants of the Predator surveillance drone built by General Atomics/Aeronautical Systems, Inc. They are designed for high-altitude, long-duration scientific sampling missions, and are powered by turbocharged piston engines. The Altus I incorporates a single-stage turbocharger, while the Altus II, built for NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology program, sports a two-stage turbocharger to enable the craft to fly at altitudes above 55,000 feet. The Altus II, the first of the two craft to be completed, made its first flight on May 1, 1996. With its engine augmented by a single-stage turbocharger, the Altus II reached an altitude of 37,000 ft during its first series of development flights at Dryden in Aug., 1996. In Oct. of that year, the Altus II was flown in an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement study for the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratory in Oklahoma. During the course of those flights, the Altus II set a single-flight endurance record for remotely-operated aircraft of more than 26 hours. The Altus I, completed in 1997, flew a series of development flights at Dryden that summer. Those test flights culminated with the craft reaching an altitude of 43,500 ft while carrying a simulated 300-lb payload, a record for an unmanned aircraft powered by a piston engine augmented with a single-stage turbocharger. The Altus II sustained an altitudeof 55,000 feet for four hours in 1999. A pilot in a control station on the ground flies the craft by radio

  19. Measures of pilot performance during V/TOL aircraft landings on ships at sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    Simulation experiments to determine the feasibility of landing V/TOL aircraft on ships at sea were studied. The motion and attitude of the aircraft relative to the landing platform was known at the instant of touchdown. The success of these experiments depended on the ability of the experimenter to measure the pilot's performance during the landing maneuver. To facilitate these measurements, the equations describing the motion of the aircraft and its attitude relative to the landing platform are presented in a form which is suitable for simulation purposes.

  20. Landing Characteristics of a Lenticular-Shaped Reentry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Ulysse J.

    1961-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the landing characteristics of a 1/9-scale dynamic model of a lenticular-shaped reentry vehicle having extendible tail panels for control after reentry and for landing control (flare-out). The landing tests were made by catapulting a free model onto a hard-surface runway and onto water. A "belly-landing" technique in which the vehicle was caused to skid and rock on its curved undersurface (heat shield), converting sinking speed into angular energy, was investigated on a hard-surface runway. Landings were made in calm water and in waves both with and without auxiliary landing devices. Landing motions and acceleration data were obtained over a range of landing attitudes and initial sinking speeds during hard-surface landings and for several wave conditions during water landings. A few vertical landings (parachute letdown) were made in calm water. The hard-surface landing characteristics were good. Maximum landing accelerations on a hard surface were 5g and 18 radians per sq second over a range of landing conditions. Horizontal landings on water resulted in large violent rebounds and some diving in waves. Extreme attitude changes during rebound at initial impact made the attitude of subsequent impact random. Maximum accelerations for water landings were approximately 21g and 145 radians per sq second in waves 7 feet high. Various auxiliary water-landing devices produced no practical improvement in behavior. Reduction of horizontal speed and positive control of impact attitude did improve performance in calm water. During vertical landings in calm water maximum accelerations of 15g and 110 radians per sq second were measured for a contact attitude of -45 deg and a vertical velocity of 70 feet per second.

  1. 48 CFR 252.228-7005 - Accident reporting and investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. 252.228-7005 Section 252.228-7005 Federal... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. As prescribed in 228.370(d), use the following clause: Accident Reporting and Investigation Involving Aircraft, Missiles, and Space...

  2. 48 CFR 252.228-7005 - Accident reporting and investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. 252.228-7005 Section 252.228-7005 Federal... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. As prescribed in 228.370(d), use the following clause: Accident Reporting and Investigation Involving Aircraft, Missiles, and Space...

  3. 48 CFR 252.228-7005 - Accident reporting and investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. 252.228-7005 Section 252.228-7005 Federal... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. As prescribed in 228.370(d), use the following clause: Accident Reporting and Investigation Involving Aircraft, Missiles, and Space...

  4. 48 CFR 252.228-7005 - Accident reporting and investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. 252.228-7005 Section 252.228-7005 Federal... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. As prescribed in 228.370(d), use the following clause: Accident Reporting and Investigation Involving Aircraft, Missiles, and Space...

  5. 48 CFR 252.228-7005 - Accident reporting and investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. 252.228-7005 Section 252.228-7005 Federal... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. As prescribed in 228.370(d), use the following clause: Accident Reporting and Investigation Involving Aircraft, Missiles, and Space...

  6. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles, summary. [aircraft design of aircraft fuel systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirrello, C. J.; Baker, A. H.; Stone, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed analytical study was made to investigate the effects of fuselage cross section (circular and elliptical) and the structural arrangement (integral and nonintegral tanks) on aircraft performance. The vehicle was a 200 passenger, liquid hydrogen fueled Mach 6 transport designed to meet a range goal of 9.26 Mn (5000 NM). A variety of trade studies were conducted in the area of configuration arrangement, structural design, and active cooling design in order to maximize the performance of each of three point design aircraft: (1) circular wing-body with nonintegral tanks, (2) circular wing-body with integral tanks and (3) elliptical blended wing-body with integral tanks. Aircraft range and weight were used as the basis for comparison. The resulting design and performance characteristics show that the blended body integral tank aircraft weights the least and has the greatest range capability, however, producibility and maintainability factors favor nonintegral tank concepts.

  7. 32 CFR 855.6 - Aircraft exempt from the requirement for a civil aircraft landing permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft... aircraft owned by: (1) Any other US Government agency. (2) US Air Force aero clubs established as prescribed in AFI 34-117, Air Force Aero Club Program, and AFMAN 3-132, Air Force Aero Club Operations 1 ....

  8. 32 CFR 855.6 - Aircraft exempt from the requirement for a civil aircraft landing permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft... aircraft owned by: (1) Any other US Government agency. (2) US Air Force aero clubs established as prescribed in AFI 34-117, Air Force Aero Club Program, and AFMAN 3-132, Air Force Aero Club Operations 1 ....

  9. 32 CFR 855.6 - Aircraft exempt from the requirement for a civil aircraft landing permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft... aircraft owned by: (1) Any other US Government agency. (2) US Air Force aero clubs established as prescribed in AFI 34-117, Air Force Aero Club Program, and AFMAN 3-132, Air Force Aero Club Operations 1 ....

  10. 32 CFR 855.6 - Aircraft exempt from the requirement for a civil aircraft landing permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft... aircraft owned by: (1) Any other US Government agency. (2) US Air Force aero clubs established as prescribed in AFI 34-117, Air Force Aero Club Program, and AFMAN 3-132, Air Force Aero Club Operations 1 ....

  11. Landing Characteristics of a Re-entry Vehicle with a Passive Landing System for Impact Alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Landing Characteristics of a Re-entry Vehicle with a Passive Landing System for Impact Alleviation. An experimental investigation was made to determine the landing characteristics of a 1/8-scale dynamic model of a reentry vehicle using a passive landing system to alleviate the landing-impact loads. The passive landing system consisted of a flexible heat shield with a small section of aluminum honeycomb placed between the heat shield and the crew compartment at the point that would be the first to contact the landing surface. The model was landed on concrete and sand landing surfaces at parachute letdown velocities. The investigations simulated a vertical velocity of 30 ft/sec (full scale), horizontal velocities of 0, 15, 30, 40, and 50 ft/sec (full scale), and landing attitudes ranging from -30 degrees to 20 degrees. The model investigation indicated that stable landings could be made on a concrete surface at horizontal velocities up to about 30 ft/sec, but the stable landing-attitude range at these speeds was small. The aluminum honeycomb bottomed occasionally during landings on concrete. When bottoming did not occur, maximum normal and longitudinal accelerations at the center of gravity of the vehicle were approximately 50g and 30g, respectively. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030981. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  12. Guidance and control of flight vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breakwell, J. V.; Bryson, A. E., Jr.; Franklin, G. F.

    1971-01-01

    Progress reports on guidance and attitude control mechanisms of different flight vehicles are presented. The vehicles considered include orbiting spacecraft, supersonic aircraft, and general aviation aircraft. Data also cover orbital transfer using low thrust, automatic landing logic for aircraft, optimal and three dimensional turns for supersonic aircraft, and orbital rendezvous.

  13. Next Generation Civil Transport Aircraft Design Considerations for Improving Vehicle and System-Level Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Diana M.; Guynn, Mark D.; Wahls, Richard A.; DelRosario, Ruben,

    2013-01-01

    The future of aviation will benefit from research in aircraft design and air transportation management aimed at improving efficiency and reducing environmental impacts. This paper presents civil transport aircraft design trends and opportunities for improving vehicle and system-level efficiency. Aircraft design concepts and the emerging technologies critical to reducing thrust specific fuel consumption, reducing weight, and increasing lift to drag ratio currently being developed by NASA are discussed. Advancements in the air transportation system aimed towards system-level efficiency are discussed as well. Finally, the paper describes the relationship between the air transportation system, aircraft, and efficiency. This relationship is characterized by operational constraints imposed by the air transportation system that influence aircraft design, and operational capabilities inherent to an aircraft design that impact the air transportation system.

  14. Landing Gear Integration in Aircraft Conceptual Design. Revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chai, Sonny T.; Mason, William H.

    1997-01-01

    The design of the landing gear is one of the more fundamental aspects of aircraft design. The design and integration process encompasses numerous engineering disciplines, e.g., structure, weights, runway design, and economics, and has become extremely sophisticated in the last few decades. Although the design process is well-documented, no attempt has been made until now in the development of a design methodology that can be used within an automated environment. As a result, the process remains to be a key responsibility for the configuration designer and is largely experience-based and graphically-oriented. However, as industry and government try to incorporate multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) methods in the conceptual design phase, the need for a more systematic procedure has become apparent. The development of an MDO-capable design methodology as described in this work is focused on providing the conceptual designer with tools to help automate the disciplinary analyses, i.e., geometry, kinematics, flotation, and weight. Documented design procedures and analyses were examined to determine their applicability, and to ensure compliance with current practices and regulations. Using the latest information as obtained from industry during initial industry survey, the analyses were in terms modified and expanded to accommodate the design criteria associated with the advanced large subsonic transports. Algorithms were then developed based on the updated analysis procedures to be incorporated into existing MDO codes.

  15. Taxiing, Take-Off, and Landing Simulation of the High Speed Civil Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reaves, Mercedes C.; Horta, Lucas G.

    1999-01-01

    The aircraft industry jointly with NASA is studying enabling technologies for higher speed, longer range aircraft configurations. Higher speeds, higher temperatures, and aerodynamics are driving these newer aircraft configurations towards long, slender, flexible fuselages. Aircraft response during ground operations, although often overlooked, is a concern due to the increased fuselage flexibility. This paper discusses modeling and simulation of the High Speed Civil Transport aircraft during taxiing, take-off, and landing. Finite element models of the airframe for various configurations are used and combined with nonlinear landing gear models to provide a simulation tool to study responses to different ground input conditions. A commercial computer simulation program is used to numerically integrate the equations of motion and to compute estimates of the responses using an existing runway profile. Results show aircraft responses exceeding safe acceptable human response levels.

  16. A head-up display format for application to transport aircraft approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    A head up display (HUD) format used in simulator studies of the application of HUD to the landing of civil transport aircraft is described in detail. The display features an indication of the aircraft's instantaneous flightpath that constitutes the primary controlled element. Discrete ILS error and altitude signals are scaled and positioned to provide precise guidance modes when tracked with the flightpath symbol. Consideration is given to both the availability and nonavailability of inertial velocity information in the aircraft.

  17. Measurement and analysis of aircraft and vehicle LRCS in outfield test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chang-Qing; Zeng, Xiao-dong; Fan, Zhao-jin; Feng, Zhe-jun; Lai, Zhi

    2015-04-01

    The measurement of aircraft and vehicle Laser Radar Cross Section (LRCS) is of crucial importance for the detection system evaluation and the characteristic research of the laser scattering. A brief introduction of the measuring theory of the laser scattering from the full-scale aircraft and vehicle targets is presented in this paper. By analyzing the measuring condition in outfield test, the laser systems and test steps are designed for full-scale aircraft and vehicle LRCS and verified by the experiment in laboratory. The processing data error 7% below is obtained of the laser radar cross section by using Gaussian compensation and elimination of sky background for original test data. The study of measurement and analysis proves that the proposed method is effective and correct to get laser radar cross section data in outfield test. The objectives of this study were: (1) to develop structural concepts for different LRCS fuselage configurations constructed of conventional materials; (2) to compare these findings with those of aircrafts or vehicles; (3) to assess the application of advanced materials for each configuration; (4) to conduct an analytical investigation of the aerodynamic loads, vertical drag and mission performance of different LRCS configurations; and (5) to compare these findings with those of the aircrafts or vehicles.

  18. Land vehicle antennas for satellite mobile communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, H. A.; Paschen, D.; Pieper, B. V.

    1985-01-01

    Antenna designs applicable to future satellite mobile vehicle communications are examined. Microstrip disk, quadrifilar helix, cylindrical microstrip, and inverted V and U crossed-dipole low gain antennas (3-5 dBic) that provide omnidirectional coverage are described. Diagrams of medium gain antenna (9-12 dBic) concepts are presented; the antennas are classified into three types: (1) electronically steered with digital phase shifters; (2) electronically switched with switchable power divider/combiner; and (3) mechanically steered with motor. The operating characteristics of a conformal antenna with electronic beam steering and a nonconformal design with mechanical steering are evaluated with respect to isolation levels in a multiple satellite system. Vehicle antenna pointing systems and antenna system costs are investigated.

  19. Instrumentation of sampling aircraft for measurement of launch vehicle effluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wornom, D. E.; Woods, D. C.; Thomas, M. E.; Tyson, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    An aircraft was selected and instrumented to measure effluents emitted from large solid propellant rockets during launch activities. The considerations involved in aircraft selection, sampling probes, and instrumentation are discussed with respect to obtaining valid airborne measurements. Discussions of the data acquisition system used, the instrument power system, and operational sampling procedures are included. Representative measurements obtained from an actual rocket launch monitoring activity are also presented.

  20. Hardware-in-the-loop environment facility to address pilot-vehicle-interface issues of a fighter aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandurangareddy, Meenige

    2002-07-01

    The evolution of Pilot-Vehicle-Interface (PVI) of a fighter aircraft is a complex task. The PVI design involves both static and dynamic issues. Static issues involve the study of reach of controls and switches, ejection path clearance, readability of indicators and display symbols, etc. Dynamic issues involve the study of the effect of aircraft motion on display symbols, pilot emergency handling, situation awareness, weapon aiming, etc. This paper describes a method of addressing the above issues by building a facility with cockpit, which is ergonomically similar to the fighter cockpit. The cockpit is also fitted with actual displays, controls and switches. The cockpit is interfaced with various simulation models of aircraft and outside-window-image generators. The architecture of the facility is designed to represent the latencies of the aircraft and facilitates replacement of simulation models with actual units. A parameter injection facility could be used to induce faults in a comprehensive manner. Pilots could use the facility right from familiarising themselves with procedures to start the engine, take-off, navigate, aim the weapons, handling of emergencies and landing. This approach is being followed and further being enhanced on Cockpit-Environment-Facility (CEF) at Aeronautical Development Agency (ADA), Bangalore, India.

  1. Pilot Joe Walker in Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    In this 1964 NASA Flight Research Center photograph, NASA Pilot Joe Walker is setting in the pilot's platform of the the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) number 1. This photograph provides a good view of the pilot setting in front of the primary instrumentation panel. When Apollo planning was underway in 1960, NASA was looking for a simulator to profile the descent to the moon's surface. Three concepts surfaced: an electronic simulator, a tethered device, and the ambitious Dryden contribution, a free-flying vehicle. All three became serious projects, but eventually the NASA Flight Research Center's (FRC) Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) became the most significant one. Hubert M. Drake is credited with originating the idea, while Donald Bellman and Gene Matranga were senior engineers on the project, with Bellman, the project manager. Simultaneously, and independently, Bell Aerosystems Company, Buffalo, N.Y., a company with experience in vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft, had conceived a similar free-flying simulator and proposed their concept to NASA headquarters. NASA Headquarters put FRC and Bell together to collaborate. The challenge was; to allow a pilot to make a vertical landing on earth in a simulated moon environment, one sixth of the earth's gravity and with totally transparent aerodynamic forces in a 'free flight' vehicle with no tether forces acting on it. Built of tubular aluminum like a giant four-legged bedstead, the vehicle was to simulate a lunar landing profile from around 1500 feet to the moon's surface. To do this, the LLRV had a General Electric CF-700-2V turbofan engine mounted vertically in gimbals, with 4200 pounds of thrust. The engine, using JP-4 fuel, got the vehicle up to the test altitude and was then throttled back to support five-sixths of the vehicle's weight, simulating the reduced gravity of the moon. Two hydrogen-peroxide lift rockets with thrust that could be varied from 100 to 500 pounds handled the LLRV's rate of

  2. Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) in flight lifting off from ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    This 1964 NASA Flight Reserch Center photograph shows the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) number 1 in flight at the south base of Edwards Air Force Base. When Apollo planning was underway in 1960, NASA was looking for a simulator to profile the descent to the moon's surface. Three concepts surfaced: an electronic simulator, a tethered device, and the ambitious Dryden contribution, a free-flying vehicle. All three became serious projects, but eventually the NASA Flight Research Center's (FRC) Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) became the most significant one. Hubert M. Drake is credited with originating the idea, while Donald Bellman and Gene Matranga were senior engineers on the project, with Bellman, the project manager. Simultaneously, and independently, Bell Aerosystems Company, Buffalo, N.Y., a company with experience in vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft, had conceived a similar free-flying simulator and proposed their concept to NASA headquarters. NASA Headquarters put FRC and Bell together to collaborate. The challenge was; to allow a pilot to make a vertical landing on earth in a simulated moon environment, one sixth of the earth's gravity and with totally transparent aerodynamic forces in a 'free flight' vehicle with no tether forces acting on it. Built of tubular aluminum like a giant four-legged bedstead, the vehicle was to simulate a lunar landing profile from around 1500 feet to the moon's surface. To do this, the LLRV had a General Electric CF-700-2V turbofan engine mounted vertically in gimbals, with 4200 pounds of thrust. The engine, using JP-4 fuel, got the vehicle up to the test altitude and was then throttled back to support five-sixths of the vehicle's weight, simulating the reduced gravity of the moon. Two hydrogen-peroxide lift rockets with thrust that could be varied from 100 to 500 pounds handled the LLRV's rate of descent and horizontal translations. Sixteen smaller hydrogen-peroxide rockets, mounted in pairs, gave the pilot

  3. Lunar Landing Training vehicle piloted by Neil Armstrong during training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    A Lunar Landing Training Vehicle, piloted by Astronaut Neil Armstrong, goes through a checkout flight at Ellington Air Force Base on June 16, 1969. The total duration of the lunar simulation flight was five minutes and 59 seconds. Maximum altitude attained was about 300 feet.

  4. The development of advanced automatic flare and decrab for powered lift short haul aircraft using a microwave landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gevaert, G.; Feinreich, B.

    1977-01-01

    Advanced automatic flare and decrab control laws were developed for future powered lift STOL aircraft using the NASA-C-8A augmentor wing vehicle as the aircraft model. The longitudinal control laws utilize the throttle for flight path control and use the direct lift augmentor flap chokes for flight path augmentation. The elevator is used to control airspeed during the approach phase and to enhance path control during the flare. The forward slip maneuver was selected over the flat decrab technique for runway alignment because it can effectively handle the large crab angles obtained at STOL approach speeds. Performance evaluation of selected system configurations were obtained over the total landing environment. Limitations were defined and critical failure modes assessed. Pilot display concepts are discussed.

  5. Stress-strain state of ice cover during aircraft takeoff and landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelova, A. V.; Kozin, V. M.; Matyushina, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    We consider the linear unsteady motion of an IL-76TD aircraft on ice. Water is treated as an ideal incompressible liquid, and the liquid motion is considered potential. Ice cover is modeled by an initially unstressed uniform isotropic elastic plate, and the load exerted by the aircraft on the ice cover with consideration of the wing lift is modeled by regions of distributed pressure of variable intensity, arranged under the aircraft landing gear. The effect of the thickness and elastic modulus of the ice plate, takeoff and landing regimes on stress-strain state of the ice cover used as a runway.

  6. Landing Characteristics of a Re-entry Vehicle with a Passive Landing System for Impact Alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbs, Sandy M.

    1963-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made to determine the landing characteristics of a 1/8-scale dynamic model of a reentry vehicle using a passive landing system to alleviate the landing-impact loads. The passive landing system consisted of a flexible heat shield with a small section of aluminum honeycomb placed between the heat shield and the crew compartment at the point that would be the first to contact the landing surface. The model was landed on concrete and sand landing surfaces at parachute letdown velocities. The investigations simulated a vertical velocity of 30 ft/sec (full scale), horizontal velocities of 0, 15, 30, 40, and 50 ft/sec (full scale), and landing attitudes ranging from -30 degrees to 20 degrees. The model investigation indicated that stable landings could be made on a concrete surface at horizontal velocities up to about 30 ft/sec, but the stable landing-attitude range at these speeds was small. The aluminum honeycomb bottomed occasionally during landings on concrete. When bottoming did not occur, maximum normal and longitudinal accelerations at the center of gravity of the vehicle were approximately 50g and 30g, respectively.

  7. A CLIPS-based tool for aircraft pilot-vehicle interface design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, Thomas D.; Rogers, Steven P.

    1991-01-01

    The Pilot-Vehicle Interface of modern aircraft is the cognitive, sensory, and psychomotor link between the pilot, the avionics modules, and all other systems on board the aircraft. To assist pilot-vehicle interface designers, a C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) based tool was developed that allows design information to be stored in a table that can be modified by rules representing design knowledge. Developed for the Apple Macintosh, the tool allows users without any CLIPS programming experience to form simple rules using a point and click interface.

  8. Microphysical Properties of Warm Clouds During The Aircraft Take-Off and Landing Over Bucharest, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, Sabina; Nicolae Vajaiac, Sorin; Boscornea, Andreea

    2016-06-01

    This paper is focused on airborne measurements of microphysical parameters into warm clouds when the aircraft penetrates the cloud, both during take-off and landing. The experiment was conducted during the aircraft flight between Bucharest and Craiova, in the southern part of Romania. The duration of the experimental flight was 2 hours and 35 minutes in October 7th, 2014, but the present study is dealing solely with the analysis of cloud microphysical properties at the beginning of the experiment (during the aircraft take-off) and at the end, when it got finalized by the aircraft landing procedure. The processing and interpretation of the measurements showed the differences between microphysical parameters, emphasizing that the type of cloud over Bucharest changed, as it was expected. In addition, the results showed that it is important to take into account both the synoptic context and the cloud perturbation due to the velocity of the aircraft, in such cases.

  9. The vehicle design evaluation program - A computer-aided design procedure for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, B. H.; Kruse, G. S.; Schrader, O. E.

    1977-01-01

    The vehicle design evaluation program is described. This program is a computer-aided design procedure that provides a vehicle synthesis capability for vehicle sizing, external load analysis, structural analysis, and cost evaluation. The vehicle sizing subprogram provides geometry, weight, and balance data for aircraft using JP, hydrogen, or methane fuels. The structural synthesis subprogram uses a multistation analysis for aerodynamic surfaces and fuselages to develop theoretical weights and geometric dimensions. The parts definition subprogram uses the geometric data from the structural analysis and develops the predicted fabrication dimensions, parts material raw stock buy requirements, and predicted actual weights. The cost analysis subprogram uses detail part data in conjunction with standard hours, realization factors, labor rates, and material data to develop the manufacturing costs. The program is used to evaluate overall design effects on subsonic commercial type aircraft due to parameter variations.

  10. Optimal sensor fusion for land vehicle navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, J.D.

    1990-10-01

    Position location is a fundamental requirement in autonomous mobile robots which record and subsequently follow x,y paths. The Dept. of Energy, Office of Safeguards and Security, Robotic Security Vehicle (RSV) program involves the development of an autonomous mobile robot for patrolling a structured exterior environment. A straight-forward method for autonomous path-following has been adopted and requires digitizing'' the desired road network by storing x,y coordinates every 2m along the roads. The position location system used to define the locations consists of a radio beacon system which triangulates position off two known transponders, and dead reckoning with compass and odometer. This paper addresses the problem of combining these two measurements to arrive at a best estimate of position. Two algorithms are proposed: the optimal'' algorithm treats the measurements as random variables and minimizes the estimate variance, while the average error'' algorithm considers the bias in dead reckoning and attempts to guarantee an average error. Data collected on the algorithms indicate that both work well in practice. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  11. An electronic control for an electrohydraulic active control landing gear for the F-4 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, I.

    1982-01-01

    A controller for an electrohydraulic active control landing gear was developed for the F-4 aircraft. A controller was modified for this application. Simulation results indicate that during landing and rollout over repaired bomb craters the active gear effects a force reduction, relative to the passive gear, or approximately 70%.

  12. 14 CFR 135.183 - Performance requirements: Land aircraft operated over water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... operated over water. 135.183 Section 135.183 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... operated over water. No person may operate a land aircraft carrying passengers over water unless— (a) It is operated at an altitude that allows it to reach land in the case of engine failure; (b) It is necessary...

  13. OVRhyp, Scramjet Test Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslan, J.; Bisard, T.; Dallinga, S.; Draper, K.; Hufford, G.; Peters, W.; Rogers, J.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary design for an unmanned hypersonic research vehicle to test scramjet engines is presented. The aircraft will be launched from a carrier aircraft at an altitude of 40,000 feet at Mach 0.8. The vehicle will then accelerate to Mach 6 at an altitude of 100,000 feet. At this stage the prototype scramjet will be employed to accelerate the vehicle to Mach 10 and maintain Mach 10 flight for 2 minutes. The aircraft will then decelerate and safely land.

  14. Development and evaluation of automatic landing control laws for power lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinreich, B.; Gevaert, G.

    1981-01-01

    A series of investigations were conducted to generate and verify through ground bases simulation and flight research a data base to aid in the design and certification of advanced propulsive lift short takeoff and landing aircraft. Problems impacting the design of powered lift short haul aircraft that are to be landed automatically on STOL runways in adverse weather were examined. An understanding of the problems was gained by a limited coverage of important elements that are normally included in the certification process of a CAT 3 automatic landing system.

  15. JUSTINA: A platform for autonomous land vehicle research and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhala, Matti

    A platform for autonomous land vehicle research and development was developed. The platform makes it possible to conduct tests in natural surroundings. The platform is based on a small car, which was modified and equipped for computer control. The car is equipped with a controller area network, which makes it possible to use parallel processing. The computer system and the modifications made are described. Programs for basic image processing were written and they are tested in a simple line following application. The programs allow different image processing tasks to be done on a desktop computer using either a recorded video signal or digitized images from natural scenes. Special attention was paid to the camera calibration procedure. A simple vehicle model was created for hardware in the loop testing of image processing and vehicle control algorithms. The model uses artificially produced road images. The vehicle is equipped with a differential Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation system, which was tested on an open field application. This platform is modular and can be easily adapted for different research purposes in autonomous land vehicle development.

  16. 36 CFR 293.6 - Commercial enterprises, roads, motor vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Commercial enterprises, roads..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.6 Commercial enterprises, roads, motor vehicles... National Forest Wilderness no commercial enterprises; no temporary or permanent roads; no aircraft...

  17. 36 CFR 293.6 - Commercial enterprises, roads, motor vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Commercial enterprises, roads..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.6 Commercial enterprises, roads, motor vehicles... National Forest Wilderness no commercial enterprises; no temporary or permanent roads; no aircraft...

  18. 36 CFR 293.6 - Commercial enterprises, roads, motor vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Commercial enterprises, roads..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.6 Commercial enterprises, roads, motor vehicles... National Forest Wilderness no commercial enterprises; no temporary or permanent roads; no aircraft...

  19. 36 CFR 293.6 - Commercial enterprises, roads, motor vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Commercial enterprises, roads..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.6 Commercial enterprises, roads, motor vehicles... National Forest Wilderness no commercial enterprises; no temporary or permanent roads; no aircraft...

  20. 36 CFR 293.6 - Commercial enterprises, roads, motor vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats, aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Commercial enterprises, roads..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.6 Commercial enterprises, roads, motor vehicles... National Forest Wilderness no commercial enterprises; no temporary or permanent roads; no aircraft...

  1. Optimum Noise Reduction Methods for the Interior of Vehicles and Aircraft Cabins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavossi, Ph. D., Hasson M.

    The most effective methods of noise reduction in vehicles and Aircraft cabins are investigated. The first goal is to determine the optimal means of noise mitigation without change in external shape of the vehicle, or aircraft cabin exterior such as jet engine or fuselage design, with no significant added weight. The second goal is to arrive at interior designs that can be retrofitted to the existing interiors, to reduce overall noise level for the passengers. The physical phenomena considered are; relaxation oscillations, forced vibrations with non-linear damping and sub-harmonic resonances. The negative and positive damping coefficients and active noise cancelations methods are discussed. From noise power-spectrum for a prototype experimental setup, the most energetic vibration modes are determined, that require the highest damping. The proposed technique will utilize the arrangement of uniformly distributed open Helmholtz resonators, with sound absorbing surface. They are tuned to the frequencies that correspond to the most energetic noise levels. The resonators dissipate noise energy inside the vehicle, or aircraft cabin, at the peak frequencies of the noise spectrum, determined for different vehicle or aircraft cabin, interior design models.

  2. Synthetic Vision for Lunar and Planetary Landing Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Steven P.; Arthur, Jarvis (Trey) J., III; Shelton, Kevin J.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Norman, R. Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Crew Vehicle Interface (CVI) group of the Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck Technologies (IIFDT) has done extensive research in the area of Synthetic Vision (SV), and has shown that SV technology can substantially enhance flight crew situation awareness, reduce pilot workload, promote flight path control precision and improve aviation safety. SV technology is being extended to evaluate its utility for lunar and planetary exploration vehicles. SV may hold significant potential for many lunar and planetary missions since the SV presentation provides a computer-generated view of the terrain and other significant environment characteristics independent of the outside visibility conditions, window locations, or vehicle attributes. SV allows unconstrained control of the computer-generated scene lighting, terrain coloring, and virtual camera angles which may provide invaluable visual cues to pilots/astronauts and in addition, important vehicle state information may be conformally displayed on the view such as forward and down velocities, altitude, and fuel remaining to enhance trajectory control and vehicle system status. This paper discusses preliminary SV concepts for tactical and strategic displays for a lunar landing vehicle. The technical challenges and potential solutions to SV applications for the lunar landing mission are explored, including the requirements for high resolution terrain lunar maps and an accurate position and orientation of the vehicle that is essential in providing lunar Synthetic Vision System (SVS) cockpit displays. The paper also discusses the technical challenge of creating an accurate synthetic terrain portrayal using an ellipsoid lunar digital elevation model which eliminates projection errors and can be efficiently rendered in real-time.

  3. Autonomous landing and ingress of micro-air-vehicles in urban environments based on monocular vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockers, Roland; Bouffard, Patrick; Ma, Jeremy; Matthies, Larry; Tomlin, Claire

    2011-06-01

    Unmanned micro air vehicles (MAVs) will play an important role in future reconnaissance and search and rescue applications. In order to conduct persistent surveillance and to conserve energy, MAVs need the ability to land, and they need the ability to enter (ingress) buildings and other structures to conduct reconnaissance. To be safe and practical under a wide range of environmental conditions, landing and ingress maneuvers must be autonomous, using real-time, onboard sensor feedback. To address these key behaviors, we present a novel method for vision-based autonomous MAV landing and ingress using a single camera for two urban scenarios: landing on an elevated surface, representative of a rooftop, and ingress through a rectangular opening, representative of a door or window. Real-world scenarios will not include special navigation markers, so we rely on tracking arbitrary scene features; however, we do currently exploit planarity of the scene. Our vision system uses a planar homography decomposition to detect navigation targets and to produce approach waypoints as inputs to the vehicle control algorithm. Scene perception, planning, and control run onboard in real-time; at present we obtain aircraft position knowledge from an external motion capture system, but we expect to replace this in the near future with a fully self-contained, onboard, vision-aided state estimation algorithm. We demonstrate autonomous vision-based landing and ingress target detection with two different quadrotor MAV platforms. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of onboard, vision-based autonomous landing and ingress algorithms that do not use special purpose scene markers to identify the destination.

  4. Autonomous Landing and Ingress of Micro-Air-Vehicles in Urban Environments Based on Monocular Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockers, Roland; Bouffard, Patrick; Ma, Jeremy; Matthies, Larry; Tomlin, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Unmanned micro air vehicles (MAVs) will play an important role in future reconnaissance and search and rescue applications. In order to conduct persistent surveillance and to conserve energy, MAVs need the ability to land, and they need the ability to enter (ingress) buildings and other structures to conduct reconnaissance. To be safe and practical under a wide range of environmental conditions, landing and ingress maneuvers must be autonomous, using real-time, onboard sensor feedback. To address these key behaviors, we present a novel method for vision-based autonomous MAV landing and ingress using a single camera for two urban scenarios: landing on an elevated surface, representative of a rooftop, and ingress through a rectangular opening, representative of a door or window. Real-world scenarios will not include special navigation markers, so we rely on tracking arbitrary scene features; however, we do currently exploit planarity of the scene. Our vision system uses a planar homography decomposition to detect navigation targets and to produce approach waypoints as inputs to the vehicle control algorithm. Scene perception, planning, and control run onboard in real-time; at present we obtain aircraft position knowledge from an external motion capture system, but we expect to replace this in the near future with a fully self-contained, onboard, vision-aided state estimation algorithm. We demonstrate autonomous vision-based landing and ingress target detection with two different quadrotor MAV platforms. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of onboard, vision-based autonomous landing and ingress algorithms that do not use special purpose scene markers to identify the destination.

  5. Landing approach evaluation of an integrated CRT display for general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, P. D.; Stinnett, G. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A flight director adaptable to general aviation aircraft was evaluated for the landing approach task in a twin turbojet business aircraft. The flight director combined aircraft heading, pitch and roll atitude, and ILS (Instrument Landing System) signals into a single picture on a small cathode ray tube (CRT) to give the pilot an integrated picture of the aircraft situation. The display is unique in that it presents the information on a CRT and gives quasi-command signals to the pilot. The particular display investigated was a preproduction version of the Kaiser Model FP-50 flight director. Approaches made with visual references only, with a conventional ILS displacement instrument, and with the CRT display were compared in terms of tracking performance and pilot workload. Tracking performance of three research pilots using the CRT display was superior to that using the conventional ILS instrument and comparable to that under VFR conditions. Pilot workload (based on pilot comments) was not clearly decreased.

  6. An electric control for an electrohydraulic active control aircraft landing gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, I.; Edson, R.

    1979-01-01

    An electronic controller for an electrohydraulic active control aircraft landing gear was developed. Drop tests of a modified gear from a 2722 Kg (6000 lbm) class of airplane were conducted to illustrate controller performance. The results indicate that the active gear effects a force reduction, relative to that of the passive gear, from 9 to 31 percent depending on the aircraft sink speed and the static gear pressure.

  7. Design criteria for flightpath and airspeed control for the approach and landing of STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Innis, R. C.; Hardy, G. H.; Stephenson, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    A flight research program was conducted to assess requirements for flightpath and airspeed control for glide-slope tracking during a precision approach and for flare control, particularly as applied to powered-lift, short takeoff and landing (STOL) aircraft. Ames Research Center's Augmentor Wing Research Aircraft was used to fly approaches on a 7.5 deg glide slope to landings on a 30 X 518 m (100 X 1700 ft) STOL runway. The dominant aircraft response characteristics determined were flightpath overshoot, flightpath-airspeed coupling, and initial flightpath response time. The significant contribution to control of the landing flare using pitch attitude was the short-term flightpath response. The limiting condition for initial flightpath response time for flare control with thrust was also identified. It is possible to define flying-qualities design criteria for glide-slope and flare control based on the aforementioned response characteristics.

  8. The remotely piloted vehicle as an earth science research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dean S.; Bufton, Jack L.

    1991-01-01

    A brief study was conducted at the Goddard Space Flight Center to identify existing remotely piloted vehicle (RPV) capabilities and to determine if the use of an RPV was advantageous and practical for Earth science investigations. A total of 17 instrument systems were identified. It was found that RPV's were considered especially valuable for dangerous missions, e.g., flights through volcano plumes and hurricanes, long duration profiles over inaccessible regions such as the Antarctic, and very low altitude ocean profiling missions.

  9. 32 CFR 855.6 - Aircraft exempt from the requirement for a civil aircraft landing permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... individuals but leased by an Air Force aero club. (3) Aero clubs of other US military services. Note: This... pilot will always be in uniform and normally have a copy of a Coast Guard Auxiliary Patrol Order. If the aircraft is operating under “verbal orders of the commander,” the pilot can provide the telephone number...

  10. Mobile Laboratory Characterization of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions from Motor Vehicles and Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, C. E.; Herndon, S. C.; Shorter, J. H.; Nelson, D. D.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Wormhoudt, J. C.; Zahniser, M. S.

    2004-12-01

    Nitrogen oxide emissions from mobile sources can strongly influence photochemical oxidant and secondary particulate nitrate formation in the troposphere. Quantification of the impact of mobile NOx sources requires accurate characterization of mobile source emissions under real world operating conditions. We have developed a mobile laboratory equipped with fast response trace gas sensors that has been deployed to quantifyon-road NOx fleet average emissions, NOx emissions from individual on-road vehicles, and aircraft NOx emissions at airports during taxi, take-off, and tarmac operations. Measurement strategies and instrumentation will be described and results of NOx emissions from a range of on-road vehicles, urban traffic mixes, and commercial aircraft will be presented.

  11. 14 CFR 135.183 - Performance requirements: Land aircraft operated over water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance requirements: Land aircraft operated over water. 135.183 Section 135.183 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING...

  12. Automatic carrier landing system for V/STOL aircraft using L1 adaptive and optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariharapura Ramesh, Shashank

    This thesis presents a framework for developing automatic carrier landing systems for aircraft with vertical or short take-off and landing capability using two different control strategies---gain-scheduled linear optimal control, and L1 adaptive control. The carrier landing sequence of V/STOL aircraft involves large variations in dynamic pressure and aerodynamic coefficients arising because of the transition from aerodynamic-supported to jet-borne flight, descent to the touchdown altitude, and turns performed to align with the runway. Consequently, the dynamics of the aircraft exhibit a highly non-linear dynamical behavior with variations in flight conditions prior to touchdown. Therefore, the implication is the need for non-linear control techniques to achieve automatic landing. Gain-scheduling has been one of the most widely employed techniques for control of aircraft, which involves designing linear controllers for numerous trimmed flight conditions, and interpolating them to achieve a global non-linear control. Adaptive control technique, on the other hand, eliminates the need to schedule the controller parameters as they adapt to changing flight conditions.

  13. Evaluating source area contributions from aircraft flux measurements over heterogeneous land cover by large eddy simulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The estimation of spatial patterns in surface fluxes from aircraft observations poses several challenges in presence of heterogeneous land cover. In particular, the effects of turbulence on scalar transport and the different behavior of passive (e.g. moisture) versus active (e.g. temperature) scalar...

  14. Preliminary design of a supersonic Short-Takeoff and Vertical-Landing (STOVL) fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary study of a supersonic short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) fighter is presented. Three configurations (a lift plus lift/cruise concept, a hybrid fan vectored thrust concept, and a mixed flow vectored thrust concept) were initially investigated with one configuration selected for further design analysis. The selected configuration, the lift plus lift/cruise concept, was successfully integrated to accommodate the powered lift short takeoff and vertical landing requirements as well as the demanding supersonic cruise and point performance requirements. A supersonic fighter aircraft with a short takeoff and vertical landing capability using the lift plus lift/cruise engine concept seems a viable option for the next generation fighter.

  15. Cross-stream ejection in the inter-wheel region of aircraft landing gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Philip; Ekmekci, Alis

    2014-11-01

    The reduction of aircraft noise is an important challenge currently faced by aircraft manufacturers. During approach and landing, the landing gears contribute a significant proportion of the aircraft generated noise. It is therefore critical that the key noise sources be identified and understood in order for effective mitigation methods to be developed. For a simplified two-wheel nose landing gear, a strong cross stream flow ejection phenomena has been observed to occur in the inter-wheel region in presence of wheel wells. The location and orientation of these flow ejections causes highly unsteady, three dimensional flow between the wheels that may impinge on other landing gear components, thereby potentially acting as a significant noise generator. The effects of changing the inter-wheel geometry (inter-wheel spacing, the wheel well depth and main strut geometry) upon the cross-stream ejection behaviour has been experimentally investigated using both qualitative flow visualisation and quantitative PIV techniques. A summary of the key results will be presented for the three main geometrical parameters under examination and the application of these findings to real life landing gears will be discussed. Thanks to Messier-Bugatti-Dowty and NSERC for their support for this project.

