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Sample records for aircraft parts shipping

  1. 14 CFR Appendix B to Part 417 - Flight Hazard Area Analysis for Aircraft and Ship Protection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight Hazard Area Analysis for Aircraft... Appendix B to Part 417—Flight Hazard Area Analysis for Aircraft and Ship Protection B417.1Scope This appendix contains requirements to establish aircraft hazard areas, ship hazard areas, and land...

  2. 14 CFR Appendix B to Part 417 - Flight Hazard Area Analysis for Aircraft and Ship Protection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight Hazard Area Analysis for Aircraft... Appendix B to Part 417—Flight Hazard Area Analysis for Aircraft and Ship Protection B417.1Scope This appendix contains requirements to establish aircraft hazard areas, ship hazard areas, and land...

  3. 14 CFR Appendix B to Part 417 - Flight Hazard Area Analysis for Aircraft and Ship Protection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight Hazard Area Analysis for Aircraft... Appendix B to Part 417—Flight Hazard Area Analysis for Aircraft and Ship Protection B417.1Scope This appendix contains requirements to establish aircraft hazard areas, ship hazard areas, and land...

  4. 14 CFR Appendix B to Part 417 - Flight Hazard Area Analysis for Aircraft and Ship Protection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight Hazard Area Analysis for Aircraft... Appendix B to Part 417—Flight Hazard Area Analysis for Aircraft and Ship Protection B417.1Scope This appendix contains requirements to establish aircraft hazard areas, ship hazard areas, and land...

  5. 14 CFR Appendix B to Part 417 - Flight Hazard Area Analysis for Aircraft and Ship Protection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight Hazard Area Analysis for Aircraft... Appendix B to Part 417—Flight Hazard Area Analysis for Aircraft and Ship Protection B417.1Scope This appendix contains requirements to establish aircraft hazard areas, ship hazard areas, and land...

  6. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  7. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  8. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  9. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  10. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  11. 26 CFR 521.107 - Income from operation of ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 19 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Income from operation of ships or aircraft. 521... of Denmark and of Danish Corporations § 521.107 Income from operation of ships or aircraft. The income derived from the operation of ships or aircraft registered in Denmark by a nonresident alien...

  12. 26 CFR 521.107 - Income from operation of ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 19 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Income from operation of ships or aircraft. 521... of Denmark and of Danish Corporations § 521.107 Income from operation of ships or aircraft. The income derived from the operation of ships or aircraft registered in Denmark by a nonresident alien...

  13. 26 CFR 521.107 - Income from operation of ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 19 2013-04-01 2010-04-01 true Income from operation of ships or aircraft. 521... of Denmark and of Danish Corporations § 521.107 Income from operation of ships or aircraft. The income derived from the operation of ships or aircraft registered in Denmark by a nonresident alien...

  14. 26 CFR 521.107 - Income from operation of ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 19 2014-04-01 2010-04-01 true Income from operation of ships or aircraft. 521... of Denmark and of Danish Corporations § 521.107 Income from operation of ships or aircraft. The income derived from the operation of ships or aircraft registered in Denmark by a nonresident alien...

  15. 26 CFR 521.107 - Income from operation of ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 19 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Income from operation of ships or aircraft. 521... of Denmark and of Danish Corporations § 521.107 Income from operation of ships or aircraft. The income derived from the operation of ships or aircraft registered in Denmark by a nonresident alien...

  16. 26 CFR 509.107 - Income from operation of ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 19 2013-04-01 2010-04-01 true Income from operation of ships or aircraft. 509...) REGULATIONS UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS SWITZERLAND General Income Tax § 509.107 Income from operation of ships or... a Swiss enterprise as consists of earnings derived from the operation of ships or...

  17. 26 CFR 509.107 - Income from operation of ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 19 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Income from operation of ships or aircraft. 509...) REGULATIONS UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS SWITZERLAND General Income Tax § 509.107 Income from operation of ships or... a Swiss enterprise as consists of earnings derived from the operation of ships or...

  18. 26 CFR 509.107 - Income from operation of ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 19 2014-04-01 2010-04-01 true Income from operation of ships or aircraft. 509...) REGULATIONS UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS SWITZERLAND General Income Tax § 509.107 Income from operation of ships or... a Swiss enterprise as consists of earnings derived from the operation of ships or...

  19. 26 CFR 509.107 - Income from operation of ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 19 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Income from operation of ships or aircraft. 509...) REGULATIONS UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS SWITZERLAND General Income Tax § 509.107 Income from operation of ships or... a Swiss enterprise as consists of earnings derived from the operation of ships or...

  20. Exploring Science Applications for Unmanned Aircraft Systems Aboard UNOLS Ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, R.; Lachenmeier, T.; Hatfield, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The University of Alaska Fairbanks has been expanding the use of small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) for science support from a variety of ships for several years. The ease and safety of flying from research vessels offers the science community lower cost access to overhead surveys of marine mammals without impact on sensitive populations, monitoring of AUV operations and collection of transmitted data, extensive surveys of sea ice during formation, melt, and sea temperatures through multiple seasons. As FAA expands access to the Arctic airspace over the Chukchi, Beaufort, and Bering Seas, the opportunities to employ UAS in science applications will become easier to exploit. This presentation describes the changes coming through new FAA rules, through the Alaska FAA Test Site, the Pan-Pacific UAS Test Range Complex which includes Oregon and Hawaii, and even Iceland. Airspace access advances associated with recent operations including the NASA-sponsored MIZOPEX, whale detection, and forming sea ice work in October will be presented, as well as a glider UAS connected to very high altitude balloons collecting atmospheric data. Development of safety procedures for use of UAS on UNOLS ships will be discussed.

  1. A low cost maritime control aircraft-ship-weapons system. [antiship missile defense

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fluk, H.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that the long-range antiship standoff missile is emerging as the foremost threat on the seas. Delivered by high speed bombers, surface ships, and submarines, a missile attack can be mounted against selected targets from any point on the compass. An investigation is conducted regarding the configuration of a system which could most efficiently identify and destroy standoff threats before they launch their weapons. It is found that by using ships for carrying and launching missiles, and employing aircraft with a powerful radar only for search and missile directing operations, aircraft cost and weight can be greatly reduced. The employment of V/STOL aircraft in preference to other types of aircraft makes it possible to use ships of smaller size for carrying the aircraft. However, in order to obtain an all-weather operational capability for the system, ships are selected which are still big enough to display the required stability in heavy seas.

  2. 19 CFR 10.183 - Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components, and... aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including their parts, components, and... United States Coast Guard, aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including...

  3. 19 CFR 10.183 - Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components, and... aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including their parts, components, and... United States Coast Guard, aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including...

  4. 19 CFR 10.183 - Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components, and... aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including their parts, components, and... United States Coast Guard, aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including...

  5. 19 CFR 10.183 - Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components, and... aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including their parts, components, and... United States Coast Guard, aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including...

  6. 19 CFR 10.183 - Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components, and... aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including their parts, components, and... United States Coast Guard, aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including...

  7. Surface Effect Ship Structural Producibility. Part 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-14

    2-27 2.12 Tee Stringer (Baseline). ................ 2-35 2.13 ŕ" Beam Truss (Baseline). ............... 2-35 2.14 Straight Flat...Tube Truss (Looking Forward). ...... ........ 2-39 2.18 Stiffened Plate Girder (Looking Forward). ..... ... 2-39 2.19 Standard Transverse Frame...34 beam truss floor located between the wet and thrd decks (inner bottom). This design detail is in contrast to the PHM-1 lead ship design and the PHM

  8. Ship Fracture Mechanisms Investigation. Part 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    the spar deck, but is belcw the nominal yield for mild steel of 32,000 psi. 3-13 Initiation Site Arrest Down- Toward Ship’s bottom Up- Toward Figure 3...hatch. The deck material in the vicinity of fracture was 46mm (1.81 inch)"EH33" normalized steel . Description of the Circumstances at the Time of...finally installing "CS" normalized steel doubler plate over the existing deck plate at the hatch corners. This repair fractured in the spring of 1976

  9. VIEW OF SOUTHEASTERN INTERIOR SPACE, FACING NORTHWEST. Douglas Aircraft ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF SOUTHEASTERN INTERIOR SPACE, FACING NORTHWEST. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Parts Shipping & Receiving Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. VIEW OF CENTRAL INTERIOR SPACE, FACING NORTHEAST. Douglas Aircraft ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF CENTRAL INTERIOR SPACE, FACING NORTHEAST. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Parts Shipping & Receiving Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. Trust Control of VTOL Aircraft Part Deux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Thrust control of Vertical Takeoff and Landing (VTOL) aircraft has always been a debatable issue. In most cases, it comes down to the fundamental question of throttle versus collective. Some aircraft used throttle(s), with a fore and aft longitudinal motion, some had collectives, some have used Thrust Levers where the protocol is still "Up is Up and Down is Down," and some have incorporated both throttles and collectives when designers did not want to deal with the Human Factors issues. There have even been combinations of throttles that incorporated an arc that have been met with varying degrees of success. A previous review was made of nineteen designs without attempting to judge the merits of the controller. Included in this paper are twelve designs entered in competition for the 1961 Tri-Service VTOL transport. Entries were from a Bell/Lockheed tiltduct, a North American tiltwing, a Vanguard liftfan, and even a Sikorsky tiltwing. Additional designs were submitted from Boeing Wichita (direct lift), Ling-Temco-Vought with its XC-142 tiltwing, Boeing Vertol's tiltwing, Mcdonnell's compound and tiltwing, and the Douglas turboduct and turboprop designs. A private party submitted a re-design of the Breguet 941 as a VTOL transport. It is important to document these 53 year-old designs to preserve a part of this country's aviation heritage.

  12. 9 CFR 93.502 - Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon; unloading, cleaning, and disinfection... IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.502 Inspection of certain aircraft...

  13. Body weight of hypersonic aircraft, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, Mark D.

    1988-01-01

    The load bearing body weight of wing-body and all-body hypersonic aircraft is estimated for a wide variety of structural materials and geometries. Variations of weight with key design and configuration parameters are presented and discussed. Both hot and cool structure approaches are considered in isotropic, organic composite, and metal matrix composite materials; structural shells are sandwich or skin-stringer. Conformal and pillow-tank designs are investigated for the all-body shape. The results identify the most promising hypersonic aircraft body structure design approaches and their weight trends. Geometric definition of vehicle shapes and structural analysis methods are presented in appendices.

  14. Aircraft Environmental Systems Mechanic. Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chanute AFB Technical Training Center, IL.

    This packet contains learning modules for a self-paced course in aircraft environmental systems mechanics that was developed for the Air Force. Each learning module consists of some or all of the following: objectives, instructions, equipment, procedures, information sheets, handouts, self-tests with answers, review section, tests, and response…

  15. Aircraft Environmental Systems Mechanic. Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chanute AFB Technical Training Center, IL.

    This packet contains learning modules designed for a self-paced course in aircraft environmental systems mechanics that was developed for the Air Force. Learning modules consist of some or all of the following materials: objectives, instructions, equipment, procedures, information sheets, handouts, workbooks, self-tests with answers, review…

  16. 32 CFR 705.5 - Taking of photos on board naval ships, aircraft and installations by members of the general public.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Taking of photos on board naval ships, aircraft... AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.5 Taking of photos on board naval ships, aircraft and installations by members... wish to take photos within naval jurisdictions will be advised of areas where photography is...

  17. Multiplafform sampling (ship, aircraft, and satellite) of a Gulf Stream warm core ring.

    PubMed

    Smith, R C; Brown, O B; Hoge, F E; Baker, K S; Evans, R H; Swift, R N; Esaias, W E

    1987-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the ability to meet the need to measure distributions of physical and biological properties of the ocean over large areas synoptically and over long time periods by means of remote sensing utilizing contemporaneous buoy, ship, aircraft, and satellite (i.e., multiplatform) sampling strategies. A mapping of sea surface temperature and chlorophyll fields in a Gulf Stream warm core ring using the multiplatform approach is described. Sampling capabilities of each sensing system are discussed as background for the data collected by means of these three dissimilar methods. Commensurate space/time sample sets from each sensing system are compared, and their relative accuracies in space and time are determined. The three-dimensional composite maps derived from the data set provide a synoptic perspective unobtainable from single platforms alone.

  18. Multiplatform sampling (ship, aircraft, and satellite) of a Gulf Stream warm core ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Raymond C.; Brown, Otis B.; Hoge, Frank E.; Baker, Karen S.; Evans, Robert H.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the ability to meet the need to measure distributions of physical and biological properties of the ocean over large areas synoptically and over long time periods by means of remote sensing utilizing contemporaneous buoy, ship, aircraft, and satellite (i.e., multiplatform) sampling strategies. A mapping of sea surface temperature and chlorophyll fields in a Gulf Stream warm core ring using the multiplatform approach is described. Sampling capabilities of each sensing system are discussed as background for the data collected by means of these three dissimilar methods. Commensurate space/time sample sets from each sensing system are compared, and their relative accuracies in space and time are determined. The three-dimensional composite maps derived from the data set provide a synoptic perspective unobtainable from single platforms alone.

  19. Measurement and computer simulation of antennas on ships and aircraft for results of operational reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubina, Stanley J.

    1989-09-01

    The review of the status of computational electromagnetics by Miller and the exposition by Burke of the developments in one of the more important computer codes in the application of the electric field integral equation method, the Numerical Electromagnetic Code (NEC), coupled with Molinet's summary of progress in techniques based on the Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD), provide a clear perspective on the maturity of the modern discipline of computational electromagnetics and its potential. Audone's exposition of the application to the computation of Radar Scattering Cross-section (RCS) is an indication of the breadth of practical applications and his exploitation of modern near-field measurement techniques reminds one of progress in the measurement discipline which is essential to the validation or calibration of computational modeling methodology when applied to complex structures such as aircraft and ships. The latter monograph also presents some comparison results with computational models. Some of the results presented for scale model and flight measurements show some serious disagreements in the lobe structure which would require some detailed examination. This also applies to the radiation patterns obtained by flight measurement compared with those obtained using wire-grid models and integral equation modeling methods. In the examples which follow, an attempt is made to match measurements results completely over the entire 2 to 30 MHz HF range for antennas on a large patrol aircraft. The problem of validating computer models of HF antennas on a helicopter and using computer models to generate radiation pattern information which cannot be obtained by measurements are discussed. The use of NEC computer models to analyze top-side ship configurations where measurement results are not available and only self-validation measures are available or at best comparisons with an alternate GTD computer modeling technique is also discussed.

  20. An investigation of automatic guidance concepts to steer a VTOL aircraft to a small aviation facility ship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.; Goka, T.; Phatak, A. V.; Schmidt, S. F.

    1980-01-01

    A detailed system model of a VTOL aircraft approaching a small aviation facility ship was developed and used to investigate several approach guidance concepts. A preliminary anaysis of the aircraft-vessel landing guidance requirements was conducted. The various subelements and constraints of the flight system are described including the landing scenario, lift fan aircraft, state rate feedback flight control, MLS-based navigation, sea state induced ship motion, and wake turbulence due to wind-over-deck effects. These elements are integrated into a systems model with various guidance concepts. Guidance is described in terms of lateral, vertical, and longitudinal axes steering modes and approach and landing phases divided by a nominal hover (or stationkeeping) point defined with respect to the landing pad. The approach guidance methods are evaluated, and the two better steering concepts are studied by both single pass and Monte Carlo statistical simulation runs. Four different guidance concepts are defined for further analysis for the landing phase of flight.

  1. 32 CFR Table 2 to Part 855 - Aircraft Liability Coverage Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aircraft Liability Coverage Requirements 2 Table... AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Pt. 855, Table 2 Table 2 to Part 855—Aircraft Liability Coverage Requirements Aircraft maximum gross takeoff weight(MGTOW) Coverage for...

  2. 32 CFR Table 2 to Part 855 - Aircraft Liability Coverage Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aircraft Liability Coverage Requirements 2 Table... AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Pt. 855, Table 2 Table 2 to Part 855—Aircraft Liability Coverage Requirements Aircraft maximum gross takeoff weight(MGTOW) Coverage for...

  3. 32 CFR Table 2 to Part 855 - Aircraft Liability Coverage Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aircraft Liability Coverage Requirements 2 Table... AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Pt. 855, Table 2 Table 2 to Part 855—Aircraft Liability Coverage Requirements Aircraft maximum gross takeoff weight(MGTOW) Coverage for...

  4. Coordinated aircraft and ship surveys for determining impact of river inputs on great lakes waters. Remote sensing results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raquet, C. A.; Salzman, J. A.; Coney, T. A.; Svehla, R. A.; Shook, D. F.; Gedney, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    The remote sensing results of aircraft and ship surveys for determining the impact of river effluents on Great Lakes waters are presented. Aircraft multi-spectral scanner data were acquired throughout the spring and early summer of 1976 at five locations: the West Basin of Lake Erie, Genesee River - Lake Ontario, Menomonee River - Lake Michigan, Grand River - Lake Michigan, and Nemadji River - Lake Superior. Multispectral scanner data and ship surface sample data are correlated resulting in 40 contour plots showing large-scale distributions of parameters such as total suspended solids, turbidity, Secchi depth, nutrients, salts, and dissolved oxygen. The imagery and data analysis are used to determine the transport and dispersion of materials from the river discharges, especially during spring runoff events, and to evaluate the relative effects of river input, resuspension, and shore erosion. Twenty-five LANDSAT satellite images of the study sites are also included in the analysis. Examples of the use of remote sensing data in quantitatively estimating total particulate loading in determining water types, in assessing transport across international boundaries, and in supporting numerical current modeling are included. The importance of coordination of aircraft and ship lake surveys is discussed, including the use of telefacsimile for the transmission of imagery.

  5. 41 CFR 102-33.345 - What are a State agency's responsibilities in the donation of Federal Government aircraft parts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...'s responsibilities in the donation of Federal Government aircraft parts? 102-33.345 Section 102-33...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Disposing of Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Reporting Excess Aircraft Parts § 102-33.345 What are a State...

  6. 41 CFR 102-33.345 - What are a State agency's responsibilities in the donation of Federal Government aircraft parts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...'s responsibilities in the donation of Federal Government aircraft parts? 102-33.345 Section 102-33...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Disposing of Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Reporting Excess Aircraft Parts § 102-33.345 What are a State...

  7. 41 CFR 102-33.345 - What are a State agency's responsibilities in the donation of Federal Government aircraft parts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...'s responsibilities in the donation of Federal Government aircraft parts? 102-33.345 Section 102-33...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Disposing of Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Reporting Excess Aircraft Parts § 102-33.345 What are a State...

  8. 41 CFR 102-33.345 - What are a State agency's responsibilities in the donation of Federal Government aircraft parts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...'s responsibilities in the donation of Federal Government aircraft parts? 102-33.345 Section 102-33...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Disposing of Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Reporting Excess Aircraft Parts § 102-33.345 What are a State...

  9. 41 CFR 102-33.345 - What are a State agency's responsibilities in the donation of Federal Government aircraft parts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...'s responsibilities in the donation of Federal Government aircraft parts? 102-33.345 Section 102-33...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Disposing of Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Reporting Excess Aircraft Parts § 102-33.345 What are a State...

  10. 32 CFR Table 2 to Part 855 - Aircraft Liability Coverage Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aircraft Liability Coverage Requirements 2 Table 2 to Part 855 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Pt. 855, Table 2 Table 2 to Part...

  11. 32 CFR Table 2 to Part 855 - Aircraft Liability Coverage Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aircraft Liability Coverage Requirements 2 Table 2 to Part 855 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Pt. 855, Table 2 Table 2 to Part...

  12. Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Company, Washington, DC Boeing Commercial Aircraft Division, Seattle, WA and Long Beach, CA Boeing Military Aircraft and Missile Division, St. Louis, MO and... aircraft ; military fixed-wing aircraft ; rotorcraft (helicopters and tiltrotor aircraft ); and aircraft jet engines. Two companies dominate the commercial... aircraft business, Boeing and Airbus. Four companies dominate the military fixed-wing market, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, BAE Systems, and European

  13. Influence of friction forces on the motion of VTOL aircraft during landing operations on ships at sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, J. C.; Chin, D. O.

    1981-01-01

    Equations describing the friction forces generated during landing operations on ships at sea were formulated. These forces depend on the platform reaction and the coefficient of friction. The platform reaction depends on the relative sink rate and the shock absorbing capability of the landing gear. The friction coefficient varies with the surface condition of the landing platform and the angle of yaw of the aircraft relative to the landing platform. Landings by VTOL aircraft, equipped with conventional oleopneumatic landing gears are discussed. Simplifications are introduced to reduce the complexity of the mathematical description of the tire and shock strut characteristics. Approximating the actual complicated force deflection characteristic of the tire by linear relationship is adequate. The internal friction forces in the shock strut are included in the landing gear model. A set of relatively simple equations was obtained by including only those tire and shock strut characteristics that contribute significantly to the generation of landing gear forces.

  14. 14 CFR 43.10 - Disposition of life-limited aircraft parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Disposition of life-limited aircraft parts... life-limited aircraft parts. (a) Definitions used in this section. For the purposes of this section the following definitions apply. Life-limited part means any part for which a mandatory replacement limit...

  15. Aircraft/island/ship/satellite intercomparison: Preliminary results from July 16, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Howard P.; Davidson, Ken; Gerber, Herman; Khalsa, Siri Jodha Singh; Kloesel, Kevin A.; Schwiesow, Ronald; Snider, Jack B.; Wielicki, Bruce M.; Wylie, Donald P.

    1990-01-01

    The First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) objective of validating and improving satellite algorithms for inferring cloud properties from satellite radiances was one of the central motivating factors in the design of the specific field experimental strategies used in the July, 1987 marine stratocumulus intensive field observations (IFO). The in situ measuring platforms were deployed to take maximum advantage of redundant measurements (for intercomparison of the in situ sensors) and to provide optimal coverage within satellite images. One of the most ambitious of these strategies was the attempt to coordinate measurements from San Nicolas Island (SNI), the R/V Pt. Sur, the meteorological aircraft, and the satellites. For the most part, this attempt was frustrated by flight restrictions in the vicinity of SNI. The exception was the mission of July 16, 1987, which achieved remarkable success in the coordination of the platforms. This presentation concerns operations conducted by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Electra and how data from the Electra can be integrated with and compared to data from the Pt. Sur, SNI, and the satellites. The focus is on the large-scale, integrated picture of the conditions on July 16 from the perspective of the Electra's flight operations.

  16. 26 CFR 509.107 - Income from operation of ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) REGULATIONS UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS SWITZERLAND General Income Tax § 509.107 Income from operation of ships or... documented or registered in Switzerland shall not be included in gross income and shall be exempt from...

  17. Aircraft noise prediction program theoretical manual, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Aircraft noise prediction theoretical methods are given. The prediction of data which affect noise generation and propagation is addressed. These data include the aircraft flight dynamics, the source noise parameters, and the propagation effects.

  18. 49 CFR Appendix to Part 800 - Request to the Secretary of the Department of Transportation To Investigate Certain Aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... surrounding certain fixed-wing and rotorcraft aircraft accidents and to submit a report to the Board from... application, amateur-built aircraft, restricted category aircraft, and all fixed-wing aircraft which have a... Transportation To Investigate Certain Aircraft Accidents Appendix to Part 800 Transportation Other...

  19. Critical parts are stored and shipped in environmentally controlled reusable container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerfeld, K. R.

    1966-01-01

    Environmentally controlled, hermetically sealed, reusable metal cabinet with storage drawers is used to ship and store sensitive electronic, pneumatic, or hydraulic parts or medical supplies under extreme weather or handling conditions. This container is compatible with on-site and transportation handling facilities.

  20. Aircraft noise prediction program theoretical manual, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Detailed prediction methods for specific aircraft noise sources are given. These sources are airframe noise, combustion noise, fan noise, single and dual stream jet noise, and turbine noise. Modifications to the NASA methods which comply with the International Civil Aviation Organization standard method for aircraft noise prediction are given.

  1. V/STOL tilt rotor research aircraft. Volume 2: Ship 1 instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information covering sensor cables, sensor installation, and sensor calibration for the XV-15 aircraft number 1 is included. For each junction box (J-box) designation there is a schematic of the J-box disconnect harness instrumentation worksheets which show sensor location, and calibration data sheets for each sensor associated with that J-box. An index of measurement item codes to J-box locations is given in a table. Cross references are given.

  2. Satellites and Remotely Piloted Aircraft: Two Remotely Operated Ships Passing in the Fight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Report (SAR) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 7 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a . REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c . THIS PAGE unclassified...combined air and space operations center, the ground commander, and, of course, the UAS pilot. —Pilot of a remotely piloted aircraft Operation Enduring...US Strategic Command, space operations are “absolutely global in nature and indifferent to physical terrain or lines drawn on a map.”2 Forces able

  3. V/STOL tilt rotor research aircraft. Volume 3: Ship 2 instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information covering sensor cables, sensor installation, and sensor calibration for the XV-15 aircraft number 2 is included. For each junction box (J-box) designation there is a schematic of the J-box disconnect harness, instrumentation worksheets which show sensor location, and calibration data sheets for each sensor associated with that J-box. An index of measurement data codes to J-box locations is given in a table. Cross references are given.

  4. Modeling of aircraft unsteady aerodynamic characteristics. Part 1: Postulated models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Vladislav; Noderer, Keith D.

    1994-01-01

    A short theoretical study of aircraft aerodynamic model equations with unsteady effects is presented. The aerodynamic forces and moments are expressed in terms of indicial functions or internal state variables. The first representation leads to aircraft integro-differential equations of motion; the second preserves the state-space form of the model equations. The formulations of unsteady aerodynamics is applied in two examples. The first example deals with a one-degree-of-freedom harmonic motion about one of the aircraft body axes. In the second example, the equations for longitudinal short-period motion are developed. In these examples, only linear aerodynamic terms are considered. The indicial functions are postulated as simple exponentials and the internal state variables are governed by linear, time-invariant, first-order differential equations. It is shown that both approaches to the modeling of unsteady aerodynamics lead to identical models.

  5. Ship emissions measurement in the Arctic by plume intercepts of the Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker Amundsen from the Polar 6 aircraft platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliabadi, Amir A.; Thomas, Jennie L.; Herber, Andreas B.; Staebler, Ralf M.; Leaitch, W. Richard; Schulz, Hannes; Law, Kathy S.; Marelle, Louis; Burkart, Julia; Willis, Megan D.; Bozem, Heiko; Hoor, Peter M.; Köllner, Franziska; Schneider, Johannes; Levasseur, Maurice; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.

    2016-06-01

    Decreasing sea ice and increasing marine navigability in northern latitudes have changed Arctic ship traffic patterns in recent years and are predicted to increase annual ship traffic in the Arctic in the future. Development of effective regulations to manage environmental impacts of shipping requires an understanding of ship emissions and atmospheric processing in the Arctic environment. As part of the summer 2014 NETCARE (Network on Climate and Aerosols) campaign, the plume dispersion and gas and particle emission factors of effluents originating from the Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker Amundsen operating near Resolute Bay, NU, Canada, were investigated. The Amundsen burned distillate fuel with 1.5 wt % sulfur. Emissions were studied via plume intercepts using the Polar 6 aircraft measurements, an analytical plume dispersion model, and using the FLEXPART-WRF Lagrangian particle dispersion model. The first plume intercept by the research aircraft was carried out on 19 July 2014 during the operation of the Amundsen in the open water. The second and third plume intercepts were carried out on 20 and 21 July 2014 when the Amundsen had reached the ice edge and operated under ice-breaking conditions. Typical of Arctic marine navigation, the engine load was low compared to cruising conditions for all of the plume intercepts. The measured species included mixing ratios of CO2, NOx, CO, SO2, particle number concentration (CN), refractory black carbon (rBC), and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The results were compared to similar experimental studies in mid-latitudes. Plume expansion rates (γ) were calculated using the analytical model and found to be γ = 0.75 ± 0.81, 0.93 ± 0.37, and 1.19 ± 0.39 for plumes 1, 2, and 3, respectively. These rates were smaller than prior studies conducted at mid-latitudes, likely due to polar boundary layer dynamics, including reduced turbulent mixing compared to mid-latitudes. All emission factors were in agreement with prior

  6. Dynamic Forms. Part 2; Application to Aircraft Guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, George; Smith, G. Allan

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes a method for guiding a dynamic system through a given set of points. The paradigm is a fully automatic aircraft subject to air traffic control (ATC). The ATC provides a sequence of waypoints through which the aircraft trajectory must pass. The waypoints typically specify time, position, and velocity. The guidance problem is to synthesize a system state trajectory that satisfies both the ATC and aircraft constraints. Complications arise because the controlled process is multidimensional, multiaxis, nonlinear, highly coupled, and the state space is not flat. In addition, there is a multitude of operating modes, which may number in the hundreds. Each such mode defines a distinct state space model of the process by specifying the state space coordinatization, the partition of the controls into active controls and configuration controls, and the output map. Furthermore, mode transitions are required to be smooth. The proposed guidance algorithm is based on the inversion of the pure feedback approximation, followed by correction for the effects of zero dynamics. The paper describes the structure and major modules of the algorithm, and the performance is illustrated by several example aircraft maneuvers.

  7. The 1980 Aircraft Safety and Operating Problems, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stickle, J. W. (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    It is difficult to categorize aircraft operating problems, human factors and safety. Much of NASA's research involves all three and considers the important inter-relationships between man, the machine and the environment, whether the environment be man-made or natural. Topics covered in 20 papers include terminal-area operations; avionics and human factors; and the atmospheric environment.

  8. An investigation into the vertical axis control power requirements for landing VTOL type aircraft onboard nonaviation ships in various sea states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, M. E.; Roskam, J.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of determining the vertical axis control requirements for landing a VTOL aircraft on a moving ship deck in various sea states is examined. Both a fixed-base piloted simulation and a nonpiloted simulation were used to determine the landing performance as influenced by thrust-to-weight ratio, vertical damping, and engine lags. The piloted simulation was run using a fixed-based simulator at Ames Research center. Simplified versions of an existing AV-8A Harrier model and an existing head-up display format were used. The ship model used was that of a DD963 class destroyer. Simplified linear models of the pilot, aircraft, ship motion, and ship air-wake turbulence were developed for the nonpiloted simulation. A unique aspect of the nonpiloted simulation was the development of a model of the piloting strategy used for shipboard landing. This model was refined during the piloted simulation until it provided a reasonably good representation of observed pilot behavior.

  9. 41 CFR 102-33.115 - Are there special requirements for acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... requirements for acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? 102-33.115 Section 102-33... acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? Yes, when you acquire military Flight...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring...

  10. 41 CFR 102-33.115 - Are there special requirements for acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? 102-33.115 Section 102-33... acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? Yes, when you acquire military Flight...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring...

  11. 41 CFR 102-33.115 - Are there special requirements for acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? 102-33.115 Section 102-33...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government... acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? Yes, when you acquire military...

  12. 41 CFR 102-33.115 - Are there special requirements for acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... requirements for acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? 102-33.115 Section 102-33...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government... acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? Yes, when you acquire military...

  13. 41 CFR 102-33.115 - Are there special requirements for acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... requirements for acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? 102-33.115 Section 102-33...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government... acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? Yes, when you acquire military...

  14. 41 CFR 102-36.345 - May we dispose of excess Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? 102-36.345 Section 102-36.345 Public Contracts and... Requires Special Handling Aircraft and Aircraft Parts § 102-36.345 May we dispose of excess Flight Safety... appropriate Criticality Code on the SF 120, and ensure that all available historical and maintenance...

  15. 41 CFR 102-36.345 - May we dispose of excess Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? 102-36.345 Section 102-36.345 Public Contracts and... Requires Special Handling Aircraft and Aircraft Parts § 102-36.345 May we dispose of excess Flight Safety... appropriate Criticality Code on the SF 120, and ensure that all available historical and maintenance...

  16. 41 CFR 102-36.345 - May we dispose of excess Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? 102-36.345 Section 102-36.345 Public Contracts and... Requires Special Handling Aircraft and Aircraft Parts § 102-36.345 May we dispose of excess Flight Safety... appropriate Criticality Code on the SF 120, and ensure that all available historical and maintenance...

  17. 41 CFR 102-36.345 - May we dispose of excess Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? 102-36.345 Section 102-36.345 Public Contracts and... Requires Special Handling Aircraft and Aircraft Parts § 102-36.345 May we dispose of excess Flight Safety... appropriate Criticality Code on the SF 120, and ensure that all available historical and maintenance...

  18. 26 CFR 1.883-1 - Exclusion of income from the international operation of ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... cruises but does not own any ships. S1, S2, and S3 are foreign corporations that own cruise ships. S1, S2... management of the cruise line will be provided by S4. (ii) Analysis. S1, S2, and S3 each owns ships and time... cruises. Thus, JV would be engaged in the operation of ships within the meaning of paragraph (e)(1)...

  19. 26 CFR 1.883-1 - Exclusion of income from the international operation of ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... cruises but does not own any ships. S1, S2, and S3 are foreign corporations that own cruise ships. S1, S2... management of the cruise line will be provided by S4. (ii) Analysis. S1, S2, and S3 each owns ships and time... cruises. Thus, JV would be engaged in the operation of ships within the meaning of paragraph (e)(1)...

  20. 26 CFR 1.883-1 - Exclusion of income from the international operation of ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cruises but does not own any ships. S1, S2, and S3 are foreign corporations that own cruise ships. S1, S2... management of the cruise line will be provided by S4. (ii) Analysis. S1, S2, and S3 each owns ships and time... cruises. Thus, JV would be engaged in the operation of ships within the meaning of paragraph (e)(1)...

  1. 26 CFR 1.883-1 - Exclusion of income from the international operation of ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cruises but does not own any ships. S1, S2, and S3 are foreign corporations that own cruise ships. S1, S2... management of the cruise line will be provided by S4. (ii) Analysis. S1, S2, and S3 each owns ships and time... cruises. Thus, JV would be engaged in the operation of ships within the meaning of paragraph (e)(1)...

