Science.gov

Sample records for aircraft precision approach

  1. A state dynamics method for integrated GPS/INS navigation and its application to aircraft precision approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Fang-Cheng

    In recent years, GPS navigation systems have found widespread use in many diverse applications. The achievements of GPS navigation systems in positioning and navigation services have been nothing short of extraordinary. With the use of carrier phase measurements and Differential GPS (DGPS), centimeter-level performance is achievable today. Therefore, the principal issues for modern navigation are not related to accuracy per se, but robustness. Unfortunately in this regard, all radionavigation systems are subject to Radio Frequency Interference (RFI). In response, this research is focused on the development of interference-robust navigation systems for aviation applications. A new dual-frequency Carrier-phase DGPS (CDGPS) architecture has been developed in this research and its performance was evaluated relative to the requirements for a unique shipboard landing application. RFI vulnerability was addressed for this application by directly incorporating a single frequency architecture as a back-up in the event of hostile jamming on one frequency. For critical civil aviation applications without access to dual frequency GPS signals, a novel method for tightly-coupling GPS and Inertial Navigation Sensors (INS) was developed to address the signal vulnerability issue. The new hybrid navigation system, based on the direct fusion of GPS and INS using state dynamics, is a mathematically rigorous approach, yet it is more direct and simpler to implement than existing GPS/INS integration schemes. The hybrid navigation system was validated with flight data, and predicted system performance was evaluated using a covariance analysis method. Necessary conditions on INS sensor and gravity model quality were derived to ensure that the hybrid system performance is compliant with navigation requirements for aircraft precision approach and landing. In addition, a new fault detection algorithm, based on integrated Kalman filter innovations, was developed and evaluated against other

  2. Precision visual guidance for agricultural applicator aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartt, Joseph R.; Bletzacker, Frank R.; Forgette, T. J.; Vetter, Alan A.

    1992-07-01

    The in-cockpit swath centerline identifier (SCI) for aerial applicators uses differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) signals to determine precise ground track of an aircraft and provide guidance to the pilot for flying patterns for aerial application of materials such as pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers. Cross track distance from the swath centerline is provided by a heads up light bar display while detailed navigation, position, and status information is provided on an alphanumeric display on a panel mounted console. This system provides straight line guidance when executing a swath and turn-in guidance when proceeding from one swath to the next. It provides a record of the swaths which were sprayed and logs all of the associated navigation and operational data, including time. In addition, it provides navigation information from base to the fields, between fields, and return. The SCI eliminates the need for flaggers while providing improved accuracy of application. Reduced exposure to liability and improved quality control results as the position, altitude, time, and spray status are logged for post flight analysis. The SCI has been used in commercial agricultural applications. Demonstrations of the SCI showed better precision than anticipated.

  3. A Concept for Airborne Precision Spacing for Dependent Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Baxley, Brian T.; Abbott, Terence S.; Capron, William R.; Smith, Colin L.; Shay, Richard F.; Hubbs, Clay

    2012-01-01

    The Airborne Precision Spacing concept of operations has been previously developed to support the precise delivery of aircraft landing successively on the same runway. The high-precision and consistent delivery of inter-aircraft spacing allows for increased runway throughput and the use of energy-efficient arrivals routes such as Continuous Descent Arrivals and Optimized Profile Descents. This paper describes an extension to the Airborne Precision Spacing concept to enable dependent parallel approach operations where the spacing aircraft must manage their in-trail spacing from a leading aircraft on approach to the same runway and spacing from an aircraft on approach to a parallel runway. Functionality for supporting automation is discussed as well as procedures for pilots and controllers. An analysis is performed to identify the required information and a new ADS-B report is proposed to support these information needs. Finally, several scenarios are described in detail.

  4. Remote sensing with unmanned aircraft systems for precision agriculture applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Federal Aviation Administration is revising regulations for using unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) in the national airspace. An important potential application of UAS may be as a remote-sensing platform for precision agriculture, but simply down-scaling remote sensing methodologies developed usi...

  5. Millimeter-Wave Localizers for Aircraft-to-Aircraft Approach Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Adrian J.

    2013-01-01

    its ability to operate beyond the 1-to-2-meter precisions associated with commercial runway width. A prototype ILS-type system operates at millimeter-wave frequencies to provide automatic and robust approach control for aerial refueling. The system allows for the coupling process to remain completely autonomous, as a boom operator is no longer required. Operating beyond 100 GHz provides enough resolution and a narrow enough beamwidth that an approach corridor of centimeter scales can be maintained. Two modules were used to accomplish this task. The first module is a localizer/glide-slope module that can be fitted on a refueling aircraft. This module provides the navigation beams for aligning the approaching aircraft. The second module is navigational receiver fitted onto the approaching aircraft to be re fueled that can detect the approach beams. Since unmanned aircraft have a limited payload size and limited electrical power, the receiver portion was implemented in CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) technology based on a super-regenerative receiver (SRR) architecture. The SRR achieves mW-level power consumption and chip sizes less than l mm2. While super-regenerative techniques have small bandwidths that limit use in communication systems, their advantages of high sensitivity, low complexity, and low power make them ideal in this situation where modulating tones of less than 1 kHz are used.

  6. Helicopter precision approach capability using the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, David N.

    1992-01-01

    The period between 1 July and 31 December, 1992, was spent developing a research plan as well as a navigation system document and flight test plan to investigate helicopter precision approach capability using the Global Positioning System (GPS). In addition, all hardware and software required for the research was acquired, developed, installed, and verified on both the test aircraft and the ground-based reference station.

  7. Consistent approach to describing aircraft HIRF protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rimbey, P. R.; Walen, D. B.

    1995-01-01

    The high intensity radiated fields (HIRF) certification process as currently implemented is comprised of an inconsistent combination of factors that tend to emphasize worst case scenarios in assessing commercial airplane certification requirements. By examining these factors which include the process definition, the external HIRF environment, the aircraft coupling and corresponding internal fields, and methods of measuring equipment susceptibilities, activities leading to an approach to appraising airplane vulnerability to HIRF are proposed. This approach utilizes technically based criteria to evaluate the nature of the threat, including the probability of encountering the external HIRF environment. No single test or analytic method comprehensively addresses the full HIRF threat frequency spectrum. Additional tools such as statistical methods must be adopted to arrive at more realistic requirements to reflect commercial aircraft vulnerability to the HIRF threat. Test and analytic data are provided to support the conclusions of this report. This work was performed under NASA contract NAS1-19360, Task 52.

  8. Comparison of precise ionising Radiation Dose Measurements on board Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindborg, L.; Beck, P.; Bottollier, J. F.; Roos, H.; Spurny, F.; Wissman, F.

    2003-04-01

    The cosmic radiation makes aircrew one of the most exposed occupational groups. The European Council has therefore in its Directive 96/29Euratom on basic safety standards for radiation protection a particular article (42) for the protection of aircrew. One of the measures to be taken is to assess the exposure of the crew. This is, however, not a trivial task. The radiation consists of many different types of radiation with energies that are hardly met on ground. The knowledge on the dose levels on board aircraft has improved gradually during the last decade as several groups around the world have performed measurements on board civil aircraft in cooperation with airlines. Only occasionally has more than one instrument been able to fly at the same time for practical reasons. The statistical uncertainty in a measurement of the dose equivalent rate is typically ±15 % (1 relative standard deviation) if determined during half an hour. Systematic uncertainties add to this. The dose rate depends on flight altitude, geographic coordinates of the flight, the phase of the solar cycle and the prevailing solar wind. For that reason the possibility to fly on the same flight will eliminate some of the systematic uncertainties that limits an evaluation of the measurement techniques. The proposal aims at measurements on board the aircraft on a geographically limited area for a few hours to decrease the statistical uncertainty of the measurements and thereby get an excellent opportunity to look for possible systematic differences between the different measurement systems. As the dose equivalent rate will be quite well established it will also be possible to compare the measured values with calculated ones. The dose rate increases towards the geomagnetic poles and decreases towards the equator. The composition of the radiation components varies also with altitude. For that reason measurements both at southern latitude and at northern latitude are planned.

  9. Intelligent Control Approaches for Aircraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundy-Burlet, Karen; KrishnaKumar, K.; Soloway, Don; Kaneshige, John; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of various intelligent control technologies currently being developed and studied under the Intelligent Flight Control (IFC) program at the NASA Ames Research Center. The main objective of the intelligent flight control program is to develop the next generation of flight controllers for the purpose of automatically compensating for a broad spectrum of damaged or malfunctioning aircraft components and to reduce control law development cost and time. The approaches being examined include: (a) direct adaptive dynamic inverse controller and (b) an adaptive critic-based dynamic inverse controller. These approaches can utilize, but do not require, fault detection and isolation information. Piloted simulation studies are performed to examine if the intelligent flight control techniques adequately: 1) Match flying qualities of modern fly-by-wire flight controllers under nominal conditions; 2) Improve performance under failure conditions when sufficient control authority is available; and 3) Achieve consistent handling qualities across the flight envelope and for different aircraft configurations. Results obtained so far demonstrate the potential for improving handling qualities and significantly increasing survivability rates under various simulated failure conditions.

  10. Remote sensing with simulated unmanned aircraft systems for precision agriculture applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important application of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) may be remote-sensing for precision agriculture, because of its ability to acquire images with very small pixel sizes from low altitude flights. The objective of this study was to compare pixel sampling with plot-scale metrics for the remo...

  11. Evaluation of HiMAT aircraft landing approach lateral control gearing using simulation and a visual display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarrafian, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    The utility of a visual display when studying the influence of changes in lateral stick gearing gains on the Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology (HiMAT) vehicle handling qualities during simulated approaches and landings is investigated. The visual display improved the validity of the simulation and provided improved roll response cues for the HiMAT aircraft landing approach. A range of acceptable constant lateral stick gearing gains is found that provides adequate maneuverability and allows for precision moments.

  12. A New Approach to Precision Design for Machine Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baodong; Jiao, Aisheng; Yi, Xiangbin; Xu, Yanwei

    Precision of the NC axes is an important aspect of machine tool design. Conventionally, the precision specification of machine tools is empirically determined, resulting in poor designs with insufficient or excessive precision. To provide a cost-effective precision specification for machine tools, an active precision design approach is proposed to generate the specification of the positioning repeatability of NC axes to meet the designated working precision requirements of the machine tools. Finally, the approach is demonstrated and validated through a case study of precision design for a gear milling machine.

  13. Flight test evaluation of precision-code differential GPS for terminal approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnally, B. D.; Warner, David N., Jr.; Hegarty, Daniel M.; Schultz, Thomas A.; Bronson, Richard

    1992-01-01

    A flight test evaluation conducted at the NASA Ames Research Center of precision-code differential GPS for terminal approach and landing is described. Differential corrections to satellite range and range-rate measurements are computed in a stationary ground reference system, uplinked to the test aircraft, and employed to correct corresponding airborne satellite data. Differentially corrected range and range-rate data, combined with inertial data, are then utilized with satellite position and velocity to compute aircraft position and velocity employing an eight-state extended Kalman filter.