  16. CV-990 Landing Systems Research Aircraft (LSRA) during final Space Shuttle tire test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A Convair 990 (CV-990) was used as a Landing Systems Research Aircraft (LSRA) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to test space shuttle landing gear and braking systems as part of NASA's effort to upgrade and improve space shuttle capabilities. The first flight at Dryden of the CV-990 with shuttle test components occurred in April 1993, and tests continued into August 1995, when this photo shows a test of the shuttle tires. The purpose of this series of tests was to determine the performance parameters and failure limits of the tires. This particular landing was on the dry lakebed at Edwards, but other tests occurred on the main runway there. The CV-990, built in 1962 by the Convair Division of General Dynamics Corp., Ft. Worth, Texas, served as a research aircraft at Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, before it came to Dryden.

  17. Magnetic levitation assisted aircraft take-off and landing (feasibility study - GABRIEL concept)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohacs, Daniel; Rohacs, Jozsef

    2016-08-01

    The Technology Roadmap 2013 developed by the International Air Transport Association envisions the option of flying without an undercarriage to be in operation by 2032. Preliminary investigations clearly indicate that magnetic levitation technology (MagLev) might be an appealing solution to assist the aircraft take-off and landing. The EU supported research project, abbreviated as GABRIEL, was dealing with (i) the concept development, (ii) the identification, evaluation and selection of the deployable magnetic levitation technology, (iii) the definition of the core system elements (including the required aircraft modifications, the ground-based system and airport elements, and the rendezvous control system), (iv) the analysis of the safety and security aspects, (v) the concept validation and (vi) the estimation of the proposed concept impact in terms of aircraft weight, noise, emission, cost-benefit). All results introduced here are compared to a medium size hypothetic passenger aircraft (identical with an Airbus A320). This paper gives a systematic overview of (i) the applied methods, (ii) the investigation of the possible use of magnetic levitation technology to assist the commercial aircraft take-off and landing processes and (iii) the demonstrations, validations showing the feasibility of the radically new concept. All major results are outlined.

  18. Airborne antenna coverage requirements for the TCV B-737 aircraft. [for operation with microwave landing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Southall, W. A., Jr.; White, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    The airborne antenna line of sight look angle requirement for operation with a Microwave Landing System (MLS) was studied. The required azimuth and elevation line of sight look angles from an antenna located on an aircraft to three ground based antenna sites at the Wallops Flight Center (FPS-16 radar, MLS aximuth, and MLS elevation) as the aircraft follows specific approach paths selected as representative of MLS operations at the Denver, Colorado, terminal area are presented. These required azimuth and elevation look angles may be interpreted as basic design requirements for antenna of the TCV B-737 airplane for MLS operations along these selected approach paths.

  19. The ground effects of a powered-lift STOL aircraft during landing approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Victor C.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of ground proximity on a powered lift STOL aircraft are presented. The data are from NASA's Quiet Short Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA) flown at landing approach airspeeds of less than 60 knots with an 80 lb/sq ft wing loading. These results show that the ground effect change in lift is positive and does significantly reduce the touchdown sink rate. These results are compared to those of the YC-14 and YC-15. The change in drag and pitching moment caused by ground effects is also presented.

  20. Crash Testing and Simulation of a Cessna 172 Aircraft: Hard Landing Onto Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2016-01-01

    A full-scale crash test of a Cessna 172 aircraft was conducted at the Landing and Impact Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center during the summer of 2015. The purpose of the test was to evaluate the performance of Emergency Locator Transmitters (ELTs) that were mounted at various locations in the aircraft and to generate impact test data for model validation. A finite element model of the aircraft was developed for execution in LSDYNA to simulate the test. Measured impact conditions were 722.4-in/s forward velocity and 276-in/s vertical velocity with a 1.5deg pitch (nose up) attitude. These conditions were intended to represent a survivable hard landing. The impact surface was concrete. During the test, the nose gear tire impacted the concrete, followed closely by impact of the main gear tires. The main landing gear spread outward, as the nose gear stroked vertically. The only fuselage contact with the impact surface was a slight impact of the rearmost portion of the lower tail. Thus, capturing the behavior of the nose and main landing gear was essential to accurately predict the response. This paper describes the model development and presents test-analysis comparisons in three categories: inertial properties, time sequence of events, and acceleration and velocity time-histories.

  1. Dynamics of aircraft antiskid braking systems. [conducted at the Langley aircraft landing loads and traction facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, J. A.; Stubbs, S. M.; Dreher, R. C.; Smith, E. G.

    1982-01-01

    A computer study was performed to assess the accuracy of three brake pressure-torque mathematical models. The investigation utilized one main gear wheel, brake, and tire assembly of a McDonnell Douglas DC-9 series 10 airplane. The investigation indicates that the performance of aircraft antiskid braking systems is strongly influenced by tire characteristics, dynamic response of the antiskid control valve, and pressure-torque response of the brake. The computer study employed an average torque error criterion to assess the accuracy of the models. The results indicate that a variable nonlinear spring with hysteresis memory function models the pressure-torque response of the brake more accurately than currently used models.

  2. Lidar Wind Profiler Comparison to Weather Balloon for Support of Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle Landings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houtas, Franzeska F.; Teets, Edward H.

    2010-01-01

    A comparison study by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) and the Naval Post Graduate School Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (Marina, California) was conducted to show the advantages of an airborne wind profiling light detection and ranging (lidar) system in reducing drift uncertainty along a reentry vehicle descent trajectory. This effort was in support of the once planned Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle ground landing. A Twin Otter Doppler Wind Lidar was flown on multiple flights along the approximate ground track of each ascending weather balloon launched from the Marina Municipal Airport (Marina, California). The airborne lidar used was a 5-mJ, 2-micron infrared laser with a 10-cm telescope and a two-axis scanner. Each lidar wind profile contains data for an altitude range between the surface and flight altitude of 2.7 km, processed on board every 20 s. In comparison, a typical weather balloon would traverse that same altitude range with a similar data set available in approximately 15 to 20 min. These tests were conducted on November 15 and 16, 2007. Results show a best-case absolute difference of 0.18 m/s (0.35 knots) in speed and 1 degree in direct

  3. Environmental modeling and recognition for an autonomous land vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, D. T.; Levitt, T. S.; Mcconnell, C. C.; Nelson, P. C.

    1987-01-01

    An architecture for object modeling and recognition for an autonomous land vehicle is presented. Examples of objects of interest include terrain features, fields, roads, horizon features, trees, etc. The architecture is organized around a set of data bases for generic object models and perceptual structures, temporary memory for the instantiation of object and relational hypotheses, and a long term memory for storing stable hypotheses that are affixed to the terrain representation. Multiple inference processes operate over these databases. Researchers describe these particular components: the perceptual structure database, the grouping processes that operate over this, schemas, and the long term terrain database. A processing example that matches predictions from the long term terrain model to imagery, extracts significant perceptual structures for consideration as potential landmarks, and extracts a relational structure to update the long term terrain database is given.

  4. Advanced hypersonic aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utzinger, Rob; Blank, Hans-Joachim; Cox, Craig; Harvey, Greg; Mckee, Mike; Molnar, Dave; Nagy, Greg; Petersen, Steve

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this design project is to develop the hypersonic reconnaissance aircraft to replace the SR-71 and to complement existing intelligence gathering devices. The initial design considerations were to create a manned vehicle which could complete its mission with at least two airborne refuelings. The aircraft must travel between Mach 4 and Mach 7 at an altitude of 80,000 feet for a maximum range of 12,000 nautical miles. The vehicle should have an air breathing propulsion system at cruise. With a crew of two, the aircraft should be able to take off and land on a 10,000 foot runway, and the yearly operational costs were not to exceed $300 million. Finally, the aircraft should exhibit stealth characteristics, including a minimized radar cross-section (RCS) and a reduced sonic boom. The technology used in this vehicle should allow for production between the years 1993 and 1995.

  5. A Flight Study of a Power-Off Landing Technique Applicable to Re-Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, Richard S.; Drinkwater, Fred J.; White, Maurice D.

    1960-01-01

    A power-off landing technique, applicable to aircraft of configurations presently being considered for manned re-entry vehicles, has been developed and flight tested at Ames Research Center. The flight tests used two configurations of an airplane for which the values of maximum lift-drag ratios were 4.0 and 2.8. Twenty-four idle-power approaches were made to an 8000-foot runway with touchdown point and airspeed accuracies of +/-600 feet and +/-10 knots, respectively. The landing pattern used was designed to provide an explicitly defined flight path for the pilot and, yet, to require no external guidance other than the pilot's view from the cockpit. The initial phase of the approach pattern is a constant high-speed descent from altitude aimed at a ground reference point short of the runway threshold. At a specified altitude and speed, a constant g pull-out is made to a shallow flight path along which the air-plane decelerates to the touchdown point. Repeatability and safety are inherent because of the reduced number of variables requiring pilot judgment, and because of the fact that a missed approach is evident at speeds and altitudes suitable for safe ejection. The accuracy and repeatability of the pattern are indicated by the measured results. The proposed pattern appears to be particularly suitable for configurations having unusual drag variations with speed in the lower speed regime, since the pilot is not required to control speed in the latter portions of the pattern.

  6. A head-up display format for transport aircraft approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, R. S.; Scott, B. C.

    1981-01-01

    An electronic flight-guidance display format was designed for use in evaluations of the collimated head-up display concept applied to transport aircraft landing. In the design process of iterative evaluation and modification, some general principles, or guidelines, applicable to electronic flight displays were suggested. The usefulness of an indication of instantaneous inertial flightpath was clearly demonstrated. Evaluator pilot acceptance of the unfamiliar display concepts was very positive when careful attention was given to indoctrination and training.

  7. Simulation of Aircraft Landing Gears with a Nonlinear Dynamic Finite Element Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.; Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2000-01-01

    Recent advances in computational speed have made aircraft and spacecraft crash simulations using an explicit, nonlinear, transient-dynamic, finite element analysis code more feasible. This paper describes the development of a simple landing gear model, which accurately simulates the energy absorbed by the gear without adding substantial complexity to the model. For a crash model, the landing gear response is approximated with a spring where the force applied to the fuselage is computed in a user-written subroutine. Helicopter crash simulations using this approach are compared with previously acquired experimental data from a full-scale crash test of a composite helicopter.

  8. Validation of an Active Gear, Flexible Aircraft Take-off and Landing analysis (AGFATL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The results of an analytical investigation using a computer program for active gear, flexible aircraft take off and landing analysis (AGFATL) are compared with experimental data from shaker tests, drop tests, and simulated landing tests to validate the AGFATL computer program. Comparison of experimental and analytical responses for both passive and active gears indicates good agreement for shaker tests and drop tests. For the simulated landing tests, the passive and active gears were influenced by large strut binding friction forces. The inclusion of these undefined forces in the analytical simulations was difficult, and consequently only fair to good agreement was obtained. An assessment of the results from the investigation indicates that the AGFATL computer program is a valid tool for the study and initial design of series hydraulic active control landing gear systems.

  9. Launch Vehicle Manual Steering with Adaptive Augmenting Control In-flight Evaluations Using a Piloted Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt

    2014-01-01

    An adaptive augmenting control algorithm for the Space Launch System has been developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center as part of the launch vehicles baseline flight control system. A prototype version of the SLS flight control software was hosted on a piloted aircraft at the Armstrong Flight Research Center to demonstrate the adaptive controller on a full-scale realistic application in a relevant flight environment. Concerns regarding adverse interactions between the adaptive controller and a proposed manual steering mode were investigated by giving the pilot trajectory deviation cues and pitch rate command authority.

  10. Nonlinear acoustic propagation of launch vehicle and military jet aircraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, Kent L.

    2010-10-01

    The noise from launch vehicles and high-performance military jet aircraft has been shown to travel nonlinearly as a result of an amplitude-dependent speed of sound. Because acoustic pressure compressions travel faster than rarefactions, the waveform steepens and shocks form. This process results in a very different (and readily audible) noise signature and spectrum than predicted by linear models. On-going efforts to characterize the nonlinearity using statistical and spectral measures are described with examples from recent static tests of solid rocket boosters and the F-22 Raptor.

  11. Operational benefits from the Terminal Configured Vehicle. [aircraft equipment for air traffic improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. P.; Schmitz, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    The objective of Terminal Configured Vehicle (TCV) research activity is to provide improvements which lead to increased airport and runway capacity, increasing air traffic controller productivity, energy efficient terminal area operations, reduced weather minima with safety, and reduced community noise by use of appropriate measures. Some early results of this research activity are discussed, and present and future research needs to meet the broad research objectives are defined. Particular consideration is given to the development of the TCV B-737 aircraft, the integration of the TCV with MLS, and avionics configurations, flight profiles, and manually controlled approaches for TCV. Some particular test demonstrations are discussed.

  12. Automatic guidance and control of a transport aircraft during a helical landing approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A linear optimal regulator theory was applied to a nonlinear simulation of a transport aircraft performing a helical landing approach. A closed-form expression for the quasi-steady nominal flight path is presented along with the method for determining the corresponding constant nominal control inputs. The Jacobian matrices and the weighting matrices in the cost functional were time varying. A method of solving for the optimal feedback gains is reviewed. The control system was tested on several alternative landing approaches using both 3 deg and 6 deg flight path angles. On each landing approach, the aircraft was subjected to large random initial-state errors and to randomly directed crosswinds. The system was also tested for sensitivity to changes in the parameters of the aircraft and of the atmosphere. Results indicate that performance of the optimal controller on all the 3 deg approaches is very good. The control system proved to be reasonably insensitive to parametric uncertainties. Performance is not as good on the 6 deg approaches. A modification to the 6 deg flight path was proposed for the purpose of improving performance.

  13. Assured crew return vehicle post landing configuration design and test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The 1991-1992 senior Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Design class continued work on the post landing configurations for the Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) and the Emergency Egress Couch (EEC). The ACRV will be permanently docked to Space Station Freedom fulfilling NASA's commitment of Assured Crew Return Capability in the event of an accident or illness aboard Space Station Freedom. The EEC provides medical support and a transportation surface for an incapacitated crew member. The objective of the projects was to give the ACRV Project Office data to feed into their feasibility studies. Four design teams were given the task of developing models with dynamically and geometrically scaled characteristics. Groups one and two combined efforts to design a one-fifth scale model for the Apollo Command Module derivative, an on-board flotation system, and a lift attachment point system. This model was designed to test the feasibility of a rigid flotation and stabilization system and to determine the dynamics associated with lifting the vehicle during retrieval. However, due to priorities, it was not built. Group three designed a one-fifth scale model of the Johnson Space Center (JSC) benchmark configuration, the Station Crew Return Alternative Module (SCRAM) with a lift attachment point system. This model helped to determine the flotation and lifting characteristics of the SCRAM configuration. Group four designed a full scale EEC with changeable geometric and geometric and dynamic characteristics. This model provided data on the geometric characteristics of the EEC and on the placement of the CG and moment of inertia. It also gave the helicopter rescue personnel direct input to the feasibility study. Section 1 describes in detail the design of a one-fifth scale model of the Apollo Command Module Derivative (ACMD) ACRV. The objective of the ACMD Configuration Model Team was to use geometric and dynamic constraints to design a one-fifth scale working model of the

  14. Assured crew return vehicle post landing configuration design and test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 1991-1992 senior Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Design class continued work on the post landing configurations for the Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) and the Emergency Egress Couch (EEC). The ACRV will be permanently docked to Space Station Freedom fulfilling NASA's commitment of Assured Crew Return Capability in the event of an accident or illness aboard Space Station Freedom. The EEC provides medical support and a transportation surface for an incapacitated crew member. The objective of the projects was to give the ACRV Project Office data to feed into their feasibility studies. Four design teams were given the task of developing models with dynamically and geometrically scaled characteristics. Groups one and two combined efforts to design a one-fifth scale model for the Apollo Command Module derivative, an on-board flotation system, and a lift attachment point system. This model was designed to test the feasibility of a rigid flotation and stabilization system and to determine the dynamics associated with lifting the vehicle during retrieval. However, due to priorities, it was not built. Group three designed a one-fifth scale model of the Johnson Space Center (JSC) benchmark configuration, the Station Crew Return Alternative Module (SCRAM) with a lift attachment point system. This model helped to determine the flotation and lifting characteristics of the SCRAM configuration. Group four designed a full scale EEC with changeable geometric and geometric and dynamic characteristics. This model provided data on the geometric characteristics of the EEC and on the placement of the CG and moment of inertia. It also gave the helicopter rescue personnel direct input to the feasibility study. Section 1 describes in detail the design of a one-fifth scale model of the Apollo Command Module Derivative (ACMD) ACRV. The objective of the ACMD Configuration Model Team was to use geometric and dynamic constraints to design a one-fifth scale working model of the

  15. Aerodynamic configuration development of the highly maneuverable aircraft technology remotely piloted research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gingrich, P. B.; Child, R. D.; Panageas, G. N.

    1977-01-01

    The aerodynamic development of the highly maneuverable aircraft technology remotely piloted research vehicle (HiMAT/RPRV) from the conceptual design to the final configuration is presented. The design integrates several advanced concepts to achieve a high degree of transonic maneuverability, and was keyed to sustained maneuverability goals while other fighter typical performance characteristics were maintained. When tests of the baseline configuration indicated deficiencies in the technology integration and design techniques, the vehicle was reconfigured to satisfy the subcritical and supersonic requirements. Drag-due-to-lift levels only 5 percent higher than the optimum were obtained for the wind tunnel model at a lift coefficient of 1 for Mach numbers of up to 0.8. The transonic drag rise was progressively lowered with the application of nonlinear potential flow analyses coupled with experimental data.

  16. X-38 Vehicle #132 in Flight Approaching Landing during First Free Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The X-38, a research vehicle built to help develop technology for an emergency Crew Return Vehicle (CRV), maneuvers toward landing at the end of a March 1999 test flight at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used on the X-38 thermal tiles to make them more durable than those used on the space shuttles. The X-38 itself was an unpiloted lifting

  17. Influence of friction forces on the motion of VTOL aircraft during landing operations on ships at sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, J. C.; Chin, D. O.

    1981-01-01

    Equations describing the friction forces generated during landing operations on ships at sea were formulated. These forces depend on the platform reaction and the coefficient of friction. The platform reaction depends on the relative sink rate and the shock absorbing capability of the landing gear. The friction coefficient varies with the surface condition of the landing platform and the angle of yaw of the aircraft relative to the landing platform. Landings by VTOL aircraft, equipped with conventional oleopneumatic landing gears are discussed. Simplifications are introduced to reduce the complexity of the mathematical description of the tire and shock strut characteristics. Approximating the actual complicated force deflection characteristic of the tire by linear relationship is adequate. The internal friction forces in the shock strut are included in the landing gear model. A set of relatively simple equations was obtained by including only those tire and shock strut characteristics that contribute significantly to the generation of landing gear forces.

  18. Evaluation of a real-time predictive guidance law for landing VTOL aircraft at sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulk, C. H., Jr.; Phatak, A. V.

    1984-01-01

    A piloted simulation evaluation was conducted to assess the merits of a predictive lull/swell guidance law for landing a vertical takeoff and landing aircraft at sea. Two cases were evaluated. The first was performed by the pilot without the aid of the lull/swell guidance indicator, which indicates a landing opportunity. The second was performed in a similar manner with the aid of the guidance indicator. The pilot was instructed to use the guidance indicator only as a landing aid. The results indicated the pilots were able to visually determine ship lulls and swells prior to landing. However, use of the lull/swell guidance resulted in increased pilot confidence in the existence of a landing opportunity, which resulted in significantly shorter hover waiting times prior to landing. The performance of the lull/swell guidance was conservative, in that it forecast the onset of deck lulls and swells later than the pilot could detect them, but with greater reliability and therefore greater pilot confidence. In no instances did the guidance algorithm predict a false ship lull with which the pilot did not agree.

  19. Development and Deployment of Unmanned Aircraft Instrumentation for Measuring Quantities Related to Land Surface-Atmosphere Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, G.; Lawrence, D.; Elston, J.; Argrow, B. M.; Palo, S. E.; Curry, N.; Finamore, W.; Mack, J.; LoDolce, G.; Schmid, B.; Long, C. N.; Bland, G.; Maslanik, J. A.; Gao, R. S.; Telg, H.; Semmer, S.; Maclean, G.; Ivey, M.; Hock, T. F.; Bartram, B.; Bendure, A.; Stachura, M.

    2015-12-01

    Use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) in evaluation of geophysical parameters is expanding at a rapid rate. Despite limitation imposed by necessary regulations related to operation of UAS in the federal airspace, several groups have developed and deployed a variety of UAS and the associated sensors to make measurements of the atmosphere, land surface, ocean and cryosphere. Included in this grouping is work completed at the University of Colorado - Boulder, which has an extended history of operating UAS and expanding their use in the earth sciences. Collaborative projects between the department of Aerospace Engineering, the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), the Research and Engineering Center for Unmanned Vehicles (RECUV), the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Centers for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have resulted in deployment of UAS to a variety of environments, including the Arctic. In this presentation, I will give an overview of some recent efforts lead by the University of Colorado to develop and deploy a variety of UAS. Work presented will emphasize recent campaigns and instrument development and testing related to understanding the land-atmosphere interface. Specifically, information on systems established for evaluating surface radiation (including albedo), turbulent exchange of water vapor, heat and gasses, and aerosol processes will be presented, along with information on the use of terrestrial ecosystem sensing to provide critical measurments for the evaluation of lower atmospheric flux measurements.

  20. Future Civil Aircraft and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, J.; Zuk, J.

    1989-01-01

    New aircraft technologies are presented that have the potential to expand the air transportation system and reduce congestion through new operating capabilities while also providing greater levels of safety and environmental compatibility. These new capabilities will result from current and planned civil aeronautics technology at the NASA Ames, Lewis, and Langley Research Centers and will cover the complete spectrum of current aircraft and new vehicle concepts including rotorcraft (helicopters and tilt rotors), vertical and short takeoff and landing (V/STOL), and short takeoff and landing (STOL) aircraft, subsonic transports, high-speed transports, and hypersonic/transatmospheric vehicles. New technologies will improve efficiency, affordability, safety, and environmental compatibility of current aircraft and will enable the development of new transportation system. The new capabilities of vehicles could lead to substantial market opportunities and economic growth and could improve the competitive position of the U.S. aerospace industry.

  1. A comparison of land-use determinations using data from ERTS-1 and high altitude aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundelius, M. A.; Chestnutwood, C. M.; Garcia, J. G.; Erb, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    A manual interpretation of ERTS-1 MSS system corrected imagery has been performed on a study area within the Houston Area Test Site to classify land use using the Level 1 categories proposed by the Department of the Interior. The two types of imagery used included: (1) black and white transparencies of each band enlarged to a scale of approximately 1:250,000 and (2) color transparencies composited from the computer compatible tapes using the film recorder on a multispectral data analysis station. The results of this interpretation have been compared with the 1970 land use inventory of HATS which was compiled using color ektachrome imagery from high altitude aircraft (scale 1:120,000). Urban data from the same scene was also analyzed using a computer-aided (clustering) technique. The resulting clusters, representing areas of similar content, were compared with existing land use patterns in Houston. A technique was developed to correlate the spectral clusters to specific urban features on aircraft imagery by the location of specific, high contrast objects in particular resolution elements. It was concluded that ERTS-1 data could be used to develop Level 1 and many Level 2 land use categories for regional inventories and perhaps to some degree on a local level.

  2. A mathematical model for Vertical Attitude Takeoff and Landing (VATOL) aircraft simulation. Volume 3: User's manual for VATOL simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortenbaugh, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Instructions for using Vertical Attitude Takeoff and Landing Aircraft Simulation (VATLAS), the digital simulation program for application to vertical attitude takeoff and landing (VATOL) aircraft developed for installation on the NASA Ames CDC 7600 computer system are described. The framework for VATLAS is the Off-Line Simulation (OLSIM) routine. The OLSIM routine provides a flexible framework and standardized modules which facilitate the development of off-line aircraft simulations. OLSIM runs under the control of VTOLTH, the main program, which calls the proper modules for executing user specified options. These options include trim, stability derivative calculation, time history generation, and various input-output options.

  3. Assured crew return vehicle post landing configuration design and test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Loren A.; Armitage, Pamela Kay

    The 1991-1992 senior Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Design class continued work on the post landing configurations for the Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) and the Emergency Egress Couch (EEC). The ACRV will be permanently docked to Space Station Freedom, fulfilling NASA's commitment of Assured Crew Return Capability in the event of an accident or illness aboard Space Station Freedom. The EEC provides medical support and a transportation surface for an incapacitated crew member. The objective of the projects was to give the ACRV Project Office data to feed into their feasibility studies. Four design teams were given the task of developing models with dynamically and geometrically scaled characteristics. Groups one and two combined effort to design a one-fifth scale model of the Apollo Command Module derivative, an on-board flotation system, and a lift attachment point system. This model was designed to test the feasibility of a rigid flotation and stabilization system and to determine the dynamics associated with lifting the vehicle during retrieval. However, due to priorities, it was not built. Group three designed a one-fifth scale model of the Johnson Space Center (JSC) benchmark configuration, the Station Crew Return Alternative Module (SCRAM) with a lift attachment point system. This model helped to determine the flotation and lifting characteristics of the SCRAM configuration. Group four designed a full scale EEC with changeable geometric and dynamic characteristics. This model provided data on the geometric characteristics of the EEC and on the placement of the CG and moment of inertia. It also gave the helicopter rescue personnel direct input to the feasibility study.

  4. Assured crew return vehicle post landing configuration design and test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Loren A.; Armitage, Pamela Kay

    1992-01-01

    The 1991-1992 senior Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Design class continued work on the post landing configurations for the Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) and the Emergency Egress Couch (EEC). The ACRV will be permanently docked to Space Station Freedom, fulfilling NASA's commitment of Assured Crew Return Capability in the event of an accident or illness aboard Space Station Freedom. The EEC provides medical support and a transportation surface for an incapacitated crew member. The objective of the projects was to give the ACRV Project Office data to feed into their feasibility studies. Four design teams were given the task of developing models with dynamically and geometrically scaled characteristics. Groups one and two combined effort to design a one-fifth scale model of the Apollo Command Module derivative, an on-board flotation system, and a lift attachment point system. This model was designed to test the feasibility of a rigid flotation and stabilization system and to determine the dynamics associated with lifting the vehicle during retrieval. However, due to priorities, it was not built. Group three designed a one-fifth scale model of the Johnson Space Center (JSC) benchmark configuration, the Station Crew Return Alternative Module (SCRAM) with a lift attachment point system. This model helped to determine the flotation and lifting characteristics of the SCRAM configuration. Group four designed a full scale EEC with changeable geometric and dynamic characteristics. This model provided data on the geometric characteristics of the EEC and on the placement of the CG and moment of inertia. It also gave the helicopter rescue personnel direct input to the feasibility study.

  5. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, B.D.; Lissaman, P.B.S.; Morgan, W.R.; Radkey, R.L.

    1998-09-22

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing`s top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gases for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well. 31 figs.

  6. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, Bart D.; Lissaman, Peter B. S.; Morgan, Walter R.; Radkey, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing's top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gasses for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well.

  7. Videopanorama Frame Rate Requirements Derived from Visual Discrimination of Deceleration During Simulated Aircraft Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furnstenau, Norbert; Ellis, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine the required visual frame rate (FR) for minimizing prediction errors with out-the-window video displays at remote/virtual airport towers, thirteen active air traffic controllers viewed high dynamic fidelity simulations of landing aircraft and decided whether aircraft would stop as if to be able to make a turnoff or whether a runway excursion would be expected. The viewing conditions and simulation dynamics replicated visual rates and environments of transport aircraft landing at small commercial airports. The required frame rate was estimated using Bayes inference on prediction errors by linear FRextrapolation of event probabilities conditional on predictions (stop, no-stop). Furthermore estimates were obtained from exponential model fits to the parametric and non-parametric perceptual discriminabilities d' and A (average area under ROC-curves) as dependent on FR. Decision errors are biased towards preference of overshoot and appear due to illusionary increase in speed at low frames rates. Both Bayes and A - extrapolations yield a framerate requirement of 35 < FRmin < 40 Hz. When comparing with published results [12] on shooter game scores the model based d'(FR)-extrapolation exhibits the best agreement and indicates even higher FRmin > 40 Hz for minimizing decision errors. Definitive recommendations require further experiments with FR > 30 Hz.

  8. Application of the concept of dynamic trim control to automatic landing of carrier aircraft. [utilizing digital feedforeward control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. A.; Meyer, G.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a simulation study of an alternative design concept for an automatic landing control system are presented. The alternative design concept for an automatic landing control system is described. The design concept is the total aircraft flight control system (TAFCOS). TAFCOS is an open loop, feed forward system that commands the proper instantaneous thrust, angle of attack, and roll angle to achieve the forces required to follow the desired trajector. These dynamic trim conditions are determined by an inversion of the aircraft nonlinear force characteristics. The concept was applied to an A-7E aircraft approaching an aircraft carrier. The implementation details with an airborne digital computer are discussed. The automatic carrier landing situation is described. The simulation results are presented for a carrier approach with atmospheric disturbances, an approach with no disturbances, and for tailwind and headwind gusts.

  9. A preliminary study of containment concepts for aircraft landing on elevated STOL-ports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haviland, J. K.

    1971-01-01

    A preliminary study of containment systems for aircraft landing on elevated STOL-ports was conducted as part of an overall study of human acceptance problems associated with STOL operations. The study included a survey and feasibility study of different concepts and a computer analysis of four arrestment systems. The principal conclusion was that a system referred to as the FAA system appears to offer the greatest promise. In this system, standard arresting gear cables are stretched across the roof-top, at roughly 100-foot intervals, but are shielded over the 100-foot-wide primary landing strip. Thus a pilot can land with an arresting hook down, but will not contact the cable unless he swerves off the landing strip, either because he has made a bad landing, or because his landing gear has failed. It was also noted that a suitable curb or guard rail should be developed. Presently available arresting gears and nylon net barriers were considered satisfactory for the overshoot problem.

  10. Flight study of on-board enhanced vision system for all-weather aircraft landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akopdjanan, Yuri A.; Machikhin, Alexander S.; Bilanchuk, Vyacheslav V.; Drynkin, Vladimir N.; Falkov, Eduard Y.; Tsareva, Tatiana I.; Fomenko, Anatoly I.

    2014-11-01

    On-board enhanced vision system for all-weather aircraft navigation and landing which is currently under development in State research institute of aviation systems is described. The system is based on combination of three imagers sensitive in visible, short wave infrared (SWIR) and long wave infrared (LWIR) spectral ranges and demonstrating to the pilot only the most informative images from the time-aligned multi-sensor data. The results of flight tests at glissade trajectories of the light aircraft OR-5 MO obtained at various weather conditions are presented. It is shown that each spectral range may be informative under certain conditions of observation. In adverse and poor-visibility conditions, such as fog, high humidity and low clouds, SWIR range has the biggest information content.

  11. Aircraft and ground vehicle friction correlation test results obtained under winter runway conditions during joint FAA/NASA Runway Friction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Vogler, William A.; Baldasare, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Aircraft and ground vehicle friction data collected during the Joint FAA/NASA Runway Friction Program under winter runway conditions are discussed and test results are summarized. The relationship between the different ground vehicle friction measurements obtained on compacted snow- and ice-covered conditions is defined together with the correlation to aircraft tire friction performance under similar runway conditions.

  12. Adaptive Data-based Predictive Control for Short Take-off and Landing (STOL) Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Jonathan Spencer; Acosta, Diana Michelle; Phan, Minh Q.

    2010-01-01

    Data-based Predictive Control is an emerging control method that stems from Model Predictive Control (MPC). MPC computes current control action based on a prediction of the system output a number of time steps into the future and is generally derived from a known model of the system. Data-based predictive control has the advantage of deriving predictive models and controller gains from input-output data. Thus, a controller can be designed from the outputs of complex simulation code or a physical system where no explicit model exists. If the output data happens to be corrupted by periodic disturbances, the designed controller will also have the built-in ability to reject these disturbances without the need to know them. When data-based predictive control is implemented online, it becomes a version of adaptive control. The characteristics of adaptive data-based predictive control are particularly appropriate for the control of nonlinear and time-varying systems, such as Short Take-off and Landing (STOL) aircraft. STOL is a capability of interest to NASA because conceptual Cruise Efficient Short Take-off and Landing (CESTOL) transport aircraft offer the ability to reduce congestion in the terminal area by utilizing existing shorter runways at airports, as well as to lower community noise by flying steep approach and climb-out patterns that reduce the noise footprint of the aircraft. In this study, adaptive data-based predictive control is implemented as an integrated flight-propulsion controller for the outer-loop control of a CESTOL-type aircraft. Results show that the controller successfully tracks velocity while attempting to maintain a constant flight path angle, using longitudinal command, thrust and flap setting as the control inputs.

  13. Flight testing of a remotely piloted vehicle for aircraft parameter estimation purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seanor, Brad A.

    2002-01-01

    The contribution of this research effort was to show that a reliable RPV could be built, tested, and successfully used for flight testing and parameter estimation purposes, in an academic setting. This was a fundamental step towards the creation of an automated Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). This research project was divided into four phases. Phase one involved the construction, development, and initial flight of a Remotely Piloted Vehicle (RPV), the West Virginia University (WVU) Boeing 777 (B777) aircraft. This phase included the creation of an onboard instrumentation system to provide aircraft flight data. The objective of the second phase was to estimate the longitudinal and lateral-directional stability and control derivatives from actual flight data for the B777 model. This involved performing and recording flight test maneuvers used for analysis of the longitudinal and lateral-directional estimates. Flight maneuvers included control surface doublets produced by the elevator, aileron, and rudder controls. A parameter estimation program known as pEst, developed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC), was used to compute the off-line estimates of parameters from collected flight data. This estimation software uses the Maximum Likelihood (ML) method with a Newton-Raphson (NR) minimization algorithm. The mathematical model used a traditional static and dynamic derivative buildup. Phase three focused on comparing a linear model obtained from the phase two ML estimates, with linear models obtained from a (i) Batch Least Squares Technique (BLS) and (ii) a technique from the Matlab system identification toolbox. Historically, aircraft parameter estimation has been performed off-line using recorded flight data from specifically designed maneuvers. In recent years, several on-line parameter identification techniques have been evaluated for real-time on-line applications. Along this research line, a novel contribution of this work was to compare the off

  14. Carrier differtial GPS for takeoff to landing of an unmanned flight vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, P.Y.; Parkinson, B.W.

    1996-10-01

    Using the carrier of the GPS signal, one is able to resolve relative displacements in space to the centimeter level. This paper describes the use of carrier differential techniques to determine the position, velocity, attitude and angular velocity of an autonomous aircraft in real time. The full state GPS estimates are used in linear quadratic (LQ) feedback control to automate the flight of the aircraft from takeoff thru landing. We present flight data from recent flight tests. In addition to GPS, the aircraft is instrumented with a variety of inexpensive conventional sensors including alpha and beta vanes, and a dynamic pressure sensor (pitot). These provide an independent measurement of the aircraft velocity relative to the air. This independent measurement of the aircraft velocity relative to the air. This independent measurements enables estimation of the the absolute wind vector, which is used in waypoint tracking. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Assessment of dynamic effects on aircraft design loads: The landing impact case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronstein, Michael; Feldman, Esther; Vescovini, Riccardo; Bisagni, Chiara

    2015-10-01

    This paper addresses the potential benefits due to a fully dynamic approach to determine the design loads of a mid-size business jet. The study is conducted by considering the fuselage midsection of the DAEDALOS aircraft model with landing impact conditions. The comparison is presented in terms of stress levels between the novel dynamic approach and the standard design practice based on the use of equivalent static loads. The results illustrate that a slight reduction of the load levels can be achieved, but careful modeling of the damping level is needed. Guidelines for an improved load definition are discussed, and suggestions for future research activities are provided.

  16. An engineering optimization method with application to STOL-aircraft approach and landing trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    An optimization method has been developed that computes the optimal open loop inputs for a dynamical system by observing only its output. The method reduces to static optimization by expressing the inputs as series of functions with parameters to be optimized. Since the method is not concerned with the details of the dynamical system to be optimized, it works for both linear and nonlinear systems. The method and the application to optimizing longitudinal landing paths for a STOL aircraft with an augmented wing are discussed. Noise, fuel, time, and path deviation minimizations are considered with and without angle of attack, acceleration excursion, flight path, endpoint, and other constraints.

  17. Design of a Low Cost Short Takeoff-vertical Landing Export Fighter/attack Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, Anne; Bodeker, Dan, III; Miu, Steve; Petro, Laura; Senf, Cary Taylor; Woeltjen, Donald

    1990-01-01

    The design of a supersonic short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft is presented that is suitable for export. An advanced four poster, low bypass turbofan engine is to be used for propulsion. Preliminary aerodynamic analysis is presented covering a determination of CD versus CL, CD versus Mach number, as well as best cruise Mach number and altitude. Component locations are presented and center of gravity determined. Cost minimization is achieved through the use of developed subsystems and standard fabrication techniques using nonexotic materials. Conclusions regarding the viability of the STOVL design are presented.

  18. Lidar Wind Profiler Comparison to Weather Balloon for Support of Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle Landings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houtas, Franzeska; Teets, Edward H., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A comparison study by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA and the Naval Post Graduate School Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies, Marina, CA was conducted to show the advantages of an airborne wind profiling lidar system in reducing drift uncertainty along a reentry vehicle descent trajectory. This effort was in support of the once planned Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle ground landing. A Twin Otter Doppler Wind Lidar was flown on multiple flights along the approximate ground track of an ascending weather balloons launched from the Marina Municipal Airport. The airborne lidar used was a 5-milli-Joules, 2-micron infrared laser with a 10-centimeter telescope and a two-axis scanner. Each lidar wind profile contains data for an altitude range between the surface and flight altitude of 2,700 meters, processed on board every 20 seconds. In comparison, a typical weather balloon would traverse that same altitude range with a similar data set available in approximately 15-20 minutes. These tests were conducted on November 15 & 16, 2007. Results comparing the balloon and a 10 minute multiple lidar profile averages show a best case absolute difference of 0.18 m/s (0.35 knots) in speed and 1 degree in direction during light and variable (less than 5 knots, without constant direction) wind conditions. These limited test results indicated a standard deviation wind velocity and direction differences of 0.71 m/s (1.3 knots) and 7.17 degrees for 1800Z, and 0.70 m/s (1.3 knots) and 6.79 degrees, outside of cloud layer.

  19. In flight image processing on multi-rotor aircraft for autonomous landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Richard, Jr.

    An estimated $6.4 billion was spent during the year 2013 on developing drone technology around the world and is expected to double in the next decade. However, drone applications typically require strong pilot skills, safety, responsibilities and adherence to regulations during flight. If the flight control process could be safer and more reliable in terms of landing, it would be possible to further develop a wider range of applications. The objective of this research effort is to describe the design and evaluation of a fully autonomous Unmanned Aerial system (UAS), specifically a four rotor aircraft, commonly known as quad copter for precise landing applications. The full landing autonomy is achieved by image processing capabilities during flight for target recognition by employing the open source library OpenCV. In addition, all imaging data is processed by a single embedded computer that estimates a relative position with respect to the target landing pad. Results shows a reduction on the average offset error by 67.88% in comparison to the current return to lunch (RTL) method which only relies on GPS positioning. The present work validates the need for relying on image processing for precise landing applications instead of the inexact method of a commercial low cost GPS dependency.

  20. Vehicle Design Evaluation Program (VDEP). A computer program for weight sizing, economic, performance and mission analysis of fuel-conservative aircraft, multibodied aircraft and large cargo aircraft using both JP and alternative fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, B. H.