  2. Clear Sky Column Closure Studies of Urban-Marine and Mineral-Dust Aerosols Using Aircraft, Ship, Satellite and Ground-Based Measurements in ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Russell, Philip B.; Livingston, John M.; Gasso, Santiago; Hegg, Dean A.; Collins, Donald R.; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.; Oestroem, Elisabeth; Noone, Kevin J.; Durkee, Philip A.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Gordon, Howard R.; Formenti, Paola; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Kapustin, Vladimir N.; Bates, Timothy S.; Quinn, Patricia K.

    2000-01-01

    As part of the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2), European urban-marine and African mineral-dust aerosols were measured aboard the Pelican aircraft, the Research Vessel Vodyanitskiy from the ground and from satellites.

  3. Aircraft measurements of bromine monoxide, iodine monoxide, and glyoxal profiles in the tropics: comparison with ship-based and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkamer, R.; Baidar, S.; Campos, T. L.; Coburn, S.; DiGangi, J. P.; Dix, B.; Koenig, T. K.; Ortega, I.; Pierce, B. R.; Reeves, M.; Sinreich, R.; Wang, S.; Zondlo, M. A.; Romashkin, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric chemistry of halogens and organic carbon over tropical oceans modifies ozone and atmospheric aerosols, yet atmospheric models remain largely untested for lack of vertically resolved measurements of bromine monoxide (BrO), iodine monoxide (IO), and small oxygenated hydrocarbons like glyoxal (CHOCHO) in the tropical troposphere. BrO, IO, glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), water vapor (H2O) and O2-O2 collision complexes (O4) were measured by the CU Airborne Multi AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument, in situ aerosol size distributions by an Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS), and in situ H2O by Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser hygrometer (VCSEL). Data are presented from two research flights (RF12, RF17) aboard the NSF/NCAR GV aircraft over the tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean (tEPO) as part of the "Tropical Ocean tRoposphere Exchange of Reactive halogens and Oxygenated hydrocarbons" (TORERO) project. We assess the accuracy of O4 slant column density (SCD) measurements in the presence and absence of aerosols, and find O4-inferred aerosol extinction profiles at 477 nm agree within 5% with Mie calculations of extinction profiles constrained by UHSAS. CU AMAX-DOAS provides a flexible choice of geometry which we exploit to minimize the SCD in the reference spectrum (SCDREF, maximize signal-to-noise), and to test the robustness of BrO, IO, and glyoxal differential SCDs. The RF12 case study was conducted in pristine marine and free tropospheric air. The RF17 case study was conducted above the NOAA RV Ka'imimoana (TORERO cruise, KA-12-01), and provides independent validation data from ship-based in situ Cavity Enhanced- and MAX-DOAS. Inside the marine boundary layer (MBL) no BrO was detected (smaller than 0.5 pptv), and 0.2-0.55 pptv IO and 32-36 pptv glyoxal were observed. The near surface concentrations agree within 20% (IO) and 10% (glyoxal) between ship and aircraft. The BrO concentration strongly

  4. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, B.D.; Lissaman, P.B.S.; Morgan, W.R.; Radkey, R.L.

    1998-09-22

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing`s top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gases for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well. 31 figs.

  5. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, Bart D.; Lissaman, Peter B. S.; Morgan, Walter R.; Radkey, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing's top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gasses for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well.

  6. 41 CFR 102-33.330 - What must we do with aircraft parts that are excess to our needs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What must we do with... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Disposing of Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts...

  7. 41 CFR 102-33.330 - What must we do with aircraft parts that are excess to our needs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What must we do with... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Disposing of Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts...

  8. 41 CFR 102-33.330 - What must we do with aircraft parts that are excess to our needs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What must we do with... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Disposing of Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts...

  9. The effects of aircraft on climate and pollution. Part II: 20-year impacts of exhaust from all commercial aircraft worldwide treated individually at the subgrid scale.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, M Z; Wilkerson, J T; Naiman, A D; Lele, S K

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the 20-year impacts of emissions from all commercial aircraft flights worldwide on climate, cloudiness, and atmospheric composition. Aircraft emissions from each individual flight worldwide were modeled to evolve from the subgrid to grid scale with the global model described and evaluated in Part I of this study. Simulations with and without aircraft emissions were run for 20 years. Aircraft emissions were found to be responsible for -6% of Arctic surface global warming to date, -1.3% of total surface global warming, and -4% of global upper tropospheric warming. Arctic warming due to aircraft slightly decreased Arctic sea ice area. Longer simulations should result in more warming due to the further increase in CO2. Aircraft increased atmospheric stability below cruise altitude and decreased it above cruise altitude. The increase in stability decreased cumulus convection in favor of increased stratiform cloudiness. Aircraft increased total cloud fraction on average. Aircraft increased surface and upper tropospheric ozone by -0.4% and -2.5%, respectively and surface and upper-tropospheric peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) by -0.1% and -5%, respectively. Aircraft emissions increased tropospheric OH, decreasing column CO and CH4 by -1.7% and -0.9%, respectively. Aircraft emissions increased human mortality worldwide by -620 (-240 to 4770) deaths per year, with half due to ozone and the rest to particulate matter less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter (PM2.5).

  10. 9 CFR 93.202 - Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon; unloading, cleaning, and disinfection... IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Poultry § 93.202 Inspection of certain...

  11. 9 CFR 93.402 - Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon; unloading, cleaning, and disinfection... IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants § 93.402 Inspection of certain...

  12. Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    national power. But with the recent events such as the war with Iraq, the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak, some major carriers... TITLE AND SUBTITLE 2003 Industry Studies: Aircraft 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  13. The impact of shipping emissions on air pollution in the greater North Sea region - Part 1: Current emissions and concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulinger, A.; Matthias, V.; Zeretzke, M.; Bieser, J.; Quante, M.; Backes, A.

    2016-01-01

    The North Sea is one of the areas with the highest ship traffic densities worldwide. At any time, about 3000 ships are sailing its waterways. Previous scientific publications have shown that ships contribute significantly to atmospheric concentrations of NOx, particulate matter and ozone. Especially in the case of particulate matter and ozone, this influence can even be seen in regions far away from the main shipping routes. In order to quantify the effects of North Sea shipping on air quality in its bordering states, it is essential to determine the emissions from shipping as accurately as possible. Within Interreg IVb project Clean North Sea Shipping (CNSS), a bottom-up approach was developed and used to thoroughly compile such an emission inventory for 2011 that served as the base year for the current emission situation. The innovative aspect of this approach was to use load-dependent functions to calculate emissions from the ships' current activities instead of averaged emission factors for the entire range of the engine loads. These functions were applied to ship activities that were derived from hourly records of Automatic Identification System signals together with a database containing the engine characteristics of the vessels that traveled the North Sea in 2011. The emission model yielded ship emissions among others of NOx and SO2 at high temporal and spatial resolution that were subsequently used in a chemistry transport model in order to simulate the impact of the emissions on pollutant concentration levels. The total emissions of nitrogen reached 540 Gg and those of sulfur oxides 123 Gg within the North Sea - including the adjacent western part of the Baltic Sea until 5° W. This was about twice as much of those of a medium-sized industrialized European state like the Netherlands. The relative contribution of ships to, for example, NO2 concentration levels ashore close to the sea can reach up to 25 % in summer and 15 % in winter. Some hundred kilometers

  14. 41 CFR 102-36.345 - May we dispose of excess Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May we dispose of excess Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? 102-36.345 Section 102-36.345 Public Contracts and... Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? Yes, you may dispose of excess FSCAP, but first you must determine...

  15. 41 CFR 102-33.335 - What are the receiving agency's responsibilities in the transfer or donation of aircraft parts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the receiving agency's responsibilities in the transfer or donation of aircraft parts? 102-33.335 Section 102-33.335... agency's responsibilities in the transfer or donation of aircraft parts? An agency that...

  16. 14 CFR Appendix J to Part 141 - Aircraft Type Rating Course, For Other Than an Airline Transport Pilot Certificate

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aircraft Type Rating Course, For Other Than an Airline Transport Pilot Certificate J Appendix J to Part 141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... PILOT SCHOOLS Pt. 141, App. J Appendix J to Part 141—Aircraft Type Rating Course, For Other Than...

  17. Ship Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Guided missile cruiser equipped with advanced Aegis fleet defense system which automatically tracks hundreds of attacking aircraft or missiles, then fires and guides the ship's own weapons in response. Designed by Ingalls Shipbuilding for the US Navy, the U.S.S. Ticonderoga is the first of four CG-47 cruisers to be constructed. NASTRAN program was used previously in another Navy/Ingalls project involving design and construction of four DDG-993 Kidd Class guided missile destroyers.

  18. Ankudinov Ship Squat Predictions - Part 2: Laboratory and Field Comparisons and Validations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    Panamax bulk carrier (Global Challenger), and Panamax con- tainership ( Majestic Maersk), and one containership (OOCL Fair) shorter than Panamax length...Panama Canal study. Ship Name Type Lpp (ft) B (ft) Tfp (ft) Tap (ft) CB Vk (kts) December 1997 – Minimum depth = 44.6 to 49 ft Majestic Maersk Container...metric units) for the Majestic Maersk Panamax containership at location 1,800 in Gaillard Cut. The ship speed was relatively steady in this section with

  19. Aircraft Measurements of BrO, IO, Glyoxal, NO2, H2O, O2-O2 and Aerosol Extinction Profiles in the Tropics: Comparison with Aircraft-/Ship-Based in Situ and Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkamer, R.; Baidar, S.; Campos, T. L.; Coburn, S.; DiGangi, J. P.; Dix, B.; Eloranta, E. W.; Koenig, T. K.; Morley, B.; Ortega, I.; Pierce, B. R.; Reeves, M.; Sinreich, R.; Wang, S.; Zondlo, M. A.; Romashkin, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric chemistry of halogens and organic carbon over tropical oceans modifies ozone and atmospheric aerosols, yet atmospheric models remain largely untested for lack of vertically resolved measurements of bromine monoxide (BrO), iodine monoxide (IO) and small oxygenated hydrocarbons like glyoxal (CHOCHO) in the tropical troposphere. BrO, IO, glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), water vapor (H2O) and O2-O2 collision complexes (O4/ were measured by the University of Colorado Airborne Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAXDOAS) instrument, aerosol extinction by high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL), in situ aerosol size distributions by an ultra high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer (UHSAS) and in situ H2O by vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) hygrometer. Data are presented from two research flights (RF12, RF17) aboard the National Science Foundation/ National Center for Atmospheric Research Gulfstream V aircraft over the tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean (tEPO) as part of the "Tropical Ocean tRoposphere Exchange of Reactive halogens and Oxygenated hydrocarbons" (TORERO) project (January/February 2012). We assess the accuracy of O4 slant column density (SCD) measurements in the presence and absence of aerosols. Our O4-inferred aerosol extinction profiles at 477 nm agree within 6% with HSRL in the boundary layer and closely resemble the renormalized profile shape of Mie calculations constrained by UHSAS at low (sub-Rayleigh) aerosol extinction in the free troposphere. CU AMAX-DOAS provides a flexible choice of geometry, which we exploit to minimize the SCD in the reference spectrum (SCDREF, maximize signal-to-noise ratio) and to test the robustness of BrO, IO and glyoxal differential SCDs. The RF12 case study was conducted in pristine marine and free tropospheric air. The RF17 case study was conducted above the NOAA RV Ka'imimoana (TORERO cruise, KA-12-01) and provides independent validation data from ship-based in situ cavity

  20. Aircraft measurements of BrO, IO, glyoxal, NO2, H2O, O2-O2 and aerosol extinction profiles in the tropics: comparison with aircraft-/ship-based in situ and lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkamer, R.; Baidar, S.; Campos, T. L.; Coburn, S.; DiGangi, J. P.; Dix, B.; Eloranta, E. W.; Koenig, T. K.; Morley, B.; Ortega, I.; Pierce, B. R.; Reeves, M.; Sinreich, R.; Wang, S.; Zondlo, M. A.; Romashkin, P. A.

    2015-05-01

    Tropospheric chemistry of halogens and organic carbon over tropical oceans modifies ozone and atmospheric aerosols, yet atmospheric models remain largely untested for lack of vertically resolved measurements of bromine monoxide (BrO), iodine monoxide (IO) and small oxygenated hydrocarbons like glyoxal (CHOCHO) in the tropical troposphere. BrO, IO, glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), water vapor (H2O) and O2-O2 collision complexes (O4) were measured by the University of Colorado Airborne Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument, aerosol extinction by high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL), in situ aerosol size distributions by an ultra high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer (UHSAS) and in situ H2O by vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) hygrometer. Data are presented from two research flights (RF12, RF17) aboard the National Science Foundation/National Center for Atmospheric Research Gulfstream V aircraft over the tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean (tEPO) as part of the "Tropical Ocean tRoposphere Exchange of Reactive halogens and Oxygenated hydrocarbons" (TORERO) project (January/February 2012). We assess the accuracy of O4 slant column density (SCD) measurements in the presence and absence of aerosols. Our O4-inferred aerosol extinction profiles at 477 nm agree within 6% with HSRL in the boundary layer and closely resemble the renormalized profile shape of Mie calculations constrained by UHSAS at low (sub-Rayleigh) aerosol extinction in the free troposphere. CU AMAX-DOAS provides a flexible choice of geometry, which we exploit to minimize the SCD in the reference spectrum (SCDREF, maximize signal-to-noise ratio) and to test the robustness of BrO, IO and glyoxal differential SCDs. The RF12 case study was conducted in pristine marine and free tropospheric air. The RF17 case study was conducted above the NOAA RV Ka'imimoana (TORERO cruise, KA-12-01) and provides independent validation data from ship-based in situ cavity

  1. Shipboard Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth During ACE-2 and Comparison with Selected Ship, Aircraft and Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, J. M.; Kapustin, V. N.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Durkee, P. A.; Nielsen, K.; Freudenthaler, V.; Wiegner, M.; Covert, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    We present analyses of aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements taken with a shipboard six-channel tracking sunphotometer during ACE-2. For 10 July 1997, results are also shown for measurements acquired 70 km from the ship with a fourteen-channel airborne tracking sunphotometer.

  2. 9 CFR 93.302 - Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... as to present a danger of the spread of any communicable animal disease, he or she shall notify the... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inspection of certain aircraft and... requirements. 93.302 Section 93.302 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  3. 9 CFR 93.202 - Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... as to present a danger of the spread of any communicable animal disease, he or she shall notify the... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inspection of certain aircraft and... requirements. 93.202 Section 93.202 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  4. 9 CFR 93.502 - Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... as to present a danger of the spread of any communicable animal disease, he or she shall notify the... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inspection of certain aircraft and... requirements. 93.502 Section 93.502 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  5. 9 CFR 93.402 - Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... as to present a danger of the spread of any communicable animal disease, he or she shall notify the... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inspection of certain aircraft and... requirements. 93.402 Section 93.402 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  6. 9 CFR 98.32 - Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... as to present a danger of the spread of any communicable animal disease, he or she shall notify the... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inspection of certain aircraft and... requirements. 98.32 Section 98.32 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  7. 9 CFR 98.32 - Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... as to present a danger of the spread of any communicable animal disease, he or she shall notify the... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inspection of certain aircraft and... requirements. 98.32 Section 98.32 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  8. 9 CFR 93.502 - Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... as to present a danger of the spread of any communicable animal disease, he or she shall notify the... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inspection of certain aircraft and... requirements. 93.502 Section 93.502 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  9. 9 CFR 93.402 - Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... as to present a danger of the spread of any communicable animal disease, he or she shall notify the... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inspection of certain aircraft and... requirements. 93.402 Section 93.402 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  10. 9 CFR 93.202 - Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... as to present a danger of the spread of any communicable animal disease, he or she shall notify the... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inspection of certain aircraft and... requirements. 93.202 Section 93.202 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  11. 9 CFR 93.302 - Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Inspection of certain aircraft and... requirements. 93.302 Section 93.302 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL...

  12. 9 CFR 93.302 - Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inspection of certain aircraft and... requirements. 93.302 Section 93.302 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL...

  13. A Framework for Preliminary Design of Aircraft Structures Based on Process Information. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rais-Rohani, Masoud

    1998-01-01

    This report discusses the general framework and development of a computational tool for preliminary design of aircraft structures based on process information. The described methodology is suitable for multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) activities associated with integrated product and process development (IPPD). The framework consists of three parts: (1) product and process definitions; (2) engineering synthesis, and (3) optimization. The product and process definitions are part of input information provided by the design team. The backbone of the system is its ability to analyze a given structural design for performance as well as manufacturability and cost assessment. The system uses a database on material systems and manufacturing processes. Based on the identified set of design variables and an objective function, the system is capable of performing optimization subject to manufacturability, cost, and performance constraints. The accuracy of the manufacturability measures and cost models discussed here depend largely on the available data on specific methods of manufacture and assembly and associated labor requirements. As such, our focus in this research has been on the methodology itself and not so much on its accurate implementation in an industrial setting. A three-tier approach is presented for an IPPD-MDO based design of aircraft structures. The variable-complexity cost estimation methodology and an approach for integrating manufacturing cost assessment into design process are also discussed. This report is presented in two parts. In the first part, the design methodology is presented, and the computational design tool is described. In the second part, a prototype model of the preliminary design Tool for Aircraft Structures based on Process Information (TASPI) is described. Part two also contains an example problem that applies the methodology described here for evaluation of six different design concepts for a wing spar.

  14. 41 CFR 102-33.240 - What must we consider before disposing of aircraft and aircraft parts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must we consider... Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Disposing of Government Aircraft...

  15. Aircraft noise prediction program theoretical manual: Rotorcraft System Noise Prediction System (ROTONET), part 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weir, Donald S.; Jumper, Stephen J.; Burley, Casey L.; Golub, Robert A.

    1995-01-01

    This document describes the theoretical methods used in the rotorcraft noise prediction system (ROTONET), which is a part of the NASA Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP). The ANOPP code consists of an executive, database manager, and prediction modules for jet engine, propeller, and rotor noise. The ROTONET subsystem contains modules for the prediction of rotor airloads and performance with momentum theory and prescribed wake aerodynamics, rotor tone noise with compact chordwise and full-surface solutions to the Ffowcs-Williams-Hawkings equations, semiempirical airfoil broadband noise, and turbulence ingestion broadband noise. Flight dynamics, atmosphere propagation, and noise metric calculations are covered in NASA TM-83199, Parts 1, 2, and 3.

  16. Interference fits and stress-corrosion failure. [aircraft parts fatigue life analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, S.; Carter, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    It is pointed out that any proper design of interference fit fastener, interference fit bushings, or stress coining processes should consider both the stress-corrosion susceptibility and fatigue-life improvement together. Investigations leading to such a methodology are discussed. A service failure analysis of actual aircraft parts is considered along with the stress-corrosion susceptibility of cold-working interference fit bushings. The optimum design of the amount of interference is considered, giving attention to stress formulas and aspects of design methodology.

  17. The Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 4. Impact, Packaging and Shipping, Blast and Impulsive Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-01

    Underwater Explo- sio Attack," Naval Ship Research and Development Aditional -n are possible employing plastic Center Repo"t E SD 177-120. deforantion...system is a trailer mounted gun. IM trailer provides nobility and doubles as a gun mount d gum elevation mechanism. The Davis Gun is a special type...penetrator -Davis Gun behavior to be transformed to experiment consists of a subcaliber "a closed breech gum framework. (i.e. less than 12 inches

  18. Department management of the Ross Aviation, Inc. , contract aircraft major spare parts inventory, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-26

    The purpose of this audit was to determine whether the Department of Energy's (Department) management of its contract with Ross Aviation, Inc. (Ross) provided reasonable assurance that the inventory of aircraft major spare parts at Ross was economical and efficient. The audit disclosed that approximately $447,000 (acquisition and interest carrying costs) of low-use major spare parts was excessive. Internal control deficiencies which fostered the excessive inventory included: (1) Ross had set stock levels without considering such factors as consumption or projected needs; and (2) the Department had not reviewed inventory quantities when appraising Ross' property management. The Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) agreed to take the corrective actions recommended in the report.

  19. Aircraft noise effects: An interdisciplinary study of the effect of aircraft noise on man. Part 2: Appendix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A survey used to obtain data of a sociological nature regarding subjects used in a study of aircraft noise perception and tolerance near the Munich-Reims airport is presented. Statistics compiled on occupational, physiological, and medical aspects of the subjects are tabulated.

  20. Multiple object tracking with non-unique data-to-object association via generalized hypothesis testing. [tracking several aircraft near each other or ships at sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, D. W.; Lefler, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    A generalized hypothesis testing approach is applied to the problem of tracking several objects where several different associations of data with objects are possible. Such problems occur, for instance, when attempting to distinctly track several aircraft maneuvering near each other or when tracking ships at sea. Conceptually, the problem is solved by first, associating data with objects in a statistically reasonable fashion and then, tracking with a bank of Kalman filters. The objects are assumed to have motion characterized by a fixed but unknown deterministic portion plus a random process portion modeled by a shaping filter. For example, the object might be assumed to have a mean straight line path about which it maneuvers in a random manner. Several hypothesized associations of data with objects are possible because of ambiguity as to which object the data comes from, false alarm/detection errors, and possible uncertainty in the number of objects being tracked. The statistical likelihood function is computed for each possible hypothesized association of data with objects. Then the generalized likelihood is computed by maximizing the likelihood over parameters that define the deterministic motion of the object.

  1. Application of Abrasive-Waterjets for Machining Fatigue-Critical Aircraft Aluminum Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H T; Hovanski, Yuri; Dahl, Michael E; Zeng, J

    2010-08-19

    Current specifications require AWJ-cut aluminum parts for fatigue critical aerospace structures to go through subsequent processing due to concerns of degradation in fatigue performance. The requirement of secondary process for AWJ-machined parts greatly negates the cost effectiveness of waterjet technology. Some cost savings are envisioned if it can be shown that AWJ net cut parts have comparable durability properties as those conventionally machined. To revisit and upgrade the specifications for AWJ machining of aircraft aluminum, “Dog-bone” specimens, with and without secondary processes, were prepared for independent fatigue tests at Boeing and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Test results show that the fatigue life is proportional to quality levels of machined edges or inversely proportional to the surface roughness Ra . Even at highest quality level, the average fatigue life of AWJ-machined parts is about 30% shorter than those of conventionally machined counterparts. Between two secondary processes, dry-grit blasting with aluminum oxide abrasives until the striation is removed visually yields excellent result. It actually prolongs the fatigue life of parts at least three times higher than that achievable with conventional machining. Dry-grit blasting is relatively simple and inexpensive to administrate and, equally important, alleviates the concerns of garnet embedment.

  2. Testing and Analysis of a Composite Non-Cylindrical Aircraft Fuselage Structure . Part II; Severe Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Rouse, Marshall; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.

    2016-01-01

    The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project aimed to develop aircraft technologies enabling significant fuel burn and community noise reductions. Small incremental changes to the conventional metallic alloy-based 'tube and wing' configuration were not sufficient to achieve the desired metrics. One airframe concept identified by the project as having the potential to dramatically improve aircraft performance was a composite-based hybrid wing body configuration. Such a concept, however, presented inherent challenges stemming from, among other factors, the necessity to transfer wing loads through the entire center fuselage section which accommodates a pressurized cabin confined by flat or nearly flat panels. This paper discusses a finite element analysis and the testing of a large-scale hybrid wing body center section structure developed and constructed to demonstrate that the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure concept can meet these challenging demands of the next generation airframes. Part II of the paper considers the final test to failure of the test article in the presence of an intentionally inflicted severe discrete source damage under the wing up-bending loading condition. Finite element analysis results are compared with measurements acquired during the test and demonstrate that the hybrid wing body test article was able to redistribute and support the required design loads in a severely damaged condition.

  3. Concurrent engineering solution for the design of ship and offshore bracket parts and fabrication process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-Won; Lim, Sang-Sub; Seok, Ho-Hyun; Kang, Chung-Gil

    2013-09-01

    Brackets in ships and offshore structures are added structures that can endure stress concentrations. In this study, a concurrent engineering solution was proposed, and a high strength low carbon cast steel alloy applicable to offshore structures was designed and developed. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the designed steel were 480 and 600 MPa, respectively. The carbon equivalent of the steel was 0.446 with a weld crack susceptibility index of 0.219. The optimal structural design of the brackets for offshore structures was evaluated using ANSYS commercial software. The possibility of replacing an assembly of conventional built-up brackets with a single casting bulb bracket was verified. The casting process was simulated using MAGMAsoft commercial software, and a casting fabrication process was designed. For the proposed bulb bracket, it was possible to reduce the size and weight by approximately 30% and 50%, respectively, compared to the conventional type of bracket.

  4. Defense Logistics Agency Did Not Obtain Fair and Reasonable Prices From Meggitt Aircraft Braking Systems for Sole-Source Commercial Spare Parts (REDACTED)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-08

    Defense Logistics Agency Did Not Obtain Fair and Reasonable Prices From Meggitt Aircraft Braking Systems for Sole-Source Commercial Spare Parts...Defense Logistics Agency Did Not Obtain Fair and Reasonable Prices From Meggitt Aircraft Braking Systems for Sole-Source Commercial Spare Parts...D000AH-0180.000) │ i Results in Brief Defense Logistics Agency Did Not Obtain Fair and Reasonable Prices From Meggitt Aircraft Braking Systems for

  5. 41 CFR 102-33.340 - What are GSA's responsibilities in disposing of excess and surplus aircraft parts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT... office in your region reviews your SF 120, Report of Excess Personal Property (see § 102-2.135 of...' failure and the resulting potential safety threat, recipients of aircraft parts must ensure that any...

  6. 41 CFR 102-33.340 - What are GSA's responsibilities in disposing of excess and surplus aircraft parts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT... office in your region reviews your SF 120, Report of Excess Personal Property (see § 102-2.135 of...' failure and the resulting potential safety threat, recipients of aircraft parts must ensure that any...

  7. 41 CFR 102-33.340 - What are GSA's responsibilities in disposing of excess and surplus aircraft parts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT... office in your region reviews your SF 120, Report of Excess Personal Property (see § 102-2.135 of...' failure and the resulting potential safety threat, recipients of aircraft parts must ensure that any...

  8. Aerodynamics of the Viggen 37 aircraft. Part 1: General characteristics at low speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karling, K.

    1986-01-01

    A description of the aerodynamics of the Viggen 37 and its performances, especially at low speeds is presented. The aerodynamic requirements for the design of the Viggen 37 aircraft are given, including the basic design, performance requirement, and aerodynamic characteristics, static and dynamic load test results and flight test results. The Viggen 37 aircraft is designed to be used for air attack, surveillance, pursuit, and training applications. It is shown that this aircraft is suitable for short runways, and has good maneuvering, acceleration, and climbing characteristics. The design objectives for this aircraft were met by utilizing the effect produced by the interference between two triangular wings, positioned in tandem.

  9. Residual stress analysis of an aircraft landing gear part using neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Eunjoo; Seong, Baek Seok; Sim, Cheul Muu

    2013-07-01

    The residual stress of a landing gear part of a fighter jet that has a frequent practice of takeoff and landing was evaluated for the safety. The sample was a cylindrical steel bar with a 22.2 mm diameter and 55 mm length used to fix the main landing gear to the aircraft body. For a deep measurement up to 6 mm, we used a neutron beam. From the measurements, the tensile and compressive strain in the axial direction were observed around one side of the pin hole which was across the steel bar vertically with an 8 mm diameter. The strain distribution along the length of the bar presented a similar tendency through the thickness and a larger value on the surface. The maximum value of the residual stress around the pin hole was about 100 MPa. However, there was no strain on the opposite side of the pin hole. From the results, it may be surmised that the steel bar received a steady force in one direction around the pin hole, however the force was weak and affected a small limited area and thus not influence on the steel bar on the whole.

  10. The importance of ships and spare parts in LCAs of offshore wind power.

    PubMed

    Arvesen, Anders; Birkeland, Christine; Hertwich, Edgar G

    2013-03-19

    We develop and assess life cycle inventories of a conceptual offshore wind farm using a hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. Special emphasis is placed on aspects of installation, operation, and maintenance, as these stages have been given only cursory consideration in previous LCAs. The results indicate that previous studies have underestimated the impacts caused by offshore operations and (though less important) exchange of parts. Offshore installation and maintenance activities cause 28% (10 g CO(2)-Eq/kWh) of total greenhouse gas emissions and 31-45% of total impact indicator values at the most (marine eutrophication, acidification, particulates, photochemical ozone). Transport and dumping of rock in installation phase and maintenance of wind turbines in use phase are major contributory activities. Manufacturing of spare parts is responsible for 6% (2 g CO2-Eq/kWh) of greenhouse gas emissions and up to 13% of total impact indicator values (freshwater ecotoxicity). Assumptions on lifetimes, work times for offshore activities and implementation of NOx abatement on vessels are shown to have a significant influence on results. Another source of uncertainty is assumed operating mode data for vessels determining fuel consumption rates.

  11. 41 CFR 301-70.910 - Do the rules in this part apply to travel on Government aircraft by the President and Vice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... part apply to travel on Government aircraft by the President and Vice President or by individuals traveling in support of the President and Vice President? 301-70.910 Section 301-70.910 Public Contracts and... Government aircraft by the President and Vice President or by individuals traveling in support of...

  12. 41 CFR 301-70.808 - Do the rules in this part apply to travel on Government aircraft by the President and Vice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... part apply to travel on Government aircraft by the President and Vice President or by individuals traveling in support of the President and Vice President? 301-70.808 Section 301-70.808 Public Contracts and... aircraft by the President and Vice President or by individuals traveling in support of the President...

  13. The Second Joint NASA/FAA/DoD Conference on Aging Aircraft. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Conference was to bring together world leaders in aviation safety research, aircraft design and manufacturing, fleet operation and aviation maintenance to disseminate information on current practices and advanced technologies that will assure the continued airworthiness of the aging aircraft in the military and commercial fleets. The Conference included reviews of current industry practices, assessments of future technology requirements, and status of aviation safety research. The Conference provided an opportunity for interactions among the key personnel in the research and technology development community, the original equipment manufacturers, commercial airline operators, military fleet operators, aviation maintenance, and aircraft certification and regulatory authorities. Conference participation was unrestricted and open to the international aviation community. Appendix B contains the name and addresses of the 623 participants in the Conference.

  14. The impact of shipping emissions on air pollution in the Greater North Sea region - Part 1: Current emissions and concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulinger, A.; Matthias, V.; Zeretzke, M.; Bieser, J.; Quante, M.; Backes, A.

    2015-04-01

    The North Sea is one of the areas with the highest ship traffic densities worldwide. At any time, about 3000 ships are sailing its waterways. Previous scientific publications have shown that ships contribute significantly to atmospheric concentrations of NOx, particulate matter and ozone. Especially in the case of particulate matter and ozone this influence can even be seen in regions far away from the main shipping routes. In order to quantify the effects of North Sea shipping on air quality in its bordering states, it is essential to determine the emissions from shipping as accurately as possible. Within the Interreg IVb project Clean North Sea Shipping (CNSS) a bottom-up approach was developed and used to thoroughly compile such an emission inventory for 2011 that served as the base year for the current emission situation. The innovative aspect of this approach was to use load dependent functions to calculate emissions from the ships' current activities instead of averaged emission factors for the entire range of the engine loads. These functions were applied to ship activities that were derived from hourly records of Automatic Identification System signals together with a data base containing the engine characteristics of the vessels that traveled the North Sea in 2011. The emission model yielded ship emissions among others of NOx and SO2 in high temporal and spatial resolution that were subsequently used in a chemistry transport model in order to simulate the impact of the emissions on pollutant concentration levels. The total emissions of nitrogen reached 540 Gg and of sulfur oxides 123 Gg within the North Sea, which was about twice as much of those of a medium-sized industrialized European state like the Netherlands. The relative contribution of ships to, for example, NO2 concentration levels ashore close to the sea can reach up to 25% in summer and 15% in winter. Some hundred kilometers away from the sea the contribution was about 6% in summer and 4% in

  15. Estimation of energetic efficiency of heat supply in front of the aircraft at supersonic accelerated flight. Part 1. Mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latypov, A. F.

    2008-12-01

    Fuel economy at boost trajectory of the aerospace plane was estimated during energy supply to the free stream. Initial and final flight velocities were specified. The model of a gliding flight above cold air in an infinite isobaric thermal wake was used. The fuel consumption rates were compared at optimal trajectory. The calculations were carried out using a combined power plant consisting of ramjet and liquid-propellant engine. An exergy model was built in the first part of the paper to estimate the ramjet thrust and specific impulse. A quadratic dependence on aerodynamic lift was used to estimate the aerodynamic drag of aircraft. The energy for flow heating was obtained at the expense of an equivalent reduction of the exergy of combustion products. The dependencies were obtained for increasing the range coefficient of cruise flight for different Mach numbers. The second part of the paper presents a mathematical model for the boost interval of the aircraft flight trajectory and the computational results for the reduction of fuel consumption at the boost trajectory for a given value of the energy supplied in front of the aircraft.