  14. Design criteria for flightpath and airspeed control for the approach and landing of STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Innis, R. C.; Hardy, G. H.; Stephenson, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    A flight research program was conducted to assess requirements for flightpath and airspeed control for glide-slope tracking during a precision approach and for flare control, particularly as applied to powered-lift, short takeoff and landing (STOL) aircraft. Ames Research Center's Augmentor Wing Research Aircraft was used to fly approaches on a 7.5 deg glide slope to landings on a 30 X 518 m (100 X 1700 ft) STOL runway. The dominant aircraft response characteristics determined were flightpath overshoot, flightpath-airspeed coupling, and initial flightpath response time. The significant contribution to control of the landing flare using pitch attitude was the short-term flightpath response. The limiting condition for initial flightpath response time for flare control with thrust was also identified. It is possible to define flying-qualities design criteria for glide-slope and flare control based on the aforementioned response characteristics.

  15. Aircraft engine mathematical model - linear system approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotaru, Constantin; Roateşi, Simona; Cîrciu, Ionicǎ

    2016-06-01

    This paper examines a simplified mathematical model of the aircraft engine, based on the theory of linear and nonlinear systems. The dynamics of the engine was represented by a linear, time variant model, near a nominal operating point within a finite time interval. The linearized equations were expressed in a matrix form, suitable for the incorporation in the MAPLE program solver. The behavior of the engine was included in terms of variation of the rotational speed following a deflection of the throttle. The engine inlet parameters can cover a wide range of altitude and Mach numbers.

  16. A system approach to aircraft optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1991-01-01

    Mutual couplings among the mathematical models of physical phenomena and parts of a system such as an aircraft complicate the design process because each contemplated design change may have a far reaching consequence throughout the system. Techniques are outlined for computing these influences as system design derivatives useful for both judgemental and formal optimization purposes. The techniques facilitate decomposition of the design process into smaller, more manageable tasks and they form a methodology that can easily fit into existing engineering organizations and incorporate their design tools.

  17. Targeted Proteomics Approach for Precision Plant Breeding.

    PubMed

    Chawade, Aakash; Alexandersson, Erik; Bengtsson, Therese; Andreasson, Erik; Levander, Fredrik

    2016-02-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is a targeted mass spectrometry technique that enables precise quantitation of hundreds of peptides in a single run. This technique provides new opportunities for multiplexed protein biomarker measurements. For precision plant breeding, DNA-based markers have been used extensively, but the potential of protein biomarkers has not been exploited. In this work, we developed an SRM marker panel with assays for 104 potato (Solanum tuberosum) peptides selected using univariate and multivariate statistics. Thereafter, using random forest classification, the prediction markers were identified for Phytopthora infestans resistance in leaves, P. infestans resistance in tubers, and plant yield in potato leaf secretome samples. The results suggest that the marker panel has the predictive potential for three traits, two of which have no commercial DNA markers so far. Furthermore, the marker panel was also tested and found to be applicable to potato clones not used during the marker development. The proposed workflow is thus a proof-of-concept for targeted proteomics as an efficient readout in accelerated breeding for complex and agronomically important traits. PMID:26704985

  18. A multiple objective optimization approach to aircraft control systems design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabak, D.; Schy, A. A.; Johnson, K. G.; Giesy, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    The design of an aircraft lateral control system, subject to several performance criteria and constraints, is considered. While in the previous studies of the same model a single criterion optimization, with other performance requirements expressed as constraints, has been pursued, the current approach involves a multiple criteria optimization. In particular, a Pareto optimal solution is sought.

  19. DC-link approach to constant-frequency aircraft power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorksi, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses a hybrid high-power aircraft electrical system that has very difficult and complex operating requirements. Many issues raised in selecting an approach for this application are similar to those that must eventually be addressed for a large all-electric aircraft. The requirements for this specific system are reviewed, a solution for those requirements is proposed, and some explanation is provided for the choice. Because the system requires a substantial amount of 400-Hz power, a dc-link system was selected to provide that power.

  20. A systematic approach to design for lifelong aircraft evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Dongwook

    This research proposes a systematic approach with which the decision makers can evaluate the value and risk of a new aircraft development program, including potential derivative development opportunities. The proposed Evaluation of Lifelong Vehicle Evolution (EvoLVE) method is a two- or multi-stage representation of the aircraft design process that accommodates initial development phases as well as follow-on phases. One of the key elements of this method is the Stochastic Programming with Recourse (SPR) technique, which accounts for uncertainties associated with future requirements. The remedial approach of SPR in its two distinctive problem-solving steps is well suited to aircraft design problems where derivatives, retrofits, and upgrades have been used to fix designs that were once but no longer optimal. The solution approach of SPR is complemented by the Risk-Averse Strategy Selection (RASS) technique to gauge risk associated with vehicle evolution options. In the absence of a full description of the random space, a scenario-based approach captures the randomness with a few probable scenarios and reveals implications of different future events. Last, an interactive framework for decision-making support allows simultaneous navigation of the current and future design space with a greater degree of freedom. A cantilevered beam design problem was set up and solved using the SPR technique to showcase its application to an engineering design setting. The full EvoLVE method was conducted on a notional multi-role fighter based on the F/A-18 Hornet.

  1. A population approach to precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Muin J; Gwinn, Marta L; Glasgow, Russell E; Kramer, Barnett S

    2012-06-01

    The term P4 medicine is used to denote an evolving field of medicine that uses systems biology approaches and information technologies to enhance wellness rather than just treat disease. Its four components include predictive, preventive, personalized, and participatory medicine. In the current paper, it is argued that in order to fulfill the promise of P4 medicine, a "fifth P" must be integrated-the population perspective-into each of the other four components. A population perspective integrates predictive medicine into the ecologic model of health; applies principles of population screening to preventive medicine; uses evidence-based practice to personalize medicine; and grounds participatory medicine on the three core functions of public health: assessment, policy development, and assurance. Population sciences-including epidemiology; behavioral, social, and communication sciences; and health economics, implementation science, and outcomes research-are needed to show the value of P4 medicine. Balanced strategies that implement both population- and individual-level interventions can best maximize health benefits, minimize harm, and avoid unnecessary healthcare costs. PMID:22608383

  2. Factors affecting handling qualities of a lift-fan aircraft during steep terminal area approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerdes, R. M.; Hynes, C. S.

    1975-01-01

    The XV-5B lift-fan aircraft was used to explore the factors affecting handling qualities in the terminal area. A 10 deg ILS approach task was selected to explore these problems. Interception of the glide slope at 457.2 m, glide slope tracking, deceleration along the glide slope to a spot hover were considered. Variations in airplane deck angle, deceleration schedule, and powered-lift management were studied. The overall descent performance envelope was identified on the basis of fan stall, maximum comfortable descent rate, and controllability restrictions. The collective-lift stick provided precise glide slope tracking capability. The pilot preferred a deck-parallel attitude for which he used powered lift to control glide slope and pitch attitude to keep the angle of attack near zero. Workload was reduced when the deceleration schedule was delayed until the aircraft was well established on the glide slope, since thrust vector changes induced flight path disturbances.

  3. Approach path control for powered-lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clymer, D. J.; Flora, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    A flight control system concept is defined for approach flightpath control of an augmentor wing (or similar) powered-lift STOL configuration. The proposed STOL control concept produces aircraft transient and steady-state control responses that are familiar to pilots of conventional jet transports, and has potential for good handling qualities ratings in all approach and landing phases. The effects of trailing-edge rate limits, real-engine dynamics, and atmospheric turbulence are considered in the study. A general discussion of STOL handling qualities problems and piloting techniques is included.

  4. Aircraft Engine Noise Scattering - A Discontinuous Spectral Element Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanescu, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Farassat, F.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a time-domain method for computation of sound radiation from aircraft engine sources to the far-field. The effects of nonuniform flow around the aircraft and scattering of sound by fuselage and wings are accounted for in the formulation. Our approach is based on the discretization of the inviscid flow equations through a collocation form of the Discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method. An isoparametric representation of the underlying geometry is used in order to take full advantage of the spectral accuracy of the method. Largescale computations are made possible by a parallel implementation based on message passing. Results obtained for radiation from an axisymmetric nacelle alone are compared with those obtained when the same nacelle is installed in a generic con.guration, with and without a wing.

  5. Remote sensing with simulated unmanned aircraft imagery for precision agriculture applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, E. Raymond, Jr.; Daughtry, Craig S.T.; Mirsky, Steven B.; Hively, W. Dean

    2014-01-01

    An important application of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) may be remote-sensing for precision agriculture, because of its ability to acquire images with very small pixel sizes from low altitude flights. The objective of this study was to compare information obtained from two different pixel sizes, one about a meter (the size of a small vegetation plot) and one about a millimeter. Cereal rye (Secale cereale) was planted at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center for a winter cover crop with fall and spring fertilizer applications, which produced differences in biomass and leaf chlorophyll content. UAS imagery was simulated by placing a Fuji IS-Pro UVIR digital camera at 3-m height looking nadir. An external UV-IR cut filter was used to acquire true-color images; an external red cut filter was used to obtain color-infrared-like images with bands at near-infrared, green, and blue wavelengths. Plot-scale Green Normalized Difference Vegetation Index was correlated with dry aboveground biomass ( ${mbi {r}} = 0.58$ ), whereas the Triangular Greenness Index (TGI) was not correlated with chlorophyll content. We used the SamplePoint program to select 100 pixels systematically; we visually identified the cover type and acquired the digital numbers. The number of rye pixels in each image was better correlated with biomass ( ${mbi {r}} = 0.73$ ), and the average TGI from only leaf pixels was negatively correlated with chlorophyll content ( ${mbi {r}} = -0.72$ ). Thus, better information for crop requirements may be obtained using very small pixel sizes, but new algorithms based on computer vision are needed for analysis. It may not be necessary to geospatially register large numbers of photographs with very small pixel sizes. Instead, images could be analyzed as single plots along field transects.

  6. Analytical methodology for determination of helicopter IFR precision approach requirements. [pilot workload and acceptance level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phatak, A. V.

    1980-01-01

    A systematic analytical approach to the determination of helicopter IFR precision approach requirements is formulated. The approach is based upon the hypothesis that pilot acceptance level or opinion rating of a given system is inversely related to the degree of pilot involvement in the control task. A nonlinear simulation of the helicopter approach to landing task incorporating appropriate models for UH-1H aircraft, the environmental disturbances and the human pilot was developed as a tool for evaluating the pilot acceptance hypothesis. The simulated pilot model is generic in nature and includes analytical representation of the human information acquisition, processing, and control strategies. Simulation analyses in the flight director mode indicate that the pilot model used is reasonable. Results of the simulation are used to identify candidate pilot workload metrics and to test the well known performance-work-load relationship. A pilot acceptance analytical methodology is formulated as a basis for further investigation, development and validation.

  7. Real Time Analysis and Display of Aircraft Approach Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Robert E. (Inventor); Chidester, Thomas R. (Inventor); Lawrence, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for monitoring and comparing, in real time, performance of an aircraft during an approach to touchdown along a conventional approach path and along a contemplated modified approach path to touchdown. In a first procedure, a flight parameter value at a selected location is compared and displayed, for the planned path and for the modified path. In a second procedure, flight parameter values FP(t(sub m)) at a sequence (t(sub n)}n, of measurement times is compared and displayed, for the planned path and for a contemplated or presently-executed modified path. If the flight parameter for the planned path and for the modified path differ too much from each other, the pilot in command has an option of terminating the approach along the modified path.