    1977-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center vehicle design evaluation program (VDEP-2) was expanded by (1) incorporating into the program a capability to conduct preliminary design studies on subsonic commercial transport type aircraft using both JP and such alternate fuels as hydrogen and methane;(2) incorporating an aircraft detailed mission and performance analysis capability; and (3) developing and incorporating an external loads analysis capability. The resulting computer program (VDEP-3) provides a preliminary design tool that enables the user to perform integrated sizing, structural analysis, and cost studies on subsonic commercial transport aircraft. Both versions of the VDEP-3 Program which are designated preliminary Analysis VDEP-3 and detailed Analysis VDEP utilize the same vehicle sizing subprogram which includes a detailed mission analysis capability, as well as a geometry and weight analysis for multibodied configurations.

  1. 41 CFR 301-10.201 - For what purposes may I use a Government vehicle other than a Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... when public transportation is unavailable or its use is impractical; (c) Between either paragraph (a... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false For what purposes may I use a Government vehicle other than a Government aircraft? 301-10.201 Section 301-10.201...

  2. 41 CFR 301-10.201 - For what purposes may I use a Government vehicle other than a Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... when public transportation is unavailable or its use is impractical; (c) Between either paragraph (a... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true For what purposes may I use a Government vehicle other than a Government aircraft? 301-10.201 Section 301-10.201...

  3. 41 CFR 301-10.201 - For what purposes may I use a Government vehicle other than a Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... when public transportation is unavailable or its use is impractical; (c) Between either paragraph (a... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false For what purposes may I use a Government vehicle other than a Government aircraft? 301-10.201 Section 301-10.201...

  4. 41 CFR 301-10.201 - For what purposes may I use a Government vehicle other than a Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... when public transportation is unavailable or its use is impractical; (c) Between either paragraph (a... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false For what purposes may I use a Government vehicle other than a Government aircraft? 301-10.201 Section 301-10.201...

  5. 41 CFR 301-10.201 - For what purposes may I use a Government vehicle other than a Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... when public transportation is unavailable or its use is impractical; (c) Between either paragraph (a... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false For what purposes may I use a Government vehicle other than a Government aircraft? 301-10.201 Section 301-10.201...

  6. Vehicle Sketch Pad: a Parametric Geometry Modeler for Conceptual Aircraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Andrew S.

    2010-01-01

    The conceptual aircraft designer is faced with a dilemma, how to strike the best balance between productivity and fidelity? Historically, handbook methods have required only the coarsest of geometric parameterizations in order to perform analysis. Increasingly, there has been a drive to upgrade analysis methods, but these require considerably more precise and detailed geometry. Attempts have been made to use computer-aided design packages to fill this void, but their cost and steep learning curve have made them unwieldy at best. Vehicle Sketch Pad (VSP) has been developed over several years to better fill this void. While no substitute for the full feature set of computer-aided design packages, VSP allows even novices to quickly become proficient in defining three-dimensional, watertight aircraft geometries that are adequate for producing multi-disciplinary meta-models for higher order analysis methods, wind tunnel and display models, as well as a starting point for animation models. This paper will give an overview of the development and future course of VSP.

  7. Description of a landing site indicator (LASI) for light aircraft operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, H. V.; Outlaw, B. K. E.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental cockpit mounted head-up type display system was developed and evaluated by LaRC pilots during the landing phase of light aircraft operations. The Landing Site Indicator (LASI) system display consists of angle of attack, angle of sideslip, and indicated airspeed images superimposed on the pilot's view through the windshield. The information is made visible to the pilot by means of a partially reflective viewing screen which is suspended directly in frot of the pilot's eyes. Synchro transmitters are operated by vanes, located at the left wing tip, which sense angle of attack and sideslip angle. Information is presented near the center of the display in the form of a moving index on a fixed grid. The airspeed is sensed by a pitot-static pressure transducer and is presented in numerical form at the top center of the display.

  8. Effects of higher order control systems on aircraft approach and landing longitudinal handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasha, M. A.; Dazzo, J. J.; Silverthorn, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation of approach and landing longitudinal flying qualities, based on data generated using a variable stability NT-33 aircraft combined with significant control system dynamics is described. An optimum pilot lead time for pitch tracking, flight path angle tracking, and combined pitch and flight path angle tracking tasks is determined from a closed loop simulation using integral squared error (ISE) as a performance measure. Pilot gain and lead time were varied in the closed loop simulation of the pilot and aircraft to obtain the best performance for different control system configurations. The results lead to the selection of an optimum lead time using ISE as a performance criterion. Using this value of optimum lead time, a correlation is then found between pilot rating and performance with changes in the control system and in the aircraft dynamics. It is also shown that pilot rating is closely related to pilot workload which, in turn, is related to the amount of lead which the pilot must generate to obtain satisfactory response. The results also indicate that the pilot may use pitch angle tracking for the approach task and then add flight path angle tracking for the flare and touchdown.

  9. Landmark navigation and autonomous landing approach with obstacle detection for aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerst, Simon; Werner, Stefan; Dickmanns, Dirk; Dickmanns, Ernst D.

    1997-06-01

    A machine perception system for aircraft and helicopters using multiple sensor data for state estimation is presented. By combining conventional aircraft sensor like gyros, accelerometers, artificial horizon, aerodynamic measuring devices and GPS with vision data taken by conventional CCD-cameras mounted on a pan and tilt platform, the position of the craft can be determined as well as the relative position to runways and natural landmarks. The vision data of natural landmarks are used to improve position estimates during autonomous missions. A built-in landmark management module decides which landmark should be focused on by the vision system, depending on the distance to the landmark and the aspect conditions. More complex landmarks like runways are modeled with different levels of detail that are activated dependent on range. A supervisor process compares vision data and GPS data to detect mistracking of the vision system e.g. due to poor visibility and tries to reinitialize the vision system or to set focus on another landmark available. During landing approach obstacles like trucks and airplanes can be detected on the runway. The system has been tested in real-time within a hardware-in-the-loop simulation. Simulated aircraft measurements corrupted by noise and other characteristic sensor errors have been fed into the machine perception system; the image processing module for relative state estimation was driven by computer generated imagery. Results from real-time simulation runs are given.

  10. Composition and morphology of particle emissions from in-use aircraft during takeoff and landing.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, Mandana; Bostrom, Thor E; Johnson, Graham R; Morawska, Lidia

    2013-05-21

    In order to provide realistic data for air pollution inventories and source apportionment at airports, the morphology and composition of ultrafine particles (UFP) in aircraft engine exhaust were measured and characterized. For this purpose, two independent measurement techniques were employed to collect emissions during normal takeoff and landing operations at Brisbane Airport, Australia. PM1 emissions in the airfield were collected on filters and analyzed using the particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique. Morphological and compositional analyses of individual ultrafine particles in aircraft plumes were performed on silicon nitride membrane grids using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). TEM results showed that the deposited particles were in the range of 5-100 nm in diameter, had semisolid spherical shapes and were dominant in the nucleation mode (18-20 nm). The EDX analysis showed the main elements in the nucleation particles were C, O, S, and Cl. The PIXE analysis of the airfield samples was generally in agreement with the EDX in detecting S, Cl, K, Fe, and Si in the particles. The results of this study provide important scientific information on the toxicity of aircraft exhaust and their impact on local air quality. PMID:23618073

  11. Experimental investigation of the landing characteristics of hypersonic flight vehicles (Saenger II/Horus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huenecke, Klaus; Mertens, Josef

    An experimental study of the landing characteristics of the Saenger concept for a two-stage, fully reusable space transport vehicle which takes off from a conventional runway and reaches earth orbit, is reported. The problem of maneuvering during reentry is reviewed, and the experimental program is summarized. The test results, which demonstrate the stability of the vehicle during reentry and landing, are reviewed and discussed.

  12. Water landing characteristics of a model of a winged reentry vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbs, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    Proposed manned space shuttle vehicles are expected to land on airport runways. In an emergency situation, however, the vehicle may be required to land on water. A 1/10-scale dynamic model of a winged reentry vehicle was investigated to determine the water landing characteristics. Two configurations of the proposed vehicle were studied. Configuration 1 had a 30 deg negative dihedral of the stabilizer-elevon surface whereas configuration 2 had a 30 deg positive dihedral. Results indicate that the maximum normal accelerations for configurations 1 and 2 when landing in calm water were approximately 8g and 6g, respectively, and the maximum longitudinal accelerations were approximately 5g and 3g, respectively. A small hydroflap was needed to obtain satisfactory calm-water landings with configuration 2, whereas configuration 1 gave good landings without a hydroflap. All landings made in rough water resulted in unsatisfactory motions. For landings made in three different wave sizes, both configurations dived. The maximum normal accelerations for configurations 1 and 2 when landing in waves were -10.1g and -18.7g, respectively, and the maximum longitudinal accelerations for both configurations were approximately 13g.

  13. Evaluating Source Area Contributions from Aircraft Flux Measurements Over Heterogeneous Land Using Large-Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoldi, Giacomo; Kustas, William P.; Albertson, John D.

    2013-05-01

    The estimation of spatial patterns in surface fluxes from aircraft observations poses several challenges in the presence of heterogeneous land cover. In particular, the effects of turbulence on scalar transport and the different behaviour of passive (e.g. water vapour) versus active (e.g. temperature) scalars may lead to large uncertainties in the source area/flux-footprint estimation for sensible ( H) and latent ( LE) heat-flux fields. This study uses large-eddy simulation (LES) of the land-atmosphere interactions to investigate the atmospheric boundary-layer (ABL) processes that are likely to create differences in airborne-estimated H and LE footprints. We focus on 32~m altitude aircraft flux observations collected over a study site in central Oklahoma during the Southern Great Plains experiment in 1997 (SGP97). Comparison between the aircraft data and traditional model estimates provide evidence of a difference in source area for turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes. The LES produces reasonable representations of the observed fluxes, and hence provides credible evidence and explanation of the observed differences in the H and LE footprints. Those differences can be quantified by analyzing the change in the sign of the spatial correlation of the H and LE fields provided by the LES model as a function of height. Dry patterns in relatively moist surroundings are able to generate strong, but localized, sensible heating. However, whereas H at the aircraft altitude is still in phase with the surface, LE presents a more complicated connection to the surface as the dry updrafts force a convergence of the surrounding moist air. Both the observational and LES model evidence support the concept that under strongly advective conditions, H and LE measured at the top of the surface layer (≈50 m) can be associated with very different upwind source areas, effectively contradicting surface-layer self-similarity theory for scalars. The results indicate that, under certain

  14. An aircraft sensor fault tolerant system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caglayan, A. K.; Lancraft, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The design of a sensor fault tolerant system which uses analytical redundancy for the Terminal Configured Vehicle (TCV) research aircraft in a Microwave Landing System (MLS) environment was studied. The fault tolerant system provides reliable estimates for aircraft position, velocity, and attitude in the presence of possible failures in navigation aid instruments and onboard sensors. The estimates, provided by the fault tolerant system, are used by the automated guidance and control system to land the aircraft along a prescribed path. Sensor failures are identified by utilizing the analytic relationship between the various sensor outputs arising from the aircraft equations of motion.

  15. In-Service Evaluation of HVOF Coated Main Landing Gear on Navy P-3 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereaux, jon L.; Forrest, Clint

    2008-01-01

    Due to the environmental and health concerns with Electroplated Hard Chrome (EHC), the Hard Chrome Alternatives Team (HCAT) has been working to provide an alternative wear coating for EHC. The US Navy selected Tungsten-Carbide Cobalt (WC- 17Co) High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coating for this purpose and completed service evaluations on select aircraft components to support the HCAT charter in identifying an alternative wear coating for chrome plating. Other benefits of WC-Co thermal spray coatings over EHC are enhanced corrosion resistance, improved durability, and exceptional wear properties. As part of the HCAT charter and to evaluate HVOF coatings on operational Navy components, the P-3 aircraft was selected for a service evaluation to determine the coating durability as compared to chrome plating. In April 1999, a VP-30 P-3 aircraft was outfitted with a right-hand Main Landing Gear (MLG) shock strut coated with WCCo HYOF thermal spray applied to the piston barrel and four axle journals. The HVOF coating on the piston barrel and axle journals was applied by Southwest United Industries, Inc. This HVOF coated strut assembly has since completed 6,378 landings. Teardown analysis .for this WC-Co HVOF coated MLG asset is significant in assessing the durability of this wear coating in service relative to EHC and to substantiate Life Cycle Cost (LCC) data to support a retrograde transition from EHC to HVOF thermal spray coatings. Findings from this teardown analysis may also benefit future transitions to HVOF thermal spray coatings by identifying enhancements to finishing techniques, mating bearing and liner material improvements, improved seal materials, and improvements in HVOF coating selection.

  16. Fugitive particulate air emissions from off-road vehicle maneuvers at military training lands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Military training lands used for off-road vehicle maneuvers may be subject to severe soil loss and air quality degradation as a result of severe wind erosion. The objective of this study was to measure suspended particulate matter resulting from various different vehicle training scenarios. Soil s...

  17. Development and evaluation of automatic landing control laws for light wing loading STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinreich, B.; Degani, O.; Gevaert, G.

    1981-01-01

    Automatic flare and decrab control laws were developed for NASA's experimental Twin Otter. This light wing loading STOL aircraft was equipped with direct lift control (DLC) wing spoilers to enhance flight path control. Automatic landing control laws that made use of the spoilers were developed, evaluated in a simulation and the results compared with these obtained for configurations that did not use DLC. The spoilers produced a significant improvement in performance. A simulation that could be operated faster than real time in order to provide statistical landing data for a large number of landings over a wide spectrum of disturbances in a short time was constructed and used in the evaluation and refinement of control law configurations. A longitudinal control law that had been previously developed and evaluated in flight was also simulated and its performance compared with that of the control laws developed. Runway alignment control laws were also defined, evaluated, and refined to result in a final recommended configuration. Good landing performance, compatible with Category 3 operation into STOL runways, was obtained.

  18. Forward Looking Radar Imaging by Truncated Singular Value Decomposition and Its Application for Adverse Weather Aircraft Landing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yulin; Zha, Yuebo; Wang, Yue; Yang, Jianyu

    2015-01-01

    The forward looking radar imaging task is a practical and challenging problem for adverse weather aircraft landing industry. Deconvolution method can realize the forward looking imaging but it often leads to the noise amplification in the radar image. In this paper, a forward looking radar imaging based on deconvolution method is presented for adverse weather aircraft landing. We first present the theoretical background of forward looking radar imaging task and its application for aircraft landing. Then, we convert the forward looking radar imaging task into a corresponding deconvolution problem, which is solved in the framework of algebraic theory using truncated singular decomposition method. The key issue regarding the selecting of the truncated parameter is addressed using generalized cross validation approach. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in achieving angular resolution enhancement with suppressing the noise amplification in forward looking radar imaging. PMID:26094627

  19. Forward Looking Radar Imaging by Truncated Singular Value Decomposition and Its Application for Adverse Weather Aircraft Landing

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yulin; Zha, Yuebo; Wang, Yue; Yang, Jianyu

    2015-01-01

    The forward looking radar imaging task is a practical and challenging problem for adverse weather aircraft landing industry. Deconvolution method can realize the forward looking imaging but it often leads to the noise amplification in the radar image. In this paper, a forward looking radar imaging based on deconvolution method is presented for adverse weather aircraft landing. We first present the theoretical background of forward looking radar imaging task and its application for aircraft landing. Then, we convert the forward looking radar imaging task into a corresponding deconvolution problem, which is solved in the framework of algebraic theory using truncated singular decomposition method. The key issue regarding the selecting of the truncated parameter is addressed using generalized cross validation approach. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in achieving angular resolution enhancement with suppressing the noise amplification in forward looking radar imaging. PMID:26094627

  20. STS-42 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, lands on runway 22 at EAFB, Calif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-42 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, with nose landing gear (NLG) and main landing gear (MLG) deployed glides over concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. Runway lights appear in the foreground and by-standers (observers) and mountains appear in the background.

  1. Compilation of Papers Presented to Meeting on Space Vehicle Landing and Recovery Research and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    A meeting on Space Vehicle Landing and Recovery was held on July 10-11, 1962 at NASA Headquarters. The Centers were asked to participate in this meeting in accordance with their interest, activities, and requirements in the subject area. Primary emphasis was directed toward parachutes, parachute-rocket systems, paragliders, and lifting rotor concepts applicable to bothe booster and spacecraft landing and recovery.

  2. STS-53 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, lands on runway 22 at EAFB, Calif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-53 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, lands on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. Main landing gear (MLG) touchdown occurred at 12:43:17 pm (Pacific Standard Time (PST)). This profile view shows OV-103's starboard side with MLG wheels on the runway and nose landing gear (NLG) riding above the runway. Desert scrub brush appears in the foreground. EAFB hangars and mountains are seen in the background.

  3. Some Landing Studies Pertinent to Glider-Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houbolt, John C.; Batterson, Sidney A.

    1960-01-01

    Results are presented of some landing studies that may serve as guidelines in the consideration of landing problems of glider-reentry configurations. The effect of the initial conditions of sinking velocity, angle of attack, and pitch rate on impact severity and the effect of locating the rear gear in various positions are discussed. Some information is included regarding the influence of landing-gear location on effective masses. Preliminary experimental results on the slideout phase of landing include sliding and rolling friction coefficients that have been determined from tests of various skids and all-metal wheels.

  4. Runway Independent Aircraft Extremely Short Takeoff and Landing Regional Airliner: The Model 110

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David W.

    2003-01-01

    Airports throughout the United States are plagued with growing congestion. With the increase in air traffic predicted in the next few years, congestion will worsen. The accepted solution of building larger airplanes to carry more travelers is no longer a viable option, as airports are unable to accommodate larger aircraft without expensive infrastructure changes. Past NASA research has pointed to the need for a new approach, which can economically and safely utilize smaller airports. To study this option further, NASA requested the California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo (Cal Poly/SLO) to design a baseline aircraft to be used for system studies. The requirements put forth by NASA are summarized. The design team was requested to create a demonstrator vehicle, which could be built without requiring enabling technology development. To this end, NASA requested that the tested and proven high-lift system of the Boeing C-17 Globemaster III be combined with the fuselage of the BAe-146. NASA also requested that Cal Poly determine the availability and usability of underutilized airports starting with California, then expanding if time and funds permitted to the U.S.

  5. 31 CFR 585.208 - Prohibited overflights, takeoffs and landings of aircraft en route to or from the FRY (S&M).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., 14 CFR part 91. ... landings of aircraft en route to or from the FRY (S&M). 585.208 Section 585.208 Money and Finance: Treasury..., takeoffs and landings of aircraft en route to or from the FRY (S&M). Except as otherwise authorized,...

  6. Downscaling of Aircraft-, Landsat-, and MODIS-based Land Surface Temperature Images with Support Vector Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, W.; Gowda, P. H.; Oommen, T.; Howell, T. A.; Hernandez, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    High spatial resolution Land Surface Temperature (LST) images are required to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) at a field scale for irrigation scheduling purposes. Satellite sensors such as Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) can offer images at several spectral bandwidths including visible, near-infrared (NIR), shortwave-infrared, and thermal-infrared (TIR). The TIR images usually have coarser spatial resolutions than those from non-thermal infrared bands. Due to this technical constraint of the satellite sensors on these platforms, image downscaling has been proposed in the field of ET remote sensing. This paper explores the potential of the Support Vector Machines (SVM) to perform downscaling of LST images derived from aircraft (4 m spatial resolution), TM (120 m), and MODIS (1000 m) using normalized difference vegetation index images derived from simultaneously acquired high resolution visible and NIR data (1 m for aircraft, 30 m for TM, and 250 m for MODIS). The SVM is a new generation machine learning algorithm that has found a wide application in the field of pattern recognition and time series analysis. The SVM would be ideally suited for downscaling problems due to its generalization ability in capturing non-linear regression relationship between the predictand and the multiple predictors. Remote sensing data acquired over the Texas High Plains during the 2008 summer growing season will be used in this study. Accuracy assessment of the downscaled 1, 30, and 250 m LST images will be made by comparing them with LST data measured with infrared thermometers at a small spatial scale, upscaled 30 m aircraft-based LST images, and upscaled 250 m TM-based LST images, respectively.

  7. A head up display format for application to V/STOL aircraft approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrick, Vernon K.; Farris, Glenn G.; Vanags, Andrejs A.

    1990-01-01

    A head up display (HUD) format developed at NASA Ames Research Center to provide pilots of V/STOL aircraft with complete flight guidance and control information for category-3C terminal-area flight operations, is described in detail. These flight operations cover a large spectrum, from STOL operations on land-based runways to VTOL operations on small ships in high seas. Included in this description is a complete geometrical specification of the HUD elements and their drive laws. The principal features of this display format are the integration of the flightpath and pursuit guidance information into a narrow field of view, easily assimilated by the pilot with a single glance, and the superposition of vertical and horizontal situation information. The display is a derivative of a successful design developed for conventional transport aircraft. The design is the outcome of many piloted simulations conducted over a four-year period. Whereas the concepts on which the display format rests could not be fully exploited because of field-of-view restrictions, and some reservations remain about the acceptability of superimposing vertical and horizontal situation information, the design successfully fulfilled its intended objectives.

  8. Ultraviolet light propagation under low visibility atmospheric conditions and its application to aircraft landing aid.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Claire; Durand, Gérard; Roblin, Antoine

    2006-12-20

    Light scattering in the atmosphere by particles and molecules gives rise to an aureole surrounding the source image that tends to reduce the contrast of the source with respect to the background. However, UV scattering phase functions of the haze droplets present a very important forward peak. The spreading of a detected signal in the UV is not as important as in the case of a clear atmosphere where Rayleigh scattering predominates. This physical property has to be taken into account to evaluate the potential of UV radiation as an aircraft landing aid under low visibility conditions. Different results characterizing UV runway lights, simulations of UV radiation propagation in the atmosphere, and the use of a simple detection algorithm applied to one particular sensor are presented. PMID:17151753

  9. An Experimental Investigation of Damaged Arresting Gear Tapes for the Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Angela J.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed on damaged arresting gear tapes at the Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility. The arrestment system uses five pairs of tapes to bring the test carriage to a halt. The procedure used to determine when to replace the tapes consists of a close evaluation of each of the 10 tapes after each run. During this evaluation, each tape is examined thoroughly and any damage observed on the tape is recorded. If the damaged tape does not pass the inspection, the tape is replaced with a new one. For the past 13 years, the most commonly seen damage types are edge fray damage and transverse damage. Tests were conducted to determine the maximum tensile strength of a damaged arresting gear tape specimen. The data indicate that tapes exhibiting transverse damage can withstand higher loads than tapes with edge fray damage.

  10. Radar multipath study for rain-on-radome experiments at the Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackenzie, Anne I.; Staton, Leo D.

    1990-01-01

    An analytical study to determine the feasibility of a rain-on-radome experiment at the Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF) at the Langley Research Center is described. The experiment would measure the effects of heavy rain on the transmission of X-band weather radar signals, looking in particular for sources of anomalous attenuation. Feasibility is determined with regard to multipath signals arising from the major structural components of the ALDF. A computer program simulates the transmit and receive antennas, direct-path and multipath signals, and expected attenuation by rain. In the simulation, antenna height, signal polarization, and rainfall rate are variable parameters. The study shows that the rain-on-radome experiment is feasible with regard to multipath signals. The total received signal, taking into account multipath effects, could be measured by commercially available equipment. The study also shows that horizontally polarized signals would produce better experimental results than vertically polarized signals.

  11. Application of active control landing gear technology to the A-10 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, I.; Edson, R.

    1983-01-01

    Two concepts which reduce the A-10 aircraft's wing/gear interface forces as a result of applying active control technology to the main landing gear are described. In the first concept, referred to as the alternate concept a servovalve in a closed pressure control loop configuration effectively varies the size of the third stage spool valve orifice which is embedded in the strut. This action allows the internal energy in the strut to shunt hydraulic flow around the metering orifice. The command signal to the loop is reference strut pressure which is compared to the measured strut pressure, the difference being the loop error. Thus, the loop effectively varies the spool valve orifice size to maintain the strut pressure, and therefore minimizes the wing/gear interface force referenced.

  12. Flight evaluation of configuration management system concepts during transition to the landing approach for a powered-lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Innis, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    Flight experiments were conducted to evaluate two control concepts for configuration management during the transition to landing approach for a powered-lift STOL aircraft. NASA Ames' augmentor wing research aircraft was used in the program. Transitions from nominal level-flight configurations at terminal area pattern speeds were conducted along straight and curved descending flightpaths. Stabilization and command augmentation for attitude and airspeed control were used in conjunction with a three-cue flight director that presented commands for pitch, roll, and throttle controls. A prototype microwave system provided landing guidance. Results of these flight experiments indicate that these configuration management concepts permit the successful performance of transitions and approaches along curved paths by powered-lift STOL aircraft. Flight director guidance was essential to accomplish the task.

  13. Aircraft Landing Gear, Ice and Rain Control Systems (Course Outline), Aviation Mechanics 3 (Air Frame):9067.02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This document presents an outline for a 135-hour course designed to familiarize the student with operation, inspection, troubleshooting, and repair of aircraft landing gear, ice and rain control systems. It is designed to help the trainee master the knowledge and skills necessary to become an aviation airframe mechanic. The aviation airframe…

  14. Using large eddy simulation to evaluate source area contributions from aircraft flux measurements over heterogeneous land cover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The estimation of spatial patterns in surface fluxes from aircraft observations poses several challenges in presence of heterogeneous land cover, related to the effects of turbulence on scalar transport, the different behavior of passive (moisture) versus active (temperature) scalars. This in turn h...

  15. Constellation Program (CxP) Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Project Integrated Landing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John D.; Yuchnovicz, Daniel E.; Eisenman, David J.; Peer, Scott G.; Fasanella, Edward L.; Lawrence, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Chief Engineer requested a risk comparison of the Integrated Landing System design developed by NASA and the design developed by Contractor- referred to as the LM 604 baseline. Based on the results of this risk comparison, the CEV Chief engineer requested that the NESC evaluate identified risks and develop strategies for their reduction or mitigation. The assessment progressed in two phases. A brief Phase I analysis was performed by the Water versus Land-Landing Team to compare the CEV Integrated Landing System proposed by the Contractor against the NASA TS-LRS001 baseline with respect to risk. A phase II effort examined the areas of critical importance to the overall landing risk, evaluating risk to the crew and to the CEV Crew Module (CM) during a nominal land-landing. The findings of the assessment are contained in this report.

  16. Rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) powered spaceliner class vehicle can advantageously employ vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1995-01-01

    The subject is next generation orbital space transporation, taken to be fully reusable non-staged 'aircraft like' systems targeted for routine, affordable access to space. Specifically, the takeoff and landing approach to be selected for such systems is considered, mainly from a propulsion viewpoint. Conventional wisdom has it that any transatmospheric-class vehicle which uses high-speed airbreathing propulsion modes (e.g., scramjet) intrinsically must utilize horizontal takeoff and landing, HTOHL. Although this may be true for all-airbreathing propulsion (i.e., no rocket content as in turboramjet propulsion), that emerging class of powerplant which integrally combines airbreathing and rocket propulsion, referred to as rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) propulsion, is considerably more flexible with respect to selecting takeoff/landing modes. In fact, it is proposed that any of the modes of interest may potentially be selected: HTOHL, VTOHL, VTOVL. To illustrate this surmise, the case of a previously documented RBCC-powered 'Spaceliner' class space transport concept, which is designed for vertical takeoff and landing, is examined. The 'RBCC' and 'Spaceliner' categories are first described for background. Departing form an often presumed HTOHL baseline, the leading design and operational advantages of moving to VTOVL are then elucidated. Technical substantiation that the RBCC approach, in fact, enables this capability (but also that of HTOHL and VTOVL) is provided, with extensive reference to case-in-point supporting studies. The paper closes with a set of conditional surmises bearing on its set of conclusions, which point up the operational cost advantages associated with selecting the vertical takeoff and landing mode combination (VTOL), uniquely offered by RBCC propulsion.

  17. Rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) powered spaceliner class vehicle can advantageously employ vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    The subject is next generation orbital space transporation, taken to be fully reusable non-staged 'aircraft like' systems targeted for routine, affordable access to space. Specifically, the takeoff and landing approach to be selected for such systems is considered, mainly from a propulsion viewpoint. Conventional wisdom has it that any transatmospheric-class vehicle which uses high-speed airbreathing propulsion modes (e.g., scramjet) intrinsically must utilize horizontal takeoff and landing, HTOHL. Although this may be true for all-airbreathing propulsion (i.e., no rocket content as in turboramjet propulsion), that emerging class of powerplant which integrally combines airbreathing and rocket propulsion, referred to as rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) propulsion, is considerably more flexible with respect to selecting takeoff/landing modes. In fact, it is proposed that any of the modes of interest may potentially be selected: HTOHL, VTOHL, VTOVL. To illustrate this surmise, the case of a previously documented RBCC-powered 'Spaceliner' class space transport concept, which is designed for vertical takeoff and landing, is examined. The 'RBCC' and 'Spaceliner' categories are first described for background. Departing form an often presumed HTOHL baseline, the leading design and operational advantages of moving to VTOVL are then elucidated. Technical substantiation that the RBCC approach, in fact, enables this capability (but also that of HTOHL and VTOVL) is provided, with extensive reference to case-in-point supporting studies. The paper closes with a set of conditional surmises bearing on its set of conclusions, which point up the operational cost advantages associated with selecting the vertical takeoff and landing mode combination (VTOL), uniquely offered by RBCC propulsion.

  18. X-38 vehicle #131R during pre-launch with B-52 008 mothership and F-18 chase aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The X-38 prototypes are intended to perfect a 'crew lifeboat' for the International Space Station. The X-38 vehicle 131R demonstrates a huge 7,500 square-foot parafoil that will that will enable the Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) to land on the length of a football field after returning from space. The CRV is intended to serve as an emergency transport to carry a crew to safety in the event of problems with the International Space Station.

  19. Application of the H-Mode, a Design and Interaction Concept for Highly Automated Vehicles, to Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, Kenneth H.; Flemisch, Frank O.; Schutte, Paul C.; Williams, Ralph A.

    2006-01-01

    Driven by increased safety, efficiency, and airspace capacity, automation is playing an increasing role in aircraft operations. As aircraft become increasingly able to autonomously respond to a range of situations with performance surpassing human operators, we are compelled to look for new methods that help us understand their use and guide their design using new forms of automation and interaction. We propose a novel design metaphor to aid the conceptualization, design, and operation of highly-automated aircraft. Design metaphors transfer meaning from common experiences to less familiar applications or functions. A notable example is the "Desktop metaphor" for manipulating files on a computer. This paper describes a metaphor for highly automated vehicles known as the H-metaphor and a specific embodiment of the metaphor known as the H-mode as applied to aircraft. The fundamentals of the H-metaphor are reviewed followed by an overview of an exploratory usability study investigating human-automation interaction issues for a simple H-mode implementation. The envisioned application of the H-mode concept to aircraft is then described as are two planned evaluations.

  20. Vision-Aided Autonomous Landing and Ingress of Micro Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockers, Roland; Ma, Jeremy C.; Matthies, Larry H.; Bouffard, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Micro aerial vehicles have limited sensor suites and computational power. For reconnaissance tasks and to conserve energy, these systems need the ability to autonomously land at vantage points or enter buildings (ingress). But for autonomous navigation, information is needed to identify and guide the vehicle to the target. Vision algorithms can provide egomotion estimation and target detection using input from cameras that are easy to include in miniature systems.

  1. Analytic Modeling of Pressurization and Cryogenic Propellant Conditions for Lunar Landing Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corpening, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development, validation and application of the model to the Lunar Landing Vehicle. The model named, Computational Propellant and Pressurization Program -- One Dimensional (CPPPO), is used to model in this case cryogenic propellant conditions of the Altair Lunar lander. The validation of CPPPO was accomplished via comparison to an existing analytic model (i.e., ROCETS), flight experiment and ground experiments. The model was used to the Lunar Landing Vehicle perform a parametric analysis on pressurant conditions and to examine the results of unequal tank pressurization and draining for multiple tank designs.

  2. STS-53 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, lands on runway 22 at EAFB, Calif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-53 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, rides along concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, as the red, white, and blue drag chute unfurls behind it. Nose landing gear (NLG) wheels are inches above the runway surface as the main landing gear (MLG) wheels roll along it. MLG touchdown occurred at 12:43:17 pm (Pacific Standard Time (PST)).This head-on view looks down OV-103's port side. The speedbrake/rudder flaps are deployed as the drag chute opens behind the vehicle. Desert scrub brush appears in the foreground and mountains are seen in the background.

  3. Probabilistic model, analysis and computer code for take-off and landing related aircraft crashes into a structure

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, R.

    1996-02-06

    A methodology is presented that allows the calculation of the probability that any of a particular collection of structures will be hit by an aircraft in a take-off or landing related accident during a specified window of time with a velocity exceeding a given critical value. A probabilistic model is developed that incorporates the location of each structure relative to airport runways in the vicinity; the size of the structure; the sizes, types, and frequency of use of commercial, military, and general aviation aircraft which take-off and land at these runways; the relative frequency of take-off and landing related accidents by aircraft type; the stochastic properties of off-runway crashes, namely impact location, impact angle, impact velocity, and the heading, deceleration, and skid distance after impact; and the stochastic properties of runway overruns and runoffs, namely the position at which the aircraft exits the runway, its exit velocity, and the heading and deceleration after exiting. Relevant probability distributions are fitted from extensive commercial, military, and general aviation accident report data bases. The computer source code for implementation of the calculation is provided.

  4. STS-53 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, lands on runway 22 at EAFB, Calif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-53 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, touches down at 12:43:17 pm (Pacific Standard Time (PST)) on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. A small cloud of dust is produced as the main landing gear (MLG) wheels hit the runway. The nose landing gear (NLG) rides above the runway surface. Desert scrub brush and the runway light fixtures appear in the foreground. Mountains and low-lying clouds are seen in the background.

  5. STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, lands on EAFB concrete runway 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The main landing gear (MLG) of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, rides along concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, bringing mission STS-31 to an end. The nose landing gear (NLG) is suspended above the runway prior to touchdown and wheel stop which occurred at 6:51:00 am (Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)). View shows OV-103's starboard side and deployed rudder/speedbrake. EAFB facilities are seen in the distance.

  6. Flight Demonstration of X-33 Vehicle Health Management System Components on the F/A-18 Systems Research Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweikhard, Keith A.; Richards, W. Lance; Theisen, John; Mouyos, William; Garbos, Raymond; Schkolnik, Gerald (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The X-33 reusable launch vehicle demonstrator has identified the need to implement a vehicle health monitoring system that can acquire data that monitors system health and performance. Sanders, a Lockheed Martin Company, has designed and developed a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS)-based open architecture system that implements a number of technologies that have not been previously used in a flight environment. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center and Sanders teamed to demonstrate that the distributed remote health nodes, fiber optic distributed strain sensor, and fiber distributed data interface communications components of the X-33 vehicle health management (VHM) system could be successfully integrated and flown on a NASA F-18 aircraft. This paper briefly describes components of X-33 VHM architecture flown at Dryden and summarizes the integration and flight demonstration of these X-33 VHM components. Finally, it presents early results from the integration and flight efforts.

  7. Flight Demonstration of X-33 Vehicle Health Management System Components on the F/A-18 Systems Research Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweikhard, Keith A.; Richards, W. Lance; Theisen, John; Mouyos, William; Garbos, Raymond

    2001-01-01

    The X-33 reusable launch vehicle demonstrator has identified the need to implement a vehicle health monitoring system that can acquire data that monitors system health and performance. Sanders, a Lockheed Martin Company, has designed and developed a COTS-based open architecture system that implements a number of technologies that have not been previously used in a flight environment. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center and Sanders teamed to demonstrate that the distributed remote health nodes, fiber optic distributed strain sensor, and fiber distributed data interface communications components of the X-33 vehicle health management (VHM) system could be successfully integrated and flown on a NASA F-18 aircraft. This paper briefly describes components of X-33 VHM architecture flown at Dryden and summarizes the integration and flight demonstration of these X-33 VHM components. Finally, it presents early results from the integration and flight efforts.

  8. Comparison of in-situ, aircraft, and satellite based land surface temperature measurements over a mixed agricultural region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, P.; Baker, B.; Kochendorfer, J.; Dumas, E.; Meyers, T. P.; Guillevic, P. C.; Corda, S.; Muratore, J. F.; Simmons, D.

    2013-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a key variable in the study of the exchange of energy and water between the land surface and the atmosphere, and it influences land surface physical processes at regional and global scales. With the objective of quantifying the spatial variability and overall representativeness of single-point surface temperature measurements and to improve the accuracy of satellite LST measurements, airborne campaigns were conducted over a mixed agricultural area near Bondville, Illinois during 2012 and 2013. During the campaigns, multiple measurements of surface temperature were made using infra-red temperature sensors at micrometeorological tower sites, which include NOAA's Climate Reference Network (CRN) and nearby flux tower sites, and onboard an instrumented Piper Navajo airborne research aircraft. In addition to this, daily LST products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), onboard the NASA Terra and Aqua Earth Observing System satellites were used. The aircraft-based and satellite-based LST measurements were compared with the in situ, tower-based LST measurements. Observations indicate large spatial and temporal variability of land surface temperature over the Bondville area. Our results show good agreement between in situ, aircraft and satellite measurements. The agreement was better with the LST data from the flux tower than those from CRN tower.

  9. Design of an aircraft landing system using dual-frequency GNSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Hiroyuki

    There is a strong demand for new all-weather navigation aids to support aircraft precision approach and landing. The Federal Aviation Administration's Local Area Augmentation System (LAAS) is one such navigation aid that uses the Global Positioning System (GPS) to estimate aircraft location. LAAS is required to provide very high levels of accuracy, integrity, continuity, and availability, and the integrity requirement of one undetected navigation failure in a billion approaches has been a critical challenge in the design of this system. Tremendous efforts have developed methods to guarantee integrity for various potential anomalies that might threaten LAAS-aided landing. Currently, almost all these risks are mitigated by existing methods. One issue that remains is the risk due to ionosphere anomalies. This dissertation introduces novel integrity algorithms for ionosphere anomalies that take advantage of GPS modernization---undergoing changes in the GPS system that enhance civil user capabilities. This modernization includes adding new GPS civil signals, and these signals make possible multiple-frequency techniques. This research focuses on two types of dual-frequency carrier-smoothing methods---Divergence-Free Smoothing and Ionosphere-Free Smoothing---and develops integrity algorithms for ionosphere anomalies using these methods. Simulations show that the first algorithm, using Ionosphere-Free Smoothing, can achieve 96% to 99.9% availability at best over a broad region of the Conterminous United States (CONUS). This level of availability is unacceptably low for practical use. However, a benefit is that the resulting availability is not a function of the ionosphere condition. The second algorithm, based on Divergence-Free Smoothing, is shown by simulations to achieve more than 99.9% availability over more than 70% of CONUS under nominal ionosphere conditions. However, it has the potential to completely lose availability under severe ionosphere conditions. Taking

  10. A Study of Vehicle Structural Layouts in Post-WWII Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sensmeier, Mark D.; Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, results of a study of structural layouts of post-WWII aircraft are presented. This study was undertaken to provide the background information necessary to determine typical layouts, design practices, and industry trends in aircraft structural design. Design decisions are often predicated not on performance-related criteria, but rather on such factors as manufacturability, maintenance access, and of course cost. For this reason, a thorough understanding of current best practices in the industry is required as an input for the design optimization process. To determine these best practices and industry trends, a large number of aircraft structural cutaway illustrations were analyzed for five different aircraft categories (commercial transport jets, business jets, combat jet aircraft, single engine propeller aircraft, and twin-engine propeller aircraft). Several aspects of wing design and fuselage design characteristics are presented here for the commercial transport and combat aircraft categories. A great deal of commonality was observed for transport structure designs over a range of eras and manufacturers. A much higher degree of variability in structural designs was observed for the combat aircraft, though some discernable trends were observed as well.

  11. Statistical analysis of landing contact conditions for three lifting body research vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    The landing contact conditions for the HL-10, M2-F2/F3, and the X-24A lifting body vehicles are analyzed statistically for 81 landings. The landing contact parameters analyzed are true airspeed, peak normal acceleration at the center of gravity, roll angle, and roll velocity. Ground measurement parameters analyzed are lateral and longitudinal distance from intended touchdown, lateral distance from touchdown to full stop, and rollout distance. The results are presented in the form of histograms for frequency distributions and cumulative frequency distribution probability curves with a Pearson Type 3 curve fit for extrapolation purposes.