  16. Shipboard Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth Spectra and Columnar Water Vapor During ACE-2, and Comparison with Selected Land, Ship, Aircraft, and Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, John M.; Kapustin, Vladimir N.; Schmid, Beat; Russell, Philip B.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Bates, Timothy S.; Durkee, Philip A.; Smith, Peter J.; Freudenthaler, Volker; Wiegner, Matthias

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and columnar water vapor (CWV) measurements acquired with NASA Ames Research Center's six-channel Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) operated aboard the R/V (research vehicle) Professor Vodyanitskiy during the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) are discussed. Data are compared with various in situ and remote measurements for selected cases. The focus is on 10 July, when the Pelican airplane flew within 70 km of the ship near the time of a NOAA (National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration)-14/AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) satellite overpass and AOD measurements with the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) above the marine boundary layer (MBL) permitted calculation of AOD within the MBL from the AATS-6 measurements. A detailed column closure test is performed for MBL AOD on 10 July by comparing the AATS-6 MBL AODs with corresponding values calculated by combining shipboard particle size distribution measurements with models of hygroscopic growth and radiosonde humidity profiles (plus assumptions on the vertical profile of the dry particle size distribution and composition). Large differences (30-80% in the mid-visible) between measured and reconstructed AODs are obtained, in large part because of the high sensitivity of the closure methodology to hygroscopic growth models, which vary considerably and have not been validated over the necessary range of particle size/composition distributions. The wavelength dependence of AATS-6 AODs is compared with the corresponding dependence of aerosol extinction calculated from shipboard measurements of aerosol size distribution and of total scattering measured by a shipboard integrating nephelometer for several days. Results are highly variable, illustrating further the great difficulty of deriving column values from point measurements. AATS-6 CWV values are shown to agree well with corresponding values derived from

  17. Shipboard Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth Spectra and Columnar Water Vapor During ACE-2 and Comparison with Selected Land, Ship, Aircraft, and Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, John M.; Kapustin, Vladimir N.; Schmid, Beat; Russell, Philip B.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Bates, Timothy S.; Durkee, Philip A.; Smith, Peter J.; Freudenthaler, Volker; Wiegner, Matthias; Covert, Dave S.; Gasso, Santiago; Hegg, Dean; Collins, Donald R.; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.; Vitale, Vito; Tomasi, Claudio

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and colurnmn water vapor (CWV) measurements acquired with NASA Ames Research Center's 6-channel Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) operated aboard the R/V Professor Vodyanitskiy during the 2nd Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) are discussed. Data are compared with various in situ and remote measurements for selected cases. The focus is on 10 July, when the Pelican airplane flew within 70 km of the ship near the time of a NOAA-14/AVHRR satellite overpass and AOD measurements with the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) above the marine boundary layer (MBL) permitted calculation of AOD within the MBL from the AATS-6 measurements. A detailed column closure test is performed for MBL AOD on 10 July by comparing the AATS-6 MBL AODs with corresponding values calculated by combining shipboard particle size distribution measurements with models of hygroscopic growth and radiosonde humidity profiles (plus assumptions on the vertical profile of the dry particle size distribution and composition). Large differences (30-80% in the mid-visible) between measured and reconstructed AODs are obtained, in large part because of the high sensitivity of the closure methodology to hygroscopic growth models, which vary considerably and have not been validated over the necessary range of particle size/composition distributions. The wavelength dependence of AATS-6 AODs is compared with the corresponding dependence of aerosol extinction calculated from shipboard measurements of aerosol size distribution and of total scattering mearured by a shipboard integrating nephelometer for several days. Results are highly variable, illustrating further the great difficulty of deriving column values from point measurements. AATS-6 CWV values are shown to agree well with corresponding values derived from radiosonde measurements during 8 soundings on 7 days and also with values calculated from measurements taken on 10 July with

  18. Propeller study. Part 3: Experimental determination of thrust and torque on the YO-3A aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsbee, A. I.; Siddiqi, S. A.; Sivier, K. R.

    1977-01-01

    Instrumentation and procedures for obtaining in-flight measurements of the torque and thrust of a propeller mounted on a YO-3A aircraft are described. Problems encountered in the study are discussed and methods for eliminating these difficulties are suggested.

  19. 14 CFR 43.10 - Disposition of life-limited aircraft parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE, REBUILDING, AND ALTERATION § 43.10 Disposition of... specified in the type design, the Instructions for Continued Airworthiness, or the maintenance manual. Life... temporarily removed and reinstalled for the purpose of performing maintenance, no disposition under...

  20. 14 CFR 43.10 - Disposition of life-limited aircraft parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE, REBUILDING, AND ALTERATION § 43.10 Disposition of... specified in the type design, the Instructions for Continued Airworthiness, or the maintenance manual. Life... temporarily removed and reinstalled for the purpose of performing maintenance, no disposition under...

  1. 14 CFR 43.10 - Disposition of life-limited aircraft parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE, REBUILDING, AND ALTERATION § 43.10 Disposition of... specified in the type design, the Instructions for Continued Airworthiness, or the maintenance manual. Life... temporarily removed and reinstalled for the purpose of performing maintenance, no disposition under...

  2. 14 CFR 43.10 - Disposition of life-limited aircraft parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE, REBUILDING, AND ALTERATION § 43.10 Disposition of... specified in the type design, the Instructions for Continued Airworthiness, or the maintenance manual. Life... temporarily removed and reinstalled for the purpose of performing maintenance, no disposition under...

  3. 44 CFR 402.5 - Forwarding commodities previously shipped.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... previously shipped. 402.5 Section 402.5 Emergency Management and Assistance DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SHIPMENTS ON AMERICAN FLAG SHIPS AND AIRCRAFT (T-1, INT. 1) § 402.5 Forwarding commodities previously shipped. Order T-1 applies to transportation on or discharge from ships...

  4. 44 CFR 402.5 - Forwarding commodities previously shipped.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... previously shipped. 402.5 Section 402.5 Emergency Management and Assistance DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SHIPMENTS ON AMERICAN FLAG SHIPS AND AIRCRAFT (T-1, INT. 1) § 402.5 Forwarding commodities previously shipped. Order T-1 applies to transportation on or discharge from ships...

  5. 44 CFR 402.5 - Forwarding commodities previously shipped.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... previously shipped. 402.5 Section 402.5 Emergency Management and Assistance DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SHIPMENTS ON AMERICAN FLAG SHIPS AND AIRCRAFT (T-1, INT. 1) § 402.5 Forwarding commodities previously shipped. Order T-1 applies to transportation on or discharge from ships...

  6. 44 CFR 402.5 - Forwarding commodities previously shipped.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... previously shipped. 402.5 Section 402.5 Emergency Management and Assistance DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SHIPMENTS ON AMERICAN FLAG SHIPS AND AIRCRAFT (T-1, INT. 1) § 402.5 Forwarding commodities previously shipped. Order T-1 applies to transportation on or discharge from ships...

  7. 44 CFR 402.5 - Forwarding commodities previously shipped.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... previously shipped. 402.5 Section 402.5 Emergency Management and Assistance DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SHIPMENTS ON AMERICAN FLAG SHIPS AND AIRCRAFT (T-1, INT. 1) § 402.5 Forwarding commodities previously shipped. Order T-1 applies to transportation on or discharge from ships...

  8. Navy DD(X) and LCS Ship Acquisition Programs: Oversight Issues and Options for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    detecting and attacking enemy submarines, surface ships , aircraft, anti- ship cruise missiles, and land targets. Many surface combatants also carry one or two...both themselves and other friendly surface ships against enemy submarines, surface ships , aircraft, and anti- ship cruise missiles. Service Lives. For...large surface combatants that were each equipped with 512 VLS tubes for firing Tomahawk cruise missiles and other land-attack weapons. The arsenal ships

  9. Estimation of energetic efficiency of heat supply in front of the aircraft at supersonic accelerated flight. Part II. Mathematical model of the trajectory boost part and computational results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latypov, A. F.

    2009-03-01

    The fuel economy was estimated at boost trajectory of aerospace plane during energy supply to the free stream. Initial and final velocities of the flight were given. A model of planning flight above cold air in infinite isobaric thermal wake was used. The comparison of fuel consumption was done at optimal trajectories. The calculations were done using a combined power plant consisting of ramjet and liquid-propellant engine. An exergy model was constructed in the first part of the paper for estimating the ramjet thrust and specific impulse. To estimate the aerodynamic drag of aircraft a quadratic dependence on aerodynamic lift is used. The energy for flow heating is obtained at the sacrifice of an equivalent decrease of exergy of combustion products. The dependencies are obtained for increasing the range coefficient of cruise flight at different Mach numbers. In the second part of the paper, a mathematical model is presented for the boost part of the flight trajectory of the flying vehicle and computational results for reducing the fuel expenses at the boost trajectory at a given value of the energy supplied in front of the aircraft.

  10. Ship Tracks

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Ship Tracks in a Stratiform Cloud Layer     ... stratocumulus. These striking linear patterns are known as "ship tracks", and are produced when fine particles (also called aerosols) from ... be used with the red filter placed over your left eye. Ship tracks are important examples of aerosol-cloud interactions. They are ...

  11. Aerodynamic design and analysis system for supersonic aircraft. Part 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, W. D.; Lundry, J. L.; Coleman, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    An integrated system of computer programs for supersonic configurations is described. An explanation of system usage, the input definitions, and example output are included. For Part 1, see N75-18185; for Part 3, see N75-18186.

  12. Modeling of aircraft unsteady aerodynamic characteristics. Part 2: Parameters estimated from wind tunnel data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Vladislav; Noderer, Keith D.

    1995-01-01

    Aerodynamic equations with unsteady effects were formulated for an aircraft in one-degree-of-freedom, small-amplitude, harmonic motion. These equations were used as a model for aerodynamic parameter estimation from wind tunnel oscillatory data. The estimation algorithm was based on nonlinear least squares and was applied in three examples to the oscillatory data in pitch and roll of 70 deg triangular wing and an X-31 model, and in-sideslip oscillatory data of the High Incidence Research Model 2 (HIRM 2). All three examples indicated that a model using a simple indicial function can explain unsteady effects observed in measured data. The accuracy of the estimated parameters and model verification were strongly influenced by the number of data points with respect to the number of unknown parameters.

  13. X-15 ship #3 on lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    The X-15 ship #3 (56-6672) is seen here on the lakebed at the Edwards Air Force Base, Edwards, California. Ship #3 made 65 flights during the program, attaining a top speed of Mach 5.65 and a maximum altitude of 354,200 feet. Only 10 of the 12 X-15 pilots flew Ship #3, and only eight of them earned their astronaut wings during the program. Robert White, Joseph Walker, Robert Rushworth, John 'Jack' McKay, Joseph Engle, William 'Pete' Knight, William Dana, and Michael Adams all earned their astronaut wings in Ship #3. Neil Armstrong and Milton Thompson also flew Ship #3. In fact, Armstrong piloted Ship #3 on its first flight, on 20 December 1961. On 15 November 1967, Ship #3 was launched over Delamar Lake, Nevada with Maj. Michael J. Adams at the controls. The vehicle soon reached a speed of Mach 5.2, and a peak altitude of 266,000 feet. During the climb, an electrical disturbance degraded the aircraft's controllability. Ship #3 began a slow drift in heading, which soon became a spin. Adams radioed that the X-15 'seems squirrelly,' and then said 'I'm in a spin.' Through some combination of pilot technique and basic aerodynamic stability, Adams recovered from the spin, and entered an inverted Mach 4.7 dive. As the X-15 plummeted into the increasingly thicker atmosphere, the Honeywell adaptive flight control system caused the vehicle to begin oscillating. As the pitching motion increased, aerodynamic forces finally broke the aircraft into several major pieces. Adams was killed when the forward fuselage impacted the desert. This was the only fatal accident during the entire X-15 program. The X-15 was a rocket powered aircraft 50 ft long with a wingspan of 22 ft. It was a missile-shaped vehicle with an unusual wedge-shaped vertical tail, thin stubby wings, and unique side fairings that extended along the side of the fuselage. The X-15 weighed about 14,000 lb empty and approximately 34,000 lb at launch. The XLR-99 rocket engine, manufactured by Thiokol Chemical Corp., was

  14. Testing and Analysis of a Composite Non-Cylindrical Aircraft Fuselage Structure. Part 1; Ultimate Design Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Rouse, Marshall; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.

    2016-01-01

    The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project aimed to develop aircraft technologies enabling significant fuel burn and community noise reductions. Small incremental changes to the conventional metallic alloy-based 'tube and wing' configuration were not sufficient to achieve the desired metrics. One airframe concept identified by the project as having the potential to dramatically improve aircraft performance was a composite-based hybrid wing body configuration. Such a concept, however, presented inherent challenges stemming from, among other factors, the necessity to transfer wing loads through the entire center fuselage section which accommodates a pressurized cabin confined by flat or nearly flat panels. This paper discusses finite element analysis and testing of a large-scale hybrid wing body center section structure developed and constructed to demonstrate that the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure concept can meet these challenging demands of the next generation airframes. Part I of the paper considers the five most critical load conditions, which are internal pressure only and positive and negative g-loads with and without internal pressure. Analysis results are compared with measurements acquired during testing. Performance of the test article is found to be closely aligned with predictions and, consequently, able to support the hybrid wing body design loads in pristine and barely visible impact damage conditions.

  15. Bibliography on aircraft fire hazards and safety. Volume 2: Safety. Part 1: Key numbers 1 to 524

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelouch, J. J., Jr. (Compiler); Hacker, P. T. (Compiler)

    1974-01-01

    Bibliographic citations are presented to describe and define aircraft safety methods, equipment, and criteria. Some of the subjects discussed are: (1) fire and explosion suppression using whiffle balls, (2) ultraviolet flame detecting sensors, (3) evaluation of flame arrestor materials for aircraft fuel systems, (4) crash fire prevention system for supersonic commercial aircraft, and (5) fire suppression for aerospace vehicles.

  16. Aircraft noise effects: An inter-disciplinary study of the effect of aircraft noise on man. Part 3: Supplementary analyses of the social-scientific portion of the study on aircraft noise conducted by the DFG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumer, R.

    1980-01-01

    Variables in a study of noise perception near the Munich-Reims airport are explained. The interactive effect of the stimulus (aircraft noise) and moderator (noise sensitivity) on the aircraft noise reaction (disturbance or annoyance) is considered. Methods employed to demonstrate that the moderator has a differencing effect on various stimulus levels are described. Results of the social-scientific portion of the aircraft noise project are compared with those of other survey studies on the problem of aircraft noise. Procedures for contrast group analysis and multiple classification analysis are examined with focus on some difficulties in their application.

  17. [Flight and altitude medicine for anesthetists-part 3: emergencies on board commercial aircraft].

    PubMed

    Graf, Jürgen; Stüben, Uwe; Pump, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    The demographic trend of industrialized societies is also reflected in commercial airlines' passengers: passengers are older nowadays and long-haul flights are routine mode of transport despite considerable chronic and acute medical conditions. Moreover, duration of non-stop flight routes and the number of passengers on board increase. Thus, the probability of a medical incident during a particular flight event increases, too.Due to international regulations minimum standards for medical equipment on board, and first aid training of the crews are set. However, it is often difficult to assess whether a stopover at a nearby airport can improve the medical care of a critically ill passenger. Besides flight operations and technical aspects, the medical infrastructure on the ground has to be considered carefully.Regardless of the amount of experience of a physician medical emergencies on board an aircraft usually represent a particular challenge. This is mainly due to the unfamiliar surroundings, the characteristics of the cabin atmosphere, the often existing cultural and language barriers and legal liability concerns.

  18. Aeroacoustic Study of a High-Fidelity Aircraft Model. Part 2; Unsteady Surface Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Neuhart, Danny H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present unsteady surface pressure measurements for an 18%-scale, semi-span Gulfstream aircraft model. This high-fidelity model is being used to perform detailed studies of airframe noise associated with main landing gear, flap components, and gear-flap interaction noise, as well as to evaluate novel noise reduction concepts. The aerodynamic segment of the tests, conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel, was completed in November 2010. To discern the characteristics of the surface pressure fluctuations in the vicinity of the prominent noise sources, unsteady sensors were installed on the inboard and outboard flap edges, and on the main gear wheels, struts, and door. Various configurations were tested, including flap deflections of 0?, 20?, and 39?, with and without the main landing gear. The majority of unsteady surface pressure measurements were acquired for the nominal landing configuration where the main gear was deployed and the flap was deflected 39?. To assess the Mach number variation of the surface pressure amplitudes, measurements were obtained at Mach numbers of 0.16, 0.20, and 0.24. Comparison of the unsteady surface pressures with the main gear on and off shows significant interaction between the gear wake and the inboard flap edge, resulting in higher amplitude fluctuations when the gear is present.

  19. Aeroacoustic Study of a High-Fidelity Aircraft Model: Part 1- Steady Aerodynamic Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Hannon, Judith A.; Neuhart, Danny H.; Markowski, Gregory A.; VandeVen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present steady aerodynamic measurements for an 18% scale model of a Gulfstream air-craft. The high fidelity and highly-instrumented semi-span model was developed to perform detailed aeroacoustic studies of airframe noise associated with main landing gear/flap components and gear-flap interaction noise, as well as to evaluate novel noise reduction concepts. The aeroacoustic tests, being conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel, are split into two entries. The first entry, completed November 2010, was entirely devoted to the detailed mapping of the aerodynamic characteristics of the fabricated model. Flap deflections of 39?, 20?, and 0? with the main landing gear on and off were tested at Mach numbers of 0.16, 0.20, and 0.24. Additionally, for each flap deflection, the model was tested with the tunnel both in the closed-wall and open-wall (jet) modes. During this first entry, global forces (lift and drag) and extensive steady and unsteady surface pressure measurements were obtained. Preliminary analysis of the measured forces indicates that lift, drag, and stall characteristics compare favorably with Gulfstream?s high Reynolds number flight data. The favorable comparison between wind-tunnel and flight data allows the semi-span model to be used as a test bed for developing/evaluating airframe noise reduction concepts under a relevant environment. Moreover, initial comparison of the aerodynamic measurements obtained with the tunnel in the closed- and open-wall configurations shows similar aerodynamic behavior. This permits the acoustic and off-surface flow measurements, planned for the second entry, to be conducted with the tunnel in the open-jet mode.

  20. Validation of cold chain shipping environment for transport of allografts as part of a human tissue bank returns policy.

    PubMed

    Rooney, P; Eagle, M J; Kearney, J N

    2015-12-01

    Human tissue is shipped to surgeons in the UK in either a freeze-dried or frozen state. To ensure quality and safety of the tissue, frozen tissue must be shipped in insulated containers such that tissue is maintained at an appropriate temperature. UK Blood Transfusion Service regulations state "Transportation systems must be validated to show maintenance of the required storage temperature" and also state that frozen, non-cryopreserved tissue "must be transported… at -20 °C or lower" (Guidelines for the Blood Transfusion Services in the United Kingdom, 8th Edn. 2013). To maintain an expiry date for frozen tissue longer than 6 months, the tissue must be maintained at a temperature of -40 °C or below. The objective of this study was to evaluate and validate the capability of a commercially available insulated polystyrene carton (XPL10), packed with dry ice, to maintain tissue temperature below -40 °C. Tissue temperature of a single frozen femoral head or a single frozen Achilles tendon, was recorded over a 4-day period at 37 °C, inside a XPL10 carton with dry ice as refrigerant. The data demonstrate that at 37 °C, the XPL10 carton with 9.5 kg of dry ice maintained femoral head and tendon tissue temperature below -55 °C for at least 48 h; tissue temperature did not rise above -40 °C until at least 70 h. Data also indicated that at a storage temperature lower than 37 °C, tissue temperature was maintained for longer periods.

  1. Ship Hydrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafrance, Pierre

    1978-01-01

    Explores in a non-mathematical treatment some of the hydrodynamical phenomena and forces that affect the operation of ships, especially at high speeds. Discusses the major components of ship resistance such as the different types of drags and ways to reduce them and how to apply those principles for the hovercraft. (GA)

  2. Morphing Wing Weight Predictors and Their Application in a Template-Based Morphing Aircraft Sizing Environment II. Part 2; Morphing Aircraft Sizing via Multi-level Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skillen, Michael D.; Crossley, William A.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents an approach for sizing of a morphing aircraft based upon a multi-level design optimization approach. For this effort, a morphing wing is one whose planform can make significant shape changes in flight - increasing wing area by 50% or more from the lowest possible area, changing sweep 30 or more, and/or increasing aspect ratio by as much as 200% from the lowest possible value. The top-level optimization problem seeks to minimize the gross weight of the aircraft by determining a set of "baseline" variables - these are common aircraft sizing variables, along with a set of "morphing limit" variables - these describe the maximum shape change for a particular morphing strategy. The sub-level optimization problems represent each segment in the morphing aircraft's design mission; here, each sub-level optimizer minimizes fuel consumed during each mission segment by changing the wing planform within the bounds set by the baseline and morphing limit variables from the top-level problem.

  3. Aerodynamic design and analysis system for supersonic aircraft. Part 1: General description and theoretical development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, W. D.; Lundry, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    An integrated system of computer programs has been developed for the design and analysis of supersonic configurations. The system uses linearized theory methods for the calculation of surface pressures and supersonic area rule concepts in combination with linearized theory for calculation of aerodynamic force coefficients. Interactive graphics are optional at the user's request. This part presents a general description of the system and describes the theoretical methods used.

  4. Hydrodynamics of Ship Propellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breslin, John P.; Andersen, Poul

    1996-11-01

    This book deals with flows over propellers operating behind ships, and the hydrodynamic forces and movements that the propeller generates on the shaft and on the ship hull. The first part of the book is devoted to fundamentals of the flow about hydrofoil sections and wings, and to propellers in uniform flow, with guidance for design and pragmatic analysis of performance. The second part covers the development of unsteady forces arising from operation in nonuniform hull wakes. A final chapter discusses the optimization of efficiency of compound propulsors. Researchers in ocean technology and naval architecture will find this book appealing.

  5. 46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school ship must comply with part 171 of this subchapter as though it were a passenger vessel. In addition...

  6. 46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school ship must comply with part 171 of this subchapter as though it were a passenger vessel. In addition...

  7. 46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school ship must comply with part 171 of this subchapter as though it were a passenger vessel. In addition...

  8. 46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school ship must comply with part 171 of this subchapter as though it were a passenger vessel. In addition...

  9. 46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school ship must comply with part 171 of this subchapter as though it were a passenger vessel. In addition...

  10. Analysis of a ship-to-ship collision

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, V.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1996-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is involved in a safety assessment for the shipment of radioactive material by sea. One part of this study is investigation of the consequences of ship-to-ship collisions. This paper describes two sets of finite element analyses performed to assess the structural response of a small freighter and the loading imparted to radioactive material (RAM) packages during several postulated collision scenarios with another ship. The first series of analyses was performed to evaluate the amount of penetration of the freighter hull by a striking ship of various masses and initial velocities. Although these analyses included a representation of a single RAM package, the package was not impacted during the collision so forces on the package could not be computed. Therefore, a second series of analyses incorporating a representation of a row of seven packages was performed to ensure direct package impact by the striking ship. Average forces on a package were evaluated for several initial velocities and masses of the striking ship. In addition to. providing insight to ship and package response during a few postulated ship collisions scenarios, these analyses will be used to benchmark simpler ship collision models used in probabilistic risk assessment analyses.

  11. 49 CFR 177.817 - Shipping papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Shipping papers. 177.817 Section 177.817... Information and Regulations § 177.817 Shipping papers. (a) General requirements. A person may not accept a... received a shipping paper prepared in accordance with part 172 of this subchapter or the material...

  12. 49 CFR 177.817 - Shipping papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Shipping papers. 177.817 Section 177.817... Information and Regulations § 177.817 Shipping papers. (a) General requirements. A person may not accept a... received a shipping paper prepared in accordance with part 172 of this subchapter or the material...

  13. Modeling of Aircraft Unsteady Aerodynamic Characteristics/Part 3 - Parameters Estimated from Flight Data. Part 3; Parameters Estimated from Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Vladislav; Noderer, Keith D.

    1996-01-01

    A nonlinear least squares algorithm for aircraft parameter estimation from flight data was developed. The postulated model for the analysis represented longitudinal, short period motion of an aircraft. The corresponding aerodynamic model equations included indicial functions (unsteady terms) and conventional stability and control derivatives. The indicial functions were modeled as simple exponential functions. The estimation procedure was applied in five examples. Four of the examples used simulated and flight data from small amplitude maneuvers to the F-18 HARV and X-31A aircraft. In the fifth example a rapid, large amplitude maneuver of the X-31 drop model was analyzed. From data analysis of small amplitude maneuvers ft was found that the model with conventional stability and control derivatives was adequate. Also, parameter estimation from a rapid, large amplitude maneuver did not reveal any noticeable presence of unsteady aerodynamics.

  14. Smart skin technology development for measuring ice accretion, stall, and high AOA aircraft performance. Part 1: Capacitive ice detector development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruzan, Daniel A.; Khatkhate, Ateen A.; Gerardi, Joseph J.; Hickman, Gail A.

    1993-01-01

    A reliable way to detect and measure ice accretion during flight is required to reduce the hazards of icing currently threatening present day aircraft. Many of the sensors used for this purpose are invasive (probe) sensors which must be placed in areas of the airframe where ice does not naturally form. Due to the difference in capture efficiency of the exposed surface, difficulties result in correlating the ice accretion on the probe to what is happening on a number of vastly different airfoil sections. Most flush mounted sensors in use must be integrated into the aircraft surface by cutting or drilling the aircraft surface. An alternate type of ice detector which is based on a NASA patent is currently being investigated at Innovative Dynamics, Inc. (IDI). Results of the investigation into the performance of different capacitive type sensor designs, both rigid as well as elastic, are presented.

  15. An Analysis of the Impact of Variation in Mean Time Between Demand on Air Force Fleet Level Aircraft Parts Inventories

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-22

    21 vi OIM Operating Requirement (OIM OPERATING RQMT) ....................................... 21 Total Base Stock Level TOT BASE STK LVL (FULL...21 Depot Safety Level DEPOT SAFETY LVL (FULL) .................................................... 22...2008). Total Base Stock Level TOT BASE STK LVL (FULL) For each pick-off point, the Total Base Stock Level is the sum of the OIM base Order &Shipping

  16. Design criteria for integrated flight/propulsion control systems for STOVL fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, James A.

    1993-01-01

    As part of NASA's program to develop technology for short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) fighter aircraft, control system designs have been developed for a conceptual STOVL aircraft. This aircraft is representative of the class of mixed-flow remote-lift concepts that was identified as the preferred design approach by the US/UK STOVL Joint Assessment and Ranking Team. The control system designs have been evaluated throughout the powered-lift flight envelope on Ames Research Center's Vertical Motion Simulator. Items assessed in the control system evaluation were: maximum control power used in transition and vertical flight, control system dynamic response associated with thrust transfer for attitude control, thrust margin in the presence of ground effect and hot gas ingestion, and dynamic thrust response for the engine core. Effects of wind, turbulence, and ship airwake disturbances are incorporated in the evaluation. Results provide the basis for a reassessment of existing flying qualities design criteria applied to STOVL aircraft.

  17. Wallops Ship Surveillance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Donna C.

    2011-01-01

    Approved as a Wallops control center backup system, the Wallops Ship Surveillance Software is a day-of-launch risk analysis tool for spaceport activities. The system calculates impact probabilities and displays ship locations relative to boundary lines. It enables rapid analysis of possible flight paths to preclude the need to cancel launches and allow execution of launches in a timely manner. Its design is based on low-cost, large-customer- base elements including personal computers, the Windows operating system, C/C++ object-oriented software, and network interfaces. In conformance with the NASA software safety standard, the system is designed to ensure that it does not falsely report a safe-for-launch condition. To improve the current ship surveillance method, the system is designed to prevent delay of launch under a safe-for-launch condition. A single workstation is designated the controller of the official ship information and the official risk analysis. Copies of this information are shared with other networked workstations. The program design is divided into five subsystems areas: 1. Communication Link -- threads that control the networking of workstations; 2. Contact List -- a thread that controls a list of protected item (ocean vessel) information; 3. Hazard List -- threads that control a list of hazardous item (debris) information and associated risk calculation information; 4. Display -- threads that control operator inputs and screen display outputs; and 5. Archive -- a thread that controls archive file read and write access. Currently, most of the hazard list thread and parts of other threads are being reused as part of a new ship surveillance system, under the SureTrak project.

  18. Navy Ship Names: Background for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-29

    1965 to 1996. The previous eight Wasp (LHD-1) class big deck amphibious assault ships were named for World War II-era Navy aircraft carriers and...S.Amdt. 1354 to H.J.Res. 395 CVN-74 or CVN-75 John C. Stennis [98th] H.Res. 99 an aircraft carrier Wasp [97th] H.Con.Res. 312 a nonlethal naval...vessela Corpus Christia [97th] H.Res. 174 an aircraft carrier Wasp [97th] H.R. 4977 CVN-72 Hyman G. Rickover [93rd] H.Con.Res. 386 CVN-70 Carl Vinson

  19. 75 FR 35329 - Notification and Reporting of Aircraft Accidents or Incidents and Overdue Aircraft, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD 49 CFR Part 830 Notification and Reporting of Aircraft Accidents or Incidents and Overdue Aircraft, and Preservation of Aircraft Wreckage, Mail, Cargo, and Records AGENCY: National...

  20. Recovery Ship Freedom Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, is towing a barge containing the third Space Shuttle Super Lightweight External Tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. This SLWT was slated for use to launch the orbiter Discovery on mission STS-95 in October 1998. This first time towing arrangement, part of a cost saving plan by NASA to prudently manage existing resources, began June 12 from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans where the Shuttle's external tanks were manufactured. The barge was transported up Banana River to the LC-39 turn basin using a conventional tug boat. Previously, NASA relied on an outside contractor to provide external tank towing services at a cost of about $120,000 per trip. The new plan allowed NASA's Space Flight Operations contractor, United Space Alliance (USA), to provide the same service to NASA using the recovery ships during their downtime between Shuttle launches. Studies showed a potential savings of about $50,000 per trip. The cost of the necessary ship modifications would be paid back by the fourteenth tank delivery. The other recovery ship, Liberty Star, also underwent deck strengthening enhancements and had the necessary towing wench installed.

  1. Water and sediment budgets for the stormwater-drainage channel at the Navy Ships Parts Control Center near Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, water year 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, L.A.; Durlin, R.R.; Bender, J.K.

    1994-01-01

    The Navy Ships Parts Control Center near Mechanicsburg, Pa., occupies an area of 824 acres, of which 358 are covered by impervious surfaces. Most of the impervious area is drained by stormwater systems that discharge to an open channel that extends about 7,900 feet from its headwaters to its confluence with Trindle Spring Run. The channel drains an area of 992 acres, of which 435 are covered by impervious surfaces. The entire area of the Center including the stormwater-drainage channel is situated in karst terrain. Parts of the drainage channel contain large sinkholes and most of the storm runoff that enters the channel drains to the sinkholes. From 1992 to 1994, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Department of the Navy, conducted a detailed study of water and sediment flows in the stormwater-drainage channel. The purpose of this study was to quantify the discharge of stormwater and suspended sediment to the ground-water system, by way of sinkholes, and to Trindle Spring Run. From October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993, the data-collection period for the study, discharge and suspended-sediment concentrations were measured at three sites along the drainage channel. During the period, water inflow to the channel totaled 679 acre-feet and outflow to Trindle Spring Run totaled 131 acre-feet. Water loss to sinkholes in the drainage channel totaled 548 acre-feet or 81 percent of inflow. Total sediment inflow to the drainage channel was 97 tons, outflow to Trindle Spring Run was 22 tons, sediment loss to sinkholes was 63 tons, and the residual 12 tons of sediment was deposited in the channel. The effect of filling the sinkholes on flooding was estimated through use of a step-backwater model. The model was used to simulate undampened water-surface elevations that would result from the maximum instantaneous discharge recorded during October 1992-September 1993. The model is constrained by uncertainty in the values of the channel-roughness parameter

  2. 14 CFR 21.6 - Manufacture of new aircraft, aircraft engines, and propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Manufacture of new aircraft, aircraft..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS General § 21.6 Manufacture of new aircraft, aircraft engines, and propellers. (a) Except as specified in paragraphs (b)...

  3. 14 CFR 21.6 - Manufacture of new aircraft, aircraft engines, and propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Manufacture of new aircraft, aircraft..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS General § 21.6 Manufacture of new aircraft, aircraft engines, and propellers. (a) Except as specified in paragraphs (b)...

  4. 14 CFR 21.6 - Manufacture of new aircraft, aircraft engines, and propellers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Manufacture of new aircraft, aircraft..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS General § 21.6 Manufacture of new aircraft, aircraft engines, and propellers. (a) Except as specified in paragraphs (b)...

  5. Onboard Inert Gas Generation System/Onboard Oxygen Gas Generation System (OBIGGS/OBOGS) Study. Part 1; Aircraft System Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas L.; Bailey, Delbert B.; Lewinski, Daniel F.; Roseburg, Conrad M.; Palaszewski, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this technology assessment is to define a multiphase research study program investigating Onboard Inert Gas Generation Systems (OBIGGS) and Onboard Oxygen Generation Systems (OBOGS) that would identify current airplane systems design and certification requirements (Subtask 1); explore state-of-the-art technology (Subtask 2); develop systems specifications (Subtask 3); and develop an initial system design (Subtask 4). If feasible, consideration may be given to the development of a prototype laboratory test system that could potentially be used in commercial transport aircraft (Subtask 5). These systems should be capable of providing inert nitrogen gas for improved fire cargo compartment fire suppression and fuel tank inerting and emergency oxygen for crew and passenger use. Subtask I of this research study, presented herein, defines current production aircraft certification requirements and design objectives necessary to meet mandatory FAA certification requirements and Boeing design and performance specifications. These requirements will be utilized for baseline comparisons for subsequent OBIGGS/OBOGS application evaluations and assessments.

