Science.gov

Sample records for aircraft lap joints

  1. Measurements of fuselage skin strains and displacements near a longitudinal lap joint in a pressurized aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Edward P.; Britt, Vicki O.

    1991-01-01

    Strains and displacements in a small area near a longitudinal lap joint in the fuselage skin of a B737 aircraft were measured during a pressurization cycle to a differential pressure of 6.2 psi while the aircraft was on the ground. It was found that hoop strains were higher than longitudinal strains at each location; membrane strains in the unreinforced skin were higher than in the joint; membrane strains in the hoop direction, as well as radial displacements, tended to be highest at the mid-bay location between skin reinforcements; significant bending in the hoop direction occurred in the joint and in the skin near the joint, and the bending was unsymmetrically distributed about the stringer at the middle of the joint; and radial displacements were unsymmetrically distributed across the lap joint. The interpretation of the strain gage data for locations on the bonded and riveted lap joint assumed that the joint did not contain disbonded areas.

  2. Determination of the Corrosive Conditions Present within Aircraft Lap-Splice Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Karen S.; Kelly, Robert G.; Piascik, Robert S.

    1999-01-01

    The complexity of airframe structure lends itself to damage resulting from crevice corrosion. Fuselage lap-splice joints are a particularly important structural detail in this regard because of the difficulty associated with detection and measurement of corrosion in these occluded regions. The objective of this work is to develop a laboratory corrosion test protocol to identify the chemistry to which lap joints are exposed and to develop a model of the corrosion within the joints. A protocol for collecting and identifying the chemistry of airframe crevice corrosion has been developed. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is used to identify the ionic species contained in corrosion product samples removed from fuselage lap splice joints. CE analysis has been performed on over sixty corrosion product samples removed from both civilian and military aircraft. Over twenty different ions have been detected. Measurements of pH of wetted corroded surfaces indicated an alkaline occluded solution. After determining the species present and their relative concentrations, the resultant solution was reproduced in bulk and electrochemical tests were performed to determine the corrosion rate. Electrochemical analyses of the behavior of AA2024-T3 in these solutions gave corrosion rates of up to 250 microns per year (10 mpy). Additional tests have determined the relative importance of each of the detected ions in model solutions used for future predictive tests. The statistically significant ions have been used to create a second generation solution. Laboratory studies have also included exposure tests involving artificial lap joints exposed to various simulated bulk and crevice environments. The extent and morphology of the attack in artificial lap joints has been compared to studies of corroded samples from actual aircraft. Other effects, such as temperature and potential, as well as the impact of the environment on fatigue crack growth have also been studied.

  3. A finite element and experimental investigation on the fatigue of riveted lap joints in aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atre, Amarendra

    Aircraft fuselage skin panels are joined together by rivets. The initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks in aircraft structures at and around the rivet/skin interface is directly related to residual stress field induced during the riveting process and subsequent service loads. Variations in the manufacturing process, such as applied loading and presence of sealant can influence the induced residual stress field. In previous research, the riveting process has been simulated by a 2D axisymmetric force-controlled analysis. The 2D analysis cannot capture the unsymmetrical residual stress state resulting from process variations. Experimental work has also been limited to observing effects of squeeze force on fatigue crack initiation in the riveted lap joint. In this work, a 3D finite element model of the riveting process that incorporates plasticity and contact between the various surfaces is simulated using ABAQUS finite element code to capture the residual stress state at the rivet/skin interface. The finite element model is implemented to observe the effects of interference, sealant and hole quality on the residual stress state using Implicit and Explicit solvers. Effects of subsequent load transfer are also analyzed with the developed model. A set of controlled lap joint fatigue experiments for the different conditions provides validation to the model.

  4. Preliminary results on the fracture analysis of multi-site cracking of lap joints in aircraft skins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuth, J. L., Jr.; Hutchinson, John W.

    1992-07-01

    Results of a fracture mechanics analysis relevant to fatigue crack growth at rivets in lap joints of aircraft skins are presented. Multi-site damage (MSD) is receiving increased attention within the context of problems of aging aircraft. Fracture analyses previously carried out include small-scale modeling of rivet/skin interactions, larger-scale two-dimensional models of lap joints similar to that developed here, and full scale three-dimensional models of large portions of the aircraft fuselage. Fatigue testing efforts have included flat coupon specimens, two-dimensional lap joint tests, and full scale tests on specimens designed to closely duplicate aircraft sections. Most of this work is documented in the proceedings of previous symposia on the aging aircraft problem. The effect MSD has on the ability of skin stiffeners to arrest the growth of long skin cracks is a particularly important topic that remains to be addressed. One of the most striking features of MSD observed in joints of some test sections and in the joints of some of the older aircraft fuselages is the relative uniformity of the fatigue cracks from rivet to rivet along an extended row of rivets. This regularity suggests that nucleation of the cracks must not be overly difficult. Moreover, it indicates that there is some mechanism which keeps longer cracks from running away from shorter ones, or, equivalently, a mechanism for shorter cracks to catch-up with longer cracks. This basic mechanism has not been identified, and one of the objectives of the work is to see to what extent the mechanism is revealed by a fracture analysis of the MSD cracks. Another related aim is to present accurate stress intensity factor variations with crack length which can be used to estimate fatigue crack growth lifetimes once cracks have been initiated. Results are presented which illustrate the influence of load shedding from rivets with long cracks to neighboring rivets with shorter cracks. Results are also included

  5. Preliminary results on the fracture analysis of multi-site cracking of lap joints in aircraft skins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuth, J. L., Jr.; Hutchinson, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a fracture mechanics analysis relevant to fatigue crack growth at rivets in lap joints of aircraft skins are presented. Multi-site damage (MSD) is receiving increased attention within the context of problems of aging aircraft. Fracture analyses previously carried out include small-scale modeling of rivet/skin interactions, larger-scale two-dimensional models of lap joints similar to that developed here, and full scale three-dimensional models of large portions of the aircraft fuselage. Fatigue testing efforts have included flat coupon specimens, two-dimensional lap joint tests, and full scale tests on specimens designed to closely duplicate aircraft sections. Most of this work is documented in the proceedings of previous symposia on the aging aircraft problem. The effect MSD has on the ability of skin stiffeners to arrest the growth of long skin cracks is a particularly important topic that remains to be addressed. One of the most striking features of MSD observed in joints of some test sections and in the joints of some of the older aircraft fuselages is the relative uniformity of the fatigue cracks from rivet to rivet along an extended row of rivets. This regularity suggests that nucleation of the cracks must not be overly difficult. Moreover, it indicates that there is some mechanism which keeps longer cracks from running away from shorter ones, or, equivalently, a mechanism for shorter cracks to catch-up with longer cracks. This basic mechanism has not been identified, and one of the objectives of the work is to see to what extent the mechanism is revealed by a fracture analysis of the MSD cracks. Another related aim is to present accurate stress intensity factor variations with crack length which can be used to estimate fatigue crack growth lifetimes once cracks have been initiated. Results are presented which illustrate the influence of load shedding from rivets with long cracks to neighboring rivets with shorter cracks. Results are also included

  6. A Comprehensive Structural Analysis Process for Failure Assessment in Aircraft Lap-Joint Mimics Using Multi-Modal Fusion of NDE Data (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    modality . In order to address the limitations of FEM-based methods in their ability to predict fatigue, more specialized numerical modeling...AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2012-0350 A COMPREHENSIVE STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS PROCESS FOR FAILURE ASSESSMENT IN AIRCRAFT LAP-JOINT MIMICS USING MULTI- MODAL ...structural analysis process is presented that includes intra- and inter- modal NDE data fusion. The process includes defect detection, defect

  7. The Effect of Surface Irregularities on Wing Drag. II - Lap Joints. 2; Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Manley J.

    1938-01-01

    Tests have been made in the NACA 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel of the drag caused by four types of lap joint. The tests were made on an airfoil of NACA 23012 section and 5-foot chord and covered in a range of speeds from 80 to 500 miles per hour and lift coefficients from 0 to 0.30. The increases in profile drag caused by representative arrangements of laps varied from 4 to 9%. When there were protruding rivet heads on the surface, the addition of laps increased the drag only slightly. Laps on the forward part of a wing increased the drag considerably more than those farther back.

  8. 49 CFR 230.30 - Lap-joint seam boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lap-joint seam boilers. 230.30 Section 230.30..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Inspection and Repair § 230.30 Lap-joint seam boilers. Every boiler having lap-joint longitudinal...

  9. 49 CFR 230.30 - Lap-joint seam boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lap-joint seam boilers. 230.30 Section 230.30..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Inspection and Repair § 230.30 Lap-joint seam boilers. Every boiler having lap-joint longitudinal...

  10. 49 CFR 230.30 - Lap-joint seam boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lap-joint seam boilers. 230.30 Section 230.30..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Inspection and Repair § 230.30 Lap-joint seam boilers. Every boiler having lap-joint longitudinal...

  11. 49 CFR 230.30 - Lap-joint seam boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lap-joint seam boilers. 230.30 Section 230.30..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Inspection and Repair § 230.30 Lap-joint seam boilers. Every boiler having lap-joint longitudinal...

  12. 49 CFR 230.30 - Lap-joint seam boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lap-joint seam boilers. 230.30 Section 230.30..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Inspection and Repair § 230.30 Lap-joint seam boilers. Every boiler having lap-joint longitudinal...

  13. Tubular lap joints for wind turbine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, E.D. Jr.; Guess, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    A combined analytical/experimental study of the strength of thick- walled, adhesively bonded PMMA-to-aluminum and E-glass/epoxy composite-to-aluminum tubular lap joints under axial load has been conducted. Test results include strength and failure mode data. Moreover, strain gages placed along the length of the outer tubular adherend characterize load transfer from one adherend to the other. The strain gage data indicate that load transfer is nonuniform and that the relatively compliant PMMA has the shorter load transfer length. Strains determined by a finite element analysis of the tested joints are in excellent agreement with those measured. Calculated bond stresses are highest in the region of observed failure, and extensive bond yielding is predicted in the E- glass/epoxy composite-to-aluminum joint prior to joint failure. 4 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Flaw Tolerance In Lap Shear Brazed Joints. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Len; Flom, Yury

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents results of the second part of an on-going effort to gain better understanding of defect tolerance in braze joints. In the first part of this three-part series, we mechanically tested and modeled the strength of the lap joints as a function of the overlap distance. A failure criterion was established based on the zone damage theory, which predicts the dependence of the lap joint shear strength on the overlap distance, based on the critical size of a finite damage zone or an overloaded region in the joint. In this second part of the study, we experimentally verified the applicability of the damage zone criterion on prediction of the shear strength of the lap joint and introduced controlled flaws into the lap joints. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the lap joint strength as a function of flaw size and its location through mechanical testing and nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) employing damage zone criterion for definition of failure. The results obtained from the second part of the investigation confirmed that the failure of the ductile lap shear brazed joints occurs when the damage zone reaches approximately 10% of the overlap width. The same failure criterion was applicable to the lap joints containing flaws.

  15. Multicrack growth monitoring at riveted lap joints using piezoelectric patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihn, Jeong-Beom; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2002-06-01

    A built-in cost-effective diagnostic system is being developed to monitor fatigue crack growth in aircraft structures. The proposed system consists of a SMART Layer by Acellent Technologies with an embedded network of distributed piezoelectric sensors/actuators, a diagnostic unit, and software. Multi-riveted aluminum lap joints (936 x 462 mm) were tested for a constant amplitude fatigue test under tensile loading to monitor crack growth at rivet holes. A SMART Layer was designed as a strip and surface-mounted to the critical area of lap joints where crack initiation and growth were suspected. The SMART Layer installed between the two rivet rows was used as an actuator strip and the other layer located below the rivets was used as a sensor strip. Using the software, pre-selected diagnostic signals from a designated piezoelectric actuator to its neighboring sensors were generated by the diagnostic unit. A corresponding sensor signals were recorded and compared to a previously recorded baseline reference. The signal processing technique and interpretation algorithm were developed and implemented for extracting features related to crack growth condition at the time of measurement. The results of estimates were compared with non-destructive testing (NDT) data taken from the experiments, which were conducted during the course of the investigation. The probability of damage detection, compared to conventional NDT techniques, was evaluated.

  16. Adhesive-bonded scarf and stepped-lap joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Continuum mechanics solutions are derived for the static load-carrying capacity of scarf and stepped-lap adhesive-bonded joints. The analyses account for adhesive plasticity and adherend stiffness imbalance and thermal mismatch. The scarf joint solutions include a simple algebraic formula which serves as a close lower bound, within a small fraction of a per cent of the true answer for most practical geometries and materials. Digital computer programs were developed and, for the stepped-lap joints, the critical adherend and adhesive stresses are computed for each step. The scarf joint solutions exhibit grossly different behavior from that for double-lap joints for long overlaps inasmuch as that the potential bond shear strength continues to increase with indefinitely long overlaps on the scarf joints. The stepped-lap joint solutions exhibit some characteristics of both the scarf and double-lap joints. The stepped-lap computer program handles arbitrary (different) step lengths and thickness and the solutions obtained have clarified potentially weak design details and the remedies. The program has been used effectively to optimize the joint proportions.

  17. Flaw Tolerance in Lap Shear Brazed Joints. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Wang, Li-Qin

    2003-01-01

    Furnace brazing is a joining process used in the aerospace and other industries to produce strong permanent and hermetic structural joints. As in any joining process, brazed joints have various imperfections and defects. At the present time, our understanding of the influence of the internal defects on the strength of the brazed joints is not adequate. The goal of this 3-part investigation is to better understand the properties and failure mechanisms of the brazed joints containing defects. This study focuses on the behavior of the brazed lap shear joints because of their importance in manufacturing aerospace structures. In Part 1, an average shear strength capability and failure modes of the single lap joints are explored. Stainless steel specimens brazed with pure silver are tested in accordance with the AWS C3.2 standard. Comparison of the failure loads and the ultimate shear strength with the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of the same specimens as a function of the overlap widths shows excellent correlation between the experimental and calculated values for the defect-free lap joints. A damage zone criterion is shown to work quite well in understanding the failure of the braze joints. In Part 2, the findings of the Part 1 will be verified on the larger test specimens. Also, various flaws will be introduced in the test specimens to simulate lack of braze coverage in the lap joints. Mechanical testing and FEA will be performed on these joints to verify that behavior of the flawed ductile lap joints is similar to joints with a reduced braze area. Finally, in Part 3, the results obtained in Parts 1 and 2 will be applied to the actual brazed structure to evaluate the load-carrying capability of a structural lap joint containing discontinuities. In addition, a simplified engineering procedure will be offered for the laboratory testing of the lap shear specimens.

  18. Mechanical properties of a lap joint under uniform clamping pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diller, S. V.; Metherell, A. F.

    1969-01-01

    Equations were derived for the load deflection relations, the energy dissipation per cycle, and the instantaneous rate of dissipation for a lap joint idealized as two overlapping plates clamped together under a uniform clamping pressure.

  19. Flaw Tolerance in Lap Shear Brazed Joints. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Wang, Liqin; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Vacuum brazing is a viable process to achieve strong permanent and hermetic joints in space. As in any joining process, brazed Joints have various imperfections and defects. It is important to understand the impact that flaws have on the load carrying capacity and performance of the brazed joints. This study focuses on the behavior of lap shear joints due to their engineering importance in brazed aerospace structures. In Part 1 an average shear strength capabilitY and failure modes of the single lap joints are explored. Specimens comprised of 0.090 inch thick 347 stainless steel sheet brazed with pure silver are tested in accordance with the AWS C3.2 standard. Comparison of the measured loads and average shear stresses at failure with the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of the same specimens as a function of the overlap lengths shows excellent correlation between the experimental and calculated values for the defect-free lap joints. In Part 2, various flaws will be introduced in the test specimens to simulate lack of braze coverage in the lap joints. Mechanical testing and FEA will be performed on these joints to verify if behavior of ductile ]appoints containing flaws is similar to the joints with the reduced braze area. Finally, in Part 3, the results obtained in Part 1 and 2 will be applied to the brazed assembly to evaluate a load carrying capability of the structural lap joint containing defects.

  20. Fracture analysis of multi-site cracking in fuselage lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuth, J. L.; Hutchinson, J. W.

    1994-09-01

    A two-dimensional plane stress elastic fracture mechanics analysis of a cracked lap joint fastened by rigid pins is presented and results are applied to the problem of multi-site damage (MSD) in riveted lap joints of aircraft fuselage skins. Two problems are addressed, the problem of equal length MSD cracks and the problem of alternating length MSD cracks. For the problem of equal length cracks, two models of rivet/skin interactions are studied and the role of residual stresses due to the riveting process is explored. Stress intensity factors are obtained as a function of normalized crack length. Also, the load distribution among rivet rows and the compliance change of the joint due to MSD cracking are obtained. For the problem of alternating length cracks, attention is focussed on how load is distributed between columns of rivets and how this load shedding can alter crack tip stress intensity factors. The equal and alternating length crack analyses reveal no clear-cut mechanism to explain the relative uniformity of fatigue cracks emerging from lap joint rivet holes in actual aircraft and in mechanical lap joint tests.

  1. Seam-Tracking for Friction Stir Welded Lap Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Paul A.; Hendricks, Christopher E.; Cook, George E.; Wilkes, D. M.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Lammlein, David H.

    2010-11-01

    This article presents a method for automatic seam-tracking in friction stir welding (FSW) of lap joints. In this method, tracking is accomplished by weaving the FSW tool back-and-forth perpendicular to the direction of travel during welding and monitoring force and torque signals. Research demonstrates the ability of this method to automatically track weld seam positions. Additionally, tensile and S-bend test result comparisons demonstrate that weaving most likely does not reduce weld quality. Finally, benefits of this weave-based method to FSW of lap joints are discussed and methods for incorporating it into existing friction stir welding control algorithms (such as axial load control) are examined.

  2. Enhancing pulsed eddy current for inspection of P-3 Orion lap-joint structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, D. M.; Underhill, P. R.; Krause, T. W.

    2016-02-01

    During flight, aircraft are subjected to cyclic loading. In the Lockheed P-3 Orion airframe, this cyclic loading can lead to development of fatigue cracks at steel fastener locations in the top and second layers of aluminum wing skin lap-joints. An inspection method that is capable of detecting these cracks, without fastener removal, is desirable as this can minimize aircraft downtime, while subsequently reducing the risk of collateral damage. The ability to detect second layer cracks has been demonstrated using a Pulsed Eddy Current (PEC) probe design that utilizes the ferrous fastener as a flux conduit. This allows for deeper penetration of flux into the lap-joint second layer and consequently, sensitivity to the presence of cracks. Differential pick-up coil pairs are used to sense the eddy current response due to the presence of a crack. The differential signal obtained from pick-up coils on opposing sides of the fastener is analyzed using a Modified Principal Components Analysis (MPCA). This is followed by a cluster analysis of the resulting MPCA scores to separate fastener locations with cracks from those without. Probe design features, data acquisition system parameters and signal post-processing can each have a strong impact on crack detection. Physical probe configurations and signal analysis processes, used to enhance the PEC system for detection of cracks in P-3 Orion lap-joint structures, are investigated and an enhanced probe design is identified.

  3. Ultrasonic guided wave inspection of Inconel 625 brazed lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comot, Pierre; Bocher, Philippe; Belanger, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The aerospace industry has been investigating the use of brazing for structural joints, as a mean of reducing cost and weight. There therefore is a need for a rapid, robust, and cost-effective non-destructive testing method for evaluating the structural integrity of the joints. The mechanical strength of brazed joints depends mainly on the amount of brittle phases in their microstructure. Ultrasonic guided waves offer the possibility of detecting brittle phases in joints using spatio-temporal measurements. Moreover, they offer the opportunity to inspect complex shape joints. This study focused on the development of a technique based on ultrasonic guided waves for the inspection of Inconel 625 lap joints brazed with BNi-2 filler metal. A finite element model of a lap joint was used to optimize the inspection parameters and assess the feasibility of detecting the amount of brittle phases in the joint. A finite element parametric study simulating the input signal shape, the center frequency, and the excitation direction was performed. The simulations showed that the ultrasonic guided wave energy transmitted through, and reflected from, the joints was proportional to the amount of brittle phases in the joint.

  4. Fatigue strength of a single lap joint SPR-bonded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Franco, G.; Fratini, L.; Pasta, A.

    2011-05-01

    In the last years, hybrid joints, meaning with this the joints which consist in combining a traditional mechanical joint to a layer of adhesive, are gradually attracting the attention of various sectors of the construction of vehicles and transportation industries, for their better performance compared to just mechanical joints (self-piercing riveting SPR, riveting, and so on) or just to bonded joints. The paper investigates the fatigue behavior of a single lap joint self-piercing riveted (SPR) and bonded throughout fatigue tests. The considered geometric configuration allowed the use of two rivets placed longitudinally; an epoxy resin was used as adhesive. In the first part of the work static characterization of the joints was carried out through tensile tests. Then fatigue tests were made with the application of different levels of load. The fatigue curves were also obtained at the varying the distance between the two rivets in order to better assess the joint strength for a given length of overlap.

  5. Testing composite-to-metal tubular lap joints

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Reedy, E.D. Jr.; Slavin, A.M.

    1993-11-01

    Procedures were developed to fabricate, nondestructively evaluate, and mechanically test composite-to-metal tubular joints. The axially loaded tubular lap joint specimen consisted of two metal tubes bonded within each end of a fiberglass composite tube. Joint specimens with both tapered and untapered aluminum adherends and a plain weave E-glass/epoxy composite were tested in tension, compression, and flexure. Other specimens with tapered and untapered steel adherends and a triaxially reinforced E-glass/epoxy composite were tested in tension and compression. Test results include joint strength and failure mode data. A finite element analysis of the axially loaded joints explains the effect of adherend geometry and material properties on measured joint strength. The flexural specimen was also analyzed; calculated surface strains are in good agreement with measured values, and joint failure occurs in the region of calculated peak peel stress.

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF DAMPING IN BOLTED LAP JOINTS

    SciTech Connect

    C. MALONEY; D. PEAIRS; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    The dynamic response of a jointed beam was measured in laboratory experiments. The data were analyzed and the system was mathematically modeled to establish plausible representations of joint damping behavior. Damping is examined in an approximate, local linear framework using log decrement and half power bandwidth approaches. in addition, damping is modeled in a nonlinear framework using a hybrid surface irregularities model that employs a bristles-construct. Experimental and analytical results are presented.

  7. Nonlinear Analysis of Bonded Composite Tubular Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oterkus, E.; Madenci, E.; Smeltzer, S. S., III; Ambur, D. R.

    2005-01-01

    The present study describes a semi-analytical solution method for predicting the geometrically nonlinear response of a bonded composite tubular single-lap joint subjected to general loading conditions. The transverse shear and normal stresses in the adhesive as well as membrane stress resultants and bending moments in the adherends are determined using this method. The method utilizes the principle of virtual work in conjunction with nonlinear thin-shell theory to model the adherends and a cylindrical shear lag model to represent the kinematics of the thin adhesive layer between the adherends. The kinematic boundary conditions are imposed by employing the Lagrange multiplier method. In the solution procedure, the displacement components for the tubular joint are approximated in terms of non-periodic and periodic B-Spline functions in the longitudinal and circumferential directions, respectively. The approach presented herein represents a rapid-solution alternative to the finite element method. The solution method was validated by comparison against a previously considered tubular single-lap joint. The steep variation of both peeling and shearing stresses near the adhesive edges was successfully captured. The applicability of the present method was also demonstrated by considering tubular bonded lap-joints subjected to pure bending and torsion.

  8. Residual Strength Analyses of Riveted Lap-Splice Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, B. R.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to analyze the crack-linkup behavior in riveted-stiffened lap-splice joint panels with small multiple-site damage (MSD) cracks at several adjacent rivet holes. Analyses are based on the STAGS (STructural Analysis of General Shells) code with the critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. To account for high constraint around a crack front, the "plane strain core" option in STAGS was used. The importance of modeling rivet flexibility with fastener elements that accurately model load transfer across the joint is discussed. Fastener holes are not modeled but rivet connectivity is accounted for by attaching rivets to the sheet on one side of the cracks that simulated both the rivet diameter and MSD cracks. Residual strength analyses made on 2024-T3 alloy (1.6-mm thick) riveted-lap-splice joints with a lead crack and various size MSD cracks were compared with test data from Boeing Airplane Company. Analyses were conducted for both restrained and unrestrained buckling conditions. Comparison of results from these analyses and results from lap-splice-joint test panels, which were partially restrained against buckling indicate that the test results were bounded by the failure loads predicted by the analyses with restrained and unrestrained conditions.

  9. Multifrequency Eddy Current Inspection of Corrosion in Clad Aluminum Riveted Lap Joints and Its Effect on Fatigue Life

    SciTech Connect

    Okafor, A. C.; Natarajan, S.

    2007-03-21

    Aging aircraft are prone to corrosion damage and fatigue cracks in riveted lap joints of fuselage skin panels. This can cause catastrophic failure if not detected and repaired. Hence detection of corrosion damage and monitoring its effect on structural integrity are essential. This paper presents multifrequency eddy current (EC) inspection of corrosion damage and machined material loss defect in clad A1 2024-T3 riveted lap joints and its effect on fatigue life. Results of eddy current inspection, corrosion product removal and fatigue testing are presented.

  10. Analytical and experimental investigation of fatigue in lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Daniel V.; Chih-Chien, Chia; Derber, Thomas G.

    A finite element model is presented that can simulate crack growth in layered structures such as lap joints. The layers can be joined either by rivets or adhesives. The crack is represented discretely in the mesh, and automatic remeshing is performed as the crack grows. Because of the connections between the layers, load is transferred to the uncracked layer as the crack grows. This reduces the stress intensity and slows the crack growth rate. The model is used to analyze tests performed on a section of a wing spanwise lap joint. The crack was initiated at a rivet and grown under constant amplitude cyclic loads. Both experimentally observed crack growth rates and the analysis show the retardation that occurs as a result of load transfer between layers. A good correlation is obtained between predicted and observed crack growth rates for the fullly developed through-thickness crack.

  11. Progressive damage in single lap countersunk composite joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chishti, Maajid; Wang, Chun Hui; Thomson, Rodney S.; Orifici, Adrian

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental and computational investigation of the influences of countersink and bolt torque on the progressive failure of single-lap composite joint. Using the Abaqus® software, delamination damage and ply fracture are modelled using cohesive element approach and continuum damage mechanics method, respectively. The model is first validated against a filled-hole tension test to calibrate the composite damage model. Comparison with the experimental results indicates that the computational model is capable of accurately predicting the joint strength and the damage progression process.

  12. Results of uniaxial and biaxial tests on riveted fuselage lap joint specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlieger, H.

    1994-01-01

    As part of an FAA-NLR collaborative program on structural integrity of aging aircraft, NLR carried out uniaxial and biaxial fatigue tests on riveted lap joint specimens being representative for application in a fuselage. All tests were constant amplitude tests with maximum stresses being representative for fuselage pressurization cycles and R-values of 0.1. The parameters selected in the testing program were the stress level (sigma(sub max) = 14 and 16 ksi) and the rivet spacing (0.75 and 1.0 inch). All specimens contained 3 rows of countersunk rivets, the rivet row spacing was 1 inch and the rivet orientation continuous.

  13. Evaluation of the fuselage lap joint fatigue and terminating action repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samavedam, Gopal; Thomson, Douglas; Jeong, David Y.

    1994-09-01

    Terminating action is a remedial repair which entails the replacement of shear head countersunk rivets with universal head rivets which have a larger shank diameter. The procedure was developed to eliminate the risk of widespread fatigue damage (WFD) in the upper rivet row of a fuselage lap joint. A test and evaluation program has been conducted by Foster-Miller, Inc. (FMI) to evaluate the terminating action repair of the upper rivet row of a commercial aircraft fuselage lap splice. Two full scale fatigue tests were conducted on fuselage panels using the growth of fatigue cracks in the lap joint. The second test was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the terminating action repair. In both tests, cyclic pressurization loading was applied to the panels while crack propagation was recorded at all rivet locations at regular intervals to generate detailed data on conditions of fatigue crack initiation, ligament link-up, and fuselage fracture. This program demonstrated that the terminating action repair substantially increases the fatigue life of a fuselage panel structure and effectively eliminates the occurrence of cracking in the upper rivet row of the lap joint. While high cycle crack growth was recorded in the middle rivet row during the second test, failure was not imminent when the test was terminated after cycling to well beyond the service life. The program also demonstrated that the initiation, propagation, and linkup of WFD in full-scale fuselage structures can be simulated and quantitatively studied in the laboratory. This paper presents an overview of the testing program and provides a detailed discussion of the data analysis and results. Crack distribution and propagation rates and directions as well as frequency of cracking are presented for both tests. The progression of damage to linkup of adjacent cracks and to eventual overall panel failure is discussed. In addition, an assessment of the effectiveness of the terminating action repair and the

  14. Evaluation of the fuselage lap joint fatigue and terminating action repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samavedam, Gopal; Thomson, Douglas; Jeong, David Y.

    1994-01-01

    Terminating action is a remedial repair which entails the replacement of shear head countersunk rivets with universal head rivets which have a larger shank diameter. The procedure was developed to eliminate the risk of widespread fatigue damage (WFD) in the upper rivet row of a fuselage lap joint. A test and evaluation program has been conducted by Foster-Miller, Inc. (FMI) to evaluate the terminating action repair of the upper rivet row of a commercial aircraft fuselage lap splice. Two full scale fatigue tests were conducted on fuselage panels using the growth of fatigue cracks in the lap joint. The second test was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the terminating action repair. In both tests, cyclic pressurization loading was applied to the panels while crack propagation was recorded at all rivet locations at regular intervals to generate detailed data on conditions of fatigue crack initiation, ligament link-up, and fuselage fracture. This program demonstrated that the terminating action repair substantially increases the fatigue life of a fuselage panel structure and effectively eliminates the occurrence of cracking in the upper rivet row of the lap joint. While high cycle crack growth was recorded in the middle rivet row during the second test, failure was not imminent when the test was terminated after cycling to well beyond the service life. The program also demonstrated that the initiation, propagation, and linkup of WFD in full-scale fuselage structures can be simulated and quantitatively studied in the laboratory. This paper presents an overview of the testing program and provides a detailed discussion of the data analysis and results. Crack distribution and propagation rates and directions as well as frequency of cracking are presented for both tests. The progression of damage to linkup of adjacent cracks and to eventual overall panel failure is discussed. In addition, an assessment of the effectiveness of the terminating action repair and the

  15. Chaotic and ambient vibration analysis of composite lap joint damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecora, Lou; Nichols, Jon; Seaver, Mark; Trickey, Steve; Motley, Sara

    2007-04-01

    We examined strain time series from fiber Bragg gratings sensors located in various positions on a composite material beam attached to a steel plate by a lap joint. The beam was vibrated using both broad-band chaotic signals (Lorenz system), and a narrow band signal conforming to the Pierson-Moskowitz frequency distribution for wave height (ambient excitation). The system was damaged by decreasing the torque on instrumented bolts in the lap joint from very tight all the way through to a joint with a gap and slippage. We analyzed the strain data by reconstructing the attractor of the system in the case of chaotic forcing and a pseudo-attractor in the case of sea-wave forcing. Using the highest torque case as an "undamaged" baseline, we calculated the continuity statistic between the baseline attractor and the attractors of the various damage levels for both forcing cases. We show where one can and cannot say that the functional relationship between the attractors changes and how those changes are related to damage levels.

  16. Fatigue strength of a single lap joint SPR-bonded

    SciTech Connect

    Di Franco, G.; Fratini, L.; Pasta, A.

    2011-05-04

    In the last years, hybrid joints, meaning with this the joints which consist in combining a traditional mechanical joint to a layer of adhesive, are gradually attracting the attention of various sectors of the construction of vehicles and transportation industries, for their better performance compared to just mechanical joints (self-piercing riveting SPR, riveting, and so on) or just to bonded joints.The paper investigates the fatigue behavior of a single lap joint self-piercing riveted (SPR) and bonded throughout fatigue tests. The considered geometric configuration allowed the use of two rivets placed longitudinally; an epoxy resin was used as adhesive. In the first part of the work static characterization of the joints was carried out through tensile tests. Then fatigue tests were made with the application of different levels of load. The fatigue curves were also obtained at the varying the distance between the two rivets in order to better assess the joint strength for a given length of overlap.

  17. Nonlinear Analysis of Bonded Composite Single-LAP Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oterkus, E.; Barut, A.; Madenci, E.; Smeltzer, S. S.; Ambur, D. R.

    2004-01-01

    This study presents a semi-analytical solution method to analyze the geometrically nonlinear response of bonded composite single-lap joints with tapered adherend edges under uniaxial tension. The solution method provides the transverse shear and normal stresses in the adhesive and in-plane stress resultants and bending moments in the adherends. The method utilizes the principle of virtual work in conjunction with von Karman s nonlinear plate theory to model the adherends and the shear lag model to represent the kinematics of the thin adhesive layer between the adherends. Furthermore, the method accounts for the bilinear elastic material behavior of the adhesive while maintaining a linear stress-strain relationship in the adherends. In order to account for the stiffness changes due to thickness variation of the adherends along the tapered edges, their in-plane and bending stiffness matrices are varied as a function of thickness along the tapered region. The combination of these complexities results in a system of nonlinear governing equilibrium equations. This approach represents a computationally efficient alternative to finite element method. Comparisons are made with corresponding results obtained from finite-element analysis. The results confirm the validity of the solution method. The numerical results present the effects of taper angle, adherend overlap length, and the bilinear adhesive material on the stress fields in the adherends, as well as the adhesive, of a single-lap joint

  18. Analysis of the ’Joggle-LapJoint for Automotive Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    An analytical model is developed to describe the response of the ’ joggle -lapjoint to both tensile and bending loads. The model consists of a non...8217 joggle -lapjoint due to tensile loads was verified through experimental testing and ultimate loads were accurately predicted within experimental error

  19. Use of two-dimensional transmission photoelastic models to study stresses in double-lap bolted joints: Load transfer and stresses in the inner lap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    The determination of the stress distribution in the inner lap of double-lap, double-bolt joints using photoelastic models of the joint is discussed. The principal idea is to fabricate the inner lap of a photoelastic material and to use a photoelastically sensitive material for the two outer laps. With this setup, polarized light transmitted through the stressed model responds principally to the stressed inner lap. The model geometry, the procedures for making and testing the model, and test results are described.

  20. Secondary bending effects in progressively damaged single-lap, single-bolt composite joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Libin; Xin, An; Liu, Fengrui; Zhang, Jianyu; Hu, Ning

    Static tensile experiments and progressive failure simulations of single-bolt, single- and double-lap joints were carried out to comparatively investigate secondary bending effects, which present significant eccentric-loading phenomena in single-lap joints but are almost non-existent in symmetric double-lap joints. Progressive damage models of single-lap and double-lap joints were established, from which the numerical predictions were found to be in good agreement with the experimental outcomes. Experimental macro-scope failure patterns and seven numerical micro-scope failure modes obtained from the progressive damage analyses were presented for the two types of joints. The effects of secondary bending on the mechanical degradation and failure mechanism of single-lap joints were revealed. Some characterizations of secondary bending in the joints, such as a characterized parameter on the AGARD points, joint deformations and contact states, were quantitatively traced during the total progressive damage process. All these characterizations increased the understanding of the effects of secondary bending on the failure process of a single-bolt, single-lap joint.

  1. Characterization of lap joints laser beam welding of thin AA 2024 sheets with Yb:YAG disk-laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiazzo, Fabrizia; Alfieri, Vittorio; Cardaropoli, Francesco; Sergi, Vincenzo

    2012-06-01

    Lap joints obtained by overlapping two plates are widely diffused in aerospace industry. Nevertheless, because of natural aging, adhesively bonded and riveted aircraft lap joints may be affected by cracks from rivets, voids or corrosion. Friction stir welding has been proposed as a valid alternative, although large heat affected zones are produced both in the top and the bottom plate due to the pin diameter. Interest has therefore been shown in studying laser lap welding as the laser beam has been proved to be competitive since it allows to concentrate the thermal input and increases productivity and quality. Some challenges arise as a consequence of aluminum low absorptance and high thermal conductivity; furthermore, issues are due to metallurgical challenges such as both micro and macro porosity formation and softening in the fused zone. Welding of AA 2024 thin sheets in a lap joint configuration is discussed in this paper: tests are carried out using a recently developed Trumpf TruDisk 2002 Yb:YAG disk-laser with high beam quality which allows to produce beads with low plates distortion and better penetration. The influence of the processing parameters is discussed considering the fused zone extent and the bead shape. The porosity content as well as the morphological features of the beads have been examined.

  2. Correlation-based imaging technique for fatigue monitoring of riveted lap-joint structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaegebeur, N.; Ostiguy, P. C.; Masson, P.

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, a correlation-based imaging technique called Excitelet is assessed to monitor fatigue crack propagation in a riveted aluminum lap-joint, representative of an aircraft component. For this purpose, a micro-machined piezoceramic array is used to generate guided waves into the structure and measure the reflections induced by potential damage. The method uses a propagation model to correlate measured signals with a bank of signals and imaging is performed using a round-robin procedure (full-matrix capture). This allows taking into account the transducer dynamics and finite dimensions, multi-modal and dispersive characteristics of the guided wave propagation and complex interaction between with damage. Experimental validation has been conducted on an aluminum lap-joint instrumented with a compact linear piezoceramic array of 8 circular elements of 3 mm diameter each. The imaging technique is applied to detect crack propagation after fatigue cycling. Imaging results obtained using A0 mode at 300 and 450 kHz are presented for different crack sizes. It is demonstrated that crack detection and localization can be achieved, while the correlation level indicates the level of reflected energy, and thus damage severity. An accuracy below 5 mm on damage location can be achieved, demonstrating the potential of the correlation-based imaging technique for damage monitoring of complex aerospace structures.

  3. Global-Local Finite Element Analysis of Bonded Single-Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilic, Bahattin; Madenci, Erdogan; Ambur, Damodar R.

    2004-01-01

    Adhesively bonded lap joints involve dissimilar material junctions and sharp changes in geometry, possibly leading to premature failure. Although the finite element method is well suited to model the bonded lap joints, traditional finite elements are incapable of correctly resolving the stress state at junctions of dissimilar materials because of the unbounded nature of the stresses. In order to facilitate the use of bonded lap joints in future structures, this study presents a finite element technique utilizing a global (special) element coupled with traditional elements. The global element includes the singular behavior at the junction of dissimilar materials with or without traction-free surfaces.

  4. Failure strength prediction for adhesively bonded single lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Niat Mahmud

    For adhesively bonded joint, failure strength depends on many factors such as material properties (both adhesive and adherend), specimen geometries, test environments, surface preparation procedures, etc. Failure occurs inside constitutive materials or along joint interfaces. Based on location, adhesively bonded failure mode can be classified as adhesive failure mode, cohesive failure mode and adherend failure mode. Failure mode directly affects the failure strength of joint. For last eight decades, researchers have developed analytical, empirical or semi-empirical methods capable of predicting failure strength for adhesively bonded joints generating either cohesive failure or adherend failure. Applicability of most of the methods is limited to particular cases. In this research, different failure modes for single lap joints (SLJs) were generated experimentally using epoxy based paste adhesive. Based on experimental data and analytical study, simplified failure prediction methods were developed for each failure mode. For adhesive failure mode, it is observed that peel stress distributions concur along interface near crack initiation points. All SLJs for this test endured consistent surface treatments. Geometric parameters of the joints were varied to study their effect on failure strength. Peel stress distributions were calculated using finite analysis (FEA). Based on peel stress distribution near crack initiation point, a failure model is proposed. Numerous analytical, empirical and semi-empirical models are available for predicting failure strengths of SLJs generating cohesive failures. However, most of the methods in the literature failed to capture failure behavior of SLJs having thickness of adhesive layer as variable. Cohesive failure mode was generated experimentally using aluminum as adherend and epoxy adhesive considering thickness of adhesive layers as variable within SLJs. Comparative study was performed among various methods. It was observed that

  5. Use of two-dimensional transmission photoelastic models to study stresses in double-lap bolted joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Liu, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The stress distribution in two hole connectors in a double lap joint configuration was studied. The following steps are described: (1) fabrication of photoelastic models of double lap double hole joints designed to determine the stresses in the inner lap; (2) assessment of the effects of joint geometry on the stresses in the inner lap; and (3) quantification of differences in the stresses near the two holes. The two holes were on the centerline of the joint and the joints were loaded in tension, parallel to the centerline. Acrylic slip fit pins through the holes served as fasteners. Two dimensional transmission photoelastic models were fabricated by using transparent acrylic outer laps and a photoelastic model material for the inner laps. It is concluded that the photoelastic fringe patterns which are visible when the models are loaded are due almost entirely to stresses in the inner lap.

  6. The mechanics and tribology of fretting fatigue with application to riveted lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szolwinski, Matthew Paul

    Fretting is the synergistic combination of wear, corrosion, and fatigue damage mechanisms driven by the partial slip of contacting surfaces. The surface microslip and near-surface contact stresses associated with fretting can lead to severe reduction in service lifetimes of contacting components as diversified as bearings, turbine blades and mechanically-fastened joints, both structural and biological. This tribologically induced degradation has come under close scrutiny by those responsible for maintaining aging fleets of both commercial and military aircraft. Thus a critical need exists for predicting fretting crack nucleation in riveted aluminum. aircraft joints. Fulfilling this need requires characterizing both the near-surface mechanics and intimately-related tribology of fretting. To this end, a well characterized experimental setup has been developed to generate carefully controlled and monitored fretting contacts to investigate the nature of the near-surface conditions. Included in this investigation were in-situ observations of the fretting contact stress field via a non-invasive thermal imaging technique and a characterization of the evolution of friction under partial slip conditions. With specific qualitative and quantitative understanding of these near-surface conditions, a series of fretting fatigue experiments have been conducted to validate a mechanics-based model for predicting fretting fatigue crack nucleation. Finally, efforts have been directed toward extending this understanding of fretting crack nucleation to riveted aircraft structure through modeling of the riveting process and a related experimental program designed to link riveting process parameters and fretting damage in single-lap joint structures. This work focuses specifically on determination of the residual stresses induced during rivet installation and the morphological characterization of fretting fatigue damage in the riveted test specimens manufactured under controlled

  7. Experimental and analytical program to determine strains in 737 LAP splice joints subjected to normal fuselage pressurization loads

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, D.P.; Jeong, D.Y.

    1996-02-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center (FAATC) has initiated several research projects to assess the structural integrity of the aging commercial aircraft fleet. One area of research involves the understanding of a phenomenon known as ``Widespread Fatigue Damage`` or WFD, which refers to a type of multiple element cracking that degrades the damage tolerance capability of an aircraft structure. Research on WFD has been performed both experimentally and analytically including finite element modeling of fuselage lap splice joints by the Volpe Center. Fuselage pressurization tests have also been conducted at the FAA`s Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) to obtain strain gage data from select locations on the FAA/AANC 737 Transport Aircraft Test Bed. One-hundred strain channels were used to monitor five different lap splice bays including the fuselage skin and substructure elements. These test results have been used to evaluate the accuracy of the analytical models and to support general aircraft analysis efforts. This paper documents the strain fields measured during the AANC tests and successfully correlates the results with analytical predictions.

  8. Methodology for Predicting the Onset of Widespread Fatigue Damage in Lap-Splice Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Harris, C. E.; Piascik, R. S.; Dawicke, D. S.

    1998-01-01

    NASA has conducted an Airframe Structural Integrity Program to develop the methodology to predict the onset of widespread fatigue damage to lap-splice joints of fuselage structures. Several stress analysis codes have been developed or enhanced to analyze the lap-splice-joint configuration. Fatigue lives in lap-splice-joint specimens and fatigue-crack growth in a structural fatigue test article agreed well with calculations from small-crack theory and fatigue-crack growth analyses with the FASTRAN code. Residual-strength analyses of laboratory specimens and wide stiffened panels were predicted quite well from the critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion and elastic-plastic finite-element analyses (two- or three-dimensional codes and the STAGS shell code).

  9. The Growth of Multi-Site Fatigue Damage in Fuselage Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1999-01-01

    Destructive examinations were performed to document the progression of multi-site damage (MSD) in three lap joint panels that were removed from a full scale fuselage test article that was tested to 60,000 full pressurization cycles. Similar fatigue crack growth characteristics were observed for small cracks (50 microns to 10 mm) emanating from counter bore rivets, straight shank rivets, and 100 deg counter sink rivets. Good correlation of the fatigue crack growth data base obtained in this study and FASTRAN Code predictions show that the growth of MSD in the fuselage lap joint structure can be predicted by fracture mechanics based methods.

  10. A Single-Lap Joint Adhesive Bonding Optimization Method Using Gradient and Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Finckenor, Jeffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A natural process for any engineer, scientist, educator, etc. is to seek the most efficient method for accomplishing a given task. In the case of structural design, an area that has a significant impact on the structural efficiency is joint design. Unless the structure is machined from a solid block of material, the individual components which compose the overall structure must be joined together. The method for joining a structure varies depending on the applied loads, material, assembly and disassembly requirements, service life, environment, etc. Using both metallic and fiber reinforced plastic materials limits the user to two methods or a combination of these methods for joining the components into one structure. The first is mechanical fastening and the second is adhesive bonding. Mechanical fastening is by far the most popular joining technique; however, in terms of structural efficiency, adhesive bonding provides a superior joint since the load is distributed uniformly across the joint. The purpose of this paper is to develop a method for optimizing single-lap joint adhesive bonded structures using both gradient and genetic algorithms and comparing the solution process for each method. The goal of the single-lap joint optimization is to find the most efficient structure that meets the imposed requirements while still remaining as lightweight, economical, and reliable as possible. For the single-lap joint, an optimum joint is determined by minimizing the weight of the overall joint based on constraints from adhesive strengths as well as empirically derived rules. The analytical solution of the sin-le-lap joint is determined using the classical Goland-Reissner technique for case 2 type adhesive joints. Joint weight minimization is achieved using a commercially available routine, Design Optimization Tool (DOT), for the gradient solution while an author developed method is used for the genetic algorithm solution. Results illustrate the critical design variables

  11. Identifying Combination of Friction Stir Welding Parameters to Maximize Strength of Lap Joints of AA2014-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendrana, C.; Srinivasan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Balaji, H.; Selvaraj, P.

    2017-01-01

    AA2014 aluminum alloy (Al-Cu alloy) has been widely utilized in fabrication of lightweight structures like aircraft structures, demanding high strength to weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. The fusion welding of these alloys will lead to solidification problems such as hot cracking. Friction stir welding is a new solid state welding process, in which the material being welded does not melt and recast. Lot of research works have been carried out by many researchers to optimize process parameters and establish empirical relationships to predict tensile strength of friction stir welded butt joints of aluminum alloys. However, very few investigations have been carried out on friction stir welded lap joints of aluminum alloys. Hence, in this investigation, an attempt has been made to optimize friction stir lap welding (FSLW) parameters to attain maximum tensile strength using statistical tools such as design of experiment (DoE), analysis of variance (ANOVA), response graph and contour plots. By this method, it is found that maximum tensile shear fracture load of 12.76 kN can be achieved if a joint is made using tool rotational speed of 900 rpm, welding speed of 110 mm/min, tool shoulder diameter of 12 mm and tool tilt angle of 1.5°.

  12. Fatigue crack initiation in riveted lap joints and in pressurized fuselages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Richard P. G.

    1993-06-01

    Riveted joints in pressurized fuselages are exposed to severe fatigue loading. The study was carried out to increase fundamental understanding of the behavior of riveted fuselage joints. Areas of interest include rivet flexibility, load transfer, residual stress distribution, fatigue crack location, secondary bending and inter-sheet friction. These aspects depend on the squeezing force used to drive the rivet. Flat uniaxially loaded riveted lap joint specimens show longer fatigue lives than curved riveted panels loaded by internal pressure in a barrel test setup. Strain gauge measurements on a barrel test setup show more severe loading of the non-countersunk inner sheet compared to the countersunk outer sheet. Finite element calculations gave insight to the improved fatigue crack initiation performance for increased sqeezing force and to the crack initiation location. The early crack initiation at the edges of flat riveted lap joint panels is explained.

  13. The Characteristics of Fatigue Damage in the Fuselage Riveted Lap Splice Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    An extensive data base has been developed to form the physical basis for new analytical methodology to predict the onset of widespread fatigue damage in the fuselage lap splice joint. The results of detailed destructive examinations have been cataloged to describe the physical nature of MSD in the lap splice joint. ne catalog includes a detailed description, e.g., crack initiation, growth rates, size, location, and fracture morphology, of fatigue damage in the fuselage lap splice joint structure. Detailed examinations were conducted on a lap splice joint panel removed from a full scale fuselage test article after completing a 60,000 cycle pressure test. The panel contained a four bay region that exhibited visible outer skin cracks and regions of crack link-up along the upper rivet row. Destructive examinations revealed undetected fatigue damage in the outer skin, inner skin, and tear strap regions. Outer skin fatigue cracks were found to initiate by fretting damage along the faying surface. The cracks grew along the faying surface to a length equivalent to two to three skin thicknesses before penetrating the outboard surface of the outer skin. Analysis of fracture surface marker bands produced during full scale testing revealed that all upper rivet row fatigue cracks contained in a dim bay region grow at similar rates; this important result suggests that fracture mechanics based methods can be used to predict the growth of outer skin fatigue cracks in lap splice structure. Results are presented showing the affects of MSD and out-of-plane pressure loads on outer skin crack link-up.

  14. Modeling the Influence of Stitching on Delamination Growth in Stitched Warp-Knit Composite Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, E. H.; Raju, I. S.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of stitches on the failure of a single lap joint configuration was determined in a combined experimental and analytical study. The experimental study was conducted to determine debond growth under static monotonic loading. The stitches were shown to delay the initiation of the debond and provide load transfer beyond the load necessary to completely debond the stitched lap joint. The strain energy release rates at the debond front were calculated using a finite element-based technique. Models of the unstitched configuration showed significant values of modes I and II across the width of the joint and showed that mode III is zero at the centerline but increases near the free edge. Models of the stitched configuration showed that the stitches effectively reduced mode I to zero, but had less of an effect on modes II and III.

  15. Fatigue growth of multiple-cracks near a row of fastener-holes in a fuselage lap-joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. H.; Atluri, S. N.

    1993-12-01

    The fatigue growth of multiple cracks, of arbitrary lengths, emanating from a row of fastener holes in a bonded, riveted, lap joint in a pressurized aircraft fuselage is studied. The effects of residual stresses due to a rivet misfit, and of plastic deformation near the hole, are included. A Schwartz-Neumann alternating method which uses the analytical solution for a row of multiple colinear cracks in an infinite sheet (the crack-faces being subject to arbitrary tractions), is developed to analyze this MSD problem on a personal computer. It is found that for a range of crack lengths, a phenomena wherein the shorter cracks may grow faster than longer cracks may exist.

  16. Optimum design of bolted composite lap joints under mechanical and thermal loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kradinov, Vladimir Yurievich

    A new approach is developed for the analysis and design of mechanically fastened composite lap joints under mechanical and thermal loading. Based on the combined complex potential and variational formulation, the solution method satisfies the equilibrium equations exactly while the boundary conditions are satisfied by minimizing the total potential. This approach is capable of modeling finite laminate planform dimensions, uniform and variable laminate thickness, laminate lay-up, interaction among bolts, bolt torque, bolt flexibility, bolt size, bolt-hole clearance and interference, insert dimensions and insert material properties. Comparing to the finite element analysis, the robustness of the method does not decrease when modeling the interaction of many bolts; also, the method is more suitable for parametric study and design optimization. The Genetic Algorithm (GA), a powerful optimization technique for multiple extrema functions in multiple dimensions search spaces, is applied in conjunction with the complex potential and variational formulation to achieve optimum designs of bolted composite lap joints. The objective of the optimization is to acquire such a design that ensures the highest strength of the joint. The fitness function for the GA optimization is based on the average stress failure criterion predicting net-section, shear-out, and bearing failure modes in bolted lap joints. The criterion accounts for the stress distribution in the thickness direction at the bolt location by applying an approach utilizing a beam on an elastic foundation formulation.

  17. A Practical Engineering Approach to Predicting Fatigue Crack Growth in Riveted Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Piascik, Robert S.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    An extensive experimental database has been assembled from very detailed teardown examinations of fatigue cracks found in rivet holes of fuselage structural components. Based on this experimental database, a comprehensive analysis methodology was developed to predict the onset of widespread fatigue damage in lap joints of fuselage structure. Several computer codes were developed with specialized capabilities to conduct the various analyses that make up the comprehensive methodology. Over the past several years, the authors have interrogated various aspects of the analysis methods to determine the degree of computational rigor required to produce numerical predictions with acceptable engineering accuracy. This study led to the formulation of a practical engineering approach to predicting fatigue crack growth in riveted lap joints. This paper describes the practical engineering approach and compares predictions with the results from several experimental studies.