  12. STS-35 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, makes night landing at EAFB, Calif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The night landing sequence of STS-35 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, is captured in this series of photographs. Darkness surrounds OV-102 as it nears touchdown on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California (STS035(S)088 and STS035(S)090). At touchdown, dust surges upward behind OV-102 (STS035(S)089). Main landing gear (MLG) hit the runway at 9:54:09 pm (Pacific Standard Time (PST)). Only OV-102' silhouette illuminated by the runway lights is visible during the landing sequence.

  13. STS-53 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, lands on runway 22 at EAFB, Calif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-53 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, is slowed by a red, white, and blue drag chute during its landing on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. Main landing gear (MLG) touchdown occurred at 12:43:17 pm (Pacific Standard Time (PST)). This aft view of OV-103 shows the drag chute deployed from its compartment at the base of the vertical tail, the speedbrake/rudder flaps open, and the space shuttle main engines (SSMEs). Both MLG and nose landing gear (NLG) ride along the runway surface. Desert scrub brush appears in the foreground and mountains are seen in the background.

  14. Improving land vehicle situational awareness using a distributed aperture system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, Jean; Bias, Jason; Wells, Ashley; Riddle, Larry; van der Wal, Gooitzen; Piacentino, Mike; Mandelbaum, Robert

    2005-05-01

    U.S. Army Research, Development, and Engineering Command (RDECOM) Communications Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center (CERDEC) Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) has performed early work to develop a Distributed Aperture System (DAS). The DAS aims at improving the situational awareness of armored fighting vehicle crews under closed-hatch conditions. The concept is based on a plurality of sensors configured to create a day and night dome of surveillance coupled with heads up displays slaved to the operator's head to give a "glass turret" feel. State-of-the-art image processing is used to produce multiple seamless hemispherical views simultaneously available to the vehicle commander, crew members and dismounting infantry. On-the-move automatic cueing of multiple moving/pop-up low silhouette threats is also done with the possibility to save/revisit/share past events. As a first step in this development program, a contract was awarded to United Defense to further develop the Eagle VisionTM system. The second-generation prototype features two camera heads, each comprising four high-resolution (2048x1536) color sensors, and each covering a field of view of 270°hx150°v. High-bandwidth digital links interface the camera heads with a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based custom processor developed by Sarnoff Corporation. The processor computes the hemispherical stitch and warp functions required for real-time, low latency, immersive viewing (360°hx120°v, 30° down) and generates up to six simultaneous extended graphics array (XGA) video outputs for independent display either on a helmet-mounted display (with associated head tracking device) or a flat panel display (and joystick). The prototype is currently in its last stage of development and will be integrated on a vehicle for user evaluation and testing. Near-term improvements include the replacement of the color camera heads with a pixel-level fused combination of

  15. 36 CFR 261.13 - Motor vehicle use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... System trails, and areas on National Forest System lands have been designated pursuant to 36 CFR 212.51... prohibition: (a) Aircraft; (b) Watercraft; (c) Over-snow vehicles; (d) Limited administrative use by...

  16. 36 CFR 261.13 - Motor vehicle use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... System trails, and areas on National Forest System lands have been designated pursuant to 36 CFR 212.51... prohibition: (a) Aircraft; (b) Watercraft; (c) Over-snow vehicles; (d) Limited administrative use by...

  17. Differential wheel speed sensor integration with GPS/INS for land vehicle navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazlett, Andrew C.

    This paper develops an approach for the integration of GPS, inertial measurements from accelerometers and gyros, and differential wheel speed sensors for land vehicle navigation. Incorporating differential wheel speed sensor information into land vehicle navigation provides a solution for eliminating large errors caused by vehicle roll and pitch while also reducing errors from sideslip. Extended Kalman and Unscented Filtering algorithms are designed with a six degree-of-freedom model. In order to incorporate differential wheel speed information properly, the effective wheel radius must also be estimated as part of the overall estimation approach. Simulation results show the performance of the filters for cases of GPS/INS with and without the differential wheel speed sensor.

  18. Descent and Landing Triggers for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Exploration Flight Test-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bihari, Brian D.; Semrau, Jeffrey D.; Duke, Charity J.

    2013-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) will perform a flight test known as Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1) currently scheduled for 2014. One of the primary functions of this test is to exercise all of the important Guidance, Navigation, Control (GN&C), and Propulsion systems, along with the flight software for future flights. The Descent and Landing segment of the flight is governed by the requirements levied on the GN&C system by the Landing and Recovery System (LRS). The LRS is a complex system of parachutes and flight control modes that ensure that the Orion MPCV safely lands at its designated target in the Pacific Ocean. The Descent and Landing segment begins with the jettisoning of the Forward Bay Cover and concludes with sensing touchdown. This paper discusses the requirements, design, testing, analysis and performance of the current EFT-1 Descent and Landing Triggers flight software.

  19. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Aircraft design evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nobe, T.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross sections and structural members on the performance of hypersonic cruise aircraft are evaluated. Representative fuselage/tank area structure was analyzed for strength, stability, fatigue and fracture mechanics. Various thermodynamic and structural tradeoffs were conducted to refine the conceptual designs with the primary objective of minimizing weight and maximizing aircraft range.

  20. Numerical simulation of the actuation system for the ALDF's propulsion control valve. [Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, John J.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the actuation system for the propulsion control valve (PCV) of the NASA Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility was developed during the preliminary design of the PCV and used throughout the entire project. The simulation is based on a predictive model of the PCV which is used to evaluate and design the actuation system. The PCV controls a 1.7 million-pound thrust water jet used in propelling a 108,000-pound test carriage. The PCV can open and close in 0.300 second and deliver over 9,000 gallons of water per sec at pressures up to 3150 psi. The numerical simulation results are used to predict transient performance and valve opening characteristics, specify the hydraulic control system, define transient loadings on components, and evaluate failure modes. The mathematical model used for numerically simulating the mechanical fluid power system is described, and numerical results are demonstrated for a typical opening and closing cycle of the PCV. A summary is then given on how the model is used in the design process.

  1. Experimental and analytical determination of characteristics affecting light aircraft landing-gear dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, E. L.; Mcgehee, J. R.; Pappas, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation was conducted to determine which characteristics of a light aircraft landing gear influence gear dynamic behavior significantly. The investigation focused particularly on possible modification for load control. Pseudostatic tests were conducted to determine the gear fore-and-aft spring constant, axial friction as a function of drag load, brake pressure-torque characteristics, and tire force-deflection characteristics. To study dynamic tire response, vertical drops were conducted at impact velocities of 1.2, 1.5, and 1.8 m/s onto a level surface; to determine axial-friction effects, a second series of vertical drops were made at 1.5 m/s onto surfaces inclined 5 deg and 10 deg to the horizontal. An average dynamic axial-friction coefficient of 0.15 was obtained by comparing analytical data with inclined surface drop test data. Dynamic strut bending and associated axial friction were found to be severe for the drop tests on the 10 deg surface.

  2. Aircraft technology opportunities for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, James A.; Zuk, John

    1988-01-01

    New aircraft technologies are presented that have the potential to expand the air transportation system and reduce congestion through new operating capabilities, and at the same time provide greater levels of safety and environmental compatibility. Both current and planned civil aeronautics technology at the NASA Ames, Lewis, and Langley Research Centers are addressed. The complete spectrum of current aircraft and new vehicle concepts is considered including rotorcraft (helicopters and tiltrotors), vertical and short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) and short takeoff and landing (STOL) aircraft, subsonic transports, high speed transports, and hypersonic/transatmospheric vehicles. New technologies for current aircraft will improve efficiency, affordability, safety, and environmental compatibility. Research and technology promises to enable development of new vehicles that will revolutionize or greatly change the transportation system. These vehicles will provide new capabilities which will lead to enormous market opportunities and economic growth, as well as improve the competitive position of the U.S. aerospace industry.

  3. Control and display requirements for decelerating approach and landing of fixed- and rotary-wing VSTOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebacqz, J. V.; Merrick, V. K.; Franklin, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews the results of several simulation investigations of rotary-wing and fixed-wing VSTOL aircraft performing terminal-area operations that include decelerating approaches under instrument conditions and recovery to either fixed landing pads or a ship. By concentrating on instrument decelerating approaches and the hover and landing, it is possible to compare directly the control and display requirements for similar tasks for aircraft with and without vectored thrust capability. Collectively, the results from these experiments, together with other simulator and flight experiments and operational experience, provide a consistent view of control and display complexity required for similar operational capability in adverse weather for the two types of VSTOL configurations. Some initial data showing influence of the transition corridor on flying qualities during transition are pesented and lead to a general discussion of the problem of operating margin definition.

  4. VTOL control for shipboard landing in high sea states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmuldroch, C. G.; Stein, G.; Athans, M.

    1979-01-01

    A control algorithm is developed for a VTOL type aircraft landing on a small ship in rough seas. The work covers modelling the dynamics of the two vehicles, the design of an aircraft-tracking-ship-motion controller, and the specification of an actual landing control algorithm. The landing controller design is more practical and found to perform better than the hover controller. In addition to outlining a design technique, the results provide design guidelines and performance bounds for practical landing control systems.

  5. Design and fabrication of an aeroelastic flap element for a Short TakeOff and Landing (STOL) aircraft model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belleman, G. W.; June, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    A flap element typifying a third element in the flap system of a short takeoff and landing aircraft was designed, fabricated, and instrumented. It was delivered to NASA for flight-simulated testing. The flap element was aluminum skin-stringer-rib construction with adhesive laminated skins. The tests conducted were as follows: (1) sonic check, (2) thermal expansion, (3) end fitting stiffness, (4) material properties, (5) maximum bending stress in the skin, and (6) effective skin width and stringer spacing.

  6. Novel illumination architectures based on nonimaging optics for low visual ground signature rapid deployment aircraft landing director

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Lonnie; Savant, Gajendra D.; Jannson, Tomasz P.

    2000-08-01

    Traditional methods of marking aircraft landing zones during combat deployment operations range from simple reflective panels and colored smoke to the more elaborate strobe lighting systems and active radio frequency transceivers. Downed pilots, pathfinders, and special operations personnel are in jeopardy of detection by unfriendly ground forces, active location/direction devices act as beacons to foes as well as friends. Even passive devices can have unacceptable detection profiles. A highly directional fiber optic-based miniaturized landing director minimizes the more undesirable consequences of high profile directional devices.

  7. Crash Test of Three Cessna 172 Aircraft at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    During the summer of 2015, three Cessna 172 aircraft were crash tested at the Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The three tests simulated three different crash scenarios. The first simulated a flare-to-stall emergency or hard landing onto a rigid surface such as a road or runway, the second simulated a controlled flight into terrain with a nose down pitch on the aircraft, and the third simulated a controlled flight into terrain with an attempt to unsuccessfully recover the aircraft immediately prior to impact, resulting in a tail strike condition. An on-board data acquisition system captured 64 channels of airframe acceleration, along with acceleration and load in two onboard Hybrid II 50th percentile Anthropomorphic Test Devices, representing the pilot and co-pilot. Each test contained different airframe loading conditions and results show large differences in airframe performance. This paper presents test methods used to conduct the crash tests and will summarize the airframe results from the test series.

  8. TCV software test and validation tools and technique. [Terminal Configured Vehicle program for commercial transport aircraft operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straeter, T. A.; Williams, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes techniques for testing and validating software for the TCV (Terminal Configured Vehicle) program which is intended to solve problems associated with operating a commercial transport aircraft in the terminal area. The TCV research test bed is a Boeing 737 specially configured with digital computer systems to carry out automatic navigation, guidance, flight controls, and electronic displays research. The techniques developed for time and cost reduction include automatic documentation aids, an automatic software configuration, and an all software generation and validation system.

  9. Aerodynamically controlled expansion (ACE) nozzle for short takeoff and vertical landing aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrier, Douglas Anthony

    2000-10-01

    An Aerodynamically Controlled Expansion (ACE) propulsion nozzle that improves hover thrust performance by 2.5 percent in a short take off and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft has been developed. The ACE concept employs a carefully defined step in the nozzle internal contour that interacts with the boundary layer to induce flow separation in the divergent section, thereby relieving over-expansion losses during hover. This study specifies design parameters for a passive boundary layer control step for application on the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF). In addition, parametric performance predictions presented herein provide a basic understanding of how the step concept can be applied to overcome undesirable over-expansion in generalized supersonic nozzle flows. The aerodynamic phenomena governing the interaction of the step with the nozzle flow were investigated in an extensive, parametric CFD analysis. The CFD analysis matrix consists of thirty-three axi-symmetric nozzle cases including expansion area ratios (A9/A 8) of 1.1, 1.3 and 1.5, slot area ratios (A s/A8) of 1.0 (baseline), 1.1 and 1.2, and covering the nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) range of 2.0 to 8.0. The CFD results define the NPR at which flow separation occurs as a function of A9/A8, and A s/A8, and the effect of the step on nozzle performance. Results indicate that the onset of separation occurs at higher NPR with increasing A9/A 8 and increasing As/A 8. For the case of the JSF nozzle with A9/ A8 = 1.3, the CFD analysis predicted that a nozzle having an As/A8 = 1.1 produces an improvement of approximately 2.5 percent in hover thrust relative to the baseline with a minimal adverse impact at other design conditions. Twelve percent scale models representing the baseline, and step sizes of 1.1 and 1.2 were tested in the Lockheed Martin Thrust Measurement Facility (TMF). Test results showed excellent agreement with CFD predictions and validated the step performance. Preliminary design integration studies support

  10. Research on the rapid and accurate positioning and orientation approach for land missile-launching vehicle.

    PubMed

    Li, Kui; Wang, Lei; Lv, Yanhong; Gao, Pengyu; Song, Tianxiao

    2015-01-01

    Getting a land vehicle's accurate position, azimuth and attitude rapidly is significant for vehicle based weapons' combat effectiveness. In this paper, a new approach to acquire vehicle's accurate position and orientation is proposed. It uses biaxial optical detection platform (BODP) to aim at and lock in no less than three pre-set cooperative targets, whose accurate positions are measured beforehand. Then, it calculates the vehicle's accurate position, azimuth and attitudes by the rough position and orientation provided by vehicle based navigation systems and no less than three couples of azimuth and pitch angles measured by BODP. The proposed approach does not depend on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), thus it is autonomous and difficult to interfere. Meanwhile, it only needs a rough position and orientation as algorithm's iterative initial value, consequently, it does not have high performance requirement for Inertial Navigation System (INS), odometer and other vehicle based navigation systems, even in high precise applications. This paper described the system's working procedure, presented theoretical deviation of the algorithm, and then verified its effectiveness through simulation and vehicle experiments. The simulation and experimental results indicate that the proposed approach can achieve positioning and orientation accuracy of 0.2 m and 20″ respectively in less than 3 min. PMID:26492249

  11. An analysis of flight data from aircraft landings with and without the aid of a painted diamond on the same runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swaroop, R.; Ashworth, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    The usefulness of a painted diamond on a runway as a visual aid to perform safe landings of aircraft was studied. Flight data on glideslope intercepts, flight path elevation angles, and touchdown distances were collected and analyzed. It is concluded that an appropriately painted diamond on a runway has the potential of providing glideslope information for the light weight class of general aviation aircraft. This conclusion holds irrespective of the differences in landing techniques used by the pilots.

  12. Conceptual Design of a Vertical Takeoff and Landing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle with 24-HR Endurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredericks, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a conceptual design study for a vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) that is able to carry a 25-lb science payload for 24 hr and is able to land and take off at elevations as high as 15,000 ft without human intervention. In addition to the science payload, this vehicle must be able to carry a satellite communication system, and the vehicle must be able to be transported in a standard full-size pickup truck and assembled by only two operators. This project started with a brainstorming phase to devise possible vehicle configurations that might satisfy the requirements. A down select was performed to select a near-term solution and two advanced vehicle concepts that are better suited to the intent of the mission. Sensitivity analyses were also performed on the requirements and the technology levels to obtain a better understanding of the design space. This study found that within the study assumptions the mission is feasible; the selected concepts are recommended for further development.

  13. Comparison of in-situ, aircraft, and satellite based land surface temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, B.; Krishna, P.; Meyers, T. P.

    2013-12-01

    and surface temperature (LST) is a key variable used in surface energy budget studies, and in near-real time is assimilated into land surface models for short and medium range forecasts. Observations of LST over multiple years are also critical for climate trend assessment. However, accurate in-situ measurements of LST over continents are not yet available for the whole globe and are not routinely conducted at weather stations. Recently an effort has been underway to validate LST sensed remotely from satellites to the actual measured skin temperature using data from the United States Climate Reference Network (USCRN). The goal of this work is to quantify the spatial variability and the representativeness of the single-point skin temperature measurement already being made at USCRN sites. NOAA/ATDD is collaborating with the University of Tennessee Space Institute's (UTSI) Aviation Systems and Flight Research Department in Tullahoma, TN to utilize an instrumented aircraft to perform measurements of Earth's skin temperature over selected USCRN sites in the continental U.S. Airborne remote sensing is a powerful tool to assess the spatial variability of LST over a location with sufficient sampling density and has the operational flexibility depending on the study requirements. We will present the results from airborne campaigns made concurrently with satellite overpasses over a grassland site and a deciduous forest site, compare the relationship of surface temperature to air temperature at a number of CRN sites and show results of an intercomparison between the JPL reference skin temperature measurement and the CRN sensor.

  14. A mathematical model for Vertical Attitude Takeoff and Landing (VATOL) aircraft simulation. Volume 2: Model equations and base aircraft data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortenbaugh, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Equations incorporated in a VATOL six degree of freedom off-line digital simulation program and data for the Vought SF-121 VATOL aircraft concept which served as the baseline for the development of this program are presented. The equations and data are intended to facilitate the development of a piloted VATOL simulation. The equation presentation format is to state the equations which define a particular model segment. Listings of constants required to quantify the model segment, input variables required to exercise the model segment, and output variables required by other model segments are included. In several instances a series of input or output variables are followed by a section number in parentheses which identifies the model segment of origination or termination of those variables.

  15. Development of SCR Aircraft takeoff and landing procedures for community noise abatement and their impact on flight safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, W. D.; Smith, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    Piloted simulator studies to determine takeoff and landing procedures for a supersonic cruise transport concept that result in predicted community noise levels which meet current Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) standards are discussed. The results indicate that with the use of advanced procedures, the subject simulated aircraft meets the FAA traded noise levels during takeoff and landing utilizing average flight crew skills. The advanced takeoff procedures developed involved violating three of the current Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) noise test conditions. These were: (1) thrust cutbacks at altitudes below 214 meters (700 ft); (2) thrust cutback level below those presently allowed; and (3) configuration change, other than raising the landing gear. It was not necessary to violate any FAR noise test conditions during landing approach. It was determined that the advanced procedures developed do not compromise flight safety. Automation of some of the aircraft functions reduced pilot workload, and the development of a simple head-up display to assist in the takeoff flight mode proved to be adequate.

  16. STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, lands on EAFB concrete runway 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, rolls along concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, after nose landing gear (NLG) and main landing gear (MLG) touchdown. This view looks down OV-103's port side from the space shuttle main engines (SSMEs) to the nose section. The SSMEs are gimbaled to their descent position and the rudder/speedbrake is deployed on the vertical stabilizer. Wheel stop occurred at 6:51 am (Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)). In the distance EAFB facilities are visible.

  17. Cultivated land information extraction from high-resolution unmanned aerial vehicle imagery data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lei; Cheng, Liang; Han, Wenquan; Zhong, Lishan; Li, Manchun

    2014-01-01

    The development of precision agriculture demands high accuracy and efficiency of cultivated land information extraction. Simultaneously, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have been increasingly used for natural resource applications in recent years as a result of their greater availability, the miniaturization of sensors, and the ability to deploy UAVs relatively quickly and repeatedly at low altitudes. We examine the potential of utilizing a small UAV for the characterization, assessment, and monitoring of cultivated land. Because most UAV images lack spectral information, we propose a novel cultivated land information extraction method based on a triangulation for cultivated land information extraction (TCLE) method. Thus, the information on more spatial properties of a region is incorporated into the classification process. The TCLE comprises three main steps: image segmentation, triangulation construction, and triangulation clustering using AUTOCLUST. Experiments were conducted on three UAV images in Deyang, China, using TCLE and eCognition for cultivated land information extraction (ECLE). Experimental results show that TCLE, which does not require training samples and has a much higher level of automation, can obtain accuracies equivalent to ECLE. Comparing with ECLE, TCLE also extracts coherent cultivated land with much less noise. As such, cultivated land information extraction based on high-resolution UAV images can be effectively and efficiently conducted using the proposed method.

  18. Hyper-X Research Vehicle - Artist Concept Mounted on Pegasus Rocket Attached to B-52 Launch Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This artist's concept depicts the Hyper-X research vehicle riding on a booster rocket prior to being launched by the Dryden Flight Research Center's B-52 at about 40,000 feet. The X-43A was developed to flight test a dual-mode ramjet/scramjet propulsion system at speeds from Mach 7 up to Mach 10 (7 to 10 times the speed of sound, which varies with temperature and altitude). Hyper-X, the flight vehicle for which is designated as X-43A, is an experimental flight-research program seeking to demonstrate airframe-integrated, 'air-breathing' engine technologies that promise to increase payload capacity for future vehicles, including hypersonic aircraft (faster than Mach 5) and reusable space launchers. This multiyear program is currently underway at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Hyper-X schedule calls for its first flight later this year (2000). Hyper-X is a joint program, with Dryden sharing responsibility with NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Dryden's primary role is to fly three unpiloted X-43A research vehicles to validate engine technologies and hypersonic design tools as well as the hypersonic test facility at Langley. Langley manages the program and leads the technology development effort. The Hyper-X Program seeks to significantly expand the speed boundaries of air-breathing propulsion by being the first aircraft to demonstrate an airframe-integrated, scramjet-powered free flight. Scramjets (supersonic-combustion ramjets) are ramjet engines in which the airflow through the whole engine remains supersonic. Scramjet technology is challenging because only limited testing can be performed in ground facilities. Long duration, full-scale testing requires flight research. Scramjet engines are air-breathing, capturing their oxygen from the atmosphere. Current spacecraft, such as the Space Shuttle, are rocket powered, so they must carry both fuel and oxygen for propulsion. Scramjet technology-based vehicles need to carry

  19. Development of a Corrosion Sensor for AN Aircraft Vehicle Health Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, D. A.; Price, D. C.; Edwards, G. C.; Batten, A. B.; Kolmeder, J.; Muster, T. H.; Corrigan, P.; Cole, I. S.

    2010-02-01

    A Rayleigh-wave-based sensor has been developed to measure corrosion damage in aircraft. This sensor forms an important part of a corrosion monitoring system being developed for a major aircraft manufacturer. This system measures the corrosion rate at the location of its sensors, and through a model predicts the corrosion rates in nearby places on an aircraft into which no sensors can be placed. In order to calibrate this model, which yields corrosion rates rather than the accumulated effect, an absolute measure of the damage is required. In this paper the development of a surface wave sensor capable of measuring accumulated damage will be described in detail. This sensor allows the system to measure material loss due to corrosion regardless of the possible loss of historical corrosion rate data, and can provide, at any stage, a benchmark for the predictive model that would allow a good estimate of the accumulated corrosion damage in similar locations on an aircraft. This system may obviate the need for costly inspection of difficult-to-access places in aircraft, where presently the only way to check for corrosion is by periodic dismantling and reassembly.

  20. Study of the dynamic of motion landing vehicles in the planet's atmosphere using inflatable braking device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koryanov, Vsevolod; Harri, Ari-Matti; Kazakovtcev, Victor

    At present paper analyzes the dynamics of movement of the landing vehicle (LV) with an inflatable braking device (IBD). During the movement in the planet's atmosphere with LV with IBD are significant aerodynamic loads, which can lead to a change in a non-rigid shape and appearance of the shell IBD current asymmetries LV with IBD. The presence arising in the manufacture of structural LV asymmetry results in a stabilized descent in the process of turning the LV with IBD various dynamic phenomena, such as the vibrational-rotational resonance, the resonance autorotation, altering the dynamics of angular motion of the LV. As a result of work carried out, among others, the following conclusions: 1. In the first step of descent of landing vehicle possible high angles of attack, however, the very small quantities of the velocity head. 2. In the second phase of descent arise spatial angles of attack, caused by small structural asymmetries of LV. These angles of attack, together with increasing magnitude of the velocity head cause these significant increase in lateral load. The increase in the transverse load leads to an increase in the asymmetry of the external form, which causes an additional increase in the spatial angle of attack. Depending on the magnitude of the transverse stiffness IBD or leads to a certain additional increase in the spatial angle of attack, or a possible buckling landing vehicle. 3. In the third (final) stage of the descent at subsonic speed landing vehicle with additional inflatable braking device does not influence the stiffness braking, changing the dynamics of angular motion slightly. This is due to the small size of the ram on the subsonic long trajectory and, accordingly, small deformation additional inflatable braking device. This research was supported by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2007-2013 under grant agreement n 263255 RITD.

  1. Requirements report for SSTO vertical take-off and horizontal landing vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    This document describes the detailed design requirements and design criteria to support Structures/TPS Technology development for SSTO winged vehicle configurations that use vertical take-off and horizontal landing and delivers 25,000 lb payloads to a 220 nm circular orbit at an inclination of 51.6 degrees or 40,000 lb payloads to a 150 nm circular orbit at a 28.5 degree inclination.

  2. A synergistic glance at the prospects of distributed propulsion technology and the electric aircraft concept for future unmanned air vehicles and commercial/military aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohardani, Amir S.

    2013-02-01

    Distributed propulsion is one of the revolutionary candidates for future aircraft propulsion. In this journal article, the potential role of distributed propulsion technology in future aviation is investigated. Following a historical journey that revisits distributed propulsion technology in unmanned air vehicles and military aircraft, features of this specific technology are highlighted in synergy with an electric aircraft concept and a first-of-a-kind comparison to commercial aircraft employing distributed propulsion arrangements. In light of propulsion-airframe integration and complementary technologies such as boundary layer ingestion, thrust vectoring and circulation control, transpired opportunities and challenges are addressed in addition to a number of identified research directions proposed for future aircraft. The motivation behind enhanced means of communication between engineers, researchers and scientists has stimulated a novel proposed definition for the distributed propulsion technology in aviation and is presented herein.

  3. Evolution of an artificial neural network based autonomous land vehicle controller.

    PubMed

    Baluja, S

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an evolutionary method for creating an artificial neural network based autonomous land vehicle controller. The evolved controllers perform better in unseen situations than those trained with an error backpropagation learning algorithm designed for this task. In this paper, an overview of the previous connectionist based approaches to this task is given, and the evolutionary algorithms used in this study are described in detail. Methods for reducing the high computational costs of training artificial neural networks with evolutionary algorithms are explored. Error metrics specific to the task of autonomous vehicle control are introduced; the evolutionary algorithms guided by these error metrics reveal improved performance over those guided by the standard sum-squared error metric. Finally, techniques for integrating evolutionary search and error backpropagation are presented. The evolved networks are designed to control Carnegie Mellon University's NAVLAB vehicles in road following tasks. PMID:18263046

  4. A Proposed Mars Base Design Adopting a Horizontally Landed Bent Biconic Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, D.; Clarke, J. D. A.

    Mars Society Australia has proposed the construction of a simulated Mars Base to explore the technical and physiological issues related to long term living on a similar base on Mars. The project is called MARS-OZ and is one of a series of similar projects constructed under the auspices of the international Mars Society. Others are located in Utah and Devon Island in the Canadian Arctic. A third has been built and will be deployed in Iceland. The MARS-OZ simulated base employs a different configuration from the other simulated Mars bases. Rather than consisting of vertical cylinders, MARS-OZ employs modules that are based on horizontally landed bent biconic lifting bodies. The MARS-OZ mission concept is based on the `Mars Semi-Direct' mission architecture, as used by NASA's design reference mission, resized to a four-person crew. This paper explores the technical issues underlying a horizontally landed bent biconic vehicle and demonstrates the feasibility of the unique MARS-OZ mission concept configuration. The issues of mission architecture, vehicle shape, vehicle mass, a Mars base assembly sequence and interior design to form an extendable long-term integrated base is dis- cussed and evaluated. We conclude that the configuration is overall superior to others with reference to both Mars landing and surface utilisation.

  5. Flight evaluation of advanced controls and displays for transition and landing on the NASA V/STOL systems research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, James A.; Stortz, Michael W.; Borchers, Paul F.; Moralez, Ernesto, III

    1996-01-01

    Flight experiments were conducted on Ames Research Center's V/STOL Systems Research Aircraft (VSRA) to assess the influence of advanced control modes and head-up displays (HUD's) on flying qualities for precision approach and landing operations. Evaluations were made for decelerating approaches to hover followed by a vertical landing and for slow landings for four control/display mode combinations: the basic YAV-8B stability augmentation system; attitude command for pitch, roll, and yaw; flightpath/acceleration command with translational rate command in the hover; and height-rate damping with translational-rate command. Head-up displays used in conjunction with these control modes provided flightpath tracking/pursuit guidance and deceleration commands for the decelerating approach and a mixed horizontal and vertical presentation for precision hover and landing. Flying qualities were established and control usage and bandwidth were documented for candidate control modes and displays for the approach and vertical landing. Minimally satisfactory bandwidths were determined for the translational-rate command system. Test pilot and engineer teams from the Naval Air Warfare Center, the Boeing Military Airplane Group, Lockheed Martin, McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, Northrop Grumman, Rolls-Royce, and the British Defense Research Agency participated in the program along with NASA research pilots from the Ames and Lewis Research Centers. The results, in conjunction with related ground-based simulation data, indicate that the flightpath/longitudinal acceleration command response type in conjunction with pursuit tracking and deceleration guidance on the HUD would be essential for operation to instrument minimums significantly lower than the minimums for the AV-8B. It would also be a superior mode for performing slow landings where precise control to an austere landing area such as a narrow road is demanded. The translational-rate command system would reduce pilot workload for

  6. Pitch attitude, flight path, and airspeed control during approach and landing of a powered lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Innis, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical investigations and piloted moving base simulator evaluations were conducted for manual control of pitch attitude, flight path, and airspeed for the approach and landing of a powered lift jet STOL aircraft. Flight path and speed response characteristics were described analytically and were evaluated for the simulation experiments which were carried out on a large motion simulator. The response characteristics were selected and evaluated for a specified path and speed control technique. These charcteristics were: (1) the initial pitch response and steady pitch rate sensitivity for control of attitude with a pitch rate command/ attitude hold system, (2) the initial flight path response, flight path overshoot, and flight path-airspeed coupling in response to a change in thrust, and (3) the sensitivity of airspeed to pitch attitude changes. Results are presented in the form of pilot opinion ratings and commentary, substantiated where appropriate by response time histories and aircraft states at the point of touchdown.

  7. Fully self-contained vision-aided navigation and landing of a micro air vehicle independent from external sensor inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockers, Roland; Susca, Sara; Zhu, David; Matthies, Larry

    2012-06-01

    Direct-lift micro air vehicles have important applications in reconnaissance. In order to conduct persistent surveillance in urban environments, it is essential that these systems can perform autonomous landing maneuvers on elevated surfaces that provide high vantage points without the help of any external sensor and with a fully contained on-board software solution. In this paper, we present a micro air vehicle that uses vision feedback from a single down looking camera to navigate autonomously and detect an elevated landing platform as a surrogate for a roof top. Our method requires no special preparation (labels or markers) of the landing location. Rather, leveraging the planar character of urban structure, the landing platform detection system uses a planar homography decomposition to detect landing targets and produce approach waypoints for autonomous landing. The vehicle control algorithm uses a Kalman filter based approach for pose estimation to fuse visual SLAM (PTAM) position estimates with IMU data to correct for high latency SLAM inputs and to increase the position estimate update rate in order to improve control stability. Scale recovery is achieved using inputs from a sonar altimeter. In experimental runs, we demonstrate a real-time implementation running on-board a micro aerial vehicle that is fully self-contained and independent from any external sensor information. With this method, the vehicle is able to search autonomously for a landing location and perform precision landing maneuvers on the detected targets.

  8. Fully Self-Contained Vision-Aided Navigation and Landing of a Micro Air Vehicle Independent from External Sensor Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockers, Roland; Susca, Sara; Zhu, David; Matthies, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Direct-lift micro air vehicles have important applications in reconnaissance. In order to conduct persistent surveillance in urban environments, it is essential that these systems can perform autonomous landing maneuvers on elevated surfaces that provide high vantage points without the help of any external sensor and with a fully contained on-board software solution. In this paper, we present a micro air vehicle that uses vision feedback from a single down looking camera to navigate autonomously and detect an elevated landing platform as a surrogate for a roof top. Our method requires no special preparation (labels or markers) of the landing location. Rather, leveraging the planar character of urban structure, the landing platform detection system uses a planar homography decomposition to detect landing targets and produce approach waypoints for autonomous landing. The vehicle control algorithm uses a Kalman filter based approach for pose estimation to fuse visual SLAM (PTAM) position estimates with IMU data to correct for high latency SLAM inputs and to increase the position estimate update rate in order to improve control stability. Scale recovery is achieved using inputs from a sonar altimeter. In experimental runs, we demonstrate a real-time implementation running on-board a micro aerial vehicle that is fully self-contained and independent from any external sensor information. With this method, the vehicle is able to search autonomously for a landing location and perform precision landing maneuvers on the detected targets.

  9. Landing strategies in honeybees, and possible applications to autonomous airborne vehicles.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, M V; Zhang, S; Chahl, J S

    2001-04-01

    Insects, being perhaps more reliant on image motion cues than mammals or higher vertebrates, are proving to be an excellent organism in which to investigate how information on optic flow is exploited to guide locomotion and navigation. This paper describes one example, illustrating how bees perform grazing landings on a flat surface. A smooth landing is achieved by a surprisingly simple and elegant strategy: image velocity is held constant as the surface is approached, thus automatically ensuring that flight speed is close to zero at touchdown. No explicit knowledge of flight speed or height above the ground is necessary. The feasibility of this landing strategy is tested by implementation in a robotic gantry, and its applicability to autonomous airborne vehicles is discussed. PMID:11341587

  10. Inhalation of motor vehicle emissions: effects of urban population and land area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Julian D.; McKone, Thomas E.; Deakin, Elizabeth; Nazaroff, William W.

    2005-01-01

    Urban population density may influence transportation demand, e.g., as expressed through average daily vehicle-kilometers traveled in private motor vehicles per capita. In turn, changes in transportation demand influence total passenger vehicle emissions to which populations are exposed. Population density can also influence the fraction of total emissions that are inhaled by the exposed urban population. Equations are presented that describe these relationships for an idealized representation of an urban area. Using analytic solutions to these equations, we investigate the effect of three changes in urban population and urban land area (infill, sprawl, and constant-density growth) on per capita inhalation intake of primary pollutants from passenger vehicles. For the system considered, the magnitude of these effects depends on density-emissions elasticity (εe) , a normalized derivative relating change in population density to change in vehicle emissions. For example, based on the idealized representation of the emissions-to-intake relationship presented herein, if urban population increases, then per capita intake is less with infill development than with constant-density growth if εe is <-0.5, while for εe >-0.5, the reverse is true.

  11. Cost, accuracy, and consistency comparisons of land use maps made from high-altitutde aircraft photography and ERTS imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick, Katherine A.

    1975-01-01

    Accuracy analyses for the land use maps of the Central Atlantic Regional Ecological Test Site were performed for a 1-percent sample of the area. Researchers compared Level II land use maps produced at three scales, 1:24,000, 1:100,000, and 1:250,000 from high-altitude photography, with each other and with point data obtained in the field. They employed the same procedures to determine the accuracy of the Level I land use maps produced at 1:250,000 from high-altitude photography and color composite ERTS imagery. The accuracy of the Level II maps was 84.9 percent at 1:24,000, 77.4 percent at 1:100,000, and 73.0 percent at 1:250,000. The accuracy of the Level I 1:250,000 maps produced from high-altitude aircraft photography was 76.5 percent and for those produced from ERTS imagery was 69.5 percent The cost of Level II land use mapping at 1:24,000 was found to be high ($11.93 per km2 ). The cost of mapping at 1:100,000 ($1.75) was about 2 times as expensive as mapping at 1:250,000 ($.88), and the accuracy increased by only 4.4 percent. Level I land use maps, when mapped from highaltitude photography, were about 4 times as expensive as the maps produced from ERTS imagery, although the accuracy is 7.0 percent greater. The Level I land use category that is least accurately mapped from ERTS imagery is urban and built-up land in the non-urban areas; in the urbanized areas, built-up land is more reliably mapped.

  12. Collaboration for Land, Air, Sea, and Space Vehicles: Developing the Common Ground in Vehicle Dynamics, System Identification, Control, and Handling Qualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    This technical report is the culmination of the SCI-053 Task Group - Vehicle Dynamics, System Identification, Control and Handling Qualities. It summarizes the discussions of tank, truck, aircraft, helicopter, ship, submarine and satellite experts held over a three-year period. It addresses the various technical areas identified in the name of the task group, exploring the similarities and differences between the vehicle types and identifying areas where collaboration between experts would be the most valuable. Twenty-three specific technical issues are identified as initial areas with high potential for valuable collaboration. Overall, the report provides the vehicle expert of one environment a sufficient background on the other vehicle environments, so that meaningful discussions towards these technical collaborations can be initiated.

  13. Interfacing and Verifying ALHAT Safe Precision Landing Systems with the Morpheus Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John M., III; Hirsh, Robert L.; Roback, Vincent E.; Villalpando, Carlos; Busa, Joseph L.; Pierrottet, Diego F.; Trawny, Nikolas; Martin, Keith E.; Hines, Glenn D.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Autonomous precision Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project developed a suite of prototype sensors to enable autonomous and safe precision landing of robotic or crewed vehicles under any terrain lighting conditions. Development of the ALHAT sensor suite was a cross-NASA effort, culminating in integration and testing on-board a variety of terrestrial vehicles toward infusion into future spaceflight applications. Terrestrial tests were conducted on specialized test gantries, moving trucks, helicopter flights, and a flight test onboard the NASA Morpheus free-flying, rocket-propulsive flight-test vehicle. To accomplish these tests, a tedious integration process was developed and followed, which included both command and telemetry interfacing, as well as sensor alignment and calibration verification to ensure valid test data to analyze ALHAT and Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) performance. This was especially true for the flight test campaign of ALHAT onboard Morpheus. For interfacing of ALHAT sensors to the Morpheus flight system, an adaptable command and telemetry architecture was developed to allow for the evolution of per-sensor Interface Control Design/Documents (ICDs). Additionally, individual-sensor and on-vehicle verification testing was developed to ensure functional operation of the ALHAT sensors onboard the vehicle, as well as precision-measurement validity for each ALHAT sensor when integrated within the Morpheus GNC system. This paper provides some insight into the interface development and the integrated-systems verification that were a part of the build-up toward success of the ALHAT and Morpheus flight test campaigns in 2014. These campaigns provided valuable performance data that is refining the path toward spaceflight infusion of the ALHAT sensor suite.

  14. Potential and prospective implementation of carbon nanotubes on next generation aircraft and space vehicles: A review of current and expected applications in aerospace sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohardani, Omid; Elola, Maialen Chapartegui; Elizetxea, Cristina

    2014-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes have instigated the interest of many different scientific fields since their authenticated introduction, more than two decades ago. Particularly in aerospace applications, the potential implementations of these advanced materials have been predicted to have a large impact on future aircraft and space vehicles, mainly due to their distinct features, which include superior mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. This article provides the very first consolidated review of the imminent prospects of utilizing carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles in aerospace sciences, based on their recent implementations and predicted future applications. Explicitly, expected carbon nanotube employment in aeronautics and astronautics are identified for commercial aircraft, military aircraft, rotorcraft, unmanned aerial vehicles, satellites, and space launch vehicles. Attention is devoted to future utilization of carbon nanotubes, which may comprise hydrogen storage encapsulation, composite material implementation, lightning protection for aircraft, aircraft icing mitigation, reduced weight of airframes/satellites, and alleviation of challenges related to future space launch. This study further sheds light onto recent actualized implementations of carbon nanotubes in aerospace applications, as well as current and prospective challenges related to their usage in aerospace sciences, encompassing health and safety hazards, large scale manufacturing, achievement of optimum properties, recycling, and environmental impacts.