  6. AGARD Flight Test Techniques Series. Volume 3. Identification of Dynamic Systems - Applications to Aircraft. Part 1. The Output Error Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    this procedure. Some aircraft have erection circuits that amount to high-pass filters. This means that the Euler angle data might be distorted in long...slow maneuvers if the erect circuit is active and the break frequency is high enough. You should know at least enough about the gyro erection in your...New York, 1983. Levin, Morris J.: Optimal Estimation of Impulse Response in the Presence of Noise. IRE Trans. Circuit Theory, vol. CT-7, no. 1, pp. 50

  7. Design Data Sheet: Calculation of Surface Ship Annual Energy Usage, Annual Energy Cost, and Fully Burdened Cost of Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-07

    F76 for ship propulsion and power generation and JP5 for aircraft. JP5 is also used occasionally for ship propulsion and power generation. While...applications, the FBCE includes the acquisition cost of a barrel of ship propulsion fuel burdened with the additional indirect costs associated with...fuel used for Navy ship propulsion and electrical power generation. JP5 is primarily used for powering aircraft. The FY 2011 DoD composite standard

  8. Instrumentation and measurement strategy for the NOAA SENEX aircraft campaign as part of the Southeast Atmosphere Study 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warneke, Carsten; Trainer, Michael; de Gouw, Joost A.; Parrish, David D.; Fahey, David W.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Brock, Charles A.; Roberts, James M.; Brown, Steven S.; Neuman, Jonathan A.; Lerner, Brian M.; Lack, Daniel; Law, Daniel; Hübler, Gerhard; Pollack, Iliana; Sjostedt, Steven; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Gilman, Jessica B.; Liao, Jin; Holloway, John; Peischl, Jeff; Nowak, John B.; Aikin, Kenneth C.; Min, Kyung-Eun; Washenfelder, Rebecca A.; Graus, Martin G.; Richardson, Mathew; Markovic, Milos Z.; Wagner, Nick L.; Welti, André; Veres, Patrick R.; Edwards, Peter; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Gordon, Timothy; Dube, William P.; McKeen, Stuart A.; Brioude, Jerome; Ahmadov, Ravan; Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Lin, Jack J.; Nenes, Athanasios; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Hanisco, Thomas F.; Lee, Ben H.; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Thornton, Joel A.; Keutsch, Frank N.; Kaiser, Jennifer; Mao, Jingqiu; Hatch, Courtney D.

    2016-07-01

    Natural emissions of ozone-and-aerosol-precursor gases such as isoprene and monoterpenes are high in the southeastern US. In addition, anthropogenic emissions are significant in the southeastern US and summertime photochemistry is rapid. The NOAA-led SENEX (Southeast Nexus) aircraft campaign was one of the major components of the Southeast Atmosphere Study (SAS) and was focused on studying the interactions between biogenic and anthropogenic emissions to form secondary pollutants. During SENEX, the NOAA WP-3D aircraft conducted 20 research flights between 27 May and 10 July 2013 based out of Smyrna, TN. Here we describe the experimental approach, the science goals and early results of the NOAA SENEX campaign. The aircraft, its capabilities and standard measurements are described. The instrument payload is summarized including detection limits, accuracy, precision and time resolutions for all gas-and-aerosol phase instruments. The inter-comparisons of compounds measured with multiple instruments on the NOAA WP-3D are presented and were all within the stated uncertainties, except two of the three NO2 measurements. The SENEX flights included day- and nighttime flights in the southeastern US as well as flights over areas with intense shale gas extraction (Marcellus, Fayetteville and Haynesville shale). We present one example flight on 16 June 2013, which was a daytime flight over the Atlanta region, where several crosswind transects of plumes from the city and nearby point sources, such as power plants, paper mills and landfills, were flown. The area around Atlanta has large biogenic isoprene emissions, which provided an excellent case for studying the interactions between biogenic and anthropogenic emissions. In this example flight, chemistry in and outside the Atlanta plumes was observed for several hours after emission. The analysis of this flight showcases the strategies implemented to answer some of the main SENEX science questions.

  9. Effects of engine emissions from high-speed civil transport aircraft: A two-dimensional modeling study, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Sze, Nein Dak; Shia, Run-Lie; Rodriguez, Jose M.; Heisey, Curtis

    1991-01-01

    The AER two-dimensional chemistry-transport model is used to study the effect of supersonic and subsonic aircraft operation in the 2010 atmosphere on stratospheric ozone (O3). The results show that: (1) the calculated O3 response is smaller in the 2010 atmosphere compared to previous calculations performed in the 1980 atmosphere; (2) with the emissions provided, the calculated decrease in O3 column is less than 1 percent; and (3) the effect of model grid resolution on O3 response is small provided that the physics is not modified.

  10. Hierarchical classifier design for airborne SAR images of ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Langis; Klepko, Robert

    1998-09-01

    We report about a hierarchical design for extracting ship features and recognizing ships from SAR images, and which will eventually feed a multisensor data fusion system for airborne surveillance. The target is segmented from the image background using directional thresholding and region merging processes. Ship end-points are then identified through a ship centerline detection performed with a Hough transform. A ship length estimate is calculated assuming that the ship heading and/or the cross-range resolution are known. A high-level ship classification identifies whether the target belongs to Line (mainly combatant military ships) or Merchant ship categories. Category discrimination is based on the radar scatterers' distribution in 9 ship sections along the ship's range profile. A 3-layer neural network has been trained on simulated scatterers distributions and supervised by a rule- based expert system to perform this task. The NN 'smoothes out' the rules and the confidence levels on the category declaration. Line ship type (Frigate, Destroyer, Cruiser, Battleship, Aircraft Carrier) is then estimated using a Bayes classifier based on the ship length. Classifier performances using simulated images are presented.

  11. 41 CFR 102-33.90 - What is the process for budgeting to acquire a Federal aircraft (including a Federal aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... budgeting to acquire a Federal aircraft (including a Federal aircraft transferred from another executive... AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts The Process for Budgeting to Acquire Government Aircraft § 102-33.90 What is the process for budgeting to acquire a Federal aircraft (including a...

  12. 41 CFR 102-33.90 - What is the process for budgeting to acquire a Federal aircraft (including a Federal aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... budgeting to acquire a Federal aircraft (including a Federal aircraft transferred from another executive... AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts The Process for Budgeting to Acquire Government Aircraft § 102-33.90 What is the process for budgeting to acquire a Federal aircraft (including a...

  13. Preliminary Axial Flow Turbine Design and Off-Design Performance Analysis Methods for Rotary Wing Aircraft Engines. Part 1; Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shu-cheng, S.

    2009-01-01

    For the preliminary design and the off-design performance analysis of axial flow turbines, a pair of intermediate level-of-fidelity computer codes, TD2-2 (design; reference 1) and AXOD (off-design; reference 2), are being evaluated for use in turbine design and performance prediction of the modern high performance aircraft engines. TD2-2 employs a streamline curvature method for design, while AXOD approaches the flow analysis with an equal radius-height domain decomposition strategy. Both methods resolve only the flows in the annulus region while modeling the impact introduced by the blade rows. The mathematical formulations and derivations involved in both methods are documented in references 3, 4 for TD2-2) and in reference 5 (for AXOD). The focus of this paper is to discuss the fundamental issues of applicability and compatibility of the two codes as a pair of companion pieces, to perform preliminary design and off-design analysis for modern aircraft engine turbines. Two validation cases for the design and the off-design prediction using TD2-2 and AXOD conducted on two existing high efficiency turbines, developed and tested in the NASA/GE Energy Efficient Engine (GE-E3) Program, the High Pressure Turbine (HPT; two stages, air cooled) and the Low Pressure Turbine (LPT; five stages, un-cooled), are provided in support of the analysis and discussion presented in this paper.

  14. Effects of engine emissions from high-speed civil transport aircraft: A two-dimensional modeling study, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Sze, Nein Dak; Rodriguez, Jose M.; Heisey, Curtis

    1991-01-01

    The AER two-dimensional chemistry-transport model is used to study the effect on stratospheric ozone (O3) from operations of supersonic and subsonic aircraft. The study is based on six emission scenarios provided to AER. The study showed that: (1) the O3 response is dominated by the portion of the emitted nitrogen compounds that is entrained in the stratosphere; (2) the entrainment is a sensitive function of the altitude at which the material is injected; (3) the O3 removal efficiency of the emitted material depends on the concentrations of trace gases in the background atmosphere; and (4) evaluation of the impact of fleet operations in the future atmosphere must take into account the expected changes in trace gas concentrations from other activities. Areas for model improvements in future studies are also discussed.

  15. Bibliography on aircraft fire hazards and safety. Volume 1: Hazards. Part 1: Key numbers 1 to 817

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelouch, J. J., Jr. (Compiler); Hacker, P. T. (Compiler)

    1974-01-01

    Ignition temperatures of n-hexane, n-octane, n-decane, JP-6 jet fuel, and aircraft engine oil MIL-7-7808 (0-60-18) were determined in air using heated Pyrex cylinders and Nichrome wires, rods, or tubes. Ignition temperature varied little with fuel-air ratio, but increased as the size of the heat source was decreased. Expressions are given which define the variation of the hot surface ignition temperatures of these combustibles with the radius and the surface area of the heat source. The expressions are applicable to stagnant or low velocity flow conditions (less than 0.2 in./sec.). In addition, the hot gas ignition temperatures of the combustible vapor-air mixtures were determined with jets of hot air. These ignition temperatures also varied little with fuel-air ratio and increased as the diameter of the heat sources was decreased.

  16. Aircraft measurements of electrified clouds at Kennedy Space Center. Part 2: Case study: 4 November 1988 (88309)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. J.; Winn, W. P.; Hunyady, S. J.; Moore, C. B.; Bullock, J. W.

    1990-01-01

    During the fall of 1988, a Schweizer airplane equipped to measure electric field and other meteorological parameters flew over Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in a program to study clouds defined in the existing launch restriction criteria. A case study is presented of a single flight over KSC on November 4, 1988. This flight was chosen for two reasons: (1) the clouds were weakly electrified, and no lightning was reported during the flight; and (2) electric field mills in the surface array at KSC indicated field strengths greater than 3 kV/m, yet the aircraft flying directly over them at an altitude of 3.4 km above sea level measured field strengths of less than 1.6 kV/m. A weather summary, sounding description, record of cloud types, and an account of electric field measurements are included.

  17. Improving and Assessing Aircraft-based Greenhouse Gas Emission Rate Measurements at Indianapolis as part of the INFLUX project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimburger, A. M. F.; Shepson, P. B.; Stirm, B. H.; Susdorf, C.; Cambaliza, M. O. L.

    2015-12-01

    Since the Copenhagen accord in 2009, several countries have affirmed their commitment to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. The United States and Canada committed to reduce their emissions by 17% below 2005 levels, by 2020, Europe by 14% and China by ~40%. To achieve such targets, coherent and effective strategies in mitigating atmospheric carbon emissions must be implemented in the next decades. Whether such goals are actually achieved, they require that reductions are "measurable", "reportable", and "verifiable". Management of greenhouse gas emissions must focus on urban environments since ~74% of CO2 emissions worldwide will be from cities, while measurement approaches are highly uncertain (~50% to >100%). The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) was established to develop, assess and improve top-down and bottom-up quantifications of urban greenhouse gas emissions. Based on an aircraft mass balance approach, we performed a series of experiments focused on the improvement of CO2, CH4 and CO emission rates quantification from Indianapolis, our final objective being to drastically improve the method overall uncertainty from the previous estimate of 50%. In November-December 2014, we conducted nine methodologically identical mass balance experiments in a short period of time (24 days, one downwind distance) for assumed constant total emission rate conditions, as a means to obtain an improved standard deviation of the mean determination. By averaging the individual emission rate determinations, we were able to obtain a method precision of 17% and 16% for CO2 and CO, respectively, at the 95%C.L. CH4 emission rates are highly variable day to day, leading to precision of 60%. Our results show that repetitive sampling can enable improvement in precision of the aircraft top-down methods through averaging.

  18. Preliminary Axial Flow Turbine Design and Off-Design Performance Analysis Methods for Rotary Wing Aircraft Engines. Part 2; Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shu-cheng, S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, preliminary studies on two turbine engine applications relevant to the tilt-rotor rotary wing aircraft are performed. The first case-study is the application of variable pitch turbine for the turbine performance improvement when operating at a substantially lower shaft speed. The calculations are made on the 75 percent speed and the 50 percent speed of operations. Our results indicate that with the use of the variable pitch turbines, a nominal (3 percent (probable) to 5 percent (hypothetical)) efficiency improvement at the 75 percent speed, and a notable (6 percent (probable) to 12 percent (hypothetical)) efficiency improvement at the 50 percent speed, without sacrificing the turbine power productions, are achievable if the technical difficulty of turning the turbine vanes and blades can be circumvented. The second casestudy is the contingency turbine power generation for the tilt-rotor aircraft in the One Engine Inoperative (OEI) scenario. For this study, calculations are performed on two promising methods: throttle push and steam injection. By isolating the power turbine and limiting its air mass flow rate to be no more than the air flow intake of the take-off operation, while increasing the turbine inlet total temperature (simulating the throttle push) or increasing the air-steam mixture flow rate (simulating the steam injection condition), our results show that an amount of 30 to 45 percent extra power, to the nominal take-off power, can be generated by either of the two methods. The methods of approach, the results, and discussions of these studies are presented in this paper.

  19. Aircraft operations management manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA aircraft operations program is a multifaceted, highly diverse entity that directly supports the agency mission in aeronautical research and development, space science and applications, space flight, astronaut readiness training, and related activities through research and development, program support, and mission management aircraft operations flights. Users of the program are interagency, inter-government, international, and the business community. This manual provides guidelines to establish policy for the management of NASA aircraft resources, aircraft operations, and related matters. This policy is an integral part of and must be followed when establishing field installation policy and procedures covering the management of NASA aircraft operations. Each operating location will develop appropriate local procedures that conform with the requirements of this handbook. This manual should be used in conjunction with other governing instructions, handbooks, and manuals.

  20. 75 FR 9327 - Aircraft Noise Certification Documents for International Operations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... the aircraft flight manual and approved as part of the aircraft's airworthiness certification, and... Airplane Flight Manual (AFM) or Rotorcraft Flight Manual (RFM) as part of an aircraft's certification... operating under part 121, a carrier is allowed to create an Aircraft Operations Manual (AOM) or a...

  1. Navy Ship Names: Background for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-13

    served in the Navy from 1965 to 1996. The previous eight Wasp (LHD-1) class big deck amphibious assault ships were named for World War II-era Navy...H.Res. 99 an aircraft carrier Wasp [97th] H.Con.Res. 312 a nonlethal naval vessela Corpus Christia [97th] H.Res. 174 an aircraft carrier Wasp [97th...honoring British Ambassador Sir David Manning, and a special underway demonstration during which 60 Medal of Honor recipients each received a personal

  2. Navy Ship Names: Background for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-23

    served in the Navy from 1965 to 1996. The previous eight Wasp (LHD-1) class big deck amphibious assault ships were named for World War II-era Navy...395 CVN-74 or CVN-75 John C. Stennis [98th] H.Res. 99 an aircraft carrier Wasp [97th] H.Con.Res. 312 a nonlethal naval vessela Corpus Christia...97th] H.Res. 174 an aircraft carrier Wasp [97th] H.R. 4977 CVN-72 Hyman G. Rickover [93rd] H.Con.Res. 386 CVN-70 Carl Vinson [93rd] H.Con.Res. 387

  3. Automatic aircraft recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hmam, Hatem; Kim, Jijoong

    2002-08-01

    Automatic aircraft recognition is very complex because of clutter, shadows, clouds, self-occlusion and degraded imaging conditions. This paper presents an aircraft recognition system, which assumes from the start that the image is possibly degraded, and implements a number of strategies to overcome edge fragmentation and distortion. The current vision system employs a bottom up approach, where recognition begins by locating image primitives (e.g., lines and corners), which are then combined in an incremental fashion into larger sets of line groupings using knowledge about aircraft, as viewed from a generic viewpoint. Knowledge about aircraft is represented in the form of whole/part shape description and the connectedness property, and is embedded in production rules, which primarily aim at finding instances of the aircraft parts in the image and checking the connectedness property between the parts. Once a match is found, a confidence score is assigned and as evidence in support of an aircraft interpretation is accumulated, the score is increased proportionally. Finally a selection of the resulting image interpretations with the highest scores, is subjected to competition tests, and only non-ambiguous interpretations are allowed to survive. Experimental results demonstrating the effectiveness of the current recognition system are given.

  4. X-31 Wing Storage for Shipping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The right wing of the X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability Technology Demonstrator Aircraft is seen here being put into a shipping container May 18, 1995, at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, by U.S. and German members of the program. To fit inside an Air Force Reserve C-5 transport, which was used to ferry the X-31 to Europe on May 22, 1995, the right wing had to be removed. Manching, Germany, was used as a staging base to prepare the aircraft for participation in the Paris Air Show. At the air show on June 11 through the 18th, the X-31 demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with advanced flight control systems to provide controlled flight at very high angles of attack. The aircraft arrived back at Edwards in an Air Force Reserve C-5 on June 25, 1995, and off loaded at Dryden the 27th. The X-31 aircraft was developed jointly by Rockwell International's North American Aircraft Division (now part of Boeing) and Daimler-Benz Aerospace (formerly Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm), under sponsorship by the U.S. Department of Defense and The German Federal Ministry of Defense. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft

  5. Robots for Aircraft Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center charged USBI (now Pratt & Whitney) with the task of developing an advanced stripping system based on hydroblasting to strip paint and thermal protection material from Space Shuttle solid rocket boosters. A robot, mounted on a transportable platform, controls the waterjet angle, water pressure and flow rate. This technology, now known as ARMS, has found commercial applications in the removal of coatings from jet engine components. The system is significantly faster than manual procedures and uses only minimal labor. Because the amount of "substrate" lost is minimal, the life of the component is extended. The need for toxic chemicals is reduced, as is waste disposal and human protection equipment. Users of the ARMS work cell include Delta Air Lines and the Air Force, which later contracted with USBI for development of a Large Aircraft Paint Stripping system (LARPS). LARPS' advantages are similar to ARMS, and it has enormous potential in military and civil aircraft maintenance. The technology may also be adapted to aircraft painting, aircraft inspection techniques and paint stripping of large objects like ships and railcars.

  6. [Malaria and life at sea: prophylactic regimens on merchant ships].

    PubMed

    Michot, S

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe requirements for protection/treatment of malaria on merchant ships. The first part of the article reviews recent data on the incidence of malaria in seagoing personnel. The second part provides advice on mosquito-bite prevention on merchant ships. The third part presents the most important information on prophylaxis for seafarers working in malarial risk areas. Several regimens are proposed. The last part of the article discusses curative treatment for malaria on merchant ships.

  7. A Bayesian approach for understanding the role of ship speed in whale-ship encounters.

    PubMed

    Gende, Scott M; Hendrix, A Noble; Harris, Karin R; Eichenlaub, Bill; Nielsen, Julie; Pyare, Sanjay

    2011-09-01

    Mandatory or voluntary reductions in ship speed are a common management strategy for reducing deleterious encounters between large ships and large whales. This has produced strong resistance from shipping and marine transportation entities, in part because very few studies have empirically demonstrated whether or to what degree ship speed influences ship-whale encounters. Here we present the results of four years of humpback whale sightings made by observers aboard cruise ships in Alaska, representing 380 cruises and 891 ship-whale encounters. Encounters occurred at distances from 21 m to 1000 m (x = 567 m) with 61 encounters (7%) occurring between 200 m and 100 m, and 19 encounters (2%) within 100 m. Encounters were spatially aggregated and highly variable across all ship speeds. Nevertheless a Bayesian change-point model found that the relationship between whale distance and ship speed changed at 11.8 knots (6.1 m/s) with whales encountering ships, on average, 114 m closer when ship speeds were above 11.8 knots. Binning encounter distances by 1-knot speed increments revealed a clear decrease in encounter distance with increasing ship speed over the range of 7-17 knots (3.6-8.7 m/s). Our results are the first to demonstrate that speed influences the encounter distance between large ships and large whales. Assuming that the closer ships come to whales the more likely they are to be struck, our results suggest that reduced ship speed may be an effective management action in reducing the probability of a collision.

  8. Fundamentals of the Control of Gas-Turbine Power Plants for Aircraft. Part 2; Principles of Control Common to Jet, Turbine-Propeller Jet, and Ducted-Fan Jet Power Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuehl, H.

    1947-01-01

    After defining the aims and requirements to be set for a control system of gas-turbine power plants for aircraft, the report will deal with devices that prevent the quantity of fuel supplied per unit of time from exceeding the value permissible at a given moment. The general principles of the actuation of the adjustable parts of the power plant are also discussed.

  9. 76 FR 21849 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Ships Bunkers Easy Acquisition (SEA) Card® and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-19

    ... Regulation Supplement; Ships Bunkers Easy Acquisition (SEA) Card and Aircraft Ground Services (DFARS Case... include purchases of marine fuel, oil, and refueling-related items using the Ships Bunkers Easy... the purchase of marine fuel using the Ships' bunkers Easy Acquisition (SEA) Card in lieu of the...

  10. 76 FR 58149 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Ships Bunkers Easy Acquisition (SEA) Card® and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... Regulation Supplement; Ships Bunkers Easy Acquisition (SEA) Card and Aircraft Ground Services (DFARS Case... to the simplified acquisition threshold using the Ships Bunkers Easy Acquisition (SEA) Card in lieu... fuel using the Ships' bunkers Easy Acquisition (SEA) Card in lieu of the SF44, Purchase...

  11. High repetition ration solid state switched CO2 TEA laser employed in industrial ultrasonic testing of aircraft parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bergmann, Hubertus; Morkel, Francois; Stehmann, Timo

    2015-02-01

    Laser Ultrasonic Testing (UT) is an important technique for the non-destructive inspection of composite parts in the aerospace industry. In laser UT a high power, short pulse probe laser is scanned across the material surface, generating ultrasound waves which can be detected by a second low power laser system and are used to draw a defect map of the part. We report on the design and testing of a transversely excited atmospheric pressure (TEA) CO2 laser system specifically optimised for laser UT. The laser is excited by a novel solid-state switched pulsing system and utilises either spark or corona preionisation. It provides short output pulses of less than 100 ns at repetition rates of up to 1 kHz, optimised for efficient ultrasonic wave generation. The system has been designed for highly reliable operation under industrial conditions and a long term test with total pulse counts in excess of 5 billion laser pulses is reported.

  12. Improvements Needed in the Defense Logistics Agencys Evaluation of Fair and Reasonable Prices for C130 Aircraft Spare Parts (Redacted)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-16

    DLA Aviation material purchases supporting the C-130. The first report addressed whether DLA Aviation cost effectively managed spare-part...inventory for the C-130. In this report, we addressed whether DLA Aviation paid a fair and reasonable price for inventory unique to the C-130. Findings...contracts to support the C-130 hub and blade (propeller). We determined that DLA Aviation contracting officers did not perform adequate proposal

  13. 15 CFR 8b.15 - Employment on ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employment on ships. 8b.15 Section 8b... Practices § 8b.15 Employment on ships. No qualified handicapped individual possessing an appropriate license... employment on ships under any program or activity to which this part applies....

  14. 15 CFR 8b.15 - Employment on ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Employment on ships. 8b.15 Section 8b... Practices § 8b.15 Employment on ships. No qualified handicapped individual possessing an appropriate license... employment on ships under any program or activity to which this part applies....

  15. 15 CFR 8b.15 - Employment on ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Employment on ships. 8b.15 Section 8b... Practices § 8b.15 Employment on ships. No qualified handicapped individual possessing an appropriate license... employment on ships under any program or activity to which this part applies....

  16. 15 CFR 8b.15 - Employment on ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Employment on ships. 8b.15 Section 8b... Practices § 8b.15 Employment on ships. No qualified handicapped individual possessing an appropriate license... employment on ships under any program or activity to which this part applies....

  17. 15 CFR 8b.15 - Employment on ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Employment on ships. 8b.15 Section 8b... Practices § 8b.15 Employment on ships. No qualified handicapped individual possessing an appropriate license... employment on ships under any program or activity to which this part applies....

  18. Aircraft electromagnetic compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Clifton A.; Larsen, William E.

    1987-01-01

    Illustrated are aircraft architecture, electromagnetic interference environments, electromagnetic compatibility protection techniques, program specifications, tasks, and verification and validation procedures. The environment of 400 Hz power, electrical transients, and radio frequency fields are portrayed and related to thresholds of avionics electronics. Five layers of protection for avionics are defined. Recognition is given to some present day electromagnetic compatibility weaknesses and issues which serve to reemphasize the importance of EMC verification of equipment and parts, and their ultimate EMC validation on the aircraft. Proven standards of grounding, bonding, shielding, wiring, and packaging are laid out to help provide a foundation for a comprehensive approach to successful future aircraft design and an understanding of cost effective EMC in an aircraft setting.

  19. LHA 6 America Class Amphibious Assault Ship (LHA 6)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Landing Marine expeditionary aviation assets in the ESG/ARG, including the MV-22 and the F-35B, the STOVL model of the Joint Strike Fighter. The...LHA 6 America Class is an LHD 8 gas turbine variant with enhanced aviation capability. The Flight 0 ship will embark over 1,600 Marines and transport...them and their equipment ashore by rotary-wing aircraft when the situation requires. The Flight I ship maintains an aviation centric capability with

  20. Hospital Ship Replacement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    designed to operate primarily when anchored to reduce the effects of roll. Quantum markets two separate zero speed active roll fin models for small ...ships. Feasibility of scaling fins to the size of the hospital ship requires validation. 3.12 Lifeboats and Liferafts The safety appliances designated ...for Innovation in Ship Design Technical Report Hospital Ship Replacement By Hannah Allison, Christopher Mehrvarzi, Rebecca Piks, Beau Lovdahl

  1. F-16XL ship #1 crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    November 27, 1995 Photograph of the F-16XL Ship #1 Cranked-Arrow Wing Aerodynamic Project (CAWAP) Test Team; from left to right, Ron Wilcox; Operations Engineer, Art Cope; Aircraft Mechanic, Dave Fisher; Chief Project Engineer, Dick Denman; Aircraft Mechanic, Bob Garcia; A/C Crew Chief, Susan Ligon; Aircraft Mechanic, Rodger Tarango; Mobile Operations Facility (MOF) Staff, Jerry Cousins; Aircraft Mechanic, Bruce Gallmeyer; MOF Staff, and Mike Reardon; Aircraft Mechanic/Helper. The modified airplane features a delta 'cranked-arrow' wing with strips of tubing along the leading edge to the trailing edge to sense static on the wing and obtain pressure distribution data. The right wing receives data on pressure distribution and the left wing has three types of instrumentation - preston tubes to measure local skin friction, boundary layer rakes to measure boundary layer profiles (the layer where the air interacts with the surfaces of a moving aircraft), and hot films to determine boundary layer transition locations. The first flight of CAWAP occurred at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on November 21, 1995, and the test program ended in April 1996.

  2. Platform Camera Aircraft Detection for Approach Evaluation and Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    cameras. Consistent and easily available approach data provides positive reinforcement for pilots preparing to participate in ship- based evolutions...glideslope and lineup guarantee more accurate approach representations. Consistent depictions of aircraft approaches have the ability to provide positive ... reinforcement for pilots preparing to land at the ship. 3 D. ADVANTAGES Providing supplemental objective feedback improves the pilot’s landing

  3. MERCHANT MARINE SHIP REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Mumm, J.F.; North, D.C. Jr.; Rock, H.R.; Geston, D.K.

    1961-05-01

    A nuclear reactor is described for use in a merchant marine ship. The reactor is of pressurized light water cooled and moderated design in which three passes of the water through the core in successive regions of low, intermediate, and high heat generation and downflow in a fuel region are made. The foregoing design makes a compact reactor construction with extended core life. The core has an egg-crate lattice containing the fuel elements confined between a lower flow baffle and upper grid plate, with the latter serving also as part of a turn- around manifold from which the entire coolant is distributed into the outer fuel elements for the second pass through the core. The inner fuel elements are cooled in the third pass.

  4. Merchant Marine Ship Reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sankovich, M. F.; Mumm, J. F.; North, Jr, D. C.; Rock, H. R.; Gestson, D. K.

    1961-05-01

    A nuclear reactor for use in a merchant marine ship is described. The reactor is of pressurized, light water cooled and moderated design in which three passes of the water through the core in successive regions of low, intermediate, and high heat generation and downflow in a fuel region are made. The design makes a compact reactor construction with extended core life. The core has an egg-crate lattice containing the fuel elements that are confined between a lower flow baffle and upper grid plate, with the latter serving also as part of a turn- around manifold from which the entire coolant is distributed into the outer fuel elements for the second pass through the core. The inner fuel elements are cooled in the third pass. (AEC)

  5. Infections on Cruise Ships.

    PubMed

    Kak, Vivek

    2015-08-01

    The modern cruise ship is a small city on the seas, with populations as large as 5,000 seen on large ships. The growth of the cruise ship industry has continued in the twenty-first century, and it was estimated that nearly 21.3 million passengers traveled on cruise ships in 2013, with the majority of these sailing from North America. The presence of large numbers of individuals in close proximity to each other facilitates transmission of infectious diseases, often through person-to-person spread or via contaminated food or water. An infectious agent introduced into the environment of a cruise ship has the potential to be distributed widely across the ship and to cause significant morbidity. The median cruise ship passenger is over 45 years old and often has chronic medical problems, so it is important that, to have a safe cruise ship experience, any potential for the introduction of an infecting agent as well as its transmission be minimized. The majority of cruise ship infections involve respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. This article discusses infectious outbreaks on cruise ships and suggests preventative measures for passengers who plan to travel on cruise ships.

  6. Aircraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H. (Inventor); Uden, Edward (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention is an aircraft wing design that creates a bell shaped span load, which results in a negative induced drag (induced thrust) on the outer portion of the wing; such a design obviates the need for rudder control of an aircraft.

  7. Mission management aircraft operations manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This manual prescribes the NASA mission management aircraft program and provides policies and criteria for the safe and economical operation, maintenance, and inspection of NASA mission management aircraft. The operation of NASA mission management aircraft is based on the concept that safety has the highest priority. Operations involving unwarranted risks will not be tolerated. NASA mission management aircraft will be designated by the Associate Administrator for Management Systems and Facilities. NASA mission management aircraft are public aircraft as defined by the Federal Aviation Act of 1958. Maintenance standards, as a minimum, will meet those required for retention of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airworthiness certification. Federal Aviation Regulation Part 91, Subparts A and B, will apply except when requirements of this manual are more restrictive.

  8. 41 CFR 102-33.215 - May we use Government aircraft to carry passengers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Managing Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Accounting for the Use of Government Aircraft § 102-33.215 May we use Government aircraft to carry passengers? Yes, you may use Government aircraft to carry passengers with the following restrictions: (a) You may...

  9. 41 CFR 102-33.65 - What is the process for acquiring Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... acquiring Government aircraft? 102-33.65 Section 102-33.65 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.65 What is the process for acquiring Government aircraft? Acquiring aircraft generally follows a...

  10. 41 CFR 102-33.65 - What is the process for acquiring Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... acquiring Government aircraft? 102-33.65 Section 102-33.65 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.65 What is the process for acquiring Government aircraft? Acquiring aircraft generally follows a...

  11. 41 CFR 102-33.215 - May we use Government aircraft to carry passengers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Managing Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Accounting for the Use of Government Aircraft § 102-33.215 May we use Government aircraft to carry passengers? Yes, you may use Government aircraft to carry passengers with the following restrictions: (a) You may...

  12. 41 CFR 102-33.65 - What is the process for acquiring Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... acquiring Government aircraft? 102-33.65 Section 102-33.65 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.65 What is the process for acquiring Government aircraft? Acquiring aircraft generally follows a...

  13. 41 CFR 102-33.215 - May we use Government aircraft to carry passengers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Managing Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Accounting for the Use of Government Aircraft § 102-33.215 May we use Government aircraft to carry passengers? Yes, you may use Government aircraft to carry passengers with the following restrictions: (a) You may...

  14. 41 CFR 102-33.215 - May we use Government aircraft to carry passengers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Managing Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Accounting for the Use of Government Aircraft § 102-33.215 May we use Government aircraft to carry passengers? Yes, you may use Government aircraft to carry passengers with the following restrictions: (a) You may...

  15. 41 CFR 102-33.65 - What is the process for acquiring Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... acquiring Government aircraft? 102-33.65 Section 102-33.65 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.65 What is the process for acquiring Government aircraft? Acquiring aircraft generally follows a...

  16. 41 CFR 102-33.65 - What is the process for acquiring Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... acquiring Government aircraft? 102-33.65 Section 102-33.65 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.65 What is the process for acquiring Government aircraft? Acquiring aircraft generally follows a...

  17. 41 CFR 102-33.215 - May we use Government aircraft to carry passengers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Managing Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Accounting for the Use of Government Aircraft § 102-33.215 May we use Government aircraft to carry passengers? Yes, you may use Government aircraft to carry passengers with the following restrictions: (a) You may...

  18. Radiative Forcing Over Ocean by Ship Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, Charles K.; Wilcox, E.; Poudyal, R.; Wang, J.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in surface albedo represent one of the main forcing agents that can counteract, to some extent, the positive forcing from increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Here, we report on enhanced ocean reflectance from ship wakes over the Pacific Ocean near the California coast, where we determined, based on airborne radiation measurements that ship wakes can increase reflected sunlight by more than 100%. We assessed the importance of this increase to climate forcing, where we estimated the global radiative forcing of ship wakes to be -0.00014 plus or minus 53% Watts per square meter assuming a global distribution of 32331 ships of size of greater than or equal to 100000 gross tonnage. The forcing is smaller than the forcing of aircraft contrails (-0.007 to +0.02 Watts per square meter), but considering that the global shipping fleet has rapidly grown in the last five decades and this trend is likely to continue because of the need of more inter-continental transportation as a result of economic globalization, we argue that the radiative forcing of wakes is expected to be increasingly important especially in harbors and coastal regions.

  19. 14 CFR 135.125 - Aircraft security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.125 Aircraft security. Certificate holders conducting operators conducting operations under this part... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aircraft security. 135.125 Section...

  20. 14 CFR 135.125 - Aircraft security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.125 Aircraft security. Certificate holders conducting operators conducting operations under this part... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aircraft security. 135.125 Section...