  18. A Practical Engineering Approach to Predicting Fatigue Crack Growth in Riveted Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.; Piascik, R. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An extensive experimental database has been assembled from very detailed teardown examinations of fatigue cracks found in rivet holes of fuselage structural components. Based on this experimental database, a comprehensive analysis methodology was developed to predict the onset of widespread fatigue damage in lap joints of fuselage structure. Several computer codes were developed with specialized capabilities to conduct the various analyses that make up the comprehensive methodology. Over the past several years, the authors have interrogated various aspects of the analysis methods to determine the degree of computational rigor required to produce numerical predictions with acceptable engineering accuracy. This study led to the formulation of a practical engineering approach to predicting fatigue crack growth in riveted lap joints. This paper describes the practical engineering approach and compares predictions with the results from several experimental studies.

  19. Analysis of interface cracks in adhesively bonded lap shear joints, part 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. S.; Yau, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Conservation laws of elasticity for nonhomogeneous materials were developed and were used to study the crack behavior in adhesively bonded lap shear joints. By using these laws and the fundamental relationships in fracture mechanics of interface cracks, the problem is reduced to a pair of linear algebraic equations, and stress intensity solutions can be determined directly by information extracted from the far field. The numerical results obtained show that: (1) in the lap-shear joint with a given adherend, the opening-mode stress intensity factor, (K sub 1) is always larger than that of the shearing-mode (K sub 2); (2) (K sub 1) is not sensitive to adherent thickness abut (K sub 2) increases rapidly with increasing thickness; and (3) (K sub 1) and (K sub 2) increase simultaneously as the interfacial crack length increases.

  20. Interfacial and Mechanical Behavior of AA5456 Filling Friction-Stir-Welded Lap Joints Using Similar and Dissimilar Pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behmand, Saleh Alaei; Mirsalehi, Seyyed Ehsan; Omidvar, Hamid; Safarkhanian, Mohammad Ali

    2016-10-01

    In this article, filling friction stir welding (FFSW) of the remaining exit holes of AA5456 alloy friction-stir-welded lap joints was studied. For this purpose, the influences of different rotating speeds, holding times, and pin materials, AA5456 and AA2024, on the metallurgical structure and joint strength were investigated. The observations showed that defect-free lap joints are successfully obtainable by this method using similar and dissimilar consumable pins. The results indicated that the higher rotating speed and holding time adversely affect the weld performance. The best result was achieved for 30 seconds holding time, 500 rpm rotating speed, and AA2024 consumable pin. In this condition, a lap shear strength of 10 pct higher than that of the nonfilled joint, equivalent to about 94 pct of the original defect-free FSW joint, was obtained, whereas the GTAW filled joint showed only approximately 87 pct of the continuous FSW joint strength.

  1. An empirical relationship for extrapolating sparse experimental lap joint data.

    SciTech Connect

    Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Starr, Michael James

    2010-10-01

    Correctly incorporating the influence of mechanical joints in built-up mechanical systems is a critical element for model development for structural dynamics predictions. Quality experimental data are often difficult to obtain and is rarely sufficient to determine fully parameters for relevant mathematical models. On the other hand, fine-mesh finite element (FMFE) modeling facilitates innumerable numerical experiments at modest cost. Detailed FMFE analysis of built-up structures with frictional interfaces reproduces trends among problem parameters found experimentally, but there are qualitative differences. Those differences are currently ascribed to the very approximate nature of the friction model available in most finite element codes. Though numerical simulations are insufficient to produce qualitatively correct behavior of joints, some relations, developed here through observations of a multitude of numerical experiments, suggest interesting relationships among joint properties measured under different loading conditions. These relationships can be generalized into forms consistent with data from physical experiments. One such relationship, developed here, expresses the rate of energy dissipation per cycle within the joint under various combinations of extensional and clamping load in terms of dissipation under other load conditions. The use of this relationship-though not exact-is demonstrated for the purpose of extrapolating a representative set of experimental data to span the range of variability observed from real data.

  2. Effect of Welding Speed on Joint Features and Lap Shear Properties of Stationary Shoulder FSLWed Alclad 2024 Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhiwu; Li, Zhengwei; Lv, Zan; Zhang, Liguo

    2017-02-01

    Using alclad 2024-T4 aluminum alloy as the research object, stationary shoulder technology was used in friction stir lap welding process to investigate its performance in this study. Joint features and mechanical properties of the lap joints were mainly investigated. Results show that lap joint with smooth surface, without shoulder marks and inner defects can be obtained using the stationary shoulder technology. With increasing the welding speed from 40 to 130 mm/min, effective sheet thickness (EST) at the advancing side (AS) shows rather stable values (from 1.17 to 1.31 mm), EST at the retreating side (RS) increases from 0.57 to 1.13 mm, and stir zone width decreases from 4.95 to 4.44 mm. Lap shear failure load of the SSFSLW joints firstly increases and then decreases with increasing the welding speed. Using 100 mm/min, the maximum failure loads of 15.85 and 9.01 kN were obtained when the RS and AS of the joint bear the main load during the lap shear test. Shear fracture mode and tensile fracture mode can be obtained during the lap shear test. All joints present ductile fracture mode.

  3. Effect of Welding Speed on Joint Features and Lap Shear Properties of Stationary Shoulder FSLWed Alclad 2024 Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhiwu; Li, Zhengwei; Lv, Zan; Zhang, Liguo

    2017-03-01

    Using alclad 2024-T4 aluminum alloy as the research object, stationary shoulder technology was used in friction stir lap welding process to investigate its performance in this study. Joint features and mechanical properties of the lap joints were mainly investigated. Results show that lap joint with smooth surface, without shoulder marks and inner defects can be obtained using the stationary shoulder technology. With increasing the welding speed from 40 to 130 mm/min, effective sheet thickness (EST) at the advancing side (AS) shows rather stable values (from 1.17 to 1.31 mm), EST at the retreating side (RS) increases from 0.57 to 1.13 mm, and stir zone width decreases from 4.95 to 4.44 mm. Lap shear failure load of the SSFSLW joints firstly increases and then decreases with increasing the welding speed. Using 100 mm/min, the maximum failure loads of 15.85 and 9.01 kN were obtained when the RS and AS of the joint bear the main load during the lap shear test. Shear fracture mode and tensile fracture mode can be obtained during the lap shear test. All joints present ductile fracture mode.

  4. An evaluation of the blind lap joint for the surface mount attachment of chip components

    SciTech Connect

    Vianco, P T; Dal Porto, J F

    1992-01-01

    Blind lap solder joints were used to attach leadless ceramic chip resistors to polyimidequartz circuit boards. Hand soldering and vapor phase reflow techniques were evaluated. The solder was 62Sn-36Pb-2Ag (wt.%). The integrity of the solder joints was assessed by microstructural examination and room temperature shear tests. These analyses were performed on as-fabricated circuit boards as well as an those samples exposed to thermal cycling (308 cycles; {minus}55{degree} to 125{degree}C; 6{degree}C/min ramps; 120 min hold periods;) or thermal shock (100 cycles, {minus}55{degree}C to 125{degree}C; liquid-to-liquid transfer; 10 min hold periods). In all cases, microscopy revealed no cracks within the solder joints. The shear strengths of the joints were 13.4 lb (59 N), as-fabricated; 10.5 lb (47 N), 308 thermal cycles; and 14.0 lb (62 N), 100 thermal shock cycles. All values were well within acceptability limits for the particular application. Measurements of the intermetallic compound thicknesses at the copper land/solder interface indicated that the additional heating cycle of the hand soldering step decreased the layer thickness as compared to non-hand soldered joints. The successful implementation of the blind lap joint can provide increased device densities on circuit boards by reducing bonding pad extension beyond the ceramic chip foot print.

  5. Lamb wave based active damage identification in adhesively bonded composite lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Prateek

    Bonding composite structures using adhesives offers several advantages over mechanical fastening such as better flow stress, weight saving, improved fatigue resistance and the ability to join dissimilar structures. The hesitation to adopt adhesively bonded composite joints stems from the lack of knowledge regarding damage initiation and propagation mechanisms within the joint. A means of overcoming this hesitation is to continuously monitor damage in the joint. This study proposes a methodology to conduct structural health monitoring (SHM) of an adhesively bonded composite lap joint using acoustic, guided Lamb waves by detecting, locating and predicting the size of damage. Finite element modeling of a joint in both 2D and 3D is used to test the feasibility of the proposed damage triangulation technique. Experimental validation of the methodology is conducted by detecting the presence, location and size of inflicted damage with the use of tuned guided Lamb waves.

  6. Some Observations on the Behaviour of Superimposed and Lap Sewn Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-01

    Fig. 1a); Ferrier used this configuration in some of his work. The sideways loading is omitted but part of the restraint due to sewing is present. The...reminder of the joints mentioned in section 3.2 and the lap joints (sectiou 3.3). While the work was in progress, a Monsanto Tensometer E testing...the remaining samples part of the stitching broke and then the webbing failed near one end of the ocitched length. With the shorter stitched lengths it

  7. Multitechnique monitoring of fatigue damage in adhesively bonded composite lap-joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, Oleksii; Koricho, Ermias; Khomenko, Anton; Dib, Gerges; Haq, Mahmoodul; Udpa, Lalita

    2015-03-01

    The requirement for reduced structural weight has driven the development of adhesively bonded joints. However, a major issue preventing their full acceptance is the initiation of premature failure in the form of a disbond between adherends, mainly due to fatigue, manufacturing flaws or impact damage. This work presents the integrated approach for in-situ monitoring of degradation of the adhesive bond in the GFRP composite lap-joint using ultrasonic guided waves and dynamic measurements from strategically embedded FBG sensors. Guided waves are actuated with surface mounted piezoelectric elements and mode tuning is used to provide high sensitivity to the degradation of the adhesive layer parameters. Composite lap-joints are subjected to fatigue loading, and data from piezoceramic transducers are collected at regular intervals to evaluate the progression of damage. Results demonstrate that quasi-static loading affects guided wave measurements considerably, but FBG sensors can be used to monitor the applied load levels and residual strains in the adhesive bond. The proposed technique shows promise for determining the post-damage stiffness of adhesively bonded joints.

  8. Monitoring of fatigue damage in composite lap-joints using guided waves and FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, Oleksii; Khomenko, Anton; Koricho, Ermias; Haq, Mahmoodul; Udpa, Lalita

    2016-02-01

    Adhesive bonding is being increasingly employed in many applications as it offers possibility of light-weighting and efficient multi-material joining along with reduction in time and cost of manufacturing. However, failure initiation and progression in critical components like joints, specifically in fatigue loading is not well understood, which necessitates reliable NDE and SHM techniques to ensure structural integrity. In this work, concurrent guided wave (GW) and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor measurements were used to monitor fatigue damage in adhesively bonded composite lap-joints. In the present set-up, one FBG sensor was strategically embedded in the adhesive bond-line of a lap-joint, while two other FBGs were bonded on the surface of the adherends. Full spectral responses of FBG sensors were collected and compared at specific intervals of fatigue loading. In parallel, guided waves were actuated and sensed using PZT wafers mounted on the composite adherends. Experimental results demonstrated that time-of-flight (ToF) of the fundamental modes transmitted through the bond-line and spectral response of FBG sensors were sensitive to fatigue loading and damage. Combination of guided wave and FBG measurements provided the desired redundancy and synergy in the data to evaluate the degradation in bond-line properties. Measurements taken in the presence of continuously applied load replicated the in-situ/service conditions. The approach shows promise in understanding the behavior of bonded joints subjected to complex loading.

  9. Microstructure and Properties of Lap Joint Between Aluminum Alloy and Galvanized Steel by CMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Song; Chen, Su; Dong, Honggang; Zhao, Dongsheng; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Guo, Xin; Wang, Guoqiang

    2016-05-01

    Lap joining of 1-mm-thick Novelist AC 170 PX aluminum alloy to 1.2-mm-thick ST06 Z galvanized steel sheets for automotive applications was conducted by cold metal transfer advanced welding process with ER4043 and ER4047 filler wires. Under the optimized welding parameters with ER4043 filler wire, the tensile shear strength of joint was 189 MPa, reaching 89% of the aluminum alloy base metal. Microstructure and elemental distribution were characterized by optical metalloscope and electron probe microanalysis. The lap joints with ER4043 filler wire had smaller wetting angle and longer bonded line length with better wettability than with ER4047 filler wire during welding with same parameters. The needle-like Al-Fe-Si intermetallic compounds (IMCs) were spalled into the weld and brought negative effect to the tensile strength of joints. With increasing welding current, the needle-like IMCs grew longer and spread further into the weld, which would deteriorate the tensile shear strength.

  10. Bolted Double-Lap Composite Joints Under Mechanical and Thermal Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kradinov, V.; Barut, A.; Madenci, E.; Walker, Sandra P. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This study concerns the determination of the contact stresses and contact region around bolt holes and the bolt load distribution in single- and double-lap joints of composite laminates with arbitrarily located bolts under general mechanical loading conditions and uniform temperature change. The unknown contact stress distribution and contact region between the bolt and laminates and the interaction among the bolts require the bolt load distribution, as well as the contact stresses, to be as part of the solution. The present method is based on the complex potential theory and the variational formulation in order to account for bolt stiffness, bolt-hole clearance, and finite geometry of the composite laminates.

  11. Biomimetic-inspired joining of composite with metal structures: A survey of natural joints and application to single lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avgoulas, Evangelos Ioannis; Sutcliffe, Michael P. F.

    2014-03-01

    Joining composites with metal parts leads, inevitably, to high stress concentrations because of the material property mismatch. Since joining composite to metal is required in many high performance structures, there is a need to develop a new multifunctional approach to meet this challenge. This paper uses the biomimetics approach to help develop solutions to this problem. Nature has found many ingenious ways of joining dissimilar materials and making robust attachments, alleviating potential stress concentrations. A literature survey of natural joint systems has been carried out, identifying and analysing different natural joint methods from a mechanical perspective. A taxonomy table was developed based on the different methods/functions that nature successfully uses to attach dissimilar tissues (materials). This table is used to understand common themes or approaches used in nature for different joint configurations and functionalities. One of the key characteristics that nature uses to joint dissimilar materials is a transitional zone of stiffness in the insertion site. Several biomimetic-inspired metal-to-composite (steel-to-CFRP), adhesively bonded, Single Lap Joints (SLJs) were numerically investigated using a finite element analysis. The proposed solutions offer a transitional zone of stiffness of one joint part to reduce the material stiffness mismatch at the joint. An optimisation procedure was used to identify the variation in material stiffness which minimises potential failure of the joint. It was found that the proposed biomimetic SLJs reduce the asymmetry of the stress distribution along the adhesive area.

  12. Adhesive-bonded double-lap joints. [analytical solutions for static load carrying capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Explicit analytical solutions are derived for the static load carrying capacity of double-lap adhesive-bonded joints. The analyses extend the elastic solution Volkersen and cover adhesive plasticity, adherend stiffness imbalance and thermal mismatch between the adherends. Both elastic-plastic and bi-elastic adhesive representations lead to the explicit result that the influence of the adhesive on the maximum potential bond strength is defined uniquely by the strain energy in shear per unit area of bond. Failures induced by peel stresses at the ends of the joint are examined. This failure mode is particularly important for composite adherends. The explicit solutions are sufficiently simple to be used for design purposes

  13. Optimization of geometry of elastic bodies in the vicinity of singular points on the example of an adhesive lap joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveenko, V. P.; Sevodina, N. V.; Fedorov, A. Yu.

    2013-09-01

    The stress state in adhesive lap joints with various geometric shapes of spew fillet is studied. It is noted that the applied design models of the considered problem include singular points at which infinite stress values are possible if one uses the linear elasticity theory to calculate the stress state. Based on the conclusions of the solution of the geometry optimization problem in the vicinity of the singular points of elastic bodies, variants of the geometry of spew fillet, which provide the most significant decrease in the concentration of stresses in adhesive lap joints, are proposed.

  14. Multi-Site Fatigue Testing and Characterization of Fuselage Panels from Aging Aircraft Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-07

    Multi-site fatigue damage is a common problem in the riveted lap joint structure of aging aircraft. Modeling and characterization of such damage is...an especially daunting task. In this effort we present the results from fatigue tests which were performed on fuselage lap joints extracted from...in the lap joint . Some spot welded lap joint panels were also tested during the larger program; however, only the results from mechanically fastened

  15. Initiation and growth of multiple-site damage in the riveted lap joint of a curved stiffened fuselage panel: An experimental and analytical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Abubaker Ali

    As part of the structural integrity research of the National Aging Aircraft Research Program, a comprehensive study on multiple-site damage (MSD) initiation and growth in a pristine lap-joint fuselage panel has been conducted. The curved stiffened fuselage panel was tested at the Full-Scale Aircraft Structural Test Evaluation and Research (FASTER) facility located at the Federal Aviation Administration William J. Hughes Technical Center. A strain survey test was conducted to verify proper load application. The panel was then subjected to a fatigue test with constant-amplitude cyclic loading. The applied loading spectrum included underload marker cycles so that crack growth history could be reconstructed from post-test fractographic examinations. Crack formation and growth were monitored via nondestructive and high-magnification visual inspections. Strain gage measurements recorded during the strain survey tests indicated that the inner surface of the skin along the upper rivet row of the lap joint experienced high tensile stresses due to local bending. During the fatigue loading, cracks were detected by eddy-current inspections at multiple rivet holes along the upper rivet row. Through-thickness cracks were detected visually after about 80% of the fatigue life. Once MSD cracks from two adjacent rivet holes linked up, there was a quick deterioration in the structural integrity of the lap joint. The linkup resulted in a 2.87" (72.9-mm) lead fatigue crack that rapidly propagated across 12 rivet holes and crossed over into the next skin bay, at which stage the fatigue test was terminated. A post-fatigue residual strength test was then conducted by loading the panel quasi-statically up to final failure. The panel failed catastrophically when the crack extended instantaneously across three additional bays. Post-test fractographic examinations of the fracture surfaces in the lap joint of the fuselage panel were conducted to characterize subsurface crack initiation and

  16. Nondestructive Evaluation of Friction Stir-Welded Aluminum Alloy to Coated Steel Sheet Lap Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, H.; Kumar, A.; Rajkumar, K. V.; Saravanan, T.; Jayakumar, T.; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Dissimilar lap joints of aluminum sheet (AA 6061) of 2 mm thickness and zinc-coated steel sheet of 1 mm thickness were produced by friction stir welding with different combinations of rotational speed and travel speed. Ultrasonic C- and B-scanning, and radiography have been used in a complementary manner for detection of volumetric (cavity and flash) and planar (de bond) defects as the defects are in micron level. Advanced ultrasonic C-scanning did not provide any idea about the defects, whereas B-scanning cross-sectional image showed an exclusive overview of the micron-level defects. A digital x-ray radiography methodology is proposed for quality assessment of the dissimilar welds which provide three-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio with improved defect detection sensitivity. The present study clearly shows that the weld tool rotational speed and travel speed have a decisive role on the quality of the joints obtained by the friction stir welding process. The suitability of the proposed NDE techniques to evaluate the joint integrity of dissimilar FSW joints is thus established.

  17. Dissimilar Al/steel friction stir welding lap joints for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanella, D.; Spena, P. Russo; Buffa, G.; Fratini, L.

    2016-10-01

    A widespread usage of aluminum alloys for the fabrication of car-body parts is conditional on the employment of appropriate welding methods, especially if dissimilar welding must be performed with automotive steel grades. Dissimilar welding of aluminum alloys and steel grades poses some issues concerning the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds, difference in physical and chemical properties of the parent metals, and poor wetting behavior of aluminum. Friction stir welding is considered to be a reasonable solution to obtain sound aluminum/steel joints. A study on the join quality of dissimilar lap joints of steel and aluminum alloy sheets after friction stir welding is proposed here. A low carbon steel is joined with AA6016 aluminum alloy to study preliminarily the feasibility to assembly car-body parts. The joints, welded with tool rotation and feed rate varying in a wide range, have been studied from a visual examination and microstructural point of view. Optical microscopy has been used to characterize the microstructure of the examined sheets in as-received and welded conditions. Micro-hardness measurements have been carried out to quantitatively analyze the local hardness of the welded joints. Set welding process parameters are identified to assemble without the presence of macroscopic defects the examined steel and aluminum welded parts.

  18. A two-dimensional stress analysis of single lap joints subjected to external bending moments

    SciTech Connect

    Sawa, Toshiyuki; Nakano, Katsuyuki; Toratani, Hiroshi

    1995-11-01

    The stress distribution of single lap adhesive joints subjected to external bending moments are analyzed as a three-body contact problem by using a two-dimensional theory of elasticity. In the analysis, two similar adherends and an adhesive are replaced by finite strips, respectively. In the numerical calculations, the effects of the ratio of Young;s modulus of adherends to that of adhesive and the adhesive thickness on the stress distribution at the interface are examined. As the results, it is seen that the stress singularity causes at the edges of the interfaces and the peel stress at the edges of the interface increases with a decrease of Young`s modulus of the adherends. In addition, photoelastic experiments are carried out. A fairly good agreement is seen between the analytical and the experimental results.

  19. Shear Strength of Single Lap Joint Aluminium-Thermoplastic Natural Rubber (Al-TPNR) Laminated Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzakkar, M. Z.; Ahmad, S.; Yarmo, M. A.; Jalar, A.; Bijarimi, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this work, we studied the effect of surface treatment on the aluminium surface and a coupling agent to improve adhesion between aluminium with organic polymer. Thermoplastic natural rubber (TPNR) matrix was prepared by melt blending of natural rubber (NR), liquid natural rubber (LNR) compatibilizer, linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) and polyethylene grafted maleic anhydride (PE-g-MAH). The PEgMAH concentration used was varied from 0% - 25%. In addition, the aluminium surface was pre-treated with 3-glycidoxy propyl trimethoxy silane (3-GPS) to enhance the mechanical properties of laminated composite. It was found that the shear strength of single lap joint Al-TPNR laminated composite showing an increasing trend as a function of PE-g-MAH contents for the 3-GPS surface treated aluminium. Moreover, the scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that the strength improvement was associated with the chemical state of the compound involved.

  20. Strengths of composite-to-metal double-lap bolted joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hsien-Tang

    1998-12-01

    A three-dimensional analysis was proposed to study the through-the-thickness clamping effect on the bearing failure of double-lap bolted laminated composite joints. Experiments were first performed to characterize the material response due to bearing failure in composite bolted joints with and without lateral clamp-up supports. Composite plates made of T800H/3900-2 graphite/epoxy were selected in the tests, and various washer sizes and clamping forces were used in the study. The clamping force in the bolt was found to vary with the applied load, and may increase significantly due to a sudden through-the-thickness expansion of the laminate under the washers where bearing failure occurred. Experiments showed that the joint strength and response can be significantly affected by the bolt clamp-up, and the bolt bearing failure is a 3-D phenomenon. In order to facilitate the use of the proposed model with the ABAQUS code, an interface module 3DBOLT was developed. In order to reinforce the incompressibility condition in calculations for bearing-damaged material predicted by the model, the condition was imposed through a penalty method in the frame work of finite element analyses. The module provides a user-friendly input deck, generates automatically a joint mesh, and produces outputs and graphics for displaying the stresses, strains, and deformations of the joints and for simulating the failure progression in joints during loading. Extensive comparisons were made between the test data and model predictions. Overall, the model predicts both the failure load and response of bolted composite joints very well for various clamping forces and washer sizes. The model also predicted very well for joints failed in net-tension and shear-out modes. The predicted bolt clamp-up load as a function of the applied load agreed also very well with the data, which validates that the proposed incompressibility assumption for bearing-damaged material. Based on the model, a parametric study

  1. Strength of Welded Aircraft Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueggeman, W C

    1937-01-01

    This investigation is a continuation of work started in 1928 and described in NACA-TR-348 which shows that the insertion of gusset plates was the most satisfactory way of strengthening a joint. Additional tests of the present series show that joints of this type could be improved by cutting out the portion of the plate between the intersecting tubes. T and lattice joints in thin-walled tubing 1 1/2 by 0.020 inch have somewhat lower strengths than joints in tubing of greater wall thickness because of failure by local buckling. In welding the thin-walled tubing, the recently developed "carburizing flux" process was found to be the only method capable of producing joints free from cracks. The "magnetic powder" inspection was used to detect cracks in the joints and flaws in the tubing.

  2. Single-cycle and fatigue strengths of adhesively bonded lap joints

    SciTech Connect

    Metzinger, K.E.; Guess, T.R.

    1998-12-31

    This study considers a composite-to-steel tubular lap joint in which failure typically occurs when the adhesive debonds from the steel adherend. The same basic joint was subjected to compressive and tensile axial loads (single-cycle) as well as bending loads (fatigue). The purpose of these tests was to determine whether failure is more dependent on the plastic strain or the peel stress that develops in the adhesive. For the same joint, compressive and tensile loads of the same magnitude will produce similar plastic strains but peel stresses of opposite signs in the adhesive. In the axial tests, the tensile strengths were much greater than the compressive strengths - indicating that the peel stress is key to predicting the single-cycle strengths. To determine the key parameter(s) for predicting high-cycle fatigue strengths, a test technique capable of subjecting a specimen to several million cycles per day was developed. In these bending tests, the initial adhesive debonding always occurred on the compressive side. This result is consistent with the single-cycle tests, although not as conclusive due to the limited number of tests. Nevertheless, a fatigue test method has been established and future tests are planned.

  3. The role of rivet installation on the fatigue performance of riveted lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rans, Calvin D.

    Solid rivets are widely used as mechanical fasteners in airframe applications due to their relative low cost and good fatigue performance. Although rivet installation is known to influence this fatigue performance, variabilities in hand riveting practices make exploiting rivet installation as a design variable difficult. Developments in riveting technology have led to force-controlled rivet squeezers and fully automated riveting gantries, improving the consistency of rivet installation and providing the opportunity to exploit its influence on fatigue. This dissertation describes a research program undertaken to examine the influence of rivet installation on the fatigue performance of riveted lap joints and identify what aspects can be exploited during design. A combination of finite element analyses and experimental techniques were used to investigate the role of rivet installation on the formation of residual stresses and on secondary bending stresses in a loaded joint, two aspects established as critical to the fatigue performance of riveted lap joints. Crack growth reconstructions of fracture surfaces marked using a special marker fatigue spectrum were also completed in order to quantify the effects of these residual and secondary bending stresses on fatigue performance. Additionally, variations in the effects of rivet installation on traditional monolithic aluminum sheet materials and hybrid aluminum-fibre glass laminates known as GLARE were also investigated. Results from these investigations provided new insights into the role of rivet installation on fatigue. The radial expansion mechanism to which residual stress formation during riveting is typically attributed was observed to be a secondary mechanism relative to the through-thickness compression of the joined sheets. The location and magnitude of peak secondary bending stresses were found to be directly influenced by rivet head geometry. In certain cases, shifts in the location of peak secondary bending

  4. A feasibility study for experimentally determining dynamic force distribution in a lap joint.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, Randall Lee

    2013-11-01

    Developing constitutive models of the physics in mechanical joints is currently stymied by inability to measure forces and displacements within the joint. The current state of the art estimates whole joint stiffness and energy loss per cycle from external measured force input and one or two acceleration responses. To validate constitutive models beyond this state requires a measurement of the distributed forces and displacements at the joint interface. Unfortunately, introducing measurement devices at the interface completely disrupts the desired physics. A feasibility study is presented for a non-intrusive method of solving for the interface dynamic forces from an inverse problem using full field measured responses. The responses come from the viewable surface of a beam. The noise levels associated with digital image correlation and continuous scanning laser Doppler velocimetry are evaluated from typical beam experiments. Two inverse problems are simulated. One utilizes the extended Sum of Weighted Accelerations Technique (SWAT). The second is a new approach dubbed the method of truncated orthogonal forces. These methods are much more robust if the contact patch geometry is well identified. Various approaches to identifying the contact patch are investigated, including ion marker tracking, Prussian blue and ultrasonic measurements. A typical experiment is conceived for a beam which has a lap joint at one end with a single bolt connecting it to another identical beam. In a virtual test using the beam finite element analysis, it appears that the SWAT inverse method requires evaluation of too many coefficients to adequately identify the force distribution to be viable. However, the method of truncated orthogonal forces appears viable with current digital image correlation (and probably other) imaging techniques.

  5. Structural analysis of Aircraft fuselage splice joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udaya Prakash, R.; Kumar, G. Raj; Vijayanandh, R.; Senthil Kumar, M.; Ramganesh, T.

    2016-09-01

    In Aviation sector, composite materials and its application to each component are one of the prime factors of consideration due to the high strength to weight ratio, design flexibility and non-corrosive so that the composite materials are widely used in the low weight constructions and also it can be treated as a suitable alternative to metals. The objective of this paper is to estimate and compare the suitability of a composite skin joint in an aircraft fuselage with different joints by simulating the displacement, normal stress, vonmises stress and shear stress with the help of numerical solution methods. The reference Z-stringer component of this paper is modeled by CATIA and numerical simulation is carried out by ANSYS has been used for splice joint presents in the aircraft fuselage with three combinations of joints such as riveted joint, bonded joint and hybrid joint. Nowadays the stringers are using to avoid buckling of fuselage skin, it has joined together by rivets and they are connected end to end by splice joint. Design and static analysis of three-dimensional models of joints such as bonded, riveted and hybrid are carried out and results are compared.

  6. Computerized evaluation of holographic interferograms for fatigue crack detection in riveted lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiang

    Using an innovative portable holographic inspection and testing system (PHITS) developed at the Australian Defence Force Academy, fatigue cracks in riveted lap joints can be detected by visually inspecting the abnormal fringe changes recorded on holographic interferograms. In this thesis, for automatic crack detection, some modern digital image processing techniques are investigated and applied to holographic interferogram evaluation. Fringe analysis algorithms are developed for identification of the crack-induced fringe changes. Theoretical analysis of PHITS and riveted lap joints and two typical experiments demonstrate that the fatigue cracks in lightly-clamped joints induce two characteristic fringe changes: local fringe discontinuities at the cracking sites; and the global crescent fringe distribution near to the edge of the rivet hole. Both of the fringe features are used for crack detection in this thesis. As a basis of the fringe feature extraction, an algorithm for local fringe orientation calculation is proposed. For high orientation accuracy and computational efficiency, Gaussian gradient filtering and neighboring direction averaging are used to minimize the effects of image background variations and random noise. The neighboring direction averaging is also used to approximate the fringe directions in centerlines of bright and dark fringes. Experimental results indicate that for high orientation accuracy the scales of the Gaussian filter and neighboring direction averaging should be chosen according to the local fringe spacings. The orientation histogram technique is applied to detect the local fringe discontinuity due to the fatigue cracks. The Fourier descriptor technique is used to characterize the global fringe distribution change from a circular to a crescent distribution with the fatigue crack growth. Experiments and computer simulations are conducted to analyze the detectability and reliability of crack detection using the two techniques. Results

  7. Adhesives: Test Method, Group Assignment, and Categorization Guide for High-Loading-Rate Applications Preparation and Testing of Single Lap Joints (Ver. 2.2, Unlimited)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    Assignment, and Categorization Guide for High-Loading- Rate Applications – Preparation and Testing of Single Lap Joints (Ver. 2.2, Unlimited) by...Rate Applications – Preparation and Testing of Single Lap Joints (Ver. 2.2, Unlimited) by Robert Jensen, Daniel DeSchepper, David Flanagan...Gerard Chaney, and Charles Pergantis Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL Coatings, Corrosion, and Engineered Polymers Branch (CCEPB

  8. Structural Health Monitoring of AN Aircraft Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickens, T.; Schulz, M.; Sundaresan, M.; Ghoshal, A.; Naser, A. S.; Reichmeider, R.

    2003-03-01

    A major concern with ageing aircraft is the deterioration of structural components in the form of fatigue cracks at fastener holes, loose rivets and debonding of joints. These faults in conjunction with corrosion can lead to multiple-site damage and pose a hazard to flight. Developing a simple vibration-based method of damage detection for monitoring ageing structures is considered in this paper. The method is intended to detect damage during operation of the vehicle before the damage can propagate and cause catastrophic failure of aircraft components. It is typical that only a limited number of sensors could be used on the structure and damage can occur anywhere on the surface or inside the structure. The research performed was to investigate use of the chirp vibration responses of an aircraft wing tip to detect, locate and approximately quantify damage. The technique uses four piezoelectric patches alternatively as actuators and sensors to send and receive vibration diagnostic signals.Loosening of selected screws simulated damage to the wing tip. The results obtained from the testing led to the concept of a sensor tape to detect damage at joints in an aircraft structure.

  9. Critical joints in large composite aircraft structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, W. D.; Bunin, B. L.; Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    A program was conducted at Douglas Aircraft Company to develop the technology for critical structural joints of composite wing structure that meets design requirements for a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The prime objective of the program was to demonstrate the ability to reliably predict the strength of large bolted composite joints. Ancillary testing of 180 specimens generated data on strength and load-deflection characteristics which provided input to the joint analysis. Load-sharing between fasteners in multirow bolted joints was computed by the nonlinear analysis program A4EJ. This program was used to predict strengths of 20 additional large subcomponents representing strips from a wing root chordwise splice. In most cases, the predictions were accurate to within a few percent of the test results. In some cases, the observed mode of failure was different than anticipated. The highlight of the subcomponent testing was the consistent ability to achieve gross-section failure strains close to 0.005. That represents a considerable improvement over the state of the art.

  10. Multiple-site-damage fatigue of riveted joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schijve, J.

    1992-04-01

    Results of fatigue tests in riveted lap joints, including fractographic observations, are presented and analyzed. They indicate that the load transmission in a riveted lap joint is a rather complex phenomenon, as confirmed by quite different crack initiation mechanisms. It may not be expected that fracture mechanics predicts early crack growth with a practically useful degree of accuracy. Most important, the fractographic analysis reveals, that if there are visible cracks in a riveted lap joint, there are many small cracks at most rivet holes in the same critical row of rivets. A multiple site damage situation is present. The conclusion also applies to fuselage lap joints. Scatter in laboratory tests in riveted lap joint specimens is relatively low. However, scatter of riveted joints in a fleet of aircraft may be larger for several reasons. Crack growth in riveted lap joints may be sufficiently slow to allow a timely detection in service. For aging aircraft this should be confirmed by full scale testing.

  11. An artifical corrosion protocol for lap-splices in aircraft skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Bevil J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the progress to date to formulate an artificial corrosion protocol for the Tinker AFB C/KC-135 Corrosion Fatigue Round Robin Test Program. The project has provided new test methods to faithfully reproduce the corrosion damage within a lap-splice by accelerated means, the rationale for a new laboratory test environment, and a means for corrosion damage quantification. The approach is pragmatic and the resulting artificial corrosion protocol lays the foundation for future research in the assessment of aerospace alloys. The general means for quantification of corrosion damage has been presented in a form which can be directly applied to structural integrity calculations.

  12. Ultrasonic Welding of Thermoplastic Composite Coupons for Mechanical Characterization of Welded Joints through Single Lap Shear Testing.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Irene F; Palardy, Genevieve

    2016-02-11

    This paper presents a novel straightforward method for ultrasonic welding of thermoplastic-composite coupons in optimum processing conditions. The ultrasonic welding process described in this paper is based on three main pillars. Firstly, flat energy directors are used for preferential heat generation at the joining interface during the welding process. A flat energy director is a neat thermoplastic resin film that is placed between the parts to be joined prior to the welding process and heats up preferentially owing to its lower compressive stiffness relative to the composite substrates. Consequently, flat energy directors provide a simple solution that does not require molding of resin protrusions on the surfaces of the composite substrates, as opposed to ultrasonic welding of unreinforced plastics. Secondly, the process data provided by the ultrasonic welder is used to rapidly define the optimum welding parameters for any thermoplastic composite material combination. Thirdly, displacement control is used in the welding process to ensure consistent quality of the welded joints. According to this method, thermoplastic-composite flat coupons are individually welded in a single lap configuration. Mechanical testing of the welded coupons allows determining the apparent lap shear strength of the joints, which is one of the properties most commonly used to quantify the strength of thermoplastic composite welded joints.

  13. Three-dimensional finite element analyses of the local mechanical behavior of riveted lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Kaushik Arjunan

    Three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element models of single and double rivet-row lap joints have been developed to evaluate local distortions and the mechanics of airframe-type 7075-T6 aluminum alloy riveted assemblies. Loading induced distortion features such as the excess assembly compliance, rivet tilt, local in- and out-of-plane slips and stress concentration factors are evaluated as functions of rivet countersinking, rivet material and friction coefficient. Computed features are examined to identify alterations in the proportions of in-plane and out-of-plane load transmission across rivet-panel interfaces and isolate global and lower-order effects present in the complex response of these multi-body assemblies. Analytical procedures are validated by comparing calculated and measured values of excess assembly compliance and local panel bending. Direct out-of-plane load transmission between the rivet heads and panels affects global deformation features such as remote panel bending and local features such as the panel stress concentration factor. The increase in stress concentration due to panel bending is self-limiting owing to decreasing in-plane load bearing with increasing rivet tilt, which is a composite reflection of the basic rivet deformation modes of shear and rotation. Calculations have also been performed to define approximate steady-state fretting fatigue conditions that lead to crack initiation at a panel hole surface in single and double rivet-row assemblies for countersunk and non-countersunk rivets. These account for and isolate effects of interference and clamping forces on fatigue performance by comparing computed circumferential variations of bulk residual stresses, cyclic stress range and mean stress. With interference, a non-countersunk assembly is shown to be as prone to crack initiation as a countersunk assembly. Frictional work due to fretting is evaluated and the physical location of fretting fatigue crack initiation is predicted by

  14. The Joint Cargo Aircraft Legislative Issues and the Way Ahead

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    color images. 14. ABSTRACT The Joint Cargo Aircraft (JCA), a joint acquisition program between the Army and Air Force, has had an unusual history, and... acquisition processes, and proper organization of each military branch. As an introduction to this topic, this paper intends to describe briefly the basic JCA...Abstract The Joint Cargo Aircraft (JCA), a joint acquisition program between the Army and Air Force, has had an unusual history, and has been a

  15. Lake Michigan and Lake Superior air quality: The 1994-2003 LADCO Aircraft Project (LAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, T. A.; Betterton, E. A.; Jacko, R.; Hillery, J.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of the 1994 to 2003 LADCO Airplane Project (LAP) was to study ozone formation over Lake Michigan so that equitable regional control strategies could be devised. During the ten year LAP campaign, a total of 328 flights were flown on 81 days over Lake Michigan and its southern and western boundaries. LAP also monitored air quality over Lake Superior and other areas in the Midwestern and southern United States. From 2001 to 2003, 117 flights were conducted over Lake Superior, Isle Royale National Park, Painted Rocks National Lakeshore and the Seeney National Wildlife Refuge in Michigan. 63 flights were conducted over St. Louis and 58 flights over the Dolly Sods Wilderness Area in West Virginia. We are looking for collaborators to help us analyze this vast data archive. Our first paper (Atmospheric Environment 45 (2011) 3192-3202) documented the project and presented results of our ozone analysis. Our results support the hypothesis of Dye et al. (1995), who found that the atmosphere over Lake Michigan is stable in the summer due to the air water temperature difference, which creates an efficient reaction chamber for ozone formation. They also hypothesized that the southwest winds characteristic of ozone-conducive conditions transport ozone further north over the lake before it crosses the shoreline onto land. We found that below 200 m above the lake, ozone formation is VOC-limited in the morning and becomes NOx limited in the afternoon. Above 200 m, ozone formation is NOx-limited throughout the day. The onshore NOx and VOC diurnal cycles peak during the early morning rush hour and are clearly linked to traffic patterns. Over the lake, VOC and NOy concentrations peak during the mid-morning rather than the early morning, supporting the hypothesis that the land breeze transports VOC and NOy over the lake. The diurnal NOx pattern over Lake Michigan is less clearly defined than the VOC pattern possibly as a result of emissions from five coal-burning power plants

  16. Hybrid laser-arc welding of galvanized high-strength steels in a gap-free lap-joint configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shanglu

    In order to meet the industry demands for increased fuel efficiency and enhanced mechanical and structural performance of vehicles as well as provided excellent corrosion resistance, more and more galvanized advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) have been used to fabricate automobile parts such as panels, bumpers, and front rails. The automotive industry has shown tremendous interest in using laser welding to join galvanized dual phase steels because of lower heat input and higher welding speed. However, the laser welding process tends to become dramatically unstable in the presence of highly pressurized zinc vapor because of the low boiling point of zinc, around 906°C, compared to higher melting point of steel, over 1500°C. A large number of spatters are produced by expelling the liquid metal from the molten pool by the pressurized zinc vapor. Different weld defects such as blowholes and porosities appear in the welds. So far, limited information has been reported on welding of galvanized high strength dual-phase steels in a gap-free lap joint configuration. There is no open literature on the successful attainment of defect-free welds from the laser or hybrid welding of galvanized high-strength steels. To address the significant industry demand, in this study, different welding techniques and monitoring methods are used to study the features of the welding process of galvanized DP steels in a gap-free lap joint configuration. The current research covers: (i) a feasibility study on the welding of galvanized DP 980 steels in a lap joint configuration using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), laser welding, hybrid laser/arc welding with the common molten pool, laser welding with the assistance of GTAW preheating source and hybrid laser-variable polarity gas tungsten arc welding (Laser-VPGTAW) techniques (Chapter 2-4); (ii) a welding process monitoring of the welding techniques including the use of machine vision and acoustic emission technique (Chapter 5); (iii

  17. Ultrasonic inspection of multiple-rivet-hole lap joint cracks using global analysis with local finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiyan, Yeasin; Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of multiple-rivet-hole lap joint cracks has been introduced using combined analytical and finite element approach (CAFA). Finite element analyses have been performed on local damage area in spite of the whole large structure and transfer function based analytical model is used to analyze the full structure. "Scattered cube" of complex valued wave damage interaction coefficient (WDIC) that involves scattering and mode conversion of Lamb waves around the damage is used as coupling between analytical and FEM simulation. WDIC is captured for multiple angles of incident Lamb mode (S0 and A0) over the frequency domain to analyze the cracks of multiple-rivet-hole lap joint. By analyzing the scattered cube of WDICs over the frequency domain and azimuthal angles the optimum parameters can be determined for each angle of incidence and the most sensitive signals are obtained using WaveformRevealer2D (WFR2D). These sensitive signals confirm the detection of the butterfly cracks in rivet holes through the installment of the transmitting and sensing PWASs in the proper locations and selecting the right frequency of excitation.

  18. Nd:Yag laser irradiation of single lap joints made by polyethylene and polyethylene doped by carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visco, A. M.; Brancato, V.; Cutroneo, M.; Torrisi, L.

    2014-04-01

    Thermoplastic polyethylene can be welded by the transmission laser welding technique (TTLW) that exhibits some process related benefits with respect other conventional joining methods. This justifies its large use in wide fields, from the automotive to medical or domestic appliances. In this research, we studied single lap joints made by polyethylene pure and filled with carbon nanomaterials (0.2% in weight) to make the polymer laser absorbent. The joints were irradiated by a Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm (first harmonic) with an intensity of 107 W/cm2 and 1 ÷ 30Hz, a maximum pulse energy of 300mJ and a laser spot of ≈ 1 cm2 (no focusing lens were employed). The joints were characterized by morphological analysis, mechanical shear tests and calorimetric analysis. The results suggested that the laser exposition time must be opportunely balanced in order to avoid a poor adhesion between the polymer sheets and to realized efficient joints. In particular the mechanical test showed that the laser exposition time of 40 seconds is the best conditions to obtain the highest shear strength of the joints of 140 N. After too prolonged laser exposure times, degrading phenomena starts.

  19. Analysis of the Static and Fatigue Strenght of a Damage Tolerant 3D-Reinforced Joining Technology on Composite Single Lap Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, A. C.; Drechsler, K.; Hombergsmeier, E.

    2012-07-01

    The increasing usage of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) in aerospace together with the constant drive for fuel efficiency and lightweight design have imposed new challenges in next generation structural assemblies and load transfer efficient joining methods. To address this issue, an innovative technology, denominated Redundant High Efficiency Assembly (RHEA) joints, is introduced as a high-performance lightweight joint that combines efficient load transfer with good damage tolerance. A review of the ongoing research involving the RHEA joint technology, its through-thickness reinforcement concept and the results of quasi-static and fatigue tensile investigations of single lap shear specimens are exposed and discussed. Improvements in ultimate static load, maximum joint deformation, damage tolerance and fatigue life are encountered when comparing the performance of the RHEA lap shear joints to co-bonded reference specimens.

  20. Characterization of fatigue damage in adhesively bonded lap joints through dynamic, full-spectral interrogation of fiber Bragg grating sensors: 1. Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S.; Shin, P.; Peters, K.; Zikry, M. A.; Stan, N.; Chadderdon, S.; Selfridge, R.; Schultz, S.

    2014-02-01

    In this study we measure the in situ response of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor embedded in the adhesive layer of a single composite lap joint, subjected to harmonic excitation after fatigue loading. After a fully reversed cyclic fatigue loading is applied to the composite lap joint, the full-spectral response of the sensor is interrogated at 100 kHz during two loading conditions: with and without an added harmonic excitation. The full-spectral information avoided dynamic measurement errors often experienced using conventional peak wavelength and edge filtering techniques. The short-time Fourier transform (STFT) is computed for the extracted peak wavelength information to reveal time-dependent frequencies and amplitudes of the dynamic FBG sensor response. The dynamic response of the FBG sensor indicated a transition to strong nonlinear dynamic behavior as fatigue-induced damage progressed. The ability to measure the dynamic response of the lap joint through sensors embedded in the adhesive layer can provide in situ monitoring of the lap joint condition.

  1. Characterization of fatigue damage in adhesively bonded lap joints through dynamic, full-spectral interrogation of fiber Bragg grating sensors: 2. Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S.; Shin, P.; Peters, K.; Zikry, M. A.; Stan, N.; Chadderdon, S.; Selfridge, R.; Schultz, S.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we simulate the response of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors embedded in the adhesive layer of a composite lap that is subjected to harmonic excitation. To simulate accumulated fatigue damage at the adhesive layer, two forms of numerical nonlinearities are introduced into the model: (1) progressive plastic deformation of the adhesive and (2) changing the boundary of an interfacial defect at the adhesive layer across the overlap shear area. The simulation results are compared with previous measurements of the dynamic, full-spectral response of such FBG sensors for condition monitoring of the lap joint. Short-time Fourier transforms (STFT) of the locally extracted axial strain time histories reveal a transition to nonlinear behavior of the composite lap joint by means of intermittent frequencies that were observed in the experimental measurements and are not associated with the external excitation. The simulation results verify that the nonlinear changes in measured dynamic FBG responses are due to the progression of damage in the lap joint.

  2. How geometric details can affect the strength of adhesive lap joints

    SciTech Connect

    Metzinger, K.E.; Guess, T.R.

    1996-12-31

    The durability of adhesively bonded joints--when utilized as blade attachments--has a significant impact on the performance of wind turbines. Accordingly, there is interest in determining how geometric details affect the strength of these joints. Finite element analyses were performed to aid in the selection of three composite-to-metal joint geometries for compressive axial testing. Both monotonic and low-cycle fatigue tests were conducted. Analysis and testing of these joints provide insight into the effects of adding extra adhesive to the end of the bond or tapering the metal adherend. The issue of whether the relative performance of different joints in monotonic tests can be used to predict the relative fatigue strength of these joints is also addressed.

  3. Abernathy's Lap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A lap in this instance is not a midriff but a tool for presision.polishing and grinding. During the Saturn V moonbooster program, Marshall Space Flight Center found a need for a better lap. The need arose from the exquisitely precise tolerances required for parts of the launch vehicle's guidance,and control system. So William J. Abernathy, a former Marshall employee, built a better lap; he invented a method for charging aluminum lap plates with diamond powder, then hard-anodizing them. The resulting lap produces a high polish on materials ranging from the softest aluminum to the hardest ceramics. It operates faster, wears longer and requires less reworking. Abernathy got NASA's permission to obtain a personal patent and he formed the one-man Abernathy Laps Co. in Huntsville, which produces a variety of laps. One of Abernathy's customers is Bell Aerospace Textron, Buffalo, which uses the laps to finish polish delicate instrument parts produced for NASA's Viking and other space programs. Says a Bell official: "Time needed (with the Abernathy lap) is a fraction of that required by conventional methods. The result is extremely accurate flatness and surface finish." Abernathy is providing laps for other manufacturing applications and for preparation of metallurgical specimens. The business is small but steady, and Abernathy plans expansion into other markets.

  4. Evaluation of High Temperature Properties and Microstructural Characterization of Resistance Spot Welded Steel Lap Shear Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Anil Kumar, V.; Panicker, Paul G.

    2016-02-01

    Joining of thin sheets (0.5 mm) of stainless steel 304 and 17-4PH through resistance spot welding is highly challenging especially when joint is used for high temperature applications. Various combinations of stainless steel sheets of thickness 0.5 mm are spot welded and tested at room temperature as well as at high temperatures (800 K, 1,000 K, 1,200 K). Parent metal as well as spot welded joints are tested and characterized. It is observed that joint strength of 17-4PH steel is highest and then dissimilar steel joint of 17-4PH with SS-304 is moderate and of SS-304 is lowest at all the temperatures. Joint strength of 17-4PH steel is found to be >80% of parent metal properties up to 1,000 K then drastic reduction in strength is noted at 1,200 K. Gradual reduction in strength of SS-304 joint with increase in temperature from 800 to 1,200 K is noted. At 1,200 K, joint strength of all combinations of joints is found to be nearly same. Microstructural evaluation of weld nugget after testing at different temperatures shows presence of tempered martensite in 17-4PH containing welds and homogenized structure in stainless steel 304 weld.

  5. Formation of a diffusion-based intermetallic interface layer in friction stir welded dissimilar Al-Cu lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marstatt, R.; Krutzlinger, M.; Luderschmid, J.; Zaeh, M. F.; Haider, F.

    2017-03-01

    The joining of dissimilar metals is an important issue in modern lightweight design. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is suitable for this task since the solidus temperature is usually not exceeded during the process. As a consequence, dissimilar joints can be produced with a minimum of deteriorating intermetallic phases. The latest studies showed the formation of intermetallic layers at the bonding interface with no significant negative influence on the seam quality. In this study, those intermetallic nanolayers at the interface of aluminium / copper lap joints were analysed. For the experiments, the commercially pure alloys EN AW-1050 and CW008A were chosen. The process temperature changed with respect to the parameter setup and was measured at different locations of the seam. The intermetallic layers at the interface were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The experiments show that the thickness of the interlayer clearly correlates with the process temperature using an Arrhenius equation. It is supposed, that the rotating probe removes the oxide layers of the metal surfaces and a metallic bonding between the Al- and the Cu-phase is formed. Due to the elevated temperature after the probe has passed, the intermetallic layer has emerged by interdiffusion.

  6. Influence of Zn Interlayer on Interfacial Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of TIG Lap-Welded Mg/Al Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qiong; Wang, Kehong

    2016-03-01

    This study explored 6061 Al alloy and AZ31B Mg alloy joined by TIG lap welding with Zn foils of varying thicknesses, with the additional Zn element being imported into the fusion zone to alloy the weld seam. The microstructures and chemical composition in the fusion zone near the Mg substrate were examined by SEM and EDS, and tensile shear strength tests were conducted to investigate the mechanical properties of the Al/Mg joints, as well as the fracture surfaces, and phase compositions. The results revealed that the introduction of an appropriate amount of Zn transition layer improves the microstructure of Mg/Al joints and effectively reduces the formation of Mg-Al intermetallic compounds (IMCs). The most common IMCs in the fusion zone near the Mg substrate were Mg-Zn and Mg-Al-Zn IMCs. The type and distribution of IMCs generated in the weld zone differed according to Zn additions; Zn interlayer thickness of 0.4 mm improved the sample's mechanical properties considerably compared to thicknesses of less than 0.4 mm; however, any further increase in Zn interlayer thickness of above 0.4 mm caused mechanical properties to deteriorate.

  7. Strength of Welded Joints in Tubular Members for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittemore, H L; Brueggeman, W C

    1931-01-01

    The object of this investigation is to make available to the aircraft industry authoritative information on the strength, weight, and cost of a number of types of welded joints. This information will, also, assist the aeronautics branch in its work of licensing planes by providing data from which the strength of a given joint may be estimated. As very little material on the strength of aircraft welds has been published, it is believed that such tests made by a disinterested governmental laboratory should be of considerable value to the aircraft industry. Forty joints were welded under procedure specifications and tested to determine their strengths. The weight and time required to fabricate were also measured for each joint.