  8. Industrial approach to piezoelectric damping of large fighter aircraft components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, John; Schweiger, Johannes

    1998-06-01

    Different concepts to damp structural vibrations of the vertical tail of fighter aircraft are reported. The various requirements for a vertical tail bias an integrated approach for the design. Several active vibrations suppression concepts had been investigated during the preparatory phase of a research program shared by Daimler-Benz Aerospace Military Aircraft (Dasa), Daimler-Benz Forschung (DBF) and Deutsche Forschungsandstalt fuer Luftund Raumfahrt (DLR). Now in the main phase of the programme, four concepts were finally chosen: two concepts with aerodynamic control surfaces and two concepts with piezoelectric components. One piezo concept approach will be described rigorously, the other concepts are briefly addressed. In the Dasa concept, thin surface piezo actuators are set out carefully to flatten the dynamic portion of the combined static and dynamic maximum bending moment loading case directly in the shell structure. The second piezo concept by DLR involves pre-loaded lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-block actuators at host structure fixtures. To this end a research apparatus was designed and built as a full scale simplified fin box with carbon fiber reinformed plastic skins and an aluminium stringer-rib substructure restrained by relevant aircraft fixtures. It constitutes a benchmark 3D-structural impedance. The engineering design incorporates 7kg of PZT surface actuators. The structural system then should be excited to more than 15mm tip displacement amplitude. This prepares the final step to total A/C integration. Typical analysis methods using cyclic thermal analogies adapted to induced load levels are compared. Commercial approaches leading onto basic state space model interpretation wrt. actuator sizing and positioning, structural integrity constraints, FE-validation and testing are described. Both piezoelectric strategies are aimed at straight open-loop performance related to concept weight penalty and input electric power. The required actuators, power

  9. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, B.D.; Lissaman, P.B.S.; Morgan, W.R.; Radkey, R.L.

    1998-09-22

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing`s top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gases for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well. 31 figs.

  10. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, Bart D.; Lissaman, Peter B. S.; Morgan, Walter R.; Radkey, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing's top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gasses for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well.

  11. A head-up display format for application to transport aircraft approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    A head up display (HUD) format used in simulator studies of the application of HUD to the landing of civil transport aircraft is described in detail. The display features an indication of the aircraft's instantaneous flightpath that constitutes the primary controlled element. Discrete ILS error and altitude signals are scaled and positioned to provide precise guidance modes when tracked with the flightpath symbol. Consideration is given to both the availability and nonavailability of inertial velocity information in the aircraft.

  12. Learning the Task Management Space of an Aircraft Approach Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krall, Joseph; Menzies, Tim; Davies, Misty

    2014-01-01

    Validating models of airspace operations is a particular challenge. These models are often aimed at finding and exploring safety violations, and aim to be accurate representations of real-world behavior. However, the rules governing the behavior are quite complex: nonlinear physics, operational modes, human behavior, and stochastic environmental concerns all determine the responses of the system. In this paper, we present a study on aircraft runway approaches as modeled in Georgia Tech's Work Models that Compute (WMC) simulation. We use a new learner, Genetic-Active Learning for Search-Based Software Engineering (GALE) to discover the Pareto frontiers defined by cognitive structures. These cognitive structures organize the prioritization and assignment of tasks of each pilot during approaches. We discuss the benefits of our approach, and also discuss future work necessary to enable uncertainty quantification.

  13. In-Flight Assessment of a Pursuit Guidance Display Format for Manually Flown Precision Instrument Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moralez, Ernesto, III; Tucker, George E.; Hindson, William S.; Frost, Chad R.; Hardy, Gordon H.

    2004-01-01

    In-flight evaluations of a pursuit guidance display system for manually flown precision instrument approaches were performed. The guidance system was integrated into the RASCAL JUH-60A Black Hawk helicopter. The applicability of the pursuit guidance disp1aFs to the operation of Runway Independent Aircraft (RIA) is made evident because the displays allow the pilot to fly a complex, multi-segment, descending, decelerating approach trajectory. The complex trajectory chosen for this in-flight assessment began from a downwind abeam position at 110 knots and was hand-flown to a 50 ft decision altitude at 40 knots using a rate-command/attitude-hold plus turn-coordination control system. The elements of the pursuit guidance format displayed on a 10-inch liquid crystal display (LCD) flat panel consisted of a flightpath vector and a "leader" aircraft as the pursuit guidance element. Approach guidance was based primarily on carrier-phase differential Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation, and secondarily on both medium accuracy inertial navigation unit states and air data computer states. Required Navigation Performance (RNP) concepts were applied to the construction of display elements such as lateral/vertical deviation indicators and a tunnel that indicated to the pilot, in real-time, the performance with respect to RNP error bounds. The results of the flight evaluations of the guidance display show that precise path control for operating within tight RNP boundaries (RNP 0.007NM/24ft for initial approach, RNP 0.008NM/19ft for intermediate approach, and RNP 0.002NM/9ft for final approach) is attainable with minimal to moderate pilot workload.

  14. An integrated systems engineering approach to aircraft design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, M.; Raghunathan, S.; Curran, R.

    2006-06-01

    The challenge in Aerospace Engineering, in the next two decades as set by Vision 2020, is to meet the targets of reduction of nitric oxide emission by 80%, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide both by 50%, reduce noise by 50% and of course with reduced cost and improved safety. All this must be achieved with expected increase in capacity and demand. Such a challenge has to be in a background where the understanding of physics of flight has changed very little over the years and where industrial growth is driven primarily by cost rather than new technology. The way forward to meet the challenges is to introduce innovative technologies and develop an integrated, effective and efficient process for the life cycle design of aircraft, known as systems engineering (SE). SE is a holistic approach to a product that comprises several components. Customer specifications, conceptual design, risk analysis, functional analysis and architecture, physical architecture, design analysis and synthesis, and trade studies and optimisation, manufacturing, testing validation and verification, delivery, life cycle cost and management. Further, it involves interaction between traditional disciplines such as Aerodynamics, Structures and Flight Mechanics with people- and process-oriented disciplines such as Management, Manufacturing, and Technology Transfer. SE has become the state-of-the-art methodology for organising and managing aerospace production. However, like many well founded methodologies, it is more difficult to embody the core principles into formalised models and tools. The key contribution of the paper will be to review this formalisation and to present the very latest knowledge and technology that facilitates SE theory. Typically, research into SE provides a deeper understanding of the core principles and interactions, and helps one to appreciate the required technical architecture for fully exploiting it as a process, rather than a series of events. There are major issues as

  15. Inductive Learning Approaches for Improving Pilot Awareness of Aircraft Faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spikovska, Lilly; Iverson, David L.; Poll, Scott; Pryor, anna

    2005-01-01

    Neural network flight controllers are able to accommodate a variety of aircraft control surface faults without detectable degradation of aircraft handling qualities. Under some faults, however, the effective flight envelope is reduced; this can lead to unexpected behavior if a pilot performs an action that exceeds the remaining control authority of the damaged aircraft. The goal of our work is to increase the pilot s situational awareness by informing him of the type of damage and resulting reduction in flight envelope. Our methodology integrates two inductive learning systems with novel visualization techniques. One learning system, the Inductive Monitoring System (IMS), learns to detect when a simulation includes faulty controls, while two others, Inductive Classification System (INCLASS) and multiple binary decision tree system (utilizing C4.5), determine the type of fault. In off-line training using only non-failure data, IMS constructs a characterization of nominal flight control performance based on control signals issued by the neural net flight controller. This characterization can be used to determine the degree of control augmentation required in the pitch, roll, and yaw command channels to counteract control surface failures. This derived information is typically sufficient to distinguish between the various control surface failures and is used to train both INCLASS and C4.5. Using data from failed control surface flight simulations, INCLASS and C4.5 independently discover and amplify features in IMS results that can be used to differentiate each distinct control surface failure situation. In real-time flight simulations, distinguishing features learned during training are used to classify control surface failures. Knowledge about the type of failure can be used by an additional automated system to alter its approach for planning tactical and strategic maneuvers. The knowledge can also be used directly to increase the pilot s situational awareness and

  16. A Probability-Base Alerting Logic for Aircraft on Parallel Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Brenda D.; Kuchar, James K.

    1997-01-01

    This document discusses the development and evaluation of an airborne collision alerting logic for aircraft on closely-spaced approaches to parallel runways. A novel methodology is used when links alerts to collision probabilities: alerting thresholds are set such that when the probability of a collision exceeds an acceptable hazard level an alert is issued. The logic was designed to limit the hazard level to that estimated for the Precision Runway Monitoring system: one accident in every one thousand blunders which trigger alerts. When the aircraft were constrained to be coaltitude, evaluations of a two-dimensional version of the alerting logic show that the achieved hazard level is approximately one accident in every 250 blunders. Problematic scenarios have been identified and corrections to the logic can be made. The evaluations also show that over eighty percent of all unnecessary alerts were issued during scenarios in which the miss distance would have been less than 1000 ft, indicating that the alerts may have been justified. Also, no unnecessary alerts were generated during normal approaches.

  17. Preliminary design approach for large high precision segmented reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.; Collins, Timothy J.; Hedgepeth, John M.

    1990-01-01

    A simplified preliminary design capability for erectable precision segmented reflectors is presented. This design capability permits a rapid assessment of a wide range of reflector parameters as well as new structural concepts and materials. The preliminary design approach was applied to a range of precision reflectors from 10 meters to 100 meters in diameter while considering standard design drivers. The design drivers considered were: weight, fundamental frequency, launch packaging volume, part count, and on-orbit assembly time. For the range of parameters considered, on-orbit assembly time was identified as the major design driver. A family of modular panels is introduced which can significantly reduce the number of reflector parts and the on-orbit assembly time.

  18. Application of Smart Infrastructure Systems approach to precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Govindaraju, Diddahally R; Annaswamy, Anuradha M

    2015-12-01

    All biological variation is hierarchically organized dynamic network system of genomic components, organelles, cells, tissues, organs, individuals, families, populations and metapopulations. Individuals are axial in this hierarchy, as they represent antecedent, attendant and anticipated aspects of health, disease, evolution and medical care. Humans show individual specific genetic and clinical features such as complexity, cooperation, resilience, robustness, vulnerability, self-organization, latent and emergent behavior during their development, growth and senescence. Accurate collection, measurement, organization and analyses of individual specific data, embedded at all stratified levels of biological, demographic and cultural diversity - the big data - is necessary to make informed decisions on health, disease and longevity; which is a central theme of precision medicine initiative (PMI). This initiative also calls for the development of novel analytical approaches to handle complex multidimensional data. Here we suggest the application of Smart Infrastructure Systems (SIS) approach to accomplish some of the goals set forth by the PMI on the premise that biological systems and the SIS share many common features. The latter has been successfully employed in managing complex networks of non-linear adaptive controls, commonly encountered in smart engineering systems. We highlight their concordance and discuss the utility of the SIS approach in precision medicine programs. PMID:27054084

  19. Application of Smart Infrastructure Systems approach to precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Govindaraju, Diddahally R.; Annaswamy, Anuradha M.