  1. 14 CFR 135.125 - Aircraft security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.125 Aircraft security. Certificate holders conducting operators conducting operations under this part... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aircraft security. 135.125 Section...

  2. 14 CFR 135.125 - Aircraft security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.125 Aircraft security. Certificate holders conducting operators conducting operations under this part... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aircraft security. 135.125 Section...

  3. 14 CFR 135.125 - Aircraft security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.125 Aircraft security. Certificate holders conducting operators conducting operations under this part... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aircraft security. 135.125 Section...

  4. 14 CFR 21.127 - Tests: aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tests: aircraft. 21.127 Section 21.127... PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Production Under Type Certificate § 21.127 Tests: aircraft. (a) Each person manufacturing aircraft under a type certificate must establish an approved production flight test procedure...

  5. 14 CFR 21.127 - Tests: aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tests: aircraft. 21.127 Section 21.127... PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Production Under Type Certificate § 21.127 Tests: aircraft. (a) Each person manufacturing aircraft under a type certificate must establish an approved production flight test procedure...

  6. 78 FR 67309 - Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 25 Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION... collection associated with the Commission's Earth Station Aboard Aircraft, Report and Order (Order), which adopted licensing and service rules for Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft (ESAA) communicating with...

  7. 14 CFR 21.182 - Aircraft identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aircraft identification. 21.182 Section 21.182 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Airworthiness Certificates § 21.182 Aircraft identification....

  8. 14 CFR 21.182 - Aircraft identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aircraft identification. 21.182 Section 21.182 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Airworthiness Certificates § 21.182 Aircraft identification....

  9. 40 CFR 87.6 - Aircraft safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aircraft safety. 87.6 Section 87.6.... § 87.6 Aircraft safety. Link to an amendment published at 77 FR 36381, June 18, 2012. The provisions of... revised text is set forth as follows: § 87.6 Aircraft safety. The provisions of this part will be...

  10. 14 CFR 21.127 - Tests: aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tests: aircraft. 21.127 Section 21.127 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Production Under Type Certificate § 21.127 Tests: aircraft. (a) Each...

  11. 14 CFR 21.182 - Aircraft identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aircraft identification. 21.182 Section 21.182 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Airworthiness Certificates § 21.182 Aircraft identification....

  12. 43 CFR 423.41 - Aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aircraft. 423.41 Section 423.41 Public... Aircraft. (a) You must comply with any applicable Federal, State, and local laws, and with any additional... this part 423, with respect to aircraft landings, takeoffs, and operation on or in the proximity...

  13. 14 CFR 21.182 - Aircraft identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aircraft identification. 21.182 Section 21.182 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Airworthiness Certificates § 21.182 Aircraft identification....

  14. 43 CFR 423.41 - Aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aircraft. 423.41 Section 423.41 Public... Aircraft. (a) You must comply with any applicable Federal, State, and local laws, and with any additional... this part 423, with respect to aircraft landings, takeoffs, and operation on or in the proximity...

  15. 43 CFR 423.41 - Aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aircraft. 423.41 Section 423.41 Public... Aircraft. (a) You must comply with any applicable Federal, State, and local laws, and with any additional... this part 423, with respect to aircraft landings, takeoffs, and operation on or in the proximity...

  16. 14 CFR 21.182 - Aircraft identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aircraft identification. 21.182 Section 21.182 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Airworthiness Certificates § 21.182 Aircraft identification....

  17. 43 CFR 423.41 - Aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aircraft. 423.41 Section 423.41 Public... Aircraft. (a) You must comply with any applicable Federal, State, and local laws, and with any additional... this part 423, with respect to aircraft landings, takeoffs, and operation on or in the proximity...

  18. 43 CFR 423.41 - Aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Aircraft. 423.41 Section 423.41 Public... Aircraft. (a) You must comply with any applicable Federal, State, and local laws, and with any additional... this part 423, with respect to aircraft landings, takeoffs, and operation on or in the proximity...

  19. 14 CFR 21.127 - Tests: aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tests: aircraft. 21.127 Section 21.127 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Production Under Type Certificate Only § 21.127 Tests: aircraft. (a)...

  20. Air pollution from ships over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    -Eleni Sotiropoulou, Rafaella; Tagaris, Efthimios

    2016-04-01

    Shipping sector is a large and growing source of emissions. Large quantities of nitrogen oxides (NOX) and sulphur dioxide (SO2) are emitted from ships affecting the chemical composition of the atmosphere in coastal areas. Changes of the world fleet over the past decades suggest a continuously increasing trend of the shipping emissions. Therefore, shipping emissions may partly offset the benefits from the reduction of anthropogenic emissions over land. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of shipping emissions on air quality degradation over Europe for a winter (January 2006) and a summer month (July 2006) using CMAQ modeling system and the TNO anthropogenic emission inventory for 2006. Results suggest that shipping emissions increase NO2 and SO2 mixing ratios more than 90% over the sea and close to the coastline, locally. Ship induced ozone contribution to total surface ozone exceeds 5% over the sea and near the coastline during the summer month. The largest impact is simulated over the Mediterranean Sea. Ship traffic emissions are estimated to increase PM2.5 concentration during winter up to 40% over the Mediterranean Sea while during summer an increase more than 50% is simulated over the sea.

  1. Melt pond fraction and spectral sea ice albedo retrieval from MERIS data - Part 1: Validation against in situ, aerial, and ship cruise data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomina, L.; Heygster, G.; Huntemann, M.; Schwarz, P.; Birnbaum, G.; Scharien, R.; Polashenski, C.; Perovich, D.; Zege, E.; Malinka, A.; Prikhach, A.; Katsev, I.

    2015-08-01

    The presence of melt ponds on the Arctic sea ice strongly affects the energy balance of the Arctic Ocean in summer. It affects albedo as well as transmittance through the sea ice, which has consequences for the heat balance and mass balance of sea ice. An algorithm to retrieve melt pond fraction and sea ice albedo from Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) data is validated against aerial, shipborne and in situ campaign data. The results show the best correlation for landfast and multiyear ice of high ice concentrations. For broadband albedo, R2 is equal to 0.85, with the RMS (root mean square) being equal to 0.068; for the melt pond fraction, R2 is equal to 0.36, with the RMS being equal to 0.065. The correlation for lower ice concentrations, subpixel ice floes, blue ice and wet ice is lower due to ice drift and challenging for the retrieval surface conditions. Combining all aerial observations gives a mean albedo RMS of 0.089 and a mean melt pond fraction RMS of 0.22. The in situ melt pond fraction correlation is R2 = 0.52 with an RMS = 0.14. Ship cruise data might be affected by documentation of varying accuracy within the Antarctic Sea Ice Processes and Climate (ASPeCt) protocol, which may contribute to the discrepancy between the satellite value and the observed value: mean R2 = 0.044, mean RMS = 0.16. An additional dynamic spatial cloud filter for MERIS over snow and ice has been developed to assist with the validation on swath data.

  2. Ocean drilling ship chosen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    The Sedco/BP 471, owned jointly by Sedco, Inc., of Dallas, Tex., and British Petroleum, has been selected as the drill ship for the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP). The contract, with a specified initial term of 4 years with 10 1-year options after that, is expected to be signed by mid March by Texas A&M University, the ODP science operator, and Sedco, Inc. Texas A&M will develop the design for scientific and laboratory spaces aboard the Sedco/BP 471 and will oversee the ship conversion. Testing and shakedown of the ship is scheduled for the coming autumn; the first scientific cruise is scheduled for next January.One year ago, the commercial drilling market sagged, opening up the option for leasing a commercial drill ship (Eos, February 22, 1983, p. 73). Previously, the ship of choice had been the Glomar Explorer; rehabilitating the former CIA salvage ship would have been extremely expensive, however.

  3. 46 CFR 147.15 - Hazardous ships' stores permitted on board vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hazardous ships' stores permitted on board vessels. 147... HAZARDOUS SHIPS' STORES General Provisions § 147.15 Hazardous ships' stores permitted on board vessels. Unless prohibited under subpart B of this part, any hazardous material may be on board a vessel as...

  4. 46 CFR 147.15 - Hazardous ships' stores permitted on board vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hazardous ships' stores permitted on board vessels. 147... HAZARDOUS SHIPS' STORES General Provisions § 147.15 Hazardous ships' stores permitted on board vessels. Unless prohibited under subpart B of this part, any hazardous material may be on board a vessel as...

  5. 46 CFR 147.15 - Hazardous ships' stores permitted on board vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hazardous ships' stores permitted on board vessels. 147... HAZARDOUS SHIPS' STORES General Provisions § 147.15 Hazardous ships' stores permitted on board vessels. Unless prohibited under subpart B of this part, any hazardous material may be on board a vessel as...

  6. 46 CFR 147.15 - Hazardous ships' stores permitted on board vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hazardous ships' stores permitted on board vessels. 147... HAZARDOUS SHIPS' STORES General Provisions § 147.15 Hazardous ships' stores permitted on board vessels. Unless prohibited under subpart B of this part, any hazardous material may be on board a vessel as...

  7. 46 CFR 147.15 - Hazardous ships' stores permitted on board vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hazardous ships' stores permitted on board vessels. 147... HAZARDOUS SHIPS' STORES General Provisions § 147.15 Hazardous ships' stores permitted on board vessels. Unless prohibited under subpart B of this part, any hazardous material may be on board a vessel as...

  8. An Arsenal Ship Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    and dental services underway. 5. Disbursing Office In addition to being paperless, the Arsenal Ship is also a cashless ship. The ship does not have...Vending Machines Cashless ship (i.e. Use MARC card) O 10.4.3 Provide Crew Entertainment O 10.4.3.1 Closed Circuit TV Shipboard Multi-Media Resource Center...Administration MARC (Multi-technology Automated Reader Card) O 10.5.2 Distribution of Pay/Banking/Postal Services Shifting to Cashless Services

  9. The Effect of Shipping Stresses on Vaccine Re-dispersion Time.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianxin; Lewis, Lavinia M; Billones, Hilbert; Torres, Ekaterina; Kolhe, Parag

    2016-06-01

    A case study is presented for a vaccine drug product (DP) that showed variable re-dispersion times between syringes within a given DP lot and between different DP lots when shipped from the manufacturing site to the receiving site. A simulated shipping study was designed to understand the effect of individual shipping stresses on re-dispersion time and product quality. Shipping stresses simulating shock/drop, aircraft, and truck vibrations were applied separately to 3 syringe orientations, namely tip up, tip down, and tip horizontal (TH). Results from the simulated shipping study showed that shock/drop reduced re-dispersion time while truck and aircraft vibrations increased re-dispersion time in the tip down orientation. The dissimilar effects of different shipping stresses on re-dispersion resulted in the observed intra and inter DP lot variability in re-dispersion time. Shipping stresses did not impact re-dispersion in the TH or tip up orientation. No vaccine product quality attributes or physical properties were affected by shipping stresses. Actual shipping results correlated well with simulated shipping data. Because re-dispersion time was influenced mainly by shipping stress and syringe orientation, the mitigation measure to reduce end-user re-dispersion time was to implement the TH orientation for DP syringes during shipment and storage.

  10. Aircraft Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-19

    NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 AIRCRAFT STEELS by E. U. Lee R. Taylor C. Lei H. C. Sanders 19 February 2009...MARYLAND NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 19 February 2009 AIRCRAFT STEELS by E. U. Lee R. Taylor C. Lei H. C. Sanders...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 ii SUMMARY Five high strength and four stainless steels have been studied, identifying their

  11. Optical properties of marine stratocumulus clouds modified by ships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Radke, Lawrence F.; Hobbs, Peter V.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of an application of the diffusion domain method to multispectral solar radiation measurements obtained deep within a marine stratocumulus cloud layer modified by pollution from ships. In situ airborne measurements of the relative angular distribution of scattered radiation are compared to known asymptotic expressions for the intensity field deep within an optically thick cloud layer. Analytical expressions relating the ratio of the nadir-to-zenith intensities to surface reflectance, similarity parameter, and scaled optical depth beneath the aircraft flight level are used to analyze measurements obtained with the cloud absorption radiometer mounted on the University of Washington's C-131A research aircraft. It is shown that the total optical thickness of the cloud layer increased in the ship tracks, in contrast to the similarity parameter, which decreased. The decrease in absorption was a direct consequence of the reduction in cloud droplet size that occurred within the ship tracks.

  12. Aircraft Design Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The helicopter pictured is the twin-turbine S-76, produced by Sikorsky Aircraft division of United Technologies, Stratford, Connecticut. It is the first transport helicopter ever dey n e d purely as a commercial vehicle rather than an adaptation of a military design. Being built in large numbers for customers in 16 countries, the S-76 is intended for offshore oil rig support, executive transportation and general utility service. The craft carries 12 passengers plus a crew of two and has a range of more than 450 miles-yet it weighs less than 10,000 pounds. Significant weight reduction was achieved by use of composite materials, which are generally lighter but stronger than conventional aircraft materials. NASA composite technology played a part in development of the S-76. Under contract with NASA's Langley Research Center, Sikorsky Aircraft designed and flight-tested a helicopter airframe of advanced composite materials.

  13. Ships to the Sea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Navy, Washington, DC.

    This lesson contains materials for the U.S. Navy Museum's "Ships to the Sea" program. The program is appropriate for students in grades 2-4 and was designed in accordance with local and national social studies standards. The materials introduce students to the world of ship technology and naval terminology. The lesson is presented in…

  14. Modeling the Impact of Arctic Shipping Pollution on Air Quality off the Coast of Northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, J. L.; Law, K.; Marelle, L.; Raut, J.; Jalkanen, J.; Johansson, L.; Roiger, A.; Schlager, H.; Kim, J.; Reiter, A.; Weinzierl, B.; Rose, M.; Fast, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    As the Arctic is undergoing rapid and potentially irreversible changes, such as the shrinking and thinning of sea-ice cover, the levels of atmospheric pollution are expected to rise dramatically due to the emergence of local pollution sources including shipping. Shipping routes through the Arctic (such as Russia's Northern Sea Route) are already used as an alternative to the traditional global transit shipping routes. In summer 2012, the ACCESS (Arctic Climate Change, Economy, and Society) aircraft campaign focused on studying pollution sources off the coast of northern Norway to quantify emissions from shipping and other anthropogenic pollution sources. To complement these measurements, a regional chemical transport model is used to study the impact of shipping pollution on gas and aerosol concentrations in the region. WRF-Chem (The Weather Research and Forecasting Model with Chemistry, which simulates gas and aerosols simultaneously with meteorology) is run with real time shipping emissions from STEAM (Ship Traffic Emission Assessment Model) for July 2012. The STEAM model calculates gas and aerosol emissions of marine traffic based on the ship type and location provided by the Automatic Identification System (AIS). Use of real time position, speed, and ship specific information allows for development of emissions with very high spatial (1x1 km) and temporal (30 min) resolution, which are used in the regional model runs. STEAM emissions have been specifically generated for shipping off the coast of Norway during the entire ACCESS campaign period. Simulated ship plumes from high-resolution model runs are compared to aircraft measurements. The regional impact of current summertime shipping is also examined. At present, relatively light ship traffic off the coast of northern Norway results in only a small impact of shipping pollution on regional atmospheric chemistry. The impact of increased future shipping on regional atmospheric chemistry is also assessed.

  15. Flight service evaluation of Kevlar-49 epoxy composite panels in wide-bodies commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Kevlar-49 fairing panels, installed as flight service components on three L-1011s, were inspected after 9 years of service. There are six Kevlar-49 panels on each aircraft: a left hand and right hand set of a wing body sandwich fairing; a solid laminate under wing fillet panel; and a 422 K (300 F) service aft engine fairing. The fairings have accumulated a total of 70,000 hours, with one ship set having over 24,000 hours service. The Kevlar-49 components were found to be performing satisfactorily in service with no major problems, or any condition requiring corrective action. The only defects noted were minor impact damage, a few minor disbonds and a minor degree of fastener hole fraying and elongation. These are for the most part comparable to damage noted on fiberglass fairings. The service history to date indicates that Kevlar-49 epoxy composite materials have satisfactory service characteristics for use in aircraft secondary structure.

  16. [Psychopathology service on ships].

    PubMed

    Nowosielski, Radosław; Mazurek, Tomasz; Florkowski, Antoni

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the specific engineering services and suitability of candidates for the psychophysical performance. Navy ships are equipped with equipment and weapons are controlled by electronic devices ship and crew. Advanced technology puts high demands on operator. For the ship's staff are recruited soldiers of the psychophysical characteristics predisposing to this kind of action. The paper uses personal experience to work in military units of the Navy, and data from the literature. Terms of sailing ships off the summer season are defined as difficult. The crew during a combat mission felt the risks associated with movements of the ship in difficult meteorological conditions, and associated with the implementation of the task. The development of ship's technical equipment, working in isolated groups, functioning within a limited space, noise, vibration, electromagnetic waves heighten the emotional burden on crew members. Military service on Navy ships require high psycho-physical predisposition, resistance to stress. The crucial factor is proper selection among the candidates based on psychiatric and psychological counseling for military and medical jurisprudence. Also plays a significant role for training doctors and specialists in psychoprophylaxy of military units in the field of mental hygiene.

  17. Infrared imaging simulation and detection of ship wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Chen, Xuan; Chang, Shizheng; Xu, Enchi; Wang, Xingyu; Wang, Ye; Zhao, Xiaolong; Du, Yongchen; Kou, Wei; Fan, Chunli

    2015-10-01

    The thermal wake would be formed owing to the cooling water or exhaust heat discharged by ship, and the cold wake could be formed by the cool water in the lower part of sea stirred up by the ship propeller or vortexes. Owing to the difference of surface temperature and emissivity between the ship wake and the surrounding ocean the ship wake will be easily detected by the infrared detecting system. The wave of wake also could be detected by the difference of reflected radiance between the background and the Kelvin wake of ship. In this paper the simulating models of infrared imaging of ship wake are developed based on the selfradiation of wake, the reflected radiance of the sky and sun and the transmitted radiance of atmosphere, and the infrared imaging signatures of ship wake are investigated. The results show that the infrared imaging signatures of ship wake can be really simulated by the models proposed in this paper. The effects of the detecting height, the angle of view, the NETD of detector and the temperature of wake on the infrared imaging signatures of ship wake are studied. The temperature difference between the ship wake and surrounding ocean is a main fact which effects on the detecting distance. The infrared imaging signatures of ship wake in 8-14μm wave band is stronger than that in 2-5μm wave band whenever the temperature of ship wake is warmer or cooler than the surrounding ocean. Further, the infrared imaging of thermal wake is investigated in the homogenous water and temperature stratified water at different speed of a ship and different flow rate and depth of the discharged water in a water tank. The spreading and decaying laws of infrared signature of ship wake are obtained experimentally. The results obtained in this paper have an important application in the infrared remote sensing of ship wake.

  18. A simulator investigation of the influence of engine response characteristics on the approach and landing for an externally blown flap aircraft. Part 2: Aerodynamic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciffone, D. L.; Robinson, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis of the influence of engine response characteristics on the approach and landing of an externally blown flap aircraft was conducted using flight simulator facilities. The configuration of the aerodynamic model is described. The aerodynamic characteristics as a function of angle of attack, thrust coefficient, and flap deflection are presented in tabular form and as graphs.

  19. 41 CFR 102-33.255 - Must we document FSCAP or life-limited parts installed on aircraft that we will report as excess...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Must we document FSCAP... Section 102-33.255 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Disposing...

  20. Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Gundel, Lara; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas

    2010-05-06

    The Indoor Environment Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) teamed with seven universities to participate in a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Center of Excellence (COE) for research on environmental quality in aircraft. This report describes research performed at LBNL on selecting and evaluating sensors for monitoring environmental quality in aircraft cabins, as part of Project 7 of the FAA's COE for Airliner Cabin Environmental Research (ACER)1 effort. This part of Project 7 links to the ozone, pesticide, and incident projects for data collection and monitoring and is a component of a broader research effort on sensors by ACER. Results from UCB and LBNL's concurrent research on ozone (ACER Project 1) are found in Weschler et al., 2007; Bhangar et al. 2008; Coleman et al., 2008 and Strom-Tejsen et al., 2008. LBNL's research on pesticides (ACER Project 2) in airliner cabins is described in Maddalena and McKone (2008). This report focused on the sensors needed for normal contaminants and conditions in aircraft. The results are intended to complement and coordinate with results from other ACER members who concentrated primarily on (a) sensors for chemical and biological pollutants that might be released intentionally in aircraft; (b) integration of sensor systems; and (c) optimal location of sensors within aircraft. The parameters and sensors were selected primarily to satisfy routine monitoring needs for contaminants and conditions that commonly occur in aircraft. However, such sensor systems can also be incorporated into research programs on environmental quality in aircraft cabins.

  1. Aircraft Manufacturing Occupations. Aviation Careers Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in the aircraft manufacturing industry. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers in the aerospace industry (of which aircraft manufacturing is one part), including the numbers of various types of workers employed in those…

  2. Estimation of Ship-plume Ozone Production Efficiency: ITCT 2K2 Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Song, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Ozone Production Efficiency (OPE) of ship plume was evaluated in this study, based on ship-plume photochemical/dynamic model simulations and the ship-plume composition data measured during the ITCT 2K2 (Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation 2002) aircraft campaign. The averaged instantaneous OPEs (OPEi ) estimated via the ship-plume photochemical/dynamic modeling for the ITCT 2K2 ship-plume ranged between 4.61 and 18.92, showing that the values vary with the extent of chemical evolution (or chemical stage) of the ship plume and the stability classes of the marine boundary layer (MBL). Together with OPEi, the equivalent OPEs (OPEe) for the entire ITCT 2K2 ship-plume were also estimated. The OPEe values varied between 9.73 (for the stable MBL) and 12.73 (for the moderately stable MBL), which agreed well with the OPEe of 12.85 estimated based on the ITCT 2K2 ship-plume observations. It was also found that both the model-simulated and observation-based OPEe inside the ship-plume were 0.29-0.38 times smaller than the OPEe calculated/measured outside the ITCT 2K2 ship-plume. Lower OPEs insides the ship plume were due to the high levels of NOx. Possible implications of this ship-plume OPE study in the global chemistry-transport modeling are also discussed in this study.

  3. Aircraft cybernetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The use of computers for aircraft control, flight simulation, and inertial navigation is explored. The man-machine relation problem in aviation is addressed. Simple and self-adapting autopilots are described and the assets and liabilities of digital navigation techniques are assessed.

  4. Total Ship System Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    LONG LEAD PRODUCTION I PROCUREMENT / SUPPORT / (IF REQUIRED) / A PMR *~~~ IA AI COR AWARD (L" d Ship) .. . pi .. ., f X .. = ,,.f A.. ,, .. . . D ...in place of Combat Control. With this convention, the partitioning shown is applicable to all ship types. System of Systems As indicated earlier, the...tablishment of this framework begins with domain analysis, to es- tablish a common foun- dation for specifying system concepts and requirements. Next, in

  5. 41 CFR 102-33.50 - Under what circumstances may we acquire Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Government aircraft when you meet the requirements for operating an in-house aviation program contained in... may we acquire Government aircraft? 102-33.50 Section 102-33.50 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts...

  6. 41 CFR 102-33.60 - What methods may we use to acquire Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to acquire Government aircraft? 102-33.60 Section 102-33.60 Public Contracts and Property Management... 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.60 What methods may we use to acquire Government aircraft? Following the requirements of §§...

  7. 41 CFR 102-33.45 - What is a Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.45 What is a Government aircraft? A Government aircraft is one that is operated for the exclusive use of an executive agency and is... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What is a...

  8. 41 CFR 102-33.55 - Are there restrictions on acquiring Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... on acquiring Government aircraft? 102-33.55 Section 102-33.55 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.55 Are there restrictions on acquiring Government aircraft? Yes, you may not acquire— (a)...

  9. 41 CFR 102-33.50 - Under what circumstances may we acquire Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Government aircraft when you meet the requirements for operating an in-house aviation program contained in... may we acquire Government aircraft? 102-33.50 Section 102-33.50 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts...

  10. 41 CFR 102-33.60 - What methods may we use to acquire Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to acquire Government aircraft? 102-33.60 Section 102-33.60 Public Contracts and Property Management... 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.60 What methods may we use to acquire Government aircraft? Following the requirements of §§...

  11. 41 CFR 102-33.45 - What is a Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.45 What is a Government aircraft? A Government aircraft is one that is operated for the exclusive use of an executive agency and is... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What is a...

  12. 41 CFR 102-33.50 - Under what circumstances may we acquire Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Government aircraft when you meet the requirements for operating an in-house aviation program contained in... may we acquire Government aircraft? 102-33.50 Section 102-33.50 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts...

  13. 41 CFR 102-33.50 - Under what circumstances may we acquire Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Government aircraft when you meet the requirements for operating an in-house aviation program contained in... may we acquire Government aircraft? 102-33.50 Section 102-33.50 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts...

  14. 41 CFR 102-33.55 - Are there restrictions on acquiring Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... on acquiring Government aircraft? 102-33.55 Section 102-33.55 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.55 Are there restrictions on acquiring Government aircraft? Yes, you may not acquire— (a)...

  15. 41 CFR 102-33.55 - Are there restrictions on acquiring Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... on acquiring Government aircraft? 102-33.55 Section 102-33.55 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.55 Are there restrictions on acquiring Government aircraft? Yes, you may not acquire— (a)...

  16. 41 CFR 102-33.45 - What is a Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.45 What is a Government aircraft? A Government aircraft is one that is operated for the exclusive use of an executive agency and is... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What is a...

  17. 41 CFR 102-33.50 - Under what circumstances may we acquire Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Government aircraft when you meet the requirements for operating an in-house aviation program contained in... may we acquire Government aircraft? 102-33.50 Section 102-33.50 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts...

  18. 41 CFR 102-33.60 - What methods may we use to acquire Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to acquire Government aircraft? 102-33.60 Section 102-33.60 Public Contracts and Property Management... 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.60 What methods may we use to acquire Government aircraft? Following the requirements of §§...

  19. 41 CFR 102-33.60 - What methods may we use to acquire Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to acquire Government aircraft? 102-33.60 Section 102-33.60 Public Contracts and Property Management... 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.60 What methods may we use to acquire Government aircraft? Following the requirements of §§...

  20. 41 CFR 102-33.45 - What is a Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.45 What is a Government aircraft? A Government aircraft is one that is operated for the exclusive use of an executive agency and is... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What is a...

  1. 41 CFR 102-33.45 - What is a Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.45 What is a Government aircraft? A Government aircraft is one that is operated for the exclusive use of an executive agency and is... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is a...

  2. 41 CFR 102-33.55 - Are there restrictions on acquiring Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... on acquiring Government aircraft? 102-33.55 Section 102-33.55 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.55 Are there restrictions on acquiring Government aircraft? Yes, you may not acquire— (a)...

  3. 41 CFR 102-33.55 - Are there restrictions on acquiring Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... on acquiring Government aircraft? 102-33.55 Section 102-33.55 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.55 Are there restrictions on acquiring Government aircraft? Yes, you may not acquire— (a)...

  4. 41 CFR 102-33.60 - What methods may we use to acquire Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to acquire Government aircraft? 102-33.60 Section 102-33.60 Public Contracts and Property Management... 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview § 102-33.60 What methods may we use to acquire Government aircraft? Following the requirements of §§...

  5. 78 FR 60137 - Shipping and Transportation; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... Parts 7, 450, 451, et al. Shipping and Transportation; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming... Shipping and Transportation; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS.... Federalism F. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act G. Taking of Private Property H. Civil Justice Reform...

  6. Vertical ship motions and sea loads considering nonlinear effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shacham, I.; Weller, T.

    1986-12-01

    A mathematical model dealing with vertical motions and longitudinal strength of a ship, whose shape deviates from the linear theory assumptions, was developed. The model includes nonlinear effects stemming from ship flexibility, widening of side walls in the waterline region and ship bottom emersion. The model also considers coupling between ship response and exciting forces (hydroelastic). Based on the mathematical model equations, a computer program was written to calculate the motions and stresses, developed in a prescribed ship hull sailing at a given speed and course in a given sinusoidal type sea. Calculations obtained for a fast patrol boat and an aircraft carrier featured by a large bow flare, demonstrated very good agreement, both qualitatively and quantitatively, with results measured in sea trials. The method of solution proposed resulted in a time saving computer program, which can be applied effectively for a parametric study of the many factors which affect the whipping phenomenon. The program can also be used as an auxiliary tool at the design stage of new ships and for the determination of sailing envelopes of existing ships.

  7. D Recording of a 19-CENTURY OB River Ship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarev, A. A.; Zaytceva, O. V.; Vavulin, M. V.; Skorobogatova, A. Y.

    2016-06-01

    A 3D recording of a 19-century wooden ship discovered on the bank of the river Ob (Western Siberia) was performed in autumn 2015. The archaeologized ship was partly under water, partly lying ashore, buried under fluvial deposits. The 3D recording was performed in October, when the water level was at its lowest after clearing the area around the ship. A 3D recording at the place of discovery was required as part of the ship museumification and reconstruction project. The works performed were primarily aimed at preserving as much information about the object as possible. Given the location and peculiar features of the object, a combination of close-range photogrammetry and aerial photography was considered to be the best possible solution for creating a high-quality 3D model. The dismantled ship was delivered to Nizhnevartovsk Museum of Local History in October 2015. The ship is going to be reassembled using the created 3D model to be exhibited in the museum. The resulting models are also going to be used to make a virtual 3D reconstruction of the ship in the future. We shot a stereoscopic video for Nizhnevartovsk Museum of Local History to let visitors see the place of discovery and explore the ship in greater details. Besides, 3D printing allowed for creating a miniature of the ship, which is also going to be included in the exposition devoted to this unique discovery.

  8. 77 FR 22187 - Technical Amendment; Airworthiness Standards-Aircraft Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 33 Technical Amendment; Airworthiness Standards--Aircraft.... SUMMARY: This amendment corrects a number of errors in the airworthiness standards for aircraft engine... additional burden on any person. List of Subjects 14 CFR Part 33 Air transportation, Aircraft,...

  9. Nonlinear ship waves and computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Hideaki; Orihara, Hideo; Sato, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Research works undertaken in the first author's laboratory at the University of Tokyo over the past 30 years are highlighted. Finding of the occurrence of nonlinear waves (named Free-Surface Shock Waves) in the vicinity of a ship advancing at constant speed provided the start-line for the progress of innovative technologies in the ship hull-form design. Based on these findings, a multitude of the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) techniques have been developed over this period, and are highlighted in this paper. The TUMMAC code has been developed for wave problems, based on a rectangular grid system, while the WISDAM code treats both wave and viscous flow problems in the framework of a boundary-fitted grid system. These two techniques are able to cope with almost all fluid dynamical problems relating to ships, including the resistance, ship's motion and ride-comfort issues. Consequently, the two codes have contributed significantly to the progress in the technology of ship design, and now form an integral part of the ship-designing process.

  10. Terminal area automatic navigation, guidance, and control research using the Microwave Landing System (MLS). Part 2: RNAV/MLS transition problems for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, S.

    1982-01-01

    The problems in navigation and guidance encountered by aircraft in the initial transition period in changing from distance measuring equipment, VORTAC, and barometric instruments to the more precise microwave landing system data type navaids in the terminal area are investigated. The effects of the resulting discontinuities on the estimates of position and velocity for both optimal (Kalman type navigation schemes) and fixed gain (complementary type) navigation filters, and the effects of the errors in cross track, track angle, and altitude on the guidance equation and control commands during the critical landing phase are discussed. A method is presented to remove the discontinuities from the navigation loop and to reconstruct an RNAV path designed to land the aircraft with minimal turns and altitude changes.

  11. The influence of ship's stability on safety of navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanzu-Pazara, R.; Duse; Varsami, C.; Andrei, C.; Dumitrache, R.

    2016-08-01

    Ship's stability is one of the most important and complex concept about safety of ship and safety of navigation and it is governed by maritime law as well as maritime codes. The paper presents the importance of ship's intact stability as part of the general concept of ship's seaworthiness. There is always a correlation between ship’ stability and safety of ship and safety of navigation. Loss of ship's stability is presented as a threat to safety of navigation. We are going to present the causes that lead to ship stability failure and their impact on safety of navigation. A study of various ship stability casualties in heavy weather conditions are going to be presented, the causes are going to be analyzed and the possible ways of stability failures are assessed. Vessel's intact stability is a fundamental component of seaworthiness so it is in the interest of all owners/operators to learn about this topic and ensure that their vessel possesses a satisfactory level of stability in order to ensure its safety as well as that of the people on board the ship. Understanding ship's stability, trim, stress, and the basics of ship's construction is a key to keeping a ship seaworthy. The findings of this study can be beneficial to the maritime safety administrations to adopt decision-making on maritime safety management, but it is also important to carry out statistics and analysis of marine casualties to help to adopt proper safety management measures. Moreover, the study can be a useful guidance for masters and officers on board vessel in order to understand the factors that contribute to ship stability failure during the voyage not only in port during loading operations and to take preventive measures to avoid to put the ship in such a dangerous situations.

  12. 77 FR 39623 - Airworthiness Standards: Aircraft Engines; Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... Part 33 [Amendment No. 33-33] Airworthiness Standards: Aircraft Engines; Technical Amendment AGENCY... amendment clarifies aircraft engine vibration test requirements in the airworthiness standards. The clarification is in response to inquiries from applicants requesting FAA engine type certifications...

  13. Criteria for design of integrated flight/propulsion control systems for STOVL fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, James A.

    1993-01-01

    As part of NASA's program to develop technology for short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) fighter aircraft, control system designs have been developed for a conceptual STOVL aircraft. This aircraft is representative of the class of mixed-flow remote-lift concepts that was identified as the preferred design approach by the U.S./U.K. STOVL Joint Assessment and Ranking Team. The control system designs have been evaluated throughout the powered-lift flight envelope on the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) at Ames Research Center. Items assessed in the control system evaluation were: maximum control power used in transition and vertical flight, control system dynamic response associated with thrust transfer for attitude control, thrust margin in the presence of ground effect and hot-gas ingestion, and dynamic thrust response for the engine core. Effects of wind, turbulence, and ship airwake disturbances are incorporated in the evaluation. Results provide the basis for a reassessment of existing flying-qualities design criteria applied to STOVL aircraft.