  8. Dual beam Nd:YAG laser welding: influence of lubricants to lap joint welding of steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, M.; Merklein, M.; Otto, A.; Blankl, A.

    2007-05-01

    Laser welding is applied in large-volume production since the late eighties and has revolutionized the possibilities of designing and engineering products. Nevertheless, problems appear during application because the operational conditions in industrial environments fluctuate and can influence the welding process negatively. Contaminations, like lubricants and organic solids, are an example of changing conditions in laser beam welding. If a lap joint is welded, these materials have to be removed from the sheets, otherwise pores and surface failures may appear due to keyhole instabilities induced by uncontrolled outgassing. One possibility for solving this problem is the use of two separate laser beams. For producing these two beams several systems are available for all different kind of lasers. A bifocal optic is such a solution for an Nd:YAG laser. By using this system, the laser beam is divided after collimation with a prism. Afterwards the two beams are focussed with a lens to the surface of the sheet and two single spots are produced. If the distance between the two spots is low, one common, elliptical keyhole is created. With this system two different welding strategies are possible. The spots can be oriented parallel or normal to the feed direction. For stabilizing the laser welding of contaminated steel sheets the parallel arrangement is better, because the amount of contamination is nearly the same as in single spot welding but the total volume of the keyhole is greater and so pressure variations due to uncontrolled evaporation of contaminations are lower. In order to prove this theory and to determine the exact effects some investigations were made at the Chair of Manufacturing Technology of the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg. A 4 kW Nd:YAG laser with a beam parameter product of 25 mm*mrad and a focal distance of 200 mm was used to weld two 1 mm DC04 steel sheets together with a lap joint. Between the sheets a deep drawing lubricant, Castrol FST 6, was

  9. Fatigue Behaviour of Magnesium to Steel Dissimilar Friction Stir Lap Joints

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, Saumyadeep; Hovanski, Yuri

    2012-02-01

    A short study has been conducted to assess the performance of friction stir welded Mg/steel joints under dynamic loads. The major mode of failure was found to be top Mg sheet fracture. Crack initiation is noted to have taken place at the Mg/steel interface. The fatigue life of the joints is found to be significantly different than the fatigue data of the Mg alloy obtained from the literature. The reasons behind such a difference have been examined in this work.

  10. Strength of Welded Joints in Tubular Members for Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1930-02-06

    STRENGTH OF WELDED JOINTS IN TUBULAR MEMBERS FOR AIRCRAFT By H. L. WHITTEMORE and W. C. BRUEGGEMAN Bureau of Standards ——— - ..— .-.— .— .— —___ 107346->1...331 331 332 341 341 342 343 343 343 347 347 347 367 .— .— — ● REPORT ~0, 348 STRENGTH OF WELDED JOINTS IN TUBULAR MELMBERS FOR AIRCRAFT By H. L...airoraft welds has been publi~hed)lit ig beh%redthat euch tests made by a disinterested governmental laboratory should be of considerablemdueto the

  11. F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Aircraft (F-35)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-198 F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Aircraft (F-35) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be Determined TY

  12. A multi-feature integration method for fatigue crack detection and crack length estimation in riveted lap joints using Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jingjing; Guan, Xuefei; Peng, Tishun; Liu, Yongming; Saxena, Abhinav; Celaya, Jose; Goebel, Kai

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of damage detection and quantification in riveted lap joints. Embedded lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric (PZT) ceramic wafer-type sensors are employed to perform in situ non-destructive evaluation (NDE) during fatigue cyclical loading. PZT wafers are used to monitor the wave reflection from the boundaries of the fatigue crack at the edge of bolt joints. The group velocity of the guided wave is calculated to select a proper time window in which the received signal contains the damage information. It is found that the fatigue crack lengths are correlated with three main features of the signal, i.e., correlation coefficient, amplitude change, and phase change. It was also observed that a single feature cannot be used to quantify the damage among different specimens since a considerable variability was observed in the response from different specimens. A multi-feature integration method based on a second-order multivariate regression analysis is proposed for the prediction of fatigue crack lengths using sensor measurements. The model parameters are obtained using training datasets from five specimens. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology is demonstrated using several lap joint specimens from different manufactures and under different loading conditions.

  13. Joint Technical Coordinating Group on Aircraft Survivability (JTCG/AS). Bibliography of Joint Aircraft Survivability Reports

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    Existing 90 Vulnerability Analysis Methods Steady-Flow Fuel Ingestion Tolerance Predictions for New Turbofan Engines 90 Engine Assessment of...Element Assessment Report (U) 102 Helicopter Signature Prediction Model Validation (U) 102 Software User’s Manual for the Advanced Low Altitude...Advanced Wing Skin Material Evaluation 153 A Survey of Analysis Techniques to Predict Residual Properties of Ballistically 153 Damaged Aircraft

  14. On design methods for bolted joints in composite aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireman, Tomas; Nyman, Tonny; Hellbom, Kurt

    The problems related to the determination of the load distribution in a multirow fastener joint using the finite element method are discussed. Both simple and more advanced design methods used at Saab Military Aircraft are presented. The stress distributions obtained with an analytically based method and an FE-based method are compared. Results from failure predictions with a simple analytically based method and the more advanced FE-based method of multi-fastener tension and shear loaded test specimens are compared with experiments. Finally, complicating factors such as three-dimensional effects caused by secondary bending and fastener bending are discussed and suggestions for future research are given.

  15. Joint USAF/NASA hypersonic research aircraft study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, F. S.; Jones, R. A.; Buck, M. L.; Zima, W. P.

    1975-01-01

    A joint USAF/NASA study has developed a conceptual design for a new high-speed research airplane (X-24C) and identified candidate flight research experiments in the Mach 3 to 6 speed range. Four major categories of high priority research experiments are described as well as the X-24C design concept. The vehicle, a rocket-boosted, delta planform aircraft, is air launched from a B-52 and is capable of forty seconds of rocket cruise at Mach 6 with a research scramjet. Research provisions include a dedicated 10-foot long research experiments section, removable fins and strakes, and provisions for testing integrated airbreathing propulsion systems.

  16. A record of all marker bands found in the upper rivet rows of 2 adjacent bays from a fuselage lap splice joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willard, Scott A.

    1995-01-01

    A full scale fuselage test article was subjected to 60,000 load cycles (pressurizations) to study the effect of widespread fatigue damage in fuselage structures. Every 10,000 cycles coded marker block loading sequences were used to mark the fracture surfaces of the fatigue cracks propagating within the panel. The loading sequences consisted of series of underloads combined with a series of full pressurizations. The combination of loads and underloads marked the fracture surfaces with marker bands that could later be used to reconstruct the fatigue crack growth history of selected regions within the test article. Thirty rivet holes comprising the upper rivet rows from two adjacent bays (bays #3 and #4) from a fuselage lap splice joint were examined for the purpose of this study. Optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to locate the marker bands.

  17. A Semi-Analytical Method for Determining the Energy Release Rate of Cracks in Adhesively-Bonded Single-Lap Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Charles; Sun, Wenjun; Tomblin, John S.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2007-01-01

    A semi-analytical method for determining the strain energy release rate due to a prescribed interface crack in an adhesively-bonded, single-lap composite joint subjected to axial tension is presented. The field equations in terms of displacements within the joint are formulated by using first-order shear deformable, laminated plate theory together with kinematic relations and force equilibrium conditions. The stress distributions for the adherends and adhesive are determined after the appropriate boundary and loading conditions are applied and the equations for the field displacements are solved. Based on the adhesive stress distributions, the forces at the crack tip are obtained and the strain energy release rate of the crack is determined by using the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). Additionally, the test specimen geometry from both the ASTM D3165 and D1002 test standards are utilized during the derivation of the field equations in order to correlate analytical models with future test results. The system of second-order differential field equations is solved to provide the adherend and adhesive stress response using the symbolic computation tool, Maple 9. Finite element analyses using J-integral as well as VCCT were performed to verify the developed analytical model. The finite element analyses were conducted using the commercial finite element analysis software ABAQUS. The results determined using the analytical method correlated well with the results from the finite element analyses.

  18. Study on the Formation and Characterization of the Intermetallics in Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy to Coated Steel Sheet Lap Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, H.; Ghosh, R. N.; Pal, T. K.

    2014-10-01

    Multimaterial fabrication such as joining of steel and aluminum is currently prominent in a variety of industries. Friction stir welding is a novel solid-state welding process that causes good joint strength between steel and aluminum. However, the phenomenon contributing significant strength at the interface is not yet clear. In the present study, the interface of the friction stir lap-welded aluminum and coated steel sheet having joint strength maximum (71.4 pct of steel base metal) and minimum, respectively, under two parameter combinations, i.e., 1000 rpm 50 mm min-1 and 500 rpm 100 mm min-1, was exclusively characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), concentration profile, and elemental mapping by electron-probe microanalysis. A TEM-assisted EDS study identifies the morphologies of large size Al13Fe4 and small size Fe3Al-type intermetallic compounds at the interface. The diffusion-induced intermetallic growth (thickness) measured from a backscattered image and concentration profile agreed well with the numerically calculated one. The growth of these two phases at 1000 rpm 50 mm min-1 is attributed to the slower cooling rate (~3.5 K/s) with higher diffusion time (44 seconds) along the interface in comparison to the same for 500 rpm 100 mm min-1 with faster cooling rate (~10 K/s) and less diffusion time (13.6 seconds). The formation of thermodynamically stable and hard intermetallic phase Al13Fe4 at 1000 rpm and travel speed 50 mm min-1 in amounts higher than 500 rpm and a travel speed of 100 mm min-1 results in better joint strength, i.e., 71.4 pct, of the steel base metal.

  19. Influences of Friction Stir Welding Parameters on Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of AA5456 (AlMg5) at Different Lap Joint Thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishevar, M. R.; Mohandesi, J. Aghazadeh; Omidvar, H.; Safarkhanian, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welding is suitable for joining series 5000 alloys because no fusion welding problems arise for the alloys in this process. The present study examined the effects of double-pass welding and tool rotational and travel speeds for the second-pass welding on the mechanical and microstructural properties of friction stir lap welding of AA5456 (AlMg5)-H321 (5 mm thickness) and AA5456 (AlMg5)-O (2.5 mm thickness). The first pass of all specimens was performed at a rotational speed of 650 rpm and a travel speed of 50 mm/min. The second pass was performed at rotational speeds of 250, 450, and 650 rpm and travel speeds of 25, 50, and 75 mm/min. The results showed that the second pass changed the grain sizes in the center of the nugget zone compared with the first pass. It was observed that the size of the hooking defect of the double-pass-welded specimens was higher than that for the single-pass-welded specimen. The size of the hooking defect was found to be a function of the rotational and travel speeds. The optimal joint tensile shear properties were achieved at a rotational speed of 250 rpm and travel a speed of 75 mm/min.

  20. Effect of adhesive thickness and surface treatment on shear strength on single lap joint Al/CFRP using adhesive of epoxy/Al fine powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diharjo, Kuncoro; Anwar, Miftahul; Tarigan, Roy Aries P.; Rivai, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of adhesive thickness and surface treatment on the shear strength and failure type characteristic of single lap joint (SLJ) CFRP/Al using adhesive epoxy/Al-fine-powder. The CFRP was produced by using hand layup method for 30% of woven roving carbon fiber (w/w) and the resin used was bisphenolic. The adhesive was prepared using 12.5% of aluminum fine powder (w/w) in the epoxy adhesive. The powder was mixed by using a mixing machine at 60 rpm for 6 minutes, and then it was used to join the Al plate-2024 and CFRP. The start time to pressure for the joint process was 20 minutes after the application of adhesive on the both of adherends. The variables in this research are adhesive thickness (i.e. 0.2 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.8 mm and 1 mm) and surface treatment of adherends (i.e. acetone, chromate sulphuric acid, caustic etch and tucker's reagent). Before shear testing, all specimens were post-cured at 100 °C for 15 minutes. The result shows that the SLJ has the highest shear strength for 0.4 mm of adhesive thickness. When the adhesive thickness is more than 0.4 mm (0.6-1 mm), the shear strength decreases significantly. It might be caused by the property change of adhesive from ductile to brittle. The acetone surface treatment produces the best bonding between the adhesive and adherends (CFRP and Al-plate 2024), and the highest shear strength is 9.31 MPa. The surface treatment give the humidification effect of adherend surfaces by adhesive. The failure characteristic shows that the mixed failure of light-fiber-tear-failure and cohesive-failure are occurred on the high shear strength of SLJ, and the low shear strength commonly has the adhesive-failure type.

  1. How cats lap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocker, Roman; Reis, Pedro; Jung, Sunghwan; Aristoff, Jeffrey

    2010-11-01

    We studied the lapping of the domestic cat (Felis catus) by combining high-speed photography with a laboratory model of lapping. We found that Felis catus laps by a subtle mechanism based on water adhesion to the dorsal side of the tongue and the creation of a liquid column, exploiting inertia to defeat gravity and pull liquid into the mouth. The competition between inertia and gravity controls the pinch-off time of the column, determining the optimal lapping frequency, f. Felis catus was found to operate near the optimum and theoretical analysis yielded a scaling, f ˜M-1/6, of lapping frequency with animal mass, M. This prediction was verified by measuring lapping frequency across felids, from ocelots to lions, suggesting that the lapping mechanism is conserved among felines.

  2. Calibration of 3D ALE finite element model from experiments on friction stir welding of lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourment, Lionel; Gastebois, Sabrina; Dubourg, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    In order to support the design of such a complex process like Friction Stir Welding (FSW) for the aeronautic industry, numerical simulation software requires (1) developing an efficient and accurate Finite Element (F.E.) formulation that allows predicting welding defects, (2) properly modeling the thermo-mechanical complexity of the FSW process and (3) calibrating the F.E. model from accurate measurements from FSW experiments. This work uses a parallel ALE formulation developed in the Forge® F.E. code to model the different possible defects (flashes and worm holes), while pin and shoulder threads are modeled by a new friction law at the tool / material interface. FSW experiments require using a complex tool with scroll on shoulder, which is instrumented for providing sensitive thermal data close to the joint. Calibration of unknown material thermal coefficients, constitutive equations parameters and friction model from measured forces, torques and temperatures is carried out using two F.E. models, Eulerian and ALE, to reach a satisfactory agreement assessed by the proper sensitivity of the simulation to process parameters.

  3. Experimental and numerical studies on the issues in laser welding of light-weight alloys in a zero-gap lap joint configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harooni, Masoud

    current study a non-destructive evaluation method based on spectroscopy is proposed to detect the presence of pores in the lap joint of laser welded AZ31B magnesium alloy. The electron temperature that is calculated by the Boltzmann plot method is correlated to the presence of pores in the weld bead. A separate series of experiments was performed to evaluate the effect of an oxide coating layer on the dynamic behavior of the molten pool in the laser welding of an AZ31B magnesium alloy in a zero-gap lap joint configuration. A high speed CCD camera assisted with a green laser as an illumination source was selected to record the weld pool dynamics. Another technique used in this study was two-pass laser welding process to join AZ31B magnesium sheet in a zero-gap, lap-shear configuration. Two groups of samples including one pass laser welding (OPLW) and two pass laser welding (TPLW) were studied. In the two pass laser welding procedure, the first pass is performed by a defocused laser beam on the top of the two overlapped sheets in order to preheat the faying surface prior to laser welding, while the second pass is applied to melt and eventually weld the samples. Tensile and microhardness tests were used to measure the mechanical properties of the laser welded samples. A spectrometer was also used in real-time to correlate pore formation with calculated electron temperature using the Boltzmann plot method. The results of calculated electron temperature confirmed the previous results in earlier chapter. Magnesium and aluminum are two alloys which are used in different industries mainly due to their light weight. The main use of these two alloys is in automotive industry. Since different parts of the automobiles can be manufactured with each of these two alloys, it is essential to evaluate the joining feasibility of dissimilar metals such as aluminum to magnesium. A 4 kW fiber laser is used to join AZ31B magnesium alloy to AA 6014 using an overlap joint configuration. Two

  4. NASA Boeing 737 Aircraft Test Results from 1996 Joint Winter Runway Friction Measurement Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1996-01-01

    A description of the joint test program objectives and scope is given together with the performance capability of the NASA Langley B-737 instrumented aircraft. The B-737 test run matrix conducted during the first 8 months of this 5-year program is discussed with a description of the different runway conditions evaluated. Some preliminary test results are discussed concerning the Electronic Recording Decelerometer (ERD) readings and a comparison of B-737 aircraft braking performance for different winter runway conditions. Detailed aircraft parameter time history records, analysis of ground vehicle friction measurements and harmonization with aircraft braking performance, assessment of induced aircraft contaminant drag, and evaluation of the effects of other factors on aircraft/ground vehicle friction performance will be documented in a NASA Technical Report which is being prepared for publication next year.

  5. Critical joints in large composite primary aircraft structures. Volume 1: Technical summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunin, Bruce L.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted at Douglas Aircraft Company to develop the technology for critical joints in composite wing structure that meets all the design requirements of a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. In fulfilling this objective, analytical procedures for joint design and analysis were developed during Phase 1 of the program. Tests were conducted at the element level to supply the empirical data required for methods development. Large composite multirow joints were tested to verify the selected design concepts and for correlation with analysis predictions. The Phase 2 program included additional tests to provide joint design and analysis data, and culminated with several technology demonstration tests of a major joint area representative of a commercial transport wing. The technology demonstration program of Phase 2 is discussed. The analysis methodology development, structural test program, and correlation between test results and analytical strength predictions are reviewed.

  6. V-22 Osprey Joint Services Advanced Vertical Lift Aircraft (V-22)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-212 V-22 Osprey Joint Services Advanced Vertical Lift Aircraft (V-22) As of FY 2017...POE - Program Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To

  7. F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Aircraft (F-35)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Authority/Budget Activity BY - Base Year DAMIR - Defense Acquisition Management Information Retrieval Dev Est - Development Estimate DoD - Department...BlocK 3F Fleet Release ~)II USNIOC • Completed IOT &E .,. Full Rate Production Decision .,. DAB Milestone c ~· F-35 Engine See Note...F-35 Aircraft Milestones SAR Baseline Dev Est Current APB Development Objective/Threshold Current Estimate Concept Demonstration Contract Award

  8. 13. Detail closeup view of wooden peg fastenings; note lapped ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail close-up view of wooden peg fastenings; note lapped joint fastened with iron bolts using washers fashioned from oxen shoes. - Mormon Tabernacle, Temple Square, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  9. Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Company, Washington, DC Boeing Commercial Aircraft Division, Seattle, WA and Long Beach, CA Boeing Military Aircraft and Missile Division, St. Louis, MO and... aircraft ; military fixed-wing aircraft ; rotorcraft (helicopters and tiltrotor aircraft ); and aircraft jet engines. Two companies dominate the commercial... aircraft business, Boeing and Airbus. Four companies dominate the military fixed-wing market, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, BAE Systems, and European

  10. Al-to-Cu Friction Stir Lap Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzdor, Vahid; Kou, Sindo

    2012-01-01

    Recently, friction stir welding (FSW) has been used frequently to join dissimilar metals, for instance, Al to Mg, Cu, and steel. The formation of brittle intermetallic compounds often severely limits the strength and ductility of the resultant welds. In the present study, Al-to-Cu lap FSW was studied by welding 6061 Al to commercially pure Cu. Conventional lap FSW was modified by butt welding a small piece of Al to the top of Cu, with a slight pin penetration into the bottom of Al. At travel speeds up to 127 mm/min (5 ipm), the modified welds were about twice the joint strength and five to nine times the ductility of the conventional lap welds. In the conventional lap welds, voids were present along the Al-Cu interface, and fracture occurred along the interface in tensile testing. No such voids were observed in the modified lap welds, and fracture occurred through Cu. Thus, as in the case of Al-to-Mg lap FSW recently studied by the authors, modified lap FSW significantly improved the weld quality in Al-to-Cu lap FSW. At the relatively high travel speed of 203 mm/min (8 ipm), however, modified lap FSW was no longer superior because of channel formation.

  11. Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagerser, D. A.; Ludemann, S. G.

    1985-01-01

    The propfan is an advanced propeller concept which maintains the high efficiencies traditionally associated with conventional propellers at the higher aircraft cruise speeds associated with jet transports. The large-scale advanced propfan (LAP) program extends the research done on 2 ft diameter propfan models to a 9 ft diameter article. The program includes design, fabrication, and testing of both an eight bladed, 9 ft diameter propfan, designated SR-7L, and a 2 ft diameter aeroelastically scaled model, SR-7A. The LAP program is complemented by the propfan test assessment (PTA) program, which takes the large-scale propfan and mates it with a gas generator and gearbox to form a propfan propulsion system and then flight tests this system on the wing of a Gulfstream 2 testbed aircraft.

  12. An overview of the joint FAA/NASA aircraft/ground runway friction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    There is a need for information on runways which may become slippery due to various forms and types of contaminants. Experience has shown that since the beginning of all weather aircraft operations, there have been landing and aborted takeoff incidents and/or accidents each year where aircraft have either run off the end or veered off the shoulder of low friction runways. NASA Langley's Landing and Impact Dynamics Branch is involved in several research programs directed towards obtaining a better understanding of how different tire properties interact with varying pavement surface characteristics to produce acceptable performance for aircraft ground handling requirements. One such effort, which was jointly supported by not only NASA and the FAA but by several aviation industry groups including the Flight Safety Foundation, is described.

  13. Critical joints in large composite primary aircraft structures. Volume 2: Technology demonstration test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunin, Bruce L.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop the technology for critical structural joints in composite wing structure that meets all the design requirements of a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The results of four large composite multirow bolted joint tests are presented. The tests were conducted to demonstrate the technology for critical joints in highly loaded composite structure and to verify the analytical methods that were developed throughout the program. The test consisted of a wing skin-stringer transition specimen representing a stringer runout and skin splice on the wing lower surface at the side of the fuselage attachment. All tests were static tension tests. The composite material was Toray T-300 fiber with Ciba-Geigy 914 resin in 10 mil tape form. The splice members were metallic, using combinations of aluminum and titanium. Discussions are given of the test article, instrumentation, test setup, test procedures, and test results for each of the four specimens. Some of the analytical predictions are also included.

  14. Critical Joints in Large Composite Primary Aircraft Structures. Volume 3: Ancillary Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunin, Bruce L.; Sagui, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop the technology for critical structural joints for composite wing structure that meets all the design requirements of a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The results of a comprehensive ancillary test program are summarized, consisting of single-bolt composite joint specimens tested in a variety of configurations. These tests were conducted to characterize the strength and load deflection properties that are required for multirow joint analysis. The composite material was Toray 300 fiber and Ciba-Geigy 914 resin, in the form of 0.005 and 0.01 inch thick unidirectional tape. Tests were conducted in single and double shear for loaded and unloaded hole configurations under both tensile and compressive loading. Two different layup patterns were examined. All tests were conducted at room temperature. In addition, the results of NASA Standard Toughness Test (NASA RP 1092) are reported, which were conducted for several material systems.

  15. [Sample German LAPS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Bianca

    Four learning activity packages (LAPS) for use in secondary school German programs contain instructional materials which enable students to improve their basic linguistic skills. The units include: (1) "Grusse," (2) "Ich Heisse...Namen," (3) "Tune into Your Career: Business Correspondence 'Auf Deutch'," and (4) "Understanding German Culture."…

  16. High-strength combination fasteners for joint assembly in aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'Ev, S. L.; Gromov, V. F.; Liapunov, M. L.; Maslov, Iu. V.

    Two new titanium alloy rivet designs intended for the assembly of the aluminum structures of wide-body aircraft are described. One type of rivet consists of a bushing of VT16 titanium alloy and a pin of V65 alloy. The other rivet is a three-element design consisting of a pin with two end cavities filled with inserts of V65 alloy. The new rivets make it possible to produce high-strength joints using automatic equipment and can be used instead of bolt-rivets of titanium alloys.

  17. Structural development of laminar flow control aircraft chordwise wing joint designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischler, J. E.; Jerstad, N. M.; Gallimore, F. H., Jr.; Pollard, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    For laminar flow to be achieved, any protuberances on the surface must be small enough to avoid transition to turbulent flow. However, the surface must have joints between the structural components to allow assembly or replacement of damaged parts, although large continuous surfaces can be utilized to minimize the number the number of joints. Aircraft structural joints usually have many countersunk bolts or rivets on the outer surface. To maintain no mismatch on outer surfaces, it is desirable to attach the components from the inner surface. It is also desirable for the panels to be interchangeable, without the need for shims at the joint, to avoid surface discontinuities that could cause turbulence. Fabricating components while pressing their outer surfaces against an accurate mold helps to ensure surface smoothness and continuity at joints. These items were considered in evaluating the advantages and disadvantages of the joint design concepts. After evaluating six design concepts, two of the leading candidates were fabricated and tested using many small test panels. One joint concept was also built and tested using large panels. The small and large test panel deflections for the leading candidate designs at load factors up to +1.5 g's were well within the step and waviness requirements for avoiding transition.The small panels were designed and tested for compression and tension at -65 F, at ambient conditions, and at 160 F. The small panel results for the three-rib and the sliding-joint concepts indicated that they were both acceptable. The three-rib concept, with tapered splice plates, was considered to be the most practical. A modified three-rib joint that combined the best attributes of previous candidates was designed, developed, and tested. This improved joint met all of the structural strength, surface smoothness, and waviness criteria for laminar flow control (LFC). The design eliminated all disadvantages of the initial three-rib concept except for

  18. FRICTION STIR LAP WELDING OF ALUMINUM - POLYMER USING SCRIBE TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2015-02-16

    Friction Stir Scribe (FSS) technology is a relatively new variant of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) which enables lap joining of dissimilar material with very different melting points and different high temperature flow behaviors. The cutter scribe attached at the tip of FSW tool pin effectively cuts the high melting point material such that a mechanically interlocking feature is created between the dissimilar materials. The geometric shape of this interlocking feature determines the shear strength attained by the lap joint. This work presents first use of scribe technology in joining polymers to aluminum alloy. Details of the several runs of scribe welding performed in lap joining of ~3.175mm thick polymers including HDPE, filled and unfilled Nylon 66 to 2mm thick AA5182 are presented. The effect of scribe geometry and length on weld interlocking features is presented along with lap shear strength evaluations.

  19. Design, fabrication and test of graphite/polyimide composite joints and attachments for advanced aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Results of an experimental program to develop several types of graphite/polyimide (GR/PI) bonded and bolted joints for lightly loaded flight components for advanced space transportation systems and high speed aircraft are presented. Tasks accomplished include: a literature survey; design of static discriminator specimens; design allowables testing; fabrication of test panels and specimens; small specimen testing; and standard joint testing. Detail designs of static discriminator specimens for each of the four major attachment types are presented. Test results are given for the following: (1) transverse tension of Celion 3000/PMR-15 laminate; (2) net tension of a laminate for both a loaded and unloaded bolt hole; (3) comparative testing of bonded and co-cured doublers along with pull-off tests of single and double bonded angles; (4) single lap shear tests, transverse tension and coefficient of thermal expansion tests of A7F (LARC-13 amide-imide modified) adhesive; and (5) tension tests of standard single lap, double lap, and symmetric step lap bonded joints. Also, included are results of a finite element analysis of a single lap bonded composite joint.

  20. Rubicon swaps autophagy for LAP.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Keith B; Randow, Felix

    2015-07-01

    Phagocytic cells engulf their prey into vesicular structures called phagosomes, of which a certain proportion becomes demarcated for enhanced maturation by a process called LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP). Light has now been shed on the molecular requirements of LAP, establishing a central role for the protein Rubicon in the immune response to Aspergillus fumigatus.

  1. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, B.D.; Lissaman, P.B.S.; Morgan, W.R.; Radkey, R.L.

    1998-09-22

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing`s top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gases for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well. 31 figs.

  2. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, Bart D.; Lissaman, Peter B. S.; Morgan, Walter R.; Radkey, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing's top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gasses for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well.

  3. Aircraft remote sensing of phytoplankton spatial patterns during the 1989 Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) North Atlantic bloom experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, James A.; Hoge, Frank E.

    1991-01-01

    Mesoscale phytoplankton chlorophyll variability near the Joint Global Ocean Flux study sites along the 20 W meridian at 34 N, 47 N, and 59 N is discussed. The NASA P-3 aircraft and the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) system provides remote sensing support for the North Atlantic Bloom Experiment. The principal instrument of the AOL system is the blue-green laser that stimulates fluorescence from photoplankton chlorophyll, the principal photosynthetic pigment. Other instruments on the NASA P-3 aircraft include up- and down-looking spectrometers, PRT-5 for infrared measurements to determine sea surface temperature, and a system to deploy and record AXBTs to measure subsurface temperature structure.

  4. Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    national power. But with the recent events such as the war with Iraq, the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak, some major carriers... TITLE AND SUBTITLE 2003 Industry Studies: Aircraft 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  5. Aircraft and ground vehicle friction correlation test results obtained under winter runway conditions during joint FAA/NASA Runway Friction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Vogler, William A.; Baldasare, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Aircraft and ground vehicle friction data collected during the Joint FAA/NASA Runway Friction Program under winter runway conditions are discussed and test results are summarized. The relationship between the different ground vehicle friction measurements obtained on compacted snow- and ice-covered conditions is defined together with the correlation to aircraft tire friction performance under similar runway conditions.

  6. Reliability of Step-Lap Bonded Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    and Materials, 1973, pp. 5-64. 12. Schijve, J. and Jacobs, F. A., "Program- Fatigue Tests on Notched Light Alloy Specimens of 2024 and 7075 Material...Loading Sequence on Fatigue Characteristics of Aluminum- Alloy Box Beams," Effects of Environment and Complex Load History on Fatigue Life, ASTM STP 462...No. 1, January 1945, pp. 46-156. 22. Fralich, R. W., "Experimental Investigation of Effects of Random Loading on the Fatigue Life of Notched Cantilc

  7. Investigation into Interface Lifting Within FSW Lap Welds

    SciTech Connect

    K. S. Miller; C. R. Tolle; D. E. Clark; C. I. Nichol; T. R. McJunkin; H. B. Smartt

    2008-06-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is rapidly penetrating the welding market in many materials and applications, particularly in aluminum alloys for transportation applications. As this expansion outside the research laboratory continues, fitness for service issues will arise, and process control and NDE methods will become important determinants of continued growth. The present paper describes research into FSW weld nugget flaw detection within aluminum alloy lap welds. We present results for two types of FSW tool designs: a smooth pin tool and a threaded pin tool. We show that under certain process parameters (as monitored during welding with a rotating dynamometer that measures x, y, z, and torque forces) and tooling designs, FSW lap welds allow significant nonbonded interface lifting of the lap joint, while forming a metallurgical bond only within the pin region of the weld nugget. These lifted joints are often held very tightly together even though unbonded, and might be expected to pass cursory NDE while representing a substantial compromise in joint mechanical properties. The phenomenon is investigated here via radiographic and ultrasonic NDE techniques, with a copper foil marking insert (as described elsewhere) and by the tensile testing of joints. As one would expect, these results show that tool design and process parameters significantly affect plactic flow and this lifted interface. NDE and mechanical strength ramifications of this defect are discussed.

  8. Fatigue Strength and Related Characteristics of Aircraft Joints I : Comparison of Spot-Weld and Rivet Patterns in 24s-t Alclad and 75s-t Alclad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, H W; Jackson, L R; Grover, H J; Beaver, W W

    1944-01-01

    Report contains detailed results of a number of fatigue tests on spot-welded joints in aluminum alloys. The tests described include: (1) fatigue tests on spot-welded lap joints in sheets of unequal thickness of alclad 24s-t. These tests indicate that the fatigue strength of a spot-welded joint in sheets of two different gages is slightly higher than that of a similar joint in two sheets of the thinner gage but definitely lower than that of a similar joint in two sheets of the thicker gage. (2) Fatigue tests on spot-welded alclad 75s-t spot-welded lap-joint specimens of alclad 75s-t were not any stronger in fatigue than similar specimens of alclad 24s-t. (3) Fatigue tests on lap-joint specimens spot -welded after various surface preparations--these included ac welding wire-brushed surfaces, dc welding wire-brushed surfaces, and dc welding chemically cleaned surfaces. While the ac welds were strongest statically, the dc welds on wire-brushed surfaces were strongest in fatigue. Specimens prepared in this way were very nearly as strong as the best riveted specimens tested for comparison. (4) Fatigue tests on specimens spot-welded with varying voltage so as to include a wide range of static spot-weld strengths. The fatigue strengths were in the same order as the static strengths but showed less range. (author)

  9. Cashier/Checker Learning Activity Packets (LAPs).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    Twenty-four learning activity packets (LAPs) are provided for six areas of instruction in a cashier/checker program. Section A, Orientation, contains an LAP on exploring the job of cashier-checker. Section B, Operations, has nine LAPs, including those on operating the cash register, issuing trading stamps, and completing the cash register balance…

  10. Economics of technological change - A joint model for the aircraft and airline industries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kneafsey, J. T.; Taneja, N. K.

    1981-01-01

    The principal focus of this econometric model is on the process of technological change in the U.S. aircraft manufacturing and airline industries. The problem of predicting the rate of introduction of current technology aircraft into an airline's fleet during the period of research, development, and construction for new technology aircraft arises in planning aeronautical research investments. The approach in this model is a statistical one. It attempts to identify major factors that influence transport aircraft manufacturers and airlines, and to correlate them with the patterns of delivery of new aircraft to the domestic trunk carriers. The functional form of the model has been derived from several earlier econometric models on the economics of innovation, acquisition, and technological change.

  11. Additive manufacturing of tools for lapping glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Wesley B.

    2013-09-01

    Additive manufacturing technologies have the ability to directly produce parts with complex geometries without the need for secondary processes, tooling or fixtures. This ability was used to produce concave lapping tools with a VFlash 3D printer from 3D Systems. The lapping tools were first designed in Creo Parametric with a defined constant radius and radial groove pattern. The models were converted to stereolithography files which the VFlash used in building the parts, layer by layer, from a UV curable resin. The tools were rotated at 60 rpm and used with 120 grit and 220 grit silicon carbide lapping paste to lap 0.750" diameter fused silica workpieces. The samples developed a matte appearance on the lapped surface that started as a ring at the edge of the workpiece and expanded to the center. This indicated that as material was removed, the workpiece radius was beginning to match the tool radius. The workpieces were then cleaned and lapped on a second tool (with equivalent geometry) using a 3000 grit corundum aluminum oxide lapping paste, until a near specular surface was achieved. By using lapping tools that have been additively manufactured, fused silica workpieces can be lapped to approach a specified convex geometry. This approach may enable more rapid lapping of near net shape workpieces that minimize the material removal required by subsequent polishing. This research may also enable development of new lapping tool geometry and groove patterns for improved loose abrasive finishing.

  12. Biodegradation of international jet A-1 aviation fuel by microorganisms isolated from aircraft tank and joint hydrant storage systems.

    PubMed

    Itah, A Y; Brooks, A A; Ogar, B O; Okure, A B

    2009-09-01

    Microorganisms contaminating international Jet A-1 aircraft fuel and fuel preserved in Joint Hydrant Storage Tank (JHST) were isolated, characterized and identified. The isolates were Bacillus subtillis, Bacillus megaterium, Flavobacterium oderatum, Sarcina flava, Micrococcus varians, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus cereus and Bacillus brevis. Others included Candida tropicalis, Candida albicans, Saccharomyces estuari, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cladosporium resinae, Penicillium citrinum and Penicillium frequentans. The viable plate count of microorganisms in the Aircraft Tank ranged from 1.3 (+/-0.01) x 104 cfu/mL to 2.2 (+/-1.6) x 104 cfu/mL for bacteria and 102 cfu/mL to 1.68 (+/-0.32) x 103 cfu/mL for fungi. Total bacterial counts of 1.79 (+/-0.2) x 104 cfu/mL to 2.58 (+/-0.04) x 104 cfu/mL and total fungal count of 2.1 (+/-0.1) x 103 cfu/mL to 2.28 (+/-0.5) x 103 cfu/mL were obtained for JHST. Selected isolates were re-inoculated into filter sterilized aircraft fuels and biodegradation studies carried out. After 14 days incubation, Cladosporium resinae exhibited the highest degradation rate with a percentage weight loss of 66 followed by Candida albicans (60.6) while Penicillium citrinum was the least degrader with a weight loss of 41.6%. The ability of the isolates to utilize the fuel as their sole source of carbon and energy was examined and found to vary in growth profile between the isolates. The results imply that aviation fuel could be biodegraded by hydrocarbonoclastic microorganisms. To avert a possible deterioration of fuel quality during storage, fuel pipe clogging and failure, engine component damage, wing tank corrosion and aircraft disaster, efficient routine monitoring of aircraft fuel systems is advocated.

  13. Durability and Intelligent Nondestructive Evaluation of Adhesive Composite Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    theories used for 195 data reduction, and whether they have to be modified to model the adhesive system properly. Computer modeling of the adhesive joint...analysis of single lap joints with unidirectional and cross-ply adherends 26 2. Modeling of single lap joints with unidirectional and cross-ply...part of the research were to develop a nonlinear finite element model for a cracked single-lap adhesive joint with laminated composite adherends and

  14. Structural FEM analysis of the strut-to-fuselage joint of a two-seat composite aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas-Rojas, Erik Camarena-Arellano, Diego Hernández-Moreno, Hilario

    2014-05-15

    An analysis of a strut-to-fuselage joint is realized in order to evaluate the zones with a high probability of failure by means of a safety factor. The whole section is analyzed using the Finite Element Method (FEM) so as to estimate static resistance behavior, therefore it is necessary a numerical mock-up of the section, the mechanical properties of the Carbon-Epoxy (C-Ep) material, and to evaluate the applied loads. Results of the analysis show that the zones with higher probability of failure are found around the wing strut and the fuselage joint, with a safety factor lower than expected in comparison with the average safety factor used on aircrafts built mostly with metals.

  15. Quantitative thermal imaging of aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Howell, Patricia A.; Syed, Hazari I.

    1995-03-01

    Aircraft structural integrity is a major concern for airlines and airframe manufacturers. To remain economically competitive, airlines are looking at ways to retire older aircraft, not when some fixed number of flight hours or cycles has been reached, but when true structural need dictates. This philosophy is known as `retirement for cause.' The need to extend the life of commercial aircraft has increased the desire to develop nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques capable of detecting critical flaws such as disbonding and corrosion. These subsurface flaws are of major concern in bonded lap joints. Disbonding in such a joint can provide an avenue for moisture to enter the structure leading to corrosion. Significant material loss due to corrosion can substantially reduce the structural strength, load bearing capacity and ultimately reduce the life of the structure. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center has developed a thermal NDE system designed for application to disbonding and corrosion detection in aircraft skins. By injecting a small amount of heat into the front surface of an aircraft skin, and recording the time history of the resulting surface temperature variations using an infrared camera, quantitative images of both bond integrity and material loss due to corrosion can be produced. This paper presents a discussion of the development of the thermal imaging system as well as the techniques used to analyze the resulting thermal images. The analysis techniques presented represent a significant improvement in the information available over conventional thermal imaging due to the inclusion of data from both the heating and cooling portion of the thermal cycle. Results of laboratory experiments on fabricated disbond and material loss samples are presented to determine the limitations of the system. Additionally, the results of actual aircraft inspections are shown, which help to establish the field applicability for this

  16. How Tongue Size and Roughness Affect Lapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, M. J.; Hay, K. M.

    2012-10-01

    The biomechanics of domestic cat lapping (Felis catus) and domestic dog lapping (Canis familiaris) is currently under debate. Lapping mechanics in vertebrates with incomplete cheeks, such as cats and dogs, is a balance of inertia and the force of gravity likely optimized for ingestion and physical necessities. Physiology dictates vertebrate mass, which dictates vertebrate tongue size, which dictates lapping mechanics to achieve optimum liquid ingestion; with either touch lapping, scooping, or a hybrid lapping method. The physics of this optimized system then determines how high a column of liquid can be raised before it collapses due to gravity, and therefore, lapping frequency. Through tongue roughness model variation experiments it was found that pore-scale geometrical roughness does not appear to affect lapping or liquid uptake. Through tongue size model variation experiments it was found that there is a critical tongue radius in the range of 25 mm to 35 mm above which touch lapping is no longer an efficient way to uptake liquid. Vertebrates with incomplete cheeks may use a touch lapping method to ingest water if their tongue radius is less than this critical radius and use an alternative ingestion method if their tongue radius is larger.

  17. The fretting damage and effect of temperature in typical joint of aircraft construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, T. Z.

    The fatigue test results and the fatigue fracture for three types of joints, i.e., bolted joints, set-head rivet joints and countersunk rivet joints of the aluminum alloy, have been studied on the basis of more than 200 joints test at both elevated temperature and room temperature. It is revealed that the cracks initiated in the places where fretting had taken place and led to the failure of fretting fatigue. Different types of joints cause different modes of transmitting loads so that the places of cracks changed, which result in difference of fatigue strength. In this paper, the effect of fretting damage on fatigue strength and the effect of elevated temperature on fatigue strength and fracture appearance are also presented.

  18. The Second Joint NASA/FAA/DOD Conference on Aging Aircraft. Pt. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Conference was to bring together world leaders in aviation safety research, aircraft design and manufacturing, fleet operation and aviation maintenance to disseminate information on current practices and advanced technologies that will assure the continued airworthiness of the aging aircraft in the military and commercial fleets. The Conference included reviews of current industry practices, assessments of future technology requirements, and status of aviation safety research. The Conference provided an opportunity for interactions among the key personnel in the research and technology development community, the original equipment manufacturers, commercial airline operators, military fleet operators, aviation maintenance, and aircraft certification and regulatory authorities. Conference participation was unrestricted and open to the international aviation community.

  19. The Second Joint NASA/FAA/DoD Conference on Aging Aircraft. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Conference was to bring together world leaders in aviation safety research, aircraft design and manufacturing, fleet operation and aviation maintenance to disseminate information on current practices and advanced technologies that will assure the continued airworthiness of the aging aircraft in the military and commercial fleets. The Conference included reviews of current industry practices, assessments of future technology requirements, and status of aviation safety research. The Conference provided an opportunity for interactions among the key personnel in the research and technology development community, the original equipment manufacturers, commercial airline operators, military fleet operators, aviation maintenance, and aircraft certification and regulatory authorities. Conference participation was unrestricted and open to the international aviation community. Appendix B contains the name and addresses of the 623 participants in the Conference.

  20. Literature Review and Preliminary Studies of Fretting and Fretting Fatigue Including Special Applications to Aircraft Joints.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    interfay sealant appeared to be porous. There was a small fatigue reduction. Hot bonded joints ( hot cured interfay) had no cracking at rivet holes. A...Base, Ohio,1973, 11 pp. 1 05 F. E. Kiddie , Fatigue behavior of bolted joints in RR58 aluminum alloy with and without interfay sealant, Procurement

  1. FRICTION-STIR-LAP-WELDS OF AA6111 ALUMINUM ALLOY

    SciTech Connect

    Yadava, Manasij; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Chen, Y. L.; Gayden, X.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2007-01-09

    Lap joints of 1 mm thick AA6111 aluminum sheets were made by friction stir welding, using robotic and conventional machines. Welds were made for advancing as well as retreating side loading. Thinning in welds was quantified. Lap shear test of welds was conducted in as-welded and paint-baked conditions. Conventional machine welds showed less thinning and better strength than robotic machine welds. Process forces in conventional machine welding were higher. Paint bake treatment improved the weld strength; but the improvement varied with process parameters. Advancing side loaded welds achieved higher strength than the retreating side loaded welds. Fracture location was found to occur on the loaded side of the weld and along the thinning defect.

  2. Chemical conditions inside occluded regions on corroding aircraft aluminum alloys.

    PubMed

    Lewis, K S; Yuan, J; Kelly, R G

    1999-07-30

    Corrosion of aluminum alloy structures costs the US Air Force in the order of US$1 x 10(9) annually. Corrosion develops in areas of overlap such as aircraft lap-splice joints and under protective organic coatings. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been used to determine the local chemistries at these corrosion sites of solutions that were extracted using a microsampling system. Analysis of the local solution within lap-splice joints from aircraft has been performed in two ways: rehydration of corrosion products and direct microsampling. The solutions collected were analyzed with CE to quantitatively determine the species present during corrosion. The most common ions detected were Cl-, NO2-, NO3-, HCO3-, K+, Al3+, Ca2+, Na+ and Mg2+. Studies of the solution chemistry under local coating defects are required to understand coating failure and develop more durable coatings. A microsampling system and micro pH sensor were developed to extract solution from and measure pH in defects with diameters as small as 170 microns. Actively corroding defects contained high concentrations of Cl-, Al3+, Mg2+, Mn2+ and Cu2+ whereas only trace levels of Mg2+ were found in repassivated defects. The effects of these species on initiation and propagation of corrosion are discussed.

  3. Lap Shear Testing of Candidate Radiator Panel Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David; Briggs, Maxwell; McGowan, Randy

    2013-01-01

    During testing of a subscale radiator section used to develop manufacturing techniques for a full-scale radiator panel, the adhesive bonds between the titanium heat pipes and the aluminum face sheets failed during installation and operation. Analysis revealed that the thermal expansion mismatch between the two metals resulted in relatively large shear stresses being developed even when operating the radiator at moderate temperatures. Lap shear testing of the adhesive used in the original joints demonstrated that the two-part epoxy adhesive fell far short of the strength required. A literature review resulted in several candidate adhesives being selected for lap shear joint testing at room temperature and 398 K, the nominal radiator operating temperature. The results showed that two-part epoxies cured at room and elevated temperatures generally did not perform well. Epoxy film adhesives cured at elevated temperatures, on the other hand, did very well with most being sufficiently strong to cause yielding in the titanium sheet used for the joints. The use of an epoxy primer generally improved the strength of the joint. Based upon these results, a new adhesive was selected for the second subscale radiator section.

  4. Assessment of Cabin Dimensions to Accommodate Infantry Soldiers for the Future Vertical Lift/Joint Multi-Role Medium-Class Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    infantry Soldiers for the Future Vertical Lift/Joint Multi-Role (FVL/JMR) medium-class aircraft. An adjustable mockup was used to conduct the assessment...1 1.2 Cabin Mockup ...43 Appendix A. Mockup Dimensions (all measurements in inches and feet) 45 Appendix

  5. Marine TACAIR Challenge 2020: Team the Joint Strike Fighter with the Next Unmanned Aircraft System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-05

    shipping-in terms of raw numbers, tonnage capacity and network- based command and control ability.12 This deficit will hamper TACAIR presence. The...over- reliance upon canier- based air support that would grow increasingly ineffective as theN avy faced shortfalls of both fighters and aircraft cm1...spectrum, internet protocol (IP), and associated bandwidth serve as lifeblood for network-centric American forces, yet this invisible arena proves

  6. The Application of Unmanned Rotary-Wing Aircraft in Tactical Logistics in Support of Joint Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-13

    autonomous unmanned rotary- wing aircraft prototype, specifically the K-MAX and another called the A-160 Hummingbird .18 The A-160 Hummingbird is designed...system that can spot, mark, and target human activity through tree canopy.19 Originally, the Army’s interest in the new A-160 Hummingbird was for...cargo lift capabilities, but it has since shifted its interests to tactical ISR capabilities. The Hummingbird still remains one of the top options for

  7. Dual-band infrared imaging applications: Locating buried minefields, mapping sea ice, and inspecting aging aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.; Perkins, D.E.

    1992-09-01

    We discuss the use of dual-band infrared (DBIR) imaging for three quantitative NDE applications: location buried surrogate mines, mapping sea ice thicknesses and inspecting subsurface flaws in aging aircraft parts. Our system of DBIR imaging offers a unique combination of thermal resolution, detectability, and interpretability. Pioneered at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, it resolves 0.2 {degrees}C differences in surface temperatures needed to identify buried mine sites and distinguish them from surface features. It produces both surface temperature and emissivity-ratio images of sea ice, needed to accurately map ice thicknesses (e.g., by first removing clutter due to snow and surface roughness effects). The DBIR imaging technique depicts subsurface flaws in composite patches and lap joints of aircraft, thus providing a needed tool for aging aircraft inspections.

  8. Dual-band infrared imaging applications: Locating buried minefields, mapping sea ice, and inspecting aging aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgrande, N. K.; Durbin, P. F.; Perkins, D. E.

    1992-09-01

    We discuss the use of dual-band infrared (DBIR) imaging for three quantitative NDE applications: location buried surrogate mines, mapping sea ice thicknesses, and inspecting subsurface flaws in aging aircraft parts. Our system of DBIR imaging offers a unique combination of thermal resolution, detectability, and interpretability. Pioneered at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, it resolves 0.2 C differences in surface temperatures needed to identify buried mine sites and distinguish them from surface features. It produces both surface temperature and emissivity-ratio images of sea ice, needed to accurately map ice thicknesses (e.g., by first removing clutter due to snow and surface roughness effects). The DBIR imaging technique depicts subsurface flaws in composite patches and lap joints of aircraft, thus providing a needed tool for aging aircraft inspections.

  9. Quadruple Lap Shear Processing Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Tony N.; McCool, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Thiokol, Science and Engineering Huntsville Operations (SEHO) Laboratory has previously experienced significant levels of variation in testing Quadruple Lap Shear (QLS) specimens. The QLS test is used at Thiokol / Utah for the qualification of Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle flex bearing materials. A test was conducted to verify that process changes instituted by SEHO personnel effectively reduced variability, even with normal processing variables introduced. A test matrix was designed to progress in a series of steps; the first establishing a baseline, then introducing additional solvents or other variables. Variables included normal test plan delay times, pre-bond solvent hand-wipes and contaminants. Each condition tested utilized standard QLS hardware bonded with natural rubber, two separate technicians and three replicates. This paper will report the results and conclusions of this investigation.

  10. Multiplexed HTS rf SQUID magnetometer array for eddy current testing of aircraft rivet joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gärtner, S.; Krause, H.-J.; Wolters, N.; Lomparski, D.; Wolf, W.; Schubert, J.; Kreutzbruck, M. v.; Allweins, K.

    2002-05-01

    Using three rf SQUID magnetometers, a multiplexed SQUID array was implemented. The SQUIDs are positioned in line with 7 mm spacing and operated using one feedback electronics with sequential read out demodulation at different radio frequencies (rf). The cross-talk between SQUID channels was determined to be negligible. To show the performance of the SQUID array, eddy current (EC) measurements of aluminum aircraft samples in conjunction with a differential (double-D) EC excitation and lock-in readout were carried out. With computer-controlled continuous switching of the SQUIDs during the scan, three EC signal traces of the sample are obtained simultaneously. We performed measurements with an EC excitation frequency of 135 Hz to localize an artificial crack (sawcut flaw) of 20 mm length in an aluminum sheet with 0.6 mm thickness. The flaw was still detected when covered with aluminum of up to 10 mm thickness. In addition, measurements with varying angles between scanning direction and flaw orientation are presented.

  11. Measuring Hole Elongation in Bolted Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichorek, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    Measurement does not affect joint parameters. Verification of analytical and strength-prediction methods for bolted composite joints based generally on data obtained experimentally from double-lap-joint specimens. In mechanically fastened joints, stresses maximal at fastener holes. Ability to measure accurately hole elongations without affecting joint parameters provides better understanding of elastic and plastic behavior of joint material leading to failure mechanisms in mechanically fastened joints required for design of more-efficient, lightweight composite joints.

  12. Large-Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degeorge, C. L.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been directed toward improving aircraft fuel efficiency. Analytical studies and research with wind tunnel models have demonstrated that the high inherent efficiency of low speed turboprop propulsion systems may now be extended to the Mach .8 flight regime of today's commercial airliners. This can be accomplished with a propeller, employing a large number of thin highly swept blades. The term Prop-Fan has been coined to describe such a propulsion system. In 1983 the NASA-Lewis Research Center contracted with Hamilton Standard to design, build and test a near full scale Prop-Fan, designated the Large Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP). This report provides a detailed description of the LAP program. The assumptions and analytical procedures used in the design of Prop-Fan system components are discussed in detail. The manufacturing techniques used in the fabrication of the Prop-Fan are presented. Each of the tests run during the course of the program are also discussed and the major conclusions derived from them stated.