    2015-01-01

    All biological variation is hierarchically organized dynamic network system of genomic components, organelles, cells, tissues, organs, individuals, families, populations and metapopulations. Individuals are axial in this hierarchy, as they represent antecedent, attendant and anticipated aspects of health, disease, evolution and medical care. Humans show individual specific genetic and clinical features such as complexity, cooperation, resilience, robustness, vulnerability, self-organization, latent and emergent behavior during their development, growth and senescence. Accurate collection, measurement, organization and analyses of individual specific data, embedded at all stratified levels of biological, demographic and cultural diversity – the big data – is necessary to make informed decisions on health, disease and longevity; which is a central theme of precision medicine initiative (PMI). This initiative also calls for the development of novel analytical approaches to handle complex multidimensional data. Here we suggest the application of Smart Infrastructure Systems (SIS) approach to accomplish some of the goals set forth by the PMI on the premise that biological systems and the SIS share many common features. The latter has been successfully employed in managing complex networks of non-linear adaptive controls, commonly encountered in smart engineering systems. We highlight their concordance and discuss the utility of the SIS approach in precision medicine programs. PMID:27054084

  20. The ASLOTS concept: An interactive, adaptive decision support concept for Final Approach Spacing of Aircraft (FASA). FAA-NASA Joint University Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    This presentation outlines a concept for an adaptive, interactive decision support system to assist controllers at a busy airport in achieving efficient use of multiple runways. The concept is being implemented as a computer code called FASA (Final Approach Spacing for Aircraft), and will be tested and demonstrated in ATCSIM, a high fidelity simulation of terminal area airspace and airport surface operations. Objectives are: (1) to provide automated cues to assist controllers in the sequencing and spacing of landing and takeoff aircraft; (2) to provide the controller with a limited ability to modify the sequence and spacings between aircraft, and to insert takeoffs and missed approach aircraft in the landing flows; (3) to increase spacing accuracy using more complex and precise separation criteria while reducing controller workload; and (4) achieve higher operational takeoff and landing rates on multiple runways in poor visibility.

  1. A New Approach to Aircraft Robust Performance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Irene M.; Tierno, Jorge E.

    2004-01-01

    A recently developed algorithm for nonlinear system performance analysis has been applied to an F16 aircraft to begin evaluating the suitability of the method for aerospace problems. The algorithm has a potential to be much more efficient than the current methods in performance analysis for aircraft. This paper is the initial step in evaluating this potential.

  2. Electro-optic precision approach and landing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salt, David

    1995-06-01

    The ASIST (Aircraft Ship Integrated Secure and Traverse) system is a second generation shipborne helicopter handling system developed by Indal Technologies Inc. (ITI). The first generation of the RAST (Recovery Assist, Securing and Traversing) system has established itself as the most successful shipborne helicopter handling system in the world, with more than 150 shipsets delivered or on order to naval forces sailing all the world's oceans. ASIST completed sea trials by July 31, 1992 and production units are in operation with the Chilean Navy. A significant feature of ASIST is the incorporation of a Helicopter Position Sensing Subsystem (HPSS) which is based on an automatic target detection technique developed at ITI. The HPSS will detect a laser beacon equipped helicopter within one second (usually 0.25 second) of it appearing in the field of view of the system cameras. The system then will track the helicopter and provide real time helicopter position relative to the landing area updated every 1/30 second until it is landed. A Rapid Securing Device (RSD) will also be driven by the position data to track the helicopter at low hover. Once the system has detected that the helicopter has landed on the deck, the RSD automatically approaches the helicopter and secures it. This occurs within two seconds. The RSD and traversing system are then used to align the helicopter with the deck tracks and manoeuvre it into a hanger, all without the need for manned intervention.

  3. GPS vertical axis performance enhancement for helicopter precision landing approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denaro, Robert P.; Beser, Jacques

    1986-01-01

    Several areas were investigated for improving vertical accuracy for a rotorcraft using the differential Global Positioning System (GPS) during a landing approach. Continuous deltaranging was studied and the potential improvement achieved by estimating acceleration was studied by comparing the performance on a constant acceleration turn and a rough landing profile of several filters: a position-velocity (PV) filter, a position-velocity-constant acceleration (PVAC) filter, and a position-velocity-turning acceleration (PVAT) filter. In overall statistics, the PVAC filter was found to be most efficient with the more complex PVAT performing equally well. Vertical performance was not significantly different among the filters. Satellite selection algorithms based on vertical errors only (vertical dilution of precision or VDOP) and even-weighted cross-track and vertical errors (XVDOP) were tested. The inclusion of an altimeter was studied by modifying the PVAC filter to include a baro bias estimate. Improved vertical accuracy during degraded DOP conditions resulted. Flight test results for raw differential results excluding filter effects indicated that the differential performance significantly improved overall navigation accuracy. A landing glidepath steering algorithm was devised which exploits the flexibility of GPS in determining precise relative position. A method for propagating the steering command over the GPS update interval was implemented.

  4. An intelligent, robust approach to volumetric aircraft sizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upton, Eric

    Advances in computational power have produced great strides in the later design and production portions of an aircraft's life cycle, and these advances have included the internal layout component of the design and manufacturing process. However, conceptual and preliminary design tools for internal layout remain primarily based on historical regressions and estimations---a situation that becomes untenable when considering revolutionary designs or component technologies. Bringing internal layout information forward in the design process can encourage the same level of benefits enjoyed by other disciplines as advances in aerodynamics, structures and other fields propagate forward in the design of complex systems. Accurate prediction of the volume required to contain all of an aircraft's internal components results in a more accurate prediction of aircraft specifications, mission effectiveness, and costs, helping determine if an aircraft is the best choice for continued development. This is not a computationally simple problem, however, and great care must be taken to ensure the efficiency of any proposed solution. Any solution must also address the uncertainty inherent in describing internal components early in the design process. Implementing a methodology that applies notions of an intelligent search for a solution, as well as deals robustly with component sizing, produces a high chance of success. Development of a robust, rapid method for assessing the volumetric characteristics of an aircraft in the context of the conceptual and preliminary design processes can offer many of the benefits of a complete internal layout without the immense assignment of resources typical in the detail phase of the design process. A simplified methodology for volumetrically sizing an aircraft is presented here as well as an assessment of the state-of-the-art techniques for volumetric considerations used in current aircraft design literature. A prototype tool using a combination of

  5. A Variable Precision Attribute Reduction Approach in Multilabel Decision Tables

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua; Li, Deyu; Zhai, Yanhui; Wang, Suge; Zhang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Owing to the high dimensionality of multilabel data, feature selection in multilabel learning will be necessary in order to reduce the redundant features and improve the performance of multilabel classification. Rough set theory, as a valid mathematical tool for data analysis, has been widely applied to feature selection (also called attribute reduction). In this study, we propose a variable precision attribute reduct for multilabel data based on rough set theory, called δ-confidence reduct, which can correctly capture the uncertainty implied among labels. Furthermore, judgement theory and discernibility matrix associated with δ-confidence reduct are also introduced, from which we can obtain the approach to knowledge reduction in multilabel decision tables. PMID:25170521

  6. A variable precision attribute reduction approach in multilabel decision tables.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Li, Deyu; Zhai, Yanhui; Wang, Suge; Zhang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Owing to the high dimensionality of multilabel data, feature selection in multilabel learning will be necessary in order to reduce the redundant features and improve the performance of multilabel classification. Rough set theory, as a valid mathematical tool for data analysis, has been widely applied to feature selection (also called attribute reduction). In this study, we propose a variable precision attribute reduct for multilabel data based on rough set theory, called δ-confidence reduct, which can correctly capture the uncertainty implied among labels. Furthermore, judgement theory and discernibility matrix associated with δ-confidence reduct are also introduced, from which we can obtain the approach to knowledge reduction in multilabel decision tables. PMID:25170521

  7. Single-frequency precise point positioning: an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterle, Oskar; Stopar, Bojan; Pavlovčič Prešeren, Polona

    2015-08-01

    An analytical approach to single-frequency precise point positioning (PPP) is discussed in this paper. To obtain highest precision results, all biases must be eliminated or modelled to centimetre level. The use of the GRAPHIC ionosphere-free linear combination that is based on single-frequency phase and code observations eliminates the ionosphere bias; however, the rank deficient Gauss-Markov model is obtained. We explicitly determine rank deficiency of a Gauss-Markov model as a number of all ambiguity clusters, each of them defined as a set of all ambiguities overlapping in time. On the basis of S-transformation we prove that the single-frequency PPP represents an unbiased estimator for station coordinates and troposphere parameters, while it presents a biased estimator for ambiguities and receiver-clock error parameters. Additionally we describe the estimable parameters in each ambiguity cluster as the differences between ambiguity parameters and the sum of receiver-clock parameters with one of the ambiguities. We also show that any other particular solution on the basis of S-transformation is obtained only when the common least-squares estimation in single step is applied. The recursive least-squares estimation with parameter pre-elimination only determines the vector of unknowns as possible to transform through S-transformation, whereas the same does not hold for the cofactor matrix of unknowns. For a case study, we present our method on GPS data from 19 permanent stations (14 IGS and 5 EPN) in Europe, for 89 consecutive days in the beginning of 2013. The static case study revealed the precision of daily coordinates as 7.6, 11.7 and 19.6 mm for , and , respectively. The accuracies of the , and components were determined as 6.9, 13.5 and 31.4 mm, respectively, and were calculated using the Helmert transformation of weighted-mean daily single-frequency PPP and IGb08 coordinates. The estimated convergence times were relatively diverse, expanding from 1.75 h (CAGL

  8. Development and flight test of an X-band precision approach concept for remote-area rotorcraft operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clary, G. R.; Chisholm, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    A novel airborne radar-based precision approach concept was developed and flight tested as a part of NASA's Rotorcraft All-Weather Operations Research Program. A demonstration, transponder-based beacon landing system (BLS), incorporating state-of-the-art X-band radar technology and digital processing techniques, was built and flight tested to demonstrate the concept feasibility. The BLS airborne hardware consists of an add-on microprocessor, installed in conjunction with the aircraft weather/mapping radar, which analyzes the radar beacon receiver returns and determines range, localizer deviation, and glide slope deviation. The ground station is an inexpensive, portable unit which can be quickly deployed at a landing site. Results from the flight test program show that the BLS concept has a significant potential for providing rotorcraft with low-cost, precision, instrument approach capability in remote areas. Previously announced in STAR as N84-10041

  9. Development and flight test of an X-band precision approach concept for remote-area rotorcraft operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clary, G. R.; Chisholm, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    A novel airborne radar-based precision approach concept was developed and flight tested as a part of NASA's Rotorcraft All-Weather Operations Research Program. A demonstration, transponder-based beacon landing system (BLS), incorporating state-of-the-art X-band radar technology and digital processing techniques, was built and flight tested to demonstrate the concept feasibility. The BLS airborne hardware consists of an add-on microprocessor, installed in conjunction with the aircraft weather/mapping radar, which analyzes the radar beacon receiver returns and determines range, localizer deviation, and glide slope deviation. The ground station is an inexpensive, portable unit which can be quickly deployed at a landing site. Results from the flight test program show that the BLS concept has a significant potential for providing rotorcraft with low-cost, precision, instrument approach capability in remote areas.

  10. Improving safety of aircraft engines: a consortium approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasche, Lisa J. H.