  15. Man-vehicle systems research facility advanced aircraft flight simulator throttle mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurasaki, S. S.; Vallotton, W. C.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Aircraft Flight Simulator is equipped with a motorized mechanism that simulates a two engine throttle control system that can be operated via a computer driven performance management system or manually by the pilots. The throttle control system incorporates features to simulate normal engine operations and thrust reverse and vary the force feel to meet a variety of research needs. While additional testing to integrate the work required is principally now in software design, since the mechanical aspects function correctly. The mechanism is an important part of the flight control system and provides the capability to conduct human factors research of flight crews with advanced aircraft systems under various flight conditions such as go arounds, coupled instrument flight rule approaches, normal and ground operations and emergencies that would or would not normally be experienced in actual flight.

  16. A Highly Reliable and Cost-Efficient Multi-Sensor System for Land Vehicle Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu; Xu, Qimin; Li, Bin; Song, Xianghui

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel positioning solution for land vehicles which is highly reliable and cost-efficient. The proposed positioning system fuses information from the MEMS-based reduced inertial sensor system (RISS) which consists of one vertical gyroscope and two horizontal accelerometers, low-cost GPS, and supplementary sensors and sources. First, pitch and roll angle are accurately estimated based on a vehicle kinematic model. Meanwhile, the negative effect of the uncertain nonlinear drift of MEMS inertial sensors is eliminated by an H∞ filter. Further, a distributed-dual-H∞ filtering (DDHF) mechanism is adopted to address the uncertain nonlinear drift of the MEMS-RISS and make full use of the supplementary sensors and sources. The DDHF is composed of a main H∞ filter (MHF) and an auxiliary H∞ filter (AHF). Finally, a generalized regression neural network (GRNN) module with good approximation capability is specially designed for the MEMS-RISS. A hybrid methodology which combines the GRNN module and the AHF is utilized to compensate for RISS position errors during GPS outages. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed solution, road-test experiments with various scenarios were performed. The experimental results illustrate that the proposed system can achieve accurate and reliable positioning for land vehicles. PMID:27231917

  17. A Highly Reliable and Cost-Efficient Multi-Sensor System for Land Vehicle Positioning.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Xu, Qimin; Li, Bin; Song, Xianghui

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel positioning solution for land vehicles which is highly reliable and cost-efficient. The proposed positioning system fuses information from the MEMS-based reduced inertial sensor system (RISS) which consists of one vertical gyroscope and two horizontal accelerometers, low-cost GPS, and supplementary sensors and sources. First, pitch and roll angle are accurately estimated based on a vehicle kinematic model. Meanwhile, the negative effect of the uncertain nonlinear drift of MEMS inertial sensors is eliminated by an H∞ filter. Further, a distributed-dual-H∞ filtering (DDHF) mechanism is adopted to address the uncertain nonlinear drift of the MEMS-RISS and make full use of the supplementary sensors and sources. The DDHF is composed of a main H∞ filter (MHF) and an auxiliary H∞ filter (AHF). Finally, a generalized regression neural network (GRNN) module with good approximation capability is specially designed for the MEMS-RISS. A hybrid methodology which combines the GRNN module and the AHF is utilized to compensate for RISS position errors during GPS outages. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed solution, road-test experiments with various scenarios were performed. The experimental results illustrate that the proposed system can achieve accurate and reliable positioning for land vehicles. PMID:27231917

  18. Land Vehicle Navigation with the Integration of GPS and Reduced INS: Performance Improvement with Velocity Aiding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Songlai; Wang, Jinling

    The movement of a land vehicle is constrained because the vehicle always remains on the Earth's surface and only experiences small pitch and roll angles. So the GPS/INS integrated system for land vehicle navigation could be reconfigured to be the integration of GPS and reduced INS to cut down the costs. In a reduced INS, the vertical accelerometer and two horizontal gyros could be omitted from the system. But both theoretical analysis and experimental results show that this configuration may result in the divergence of height solution and large velocity errors. To improve the system performances, precise velocity derived from GPS carrier phase measurements, together with the GPS single point positioning solution, is used to aid the reduced INS. Field test results have demonstrated that first, the aiding from GPS precise velocity overcomes the divergence problem of the integrated height solutions and improves the integrated velocity and secondly the proposed novel integration scheme could achieve comparable navigation accuracy with that from the GPS and full INS integrated system.

  19. Unmanned aircraft systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unmanned platforms have become increasingly more common in recent years for acquiring remotely sensed data. These aircraft are referred to as Unmanned Airborne Vehicles (UAV), Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA), Remotely Piloted Vehicles (RPV), or Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), the official term used...

  20. Launch Vehicle Manual Steering with Adaptive Augmenting Control In-flight Evaluations of Adverse Interactions Using a Piloted Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt; Miller, Chris; Wall, John H.; Vanzwieten, Tannen S.; Gilligan, Eric; Orr, Jeb S.

    2015-01-01

    An adaptive augmenting control algorithm for the Space Launch System has been developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center as part of the launch vehicles baseline flight control system. A prototype version of the SLS flight control software was hosted on a piloted aircraft at the Armstrong Flight Research Center to demonstrate the adaptive controller on a full-scale realistic application in a relevant flight environment. Concerns regarding adverse interactions between the adaptive controller and a proposed manual steering mode were investigated by giving the pilot trajectory deviation cues and pitch rate command authority. Two NASA research pilots flew a total of twenty five constant pitch-rate trajectories using a prototype manual steering mode with and without adaptive control.

  1. Flight Testing a Real-Time Hazard Detection System for Safe Lunar Landing on the Rocket-Powered Morpheus Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trawny, Nikolas; Huertas, Andres; Luna, Michael E.; Villalpando, Carlos Y.; Martin, Keith E.; Carson, John M.; Johnson, Andrew E.; Restrepo, Carolina; Roback, Vincent E.

    2015-01-01

    The Hazard Detection System (HDS) is a component of the ALHAT (Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology) sensor suite, which together provide a lander Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) system with the relevant measurements necessary to enable safe precision landing under any lighting conditions. The HDS consists of a stand-alone compute element (CE), an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), and a gimbaled flash LIDAR sensor that are used, in real-time, to generate a Digital Elevation Map (DEM) of the landing terrain, detect candidate safe landing sites for the vehicle through Hazard Detection (HD), and generate hazard-relative navigation (HRN) measurements used for safe precision landing. Following an extensive ground and helicopter test campaign, ALHAT was integrated onto the Morpheus rocket-powered terrestrial test vehicle in March 2014. Morpheus and ALHAT then performed five successful free flights at the simulated lunar hazard field constructed at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center, for the first time testing the full system on a lunar-like approach geometry in a relevant dynamic environment. During these flights, the HDS successfully generated DEMs, correctly identified safe landing sites and provided HRN measurements to the vehicle, marking the first autonomous landing of a NASA rocket-powered vehicle in hazardous terrain. This paper provides a brief overview of the HDS architecture and describes its in-flight performance.

  2. SIG: Multiple Views on Safety-Critical Automation: Aircraft, Autonomous Vehicles, Air Traffic Management and Satellite Ground Segments Perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feary, Michael; Palanque, Philippe; Martinie, Célia; Tscheligi, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    This SIG focuses on the engineering of automation in interactive critical systems. Automation has already been studied in a number of (sub-) disciplines and application fields: design, human factors, psychology, (software) engineering, aviation, health care, games. One distinguishing feature of the area we are focusing on is that in the field of interactive critical systems properties such as reliability, dependability, fault tolerance are as important as usability, user experience or overall acceptance issues. The SIG targets at two problem areas: first the engineering of the user interaction with (partly-) autonomous systems: how to design, build and assess autonomous behavior, especially in cases where there is a need to represent on the user interface both autonomous and interactive objects. An example of such integration is the representation of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) (where no direct interaction is possible), together with aircrafts (that have to be instructed by an air traffic controller to avoid the UAV). Second the design and engineering of user interaction in general for autonomous objects/systems (for example a cruise control in a car or an autopilot in an aircraft). The goal of the SIG is to raise interest in the CHI community on the general aspects of automation and to identify a community of researchers and practitioners interested in those increasingly prominent issues of interfaces towards (semi)-autonomous systems. The expected audience should be interested in addressing the issues of integration of mainly unconnected research domains to formulate a new joint research agenda.

  3. Launch Vehicle Manual Steering with Adaptive Augmenting Control:In-Flight Evaluations of Adverse Interactions Using a Piloted Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt; Miller, Chris; Wall, John H.; VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Gilligan, Eric T.; Orr, Jeb S.

    2015-01-01

    An Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) algorithm for the Space Launch System (SLS) has been developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as part of the launch vehicle's baseline flight control system. A prototype version of the SLS flight control software was hosted on a piloted aircraft at the Armstrong Flight Research Center to demonstrate the adaptive controller on a full-scale realistic application in a relevant flight environment. Concerns regarding adverse interactions between the adaptive controller and a potential manual steering mode were also investigated by giving the pilot trajectory deviation cues and pitch rate command authority, which is the subject of this paper. Two NASA research pilots flew a total of 25 constant pitch rate trajectories using a prototype manual steering mode with and without adaptive control, evaluating six different nominal and off-nominal test case scenarios. Pilot comments and PIO ratings were given following each trajectory and correlated with aircraft state data and internal controller signals post-flight.

  4. Evaluation of V/STOL research aircraft design. [landing approaches, propulsion/control, piloted moving base simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckert, W. H.; Holzhauser, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    The evaluation and evolution of direct jet lift V/STOL transport aircraft designs are discussed. The V/STOL transport design selected as an example is a lift-fan design that was evaluated as a candidate configuration for a possible future V/STOL research transport. The paper includes discussion of potential advanced V/STOL landing approach profiles as key design requirements for V/STOL aircraft, description and experimental results of an integrated propulsion/control system designed to achieve desired advanced V/STOL near-terminal operating capabilities, and results from evaluating V/STOL designs on piloted moving-base simulators. This paper discusses use of the piloted moving-base simulator as a design tool for evolving satisfactory V/STOL stabilization and propulsion/control systems. Included are problems and solutions identified during simulation of simultaneous decelerating/descent steep curved landing approaches under instrument flight conditions. Simulation results are also compared to flight results obtained with the DO-31 V/STOL research transport.

  5. Research on the Rapid and Accurate Positioning and Orientation Approach for Land Missile-Launching Vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kui; Wang, Lei; Lv, Yanhong; Gao, Pengyu; Song, Tianxiao

    2015-01-01

    Getting a land vehicle’s accurate position, azimuth and attitude rapidly is significant for vehicle based weapons’ combat effectiveness. In this paper, a new approach to acquire vehicle’s accurate position and orientation is proposed. It uses biaxial optical detection platform (BODP) to aim at and lock in no less than three pre-set cooperative targets, whose accurate positions are measured beforehand. Then, it calculates the vehicle’s accurate position, azimuth and attitudes by the rough position and orientation provided by vehicle based navigation systems and no less than three couples of azimuth and pitch angles measured by BODP. The proposed approach does not depend on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), thus it is autonomous and difficult to interfere. Meanwhile, it only needs a rough position and orientation as algorithm’s iterative initial value, consequently, it does not have high performance requirement for Inertial Navigation System (INS), odometer and other vehicle based navigation systems, even in high precise applications. This paper described the system’s working procedure, presented theoretical deviation of the algorithm, and then verified its effectiveness through simulation and vehicle experiments. The simulation and experimental results indicate that the proposed approach can achieve positioning and orientation accuracy of 0.2 m and 20″ respectively in less than 3 min. PMID:26492249

  6. Inhalation of primary motor vehicle emissions: Effects of urbanpopulation and land area

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Julian D.; McKone, Thomas E.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2004-06-14

    Urban population density can influence transportation demand, as expressed through average daily vehicle-kilometers traveled per capita (VKT). In turn, changes in transportation demand influence total passenger vehicle emissions. Population density can also influence the fraction of total emissions that are inhaled by the exposed urban population. Equations are presented that describe these relationships for an idealized representation of an urban area. Using analytic solutions to these equations, we investigate the effect of three changes in urban population and urban land area (infill, sprawl, and constant-density growth) on per capita inhalation intake of primary pollutants from passenger vehicles. The magnitude of these effects depends on density-emissions elasticity ({var_epsilon}{sub e}), a normalized derivative relating change in population density to change in vehicle emissions. For example, if urban population increases, per capita intake is less with infill development than with constant-density growth if {var_epsilon}{sub e} is less than -0.5, while for {var_epsilon}{sub e} greater than -0.5 the reverse is true.

  7. Obstacle avoidance for autonomous land vehicle navigation in indoor environments by quadratic classifier.

    PubMed

    Ku, C H; Tsai, W H

    1999-01-01

    A vision-based approach to obstacle avoidance for autonomous land vehicle (ALV) navigation in indoor environments is proposed. The approach is based on the use of a pattern recognition scheme, the quadratic classifier, to find collision-free paths in unknown indoor corridor environments. Obstacles treated in this study include the walls of the corridor and the objects that appear in the way of ALV navigation in the corridor. Detected obstacles as well as the two sides of the ALV body are considered as patterns. A systematic method for separating these patterns into two classes is proposed. The two pattern classes are used as the input data to design a quadratic classifier. Finally, the two-dimensional decision boundary of the classifier, which goes through the middle point between the two front vehicle wheels, is taken as a local collision-free path. This approach is implemented on a real ALV and successful navigations confirm the feasibility of the approach. PMID:18252315

  8. A flight-test and simulation evaluation of the longitudinal final approach and landing performance of an automatic system for a light wing loading STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, S. C.; Hardy, G. H.; Hindson, W. S.

    1983-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive flight-test program of STOL operating systems for the terminal area, an automatic landing system was developed and evaluated for a light wing loading turboprop aircraft. The aircraft utilized an onboard advanced digital avionics system. Flight tests were conducted at a facility that included a STOL runway site with a microwave landing system. Longitudinal flight-test results were presented and compared with available (basically CTOL) criteria. These comparisons were augmented by results from a comprehensive simulation of the controlled aircraft which included representations of navigation errors that were encountered in flight and atmospheric disturbances. Acceptable performance on final approach and at touchdown was achieved by the autoland (automatic landing) system for the moderate winds and turbulence conditions encountered in flight. However, some touchdown performance goals were marginally achieved, and simulation results suggested that difficulties could be encountered in the presence of more extreme atmospheric conditions. Suggestions were made for improving performance under those more extreme conditions.

  9. Requirements report for SSTO vertical take-off/horizontal landing vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    This document describes the detailed design requirements and design criteria to support Structures/TPS Technology development for SSTO winged vehicle configurations that use vertical take-off and horizontal landing and deliver 25,000 lb payloads to a 220 nm circular orbit at an inclination of 51.6 degrees or 40,000 lb payloads to a 150 nm circular orbit at a 28.5 degree of inclination. This document will be updated on a timely basis as informatIon becomes available throughout the project.

  10. Development of a man-portable control unit for a teleoperated land vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    McGovern, D.E.; Spires, S.V.

    1988-05-01

    A man-portable conrtrol unit has been designed and fabricated to support teleoperation of a land vehicle. The basic contol unit is configured to include the capabilities of mobile platform control, platform location and status display, sensor contol and output display, and weapons contol, if so desired. When the platform is being driven to a new location, the operator is able to control the platform through basic steering, braking and speed commands, obstacle recognition and avoidance, maneuvering in constricted space, and navigation with visual cues and simple dead-reckoning inputs from the vehicle. While the platform is on station, the human operator is able to perform the functions of surveillance, target recognition, target tracking, and weapons or designator control. A fully software-driven system has been configured to meet these requirements. All controls and vehicle signals are processed by an on-board microprocessor allowing the system to be easily reconfigured. Video information is provided through a set of three CCTV monitors. Graphics and alphanumeric data are provided on a flat panel dislay. Push buttons, keypad, trackball, throttle lever, and a steering yoke accept operator input. A video cueing system is included to allow automatic processing of the platform video for motion detection surveillance operations. The man-portable control unit was developed for application to the Teleoperated Mobile All-Purpose Platform (TMAP) project supported by the US Army Missile Command (MICOM). The control unit has been integrated with the MICOM vehicle system and with a vehicle system at Sandia National Labs. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  11. 43 CFR 4740.2 - Standards for vehicles used for transport of wild horses and burros.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of wild horses and burros. 4740.2 Section 4740.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to...) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Motor Vehicles and Aircraft § 4740.2 Standards for vehicles used for transport of wild horses and burros. (a) Use of motor vehicles...

  12. 43 CFR 4740.2 - Standards for vehicles used for transport of wild horses and burros.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of wild horses and burros. 4740.2 Section 4740.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to...) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Motor Vehicles and Aircraft § 4740.2 Standards for vehicles used for transport of wild horses and burros. (a) Use of motor vehicles...

  13. 43 CFR 4740.2 - Standards for vehicles used for transport of wild horses and burros.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of wild horses and burros. 4740.2 Section 4740.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to...) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Motor Vehicles and Aircraft § 4740.2 Standards for vehicles used for transport of wild horses and burros. (a) Use of motor vehicles...

  14. 43 CFR 4740.2 - Standards for vehicles used for transport of wild horses and burros.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of wild horses and burros. 4740.2 Section 4740.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to...) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Motor Vehicles and Aircraft § 4740.2 Standards for vehicles used for transport of wild horses and burros. (a) Use of motor vehicles...

  15. Civil applications of high speed rotorcraft and powered lift aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, James A.; Zuk, John

    1988-01-01

    Advanced subsonic vertical and short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) aircraft configurations offer new transportation options for civil applications. Described is a range of vehicles from low-disk to high-disk loading aircraft, including high-speed rotorcraft, V/STOL aircraft, and short takeoff and landing (STOL) aircraft. The status and advantages of the various configurations are described. Some of these show promise for relieving congestion in high population-density regions and providing transportation opportunities for low population-density regions.

  16. V/STOL aircraft configurations and opportunities in the Pacific Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, James A.; Zuk, John

    1988-01-01

    Advanced aircraft configurations offer new transportation options for the Pacific Basin. Described is a range of vehicles from low-disk to high-disk loading aircraft, including high-speed rotorcraft, subsonic vertical and short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) aircraft, and subsonic short takeoff and landing (STOL) aircraft. The status and advantages of the various configurations are described. Some of these show promise for satisfying many of the transportation requirements of the Pacific Basin; as such, they could revolutionize short-haul transportation in that region.

  17. Civil applications of high-speed rotorcraft and powered-lift aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, James A.; Zuk, John

    1987-01-01

    Advanced subsonic vertical and short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) aircraft configurations offer new transportation options for civil applications. Described is a range of vehicles from low-disk to high-disk loading aircraft, including high-speed rotorcraft, V/STOL aircraft, and short takeoff and landing (STOL) aircraft. The status and advantages of the various configurations are described. Some of these show promise for relieving congestion in high population-density regions and providing transportation opportunities for low population-density regions.

  18. V/STOL aircraft configurations and opportunities in the Pacific Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, James A.; Zuk, John

    1987-01-01

    Advanced aircraft configurations offer new transportation options for the Pacific Basin. Described is a range of vehicles from low-disk to high-disk loading aircraft, including high-speed rotorcraft, subsonic vertical and short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) aircraft, and subsonic short takeoff and landing (STOL) aircraft. The status and advantages of the various configurations are described. Some of these show promise for satisfying many of the transportation requirements of the Pacific Basin; as such, they could revolutionize short-haul transportation in that region.

  19. Alaskan flight trials of a synthetic vision system for instrument landings of a piston twin aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, Andrew K.; Alter, Keith W.; Jennings, Chad W.; Powell, J. D.

    1999-07-01

    Stanford University has developed a low-cost prototype synthetic vision system and flight tested it onboard general aviation aircraft. The display aids pilots by providing an 'out the window' view, making visualization of the desired flight path a simple task. Predictor symbology provides guidance on straight and curved paths presented in a 'tunnel- in-the-sky' format. Based on commodity PC hardware to achieve low cost, the Tunnel Display system uses differential GPS (typically from Stanford prototype Wide Area Augmentation System hardware) for positioning and GPS-aided inertial sensors for attitude determination. The display has been flown onboard Piper Dakota and Beechcraft Queen Air aircraft at several different locations. This paper describes the system, its development, and flight trials culminating with tests in Alaska during the summer of 1998. Operational experience demonstrated the Tunnel Display's ability to increase flight- path following accuracy and situational awareness while easing the task instrument flying.

  20. A Performance Improvement Method for Low-Cost Land Vehicle GPS/MEMS-INS Attitude Determination

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Li; Li, Ercui; Qin, Honglei; Ling, Keck Voon; Xue, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) technology is well suited for attitude determination. However, in land vehicle application, low-cost single frequency GPS receivers which have low measurement quality are often used, and external factors such as multipath and low satellite visibility in the densely built-up urban environment further degrade the quality of the GPS measurements. Due to the low-quality receivers used and the challenging urban environment, the success rate of the single epoch ambiguity resolution for dynamic attitude determination is usually quite low. In this paper, a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS)—inertial navigation system (INS)-aided ambiguity resolution method is proposed to improve the GPS attitude determination performance, which is particularly suitable for land vehicle attitude determination. First, the INS calculated baseline vector is augmented with the GPS carrier phase and code measurements. This improves the ambiguity dilution of precision (ADOP), resulting in better quality of the unconstrained float solution. Second, the undesirable float solutions caused by large measurement errors are further filtered and replaced using the INS-aided ambiguity function method (AFM). The fixed solutions are then obtained by the constrained least squares ambiguity decorrelation (CLAMBDA) algorithm. Finally, the GPS/MEMS-INS integration is realized by the use of a Kalman filter. Theoretical analysis of the ADOP is given and experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method can significantly improve the quality of the float ambiguity solution, leading to high success rate and better accuracy of attitude determination. PMID:25760057

  1. A performance improvement method for low-cost land vehicle GPS/MEMS-INS attitude determination.

    PubMed

    Cong, Li; Li, Ercui; Qin, Honglei; Ling, Keck Voon; Xue, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) technology is well suited for attitude determination. However, in land vehicle application, low-cost single frequency GPS receivers which have low measurement quality are often used, and external factors such as multipath and low satellite visibility in the densely built-up urban environment further degrade the quality of the GPS measurements. Due to the low-quality receivers used and the challenging urban environment, the success rate of the single epoch ambiguity resolution for dynamic attitude determination is usually quite low. In this paper, a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS)-inertial navigation system (INS)-aided ambiguity resolution method is proposed to improve the GPS attitude determination performance, which is particularly suitable for land vehicle attitude determination. First, the INS calculated baseline vector is augmented with the GPS carrier phase and code measurements. This improves the ambiguity dilution of precision (ADOP), resulting in better quality of the unconstrained float solution. Second, the undesirable float solutions caused by large measurement errors are further filtered and replaced using the INS-aided ambiguity function method (AFM). The fixed solutions are then obtained by the constrained least squares ambiguity decorrelation (CLAMBDA) algorithm. Finally, the GPS/MEMS-INS integration is realized by the use of a Kalman filter. Theoretical analysis of the ADOP is given and experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method can significantly improve the quality of the float ambiguity solution, leading to high success rate and better accuracy of attitude determination. PMID:25760057

  2. Mars Sample Return Using Commercial Capabilities: Propulsive Entry, Descent, and Landing of a Capsule Form Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzales, Andrew A.; Lemke, Lawrence G.; Huynh, Loc C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a critical portion of the work that has been done at NASA, Ames Research Center regarding the use of the commercially developed Dragon capsule as a delivery vehicle for the elements of a high priority Mars Sample Return mission. The objective of the investigation was to determine entry and landed mass capabilities that cover anticipated mission conditions. The "Red Dragon", Mars configuration, uses supersonic retro-propulsion, with no required parachute system, to perform Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) maneuvers. The propulsive system proposed for use is the same system that will perform an abort, if necessary, for a human rated version of the Dragon capsule. Standard trajectory analysis tools are applied to publically available information about Dragon and other legacy capsule forms in order to perform the investigation. Trajectory simulation parameters include entry velocity, flight path angle, lift to drag Ratio (L/D), landing site elevation, atmosphere density, and total entry mass, in addition engineering assumptions for the performance of the propulsion system are stated. Mass estimates for major elements of the overall proposed architecture are coupled to this EDL analysis to close the overall architecture. Three synodic launch opportunities, beginning with the 2022 opportunity, define the arrival conditions. Results state the relations between the analysis parameters as well as sensitivities to those parameters. The EDL performance envelope includes landing altitudes between 0 and -4 km referenced to the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter datum as well as minimum and maximum atmosphere density. Total entry masses between 7 and 10 mt are considered with architecture closure occurring between 9.0 and 10 mt. Propellant mass fractions for each major phase of the EDL - Entry, Terminal Descent, and Hazard Avoidance - have been derived. An assessment of the effect of the entry conditions on the Thermal Protection System (TPS) currently in use for

  3. General aviation approach and landing practices. [by pilots of light aircraft at uncontrolled airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. C.; Goode, M. W.

    1976-01-01

    The characteristics of air traffic patterns at uncontrolled airports and techniques used by a group of general aviation pilots in landing light airplanes are documented. The results of some 1,600 radar tracks taken at four uncontrolled airports and some 600 landings made by 22 pilots in two, four place, single engine light airplanes show that the uncontrolled traffic pattern is highly variable. The altitudes, distances, and piloting procedures utilized may affect the ability for pilots to see-and-avoid in this environment. Most landing approaches were conducted at an airspeed above recommended, resulting in significant floating during flare and touchdowns that were relatively flat and often nose-low.

  4. Enabling efficient vertical takeoff/landing and forward flight of unmanned aerial vehicles: Design and control of tandem wing-tip mounted rotor mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Peter Timothy

    Fixed-wing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) that offer vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) and forward flight capability suffer from sub-par performance in both flight modes. Achieving the next generation of efficient hybrid aircraft requires innovations in: (i) power management, (ii) efficient structures, and (iii) control methodologies. Existing hybrid UAVs generally utilize one of three transitioning mechanisms: an external power mechanism to tilt the rotor-propulsion pod, separate propulsion units and rotors during hover and forward flight, or tilt body craft (smaller scale). Thus, hybrid concepts require more energy compared to dedicated fixed-wing or rotorcraft UAVs. Moreover, design trade-offs to reinforce the wing structure (typically to accommodate the propulsion systems and enable hover, i.e. tilt-rotor concepts) adversely impacts the aerodynamics, controllability and efficiency of the aircraft in both hover and forward flight modes. The goal of this research is to develop more efficient VTOL/ hover and forward flight UAVs. In doing so, the transition sequence, transition mechanism, and actuator performance are heavily considered. A design and control methodology was implemented to address these issues through a series of computer simulations and prototype benchtop tests to verify the proposed solution. Finally, preliminary field testing with a first-generation prototype was conducted. The methods used in this research offer guidelines and a new dual-arm rotor UAV concept to designing more efficient hybrid UAVs in both hover and forward flight.

  5. Flight evaluation of stabilization and command augmentation system concepts and cockpit displays during approach and landing of powered-lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Innis, R. C.; Hardy, G. H.

    1980-01-01

    A flight research program was conducted to assess the effectiveness of manual control concepts and various cockpit displays in improving altitude (pitch, roll, and yaw) and longitudinal path control during short takeoff aircraft approaches and landings. Satisfactory flying qualities were demonstrared to minimum decision heights of 30 m (100 ft) for selected stabilization and command augmentation systems and flight director combinations. Precise landings at low touchdown sink rates were achieved with a gentle flare maneuver.

  6. Static internal performance of ventral and rear nozzle concepts for short-takeoff and vertical-landing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Re, Richard J.; Carson, George T., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The internal performance of two exhaust system concepts applicable to single-engine short-take-off and vertical-landing tactical fighter configurations was investigated. These concepts involved blocking (or partially blocking) tailpipe flow to the rear (cruise) nozzle and diverting it through an opening to a ventral nozzle exit for vertical thrust. A set of variable angle vanes at the ventral nozzle exit were used to vary ventral nozzle thrust angle between 45 and 110 deg relative to the positive axial force direction. In the vertical flight mode the rear nozzle (or tailpipe flow to it) was completely blocked. In the transition flight mode flow in the tailpipe was split between the rear and ventral nozzles and the flow was vectored at both exits for aircraft control purposes through this flight regime. In the cruise flight mode the ventral nozzle was sealed and all flow exited through the rear nozzle.

  7. A Model for Space Shuttle Orbiter Tire Side Forces Based on NASA Landing Systems Research Aircraft Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, John F.; Nagy, Christopher J.; Barnicki, Joseph S.

    1997-01-01

    Forces generated by the Space Shuttle orbiter tire under varying vertical load, slip angle, speed, and surface conditions were measured using the Landing System Research Aircraft (LSRA). Resulting data were used to calculate a mathematical model for predicting tire forces in orbiter simulations. Tire side and drag forces experienced by an orbiter tire are cataloged as a function of vertical load and slip angle. The mathematical model is compared to existing tire force models for the Space Shuttle orbiter. This report describes the LSRA and a typical test sequence. Testing methods, data reduction, and error analysis are presented. The LSRA testing was conducted on concrete and lakebed runways at the Edwards Air Force Flight Test Center and on concrete runways at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Wet runway tire force tests were performed on test strips made at the KSC using different surfacing techniques. Data were corrected for ply steer forces and conicity.

  8. Practical applications of low, medium, and high altitude aircraft remote sensing data to land use planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drackett, K.; Gregg, T. W. D.; Bale, J.

    1975-01-01

    Remotely sensed data is gaining wider acceptance in land use planning activities because of several inherent advantages offered by the technology. Scope of applications have increased to meet planners broadening responsibilities and needs for more comprehensive and specific information in response to new legislative mandates. Specific data needs associated with the land use planning process are varied. To illustrate how remote sensing surveys can be designed to meet a variety of goals at several planning levels, specific examples of the use of remotely sensed data and analysis techniques in four planning oriented land use surveys are discussed. These examples illustrate the use of aerial photography at the state planning level in Maryland and county level in Jefferson Parish, Louisiana. Special applications of aerial photography are demonstrated by energy planning in San Bernardino County, California and water management planning in New Castle County, Delaware.

  9. Beta 2: A near term, fully reusable, horizontal takeoff and landing two-stage-to-orbit launch vehicle concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkardt, Leo A.

    1992-01-01

    A recent study has confirmed the feasibility of a near term, fully reusable, horizontal takeoff and landing two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) launch vehicle concept. The vehicle stages at Mach 6.5. The first stage is powered by a turboramjet propulsion system with the turbojets being fueled by JP and the ramjet by LH2. The second stage is powered by a space shuttle main engine (SSME) rocket engine. For about the same gross weight as growth versions of the 747, the vehicle can place 10,000 lbm. in low polar orbit or 16,000 lbm. to Space Station Freedom.

  10. Concepts and cost trade-offs for land vehicle antennas in satellite mobile communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, H. A.

    1948-01-01

    Several antenna design concepts, operating at UHF (821 to 825 MHz transmit and 866 to 870 MHz receive bands), with gain ranging between 6 and 12 dBic, that are suitable for land mobile vehicles are presented. The antennas may be used within CONUS and ALASKA to communicate to and from a geosynchronous satellite. Depending on the type of steering mechanism, the antennas are broken down into three categories; (1) electronically scanned arrays with phase shifters, (2) electronically switched arrays with switchable power dividers/combiners, and (3) mechanically steered arrays. The operating characteristics of two of these design concepts, one a conformal antenna with electronic beam steering and the other a nonconformal design with mechanical steering, were evaluated with regard to two and three satellite system. Cost estimates of various antenna concepts were made and plotted against their overall gain performance.

  11. The engineering of a nuclear thermal landing and ascent vehicle utilizing indigenous Martian propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    A design study of a novel space transportation concept called NIMF (Nuclear rocket using Indigenous Martian Fuel) is reported. In this concept, Martian CO2 gas, which constitutes 95 percent of the atmosphere, is liquified by simple compression to about 100 psi and remains stable without refrigeration. When heated and exhausted out of a rocket nozzle, a specific impulse of about 264 s can be achieved, sufficient for flights from the surface to highly energetic orbits or from one point on the surface to any other point. The propellant acquisition system can travel with the vehicle, allowing it to refuel itself each time it lands. The concept offers unequalled potential to achieve planetwide mobility, allowing complete global access for the exploration of Mars. By eliminating the necessity of transporting ascent propellant to Mars, the NIMF can also significantly reduce the initial mass in LEO and of a manned Mars mission.

  12. Downscaling of Aircraft, Landsat, and MODIS-bases Land Surface Temperature Images with Support Vector Machines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High spatial resolution Land Surface Temperature (LST) images are required to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) at a field scale for irrigation scheduling purposes. Satellite sensors such as Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) can offer images at s...

  13. Use of steepest descent and various approximations for efficient computation of minimum noise aircraft landing trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, G.; Witt, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    The following areas related to landing trajectory optimization research were discussed: (1) programming and modifying the steepest descent optimization procedure, (2) successfully iterating toward the optimum for a four-mile trajectory, (3) beginning optimization runs for a twenty-mile trajectory, and (4) adapt wind tunnel data for computer usage. Other related areas were discussed in detail in the two previous annual reports.

  14. On-line robust approach and landing trajectory generation for reusable launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhesheng

    A major objective of next generation reusable launch vehicle (RLV) programs includes significant improvements in vehicle safety, reliability, and operational costs. We first discuss trajectory generation on approach and landing (A&L) for RLVs using motion primitives (MPs) and neighboring optimal control (NOC). The proposed approach is based on an MP scheme that consists of trims and maneuvers. From an initial point to a given touchdown point, all feasible trajectories that satisfy certain constraints are generated and stored in a trajectory database. An optimal trajectory can then be found off-line by using Dijkstra's algorithm. If a vehicle failure occurs, perturbations are imposed on the initial states of the off-line optimal trajectory, and it is reshaped into a neighboring feasible trajectory by using NOC approach. If the perturbations are small enough, a neighboring feasible trajectory existence theorem (NFTET) is then investigated. The approach given in the NFTET shows that the vehicle with stuck effectors can be recovered from failures in real time. However, when the perturbations become large, for example, in severe failure scenarios, the NFTET is no longer applicable. A new method is now used to deal with this situation. The NFTET is then extended to trajectory robustness theorem (TRT). According to the TRT, a robustifying term is introduced to compensate for the effects of the linear approximation in the NFTET. The upper bounds with respect to input deviation are adaptively adjusted to eliminate their uncertainty. In order to obtain best performance, sigma-modification is employed. The simulation results verify the excellent robust performance of this method. Until now, the atmosphere has been assumed to be at rest. Since this is the exceptional rather than the usual case, it is necessary to investigate the wind effects on the behavior of RLVs, where the atmosphere has nonuniform and unsteady motion. When wind effect is included, two corollaries will be

  15. Response to actual and simulated recordings of conventional takeoff and landing jet aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mabry, J. E.; Sullivan, B. M.

    1978-01-01

    Comparability between noise characteristics of synthesized recordings of aircraft in flight and actual recordings were investigated. Although the synthesized recordings were more smoothly time-varying than the actual recordings and the synthesizer could not produce a comb-filter effect that was present in the actual recordings, results supported the conclusion that annoyance response is comparable to the synthesized and actual recordings. A correction for duration markedly improved the validity of engineering calculation procedures designed to measure noise annoyance. Results led to the conclusion that the magnitude estimation psychophysical method was a highly reliable approach for evaluating engineering calculation procedures designed to measure noise annoyance. For repeated presentations of pairs of actual recordings, differences between judgment results for identical signals ranged from 0.0 to 0.5 db.

  16. Comparative study of flare control laws. [optimal control of b-737 aircraft approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadkarni, A. A.; Breedlove, W. J., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A digital 3-D automatic control law was developed to achieve an optimal transition of a B-737 aircraft between various initial glid slope conditions and the desired final touchdown condition. A discrete, time-invariant, optimal, closed-loop control law presented for a linear regulator problem, was extended to include a system being acted upon by a constant disturbance. Two forms of control laws were derived to solve this problem. One method utilized the feedback of integral states defined appropriately and augmented with the original system equations. The second method formulated the problem as a control variable constraint, and the control variables were augmented with the original system. The control variable constraint control law yielded a better performance compared to feedback control law for the integral states chosen.

  17. Terminal area automatic navigation, guidance, and control research using the Microwave Landing System (MLS). Part 2: RNAV/MLS transition problems for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, S.

    1982-01-01

    The problems in navigation and guidance encountered by aircraft in the initial transition period in changing from distance measuring equipment, VORTAC, and barometric instruments to the more precise microwave landing system data type navaids in the terminal area are investigated. The effects of the resulting discontinuities on the estimates of position and velocity for both optimal (Kalman type navigation schemes) and fixed gain (complementary type) navigation filters, and the effects of the errors in cross track, track angle, and altitude on the guidance equation and control commands during the critical landing phase are discussed. A method is presented to remove the discontinuities from the navigation loop and to reconstruct an RNAV path designed to land the aircraft with minimal turns and altitude changes.

  18. A novel fusion methodology to bridge GPS outages for land vehicle positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Li, Xu; Song, Xiang; Li, Bin; Song, Xianghui; Xu, Qimin

    2015-07-01

    Many intelligent transportation system applications require accurate, reliable, and continuous vehicle position information whether in open-sky environments or in Global Positioning System (GPS) denied environments. However, there remains a challenging task for land vehicles to achieve such positioning performance using low-cost sensors, especially microelectromechanical system (MEMS) sensors. In this paper, a novel and cost-effective fusion methodology to bridge GPS outages is proposed and applied in the Inertial Navigation System (INS)/GPS/ compass integrated positioning system. In the implementation of the proposed methodology, a key data preprocessing algorithm is first developed to eliminate the noise in inertial sensors in order to provide more accurate information for subsequent modeling. Then, a novel hybrid strategy incorporating the designed autoregressive model (AR model)-based forward estimator (ARFE) with Kalman filter (KF) is presented to predict the INS position errors during GPS outages. To verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed methodology, real road tests with various scenarios were performed. The proposed methodology illustrates significant improvement in positioning accuracy during GPS outages.

  19. X-38 vehicle #131R during landing on first free flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The latest version of the X-38, V-131R, touches down on Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, at the end of its first free flight under a giant parafoil on Nov. 2, 2000. The X-38 prototypes are intended to perfect technology for a planned Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) 'lifeboat' to carry a crew to safety in the event of an emergency on the International Space Station. Free-flight tests of X-38 V-131R are evaluating upgraded avionics and control systems and the aerodynamics of the modified upper body, which is more representative of the final design of the CRV than the two earlier X-38 test craft, including a simulated hatch atop the body. The huge 7,500 square-foot parafoil will enable the CRV to land in the length of a football field after returning from space. The first three X-38's are air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52B mother ship, while the last version, V-201, will be carried into space by a Space Shuttle and make a fully autonomous re-entry and landing.

  20. Design, building, and testing of the post landing systems for the assured crew return vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Loren A.

    1991-01-01

    The design, building, and testing of the post landing support systems for a water landing Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) are presented. One ACRV will be permanently docked to Space Station Freedom, fulfilling NASA's commitment to Assured Crew Return Capability in the event of an accident or illness. The configuration of the ACRV is based on an Apollo Command Module (ACM) derivative. The 1990 to 91 effort concentrated on the design, building, and testing of a 1/5 scale model of the egress and stabilization systems. The objective was to determine the feasibility of: (1) stabilizing the ACM out of the range of motions which cause sea sickness; and (2) the safe and rapid removal of a sick or injured crewmember from the ACRV. The ACRV model construction is presented along with a discussion of the water test facility. The rapid egress system is also presented along with a discussion of the ACRV stabilization control systems. Results are given and discussed in detail.

  1. A Design Study of the Inflated Sphere Landing Vehicle, Including the Landing Performance and the Effects of Deviations from Design Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E. Dale

    1961-01-01

    The impact motion of the inflated sphere landing vehicle with a payload centrally supported from the spherical skin by numerous cords has been determined on the assumption of uniform isentropic gas compression during impact. The landing capabilities are determined for a system containing suspension cords of constant cross section. The effects of deviations in impact velocity and initial gas temperature from the design conditions are studied. Also discussed are the effects of errors in the time at which the skin is ruptured. These studies indicate how the design parameters should be chosen to insure reliability of the landing system. Calculations have been made and results are presented for a sphere inflated with hydrogen, landing on the moon in the absence of an atmosphere. The results are presented for one value of the skin-strength parameter.

  2. The design, development, and flight test results of the Boeing 737 aircraft antennas for the ICAO demonstration of the TRSB microwave landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, T. G.; White, W. E.; Gilreath, M. C.