  13. LAPS Grid generation and adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliantini, Cecilia; Delzanno, Gia Luca; Guo, Zehua; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xianzhu; Chacon, Luis

    2011-10-01

    LAPS uses a common-data framework in which a general purpose grid generation and adaptation package in toroidal and simply connected domains is implemented. The initial focus is on implementing the Winslow/Laplace-Beltrami method for generating non-overlapping block structured grids. This is to be followed by a grid adaptation scheme based on Monge-Kantorovich optimal transport method [Delzanno et al., J. Comput. Phys,227 (2008), 9841-9864], that equidistributes application-specified error. As an initial set of applications, we will lay out grids for an axisymmetric mirror, a field reversed configuration, and an entire poloidal cross section of a tokamak plasma reconstructed from a CMOD experimental shot. These grids will then be used for computing the plasma equilibrium and transport in accompanying presentations. A key issue for Monge-Kantorovich grid optimization is the choice of error or monitor function for equi-distribution. We will compare the Operator Recovery Error Source Detector (ORESD) [Lapenta, Int. J. Num. Meth. Eng,59 (2004) 2065-2087], the Tau method and a strategy based on the grid coarsening [Zhang et al., AIAA J,39 (2001) 1706-1715] to find an ``optimal'' grid. Work supported by DOE OFES.

  14. An examination of faying surface fretting in single lap splices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Adam

    While fretting damage in mechanically fastened joints is widely acknowledged as a common source of crack nucleation, little work is available in the open literature on the role that fretting damage plays in the fatigue life of a riveted joint. To expand on the limited knowledge available, a study was undertaken on fretting fatigue in thin-sheet riveted fuselage lap joints. In joints constructed out of 1 mm thick 2024-T3 aluminum sheet the rivet forming load was found to have a significant effect on the location of fretting damage and crack nucleation. This effect was observed for splices riveted with machine countersunk and with universal rivets. The shift in the location of peak fretting damage and crack nucleation with changing rivet forming loads was investigated through numerical and experimental methods. A predictive model based on the critical plane Smith-Watson-Topper strain life equation was applied to the complex geometry of the single lap splice and was shown to be effective in predicting the fretting fatigue life as well as the location of fretting-induced crack nucleation. Basing this model on an explicit finite element simulation allowed for the inclusion of compressive residual stresses generated during rivet forming. Key to the proper functionality of the predictive model was to have a validated finite element model from which results for the stress and strain field in the loaded component could be obtained. In addition to the predictive model, a series of splice coupon and simplified geometry fretting fatigue tests were performed. The tests showed that, at higher rivet forming loads, crack nucleation is on the faying surface away from the hole edge and that the type of surface condition is important to the fretting fatigue life of the splice. The discovery of this variation with surface treatment at high rivet forming loads is important as more research is showing the benefit of using load-controlled rivet forming and higher rivet forming loads in

  15. LAPS discretization and solution of plasma equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missanelli, Maria; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Guo, Zehua; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xianzhu

    2011-10-01

    LAPS provides spectral element discretization for solving steady state plasma profiles. Our initial focus is on its implementation for two dimensional open magnetic field equilibria in linear and toroidal geometries. The linear geometry is an axisymmetric magnetic mirror with anisotropic pressure. The toroidal case is a tokamak scrape-off layer plasma. Structured grids are produced by the grid generation package in LAPS. The spectral element discretization uses modal bases over quadrilateral elements. A Newton-Krylov solver implemented with the Portable, Extensible Toolkits for Scientific Computing PETSc is applied to iteratively converge the solution. Care has been taken in the code design to separate the grid generation, spectral element discretization, and (non)linear solver from the user-specified equilibrium equations, so the LAPS infrastructure can be easily used for different applications. Work supported by DOE OFES.

  16. An orientation-selective orthogonal lapped transform.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Dietmar

    2008-08-01

    A novel critically sampled orientation-selective orthogonal lapped transform called the lapped Hartley transform (LHT) is derived. In a first step, overlapping basis functions are generated by modulating basis functions of a 2-D block Hartley transform by a cosine wave. To achieve invertibility and orthogonality, an iterative filter is applied as prefilter in the analysis and as postfilter in the synthesis operation, respectively. Alternatively, filtering can be restricted to analysis or synthesis, ending up with a biorthogonal transform (LHT-PR, LHT-PO). A statistical analysis based on a 4000-image data base shows that the LHT and LHT-PO have better redundancy removal properties than other block or lapped transforms. Finally, image compression and noise removal examples are given, showing the advantages of the LHT especially in images containing oriented textures.

  17. Design of a composite wing extension for a general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adney, P. S.; Horn, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    A composite wing extension was designed for a typical general aviation aircraft to improve lift curve slope, dihedral effect, and lift to drag ratio. Advanced composite materials were used in the design to evaluate their use as primary structural components in general aviation aircraft. Extensive wind tunnel tests were used to evaluate six extension shapes. The extension shape chosen as the best choice was 28 inches long with a total area of 17 square feet. Subsequent flight tests showed the wing extension's predicted aerodynamic improvements to be correct. The structural design of the wing extension consisted of a hybrid laminate carbon core with outer layers of Kevlar - layed up over a foam interior which acted as an internal support. The laminate skin of the wing extension was designed from strength requirements, and the foam core was included to prevent buckling. A joint lap was recommended to attach the wing extension to the main wing structure.

  18. Experimental study of lap splice bolted connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dehui; Tian, Lishan; Jiang, Wenqiang; An, Liqiang; Zhang, Ziyang

    2017-01-01

    The bolted connection is prone to slip under external load in the lattice transmission tower, which will affect the internal forces and deformation of tower. In order to better simulate the effect of bolt connection slippage on transmission tower, the load deformation relationship should be established. In this paper, the single lap splice bolt connection under tension load is tested and the load displacement curve is obtained. Furthermore, the existing model of single lap splice bolted connection is modified, which will plays an important role in the influence of the bolt slippage of the transmission lines towers more accurately and reasonably.

  19. Application of lap laser welding technology on stainless steel railway vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongxiao; Wang, Chunsheng; He, Guangzhong; Li, Wei; Liu, Liguo

    2016-10-01

    Stainless steel railway vehicles with so many advantages, such as lightweight, antirust, low cost of maintenance and simple manufacturing process, so the production of high level stainless steel railway vehicles has become the development strategy of European, American and other developed nations. The current stainless steel railway vehicles body and structure are usually assembled by resistance spot welding process. The weak points of this process are the poor surface quality and bad airtight due to the pressure of electrodes. In this study, the partial penetration lap laser welding process was investigated to resolve the problems, by controlling the laser to stop at the second plate in the appropriate penetration. The lap laser welding joint of stainless steel railway vehicle car body with partial penetration has higher strength and surface quality than those of resistance spot welding joint. The biggest problem of lap laser welding technology is to find the balance of the strength and surface quality with different penetrations. The mechanism of overlap laser welding of stainless steel, mechanical tests, microstructure analysis, the optimization of welding parameters, analysis of fatigue performance, the design of laser welding stainless steel railway vehicles structure and the development of non-destructive testing technology were systematically studied before lap laser welding process to be applied in manufacture of railway vehicles. The results of the experiments and study show that high-quality surface state and higher fatigue strength can be achieved by the partial penetration overlap laser welding of the side panel structure, and the structure strength of the car body can be higher than the requirements of En12663, the standard of structural requirements of railway vehicles bodies. Our company has produced the stainless steel subway and high way railway vehicles by using overlap laser welding technology. The application of lap laser welding will be a big

  20. Myhre and LAPS syndromes: clinical and molecular review of 32 patients

    PubMed Central

    Michot, Caroline; Le Goff, Carine; Mahaut, Clémentine; Afenjar, Alexandra; Brooks, Alice S; Campeau, Philippe M; Destree, Anne; Di Rocco, Maja; Donnai, Dian; Hennekam, Raoul; Heron, Delphine; Jacquemont, Sébastien; Kannu, Peter; Lin, Angela E; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Mansour, Sahar; Marlin, Sandrine; McGowan, Ruth; Murphy, Helen; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Rio, Marlène; Simon, Marleen; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Stone, James R; Sznajer, Yves; Tolmie, John; Touraine, Renaud; van den Ende, Jenneke; Van der Aa, Nathalie; van Essen, Ton; Verloes, Alain; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Myhre syndrome is characterized by short stature, brachydactyly, facial features, pseudomuscular hypertrophy, joint limitation and hearing loss. We identified SMAD4 mutations as the cause of Myhre syndrome. SMAD4 mutations have also been identified in laryngotracheal stenosis, arthropathy, prognathism and short stature syndrome (LAPS). This study aimed to review the features of Myhre and LAPS patients to define the clinical spectrum of SMAD4 mutations. We included 17 females and 15 males ranging in age from 8 to 48 years. Thirty were diagnosed with Myhre syndrome and two with LAPS. SMAD4 coding sequence was analyzed by Sanger sequencing. Clinical and radiological features were collected from a questionnaire completed by the referring physicians. All patients displayed a typical facial gestalt, thickened skin, joint limitation and muscular pseudohypertrophy. Growth retardation was common (68.7%) and was variable in severity (from −5.5 to −2 SD), as was mild-to-moderate intellectual deficiency (87.5%) with additional behavioral problems in 56.2% of the patients. Significant health concerns like obesity, arterial hypertension, bronchopulmonary insufficiency, laryngotracheal stenosis, pericarditis and early death occurred in four. Twenty-nine patients had a de novo heterozygous SMAD4 mutation, including both patients with LAPS. In 27 cases mutation affected Ile500 and in two cases Arg496. The three patients without SMAD4 mutations had typical findings of Myhre syndrome. Myhre–LAPS syndrome is a clinically homogenous condition with life threatening complications in the course of the disease. Our identification of SMAD4 mutations in 29/32 cases confirms that SMAD4 is the major gene responsible for Myhre syndrome. PMID:24424121

  1. Reducing the Hook Defect of Friction Stir Lap Welded Ti-6Al-4V Alloy by Slightly Penetrating into the Lower Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Shude; Li, Zhengwei

    2017-02-01

    For the purpose of reducing the hook defect in friction stir lap welding joint, Ti-6Al-4V alloy was lap welded by slightly penetrating into the lower sheet. Hook feature, microstructure and mechanical properties of the lap joints were mainly discussed. Results show that using slight penetration, plastic material mainly concentrates above the lap interface, which is beneficial to suppress the primary hook and broaden the stir zone (SZ) width. Simultaneously, a very small secondary hook is formed. The void-like defect, which is formed due to high peak temperature and big temperature gradient along thickness, can be eliminated by decreasing the rotating speed. Microstructures along thickness show much difference due to big temperature gradient. SZ hardness of both the upper and lower sheets is higher than the base material due to finer grains. Bigger lap shear failure load can be obtained using 150 rpm, which is 17.1 KN. Lap joints fracture along the secondary hook and present ductile fracture mode.

  2. The Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) PHM and the Autonomic Logistic Concept: Potential Impact on Aging Aircraft Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-02-01

    maintenance practices, lead to preventable incidents in which people are injured or killed . This situation also ensures additional and very high...Logistics, all component parts will be tracked by serial number across all aircraft tail numbers. This will assist in catching potential fleet-wide...Additionally, with the lead time notice to order more parts, ideally there would be no more cannibalization of aircraft. Many squadrons have what is known as a

  3. Three-Dimensional Geometric Nonlinear Contact Stress Analysis of Riveted Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, Kunigal N.; Ramanujapuram, Vivek

    1998-01-01

    The problems associated with fatigue were brought into the forefront of research by the explosive decompression and structural failure of the Aloha Airlines Flight 243 in 1988. The structural failure of this airplane has been attributed to debonding and multiple cracking along the longitudinal lap splice riveted joint in the fuselage. This crash created what may be termed as a minor "Structural Integrity Revolution" in the commercial transport industry. Major steps have been taken by the manufacturers, operators and authorities to improve the structural airworthiness of the aging fleet of airplanes. Notwithstanding, this considerable effort there are still outstanding issues and concerns related to the formulation of Widespread Fatigue Damage which is believed to have been a contributing factor in the probable cause of the Aloha accident. The lesson from this accident was that Multiple-Site Damage (MSD) in "aging" aircraft can lead to extensive aircraft damage. A strong candidate in which MSD is highly probable to occur is the riveted lap joint.

  4. Low frequency ultrasonic nondestructive inspection of aluminum/adhesive fuselage lap splices

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, Thadd

    1994-01-04

    This thesis is a collection of research efforts in ultrasonics, conducted at the Center for Aviation Systems Reliability located at Iowa State University, as part of the Federal Aviation Administration`s ``Aging Aircraft Program.`` The research was directed toward the development of an ultrasonic prototype to inspect the aluminum/adhesive fuselage lap splices found on 1970`s vintage Boeing passenger aircraft. The ultrasonic prototype consists of a normal incidence, low frequency inspection technique, and a scanning adapter that allows focused immersion transducers to be operated in a direct contact manner in any inspection orientation, including upside-down. The inspection technique uses a computer-controlled data acquisition system to produce a C-scan image of a radio frequency (RF) waveform created by a low frequency, broadband, focused beam transducer, driven with a spike voltage pulser. C-scans produced by this technique are color representations of the received signal`s peak-to-peak amplitude (voltage) taken over an (x, y) grid. Low frequency, in this context, refers to a wavelength that is greater than the lap splice`s layer thicknesses. With the low frequency technique, interface echoes of the lap splice are not resolved and gating of the signal is unnecessary; this in itself makes the technique simple to implement and saves considerable time in data acquisition. Along with the advantages in data acquisition, the low frequency technique is relatively insensitive to minor surface curvature and to ultrasonic interference effects caused by adhesive bondline thickness variations in the lap splice.

  5. Molten pool characterization of laser lap welded copper and aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhiqing; Hu, Shengsun; Zuo, Di; Cai, Wayne; Lee, Dongkyun; Elijah, Kannatey-Asibu, Jr.

    2013-12-01

    A 3D finite volume simulation model for laser welding of a Cu-Al lap joint was developed using ANSYS FLUENT to predict the weld pool temperature distribution, velocity field, geometry, alloying element distribution and transition layer thickness—all key attributes and performance characteristics for a laser-welded joint. Melting and solidification of the weld pool was simulated with an enthalpy-porosity formulation. Laser welding experiments and metallographic examination by SEM and EDX were performed to investigate the weld pool features and validate the simulated results. A bowl-shaped temperature field and molten pool, and a unique maximum fusion zone width were observed near the Cu-Al interface. Both the numerical simulation and experimental results indicate an arch-shaped intermediate layer of Cu and Al, and a gradual transition of Cu concentration from the aluminum plate to the copper plate with high composition gradient. For the conditions used, welding with Cu on top was found to result in a better weld joint.

  6. Nucleation kinetics, growth and characterization of dLAP, dLAP:KF and dLAP:NaN 3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, A. S. Haja; Ravi, G.; Jayavel, R.; Ramasamy, P.

    2003-03-01

    The nucleation parameters, such as interfacial tension, radius of the critical nucleus and critical free energy change have been estimated for deuterated L-arginine phosphate (dLAP), potassium fluoride mixed dLAP and sodium azide mixed dLAP single crystals. Pure and additive mixed dLAP single crystals are grown by slow cooling technique. The effect of microbial contamination and colouration on the growth solutions has been studied. The crystalline powder of the grown crystals has been examined by X-ray diffraction and thermal analyses in order to estimate the lattice parameters and study thermal properties respectively.

  7. Mutation in TOR1AIP1 encoding LAP1B in a form of muscular dystrophy: a novel gene related to nuclear envelopathies.

    PubMed

    Kayman-Kurekci, Gulsum; Talim, Beril; Korkusuz, Petek; Sayar, Nilufer; Sarioglu, Turkan; Oncel, Ibrahim; Sharafi, Parisa; Gundesli, Hulya; Balci-Hayta, Burcu; Purali, Nuhan; Serdaroglu-Oflazer, Piraye; Topaloglu, Haluk; Dincer, Pervin

    2014-07-01

    We performed genome-wide homozygosity mapping and mapped a novel myopathic phenotype to chromosomal region 1q25 in a consanguineous family with three affected individuals manifesting proximal and distal weakness and atrophy, rigid spine and contractures of the proximal and distal interphalangeal hand joints. Additionally, cardiomyopathy and respiratory involvement were noted. DNA sequencing of torsinA-interacting protein 1 (TOR1AIP1) gene encoding lamina-associated polypeptide 1B (LAP1B), showed a homozygous c.186delG mutation that causes a frameshift resulting in a premature stop codon (p.E62fsTer25). We observed that expression of LAP1B was absent in the patient skeletal muscle fibres. Ultrastructural examination showed intact sarcomeric organization but alterations of the nuclear envelope including nuclear fragmentation, chromatin bleb formation and naked chromatin. LAP1B is a type-2 integral membrane protein localized in the inner nuclear membrane that binds to both A- and B-type lamins, and is involved in the regulation of torsinA ATPase. Interestingly, luminal domain-like LAP1 (LULL1)-an endoplasmic reticulum-localized partner of torsinA-was overexpressed in the patient's muscle in the absence of LAP1B. Therefore, the findings suggest that LAP1 and LULL1 might have a compensatory effect on each other. This study expands the spectrum of genes associated with nuclear envelopathies and highlights the critical function for LAP1B in striated muscle.

  8. Large-Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) pitch change actuator and control design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.; Carvalho, P.; Cutler, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been directed toward improving aircraft fuel consumption. Studies have shown that the high inherent efficiency previously demonstrated by low speed turboprop propulsion systems may now be extended to today's higher speed aircraft if advanced high-speed propeller blades having thin airfoils and aerodynamic sweep are utilized. Hamilton Standard has designed a 9-foot diameter single-rotation Large-Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) which will be tested on a static test stand, in a high speed wind tunnel and on a research aircraft. The major objective of this testing is to establish the structural integrity of large-scale Prop-Fans of advanced construction in addition to the evaluation of aerodynamic performance and aeroacoustic design. This report describes the operation, design features and actual hardware of the (LAP) Prop-Fan pitch control system. The pitch control system which controls blade angle and propeller speed consists of two separate assemblies. The first is the control unit which provides the hydraulic supply, speed governing and feather function for the system. The second unit is the hydro-mechanical pitch change actuator which directly changes blade angle (pitch) as scheduled by the control.

  9. Homologs of the LapD-LapG c-di-GMP Effector System Control Biofilm Formation by Bordetella bronchiseptica

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosis, Nicolás; Boyd, Chelsea D.; O´Toole, George A.; Fernández, Julieta; Sisti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation is important for infection by many pathogens. Bordetella bronchiseptica causes respiratory tract infections in mammals and forms biofilm structures in nasal epithelium of infected mice. We previously demonstrated that cyclic di-GMP is involved in biofilm formation in B. bronchiseptica. In the present work, based on their previously reported function in Pseudomonas fluorescens, we identified three genes in the B. bronchiseptica genome likely involved in c-di-GMP-dependent biofilm formation: brtA, lapD and lapG. Genetic analysis confirmed a role for BrtA, LapD and LapG in biofilm formation using microtiter plate assays, as well as scanning electron and fluorescent microscopy to analyze the phenotypes of mutants lacking these proteins. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that the protease LapG of B. bronchiseptica cleaves the N-terminal domain of BrtA, as well as the LapA protein of P. fluorescens, indicating functional conservation between these species. Furthermore, while BrtA and LapG appear to have little or no impact on colonization in a mouse model of infection, a B. bronchiseptica strain lacking the LapG protease has a significantly higher rate of inducing a severe disease outcome compared to the wild type. These findings support a role for c-di-GMP acting through BrtA/LapD/LapG to modulate biofilm formation, as well as impact pathogenesis, by B. bronchiseptica PMID:27380521

  10. Dogs lap using acceleration-driven open pumping

    PubMed Central

    Gart, Sean; Socha, John J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-01-01

    Dogs lap because they have incomplete cheeks and cannot suck. When lapping, a dog’s tongue pulls a liquid column from the bath, suggesting that the hydrodynamics of column formation are critical to understanding how dogs drink. We measured lapping in 19 dogs and used the results to generate a physical model of the tongue’s interaction with the air–fluid interface. These experiments help to explain how dogs exploit the fluid dynamics of the generated column. The results demonstrate that effects of acceleration govern lapping frequency, which suggests that dogs curl the tongue to create a larger liquid column. Comparing lapping in dogs and cats reveals that, despite similar morphology, these carnivores lap in different physical regimes: an unsteady inertial regime for dogs and steady inertial regime for cats. PMID:26668382

  11. Dogs lap using acceleration-driven open pumping.

    PubMed

    Gart, Sean; Socha, John J; Vlachos, Pavlos P; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-12-29

    Dogs lap because they have incomplete cheeks and cannot suck. When lapping, a dog's tongue pulls a liquid column from the bath, suggesting that the hydrodynamics of column formation are critical to understanding how dogs drink. We measured lapping in 19 dogs and used the results to generate a physical model of the tongue's interaction with the air-fluid interface. These experiments help to explain how dogs exploit the fluid dynamics of the generated column. The results demonstrate that effects of acceleration govern lapping frequency, which suggests that dogs curl the tongue to create a larger liquid column. Comparing lapping in dogs and cats reveals that, despite similar morphology, these carnivores lap in different physical regimes: an unsteady inertial regime for dogs and steady inertial regime for cats.

  12. Systematic Construction of Real Lapped Tight Frame Transforms

    PubMed Central

    Sandryhaila, Aliaksei; Chebira, Amina; Milo, Christina; Kovčcević, Jelena; Püschel, Markus

    2010-01-01

    We present a constructive algorithm for the design of real lapped equal-norm tight frame transforms. These transforms can be efficiently implemented through filter banks and have recently been proposed as a redundant counterpart to lapped orthogonal transforms, as well as an infinite-dimensional counterpart to harmonic tight frames. The proposed construction consists of two parts: First, we design a large class of new real lapped orthogonal transforms derived from submatrices of the discrete Fourier transform. Then, we seed these to obtain real lapped tight frame transforms corresponding to tight, equal-norm frames. We identify those frames that are maximally robust to erasures, and show that our construction leads to a large class of new lapped orthogonal transforms as well as new lapped tight frame transforms. PMID:20607116

  13. Laser Beam Oscillation Strategies for Fillet Welds in Lap Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Alexander; Goecke, Sven-F.; Sievi, Pravin; Albert, Florian; Rethmeier, Michael

    Laser beam oscillation opens up new possibilities of influencing the welding process in terms of compensation of tolerances and reduction of process emissions that occur in industrial applications, such as in body-in-white manufacturing. The approaches are to adapt the melt pool width in order to generate sufficient melt volume or to influence melt pool dynamics, e.g. for a better degassing. Welding results are highly dependent on the natural frequency of the melt pool, the used spot diameter and the oscillation speed of the laser beam. The conducted investigations with an oscillated 300 μm laser spot show that oscillation strategies, which are adjusted to the joining situation improve welding result for zero-gap welding as well as for bridging gaps to approximately 0.8 mm. However, a complex set of parameters has to be considered in order to generate proper welding results. This work puts emphasize on introducing them.

  14. Thermoelastic stress analysis of a pultruded composite double lap joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemann, John H.; Martin, Richard E.; Mandic, Davor G.

    1999-02-01

    The use of composite materials, in particular glass/epoxy systems for structural applications has seen widespread growth. Recent examples include a bridge in Butler County, Ohio and a covered pedestrian bridge that is scheduled to be installed in Akron, Ohio. Both of these structures employ pultruded composites for the main structural members due to their high strength, light weight and the ease of manufacture into common structural shapes such as wide flanges, I-beams and box sections. The use of these shapes gives the designer the ability to use many of the same types of structural details that are common to steel design. This paper will examine the most common method of joining structural members, bolted connections. The analysis of bolted connections in composite materials has been widely reported in the literature. Analysis methods have ranged from two and three dimensional finite element analysis to more empirical methods of calculating the stress concentration factors based on experimental data. This paper will focus on the use of the thermoelastic stress analysis method to determine the stress concentration around a steel pin loaded in double shear by a pultruded glass fiber composite. Further studies were conducted to determine the time dependent material behavior on the thermoelastic stress analysis signal output. The following is a description of the theory, experimental setup, and a summary of results.

  15. Computer Controller Optical Surfacing (CCOS) lap pressure control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenleaf

    1985-09-01

    A rotary lapping system and process is disclosed for producing a controlled pressure gradient, including positive and negative lift, when lapping a workpiece coated with an abrasive slurry liquid with a plurality of grinding pads mounted beneath a rotating lap substrate. To obtain positive and negative lift, the grinding pads are tilted with respectively a positive and negative angle of attack, which hydrodynamically reacts with the abrasive slurry liquid to produce the desired lift. The controlled pressure gradient is further varied by decentering the rotation of lap substrate.

  16. Joining aluminum to titanium alloy by friction stir lap welding with cutting pin

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Yanni; Li, Jinglong; Xiong, Jiangtao; Huang, Fu; Zhang, Fusheng; Raza, Syed Hamid

    2012-09-15

    Aluminum 1060 and titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V plates were lap joined by friction stir welding. A cutting pin of rotary burr made of tungsten carbide was employed. The microstructures of the joining interface were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Joint strength was evaluated by a tensile shear test. During the welding process, the surface layer of the titanium plate was cut off by the pin, and intensively mixed with aluminum situated on the titanium plate. The microstructures analysis showed that a visible swirl-like mixed region existed at the interface. In this region, the Al metal, Ti metal and the mixed layer of them were all presented. The ultimate tensile shear strength of joint reached 100% of 1060Al that underwent thermal cycle provided by the shoulder. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSW with cutting pin was successfully employed to form Al/Ti lap joint. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Swirl-like structures formed due to mechanical mixing were found at the interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-strength joints fractured at Al suffered thermal cycle were produced.

  17. Diamond machine tool face lapping machine

    DOEpatents

    Yetter, H.H.

    1985-05-06

    An apparatus for shaping, sharpening and polishing diamond-tipped single-point machine tools. The isolation of a rotating grinding wheel from its driving apparatus using an air bearing and causing the tool to be shaped, polished or sharpened to be moved across the surface of the grinding wheel so that it does not remain at one radius for more than a single rotation of the grinding wheel has been found to readily result in machine tools of a quality which can only be obtained by the most tedious and costly processing procedures, and previously unattainable by simple lapping techniques.

  18. How dogs lap: open pumping driven by acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gart, Sean; Socha, John; Vlachos, Pavlos; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-11-01

    Dogs drink by lapping because they have incomplete cheeks and cannot suck fluids into the mouth. When lapping, a dog's tongue pulls a liquid column from a bath, which is then swallowed, suggesting that the hydrodynamics of column formation are critical to understanding how dogs drink. We measured the kinematics of lapping from nineteen dogs and used the results to generate a physical model of the tongue's interaction with the air-fluid interface. These experiments with an accelerating rod help to explain how dogs exploit the fluid dynamics of the generated column. The results suggest that effects of acceleration govern lapping frequency, and that dogs curl the tongue ventrally (backwards) and time their bite on the column to increase fluid intake per lap. Comparing lapping in dogs and cats reveals that though they both lap with the same frequency scaling with respect to body mass and have similar morphology, these carnivores lap in different physical regimes: a high-acceleration regime for dogs and a low-acceleration regime for cats.

  19. Learning Activity Package, Chemistry I, (LAP) Study 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Naomi

    Presented is a Learning Activity Package (LAP) study concerned with carbon and its compounds. This LAP in chemistry includes a rationale for studying the chemical element of carbon, a list of student objectives (stated in behavioral terms), of activities (reading, laboratory experiments, model construction, etc.), a two-page worksheet, a…

  20. Lapping: Polishing and shear mode grinding

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.J.

    1990-02-01

    It is the thesis of this paper that shear mode grinding (SMG), (ductile grinding, nanogrinding, fractureless grinding) is just a particular form of polishing. It may be unique in that it can involve a hard wheel of very precise dimensions compared to the soft laps usually used in polishing. Such a wheel would permit the fabrication of a precision surface on a brittle material such as glass at a precisely located and oriented position on a part. The technological and economic consequences of such a process seem important but the technical obstacles to implementing the technique are for the moment formidable. It is in production in Japan. This paper provides a bit of understanding of that process obtained by making an end run around the obstacles to view the process from the vantage point of lapping. The paper will lay out some of the concepts and terminology necessary to understand the papers that have supplied the real labor to get us to this point. It will refer to parts of this work briefly in passing so the reader who needs the details knows where to look, and for what, in the bibliography appended. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  1. How cats lap: water uptake by Felis catus.

    PubMed

    Reis, Pedro M; Jung, Sunghwan; Aristoff, Jeffrey M; Stocker, Roman

    2010-11-26

    Animals have developed a range of drinking strategies depending on physiological and environmental constraints. Vertebrates with incomplete cheeks use their tongue to drink; the most common example is the lapping of cats and dogs. We show that the domestic cat (Felis catus) laps by a subtle mechanism based on water adhesion to the dorsal side of the tongue. A combined experimental and theoretical analysis reveals that Felis catus exploits fluid inertia to defeat gravity and pull liquid into the mouth. This competition between inertia and gravity sets the lapping frequency and yields a prediction for the dependence of frequency on animal mass. Measurements of lapping frequency across the family Felidae support this prediction, which suggests that the lapping mechanism is conserved among felines.

  2. Strain measurements in composite bolted-joint specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Lightfoot, M. C.; Perry, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Strain data from a series of bolted joint tests is presented. Double lap, double hole, double lap, single hole, and open hole tensile specimens were tested and the strain gage locations, load strain responses, and load axial displacement responses are presented. The open hole specimens were gaged to determine strain concentration factors. The double lap, double hole specimens were gaged to determine the uniformity of the strain in the joint and the amount of load transferred past the first bolt. The measurements indicated roughly half the load passed the first bolt to be reacted by the second bolt.

  3. Weld seam tracking and lap weld penetration monitoring using the optical spectrum of the weld plume

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, R.E.; Hopkins, J.A.; Semak, V.V.; McCay, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Joining of dissimilar materials is a long standing problem in manufacturing, with many tricks and special techniques developed to successfully join specific pairs of materials. Often, these special techniques impose stringent requirements on the process such as precise control of process parameters to achieve the desired joint characteristics. Laser welding is one of the techniques which has had some success in welding dissimilar metal alloys, and appears to be a viable process for these materials. Minimal heat input limits differential thermal expansion, and the small weld pool allows precise control of alloy mixing in the fusion zone. Obtaining optimal weld performance requires accurate monitoring and control of absorbed laser power and weld focus position. In order to monitor the laser welding process, the authors have used a small computer controlled optical spectrometer to observe the emission from the weld plume. Absorbed laser power can be related to the temperature of the weld pool surface and the plume above the weld. Focus position relative to the joint can easily be seen by the proportion of elements from each material existing in the plume. This monitor has been used to observe and optimize the performance of butt and lap welds between dissimilar alloys, where each alloy contains at least one element not found in the other alloy. Results will be presented for a copper-steel butt joint and a lap weld between stainless and low alloy steels.

  4. Fatigue damage assessment of high-usage in-service aircraft fuselage structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosinyi, Bao Rasebolai

    As the commercial and military aircraft fleets continue to age, there is a growing concern that multiple-site damage (MSD) can compromise structural integrity. Multiple site damage is the simultaneous occurrence of many small cracks at independent structural locations, and is the natural result of fatigue, corrosion, fretting and other possible damage mechanisms. These MSD cracks may linkup and form a fatigue lead crack of critical length. The presence of MSD also reduces the structure's ability to withstand longer cracks. The objective of the current study is to assess, both experimentally and analytically, MSD formation and growth in the lap joint of curved panels removed from a retired aircraft. A Boeing 727-232 airplane owned and operated by Delta Air Lines, and retired at its design service goal, was selected for the study. Two panels removed from the left-hand side of the fuselage crown, near stringer 4L, were subjected to extended fatigue testing using the Full-Scale Aircraft Structural Test Evaluation and Research (FASTER) facility located at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) William J. Hughes Technical Center. The state of MSD was continuously assessed using several nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods. Damage to the load attachment points of the first panel resulted in termination of the fatigue test at 43,500 fatigue cycles, before cracks had developed in the lap joint. The fatigue test for the second panel was initially conducted under simulated in-service loading conditions for 120,000 cycles, and no cracks were detected in the skin of the panel test section. Artificial damage was then introduced into the panel at selected rivets in the critical (lower) rivet row, and the fatigue loads were increased. Visually detectable crack growth from the artificial notches was first seen after 133,000 cycles. The resulting lead crack grew along the lower rivet row, eventually forming an 11.8" long unstable crack after 141,771 cycles, at which point the

  5. Evaluation of two transport aircraft and several ground test vehicle friction measurements obtained for various runway surface types and conditions. A summary of test results from joint FAA/NASA Runway Friction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Vogler, William A.; Baldasare, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Tests with specially instrumented NASA Boeing 737 and 727 aircraft together with several different ground friction measuring devices were conducted for a variety of runway surface types and conditions. These tests are part of joint FAA/NASA Aircraft/Ground Vehicle Runway Friction Program aimed at obtaining a better understanding of aircraft ground handling performance under adverse weather conditions and defining relationships between aircraft and ground vehicle tire friction measurements. Aircraft braking performance on dry, wet, snow and ice-covered runway conditions is discussed as well as ground vehicle friction data obtained under similar runway conditions. For a given contaminated runway surface condition, the correlation between ground vehicles and aircraft friction data is identified. The influence of major test parameters on friction measurements such as speed, test tire characteristics, type and amount of surface contaminant, and ambient temperature are discussed. The effect of surface type on wet friction levels is also evaluated from comparative data collected on grooved and ungrooved concrete and asphalt surfaces.

  6. Aircraft to Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This video discusses how the technology of computer modeling can improve the design and durability of artificial joints for human joint replacement surgery. Also, ultrasound, originally used to detect structural flaws in aircraft, can also be used to quickly assess the severity of a burn patient's injuries, thus aiding the healing process.

  7. Residual Stresses and Tensile Properties of Friction Stir Welded AZ31B-H24 Magnesium Alloy in Lap Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Bhukya Srinivasa; Cao, Xinjin; Wanjara, Priti; Friedman, Jacob; Chen, Daolun

    2015-08-01

    AZ31B-H24 Mg alloy sheets with a thickness of 2 mm were friction stir welded in lap configuration using two tool rotational rates of 1000 and 1500 rpm and two welding speeds of 10 and 20 mm/s. The residual stresses in the longitudinal and transverse directions of the weldments were determined using X-ray diffraction. The shear tensile behavior of the lap joints was evaluated at low [233 K (-40 °C)], room [298 K (25 °C)], and elevated [453 K (180 °C)] temperatures. The failure load was highest for the lower heat input condition that was obtained at a tool rotational rate of 1000 rpm and a welding speed of 20 mm/s for all the test temperatures, due to the smaller hooking height, larger effective sheet thickness, and lower tensile residual stresses, as compared to the other two welding conditions that were conducted at a higher tool rotational rate or lower welding speed. The lap joints usually fractured on the advancing side of the top sheet near the interface between the thermo-mechanically affected zone and the stir zone. Elevated temperature testing of the weld assembled at a tool rotational rate of 1000 rpm and a welding speed of 20 mm/s led to the failure along the sheet interface in shear fracture mode due to the high integrity of the joint that exhibited large plastic deformation and higher total energy absorption.

  8. A joint numerical and experimental study of the jet of an aircraft engine installation with advanced techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, V.; Molton, P.; Bézard, H.; Deck, S.; Jacquin, L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the results obtained during the European Union JEDI (JEt Development Investigations) project carried out in cooperation between ONERA and Airbus. The aim of these studies was first to acquire a complete database of a modern-type engine jet installation set under a wall-to-wall swept wing in various transonic flow conditions. Interactions between the engine jet, the pylon, and the wing were studied thanks to ¤advanced¥ measurement techniques. In parallel, accurate Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) simulations were carried out from simple ones with the Spalart Allmaras model to more complex ones like the DRSM-SSG (Differential Reynolds Stress Modef of Speziale Sarkar Gatski) turbulence model. In the end, Zonal-Detached Eddy Simulations (Z-DES) were also performed to compare different simulation techniques. All numerical results are accurately validated thanks to the experimental database acquired in parallel. This complete and complex study of modern civil aircraft engine installation allowed many upgrades in understanding and simulation methods to be obtained. Furthermore, a setup for engine jet installation studies has been validated for possible future works in the S3Ch transonic research wind-tunnel. The main conclusions are summed up in this paper.

  9. Optimized Bolted Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.; Bunin, B. L.; Watts, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Computer technique aids joint optimization. Load-sharing between fasteners in multirow bolted composite joints computed by nonlinear-analysis computer program. Input to analysis was load-deflection data from 180 specimens tested as part of program to develop technology of structural joints for advanced transport aircraft. Bolt design optimization technique applicable to major joints in composite materials for primary and secondary structures and generally applicable for metal joints as well.

  10. INTERIOR OF WEST SPAN LOOKING WEST (SHADOW OF VERTICAL LAPS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF WEST SPAN LOOKING WEST (SHADOW OF VERTICAL LAPS PLACED ON ZONE III; ASPHALT ZONE IX) - Honey Run Bridge, Spanning Butte Creek, bypassed section of Honey Run Road (originally Carr Hill Road), Paradise, Butte County, CA

  11. 15 CFR 285.5 - Termination of a LAP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ACCREDITATION AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAMS NATIONAL VOLUNTARY LABORATORY ACCREDITATION PROGRAM § 285.5 Termination of a LAP. (a) The Chief of NVLAP...

  12. Test and analysis of Celion 3000/PMR-15, graphite/polyimide bonded composite joints: Data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cushman, J. B.; Mccleskey, S. F.; Ward, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Standard single lap, double lap and symmetric step lap bonded joints of Celion 3000/PMR-15 graphite/polyimide composite were evaluated. Composite to composite and composite to titanium joints were tested at 116 K (-250 F), 294 K (70 F) and 561 K (550 F). Joint parameters evaluated are lap length, adherend thickness, adherend axial stiffness, lamina stacking sequence and adherend tapering. Advanced joint concepts were examined to establish the change in performance of preformed adherends, scalloped adherends and hybrid systems. The material properties of the high temperature adhesive, designated A7F, used for bonding were established. The bonded joint tests resulted in interlaminar shear or peel failures of the composite and there were very few adhesive failures. Average test results agree with expected performance trends for the various test parameters. Results of finite element analyses and of test/analysis correlations are also presented.

  13. Lap shear strength and healing capability of self-healing adhesive containing epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazali, Habibah; Ye, Lin; Zhang, Ming-Qiu

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a self-healing polymeric adhesive formulation with epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules. Epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules were dispersed into a commercialize two-part epoxy adhesive for developing self-healing epoxy adhesive. The influence of different content of microcapsules on the shear strength and healing capability of epoxy adhesive were investigated using single-lap-joints with average thickness of adhesive layer of about 180 µm. This self-healing adhesive was used in bonding of 5000 series aluminum alloys adherents after mechanical and alkaline cleaning surface treatment. The adhesion strength was measured and presented as function of microcapsules loading. The results indicated that the virgin lap shear strength was increased by about 26% with addition of 3 wt% of self-healing microcapsules. 12% to 28% recovery of the shear strength is achieved after self-healing depending on the microcapsules content. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study fracture surface of the joints. The self-healing adhesives exhibit recovery of both cohesion and adhesion properties with room temperature healing.

  14. Friction Stir Lap Welding of Magnesium Alloy to Steel: A Preliminary Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, Saumyadeep; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.

    2010-12-01

    An initial study was made to evaluate the feasibility of joining Magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet to galvanized steel sheet in lap configuration using friction stir welding (FSW). Two different automotive sheet steels were used for comparative evaluation of the dissimilar joining potential; a 0.8mm thick, electro galvanized (EG) mild steel, and a 1.5mm thick hot dipped galvanized (HDG) high-strength, low-alloy steel (HSLA). These steels were joined to 2.33mm thick AZ31B magnesium sheet. A single FSW tool design was used for both dissimilar welds, and process parameters were kept the same. Average peak load for the AZ31-1.5 mm steel weld joint in lap shear mode was found to be 6.3 ± 1.0 kN. For the AZ31-0.8 mm steel weld, joint strength was 5.1 ± 1.5 kN. Microstructural investigation indicates melting of the Zn coating at the interface and subsequent alloying with the Mg sheet resulting in formation of solidified Zn-Mg alloy layer at AZ31/steel interface.

  15. LAP5 and LAP6 Encode Anther-Specific Proteins with Similarity to Chalcone Synthase Essential for Pollen Exine Development in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Dobritsa, Anna A.; Lei, Zhentian; Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Huhman, David V.; Preuss, Daphne; Sumner, Lloyd W.

    2010-01-01

    Pollen grains of land plants have evolved remarkably strong outer walls referred to as exine that protect pollen and interact with female stigma cells. Exine is composed of sporopollenin, and while the composition and synthesis of this biopolymer are not well understood, both fatty acids and phenolics are likely components. Here, we describe mutations in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) LESS ADHESIVE POLLEN (LAP5) and LAP6 that affect exine development. Mutation of either gene results in abnormal exine patterning, whereas pollen of double mutants lacked exine deposition and subsequently collapsed, causing male sterility. LAP5 and LAP6 encode anther-specific proteins with homology to chalcone synthase, a key flavonoid biosynthesis enzyme. lap5 and lap6 mutations reduced the accumulation of flavonoid precursors and flavonoids in developing anthers, suggesting a role in the synthesis of phenolic constituents of sporopollenin. Our in vitro functional analysis of LAP5 and LAP6 using 4-coumaroyl-coenzyme A yielded bis-noryangonin (a commonly reported derailment product of chalcone synthase), while similar in vitro analyses using fatty acyl-coenzyme A as the substrate yielded medium-chain alkyl pyrones. Thus, in vitro assays indicate that LAP5 and LAP6 are multifunctional enzymes and may play a role in both the synthesis of pollen fatty acids and phenolics found in exine. Finally, the genetic interaction between LAP5 and an anther gene involved in fatty acid hydroxylation (CYP703A2) demonstrated that they act synergistically in exine production. PMID:20442277

  16. Rene 95 brazed joint metallurgical program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gay, C.; Givens, J.; Mastrorroco, S.; Sterman, A.

    1972-01-01

    This metallurgical program was specifically conducted for the establishment of material properties required for the design of the LF460 fan. The LF460 lift fan is an advanced 18:1 high thrust to weight single stage design. It has a turbine attached to the outer flowpath of the fan blade tip which minimizes the axial depth of the fan. Advanced lightweight attachment designs are employed in this concept to achieve minimum mass polar moments of inertia which are required for good aircraft flight response control. The design features which are unique to this advanced LF460 lift fan are the 0.010 inch thin Udimet 700 alloy integral tip turbine design, minimum weight braze attachment of the turbine to the fan blade, and the high strength and elevated temperature capability of the Rene'95 alloy for the fan blade. The data presented in this report show that the LF460 fan rotor design is feasible and that the design stresses and margins of safety were more than adequate. Prior to any production application, however, additional stress rupture/shear lap joints should be run in order to establish a firm 1200 F stress rupture curve for the CM50 braze metal.

  17. Bolted joints in graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    All-graphite/epoxy laminates and hybrid graphite-glass/epoxy laminates were tested. The tests encompassed a range of geometries for each laminate pattern to cover the three basic failure modes - net section tension failure through the bolt hole, bearing and shearout. Static tensile and compressive loads were applied. A constant bolt diameter of 6.35 mm (0.25 in.) was used in the tests. The interaction of stress concentrations associated with multi-row bolted joints was investigated by testing single- and double-row bolted joints and open-hole specimens in tension. For tension loading, linear interaction was found to exist between the bearing stress reacted at a given bolt hole and the remaining tension stress running by that hole to be reacted elsewhere. The interaction under compressive loading was found to be non-linear. Comparative tests were run using single-lap bolted joints and double-lap joints with pin connection. Both of these joint types exhibited lower strengths than were demonstrated by the corresponding double-lap joints. The analysis methods developed here for single bolt joints are shown to be capable of predicting the behavior of multi-row joints.

  18. A Comparative Analysis of a CV Helicopter and a JVX (Joint Services Advanced Vertical Lift) Tilt-Rotor Aircraft in an Aircraft Carrier Based ASW (anti-Submarine Warfare)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    D. SEARCH AND RESCUE -------------------------- 36 E. SUMMARY ------------------------------------ 45 III . COMPARISON OF THE AIRCRAFT IN A SIMULATED...aircraft may respond to contacts generated by remote sources either from an airborne or an on-deck five minute alert status. Once the dipping sonar...scenarios are modeled. The model and results are described in Chapter III . Conclusions and recommendations for further study are contained in Chapter

  19. Lap time optimisation of a racing go-kart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lot, Roberto; Dal Bianco, Nicola

    2016-02-01

    The minimum lap time optimal control problem has been solved for a go-kart model. The symbolic algebra software Maple has been used to derive equations of motion and an indirect method has been adopted to solve the optimal control problem. Simulation has been successfully performed on a full track lap with a multibody model endowed with seven degrees of freedom. Geometrical and mechanical characteristics of a real kart have been measured by a lab test to feed the mathematical model. Telemetry recorded in an entire lap by a professional driver has been compared to simulation results in order to validate the model. After the reliability of the optimal control model was proved, the simulation has been used to study the peculiar dynamics of go-karts and focus to tyre slippage dynamics, which is highly affected by the lack of differential.

  20. Loose abrasive lapping hardness of optical glasses and its interpretation.

    PubMed

    Lambropoulos, J C; Xu, S; Fang, T

    1997-03-01

    We present an interpretation of the lapping hardness of commercially available optical glasses in terms of a micromechanics model of material removal by subsurface lateral cracking. We analyze data on loose abrasive microgrinding, or lapping at fixed nominal pressure, for many commercially available optical glasses in terms of this model. The Schott and Hoya data on lapping hardness are correlated with the results of such a model. Lapping hardness is a function of the mechanical properties of the glass: The volume removal rate increases approximately linearly with Young's modulus, and it decreases with fracture toughness and (approximately) the square of the Knoop hardness. The microroughness induced by lapping depends on the plastic and elastic properties of the glass, depending on abrasive shape. This is in contrast to deterministic microgrinding (fixed infeed rate), where it is determined from the plastic and fracture properties of the glass. We also show that Preston's coefficient has a similar dependence as lapping hardness on glass mechanical properties, as well as a linear dependence on abrasive size for the case of brittle material removal. These observations lead to the definition of an augmented Preston coefficient during brittle material removal. The augmented Preston coefficient does not depend on glass material properties or abrasive size and thus describes the interaction of the glass surface with the coolant-immersed abrasive grain and the backing plate. Numerical simulations of indentation are used to locate the origin of subsurface cracks and the distribution of residual surface and subsurface stresses, known to cause surface (radial) and subsurface (median, lateral) cracks.

  1. Time- and temperature-dependent failures of a bonded joint

    SciTech Connect

    Sihn, Sangwook; Miyano, Yasushi; Tsai, S.W.

    1997-07-01

    Time and temperature dependent properties of a tubular lap bonded joint are reported. The joint bonds a cast iron rod and a composite pipe together with an epoxy type of an adhesive material containing chopped glass fiber. A new fabrication method is proposed.

  2. Bond strength evaluation in adhesive joints using NDE and DIC methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudel, Anish

    Adhesive bonding of graphite epoxy composite laminates to itself or traditional metal alloys in modern aerospace and aircraft structural applications offers an excellent opportunity to use the most efficient and intelligent combination of materials available thus providing an attractive package for efficient structural designs. However, one of the major issues of adhesive bonding is the occasional formation of interfacial defects such as kissing or weak bonds in the bondline interface. Also, there are shortcomings of existing non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods to non-destructively detect/characterize these interfacial defects and reliably predicting the bond shear strength. As a result, adhesive bonding technology is still not solely implemented in primary structures of an aircraft. Therefore, there is a greater demand for a novel NDE tool that can meet the existing aerospace requirement for adhesive bondline characterization. This research implemented a novel Acoustography ultrasonic imaging and digital image correlation (DIC) technique to detect and characterize interfacial defects in the bondline and determine bond shear strength in adhesively bonded composite-metal joints. Adhesively bonded Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) laminate and 2024-T3 Aluminum single lap shear panels subjected to various implanted kissing/weak bond defects were the primary focus of this study. Kissing/weak bonds were prepared by controlled surface contamination in the composite bonding surface and also by improperly mixing the adhesive constituent. SEM analyses were also conducted to understand the surface morphology of substrates and their interaction with the contaminants. Morphological changes were observed in the microscopic scale and the chemical analysis confirmed the stability of the contaminant at or very close to the interface. In addition, it was also demonstrated that contaminants migrated during the curing of the adhesive from CFRP substrate which caused a

  3. Program Management Challenges in a Joint Service Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-10

    Shelley Yarborough, Mr. John Caraway , and CW5 (Ret) Mike Kather from the Program Executive Office (PEO) Aviation, Redstone Arsenal, AL, for providing...with Mr. John Caraway , Product Director, Joint Cargo Aircraft, Subject: Lessons Learned, Joint Cargo Aircraft, 6 December 2006. 59. Raytheon/EADS CASA...with Mr. John Caraway , Product Director, Joint Cargo Aircraft, Subject: Lessons Learned, Joint Cargo Aircraft, 6 December 2006. 61. John Caraway

  4. Cyclic debonding of adhesive joints: Data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, D. J.; June, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    Static and fatigue loading tests of bonded lap joints were conducted. The specimens were designed to fail in the bondline and all fatigue tests included monitoring the crack growth to failure. Detailed crack length readings for 106 fatigue specimens are provided.

  5. Dynamic thermal tomography for nondestructive inspection of aging aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Del Grande, N.K.; Dolan, K.W.; Durbin, P.F.; Gorvad, M.R.; Shapiro, A.B.

    1993-11-01

    The authors apply dual-band infrared (DBIR) imaging as a dynamic thermal tomography tool for wide area inspection of a Boeing 737 aircraft and several Boeing KC-135 aircraft panels. The analyses are discussed in this report. After flash-heating the aircraft skin, they record synchronized DBIR images every 40 ms, from onset to 8 seconds after the heat flash. They analyze selective DBIR image ratios which enhance surface temperature contrast and remove surface-emissivity clutter. The Boeing 737 and KC-135 aircraft fuselage panels have varying percent thickness losses from corrosion. They established the correlation of percent thickness loss with surface temperature rise (above ambient) for a partially corroded F-18 wing box structure and several aluminum plates which had 6 to 60% thickness losses at milled flat-bottom hole sites. Based on this correlation, lap splice temperatures rise 1C per 24 {plus_minus} 5% material loss at 0.4 s after the heat flash. They tabulate and map corrosion-related percent thickness loss effects for the riveted Boeing 737, and the riveted Boeing KKC-135. They map the fuselage composite thermal inertia, based on the (inverse) slope of the surface temperature versus inverse square root of time. Composite thermal inertia maps characterized shallow skin defects within the lap splice at early times (< 0.3 s) and deeper skin defects within the lap splice at late times (> 0.4 s). Late time composite thermal inertia maps depict where corrosion-related thickness losses occur (e.g., on the inside of the Boeing 737 lap splice, beneath the galley and the latrine). Lap splice sites on a typical Boeing KC-135 panel with low composite thermal inertia values had high skin-thickness losses from corrosion.

  6. 15 CFR 285.4 - Establishment of laboratory accreditation programs (LAPs) within NVLAP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ACCREDITATION AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAMS NATIONAL VOLUNTARY LABORATORY ACCREDITATION PROGRAM § 285.4 Establishment of laboratory accreditation programs (LAPs) within NVLAP. NVLAP establishes LAPs in response to... accreditation programs (LAPs) within NVLAP. 285.4 Section 285.4 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations...

  7. Auto Mechanics I. Learning Activity Packets (LAPs). Section D--Suspension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains six learning activity packets (LAPs) that outline the study activities for the "suspension" instructional area for an Auto Mechanics I course. The six LAPs cover the following topics: wheel bearings, tires and wheels, wheel balancing, suspension system, steering system, and wheel alignment. Each LAP contains a…

  8. Auto Mechanics I. Learning Activity Packets (LAPs). Section C--Engine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains five learning activity packets (LAPs) that outline the study activities for the "engine" instructional area for an Auto Mechanics I course. The five LAPs cover the following topics: basic engine principles, cooling system, engine lubrication system, exhaust system, and fuel system. Each LAP contains a cover sheet…

  9. The ASLOTS concept: An interactive, adaptive decision support concept for Final Approach Spacing of Aircraft (FASA). FAA-NASA Joint University Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    This presentation outlines a concept for an adaptive, interactive decision support system to assist controllers at a busy airport in achieving efficient use of multiple runways. The concept is being implemented as a computer code called FASA (Final Approach Spacing for Aircraft), and will be tested and demonstrated in ATCSIM, a high fidelity simulation of terminal area airspace and airport surface operations. Objectives are: (1) to provide automated cues to assist controllers in the sequencing and spacing of landing and takeoff aircraft; (2) to provide the controller with a limited ability to modify the sequence and spacings between aircraft, and to insert takeoffs and missed approach aircraft in the landing flows; (3) to increase spacing accuracy using more complex and precise separation criteria while reducing controller workload; and (4) achieve higher operational takeoff and landing rates on multiple runways in poor visibility.