  14. Parts Specialist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuqua, Lou; Fuqua, Debbie

    Designed to address the skills that an auto parts specialist must master in order to be effective in the market place, this manual consists of 13 units of instruction. Covered in the units are orientation; human relations; communications; safety; parts and systems identification; stocking, shipping, and receiving; inventory control; cataloging and…

  15. Journeys on the Rivers and Oceans: Ship Transportation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, John M.; Carper, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Ship transportation includes various forms of technology. Ships have special designs to meet technological needs. They are used to transport people and cargoes and have been a major part of history throughout civilization. Products are available from around the world because they can be economically moved from producers to consumers. Not only are…

  16. Building the ship of death: part I.

    PubMed

    Murfin, Sharon; Haberman, Mel

    2007-01-01

    This is the first in a series of two consecutive articles, both of which present the results of original research from a team of music-thanatology musician-clinicians working in Spokane, Washington. This article presents not only an overview of the music-thanatology narration style (through direct excerpts from clinical narratives), it also describes the interconnected physical, emotional, and spiritual needs of 11 dying persons and their families as they occur in a hospital setting. Core to narrative medicine practice, in the first article, we welcome these excerpts from patient, provider, and caregiver experiences to stand on their own, in their own voice, without interpretation. The second article will be published in the following issue and will focus on the clinical practice of music-thanatology, as well as the documentation of the palliation it offers to meet the complex physical, emotional, and spiritual needs described below.

  17. Surface Effect Ship Structural Producibility. Part 3.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-14

    Drifting 13 2100 * Drifting 14 4050 * Drifting 15 7860 * Drifting 16 17.5 19.85 Failure Readings in units of in./in. x 10 - 6 B-480 TER073 00 S...1195 Failure @ EDGE of Weld Thin Side of Speci ren. A1 Readings in units of in./in. x 10- B-482 TER073 4:70 CD 0 - \\CL. 0D 0D -. - UC! B-483 TER073...868 - Failure : 22.7 kip B-488 TER073 I -. I- 𔃺 . ~~. . .. .. R0 A IA :-. - -....... ~0 .... .. . .... - ----- ’ :7-4v . ~ .*- 7S S.Jz 110~ Z4 C4 a- C

  18. Surface Effect Ship Structural Producibility. Part 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-14

    Longitudinal Bow Framing .. ........... 2-15 2.7 Proper Radiographic Film Location. ........... 2-18 2.8 Looking Aft at Mini-Module Longitudinal Bulkhead...Test Load - Penetration Histroy ........... . B-402 8-13 Cap Block Bearing Test Results with 6-Inch Radius Keel . B-404 8-14 Cap Block Bearing Test...The " thin " material combination con- sisted of 0.200 inch thick plate and 0.250 x 4 inch stiffeners and was intended to produce plate elastic

  19. Aircraft Corrosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    chlore mais dans une proportion semblable b cells d’une eau de vil)e ; - lea solides, d’aprbs lea analyses chimique et criatallographique, paraissaiont...IATA member airlines at $100 million based on 1976 operations. Thus the numbers are large, but detailed analyses on specific aircraft types, in known...demonstrate this in any quantitative way with accurate figures. Better information is required on the cost of corrosion, together with analyses of the

  20. Aircraft Ducting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Templeman Industries developed the Ultra-Seal Ducting System, an environmental composite air duct with a 50 percent weight savings over current metallic ducting, but could not find a commercial facility with the ability to test it. Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a structural evaluation of the duct, equivalent to 86 years of take-offs and landings in an aircraft. Boeing Commercial Airplane Group and McDonnell Douglas Corporation are currently using the ducts.

  1. 75 FR 18451 - Safety and Security Zones; Tall Ships Challenge 2010, Great Lakes; Cleveland, OH; Bay City, MI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Safety and Security Zones; Tall Ships Challenge 2010... safety and security zones around each Tall Ship visiting the Great Lakes during the Tall Ships Challenge... the vicinity of each Tall Ship in the navigable waters of the United States. The Coast Guard is...

  2. 75 FR 33506 - Safety and Security Zones; Tall Ships Challenge 2010, Great Lakes, Cleveland, OH, Bay City, MI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-14

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Safety and Security Zones; Tall Ships Challenge 2010... temporary safety and security zones around each tall ship visiting the Great Lakes during the Tall Ships... each tall ship in the navigable waters of the United States. The Coast Guard is taking this action...

  3. Vacuum-Gauge Connection For Shipping Container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    External connector enables measurement of vacuum in stored part. Remote-readout connector added to shipping container and connected to thermo-couple vacuum gauge in vacuum-insulated cryogenic line packed in container. Enables monitoring of condition of vacuum without opening container.

  4. Enhanced situational technologies applied to ship channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helgeson, Michael A.; Wacker, Roger A.

    1997-06-01

    The Houston Ship Channel ranks as America's number one port in foreign tonnage by welcoming more than 50,000 cargo ships and barges annually. Locally 196,000 jobs, 5.5 billion dollars in business revenue and 213 million dollars in taxes are generated. Unfortunately, 32 days of each year vessel traffic stops for hours due to fog causing an estimated 40- 100 million dollars loss as ships idly wait in the channel for weather to clear. In addition, poor visibility has contributed to past vessel collisions which have resulted in channel closure, and associated damage to property and the environment. Today's imaging technology for synthetic vision systems and enhanced situational awareness systems offers a new solution to this problem. Whereas, typically these systems have been targeted at aircraft landing systems the channel navigation application provides a peripheral ground based market. This paper describes two imaging solutions to the problem. One using an active 35 GHz scanning radar and the other using a 94 GHz passive millimeter wave camera.

  5. Simulators for Safer Shipping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Each year one ship out of every five afloat collides with another vessel, rams a dock, or runs a ground. CAORF (Computer Aided Operations Research Facility), designed and built by Sperry Rand Corporation, incorporates technology developed in a wide variety of aerospace simulation and technical training programs. CAORF can be set up to duplicate the exact handling qualities of any vessel under various conditions of wind, tide and current. Currently a dozen different ships can be "plugged in." Bridge instrumentation is typical of modern shipboard equipment including radar, internal and external c.ommunications and new collision avoidance systems. From repetitive operation of simulated ships, MarAd is building a valuable data base for improving marine safety.

  6. Implications of China’s Aircraft Carrier Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-16

    Chong Lot 7 stated that the ship would become a floating entertainment center and casino .16 Despite that, global security suspected the actual use of...2011, http://www.defensenews.com/article/20110730/DEFSECT03/107300302/Chinese- General-Country-Needs-3-Carriers ( assessed January 10,2012) 21 Bill...aircraft-carrier-is-for-research- 072711/ ( assessed October 10, 2011) 24 War Eye, " China will build four aircraft carrier battle groups in two stages

  7. Aircraft Survivability: Survivability in The Low Altitude Regime, Summer 2009

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    highly dependent on the source of crude oil and the manufacturer, but generally JP-8 fuel (very similar to Jet A) consists of 75 to 90% paraffins, both...in the field and onboard ships to regenerate damage aircraft to sustain warfighting capability. In 1988, Al was selected as the head of the...aircraft skin . The targets had to be as smooth as possible, while exhibiting flat, singly and doubly curved surfaces. PRISM selected the

  8. Flight service evaluation of PRD-49/epoxy composite panels in wide bodied commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooley, J. H.; Paschal, D. R.; Crilly, E. R.

    1973-01-01

    L-1011 aircraft fairing panel configurations were selected as test parts to compare the fabrication, costs and service performance characteristics of PRD-49 and fiberglass. These parts are currently fiberglass reinforced structure and the purpose of this program is to evaluate the results of direct substitution of PRD-49 fabric for the fiberglass. Three ship sets of these panels have been fabricated for a five year flight service evaluation on three L-1011 commercial airlines operating in widely diverse route structures. The standard tools and machining techniques used for fiberglass parts are unacceptable for cutting, trimming, and drilling the tougher PRD-49 fibers. Therefore, a machining development study was undertaken to provide the necessary new tools and machining techniques. After incorporating these new developments in the fabrication and installation of the panels, a manufacturing cost study revealed that the labor hours were only increased by about 12.5 percent.

  9. Automated ship image acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, T. R.

    2008-04-01

    The experimental Automated Ship Image Acquisition System (ASIA) collects high-resolution ship photographs at a shore-based laboratory, with minimal human intervention. The system uses Automatic Identification System (AIS) data to direct a high-resolution SLR digital camera to ship targets and to identify the ships in the resulting photographs. The photo database is then searchable using the rich data fields from AIS, which include the name, type, call sign and various vessel identification numbers. The high-resolution images from ASIA are intended to provide information that can corroborate AIS reports (e.g., extract identification from the name on the hull) or provide information that has been omitted from the AIS reports (e.g., missing or incorrect hull dimensions, cargo, etc). Once assembled into a searchable image database, the images can be used for a wide variety of marine safety and security applications. This paper documents the author's experience with the practicality of composing photographs based on AIS reports alone, describing a number of ways in which this can go wrong, from errors in the AIS reports, to fixed and mobile obstructions and multiple ships in the shot. The frequency with which various errors occurred in automatically-composed photographs collected in Halifax harbour in winter time were determined by manual examination of the images. 45% of the images examined were considered of a quality sufficient to read identification markings, numbers and text off the entire ship. One of the main technical challenges for ASIA lies in automatically differentiating good and bad photographs, so that few bad ones would be shown to human users. Initial attempts at automatic photo rating showed 75% agreement with manual assessments.

  10. Ship Vibration Design Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    design full- power speed and all on a per shaft basis, plus the pertinent hull form and propulsion data for the similar ships. A sample of this type of...more appropriate. Based on the studies of Hadler and Cheng [10], the hull form chosen for the T-AO 187, the twin-screw open transom design, appears to...Rate Peak-to-Peak Hull Pressure Over Propeller Tip versus Ship Speed for U.S. Navy Oiler, Based on Model Tests ................................... 3

  11. Predicting Ship Fuel Consumption: Update.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-07-01

    ship propulsion fuel consumption as a function of ship speed for U.S. Navy combatant and auxiliary ships. Prediction is based on fitting an analytic function to published ship class speed-fuel use data using nonlinear regression. The form of the analytic function fitted is motivated by the literature on ship powering and resistance. The report discusses data sources and data issues, and the impact of ship propulsion plant configuration on fuel use. The regression coefficients of the exponential function fitted, tabular numerical comparison of

  12. Environmental impacts of shipping in 2030 with a particular focus on the Arctic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalsøren, S. B.; Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Corbett, J. J.; Minjares, R.; Lack, D.; Fuglestvedt, J. S.

    2013-02-01

    We quantify the concentrations changes and Radiative Forcing (RF) of short-lived atmospheric pollutants due to shipping emissions of NOx, SOx, CO, NMVOCs, BC and OC. We use high resolution ship emission inventories for the Arctic that are more suitable for regional scale evaluation than those used in former studies. A chemical transport model and a RF model are used to evaluate the time period 2004-2030, when we expect increasing traffic in the Arctic region. Two datasets for ship emissions are used that characterize the potential impact from shipping and the degree to which shipping controls may mitigate impacts: a high (HIGH) scenario and a low scenario with Maximum Feasible Reduction (MFR) of black carbon in the Arctic. In MFR, BC emissions in the Arctic are reduced with 70% representing a combination technology performance and/or reasonable advances in single-technology performance. Both scenarios result in moderate to substantial increases in concentrations of pollutants both globally and in the Arctic. Exceptions are black carbon in the MFR scenario, and sulfur species and organic carbon in both scenarios due to the future phase-in of current regulation that reduces fuel sulfur content. In the season with potential transit traffic through the Arctic in 2030 we find increased concentrations of all pollutants in large parts of the Arctic. Net global RFs from 2004-2030 of 53 mW m-2 (HIGH) and 73 mW m-2 (MFR) are similar to those found for preindustrial to present net global aircraft RF. The found warming contrasts with the cooling from historical ship emissions. The reason for this difference and the higher global forcing for the MFR scenario is mainly the reduced future fuel sulfur content resulting in less cooling from sulfate aerosols. The Arctic RF is largest in the HIGH scenario. In the HIGH scenario ozone dominates the RF during the transit season (August-October). RF due to BC in air, and snow and ice becomes significant during Arctic spring. For the HIGH

  13. Operational Performance of Sensor Systems Used to Determine Atmospheric Boundary Layer Properties as Part of the NASA Aircraft Vortex Spacing System Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, J. Allen; Rodgers, William G., Jr.; Nolf, Scott; McKissick, Burnell T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    There has been a renewed interest in the application of remote sensor technology to operational aviation and airport-related activities such as Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS). Radio Acoustic Sounding Systems (RASS), Doppler-acoustic sodars, Ultrahigh Frequencies (UHF) profilers and lidars have many advantages in measuring wind and temperature profiles in the lower atmospheric boundary layer since they can operate more or less continuously and unattended; however, there are limitations in their operational use at airports. For example, profilers deteriorate (limited altitude coverage or missing) in moderate or greater rain and can be affected by airplane targets in their field of view. Sodars can handle precipitation better but are affected by the high noise environments of airports and strong winds. Morning temperature inversions typically limit performance of RASS, sodars and profilers. Fog affects sonic anemometers. Lidars can have difficulties in clouds, fog or heavy precipitation. Despite their limitations these sensors have proven useful to provide wind and temperature profiles for AVOSS. Capabilities and limitations of these and other sensors used in the AVOSS program are discussed, parameter settings for the sensor systems are documented, and recommendations are made for the most cost-effective group of sensors for the future. The potential use of specially tuned dynamic forecast models and measurements from landing and departing aircraft are addressed.

  14. Designing Adaptable Ships: Modularity and Flexibility in Future Ship Designs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    web page). v Contents Preface...55 Contents vii... integrated into the new design while reducing the construction cost of the ship. Recommendations We offer both short-term, ship-specific recommendations and

  15. Analysis of ship maneuvering data from simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frette, V.; Kleppe, G.; Christensen, K.

    2011-03-01

    We analyze complex manuevering histories of ships obtained from training sessions on bridge simulators. Advanced ships are used in fields like offshore oil exploration: dive support vessels, supply vessels, anchor handling vessels, tugs, cable layers, and multi-purpose vessels. Due to high demands from the operations carried out, these ships need to have very high maneuverability. This is achieved through a propulsion system with several thrusters, water jets, and rudders in addition to standard propellers. For some operations, like subsea maintenance, it is crucial that the ship accurately keeps a fixed position. Therefore, bridge systems usually incorporate equipment for Dynamic Positioning (DP). DP is a method to keep ships and semi submersible rigs in a fixed position using the propulsion systems instead of anchors. It may also be used for sailing a vessel from one position to another along a predefined route. Like an autopilot on an airplane, DP may operate without human involvement. The method relies on accurate determination of position from external reference systems like GPS, as well as a continuously adjusted mathematical model of the ship and external forces from wind, waves and currents. In a specific simulator exercise for offshore crews, a ship is to be taken up to an installation consisting of three nearby oil platforms connected by bridges (Frigg field, North Sea), where a subsea inspection is to be carried out. Due to the many degrees of freedom during maneuvering, including partly or full use of DP, the chosen routes vary significantly. In this poster we report preliminary results on representations of the complex maneuvering histories; representations that allow comparison between crew groups, and, possibly, sorting of the different strategic choices behind.

  16. Educating with Aircraft Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Hobie

    1976-01-01

    Described is utilization of aircraft models, model aircraft clubs, and model aircraft magazines to promote student interest in aerospace education. The addresses for clubs and magazines are included. (SL)

  17. A Short Take-Off/Vertical Landing (STOVL) Aircraft Carrier (S-CVX).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-01

    and operation of the modem aircraft carrier, assuming availability of short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft, employing gas turbine ship ... propulsion and providing significant capability to support humanitarian operations. In the design study reported here, the authors take a systems

  18. The Good Ship Lollipop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Donald M.

    1976-01-01

    A cruise ship converted into a college took students to many foreign countries giving them the opportunity to study other cultures, politics, mores, and histories through their own observations and experiences under the guidance of teachers using a planned curriculum. (JD)

  19. Aircraft of Today. Aerospace Education I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savler, D. S.

    This textbook gives a brief idea about the modern aircraft used in defense and for commercial purposes. Aerospace technology in its present form has developed along certain basic principles of aerodynamic forces. Different parts in an airplane have different functions to balance the aircraft in air, provide a thrust, and control the general…

  20. 14 CFR 121.538 - Aircraft security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aircraft security. 121.538 Section 121.538..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.538 Aircraft security. Certificate holders conducting operations under this part must comply with the applicable security requirements in 49 CFR...

  1. 14 CFR 121.538 - Aircraft security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aircraft security. 121.538 Section 121.538..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.538 Aircraft security. Certificate holders conducting operations under this part must comply with the applicable security requirements in 49 CFR...

  2. 14 CFR 121.538 - Aircraft security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aircraft security. 121.538 Section 121.538..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.538 Aircraft security. Certificate holders conducting operations under this part must comply with the applicable security requirements in 49 CFR...

  3. 14 CFR 21.127 - Tests: aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tests: aircraft. 21.127 Section 21.127... PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Production Under Type Certificate Only § 21.127 Tests: aircraft. (a) Each... test procedure and flight check-off form, and in accordance with that form, flight test each...

  4. Nonlinear ship waves and computational fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    MIYATA, Hideaki; ORIHARA, Hideo; SATO, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Research works undertaken in the first author’s laboratory at the University of Tokyo over the past 30 years are highlighted. Finding of the occurrence of nonlinear waves (named Free-Surface Shock Waves) in the vicinity of a ship advancing at constant speed provided the start-line for the progress of innovative technologies in the ship hull-form design. Based on these findings, a multitude of the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) techniques have been developed over this period, and are highlighted in this paper. The TUMMAC code has been developed for wave problems, based on a rectangular grid system, while the WISDAM code treats both wave and viscous flow problems in the framework of a boundary-fitted grid system. These two techniques are able to cope with almost all fluid dynamical problems relating to ships, including the resistance, ship’s motion and ride-comfort issues. Consequently, the two codes have contributed significantly to the progress in the technology of ship design, and now form an integral part of the ship-designing process. PMID:25311139

  5. 75 FR 75145 - Regulated Navigation Area, Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Romeoville, IL; Safety Zone, Chicago...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-02

    ... CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA11, 1625-AA00 Regulated Navigation Area, Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Romeoville, IL; Safety Zone, Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Romeoville, IL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION... zone and a Regulated Navigation Area (RNA) on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC)...

  6. 77 FR 44140 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal, Sturgeon Bay, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal... drawbridge operating schedule for the Maple-Oregon and Michigan Street Bridges across the Sturgeon Bay Ship... drawbridges over Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal, including the two previously mentioned bridges as well as...

  7. 76 FR 11332 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Duluth Ship Canal, Duluth-Superior Harbor, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Duluth Ship Canal... proposed rulemaking (NPRM) entitled Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Duluth Ship Canal, Duluth-Superior... located 0.25 miles from Duluth Harbor North Pier Light at the lakeward end of the Duluth Ship Canal. It...

  8. 76 FR 69131 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lake Washington Ship Canal, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lake Washington Ship Canal, Seattle... the operation of the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway Bridge across the Lake Washington Ship Canal... Lake Washington Ship Canal, mile 0.1, for vessel traffic for a 14 day period to facilitate...

  9. 77 FR 25590 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lake Washington Ship Canal, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lake Washington Ship Canal, Seattle... across the Lake Washington Ship Canal, mile 4.3, at Seattle, WA. This deviation is necessary to... crosses the Lake Washington Ship Canal at mile 4.3 and while in the closed position provides 30 feet...

  10. 77 FR 25079 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lake Washington Ship Canal, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lake Washington Ship Canal, Seattle... Bridge across the Lake Washington Ship Canal, mile 5.2, at Seattle, WA. This deviation is necessary to... Bridge crosses the Lake Washington Ship Canal at mile 5.2 and while in the closed position provides...

  11. 75 FR 18755 - Security Zone; Calcasieu River and Ship Channel, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; Calcasieu River and Ship Channel, LA..., LA. The Coast Guard is also disestablishing the Calcasieu River ship channel moving safety zone and... a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) entitled ``Security Zone; Calcasieu River and Ship...

  12. 75 FR 76324 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Duluth Ship Canal, Duluth-Superior Harbor, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Duluth Ship Canal... North Pier Light at the lakeward end of the Duluth Ship Canal. It is a vertical lift type bridge that... Sec. 117.661 to read as follow: Sec. 117.661 Duluth Ship Canal (Duluth-Superior Harbor). The draw...

  13. 78 FR 55214 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lake Washington Ship Canal, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lake Washington Ship Canal, Seattle... Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) Railway Bridge across the Lake Washington Ship Canal, mile 0.1, at Seattle, WA... Washington Ship Canal, mile 0.1 (Ballard-Salmon Bay), be locked in the closed position and not be required...

  14. 78 FR 39591 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lake Washington Ship Canal at Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lake Washington Ship Canal at Seattle... the University Bridge, mile 4.3, all crossing the Lake Washington Ship Canal at Seattle, WA. The... Washington Ship Canal at Seattle, WA. The requested deviation is to accommodate heavier than normal...

  15. 77 FR 33307 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lake Washington Ship Canal, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lake Washington Ship Canal, Seattle... Bridge across the Lake Washington Ship Canal, mile 5.2, at Seattle, WA. This deviation is necessary to.... The Montlake Bridge crosses the Lake Washington Ship Canal at mile 5.2 and while in the...

  16. 78 FR 26249 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lake Washington Ship Canal, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lake Washington Ship Canal, Seattle... Bridge across the Lake Washington Ship Canal, mile 5.2, at Seattle, WA, and the University Bridge across the Lake Washington Ship Canal, mile 4.3, at Seattle, WA. This deviation is necessary to...

  17. 77 FR 21890 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal, Sturgeon Bay, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal... across the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal, at miles 4.17 and 4.3, in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin. The establishment... drawbridge schedules for all three drawbridges over Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal, including the two bridges...

  18. 77 FR 16974 - Special Local Regulations; Ocean State Tall Ships Festival 2012, Narragansett Bay, RI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... organized by Tall Ships America in conjunction with host ports in the United States and Canada. The Ocean... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Parts 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Ocean State Tall Ships... of Narragansett Bay and Newport Harbor, Rhode Island, for the Ocean State Tall Ships Festival...

  19. Daedalus Project's Light Eagle - Human powered aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Michelob Light Eagle is seen here in flight over Rogers Dry Lake at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Light Eagle and Daedalus human powered aircraft were testbeds for flight research conducted at Dryden between January 1987 and March 1988. These unique aircraft were designed and constructed by a group of students, professors, and alumni of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology within the context of the Daedalus project. The construction of the Light Eagle and Daedalus aircraft was funded primarily by the Anheuser Busch and United Technologies Corporations, respectively, with additional support from the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, MIT, and a number of other sponsors. To celebrate the Greek myth of Daedalus, the man who constructed wings of wax and feathers to escape King Minos, the Daedalus project began with the goal of designing, building and testing a human-powered aircraft that could fly the mythical distance, 115 km. To achieve this goal, three aircraft were constructed. The Light Eagle was the prototype aircraft, weighing 92 pounds. On January 22, 1987, it set a closed course distance record of 59 km, which still stands. Also in January of 1987, the Light Eagle was powered by Lois McCallin to set the straight distance, the distance around a closed circuit, and the duration world records for the female division in human powered vehicles. Following this success, two more aircraft were built, the Daedalus 87 and Daedalus 88. Each aircraft weighed approximately 69 pounds. The Daedalus 88 aircraft was the ship that flew the 199 km from the Iraklion Air Force Base on Crete in the Mediterranean Sea, to the island of Santorini in 3 hours, 54 minutes. In the process, the aircraft set new records in distance and endurance for a human powered aircraft. The specific areas of flight research conducted at Dryden included characterizing the rigid body and flexible dynamics of the Light Eagle, investigating sensors for an

  20. Direct Laboratory Funded Program - Reliability Criteria for Advanced Structural Materials/Fast Craft and Ships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-01

    determine the relation- ship between the chemical composition of high-strength polymers and their mechanical and thermal properties with emphasis on...their fracture toughness. These polymers , which include the epoxies, thermosetting polyesters and polyimides, are used in military aircraft and ship...requirements for the use of SI technology were engen - dered by the participation of NRL personnel on the design review boards for struts and foils and an

  1. A numerical modelling of an electric arc and its interaction with the anode: part III. Application to the interaction of a lightning strike and an aircraft in flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, F.; Gonzalez, J. J.; Freton, P.; Uhlig, F.; Lucius, N.; Piau, G. P.

    2006-05-01

    A numerical model is proposed to describe the arc and its interaction with a composite material in an anodic configuration. After a validation step with experimental results in two dimensions (2D) from the literature, the model is used to quantify the degradation level of the material versus the pulse duration and the current intensity value. The flux components show the importance of the Joule effect in the composite. Then, in order to simulate the aircraft displacement, an external convective force is applied. A three-dimensional (3D) model is thus developed and used to evaluate the degradation of the composite material. This model shows the behaviour of the plasma column representing the lightning strike and quantifies the power transferred to the anode.

  2. Design of a spanloader cargo aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisshaar, Terrence A.

    1989-01-01

    The design features of an aircraft capable of fulfilling a long haul, high capacity cargo mission are described. This span-loading aircraft, or flying wing, is capable of carrying extremely large payloads and is expected to be in demand to replace the slow-moving cargo ships currently in use. The spanloader seeks to reduce empty weight by eliminating the aircraft fuselage. Disadvantages are the thickness of the cargo-containing wing, and resulting stability and control problems. The spanloader presented here has a small fuselage, low-aspect ratio wings, winglets, and uses six turbofan engines for propulsion. It will have a payload capacity of 300,000 pounds plus 30 first class passengers and 6 crew members. Its projected market is transportation of freight from Europe and the U.S.A. to countries in the Pacific Basin. Cost estimates support its economic feasibility.

  3. Aircraft earth station for experimental mobile satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, S.; Hase, Y.; Kosaka, K.; Tanaka, M.

    A mobile satellite communication system, which can provide high quality service for small ships and aircraft, has been studied in Japan. This system is scheduled to be carried into experimental and evaluation phase in 1987, when a geostationary satellite (ETS-V) is launched by a Japanese rocket. This paper describes an aircraft earth station, which can establish telephone communication links for passengers on board the aircraft. The new technologies, especially an airborne phased array antenna, are developed. This is the first development in the world in mobile satellite communication areas.

  4. Local and Regional Scale Impacts of Arctic Shipping Emissions Off the Coast of Northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marelle, L.; Thomas, J. L.; Law, K.; Raut, J. C.; Jalkanen, J. P.; Johansson, L.; Roiger, A.; Schlager, H.; Kim, J.; Reiter, A.; Weinzierl, B.; Rose, M.

    2014-12-01

    Decreased sea ice extent due to warming has already resulted in the use of new shipping routes through the Arctic. Marine traffic is a source of air pollutants, including NOx, SO2, and aerosols, and is predicted to be an increasingly significant source of Arctic pollution in the future. Currently there are large uncertainties in both global and Arctic shipping emissions, leading to uncertainties in diagnosing current and future impacts of marine traffic on Arctic air quality and climate. This study focuses on the local scale, examining chemical/aerosol transformations occurring in individual ship plumes. Measurements of ship pollution in the Arctic taken during the EU ACCESS aircraft campaign (Arctic Climate Change, Economy and Society) in July 2012 are used to quantify the amount of pollution emitted from different ship types. This is combined with regional model (WRF-Chem) simulations to evaluate the impacts of shipping in northern Norway in summer 2012. The model is run at high resolution (2x2 km) combined with STEAMv2 (Ship Traffic Emission Assessment Model version 2) emissions (1x1 km, 15 minute resolution) produced for shipping activity during the measurement period. WRF-Chem model results are compared with 3 ship plumes sampled during ACCESS. The model shows that both the location and total amount of pollution in individual ship plumes are correctly represented. Given this, the model is used to investigate the regional influence of ship pollution off the coast of Norway on a weekly time scale during July 2012, focusing on ozone photochemistry in ship plumes, the evolution of aerosols, and investigating the fate of black carbon emitted from ships. We compare regional modeling results obtained using 15 minute resolution STEAMv2 emissions with results using weekly averaged emissions, which are more representative of emissions typically used by global models to study the impacts of shipping on air quality and climate.

  5. The US Cruise Ship Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Willis H.

    1985-01-01

    The cruise ship industry relates directly to many features of the natural and cultural environments. The U.S. cruise ship industry is analyzed. Discusses the size of the industry, precruise passenger liners, current cruise ships, cruise regions and routes, ports of call, major ports, passengers, and future prospects. (RM)

  6. Mathematical Modeling: Convoying Merchant Ships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Susann M.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a mathematical model that connects mathematics with social studies. Students use mathematics to model independent versus convoyed ship deployments and sinkings to determine if the British should have convoyed their merchant ships during World War I. During the war, the British admiralty opposed sending merchant ships grouped…

  7. FIRE_ACE_SHIP_SSFR

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-10-28

    FIRE_ACE_SHIP_SSFR Project Title:  FIRE III ACE Discipline:  ... Level:  L3 Platform:  SHEBA Ship Instrument:  Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer ... Info:  Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) Ship SCAR-B Block:  SCAR-B Products ...

  8. 78 FR 57104 - Airworthiness Directives; Diamond Aircraft Industries Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Diamond Aircraft... (AD) for Diamond Aircraft Industries Model DA 40 and DA 40 F Airplanes. This proposed AD results from... proposed AD, contact Diamond Aircraft Industries GmbH, N.A. Otto-Str.5, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt,...

  9. 14 CFR 291.22 - Aircraft accident liability insurance requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aircraft accident liability insurance... for All-Cargo Air Transportation § 291.22 Aircraft accident liability insurance requirement. No air... and maintains in effect aircraft accident liability coverage that meets the requirements of part...

  10. 14 CFR 291.22 - Aircraft accident liability insurance requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aircraft accident liability insurance... for All-Cargo Air Transportation § 291.22 Aircraft accident liability insurance requirement. No air... and maintains in effect aircraft accident liability coverage that meets the requirements of part...

  11. 14 CFR 291.22 - Aircraft accident liability insurance requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aircraft accident liability insurance... for All-Cargo Air Transportation § 291.22 Aircraft accident liability insurance requirement. No air... and maintains in effect aircraft accident liability coverage that meets the requirements of part...

  12. 14 CFR 291.22 - Aircraft accident liability insurance requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aircraft accident liability insurance... for All-Cargo Air Transportation § 291.22 Aircraft accident liability insurance requirement. No air... and maintains in effect aircraft accident liability coverage that meets the requirements of part...

  13. 10 CFR 70.14 - Foreign military aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Foreign military aircraft. 70.14 Section 70.14 Energy....14 Foreign military aircraft. The regulations in this part do not apply to persons who carry special nuclear material (other than plutonium) in aircraft of the armed forces of foreign nations subject to 49...

  14. 10 CFR 70.14 - Foreign military aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Foreign military aircraft. 70.14 Section 70.14 Energy....14 Foreign military aircraft. The regulations in this part do not apply to persons who carry special nuclear material (other than plutonium) in aircraft of the armed forces of foreign nations subject to 49...

  15. 10 CFR 70.14 - Foreign military aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Foreign military aircraft. 70.14 Section 70.14 Energy....14 Foreign military aircraft. The regulations in this part do not apply to persons who carry special nuclear material (other than plutonium) in aircraft of the armed forces of foreign nations subject to 49...

  16. 10 CFR 70.14 - Foreign military aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Foreign military aircraft. 70.14 Section 70.14 Energy....14 Foreign military aircraft. The regulations in this part do not apply to persons who carry special nuclear material (other than plutonium) in aircraft of the armed forces of foreign nations subject to 49...

  17. 10 CFR 70.14 - Foreign military aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Foreign military aircraft. 70.14 Section 70.14 Energy....14 Foreign military aircraft. The regulations in this part do not apply to persons who carry special nuclear material (other than plutonium) in aircraft of the armed forces of foreign nations subject to 49...

  18. 47 CFR 90.423 - Operation on board aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation on board aircraft. 90.423 Section 90... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Operating Requirements § 90.423 Operation on board aircraft. (a) Except... after September 14, 1973, under this part may be operated aboard aircraft for air-to-mobile,...

  19. 47 CFR 90.423 - Operation on board aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation on board aircraft. 90.423 Section 90... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Operating Requirements § 90.423 Operation on board aircraft. (a) Except... after September 14, 1973, under this part may be operated aboard aircraft for air-to-mobile,...

  20. 77 FR 2238 - Airworthiness Directives; Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Pilatus Aircraft... (AD) for Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. Models PC-6, PC-6-H1, PC-6-H2, PC-6/350, PC-6/ 350-H1, PC-6/350-H2, PC... PILATUS AIRCRAFT LTD., Customer Liaison Manager, CH-6371 STANS, Switzerland; telephone: +41 (0) 41 619...

  1. 47 CFR 90.423 - Operation on board aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation on board aircraft. 90.423 Section 90... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Operating Requirements § 90.423 Operation on board aircraft. (a) Except... after September 14, 1973, under this part may be operated aboard aircraft for air-to-mobile,...

  2. 47 CFR 90.423 - Operation on board aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation on board aircraft. 90.423 Section 90... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Operating Requirements § 90.423 Operation on board aircraft. (a) Except... after September 14, 1973, under this part may be operated aboard aircraft for air-to-mobile,...