    1976-01-01

    The Research Support Flight System, a modified Boeing 737, was used to evaluate the performance of several aircraft antennas and locations for the Time Reference Scanning Beam (TRSB) Microwave Landing System (MLS). These tests were conducted at the National Aviation Facilities Experimental Center (NAFEC), Atlantic City, New Jersey on December 18, 1975. The flight tests measured the signal strength and all pertinent MLS data during a straight-in approach, a racetrack approach, and ICAO approach profiles using the independent antenna-receiver combinations simultaneously on the aircraft. Signal drop-outs were experienced during the various approaches but only a small percentage could be attributed to antenna pattern effects.

  3. Cross Cutting Relative Navigation Technologies for Improved Landing Accuracy and Vehicle-to-Vehicle Rendezvous and Docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K. L.; Masciarelli, J.; Rohrschneider, R. R.

    2012-06-01

    This presentation addresses recent development and test progress, as well as future technology advancement plans for precision landing and Autonomous Rendezvous, Proximity Operations and Docking (ARPOD).

  4. Serial Escape System For Aircraft Crews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Kenneth E.

    1990-01-01

    Emergency escape system for aircraft and aerospace vehicles ejects up to seven crewmembers, one by one, within 120 s. Intended for emergencies in which disabled craft still in stable flight at no more than 220 kn (113 m/s) equivalent airspeed and sinking no faster than 110 ft/s (33.5 m/s) at altitudes up to 50,000 ft (15.2 km). Ejection rockets load themselves from magazine after each crewmember ejected. Jumpmaster queues other crewmembers and helps them position themselves on egress ramp. Rockets pull crewmembers clear of aircraft structure. Provides orderly, controlled exit and avoids ditching at sea or landing in rough terrain.

  5. Design considerations for attaining 200-knot test velocities at the aircraft landing loads and traction facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, G. L.; Stubbs, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    Design studies are presented which consider the important parameters in providing 200 knot test velocities at the landing loads and traction facility. Two major components of this facility, the hydraulic jet catapult and the test carriage structure, are considered. Suitable factors are determined to correlate analytical data for characteristics of the hydraulic jet catapult with data measured from the existing catapult system. The resulting equations are used to calculate test velocities for a range of jet nozzle diameters and carriage masses with both the current 122 m and an increased 183 m catapult stroke. Using the catapult characteristics, a target design point is selected and a carriage structure is sized to meet the target point strength requirements.

  6. Development of the NASA VALT digital navigation system. [for approach and landing procedures of VTOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, W. J., Jr.; Skutecki, E. R.; Calzado, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    The research to develop and fabricate a terminal area navigation system for use in the NASA VTOL Approach and Landing Technology (VALT) program. The results of that effort are reported. The navigation system developed and fabricated was based on a general purpose airborne digital computer. A set of flight hardware units was fabricated to create the necessary analog, digital and human interface with the computer. A comprehensive package of software was created to implement the control and guidance laws required for automatic and flight director approaches that are curved in two planes. A technique was developed that enables the generation of randomly shaped lateral paths from simple input data. The lateral path concept combines straight line and elliptical-curved segments to fit a continuous curved path to the data points. A simple, fixed base simulation was put together to assist in developing and evaluating the system. The simulation was used to obtain system performance data during simulated curved-path approaches.

  7. Characteristics of eye movement and cognition during simulated landing of aircraft.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-qi; Yuan, Xiu-gan; Liu, Wei; Wang, Rui

    2002-10-01

    Objective. To examine how the subject scans different parts of display panels and how the attention is distributed through the analysis of the eye movement principle and the cognition of the brain. Method. An experiment was conducted to simulate the airplane's landing course and eye movement data were recorded with eye movement measure system (EMMS). Result. There were three regions of interest (ROI) on which the subject's attention was concentrated. The subject's visual activity was active in the three ROIS and attention's shifting and distribution was between ROIS. Conclusion. Eye movement were driven by the top-down processing and the distribution of the attention. The consequence of the eye movement makes the subject maintain a continuous situation awareness. PMID:12449149

  8. 7 CFR 322.33 - Restricted articles in a commercial bonded vehicle arriving at a land border port in the United...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... arriving at a land border port in the United States. 322.33 Section 322.33 Agriculture Regulations of the... § 322.33 Restricted articles in a commercial bonded vehicle arriving at a land border port in the United States. If you import a restricted article through a land border port in the United States by...

  9. 7 CFR 322.33 - Restricted articles in a commercial bonded vehicle arriving at a land border port in the United...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... arriving at a land border port in the United States. 322.33 Section 322.33 Agriculture Regulations of the... § 322.33 Restricted articles in a commercial bonded vehicle arriving at a land border port in the United States. If you import a restricted article through a land border port in the United States by...

  10. Environmental effects of off-highway vehicles on Bureau of Land Management lands: A literature synthesis, annotated bibliographies, extensive bibliographies, and internet resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ouren, Douglas S.; Haas, Christopher; Melcher, Cynthia P.; Stewart, Susan C.; Ponds, Phadrea D.; Sexton, Natalie R.; Burris, Lucy; Fancher, Tammy; Bowen, Zachary H.

    2007-01-01

    This report and its associated appendixes compile and synthesize the results of a comprehensive literature and Internet search conducted in May 2006. The literature search was undertaken to uncover information regarding the effects of off-highway vehicle (OHV) use on land health, or “natural resource attributes,” and included databases archiving information from before OHVs came into existence to May 2006. Information pertaining to socioeconomic implications of OHV activities is included as well. The literature and Internet searches yielded approximately 700 peer-reviewed papers, magazine articles, agency and non-governmental reports, and internet websites regarding effects of OHV use as they relate to the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) standards of land health. Discussions regarding OHV effects are followed by brief syntheses of potential indicators of OHV effects, as well as OHV-effects mitigation, site-restoration techniques, and research needs.

  11. Preliminary performance of a vertical-attitude takeoff and landing, supersonic cruise aircraft concept having thrust vectoring integrated into the flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robins, A. W.; Beissner, F. L., Jr.; Domack, C. S.; Swanson, E. E.

    1985-01-01

    A performance study was made of a vertical attitude takeoff and landing (VATOL), supersonic cruise aircraft concept having thrust vectoring integrated into the flight control system. Those characteristics considered were aerodynamics, weight, balance, and performance. Preliminary results indicate that high levels of supersonic aerodynamic performance can be achieved. Further, with the assumption of an advanced (1985 technology readiness) low bypass ratio turbofan engine and advanced structures, excellent mission performance capability is indicated.

  12. Evaluation of Flying Qualities and Guidance Displays for an Advanced Tilt-Wing STOL Transport Aircraft in Final Approach and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Chad R.; Franklin, James A.; Hardy, Gordon H.

    2002-01-01

    A piloted simulation was performed on the Vertical Motion Simulator at NASA Ames Research Center to evaluate flying qualities of a tilt-wing Short Take-Off and Landing (STOL) transport aircraft during final approach and landing. The experiment was conducted to assess the design s handling qualities, and to evaluate the use of flightpath-centered guidance for the precision approach and landing tasks required to perform STOL operations in instrument meteorological conditions, turbulence, and wind. Pilots rated the handling qualities to be satisfactory for all operations evaluated except those encountering extreme crosswinds and severe windshear; even in these difficult meteorological conditions, adequate handling qualities were maintained. The advanced flight control laws and guidance displays provided consistent performance and precision landings.

  13. A positional estimation technique for an autonomous land vehicle in an unstructured environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talluri, Raj; Aggarwal, J. K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a solution to the positional estimation problem of an autonomous land vehicle navigating in an unstructured mountainous terrain. A Digital Elevation Map (DEM) of the area in which the robot is to navigate is assumed to be given. It is also assumed that the robot is equipped with a camera that can be panned and tilted, and a device to measure the elevation of the robot above the ground surface. No recognizable landmarks are assumed to be present in the environment in which the robot is to navigate. The solution presented makes use of the DEM information, and structures the problem as a heuristic search in the DEM for the possible robot location. The shape and position of the horizon line in the image plane and the known camera geometry of the perspective projection are used as parameters to search the DEM. Various heuristics drawn from the geometric constraints are used to prune the search space significantly. The algorithm is made robust to errors in the imaging process by accounting for the worst care errors. The approach is tested using DEM data of areas in Colorado and Texas. The method is suitable for use in outdoor mobile robots and planetary rovers.

  14. An unsymmetrical design of IMU for attitude measurement of land vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huaqiang; Zhao, Yan; Chen, Yu

    2011-08-01

    Focusing on the determining attitude of land vehicles which equipped with antenna platform for communication satellite, the mathematical model of the integrated navigation system of Strapdown Inertial Navigation System(SINS) and Global Positioning System(GPS) has been built at first. Then the observability of the attitude errors of the integrated navigation system has been concluded to be very weak, and the observability of the heading error is weaker than the horizontal attitude's. Due to this characteristic and the requirement of miniaturization and low-cost, a new inertial measurement unit (IMU) structure has been designed, which comprises three gyros and three accelerometers. Two MEMS gyros were installed on the horizontal plane, and a high degree of accuracy fibre optical gyro was installed in the vertical direction. During navigation period, the Kalman filter is used for calculating the navigation information. Both the theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the new unsymmetrical design of IMU can improve the precision of heading significantly, and when this IMU is integrated with GPS, the attitude precision can meet the requirement of the antenna platform control.

  15. An investigation of the accuracy of empirical aircraft design for the development of an unmanned aerial vehicle intended for liquid hydrogen fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaney, Christopher Scott

    A study was conducted to assess the accuracy of empirical techniques used for the calculation of flight performance for unmanned aerial vehicles. This was achieved by quantifying the error between a mathematical model developed with these techniques and experimental test data taken using an unmanned aircraft. The vehicle utilized for this study was developed at Washington State University for the purpose of flying using power derived from hydrogen stored as a cryogenic liquid. The vehicle has a mass of 32.8 kg loaded and performed a total of 14 flights under battery power for 3.58 total flight hours. Over these flights, the design proved it is capable of sustaining level flight from the power available from a PEM fuel cell propulsion system. The empirical techniques used by the model are explicitly outlined within. These yield several performance metrics that are compared to measurements taken during flight testing. Calculations of required thrust for steady flight over all airspeeds and rates of climb modeled are found to have a mean percent error of 3.2%+/-7.0% and a mean absolute percent error of 34.6%+/-5.1%. Comparison of the calculated and measured takeoff distance are made and the calculated thrust required to perform a level turn at a given rate is compared to flight test data. A section of a test flight is analyzed, over which the vehicle proves it can sustain level flight under 875 watts of electrical power. The aircraft's design is presented including the wing and tail, propulsion system, and build technique. The software and equipment used for the collection and analysis of flight data are given. Documentation and validation is provided of a unique test rig for the characterization of propeller performance using a car. The aircraft remains operational to assist with research of alternative energy propulsion systems and novel fuel storage techniques. The results from the comparison of the mathematical model and flight test data can be utilized to assist

  16. Evaluation of two transport aircraft and several ground test vehicle friction measurements obtained for various runway surface types and conditions. A summary of test results from joint FAA/NASA Runway Friction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Vogler, William A.; Baldasare, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Tests with specially instrumented NASA Boeing 737 and 727 aircraft together with several different ground friction measuring devices were conducted for a variety of runway surface types and conditions. These tests are part of joint FAA/NASA Aircraft/Ground Vehicle Runway Friction Program aimed at obtaining a better understanding of aircraft ground handling performance under adverse weather conditions and defining relationships between aircraft and ground vehicle tire friction measurements. Aircraft braking performance on dry, wet, snow and ice-covered runway conditions is discussed as well as ground vehicle friction data obtained under similar runway conditions. For a given contaminated runway surface condition, the correlation between ground vehicles and aircraft friction data is identified. The influence of major test parameters on friction measurements such as speed, test tire characteristics, type and amount of surface contaminant, and ambient temperature are discussed. The effect of surface type on wet friction levels is also evaluated from comparative data collected on grooved and ungrooved concrete and asphalt surfaces.

  17. Analysis of the dynamics of movement of the landing vehicle with an inflatable braking device on the final trajectory under the influence of wind load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koryanov, V.; Kazakovtsev, V.; Harri, A.-M.; Heilimo, J.; Haukka, H.; Aleksashkin, S.

    2015-10-01

    This research work is devoted to analysis of angular motion of the landing vehicle (LV) with an inflatable braking device (IBD), taking into account the influence of the wind load on the final stage of the movement. Using methods to perform a calculation of parameters of angular motion of the landing vehicle with an inflatable braking device based on the availability of small asymmetries, which are capable of complex dynamic phenomena, analyzes motion of the landing vehicle at the final stage of motion in the atmosphere.

  18. Design and Testing of a Prototype Lunar or Planetary Surface Landing Research Vehicle (LPSLRV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Gloria A.

    2010-01-01

    This handbook describes a two-semester senior design course sponsored by the NASA Office of Education, the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD), and the NASA Space Grant Consortium. The course was developed and implemented by the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department (MAE) at Utah State University. The course final outcome is a packaged senior design course that can be readily incorporated into the instructional curriculum at universities across the country. The course materials adhere to the standards of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), and is constructed to be relevant to key research areas identified by ESMD. The design project challenged students to apply systems engineering concepts to define research and training requirements for a terrestrial-based lunar landing simulator. This project developed a flying prototype for a Lunar or Planetary Surface Landing Research Vehicle (LPSRV). Per NASA specifications the concept accounts for reduced lunar gravity, and allows the terminal stage of lunar descent to be flown either by remote pilot or autonomously. This free-flying platform was designed to be sufficiently-flexible to allow both sensor evaluation and pilot training. This handbook outlines the course materials, describes the systems engineering processes developed to facilitate design fabrication, integration, and testing. This handbook presents sufficient details of the final design configuration to allow an independent group to reproduce the design. The design evolution and details regarding the verification testing used to characterize the system are presented in a separate project final design report. Details of the experimental apparatus used for system characterization may be found in Appendix F, G, and I of that report. A brief summary of the ground testing and systems verification is also included in Appendix A of this report. Details of the flight tests will be documented in a separate flight test

  19. STOL Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Michael E. Fisher, President of AeroVisions International, has introduced the Culex light twin engine aircraft which offers economy of operation of a single engine plane, the ability to fly well on one engine, plus the capability of flying from short, unimproved fields of takeoff and landing distances less than 35 feet. Key element of design is an airfoil developed by Langley. Culex was originally intended to be factory built aircraft for special utility markets. However, it is now offered as a build-it-yourself kit plane.

  20. Information processing requirements for on-board monitoring of automatic landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.; Karmarkar, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    A systematic procedure is presented for determining the information processing requirements for on-board monitoring of automatic landing systems. The monitoring system detects landing anomalies through use of appropriate statistical tests. The time-to-correct aircraft perturbations is determined from covariance analyses using a sequence of suitable aircraft/autoland/pilot models. The covariance results are used to establish landing safety and a fault recovery operating envelope via an event outcome tree. This procedure is demonstrated with examples using the NASA Terminal Configured Vehicle (B-737 aircraft). The procedure can also be used to define decision height, assess monitoring implementation requirements, and evaluate alternate autoland configurations.

  1. Soil runway friction evaluation in support of USAF C-17 transport aircraft operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    A series of NASA Diagonal-Braked Vehicle (DBV) test runs were performed on the soil runway 7/25 at Holland landing zone, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, near Pope Air Force Base in March 1995 at the request of the Air Force C-17 System Program Office. These ground vehicle test results indicated that the dry runway friction level was suitable for planned C-17 transport aircraft landing and take-off operations at various gross weights. These aircraft operations were successfully carried out. On-board aircraft deceleration measurements were comparable to NASA DBV measurements. Additional tests conducted with an Army High Mobility Multi-Purpose Wheeled Vehicle equipped with a portable decelerometer, showed good agreement with NASA DBV data.

  2. 7 CFR 322.18 - Restricted organisms in a commercial vehicle arriving at a land border port in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Restricted organisms in a commercial vehicle arriving... BEES, BEEKEEPING BYPRODUCTS, AND BEEKEEPING EQUIPMENT Importation of Restricted Organisms § 322.18 Restricted organisms in a commercial vehicle arriving at a land border port in the United States. (a) If...

  3. 7 CFR 322.18 - Restricted organisms in a commercial vehicle arriving at a land border port in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Restricted organisms in a commercial vehicle arriving... BEES, BEEKEEPING BYPRODUCTS, AND BEEKEEPING EQUIPMENT Importation of Restricted Organisms § 322.18 Restricted organisms in a commercial vehicle arriving at a land border port in the United States. (a) If...

  4. 7 CFR 322.18 - Restricted organisms in a commercial vehicle arriving at a land border port in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Restricted organisms in a commercial vehicle arriving... BEES, BEEKEEPING BYPRODUCTS, AND BEEKEEPING EQUIPMENT Importation of Restricted Organisms § 322.18 Restricted organisms in a commercial vehicle arriving at a land border port in the United States. (a) If...

  5. 7 CFR 322.18 - Restricted organisms in a commercial vehicle arriving at a land border port in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restricted organisms in a commercial vehicle arriving... BEES, BEEKEEPING BYPRODUCTS, AND BEEKEEPING EQUIPMENT Importation of Restricted Organisms § 322.18 Restricted organisms in a commercial vehicle arriving at a land border port in the United States. (a) If...

  6. 7 CFR 322.18 - Restricted organisms in a commercial vehicle arriving at a land border port in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Restricted organisms in a commercial vehicle arriving... BEES, BEEKEEPING BYPRODUCTS, AND BEEKEEPING EQUIPMENT Importation of Restricted Organisms § 322.18 Restricted organisms in a commercial vehicle arriving at a land border port in the United States. (a) If...

  7. Analysis and design of a capsule landing system and surface vehicle control system for Mars exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gisser, D. G.; Frederick, D. K.; Lashmet, P. K.; Sandor, G. N.; Shen, C. N.; Yerazunis, S. Y.

    1975-01-01

    Problems related to an unmanned exploration of the planet Mars by means of an autonomous roving planetary vehicle are investigated. These problems include: design, construction and evaluation of the vehicle itself and its control and operating systems. More specifically, vehicle configuration, dynamics, control, propulsion, hazard detection systems, terrain sensing and modelling, obstacle detection concepts, path selection, decision-making systems, and chemical analyses of samples are studied. Emphasis is placed on development of a vehicle capable of gathering specimens and data for an Augmented Viking Mission or to provide the basis for a Sample Return Mission.

  8. Lift/cruise fan V/STOL technology aircraft design definition study. Volume 1: Technology flight vehicle definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    Concept design is presented for two types of lift/cruise fan technology V/STOL aircraft, turbotip fans and the other using mechanically driven fans. The turbotip research technology aircraft reflects maximum usage of existing airframe components. The propulsion system consists of three turbotip fans pneumatically interconnected to three gas generators. Thrust modulation is accomplished by use of energy transfer and control system and thrust reduction modulation. This system can also be operated in the two engine/three fan mode. The mechanical RTA is virtually identical to the turbotip RTA with the exceptions that a different propulsion system and aft fuselage/tail are used. Both aircraft meet or exceed all of the mission performance guidelines and reflect a low cost, low risk approach.

  9. Temporal and spatial variability of daytime land surface temperature in Houston: Comparing DISCOVER-AQ aircraft observations with the WRF model and satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Min; Lee, Pius; McNider, Richard; Crawford, James; Buzay, Eric; Barrick, John; Liu, Yuling; Krishnan, Praveena

    2016-01-01

    Based on a semiempirical diurnal temperature cycle model and aircraft observations taken at different times of the day, daytime land surface temperature (LST) is derived at six locations in the Greater Houston area on the least cloudy day during NASA's DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) field campaign in September 2013. The aircraft-derived daytime LSTs show ranges (max-min) of 11-25°K varying by location, with the daily maxima occurring near 1300-1400 local time. Two Weather Research and Forecasting model simulations that were configured differently are compared with these aircraft-derived LST, indicating location- and time-dependent performance. The NOAA GOES geostationary satellite observed similar LST spatial patterns in Houston to those in finer resolution from two polar-orbiting satellite instruments (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite), and it provided useful information of the LST temporal variability missing from the polar-orbiting satellite products. However, spatial- and time-varying discrepancies are found among LSTs from these various platforms, which are worth further evaluation in order to benefit model evaluation and improvement. The aircraft and satellite LSTs are overall anticorrelated with satellite vegetation indexes. This emphasizes the importance of vegetation cover in urban planning due to its cooling effect and further impact on biogenic emissions and regional air quality. The approaches shown in this study are also suitable for applications under cloudless conditions at other locations and times, such as during the remaining DISCOVER-AQ deployments conducted in three other populated regions with diverse land uses.

  10. An investigation into the vertical axis control power requirements for landing VTOL type aircraft onboard nonaviation ships in various sea states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, M. E.; Roskam, J.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of determining the vertical axis control requirements for landing a VTOL aircraft on a moving ship deck in various sea states is examined. Both a fixed-base piloted simulation and a nonpiloted simulation were used to determine the landing performance as influenced by thrust-to-weight ratio, vertical damping, and engine lags. The piloted simulation was run using a fixed-based simulator at Ames Research center. Simplified versions of an existing AV-8A Harrier model and an existing head-up display format were used. The ship model used was that of a DD963 class destroyer. Simplified linear models of the pilot, aircraft, ship motion, and ship air-wake turbulence were developed for the nonpiloted simulation. A unique aspect of the nonpiloted simulation was the development of a model of the piloting strategy used for shipboard landing. This model was refined during the piloted simulation until it provided a reasonably good representation of observed pilot behavior.

  11. Analysis and design of a capsule landing system and surface vehicle control system for Mars exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A number of problems related to the design, construction and evaluation of an autonomous roving planetary vehicle and its control and operating systems intended for an unmanned exploration of Mars are studied. Vehicle configuration, dynamics, control, systems and propulsion; systems analysis; terrain sensing and modeling and path selection; and chemical analysis of samples are included.

  12. Fugitive dust emissions from off-road vehicle maneuvers on military training lands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Off-road vehicle training can contribute to air quality degradation because of increased wind erosion as a result of soil disruption during high wind events. However, limited information exists regarding the impacts of off-road vehicle maneuvering on wind erosion potential of soils. This study was c...

  13. Analysis and design of a capsule landing system and surface vehicle control system for Mars exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, D. K.; Lashmet, P. K.; Moyer, W. R.; Sandor, G. N.; Shen, C. N.; Smith, E. J.; Yerazunis, S. W.

    1973-01-01

    The following tasks related to the design, construction, and evaluation of a mobile planetary vehicle for unmanned exploration of Mars are discussed: (1) design and construction of a 0.5 scale dynamic vehicle; (2) mathematical modeling of vehicle dynamics; (3) experimental 0.4 scale vehicle dynamics measurements and interpretation; (4) vehicle electro-mechanical control systems; (5) remote control systems; (6) collapsibility and deployment concepts and hardware; (7) design, construction and evaluation of a wheel with increased lateral stiffness, (8) system design optimization; (9) design of an on-board computer; (10) design and construction of a laser range finder; (11) measurement of reflectivity of terrain surfaces; (12) obstacle perception by edge detection; (13) terrain modeling based on gradients; (14) laser scan systems; (15) path selection system simulation and evaluation; (16) gas chromatograph system concepts; (17) experimental chromatograph separation measurements and chromatograph model improvement and evaluation.

  14. Analysis and design of a capsule landing system and surface vehicle control system for Mars exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, D. K.; Lashmet, P. K.; Sandor, G. N.; Shen, C. N.; Smith, E. V.; Yerazunis, S. W.

    1973-01-01

    Problems related to the design and control of a mobile planetary vehicle to implement a systematic plan for the exploration of Mars are reported. Problem areas include: vehicle configuration, control, dynamics, systems and propulsion; systems analysis, terrain modeling and path selection; and chemical analysis of specimens. These tasks are summarized: vehicle model design, mathematical model of vehicle dynamics, experimental vehicle dynamics, obstacle negotiation, electrochemical controls, remote control, collapsibility and deployment, construction of a wheel tester, wheel analysis, payload design, system design optimization, effect of design assumptions, accessory optimal design, on-board computer subsystem, laser range measurement, discrete obstacle detection, obstacle detection systems, terrain modeling, path selection system simulation and evaluation, gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer system concepts, and chromatograph model evaluation and improvement.

  15. Analysis and design of a capsule landing system and surface vehicle control system for Mars exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, D. K.; Lashmet, P. K.; Sandor, G. N.; Shen, C. N.; Smith, E. J.; Yerazunis, S. W.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of problems related to the design and control of a mobile planetary vehicle to implement a systematic plan for the exploration of Mars has been undertaken. Problem areas receiving attention include: vehicle configuration, control, dynamics, systems and propulsion; systems analysis; terrain modeling and path selection; and chemical analysis of specimens. The following specific tasks have been under study: vehicle model design, mathematical modeling of a dynamic vehicle, experimental vehicle dynamics, obstacle negotiation, electromechanical controls, collapsibility and deployment, construction of a wheel tester, wheel analysis, payload design, system design optimization, effect of design assumptions, accessory optimal design, on-board computer sybsystem, laser range measurement, discrete obstacle detection, obstacle detection systems, terrain modeling, path selection system simulation and evaluation, gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer system concepts, chromatograph model evaluation and improvement.

  16. Analysis and design of a capsule landing system and surface vehicle control system for Mars exporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, D. K.; Lashmet, P. K.; Sandor, G. N.; Shen, C. N.; Smith, E. J.; Yerazunis, S. W.

    1972-01-01

    The problems related to the design and control of a mobile planetary vehicle to implement a systematic plan for the exploration of Mars were investigated. Problem areas receiving attention include: vehicle configuration, control, dynamics, systems and propulsion; systems analysis; navigation, terrain modeling and path selection; and chemical analysis of specimens. The following specific tasks were studied: vehicle model design, mathematical modeling of dynamic vehicle, experimental vehicle dynamics, obstacle negotiation, electromechanical controls, collapsibility and deployment, construction of a wheel tester, wheel analysis, payload design, system design optimization, effect of design assumptions, accessory optimal design, on-board computer subsystem, laser range measurement, discrete obstacle detection, obstacle detection systems, terrain modeling, path selection system simulation and evaluation, gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer system concepts, chromatograph model evaluation and improvement and transport parameter evaluation.

  17. Flight tests of three-dimensional path-redefinition algorithms for transition from Radio Navigation (RNAV) to Microwave Landing System (MLS) navigation when flying an aircraft on autopilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueschen, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    This report contains results of flight tests for three path update algorithms designed to provide smooth transition for an aircraft guidance system from DME, VORTAC, and barometric navaids to the more precise MLS by modifying the desired 3-D flight path. The first algorithm, called Zero Cross Track, eliminates the discontinuity in cross-track and altitude error at transition by designating the first valid MLS aircraft position as the desired first waypoint, while retaining all subsequent waypoints. The discontinuity in track angle is left unaltered. The second, called Tangent Path, also eliminates the discontinuity in cross-track and altitude errors and chooses a new desired heading to be tangent to the next oncoming circular arc turn. The third, called Continued Track, eliminates the discontinuity in cross-track, altitude, and track angle errors by accepting the current MLS position and track angle as the desired ones and recomputes the location of the next waypoint. The flight tests were conducted on the Transportation Systems Research Vehicle, a small twin-jet transport aircraft modified for research under the Advanced Transport Operating Systems program at Langley Research Center. The flight tests showed that the algorithms provided a smooth transition to MLS.

  18. A compilation and analysis of typical approach and landing data for a simulator study of an externally blown flap STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, D. B.; Bergeron, H. P.

    1974-01-01

    A piloted simulation study has been made of typical landing approaches with an externally blown flap STOL aircraft to ascertain a realistic dispersion of parameter values at both the flare window and touchdown. The study was performed on a fixed-base simulator using standard cockpit instrumentation. Six levels of stability and control augmentation were tested during a total of 60 approaches (10 at each level). A detached supplement containing computer printouts of the flare-window and touchdown conditions for all 60 runs has been prepared.

  19. Analysis and design of a capsule landing system and surface vehicle control system for Mars exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, D. K.; Lashmet, P. K.; Sandor, G. N.; Shen, C. N.; Smith, E. J.; Yerazunis, S. W.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of problems related to control of a mobile planetary vehicle according to a systematic plan for the exploration of Mars has been undertaken. Problem areas receiving attention include: (1) overall systems analysis; (2) vehicle configuration and dynamics; (3) toroidal wheel design and evaluation; (4) on-board navigation systems; (5) satellite-vehicle navigation systems; (6) obstacle detection systems; (7) terrain sensing, interpretation and modeling; (8) computer simulation of terrain sensor-path selection systems; and (9) chromatographic systems design concept studies. The specific tasks which have been undertaken are defined and the progress which has been achieved during the period July 1, 1971 to December 31, 1971 is summarized.

  20. Nonlinear automatic landing control of unmanned aerial vehicles on moving platforms via a 3D laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervas, Jaime Rubio; Reyhanoglu, Mahmut; Tang, Hui

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a motion tracking and control system for automatically landing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) on an oscillating platform using Laser Radar (LADAR) observations. The system itself is assumed to be mounted on a ship deck. A full nonlinear mathematical model is first introduced for the UAV. The ship motion is characterized by a Fourier transform based method which includes a realistic characterization of the sea waves. LADAR observation models are introduced and an algorithm to process those observations for yielding the relative state between the vessel and the UAV is presented, from which the UAV's state relative to an inertial frame can be obtained and used for feedback purposes. A sliding mode control algorithm is derived for tracking a landing trajectory defined by a set of desired waypoints. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) is proposed to account for process and observation noises in the design of a state estimator. The effectiveness of the control algorithm is illustrated through a simulation example.

  1. Nonlinear automatic landing control of unmanned aerial vehicles on moving platforms via a 3D laser radar

    SciTech Connect

    Hervas, Jaime Rubio; Tang, Hui; Reyhanoglu, Mahmut

    2014-12-10

    This paper presents a motion tracking and control system for automatically landing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) on an oscillating platform using Laser Radar (LADAR) observations. The system itself is assumed to be mounted on a ship deck. A full nonlinear mathematical model is first introduced for the UAV. The ship motion is characterized by a Fourier transform based method which includes a realistic characterization of the sea waves. LADAR observation models are introduced and an algorithm to process those observations for yielding the relative state between the vessel and the UAV is presented, from which the UAV's state relative to an inertial frame can be obtained and used for feedback purposes. A sliding mode control algorithm is derived for tracking a landing trajectory defined by a set of desired waypoints. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) is proposed to account for process and observation noises in the design of a state estimator. The effectiveness of the control algorithm is illustrated through a simulation example.

  2. Hypersonic aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkamhawi, Hani; Greiner, Tom; Fuerst, Gerry; Luich, Shawn; Stonebraker, Bob; Wray, Todd

    1990-01-01

    A hypersonic aircraft is designed which uses scramjets to accelerate from Mach 6 to Mach 10 and sustain that speed for two minutes. Different propulsion systems were considered and it was decided that the aircraft would use one full scale turbofan-ramjet. Two solid rocket boosters were added to save fuel and help the aircraft pass through the transonic region. After considering aerodynamics, aircraft design, stability and control, cooling systems, mission profile, and landing systems, a conventional aircraft configuration was chosen over that of a waverider. The conventional design was chosen due to its landing characteristics and the relative expense compared to the waverider. Fuel requirements and the integration of the engine systems and their inlets are also taken into consideration in the final design. A hypersonic aircraft was designed which uses scramjets to accelerate from Mach 6 to Mach 10 and sustain that speed for two minutes. Different propulsion systems were considered and a full scale turbofan-ramjet was chosen. Two solid rocket boosters were added to save fuel and help the aircraft pass through the transonic reqion. After the aerodynamics, aircraft design, stability and control, cooling systems, mission profile, landing systems, and their physical interactions were considered, a conventional aircraft configuration was chosen over that of a waverider. The conventional design was chosen due to its landing characteristics and the relative expense compared to the waverider. Fuel requirements and the integration of the engine systems and their inlets were also considered in the designing process.

  3. Integration of visual and motion cues for simulator requirements and ride quality investigation. [computerized simulation of aircraft landing, visual perception of aircraft pilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    Preliminary tests and evaluation are presented of pilot performance during landing (flight paths) using computer generated images (video tapes). Psychophysiological factors affecting pilot visual perception were measured. A turning flight maneuver (pitch and roll) was specifically studied using a training device, and the scaling laws involved were determined. Also presented are medical studies (abstracts) on human response to gravity variations without visual cues, acceleration stimuli effects on the semicircular canals, and neurons affecting eye movements, and vestibular tests.

  4. Motion-base simulator study of control of an externally blown flap STOL transport aircraft after failure of an outboard engine during landing approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, D. B.; Hurt, G. J., Jr.; Bergeron, H. P.; Patton, J. M., Jr.; Deal, P. L.; Champine, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A moving-base simulator investigation of the problems of recovery and landing of a STOL aircraft after failure of an outboard engine during final approach was made. The approaches were made at 75 knots along a 6 deg glide slope. The engine was failed at low altitude and the option to go around was not allowed. The aircraft was simulated with each of three control systems, and it had four high-bypass-ratio fan-jet engines exhausting against large triple-slotted wing flaps to produce additional lift. A virtual-image out-the-window television display of a simulated STOL airport was operating during part of the investigation. Also, a simple heads-up flight director display superimposed on the airport landing scene was used by the pilots to make some of the recoveries following an engine failure. The results of the study indicated that the variation in visual cues and/or motion cues had little effect on the outcome of a recovery, but they did have some effect on the pilot's response and control patterns.

  5. The Pilot Land Data System (PLDS) at the Ames Research Center manages aircraft data in collaboration with an ecosystem research project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelici, Gary; Popovici, Lidia; Skiles, Jay

    1991-01-01

    The Pilot Land Data System (PLDS) is a data and information system serving NASA-supported investigators in the land science community. The three nodes of the PLDS, one each at the Ames Research Center (ARC), the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), cooperate in providing consistent information describing the various data holding in the hardware and software (accessible via network and modem) that provide information about and access to PLDS-held data, which is available for distribution. A major new activity of the PLDS node at the Ames Research Center involves the interaction of the PLDS with an active NASA ecosystem science project, the Oregon Transect Ecosystems Research involves the management of, access to, and distribution of the large volume of widely-varying aircraft data collected by OTTER. The OTTER project, is managed by researchers at the Ames Research Center and Oregon State University. Its principal objective is to estimate major fluxes of carbon, nitrogen, and water of forest ecosystems using an ecosystem process model driven by remote sensing data. Ten researchers at NASA centers and universities are analyzing data for six sites along a temperature-moisture gradient across the western half of central Oregon (called the Oregon Transect). Sensors mounted on six different aircraft have acquired data over the Oregon Transect in support of the OTTER project.

  6. Modeling the Behaviour of an Advanced Material Based Smart Landing Gear System for Aerospace Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Varughese, Byji; Dayananda, G. N.; Rao, M. Subba

    2008-07-29

    The last two decades have seen a substantial rise in the use of advanced materials such as polymer composites for aerospace structural applications. In more recent years there has been a concerted effort to integrate materials, which mimic biological functions (referred to as smart materials) with polymeric composites. Prominent among smart materials are shape memory alloys, which possess both actuating and sensory functions that can be realized simultaneously. The proper characterization and modeling of advanced and smart materials holds the key to the design and development of efficient smart devices/systems. This paper focuses on the material characterization; modeling and validation of the model in relation to the development of a Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) based smart landing gear (with high energy dissipation features) for a semi rigid radio controlled airship (RC-blimp). The Super Elastic (SE) SMA element is configured in such a way that it is forced into a tensile mode of high elastic deformation. The smart landing gear comprises of a landing beam, an arch and a super elastic Nickel-Titanium (Ni-Ti) SMA element. The landing gear is primarily made of polymer carbon composites, which possess high specific stiffness and high specific strength compared to conventional materials, and are therefore ideally suited for the design and development of an efficient skid landing gear system with good energy dissipation characteristics. The development of the smart landing gear in relation to a conventional metal landing gear design is also dealt with.

  7. Modeling the Behaviour of an Advanced Material Based Smart Landing Gear System for Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varughese, Byji; Dayananda, G. N.; Rao, M. Subba

    2008-07-01

    The last two decades have seen a substantial rise in the use of advanced materials such as polymer composites for aerospace structural applications. In more recent years there has been a concerted effort to integrate materials, which mimic biological functions (referred to as smart materials) with polymeric composites. Prominent among smart materials are shape memory alloys, which possess both actuating and sensory functions that can be realized simultaneously. The proper characterization and modeling of advanced and smart materials holds the key to the design and development of efficient smart devices/systems. This paper focuses on the material characterization; modeling and validation of the model in relation to the development of a Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) based smart landing gear (with high energy dissipation features) for a semi rigid radio controlled airship (RC-blimp). The Super Elastic (SE) SMA element is configured in such a way that it is forced into a tensile mode of high elastic deformation. The smart landing gear comprises of a landing beam, an arch and a super elastic Nickel-Titanium (Ni-Ti) SMA element. The landing gear is primarily made of polymer carbon composites, which possess high specific stiffness and high specific strength compared to conventional materials, and are therefore ideally suited for the design and development of an efficient skid landing gear system with good energy dissipation characteristics. The development of the smart landing gear in relation to a conventional metal landing gear design is also dealt with.

  8. Closed-loop, pilot/vehicle analysis of the approach and landing task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. K.; Anderson, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Optimal-control-theoretic modeling and frequency-domain analysis is the methodology proposed to evaluate analytically the handling qualities of higher-order manually controlled dynamic systems. Fundamental to the methodology is evaluating the interplay between pilot workload and closed-loop pilot/vehicle performance and stability robustness. The model-based metric for pilot workload is the required pilot phase compensation. Pilot/vehicle performance and loop stability is then evaluated using frequency-domain techniques. When these techniques were applied to the flight-test data for thirty-two highly-augmented fighter configurations, strong correlation was obtained between the analytical and experimental results.

  9. NASA evaluation of Type 2 chemical depositions. [effects of deicer deposition on aircraft tire friction performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Stubbs, Sandy M.; Howell, W. Edward; Webb, Granville L.

    1993-01-01

    Recent findings from NASA Langley tests to define effects of aircraft Type 2 chemical deicer depositions on aircraft tire friction performance are summarized. The Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF) is described together with the scope of the tire cornering and braking friction tests conducted up to 160 knots ground speed. Some lower speed 32 - 96 km/hr (20 - 60 mph) test run data obtained using an Instrumented Tire Test Vehicle (ITTV) to determine effects of tire bearing pressure and transverse grooving on cornering friction performance are also discussed. Recommendations are made concerning which parameters should be evaluated in future testing.

  10. 30 CFR 250.224 - What information on support vessels, offshore vehicles, and aircraft you will use must accompany...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., anchor handling vessels, tug boats, barges, ice management vessels, other vessels, offshore vehicles, and... use that will operate within 25 miles of your drilling unit. (c) Drilling fluids and chemical products transportation. A description of the transportation method and quantities of drilling fluids and...

  11. 30 CFR 550.257 - What information on the support vessels, offshore vehicles, and aircraft you will use must...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... vehicles must estimate the storage capacity of their fuel tanks and the frequency of their visits to the facilities you will use to conduct your proposed development and production activities. (b) Air emissions. A table showing the source, composition, frequency, and duration of the air emissions likely to...

  12. 30 CFR 550.224 - What information on support vessels, offshore vehicles, and aircraft you will use must accompany...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... your exploration activities. The description of vessels and offshore vehicles must estimate the storage capacity of their fuel tanks and the frequency of their visits to your drilling unit. (b) Air emissions. A table showing the source, composition, frequency, and duration of the air emissions likely to...

  13. 30 CFR 550.224 - What information on support vessels, offshore vehicles, and aircraft you will use must accompany...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... your exploration activities. The description of vessels and offshore vehicles must estimate the storage capacity of their fuel tanks and the frequency of their visits to your drilling unit. (b) Air emissions. A table showing the source, composition, frequency, and duration of the air emissions likely to...

  14. 30 CFR 550.257 - What information on the support vessels, offshore vehicles, and aircraft you will use must...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... vehicles must estimate the storage capacity of their fuel tanks and the frequency of their visits to the facilities you will use to conduct your proposed development and production activities. (b) Air emissions. A table showing the source, composition, frequency, and duration of the air emissions likely to...

  15. 30 CFR 550.257 - What information on the support vessels, offshore vehicles, and aircraft you will use must...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... vehicles must estimate the storage capacity of their fuel tanks and the frequency of their visits to the facilities you will use to conduct your proposed development and production activities. (b) Air emissions. A table showing the source, composition, frequency, and duration of the air emissions likely to...