  10. Stress analysis of the cracked lap shear specimens: An ASTM round robin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1986-01-01

    This ASTM Round Robin was conducted to evaluate the state of the art in stress analysis of adhesively bonded joint specimens. Specifically, the participants were asked to calculate the strain-energy-release rate for two different geometry cracked lap shear (CLS) specimens at four different debond lengths. The various analytical techniques consisted of 2- and 3-dimensional finite element analysis, beam theory, plate theory, and a combination of beam theory and finite element analysis. The results were examined in terms of the total strain-energy-release rate and the mode I to mode II ratio as a function of debond length for each specimen geometry. These results basically clustered into two groups: geometric linear or geometric nonlinear analysis. The geometric nonlinear analysis is required to properly analyze the CLS specimens. The 3-D finite element analysis gave indications of edge closure plus some mode III loading. Each participant described his analytical technique and results. Nine laboratories participated.

  11. Stress analysis of the cracked-lap-shear specimen - An ASTM round-robin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1987-01-01

    This ASTM Round Robin was conducted to evaluate the state of the art in stress analysis of adhesively bonded joint specimens. Specifically, the participants were asked to calculate the strain-energy-release rate for two different geometry cracked lap shear (CLS) specimens at four different debond lengths. The various analytical techniques consisted of 2- and 3-dimensional finite element analysis, beam theory, plate theory, and a combination of beam theory and finite element analysis. The results were examined in terms of the total strain-energy-release rate and the mode I to mode II ratio as a function of debond length for each specimen geometry. These results basically clustered into two groups: geometric linear or geometric nonlinear analysis. The geometric nonlinear analysis is required to properly analyze the CLS specimens. The 3-D finite element analysis gave indications of edge closure plus some mode III loading. Each participant described his analytical technique and results. Nine laboratories participated.

  12. Highly Porous and Compositionally Intermediate Ordinary Chondrite LAP 031047

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, A.; Kring, D. A.; Friedrich, J. M.; Troiano, J.; Macke, R. J.; Britt, D. T.; Swindle, T. D.; Weirich, J. R.; Rumble, D.

    2010-03-01

    LAP 031047 is a highly porous ordinary chondrite with a very young Ar-Ar age, and oxygen isotopic, and bulk and silicate mineral composition intermediate between H- and L-chondrites: Shock-lithified debris of a distinct ordinary chondrite asteroid?

  13. Learning Activity Package, Physical Science 92, LAPs 1-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, G. J.

    This set of nine teacher-prepared Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) for individualized instruction in physical science covers the topics of scientific equipment and procedures; measure of time, length, area, and volume; water; oxygen and oxidation; atmospheric pressure; motion; machines; carbon; and light and sound. Each unit contains a rationale…

  14. Learning Activity Package, Algebra 124, LAPs 46-55.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Bill

    A series of 10 teacher-prepared Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) in advanced algebra and trigonometry, these units cover absolute value, inequalities, exponents, radicals, and complex numbers; functions; higher degree equations and the derivative; the trigonometric functions; graphs and applications of the trigonometric functions; sequences and…

  15. Insights: A LAP on Moles: Teaching an Important Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihde, John

    1985-01-01

    Describes a learning activity packet (LAP) designed to help students understand the basic concept of the mole as a chemical unit; know relationships between the mole and atomic weights in the periodic table; and solve basic conversion problems involving moles, atoms, and molecules. (JN)

  16. New analysis and design procedures for ensuring gas turbine blades and adhesive bonded joints structural integrity and durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Hsin-Yi

    Most load-carrying structural systems under severe operating conditions such as gas turbine engines usually demand durability, high reliability, light weight, and high performance. In turn, as it has been reported, a number of structural failures have occurred in aircraft engines during development testing and operational service. In order to prevent failures of turbine engines, the turbine blade vibration must be attenuated to an acceptable level. To achieve this goal, the blade has to be provided with higher damping, either externally or internally. The objective of this study is to explore the feasibility of using a stress dependent magnetomechanical surface coating material for enhancing high damping capacity on turbine blades. The results show that a 2% or 4% of blade thickness free surface magnetomechanical coating layer has a significant contribution to the damping enhancement and the reduction of vibratory stresses at various low and high frequency vibration modes under either non-rotating or rotating conditions. Similar to the blade failure, the structural reliability and safety of the adhesive bonded joint, one of the most commonly used structural joint designs in the aerospace industry, is also a serious concern of the aircraft design community. Adhesive joints easily become weaker due to environmental degradation and/or improper manufacturing procedures. This often reduces structural durability and reliability significantly. This motivates us to develop a new finite element tool/procedure for assessing the interfacial disbonding mechanics of the single-lap joint with various imperfectly-bonded conditions in order to predict the adhesive bonded joint's strength more precisely during its service period. According to these conclusions, a new three-dimensional graphic mesh has been created to display the maximum stress variations under different amounts and sizes of disbonded area. This new procedure can be used as a basis for the development of a bonded

  17. New analysis and design procedures for ensuring gas turbine blades' and adhesive-bonded joints' structural integrity and durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Hsin-Yi

    Most load-carrying structural systems under severe operating conditions such as gas turbine engines usually demand durability, high reliability, light weight, and high performance. In turn, as it has been reported, a number of structural failures have occurred in aircraft engines during development testing and operational service. In order to prevent failures of turbine engines, the turbine blade vibration must be attenuated to an acceptable level. To achieve this goal, the blade has to be provided with higher damping, either externally or internally. The objective of this study is to explore the feasibility of using a stress dependent magnetomechanical surface coating material for enhancing high damping capacity on turbine blades. The results show that a 2% or 4% of blade thickness free surface magnetomechanical coating layer has a significant contribution to the damping enhancement and the reduction of vibratory stresses at various low and high frequency vibration modes under either non-rotating or rotating conditions. Similar to the blade failure, the structural reliability and safety of the adhesive bonded joint, one of the most commonly used structural joint designs in the aerospace industry, is also a serious concern of the aircraft design community. Adhesive joints easily become weaker due to environmental degradation and/or improper manufacturing procedures. This often reduces structural durability and reliability significantly. This motivates us to develop a new finite element tool/procedure for assessing the interfacial disbonding mechanics of the single-lap joint with various imperfectly-bonded conditions in order to predict the adhesive bonded joint's strength more precisely during its service period. According to these conclusions, a new three-dimensional graphic mesh has been created to display the maximum stress variations under different amounts and sizes of disbonded area. This new procedure can be used as a basis for the development of a bonded

  18. Preliminary measurement of the noise from the 2/9 scale model of the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller, SR-7A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Noise data on the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller model SR-7A were taken into the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel. The maximum blade passing tone decreases from the peak level when going to higher helical tip Mach numbers. This noise reduction points to the use of higher propeller speeds as a possible method to reduce airplane cabin noise while maintaining high flight speed and efficiency. Comparison of the SR-7A blade passing noise with the noise of the similarly designed SR-3 propeller shows good agreement as expected. The SR-7A propeller is slightly noisier than the SR-3 model in the plane of rotation at the cruise condition. Projections of the tunnel model data are made to the full-scale LAP propeller mounted on the test bed aircraft and compared with design predictions. The prediction method is conservative in the sense that it overpredicts the projected model data.

  19. Cruise noise of the 2/9 scale model of the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller, SR-7A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Stang, David B.

    1987-10-01

    Noise data on the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller model SR-7A were taken in the NASA Lewis Research Center 8 x 6 foot Wind Tunnel. The maximum blade passing tone noise first rises with increasing helical tip Mach number to a peak level, then remains the same or decreases from its peak level when going to higher helical tip Mach numbers. This trend was observed for operation at both constant advance ratio and approximately equal thrust. This noise reduction or, leveling out at high helical tip Mach numbers, points to the use of higher propeller tip speeds as a possible method to limit airplane cabin noise while maintaining high flight speed and efficiency. Projections of the tunnel model data are made to the full scale LAP propeller mounted on the test bed aircraft and compared with predictions. The prediction method is found to be somewhat conservative in that it slightly overpredicts the projected model data at the peak.

  20. Cruise noise of the 2/9 scale model of the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller, SR-7A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Stang, David B.

    1987-01-01

    Noise data on the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller model SR-7A were taken in the NASA Lewis Research Center 8 x 6 foot Wind Tunnel. The maximum blade passing tone noise first rises with increasing helical tip Mach number to a peak level, then remains the same or decreases from its peak level when going to higher helical tip Mach numbers. This trend was observed for operation at both constant advance ratio and approximately equal thrust. This noise reduction or, leveling out at high helical tip Mach numbers, points to the use of higher propeller tip speeds as a possible method to limit airplane cabin noise while maintaining high flight speed and efficiency. Projections of the tunnel model data are made to the full scale LAP propeller mounted on the test bed aircraft and compared with predictions. The prediction method is found to be somewhat conservative in that it slightly overpredicts the projected model data at the peak.

  1. Cruise noise of the 2/9th scale model of the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller, SR-7A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Stang, David B.

    1987-01-01

    Noise data on the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller model SR-7A were taken in the NASA Lewis Research Center 8 x 6 foot Wind Tunnel. The maximum blade passing tone noise first rises with increasing helical tip Mach number to a peak level, then remains the same or decreases from its peak level when going to higher helical tip Mach numbers. This trend was observed for operation at both constant advance ratio and approximately equal thrust. This noise reduction or, leveling out at high helical tip Mach numbers, points to the use of higher propeller tip speeds as a possible method to limit airplane cabin noise while maintaining high flight speed and efficiency. Projections of the tunnel model data are made to the full scale LAP propeller mounted on the test bed aircraft and compared with predictions. The prediction method is found to be somewhat conservative in that it slightly overpredicts the projected model data at the peak.

  2. Preliminary measurement of the noise from the 2/9 scale model of the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller, SR-7A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, J. H.

    1985-09-01

    Noise data on the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller model SR-7A were taken into the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel. The maximum blade passing tone decreases from the peak level when going to higher helical tip Mach numbers. This noise reduction points to the use of higher propeller speeds as a possible method to reduce airplane cabin noise while maintaining high flight speed and efficiency. Comparison of the SR-7A blade passing noise with the noise of the similarly designed SR-3 propeller shows good agreement as expected. The SR-7A propeller is slightly noisier than the SR-3 model in the plane of rotation at the cruise condition. Projections of the tunnel model data are made to the full-scale LAP propeller mounted on the test bed aircraft and compared with design predictions. The prediction method is conservative in the sense that it overpredicts the projected model data.

  3. Cruise noise of the 2/9th scale model of the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller, SR-7A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Stang, David B.

    1987-09-01

    Noise data on the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller model SR-7A were taken in the NASA Lewis Research Center 8 x 6 foot Wind Tunnel. The maximum blade passing tone noise first rises with increasing helical tip Mach number to a peak level, then remains the same or decreases from its peak level when going to higher helical tip Mach numbers. This trend was observed for operation at both constant advance ratio and approximately equal thrust. This noise reduction or, leveling out at high helical tip Mach numbers, points to the use of higher propeller tip speeds as a possible method to limit airplane cabin noise while maintaining high flight speed and efficiency. Projections of the tunnel model data are made to the full scale LAP propeller mounted on the test bed aircraft and compared with predictions. The prediction method is found to be somewhat conservative in that it slightly overpredicts the projected model data at the peak.

  4. Dynamic deformation measurement and analysis of active stressed lap using optical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qican; Su, Xianyu; Liu, Yuankun; Xiang, Liqun

    2007-12-01

    The active stressed lap is the heart of polishing process. A novel non-contact optical method of dynamic deformation measurement and analysis of an active stressed lap is put forward. This method, based on structured illumination, is able to record full-field information of the bending and rotating stressed lap dynamically and continuously, while its profile is changed under computer control, and restore the whole process of lap deformation varied with time at different position and rotating angle. It has been verified by experiments that this proposed method will be helpful to the opticians to ensure the stressed lap as expected.

  5. Study of mechanical joint strength of aluminum alloy 7075-T6 and dual phase steel 980 welded by friction bit joining and weld-bonding under corrosion medium

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong Chae; Squires, Lile; Pan, Tsung-Yu; Miles, Michael; Song, Guang-Ling; Wang, Yanli; Feng, Zhili

    2014-12-30

    We have employed a unique solid-sate joining process, called friction bit joining (FBJ), to spot weld aluminum alloy (AA) 7075-T6 and dual phase (DP) 980 steel. Static joint strength was studied in the lap shear tension configuration. In addition, weld-bonding (adhesive + FBJ) joints were studied in order to evaluate the ability of adhesive to mitigate the impact of corrosion on joint properties. Accelerated laboratory cyclic corrosion tests were carried out for both FBJ only and weld-bonding joints. Furthermore, the FBJ only joints that emerged from corrosion testing had lap shear failure loads that were significantly lower than freshly prepared joints. However, weld-bonding specimens retained more than 80% of the lap shear failure load of the freshly prepared weld-bonding specimens. Moreover, examination of joint cross sections confirmed that the presence of adhesive in the weld-bonding joints mitigated the effect of the corrosion environment, compared to FBJ only joints.

  6. Nondestructive inspection of CFRP adhesively bonded joints using embedded FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S.; Shin, P.; Peters, K.; Selfridge, R.; Schultz, S.

    2013-05-01

    One challenging need for inspection capabilities is in adhesively bonded joints between composite components, a common location of premature failure in aerospace structures. In this work we demonstrate that dynamic, full spectral scanning of FBG sensors embedded in the adhesive bond can identify changes in bond quality through the measurement of non-linear dynamics of the joint. Eighteen lap joint specimens were fabricated with varying manufacturing quality. Ten samples also included fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors embedded in the adhesive bond for real-time inspection during a simulated flight condition of these single-lap joints. Prior to testing, pulse phase thermography imaging of the pristine specimens revealed defects such as air bubbles, adhesive thickness variations, and weak bonding surface between the laminate and adhesive. The lap joint specimens were then subjected to fatigue loading, with regular interrogation of the FBG sensors at selected load cycle intervals. The FBG data was collected during vibration loading of the lap joint to represent an in-flight environment. Changes in the lap joint dynamic response, including the transition to non-linear responses, were measured from both the full-spectral and peak wavelength FBG data. These changes were correlated to initial manufacturing defects and the progression of fatigue-induced damage independently measured with pulse phase imaging and visual inspections of the failure surfaces.

  7. Atmospheric Electricity - Aircraft Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    flux may leak inside the aircraft through apertures such as windows , radomes. canopies, seams, and joints. Other fields may arise inside the aircraft...fields of other origins are considered. The third type of c-"pling involves electric fields passing directly through aper- tures, such as windows or...Transistors Microwave Diodes Low Power Transistors 0.001 0.01 0.1 1 10 100 0.01 0.1 1 10 100 Damage Constant. K Damage Constant. K Figure 29 - Ranges

  8. Material characterization of structural adhesives in the lap shear mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sancaktar, E.; Schenck, S. C.

    1983-01-01

    A general method for characterizing structual adhesives in the bonded lap shear mode is proposed. Two approaches in the form of semiempirical and theoretical approaches are used. The semiempirical approach includes Ludwik's and Zhurkov's equations to describe respectively, the failure stresses in the constant strain rate and constant stress loading modes with the inclusion of the temperature effects. The theoretical approach is used to describe adhesive shear stress-strain behavior with the use of viscoelastic or nonlinear elastic constitutive equations. Two different model adhesives are used in the single lap shear mode with titanium adherends. These adhesives (one of which was developed at NASA Langley Research Center) are currently considered by NASA for possible aerospace applications. Use of different model adhesives helps in assessment of the generality of the method.

  9. The cyclic fatigue behavior of adhesive joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinloch, A. J.; Toh, T.

    1995-06-01

    In the last six months we have: (1) Concentrated our efforts on the fatigue failure of carbon-fiber PEEK/AFl63 lap joints, and in particular we have started to predict the life time of single-lap joints under cyclic fatigue loading. The analysis is based on data obtained from double cantilever beam (DCB) fracture mechanics tests; (2) Further, we have been successful in measuring the rate of crack growth in lap joints during fatigue fracture using ultrasonic scanning; (3) Preliminary test data on the static fracture of glass-fiber reinforced poly(phenylene sulphide) (PPS)/AF163 joints have also been studied; and (4) A comparison has been made in computing the critical strain energy release rate G(sub c) for the glass-fiber PPS/AF163 joints based on the compliance method, beam theory and corrected beam theory. The last method accounts for large non-linear deflections and the associated crack root rotations along with the necessary corrections for the increase in stiffness introduced by the presence of end blocks.

  10. Chronic Mammalian Toxicological Effects of LAP (Load, Assemble, and Pack).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    samples were extracted and cleaned up according to official AOAC methods .- The extracts were analyzed for chlorinated organic *; pesticides using glass...Weight Variation From Control Males . . .... 54 4. Percent Body Weight Variation From Control Females .. ...... 55 . 6 *%1% 6? LIST OF TABLES 1. Pesticides...corn oil with acetone added and removed in the same manner as for the LAP samples. Stability studies using this method showed that diets mixed once every

  11. Texture Development in a Friction Stir Lap-Welded AZ31B Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, B. S.; Chen, D. L.; Cao, X.; Wanjara, P.

    2014-09-01

    The present study was aimed at characterizing the microstructure, texture, hardness, and tensile properties of an AZ31B-H24 Mg alloy that was friction stir lap welded (FSLWed) at varying tool rotational rates and welding speeds. Friction stir lap welding (FSLW) resulted in the presence of recrystallized grains and an associated hardness drop in the stir zone (SZ). Microstructural investigation showed that both the AZ31B-H24 Mg base metal (BM) and SZ contained β-Mg17Al12 and Al8Mn5 second phase particles. The AZ31B-H24 BM contained a type of basal texture (0001)<110> with the (0001) plane nearly parallel to the rolled sheet surface and <110> directions aligned in the rolling direction. FSLW resulted in the formation of another type of basal texture (0001)<100> in the SZ, where the basal planes (0001) became slightly tilted toward the transverse direction, and the prismatic planes (100) and pyramidal planes (101) exhibited a 30 deg + ( n - 1) × 60 deg rotation ( n = 1, 2, 3, …) with respect to the rolled sheet normal direction, due to the shear plastic flow near the pin surface that occurred from the intense local stirring. With increasing tool rotational rate and decreasing welding speed, the maximum intensity of the basal poles (0001) in the SZ decreased due to a higher degree of dynamic recrystallization that led to a weaker or more random texture. The tool rotational rate and welding speed had a strong effect on the failure load of FSLWed joints. A combination of relatively high welding speed (20 mm/s) and low tool rotational rate (1000 rpm) was observed to be capable of achieving a high failure load. This was attributed to the relatively small recrystallized grains and high intensity of the basal poles in the SZ arising from the low heat input as well as the presence of a small hooking defect.

  12. Inadequate harnesses as a cause of death in two light aircraft accidents.

    PubMed

    Hill, I R

    1980-09-01

    In the two accidents described, both fatalities occurred because the victims were wearing only lap belts. One of the victims was piloting an aircraft. These were survivable aircraft accidents and illustrate the inadequacy of this type of harness. Recently promulgated legislation in the United Kingdom should mean that front seat incidents of this nature will become a rarity. The dangers will still exist for those in rear passenger seats, however, because they are not covered by the new laws.

  13. Assembly of lipopolysaccharide in Escherichia coli requires the essential LapB heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Klein, Gracjana; Kobylak, Natalia; Lindner, Buko; Stupak, Anna; Raina, Satish

    2014-05-23

    Here, we describe two new heat shock proteins involved in the assembly of LPS in Escherichia coli, LapA and LapB (lipopolysaccharide assembly protein A and B). lapB mutants were identified based on an increased envelope stress response. Envelope stress-responsive pathways control key steps in LPS biogenesis and respond to defects in the LPS assembly. Accordingly, the LPS content in ΔlapB or Δ(lapA lapB) mutants was elevated, with an enrichment of LPS derivatives with truncations in the core region, some of which were pentaacylated and exhibited carbon chain polymorphism. Further, the levels of LpxC, the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of lipid A synthesis, were highly elevated in the Δ(lapA lapB) mutant. Δ(lapA lapB) mutant accumulated extragenic suppressors that mapped either to lpxC, waaC, and gmhA, or to the waaQ operon (LPS biosynthesis) and lpp (Braun's lipoprotein). Increased synthesis of either FabZ (3-R-hydroxymyristoyl acyl carrier protein dehydratase), slrA (novel RpoE-regulated non-coding sRNA), lipoprotein YceK, toxin HicA, or MurA (UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase) suppressed some of the Δ(lapA lapB) defects. LapB contains six tetratricopeptide repeats and, at the C-terminal end, a rubredoxin-like domain that was found to be essential for its activity. In pull-down experiments, LapA and LapB co-purified with LPS, Lpt proteins, FtsH (protease), DnaK, and DnaJ (chaperones). A specific interaction was also observed between WaaC and LapB. Our data suggest that LapB coordinates assembly of proteins involved in LPS synthesis at the plasma membrane and regulates turnover of LpxC, thereby ensuring balanced biosynthesis of LPS and phospholipids consistent with its essentiality.

  14. Crystal structure of XoLAP, a leucine aminopeptidase, from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Kwang; Natarajan, Sampath; Park, Hanseul; Huynh, Kim-Hung; Lee, Sang Hee; Kim, Jeong-Gu; Ahn, Yeh-Jin; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2013-10-01

    Aminopeptidases are metalloproteinases that degrade N-terminal residues from protein and play important roles in cell growth and development by controlling cell homeostasis and protein maturation. We determined the crystal structure of XoLAP, a leucyl aminopeptidase, at 2.6 Å resolution from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, causing the destructive rice disease of bacterial blight. It is the first crystal structure of aminopeptidase from phytopathogens as a drug target. XoLAP existed as a hexamer and the monomer structure consisted of an N-terminal cap domain and a C-terminal peptidase domain with two divalent zinc ions. XoLAP structure was compared with BlLAP and EcLAP (EcPepA) structures. Based on the structural comparison, the molecular model of XoLAP in complex with the natural aminopeptidase inhibitor of microginin FR1 was proposed. The model structure will be useful to develop a novel antibacterial drug against Xoo.

  15. Apparatus and method for lapping an edge surface of an object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossi, Vito N. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus for lapping an edge surface of an object comprises a block having a side adapted to engage a wide surface of an object, adjustable spacers disposed on the block and adapted to engage a lap plate, and a weighted spring disposed on the block for urging the spacers and the object edge surface towards the lap plate. A method for lapping comprises setting surfaces of adjustable spacers disposed on a block to be substantially the same distance from the block, affixing a wide surface of an object to the block, urging an edge surface of the object and the spacers towards a lap plate, lapping the edge of the object, inspecting the edge for parallelism to a reference line, resetting the spacers and relapping the edge surface.

  16. Aircraft Survivability. Summer 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Survivability Program Office SUMMER 2011 craShworthineSS & personnel casualties Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public...unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Aircraft Survivability is published three times a year by the Joint...and stroking seats. The knowledge gained from studying Vietnam crash data was consolidated into the Crash Survival Design Guide (CSDG), which

  17. Design, fabrication and test of graphite/polyimide composite joints and attachments for advanced aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoumal, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    Bonded and bolted designs are presented for each of four major attachment types. Prepreg processing problems are discussed and quality control data are given for lots 2W4604, 2W4632 and 2W4643. Preliminary design allowables test results for tension tests and compression tests of laminates are included. The final small specimen test matrix is defined and the configuration of symmetric step-lap joint specimens are shown. Finite element modeling studies of a double lap joint were performed to evaluate the number of elements required through the adhesive thickness to assess effects of various joint parameters on stress distributions. Results of finite element analyses assessing the effect of an adhesive fillet on the stress distribution in a double lap joint are examined.

  18. Environmental Durability of Materials and Bonded Joints Involving Fiber Reinforced Polymers and Concerte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavari, Mahdi Mansouri; rad, A. Yazdi; Gavari, Mohsen Mansouri

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes the research work undertaken to evaluate the performance of materials and bonded joints involving Fibre Reinforced Polymers (FRPs) and concrete. Experimental variables ncluded polymer composite materials, test methods and environmental test conditions. Tensile and flexural tests were carried out to determine short term and long term environmental durability of composite materials. Single lap shear, a modified wedge cleavage and pull-off adhesion tests were used to study the performance of bonded joints. It is shown the tensile strength of composite materials can be affected after exposure to hot/humid conditions. The performance of stressed single lap joints was also affected by hot/humid conditions.

  19. Quantitative investigation of surface and subsurface fatigue cracks near rivets in riveted joints using acoustic, electron and optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Zayna Marie

    2000-10-01

    Using scanning acoustic microscopy, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, in conjunction with fractography of fractured surfaces, the crack formation and growth kinetics of subsurface fatigue cracks and surface breaking fatigue cracks near rivets have been characterized in detail in this research. The scanning acoustic microscope was used to quantitatively investigate subsurface fatigue cracks (even when they were very small) at and near countersunk rivets in riveted lap joint specimens that are similar to the riveted lap joints found in the fuselages of many aircraft. It was found that the maximum nominal applied stress influences the fatigue crack initiation and propagation behavior. Eyebrow type cracks develop at lower stresses and centerline cracks develop at higher stresses. At low stress ranges, the fatigue cracks initiate a short distance from the rivet at or near the hidden surface of the chamfered panel. At higher stress amplitudes, the cracks initiate at the blunt knife edge. Residual compressive stresses and fretting are suggested to play more important roles at lower stress ranges. Both types of cracks initiate in a shear mode but transform to tensile, mode I, cracks as they grow. This transition occurs much more rapidly at the higher stress amplitude. At both high and low stresses, the cracks are longer on the fayed surface of the panel than elsewhere. In a comparison of Alclad 2024-T3 and Alclad 2524-T3, it was found that the high purity aluminum alloy 2524 nucleates cracks at a greater number of cycles than the less pure aluminum alloy 2024. At high stress, crack initiation plays less of a roll and the 2024 alloy has a longer life. The scanning acoustic microscope enabled us to study subsurface fatigue cracks. The understanding gained from the characterization of the subsurface fatigue cracks will help in the modeling of crack initiation and growth in the riveted lap joint and will also aid in the improvement of NDE techniques for the

  20. Formation of tough composite joints

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, M.K.

    1997-05-01

    Joints which exhibit tough fracture behavior were formed in a composite with a Si/SiC matrix reinforced with Textron SCS-6 fibers with either boron nitride or silicon nitride fiber coatings. In composites with BN coatings fibers were aligned uniaxially, while composites with Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-coated fibers had a 0/90{degree} architecture. Lapped joints (joints with overlapping fingers) were necessary to obtain tough behavior. Geometrical requirements necessary to avoid brittle joint failure have been proposed. Joints with a simple overlap geometry (only a few fingers) would have to be very long in order to prevent brittle failure. Typical failure in these joints is caused by a crack propagating along the interfaces between the joint fingers. Joints of the same overall length, but with geometry changed to be symmetric about the joint centerline and with an extra shear surface exhibited tough fractures accompanied with extensive fiber pullout. The initial matrix cracking of these joints was relatively low because cracks propagated easily through the ends of the fingers. Joints with an optimized stepped sawtooth geometry produced composite-like failures with the stress/strain curves containing an elastic region followed by a region of rising stress with an increase of strain. Increasing the fiber/matrix interfacial strength from 9 to 25 MPa, by changing the fiber coating, increased matrix cracking and ultimate strength of the composite significantly. The best joints had matrix cracking stress and ultimate strength of 138 and 240 MPa, respectively. Joint failure was preceded by multiple matrix cracking in the entire composite. The high strength of the joints will permit building of structures containing joints with only a minor reduction of design stresses.

  1. Micro topography of different material surface by solid abrasive lapped at high speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Chunlin; Yang, Jiandong; Fan, Jingfeng; Zhou, Huawen

    2007-12-01

    The principle of solid abrasives lapping is that the abrasives are fixed and made into a special lapping tool; the workpiece is lapped in high speed lapping machine tool. It possesses many advantages compared with traditional low speed lapping with particulate abrasives, e.g. high machining efficiency, low machining cost, high and stable machining accuracy. So the highly efficient lapping method has been paid close attention to. This paper made a study on surface micro topography of different material by solid abrasive lapped at high speed. In experiments the lapping technique parameter is fixed, and different workpiece which are made by T10 steel, carbide, ceramic glass and alumina ceramics are lapped. The surface micro topography is measured by SEM, from the measuring result, it can be known that there is some shallow scribe on the surface of T10 steel, and the obvious plastic deformation can be observed. The SEM pictures show that there is some scribe on the surface of ceramics glass after lapped, with more magnification times many micro cracking and some plastic hump can be observed on the scribe. These scribes and humps are first cause of depressing surface quality, and these micro cracking can result in a lot of diffuse reflection on workpiece surface, it decreases the glossiness of mirror surface. On the surface of alumina ceramics there are a lot of defects, the size of such defect is more than the scribe of abrasive, it can be sure that the defect is not produced by lapping, so the material quality is an important effect fact to surface macro topography. On the surface of carbide there are a little of scribe and air cavity, and the scribe is very shallow; the defect of powder metallurgy martial is the primary reason.

  2. Analysis Concerning the Inspection Threshold for Multi-Site Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    uL 200 words) Periodic inspections, at a prescribed interval, for Multi-Site Damage (MSD) in longitudinal fuselage lap-joints start when the aircraft ...at a prescribed interval, for Multi-Site Damage (MSD) in longitudinal fuselage lap-joints start when the aircraft has accumulated a certain number of...viii 1. INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE The cumulative probability of detection of Multi-Site Damage (MSD) in fuselage lap-joints of aging aircraft was assessed

  3. Flying qualities and control system characteristics for superaugmented aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, T. T.; Mcruer, D. T.; Johnston, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    Aircraft-alone dynamics and superaugmented control system fundamental regulatory properties including stability and regulatory responses of the basic closed-loop systems; fundamental high and low frequency margins and governing factors; and sensitivity to aircraft and controller parameters are addressed. Alternative FCS mechanizations, and mechanizational side effects are also discussed. An overview of flying qualities considerations encompasses general pilot operations as a controller in unattended, intermittent and trim, and full-attention regulatory or command control; effective vehicle primary and secondary response properties to pilot inputs and disturbances; pilot control architectural possibilities; and comparison of superaugmented and conventional aircraft path responses for different forms of pilot control. Results of a simple experimental investigation into pilot dynamic behavior in attitude control of superaugmented aircraft configurations with high frequency time laps and time delays are presented.

  4. LAP (NF-IL-6), a tissue-specific transcriptional activator, is an inhibitor of hepatoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Buck, M; Turler, H; Chojkier, M

    1994-01-01

    During postnatal liver development, LAP (NF-IL-6, C/EBP beta) expression and hepatocyte proliferation are mutually exclusive. In addition to transactivating liver-specific genes, LAP, but not C/EBP alpha, arrests the cell cycle before the G1/S boundary in hepatoma cells. LIP, a liver-inhibitory protein, which is translated from LAP mRNA lacking the activation domain of LAP, is not only ineffective in blocking hepatoma cell proliferation but also antagonizes the effect of LAP on the cell cycle. Deletion analysis indicated that this effect of LIP required only the DNA-binding and leucine zipper domains. In addition we found that integrity of the LAP dimerization and activation domains is indispensable for the arrest of cell proliferation induced by LAP. Thus, hepatocyte differentiation and its characteristic quiescent state may be modulated by the LAP/LIP ratio. Images PMID:7906646

  5. Machine Shop I. Learning Activity Packets (LAPs). Section B--Basic and Related Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains eight learning activity packets (LAPs) for the "basic and related technology" instructional area of a Machine Shop I course. The eight LAPs cover the following topics: basic mathematics, blueprints, rules, micrometer measuring tools, Vernier measuring tools, dial indicators, gaging and inspection tools, and…

  6. Edge effect modeling and experiments on active lap processing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haitao; Wu, Fan; Zeng, Zhige; Fan, Bin; Wan, Yongjian

    2014-05-05

    Edge effect is regarded as one of the most difficult technical issues for fabricating large primary mirrors, especially for large polishing tools. Computer controlled active lap (CCAL) uses a large size pad (e.g., 1/3 to 1/5 workpiece diameters) to grind and polish the primary mirror. Edge effect also exists in the CCAL process in our previous fabrication. In this paper the material removal rules when edge effects happen (i.e. edge tool influence functions (TIFs)) are obtained through experiments, which are carried out on a Φ1090-mm circular flat mirror with a 375-mm-diameter lap. Two methods are proposed to model the edge TIFs for CCAL. One is adopting the pressure distribution which is calculated based on the finite element analysis method. The other is building up a parametric equivalent pressure model to fit the removed material curve directly. Experimental results show that these two methods both effectively model the edge TIF of CCAL.

  7. Behavioral comparison of sucrose and l-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4) tastes in rats: does L-AP4 have a sweet taste?

    PubMed

    Eschle, B K; Eddy, M C; Spang, C H; Delay, E R

    2008-08-13

    Even though it is generally thought that umami stimuli such as monosodium glutamate (MSG) and sweet stimuli such as sucrose are detected by different taste receptors, these stimuli appear to share taste qualities when amiloride (a sodium channel blocker) is present to reduce the sodium taste. Single fiber recording studies of the facial and glossopharyngeal nerves have shown that encoding of L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4), a potent mGluR4 agonist that elicits a taste quite similar to MSG, may occur in the same fibers that also encode sweet stimuli. This suggests that L-AP4 and sweet substances may activate common receptors or afferent signaling mechanisms. We report results of behavioral experiments that test this hypothesis. In the first study, rats conditioned to avoid sucrose or L-AP4 generalized the aversion to the opposite substance, indicating that both substances elicited similar tastes. However, two taste discrimination experiments showed that rats easily discriminated between sucrose and L-AP4 over a wide range of concentrations, even when the cue function of sodium associated with L-AP4 was reduced by amiloride and neutralized by adding equimolar concentrations of NaCl to sucrose. These data suggest that even though L-AP4 and sucrose elicit similar taste qualities, one or both substances also elicit other taste qualities not shared by the opposite substance. They also suggest that the taste-mGluR4 receptor and the signal pathway activated by L-AP4 are not the same as those activated by sucrose. These data, when combined with fiber recording data, suggest that there is convergence of L-AP4 and sucrose signals at some point early in the gustatory pathway.

  8. Dual-band infrared (DBIR) imaging inspections of Boeing 737 and KC-135 aircraft panels

    SciTech Connect

    Del Grande, N.K.; Dolan, K.W.; Durbin, P.F.; Gorvad, M.R.; Shapiro, A.B.

    1993-08-27

    We apply dual-band infrared (DBIR) imaging as a dynamic thermal tomography tool for wide area inspection of a Boeing 737 aircraft, and several Boeing KC-135 aircraft panels. Our analyses are discussed in this report. After flash-heating the aircraft skin, we record synchronized DBIR images every 40 ms, from onset to 8 seconds after the heat flash. We analyze selective DBIR image ratios which enhance surface temperature contrast and remove surface-emissivity clutter (from dirt, dents, tape, markings, ink, sealants, uneven paint, paint stripper, exposed metal and roughness variations). The Boeing 737 and KC-135 aircraft fuselage panels have varying percent thickness losses from corrosion. We established the correlation of percent thickness loss with surface temperature rise (above ambient) for a partially corroded F-18 wing box structure and several aluminum reference panels. Based on this correlation, lap splice temperatures rise 1{degrees}C per 24 {plus_minus} 5 % material loss at 0.4 s after the heat flash. We show tables, charts and temperature maps of typical lap splice material losses for the riveted (and bonded) Boeing 737, and the riveted (but unbonded) Boeing KC-135. We map the fuselage composite thermal inertia, based on the (inverse) slope of the surface temperature versus inverse square root of time. Composite thermal inertia maps characterize shallow skin defects within the lap splice at early times (<0.3 s) and deeper skin defects within the lap splice at late times (>0.4 s). Late time composite thermal inertia maps depict where corrosion-related thickness losses occur. Lap splice sites on a typical Boeing KC-135 panel with low composite thermal inertia values had high skin-thickness losses from corrosion.

  9. Guidebook for Preparation of Aircraft System Survivability Requirements for Procurement Documents.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    THE JOINT LOGISTICS COMMANDERS C... JOINT TECHNICAL COORDINATING GROUP ON AIRCRAFT SURVIVABILITY S. . r JTCG/AS-77-DO01 FOREWORD This report presents...Mr. Robert A. Bums, and Mr. David J. Watson. E" NOTE This guidebook was prepared by the Design Criteria and Industry Interface Sub- group of the Joint ...Technical Coordinating Group on Aircraft Survivability in the Joint Logistics Commanders Organization. Because the Services’ aircraft surviva- bility

  10. Role of LAP+CD4+ T cells in the tumor microenvironment of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wu; Jiang, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Jia-Hao; Wang, Shi-Jun; Liao, Cun; Cai, Bin; Chen, Li-Sheng; Zhang, Sen; Guo, Yun; Cao, Yun-Fei; Gao, Feng

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the abundance and potential functions of LAP+CD4+ T cells in colorectal cancer (CRC). METHODS Proportions of LAP+CD4+ T cells were examined in peripheral blood and tumor/paratumor tissues of CRC patients and healthy controls using flow cytometry. Expression of phenotypic markers such as forkhead box (Fox)p3, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein (CTLA)-4, chemokine CC receptor (CCR)4 and CCR5 was measured using flow cytometry. LAP-CD4+ and LAP+CD4+ T cells were isolated using a magnetic cell-sorting system and cell purity was analyzed by flow cytometry. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure expression of cytokines interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. RESULTS The proportion of LAP+CD4+ T cells was significantly higher in peripheral blood from patients (9.44% ± 3.18%) than healthy controls (1.49% ± 1.00%, P < 0.001). Among patients, the proportion of LAP+CD4+ T cells was significantly higher in tumor tissues (11.76% ± 3.74%) compared with paratumor tissues (3.87% ± 1.64%, P < 0.001). We also observed positive correlations between the proportion of LAP+CD4+ T cells and TNM stage (P < 0.001), distant metastasis (P < 0.001) and serum level of carcinoembryonic antigen (P < 0.05). Magnetic-activated cell sorting gave an overall enrichment of LAP+CD4+ T cells (95.02% ± 2.87%), which was similar for LAP-CD4+ T cells (94.75% ± 2.76%). In contrast to LAP-CD4+ T cells, LAP+CD4+ T cells showed lower Foxp3 expression but significantly higher levels of CTLA-4, CCR4 and CCR5 (P < 0.01). LAP+CD4+ T cells expressed significantly larger amounts of IL-10 and TGF-β but lower levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-17 and interferon-γ, compared with LAP-CD4+ T cells. CONCLUSION LAP+CD4+ T cells accumulated in the tumor microenvironment of CRC patients and were involved in immune evasion mediated by IL-10 and TGF-β. PMID:28210081

  11. LapF and Its Regulation by Fis Affect the Cell Surface Hydrophobicity of Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Lahesaare, Andrio; Ainelo, Hanna; Teppo, Annika; Kivisaar, Maia; Heipieper, Hermann J.; Teras, Riho

    2016-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to regulate cell surface hydrophobicity is important for the adaptation to different environmental conditions. The hydrophobicity of cell surface can be determined by several factors, including outer membrane and surface proteins. In this study, we report that an adhesin LapF influences cell surface hydrophobicity of Pseudomonas putida. Cells lacking LapF are less hydrophobic than wild-type cells in stationary growth phase. Moreover, the overexpression of the global regulator Fis decreases surface hydrophobicity by repressing the expression of lapF. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that bacteria producing LapF are more viable when confronted with methanol (a hydrophilic compound) but are more susceptible to 1-octanol (a hydrophobic compound). Thus, these results revealed that LapF is the hydrophobicity factor for the cell surface of P. putida. PMID:27812186

  12. Effect of weld schedule variation on the weldability and durability of AHSS spot weld joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weishaupt, Eric Raymond

    Tensile strength testing and high cycle fatigue testing of advanced high strength steel spot welded shear lap joints were performed for the various weld conditions. The materials used in this study were DP 980, DP 780 and TRIP 780. The microstructure and microhardness of the shear lap joints were examined in an effort to identify the effect of microstructural changes on the strength and fatigue durability of the spot weld specimens. The occurrence of interfacial failure was recorded for the differing weld processes. Several weld schedules were examined and used to produce shear lap spot weld joints, specifically varying the squeeze force and the average current. The weld force used to produce a spot weld does not have a significant effect on the fracture mode of the specimen given the average current is constant. The average current used to produce a spot weld has a significant effect on the fracture mode of the spot weld for several squeeze forces. Interfacial failure of spot welded TRIP 780 can be mitigated using a certain range of currents when welding. This appears to come as a tradeoff for sacrificing the strength of the joint. Higher values of weld strength were obtainable; however, welds that failed with higher strengths also experienced interfacial failure. A fracture mechanics approach to estimating the high cycle fatigue life of the shear lap specimen is also proposed and represents a conservative estimate of the shear lap specimen durability.

  13. Infrared Detection of Faulty Solder Joints. Phase 2.2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    Determinations 18 3.1.6 Softening Point Determinations 24 3.2 Damage Prevention on Laminates 26 - 3.3 Laser/thermal Testing Through Conformal Coatings...possibility was conceived and implemented. The feasibility of testing solder joints covered by a conformal coat- ing was confirmed. Several...efficacy of the testing method if it had to be carried out in the presence of a conformal coating. Approximately 1,000 feed-through and lap-joints were

  14. Aircraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H. (Inventor); Uden, Edward (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention is an aircraft wing design that creates a bell shaped span load, which results in a negative induced drag (induced thrust) on the outer portion of the wing; such a design obviates the need for rudder control of an aircraft.

  15. The Teacher's Lap--A Site of Emotional Well-Being for the Younger Children in Day-Care Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hännikäinen, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on a particular relationship between teachers and one- to three-year-old children: the child in the teacher's lap. When, in what situations, does this happen? Who are the children in the teacher's lap? Why are they there? How do children express emotional well-being when in the teacher's lap? Relational, sociocultural and…

  16. Distribution of adipocyte-derived leucine aminopeptidase (A-LAP)/ER-aminopeptidase (ERAP)-1 in human uterine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Daijiro; Ando, Hisao; Iwase, Akira; Nagasaka, Tetsuro; Hattori, Akira; Tsujimoto, Masafumi; Mizutani, Shigehiko

    2004-09-01

    Adipocyte-derived leucine aminopeptidase (A-LAP, endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase ERAP1) is specialized to produce peptides presented on the class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) by trimming epitopes to eight or nine residues, in addition to its enzymatic activity to degrade angiotensin II. Previously we identified placental leucine aminopeptidase (P-LAP), another member of the oxytocinase subfamily of aminopeptidases, in human uterine endometrial epithelial cells. Here we analyzed the distribution of A-LAP in human cyclic endometrium. Western blotting analysis showed that A-LAP was present in the endometrial tissue throughout the menstrual cycle. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of A-LAP showed a similar distribution to that of P-LAP. A-LAP was localized predominantly in the endometrial glands and the luminal surface epithelium. However, the intracellular localization change that accompanied apocrine secretion, which was observed in P-LAP, was not shown in A-LAP. Subcellular localization of A-LAP, demonstrated by immunofluorescence, was ER in the cultured glandular epithelial cells. Our results indicate that A-LAP may fit the endometrial localization as an antigen-presenting ER aminopeptidase. Further understanding of the function(s) of A-LAP in the endometrium appear likely to yield insights into the cyclic changes during the normal endometrial cycle.

  17. C/EBPβ-LAP*/LAP Expression Is Mediated by RSK/eIF4B-Dependent Signalling and Boosted by Increased Protein Stability in Models of Monocytic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Christmann, Martin; Friesenhagen, Judith; Westphal, Andreas; Pietsch, Daniel; Brand, Korbinian

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor C/EBPβ plays a key role in monocytic differentiation and inflammation. Its small isoform LIP is associated with proliferation at early premonocytic developmental stages and regulated via mTOR-dependent signalling. During later stages of (pre)monocytic differentiation there is a considerable increase in the large C/EBPβ isoforms LAP*/LAP which inhibit proliferation thus supporting terminal differentiation. Here, we showed in different models of monocytic differentiation that this dramatic increase in the LAP*/LAP protein and LAP/LIP ratio was accompanied by an only modest/retarded mRNA increase suggesting an important role for (post)translational mechanisms. We found that LAP*/LAP formation was induced via MEK/RSK-dependent cascades, whereas mTOR/S6K1 were not involved. Remarkably, LAP*/LAP expression was dependent on phosphorylated eIF4B, an acceleratory protein of RNA helicase eIF4A. PKR inhibition reduced the expression of eIF4B and C/EBPβ in an eIF2α-independent manner. Furthermore, under our conditions a marked stabilisation of LAP*/LAP protein occurred, accompanied by reduced chymotrypsin-like proteasome/calpain activities and increased calpastatin levels. Our study elucidates new signalling pathways inducing LAP*/LAP expression and indicates new alternative PKR functions in monocytes. The switch from mTOR- to RSK-mediated signalling to orchestrate eIF4B-dependent LAP*/LAP translation, accompanied by increased protein stability but only small mRNA changes, may be a prototypical example for the regulation of protein expression during selected processes of differentiation/proliferation. PMID:26646662

  18. Large-Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) blade design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Violette, John A.; Sullivan, William E.; Turnberg, Jay E.

    1984-01-01

    This report covers the design analysis of a very thin, highly swept, propeller blade to be used in the Large-Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) test program. The report includes: design requirements and goals, a description of the blade configuration which meets requirements, a description of the analytical methods utilized/developed to demonstrate compliance with the requirements, and the results of these analyses. The methods described include: finite element modeling, predicted aerodynamic loads and their application to the blade, steady state and vibratory response analyses, blade resonant frequencies and mode shapes, bird impact analysis, and predictions of stalled and unstalled flutter phenomena. Summarized results include deflections, retention loads, stress/strength comparisons, foreign object damage resistance, resonant frequencies and critical speed margins, resonant vibratory mode shapes, calculated boundaries of stalled and unstalled flutter, and aerodynamic and acoustic performance calculations.

  19. Volatile compounds in fruits of Peucedanum cervaria (Lap.) L.

    PubMed

    Skalicka-Wozniak, Krystyna; Los, Renata; Glowniak, Kazimierz; Malm, Anna

    2009-07-01

    The volatile compounds from Peucedanum cervaria (Lap.) L. were obtained by hydrodistillation (HD) and headspace solid-phase microextraction techniques (HS-SPME), and then analyzed by GC/MS methods. The composition of samples from a botanical garden was compared with plants collected in the wild. The main compounds of the essential oils of P. cervaria were identified as alpha-pinene, sabinene, and beta-pinene (more than 80% of oil). The content of beta-myrcene, limonene+beta-phellandrene, and germacrene D was higher than 1%. The in vitro antibacterial activity of the essential oil was evaluated by the agar dilution method against ten reference strains of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  20. How dogs lap: ingestion and intraoral transport in Canis familiaris.

    PubMed

    Crompton, A W; Musinsky, Catherine

    2011-12-23

    It has recently been suggested that the mechanism for lifting liquid from a bowl into the oral cavity during lapping is fundamentally different in cats and dogs: cats use adhesion of liquid to the tongue tip while dogs 'scoop' with their backwardly curled tongue. High-speed light videos and X-ray videos show that on the contrary, both cats and dogs use the mechanism of adhesion. Liquid is transported through the oral cavity to the oesophagus, against gravity, on the surface of the tongue as it is drawn upwards, then a tight contact between the tongue surface and palatal rugae traps liquid and prevents its falling out as the tongue is protruded. At least three cycles are needed for intraoral transport of liquid in the dog.

  1. Mammalian Toxicological Evaluation of TNT Wastewaters. Volume II. Acute and Subacute Mammalian Toxicity of TNT and LAP Mixture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    synthesis assay ; UDS assay . 20 ABSTRACT (Continued) ,LAP and LAP(I) produced conjunctivitis, iritis, and/or corneal opacity In rabbit eyes; the...and 0.38 (mildly irritating) for LAP(I). j j: In the maximization ,egt, LAP ane LAP(I) produced mild reactions in 67 and 70%, respectively, of the sites...of guinea pigs challenged with the material; these •alues classify both as strong allergens. "’In in vitro microbial assays using microsomal

  2. Fatigue Strength and Related Characteristics of Joints in 24s-t Alclad Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, H W; Jackson, L R; Grover, H J; Beaver, W W

    1944-01-01

    Report includes tension fatigue test results on the following types of samples of 0.040-inch alclad 24s-t: (1) monoblock sheet samples as received and after a post-aging heat treatment, (2) "sheet efficiency" samples (two equally stressed sheets joined by a single transverse row of spot welds) both as received and after post-aging, (3) spot-welded lap-joint samples as received and after post-aging, and (4) roll-welded lap-joint samples. (author)

  3. The effect of diamond powder characteristics on lapping of sintered silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosczyk, Benjamin; Burkam, Eric; Titov, Artem; Onyenemezu, Clement; Benea, Ion C.

    2015-10-01

    In Automotive applications, sintered Silicon Carbide has been used in applications such as seal pump faces. The surface of sintered SiC, when lapped or polished for sealing to another surface, must be free of blemishes and mechanical defects. Lapping and polishing processes therefore must be well defined and controlled assuring minimal variation and production scrap. In this study, we related the characteristics of different diamond powders (particle size distribution, particle shape and surface) to their performance in lapping of sintered silicon carbide material, expressed as removal rate and surface finish.

  4. Machine imparting complex rotary motion for lapping a spherical inner diameter

    DOEpatents

    Carroll, Thomas A.; Yetter, Harold H.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus for imparting complex rotary motion is used to lap an inner spherical diameter surface of a workpiece. A lapping tool consists of a dome and rod mounted along the dome's vertical axis. The workpiece containing the lapping tool is held in a gimbal which uses power derived from a secondary takeoff means to impart rotary motion about a horizontal axis. The gimbal is rotated about a vertical axis by a take means while mounted at a radially outward position on a rotating arm.

  5. Machine imparting complex rotary motion for lapping a spherical inner diameter

    DOEpatents

    Carroll, T.A.; Yetter, H.H.

    1985-01-30

    An apparatus for imparting complex rotary motion is used to lap an inner spherical diameter surface of a workpiece. A lapping tool consists of a dome and rod mounted along the dome's vertical axis. The workpiece containing the lapping tool is held in a gimbal which uses power derived from a secondary takeoff means to impart rotary motion about a horizontal axis. The gimbal is rotated about a vertical axis by a take means while mounted at a radially outward position on a rotating arm.

  6. Aircraft Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-19

    NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 AIRCRAFT STEELS by E. U. Lee R. Taylor C. Lei H. C. Sanders 19 February 2009...MARYLAND NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 19 February 2009 AIRCRAFT STEELS by E. U. Lee R. Taylor C. Lei H. C. Sanders...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 ii SUMMARY Five high strength and four stainless steels have been studied, identifying their

  7. Joint swelling

    MedlinePlus

    Swelling of a joint ... Joint swelling may occur along with joint pain . The swelling may cause the joint to appear larger or abnormally shaped. Joint swelling can cause pain or stiffness. After an ...

  8. A characterization of the LAP Aquarius Phantom for external LAP laser alignment and magnetic resonance geometric distortion verification for stereotactic radiation surgery patient simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Daniel

    The Thesis explores additional applications of LAP's Aquarius external laser alignment verification Phantom by examining geometric accuracy of magnetic resonance images commonly used for planning intracranial stereotactic radiation surgery (ICSRS) cases. The scans were performed with MRI protocols used for ICSRS, and head and neck diagnosis, and their images fused to computerized tomographic (CT) images. The geometric distortions (GDs) were measured against the CT in all axial, sagittal, and coronal directions at different levels. Using the Aquarius Phantom, one is able to detect GD in ICSRS planning MRI acquisitions, and align the external LAP patient alignment lasers, by following the LAP QA protocol. GDs up to about 2 mm are observed at the distal regions of the longitudinal axis in the SRS treatment planning MR images. Based on the results, one may recommend the use of the Aquarius Phantom to determine if margins should be included for SRS treatment planning.

  9. Alteration of Sulphides in the Rumuruti Chondrite La Paz Icefield (LAP) 031275

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, E. D.; Treiman, A. H.