    1996-11-01

    With over seven million departures per year, air transportation has become not a luxury, but a standard mode of transportation for the United States. A critical aspect of modern air transport is the jet engine, a complex engineered component that has enabled the rapid travel to which we have all become accustomed. One of the enabling technologies for safe air travel is nondestructive evaluation, or NDE, which includes various inspection techniques used to assess the health or integrity of a structure, component, or material. The Engine Titanium Consortium (ETC) was established in 1993 to respond to recommendations made by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Titanium Rotating Components Review Team (TRCRT) for improvements in inspection of engine titanium. Several recent accomplishments of the ETC are detailed in this paper. The objective of the Engine Titanium Consortium is to provide the FAAand the manufacturers with reliable and costeffective new methods and/or improvements in mature methods for detecting cracks, inclusions, and imperfections in titanium. The consortium consists of a team of researchers from academia and industry-namely, Iowa State University, Allied Signal Propulsion Engines, General Electric Aircraft Engines, and Pratt & Whitney Engines-who work together to develop program priorities, organize a program plan, conduct the research, and implement the solutions. The true advantage of the consortium approach is that it brings together the research talents of academia and the engineering talents of industry to tackle a technology-base problem. In bringing industrial competitors together, the consortium ensures that the research results, which have safety implications and result from FAA funds, are shared and become part of the public domain.

  11. Technical note: An improved approach to determining background aerosol concentrations with PILS sampling on aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukami, Christine S.; Sullivan, Amy P.; Ryan Fulgham, S.; Murschell, Trey; Borch, Thomas; Smith, James N.; Farmer, Delphine K.

    2016-07-01

    Particle-into-Liquid Samplers (PILS) have become a standard aerosol collection technique, and are widely used in both ground and aircraft measurements in conjunction with off-line ion chromatography (IC) measurements. Accurate and precise background samples are essential to account for gas-phase components not efficiently removed and any interference in the instrument lines, collection vials or off-line analysis procedures. For aircraft sampling with PILS, backgrounds are typically taken with in-line filters to remove particles prior to sample collection once or twice per flight with more numerous backgrounds taken on the ground. Here, we use data collected during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) to demonstrate that not only are multiple background filter samples are essential to attain a representative background, but that the chemical background signals do not follow the Gaussian statistics typically assumed. Instead, the background signals for all chemical components analyzed from 137 background samples (taken from ∼78 total sampling hours over 18 flights) follow a log-normal distribution, meaning that the typical approaches of averaging background samples and/or assuming a Gaussian distribution cause an over-estimation of background samples - and thus an underestimation of sample concentrations. Our approach of deriving backgrounds from the peak of the log-normal distribution results in detection limits of 0.25, 0.32, 3.9, 0.17, 0.75 and 0.57 μg m-3 for sub-micron aerosol nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), ammonium (NH4+), sulfate (SO42-), potassium (K+) and calcium (Ca2+), respectively. The difference in backgrounds calculated from assuming a Gaussian distribution versus a log-normal distribution were most extreme for NH4+, resulting in a background that was 1.58× that determined from fitting a log-normal distribution.

  12. A computational intelligence approach to the Mars Precision Landing problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birge, Brian Kent, III

    Various proposed Mars missions, such as the Mars Sample Return Mission (MRSR) and the Mars Smart Lander (MSL), require precise re-entry terminal position and velocity states. This is to achieve mission objectives including rendezvous with a previous landed mission, or reaching a particular geographic landmark. The current state of the art footprint is in the magnitude of kilometers. For this research a Mars Precision Landing is achieved with a landed footprint of no more than 100 meters, for a set of initial entry conditions representing worst guess dispersions. Obstacles to reducing the landed footprint include trajectory dispersions due to initial atmospheric entry conditions (entry angle, parachute deployment height, etc.), environment (wind, atmospheric density, etc.), parachute deployment dynamics, unavoidable injection error (propagated error from launch on), etc. Weather and atmospheric models have been developed. Three descent scenarios have been examined. First, terminal re-entry is achieved via a ballistic parachute with concurrent thrusting events while on the parachute, followed by a gravity turn. Second, terminal re-entry is achieved via a ballistic parachute followed by gravity turn to hover and then thrust vector to desired location. Third, a guided parafoil approach followed by vectored thrusting to reach terminal velocity is examined. The guided parafoil is determined to be the best architecture. The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility of using a computational intelligence strategy to facilitate precision planetary re-entry, specifically to take an approach that is somewhat more intuitive and less rigid, and see where it leads. The test problems used for all research are variations on proposed Mars landing mission scenarios developed by NASA. A relatively recent method of evolutionary computation is Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), which can be considered to be in the same general class as Genetic Algorithms. An improvement over

  13. Airborne Precision Spacing: A Trajectory-based Approach to Improve Terminal Area Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    Airborne Precision Spacing has been developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) over the past seven years as an attempt to benefit from the capabilities of the flight deck to precisely space their aircraft relative to another aircraft. This development has leveraged decades of work on improving terminal area operations, especially the arrival phase. With APS operations, the air traffic controller instructs the participating aircraft to achieve an assigned inter-arrival spacing interval at the runway threshold, relative to another aircraft. The flight crew then uses airborne automation to manage the aircraft s speed to achieve the goal. The spacing tool is designed to keep the speed within acceptable operational limits, promote system-wide stability, and meet the assigned goal. This reallocation of tasks with the controller issuing strategic goals and the flight crew managing the tactical achievement of those goals has been shown to be feasible through simulation and flight test. A precision of plus or minus 2-3 seconds is generally achievable. Simulations of long strings of arriving traffic show no signs of instabilities or compression waves. Subject pilots have rated the workload to be similar to current-day operations and eye-tracking data substantiate this result. This paper will present a high-level review of research results over the past seven years from a variety of tests and experiments. The results will focus on the precision and accuracy achievable, flow stability and some major sources of uncertainty. The paper also includes a summary of the flight crew s procedures and interface and a brief concept overview.

  14. Landing approach evaluation of an integrated CRT display for general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, P. D.; Stinnett, G. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A flight director adaptable to general aviation aircraft was evaluated for the landing approach task in a twin turbojet business aircraft. The flight director combined aircraft heading, pitch and roll atitude, and ILS (Instrument Landing System) signals into a single picture on a small cathode ray tube (CRT) to give the pilot an integrated picture of the aircraft situation. The display is unique in that it presents the information on a CRT and gives quasi-command signals to the pilot. The particular display investigated was a preproduction version of the Kaiser Model FP-50 flight director. Approaches made with visual references only, with a conventional ILS displacement instrument, and with the CRT display were compared in terms of tracking performance and pilot workload. Tracking performance of three research pilots using the CRT display was superior to that using the conventional ILS instrument and comparable to that under VFR conditions. Pilot workload (based on pilot comments) was not clearly decreased.

  15. Aircraft optimization by a system approach: Achievements and trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1992-01-01

    Recently emerging methodology for optimal design of aircraft treated as a system of interacting physical phenomena and parts is examined. The methodology is found to coalesce into methods for hierarchic, non-hierarchic, and hybrid systems all dependent on sensitivity analysis. A separate category of methods has also evolved independent of sensitivity analysis, hence suitable for discrete problems. References and numerical applications are cited. Massively parallel computer processing is seen as enabling technology for practical implementation of the methodology.

  16. Ozone contamination in aircraft cabins: Objectives and approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    Three panels were developed to solve the problem of ozone contamination in aircraft cabins. The problem is defined from direct in-flight measurements of ozone concentrations inside and outside airliners in their normal operations. Solutions to the cabin ozone problem are discussed under two areas: (1) flight planning to avoid high ozone concentrations, and (2) ozone destruction techniques installed in the cabin air systems.

  17. Plasma Gradient Piston: a new approach to precision pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisbrey, Shon T.

    2011-10-01

    We have successfully developed a method to create shaped pressure drives from large shocks that can be applied to a wide variety of experimental platforms. The method consists of transforming a large shock or blast wave into a ramped pressured drive by utilizing a graded density reservoir that unloads across a gap and stagnates against the sample being studied. The utilization of a graded density reservoir, different materials, and a gap transforms the energy in the initial large shock into a quasi-isentropic ramped compression. Control of the ramp history is via the size of the initial shock, the chosen reservoir materials, their densities, the thickness of each density layer, and the gap size. There are two keys to utilizing this approach to create ramped drives: the ability to produce a large shock, and making the layered density reservoir. A number of facilities can produce the strong initial shock (Z, Omega, NIF, Phoenix, high explosives, NIKE, LMJ, pulsed power,...). We have demonstrated ramped drives from 0.5 to 1.5 Mbar utilizing a large shock created at the Omega laser facility. We recently concluded a pair of NIF drive shots where we successfully converted a hohlraum-generated shock into a stepped, ramped pressure drive with a peak pressure of ~4 - 5 Mbar in a Ta sample. We will explain the basic concepts needed for producing a ramped pressure drive, compare experimental data with simulations from Omega (Pmax ~ 1 Mbar) and NIF (Pmax ~ 5-10 Mbar), and present designs for ramped, staged-shock designs up to Pmax ~ 30 Mbar. The approach that we have developed enables precision pulse shaping of the drive (applied pressure vs. time) via target characteristics, as opposed to tailoring laser power vs time or Z-pinch facility current vs time. This enables ramped, quasi-isentropic materials studies to be performed on a wide variety of HED facilities. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  18. Precision glass molding: an integrative approach for the production of high precision micro-optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hünten, Martin; Klocke, Fritz; Dambon, Olaf

    2010-02-01

    Miniaturization and integration are the dominating factors for the success of numerous optical devices. Conventional manufacturing processes for the fabrication of precise glass optics by means of grinding and polishing cannot cope the increasing demands in terms of precision, volume and costs. Here, precision glass molding is the enabling technology to meet these demands of the future optical products and applications. Since the market requests further miniaturization and integration of the micro optical components the possession of the entire sequence of processes is absolutely essential. With the accomplished and ongoing developments at the Fraunhofer IPT, the replication of double-sided (a)spherical and (a)cylindrical glass lenses with form accuracies of < 150 nm as well as lens arrays and even freeform optics could be realized. Therefore, a sequence of processes needs to be passed. The FEM-simulation of the molding process which was driven to a point capable to simulate even the molding of freeform optics is the first process step. Further on, new mold design concepts were generated to enable the replication of free formed optics. The research works focusing on the mold manufacturing led to sophisticated grinding process strategies able to realized complex mold geometries such as lens arrays. With regard to the coating of the molds, proceedings were developed assuring a defect free and uniform coating which enables the longevity of the molds and therewith helps reducing the final costs per lens. Thus, the precision glass molding becomes more and more interesting even for highly complex mid volume lots, characteristic for European or US optics manufacturer.

  19. Flight evaluation of stabilization and command augmentation system concepts and cockpit displays during approach and landing of powered-lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Innis, R. C.; Hardy, G. H.

    1980-01-01

    A flight research program was conducted to assess the effectiveness of manual control concepts and various cockpit displays in improving altitude (pitch, roll, and yaw) and longitudinal path control during short takeoff aircraft approaches and landings. Satisfactory flying qualities were demonstrared to minimum decision heights of 30 m (100 ft) for selected stabilization and command augmentation systems and flight director combinations. Precise landings at low touchdown sink rates were achieved with a gentle flare maneuver.

  20. The Automated Aircraft Rework System (AARS): A system integration approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    The Mercer Engineering Research Center (MERC), under contract to the United States Air Force (USAF) since 1989, has been actively involved in providing the Warner Robins Air Logistics Center (WR-ALC) with a robotic workcell designed to perform rework automated defastening and hole location/transfer operations on F-15 wings. This paper describes the activities required to develop and implement this workcell, known as the Automated Aircraft Rework System (AARS). AARS is scheduled to be completely installed and in operation at WR-ALC by September 1994.