  16. 30 CFR 550.224 - What information on support vessels, offshore vehicles, and aircraft you will use must accompany...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... your exploration activities. The description of vessels and offshore vehicles must estimate the storage capacity of their fuel tanks and the frequency of their visits to your drilling unit. (b) Air emissions. A table showing the source, composition, frequency, and duration of the air emissions likely to...

  17. A technical review of urban land use - transportation models as tools for evaluating vehicle travel reduction strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, F.

    1995-07-01

    The continued growth of highway traffic in the United States has led to unwanted urban traffic congestion as well as to noticeable urban air quality problems. These problems include emissions covered by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) and 1991 Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA), as well as carbon dioxide and related {open_quotes}greenhouse gas{close_quotes} emissions. Urban travel also creates a major demand for imported oil. Therefore, for economic as well as environmental reasons, transportation planning agencies at both the state and metropolitan area level are focussing a good deal of attention on urban travel reduction policies. Much discussed policy instruments include those that encourage fewer trip starts, shorter trip distances, shifts to higher-occupancy vehicles or to nonvehicular modes, and shifts in the timing of trips from the more to the less congested periods of the day or week. Some analysts have concluded that in order to bring about sustainable reductions in urban traffic volumes, significant changes will be necessary in the way our households and businesses engage in daily travel. Such changes are likely to involve changes in the ways we organize and use traffic-generating and-attracting land within our urban areas. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the ability of current analytic methods and models to support both the evaluation and possibly the design of such vehicle travel reduction strategies, including those strategies involving the reorganization and use of urban land. The review is organized into three sections. Section 1 describes the nature of the problem we are trying to model, Section 2 reviews the state of the art in operational urban land use-transportation simulation models, and Section 3 provides a critical assessment of such models as useful urban transportation planning tools. A number of areas are identified where further model development or testing is required.

  18. Application of three-dimensional hybrid structured/unstructured grids to land, sea and air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Jonathon A.; Georgala, Jeanette M.; May, Nicholas E.; Pocock, Mark F.

    1994-04-01

    The use of a numerical grid generation facility capable of forming unstructured meshes, block-structured meshes and a hybrid combination of these alternative mesh types is described. Examples of meshes created for cars, submarines, missiles and powered civil and military aircraft are given. The motives for choosing a particular type of mesh for each applied configuration are covered, with grid related data given which includes the amount of user effort required to attain the grids. Throughout the paper, algorithms are referred to which have been invoked in the creation of the meshes. These algorithms are introduced in a companion paper within the same conference proceedings.

  19. 78 FR 16040 - Petition for Exemption From the Vehicle Theft Prevention Standard; Jaguar Land Rover North...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... interior. If successful, this information is passed by a coded data transfer to the BCM via the Remote... coded data transfer. The BCM sends the key valid message to the PCM which initiates a coded data transfer authorizing the engine to start. Method two consists of unlocking the vehicle with the Smart...

  20. Aerospace vehicle design, spacecraft section. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The objective was to create a manned Martian aircraft which can perform: scientific surveys of particular sites distant from the base; a deployment of scientific instrument packages by air drop that land rovers cannot accomplish; and rescue operations. Designing the airfoil requires a wing which can operate within the low Reynolds numbers apparent on Mars. The airfoil, NASA NLF(1)-1015 was chosen. The design of the aircraft is comparable to a P-38 military aircraft. The aircraft uses fuel cells to power the two propellers. A rocket-assisted takeoff is necessary to enable Romulus to liftoff. Although the design and creation of Romulus would be an expensive adventure, such a vehicle could be most useful in evaluating the Mars surface and in creating a habitat for mankind.

  1. Land Surface Reflectance Retrieval from Hyperspectral Data Collected by an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle over the Baotou Test Site

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Si-Bo; Li, Zhao-Liang; Tang, Bo-Hui; Wu, Hua; Ma, Lingling; Zhao, Enyu; Li, Chuanrong

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the in-flight performance of a new hyperspectral sensor onboard an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV-HYPER), a comprehensive field campaign was conducted over the Baotou test site in China on 3 September 2011. Several portable reference reflectance targets were deployed across the test site. The radiometric performance of the UAV-HYPER sensor was assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the calibration accuracy. The SNR of the different bands of the UAV-HYPER sensor was estimated to be between approximately 5 and 120 over the homogeneous targets, and the linear response of the apparent reflectance ranged from approximately 0.05 to 0.45. The uniform and non-uniform Lambertian land surface reflectance was retrieved and validated using in situ measurements, with root mean square error (RMSE) of approximately 0.01–0.07 and relative RMSE of approximately 5%–12%. There were small discrepancies between the retrieved uniform and non-uniform Lambertian land surface reflectance over the homogeneous targets and under low aerosol optical depth (AOD) conditions (AOD = 0.18). However, these discrepancies must be taken into account when adjacent pixels had large land surface reflectance contrast and under high AOD conditions (e.g. AOD = 1.0). PMID:23785513

  2. Land surface reflectance retrieval from hyperspectral data collected by an unmanned aerial vehicle over the Baotou test site.

    PubMed

    Duan, Si-Bo; Li, Zhao-Liang; Tang, Bo-Hui; Wu, Hua; Ma, Lingling; Zhao, Enyu; Li, Chuanrong

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the in-flight performance of a new hyperspectral sensor onboard an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV-HYPER), a comprehensive field campaign was conducted over the Baotou test site in China on 3 September 2011. Several portable reference reflectance targets were deployed across the test site. The radiometric performance of the UAV-HYPER sensor was assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the calibration accuracy. The SNR of the different bands of the UAV-HYPER sensor was estimated to be between approximately 5 and 120 over the homogeneous targets, and the linear response of the apparent reflectance ranged from approximately 0.05 to 0.45. The uniform and non-uniform Lambertian land surface reflectance was retrieved and validated using in situ measurements, with root mean square error (RMSE) of approximately 0.01-0.07 and relative RMSE of approximately 5%-12%. There were small discrepancies between the retrieved uniform and non-uniform Lambertian land surface reflectance over the homogeneous targets and under low aerosol optical depth (AOD) conditions (AOD = 0.18). However, these discrepancies must be taken into account when adjacent pixels had large land surface reflectance contrast and under high AOD conditions (e.g. AOD = 1.0). PMID:23785513

  3. Prognostic framing of stakeholders' subjectivities: a case of all-terrain vehicle management on state public lands.

    PubMed

    Asah, Stanley T; Bengston, David N; Wendt, Keith; DeVaney, Leif

    2012-01-01

    Management of all-terrain vehicle (ATV) use on Minnesota state forest lands has a contentious history and land managers are caught between ATV riders, non-motorized recreationists, private landowners, and environmental advocates. In this paper, we demonstrate the usefulness of framing distinct perspectives about ATV management on Minnesota state public forests, understand the structure of these management perspectives, identify areas of consensus and disagreement, specify which stakeholders hold the various perspectives, clarify stakeholder perceptions of other stakeholders, and explore the implications for ATV planning and management. Using Q methodology, three distinct perspectives about how we should or should not manage ATVs resulted from our analysis, labeled Expert Management, Multiple Use, and Enforcement and Balance. A surprising degree of unanimity among the three management perspectives was found. Although some of the areas of agreement would be difficult to implement, others would be relatively simple to put into place. We suggest that land managers focus on widely accepted management actions to ameliorate commonly recognized problems, which may ease tensions between stakeholders and make tackling the tougher issues easier. PMID:21984046

  4. Modeled Trends in Impacts of Landing and Takeoff Aircraft Emissions on Surface Air-Quality in U.S for 2005, 2010 and 2018

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennam, L. P.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the present-day impacts of aircraft emissions on surface air quality is essential to plan potential mitigation policies for future growth. Stringent regulation on mobile source-related emissions in the recent past coupled with anticipated rise in the growth in aviation activity can increase the relative impacts of aviation-attributable surface air quality if adequate measures for reducing aviation emissions are not implemented. Though aircraft emissions during in-flight mode (at upper altitudes) contribute a significant (70 - 80%) proportion of the total aviation emissions, landing and takeoff (LTO) related emissions can have immediate impact on surface air quality, as most of the large airports are located in urban areas, specifically those that are designated in nonattainment for O3 and/or PM2.5. In this study, we modeled impacts of aircraft emissions during LTO cycles on surface air quality using the latest version of the CMAQ model for two contemporary years (2005, 2010) and one future year (2018). For this regional scale modeling study, we used highly resolved aircraft emissions from the FAA's Aviation Environmental Design Tool (AEDT), meteorology from NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) downscaled with the WRF model, dynamically varying chemical boundary conditions from the CAM-Chem global model (which also used the same AEDT emissions but at the global scale), and spatio-temporally resolved lightning NOx emissions estimated using National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) flash density data. We evaluated our model results with air quality observations from surface-based networks and in-situ aircraft observation data for the contemporary years. We will present results from model evaluation using this enhanced modeling system, as well as the trajectories in aviation- related air quality (focusing on O3, NO2 and PM2.5) for the three modeling years considered in this study. These findings will help plan

  5. Magnetic Launch Assist Vehicle-Artist's Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This artist's concept depicts a Magnetic Launch Assist vehicle clearing the track and shifting to rocket engines for launch into orbit. The system, formerly referred as the Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) system, is a launch system developed and tested by Engineers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) that could levitate and accelerate a launch vehicle along a track at high speeds before it leaves the ground. Using an off-board electric energy source and magnetic fields, a Magnetic Launch Assist system would drive a spacecraft along a horizontal track until it reaches desired speeds. The system is similar to high-speed trains and roller coasters that use high-strength magnets to lift and propel a vehicle a couple of inches above a guideway. A full-scale, operational track would be about 1.5-miles long, capable of accelerating a vehicle to 600 mph in 9.5 seconds, and the vehicle would then shift to rocket engines for launch into orbit. The major advantages of launch assist for NASA launch vehicles is that it reduces the weight of the take-off, the landing gear, the wing size, and less propellant resulting in significant cost savings. The US Navy and the British MOD (Ministry of Defense) are planning to use magnetic launch assist for their next generation aircraft carriers as the aircraft launch system. The US Army is considering using this technology for launching target drones for anti-aircraft training.

  6. Survey on the novel hybrid aquatic-aerial amphibious aircraft: Aquatic unmanned aerial vehicle (AquaUAV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xingbang; Wang, Tianmiao; Liang, Jianhong; Yao, Guocai; Liu, Miao

    2015-04-01

    The aquatic unmanned aerial vehicle (AquaUAV), a kind of vehicle that can operate both in the air and the water, has been regarded as a new breakthrough to broaden the application scenario of UAV. Wide application prospects in military and civil field are more than bright, therefore many institutions have focused on the development of such a vehicle. However, due to the significant difference of the physical properties between the air and the water, it is rather difficult to design a fully-featured AquaUAV. Until now, majority of partially-featured AquaUAVs have been developed and used to verify the feasibility of an aquatic-aerial vehicle. In the present work, we classify the current partially-featured AquaUAV into three categories from the scope of the whole UAV field, i.e., the seaplane UAV, the submarine-launched UAV, and the submersible UAV. Then the recent advancements and common characteristics of the three kinds of AquaUAVs are reviewed in detail respectively. Then the applications of bionics in the design of AquaUAV, the transition mode between the air and the water, the morphing wing structure for air-water adaptation, and the power source and the propulsion type are summarized and discussed. The tradeoff analyses for different transition methods between the air and the water are presented. Furthermore, it indicates that applying the bionics into the design and development of the AquaUAV will be essential and significant. Finally, the significant technical challenges for the AquaUAV to change from a conception to a practical prototype are indicated.

  7. A Flight Examination of Operating Problems of V/STOL Aircraft in STOL-Type Landing and Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Innis, Robert C.; Quigley, Hervey C.

    1961-01-01

    A flight investigation has been conducted using a large twin-engine cargo aircraft to isolate the problems associated with operating propeller-driven aircraft in the STOL speed range where appreciable engine power is used to augment aerodynamic lift. The problems considered would also be representative of those of a large overloaded VTOL aircraft operating in an STOL manner with comparable thrust-to-weight ratios. The study showed that operation at low approach speeds was compromised by the necessity of maintaining high thrust to generate high lift and yet achieving the low lift-drag ratios needed for steep descents. The useable range of airspeed and flight path angle was limited by the pilot's demand for a positive climb margin at the approach speed, a suitable stall margin, and a control and/or performance margin for one engine inoperative. The optimum approach angle over an obstacle was found to be a compromise between obtaining the shortest air distance and the lowest touchdown velocity. In order to realize the greatest low-speed potential from STOL designs, the stability and control characteristics must be satisfactory.

  8. Flight Investigation of the Stability and Control Characteristics of a 1/4-Scale Model of a Tilt-Wing Vertical-Take-Off-and-Landing Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tosti, Louis P.

    1959-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the dynamic stability and control characteristics of a tilt-wing vertical-take-off-and-landing aircraft with the use of a remotely controlled 1/4-scale free-flight model. The model had two propellers with hinged (flapping) blades mounted on the wing which could be tilted up to an incidence angle of nearly 90 deg for vertical take-off and landing. The investigation consisted of hovering flights in still air, vertical take-offs and landings, and slow constant-altitude transitions from hovering to forward flight. The stability and control characteristics of the model were generally satisfactory except for the following characteristics. In hovering flight, the model had an unstable pitching oscillation of relatively long period which the pilots were able to control without artificial stabilization but which could not be considered entirely satisfactory. At very low speeds and angles of wing incidence on the order of 70 deg, the model experienced large nose-up pitching moments which severely limited the allowable center-of-gravity range.

  9. Trade-off between land vehicle antenna cost and gain for satellite mobile communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Trade-offs between antenna cost and gain made for nine antennas as a feasibility study for the experimental land mobile satellite system, M-SAT(X) reported. This system is under development by JPL-NASA for a mobile telephone system to be used throughout the continental USA and Alaska. The mobile antenna is a key element in the development of this system.

  10. X-34 Vehicle Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brauckmann, Gregory J.

    1998-01-01

    The X-34, being designed and built by the Orbital Sciences Corporation, is an unmanned sub-orbital vehicle designed to be used as a flying test bed to demonstrate key vehicle and operational technologies applicable to future reusable launch vehicles. The X-34 will be air-launched from an L-1011 carrier aircraft at approximately Mach 0.7 and 38,000 feet altitude, where an onboard engine will accelerate the vehicle to speeds above Mach 7 and altitudes to 250,000 feet. An unpowered entry will follow, including an autonomous landing. The X-34 will demonstrate the ability to fly through inclement weather, land horizontally at a designated site, and have a rapid turn-around capability. A series of wind tunnel tests on scaled models was conducted in four facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the X-34. Analysis of these test results revealed that longitudinal trim could be achieved throughout the design trajectory. The maximum elevon deflection required to trim was only half of that available, leaving a margin for gust alleviation and aerodynamic coefficient uncertainty. Directional control can be achieved aerodynamically except at combined high Mach numbers and high angles of attack, where reaction control jets must be used. The X-34 landing speed, between 184 and 206 knots, is within the capabilities of the gear and tires, and the vehicle has sufficient rudder authority to control the required 30-knot crosswind.

  11. The engineering of a nuclear thermal landing and ascent vehicle utilizing indigenous Martian propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The following paper reports on a design study of a novel space transportation concept known as a 'NIMF' (Nuclear rocket using Indigenous Martian Fuel). The NIMF is a ballistic vehicle which obtains its propellant out of the Martian air by compression and liquefaction of atmospheric CO2. This propellant is subsequently used to generate rocket thrust at a specific impulse of 264 s by being heated to high temperature (2800 K) gas in the NIMFs' nuclear thermal rocket engines. The vehicle is designed to provide surface to orbit and surface to surface transportation, as well as housing, for a crew of three astronauts. It is capable of refueling itself for a flight to its maximum orbit in less than 50 days. The ballistic NIMF has a mass of 44.7 tonnes and, with the assumed 2800 K propellant temperature, is capable of attaining highly energetic (250 km by 34,000 km elliptical) orbits. This allows it to rendezvous with interplanetary transfer vehicles which are only very loosely bound into orbit around Mars. If a propellant temperature of 2000 K is assumed, then low Mars orbit can be attained; while if 3100 K is assumed, then the ballistic NIMF is capable of injecting itself onto a minimum energy transfer orbit to Earth in a direct ascent from the Martian surface.

  12. Fuzzy-hybrid land vehicle driveline modelling based on a moving window subtractive clustering approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, J. T.; Knowles, K.; Tsourdos, A.; White, B. A.

    2011-02-01

    In this article, the fuzzy-hybrid modelling (FHM) approach is used and compared to the input-output system Takagi-Sugeno (TS) modelling approach which correlates the drivetrain power flow equations with the vehicle dynamics. The output power relations were related to the drivetrain bounded efficiencies and also to the wheel slips. The model relates also to the wheel and ground interactions via suitable friction coefficient models relative to the wheel slip profiles. The wheel slip had a significant efficiency contribution to the overall driveline system efficiency. The peak friction slip and peak coefficient of friction values are known a priori during the analysis. Lastly, the rigid body dynamical power has been verified through both simulation and experimental results. The mathematical analysis has been supported throughout the paper via experimental data for a specific electric robotic vehicle. The identification of the localised and input-output TS models for the fuzzy hybrid and the experimental data were obtained utilising the subtractive clustering (SC) methodology. These results were also compared to a real-time TS SC approach operating on periodic time windows. This article concludes with the benefits of the real-time FHM method for the vehicle electric driveline due to the advantage of both the analytical TS sub-model and the physical system modelling for the remaining process which can be clearly utilised for control purposes.

  13. Towards an Improved Pilot-Vehicle Interface for Highly Automated Aircraft: Evaluation of the Haptic Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, Paul; Goodrich, Kenneth; Williams, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    The control automation and interaction paradigm (e.g., manual, autopilot, flight management system) used on virtually all large highly automated aircraft has long been an exemplar of breakdowns in human factors and human-centered design. An alternative paradigm is the Haptic Flight Control System (HFCS) that is part of NASA Langley Research Center s Naturalistic Flight Deck Concept. The HFCS uses only stick and throttle for easily and intuitively controlling the actual flight of the aircraft without losing any of the efficiency and operational benefits of the current paradigm. Initial prototypes of the HFCS are being evaluated and this paper describes one such evaluation. In this evaluation we examined claims regarding improved situation awareness, appropriate workload, graceful degradation, and improved pilot acceptance. Twenty-four instrument-rated pilots were instructed to plan and fly four different flights in a fictitious airspace using a moderate fidelity desktop simulation. Three different flight control paradigms were tested: Manual control, Full Automation control, and a simplified version of the HFCS. Dependent variables included both subjective (questionnaire) and objective (SAGAT) measures of situation awareness, workload (NASA-TLX), secondary task performance, time to recognize automation failures, and pilot preference (questionnaire). The results showed a statistically significant advantage for the HFCS in a number of measures. Results that were not statistically significant still favored the HFCS. The results suggest that the HFCS does offer an attractive and viable alternative to the tactical components of today s FMS/autopilot control system. The paper describes further studies that are planned to continue to evaluate the HFCS.

  14. Advanced control technology and its potential for future transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The topics covered include fly by wire, digital control, control configured vehicles, applications to advanced flight vehicles, advanced propulsion control systems, and active control technology for transport aircraft.

  15. 43 CFR 423.41 - Aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aircraft. 423.41 Section 423.41 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PUBLIC CONDUCT ON BUREAU OF RECLAMATION FACILITIES, LANDS, AND WATERBODIES Rules of Conduct § 423.41 Aircraft. (a) You must comply with any...

  16. A Critical Review of the State-of-the-Art in Autonomous Land Vehicle Systems and Technology

    SciTech Connect

    DURRNAT-WHYTE, HUGH

    2001-11-01

    This report describes the current state-of-the-art in Autonomous Land Vehicle (ALV) systems and technology. Five functional technology areas are identified and addressed. For each a brief, subjective, preface is first provided which envisions the necessary technology for the deployment of an operational ALV system. Subsequently, a detailed literature review is provided to support and elaborate these views. It is further established how these five technology areas fit together as a functioning whole. The essential conclusion of this report is that the necessary sensors, algorithms and methods to develop and demonstrate an operationally viable all-terrain ALV already exist and could be readily deployed. A second conclusion is that the successful development of an operational ALV system will rely on an effective approach to systems engineering. In particular, a precise description of mission requirements and a clear definition of component functionality is essential.

  17. Orbital and entry tracking accessory for globes. [to provide range requirements for reentry vehicles to any landing site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, E. B. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An orbital and entry tracking accessory or attachment is described which can be mounted on a globe to provide a rapid means of determining range requirements for entry vehicles returning from any orbit to any desired landing site with reasonable accuracy. The device is constructed of clear plastic strip material, and comprises a support ring, a calibrated orbital track member rigidly carried by the support ring, and a calibrated lateral range member pivotally coupled to the support ring at points such that the lateral range member is always oriented normally to the orbital track member. The assembly is mountable on the globe relatively snugly, but freely movable. At least one of the members has a detachable coupling which permits placement of the device on the globe.

  18. Some problems encountered in the development of a virtual reality system for evaluating human performance during emergency power-off aircraft landings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, David F.; Morris, Bradley E.; Matson, Kris; Hogan, Richard C.; Mershon, Donald H.; Mayer, Celeste M.; Lim, Ray; Holmes, Michael; Tomlinson, Jay

    2001-06-01

    A flight simulator was developed for studying the behavior of pilots in power-off aircraft landing situations. The simulation environment includes a 5-meter hemispherical dome in which the authors have installed a cockpit from a Cessna aircraft. The dome manufacturers provided their version of OPEN GL 1.1. The graphics rendering software has undergone constant modification because of computer and projection hardware changes and a lack of knowledge and understanding of the manufacturer's undocumented version of OPEN GL. The development team was led to believe that real time rendering of photographic quality images from 3D models was possible using the existing hardware and software. This was not true even for very simple environments. Flat surfaces must undergo major tessellation to project correctly on a hemispherical dome. The number of polygons to be rendered is increased by orders of magnitude. The tessellation also reverses some depth relationships, which causes parts of objects to disappear and reappear during the simulation. In addition, aliasing artifacts are severe because of the limited resolution and lack of antialiasing capabilities of the hardware. The authors document their experiences and their solutions to some of the rendering problems encountered.

  19. Large Field Photogrammetry Techniques in Aircraft and Spacecraft Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.

    2010-01-01

    The Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR) at NASA Langley Research Center is a 240 ft. high A-frame structure which is used for full-scale crash testing of aircraft and rotorcraft vehicles. Because the LandIR provides a unique capability to introduce impact velocities in the forward and vertical directions, it is also serving as the facility for landing tests on full-scale and sub-scale Orion spacecraft mass simulators. Recently, a three-dimensional photogrammetry system was acquired to assist with the gathering of vehicle flight data before, throughout and after the impact. This data provides the basis for the post-test analysis and data reduction. Experimental setups for pendulum swing tests on vehicles having both forward and vertical velocities can extend to 50 x 50 x 50 foot cubes, while weather, vehicle geometry, and other constraints make each experimental setup unique to each test. This paper will discuss the specific calibration techniques for large fields of views, camera and lens selection, data processing, as well as best practice techniques learned from using the large field of view photogrammetry on a multitude of crash and landing test scenarios unique to the LandIR.

  20. Effect of noise reducing components on nose landing gear stability for a mid-size aircraft coupled with vortex shedding and freeplay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eret, Petr; Kennedy, John; Bennett, Gareth J.

    2015-10-01

    In the pursuit of quieter aircraft, significant effort has been dedicated to airframe noise identification and reduction. The landing gear is one of the main sources of airframe noise on approach. The addition of noise abatement technologies such as fairings or wheel hub caps is usually considered to be the simplest solution to reduce this noise. After touchdown, noise abatement components can potentially affect the inherently nonlinear and dynamically complex behaviour (shimmy) of landing gear. Moreover, fairings can influence the aerodynamic load on the system and interact with the mechanical freeplay in the torque link. This paper presents a numerical study of nose landing gear stability for a mid-size aircraft with low noise solutions, which are modelled by an increase of the relevant model structural parameters to address a hypothetical effect of additional fairings and wheel hub caps. The study shows that the wheel hub caps are not a threat to stability. A fairing has a destabilising effect due to the increased moment of inertia of the strut and a stabilising effect due to the increased torsional stiffness of the strut. As the torsional stiffness is dependent on the method of attachment, in situations where the fairing increases the torsional inertia with little increase to the torsional stiffness, a net destabilising effect can result. Alternatively, it is possible that for the case that if the fairing were to increase equally both the torsional stiffness and the moment of inertia of the strut, then their effects could be mutually negated. However, it has been found here that for small and simple fairings, typical of current landing gear noise abatement design, their implementation will not affect the dynamics and stability of the system in an operational range (Fz ≤ 50 000 N, V ≤ 100 m/s). This generalisation is strictly dependent on size and installation methods. The aerodynamic load, which would be influenced by the presence of fairings, was modelled

  1. Soft landing of cell-sized vesicles on solid surfaces for robust vehicle capture/release.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dehui; Wu, Zhengfang; Gao, Aiting; Zhang, Weihong; Kang, Chengying; Tao, Qi; Yang, Peng

    2015-04-28

    Based on a concept of a smooth and steady landing of fragile objects without destruction via a soft cushion, we have developed a model for the soft landing of deformable lipid giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) on solid surfaces. The foundation for a successful soft landing is a solid substrate with a two-layer coating, including a bottom layer of positively charged lysozymes and an upper lipid membrane layer. We came to a clear conclusion that anionic GUVs when sedimented on a surface, the vesicle rupture occurs upon the direct contact with the positively charged lysozyme layer due to the strong coulombic interactions. In contrast, certain separation distances was achieved by the insertion of a soft lipid membrane cushion between the charged GUVs and the lysozyme layer, which attenuated the coulombic force and created a mild buffer zone, ensuring the robust capture of GUVs on the substrate without their rupture. The non-covalent bonding facilitated a fully reversible stimuli-responsive capture/release of GUVs from the biomimetic solid surface, which has never been demonstrated before due to the extreme fragility of GUVs. Moreover, the controllable capture/release of cells has been proven to be of vital importance in biotechnology, and similarity the present approach to capture/release cells is expected to open the previously inaccessible avenues of research. PMID:25787226

  2. An Enhanced Error Model for EKF-Based Tightly-Coupled Integration of GPS and Land Vehicle's Motion Sensors.

    PubMed

    Karamat, Tashfeen B; Atia, Mohamed M; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2015-01-01

    Reduced inertial sensor systems (RISS) have been introduced by many researchers as a low-cost, low-complexity sensor assembly that can be integrated with GPS to provide a robust integrated navigation system for land vehicles. In earlier works, the developed error models were simplified based on the assumption that the vehicle is mostly moving on a flat horizontal plane. Another limitation is the simplified estimation of the horizontal tilt angles, which is based on simple averaging of the accelerometers' measurements without modelling their errors or tilt angle errors. In this paper, a new error model is developed for RISS that accounts for the effect of tilt angle errors and the accelerometer's errors. Additionally, it also includes important terms in the system dynamic error model, which were ignored during the linearization process in earlier works. An augmented extended Kalman filter (EKF) is designed to incorporate tilt angle errors and transversal accelerometer errors. The new error model and the augmented EKF design are developed in a tightly-coupled RISS/GPS integrated navigation system. The proposed system was tested on real trajectories' data under degraded GPS environments, and the results were compared to earlier works on RISS/GPS systems. The findings demonstrated that the proposed enhanced system introduced significant improvements in navigational performance. PMID:26402680

  3. Analysis and design of a capsule landing system and surface vehicle control system for Mars exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gisser, D. G.; Frederick, D. K.; Yerazunis, S. W.

    1977-01-01

    A number of problems related to unmanned exploration of planets or other extraterrestrial bodies with Mars as a case in point were investigated. The design and evaluation of a prototype rover concept with emphasis on mobility, maneuverability, stability, control and propulsion is described along with the development of terrain sensor concepts and associated software for the autonomous control of any planetary rover. Results are applicable not only to the design of a mission rover but the vehicle is used as a test bed for the rigorous evaluation of alternative autonomous control systems.

  4. 5 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C to... - Daily Transportation Allowance Schedule, Commuting Over Land by Private Motor Vehicle to Remote...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Daily Transportation Allowance Schedule, Commuting Over Land by Private Motor Vehicle to Remote Duty Posts A Appendix A to Subpart C to Part 591 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS ALLOWANCES AND DIFFERENTIALS Allowance Based on Duty at...

  5. A Mathematical Model for Vertical Attitude Takeoff and Landing (VATOL) Aircraft Simulation. Volume 1; Model Description Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortenbaugh, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    A mathematical model of a high performance airplane capable of vertical attitude takeoff and landing (VATOL) was developed. An off line digital simulation program incorporating this model was developed to provide trim conditions and dynamic check runs for the piloted simulation studies and support dynamic analyses of proposed VATOL configuration and flight control concepts. Development details for the various simulation component models and the application of the off line simulation program, Vertical Attitude Take-Off and Landing Simulation (VATLAS), to develop a baseline control system for the Vought SF-121 VATOL airplane concept are described.

  6. Scheduling of an aircraft fleet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paltrinieri, Massimo; Momigliano, Alberto; Torquati, Franco

    1992-01-01

    Scheduling is the task of assigning resources to operations. When the resources are mobile vehicles, they describe routes through the served stations. To emphasize such aspect, this problem is usually referred to as the routing problem. In particular, if vehicles are aircraft and stations are airports, the problem is known as aircraft routing. This paper describes the solution to such a problem developed in OMAR (Operative Management of Aircraft Routing), a system implemented by Bull HN for Alitalia. In our approach, aircraft routing is viewed as a Constraint Satisfaction Problem. The solving strategy combines network consistency and tree search techniques.

  7. 43 CFR 423.41 - Aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aircraft. 423.41 Section 423.41 Public... Aircraft. (a) You must comply with any applicable Federal, State, and local laws, and with any additional... this part 423, with respect to aircraft landings, takeoffs, and operation on or in the proximity...

  8. 43 CFR 423.41 - Aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Aircraft. 423.41 Section 423.41 Public... Aircraft. (a) You must comply with any applicable Federal, State, and local laws, and with any additional... this part 423, with respect to aircraft landings, takeoffs, and operation on or in the proximity...

  9. 43 CFR 423.41 - Aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aircraft. 423.41 Section 423.41 Public... Aircraft. (a) You must comply with any applicable Federal, State, and local laws, and with any additional... this part 423, with respect to aircraft landings, takeoffs, and operation on or in the proximity...

  10. 43 CFR 423.41 - Aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aircraft. 423.41 Section 423.41 Public... Aircraft. (a) You must comply with any applicable Federal, State, and local laws, and with any additional... this part 423, with respect to aircraft landings, takeoffs, and operation on or in the proximity...

  11. Eclipse program F-106 aircraft in flight, front view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Shot of the QF-106 aircraft in flight with the landing gear deployed. In 1997 and 1998, the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, supported and hosted a Kelly Space & Technology, Inc. project called Eclipse, which sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a reusable tow-launch vehicle concept. The project goal was to successfully tow, inflight, a modified QF-106 delta-wing aircraft with an Air Force C-141A transport aircraft. This would demonstrate the possibility of towing and launching an actual launch vehicle from behind a tow plane. Dryden was the responsible test organization and had flight safety responsibility for the Eclipse project. Dryden provided engineering, instrumentation, simulation, modification, maintenance, range support, and research pilots for the test program. The Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC), Edwards, California, supplied the C-141A transport aircraft and crew and configured the aircraft as needed for the tests. The AFFTC also provided the concept and detail design and analysis as well as hardware for the tow system and QF-106 modifications. Dryden performed the modifications to convert the QF-106 drone into the piloted EXD-01 (Eclipse eXperimental Demonstrator-01) experimental aircraft. Kelly Space & Technology hoped to use the results gleaned from the tow test in developing a series of low-cost, reusable launch vehicles. These tests demonstrated the validity of towing a delta-wing aircraft having high wing loading, validated the tow simulation model, and demonstrated various operational procedures, such as ground processing of in-flight maneuvers and emergency abort scenarios.

  12. The Use of a Vehicle Acceleration Exposure Limit Model and a Finite Element Crash Test Dummy Model to Evaluate the Risk of Injuries During Orion Crew Module Landings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Charles; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Tabiei, Ala; Brinkley, James W.; Shemwell, David M.

    2008-01-01

    A review of astronaut whole body impact tolerance is discussed for land or water landings of the next generation manned space capsule named Orion. LS-DYNA simulations of Orion capsule landings are performed to produce a low, moderate, and high probability of injury. The paper evaluates finite element (FE) seat and occupant simulations for assessing injury risk for the Orion crew and compares these simulations to whole body injury models commonly referred to as the Brinkley criteria. The FE seat and crash dummy models allow for varying the occupant restraint systems, cushion materials, side constraints, flailing of limbs, and detailed seat/occupant interactions to minimize landing injuries to the crew. The FE crash test dummies used in conjunction with the Brinkley criteria provides a useful set of tools for predicting potential crew injuries during vehicle landings.

  13. Low Noise Cruise Efficient Short Take-Off and Landing Transport Vehicle Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Jones, Scott M.

    2007-01-01

    The saturation of the airspace around current airports combined with increasingly stringent community noise limits represents a serious impediment to growth in world aviation travel. Breakthrough concepts that both increase throughput and reduce noise impacts are required to enable growth in aviation markets. Concepts with a 25 year horizon must facilitate a 4x increase in air travel while simultaneously meeting community noise constraints. Attacking these horizon issues holistically is the concept study of a Cruise Efficient Short Take-Off and Landing (CESTOL) high subsonic transport under the NASA's Revolutionary Systems Concepts for Aeronautics (RSCA) project. The concept is a high-lift capable airframe with a partially embedded distributed propulsion system that takes a synergistic approach in propulsion-airframe-integration (PAI) by fully integrating the airframe and propulsion systems to achieve the benefits of both low-noise short take-off and landing (STOL) operations and efficient high speed cruise. This paper presents a summary of the recent study of a distributed propulsion/airframe configuration that provides low-noise STOL operation to enable 24-hour use of the untapped regional and city center airports to increase the capacity of the overall airspace while still maintaining efficient high subsonic cruise flight capability.

  14. Advanced Vehicle Concepts and Implications for NextGen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Matt; Smith, Jim; Wright, Ken; Mediavilla Ricky; Kirby, Michelle; Pfaender, Holger; Clarke, John-Paul; Volovoi, Vitali; Dorbian, Christopher; Ashok, Akshay; Reynolds, Tom; Waitz, Ian; Hileman, James; Arunachalam, Sarav; Hedrick, Matt; Vempati, Lakshmi; Laroza, Ryan; denBraven, Wim; Henderson, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the results of a major NASA study of advanced vehicle concepts and their implications for the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). Comprising the efforts of dozens of researchers at multiple institutions, the analyses presented here cover a broad range of topics including business-case development, vehicle design, avionics, procedure design, delay, safety, environmental impacts, and metrics. The study focuses on the following five new vehicle types: Cruise-efficient short takeoff and landing (CESTOL) vehicles Large commercial tiltrotor aircraft (LCTRs) Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) Very light jets (VLJs) Supersonic transports (SST). The timeframe of the study spans the years 2025-2040, although some analyses are also presented for a 3X scenario that has roughly three times the number of flights as today. Full implementation of NextGen is assumed.

  15. Flight experiments using the front-side control technique during piloted approach and landing in a powered lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindson, W. S.; Hardy, G. H.; Innis, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The essential features of using pitch attitude for glidepath control in conjunction with longitudinal thrust modulation for speed control are described, using a simple linearized model for a powered-lift STOL aircraft operating on the backside of the drag curve and at a fixed setting of propulsive lift. It is shown that an automatic speed-hold system incorporating heave-damping augmentation can allow use of the front-side control technique with satisfactory handling qualities, and the results of previous flight investigations are reviewed. Manual control considerations, as they might be involved following failure of the automatic system, are emphasized. The influence of alternative cockpit controller configurations and flight-director display features were assessed for their effect on the control task, which consisted of a straight-in steep approach flown at constant speed in simulated instrument conditions.

  16. Detection of Vehicle Tracks and Vegetation Damages Caused by use of Snowmobiles in the Longyearbyen Area on Svalbard using Unmanned Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storvold, R.; Karlsen, S. R.; Solbø, S. A.; Johansen, B.; Johansen, K.; Høgda, K. A.; Tømmervik, H.; Zmarz, A.; Joly, D.

    2013-12-01

    The study area in the surroundings of Longyearbyen on Svalbard, Arctic Norway, located at 71.2°N and 16°E is characterized by dry Arctic climate with a snow season of more than eight months, annual precipitation of less than 200mm, and a mean July temperature of about 6°C. Longyearbyen is the main settlement on Svalbard, with about 2000 inhabitants. During the last two decades the number of snowmobiles have increased from a few hundred to a number almost equals the number of inhabitants, and snowmobile trips are today the one of the main leisure activities. In addition, thousands of tourist visits every spring, and many of these go on organized snowmobile trips. Due to the often thin snow cover, and use of snowmobile even during the spring snow melt in May and early June, the rapid growth in use of snowmobile has made some damage to the vegetation. Damage on the fragile vegetation caused by the skids and belts of the snowmobile can be observed in most parts of the Adventdalen valley, close to Longyearbyen. The main aim of this study is to explore the feasibility and accuracy of using data from Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) to identify vehicle tracks and damages on vegetation caused by the use of snowmobiles. Use of UAS give the opportunity to carry out research in a manner that minimizes the environmental footprint of the research activities. Small unmanned aircraft, combining both fixed wing multi rotor types allow us to collect image data for vegetation mapping without having any personnel walking into the field disturbing the sensitive High Arctic ecosystems. UAS used here are inexpensive and simple to operate. They are being developed with the goal of providing airborne capabilities for scientists at an affordable cost. The aircraft were instrumented with a normal Canon Powershot S100 RGB compact camera and a modified Canon Powershot SX230 NDVI camera. The fixed wing aircraft was taking pictures from 100 meters altitude with ground resolution of 2.5 cm

  17. Qualification needs for advanced integrated aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackall, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    In an effort to achieve maximum aircraft performance, designers are integrating aircraft systems. The characteristics of aerodynamics, vehicle structure, and propulsion systems are being integrated and controlled through embedded, often flight critical, electronic systems. The qualification needs for such highly integrated aircraft systems are addressed. Based on flight experience with research aircraft, a set of test capabilities is described which allows for complete and efficient qualification of advanced integrated aircraft.

  18. Moving base INS/GPS vector gravimetry on a land vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaopeng

    2007-05-01

    The Inertial Navigation System and Global Positioning System (INS/GPS) system has been extensively studied over several decades, mostly for the purpose of navigation and kinematic position. Because the INS system is affected by gravitation, the integration definitely needs gravity data in order to yield accurate results. It is natural to reverse the problem and attempt a measurement of the gravity vector. The gravimetric system based on INS/GPS shows good performances in the airborne scenarios. Moving the system into a ground vehicle will help to improve the resolution of the gravity estimates, considering its lower speed and altitude. However, the system will face much more complicated dynamics and harsh observation conditions. In this study, a two-stage extended Kalman filter based on processing noise adaptation is used to fix the position gaps and provide prior information of the Inertial Measurement Units (IMU) errors. The kinematic acceleration is computed by both the position method and the phase method. All these procedures improve the steadiness and precision of the system. The advanced wavelet de-noising technique is employed to further isolate the gravity disturbance from the observation errors in the residuals of the novel Kalman filter, previously developed at the Ohio State University (OSU). The final precision of the gravity disturbance estimates is further improved by correlatively filtering the repeated estimates in the frequency domain. An intensive survey campaign was carried out to test the validities of these techniques. Based on data analysis, the results show significant consistency (as good as 0.6mGal, STD) in the vertical component on the repeated traverses, and comparison to control data indicates an accuracy of 2-3mGal (STD). However, it is also determined that the control data, being interpolated from a database, have an accuracy of approximately 3mGal (STD). Resolution of the estimated gravity disturbance is about 2km, based on 180-s

  19. Development of automatic and manual flight director landing systems for the XV-15 tilt rotor aircraft in helicopter mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, L. G.; Hoh, R. H.; Jewell, W. F.; Teper, G. L.; Patel, P. D.