    2014-09-01

    Pyrrhotite in LAP 03175 (R5) has altered to a fine-grained mineral mixture. New data (optical, chemical, and Raman) suggest the mixture includes violarite and tochilinite, but not (as suggested earlier) graphite, hematite, and/or jarosite.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation methodology for the reliabilty of aircraft structures under damage tolerance considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambalakos, Andreas

    Current federal aviation regulations in the United States and around the world mandate the need for aircraft structures to meet damage tolerance requirements through out the service life. These requirements imply that the damaged aircraft structure must maintain adequate residual strength in order to sustain its integrity that is accomplished by a continuous inspection program. The multifold objective of this research is to develop a methodology based on a direct Monte Carlo simulation process and to assess the reliability of aircraft structures. Initially, the structure is modeled as a parallel system with active redundancy comprised of elements with uncorrelated (statistically independent) strengths and subjected to an equal load distribution. Closed form expressions for the system capacity cumulative distribution function (CDF) are developed by expanding the current expression for the capacity CDF of a parallel system comprised by three elements to a parallel system comprised with up to six elements. These newly developed expressions will be used to check the accuracy of the implementation of a Monte Carlo simulation algorithm to determine the probability of failure of a parallel system comprised of an arbitrary number of statistically independent elements. The second objective of this work is to compute the probability of failure of a fuselage skin lap joint under static load conditions through a Monte Carlo simulation scheme by utilizing the residual strength of the fasteners subjected to various initial load distributions and then subjected to a new unequal load distribution resulting from subsequent fastener sequential failures. The final and main objective of this thesis is to present a methodology for computing the resulting gradual deterioration of the reliability of an aircraft structural component by employing a direct Monte Carlo simulation approach. The uncertainties associated with the time to crack initiation, the probability of crack detection, the

  11. Crystal structure, spectroscopic and thermal properties of [Zn(Lap)2(DMF)(H2O)] and isomorphous [M(Lap)2]n (M: Cd, Mn) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfán, R. A.; Espíndola, J. A.; Gomez, M. I.; de Jiménez, M. C. L.; Piro, O. E.; Castellano, E. E.; Martínez, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    The solid state structure of the lapacholate (Lap-) complexes with Zn(II), Cd(II) and Mn(II) were determined by X-ray diffraction methods. [Zn(Lap)2(DMF)(H2O)] crystallizes in the triclinic space group P 1 bar with a = 10.5051(4), b = 12.8020(4), c = 13.0394(4) Å, α = 60.418(2), β = 83.904(2), γ = 86.206(2)°, and Z = 2 molecules per unit cell. The isomorphous complexes [M(Lap)2]n (M: Cd, Mn) crystallize in the tetragonal space group P43212 with a = b = 13.5770(6) Å, c = 14.5730(6) Å (Cd), and a = b = 13.3539(4), c = 14.7148(4) Å (Mn), and Z = 4. In [Zn(Lap)2(DMF)(H2O)] the Zn(II) ion is in a distorted octahedral environment coordinated to two different and nearly perpendicular Lap- molecules acting as bidentate ligands through their adjacent carbonyl and phenol oxygen atoms. The remaining two cis-coordination sites are occupied by water and DMF molecules. [M(Lap)2]n (M: Cd, Mn) isomorphous complexes are also octahedral and present a supra-molecular arrangement in the lattice. There is only one independent Lap- molecule that coordinates the metal through all three ligand binding sites, giving rise to a 3-D structure of [M(Lap)2]n complexes that extends throughout the crystal lattice. The lapachol binding to metal is also revealed by the IR spectra. In fact, the carbonyl Cdbnd O stretching frequency is appreciable red-shifted in the complexes as compared to uncoordinated lapachol ligand. As expected, the IR and UV-Vis spectra of the isomorphous pair of complexes closely resemble to each other. Up to above 300 °C there are significant differences in the TGA of the Zn complex when compared with the isomorphous pair: while the former shows the loss of the secondary ligands (water and DMF), the latter exhibits a plateau signaling the lesser labile character of the lapacholate ligand.

  12. Fiber optics for advanced aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    The increased use of composites makes the digital control more susceptible to electromagnetic effects. In order to provide the protection to the digital control additional shielding will be required as well as protective circuitry for the electronics. This results in increased weight and reduced reliability. The advantages that fiber optic technology provides for advanced aircraft applications is recognized. The use of optical signals to carry information between the aircraft and the control module provides immunity from contamination by electromagnetic sources as well as other important benefits such as reduced weight and volume resulting from the elimination of the shielding and the replacement of metal conductors with low weight glass fibers. In 1975 NASA began work to develop passive optical sensors for use with fiber optics in aircraft control systems. The problem now is to choose the best optical sensor concepts and evaluate them for use. In 1985 NASA and DOD entered into a joint program, Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI), to look at optical technology specifically for use in advanced aircraft systems. The results of this program are discussed. The conclusion of the study indicated that the use of fiber optic technology in advanced aircraft systems is feasible and desirable. The study pointed to a lack of available sensors from vendors capable of operating in the adverse environments of advanced aircraft.

  13. Fiber optics for advanced aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    The increased use of composites makes the digital control more susceptible to electromagnetic effects. In order to provide the protection to the digital control additional shielding will be required as well as protective circuitry for the electronics. This results in increased weight and reduced reliability. The advantages that fiber optic technology provides for advanced aircraft applications is recognized. The use of optical signals to carry information between the aircraft and the control module provides immunity from contamination by electromagnetic sources as well as other important benefits such as reduced weight and volume resulting from the elimination of the shielding and the replacement of metal conductors with low weight glass fibers. In 1975 NASA began work to develop passive optical sensors for use with fiber optics in aircraft control systems. The problem now is to choose the best optical sensor concepts and evaluate them for use. In 1985 NASA and DOD entered into a joint program, Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI), to look at optical technology specifically for use in advanced aircraft systems. The results of this program are discussed. The conclusion of the study indicated that the use of fiber optic technology in advanced aircraft systems is feasible and desirable. The study pointed to a lack of available sensors from vendors capable of operating in the adverse environments of advanced aircraft.

  14. Support and Development of Workflow Protocols for High Throughput Single-Lap-Joint Testing - Data Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    Directorate, ARL Benjamin Henrie and Paul Wimberley Dynetics Technical Services, Inc. A reprint from the Proceedings of the 36th Annual...2013. * Dynetics Technical Services, Inc., NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 14. ABSTRACT To study the effects of aluminum...Henrie, Paul Wimberley Dynetics Technical Services, Inc. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Space Flight Center, AL, 35812, USA

  15. Screening Adhesively Bonded Single-Lap-Joint Testing Results Using Nonlinear Calculation Parameters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Jonathan Kaufman, and Wendy Kosik Chaney Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL Benjamin Henrie Dynetics Technical Services, Inc...February 2012.  Dynetics Technical Services, Inc., Marshall Space Flight Center, AL 35812 14. ABSTRACT Adhesive needs for Army ground vehicles are...us.army.mil Benjamin Henrie Dynetics Technical Services, Inc. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Space Flight Center, Al

  16. Multivariate Analysis of High Through-Put Adhesively Bonded Single Lap Joints: Experimental and Workflow Protocols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    bondline thickness, surface preparation, presence of an overflow fillet, and adhesive type. Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Science high...Mr Nathan Jensen (ARL Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Outreach, Bring Your Child to Work Day). Mechanical testing setup was... Mathematics and Science (GEMS) high school and middle school students as part of the US Army Research Laboratory’s (ARL) involvement with Science

  17. Disbond Detection in Bonded Aluminum Joints Using Lamb Wave Amplitude and Time-of-Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Keun J.; Johnston, Patrick H.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, there was a need of developing efficient nondestructive integrity assessment techniques for large area laminate structures, such as detections of disbond, crack, and corrosion in fuselage of an aircraft. Together with the improving tomography and computer technologies, progress has been made in many fields in NDE towards a faster inspection. Ultrasonically, Lamb wave is considered to be a candidate for large area inspections based on its capability of propagating a relatively long distance in thin plates and its media-thickness-dependent propagation properties. Moreover, the occurence of disbonds, corrosion, and even cracks often results in reduction of effective thickness of a laminate. The idea is to assess the condition of a structure by sensing the response of propagating Lamb waves to these flaws over long path length. A series of tests in the sequence of disbond, corrosion, and crack have been done on various types of specimen to investigate the feasibility of this approach. This paper will present some of the test results for disbond detection on aluminum lap splice joints.

  18. LAPS Lidar Measurements at the ARM Alaska Northslope Site (Support to FIRE Project)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philbrick, C. Russell; Lysak, Daniel B., Jr.; Petach, Tomas M.; Esposito, Steven T.; Mulik, Karoline R.

    1998-01-01

    This report consists of data summaries of the results obtained during the May 1998 measurement period at Barrow Alaska. This report does not contain any data interpretation or analysis of the results which will follow this activity. This report is forwarded with a data set on magnetic media which contains the reduced data from the LAPS lidar in 15 minute intervals. The data was obtained during the period 15-30 May 1998. The measurement period overlapped with several aircraft flights conducted by NASA as part of the FIRE project. The report contains a summary list of the data obtained plus figures that have been prepared to help visualize the measurement periods. The order of the presentation is as follows: Section 1. A copy of the Statement of Work for the planned activity of the second measurement period at the ARM Northslope site is provided. Section 2. A list of the data collection periods shows the number of one minute data records stored during each hour of operation and the corresponding size (Mbytes) of the one hour data folders. The folder and file names are composed from the year, month, day, hour and minute. The date/time information is given in UTC for easier comparison with other data sets. Section 3. A set of 4 comparisons between the LAPS lidar results and the sondes released by the ARM scientists from a location nearby the lidar. The lidar results show the +/- 1 sigma statistical error on each of the independent 75 m altitude bins of the data. This set of 4 comparisons was used to set and validate the calibration value which was then used for the complete data set. Section 4. A set of false color figures with up to 10 hours of specific humidity measurements are shown in each graph. Two days of measurements are shown on each page. These plots are crude representations of the data and permit a survey which indicates when the clouds were very low or where interesting events may occur in the results. These plots are prepared using the real time sequence

  19. 32 CFR 855.20 - Joint-use agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Agreements for Civil Aircraft Use of Air Force Airfields § 855.20 Joint-use agreements. An agreement between the Air Force and a local Government agency is...

  20. 32 CFR 855.20 - Joint-use agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Agreements for Civil Aircraft Use of Air Force Airfields § 855.20 Joint-use agreements. An agreement between the Air Force and a local Government agency is...

  1. 32 CFR 855.20 - Joint-use agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Agreements for Civil Aircraft Use of Air Force Airfields § 855.20 Joint-use agreements. An agreement between the Air Force and a local Government agency is...

  2. 32 CFR 855.20 - Joint-use agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Agreements for Civil Aircraft Use of Air Force Airfields § 855.20 Joint-use agreements. An agreement between the Air Force and a local Government agency is...

  3. 32 CFR 855.20 - Joint-use agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Agreements for Civil Aircraft Use of Air Force Airfields § 855.20 Joint-use agreements. An agreement between the Air Force and a local Government agency is...

  4. Instrumented Bolts Would Measure Shear Forces In Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, James Wayne; Mcwithey, Robert R.

    1994-01-01

    Bolts instrumented with strain gauges used to measure shear forces. Bolts installed in multiple-bolt lap joints to obtain data on distribution of stresses and deformations in and around joints. Strain gauges indicate share of applied load borne by each individual bolt. In original application, bolted panels made of advanced refractory composite materials designed to withstand use at temperatures up to 4,000 degrees F. Also applicable to other joint materials and measurement of shear loads in other connections such as, shear loads on shafts in pulleys or gears.

  5. Aircraft cybernetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The use of computers for aircraft control, flight simulation, and inertial navigation is explored. The man-machine relation problem in aviation is addressed. Simple and self-adapting autopilots are described and the assets and liabilities of digital navigation techniques are assessed.

  6. SRB/SLEEC (Solid Rocket Booster/Shingle Lap Extendible Exit Cone) feasibility study, volume 2. Appendix A: Design study for a SLEEC actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    The results are presented of a design feasibility study of a self-contained (powered) actuation system for a Shingle Lap Extendible Exit Cone (SLEEC) for Transportation System (STS). The evolution of the SLEEC actuation system design is reviewed, the final design concept is summarized, and the results of the detailed study of the final concept of the actuation system are treated. A conservative design using proven mechanical components was established as a major program priority. The final mechanical design has a very low development risk since the components, which consist of ballscrews, gearing, flexible shaft drives, and aircraft cables, have extensive aerospace applications and a history of proven reliability. The mathematical model studies have shown that little or no power is required to deploy the SLEEC actuation system because acceleration forces and internal pressure from the rocket plume provide the required energies. A speed control brake is incorporated in the design in order to control the rate of deployment.

  7. Optimized bolted joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.; Bunin, B. L.; Watts, D. J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A method is disclosed for joining segments of the skin of an aircraft. The ends of the skin are positioned in close proximity or abutt each other. The skin is of constant thickness throughout the joint and is sandwiched between splice plates, which taper in thickness from the last to the first bolt rows in order to reduce the stiffness of the splice plate and thereby reduce the load transfer at the location where bypass loads are the highest.

  8. Light Absorbing Particle (LAP) Measurements in the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, D.; Raga, G. B.; Anderson, B.; Diskin, G.; Sachse, G.; Kok, G.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation covers the capabilities and design of the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP-2), and reviews its role on the Sage III Ozone Loss Validation Experiment (SOLVE II) field campaign during 2003. On SOLVE II the SP-2 was carried into the Arctic onboard a DC-8 aircraft, in order to determine the size distribution of light-absorbing and non light-absorbing particles in the stratosphere. Graphs and tables relate some of the results from SOLVE II.

  9. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  10. Deformations and strains in adhesive joints by moire interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, D.; Czarnek, R.; Wood, J.; John, D.; Lubowinski, S.

    1984-01-01

    Displacement fields in a thick adherend lap joint and a cracked lap shear specimen were measured by high sensitivity moire interferometry. Contour maps of in-plane U and V displacements were obtained across adhesive and adherent surfaces. Loading sequences ranged from modest loads to near-failure loads. Quantitative results are given for displacements and certain strains in the adhesive and along the adhesive/adherend boundary lines. The results show nonlinear displacements and strains as a function of loads or stresses and they show viscoelastic or time-dependent response. Moire interferometry is an excellent method for experimental studies of adhesive joint performance. Subwavelength displacement resolution of a few micro-inches, and spatial resolution corresponding to 1600 fringes/inch (64 fringes/mm), were obtained in these studies. The whole-field contour maps offer insights not available from local measurements made by high sensitivity gages.

  11. Research related to variable sweep aircraft development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, E. C.; Toll, T. A.

    1981-01-01

    Development in high speed, variable sweep aircraft research is reviewed. The 1946 Langley wind tunnel studies related to variable oblique and variable sweep wings and results from the X-5 and the XF1OF variable sweep aircraft are discussed. A joint program with the British, evaluation of the British "Swallow", development of the outboard pivot wing/aft tail configuration concept by Langley, and the applied research program that followed and which provided the technology for the current, variable sweep military aircraft is outlined. The relative state of variable sweep as a design option is also covered.

  12. Aircraft radial-belted tire evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Stubbs, Sandy M.; Davis, Pamela A.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of the ongoing joint NASA/FAA/Industry Surface Traction And Radial Tire (START) Program being conducted at NASA Langley's Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF). The START Program involves tests using three different tire sizes to evaluate tire rolling resistance, braking, and cornering performance throughout the aircraft ground operational speed range for both dry and wet runway surfaces. Preliminary results from recent 40 x 14 size bias-ply, radial-belted, and H-type aircraft tire tests are discussed. The paper concludes with a summary of the current program status and planned ALDF test schedule.

  13. Large-scale Advanced Prop-fan (LAP) high speed wind tunnel test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William A.; Wainauski, Harold S.; Arseneaux, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    High Speed Wind Tunnel testing of the SR-7L Large Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) is reported. The LAP is a 2.74 meter (9.0 ft) diameter, 8-bladed tractor type rated for 4475 KW (6000 SHP) at 1698 rpm. It was designated and built by Hamilton Standard under contract to the NASA Lewis Research Center. The LAP employs thin swept blades to provide efficient propulsion at flight speeds up to Mach .85. Testing was conducted in the ONERA S1-MA Atmospheric Wind Tunnel in Modane, France. The test objectives were to confirm that the LAP is free from high speed classical flutter, determine the structural and aerodynamic response to angular inflow, measure blade surface pressures (static and dynamic) and evaluate the aerodynamic performance at various blade angles, rotational speeds and Mach numbers. The measured structural and aerodynamic performance of the LAP correlated well with analytical predictions thereby providing confidence in the computer prediction codes used for the design. There were no signs of classical flutter throughout all phases of the test up to and including the 0.84 maximum Mach number achieved. Steady and unsteady blade surface pressures were successfully measured for a wide range of Mach numbers, inflow angles, rotational speeds and blade angles. No barriers were discovered that would prevent proceeding with the PTA (Prop-Fan Test Assessment) Flight Test Program scheduled for early 1987.

  14. Aircraft Corrosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    chlore mais dans une proportion semblable b cells d’une eau de vil)e ; - lea solides, d’aprbs lea analyses chimique et criatallographique, paraissaiont...IATA member airlines at $100 million based on 1976 operations. Thus the numbers are large, but detailed analyses on specific aircraft types, in known...demonstrate this in any quantitative way with accurate figures. Better information is required on the cost of corrosion, together with analyses of the

  15. Aircraft Ducting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Templeman Industries developed the Ultra-Seal Ducting System, an environmental composite air duct with a 50 percent weight savings over current metallic ducting, but could not find a commercial facility with the ability to test it. Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a structural evaluation of the duct, equivalent to 86 years of take-offs and landings in an aircraft. Boeing Commercial Airplane Group and McDonnell Douglas Corporation are currently using the ducts.

  16. Nondestructive inspection in adhesive-bonded joint CFRP using pulsed phase thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, P. H.; Webb, S. C.; Peters, K. J.

    2013-05-01

    Many forms of damages in fiber reinforcement polymer (FRP) composites are difficult to detect because they occurs in subsurface layers of the composites. One challenging need for inspection capabilities is in adhesively bonded joints between composite components, a common location of premature failure in aerospace structures. This paper investigates pulsed phase thermography (PPT) imaging of fatigue damage in these adhesively bonded joints. Simulated defects were created to calibrate parameters for fatigue loading conditions, PPT imaging parameters, and a damage sizing algorithm for carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) single lap joints. Afterwards, lap joint specimens were fabricated with varying quality of manufacturing. PPT imaging of the pristine specimens revealed defects such as air bubbles, adhesive thickness variations, and weak bonding surface between the laminate and adhesive. Next, fatigue testing was performed and acquired PPT imaging data identified fatigue induced damage prior to final failure cycles. After failure of each sample, those images were confirmed by visual inspections of failure surface.

  17. Nitrogen oxide emissions and their control from uninstalled aircraft engines in enclosed test cells: Joint report to congress on the Environmental Protection Agency - Department of Transportation Study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    The report was submitted to the Congress under mandate of Section 233 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The report provides a characterization of aircraft engine test cells and their emissions. Various NOx control technologies that have been applied to combustion sources other than test cells are examined in the report for their applicability to test cells. Effects of NOx controls on the aircraft engine and aircraft engine test are also addressed. Finally, annual emissions from test cells are estimated and compared to total NOx emissions in the applicable ozone non-attainment areas.

  18. Ground and Flight Testing for Aircraft Guidance and Control,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    stand for testing in large wind tunnels has been assembled in a joint program with German aircraft industries under . - - -- contract by the German...Royal Aircraft Establishment, Bedrord, UK 1 SCOPE OF THE PROGRAMME RAE Flight Systems (Bedford) Department, in collaboration with British Industry and...under the sponsorship of the Department or Trade and Industry , conducts research into the application of avionic systems to civil aircraft. The trials

  19. Aircraft Survivability: Live Fire Test and Evaluation, Spring 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response...REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Aircraft...Wacker, Marcus Miller, and Dan Cyphers The Joint Cargo Aircraft (JCA) Program is a joint US Army/US Air Force program formed to procure, field, and

  20. Grain decoration in aluminum oxynitride (ALON) from polishing on bound abrasive laps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Leslie L.; Marino, Anne E.; Hayes, Jennifer C.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2004-01-01

    Aluminum oxynitride (ALON) is a polycrystalline material that has proven difficult to polish due to its grain structure. Bound abrasives are an effective means for polishing ALON, and work is being done with them to obtain good surfaces, with reasonable removal rates. Laps consisting of abrasives bound in epoxy matrices were created for polishing ALON. The effects of varying abrasive type, abrasive concentration, lap shape, coolant and load were studied. Metrology procedures were developed to monitor different aspects of the grain structure and numerically evaluate grain boundary decoration. Strategies were developed to polish ALON at acceptable rates with reasonably good surface quality. Work is directed toward finding optimal bound abrasive lap formulations that can be fabricated into ring and/or contour tools for testing on CNC machining platforms.

  1. Grain decoration in aluminum oxynitride (ALON) from polishing on bound abrasive laps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Anne E.; Hayes, Jennifer; Gregg, Leslie L.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2003-05-01

    Aluminum oxynitride (ALON) is a material with desirable qualities for a variety of applications that has proven difficult to polish because of its grain structure. Bound abrasives may prove to be an effective means of polishing it, and work is being done with them to obtain good surfaces on ALON, with reasonable removal rates. Laps consisting of abrasives bound in epoxy matrices have been created for polishing ALON. The effects of varying abrasive type, abrasive concentration, lap shape, coolant and load are being studied. Metrology procedures are being developed to monitor different aspects of the grain structure and numerically evaluate its decoration. Strategies have been developed to polish ALON at acceptable rates with reasonably good surface quality. Work is directed toward finding optimal bound abrasive lap formulations that can be fabricated into ring and/or contour tools for testing on CNC machining platforms.

  2. Large-scale Advanced Prop-fan (LAP) technology assessment report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degeorge, C. L.

    1988-01-01

    The technologically significant findings and accomplishments of the Large Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) program in the areas of aerodynamics, aeroelasticity, acoustics and materials and fabrication are described. The extent to which the program goals related to these disciplines were achieved is discussed, and recommendations for additional research are presented. The LAP program consisted of the design, manufacture and testing of a near full-scale Prop-Fan or advanced turboprop capable of operating efficiently at speeds to Mach .8. An aeroelastically scaled model of the LAP was also designed and fabricated. The goal of the program was to acquire data on Prop-Fan performance that would indicate the technology readiness of Prop-Fans for practical applications in commercial and military aviation.

  3. Study on active lap tool influence function in grinding 1.8 m primary mirror.

    PubMed

    Haitao, Liu; Zhige, Zeng; Fan, Wu; Bin, Fan; Yongjian, Wan

    2013-11-01

    We present a theoretical modeling method to predict the ring tool influence function (TIF) based on the computer-controlled active lap process. The gap on the lap-grinding layer is considered, and its influence on the ring TIF is analyzed too. The relationship between the shape of the ring TIF and the lap-workpiece rotation speed ratio is discussed in this paper. The recipe for calculating dwell time for axisymmetric fabrication is discussed. The grinding process of a 1.8 m primary mirror is improved based on these results. The grinding process is accomplished after 30 circles of grinding, and the surface shape error is from PV 82 μm RMS 16.4 μm reduced to PV 13.5 μm RMS 2.5 μm.

  4. 14 CFR 27.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shafting joints. 27.935 Section 27.935 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.935 Shafting joints. Each...

  5. Improvement of Hungarian Joint Terminal Attack Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-13

    Forward Looking Infrared GLTD Ground Laser Target Designator HDF Hungarian Defense Force JFO Joint Fires Observer JTAC Joint Terminal Attack Controller......FLIR at least. Laser capability is another important material requirement for CAS aircraft. Laser systems contain two important components. A low

  6. LapF, the second largest Pseudomonas putida protein, contributes to plant root colonization and determines biofilm architecture.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gil, Marta; Yousef-Coronado, Fátima; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel

    2010-08-01

    We have investigated the role of LapF, one of the two largest proteins encoded in the genome of Pseudomonas putida KT2440, in bacterial colonization of solid surfaces. LapF is 6310 amino acids long, and is localized on the cell surface. The C-terminal region of the protein is essential for its secretion, which presumably requires the ABC transporter encoded by an operon (lapHIJ) adjacent to the lapF gene. Although the initial attachment stages are not different between the wild type and a lapF mutant, microcolony formation and subsequent development of a mature biofilm is impaired in the mutant. This is consistent with the expression pattern of lapF; activation of its promoter takes place at late stages of growth and is regulated by the alternative sigma factor RpoS. A lapF mutant is also affected in individual and competitive plant root colonization. In these assays, mixed microcolonies formed by cells of both the wild-type and the mutant strains could be observed but microcolonies of the mutant alone were not found. These data and the localization of the protein at discrete spots in areas of contact between cells in biofilms suggest that LapF determines the establishment of cell-cell interactions during sessile growth.

  7. CrossLaps and beta-glucuronidase in peri-implant and gingival crevicular fluid.

    PubMed

    Schubert, U; Kleber, B M; Strietzel, F P; Dörfling, P

    2001-01-01

    Collagen degradation products of the carboxyterminal region possibly reflect bone and attachment loss. In the present study, the Serum CrossLaps One-Step enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine a specific part of the carboxyterminal region of type I collagen, the CrossLaps. Samples of peri-implant and gingival crevicular fluid of 111 implants and 53 teeth from 47 partially or completely edentulous patients were examined in reference to levels of CrossLaps and beta-glucuronidase (beta G), an established marker of periodontal disease. Clinical probing pocket depth (PPD), bleeding on probing (BOP), plaque accumulation, mobility, radiographic bone loss, and the occurrence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia were assessed. The mean values were: for PPD at implants 3.76 +/- 1.41 mm, at teeth 3.44 +/- 0.88 mm; for beta G at implants 0.364 +/- 0.392 pU/min, at teeth 0.314 +/- 0.209 pU/min; for CrossLaps at implants 0.069 +/- 0.059 pmol/min, at teeth 0.082 +/- 0.053 pmol/min. Bleeding on probing was significantly higher on implants than on teeth (McNemar test, P = .004). No significant difference of beta G levels was found between teeth and implants (Wilcoxon test). A negative correlation was found between beta G levels and CrossLaps levels at teeth (Pearson-rank correlation, P = .002). On implants, no significant correlation of these 2 parameters was seen, but significant correlations were found between sulcus fluid flow rate and PPD (P = .012), beta G levels and bone loss (P < 0.0005), and CrossLaps levels and PPD (P = .011). CrossLaps can be detected in both gingival and peri-implant crevicular fluid. While rising levels of beta G may indicate acute peri-implantitis, CrossLaps may not, but could play a role as a marker of ongoing attachment loss.

  8. Educating with Aircraft Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Hobie

    1976-01-01

    Described is utilization of aircraft models, model aircraft clubs, and model aircraft magazines to promote student interest in aerospace education. The addresses for clubs and magazines are included. (SL)

  9. The Analysis of Adhesively Bonded Advanced Composite Joints Using Joint Finite Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    joint configurations, including double cantilever beam and single lap joints.

  10. LAP TGF-Beta Subset of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(-) Treg Cells is Increased and Overexpresses LAP TGF-Beta in Lung Adenocarcinoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Islas-Vazquez, Lorenzo; Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Meneses-Flores, Manuel; Galicia-Velasco, Miriam; Romero-Garcia, Susana; Camacho-Mendoza, Catalina; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Adenocarcinoma, the most commonly diagnosed histologic type of lung cancer, is associated with smoking. Cigarette smoke promotes inflammation on the airways, which might be mediated by Th17 cells. This inflammatory environment may contribute to tumor development. In contrast, some reports indicate that tumors may induce immunosuppressive Treg cells to dampen immune reactivity, supporting tumor growth and progression. Thus, we aimed to analyze whether chronic inflammation or immunosuppression predominates at the systemic level in lung adenocarcinoma patients, and several cytokines and Th17 and Treg cells were studied. Higher proportions of IL-17-producing CD4(+) T-cells were found in smoking control subjects and in lung adenocarcinoma patients compared to nonsmoking control subjects. In addition, lung adenocarcinoma patients increased both plasma concentrations of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10, and proportions of Latency Associated Peptide (LAP) TGF-β subset of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(-) Treg cells, which overexpressed LAP TGF-β. This knowledge may lead to the development of immunotherapies that could inhibit the suppressor activity mediated by the LAP TGF-β subset of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(-) Treg cells to promote reactivity of immune cells against lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  11. LAP TGF-Beta Subset of CD4+CD25+CD127− Treg Cells is Increased and Overexpresses LAP TGF-Beta in Lung Adenocarcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Islas-Vazquez, Lorenzo; Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Meneses-Flores, Manuel; Galicia-Velasco, Miriam; Romero-Garcia, Susana; Camacho-Mendoza, Catalina; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Adenocarcinoma, the most commonly diagnosed histologic type of lung cancer, is associated with smoking. Cigarette smoke promotes inflammation on the airways, which might be mediated by Th17 cells. This inflammatory environment may contribute to tumor development. In contrast, some reports indicate that tumors may induce immunosuppressive Treg cells to dampen immune reactivity, supporting tumor growth and progression. Thus, we aimed to analyze whether chronic inflammation or immunosuppression predominates at the systemic level in lung adenocarcinoma patients, and several cytokines and Th17 and Treg cells were studied. Higher proportions of IL-17-producing CD4+ T-cells were found in smoking control subjects and in lung adenocarcinoma patients compared to nonsmoking control subjects. In addition, lung adenocarcinoma patients increased both plasma concentrations of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10, and proportions of Latency Associated Peptide (LAP) TGF-β subset of CD4+CD25+CD127− Treg cells, which overexpressed LAP TGF-β. This knowledge may lead to the development of immunotherapies that could inhibit the suppressor activity mediated by the LAP TGF-β subset of CD4+CD25+CD127− Treg cells to promote reactivity of immune cells against lung adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:26582240

  12. Design fabrication and test of graphite/polyimide composite joints and attachments for advanced aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Graphite/polyimide (Gr/PI) bolted and bonded joints were investigated. Possible failure modes and the design loads for the four generic joint types are discussed. Preliminary sizing of a type 1 joint, bonded and bolted configuration is described, including assumptions regarding material properties and sizing methodology. A general purpose finite element computer code is described that was formulated to analyze single and double lap joints, with and without tapered adherends, and with user-controlled variable element size arrangements. An initial order of Celion 6000/PMR-15 prepreg was received and characterized.

  13. Fatigue Behavior of Adhesively Bonded Joints. Volume I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    electron spectroscopy (AES) and/or XPS scans. The adhesive used is FM-73M, a 2500F-cure tape from American Cyanamid of Havre de Grace, MD. This...34PABST Technical Bulletin No. 1", March 28, 1975. 14. FM 73 Adhesive Film, Data Bulletin BPT 20B, Cyanamid Bloom- ingdale Aerospace Products, Havre de...Joints," J. Appl. Mech. 11, 1944 , A17-A27. 29. Hart-Smith, L. C., Adhesive-Bonded Single-Lap Joints, NASA, CR-11236, January 1973. 30. Quarterly Progress

  14. Determination of Arsenic Poisoning and Metabolism in Hair by Synchrotron Radiation: The Case of Phar Lap

    SciTech Connect

    Kempson, Ivan M.; Henry, Dermot A.

    2010-08-26

    Fresh physical evidence about the demise of the racehorse Phar Lap (see photograph) has been gathered from the study of mane hair samples by synchrotron radiation analysis with high resolution X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses. The results are indicative of arsenic ingestion and metabolism, and show that the racing champion died from arsenic poisoning.

  15. Too Many Laps? Try This Activity Recipe -- They'll Be Back for More!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCannell, Daryle

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the importance of creative warmup activities (other than running laps) to motivate students in physical activity class, explaining that the basic ingredients are: a smiling, energetic instructor; appropriate body preparation; a mold for children's boundless energy; and some creative planning. The article describes several creative warmup…

  16. Learning Activity Package, Physical Science. LAP Numbers 8, 9, 10, and 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, G. J.

    These four units of the Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) for individualized instruction in physical science cover nuclear reactions, alpha and beta particles, atomic radiation, medical use of nuclear energy, fission, fusion, simple machines, Newton's laws of motion, electricity, currents, electromagnetism, Oersted's experiment, sound, light,…

  17. Design Considerations of Polishing Lap for Computer-Controlled Cylindrical Polishing Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Gufran S.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Arnold, William; Ramsey, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper establishes a relationship between the polishing process parameters and the generation of mid spatial-frequency error. The consideration of the polishing lap design to optimize the process in order to keep residual errors to a minimum and optimization of the process (speeds, stroke, etc.) and to keep the residual mid spatial-frequency error to a minimum, is also presented.

  18. The Fundamental Reasons Why Laptop Computers should not be Used on Your Lap.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, S A R; Taeb, S; Mortazavi, S M J; Zarei, S; Haghani, M; Habibzadeh, P; Shojaei-Fard, M B

    2016-12-01

    As a tendency to use new technologies, gadgets such as laptop computers are becoming more popular among students, teachers, businessmen and office workers. Today laptops are a great tool for education and learning, work and personal multimedia. Millions of men, especially those in the reproductive age, are frequently using their laptop computers on the lap (thigh). Over the past several years, our lab has focused on the health effects of exposure to different sources of electromagnetic fields such as cellular phones, mobile base stations, mobile phone jammers, laptop computers, radars, dentistry cavitrons and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Our own studies as well as the studies performed by other researchers indicate that using laptop computers on the lap adversely affects the male reproductive health. When it is placed on the lap, not only the heat from a laptop computer can warm men's scrotums, the electromagnetic fields generated by laptop's internal electronic circuits as well as the Wi-Fi Radiofrequency radiation hazards (in a Wi-Fi connected laptop) may decrease sperm quality. Furthermore, due to poor working posture, laptops should not be used on the lap for long hours.

  19. Learning Activity Package, Algebra 103-104, LAPs 23-33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Diane

    This set of 11 teacher-prepared Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) in intermediate algebra covers number systems; exponents and radicals; polynomials and factoring; rational expressions; coordinate geometry; relations, functions, and inequalities; quadratic equations and inequalities; Quadratic functions; systems of equations and inequalities;…

  20. Learning Activity Package, Chemistry I. LAP Numbers 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, and 28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Naomi

    As a set of seven Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) for individualized instruction in chemistry, the units cover the unit system, matter, energy, atomic structures, chemical formulas, physical states of matter, solutions and suspensions, ionization, acids, bases, and salts. Each unit contains a rationale for the material; a list of behavioral…

  1. The Early Learning Accomplishment Profile (Early LAP) Examiner's Manual and Reliability and Validity Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, Belinda J.; Peisner-Feinberg, Ellen S.

    The Early Learning Accomplishment Profile (Early LAP) provides a systematic method for observing children's functioning in the birth to 36-month age range in order to assist teachers, clinicians, and parents in assessing individual skills development in six developmental domains: gross motor, fine motor, cognition, language, self-help, and social…

  2. The impact of layer thickness on the performance of additively manufactured lapping tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Wesley B.

    2015-10-01

    Lower cost additive manufacturing (AM) machines which have emerged in recent years are capable of producing tools, jigs, and fixtures that are useful in optical fabrication. In particular, AM tooling has been shown to be useful in lapping glass workpieces. Various AM machines are distinguished by the processes, materials, build times, and build resolution they provide. This research investigates the impact of varied build resolution (specifically layer resolution) on the lapping performance of tools built using the stereolithographic assembly (SLA) process in 50 μm and 100 μm layer thicknesses with a methacrylate photopolymer resin on a high resolution desktop printer. As with previous work, the lapping tools were shown to remove workpiece material during the lapping process, but the tools themselves also experienced significant wear on the order of 2-3 times the mass loss of the glass workpieces. The tool wear rates for the 100 μm and 50 μm layer tools were comparable, but the 50 μm layer tool was 74% more effective at removing material from the glass workpiece, which is attributed to some abrasive particles being trapped in the coarser surface of the 100 um layer tooling and not being available to interact with the glass workpiece. Considering the tool wear, these additively manufactured tools are most appropriate for prototype tooling where the low cost (<$45) and quick turnaround make them attractive when compared to a machined tool.

  3. Learning Activity Package, Physical Science. LAP Numbers 1, 2, 3, and 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, G. J.

    These four units of the Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) for individualized instruction in physical science cover measuring techniques, operations of instruments, metric system heat, matter, energy, elements, atomic numbers, isotopes, molecules, mixtures, compounds, physical and chemical properties, liquids, solids, and gases. Each unit contains…

  4. iLAP: a workflow-driven software for experimental protocol development, data acquisition and analysis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In recent years, the genome biology community has expended considerable effort to confront the challenges of managing heterogeneous data in a structured and organized way and developed laboratory information management systems (LIMS) for both raw and processed data. On the other hand, electronic notebooks were developed to record and manage scientific data, and facilitate data-sharing. Software which enables both, management of large datasets and digital recording of laboratory procedures would serve a real need in laboratories using medium and high-throughput techniques. Results We have developed iLAP (Laboratory data management, Analysis, and Protocol development), a workflow-driven information management system specifically designed to create and manage experimental protocols, and to analyze and share laboratory data. The system combines experimental protocol development, wizard-based data acquisition, and high-throughput data analysis into a single, integrated system. We demonstrate the power and the flexibility of the platform using a microscopy case study based on a combinatorial multiple fluorescence in situ hybridization (m-FISH) protocol and 3D-image reconstruction. iLAP is freely available under the open source license AGPL from http://genome.tugraz.at/iLAP/. Conclusion iLAP is a flexible and versatile information management system, which has the potential to close the gap between electronic notebooks and LIMS and can therefore be of great value for a broad scientific community. PMID:19941647

  5. Progerin reduces LAP2α-telomere association in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria.

    PubMed

    Chojnowski, Alexandre; Ong, Peh Fern; Wong, Esther S M; Lim, John S Y; Mutalif, Rafidah A; Navasankari, Raju; Dutta, Bamaprasad; Yang, Henry; Liow, Yi Y; Sze, Siu K; Boudier, Thomas; Wright, Graham D; Colman, Alan; Burke, Brian; Stewart, Colin L; Dreesen, Oliver

    2015-08-27

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGPS) is a premature ageing syndrome caused by a mutation in LMNA, resulting in a truncated form of lamin A called progerin. Progerin triggers loss of the heterochromatic marker H3K27me3, and premature senescence, which is prevented by telomerase. However, the mechanism how progerin causes disease remains unclear. Here, we describe an inducible cellular system to model HGPS and find that LAP2α (lamina-associated polypeptide-α) interacts with lamin A, while its interaction with progerin is significantly reduced. Super-resolution microscopy revealed that over 50% of telomeres localize to the lamina and that LAP2α association with telomeres is impaired in HGPS. This impaired interaction is central to HGPS since increasing LAP2α levels rescues progerin-induced proliferation defects and loss of H3K27me3, whereas lowering LAP2 levels exacerbates progerin-induced defects. These findings provide novel insights into the pathophysiology underlying HGPS, and how the nuclear lamina regulates proliferation and chromatin organization.

  6. Learning Activity Package, Physical Science. LAP Numbers 5, 6, and 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, G. J.

    These three units of the Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) for individualized instruction in physical science cover the physical and chemical properties of water, dehydration of crystals, solutions, acidity, strong and weak bases, neutral properties of salts, amorphous forms of carbon, hydrocarbons, and petroleum products. Each unit contains a…

  7. Learning Activity Package, American Civics 92, LAPs 1 Through 3 and 5 Through 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, B. C.

    This self paced program in American Civics is for the ninth grade student who needs help on basic skills and who plans to enroll in vocational or business courses. Instructional materials, written at 9th grade level, consist of eight Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) on the following topics: Citizenship and Our Democracy; The Constitution of the…

  8. Learning Activity Package, American Civics 94, LAPs 1 Through 4 and 6 Through 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, B. C.; And Others

    This self-paced program in American Civics is for ninth grade students who definitely plan further education after high school, who have better than average grades, and who will do more than the minimum required work. Instructional materials written at 9th grade level or above consist of Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) on the following topics:…

  9. The Effectiveness of Lap-Dissolving Projections for Visualizing in Three Dimensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, James K.

    1983-01-01

    A study investigated the effectiveness of stereochemistry lap-dissolve projection as an aid to students in developing three-dimensional imaging and whether certain visual orientation tasks could be correlated with aptitude. Students found the slides helpful, and a modest correlation of achievement and visual skills was found. (MSE)

  10. Learning Activity Package, Biology, LAPs 12, 13, 15, 17, and 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoden, Bruce

    Included is a set of five teacher-prepared Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) for individualized instruction in topics in biology. The units cover the topics of individuals and populations, communities and ecosystems, diversity, plant functions, and animal functions. Each unit contains a rationale for the material; a list of behavioral objectives…

  11. The Fundamental Reasons Why Laptop Computers should not be Used on Your Lap

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, S.A.R.; Taeb, S.; Mortazavi, S.M.J.; Zarei, S.; Haghani, M.; Habibzadeh, P.; Shojaei-fard, M.B.

    2016-01-01

    As a tendency to use new technologies, gadgets such as laptop computers are becoming more popular among students, teachers, businessmen and office workers. Today laptops are a great tool for education and learning, work and personal multimedia. Millions of men, especially those in the reproductive age, are frequently using their laptop computers on the lap (thigh). Over the past several years, our lab has focused on the health effects of exposure to different sources of electromagnetic fields such as cellular phones, mobile base stations, mobile phone jammers, laptop computers, radars, dentistry cavitrons and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Our own studies as well as the studies performed by other researchers indicate that using laptop computers on the lap adversely affects the male reproductive health. When it is placed on the lap, not only the heat from a laptop computer can warm men’s scrotums, the electromagnetic fields generated by laptop’s internal electronic circuits as well as the Wi-Fi Radiofrequency radiation hazards (in a Wi-Fi connected laptop) may decrease sperm quality. Furthermore, due to poor working posture, laptops should not be used on the lap for long hours. PMID:28144597

  12. Improving Critical Thinking Skills Using Learning Model Logan Avenue Problem Solving (LAPS)-Heuristic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anggrianto, Desi; Churiyah, Madziatul; Arief, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This research was conducted in order to know the effect of Logan Avenue Problem Solving (LAPS)-Heuristic learning model towards critical thinking skills of students of class X Office Administration (APK) in SMK Negeri 1 Ngawi, East Java, Indonesia on material curve and equilibrium of demand and supply, subject Introduction to Economics and…

  13. Progerin reduces LAP2α-telomere association in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria

    PubMed Central

    Chojnowski, Alexandre; Ong, Peh Fern; Wong, Esther SM; Lim, John SY; Mutalif, Rafidah A; Navasankari, Raju; Dutta, Bamaprasad; Yang, Henry; Liow, Yi Y; Sze, Siu K; Boudier, Thomas; Wright, Graham D; Colman, Alan; Burke, Brian; Stewart, Colin L; Dreesen, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGPS) is a premature ageing syndrome caused by a mutation in LMNA, resulting in a truncated form of lamin A called progerin. Progerin triggers loss of the heterochromatic marker H3K27me3, and premature senescence, which is prevented by telomerase. However, the mechanism how progerin causes disease remains unclear. Here, we describe an inducible cellular system to model HGPS and find that LAP2α (lamina-associated polypeptide-α) interacts with lamin A, while its interaction with progerin is significantly reduced. Super-resolution microscopy revealed that over 50% of telomeres localize to the lamina and that LAP2α association with telomeres is impaired in HGPS. This impaired interaction is central to HGPS since increasing LAP2α levels rescues progerin-induced proliferation defects and loss of H3K27me3, whereas lowering LAP2 levels exacerbates progerin-induced defects. These findings provide novel insights into the pathophysiology underlying HGPS, and how the nuclear lamina regulates proliferation and chromatin organization. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07759.001 PMID:26312502

  14. Transverse Reinforcement of Adhesive Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnikov, S.; Shakirov, A.

    2015-05-01

    The shear of single-lap adhesive joints causes significant peel stresses in the adhesive layer, which is a particularly urgent problem for low-modulus polyurethane compositions. An experimental and computational analysis of various methods for increasing the load-bearing capacity of the joints by their strengthening with metallic z-elements was carried out. This strengthening hinders their delamination by the action of peel stresses, which allows one to reduce the overall dimensions and weight of adhesive joints. Two main strengthening methods were considered: with steel tapping screws (of diameter 2.5 mm) and blind aluminum rivets (of diameter 4.0 mm). The peculiarity of the strengthening lies in the fact that z-elements of minimum available diameter were used for reducing the effect of stress concentrations on the strength of the joints. The test of specimens for each type of strengthening showed an average increase in the ultimate load by 40% for the threaded reinforcements and by 10% for the rivets. During an analysis of stress state of the joints by the FEM, the nonlinear behavior of constituent materials and stress concentration in the region of reinforcing elements were taken into account. The mechanical properties of the adhesive layer and the GFRP covering were determined in separate experiments. The analysis showed that the weight of the reinforced adhesive joints could be lowered by 20-25% relative to that of unreinforced ones without reducing their load-bearing capacity. An additional effect caused by using the threaded reinforcing elements was a more than threefold increase in their rigidity as compared with that of analogous nonreinforced ones.

  15. Aircraft Electric Secondary Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Technologies resulted to aircraft power systems and aircraft in which all secondary power is supplied electrically are discussed. A high-voltage dc power generating system for fighter aircraft, permanent magnet motors and generators for aircraft, lightweight transformers, and the installation of electric generators on turbine engines are among the topics discussed.

  16. In situ X-ray observation and simulation of ratcheting-fatigue interactions in solder joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Liting; Mei, Yunhui; Chen, Gang; Chen, Xu

    2017-01-01

    Reflow voids created by solder oxidation reduce the reliability of lap joints. In situ visualization of reflow voids in Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu (SAC305) lap-shear solder joints under cyclic stressing was realized by X-ray computed tomography (CT), while the ratcheting deformation of the solder joints was monitored by a non-contact displacement detecting system (NDDS). The results revealed that the shape evolution of reflow voids in solder joints, as characterized by the sphericity of the voids, can be divided into three stages: i.e., the initial stage with a sharp drop, a stable stage, and a rapidly declining stage. A new evolution law for describing the progress of sphericity was proposed, and was further introduced into a viscoplastic constitutive model based on the OW-AF nonlinear kinematic hardening rule. The damage-coupled OW-AF model yielded an accurate estimation of the whole-life ratcheting behavior of Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu (SAC305) lap-shear solder joints. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Expression of leucine aminopeptidase 3 (LAP3) correlates with prognosis and malignant development of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

    PubMed

    Tian, Si-Yuan; Chen, Shou-Hua; Shao, Bing-Feng; Cai, Hong-Yu; Zhou, Yuan; Zhou, Yi-Long; Xu, Ai-Bing

    2014-01-01

    Leucine aminopeptidases (LAPs) were associated with tumor cell proliferation, invasion and/or angiogenesis. LAP3 is one important member of this family. However, its clinical significance and biological function in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that LAP3 expression was significantly up-regulated in HCC tissues as well as cells and was closely correlated with lower differentiation, positive lymph node metastasis and high Ki-67 expression, indicating a poor prognosis. Then cell viability assays, flow cytometry assays, wound-healing assays and matrigel invasion assays were performed to demonstrate that LAP3 promoted HCC cells proliferation by regulating G1/S checkpoint in cell cycle and advanced HCC cells migration. Furthermore, we discovered that knockdown LAP3 will enhance the sensitivity of HCC cells to cisplatin, thus promoting the cell death of HCC cells. Collectively, our results indicated that up-regulated expression of LAP3 might contribute to the proliferation and metastasis of HCC. Our data gains greater insight into the cancer-promoting role of LAP3 and its functions in HCC cells, possibly providing potential therapeutic strategies for clinical trials.

  18. Study of mechanical joint strength of aluminum alloy 7075-T6 and dual phase steel 980 welded by friction bit joining and weld-bonding under corrosion medium

    DOE PAGES

    Lim, Yong Chae; Squires, Lile; Pan, Tsung-Yu; ...

    2014-12-30

    We have employed a unique solid-sate joining process, called friction bit joining (FBJ), to spot weld aluminum alloy (AA) 7075-T6 and dual phase (DP) 980 steel. Static joint strength was studied in the lap shear tension configuration. In addition, weld-bonding (adhesive + FBJ) joints were studied in order to evaluate the ability of adhesive to mitigate the impact of corrosion on joint properties. Accelerated laboratory cyclic corrosion tests were carried out for both FBJ only and weld-bonding joints. Furthermore, the FBJ only joints that emerged from corrosion testing had lap shear failure loads that were significantly lower than freshly preparedmore » joints. However, weld-bonding specimens retained more than 80% of the lap shear failure load of the freshly prepared weld-bonding specimens. Moreover, examination of joint cross sections confirmed that the presence of adhesive in the weld-bonding joints mitigated the effect of the corrosion environment, compared to FBJ only joints.« less

  19. Petrography of Lunar Meteorite LAP 02205, a New Low-Ti Basalt Possibly Launch Paired with NWA 032

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolliff, B. L.; Zeigler, R. A.; Korotev, R. L.

    2004-01-01

    Lunar meteorite LAP 02205 is a 1.23 kg basalt collected during the 2002 field season in the La- Paz ice field, Antarctica [1]. We present a petrographic description including mineral modes and compositions, and the major-element composition of the bulk meteorite. LAP 02205 is an Fe-rich, moderately low-Ti mare basalt that is similar in composition, mineralogy, and mineral chemistry to the NWA 032 basaltic lunar meteorite. LAP 02205 is yet another of the moderately low- Ti basaltic meteorites that are underrepresented among Apollo and Luna samples but that appear from remote sensing to be the most common basalt type on the Moon.

  20. Interface Characteristics and Mechanical Properties of the Vacuum-Brazed Joint of Titanium-Steel Having a Silver-Based Brazing Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elrefaey, A.; Tillmann, W.

    2007-12-01

    The lap joint of a commercially pure titanium plate (CP Ti) to a low-carbon steel plate was produced with a vacuum-brazed furnace using a silver-based filler alloy at different temperatures and lap widths in order to investigate the effects of such brazing parameters on the joint strength and structure. It was found that the shear strength of brazed joints depends strongly on the lap width. Furthermore, we have discovered that the shear strength of the joints increases as the lap width decreases. The maximum shear strength of the joints, 54 MPa, was obtained when they were brazed at 850 °C for 15 minutes. Our observations indicate that intermetallic compound layers of CuTi and Cu2Ti were formed at the interface of the brazed area. An increase in the brazing temperature led to increased growth of these layers. Shear tests show that the fracture path occurred mainly at the CuTi layer, because this layer is hard and brittle.

  1. 75 FR 78229 - Record of Decision for the U.S. Marine Corps East Coast Basing of the F-35B Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-15

    ... operate 11 operational F-35B Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) squadrons (up to 16 aircraft per squadron, for a total of 176 aircraft) and one Pilot Training Center (PTC) (composed of two Fleet Replacement...

  2. 32 CFR Attachment 4 to Part 855 - Sample Joint-Use Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample Joint-Use Agreement 4 Attachment 4 to... AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Pt. 855, Att. 4 Attachment 4 to Part 855—Sample Joint-Use Agreement Joint-Use Agreement Between an Airport Sponsor and the United States Air Force This Joint...

  3. 32 CFR Attachment 4 to Part 855 - Sample Joint-Use Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sample Joint-Use Agreement 4 Attachment 4 to... AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Pt. 855, Att. 4 Attachment 4 to Part 855—Sample Joint-Use Agreement Joint-Use Agreement Between an Airport Sponsor and the United States Air Force This Joint...

  4. The Joint Airport Weather Studies (JAWS) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, J.; Wilson, J.; Fujita, T. T.

    1983-01-01

    A block diagram of the joint airport weather studies program is presented. Background leading to the development of the program is reviewed. Basic studies, aircraft performance, and detection and warning techniques used to develop fine scale structure of thunderstorm dynamics and kinematics in the vicinity of a major airport; effect of thunderstorm low level wind shear on aircraft performance; and development of real time testing of flow level wind shear detection and warning techniques and displays are described.