  1. An approach to vibration analysis using wavelets in an application of aircraft health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Cary; Akujuobi, Cajetan M.; Hamory, Phil; Kloesel, Kurt

    2007-04-01

    This paper explores an application of vibration detection in aircraft. Fatigue and breakdown of aircraft structure are common. Thus, efforts are made to constantly improve the monitoring and diagnostic systems for aircraft. These improvements have led to various approaches to fault monitoring in aircraft. In this work, the characteristic features of vibration signals are extracted from noise using the Haar, Daubechies, and Morlet wavelets. Then, detection of the vibration signal is achieved using the signal's scalogram information. Based on initial results, the wavelet-based algorithm is optimised through threshold experimentation. Additionally, the algorithm is verified using the simulation of a sinusoidal waveform and real flight data from the F-15B/836 research airplane.

  2. Precision aspheric optics testing with SCOTS: a deflectometry approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Peng; Khreishi, Manal; Huang, Run; Su, Tianquan; Burge, James H.

    2013-04-01

    Absolute measurement with SCOTS/deflectometry is a calibration problem. We use a laser tracker to calibrate the test geometry. The performance id demonstrated with the initial measurement results from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope tertiary mirror. Systematic errors from the camera are carefully controlled. Camera pupil imaging aberration is removed with an external aperture stop. Imaging aberration and other inherent errors are suppressed with a rotation test. Results show that the SCOTS can act as a large dynamic range, high precision, non-null test method for precision aspheric optics. The SCOTS test can achieve measurement accuracy comparable with the traditional interferometric testing.

  3. A composite system approach to aircraft cabin fire safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.; Gilwee, W. J., Jr.; Lerner, N. R.; Hilado, C. J.; Labossiere, L. A.; Hsu, M. T. S.

    1976-01-01

    The thermochemical and flammability characteristics of two polymeric composites currently in use and seven others being considered for use as aircraft interior panels are described. The properties studied included: (1) limiting oxygen index of the composite constituents; (2) fire containment capability of the composite; (3) smoke evolution from the composite; (4) thermogravimetric analysis; (5) composition of the volatile products of thermal degradation; and (6) relative toxicity of the volatile products of pyrolysis. The performance of high temperature laminating resins such as bismaleimides is compared with the performance of phenolics and epoxies. The relationship of increased fire safety with the use of polymers with high anaerobic char yield is shown. Processing parameters of one of the baremaleimide composites are detailed.

  4. Characterizing a Wake-Free Safe Zone for the Simplified Aircraft-Based Paired Approach Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerreiro, Nelson M.; Neitzke, Kurt W.; Johnson, Sally C.; Stough, H. Paul, III; McKissick, Burnell T.; Syed, Hazari I.

    2010-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has proposed a concept of operations geared towards achieving increased arrival throughput at U.S. Airports, known as the Simplified Aircraft-based Paired Approach (SAPA) concept. In this study, a preliminary characterization of a wake-free safe zone (WFSZ) for the SAPA concept has been performed. The experiment employed Monte-Carlo simulations of varying approach profiles by aircraft pairs to closely-spaced parallel runways. Three different runway lateral spacings were investigated (750 ft, 1000 ft and 1400 ft), along with no stagger and 1500 ft stagger between runway thresholds. The paired aircraft were flown in a leader/trailer configuration with potential wake encounters detected using a wake detection surface translating with the trailing aircraft. The WFSZ is characterized in terms of the smallest observed initial in-trail distance leading to a wake encounter anywhere along the approach path of the aircraft. The results suggest that the WFSZ can be characterized in terms of two primary altitude regions, in ground-effect (IGE) and out of ground-effect (OGE), with the IGE region being the limiting case with a significantly smaller WFSZ. Runway stagger was observed to only modestly reduce the WFSZ size, predominantly in the OGE region.

  5. An Evidenced-Based Approach for Estimating Decompression Sickness Risk in Aircraft Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Ronald R.; Dervay, Joseph P.; Conkin, Johnny

    1999-01-01

    Estimating the risk of decompression Sickness (DCS) in aircraft operations remains a challenge, making the reduction of this risk through the development of operationally acceptable denitrogenation schedules difficult. In addition, the medical recommendations which are promulgated are often not supported by rigorous evaluation of the available data, but are instead arrived at by negotiation with the aircraft operations community, are adapted from other similar aircraft operations, or are based upon the opinion of the local medical community. We present a systematic approach for defining DCS risk in aircraft operations by analyzing the data available for a specific aircraft, flight profile, and aviator population. Once the risk of DCS in a particular aircraft operation is known, appropriate steps can be taken to reduce this risk to a level acceptable to the applicable aviation community. Using this technique will allow any aviation medical community to arrive at the best estimate of DCS risk for its specific mission and aviator population and will allow systematic reevaluation of the decisions regarding DCS risk reduction when additional data are available.

  6. A unique approach to fabricating precision space structures elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohan, H.; Johnson, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure of fabricating graphite epoxy columns used in the assembly of large space platforms is described. The requirement for precise dimensional control led to a unique hot resin injection process. Dry, high modulus fiber is wound over a vertically mounted steam-heated mandrel. A steam-heated sleeve or caul is slipped over the wound mandrel and resin is injected and cured in place. Approximately 200 column elements have been fabricated using this efficient process.

  7. Longitudinal handling qualities during approach and landing of a powered lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Innis, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Longitudinal handling qualities evaluations were conducted on the Ames Research Center Flight Simulator for Advanced Aircraft (FSAA) for the approach and landing tasks of a powered lift STOL research aircraft. The test vehicle was a C-8A aircraft modified with a new wing incorporating internal blowing over an augmentor flap. The investigation included: (1) use of various flight path and airspeed control techniques for the basic vehicle; (2) assessment of stability and command augmentation schemes for pitch attitude and airspeed control; (3) determination of the influence of longitudinal and vertical force coupling for the power control; (4) determination of the influence of pitch axis coupling with the thrust vector control; and (5) evaluations of the contribution of stability and command augmentation to recovery from a single engine failure. Results are presented in the form of pilot ratings and commentary substantiated by landing approach time histories.

  8. An artificial intelligence approach to onboard fault monitoring and diagnosis for aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, P. C.; Abbott, K. H.

    1986-01-01

    Real-time onboard fault monitoring and diagnosis for aircraft applications, whether performed by the human pilot or by automation, presents many difficult problems. Quick response to failures may be critical, the pilot often must compensate for the failure while diagnosing it, his information about the state of the aircraft is often incomplete, and the behavior of the aircraft changes as the effect of the failure propagates through the system. A research effort was initiated to identify guidelines for automation of onboard fault monitoring and diagnosis and associated crew interfaces. The effort began by determining the flight crew's information requirements for fault monitoring and diagnosis and the various reasoning strategies they use. Based on this information, a conceptual architecture was developed for the fault monitoring and diagnosis process. This architecture represents an approach and a framework which, once incorporated with the necessary detail and knowledge, can be a fully operational fault monitoring and diagnosis system, as well as providing the basis for comparison of this approach to other fault monitoring and diagnosis concepts. The architecture encompasses all aspects of the aircraft's operation, including navigation, guidance and controls, and subsystem status. The portion of the architecture that encompasses subsystem monitoring and diagnosis was implemented for an aircraft turbofan engine to explore and demonstrate the AI concepts involved. This paper describes the architecture and the implementation for the engine subsystem.

  9. All-order approach to high-precision atomic calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskrenova-Tchoukova, Eugeniya

    High-precision atomic calculations combined with experiments of matching accuracy provide an excellent opportunity to test our understanding of atomic structure and properties as well as the many-body atomic theories. The relativistic all-order method, which is a linearized version of the coupled-cluster singles-doubles method, has proven to yield high precision results for a variety of atomic properties. In this thesis, we study the atomic properties of neutral atoms and ions by means of the relativistic all-order method. The lifetimes and ground state static polarizabilities of a singly ionized barium atom are studied in comparison with the isoelectronic neutral cesium atom and with a singly ionized calcium atom. The lifetimes of a number of excited states in atomic potassium, rubidium, and francium are theoretically calculated and compared with the available experimental data. The magnetic dipole hyperfine constant of the 9S1/2 state in 210Fr is calculated and the result is combined with the experimental one to extract the value of the 210Fr nuclear magnetic moment. Another part of the thesis work focuses on the development and implementation of an extension of the currently used all-order singles-doubles (SD) method to include all valence triple excitations in an iterative way, all-order SD+vT approximation. Some of the ideas and results presented in Chapters 4, 5, and 6 have been published and are subject to copyright laws. These publications are cited accordingly.

  10. A planning approach for agricultural watersheds using precision conservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This brief article, written for a non-technical audience, discusses a recently-developed approach for watershed planning and nutrient reduction. The approach can help local stakeholders identify conservation practices that are locally preferred and determine how those practices can be distributed ac...

  11. The design and implementation of a low-cost GPS-MEMS/INS precision approach algorithm with health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Richard P.

    An algorithm for precision approach guidance using GPS and a MicroElectroMechanical Systems/Inertial Navigation System (MEMS/INS) has been developed to meet the Required Navigational Performance (RNP) at a cost that is suitable for General Aviation (GA) applications. This scheme allows for accurate approach guidance (Category I) using Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) at locations not served by ILS, MLS or other types of precision landing guidance, thereby greatly expanding the number of useable airports in poor weather. At locations served by a Local Area Augmentation System (LAAS), Category III-like navigation is possible with the novel idea of a Missed Approach Time (MAT) that is similar to a Missed Approach Point (MAP) but not fixed in space. Though certain augmented types of GPS have sufficient precision for approach navigation, its use alone is insufficient to meet RNP due to an inability to monitor loss, degradation or intentional spoofing and meaconing of the GPS signal. A redundant navigation system and a health monitoring system must be added to acquire sufficient reliability, safety and time-to-alert as stated by required navigation performance. An inertial navigation system is the best choice, as it requires no external radio signals and its errors are complementary to GPS. An aiding Kalman filter is used to derive parameters that monitor the correlation between the GPS and MEMS/INS. These approach guidance parameters determines the MAT for a given RNP and provide the pilot or autopilot with proceed/do-not-proceed decision in real time. The enabling technology used to derive the guidance program is a MEMS gyroscope and accelerometer package in conjunction with a single-antenna pseudo-attitude algorithm. To be viable for most GA applications, the hardware must be reasonably priced. The MEMS gyros allows for the first cost-effective INS package to be developed. With lower cost, however, comes higher drift rates and a more dependence on GPS aiding. In

  12. Monitoring estuarine circulation and ocean waste dispersion using an integrated satellite-aircraft-drogue approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V.; Davis, G.; Wang, H.; Whelan, W.; Tornatore, G.

    1976-01-01

    The mounting economic pressure to extract oil and other resources from the Continental Shelf and to continue using the Shelf for waste disposal is creating a need for cost-effective synoptic means of determining currents in this area. An integrated satellite-aircraft-drogue approach has been developed which employs remotely tracked expendable drogues together with satellite and aircraft observations of waste plumes and tracers, such as dyes or suspended sediment. Tests conducted on the Continental Shelf and in Delaware Bay indicate that the system provides a cost-effective means of studying current circulation, oil slick movement, and ocean waste dispersion even under severe environmental conditions.

  13. Identification of multiloop pilot describing functions obtained from simulated approaches to an aircraft carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewell, W. F.