  3. 77 FR 57534 - Airworthiness Directives; Piper Aircraft, Inc. Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-18

    ... Aircraft, Inc. Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... all Piper Aircraft, Inc. Models PA-31, PA-31-325, and PA-31-350 airplanes. The existing AD currently... or replacement of parts as necessary. Since we issued that AD, forced landings of aircraft...

  4. 47 CFR 90.423 - Operation on board aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation on board aircraft. 90.423 Section 90... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Operating Requirements § 90.423 Operation on board aircraft. (a) Except... after September 14, 1973, under this part may be operated aboard aircraft for air-to-mobile,...

  5. An Assessment of Fecal Coliform Bacteria in Cruise Ship Wastewater Discharge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    An Assessment of Fecal Coliform Bacteria in Cruise Ship Wastewater Discharge Charles D. McGee Orange County Sanitation District* 10844 Ellis...Alaska Cruise Ship Initiative in 1999. This initiative required investigation, understanding and oversight of discharges from large cruise ships...into the waters of Alaska. As part of the overall assessment of impacts from cruise ship waste discharges on the environment, a Science Advisory

  6. Littoral Combat Ship: Need to Address Fundamental Weaknesses in LCS and Frigate Acquisition Strategies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    Navy’s vision for the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) has evolved since its inception. As we have previously reported, LCS was initially envisioned as a...2018. LCS/frigate beyond LCS 29 Navy currently intends to request one ship in fiscal years 2019 and 2020 , and two ships in fiscal year 2021...through fiscal year 2020 and two ships in fiscal year 2021. According to the Secretary of Defense’s memorandum, this new direction was in part a response

  7. 75 FR 41986 - Certification of Aircraft and Airmen for the Operation of Light-Sport Aircraft; Modifications to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 91 RIN 2120-AJ10 Certification of Aircraft and Airmen for the Operation of Light- Sport Aircraft; Modifications to Rules for Sport Pilots and Flight Instructors With a... Operation of Light-Sport Aircraft; Modifications to Rules for Sport Pilots and Flight Instructors With...

  8. 75 FR 15609 - Certification of Aircraft and Airmen for the Operation of Light-Sport Aircraft; Modifications to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 61 RIN 2120-AJ10 Certification of Aircraft and Airmen for the Operation of Light- Sport Aircraft; Modifications to Rules for Sport Pilots and Flight Instructors With a... operate an aircraft with a V H less than or equal to 87 knots CAS if that person has logged flight...

  9. 41 CFR 102-33.75 - What other guidance is available to us in planning to acquire Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... available to us in planning to acquire Government aircraft? 102-33.75 Section 102-33.75 Public Contracts and... REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Planning to Acquire Government Aircraft § 102-33.75 What other guidance is available to us...

  10. 41 CFR 102-33.210 - How do we account for the use of our Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the use of our Government aircraft? 102-33.210 Section 102-33.210 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Managing Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Accounting for the Use of Government Aircraft § 102-33.210 How do we account for the use of our...

  11. 41 CFR 102-33.75 - What other guidance is available to us in planning to acquire Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... available to us in planning to acquire Government aircraft? 102-33.75 Section 102-33.75 Public Contracts and... REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Planning to Acquire Government Aircraft § 102-33.75 What other guidance is available to us...

  12. 41 CFR 102-33.75 - What other guidance is available to us in planning to acquire Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... available to us in planning to acquire Government aircraft? 102-33.75 Section 102-33.75 Public Contracts and... REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Planning to Acquire Government Aircraft § 102-33.75 What other guidance is available to us...

  13. 41 CFR 102-33.70 - What directives must we follow when planning to acquire Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... follow when planning to acquire Government aircraft? 102-33.70 Section 102-33.70 Public Contracts and... REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Planning to Acquire Government Aircraft § 102-33.70 What directives must we follow when...

  14. 41 CFR 102-33.210 - How do we account for the use of our Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the use of our Government aircraft? 102-33.210 Section 102-33.210 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Managing Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Accounting for the Use of Government Aircraft § 102-33.210 How do we account for the use of our...

  15. 41 CFR 102-33.70 - What directives must we follow when planning to acquire Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... follow when planning to acquire Government aircraft? 102-33.70 Section 102-33.70 Public Contracts and... REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Planning to Acquire Government Aircraft § 102-33.70 What directives must we follow when...

  16. 41 CFR 102-33.70 - What directives must we follow when planning to acquire Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... follow when planning to acquire Government aircraft? 102-33.70 Section 102-33.70 Public Contracts and... REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Planning to Acquire Government Aircraft § 102-33.70 What directives must we follow when...

  17. 41 CFR 102-33.210 - How do we account for the use of our Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the use of our Government aircraft? 102-33.210 Section 102-33.210 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Managing Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Accounting for the Use of Government Aircraft § 102-33.210 How do we account for the use of our...

  18. 41 CFR 102-33.210 - How do we account for the use of our Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the use of our Government aircraft? 102-33.210 Section 102-33.210 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Managing Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Accounting for the Use of Government Aircraft § 102-33.210 How do we account for the use of our...

  19. 41 CFR 102-33.210 - How do we account for the use of our Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the use of our Government aircraft? 102-33.210 Section 102-33.210 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Managing Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Accounting for the Use of Government Aircraft § 102-33.210 How do we account for the use of our...

  20. 41 CFR 102-33.70 - What directives must we follow when planning to acquire Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... follow when planning to acquire Government aircraft? 102-33.70 Section 102-33.70 Public Contracts and... REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Planning to Acquire Government Aircraft § 102-33.70 What directives must we follow when...

  1. 41 CFR 102-33.75 - What other guidance is available to us in planning to acquire Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... available to us in planning to acquire Government aircraft? 102-33.75 Section 102-33.75 Public Contracts and... REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Planning to Acquire Government Aircraft § 102-33.75 What other guidance is available to us...

  2. 41 CFR 102-33.70 - What directives must we follow when planning to acquire Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... follow when planning to acquire Government aircraft? 102-33.70 Section 102-33.70 Public Contracts and... REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Planning to Acquire Government Aircraft § 102-33.70 What directives must we follow when...

  3. 41 CFR 102-33.75 - What other guidance is available to us in planning to acquire Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... available to us in planning to acquire Government aircraft? 102-33.75 Section 102-33.75 Public Contracts and... REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Planning to Acquire Government Aircraft § 102-33.75 What other guidance is available to us...

  4. Fretting in aircraft turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. L.; Bill, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of fretting in aircraft turbine engines is discussed. Critical fretting can occur on fan, compressor, and turbine blade mountings, as well as on splines, rolling element bearing races, and secondary sealing elements of face type seals. Structural fatigue failures have been shown to occur at fretted areas on component parts. Methods used by designers to reduce the effects of fretting are given.

  5. Littoral Combat Ship (LCS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-374 Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense Acquisition...Executive Officer PM - Program Manager POE - Program Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition...Frigates, and down- select to one variant in FY 2019. The FY 2017 acquisition strategy supporting the final procurement of LCS is currently under review

  6. Ship and Shoot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Ron Woods shared incredibly valuable insights gained during his 28 years at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) packaging Flight Crew Equipment for shuttle and ISS missions. In particular, Woods shared anecdotes and photos from various processing events. The moral of these stories and the main focus of this discussion were the additional processing efforts and effects related to a "ship-and-shoot" philosophy toward flight hardware.

  7. Innovative Naval Ship Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-18

    Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. In 2013 PI completed the follow-on textbook Innovation in Ship Design . Whereas the first work forms the core of an...In 2011 PI completed a textbook on Practical Design of Advanced Marine Vehicles and has commenced a follow-on work on Tools for Innovation in Naval...Engineering Design . The completed textbook was made available as a PDF file with private distribution on the members-only website of the Society of

  8. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section 19 Shipping... Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form MA-159 by the... jurisdiction and submitted to the District Ship Repair and Maintenance office involved. The summaries must...

  9. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section 19 Shipping... Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form MA-159 by the... jurisdiction and submitted to the District Ship Repair and Maintenance office involved. The summaries must...

  10. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section 19 Shipping... Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form MA-159 by the... jurisdiction and submitted to the District Ship Repair and Maintenance office involved. The summaries must...

  11. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section 19 Shipping... Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form MA-159 by the... jurisdiction and submitted to the District Ship Repair and Maintenance office involved. The summaries must...

  12. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section 19 Shipping... Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form MA-159 by the... jurisdiction and submitted to the District Ship Repair and Maintenance office involved. The summaries must...

  13. Aircraft Electric Secondary Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Technologies resulted to aircraft power systems and aircraft in which all secondary power is supplied electrically are discussed. A high-voltage dc power generating system for fighter aircraft, permanent magnet motors and generators for aircraft, lightweight transformers, and the installation of electric generators on turbine engines are among the topics discussed.

  14. Wave energy propelling marine ship

    SciTech Connect

    Kitabayashi, S.

    1982-06-29

    A wave energy propelling marine ship comprises a cylindrical ship body having a hollow space therein for transporting fluid material therewithin, a ship body disposed in or on the sea; a propeller attached to the ship body for the purpose of propelling the marine ship for sailing; a rudder for controlling the moving direction of the marine ship; at least one rotary device which includes a plurality of compartments which are each partitioned into a plurality of water chambers by a plurality of radial plates, and a plurality of water charge and/or discharge ports, wherein wave energy is converted into mechanical energy; and device for adjusting buoyancy of the marine ship so that the rotary device is positioned advantageously on the sea surface.

  15. Control of the forebody vortex orientation by asymmetric air injection. Part A: Application to enhance departure/spin recovery of fighter aircraft and Part B: Details of the flow structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skow, A. M.; Peake, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    A concept developed to provide powerful directional control effectiveness for a fighter aircraft at high angles of attack is described. The concept utilizes the energy concentrated in the strong forebody vortices (which form on slender bodies of high relative incidence) by controlling the lateral orientation of the vortices with respect to the body. The objective was to utilize the side force associated with asymmetric vortices, in a controlled manner, to enhance the ability of the fighter to recover from a departure from controlled flight. The results from water tunnel and wind tunnel experiments show that a small amount of tangential blowing along the forebody near the apex can effectively alter the forebody vortex system and generate large restoring yawing moments. Six degree of freedom digital simulation results show that this concept can substantially enhance recovery characteristics of fighter aircraft with long, slender forebodies. Also, the results of experiments which were conducted on a cone model are discussed where the principal test objective was to develop an understanding of the fluid mechanics involved in the process of vortex control. Knowledge gained in these more generic tests should allow the concept to be applied to a wider range of configurations.

  16. Ozone production efficiency of a ship-plume: ITCT 2K2 case study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun S; Kim, Yong H; Han, Kyung M; Kim, Jhoon; Song, Chul H

    2016-01-01

    Ozone production efficiency (OPE) of ship plume was first evaluated in this study, based on ship-plume photochemical/dynamic model simulations and the ship-plume composition data measured during the ITCT 2K2 (Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation 2002) aircraft campaign. The averaged instantaneous OPEs (OPE(i)‾) estimated via the ship-plume photochemical/dynamic modeling for the ITCT 2K2 ship-plume ranged between 4.61 and 18.92, showing that the values vary with the extent of chemical evolution (or chemical stage) of the ship plume and the stability classes of the marine boundary layer (MBL). Together with OPE(i)‾, the equivalent OPEs (OPE(e)‾) for the entire ITCT 2K2 ship-plume were also estimated. The OPE(e)‾ values varied between 9.73 (for the stable MBL) and 12.73 (for the moderately stable MBL), which agreed well with the OPE(e)‾ of 12.85 estimated based on the ITCT 2K2 ship-plume observations. It was also found that both the model-simulated and observation-based OPE(e)‾ inside the ship-plume were 0.29-0.38 times smaller than the OPE(e)‾ calculated/measured outside the ITCT 2K2 ship-plume. Such low OPEs insides the ship plume were due to the high levels of NO and non-liner ship-plume photochemistry. Possible implications of this ship-plume OPE study in the global chemistry-transport modeling are also discussed.

  17. Ship size as a factor in illness incidence among U.S. Navy vessels.

    PubMed

    Blood, C G; Griffith, D K

    1990-07-01

    Illness incidence was examined aboard U.S. Navy vessels to ascertain whether sick call rates vary with ship size. Outpatient data from ships of three different sizes (destroyers/frigates, cruisers, aircraft carriers) were surveyed, controlling for geographical region of deployment. Overall rates of illness were lower for the largest ships when contrasted with the smallest vessels for all three operational theaters; these rate differences were significant for the East Asia and Indian Ocean regions. Among major categories of disease, significantly higher rates aboard the small vessels were seen in at least two of the geographic regions for respiratory disorders, digestive diseases, and musculoskeletal problems. Infective and parasitic diseases, skin and subcutaneous disorders, as well as symptoms and ill-defined disorders were significantly higher for small ships in one theater. It was concluded that ship size is a factor in illness incidence and should be considered in medical resource planning.

  18. Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research Testbed: Aircraft Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Thomas L.; Langford, William M.; Hill, Jeffrey S.

    2005-01-01

    The Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) testbed being developed at NASA Langley Research Center is an experimental flight test capability for research experiments pertaining to dynamics modeling and control beyond the normal flight envelope. An integral part of that testbed is a 5.5% dynamically scaled, generic transport aircraft. This remotely piloted vehicle (RPV) is powered by twin turbine engines and includes a collection of sensors, actuators, navigation, and telemetry systems. The downlink for the plane includes over 70 data channels, plus video, at rates up to 250 Hz. Uplink commands for aircraft control include over 30 data channels. The dynamic scaling requirement, which includes dimensional, weight, inertial, actuator, and data rate scaling, presents distinctive challenges in both the mechanical and electrical design of the aircraft. Discussion of these requirements and their implications on the development of the aircraft along with risk mitigation strategies and training exercises are included here. Also described are the first training (non-research) flights of the airframe. Additional papers address the development of a mobile operations station and an emulation and integration laboratory.

  19. Environmental impacts of shipping in 2030 with a particular focus on the Arctic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalsøren, S. B.; Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Corbett, J. J.; Minjares, R.; Lack, D.; Fuglestvedt, J. S.

    2012-10-01

    We quantify the concentrations change of atmospheric pollutants and Radiative Forcing (RF) of short-lived components due to shipping emissions of NOx, SOx, CO, NMVOCs, BC and OC. A set of models is used to evaluate the period 2004-2030. This time period reflects expected increasing traffic in the Arctic region. Two datasets for ship emissions are used that may characterize the potential impact from shipping and the degree to which shipping controls may mitigate impacts: A high (HIGH) scenario and a low scenario with Maximum Feasible Reduction (MFR) of black carbon in the Arctic. In MFR, BC emissions in the Arctic are reduced with 70% representing a combination technology performance and/or reasonable advances in single-technology performance. Both scenarios result in moderate to substantial increases in concentrations of pollutants both globally and in the Arctic. Exceptions are black carbon in the MFR scenario, and sulfur species and organic carbon in both scenarios due to the future phase-in of current regulation that reduces fuel sulfur content. In the season with potential transit traffic through the Arctic in 2030 significant increases occur for all pollutants in large parts of the Arctic. Net global RFs from 2004-2030 of 53 mW m-2 (HIGH) and 73 mW m-2 (MFR) are similar to those found for preindustrial to present net global aircraft RF. The found warming contrasts the cooling from historical ship emissions. The reason for this difference and the higher global forcing for the MFR scenario is mainly the reduced future fuel sulfur content resulting in less cooling from sulfate aerosols. Arctic regional forcing is largest in the HIGH scenario because other components become locally more important in polar latitudes. In the HIGH scenario ozone dominates the RF during Arctic summer and the transit season. RF due to BC in air, and snow and ice becomes of significance in Arctic spring. For the HIGH scenario the net Arctic RF during spring is 5 times higher than in

  20. Aircraft Skin Restoration and Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yandouzi, M.; Gaydos, S.; Guo, D.; Ghelichi, R.; Jodoin, B.

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of the cold spray technology has made possible the deposition of low porosity and oxide-free coatings with good adhesion and with almost no change in the microstructure of the coated parts. This focuses on the use of low-pressure cold spray process to repair damaged Al-based aircraft skin, aiming at obtaining dense coatings with strong adhesion to the Al2024-T3 alloy. In order to prove the feasibility of using of the cold spray process as a repair process for aircraft skin, series of characterisation/tests including microstructures, microhardness, adhesion strength, three-point bending, surface finish, fatigue test, and corrosion resistance were performed. The obtained results revealed that the low-pressure cold spray process is a suitable for the repair of aircraft skin.

  1. 14 CFR Appendix A to Subpart U of... - GCNP Quiet Aircraft Technology Designation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false GCNP Quiet Aircraft Technology Designation... to Subpart U of Part 93—GCNP Quiet Aircraft Technology Designation This appendix contains procedures for determining the GCNP quiet aircraft technology designation status for each aircraft subject...

  2. 14 CFR Appendix A to Subpart U of... - GCNP Quiet Aircraft Technology Designation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false GCNP Quiet Aircraft Technology Designation... to Subpart U of Part 93—GCNP Quiet Aircraft Technology Designation This appendix contains procedures for determining the GCNP quiet aircraft technology designation status for each aircraft subject...

  3. 41 CFR 102-33.250 - May we report as excess, or replace, declassified aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Disposing of Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Overview... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May we report as excess, or replace, declassified aircraft? 102-33.250 Section 102-33.250 Public Contracts and...

  4. 14 CFR Appendix A to Subpart U of... - GCNP Quiet Aircraft Technology Designation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false GCNP Quiet Aircraft Technology Designation... to Subpart U of Part 93—GCNP Quiet Aircraft Technology Designation This appendix contains procedures for determining the GCNP quiet aircraft technology designation status for each aircraft subject...

  5. 14 CFR Appendix A to Subpart U of... - GCNP Quiet Aircraft Technology Designation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false GCNP Quiet Aircraft Technology Designation... to Subpart U of Part 93—GCNP Quiet Aircraft Technology Designation This appendix contains procedures for determining the GCNP quiet aircraft technology designation status for each aircraft subject...

  6. 14 CFR Appendix A to Subpart U of... - GCNP Quiet Aircraft Technology Designation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false GCNP Quiet Aircraft Technology Designation... to Subpart U of Part 93—GCNP Quiet Aircraft Technology Designation This appendix contains procedures for determining the GCNP quiet aircraft technology designation status for each aircraft subject...

  7. 78 FR 65554 - Exhaust Emission Standards for New Aircraft Turbine Engines and Identification Plate for Aircraft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 34 and 45 RIN 2120-AK15 Exhaust Emission Standards for New Aircraft Turbine Engines and Identification Plate for Aircraft Engines Correction In rule document 2013-24712, appearing on pages 63015-63017...

  8. 75 FR 32315 - Airworthiness Directives; Various Aircraft Equipped With Rotax Aircraft Engines 912 A Series Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ..., 912 F, and 912 S series engines. Versions of the 912 F series and 912 S series engines are type... not have an engine type certificate; instead, the engine is part of the aircraft type design. You may... Equipped With Rotax Aircraft Engines 912 A Series Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...

  9. 75 FR 51953 - Notification and Reporting of Aircraft Accidents or Incidents and Overdue Aircraft, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... exclude military UASs, model aircraft, and commercial spacecraft operating under FAA waivers. ] List of... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD 49 CFR Part 830 Notification and Reporting of Aircraft Accidents or Incidents and...

  10. Research Opportunities on board Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attenborough, S.; Pomerantz, W.; Stephens, K.

    2013-09-01

    Virgin Galactic is building the world's first commercial spaceline. Our suborbital spaceflight system, pictured in Figure 1, consists of two vehicles: WhiteKnightTwo (WK2) and SpaceShipTwo (SS2). WhiteKnightTwo is a four-engine, dual-fuselage jet aircraft capable of high-altitude heavy lift missions, including, but not limited to fulfilling its role as a mothership for SpaceShipTwo, an air-launched, suborbital spaceplane capable of routinely reaching an apogee up to 110 kilometers. In conjunction, these two vehicles allow access to space and to regions of the atmosphere ranging from the troposphere to the thermosphere; additionally, they provide extended periods of microgravity in a reliable and affordable way. SpaceShipTwo, with a payload capacity of up to 1,300 lbs. (~600 kg), features payload mounting interfaces that are compatible with standard architectures such as NASA Space Shuttle Middeck Lockers, Cargo Transfer Bags, and server racks, in addition to custom structures. With the standard interface, payloads are allowed access to the large 17 inch diameter cabin windows for external observations. Each dedicated research flight will be accompanied by a Virgin Galactic Flight Test Engineer, providing an opportunity for limited in-flight interaction. In addition, tended payloads - a flight that includes the researcher and his or her payload - are also an option. At a price point that is highly competitive with parabolic aircraft and sounding rockets and significantly cheaper than orbital flights, SpaceShipTwo is a unique platform that can provide frequent and repeatable research opportunities. Suborbital flights on SpaceShipTwo offer researchers several minutes of microgravity time and views of the external environment in the upper atmosphere and in outer space. In addition to serving as an important research platform in and of itself, SpaceShipTwo also offers researchers a means to test, iterate, and calibrate experiments designed for orbital platforms

  11. Rough Sea Transfer Ship

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    GROUP 2.3 2.36003 TRIAGE 20.00 60.00 GROUP 2.4 2.41005 VENDING MACHINE AREA 1.84 5.53 2.42001 LAUNDRY 27.15 81.44 GROUP 2.5...Research Enterprise Intern Program Rough Seas Transfer Ship Acknowledgements This report is the culmination of work conducted by students hired...under the National Research Enterprise Intern Program sponsored by the Office of Naval Research. This program provides an opportunity for students to

  12. Cockroach infestation on seagoing ships.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, Marcus; Baur, Xaver

    2008-01-01

    Cockroaches are detected ashore worldwide. At present, little is known about cockroach infestation on ships. The authors' objective in this study was to assess the current prevalence of cockroach infestation on seagoing vessels. In August 2005, port officials investigated cockroach infestation on 59 ships in Hamburg's port via standardized procedures (ie, illuminating hiding places and using pyrethrum spray). About 3 minutes after illumination or chemical provocation, the inspectors counted the number of insects escaping from their hiding places. The examination revealed cockroach presence in the galley or mess room of 6 ships (10.2%). These ships were bigger than 10,000 gross register tons (GRT) and older than 7 years. Inspectors detected the cockroach species Blattella germanica on 5 ships and Blatta orientalis on 1 ship. The standardized use of pyrethrum spray more frequently detected cockroaches than did inspection or illumination of their hiding places.

  13. A New Propulsion System for Ships.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-31

    complex relationships involving ship propulsion , ship control and a host of independent problems related to hydrodynamics, structural mechanics, efficiency...namely ship configuration and ship con- trol in addition to ship propulsion . The transmission pump can 1be used for boundary layer control on the...possibly overcome the limitation and performance shortcomings of existing ship propulsion systems. Light weight propulsion systems for naval ship

  14. Metallized Coatings for Corrosion Control of Naval Ship Structures and Components.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    Deutschen Normen n.d.; Petersen 1969; Hermanek 1978; Pratt and Whitney Aircraft Group 1968; Lyashenko et al. 1969a,b) have been devised that are based on a...Naval ships. Report DoD-STD-2138(SH). Washington, D.C. Deutschen Normen (German standard). n.d. Prufung Termisch Gesprtizler Metallischer Schichten

  15. Future of Magnetohydrodynamic Ship Propulsion,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-16

    83 FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION FUTURE OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHIP PROPULSION by A.P. Baranov DTIQ ~E tJ Approved for public release; 0.. distribution...MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHIP PROPULSION By: A.P. Baranov -,English pages: 10 Source: Sudostroyeniye, Nr. 12, December 1966, pp. 3-6 . Country of origin: USSR X...equations, etc. merged into this translation were extracted from the best quality copy available. FUTURE OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHIP PROPULSION A. P

  16. Propulsion controlled aircraft computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogan, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A low-cost, easily retrofit Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) system for use on a wide range of commercial and military aircraft consists of an propulsion controlled aircraft computer that reads in aircraft data including aircraft state, pilot commands and other related data, calculates aircraft throttle position for a given maneuver commanded by the pilot, and then displays both current and calculated throttle position on a cockpit display to show the pilot where to move throttles to achieve the commanded maneuver, or is automatically sent digitally to command the engines directly.

  17. Control of Next Generation Aircraft and Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The first part of this talk will describe some of the exciting new next generation aircraft that NASA is proposing for the future. These aircraft are being designed to reduce aircraft fuel consumption and environmental impact. Reducing the aircraft weight is one approach that will be used to achieve these goals. A new control framework will be presented that enables lighter, more flexible aircraft to maintain aircraft handling qualities, while preventing the aircraft from exceeding structural load limits. The second part of the talk will give an overview of utility-scale wind turbines and their control. Results of collaboration with Dr. Balas will be presented, including new theory to adaptively control the turbine in the presence of structural modes, with the focus on the application of this theory to a high-fidelity simulation of a wind turbine.

  18. Ship Creek bioassessment investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Cushing, C.E.; Mueller, R.P.; Murphy, M.T.

    1995-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was asked by Elmendorf Air Force Base (EAFB) personnel to conduct a series of collections of macroinvertebrates and sediments from Ship Creek to (1) establish baseline data on these populations for reference in evaluating possible impacts from Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) activities at two operable units, (2) compare current population indices with those found by previous investigations in Ship Creek, and (3) determine baseline levels of concentrations of any contaminants in the sediments associated with the macroinvertebrates. A specific suite of indices established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was requested for the macroinvertebrate analyses; these follow the Rapid Bioassessment Protocol developed by Plafkin et al. (1989) and will be described. Sediment sample analyses included a Microtox bioassay and chemical analysis for contaminants of concern. These analyses included, volatile organic compounds, total gasoline and diesel hydrocarbons (EPA method 8015, CA modified), total organic carbon, and an inductive-coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) metals scan. Appendix A reports on the sediment analyses. The Work Plan is attached as Appendix B.

  19. The National SShipbuilding Research Program. 1997 Ship Production Symposium. Proceedings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-04-01

    Moulded Forms AP 218 Ship Structures Classification Society Supplier Functional Design Phase Detail Design Phase Production Engineering Phase (1) (2) (3...Application Protocol: Ship Moulded Forms ,” published by International Organization for Standardization, August, 1996. “ISO TC184/SC4/WG3 N 494 Part: 217 Title...For the three- dimensional case as provided by a photogrammetric solution, the eigen vectors are provided in the form of a 3X3 matrix of direction

  20. [Deep sea trip of the ship crash Northern Force fleet].

    PubMed

    Ushakov, I B; Bubeev, Iu A; Mazaĭkin, D N; Pisarev, A A

    2008-07-01

    A long-termed navy march of crash shupborn group of Northern Navy became a sign-oriented event in the life of the Armed Forces. After more then 10 years cessation this march signed recommencement of permanent Russia navy attendance in strategically important areas of the World Ocean. The authors highlight work of military-navy specialists in conditions of this march. The most important peculiarity of this march was participation of a hard aircraft carrier "Navy Admiral of the Soviet Union N.G.Kuznetsov". Activity of aircraft staff in carrying out the boardings and the deck starts requires the highest mobilization of all psycho-physiological resources. There was effectuated a complex medical-psychophysiological research of functional condition of aircraft and engineer staff of the group during the service. Also there was effectuated an operative recovery of functional condition among sailors and officers of the ship staff. Method of neuronsemantic diagnostics of psychological disadaptation and suicide risk was used during the analyze of groups of risk. The results of the analyze permitted to educe main psychotraumatizing factors, to form recommendations on psycho-correction, organization-educative measures taking into account individual peculiarities of motivation sphere and cognitive sensitivity. There were effectuated different trainings of moralities, communicativeness, strategy of negotiation and stress-managment in cooperation with the psychologist of the ship.

  1. Flow field analysis of aircraft configurations using a numerical solution to the three-dimensional unified supersonic/hypersonic small disturbance equations, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunness, R. C., Jr.; Knight, C. J.; Dsylva, E.

    1972-01-01

    The unified small disturbance equations are numerically solved using the well-known Lax-Wendroff finite difference technique. The method allows complete determination of the inviscid flow field and surface properties as long as the flow remains supersonic. Shock waves and other discontinuities are accounted for implicity in the numerical method. This technique was programed for general application to the three-dimensional case. The validity of the method is demonstrated by calculations on cones, axisymmetric bodies, lifting bodies, delta wings, and a conical wing/body combination. Part 1 contains the discussion of problem development and results of the study. Part 2 contains flow charts, subroutine descriptions, and a listing of the computer program.

  2. Aircraft towing feasibility study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Energy costs and availability are major concerns in most parts of the world. Many ways of increasing energy supply and reducing consumption are being proposed and investigated. One that holds considerable promise is the extended towing of aircraft between airport runways and terminal gate areas with engines shut down. This study provides a preliminary assessment of the constraints on and feasibility of extended aircraft towing. Past aircraft towing experience and the state-of-the-art in towing equipment are reviewed. Safety and operational concerns associated with aircraft towing are identified, and the benefits and costs of implementing aircraft towing at 20 major US airports are analyzed. It was concluded that extended aircraft towing is technically feasible and that substantial reductions in aircraft fuel consumption and air pollutant emissions can be achieved through its implementation. It was also concluded that, although capital and operating costs associated with towing would be increased, net savings could generally be attained at these airports. Because of the lack of past experience and the necessity of proving the cost effectiveness of the towing concept, a demonstration of the feasibility of large-scale aircraft towing is necessary. The study evaluates the suitability of the 20 study airports as potential demonstration sites and makes recommendations for the first demonstration project.

  3. 46 CFR 148.60 - Shipping papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Shipping papers. 148.60 Section 148.60 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Minimum Transportation Requirements § 148.60 Shipping papers. The shipper... appropriate information on the cargo in the form of a shipping paper, in English, prior to...

  4. 46 CFR 148.60 - Shipping papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Shipping papers. 148.60 Section 148.60 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Minimum Transportation Requirements § 148.60 Shipping papers. The shipper... appropriate information on the cargo in the form of a shipping paper, in English, prior to...

  5. 46 CFR 148.60 - Shipping papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Shipping papers. 148.60 Section 148.60 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Minimum Transportation Requirements § 148.60 Shipping papers. The shipper... appropriate information on the cargo in the form of a shipping paper, in English, prior to...

  6. Task Analysis - Aircraft Structural Maintenance AFSC 458X2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    PARTS USING ULTRASONIC CLEANERS 10346 CLEAN AIRCRAFT PARTS USING VAPOR DEGREASERS 10359 SPRAY CLEAN AIRCRAFT PARTS 10360 SPRAY CLEAN SUPPORT EQUIPMENT...tasks are as follows: ACTIVITIES: A summary of the actions performed during the task. We identified activities which: (a) summarize major parts of the...FASTENER HOLES 21 USE REAMING TOOLS 13 USE PNEUMATIC RIVET GUNS 12 APPLY PARTING AGENTS 11 USE MICROSHAVER 7 OPERATE HEATING/CURING EQUIPMENT 6 USE

  7. 14 CFR 43.7 - Persons authorized to approve aircraft, airframes, aircraft engines, propellers, appliances, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration. 43.7 Section 43.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE..., propellers, appliances, or component parts for return to service after maintenance, preventive...

  8. 14 CFR 43.7 - Persons authorized to approve aircraft, airframes, aircraft engines, propellers, appliances, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration. 43.7 Section 43.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE..., propellers, appliances, or component parts for return to service after maintenance, preventive...

  9. 14 CFR 43.7 - Persons authorized to approve aircraft, airframes, aircraft engines, propellers, appliances, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration. 43.7 Section 43.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE..., propellers, appliances, or component parts for return to service after maintenance, preventive...

  10. 14 CFR 43.7 - Persons authorized to approve aircraft, airframes, aircraft engines, propellers, appliances, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration. 43.7 Section 43.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE..., propellers, appliances, or component parts for return to service after maintenance, preventive...

  11. Coast Guard Aircraft: Transfer of Fixed-Wing C-27J Aircraft Is Complex and Further Fleet Purchases Should Coincide with Study Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    purchase a set of spare parts for each aircraft, but faces hurdles due to potential pricing issues and delivery delays from the manufacturer. Also...the 14th aircraft destined for the Coast Guard; (3) Coast Guard’s Aviation Logistics Center ; and (4) USASOC’s Pope Airfield. We also visited the...aircraft, including the fuel cost, spare parts, and wear and tear on the aircraft. The HC-144 and C-27J have a lower cost per flight hour than

  12. Arylenesiloxane Polymers for Use as High-Temperature Aircraft Integral Fuel Tank Sealants. Part 3. Synthesis and Properties of Fluoroalkylarylene-Siloxanylene (FASIL) High-Temperature Polymer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    3 . RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER AFML-TR-75-182, Part III 4 . TITLE (and Subtitle) ARYLENESILOXANE POLYMERS FOR USE...ethoxymethyl--(3,3,3-trifluoropropyl)- silyllbenzene 14 3 . l, 3 -Bis[hydroxymethyl-(3,3,3-trifluoropropyl)- silyllbenzene 14 4 . Bis(dimethylamino)methyl...3,3,3-trifluoropropyl- si lane 15 5. l, 3 -Dichloro-l, 3 - dimethyl -l, 3 -bis(3,3,3-trifluoro- propyl) disiloxane 15 6. l, 3 -Bis(dimethyiamino)-1,3- dimethyl -l, 3

  13. Updated emissions from ocean shipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, James J.; Koehler, Horst W.

    2003-10-01

    Marine vessel inventories demonstrate that ship emissions cannot be neglected in assessing environmental impacts of air pollution, although significant uncertainty in these inventories remains. We address this uncertainty by employing a bottom-up estimate of fuel consumption and vessel activity for internationally registered fleets, including cargo vessels, other commercial vessels, and military vessels. We identify model bias in previous work, which assumed internationally registered ships primarily consume international marine fuels. Updated results suggest fuel consumption is ˜289 million metric tons per year, more than twice the quantity reported as international fuel. According to our analysis, fuel used by internationally registered fleets is apparently allocated to both international and domestic fuel statistics; this implies either that ships operate along domestic routes much of the time or that marine fuel sales to these ships may be misassigned. If the former is true, then allocation of emissions to international shipping routes may underestimate near-coastal emissions from ships. Our updated inventories increases previous ship emissions inventories for all pollutants; for example, global NOx emissions (˜6.87 Tg N) are more than doubled. This work also produces detailed sensitivity analyses of inputs to these estimates, identifying uncertainty in vessel duty-cycle as critical to overall emissions estimates. We discuss implications for assessing ship emissions impacts.