  5. Aircraft Survivability: Rotorcraft Survivability. Summer 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Published by the Joint Aircraft Survivability Program Office Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Table of Contents A ir cr af t S ur vi va bi li ty • Su m m er 2 01 0 Aircraft...60M program before Milestone B. A program Integrated Program Team (IPT) was formed and met through Milestone C. In 2007, in time for a Full Rate

  6. Grinding and polishing technology by computer controlled active lap for Φ1250mmF/1.5 aspheric mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Bin; Zeng, Zhige; Li, Xiaojin; Chen, Qiang; Gao, Pingqi; Zhou, Jiabin; Wan, Yongjian

    2010-05-01

    For large aspheric optical elements, Computer Controlled Active Lap(CCAL) manufacturing which developed in IOE (Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Science), have some advantages such as higher manufacturing efficiency, lower middle-frequency and high-frequency errors comparing the fixed lapping technology and CCOS(Computer Controlled Optical Surface) technology. A paraboloid surface of Φ1250mmF/1.5 was grinded by the active lap bonded with ceramic pills, as well as polished will pitch bonded active lap. During polishing processing a null lens was designed to test the paraboloid surface, the final testing data of RMS with ZYGO interferometer reached to 0.027λ(λ=0.6328μm).

  7. Joint pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may be done include: CBC or blood differential C-reactive protein Joint x-ray Sedimentation rate ... chap 256. Schaible H-G. Joint pain: basic mechanisms. In: McMahon SB, Koltzenburg M, Tracey I, Turk ...

  8. Propulsion controlled aircraft computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogan, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A low-cost, easily retrofit Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) system for use on a wide range of commercial and military aircraft consists of an propulsion controlled aircraft computer that reads in aircraft data including aircraft state, pilot commands and other related data, calculates aircraft throttle position for a given maneuver commanded by the pilot, and then displays both current and calculated throttle position on a cockpit display to show the pilot where to move throttles to achieve the commanded maneuver, or is automatically sent digitally to command the engines directly.

  9. Joint Interdiction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-09

    Purpose This publication has been prepared under the direction of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. It sets forth joint doctrine to govern the...governmental and nongovernmental organizations, multinational forces, and other interorganizational partners. It provides military guidance for the...exercise of authority by combatant commanders and other joint force commanders (JFCs), and prescribes joint doctrine for operations and training. It

  10. Investigation of defect rate of lap laser welding of stainless steel railway vehicles car body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongxiao

    2015-02-01

    In order to resolve the disadvantages such as poor appearance quality, poor tightness, low efficiency of resistance spot welding of stainless steel rail vehicles, partial penetration lap laser welding process was investigated widely. But due to the limitation of processing technology, there will be local incomplete fusion in the lap laser welding seam. Defect rate is the ratio of the local incomplete fusion length to the weld seam length. The tensile shear strength under different defect rate and its effect on the car body static strength are not clear. It is necessary to find the biggest defect rate by numerical analysis of effects of different defect rates on the laser welding stainless steel rail vehicle body structure strength ,and tests of laser welding shear tensile strength.

  11. Ground based experiments on the growth and characterization of L-Arginine Phosphate (LAP) crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, S. M.; Cao, C.; Batra, A. K.; Lal, R. B.; Mookherji, T. K.

    1991-01-01

    L-Arginine Phosphate (LAP) is a new nonlinear optical material with higher efficiency for harmonic generation compared to KDP. Crystals of LAP were grown in the laboratory from supersaturated solutions by temperature lowering technique. Investigations revealed the presence of large dislocation densities inside the crystals which are observed to produce refractive index changes causing damage at high laser powers. This is a result of the convection during crystal growth from supersaturated solutions. It is proposed to grow these crystals in a diffusion controlled growth condition under microgravity environment and compare the crystals grown in space with those grown on ground. Physical properties of the solutions needed for modelling of crystal growth are also presented.

  12. A laboratory study of fracture in the presence of lap splice multiple site damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayville, Ronald A.; Warren, Thomas J.

    Flat coupons were tested in the laboratory to determine a fracture criterion for link-up of fuselage lap splice multiple site damage at adjacent rivet holes. Experiments were performed on 0.040 inch (1 mm) thick 2024-T3 clad aluminum sheet. Continuous and riveted lap splice coupons were tested with simulated uniform (equal crack lengths) and nonuniform MSD, and the effects of notch sharpness were also studied. A net section stress criterion was found to provide excellent predictions of fracture for uniform MSD and uniform stress distributions. This same criterion provides conservative predictions for nonuniform MSD in uniform stress fields. An overload/cyclic stress experiment was also conducted to explore the pressurized proof test scenario of ensuring structural integrity.

  13. Performance evaluation of pitch lap in correcting mid-spatial-frequency errors under different smoothing parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lichao; Wan, Yongjian; Liu, Haitao; Wang, Jia

    2016-10-01

    Smoothing is a convenient and efficient way to restrain middle spatial frequency (MSF) errors. Based on the experience, lap diameter, rotation speed, lap pressure and the hardness of pitch layer are important to correcting MSF errors. Therefore, nine groups of experiments are designed with the orthogonal method to confirm the significance of the above parameters. Based on the Zhang's model, PV (Peak and Valley) and RMS (Root Mean Square) versus processing cycles are analyzed before and after smoothing. At the same time, the smoothing limit and smoothing rate for different parameters to correct MSF errors are analyzed. Combined with the deviation analysis, we distinguish between dominant and subordinate parameters, and find out the optimal combination and law of various parameters, so as to guide the further research and fabrication.

  14. Material characterization of structural adhesives in the lap shear mode. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenck, S. C.; Sancaktar, E.

    1983-01-01

    A general method for characterizing structural adhesives in the bonded lap shear mode is proposed. Two approaches in the form of semi-empirical and theoretical approaches are used. The semi-empirical approach includes Ludwik's and Zhurkov's equations to describe respectively, the failure stresses in the constant strain rate and constant stress loading modes with the inclusion of the temperature effects. The theoretical approach is used to describe adhesive shear stress-strain behavior with the use of viscoelastic or nonlinear elastic constitutive equations. Three different model adhesives are used in the simple lap shear mode with titanium adherends. These adhesives (one of which was developed at NASA Langley Research Center) are currently considered by NASA for possible aerospace applications. Use of different model adhesives helps in assessment of the generality of the method.

  15. Joint Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    A joint is where two or more bones come together, like the knee, hip, elbow, or shoulder. Joints can be damaged by many types of injuries or diseases, including Arthritis - inflammation of a joint. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling. Over time, ...

  16. Light-Addressable Potentiometric (LAP) Sensor Assay of Newcastle Disease Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    potentiometric (LAP) sensor, was employed to detect the presence of immobilized urease -conjugated antibodies. Lower limits of detection (LOD) of the assay were...is high, approximately 95% under the conditions of these assays (8), the number of the urease -containing antibody-antigen sandwiches immobilized will...produced un- der DND contract by the University of Alberta (Edmonton, AB). Antibody from clone 25R5 was covalently linked to urease ; antibody from clone

  17. Seismic fragility analysis of lap-spliced reinforced concrete columns retrofitted by SMA wire jackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Park, Sun-Hee; Chung, Young-Soo; Kim, Hee Sun

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study is to provide seismic fragility curves of reinforced concrete columns retrofitted by shape memory alloy wire jackets and thus assess the seismic performance of the columns against earthquakes, comparing them with reinforced concrete columns with lap-spliced and continuous reinforcement. For that purpose, this study first developed analytical models of the experimental results of the three types of columns, (1) lap-spliced reinforcement, (2) continuous reinforcement and (3) lap-spliced reinforcement and retrofitted by SMA wire jackets, using the OpenSEES program, which is oriented to nonlinear dynamic analysis. Then, a suite of ten recorded ground motions was used to conduct dynamic analyses of the analytical models with scaling of the peak ground acceleration from 0.1g to 1.0g in steps of 0.1g. From the static experimental tests, the column retrofitted with SMA wire jackets had a larger displacement ductility by a factor of 2.3 times that of the lap-spliced column, which was 6% larger compared with the ductility of the continuous reinforcement column. From the fragility analyses, the SMA wire jacketed column had median values of 0.162g and 0.567g for yield and collapse, respectively. For the yield damage state, the SMA wire jacketed column had a median value similar to the continuous reinforcement column. However, for the complete damage state, the SMA wire jacketed column showed a 1.33 times larger median value than the continuously reinforcement column.

  18. Behavior Of A Confined Tension Lap Splice In High-Strength Reinforced Concrete Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Kareem, Ahmed H.; Abousafa, Hala; El-Hadidi, Omaia S.

    2015-09-01

    The results of an experimental program conducted on seventeen simply supported concrete beams to study the effect of transverse reinforcement on the behavior of the lap splice of a steel reinforcement in tension zones in high-strength concrete beams are presented. The parameters included in the experimental program were the concrete compressive strength, the lap splice length, the amount of transverse reinforcement provided within the splice region, and the shape of the transverse reinforcement around the spliced bars. The experimental results showed that the displacement ductility increased and the mode of failure changed from a splitting bond failure to a flexural failure when the amount of the transverse reinforcement in the splice region increased, and the compressive strength increased up to 100 MPa. The presence of the transverse reinforcement around the spliced bars had a pronounced effect on increasing the ultimate load, the ultimate deflection, and the displacement ductility. The prediction of maximum steel stresses for spliced bars using the ACI 318-05 building code was compared with the experimental results. The comparison showed that the effect of the transverse reinforcement around spliced bars has to be considered into the design equations for lap splice length in high-strength concrete beams.

  19. Large-scale Advanced Prop-fan (LAP) static rotor test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degeorge, Charles L.; Turnberg, Jay E.; Wainauski, Harry S.

    1987-01-01

    Discussed is Static Rotor Testing of the SR-7L Large Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP). The LAP is an advanced 9 foot diameter, 8 bladed propeller designed and built by Hamilton Standard under contract to the NASA Lewis Research Center. The Prop-Fan employs thin swept blades to provide efficient propulsion at flight speeds up to Mach .85. Static Testing was conducted on a 10,000 HP whirl rig at Wright Patterson Air Force Base. The test objectives were to investigate the Prop-Fan static aerodynamic and structural dynamic performance, determine the blade steady state stressers and deflections and to measure steady and unsteady pressures on the SR-7L blade surface. The measured performance of the LAP correlated well with analytical predictions at blade pitch angles below 30 deg. A stall buffet phenomenon was observed at blade pitch angles above 30 deg. This phenomenon manifested itself by elevated blade vibratory stress levels and lower than expected thrust produced and power absorbed by the Prop-Fan for a given speed and blade angle.

  20. Probabilistic seismic performance assessment of lap-spliced RC columns retrofitted by steel wrapping jackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Youn, Heejung; Cho, Baik-Soon

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the seismic fragility curves of two reinforced concrete (RC) columns that were lap-spliced at the bottom and retrofitted with steel wrapping jackets were generated. Their seismic performance was probabilistically assessed in comparison to that of lap-spliced or continuous reinforcement RC columns. This study used two types of steel wrapping jackets, a full jacket and a split jacket. Analytical models of the four types of columns were developed based on the experimental results of the columns using OpenSEES, which is effective in conducting nonlinear time history analyses. A suite of ten artificial ground motions, modified from recorded ground motions, was used to perform nonlinear time history analyses of the analytical models with scaling of the peak ground acceleration from 0.1 g to 1.0 g in increments of 0.1 g. The steel wrapping jackets did not increase the medians for yield (slight damage state) of the lap-spiced column and did not exceed the corresponding median of the continuous reinforcement column. However, the two steel jackets increased the medians for failure by 1.872 and 2.017 times, respectively, and exceeded the corresponding median of the continuous reinforcement column by 11.8% and 20.5%, respectively.

  1. Unmanned aircraft systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unmanned platforms have become increasingly more common in recent years for acquiring remotely sensed data. These aircraft are referred to as Unmanned Airborne Vehicles (UAV), Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA), Remotely Piloted Vehicles (RPV), or Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), the official term used...

  2. A structural health monitoring fastener for tracking fatigue crack growth in bolted metallic joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakow, Alexi Schroder

    Fatigue cracks initiating at fastener hole locations in metallic components are among the most common form of airframe damage. The fastener hole site has been surveyed as the second leading initiation site for fatigue related accidents of fixed wing aircraft. Current methods for inspecting airframes for these cracks are manual, whereby inspectors rely on non-destructive inspection equipment or hand-held probes to scan over areas of a structure. Use of this equipment often demands disassembly of the vehicle to search appropriate hole locations for cracks, which elevates the complexity and cost of these maintenance inspections. Improved reliability, safety, and reduced cost of such maintenance can be realized by the permanent integration of sensors with a structure to detect this damage. Such an integrated system of sensors would form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system. In this study, an Additive, Interleaved, Multi-layer Electromagnetic (AIME) sensor was developed and integrated with the shank of a fastener to form a SHM Fastener, a new SHM technology targeted at detection of fastener hole cracks. The major advantages of the SHM Fastener are its installation, which does not require joint layer disassembly, its capability to detect inner layer cracks, and its capability to operate in a continuous autonomous mode. Two methods for fabricating the proposed SHM Fastener were studied. The first option consisted of a thin flexible printed circuit film that was bonded around a thin metallic sleeve placed around the fastener shank. The second option consisted of coating sensor materials directly to the shank of a part in an effort to increase the durability of the sensor under severe loading conditions. Both analytical and numerical models were developed to characterize the capability of the sensors and provide a design tool for the sensor layout. A diagnostic technique for crack growth monitoring was developed to complete the SHM system, which consists of the

  3. Fracture analyses of thin films, interfaces, and joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuth, Jack Lee, Jr.

    multi-site damage (multiple small fatigue cracks emerging from rivet holes along a single line of rivets) in the lap joints of the skins of aging aircraft. Stress intensity factors are plotted as a function of normalized crack length for two types of rivet contact conditions. The roles of transverse stresses and residual stresses induced by the riveting process are explored. The underlying cause of MSD cracking is investigated, including the potential influence of the shedding of load from one cracked rivet hole to a lesser cracked neighbor.

  4. Aircraft landing gear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, John A. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Topics presented include the laboratory simulation of landing gear pitch-plane dynamics, a summary of recent aircraft/ground vehicle friction measurement tests, some recent aircraft tire thermal studies, and an evaluation of critical speeds in high-speed aircraft. Also presented are a review of NASA antiskid braking research, titanium matrix composite landing gear development, the current methods and perspective of aircraft flotation analysis, the flow rate and trajectory of water spray produced by an aircraft tire, and spin-up studies of the Space Shuttle Orbiter main gear tire.

  5. Measurement of adhesive joint fracture properties as a function of environmental degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wylde, J.W.; Spelt, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    The increased use of structural adhesives in industry would benefit from a comprehensive failure load prediction tool to ensure competent design. The work of Fernlund and Spelt has proposed a fracture envelope that relates the critical strain energy release rate to the nominal phase angle of loading. The work of Plasinus and Spelt extended this work to incorporate the viscoelastic effect of the adhesive. The objective of the present research is to incorporate the effects of temperature and water absorption into the prediction of adhesive joint fracture. Ample evidence exists to demonstrate the notion that absorbed water has an effect predominantly detrimental, on the strength of an adhesive joint. Past work was concentrated on degrading typical, in service joints such as the Single Lap Shear (SLS) joint or the Cracked Lap Shear (CLS) joint. Since water is absorbed through the exposed edges, typically small in area compared to the volume of the joint, degradation times are usually long and the water concentration varies both with time and spatially throughout the joint. In this research, a novel method of degrading adhesive fracture specimens to a spatially constant degradation condition is being used to incorporate environmental effects into the fracture load prediction tool of Spelt et al.

  6. Small transport aircraft technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    Information on commuter airline trends and aircraft developments is provided to upgrade the preliminary findings of a NASA-formed small transport aircraft technology (STAT) team, established to determine whether the agency's research and development programs could help commuter aircraft manufacturers solve technical problems related to passenger acceptance and use of 19- to 50-passenger aircraft. The results and conclusions of the full set of completed STAT studies are presented. These studies were performed by five airplane manufacturers, five engine manufacturers, and two propeller manufacturers. Those portions of NASA's overall aeronautics research and development programs which are applicable to commuter aircraft design are summarized. Areas of technology that might beneficially be expanded or initiated to aid the US commuter aircraft manufacturers in the evolution of improved aircraft for the market are suggested.

  7. Aircraft vulnerability analysis by modeling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willers, Cornelius J.; Willers, Maria S.; de Waal, Alta

    2014-10-01

    Infrared missiles pose a significant threat to civilian and military aviation. ManPADS missiles are especially dangerous in the hands of rogue and undisciplined forces. Yet, not all the launched missiles hit their targets; the miss being either attributable to misuse of the weapon or to missile performance restrictions. This paper analyses some of the factors affecting aircraft vulnerability and demonstrates a structured analysis of the risk and aircraft vulnerability problem. The aircraft-missile engagement is a complex series of events, many of which are only partially understood. Aircraft and missile designers focus on the optimal design and performance of their respective systems, often testing only in a limited set of scenarios. Most missiles react to the contrast intensity, but the variability of the background is rarely considered. Finally, the vulnerability of the aircraft depends jointly on the missile's performance and the doctrine governing the missile's launch. These factors are considered in a holistic investigation. The view direction, altitude, time of day, sun position, latitude/longitude and terrain determine the background against which the aircraft is observed. Especially high gradients in sky radiance occur around the sun and on the horizon. This paper considers uncluttered background scenes (uniform terrain and clear sky) and presents examples of background radiance at all view angles across a sphere around the sensor. A detailed geometrical and spatially distributed radiometric model is used to model the aircraft. This model provides the signature at all possible view angles across the sphere around the aircraft. The signature is determined in absolute terms (no background) and in contrast terms (with background). It is shown that the background significantly affects the contrast signature as observed by the missile sensor. A simplified missile model is constructed by defining the thrust and mass profiles, maximum seeker tracking rate, maximum

  8. The Structure and Enzyme Characteristics of a Recombinant Leucine Aminopeptidase rLap1 from Aspergillus sojae and Its Application in Debittering.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Qian; Zhong, Li-Fen; Meng, Zhi-Zhong; You, Zi-Juan; Li, Jia-Zhou; Luo, Xiao-Chun

    2015-09-01

    A leucine aminopeptidase Lap1 was cloned from Aspergillus sojae GIM3.30. The truncated Lap1 without a signal peptide was over-expressed in P. pastoris, and the enzymatic characteristics of recombinant Lap1 (rLap1) were tested. The rLap1 was about 36.7 kDa with an optimal pH 8.0 and optimal temperature 50 °C for substrate Leu-p-nitroanilide and it sustained 50 % activity after 1 h incubation at 50 °C. The activity of rLap1 was significantly inhibited by EDTA, whereas Co(2+), Mn(2+), and Ca(2+) ions, but not Zn(2+) ions, restored its activity. rLap1 showed the highest activity against Arg-pNA and then Leu-, Lys-, Met-, and Phe-pNA. The 3D structure of rLap1 showed it had a conserved functional charge/dipole complex and a hydrogen bond network of Zn2-D179-S228-Q177-D229-S158 around its active center. An acidic Asp residue was found at the bottom of the substrate binding pocket, which explains its preference for basic N-terminal amino acid substrates such as Arg and Lys. rLap1 improved the degree of hydrolysis of casein and soy protein hydrolysates and also decreased their bitterness, indicating its potential utility in food production.

  9. Mechanical properties of dissimilar metal joints composed of DP 980 steel and AA 7075-T6

    DOE PAGES

    Squires, Lile; Lim, Yong Chae; Miles, Michael; ...

    2015-03-18

    In this study, a solid state joining process, called friction bit joining, was used to spot weld aluminium alloy 7075-T6 to dual phase 980 steel. Lap shear failure loads for specimens without adhesive averaged ~10kN, while cross-tension specimens averaged 2·8 kN. Addition of adhesive with a thickness up to 500 μm provided a gain of ~50% to lap shear failure loads, while a much thinner layer of adhesive increased cross-tension failure loads by 20%. Microstructures of the welds were martensitic, but the hardness of the joining bit portion was greater than that of the DP 980, owing to its highermore » alloy content. Softening in the heat affected zone of a welded joint appeared to be relatively small, though it was enough to cause nugget pullout failures in some lap shear tension specimens. Finally, other failures in lap shear tension were interfacial, while all of the failures in cross-tension were interfacial.« less

  10. Mechanical properties of dissimilar metal joints composed of DP 980 steel and AA 7075-T6

    SciTech Connect

    Squires, Lile; Lim, Yong Chae; Miles, Michael; Feng, Zhili

    2015-03-18

    In this study, a solid state joining process, called friction bit joining, was used to spot weld aluminium alloy 7075-T6 to dual phase 980 steel. Lap shear failure loads for specimens without adhesive averaged ~10kN, while cross-tension specimens averaged 2·8 kN. Addition of adhesive with a thickness up to 500 μm provided a gain of ~50% to lap shear failure loads, while a much thinner layer of adhesive increased cross-tension failure loads by 20%. Microstructures of the welds were martensitic, but the hardness of the joining bit portion was greater than that of the DP 980, owing to its higher alloy content. Softening in the heat affected zone of a welded joint appeared to be relatively small, though it was enough to cause nugget pullout failures in some lap shear tension specimens. Finally, other failures in lap shear tension were interfacial, while all of the failures in cross-tension were interfacial.

  11. The Department of Defense Should Avoid a Joint Acquisition Approach to the Sixth-Generation Fighter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    outcomes. • The JSF is exhibiting trends similar to prior joint aircraft programs. • Historical analysis suggests that joint aircraft programs have...per- mission to move into the engineering and manufacturing development phase. 4 PAF analysis shows that the average joint acquisition cost-growth...cycle cost below that of two single-service programs.6 PAF analysis of historical O&S cost data from existing fighter programs suggests that an ideal

  12. Structural Performance of Inconel 625 Superalloy Brazed Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianqiang; Demers, Vincent; Cadotte, Eve-Line; Turner, Daniel; Bocher, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate tensile and fatigue behaviors of Inconel 625 superalloy brazed joints after transient liquid-phase bonding process. Brazing was performed in a vacuum furnace using a nickel-based filler metal in a form of paste to join wrought Inconel 625 plates. Mechanical tests were carried out on single-lap joints under various lap distance-to-thickness ratios. The fatigue crack initiation and crack growth modes were examined via metallographic analysis, and the effect of local stress on fatigue life was assessed by finite element simulations. The fatigue results show that fatigue strength and endurance limit increase with overlap distance, leading to a relatively large scatter of results. Fatigue cracks nucleated in the high-stressed region of the weld fillets from brittle eutectic phases or from internal brazing cavities. The present work proposes to rationalize the results by using the local stress at the brazing fillet. When using this local stress, all fatigue-obtained results find themselves on a single S-N curve, providing a design curve for any joint configuration in fatigue solicitation.

  13. Structural Performance of Inconel 625 Superalloy Brazed Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianqiang; Demers, Vincent; Cadotte, Eve-Line; Turner, Daniel; Bocher, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate tensile and fatigue behaviors of Inconel 625 superalloy brazed joints after transient liquid-phase bonding process. Brazing was performed in a vacuum furnace using a nickel-based filler metal in a form of paste to join wrought Inconel 625 plates. Mechanical tests were carried out on single-lap joints under various lap distance-to-thickness ratios. The fatigue crack initiation and crack growth modes were examined via metallographic analysis, and the effect of local stress on fatigue life was assessed by finite element simulations. The fatigue results show that fatigue strength and endurance limit increase with overlap distance, leading to a relatively large scatter of results. Fatigue cracks nucleated in the high-stressed region of the weld fillets from brittle eutectic phases or from internal brazing cavities. The present work proposes to rationalize the results by using the local stress at the brazing fillet. When using this local stress, all fatigue-obtained results find themselves on a single S- N curve, providing a design curve for any joint configuration in fatigue solicitation.

  14. Hybrid Airships in Joint Logistics Over the Shore (JLOTS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-13

    past year. A special thanks to Nathaniel that sat on my lap many nights and pecked at the key board when I was not looking. A debt of gratitude is...can allow silt to build up in channels, which makes the water shallower or channel too narrow. Natural disasters can degrade ports like Haiti’s Port...than one service is involved in the operation. Almost every LOTS operation that the U.S. Army is involved with is Joint by nature . 5 JLOTS

  15. Corrosion Behavior of Aluminum-Steel Weld-Brazing Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu; Li, Jie; Zhang, Gang; Huang, Jiankang; Gu, Yufen

    2016-05-01

    Dissimilar metals of 1060 aluminum and galvanized steel were joined with a lap joint by pulsed double-electrode gas metal arc weld brazing with aluminum-magnesium and aluminum-silicon filler metals. The corrosion behavior of the weld joints was investigated with immersion corrosion and electrochemical corrosion tests, and the corrosion morphology of the joints was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Galvanic corrosion was found to occur when the samples were immersed in corrosive media, and the corrosion rate of joints was increased with increased heat input of the workpiece. Comparison of the corrosion properties of weld joints with different filler wires indicated that the corrosion rate of weld joints with aluminum-silicon filler wire was larger than that of weld joints with aluminum-magnesium filler wire. Results also showed that the zinc-rich zone of weld joints was prone to corrosion. The corrosion behavior of zinc-rich zone was analyzed with SEM equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis system based on the test results.

  16. Training Engineers of Joint Programs for the European Aerospace Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jurgen

    1985-01-01

    Examines topics and issues related to training engineers of joint programs for the European aerospace industry. Forms of cooperation, European educational systems, and skills needed to successfully work as an engineer in a joint program for the European aircraft industry are the major areas addressed. (JN)

  17. Future Joint Seabasing in the Asia-Pacific Region

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) and the Joint Maritime Assault Connector ( JMAC ) provide the means to quickly move forces and cargo intra-theater from...shipping on high speed JMAC , EFV, and/or rotary wing aircraft.72 The 2005 Seabasing JIC is a great point of departure in attempting to describe

  18. 76 FR 18376 - Airworthiness Directives; CPAC, Inc. (Type Certificate Formerly Held by Commander Aircraft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... that the system operates with ease, smoothness, and positiveness appropriate to its function. Note.... Subject (d) Joint Aircraft System Component (JASC)/Air Transport Association (ATA) of America Code...

  19. Ceramic joints

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Bradley J.; Patten, Jr., Donald O.

    1991-01-01

    Butt joints between materials having different coefficients of thermal expansion are prepared having a reduced probability of failure of stress facture. This is accomplished by narrowing/tapering the material having the lower coefficient of thermal expansion in a direction away from the joint interface and not joining the narrow-tapered surface to the material having the higher coefficient of thermal expansion.

  20. Wear residue from polishing sapphire with silica aquasol on a tin lap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Joachim; Weis, Olaf

    1994-08-01

    Sapphire can be superpolished with a tin lap and aqueous colloidal silica as a polishing liquid. We present investigations of the polishing residue that was enriched in a special wearing mill. Elemental analysis, X-ray analysis by diffraction and MAS-NMR studies were performed to obtain an understanding of the microscopic polishing mechanism. We conclude that sapphire is abraded atom by atom in this polishing procedure and that the abraded aluminum atoms are finally chemically bonded in the colloidal silica clusters, in contrast to models proposed earlier.

  1. Correlation of field injuries and GM hybrid III dummy responses for lap-shoulder belt restraint.

    PubMed

    Nyquist, G W; Begman, P C; King, A I; Mertz, H J

    1980-05-01

    Simulated frontal, lap-shoulder belted, barrier impact tests were performed using a Volvo sedan and General Motors Hybrid III anthropomorphic test dummy. Swedish field accident injury data for this vehicle are available from another published study. For the purpose of this program, the injuries were logically subdivided into four body regions: head, neck, thorax, and lower torso. The Hybrid III has instrumentation in each of these regions. The results of three replicated tests at barrier equivalent velocities of nominally 32 and 48 km/h are discussed in terms of the field injuries, thereby providing a basis for more intelligent interpretation of future Hybrid III test results.

  2. Raptors and aircraft

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.G.; Ellis, D.H.; Johnson, T.H.; Glinski, Richard L.; Pendleton, Beth Giron; Moss, Mary Beth; LeFranc, Maurice N.=; Millsap, Brian A.; Hoffman, Stephen W.

    1988-01-01

    Less than 5% of all bird strikes of aircraft are by raptor species, but damage to airframe structure or jet engine dysfunction are likely consequences. Beneficial aircraft-raptor interactions include the use of raptor species to frighten unwanted birds from airport areas and the use of aircraft to census raptor species. Many interactions, however, modify the raptor?s immediate behavior and some may decrease reproduction of sensitive species. Raptors may respond to aircraft stimuli by exhibiting alarm, increased heart rate, flushing or fleeing and occasionally by directly attacking intruding aircraft. To date, most studies reveal that raptor responses to aircraft are brief and do not limit reproduction; however, additional study is needed.

  3. Analytical and Numerical Results for an Adhesively Bonded Joint Subjected to Pure Bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Lundgren, Eric

    2006-01-01

    A one-dimensional, semi-analytical methodology that was previously developed for evaluating adhesively bonded joints composed of anisotropic adherends and adhesives that exhibit inelastic material behavior is further verified in the present paper. A summary of the first-order differential equations and applied joint loading used to determine the adhesive response from the methodology are also presented. The method was previously verified against a variety of single-lap joint configurations from the literature that subjected the joints to cases of axial tension and pure bending. Using the same joint configuration and applied bending load presented in a study by Yang, the finite element analysis software ABAQUS was used to further verify the semi-analytical method. Linear static ABAQUS results are presented for two models, one with a coarse and one with a fine element meshing, that were used to verify convergence of the finite element analyses. Close agreement between the finite element results and the semi-analytical methodology were determined for both the shear and normal stress responses of the adhesive bondline. Thus, the semi-analytical methodology was successfully verified using the ABAQUS finite element software and a single-lap joint configuration subjected to pure bending.

  4. Aircraft Survivability. Spring 2009

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Surviving an Aircraft Crash with Airbag Restraintsby Thomas Barth Inflatable restraint solutions have improved the survivability of commercial...Surviving an Aircraft Crash with Airbag Restraints by Thomas Barth Transport Aircraft Interiors The AmSafe Aviation Airbag entered service on commercial...all night.” Keithley also noted that, in his early days at BRL, Walt teamed up with a group of like-minded innovators, including Jim Foulk, Roland

  5. Lightning effects on aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Direct and indirect effects of lightning on aircraft were examined in relation to aircraft design. Specific trends in design leading to more frequent lightning strikes were individually investigated. These trends included the increasing use of miniaturized, solid state components in aircraft electronics and electric power systems. A second trend studied was the increasing use of reinforced plastics and other nonconducting materials in place of aluminum skins, a practice that reduces the electromagnetic shielding furnished by a conductive skin.

  6. Acute cervical spinal cord injury secondary to air bag deployment without proper use of lap or shoulder harnesses.

    PubMed

    Hart, R A; Mayberry, J C; Herzberg, A M

    2000-02-01

    The authors present a case report of a patient with cervical central spinal cord syndrome caused by a hyperextension injury after a motor vehicle collision in which the air bag deployed in the absence of shoulder or lap belt harnesses. The potential for cervical spine and spinal cord hyperextension injuries in passengers positioned in front of air bags without proper use of shoulder or lap belt harnesses is discussed. Cervical central spinal cord quadriplegia occurred with cervical spondylosis and kyphosis that was managed by early three-level cervical corpectomy in a 58-year-old patient. Early improvement in the patient's neurological status occurred but was incomplete at the time of this report. Cervical hyperextension injuries are possible in passengers positioned in the front seat of cars with air bags when shoulder or lap belt harnesses are not used properly. Previous biomechanical studies have documented the potential for these types of injuries.

  7. Hypersonic aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkamhawi, Hani; Greiner, Tom; Fuerst, Gerry; Luich, Shawn; Stonebraker, Bob; Wray, Todd

    1990-01-01

    A hypersonic aircraft is designed which uses scramjets to accelerate from Mach 6 to Mach 10 and sustain that speed for two minutes. Different propulsion systems were considered and it was decided that the aircraft would use one full scale turbofan-ramjet. Two solid rocket boosters were added to save fuel and help the aircraft pass through the transonic region. After considering aerodynamics, aircraft design, stability and control, cooling systems, mission profile, and landing systems, a conventional aircraft configuration was chosen over that of a waverider. The conventional design was chosen due to its landing characteristics and the relative expense compared to the waverider. Fuel requirements and the integration of the engine systems and their inlets are also taken into consideration in the final design. A hypersonic aircraft was designed which uses scramjets to accelerate from Mach 6 to Mach 10 and sustain that speed for two minutes. Different propulsion systems were considered and a full scale turbofan-ramjet was chosen. Two solid rocket boosters were added to save fuel and help the aircraft pass through the transonic reqion. After the aerodynamics, aircraft design, stability and control, cooling systems, mission profile, landing systems, and their physical interactions were considered, a conventional aircraft configuration was chosen over that of a waverider. The conventional design was chosen due to its landing characteristics and the relative expense compared to the waverider. Fuel requirements and the integration of the engine systems and their inlets were also considered in the designing process.

  8. Structureborne noise in aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevenson, S. A.; Metcalf, V. L.

    1987-01-01

    The amount of noise reaching an aircraft's interior by structureborne paths, when high levels of other noises are present, involves the measurement of transfer functions between vibrating levels on the wing and interior noise. The magnitude of the structureborne noise transfer function is established by exciting the aircraft with an electrodynamic shaker; a second transfer function is measured using the same sensor locations with the aircraft engines operating. Attention is given to the case of a twin-turboprop OV-10A aircraft; the resulting transfer function values at the discrete frequencies corresponding to the propeller blade passage frequency and its first four harmonics are tabulated and illustrated.

  9. L-Cysteine and L-AP4 microinjections in the rat caudal ventrolateral medulla decrease arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Yumi

    2014-12-01

    The thiol amino acid L-cysteine increases arterial blood pressure (ABP) when injected into the cerebrospinal fluid space in conscious rats, indicating a pressor response to centrally acting L-cysteine. A prior synaptic membrane binding assay suggests that L-cysteine has a strong affinity for the L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4) binding site. The central action of L-cysteine may be vial-AP4 sensitive receptors. The present study investigated cardiovascular responses to L-cysteine and L-ap4 microinjected into the autonomic area of the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) where inhibitory neurons regulate ABP via pre-sympathetic vasomotor neurons. Both the injection of L-cysteine and L-AP4 in the CVLM sites identified with L-glutamate produced the same depressor and bradycardic responses in urethane-anesthetized rats. Neither a prior antagonist microinjection of MK801 for the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor nor CNQX for the non-NMDA receptor attenuated the responses to L-cysteine, but the combination of the two receptor blocking with an additional prior injection abolished the response. In contrast, either receptor blockade alone abolished the response to L-AP4, indicating distinct mechanisms between responses to L-cysteine and L-AP4 in the CVLM. The results indicate that the CVLM is a central active site for L-cysteine's cardiovascular response. Central L-cysteine's action could be independent of the L-AP4 sensitive receptors. Cardiovascular regulation may involve endogenous L-cysteine in the CVLM. Further multidisciplinary examinations are required to elaborate on L-cysteine's functional roles in the CVLM.

  10. Combining FoxP3 and Helios with GARP/LAP markers can identify expanded Treg subsets in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Abd Al Samid, May; Chaudhary, Belal; Khaled, Yazan S; Ammori, Basil J; Elkord, Eyad

    2016-03-22

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) comprise numerous heterogeneous subsets with distinct phenotypic and functional features. Identifying Treg markers is critical to investigate the role and clinical impact of various Treg subsets in pathological settings, and also for developing more effective immunotherapies. We have recently shown that non-activated FoxP3-Helios+ and activated FoxP3+/-Helios+ CD4+ T cells express GARP/LAP immunosuppressive markers in healthy donors. In this study we report similar observations in the peripheral blood of patients with pancreatic cancer (PC) and liver metastases from colorectal cancer (LICRC). Comparing levels of different Treg subpopulations in cancer patients and controls, we report that in PC patients, and unlike LICRC patients, there was no increase in Treg levels as defined by FoxP3 and Helios. However, defining Tregs based on GARP/LAP expression showed that FoxP3-LAP+ Tregs in non-activated and activated settings, and FoxP3+Helios+GARP+LAP+ activated Tregs were significantly increased in both groups of patients, compared with controls. This work implies that a combination of Treg-specific markers could be used to more accurately determine expanded Treg subsets and to understand their contribution in cancer settings. Additionally, GARP-/+LAP+ CD4+ T cells made IL-10, and not IFN-γ, and levels of IL-10-secreting CD4+ T cells were elevated in LICRC patients, especially with higher tumor staging. Taken together, our results indicate that investigations of Treg levels in different cancers should consider diverse Treg-related markers such as GARP, LAP, Helios, and others and not only FoxP3 as a sole Treg-specific marker.

  11. Impaired Circulating CD4+LAP+ Regulatory T Cells in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome and Its Mechanistic Study

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiao-Bo; Yu, Kun-Wu; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Peng-Fei; Ren, Ze-Peng; Wu, Bang-Wei; Ji, Qin-Wei; Wang, Xiang; Zeng, Qiu-Tang

    2014-01-01

    Objective CD4+ latency-associated peptide (LAP)+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a newly discovered T cell subset in humans and the role of these cells in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has not been explored. We designed to investigate whether circulating frequency and function of CD4+LAP+ Tregs are defective in ACS. Methods One hundred eleven ACS patients (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina) and 117 control patients were enrolled in the study. The control patients consisted of chronic stable angina (CSA) and chest pain syndrome (CPS). The frequencies of circulating CD4+LAP+ Tregs and the expression of the transmembrane protein glycoprotein-A repetitions predominant (GARP) on CD4+ T cells were determined by flow cytometry. The function of CD4+LAP+ Tregs was detected using thymidine uptake. Serum interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β protein (TGF-β) levels were detected using ELISA and expression of GARP mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was measured by real time-polymerase chain reaction. Results We found ACS patients had a significantly lower frequency of circulating CD4+LAP+ Tregs, and the function of these cells was reduced compared to controls. The expression of GARP in CD4+ T cells and the serum levels of TGF-β in ACS patients were lower than those of control patients. The serum levels of IL-10 were similar between the two cohorts. Conclusions A novel regulatory T cell subset, defined as CD4+LAP+ T cells is defective in ACS patients. PMID:24558424

  12. PLASMA POLYMER FILMS AS ADHESION PROMOTING PRIMERS FOR ALUMINUM. PART II: STRENGTH AND DURABILITY OF LAP JOINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) films (~800 A in thickness) were deposited onto 6111-T4 aluminum substrates in radio frequency and microwave powered reactors and used as primers for structural adhesive bonding. Processing variables such as substrate pre-treatment,...

  13. Atomic force and super-resolution microscopy support a role for LapA as a cell-surface biofilm adhesin of Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Ivan E.; Boyd, Chelsea D.; Newell, Peter D.; Schwartz, Mary E.; Turnbull, Lynne; Johnson, Michael S.; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; O’Toole, George A.; Camesano, Terri A.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescence Pf0-1 requires the large repeat protein LapA for stable surface attachment. This study presents direct evidence that LapA is a cell-surface-localized adhesin. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed a significant twofold reduction in adhesion force for mutants lacking the LapA protein on the cell surface compared to the wild-type strain. Deletion of lapG, a gene encoding a periplasmic cysteine protease that functions to release LapA from the cell surface, resulted in a twofold increase in the force of adhesion. Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) revealed the presence of the LapA protein on the cell surface, consistent with its role as an adhesin. The protein is only visualized in the cytoplasm for a mutant of the ABC transporter responsible for translocating LapA to the cell surface. Together, these data highlight the power of combining the use of AFM and 3D-SIM with genetic studies to demonstrate that LapA, a member of a large group of RTX-like repeat proteins, is a cell-surface adhesin. PMID:23064158

  14. (40)Ar/(39)Ar Age of Hornblende-Bearing R Chondrite LAP 04840

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Cosca, M.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrites have a complex chronology due to several variables affecting and operating on chondritic parent bodies such as radiogenic heating, pressure and temperature variation with depth, aqueous alteration, and shock or impact heating. Unbrecciated chondrites can record ages from 4.56 to 4.4 Ga that represent cooling in small parent bodies. Some brecciated chondrites exhibit younger ages (much less than 4 to 4.4 Ga) that may reflect the age of brecciation, disturbance, or shock and impact events (much less than 4 Ga). A unique R chondrite was recently found in the LaPaz Icefield of Antarctica - LAP 04840. This chondrite contains approximately 15% hornblende and trace amounts of biotite, making it the first of its kind. Studies have revealed an equigranular texture, mineral equilibria yielding equilibration near 650-700 C and 250-500 bars, hornblende that is dominantly OH-bearing (very little Cl or F), and high D/H ratios. To help gain a better understanding of the origin of this unique sample, we have measured the (40)Ar/(39)Ar age (LAP 04840 split 39).

  15. Laparoscopic adjustable silicone gastric banding: prospective evaluation of intragastric migration of the lap-band.

    PubMed

    Silecchia, G; Restuccia, A; Elmore, U; Polito, D; Perrotta, N; Genco, A; Bacci, V; Basso, N

    2001-08-01

    Intragastric prosthesis (Lap-Band, BioEnterics Co., Carpinteria, CA, U.S.A.) migration is one of the major long-term complications of laparoscopic adjustable silicone gastric banding. The causes, clinical signs, timing, and overall incidence of band entrapment have not been prospectively investigated in a large series. The purpose of this study was to assess prospectively the incidence of Lap-Band intragastric migration and to establish the safety and effectiveness of minimally invasive band removal. Between January 1996 and June 2000, 148 consecutive patients enrolled in a multidisciplinary bariatric program underwent laparoscopic adjustable silicone gastric banding. In the follow-up treatment, gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed routinely. One hundred twenty-three patients with a minimum follow-up period of 12 months were entered into the study group. Eleven (9.2%) patients had long-term major complications. Intragastric band migration was observed in nine (7.5%) patients. The diagnosis was established by routine endoscopy between 10 and 41 months after surgery. Five erosions occurred in the first 30 cases (learning curve period). In six patients, the band was removed by an intragastric endoscopic-assisted approach avoiding laparotomy. The remaining three patients are under endoscopic surveillance. The results of this study show that routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy can discover asymptomatic band migrations early. Band erosion did not require emergency treatment and can be removed safely by a minimally invasive approach.

  16. Lap Shear and Impact Testing of Ochre and Beeswax in Experimental Middle Stone Age Compound Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Kozowyk, P R B; Langejans, G H J; Poulis, J A

    2016-01-01

    The production of compound adhesives using disparate ingredients is seen as some of the best evidence of advanced cognition outside of the use of symbolism. Previous field and laboratory testing of adhesives has shown the complexities involved in creating an effective Middle Stone Age glue using Acacia gum. However, it is currently unclear how efficient different adhesive recipes are, how much specific ingredients influence their performance, and how difficult it may have been for those ingredients to be combined to maximum effect. We conducted a series of laboratory-based lap shear and impact tests, following modern adhesion testing standards, to determine the efficacy of compound adhesives, with particular regard to the ingredient ratios. We tested rosin (colophony) and gum adhesives, containing additives of beeswax and ochre in varying ratios. During both lap shear and impact tests compound rosin adhesives performed better than single component rosin adhesives, and pure acacia gum was the strongest. The large difference in performance between each base adhesive and the significant changes in performance that occur due to relatively small changes in ingredient ratios lend further support to the notion that high levels of skill and knowledge were required to consistently produce the most effective adhesives.

  17. Lap Shear and Impact Testing of Ochre and Beeswax in Experimental Middle Stone Age Compound Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The production of compound adhesives using disparate ingredients is seen as some of the best evidence of advanced cognition outside of the use of symbolism. Previous field and laboratory testing of adhesives has shown the complexities involved in creating an effective Middle Stone Age glue using Acacia gum. However, it is currently unclear how efficient different adhesive recipes are, how much specific ingredients influence their performance, and how difficult it may have been for those ingredients to be combined to maximum effect. We conducted a series of laboratory-based lap shear and impact tests, following modern adhesion testing standards, to determine the efficacy of compound adhesives, with particular regard to the ingredient ratios. We tested rosin (colophony) and gum adhesives, containing additives of beeswax and ochre in varying ratios. During both lap shear and impact tests compound rosin adhesives performed better than single component rosin adhesives, and pure acacia gum was the strongest. The large difference in performance between each base adhesive and the significant changes in performance that occur due to relatively small changes in ingredient ratios lend further support to the notion that high levels of skill and knowledge were required to consistently produce the most effective adhesives. PMID:26983080

  18. Digital signal processing using lapped transforms with variable parameter windows and orthonormal bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raduenz, Brian D.

    1992-12-01

    A number of new concepts and tools for the analysis of signals using variable overlapped windows and orthonormal bases are developed and evaluated. Windowing, often employed as a spectral estimation technique, can result in irreparable distortions in the transformed signal. By placing conditions on the window and incorporating it into the orthonormal representation, any signal distortion resulting from the transformation can be eliminated or cancelled in reconstruction. This concept is critical to the theory discussed. As part of this evaluation, a tensor product based general N-point fast Fourier transform algorithm was implemented in the DOD standard language, Ada. The most prevalent criticism of Ada is slow execution time. This code is shown to be comparable in execution time performance to the corresponding FORTRAN code. Also, a new paradigm is presented for solving the finite length data problem associated with filter banks and lapped transforms. This result could have significant importance in many Air Force applications, such as processing images in which the objects of interest are near the borders. Additionally, a limited number of experiments were performed with the coding of speech. The results indicate the lapped transform evaluated has potential as a low bit rate speech coder.

  19. The development of laser-plasma interaction program LAP3D on thousands of processors

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaoyan Hao, Liang; Liu, Zhanjun; Zheng, Chunyang; Li, Bin Guo, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Modeling laser-plasma interaction (LPI) processes in real-size experiments scale is recognized as a challenging task. For explorering the influence of various instabilities in LPI processes, a three-dimensional laser and plasma code (LAP3D) has been developed, which includes filamentation, stimulated Brillouin backscattering (SBS), stimulated Raman backscattering (SRS), non-local heat transport and plasmas flow computation modules. In this program, a second-order upwind scheme is applied to solve the plasma equations which are represented by an Euler fluid model. Operator splitting method is used for solving the equations of the light wave propagation, where the Fast Fourier translation (FFT) is applied to compute the diffraction operator and the coordinate translations is used to solve the acoustic wave equation. The coupled terms of the different physics processes are computed by the second-order interpolations algorithm. In order to simulate the LPI processes in massively parallel computers well, several parallel techniques are used, such as the coupled parallel algorithm of FFT and fluid numerical computation, the load balance algorithm, and the data transfer algorithm. Now the phenomena of filamentation, SBS and SRS have been studied in low-density plasma successfully with LAP3D. Scalability of the program is demonstrated with a parallel efficiency above 50% on about ten thousand of processors.

  20. Solder Joint Health Monitoring Testbed System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delaney, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    The density and pin count for Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) has been increasing, and has exceeded current methods of solder joint inspection, making early detection of failures more problematic. These failures are a concern for both flight safety and maintenance in commercial aviation. Ridgetop Group, Inc. has developed a method for detecting solder joint failures in real time. The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center is developing a set of boards to test this method in ground environmental and accelerated testing as well as flight test on a Dryden F-15 or F-18 research aircraft. In addition to detecting intermittent and total solder joint failures, environmental data on the boards, such as temperature and vibration, will be collected and time-correlated to aircraft state data. This paper details the technical approach involved in the detection process, and describes the design process and products to date for Dryden s FPGA failure detection boards.

  1. Compliant joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eklund, Wayne D. (Inventor); Kerley, James J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A compliant joint is provided for prosthetic and robotic devices which permits rotation in three different planes. The joint provides for the controlled use of cable under motion. Perpendicular outer mounting frames are joined by swaged cables that interlock at a center block. Ball bearings allow for the free rotation of the second mounting frame relative to the first mounting frame within a predetermined angular rotation that is controlled by two stop devices. The cables allow for compliance at the stops and the cables allow for compliance in six degrees of freedom enabling the duplication or simulation of the rotational movement and flexibility of a natural hip or knee joint, as well as the simulation of a joint designed for a specific robotic component for predetermined design parameters.

  2. Joint Commission

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content The Joint Commission Log In | Request Guest Access Forgot password? | Log In Help Contact Us | Careers | JCR Web Store | Press Room Search Home Accreditation Accreditation Ambulatory Health ...

  3. Probabilistic and Possibilistic Analyses of the Strength of a Bonded Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. Jefferson; Krishnamurthy, T.; Smith, Steven A.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of uncertainties on the strength of a single lap shear joint are explained. Probabilistic and possibilistic methods are used to account for uncertainties. Linear and geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses are used in the studies. To evaluate the strength of the joint, fracture in the adhesive and material strength failure in the strap are considered. The study shows that linear analyses yield conservative predictions for failure loads. The possibilistic approach for treating uncertainties appears to be viable for preliminary design, but with several qualifications.

  4. General Aviation Aircraft Reliability Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Duane; Turnbull, Andrew; Roelant, Henk A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This reliability study was performed in order to provide the aviation community with an estimate of Complex General Aviation (GA) Aircraft System reliability. To successfully improve the safety and reliability for the next generation of GA aircraft, a study of current GA aircraft attributes was prudent. This was accomplished by benchmarking the reliability of operational Complex GA Aircraft Systems. Specifically, Complex GA Aircraft System reliability was estimated using data obtained from the logbooks of a random sample of the Complex GA Aircraft population.

  5. Cable Tensiometer for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The invention is a cable tensiometer that can be used on aircraft for real-time, in-flight cable tension measurements. The invention can be used on any aircraft cables with high precision. The invention is extremely light-weight, hangs on the cable being tested and uses a dual bending beam design with a high mill-volt output to determine tension.

  6. Lightning protection of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, F. A.; Plumer, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The current knowledge concerning potential lightning effects on aircraft and the means that are available to designers and operators to protect against these effects are summarized. The increased use of nonmetallic materials in the structure of aircraft and the constant trend toward using electronic equipment to handle flight-critical control and navigation functions have served as impetus for this study.

  7. Aircraft landing control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambregts, Antonius A. (Inventor); Hansen, Rolf (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Upon aircraft landing approach, flare path command signals of altitude, vertical velocity and vertical acceleration are generated as functions of aircraft position and velocity with respect to the ground. The command signals are compared with corresponding actual values to generate error signals which are used to control the flight path.

  8. Predicting Aircraft Availability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    ENS- GRP -13-J-2 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio...AFIT-ENS- GRP -13-J-2 PREDICTING AIRCRAFT AVAILABILITY GRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT Presented to the Faculty Department of Operational...APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT-ENS- GRP -13-J-2 PREDICTING AIRCRAFT AVAILABILITY Mark A. Chapa

  9. Wing Rock Prediction Method for a High Performance Fighter Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    are statically stable at lower angles-of-attack. Therefore, it is possible to study basic stable motions of these aircraft without an added stabilizing ... control system. Third, extensive and well validated F-15 and F-4 aerodynamic databases were available. Finally, as part of the AFIT/TPS joint program

  10. Affordable MMW aircraft collision avoidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almsted, Larry D.; Becker, Robert C.; Zelenka, Richard E.

    1997-06-01

    Collision avoidance is of concern to all aircraft, requiring the detection and identification of hazardous terrain or obstacles in sufficient time for clearance maneuvers. The collision avoidance requirement is even more demanding for helicopters, as their unique capabilities result in extensive operations at low-altitude, near to terrain and other hazardous obstacles. TO augment the pilot's visual collision avoidance abilities, some aircraft are equipped with 'enhanced-vision' systems or terrain collision warning systems. Enhanced-vision systems are typically very large and costly systems that are not very covert and are also difficult to install in a helicopter. The display is typically raw images from infrared or radar sensors, and can require a high degree of pilot interpretation and attention. Terrain collision warning system that rely on stored terrain maps are often of low resolution and accuracy and do not represent hazards to the aircraft placed after map sampling. Such hazards could include aircraft parked on runway, man- made towers or buildings and hills. In this paper, a low cost dual-function scanning pencil-beam, millimeter-wave radar forward sensor is used to determine whether an aircraft's flight path is clear of obstructions. Due to the limited space and weight budget in helicopters, the system is a dual function system that is substituted in place of the existing radar altimeter. The system combines a 35 GHz forward looking obstacle avoidance radar and a 4.3 GHz radar altimeter. The forward looking 35 GHz 3D radar's returns are used to construct a terrain and obstruction database surrounding an aircraft, which is presented to the pilot as a synthetic perspective display. The 35 GHz forward looking radar and the associated display was evaluated in a joint NASA Honeywell flight test program in 1996. The tests were conducted on a NASA/Army test helicopter. The test program clearly demonstrated the systems potential usefulness for collision avoidance.

  11. Why aircraft disinsection?

    PubMed

    Gratz, N G; Steffen, R; Cocksedge, W

    2000-01-01

    A serious problem is posed by the inadvertent transport of live mosquitoes aboard aircraft arriving from tropical countries where vector-borne diseases are endemic. Surveys at international airports have found many instances of live insects, particularly mosquitoes, aboard aircraft arriving from countries where malaria and arboviruses are endemic. In some instances mosquito species have been established in countries in which they have not previously been reported. A serious consequence of the transport of infected mosquitoes aboard aircraft has been the numerous cases of "airport malaria" reported from Europe, North America and elsewhere. There is an important on-going need for the disinsection of aircraft coming from airports in tropical disease endemic areas into nonendemic areas. The methods and materials available for use in aircraft disinsection and the WHO recommendations for their use are described.