    1978-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to determine IFR approach path and touchdown dispersions for manual and automatic XV-15 tilt rotor landings, and to develop missed approach criteria. Only helicopter mode XV-15 operation is considered. The analysis and design sections develop the automatic and flight director guidance equations for decelerating curved and straight-in approaches into a typical VTOL landing site equipped with an MLS navigation aid. These system designs satisfy all known pilot-centered, guidance and control requirements for this flying task. Performance data, obtained from nonstationary covariance propagation dispersion analysis for the system, are used to develop the approach monitoring criteria. The autoland and flight director guidance equations are programmed for the VSTOLAND 1819B digital computer. The system design dispersion data developed through analysis and the 1819B digital computer program are verified and refined using the fixed-base, man-in-the-loop XV-15 VSTOLAND simulation.

  20. Preliminary results of simulated vortex encounters by a twin-engine, commercial aircraft during final landing approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, E. C., Jr.; Holbrook, G. T.; Keyser, G. L., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Piloted simulations of encounters with vortices of various ages and degrees of attenuation were performed with the Visual Motion Simulator. In the simulations, a twin engine, commercial transport on final approach, encountered the modeled vortices of a four engine, wide body, commercial transport. The data show the effect of vortex age and attenuation on the severity of the initial upset, as well as the effect of the vortex encounters on the landing capability.

  1. Optical communications for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Optical communications for transport aircraft are discussed. The problem involves: increasing demand for radio-frequency bands from an enlarging pool of users (aircraft, ground and sea vehicles, fleet operators, traffic control centers, and commercial radio and television); desirability of providing high-bandwidth dedicated communications to and from every aircraft in the National Airspace System; need to support communications, navigation, and surveillance for a growing number of aircraft; and improved meteorological observations by use of probe aircraft. The solution involves: optical signal transmission support very high data rates; optical transmission of signals between aircraft, orbiting satellites, and ground stations, where unobstructed line-of-sight is available; conventional radio transmissions of signals between aircraft and ground stations, where optical line-of-sight is unavailable; and radio priority given to aircraft in weather.

  2. Design optimization of high-speed proprotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schleicher, David R.; Phillips, James D.; Carbajal, Kevin B.

    1993-01-01

    NASA's high-speed rotorcraft (HSRC) studies have the objective of investigating technology for vehicles that have both low downwash velocities and forward flight speed capability of up to 450 knots. This paper investigates a tilt rotor, a tilt wing, and a folding tilt rotor designed for a civil transport mission. Baseline aircraft models using current technology are developed for each configuration using a vertical/short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) aircraft design synthesis computer program to generate converged vehicle designs. Sensitivity studies and numerical optimization are used to illustrate each configuration's key design tradeoffs and constraints. Minimization of the gross takeoff weight is used as the optimization objective function. Several advanced technologies are chosen, and their relative impact on future configurational development is discussed. Finally, the impact of maximum cruise speed on vehicle figures of merit (gross weight, productivity, and direct operating cost) is analyzed. The three most important conclusions from the study are payload ratios for these aircraft will be commensurate with current fixed-wing commuter aircraft; future tilt rotors and tilt wings will be significantly lighter, more productive, and cheaper than competing folding tilt rotors; and the most promising technologies are an advanced-technology proprotor for both tilt rotor and tilt wing and advanced structural materials for the folding tilt rotor.

  3. Predicting visibility of aircraft.

    PubMed

    Watson, Andrew; Ramirez, Cesar V; Salud, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Visual detection of aircraft by human observers is an important element of aviation safety. To assess and ensure safety, it would be useful to be able to be able to predict the visibility, to a human observer, of an aircraft of specified size, shape, distance, and coloration. Examples include assuring safe separation among aircraft and between aircraft and unmanned vehicles, design of airport control towers, and efforts to enhance or suppress the visibility of military and rescue vehicles. We have recently developed a simple metric of pattern visibility, the Spatial Standard Observer (SSO). In this report we examine whether the SSO can predict visibility of simulated aircraft images. We constructed a set of aircraft images from three-dimensional computer graphic models, and measured the luminance contrast threshold for each image from three human observers. The data were well predicted by the SSO. Finally, we show how to use the SSO to predict visibility range for aircraft of arbitrary size, shape, distance, and coloration. PMID:19462007

  4. Predicting Visibility of Aircraft

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Andrew; Ramirez, Cesar V.; Salud, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Visual detection of aircraft by human observers is an important element of aviation safety. To assess and ensure safety, it would be useful to be able to be able to predict the visibility, to a human observer, of an aircraft of specified size, shape, distance, and coloration. Examples include assuring safe separation among aircraft and between aircraft and unmanned vehicles, design of airport control towers, and efforts to enhance or suppress the visibility of military and rescue vehicles. We have recently developed a simple metric of pattern visibility, the Spatial Standard Observer (SSO). In this report we examine whether the SSO can predict visibility of simulated aircraft images. We constructed a set of aircraft images from three-dimensional computer graphic models, and measured the luminance contrast threshold for each image from three human observers. The data were well predicted by the SSO. Finally, we show how to use the SSO to predict visibility range for aircraft of arbitrary size, shape, distance, and coloration. PMID:19462007

  5. An overview of V/STOL aircraft development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, S. B.

    1983-01-01

    In reviewing the years of aviation development, it can be seen that vertical-takeoff-and-landing (VTOL) flight was considered before conventional fixed-wing operations. However, it has been difficult to develop a VTOL capability. The present investigation is concerned with a review of the historical development of VTOL aircraft, taking into account lessons learned from a selected group of concepts. Attention is given to the Flying Bedsteads, the tail-sitter designs, the Air Test Vehicle (ATV) and X-14 aircraft, the SC-1, the XV-3 tilt-rotor aircraft, the VZ3-RY deflected slipstream, the X-18 tilt wing, the VZ-2 tilt wing, the VZ-4 ducted fan, the Harrier, the XV-4A (Hummingbird), the Forger, and the XV-15 advanced tilt rotor.

  6. The Lunar Landing Research Vehicle; Prelude to the Arrival at Tranquility Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelzer, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The flight of Apollo 11 was the end of a decade-long race to reach the moon, a race between the US and Soviet Union, but also a race with time, for we as a nation only had the 1960s to reach our objective. Most of us remember that particular day, July 20, 1969, but the further we are from any date the harder it is to recall details. It s easy to forget, for instance, how close together the Apollo flights came to each other as the lunar flight date approached. Apollo 7 circled Earth for almost 11 days testing the systems of the spacecraft in October 1968; Apollo 8 gave us the first glimpse of our entire planet while circling the moon during Christmas of 1968. Apollo 9 lifted off on March 3 of 1969, and Apollo 10 returned to Earth on May 26 of that year. Less than two months later, on 16 July, Apollo 11 lifted off on its mission of landing on the moon. That s five Apollo launches in ten months, three of which went to the moon.

  7. Attitude estimation and stabilization of a quadrotor aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghashghaee, Fereshteh

    In the past few years, researchers have shown great interest in quadrotor aircraft as a platform for UAV research due to simplicity of construction as well as maintenance, ability to hover in small indoor locations or hazardous environments, vertical take-off and landing capability, etc. Attitude stabilization of a quadrotor requires accurate information about current orientation of the vehicle. With the emergence of Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) sensors, a relatively cost-effective way for attitude estimation consists of using gyroscope, accelerometer and magnetometer devices strapped down on vehicle's center of mass. A number of previous works deal with fusing angular velocity with measurements of accelerometer and magnetometer to construct an estimation of aircraft orientation.

  8. Perspective Imagery in Synthetic Scenes used to Control and Guide Aircraft during Landing and Taxi: Some Issues and Concerns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Walter W.; Kaiser, Mary K.

    2003-01-01

    Perspective synthetic displays that supplement, or supplant, the optical windows traditionally used for guidance and control of aircraft are accompanied by potentially significant human factors problems related to the optical geometric conformality of the display. Such geometric conformality is broken when optical features are not in the location they would be if directly viewed through a window. This often occurs when the scene is relayed or generated from a location different from the pilot s eyepoint. However, assuming no large visual/vestibular effects, a pilot cad often learn to use such a display very effectively. Important problems may arise, however, when display accuracy or consistency is compromised, and this can usually be related to geometrical discrepancies between how the synthetic visual scene behaves and how the visual scene through a window behaves. In addition to these issues, this paper examines the potentially critical problem of the disorientation that can arise when both a synthetic display and a real window are present in a flight deck, and no consistent visual interpretation is available.

  9. 19 CFR 122.36 - Responsibility of aircraft commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Responsibility of aircraft commander. 122.36...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Landing Requirements § 122.36 Responsibility of aircraft commander. If an aircraft lands in the U.S. and Customs officers have not arrived, the aircraft...

  10. 19 CFR 122.36 - Responsibility of aircraft commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Responsibility of aircraft commander. 122.36...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Landing Requirements § 122.36 Responsibility of aircraft commander. If an aircraft lands in the U.S. and Customs officers have not arrived, the aircraft...

  11. 19 CFR 122.36 - Responsibility of aircraft commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Responsibility of aircraft commander. 122.36...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Landing Requirements § 122.36 Responsibility of aircraft commander. If an aircraft lands in the U.S. and Customs officers have not arrived, the aircraft...

  12. 19 CFR 122.36 - Responsibility of aircraft commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Landing Requirements § 122.36 Responsibility of aircraft commander. If an aircraft lands in the U.S. and Customs officers have not arrived, the aircraft commander... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Responsibility of aircraft commander....

  13. 19 CFR 122.36 - Responsibility of aircraft commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Responsibility of aircraft commander. 122.36...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Landing Requirements § 122.36 Responsibility of aircraft commander. If an aircraft lands in the U.S. and Customs officers have not arrived, the aircraft...

  14. Machine processing of S-192 and supporting aircraft data: Studies of atmospheric effects, agricultural classifications, and land resource mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, F.

    1975-01-01

    Two tasks of machine processing of S-192 multispectral scanner data are reviewed. In the first task, the effects of changing atmospheric and base altitude on the ability to machine-classify agricultural crops were investigated. A classifier and atmospheric effects simulation model was devised and its accuracy verified by comparison of its predicted results with S-192 processed results. In the second task, land resource maps of a mountainous area near Cripple Creek, Colorado were prepared from S-192 data collected on 4 August 1973.

  15. Towards Intelligent Control for Next Generation Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Diana Michelle; KrishnaKumar, Kalmanje Srinvas; Frost, Susan Alane

    2008-01-01

    NASA Aeronautics Subsonic Fixed Wing Project is focused on mitigating the environmental and operation impacts expected as aviation operations triple by 2025. The approach is to extend technological capabilities and explore novel civil transport configurations that reduce noise, emissions, fuel consumption and field length. Two Next Generation (NextGen) aircraft have been identified to meet the Subsonic Fixed Wing Project goals - these are the Hybrid Wing-Body (HWB) and Cruise Efficient Short Take-Off and Landing (CESTOL) aircraft. The technologies and concepts developed for these aircraft complicate the vehicle s design and operation. In this paper, flight control challenges for NextGen aircraft are described. The objective of this paper is to examine the potential of state-of-the-art control architectures and algorithms to meet the challenges and needed performance metrics for NextGen flight control. A broad range of conventional and intelligent control approaches are considered, including dynamic inversion control, integrated flight-propulsion control, control allocation, adaptive dynamic inversion control, data-based predictive control and reinforcement learning control.

  16. The Effect of Lift-Drag Ratio and Speed on the Ability to Position a Gliding Aircraft for a Landing on a 5,000-Foot Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, John P.

    1959-01-01

    Flight tests were made to determine the capability of positioning a gliding airplane for a landing on a 5,000-foot runway with special reference to the gliding flight of a satellite vehicle of fixed configuration upon reentry into the earth's atmosphere. The lift-drag ratio and speed of the airplane in the glides were varied through as large a range as possible. The results showed a marked tendency to undershoot the runway when the lift-drag ratios were below certain values, depending upon the speed in the glide. A straight line dividing the successful approaches from the undershoots could be drawn through a lift-drag ratio of about 3 at 100 knots and through a lift-drag ratio of about 7 at 185 knots. Provision of a drag device would be very beneficial, particularly in reducing the tendency toward undershooting at the higher speeds.

  17. Unmanned Aircraft: A Pilot's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pestana, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the challenges of "piloting" a unmanned aircraft. The topic include the pilot-vehicle interact design, the concept of pilot/operator, and role of NASA's Ikhana UAS in the western states fire mission.

  18. A flight-test and simulation evaluation of the longitudinal final approach and landing performance of an automatic system for a light wing loading STOL aircraft equipped with wing spoilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, S. C.; Hardy, G. H.; Hindson, W. S.

    1984-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive flight-test investigation of short takeoff and landing (STOL) operating systems for the terminal systems for the terminal area, an automatic landing system has been developed and evaluated for a light wing-loading turboprop-powered aircraft. An advanced digital avionics system performed display, navigation, guidance, and control functions for the test aircraft. Control signals were generated in order to command powered actuators for all conventional controls and for a set of symmetrically driven wing spoilers. This report describes effects of the spoiler control on longitudinal autoland (automatic landing) performance. Flight-test results, with and without spoiler control, are presented and compared with available (basically, conventional takeoff and landing) performance criteria. These comparisons are augmented by results from a comprehensive simulation of the controlled aircraft that included representations of the microwave landing system navigation errors that were encountered in flight as well as expected variations in atmospheric turbulence and wind shear. Flight-test results show that the addition of spoiler control improves the touchdown performance of the automatic landing system. Spoilers improve longitudinal touchdown and landing pitch-attitude performance, particularly in tailwind conditions. Furthermore, simulation results indicate that performance would probably be satisfactory for a wider range of atmospheric disturbances than those encountered in flight. Flight results also indicate that the addition of spoiler control during the final approach does not result in any measurable change in glidepath track performance, and results in a very small deterioration in airspeed tracking. This difference contrasts with simulations results, which indicate some improvement in glidepath tracking and no appreciable change in airspeed tracking. The modeling problem in the simulation that contributed to this discrepancy with flight was

  19. Noise generated by a flight weight, air flow control valve in a vertical takeoff and landing aircraft thrust vectoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the NASA Lewis Research Center's Powered Lift Facility to experimentally evaluate the noise generated by a flight weight, 12 in. butterfly valve installed in a proposed vertical takeoff and landing thrust vectoring system. Fluctuating pressure measurements were made in the circular duct upstream and downstream of the valve. This data report presents the results of these tests. The maximum overall sound pressure level is generated in the duct downstream of the valve and reached a value of 180 dB at a valve pressure ratio of 2.8. At the higher valve pressure ratios the spectra downstream of the valve is broad banded with its maximum at 1000 Hz.

  20. An inventory of irrigated lands for selected counties within the state of California based on LANDSAT and supporting aircraft data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, R. N. (Principal Investigator)

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results: (1) Goals of the irrigated lands project were addressed by the design and implementation of a multiphase sampling scheme that was founded on the utilization of a LANDSAT-based remote sensing system. (2) The synoptic coverage of LANDSAT and the eighteen day orbit cycle allowed the project to study agricultural test sites in a variety of environmental regions and monitor the development of crops throughout the major growing season. (3) The capability to utilize multidate imagery is crucial to the reliable estimation of irrigated acreage in California where multiple cropping is widespread and current estimation systems must rely on single data survey techniques. (4) In addition, the magnitude of agricultural acreage in California makes estimation by conventional methods impossible.

  1. Statistical evaluation of control inputs and eye movements in the use of instruments clusters during aircraft landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, A. O.; Brown, J. L.; Bailey, G.

    1977-01-01

    Two different types of analyses were done on data from a study in which eye movements and other variables were recorded while four pilots executed landing sequences in a Boeing 737 simulation. Various conditions were manupulated, including changes in turbulence, starting position, and instrumentation. Control inputs were analyzed in the context of the various conditions and compared against ratings of workload obtained using the Cooper-Harper scale. A number of eye-scanning measures including mean dwell time and transition from one instrument to another were entered into a principal components factor analysis. The results show a differentiation between control inputs and eye-scanning behavior. This shows the need for improved definition of workload and experiments to uncover the important differences among control inputs, eye-scanning and cognitive processes of the pilot.

  2. Moving-base visual simulation study of decoupled controls during approach and landing of a STOL transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, G. K., Jr.; Deal, P. L.

    1975-01-01

    The simulation employed all six rigid-body degrees of freedom and incorporated aerodynamic characteristics based on wind-tunnel data. The flight instrumentation included a localizer and a flight director which was used to capture and to maintain a two-segment glide slope. A closed-circuit television display of a STOLport provided visual cues during simulations of the approach and landing. The decoupled longitudinal controls used constant prefilter and feedback gains to provide steady-state decoupling of flight-path angle, pitch angle, and forward velocity. The pilots were enthusiastic about the decoupled longitudinal controls and believed that the simulator motion was an aid in evaluating the decoupled controls, although a minimum turbulence level with root-mean-square gust intensity of 0.3 m/sec (1 ft/sec) was required to mask undesirable characteristics of the moving-base simulator.

  3. Perseus B Landing on Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    generation of the Perseus design, which began with the Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft. Perseus was initially developed as part of NASA's Small High-Altitude Science Aircraft (SHASA) program, which later evolved into the ERAST project. The Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft first flew in November 1991 and made three low-altitude flights within a month to validate the Perseus aerodynamic model and flight control systems. Next came the redesigned Perseus A, which incorporated a closed-cycle combustion system that mixed oxygen carried aboard the aircraft with engine exhaust to compensate for the thin air at high altitudes. The Perseus A was towed into the air by a ground vehicle and its engine started after it became airborne. Prior to landing, the engine was stopped, the propeller locked in horizontal position, and the Perseus A glided to a landing on its unique bicycle-type landing gear. Two Perseus A aircraft were built and made 21 flights in 1993-1994. One of the Perseus A aircraft reached over 50,000 feet in altitude on its third test flight. Although one of the Perseus A aircraft was destroyed in a crash after a vertical gyroscope failed in flight, the other aircraft completed its test program and remains on display at Aurora's facility in Manassas. Perseus B first flew Oct. 7, 1994, and made two flights in 1996 before being damaged in a hard landing on the dry lakebed after a propeller shaft failure. After a number of improvements and upgrades-including extending the original 58.5-foot wingspan to 71.5 feet to enhance high-altitude performance--the Perseus B returned to Dryden in the spring of 1998 for a series of four flights. Thereafter, a series of modifications were made including external fuel pods on the wing that more than doubled the fuel capacity to 100 gallons. Engine power was increased by more than 20 percent by boosting the turbocharger output. Fuel consumption was reduced with fuel control modifications and a leaner fuel-air mixture that did not compromise

  4. Analytical design and simulation evaluation of an approach flight director system for a jet STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, R. H.; Hofmann, L. G.; Mcruer, D. T.

    1974-01-01

    A program was undertaken to develop design criteria and operational procedures for STOL transport aircraft. As part of that program, a series of flight tests shall be performed in an Augmentor Wing Jet STOL Aircraft. In preparation for the flight test programs, an analytical study was conducted to gain an understanding of the characteristics of the vehicle for manual control, to assess the relative merits of the variety of manual control techniques available with attitude and thrust vector controllers, and to determine what improvements can be made over manual control of the bare airframe by providing the pilot with suitable command guidance information and by augmentation of the bare airframe dynamics. The objective of the study is to apply closed-loop pilot/vehicle analysis techniques to the analysis of manual flight control of powered-lift STOL aircraft in the landing approach and to the design and experimental verification of an advanced flight director display.

  5. A simulator investigation of the influence of engine response characteristics on the approach and landing for an externally blown flap aircraft. Part 1: Description of the simulation and discussion of results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Koenig, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the influence of engine response characteristics on approach and landing operations of a powered lift aircraft were carried out in a piloted ground-based simulator. The aircraft simulated was a four engine, externally-blown jet-flap configuration having an 80 pound wing loading and .56 thrust to weight ratio. Results indicate that for ideal operating conditions and minimal pilot reaction delay, substantial reductions in engine-out wave-off altitude increment and touchdown sink rate for engine-out landings can be achieved with the fast engine compared to the slow engine response. However, delays in pilot reaction of one to two seconds diminish the advantage of rapid thrust response. A need exists for some form of automatic cueing of the pilot or automatic engine control to enable the potential of rapid thrust response to be realized in improving safety in the event of an engine failure.

  6. 50 CFR 27.34 - Aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aircraft. 27.34 Section 27.34 Wildlife and... WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Disturbing Violations: With Vehicles § 27.34 Aircraft. The unauthorized operation of aircraft, including sail planes, and hang gliders, at altitudes resulting...

  7. Simulations and Experiments of Hot Forging Design and Evaluation of the Aircraft Landing Gear Barrel Al Alloy Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram Prabhu, T.

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the hot forging design of a typical landing gear barrel was evolved using finite element simulations and validated with experiments. A DEFORM3D software was used to evolve the forging steps to obtain the sound quality part free of defects with minimum press force requirements. The hot forging trial of a barrel structure was carried out in a 30 MN hydraulic press based on the simulation outputs. The tensile properties of the part were evaluated by taking samples from all three orientations (longitudinal, long transverse, short transverse). The hardness and microstructure of the part were also investigated. To study the soundness of the product, fluorescent penetrant inspection and ultrasonic testing were performed in order to identify any potential surface or internal defects in the part. From experiments, it was found that the part was formed successfully without any forging defects such as under filling, laps, or folds that validated the effectiveness of the process simulation. The tensile properties of the part were well above the specification limit (>10%) and the properties variation with respect to the orientation was less than 2.5%. The part has qualified the surface defects level of Mil Std 1907 Grade C and the internal defects level of AMS 2630 Class A (2 mm FBh). The microstructure shows mean grain length and width of 167 and 66 µm in the longitudinal direction. However, microstructure results revealed that the coarse grain structure was observed on the flat surface near the lug region due to the dead zone formation. An innovative and simple method of milling the surface layer after each pressing operation was applied to solve the problem of the surface coarse grain structure.

  8. A new Methane and carbon dioxide eddy-covariance flux monitor for land-based, sea-based, and aircraft-based applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosson, Eric; Karion, Anna; Law, Beverly; Sweeney, Colm; Christoph, Thomas; Rahn, Thomas; Mc Gillis, Wade

    2010-05-01

    It is now recognized that a comprehensive understanding of global warming's full impact on local and global weather patterns still requires much more data, namely, mapping the atmospheric mixing ratios (concentrations) of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4). Moreover, even as this understanding becomes more complete, there will also be a major ongoing need to continuously map quantitative levels of these gases to monitor the effects of regional, national and international green house gas (GHG) reduction efforts, as well as to certify compliance. To carry out this effort will require analyzers that can produce continuous, parts-per-billion precision, high accuracy measurements of ambient levels of atmospheric gases at very high data rates over years of operation in land-based, sea-based, as well as aircraft-based applications. A challenge worth considering is to create a single analyzer that can address the GHG measurement needs of virtually all these applications. Such an analyzer would be required to produce slow time-response (e.g. minute to minute data is considered very fast time response), and very high accuracy (which can also be described as precision across a network of independent measurements) as required for atmospheric inversions and some mobile applications as well as fast time-response (e.g. 1 Hz to 10 Hz) and excellent relative precision (without the need for long-term accuracy, or comparability of mixing ratios across multiple sites) as needed for eddy covariance flux measurements. Such an analyzer would give the research community much more flexibility, a wider choice of research applications, reduce overall capital equipment cost, and improve the inter-comparability of GHG measurements across applications. Picarro, Inc. has developed a high speed Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) based analyzer, able to measure carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration to a precision (one standard deviation) of 200 parts-per-billion (ppbv), and methane (CH4

  9. Aircraft parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.

    1987-01-01

    The aircraft parameter estimation problem is used to illustrate the utility of parameter estimation, which applies to many engineering and scientific fields. Maximum likelihood estimation has been used to extract stability and control derivatives from flight data for many years. This paper presents some of the basic concepts of aircraft parameter estimation and briefly surveys the literature in the field. The maximum likelihood estimator is discussed, and the basic concepts of minimization and estimation are examined for a simple simulated aircraft example. The cost functions that are to be minimized during estimation are defined and discussed. Graphic representations of the cost functions are given to illustrate the minimization process. Finally, the basic concepts are generalized, and estimation from flight data is discussed. Some of the major conclusions for the simulated example are also developed for the analysis of flight data from the F-14, highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT), and space shuttle vehicles.

  10. Entry vehicle performance analysis and atmospheric guidance algorithm for precision landing on Mars. M.S. Thesis - Massachusetts Inst. of Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dieriam, Todd A.

    1990-01-01

    Future missions to Mars may require pin-point landing precision, possibly on the order of tens of meters. The ability to reach a target while meeting a dynamic pressure constraint to ensure safe parachute deployment is complicated at Mars by low atmospheric density, high atmospheric uncertainty, and the desire to employ only bank angle control. The vehicle aerodynamic performance requirements and guidance necessary for 0.5 to 1.5 lift drag ratio vehicle to maximize the achievable footprint while meeting the constraints are examined. A parametric study of the various factors related to entry vehicle performance in the Mars environment is undertaken to develop general vehicle aerodynamic design requirements. The combination of low lift drag ratio and low atmospheric density at Mars result in a large phugoid motion involving the dynamic pressure which complicates trajectory control. Vehicle ballistic coefficient is demonstrated to be the predominant characteristic affecting final dynamic pressure. Additionally, a speed brake is shown to be ineffective at reducing the final dynamic pressure. An adaptive precision entry atmospheric guidance scheme is presented. The guidance uses a numeric predictor-corrector algorithm to control downrange, an azimuth controller to govern crossrange, and analytic control law to reduce the final dynamic pressure. Guidance performance is tested against a variety of dispersions, and the results from selected tests are presented. Precision entry using bank angle control only is demonstrated to be feasible at Mars.

  11. 8 CFR 234.2 - Landing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENTRY FOR ALIENS ARRIVING BY CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 234.2 Landing requirements. (a) Place of landing. Aircraft... obtained from the Commissioner of Customs in the case of aircraft operated by scheduled airlines, and in..., aircraft carrying passengers and crew required to be inspected under the act on flights originating in...

  12. 32 CFR 766.12 - Unauthorized landings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY AVIATION FACILITIES BY CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.12 Unauthorized landings. An aircraft that... authority, except in a bona fide emergency, is in violation of this part. Civil aircraft landing in... of the President, civil aircraft may be impounded and the operator prosecuted as indicated...

  13. 32 CFR 766.12 - Unauthorized landings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY AVIATION FACILITIES BY CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.12 Unauthorized landings. An aircraft that... authority, except in a bona fide emergency, is in violation of this part. Civil aircraft landing in... of the President, civil aircraft may be impounded and the operator prosecuted as indicated...

  14. 32 CFR 766.12 - Unauthorized landings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY AVIATION FACILITIES BY CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.12 Unauthorized landings. An aircraft that... authority, except in a bona fide emergency, is in violation of this part. Civil aircraft landing in... of the President, civil aircraft may be impounded and the operator prosecuted as indicated...

  15. 32 CFR 766.12 - Unauthorized landings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY AVIATION FACILITIES BY CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.12 Unauthorized landings. An aircraft that... authority, except in a bona fide emergency, is in violation of this part. Civil aircraft landing in... of the President, civil aircraft may be impounded and the operator prosecuted as indicated...

  16. 32 CFR 766.12 - Unauthorized landings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY AVIATION FACILITIES BY CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.12 Unauthorized landings. An aircraft that... authority, except in a bona fide emergency, is in violation of this part. Civil aircraft landing in... of the President, civil aircraft may be impounded and the operator prosecuted as indicated...

  17. 19 CFR 122.37 - Precleared aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Precleared aircraft. 122.37 Section 122.37 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Landing Requirements § 122.37 Precleared aircraft. (a) Application. This section applies when aircraft carrying crew, passengers and baggage, or merchandise which has...

  18. 19 CFR 122.37 - Precleared aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Precleared aircraft. 122.37 Section 122.37 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Landing Requirements § 122.37 Precleared aircraft. (a) Application. This section applies when aircraft carrying crew, passengers and baggage, or merchandise which has...

  19. 19 CFR 122.37 - Precleared aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Precleared aircraft. 122.37 Section 122.37 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Landing Requirements § 122.37 Precleared aircraft. (a) Application. This section applies when aircraft carrying crew, passengers and baggage, or merchandise which has...

  20. 19 CFR 122.37 - Precleared aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Landing Requirements § 122.37 Precleared aircraft. (a) Application. This section applies when aircraft carrying crew, passengers and baggage, or merchandise which has been... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Precleared aircraft. 122.37 Section 122.37...

  1. 19 CFR 122.37 - Precleared aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Precleared aircraft. 122.37 Section 122.37 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Landing Requirements § 122.37 Precleared aircraft. (a) Application. This section applies when aircraft carrying crew, passengers and baggage, or merchandise which has...

  2. Comparative Effects of Ethanol (E85), Gasoline, and Wind-Powered Electric Vehicles on Cancer, Mortality, Climate-Relevant Emissions, and Land requirements in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, M. Z.

    2007-12-01

    In this study, a nested global-through-urban air pollution/weather forecast model is combined with high- resolution future emission inventories, population data, and health effects data to examine the effect of converting from gasoline to a high-ethanol blend (E85) on cancer, mortality, and hospitalization in the U.S. as a whole and Los Angeles in particular. The effects of both are then compared with those from converting to wind-powered battery-electric vehicles (WBEVs). Under the base-case emission scenario, which accounted for projected improvements in gasoline and E85 vehicle emission controls, complete conversion to E85, which is unlikely due to land-use constraints, was found to increase ozone-related mortality, hospitalization, and asthma by about 9 percent in Los Angeles and 4 percent in the U.S. as a whole relative to 100 percent gasoline. Ozone increases in Los Angeles and the northeast U.S. were partially offset by decreases in the southeast. E85 also increased PAN in the U.S. but was estimated to cause little change in cancer risk relative to gasoline. Both gasoline and ethanol are anticipated to cause at least 10,000-20,000 premature deaths in the U.S. in 2020, which would be eliminated upon conversion to WBEVs. WBEVs require 30 times less land area than corn ethanol and 20 times less land area than cellulosic ethanol for powering the same vehicle fleet. About 70,000-120,000 5 MW wind turbines in average wind speeds exceeding 8 m/s could power all U.S. onroad vehicles, eliminating up to 26 percent of U.S. carbon, compared with a best-case carbon reduction of 0.2 percent for corn-ethanol and 4 percent for cellulosic ethanol, based on recent lifecycle emission data and landuse constraints. In sum, both gasoline and E85 pose public health risks, with E85 causing equal or possibly more damage. The conversion to battery-electric vehicles or hydrogen fuel cell vehicles powered by wind or another clean renewable, is a significantly superior solution to

  3. STS-57 Endeavour, OV-105, glides above KSC SLF runway 33 prior to landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    With main landing gear (MLG) and nose landing gear (NLG) deployed, Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, is captured just before touchdown on concrete runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). The shuttle trainer aircraft (STA) monitors the STS-57 landing as it flies overhead. Moments after this picture was taken, MLG touched down at 8:52:16am (Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)). In the foreground are a waterway, grasses, and runway lights and markers. The view looks down OV-105's port side.

  4. Monitoring of harmful gaseous emissions from land transport vehicles using a mid-infrared optical fibre sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulrooney, Jim; Clifford, John; Fitzpatrick, Colin; Lewis, Elfed

    2006-04-01

    This paper discusses the development of an optical fibre sensor suitable for the detection of gas emissions from motor vehicles based on mid-infrared spectroscopy. Initial measurements are presented for carbon dioxide emissions from a petrol engine using low-cost mid-infrared components, and a practical detection system, which could be fitted to a vehicle, is outlined.

  5. 8 CFR 234.2 - Landing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ENTRY FOR ALIENS ARRIVING BY CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 234.2 Landing requirements. (a) Place of landing. Aircraft... must land only at airports that have been authorized by CBP pursuant to 19 CFR 122.153 as an airport of... from the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) in the case of aircraft operated...

  6. 32 CFR 855.14 - Unauthorized landings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emergency landing: (i) Is not charged a landing fee. (ii) Pays all costs for labor, material, parts, use of... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits § 855.14 Unauthorized...

  7. Aircraft Flutter Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Wilmer Reed gained international recognition for his innovative research, contributions and patented ideas relating to flutter and aeroelasticity of aerospace vehicles at Langley Research Center. In the early 1980's, Reed retired from Langley and joined the engineering staff of Dynamic Engineering Inc. While at DEI, Reed conceived and patented the DEI Flutter Exciter, now used world-wide in flight flutter testing of new or modified aircraft designs. When activated, the DEI Flutter Exciter alternately deflects the airstream upward and downward in a rapid manner, creating a force similar to that produced by an oscillating trailing edge flap. The DEI Flutter Exciter is readily adaptable to a variety of aircraft.

  8. The X-38 vehicle #131R arrives at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The X-38 Vehicle 131R, intended to prove the utility of a 'lifeboat' crew return vehicle to bring crews home from the International Space Station in the event of an emergency, was unloaded from NASA's Super Guppy transport aircraft on July 11, 2000. The newest X-38 version arrived at Dryden for drop tests from NASA's venerable B-52 mother ship. The tests will evaluate a 7,500 square-foot parafoil intended to permit the crew return vehicle to return from space and land in the length of a football field.

  9. The History of the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft: From Concept to Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maisel, Martin D.; Giulianetti, Demo J.; Dugan, Daniel C.

    2000-01-01

    This monograph is a testament to the efforts of many people overcoming multiple technical challenges encountered while developing the XV-15 tilt rotor research aircraft. The Ames involvement with the tilt rotor aircraft began in 1957 with investigations of the performance and dynamic behavior of the Bell XV-3 tilt rotor aircraft. At that time, Ames Research Center was known as the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). As we approach the new millennium, and after more than 40 years of effort and the successful completion of our initial goals, it is appropriate to reflect on the technical accomplishments and consider the future applications of this unique aircraft class, the tilt rotor. The talented engineers, technicians, managers, and leaders at Ames have worked hard with their counterparts in the U.S. rotorcraft industry to overcome technology barriers and to make the military and civil tilt rotor aircraft safer, environmentally acceptable, and more efficient. The tilt rotor aircraft combines the advantages of vertical takeoff and landing capabilities, inherent to the helicopter, with the forward speed and range of a fixed wing turboprop airplane. Our studies have shown that this new vehicle type can provide the aviation transportation industry with the flexibility for highspeed, long-range flight, coupled with runway-independent operations, thus having a significant potential to relieve airport congestion. We see the tilt rotor aircraft as an element of the solution to this growing air transport problem.

  10. Yawed-Rolling Tire Mechanical Properties Testing of the Navy T-45 Aircraft Tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Robert H.

    2000-01-01

    The T-45 Goshawk is a United States Navy Jet aircraft used primarily as a trainer. The aircraft design makes use of "off the shelf" hardware as much as possible and was found to have unusual directional control issues during around operations. The aircraft was involved in numerous pilot-induced-oscillation incidents as well as observed to have unusual directional control reactions to failed main gear tires, a condition that is normally handled relatively easily by conventional aircraft steering control techniques. The behavior of the aircraft's tires had previously been modeled in simulators as a result of approximations provided in 40-year-old reference publications. Since knowledge of the true tire cornering and braking behavior is essential to modeling, understanding, and fixing directional control problems, the United States Navy requested assistance from the NASA Langley Research Center's (LARC) Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF) to define the yawed-rolling mechanical properties of the T-45 aircraft tires. The purpose of this report is to document the results of testing the subject tires at the NASA LaRC ALDF in September 1998. Brief descriptions of the Instrumented Tire Test Vehicle (ITTV) are included to familiarize the reader with the ITTV capabilities, data acquisition system, test and measurement techniques, data accuracy, and analysis and presentation of the testing results.

  11. Future V/STOL Aircraft For The Pacific Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, James A.; Zuk, John

    1992-01-01

    Report describes geography and transportation needs of Asian Pacific region, and describes aircraft configurations suitable for region and compares performances. Examines applications of high-speed rotorcraft, vertical/short-takeoff-and-landing (V/STOL) aircraft, and short-takeoff-and landing (STOL) aircraft. Configurations benefit commerce, tourism, and development of resources.

  12. 32 CFR 855.15 - Detaining an aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Detaining an aircraft. 855.15 Section 855.15 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits § 855.15 Detaining an...

  13. 32 CFR 855.15 - Detaining an aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Detaining an aircraft. 855.15 Section 855.15 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits § 855.15 Detaining an...

  14. 32 CFR 855.15 - Detaining an aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Detaining an aircraft. 855.15 Section 855.15 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits § 855.15 Detaining an...

  15. 32 CFR 855.15 - Detaining an aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Detaining an aircraft. 855.15 Section 855.15 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits § 855.15 Detaining an...

  16. 32 CFR 855.15 - Detaining an aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Detaining an aircraft. 855.15 Section 855.15 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits § 855.15 Detaining an...

  17. Aurora Flight Sciences' Perseus B Remotely Piloted Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    project. The Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft first flew in November 1991 and made three low-altitude flights within a month to validate the Perseus aerodynamic model and flight control systems. Next came the redesigned Perseus A, which incorporated a closed-cycle combustion system that mixed oxygen carried aboard the aircraft with engine exhaust to compensate for the thin air at high altitudes. The Perseus A was towed into the air by a ground vehicle and its engine started after it became airborne. Prior to landing, the engine was stopped, the propeller locked in horizontal position, and the Perseus A glided to a landing on its unique bicycle-type landing gear. Two Perseus A aircraft were built and made 21 flights in 1993-1994. One of the Perseus A aircraft reached over 50,000 feet in altitude on its third test flight. Although one of the Perseus A aircraft was destroyed in a crash after a vertical gyroscope failed in flight, the other aircraft completed its test program and remains on display at Aurora's facility in Manassas. Perseus B first flew Oct. 7, 1994, and made two flights in 1996 before being damaged in a hard landing on the dry lakebed after a propeller shaft failure. After a number of improvements and upgrades-including extending the original 58.5-foot wingspan to 71.5 feet to enhance high-altitude performance--the Perseus B returned to Dryden in the spring of 1998 for a series of four flights. Thereafter, a series of modifications were made including external fuel pods on the wing that more than doubled the fuel capacity to 100 gallons. Engine power was increased by more than 20 percent by boosting the turbocharger output. Fuel consumption was reduced with fuel control modifications and a leaner fuel-air mixture that did not compromise power. The aircraft again crashed on Oct. 1, 1999, near Barstow, California, suffering moderate damage to the aircraft but no property damage, fire, or injuries in the area of the crash. Perseus B is flown remotely by a pilot

  18. Specially equipped aircraft used in Florida airborne field mill research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, a specially equipped Cessna Citation aircraft flies over the runway to calibrate the Cessna's field mills with field mills on the ground (on the tripod at left) and on the car parked nearby (at right). Field mills measure electric fields. The aircraft is also equipped with cloud physics probes that measure the size, shape and number of ice and water particles in clouds. The plane is being flown into anvil clouds in the KSC area as part of a study to review and possibly modify lightning launch commit criteria. The weather study could lead to improved lightning avoidance rules and fewer launch scrubs for the Space Shuttle and other launch vehicles on the Eastern and Western ranges. More information about this study can be found in Release No. 56- 00.

  19. Specially equipped aircraft used in Florida airborne field mill research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, a specially equipped Cessna Citation aircraft approaches the runway to calibrate the Cessna's field mills with field mills on the ground (on the tripod at left) and on the car parked nearby (at right). Field mills measure electric fields. The aircraft is also equipped with cloud physics probes that measure the size, shape and number of ice and water particles in clouds. The plane is being flown into anvil clouds in the KSC area as part of a study to review and possibly modify lightning launch commit criteria. The weather study could lead to improved lightning avoidance rules and fewer launch scrubs for the Space Shuttle and other launch vehicles on the Eastern and Western ranges. More information on this study can be found in Release No. 56- 00.

  20. Multimodal Perception and Multicriterion Control of Nested Systems. 2; Constraints on Crew Members During Space Vehicle Abort, Entry, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccio, Gary E.; McDonald, P. Vernon; Irvin, Gregg E.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews the operational demands made of a Shuttle pilot or commander within the context of a proven empirical methodology for describing human sensorimotor performance and whole-body coordination in mechanically and perceptually complex environments. The conclusions of this review pertain to a) methods for improving our understanding of the psychophysics and biomechanics of visual/manual control and whole-body coordination in space vehicle cockpits; b) the application of scientific knowledge about human perception and performance in dynamic inertial conditions to the development of technology, procedures, and training for personnel in space vehicle cockpits; c) recommendations for mitigation of safety and reliability concerns about human performance in space vehicle cockpits; and d) in-flight evaluation of flight crew performance during nominal and off-nominal launch and reentry scenarios.