  14. Cruise Ship Port Planning Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    The cruise ship industry started off like a healthy plant in a small pot. When it was small, it struggled, survived and flourished in the small pot... cruise ship port planning issues, and demonstrates that the market demand will continue to increase in the future. This increase in demand will be driven

  15. Automatic detection of ship tracks in ATSR-2 satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campmany, E.; Grainger, R. G.; Dean, S. M.; Sayer, A. M.

    2009-03-01

    Ships modify cloud microphysics by adding cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) to a developing or existing cloud. These create lines of larger reflectance in cloud fields that are observed in satellite imagery. An algorithm has been developed to automate the detection of ship tracks in Along Track Scanning Radiometer 2 (ATSR-2) imagery. The scheme has been integrated into the Global Retrieval of ATSR Cloud Parameters and Evaluation (GRAPE) processing chain. The algorithm firstly identifies intensity ridgelets in clouds which have the potential to be part of a ship track. This identification is done by comparing each pixel with its surrounding ones. If the intensity of three adjacent pixels is greater than the intensity of their neighbours, then it is classified as a ridgelet. These ridgelets are then connected together, according to a set of connectivity rules, to form tracks which are classed as ship tracks if they are long enough. The algorithm has been applied to two years of ATSR-2 data. Ship tracks are most frequently seen off the west coast of California, and the Atlantic coast of both West Africa and South-Western Europe. The global distribution of ship tracks shows strong seasonality, little inter-annual variability and a similar spatial pattern to the distribution of ship emissions.

  16. Unmanned aircraft systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unmanned platforms have become increasingly more common in recent years for acquiring remotely sensed data. These aircraft are referred to as Unmanned Airborne Vehicles (UAV), Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA), Remotely Piloted Vehicles (RPV), or Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), the official term used...

  17. Aircraft Loss-of-Control Accident Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcastro, Christine M.; Foster, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Loss of control remains one of the largest contributors to fatal aircraft accidents worldwide. Aircraft loss-of-control accidents are complex in that they can result from numerous causal and contributing factors acting alone or (more often) in combination. Hence, there is no single intervention strategy to prevent these accidents. To gain a better understanding into aircraft loss-of-control events and possible intervention strategies, this paper presents a detailed analysis of loss-of-control accident data (predominantly from Part 121), including worst case combinations of causal and contributing factors and their sequencing. Future potential risks are also considered.

  18. Flight service evaluation of Kevlar-49 epoxy composite panels in wide-bodied commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. H.

    1979-01-01

    Kevlar-49 fairing panels, installed as flight service components on three L-1011s, were inspected after five years' service. There are six Kevlar-49 panels on each aircraft: a left-hand and right-hand set of a wing-body sandwich fairing; a solid laminate under-wing fillet panel; and a 150 C (300 F) service aft engine fairing. The fairings have accumulated a total of 40,534 hours, with one ship set having 16,091 hours service as of Feb. 11, 1979. The Kevlar-49 components were found to be performing satisfactorily in service with no major problems, or any condition requiring corrective action. The only defects noted were minor impact damage, and a minor degree of fastener hole fraying and elongation. These are for the most part comparable to damage noted on fiberglass fairings.

  19. Aircraft Survivability: Transport Aircraft Safety and Survivability, Spring 2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Regulations ( CFR ), Part 129, as a regularly scheduled international passenger and cargo flight from JFK to Charles de Gaulle Airport, Paris, France... CFR 25.903(d)(1), states that “Design precautions must be taken to minimize the hazards to the airplane in the event of an engine rotor failure...conducting aircraft configura- tion trade studies and as a certifica- tion tool to show compliance with Title 14 CFR 25.903(d)(1). It should be noted that

  20. X-15 ship #1 on lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    The X-15 aircraft, ship #1 (56-6670), sits on the lakebed early in its illustrious career of high speed flight research. The X-15 was a rocket-powered aircraft 50 ft long with a wingspan of 22 ft. It was a missile-shaped vehicle with an unusual wedge-shaped vertical tail, thin stubby wings, and unique side fairings that extended along the side of the fuselage. The X-15 weighed about 14,000 lb empty and approximately 34,000 lb at launch. The XLR-99 rocket engine, manufactured by Thiokol Chemical Corp., was pilot controlled and was capable of developing 57,000 lb of thrust. North American Aviation made three X-15 aircraft for the program. The X-15 research aircraft was developed to provide in-flight information and data on aerodynamics, structures, flight controls, and the physiological aspects of high-speed, high-altitude flight. A follow on program used the aircraft as a testbed to carry various scientific experiments beyond the Earth's atmosphere on a repeated basis. For flight in the dense air of the usable atmosphere, the X-15 used conventional aerodynamic controls such as rudder surfaces on the vertical stabilizers to control yaw and canted horizontal surfaces on the tail to control pitch when moving in synchronization or roll when moved differentially. For flight in the thin air outside of the appreciable Earth's atmosphere, the X-15 used a reaction control system. Hydrogen peroxide thrust rockets located on the nose of the aircraft provided pitch and yaw control. Those on the wings provided roll control. Because of the large fuel consumption, the X-15 was air launched from a B-52 aircraft at 45,000 ft and a speed of about 500 mph. Depending on the mission, the rocket engine provided thrust for the first 80 to 120 sec of flight. The remainder of the normal 10 to 11 min. flight was powerless and ended with a 200-mph glide landing. Generally, one of two types of X-15 flight profiles was used; a high-altitude flight plan that called for the pilot to maintain a

  1. Study of aerodynamic technology for VSTOL fighter attack aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burhans, W., Jr.; Crafta, V. J., Jr.; Dannenhoffer, N.; Dellamura, F. A.; Krepski, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Vertical short takeoff aircraft capability, supersonic dash capability, and transonic agility were investigated for the development of Fighter/attack aircraft to be accommodated on ships smaller than present aircraft carriers. Topics covered include: (1) description of viable V/STOL fighter/attack configuration (a high wing, close-coupled canard, twin-engine, control configured aircraft) which meets or exceeds specified levels of vehicle performance; (2) estimates of vehicle aerodynamic characteristics and the methodology utilized to generate them; (3) description of propulsion system characteristics and vehicle mass properties; (4) identification of areas of aerodynamic uncertainty; and (5) a test program to investigate the areas of aerodynamic uncertainty in the conventional flight mode.

  2. Physicochemical variations in atmospheric aerosols recorded at sea onboard the Atlantic-Mediterranean 2008 Scholar Ship cruise (Part II): Natural versus anthropogenic influences revealed by PM 10 trace element geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Teresa; Pérez, Noemi; Querol, Xavier; Amato, Fulvio; Alastuey, Andrés; Bhatia, Ravinder; Spiro, Baruch; Hanvey, Melanie; Gibbons, Wes

    2010-07-01

    The geochemistry of PM 10 filter samples collected at sea during the Scholar Ship Atlantic-Mediterranean 2008 research cruise reveals a constantly changing compositional mix of pollutants into the marine atmosphere. Source apportionment modelling using Positive Matrix Factorization identifies North African desert dust, sea spray, secondary inorganic aerosols, metalliferous carbon, and V-Ni-bearing combustion particles as the main PM 10 factors/sources. The least contaminated samples show an upper continental crust composition (UCC)-normalised geochemistry influenced by seawater chemistry, with marked depletions in Rb, Th and the lighter lanthanoid elements, whereas the arrival of desert dust intrusions imposes a more upper crustal signature enriched in "geological" elements such as Si, Al, Ti, Rb, Li and Sc. Superimposed on these natural background aerosol loadings are anthropogenic metal aerosols (e.g. Cu, Zn, Pb, V, and Mn) which allow identification of pollution sources such as fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning, metalliferous industries, and urban-industrial ports. A particularly sensitive tracer is La/Ce, which rises in response to contamination from coastal FCC oil refineries. The Scholar Ship database allows us to recognise seaborne pollution sourced from NW Africa, the Cape Verde and Canary islands, and European cities and industrial complexes, plumes which in extreme cases can produce a downwind deterioration in marine air quality comparable to that seen in many cities, and can persist hundreds of kilometres from land.

  3. Ship2Shore Marine Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, N. R.; Sen, G.; Doehler, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Ocean Networks Canada (ONC) Observatory, comprised of VENUS and NEPTUNE Canada (NC) cabled networks, supports transformative coastal to deep ocean research and enables real-time interactive experiments. Engaging students, educators and the public is critical to increasing the global awareness of our integral relationship with the ocean. One way to accomplish this is to encourage educators to incorporate marine science concepts into their lesson plans. ONC's new initiative, Ship2Shore Marine Educators (S2SME), enables educators to learn first hand about marine science and technology by going to sea on a maintenance/research cruise. While at sea Marine Educators (ME) participate in technology deployments, assist with water and core sampling, write daily blogs, produce short video updates, develop learning resources and conduct presentations to students on shore via video conferencing. MEs participating in the last NC cruise -"Wiring the Abyss 2012" - were fascinated with being a part of science in the real world. They had an experience of a lifetime and anticipate incorporating what they have learned into their lessons during the upcoming semester. Outreach between the MEs and ONC communication staff aboard the ship resulted in nearly 7,000 unique visitors to the "Wiring the Abyss 2012'' cruise website. Live ROPOS video feeds (~ 9,000 views), highlight videos (436 views/day), daily blogs (~1200 views) and stunning images (~391 views/day) were among the top rated pages. Visitors from 10 countries tuned in to "Wiring the Abyss 2012" and experienced the Pacific's deep sea! One of the best experiences for the MEs was connecting with students and teachers on shore via video conferencing. Roughly 300 students in BC and USA received a live connection from approximately 200km off the west coast. Students were most fascinated by a demo involving compressed Styrofoam cups, showing the intensity of pressure at the bottom of the sea. Successes: A positive working

  4. 75 FR 34927 - Safety Zone; Parade of Ships, Seattle SeaFair Fleet Week, Pier 66, Elliott Bay, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Parade of Ships, Seattle SeaFair Fleet Week... with the Parade of Ships for the annual Seattle SeaFair Fleet Week. This action is intended to restrict... associated with event activities, such as the pass and review of ships and accompanying aerial...

  5. 78 FR 54574 - Safety Zone; Tall Ships Erie 2013 Fireworks Show, Holland Street Pier, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Tall Ships Erie 2013 Fireworks Show... safety zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Presque Isle Bay during the Tall Ships Erie... safety of spectators and vessels during the Tall Ships Erie 2013 Fireworks Show display. This zone...

  6. 46 CFR 167.45-40 - Fire-fighting equipment on nautical school ships using oil as fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Requirements § 167.45-40 Fire-fighting equipment on nautical school ships using oil as fuel. Steam-propelled... school ship propelled by steam, in which a part of the fuel-oil installation is situated, 2 or more... steam propelled nautical school ship of over 1,000 gross tons having one boiler room there shall...

  7. 46 CFR 167.45-40 - Fire-fighting equipment on nautical school ships using oil as fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Requirements § 167.45-40 Fire-fighting equipment on nautical school ships using oil as fuel. Steam-propelled... school ship propelled by steam, in which a part of the fuel-oil installation is situated, 2 or more... steam propelled nautical school ship of over 1,000 gross tons having one boiler room there shall...

  8. 46 CFR 167.45-40 - Fire-fighting equipment on nautical school ships using oil as fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Requirements § 167.45-40 Fire-fighting equipment on nautical school ships using oil as fuel. Steam-propelled... school ship propelled by steam, in which a part of the fuel-oil installation is situated, 2 or more... steam propelled nautical school ship of over 1,000 gross tons having one boiler room there shall...

  9. 46 CFR 167.45-40 - Fire-fighting equipment on nautical school ships using oil as fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Requirements § 167.45-40 Fire-fighting equipment on nautical school ships using oil as fuel. Steam-propelled... school ship propelled by steam, in which a part of the fuel-oil installation is situated, 2 or more... steam propelled nautical school ship of over 1,000 gross tons having one boiler room there shall...

  10. 46 CFR 167.45-40 - Fire-fighting equipment on nautical school ships using oil as fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Requirements § 167.45-40 Fire-fighting equipment on nautical school ships using oil as fuel. Steam-propelled... school ship propelled by steam, in which a part of the fuel-oil installation is situated, 2 or more... steam propelled nautical school ship of over 1,000 gross tons having one boiler room there shall...

  11. 76 FR 45011 - Control of Air Pollution From Aircraft and Aircraft Engines; Proposed Emission Standards and Test...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ... Environmental Protection Agency 40 CFR Parts 87 and 1068 Control of Air Pollution From Aircraft and Aircraft... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 87 and 1068 [EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0687; FRL-9437-2] RIN 2060-AO70 Control of Air Pollution... engines which in her judgment causes or contributes to air pollution that may reasonably be anticipated...

  12. Aircraft landing gear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, John A. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Topics presented include the laboratory simulation of landing gear pitch-plane dynamics, a summary of recent aircraft/ground vehicle friction measurement tests, some recent aircraft tire thermal studies, and an evaluation of critical speeds in high-speed aircraft. Also presented are a review of NASA antiskid braking research, titanium matrix composite landing gear development, the current methods and perspective of aircraft flotation analysis, the flow rate and trajectory of water spray produced by an aircraft tire, and spin-up studies of the Space Shuttle Orbiter main gear tire.

  13. Ship Detection Using Sentinel-1A in the High North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannevik, Tonje Nanette Arnesen; Olsen, Richard B.; Viken, Kjell

    2016-08-01

    The Sentinel-1A and Sentinel-1B Synthetic Aperture Radar satellites are part of the European Space Agency's new European remote sensing mission, and provide data for European Union's Copernicus program. Norway uses SAR satellites operationally to monitor the vast ocean areas in the High North. This paper presents the use of Sentinel-1A modes over Norwegian waters and the use of Sentinel-1A for ship detection. Ship detection is done in all available polarisation channels. The contrast between a vessel and the ocean background is calculated in two ways: 1) Ship to sea contrast - maximum amplitude divided by mean sea background and 2) Target to Clutter Ratio - Radar Cross Section of the vessel divided by the mean sea background. The contrasts are analysed for different incidence angles and are compared with results from RADARSAT-2, which Norway uses operationally. Combing the available polarisation channels is shown to enhance the contrast between ship and sea.

  14. Small transport aircraft technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    Information on commuter airline trends and aircraft developments is provided to upgrade the preliminary findings of a NASA-formed small transport aircraft technology (STAT) team, established to determine whether the agency's research and development programs could help commuter aircraft manufacturers solve technical problems related to passenger acceptance and use of 19- to 50-passenger aircraft. The results and conclusions of the full set of completed STAT studies are presented. These studies were performed by five airplane manufacturers, five engine manufacturers, and two propeller manufacturers. Those portions of NASA's overall aeronautics research and development programs which are applicable to commuter aircraft design are summarized. Areas of technology that might beneficially be expanded or initiated to aid the US commuter aircraft manufacturers in the evolution of improved aircraft for the market are suggested.

  15. 46 CFR 153.7 - Ships built before December 27, 1977 and non-self-propelled ships built before July 1, 1983...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ships built before December 27, 1977 and non-self... this part except as provided in paragraphs (c) (3), (4), (5) and (6) of this section. (1)-(2) (3) The... to the vertical axis of the tankship. (4) The Commandant (CG-ENG) considers on a case by case...

  16. Aircraft Noise and Quality of Life around Frankfurt Airport

    PubMed Central

    Schreckenberg, Dirk; Meis, Markus; Kahl, Cara; Peschel, Christin; Eikmann, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    In a survey of 2,312 residents living near Frankfurt Airport aircraft noise annoyance and disturbances as well as environmental (EQoL) and health-related quality of life (HQoL) were assessed and compared with data on exposure due to aircraft, road traffic, and railway noise. Results indicate higher noise annoyance than predicted from general exposure-response curves. Beside aircraft sound levels source-related attitudes were associated with reactions to aircraft noise. Furthermore, aircraft noise affected EQoL in general, although to a much smaller extent. HQoL was associated with aircraft noise annoyance, noise sensitivity and partly with aircraft noise exposure, in particular in the subgroup of multimorbid residents. The results suggest a recursive relationship between noise and health, yet this cannot be tested in cross-sectional studies. Longitudinal studies would be recommendable to get more insight in the causal paths underlying the noise-health relationship. PMID:20948931

  17. Aircraft noise and quality of life around Frankfurt Airport.

    PubMed

    Schreckenberg, Dirk; Meis, Markus; Kahl, Cara; Peschel, Christin; Eikmann, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    In a survey of 2,312 residents living near Frankfurt Airport aircraft noise annoyance and disturbances as well as environmental (EQoL) and health-related quality of life (HQoL) were assessed and compared with data on exposure due to aircraft, road traffic, and railway noise. Results indicate higher noise annoyance than predicted from general exposure-response curves. Beside aircraft sound levels source-related attitudes were associated with reactions to aircraft noise. Furthermore, aircraft noise affected EQoL in general, although to a much smaller extent. HQoL was associated with aircraft noise annoyance, noise sensitivity and partly with aircraft noise exposure, in particular in the subgroup of multimorbid residents. The results suggest a recursive relationship between noise and health, yet this cannot be tested in cross-sectional studies. Longitudinal studies would be recommendable to get more insight in the causal paths underlying the noise-health relationship.

  18. Ship and Installation Program: Optimal Stationing of Naval Ships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    calculate their CGE value [ Keenan 2004]. These instructions are subject to interpretation, and therefore could lead to inconsistencies between the...a specific pier space requirement given in CGEs, as indicated in Table 1.3 [ Keenan 2004]. SHIP allows individual ships to be moved between...complex 0.686 12. Relative Pierside Crane Lift Capability 1.671 13. Relative value of specialized security / emergency services capabilities

  19. Special Operations Forces (SOF) Support Ship. Ship Conversion Feasibility Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    sequence was performed with the goal of maximizing Overall Measure of Effectiveness (OMOE) for minimum cost. The OMOE and cost of the ship were...lists the ROCs for the SOF ship. Measures of effectiveness (MOE) assess the degree to which the various design concepts meet these ROCs. The MOE...Maintain health and well-being of crew 15 Provide upkeep and maintenance of own unit 10 Table 3. Measures of Effectiveness (MOE) MOE # Associated

  20. Novel methods for aircraft corrosion monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossi, Richard H.; Criswell, Thomas L.; Ikegami, Roy; Nelson, James; Normand, Eugene; Rutherford, Paul S.; Shrader, John E.

    1995-07-01

    Monitoring aging aircraft for hidden corrosion is a significant problem for both military and civilian aircraft. Under a Wright Laboratory sponsored program, Boeing Defense & Space Group is investigating three novel methods for detecting and monitoring hidden corrosion: (1) atmospheric neutron radiography, (2) 14 MeV neutron activation analysis and (3) fiber optic corrosion sensors. Atmospheric neutron radiography utilizes the presence of neutrons in the upper atmosphere as a source for interrogation of the aircraft structure. Passive track-etch neutron detectors, which have been previously placed on the aircraft, are evaluated during maintenance checks to assess the presence of corrosion. Neutrons generated by an accelerator are used via activation analysis to assess the presence of distinctive elements in corrosion products, particularly oxygen. By using fast (14 MeV) neutrons for the activation, portable, high intensity sources can be employed for field testing of aircraft. The third novel method uses fiber optics as part of a smart structure technology for corrosion detection and monitoring. Fiber optic corrosion sensors are placed in the aircraft at locations known to be susceptible to corrosion. Periodic monitoring of the sensors is used to alert maintenance personnel to the presence and degree of corrosion at specific locations on the aircraft. During the atmospheric neutron experimentation, we identified a fourth method referred to as secondary emission radiography (SER). This paper discusses the development of these methods.

  1. Altus I aircraft on lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The remotely-piloted Altus I aircraft climbs away after takeoff from Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The short series of test flights sponsored by the Naval Postgraduate School in early August, 1997, were designed to demonstrate the ability of the experimental craft to cruise at altitudes above 40,000 feet for sustained durations. On its final flight Aug. 15, the Altus I reached an altitude of 43,500 feet. The Altus I and its sister ship, the Altus II, are variants of the Predator surveillance drone built by General Atomics/Aeronautical Systems, Inc. They are designed for high-altitude, long-duration scientific sampling missions, and are powered by turbocharged piston engines. The Altus I incorporates a single-stage turbocharger, while the Altus II, built for NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology program, sports a two-stage turbocharger to enable the craft to fly at altitudes above 55,000 feet. The Altus II, the first of the two craft to be completed, made its first flight on May 1, 1996. With its engine augmented by a single-stage turbocharger, the Altus II reached an altitude of 37,000 ft during its first series of development flights at Dryden in Aug., 1996. In Oct. of that year, the Altus II was flown in an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement study for the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratory in Oklahoma. During the course of those flights, the Altus II set a single-flight endurance record for remotely-operated aircraft of more than 26 hours. The Altus I, completed in 1997, flew a series of development flights at Dryden that summer. Those test flights culminated with the craft reaching an altitude of 43,500 ft while carrying a simulated 300-lb payload, a record for an unmanned aircraft powered by a piston engine augmented with a single-stage turbocharger. The Altus II sustained an altitudeof 55,000 feet for four hours in 1999. A pilot in a control station on the ground flies the

  2. 46 CFR 42.05-63 - Ship(s) and vessel(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship(s) and vessel(s). 42.05-63 Section 42.05-63... BY SEA Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 42.05-63 Ship(s) and vessel(s). The terms ship(s) and vessel(s) are interchangeable or synonymous words, and include every description of...

  3. Modular IPS Machinery Arrangement in Early-Stage Naval Ship Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    Modular IPS Machinery Arrangement in Early -Stage Naval Ship Design David J. Jurkiewicz1 Carderock Division Naval Surface Warfare Center West...design process as part of assessing system-level tradeoffs early within the ship design process. This paper describes a methodology for the...flexibility in the ship design since it is not necessary to align the propeller shaft with the prime movers . Instead, propulsion motors are coupled to the

  4. Lightweight Propulsion Systems for Advanced Naval Ship Applications. An Executive Summary,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    cycle gas turbines for ship propulsion . A conceptual design of an 80,000-shp helium turbine was performed and a preliminary propulsion system layout...RESULTS AND CONCLUDING REMARKS Systems Study (Part I) 1.1 For closed-cycle gas turbines to be attractive for naval ship propulsion , the heat source...for lightweight ship propulsion systems (LWSPS), their technolog- ical and economic feasibilities, and the level of efforts and time required to bring

  5. Automatic control of an aircraft employing outboard horizontal stabilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Jason S.

    2000-10-01

    This dissertation concerns the study of radio-operated control of an aircraft using fixed gain and adaptive controllers. The real-time feedback control system is developed to enhance the flying qualities of an experimental model aircraft. The non-conventional flight dynamics of the Outboard Horizontal Stabilizer (OHS) aircraft cause significant differences in the piloting of the aircraft. The control system was added to augment stability as well as to adjust the flight characteristics so that the OHS aircraft handles similar to a conventional aircraft. The control system design process, as applied to recent innovations in aircraft design, is followed. The Outboard Horizontal Stabilizer concept is a non-conventional aircraft, designed to take advantage of the normally wasted energy developed by the wing tip vortices. The research is based on a remotely-controlled OHS aircraft fitted with various sensors and telemetry as part of a real time feedback control system. Fixed gain Linear Quadratic controllers are first applied to the aircraft and result in a dramatic increase in performance at a nominal operating condition. Non-linearities in the OHS aircraft behavior and a wide operating range demanded the development of a variable gain adaptive controller utilizing a parameter estimation scheme to model the plant. The adaptive LQR gain-scheduled controller that emerged gave good performance over a wide flight envelope.

  6. The Surface Warfare Test Ship

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-26

    dedicated test platform with a schedule determined by test requirements rather than ship operational tempo. The current SDTS, ex- USS DECATUR (Ex- DDG 31), is...current engineering services in the DD 963 hull, which are to be retained. The SWTS sensor/weapons payload is reduced compared to a DD 963 or DDG 993 ...developed a plan to convert ex- USS DECATUR ( DDG 31) into the Self Defense Test Ship (SDTS). In April 1988, Chief of Naval Operations authorized

  7. Lifecycle Readiness and Ship Deployment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    The physical fatigue associated with ship motions has significant consequences for today’s minimally manned ships. “Because of minimally sized...a deployment. The inefficiencies in performance may develop from lack of training, different personal aptitude, and individual’s mental or physical ...exacerbation of symptoms known as the avalanche phenomenon follows which includes: increased salivation, bodily warmth , and light- headedness” (Stevens

  8. Fatigue tests on big structure assemblies of concorde aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, V. P.; Perrais, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    Fatigue tests on structural assemblies of the Concorde supersonic transport aircraft are reported. Two main sections of the aircraft were subjected to pressure, mechanical load, and thermal static tests. The types of fatigue tests conducted and the results obtained are discussed. It was concluded that on a supersonic aircraft whose structural weight is a significant part of the weight analysis, many fatigue and static strength development tests should be made and fatigue and thermal tests of the structures are absolutely necessary.

  9. Classification of Aircraft Maneuvers for Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj; Tumer, Irem Y.; Tumer, Kagan; Huff, Edward M.; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Automated fault detection is an increasingly important problem in aircraft maintenance and operation. Standard methods of fault detection assume the availability of either data produced during all possible faulty operation modes or a clearly-defined means to determine whether the data provide a reasonable match to known examples of proper operation. In the domain of fault detection in aircraft, the first assumption is unreasonable and the second is difficult to determine. We envision a system for online fault detection in aircraft, one part of which is a classifier that predicts the maneuver being performed by the aircraft as a function of vibration data and other available data. To develop such a system, we use flight data collected under a controlled test environment, subject to many sources of variability. We explain where our classifier fits into the envisioned fault detection system as well as experiments showing the promise of this classification subsystem.

  10. Maneuver Classification for Aircraft Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Tumer, Kagan; Huff, Edward M.

    2003-01-01

    Automated fault detection is an increasingly important problem in aircraft maintenance and operation. Standard methods of fault detection assume the availability of either data produced during all possible faulty operation modes or a clearly-defined means to determine whether the data provide a reasonable match to known examples of proper operation. In the domain of fault detection in aircraft, identifying all possible faulty and proper operating modes is clearly impossible. We envision a system for online fault detection in aircraft, one part of which is a classifier that predicts the maneuver being performed by the aircraft as a function of vibration data and other available data. To develop such a system, we use flight data collected under a controlled test environment, subject to many sources of variability. We explain where our classifier fits into the envisioned fault detection system as well as experiments showing the promise of this classification subsystem.

  11. Classification of Aircraft Maneuvers for Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Tumer, Kagan; Huff, Edward M.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Automated fault detection is an increasingly important problem in aircraft maintenance and operation. Standard methods of fault detection assume the availability of either data produced during all possible faulty operation modes or a clearly-defined means to determine whether the data is a reasonable match to known examples of proper operation. In our domain of fault detection in aircraft, the first assumption is unreasonable and the second is difficult to determine. We envision a system for online fault detection in aircraft, one part of which is a classifier that predicts the maneuver being performed by the aircraft as a function of vibration data and other available data. We explain where this subsystem fits into our envisioned fault detection system as well its experiments showing the promise of this classification subsystem.

  12. Primary particles in ship emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridell, Erik; Steen, Erica; Peterson, Kjell

    There is not much data available regarding particle emissions from ships. In this study the size distributions of particles in ship exhaust from three different ships in normal operational conditions were studied using a cascade impactor. The ships were equipped with slow- or medium-speed main engines and medium-speed auxiliary engines. The fuel was residual oil except for the auxiliary engines on one ship which used marine diesel. Large emissions and a dependence of the sulfur content in the fuel were observed. High amounts of relatively large particles (around 8 μm) were observed. These are attributed to re-entrained soot particles from walls in the engine systems. A strong variation between different ships was observed for the particle-size distribution and for the dependence on engine load. The particle emissions were found to be reduced to about half, over the whole size range, by an SCR system. The total particle emission, measured after dilution, varied between 0.3 and 3 g kW h -1 depending on load, fuel and engine.

  13. Observations of Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer Processes and High-Frequency Internal Waves from Ship-Launched UAVs and Ship-based Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reineman, B. D.; Lenain, L.; Melville, W. K.

    2014-12-01

    We present measurements obtained during the October 2012 EquatorMix experiment (0N, 140W), in which we deployed ship-launched and recovered Boeing-Insitu ScanEagle unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to measure momentum and energy fluxes, ocean surface processes, and the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL). The UAV dataset is complemented by measurements from a suite of ship-based instrumentation, including a foremast MABL eddy covariance system, scanning and point lidar altimeters, a laser Doppler wind profiler, and a digitized X-band radar system (WaMoS). The combination of the unmanned aircraft and the ship instrumentation provides a novel and valuable dataset of many air-sea interaction phenomena, extending from 100s of meters below the surface to 1500 m above. Ocean surface displacements observed with the UAV lidar altimeter (coupled with a GPS/IMU) give evidence of high-frequency equatorial internal waves, with measurements consistent and coherent with those from ship-based X-band radar, the Hydrographic Doppler Sonar System (HDSS), and a theoretical model. UAV-based flux measurements at low altitudes (down to 30 meters) are consistent with ship-based eddy covariance measurements, but reveal differences between along- and crosswind sampling flight legs associated with longitudinal roll structures that are not captured by the ship measurements from tracks mainly in the upwind-downwind directions.

  14. Raptors and aircraft

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.G.; Ellis, D.H.; Johnson, T.H.; Glinski, Richard L.; Pendleton, Beth Giron; Moss, Mary Beth; LeFranc, Maurice N.=; Millsap, Brian A.; Hoffman, Stephen W.

    1988-01-01

    Less than 5% of all bird strikes of aircraft are by raptor species, but damage to airframe structure or jet engine dysfunction are likely consequences. Beneficial aircraft-raptor interactions include the use of raptor species to frighten unwanted birds from airport areas and the use of aircraft to census raptor species. Many interactions, however, modify the raptor?s immediate behavior and some may decrease reproduction of sensitive species. Raptors may respond to aircraft stimuli by exhibiting alarm, increased heart rate, flushing or fleeing and occasionally by directly attacking intruding aircraft. To date, most studies reveal that raptor responses to aircraft are brief and do not limit reproduction; however, additional study is needed.

  15. 46 CFR 340.4 - Shipping services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shipping services. 340.4 Section 340.4 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY PRIORITY USE AND ALLOCATION OF... of the defense agency in provision of equipment, loading, ocean transport and delivery; and...

  16. Math Model for Naval Ship Handling Trainer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golovcsenko, Igor V.

    The report describes the math model for an experimental ship handling trainer. The training task is that of a replenishment operation at sea. The model includes equations for ship dynamics of a destroyer, propeller-engine response times, ship separation, interaction effects between supply ship and destroyer, and outputs to a visual display system.…

  17. Detection of ship tracks in ATSR2 satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campmany, E.; Grainger, R. G.; Dean, S. M.

    2008-08-01

    Ships modify cloud microphysics by adding cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) to a developing or existing cloud. These create lines of larger reflectance in cloud fields that are observed in satellite imagery. Ship tracks are most frequently seen off the west coast of California, and the Atlantic coast of both west Africa and south-western Europe. In order to automate their detection within the Along Track Scanning Radiometer 2 (ATSR2) data set an algorithm was developed and integrated with the Global Retrieval of ATSR Cloud Parameters and Evaluation (GRAPE) processing chain. The algorithm firstly identifies intensity ridgelets in clouds which have the potential to be part of a ship track. This identification is done by comparing each pixel with its surrounding ones. If the intensity of three adjacent pixels is greater than the intensity of its neighbours, then it is classified as a ridgelet. These ridgelets are then connected together, according to a set of connectivity rules, to form tracks which are classed as ship tracks if they are long enough. The algorithm has been applied to two years of ATSR2 data. A month of results have been compared with other satellite datasets to validate the algorithm. There is a high ratio of false detections. Nevertheless the global distribution of ship tracks shows a similar pattern to the ship emissions distribution.

  18. The technology assessment of LTA aircraft systems. [hybrid airships for passenger and cargo transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The advantages of conventional small and large airships over heavier than air aircraft are reviewed and the need for developing hybrid aircraft for passenger and heavy charge transport is assessed. Performance requirements and estimated operating costs are discussed for rota-ships to be used for short distance transportation near large cities as well as for airlifting civil engineering machinery and supplies for the construction of power stations, dams, tunnels, and roads in remote areas or on isolated islands.

  19. Aircraft Survivability. Spring 2009

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Surviving an Aircraft Crash with Airbag Restraintsby Thomas Barth Inflatable restraint solutions have improved the survivability of commercial...Surviving an Aircraft Crash with Airbag Restraints by Thomas Barth Transport Aircraft Interiors The AmSafe Aviation Airbag entered service on commercial...all night.” Keithley also noted that, in his early days at BRL, Walt teamed up with a group of like-minded innovators, including Jim Foulk, Roland

  20. Lightning effects on aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Direct and indirect effects of lightning on aircraft were examined in relation to aircraft design. Specific trends in design leading to more frequent lightning strikes were individually investigated. These trends included the increasing use of miniaturized, solid state components in aircraft electronics and electric power systems. A second trend studied was the increasing use of reinforced plastics and other nonconducting materials in place of aluminum skins, a practice that reduces the electromagnetic shielding furnished by a conductive skin.