  12. Why aircraft disinsection?

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, N. G.; Steffen, R.; Cocksedge, W.

    2000-01-01

    A serious problem is posed by the inadvertent transport of live mosquitoes aboard aircraft arriving from tropical countries where vector-borne diseases are endemic. Surveys at international airports have found many instances of live insects, particularly mosquitoes, aboard aircraft arriving from countries where malaria and arboviruses are endemic. In some instances mosquito species have been established in countries in which they have not previously been reported. A serious consequence of the transport of infected mosquitoes aboard aircraft has been the numerous cases of "airport malaria" reported from Europe, North America and elsewhere. There is an important on-going need for the disinsection of aircraft coming from airports in tropical disease endemic areas into nonendemic areas. The methods and materials available for use in aircraft disinsection and the WHO recommendations for their use are described. PMID:10994283

  13. Aircraft operations management manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA aircraft operations program is a multifaceted, highly diverse entity that directly supports the agency mission in aeronautical research and development, space science and applications, space flight, astronaut readiness training, and related activities through research and development, program support, and mission management aircraft operations flights. Users of the program are interagency, inter-government, international, and the business community. This manual provides guidelines to establish policy for the management of NASA aircraft resources, aircraft operations, and related matters. This policy is an integral part of and must be followed when establishing field installation policy and procedures covering the management of NASA aircraft operations. Each operating location will develop appropriate local procedures that conform with the requirements of this handbook. This manual should be used in conjunction with other governing instructions, handbooks, and manuals.

  14. Hypersonic reconnaissance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulk, Tim; Chiarini, David; Hill, Kevin; Kunszt, Bob; Odgen, Chris; Truong, Bon

    1992-01-01

    A conceptual design of a hypersonic reconnaissance aircraft for the U.S. Navy is discussed. After eighteen weeks of work, a waverider design powered by two augmented turbofans was chosen. The aircraft was designed to be based on an aircraft carrier and to cruise 6,000 nautical miles at Mach 4;80,000 feet and above. As a result the size of the aircraft was only allowed to have a length of eighty feet, fifty-two feet in wingspan, and roughly 2,300 square feet in planform area. Since this is a mainly cruise aircraft, sixty percent of its 100,000 pound take-off weight is JP fuel. At cruise, the highest temperature that it will encounter is roughly 1,100 F, which can be handled through the use of a passive cooling system.

  15. Analysis of bonded joints. [shear stress and stress-strain diagrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivas, S.

    1975-01-01

    A refined elastic analysis of bonded joints which accounts for transverse shear deformation and transverse normal stress was developed to obtain the stresses and displacements in the adherends and in the bond. The displacements were expanded in terms of polynomials in the thicknesswise coordinate; the coefficients of these polynomials were functions of the axial coordinate. The stress distribution was obtained in terms of these coefficients by using strain-displacement and stress-strain relations. The governing differential equations were obtained by integrating the equations of equilibrium, and were solved. The boundary conditions (interface or support) were satisfied to complete the analysis. Single-lap, flush, and double-lap joints were analyzed, along with the effects of adhesive properties, plate thicknesses, material properties, and plate taper on maximum peel and shear stresses in the bond. The results obtained by using the thin-beam analysis available in the literature were compared with the results obtained by using the refined analysis. In general, thin-beam analysis yielded reasonably accurate results, but in certain cases the errors were high. Numerical investigations showed that the maximum peel and shear stresses in the bond can be reduced by (1) using a combination of flexible and stiff bonds, (2) using stiffer lap plates, and (3) tapering the plates.

  16. Aircraft Crash Survival Design Guide. Volume 2. Aircraft Crash Environment and Human Tolerance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    spine can produce spinal fracture through flex- ure that results from jackknife bending over a lap- belt-only restraint. The lap belt might inflict...injuries to the internal organs if it is not re- tained on the pelvic girdle but is allowed to exert its force above the iliac crests in the soft...exerted by deceleration of the thighs and lower legs accom- panied by lap belt slippage up and over the iliac crests. Lap belt slippage up and over the

  17. Automation tools for flexible aircraft maintenance.

    SciTech Connect

    Prentice, William J.; Drotning, William D.; Watterberg, Peter A.; Loucks, Clifford S.; Kozlowski, David M.

    2003-11-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project 26546 at Sandia, during the period FY01 through FY03. The project team visited four DoD depots that support extensive aircraft maintenance in order to understand critical needs for automation, and to identify maintenance processes for potential automation or integration opportunities. From the visits, the team identified technology needs and application issues, as well as non-technical drivers that influence the application of automation in depot maintenance of aircraft. Software tools for automation facility design analysis were developed, improved, extended, and integrated to encompass greater breadth for eventual application as a generalized design tool. The design tools for automated path planning and path generation have been enhanced to incorporate those complex robot systems with redundant joint configurations, which are likely candidate designs for a complex aircraft maintenance facility. A prototype force-controlled actively compliant end-effector was designed and developed based on a parallel kinematic mechanism design. This device was developed for demonstration of surface finishing, one of many in-contact operations performed during aircraft maintenance. This end-effector tool was positioned along the workpiece by a robot manipulator, programmed for operation by the automated planning tools integrated for this project. Together, the hardware and software tools demonstrate many of the technologies required for flexible automation in a maintenance facility.

  18. Learning Activity Package, Chemistry II. LAP Numbers 39A, 39B, 39C, 40, 41, 41A and 42.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Naomi

    As a set of seven Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) for individualized instruction in chemistry, the units cover problems in stoichiometry, energy levels, chemical bonding, matter and its forms, electrochemical processes, chemical kinetics and equilibrium, metals, and non-metals. Each unit contains a rationale for the material; a list of…

  19. Research on the design of surface acquisition system of active lap based on FPGA and FX2LP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongshen; Li, Xiaojin; Fan, Bin; Zeng, Zhige

    2014-08-01

    In order to research the dynamic surface shape changes of active lap during the processing, this paper introduces a dynamic surface shape acquisition system of active lap using FPGA and USB communication. This system consists of high-precision micro-displacement sensor array, acquisition board, PC computer composition, and acquisition circuit board includes six sub-boards based on FPGA, a hub-board based on FPGA and USB communication. A sub-board is responsible for a number of independent channel sensors' data acquisition; hub-board is responsible for creating encoder simulation tools to active lap deformation control system with location information, sending synchronization information to latch the sensor data in all of the sub-boards for a time, while addressing the sub-boards to gather the sensor data in each sub-board one by one and transmitting all the sensor data together with location information via the USB chip FX2LP to the host computer. Experimental results show that the system is capable of fixing the location and speed of active lap, meanwhile the control of surface transforming and dynamic surface data acquisition at a certain location in the processing is implemented.

  20. Agreement between VO[subscript 2peak] Predicted from PACER and One-Mile Run Time-Equated Laps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint-Maurice, Pedro F.; Anderson, Katelin; Bai, Yang; Welk, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the agreement between estimated peak oxygen consumption (VO[subscript 2peak]) obtained from the Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run (PACER) fitness test and equated PACER laps derived from One-Mile Run time (MR). Methods: A sample of 680 participants (324 boys and 356 girls) in Grades 7 through 12…

  1. The First Use of the Learning Accomplishment Profile (LAP) in Prekindergarten Head Start 1976-1977. Report Number 77137.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silbermann, David J.

    Prekindergarten Head Start teachers were trained to administer the Learning Accomplishment Profile (LAP), an objective check list of development in seven areas: gross motor, fine motor manipulation and writing, social, self help, cognitive, and language skills. Data were collected from separate groups of 3, 4, and 5-year old children to ascertain…

  2. Aircraft and Ground Vehicle Winter Runway Friction Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    Some background information is given together with the scope and objectives of a 5-year, Joint Winter Runway Friction Measurement Program between the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA), Transport Canada (TC), and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The primary objective of this effort is to perform instrumented aircraft and ground vehicle tests aimed at identifying a common number that all the different ground vehicle devices would report. This number, denoted the International Runway Friction Index (IRFI), will be related to all types of aircraft stopping performance. The range of test equipment, the test sites, test results and accomplishments, the extent of the substantial friction database compiled, and future test plans will be described. Several related studies have also been implemented including the effects of contaminant type on aircraft impingement drag, and the effectiveness of various runway and aircraft de-icing chemical types, and application rates.

  3. Predicting Visibility of Aircraft

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Andrew; Ramirez, Cesar V.; Salud, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Visual detection of aircraft by human observers is an important element of aviation safety. To assess and ensure safety, it would be useful to be able to be able to predict the visibility, to a human observer, of an aircraft of specified size, shape, distance, and coloration. Examples include assuring safe separation among aircraft and between aircraft and unmanned vehicles, design of airport control towers, and efforts to enhance or suppress the visibility of military and rescue vehicles. We have recently developed a simple metric of pattern visibility, the Spatial Standard Observer (SSO). In this report we examine whether the SSO can predict visibility of simulated aircraft images. We constructed a set of aircraft images from three-dimensional computer graphic models, and measured the luminance contrast threshold for each image from three human observers. The data were well predicted by the SSO. Finally, we show how to use the SSO to predict visibility range for aircraft of arbitrary size, shape, distance, and coloration. PMID:19462007

  4. Predicting visibility of aircraft.

    PubMed

    Watson, Andrew; Ramirez, Cesar V; Salud, Ellen

    2009-05-20

    Visual detection of aircraft by human observers is an important element of aviation safety. To assess and ensure safety, it would be useful to be able to be able to predict the visibility, to a human observer, of an aircraft of specified size, shape, distance, and coloration. Examples include assuring safe separation among aircraft and between aircraft and unmanned vehicles, design of airport control towers, and efforts to enhance or suppress the visibility of military and rescue vehicles. We have recently developed a simple metric of pattern visibility, the Spatial Standard Observer (SSO). In this report we examine whether the SSO can predict visibility of simulated aircraft images. We constructed a set of aircraft images from three-dimensional computer graphic models, and measured the luminance contrast threshold for each image from three human observers. The data were well predicted by the SSO. Finally, we show how to use the SSO to predict visibility range for aircraft of arbitrary size, shape, distance, and coloration.

  5. Investigations on Laser Beam Welding of Different Dissimilar Joints of Steel and Aluminum Alloys for Automotive Lightweight Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seffer, Oliver; Pfeifer, Ronny; Springer, André; Kaierle, Stefan

    Due to the enormous potential of weight saving, and the consequential reduction of pollutant emissions, the use of hybrid components made of steel and aluminum alloys is increasing steadily, especially concerning automotive lightweight construction. However, thermal joining of steel and aluminum is still being researched, due to a limited solubility of the binary system of iron and aluminum causing the formation of hard and brittle intermetallic phases, which decrease the strength and the formability of the dissimilar seam. The presented results show the investigation of laser beam welding for joining different dissimilar hybrid components of the steel materials HX220LAD+Z100, 22MnB5+AS150 and 1.4301, as well as the aluminum alloy AA6016-T4 as a lap joint. Among other things, the influences of the energy per unit length, the material grade, the sheet thickness t, the weld type (lap weld, fillet weld) and the arrangement of the base materials in a lap joint (aluminum-sided irradiation, steel-sided irradiation) on the achievable strengths are analyzed. The characterization of the dissimilar joints includes tensile shear tests and metallographic analyses, depending on the energy per unit length.

  6. Lipid accumulation product (LAP) as a criterion for the identification of the healthy obesity phenotype in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Lwow, Felicja; Jedrzejuk, Diana; Milewicz, Andrzej; Szmigiero, Leszek

    2016-09-01

    Obesity and its complications constitute a major health problem in postmenopausal women. The identification of the obesity phenotype, especially that of metabolically healthy obese (MHO) patients, is a necessary part of obesity treatment protocols. There are several methods to define MHO, but unfortunately, all of them are arbitrary and inconsistent. The aim of this work was to determine whether lipid accumulation product (LAP) could be used as a marker of the MHO phenotype in postmenopausal women. A sample of 345 Polish postmenopausal women aged 50-60years old participated in the study. Participants were classified as obese when their BMI was >27. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to estimate the best cutoff for the LAP index value to identify postmenopausal women without metabolic syndrome components. We found that the best cutoff value was LAP ≤29.9, and this value was used to define MHO individuals. With this definition, the identification of MHO individuals could be made when both of the following criteria were met: LAP index ≤29.9 and no arterial hypertension (SBP<130mmHg, DBP<85mmHg). The anthropometric and body fat distribution measurements, as well as the metabolic characteristics of MHO women identified according to the above definition, were compared with those of MHO women identified by two other methods in the literature. These methods and our definition identified similar proportions of MHO women ranging from 11.6% to 16.9%. We found that MHO women identified by all of the definitions used in this study possessed a similar metabolic status, and they did not differ in anthropometric indices or body fat distribution measurements. We concluded that the combination of LAP estimation and arterial blood pressure measurement appear to constitute a useful method for identifying the MHO phenotype in postmenopausal women.

  7. Abrasion and deformed layer formation of manganese-zinc ferrite in sliding contact with lapping tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Tanaka, K.

    1986-01-01

    Wear experiments were conducted using replication electron microscopy and reflection electron diffraction to study abrasion and the deformed layers produced in single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite simulated heads during contact with lapping tapes. The crystaline state of the head is changed drastically during the abrasion process. Crystalline states ranging from nearly amorphous to highly textured polycrystalline can be produced on the wear surface of a single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite head. The total thickness of the deformed layer was approximately 0.8 microns. This thickness increased as the load and abrasive grit size increased. The anisotropic wear of the ferrite was found to be inversely proportional to the hardness of the wear surface. The wear was lower in the order 211 111 10 0110. The wear of the ferrite increased markedly with an increase in sliding velocity and abrasive grit size.

  8. SRB/SLEEC (Solid Rocket Booster/Shingle Lap Extendible Exit Cone) feasibility study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, William H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A preliminary design and analysis was completed for a SLEEC (Shingle Lap Extendible Exit Cone) which could be incorporated on the Space Transportation System (STS) Solid Rocket Booster (SRB). Studies were completed which predicted weights and performance increases and development plans were prepared for the full-scale bench and static test of SLEEC. In conjunction with the design studies, a series of supporting analyses were performed to assure the validity and feasibility of performance, fabrication, cost, and reliability for the selected design. The feasibility and required amounts of bench, static firing, and flight tests considered necessary for the successful incorporation of SLEEC on the Shuttle SRBs were determined. Preliminary plans were completed which define both a follow on study effort and a development program.

  9. FRACTURE MECHANICS APPROACH TO ESTIMATE FATIGUE LIVES OF WELDED LAP-SHEAR SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.; Michigan, J.

    2014-04-25

    A full range of stress intensity factor solutions for a kinked crack is developed as a function of weld width and the sheet thickness. When used with the associated main crack solutions (global stress intensity factors) in terms of the applied load and specimen geometry, the fatigue lives can be estimated for the laser-welded lap-shear specimens. The estimations are in good agreement with the experimental data. A classical solution for an infinitesimal kink is also employed in the approach. However, the life predictions tend to overestimate the actual fatigue lives. The traditional life estimations with the structural stress along with the experimental stress-fatigue life data (S-N curve) are also provided. In this case, the estimations only agree with the experimental data under higher load conditions.

  10. Environmental durability of adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkus, Lawrence Michael

    The goal of this project was to evaluate the environmental durability of adhesively bonded aircraft joints using fracture mechanics. Three aerospace adhesives, two epoxies and one polyimide, were investigated. Adhesive specimens were tested for tensile and toughness behavior. Bonded joint specimens were subject to Mode I, Mode II, and mixed mode fracture and fatigue tests. Prior to testing, selected specimens were exposed for up to 10,000 hours to isothermal and thermally cyclic conditions similar to aircraft service environments. Analysis was accomplished using finite element programs and closed-form solutions. Environmental exposure caused reductions in the failure strain, strength, and toughness, of the adhesive specimens and in the toughness and fatigue threshold of the bonded joint specimens. Specimens exposed to high temperature and humidity prior to testing and those tested at low temperatures indicative of high altitude operations experienced the most significant toughness losses. Results are discussed in terms of their relationship to bonded joint design and should prove valuable to efforts aimed at extending the lives of aging aircraft using bonded repairs as well as to efforts focused on using adhesive bonding for future aerospace structures.

  11. Some fighter aircraft trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, L.

    1985-01-01

    Some basic trends in fighters are traced from the post World II era. Beginning with the first operational jet fighter, the P-80, the characteristics of subsequent fighter aircraft are examined for performance, mission capability, effectiveness, and cost. Characteristics presented include: power loading, wing loading, maximum speed, rate of climb, turn rate, weight and weight distribution, cost and cost distribution. The characteristics of some USSR aircraft are included for comparison. The trends indicate some of the rationale for certain fighter designs and some likely characteristics to be sought in future fighter aircraft designs.

  12. Loftin Collection - Boeing Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1933-01-01

    Either a F2B-1 or F3B-1, both aircraft were built by Boeing and both were powered by Pratt and Whitney Wasp engines. These fighters were intended for Navy shipboard use. Boeing F3B-1: While most Boeing F3B-1s served the U. S. Navy aircraft carriers the Lexington and the Saratoga, this example flew in NACA hands at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in the late 1920's. Also known as the Boeing Model 77, the aircraft was the next to last F3B-1 build in November 1928.

  13. Tropospheric sampling with aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Daum, P.H.; Springston, S.R.

    1991-03-01

    Aircraft constitute a unique environment which places stringent requirements on the instruments used to measure the concentrations of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. Some of these requirements such as minimization of size, weight, and power consumption are general; others are specific to individual techniques. This review presents the basic principles and considerations governing the deployment of trace gas and aerosol instrumentation on an aircraft. An overview of common instruments illustrates these points and provides guidelines for designing and using instruments on aircraft-based measurement programs.

  14. Microwave imaging of aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Bernard D.

    1988-12-01

    Three methods of imaging aircraft from the ground with microwave radar with quality suitable for aircraft target recognition are described. The imaging methods are based on a self-calibration procedure called adaptive beamforming that compensates for the severe geometric distortion inherent in any imaging system that is large enough to achieve the high angular resolution necessary for two-dimensional target imaging. The signal processing algorithm is described and X-band (3-cm)-wavelength experiments demonstrate its success on commercial aircraft flying into Philadelphia International Airport.

  15. Aircraft compass characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John B; Smith, Clyde W

    1937-01-01

    A description of the test methods used at the National Bureau of Standards for determining the characteristics of aircraft compasses is given. The methods described are particularly applicable to compasses in which mineral oil is used as the damping liquid. Data on the viscosity and density of certain mineral oils used in United States Navy aircraft compasses are presented. Characteristics of Navy aircraft compasses IV to IX and some other compasses are shown for the range of temperatures experienced in flight. Results of flight tests are presented. These results indicate that the characteristic most desired in a steering compass is a short period and, in a check compass, a low overswing.

  16. OVRhyp, Scramjet Test Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslan, J.; Bisard, T.; Dallinga, S.; Draper, K.; Hufford, G.; Peters, W.; Rogers, J.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary design for an unmanned hypersonic research vehicle to test scramjet engines is presented. The aircraft will be launched from a carrier aircraft at an altitude of 40,000 feet at Mach 0.8. The vehicle will then accelerate to Mach 6 at an altitude of 100,000 feet. At this stage the prototype scramjet will be employed to accelerate the vehicle to Mach 10 and maintain Mach 10 flight for 2 minutes. The aircraft will then decelerate and safely land.

  17. Testing Aircraft Instruments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-11

    AD-A095 680 ARMY TEST AND EVALUATION COMMAND ABERDEEN PROVING GRO--ETC F/S 1/4 TESTING AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENTS .(U) FEB 81 CLASSIFIED TOP-6-3-013 ML I...Test and Evaluation Command -?Final 7, Ts .to .. eg----- ( -4_ Fia - / + I ORG REPORT STesting Aircraft Instruments , j P I- I. AUTHOR(es) S. CONTRACT...Identify by block number) This document presents information and procedures for testing aircraft flight and systems performance instruments in the functional

  18. Hypermobile joints

    MedlinePlus

    ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Joint Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an ...

  19. Solar thermal aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2007-09-18

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  20. Aircraft parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.

    1987-01-01

    The aircraft parameter estimation problem is used to illustrate the utility of parameter estimation, which applies to many engineering and scientific fields. Maximum likelihood estimation has been used to extract stability and control derivatives from flight data for many years. This paper presents some of the basic concepts of aircraft parameter estimation and briefly surveys the literature in the field. The maximum likelihood estimator is discussed, and the basic concepts of minimization and estimation are examined for a simple simulated aircraft example. The cost functions that are to be minimized during estimation are defined and discussed. Graphic representations of the cost functions are given to illustrate the minimization process. Finally, the basic concepts are generalized, and estimation from flight data is discussed. Some of the major conclusions for the simulated example are also developed for the analysis of flight data from the F-14, highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT), and space shuttle vehicles.

  1. Laminar Flow Aircraft Certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Various topics telative to laminar flow aircraft certification are discussed. Boundary layer stability, flaps for laminar flow airfoils, computational wing design studies, manufacturing requirements, windtunnel tests, and flow visualization are among the topics covered.

  2. Pollution reducing aircraft propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, R. M.

    1985-05-28

    Aircraft engine exhaust is mixed with air and fuel and recombusted. Air is drawn into the secondary combustion chamber from suction surfaces on wings. Exhaust of the secondary combustion chamber is blown over wing and fuselage surfaces.

  3. The Aircraft Morphing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wlezien, R. W.; Horner, G. C.; McGowan, A. R.; Padula, S. L.; Scott, M. A.; Silcox, R. J.; Simpson, J. O.

    1998-01-01

    In the last decade smart technologies have become enablers that cut across traditional boundaries in materials science and engineering. Here we define smart to mean embedded actuation, sensing, and control logic in a tightly coupled feedback loop. While multiple successes have been achieved in the laboratory, we have yet to see the general applicability of smart devices to real aircraft systems. The NASA Aircraft Morphing program is an attempt to couple research across a wide range of disciplines to integrate smart technologies into high payoff aircraft applications. The program bridges research in seven individual disciplines and combines the effort into activities in three primary program thrusts. System studies are used to assess the highest- payoff program objectives, and specific research activities are defined to address the technologies required for development of smart aircraft systems. In this paper we address the overall program goals and programmatic structure, and discuss the challenges associated with bringing the technologies to fruition.

  4. Aircraft electromagnetic compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Clifton A.; Larsen, William E.

    1987-01-01

    Illustrated are aircraft architecture, electromagnetic interference environments, electromagnetic compatibility protection techniques, program specifications, tasks, and verification and validation procedures. The environment of 400 Hz power, electrical transients, and radio frequency fields are portrayed and related to thresholds of avionics electronics. Five layers of protection for avionics are defined. Recognition is given to some present day electromagnetic compatibility weaknesses and issues which serve to reemphasize the importance of EMC verification of equipment and parts, and their ultimate EMC validation on the aircraft. Proven standards of grounding, bonding, shielding, wiring, and packaging are laid out to help provide a foundation for a comprehensive approach to successful future aircraft design and an understanding of cost effective EMC in an aircraft setting.

  5. Aircraft Engine Emissions. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A conference on a aircraft engine emissions was held to present the results of recent and current work. Such diverse areas as components, controls, energy efficient engine designs, and noise and pollution reduction are discussed.

  6. Depreciation of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P

    1922-01-01

    There is a widespread, and quite erroneous, impression to the effect that aircraft are essentially fragile and deteriorate with great rapidity when in service, so that the depreciation charges to be allowed on commercial or private operation are necessarily high.

  7. Aircraft Morphing program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlezien, Richard W.; Horner, Garnett C.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Padula, Sharon L.; Scott, Michael A.; Silcox, Richard J.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.

    1998-06-01

    In the last decade smart technologies have become enablers that cut across traditional boundaries in materials science and engineering. Here we define smart to mean embedded actuation, sensing, and control logic in a tightly coupled feedback loop. While multiple successes have been achieved in the laboratory, we have yet to see the general applicability of smart devices to real aircraft systems. The NASA Aircraft Morphing program is an attempt to couple research across a wide range of disciplines to integrate smart technologies into high payoff aircraft applications. The program bridges research in seven individual disciplines and combines the effort into activities in three primary program thrusts. System studies are used to assess the highest-payoff program objectives, and specific research activities are defined to address the technologies required for development of smart aircraft systems. In this paper we address the overall program goals and programmatic structure, and discuss the challenges associated with bringing the technologies to fruition.

  8. Advanced hypersonic aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utzinger, Rob; Blank, Hans-Joachim; Cox, Craig; Harvey, Greg; Mckee, Mike; Molnar, Dave; Nagy, Greg; Petersen, Steve

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this design project is to develop the hypersonic reconnaissance aircraft to replace the SR-71 and to complement existing intelligence gathering devices. The initial design considerations were to create a manned vehicle which could complete its mission with at least two airborne refuelings. The aircraft must travel between Mach 4 and Mach 7 at an altitude of 80,000 feet for a maximum range of 12,000 nautical miles. The vehicle should have an air breathing propulsion system at cruise. With a crew of two, the aircraft should be able to take off and land on a 10,000 foot runway, and the yearly operational costs were not to exceed $300 million. Finally, the aircraft should exhibit stealth characteristics, including a minimized radar cross-section (RCS) and a reduced sonic boom. The technology used in this vehicle should allow for production between the years 1993 and 1995.

  9. ANALYSIS OF AIRCRAFT MOTIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed by Ames Research Center, in cooperation with the National Transportation Safety Board, as a technique for deriving time histories of an aircraft's motion from Air Traffic Control (ATC) radar records. This technique uses the radar range and azimuth data, along with the downlinked altitude data, to derive an expanded set of data which includes airspeed, lift, attitude angles (pitch, roll, and heading), etc. This technique should prove useful as a source of data in the investigation of commercial airline accidents and in the analysis of accidents involving aircraft which do not have onboard data recorders (e.g., military, short-haul, and general aviation). The technique used to determine the aircraft motions involves smoothing of raw radar data. These smoothed results, in combination with other available information (wind profiles and aircraft performance data), are used to derive the expanded set of data. This program uses a cubic least-square fit to smooth the raw data. This moving-arc procedure provides a smoothed time history of the aircraft position, the inertial velocities, and accelerations. Using known winds, these inertial data are transformed to aircraft stability axes to provide true airspeed, thrust-drag, lift, and roll angle. Further derivation, based on aircraft dependent performance data, can determine the aircraft angle of attack, pitch, and heading angle. Results of experimental tests indicate that values derived from ATC radar records using this technique agree favorably with airborne measurements. This program is written in FORTRAN IV to be executed in the batch mode, and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of 64k (octal) of 60 bit words.

  10. Aircraft Survivability. Spring 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    advancing and applying technology to predict, evaluate , and improve combat survivability of US flight vehicles. John graduated from the University of...support for most of the aircraft and anti-aircraft programs conducted to date under LFT&E statutory requirements. A number of these test and evaluation ...initiatives to improve the state-of-the-art of LFT&E, to place greater emphasis on the evaluation of human casualties, to integrate Battle Damage

  11. Alternative jet aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Potential changes in jet aircraft fuel specifications due to shifts in supply and quality of refinery feedstocks are discussed with emphasis on the effects these changes would have on the performance and durability of aircraft engines and fuel systems. Combustion characteristics, fuel thermal stability, and fuel pumpability at low temperature are among the factors considered. Combustor and fuel system technology needs for broad specification fuels are reviewed including prevention of fuel system fouling and fuel system technology for fuels with higher freezing points.

  12. Corrosion Behavior of MIG Brazed and MIG Welded Joints of Automotive DP600-GI Steel Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Sushovan; Das, Hrishikesh; Pal, Tapan Kumar; Shome, Mahadev

    2016-12-01

    Galvanized dual-phase steel sheets are extensively used by the auto industry for their corrosion resistance property. Welding by the metal inert gas (MIG) process causes degradation of the steel in the vicinity of the joint due to excessive zinc evaporation. In order to minimize Zn loss, the MIG brazing process has been tried out in lap joint configuration over a heat input range of 136-204 J mm-1. The amount of zinc loss, intermetallic formation and corrosion properties in the joint area has been evaluated for both MIG brazing and MIG welding. Corrosion rate of 21 mm year-1 has been reduced to 2 mm year-1 by adopting MIGB in place MIGW. Impedance study has shown that the corrosion mechanism in base metal, MIG brazed and MIG welded joints is dominated by charge transfer, diffusion and mixed mode control processes, respectively.

  13. Aircraft as Research Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Aeronautical research usually begins with computers, wind tunnels, and flight simulators, but eventually the theories must fly. This is when flight research begins, and aircraft are the primary tools of the trade. Flight research involves doing precision maneuvers in either a specially built experimental aircraft or an existing production airplane that has been modified. For example, the AD-1 was a unique airplane made only for flight research, while the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) was a standard fighter aircraft that was transformed into a one-of-a-kind aircraft as it was fitted with new propulsion systems, flight controls, and scientific equipment. All research aircraft are able to perform scientific experiments because of the onboard instruments that record data about its systems, aerodynamics, and the outside environment. Since the 1970's, NASA flight research has become more comprehensive, with flights involving everything form Space Shuttles to ultralights. NASA now flies not only the fastest airplanes, but some of the slowest. Flying machines continue to evolve with new wing designs, propulsion systems, and flight controls. As always, a look at today's experimental research aircraft is a preview of the future.

  14. Automatic aircraft recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hmam, Hatem; Kim, Jijoong

    2002-08-01

    Automatic aircraft recognition is very complex because of clutter, shadows, clouds, self-occlusion and degraded imaging conditions. This paper presents an aircraft recognition system, which assumes from the start that the image is possibly degraded, and implements a number of strategies to overcome edge fragmentation and distortion. The current vision system employs a bottom up approach, where recognition begins by locating image primitives (e.g., lines and corners), which are then combined in an incremental fashion into larger sets of line groupings using knowledge about aircraft, as viewed from a generic viewpoint. Knowledge about aircraft is represented in the form of whole/part shape description and the connectedness property, and is embedded in production rules, which primarily aim at finding instances of the aircraft parts in the image and checking the connectedness property between the parts. Once a match is found, a confidence score is assigned and as evidence in support of an aircraft interpretation is accumulated, the score is increased proportionally. Finally a selection of the resulting image interpretations with the highest scores, is subjected to competition tests, and only non-ambiguous interpretations are allowed to survive. Experimental results demonstrating the effectiveness of the current recognition system are given.

  15. Ground truth report 1975 Phoenix microwave experiment. [Joint Soil Moisture Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    Direct measurements of soil moisture obtained in conjunction with aircraft data flights near Phoenix, Arizona in March, 1975 are summarized. The data were collected for the Joint Soil Moisture Experiment.

  16. Taxiing, Take-Off, and Landing Simulation of the High Speed Civil Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reaves, Mercedes C.; Horta, Lucas G.

    1999-01-01

    The aircraft industry jointly with NASA is studying enabling technologies for higher speed, longer range aircraft configurations. Higher speeds, higher temperatures, and aerodynamics are driving these newer aircraft configurations towards long, slender, flexible fuselages. Aircraft response during ground operations, although often overlooked, is a concern due to the increased fuselage flexibility. This paper discusses modeling and simulation of the High Speed Civil Transport aircraft during taxiing, take-off, and landing. Finite element models of the airframe for various configurations are used and combined with nonlinear landing gear models to provide a simulation tool to study responses to different ground input conditions. A commercial computer simulation program is used to numerically integrate the equations of motion and to compute estimates of the responses using an existing runway profile. Results show aircraft responses exceeding safe acceptable human response levels.

  17. 150 Passenger Commercial Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucovsky, Adrian; Romli, Fairuz I.; Rupp, Jessica

    2002-01-01

    It has been projected that the need for a short-range mid-sized, aircraft is increasing. The future strategy to decrease long-haul flights will increase the demand for short-haul flights. Since passengers prefer to meet their destinations quickly, airlines will increase the frequency of flights, which will reduce the passenger load on the aircraft. If a point-to-point flight is not possible, passengers will prefer only a one-stop short connecting flight to their final destination. A 150-passenger aircraft is an ideal vehicle for these situations. It is mid-sized aircraft and has a range of 3000 nautical miles. This type of aircraft would market U.S. domestic flights or inter-European flight routes. The objective of the design of the 150-passenger aircraft is to minimize fuel consumption. The configuration of the aircraft must be optimized. This aircraft must meet CO2 and NOx emissions standards with minimal acquisition price and operating costs. This report contains all the work that has been performed for the completion of the design of a 150 passenger commercial aircraft. The methodology used is the Technology Identification, Evaluation, and Selection (TIES) developed at Georgia Tech Aerospace Systems Design laboratory (ASDL). This is an eight-step conceptual design process to evaluate the probability of meeting the design constraints. This methodology also allows for the evaluation of new technologies to be implemented into the design. The TIES process begins with defining the problem with a need established and a market targeted. With the customer requirements set and the target values established, a baseline concept is created. Next, the design space is explored to determine the feasibility and viability of the baseline aircraft configuration. If the design is neither feasible nor viable, new technologies can be implemented to open up the feasible design space and allow for a plausible solution. After the new technologies are identified, they must be evaluated

  18. Analysis of the stress-strain state in single overlap joints using piezo-ceramic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pǎltânea, Veronica; Pǎltânea, Gheorghe; Popovici, Dorina; Jiga, Gabriel; Papanicolaou, George

    2014-05-01

    In this paper is presented a 2D approach to finite element modeling and an analytical calculus of a single lap bonded joint. As adherent material were selected a sheet of wood, aluminum and titanium. For adhesive part were selected Bison Super Wood D3 in case of the wood single lap joint and an epoxy resin type DGEBA-TETA for gluing together aluminum and titanium parts. In the article is described a combined method, which consists in the placement of the piezoelectric actuator inside of the adhesive part, in order to determine the tensile stress in the overlap joint. A comparison between the analytical and numerical results has been achieved through a multiphysics modeling - electrical and mechanical coupled problem. The technique used to calculate the mechanical parameters (First Principal Stress, displacements) was the three-point bending test, where different forces were applied in the mid-span of the structure, in order to maintain a constant displacement rate. The length of the overlap joint was modified from 20 to 50 mm.

  19. Time- and temperature-dependent failures of a bonded joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihn, Sangwook

    This dissertation summarizes my study of time- and temperature-dependent behavior of a tubular lap bonded joint to provide a design methodology for windmill blade structures. The bonded joint is between a cast-iron rod and a GFRP composite pipe. The adhesive material is an epoxy containing chopped glass fibers. We proposed a new fabrication method to make concentric and void-less specimens of the tubular joint with a thick adhesive bondline to stimulate the root bond of a blade. The thick bondline facilitates the joint assembly of actual blades. For a better understanding of the behavior of the bonded joint, we studied viscoelastic behavior of the adhesive materials by measuring creep compliance at several temperatures during loading period. We observed that the creep compliance depends highly on the period of loading and the temperature. We applied time-temperature equivalence to the creep compliance of the adhesive material to obtain time-temperature shift factors. We also performed constant-rate of monotonically increased uniaxial tensile tests to measure static strength of the tubular lap joint at several temperatures and different strain-rates. We observed two failure modes from load-deflection curves and failed specimens. One is the brittle mode, which was caused by weakness of the interfacial strength occurring at low temperature and short period of loading. The other is the ductile mode, which was caused by weakness of the adhesive material at high temperature and long period of loading. Transition from the brittle to the ductile mode appeared as the temperature or the loading period increased. We also performed tests under uniaxial tensile-tensile cyclic loadings to measure fatigue strength of the bonded joint at several temperatures, frequencies and stress ratios. The fatigue data are analyzed statistically by applying the residual strength degradation model to calculate statistical distribution of the fatigue life. Combining the time

  20. Joint assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A joint assembly is provided which includes a drive assembly and a swivel mechanism. The drive assembly features a motor operatively associated with a plurality of drive shafts for driving auxiliary elements, and a plurality of swivel shafts for pivoting the drive assembly. The swivel mechanism engages the swivel shafts and has a fixable element that may be attached to a foundation. The swivel mechanism is adapted to cooperate with the swivel shafts to pivot the drive assembly with at least two degrees of freedom relative to the foundation. The joint assembly allows for all components to remain encased in a tight, compact, and sealed package, making it ideal for space, exploratory, and commercial applications.

  1. Joint Warrior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-04

    hour per response , including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...reflect my own personal views and are not necessarily endorsed by the NWC or the Department of the Navy. 14. ABSTRACT The way we fight wars has been...evolving over thousands of years. Today, the U.S. Navy, finds itself in the post- modern area of war fighting . Joint warfare is the latest

  2. Growth of thin, c-axis oriented Sr-doped LaP3O9 electrolyte membranes in condensed phosphoric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatada, Naoyuki; Takahashi, Kota; Adachi, Yoshinobu; Uda, Tetsuya

    2016-08-01

    Proton-conducting Sr-doped LaP3O9 has potential application as electrolytes in intermediate temperature fuel cells, but reduction of the electrical resistance of the electrolyte membranes is necessary for practical applications. In this study, we focused on reducing the resistance by reducing the electrolyte thickness, while maintaining a preferable microstructure for proton conduction (c-axis orientation and absence of the small-crystal layer). Thin, c-axis oriented Sr-doped LaP3O9 membranes were successfully obtained in condensed phosphoric acid solutions by a novel "two-step precipitation method". In this method, Sr-doped LaP3O9 powder was artificially deposited on the surface of the carbon paper supports as seeds, and then columnar crystals were grown "downward" in the solutions. We expect that this method will be utilized to produce LaP3O9 electrolyte membranes with lower electrical resistance.

  3. Effect of Viscosity on Fuel Leakage Between Lapped Plungers and Sleeves and on the Discharge from a Pump-Injection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Marsh, E T

    1935-01-01

    Test data and analysis show that the rate of fuel leakage between a lapped plunger and sleeve varies directly with the density of the fuel, the diameter of the plunger, the pressure producing the leakage, and the cube of the mean clearance between the plunger and sleeve. The rate varies inversely as the length of the lapped fit and the viscosity of the fuel. With a mean clearance between the plunger and sleeve of 0.0001 inch the leakage amounts to approximately 0.2 percent of the fuel injected with gasoline and as low as 0.01 percent with diesel fuel oils. With this mean clearance an effective seal is obtained when the length of the lap is three times the diameter of the lap. The deformation of the sleeve and plunger under pressure is sufficient to change the rate of leakage appreciably from that which would be obtained if the clearance was constant under pressure.

  4. Description of the Joint Damping Experiment (JDX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkman, Steven L.; Redd, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective is to develop a small-scale shuttle flight experiment which allows researchers to: (1) characterize the influence of gravity and joint gaps on a small-scale truss model, and (2) evaluate the applicability of low-g aircraft test results for predicting on-orbit behavior. The experiment consists of a three-bay truss and associated hardware for truss excitation and measurement of oscillations. Other aspects of the investigation are presented in viewgraph form.

  5. High altitude reconnaissance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yazdo, Renee Anna; Moller, David

    1990-01-01

    At the equator the ozone layer ranges from 65,000 to 130,000 plus feet, which is beyond the capabilities of the ER-2, NASA's current high altitude reconnaissance aircraft. The Universities Space Research Association, in cooperation with NASA, is sponsoring an undergraduate program which is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer at the equator. This aircraft must be able to cruise at 130,000 feet for six hours at Mach 0.7, while carrying 3,000 lbs. of payload. In addition, the aircraft must have a minimum range of 6,000 miles. In consideration of the novel nature of this project, the pilot must be able to take control in the event of unforeseen difficulties. Three aircraft configurations were determined to be the most suitable - a joined-wing, a biplane, and a twin-boom conventional airplane. The performance of each configuration was analyzed to investigate the feasibility of the project.

  6. Identification of Aircraft Hazards

    SciTech Connect

    K. Ashley

    2006-12-08

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174235], Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based upon limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and upon crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a monitored geologic repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain, using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987 [DIRS 103124], Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of identified aircraft hazards based upon the criteria that apply to Category 1 and Category 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 [DIRS 176544] (Section 4). The scope of this report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the repository at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (Section 7).

  7. IDENTIFICATION OF AIRCRAFT HAZARDS

    SciTech Connect

    K.L. Ashley

    2005-03-23

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in the ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2004, Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based on limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and on crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987, Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. NUREG-0800 is being used here as a reference because some of the same considerations apply. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of the identified aircraft hazards based on the criteria that apply to Category 1 and 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 (see Section 4). The scope of this technical report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the MGR at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (see Section 7).

  8. Aircraft noise synthesis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, David A.; Grandle, Robert E.

    1987-02-01

    A second-generation Aircraft Noise Synthesis System has been developed to provide test stimuli for studies of community annoyance to aircraft flyover noise. The computer-based system generates realistic, time-varying, audio simulations of aircraft flyover noise at a specified observer location on the ground. The synthesis takes into account the time-varying aircraft position relative to the observer; specified reference spectra consisting of broadband, narrowband, and pure-tone components; directivity patterns; Doppler shift; atmospheric effects; and ground effects. These parameters can be specified and controlled in such a way as to generate stimuli in which certain noise characteristics, such as duration or tonal content, are independently varied, while the remaining characteristics, such as broadband content, are held constant. The system can also generate simulations of the predicted noise characteristics of future aircraft. A description of the synthesis system and a discussion of the algorithms and methods used to generate the simulations are provided. An appendix describing the input data and providing user instructions is also included.

  9. Aircraft noise synthesis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccurdy, David A.; Grandle, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    A second-generation Aircraft Noise Synthesis System has been developed to provide test stimuli for studies of community annoyance to aircraft flyover noise. The computer-based system generates realistic, time-varying, audio simulations of aircraft flyover noise at a specified observer location on the ground. The synthesis takes into account the time-varying aircraft position relative to the observer; specified reference spectra consisting of broadband, narrowband, and pure-tone components; directivity patterns; Doppler shift; atmospheric effects; and ground effects. These parameters can be specified and controlled in such a way as to generate stimuli in which certain noise characteristics, such as duration or tonal content, are independently varied, while the remaining characteristics, such as broadband content, are held constant. The system can also generate simulations of the predicted noise characteristics of future aircraft. A description of the synthesis system and a discussion of the algorithms and methods used to generate the simulations are provided. An appendix describing the input data and providing user instructions is also included.

  10. Aircraft Operations Classification System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlow, Charles; Zhu, Weihong

    2001-01-01

    Accurate data is important in the aviation planning process. In this project we consider systems for measuring aircraft activity at airports. This would include determining the type of aircraft such as jet, helicopter, single engine, and multiengine propeller. Some of the issues involved in deploying technologies for monitoring aircraft operations are cost, reliability, and accuracy. In addition, the system must be field portable and acceptable at airports. A comparison of technologies was conducted and it was decided that an aircraft monitoring system should be based upon acoustic technology. A multimedia relational database was established for the study. The information contained in the database consists of airport information, runway information, acoustic records, photographic records, a description of the event (takeoff, landing), aircraft type, and environmental information. We extracted features from the time signal and the frequency content of the signal. A multi-layer feed-forward neural network was chosen as the classifier. Training and testing results were obtained. We were able to obtain classification results of over 90 percent for training and testing for takeoff events.

  11. Induction of leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) like activity with wounding and methyl jasmonate in pigeonpea (Cajanas cajan) suggests the role of these enzymes in plant defense in leguminosae.

    PubMed

    Lomate, Purushottam R; Hivrale, Vandana K

    2011-06-01

    Aminopeptidases are ubiquitous in nature and their activities have been identified in several plant species. Leucine aminopeptidases (LAPs) are predominantly studied in solanaceous plants and are induced in response to wounding, herbivory and methyl jasmonate (MeJA). The functions of plant aminopeptidases are still under discussion and it is likely that the different classes play various roles. In the present study we report the local and systemic induction of LAP-like activity upon mechanical wounding and MeJA treatment. Two proteins with LAP-like activity were detected in pigeonpea leaves. They were designated as AP1 and AP2. AP1 activity was significantly induced upon wounding and application of MeJA. The estimated molecular masses of AP1 and AP2 were ∼ 60 and 41 kDa respectively in SDS-PAGE. The pH optimum for LAP-like activity in control leaf extracts was found to be neutral (pH 7.0) however the enzymes showed highest activity at alkaline pH (pH 9.0) in the leaf extracts of treated plants. The temperature optimum for LAP-like activity was around 40-50 °C. The enzymes were strongly inhibited by 1, 10 phenanthroline and bestatin. Heavy metal ions and EDTA inhibited LAP-like activities, whereas Mn(+2) and Mg(+2) activated the enzyme activities. Beside LpNA (33.5 U/mg/min) pigeonpea LAP-like enzymes also cleaved ApNA (15 U/mg/min) but were unable to cleave VpNA. Total proteolytic activity was also observed to be induced in treated plants. LAP-like activity was increased upto 19.5 fold after gel filtration chromatography. Results suggest that these enzymes may have functional defensive role in pigeonpea.

  12. Aircraft icing instrumentation: Unfilled needs. [rotary wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitchens, P. F.

    1980-01-01

    A list of icing instrumentation requirements are presented. Because of the Army's helicopter orientation, many of the suggestions are specific to rotary wing aircraft; however, some of the instrumentation are also suitable for general aviation aircraft.

  13. Evolution of a Vietnamese Village - Part 3: Duc Lap Since November 1964 and Some Comments on Village Pacification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1967-02-01

    locally trained nurses would be taught to care for the most common local diseases and ailments with simple, effective treatment. Under this program...Viet Cong and the population of Due Lap which will never be known. The effects of these incidents in the village can also be chron - icled in order to...Viet Cong-controlled areas have little opportunity to visit trained doctors or nurses, and the amount of disease and death in those areas can be only

  14. Proliferation of progeria cells is enhanced by lamina-associated polypeptide 2α (LAP2α) through expression of extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Vidak, Sandra; Kubben, Nard; Dechat, Thomas; Foisner, Roland

    2015-10-01

    Lamina-associated polypeptide 2α (LAP2α) localizes throughout the nucleoplasm and interacts with the fraction of lamins A/C that is not associated with the peripheral nuclear lamina. The LAP2α-lamin A/C complex negatively affects cell proliferation. Lamins A/C are encoded by LMNA, a single heterozygous mutation of which causes Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). This mutation generates the lamin A variant progerin, which we show here leads to loss of LAP2α and nucleoplasmic lamins A/C, impaired proliferation, and down-regulation of extracellular matrix components. Surprisingly, contrary to wild-type cells, ectopic expression of LAP2α in cells expressing progerin restores proliferation and extracellular matrix expression but not the levels of nucleoplasmic lamins A/C. We conclude that, in addition to its cell cycle-inhibiting function with lamins A/C, LAP2α can also regulate extracellular matrix components independently of lamins A/C, which may help explain the proliferation-promoting function of LAP2α in cells expressing progerin.

  15. Commercial Aircraft Integrated Vehicle Health Management Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Evans, Joni K.; Jones, Sharon Monica; Kurtoglu, Tolga; Leone, Karen M.; Sandifer, Carl E.; Thomas, Megan A.

    2010-01-01

    Statistical data and literature from academia, industry, and other government agencies were reviewed and analyzed to establish requirements for fixture work in detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and mitigation for IVHM related hardware and software. Around 15 to 20 percent of commercial aircraft accidents between 1988 and 2003 involved inalftfnctions or failures of some aircraft system or component. Engine and landing gear failures/malfunctions dominate both accidents and incidents. The IVI vl Project research technologies were found to map to the Joint Planning and Development Office's National Research and Development Plan (RDP) as well as the Safety Working Group's National Aviation Safety Strategic. Plan (NASSP). Future directions in Aviation Technology as related to IVHlvl were identified by reviewing papers from three conferences across a five year time span. A total of twenty-one trend groups in propulsion, aeronautics and aircraft categories were compiled. Current and ftiture directions of IVHM related technologies were gathered and classified according to eight categories: measurement and inspection, sensors, sensor management, detection, component and subsystem monitoring, diagnosis, prognosis, and mitigation.

  16. Commercial aircraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. J.

    The history of aircraft noise control development is traced with an eye to forecasting the future. Noise control became imperative with the advent of the first generation of commercial jet aircraft, which were extremely loud. The steady increases in the size of turbofans have nearly matched the progress in noise reduction capabilities in recent years. Only 5 dB of reduction in fleet noise has been achieved since early standards were met. Current engine design is concentrated on increasing fuel efficiency rather than lowering noise emissions. Further difficulties exist because of continued flights with older aircraft. Gains in noise reduction have been made mainly by decreasing exhaust velocities from 600-700 m/sec to 300-400 m/sec. New techniques being explored comprise mixing the core and bypass flows, interaction tone control, reduction of broadband sources, development of acoustic liner technology and alterations in the number of fan blades and stage spacing.

  17. Transport aircraft accident dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cominsky, A.

    1982-01-01

    A study was carried out of 112 impact survivable jet transport aircraft accidents (world wide) of 27,700 kg (60,000 lb.) aircraft and up extending over the last 20 years. This study centered on the effect of impact and the follow-on events on aircraft structures and was confined to the approach, landing and takeoff segments of the flight. The significant characteristics, frequency of occurrence and the effect on the occupants of the above data base were studied and categorized with a view to establishing typical impact scenarios for use as a basis of verifying the effectiveness of potential safety concepts. Studies were also carried out of related subjects such as: (1) assessment of advanced materials; (2) human tolerance to impact; (3) merit functions for safety concepts; and (4) impact analysis and test methods.

  18. Alternative aircraft fuels technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1976-01-01

    NASA is studying the characteristics of future aircraft fuels produced from either petroleum or nonpetroleum sources such as oil shale or coal. These future hydrocarbon based fuels may have chemical and physical properties that are different from present aviation turbine fuels. This research is aimed at determining what those characteristics may be, how present aircraft and engine components and materials would be affected by fuel specification changes, and what changes in both aircraft and engine design would be required to utilize these future fuels without sacrificing performance, reliability, or safety. This fuels technology program was organized to include both in-house and contract research on the synthesis and characterization of fuels, component evaluations of combustors, turbines, and fuel systems, and, eventually, full-scale engine demonstrations. A review of the various elements of the program and significant results obtained so far are presented.

  19. Aircraft Design Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The helicopter pictured is the twin-turbine S-76, produced by Sikorsky Aircraft division of United Technologies, Stratford, Connecticut. It is the first transport helicopter ever dey n e d purely as a commercial vehicle rather than an adaptation of a military design. Being built in large numbers for customers in 16 countries, the S-76 is intended for offshore oil rig support, executive transportation and general utility service. The craft carries 12 passengers plus a crew of two and has a range of more than 450 miles-yet it weighs less than 10,000 pounds. Significant weight reduction was achieved by use of composite materials, which are generally lighter but stronger than conventional aircraft materials. NASA composite technology played a part in development of the S-76. Under contract with NASA's Langley Research Center, Sikorsky Aircraft designed and flight-tested a helicopter airframe of advanced composite materials.

  20. LAPS-FSH: a new and effective long-acting follicle-stimulating hormone analogue for the treatment of infertility.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sunyoung; Park, Youngjin; Kim, YoungHoon; Kim, Yu Yon; Choi, Hyun-Ji; Son, Woo-Chan; Kwon, SeChang

    2014-10-01

    Although several long-acting follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) therapies have been developed to enhance the ovarian response, a disadvantage of FSH therapy is its relatively short half-life, which requires women to receive one to two injections per day for almost 2 weeks. In the present study, we developed a novel FSH analogue by conjugating recombinant human FSH (rhFSH) and the constant region of the human immunoglobulin G4 fragment via non-peptidyl linkers. The efficacy of the FSH analogue was evaluated in vitro by cAMP level assessments, pharmacokinetic studies and a determination of ovarian weight and by comparing these findings with the results from other FSH analogues. In addition, the total number of antral and Graafian follicles was determined after 7 days of treatment with control, 6µgkg(-1) follitropin β, 6, 12 or 42µgkg(-1) corifollitropin α or 3, 6 or 12µgkg(-1) long acting protein/peptide discovery-follicle-stimulating hormone (LAPS-FSH). As a result, the animals treated with 12µgkg(-1) LAPS-FSH produced additional and larger healthy follicles. These data demonstrate that LAPS-FSH promotes growth and inhibits atresia of the ovarian follicle compared with other available drugs, suggesting that our new drug enhances the efficacy and duration of treatment. It is expected that our new FSH analogue will result in a higher chance of pregnancy in patients who are unresponsive to other drugs.