    1981-01-01

    Predicted results of a simulation of the pilot's approach control strategy in the presence of pilot remnant are presented. The aircraft dynamics and the turbulence environment are representative of a trainer-type aircraft. The non-intrusive pilot identification program (NIPIP) was used to identify the pilot's control strategy required by this highly-coupled, multiloop control task. The results are presented in terms of frequency responses of the individual elements of the pilot's control strategy and indicate that NIPIP can identify the pilot's describing functions even in the presence of significant amounts of pilot remnant.

  14. An Adaptive Nonlinear Aircraft Maneuvering Envelope Estimation Approach for Online Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuet, Stefan R.; Lombaerts, Thomas Jan; Acosta, Diana; Wheeler, Kevin; Kaneshige, John

    2014-01-01

    A nonlinear aircraft model is presented and used to develop an overall unified robust and adaptive approach to passive trim and maneuverability envelope estimation with uncertainty quantification. The concept of time scale separation makes this method suitable for the online characterization of altered safe maneuvering limitations after impairment. The results can be used to provide pilot feedback and/or be combined with flight planning, trajectory generation, and guidance algorithms to help maintain safe aircraft operations in both nominal and off-nominal scenarios.

  15. The ground effects of a powered-lift STOL aircraft during landing approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Victor C.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of ground proximity on a powered lift STOL aircraft are presented. The data are from NASA's Quiet Short Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA) flown at landing approach airspeeds of less than 60 knots with an 80 lb/sq ft wing loading. These results show that the ground effect change in lift is positive and does significantly reduce the touchdown sink rate. These results are compared to those of the YC-14 and YC-15. The change in drag and pitching moment caused by ground effects is also presented.

  16. Nutritional interventions for Alzheimer's prevention: a clinical precision medicine approach.

    PubMed

    Schelke, Matthew W; Hackett, Katherine; Chen, Jaclyn L; Shih, Chiashin; Shum, Jessica; Montgomery, Mary E; Chiang, Gloria C; Berkowitz, Cara; Seifan, Alon; Krikorian, Robert; Isaacson, Richard Scott

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a major source of morbidity and mortality, with the disease burden expected to rise as the population ages. No disease-modifying agent is currently available, but recent research suggests that nutritional and lifestyle modifications can delay or prevent the onset of AD. However, preventive nutritional interventions are not universally applicable and depend on the clinical profile of the individual patient. This article reviews existing nutritional modalities for AD prevention that act through improvement of insulin resistance, correction of dyslipidemia, and reduction of oxidative stress, and discusses how they may be modified on the basis of individual biomarkers, genetics, and behavior. In addition, we report preliminary results of clinical application of these personalized interventions at the first AD prevention clinic in the United States. The use of these personalized interventions represents an important application of precision medicine techniques for the prevention of AD that can be adopted by clinicians across disciplines. PMID:27116241

  17. Development of an Aircraft Approach and Departure Atmospheric Profile Generation Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Bill K.; Velotas, Steven G.; Rutishauser, David K. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    In support of NASA Virtual Airspace Modeling and Simulation (VAMS) project, an effort was initiated to develop and test techniques for extracting meteorological data from landing and departing aircraft, and for building altitude based profiles for key meteorological parameters from these data. The generated atmospheric profiles will be used as inputs to NASA s Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOLSS) Prediction Algorithm (APA) for benefits and trade analysis. A Wake Vortex Advisory System (WakeVAS) is being developed to apply weather and wake prediction and sensing technologies with procedures to reduce current wake separation criteria when safe and appropriate to increase airport operational efficiency. The purpose of this report is to document the initial theory and design of the Aircraft Approach Departure Atmospheric Profile Generation Algorithm.

  18. Analytical design and simulation evaluation of an approach flight director system for a jet STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, R. H.; Hofmann, L. G.; Mcruer, D. T.

    1974-01-01

    A program was undertaken to develop design criteria and operational procedures for STOL transport aircraft. As part of that program, a series of flight tests shall be performed in an Augmentor Wing Jet STOL Aircraft. In preparation for the flight test programs, an analytical study was conducted to gain an understanding of the characteristics of the vehicle for manual control, to assess the relative merits of the variety of manual control techniques available with attitude and thrust vector controllers, and to determine what improvements can be made over manual control of the bare airframe by providing the pilot with suitable command guidance information and by augmentation of the bare airframe dynamics. The objective of the study is to apply closed-loop pilot/vehicle analysis techniques to the analysis of manual flight control of powered-lift STOL aircraft in the landing approach and to the design and experimental verification of an advanced flight director display.

  19. Multilevel decomposition approach to the preliminary sizing of a transport aircraft wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrenn, Gregory A.; Dovi, Augustine R.

    1990-01-01

    A multilevel/multidisciplinary optimization scheme for sizing an aircraft wing structure is described. A methodology using nonlinear programming in application to a very large engineering problem is presented. This capability is due to the decomposition approach. Over 1300 design variables are considered for this nonlinear optimization task. In addition, a mathematical link is established coupling the detail of structural sizing to the overall system performance objective, such as fuel consumption. The scheme is implemented as a three level system analyzing aircraft mission performance at the top level, the total aircraft structure as the middle level, and individual stiffened wing skin cover panels at the bottom level. Numerical show effectiveness of the method and its good convergence characteristics.

  20. Toward Reduced Aircraft Community Noise Impact Via a Perception-Influenced Design Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This is an exciting time for aircraft design. New configurations, including small multi-rotor uncrewed aerial systems, fixed- and tilt-wing distributed electric propulsion aircraft, high-speed rotorcraft, hybrid-electric commercial transports, and low-boom supersonic transports, are being made possible through a host of propulsion and airframe technology developments. The resulting noise signatures may be radically different, both spectrally and temporally, than those of the current fleet. Noise certification metrics currently used in aircraft design do not necessarily reflect these characteristics and therefore may not correlate well with human response. Further, as operations and missions become less airport-centric, e.g., those associated with on-demand mobility or package delivery, vehicles may operate in closer proximity to the population than ever before. Fortunately, a new set of tools are available for assessing human perception during the design process in order to affect the final design in a positive manner. The tool chain utilizes system noise prediction methods coupled with auralization and psychoacoustic testing, making possible the inclusion of human response to noise, along with performance criteria and certification requirements, into the aircraft design process. Several case studies are considered to illustrate how this approach could be used to influence the design of future aircraft.

  1. Approach for Service Life Extension of Explosive Devices for Aircraft Escape Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.; Schimmel, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The service life evaluation of explosive devices used in a wide variety of aircraft escape systems is described. The purpose was to develop a service extension approach, supported by tests on candidate devices, to evaluate the effects of service, age, and degradation, and allow responsible, conservative, service life determinations. An overview is given on the recommended approach and experimental procedures for accurate service evaluations with test results on rigid and flexible explosive transfer lines, one-way transfers, and flexible linear shaped charges.

  2. A new approach to complete aircraft landing gear noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Leonard V.

    This thesis describes a new landing gear noise prediction system developed at The Pennsylvania State University, called Landing Gear Model and Acoustic Prediction code (LGMAP). LGMAP is used to predict the noise of an isolated or installed landing gear geometry. The predictions include several techniques to approximate the aeroacoustic and aerodynamic interactions of landing gear noise generation. These include (1) a method for approximating the shielding of noise caused by the landing gear geometry, (2) accounting for local flow variations due to the wing geometry, (3) the interaction of the landing gear wake with high-lift devices, and (4) a method for estimating the effect of gross landing gear design changes on local flow and acoustic radiation. The LGMAP aeroacoustic prediction system has been created to predict the noise generated by a given landing gear. The landing gear is modeled as a set of simple components that represent individual parts of the structure. Each component, ranging from large to small, is represented by a simple geometric shape and the unsteady flow on the component is modeled based on an individual characteristic length, local flow velocity, and the turbulent flow environment. A small set of universal models is developed and applied to a large range of similar components. These universal models, combined with the actual component geometry and local environment, give a unique loading spectrum and acoustic field for each component. Then, the sum of all the individual components in the complete configuration is used to model the high level of geometric complexity typical of current aircraft undercarriage designs. A line of sight shielding algorithm based on scattering by a two-dimensional cylinder approximates the effect of acoustic shielding caused by the landing gear. Using the scattering from a cylinder in two-dimensions at an observer position directly behind the cylinder, LGMAP is able to estimate the reduction in noise due to shielding

  3. Modular Assembly Approach to Engineer Geometrically Precise Cardiovascular Tissue.

    PubMed

    Lee, Benjamin W; Liu, Bohao; Pluchinsky, Adam; Kim, Nathan; Eng, George; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-04-01

    This modular assembly approach to microfabricate functional cardiovascular tissue composites enables quantitative assessment of the effects of microarchitecture on cellular function. Cardiac and endothelial modules are micromolded separately, designed to direct cardiomyocyte alignment and anisotropic contraction or vascular network formation. Assembled cardiovascular tissue composites contract synchronously, facilitating the use of this tissue-engineering platform to study structure-function relationships in the heart. PMID:26865105

  4. Precision Cosmology with a New Probabilistic Photometric Redshifts Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco Kind, Matias; Brunner, R. J.

    2013-06-01

    A complete understanding of both dark energy and dark matter remains one of most important challenges in astrophysics today. Recent theoretical and numerical computations have made important progress in quantifying the role of these dark components on the formation and evolution of galaxies through cosmic time, but observational verification of these predictions and the development of new, more stringent constraints has not kept pace. It is in this context that, photometric redshifts have become more important with the growth of large imaging surveys, such as DES and LSST, that have been designed to address this issue. But their basic implementation has not changed significantly from their original development, as most techniques provide a single photometric redshift estimate and an associated error for the an extragalactic source. In this work, we present a unique and powerful solution that leverages the full information contained in the photometric data to address this cosmological challenge with a new approach that provides accurate photometric redshift probability density functions (PDF) for galaxies. This new approach, which scales efficiently to massive data, efficiently combines standard template fitting techniques with powerful machine learning methods. Included in this framework is our recently developed technique entitled Trees for PhotoZ (TPZ); a new, robust, parallel photometric redshift code that uses prediction trees and random forests to generate photo-z PDFs in a reliable and fast manner. In addition, our approach also provides ancillary information about the internal structure of the data, including the relative importance of variables used during the redshift estimation, an identification of areas in the training sample that provide poor predictions, and an accurate outlier rejection method. We will also present current results of this approach on a variety of datasets and discuss, by using specific examples, how the full photo-z PDF can be

  5. Integrated Approach to the Dynamics and Control of Maneuvering Flexible Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R. (Technical Monitor); Meirovitch, Leonard; Tuzcu, Ilhan

    2003-01-01

    This work uses a fundamental approach to the problem of simulating the flight of flexible aircraft. To this end, it integrates into a single formulation the pertinent disciplines, namely, analytical dynamics, structural dynamics, aerodynamics, and controls. It considers both the rigid body motions of the aircraft, three translations (forward motion, sideslip and plunge) and three rotations (roll, pitch and yaw), and the elastic deformations of every point of the aircraft, as well as the aerodynamic, propulsion, gravity and control forces. The equations of motion are expressed in a form ideally suited for computer processing. A perturbation approach yields a flight dynamics problem for the motions of a quasi-rigid aircraft and an 'extended aeroelasticity' problem for the elastic deformations and perturbations in the rigid body motions, with the solution of the first problem entering as an input into the second problem. The control forces for the flight dynamics problem are obtained by an 'inverse' process and the feedback controls for the extended aeroservoelasticity problem are determined by the LQG theory. A numerical example presents time simulations of rigid body perturbations and elastic deformations about 1) a steady level flight and 2) a level steady turn maneuver.

  6. Automatic guidance and control of a transport aircraft during a helical landing approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A linear optimal regulator theory was applied to a nonlinear simulation of a transport aircraft performing a helical landing approach. A closed-form expression for the quasi-steady nominal flight path is presented along with the method for determining the corresponding constant nominal control inputs. The Jacobian matrices and the weighting matrices in the cost functional were time varying. A method of solving for the optimal feedback gains is reviewed. The control system was tested on several alternative landing approaches using both 3 deg and 6 deg flight path angles. On each landing approach, the aircraft was subjected to large random initial-state errors and to randomly directed crosswinds. The system was also tested for sensitivity to changes in the parameters of the aircraft and of the atmosphere. Results indicate that performance of the optimal controller on all the 3 deg approaches is very good. The control system proved to be reasonably insensitive to parametric uncertainties. Performance is not as good on the 6 deg approaches. A modification to the 6 deg flight path was proposed for the purpose of improving performance.

  7. Assessment of uncertainties of an aircraft-based mass balance approach for quantifying urban greenhouse gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Shepson, P. B.; Caulton, D. R.; Stirm, B.; Samarov, D.; Gurney, K. R.; Turnbull, J.; Davis, K. J.; Possolo, A.; Karion, A.; Sweeney, C.; Moser, B.; Hendricks, A.; Lauvaux, T.; Mays, K.; Whetstone, J.; Huang, J.; Razlivanov, I.; Miles, N. L.; Richardson, S. J.

    2014-09-01

    Urban environments are the primary contributors to global anthropogenic carbon emissions. Because much of the growth in CO2 emissions will originate from cities, there is a need to develop, assess, and improve measurement and modeling strategies for quantifying and monitoring greenhouse gas emissions from large urban centers. In this study the uncertainties in an aircraft-based mass balance approach for quantifying carbon dioxide and methane emissions from an urban environment, focusing on Indianapolis, IN, USA, are described. The relatively level terrain of Indianapolis facilitated the application of mean wind fields in the mass balance approach. We investigate the uncertainties in our aircraft-based mass balance approach by (1) assessing the sensitivity of the measured flux to important measurement and analysis parameters including wind speed, background CO2 and CH4, boundary layer depth, and interpolation technique, and (2) determining the flux at two or more downwind distances from a point or area source (with relatively large source strengths such as solid waste facilities and a power generating station) in rapid succession, assuming that the emission flux is constant. When we quantify the precision in the approach by comparing the estimated emissions derived from measurements at two or more downwind distances from an area or point source, we find that the minimum and maximum repeatability were 12 and 52%, with an average of 31%. We suggest that improvements in the experimental design can be achieved by careful determination of the background concentration, monitoring the evolution of the boundary layer through the measurement period, and increasing the number of downwind horizontal transect measurements at multiple altitudes within the boundary layer.

  8. Precision and the approach to optimality in quantum annealing processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Mark W.

    The last few years have seen both a significant technological advance towards the practical application of, and a growing scientific interest in the underlying behaviour of quantum annealing (QA) algorithms. A series of commercially available QA processors, most recently the D-Wave 2XTM 1000 qubit processor, have provided a valuable platform for empirical study of QA at a non-trivial scale. From this it has become clear that misspecification of Hamiltonian parameters is an important performance consideration, both for the goal of studying the underlying physics of QA, as well as that of building a practical and useful QA processor. The empirical study of the physics of QA requires a way to look beyond Hamiltonian misspecification.Recently, a solver metric called 'time-to-target' was proposed as a way to compare quantum annealing processors to classical heuristic algorithms. This approach puts emphasis on analyzing a solver's short time approach to the ground state. In this presentation I will review the processor technology, based on superconducting flux qubits, and some of the known sources of error in Hamiltonian specification. I will then discuss recent advances in reducing Hamiltonian specification error, as well as review the time-to-target metric and empirical results analyzed in this way.

  9. Precision Obesity Treatments Including Pharmacogenetic and Nutrigenetic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Solas, Maite; Milagro, Fermin I; Martínez-Urbistondo, Diego; Ramirez, Maria J; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    Five pharmaceutical strategies are currently approved by the US FDA for the treatment of obesity: orlistat, lorcaserin, liraglutide, phentermine/topiramate, and bupropion/naltrexone. The most effective treatment seems to be the combined administration of phentermine/topiramate followed by lorcaserin and bupropion/naltrexone. In relation to the management of excessive weight, other aspects also need to be considered, including comorbidities accompanying obesity, drug interactions, and the risk of negative collateral effects, as well as individualized treatments based on the genetic make-up. This review aims to provide an overview of the approved anti-obesity drugs and newer molecules that could affect different targets in the central nervous system or peripheral tissues, the molecular mechanisms, emerging dietary treatments and phytogenic compounds, and pharmacogenetic/nutrigenetic approaches for personalized obesity management. PMID:27236593

  10. A variable structure approach to robust control of VTOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, A. J.; Kramer, F. S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper examines the application of variable structure control theory to the design of a flight control system for the AV-8A Harrier in a hover mode. The objective in variable structure design is to confine the state trajectories to a subspace of the total state space. The motion in this subspace is insensitive to system parameter variations and external disturbances that lie in the range space of the control. A switching type of control law results from the design procedure. The control system was designed to track a vector-valued velocity command. For comparison, a proportional controller was designed using optimal linear regulator theory. Both controllers were evaluated for their transient response performance using a linear model; then a nonlinear simulation study of a hovering approach to landing was conducted. The variable structure controller outperformed its linear counterpart in the presence of wind disturbances and plant parameter uncertainties afforded by the simulation.

  11. A variable structure approach to robust control of VTOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, A. J.; Kramer, F.

    1982-01-01

    This paper examines the application of variable structure control theory to the design of a flight control system for the AV-8A Harrier in a hover mode. The objective in variable structure design is to confine the motion to a subspace of the total state space. The motion in this subspace is insensitive to system parameter variations and external disturbances that lie in the range space of the control. A switching type of control law results from the design procedure. The control system was designed to track a vector velocity command defined in the body frame. For comparison purposes, a proportional controller was designed using optimal linear regulator theory. Both control designs were first evaluated for transient response performance using a linearized model, then a nonlinear simulation study of a hovering approach to landing was conducted. Wind turbulence was modeled using a 1052 destroyer class air wake model.

  12. Low-cost approach of a 3D display for general aviation aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, Gottfried; Sperl, Roman; Karl, Wunibald

    2001-08-01

    A low cost 3D-display and navigation system is described which presents guidance information in a 3-dimensional format to the pilot. For achieving the low cost goal, Commercial-off-the-Shelf components are used. The visual information provided by the 3D-display includes a presentation of the future flight path and other guidance elements as well as an image of the outside world. For generating the displayed information, a PC will be used. An appropriate computer software is available to generate the displayed information in real-time with an adequately high update rate. Precision navigation data which is required for accurately adjusting the displayed guidance information are provided by an integrated low cost navigation system. This navigation system consists of a differential global positioning system and an inertial measurement unit. Data from the navigation system is fed into an onboard-computer, using terrain elevation and feature analysis data to generate a synthetic image of the outside world. The system is intended to contribute to the safety of General Aviation aircraft, providing an affordable guidance and navigation aid for this type of aircraft. The low cost 3D display and navigation system will be installed in a two-seat Grob 109B aircraft which is operated by the Institute of Flight Mechanics and Flight Control of the Technische Universitchen as a research vehicle.

  13. A simplified fuel control approach for low cost aircraft gas turbines.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, H.

    1973-01-01

    Cost reduction in aircraft turbine engines may be obtained through performance reductions that are acceptable for ranges that are considerably shorter than the range for which current and costly engines were developed. Cost reduction in the fuel control for these cost engines must be achieved without significant performance reduction. This paper describes a fuel control approach that appears to meet this requirement and reviews the work that has been performed on it over the past few years.

  14. An information theoretic approach for generating an aircraft avoidance Markov Decision Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinert, Andrew J.

    Developing a collision avoidance system that can meet safety standards required of commercial aviation is challenging. A dynamic programming approach to collision avoidance has been developed to optimize and generate logics that are robust to the complex dynamics of the national airspace. The current approach represents the aircraft avoidance problem as Markov Decision Processes and independently optimizes a horizontal and vertical maneuver avoidance logics. This is a result of the current memory requirements for each logic, simply combining the logics will result in a significantly larger representation. The "curse of dimensionality" makes it computationally inefficient and unfeasible to optimize this larger representation. However, existing and future collision avoidance systems have mostly defined the decision process by hand. In response, a simulation-based framework was built to better understand how each potential state quantifies the aircraft avoidance problem with regards to safety and operational components. The framework leverages recent advances in signals processing and database, while enabling the highest fidelity analysis of Monte Carlo aircraft encounter simulations to date. This framework enabled the calculation of how well each state of the decision process quantifies the collision risk and the associated memory requirements. Using this analysis, a collision avoidance logic that leverages both horizontal and vertical actions was built and optimized using this simulation based approach.

  15. Evaluation of Flying Qualities and Guidance Displays for an Advanced Tilt-Wing STOL Transport Aircraft in Final Approach and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Chad R.; Franklin, James A.; Hardy, Gordon H.

    2002-01-01

    A piloted simulation was performed on the Vertical Motion Simulator at NASA Ames Research Center to evaluate flying qualities of a tilt-wing Short Take-Off and Landing (STOL) transport aircraft during final approach and landing. The experiment was conducted to assess the design s handling qualities, and to evaluate the use of flightpath-centered guidance for the precision approach and landing tasks required to perform STOL operations in instrument meteorological conditions, turbulence, and wind. Pilots rated the handling qualities to be satisfactory for all operations evaluated except those encountering extreme crosswinds and severe windshear; even in these difficult meteorological conditions, adequate handling qualities were maintained. The advanced flight control laws and guidance displays provided consistent performance and precision landings.

  16. A service life extension (SLEP) approach to operating aging aircraft beyond their original design lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentz, Alan Carter

    With today's uncertain funding climate (including sequestration and continuing budget resolutions), decision makers face severe budgetary challenges to maintain dominance through all aspects of the Department of Defense (DoD). To meet war-fighting capabilities, the DoD continues to extend aircraft programs beyond their design service lives by up to ten years, and occasionally much more. The budget requires a new approach to traditional extension strategies (i.e., reuse, reset, and reclamation) for structural hardware. While extending service life without careful controls can present a safety concern, future operations planning does not consider how much risk is present when operating within sound structural principles. Traditional structural hardware extension methods drive increased costs. Decision makers often overlook the inherent damage tolerance and fatigue capability of structural components and rely on simple time- and flight-based cycle accumulation when determining aircraft retirement lives. This study demonstrates that decision makers should consider risk in addition to the current extension strategies. Through an evaluation of eight military aircraft programs and the application and simulation of F-18 turbine engine usage data, this dissertation shows that insight into actual aircraft mission data, consideration of fatigue capability, and service extension length are key factors to consider. Aircraft structural components, as well as many critical safety components and system designs, have a predefined level of conservatism and inherent damage tolerance. The methods applied in this study would apply to extensions of other critical structures such as bridges. Understanding how much damage tolerance is built into the design compared to the original design usage requirements presents the opportunity to manage systems based on risk. The study presents the sensitivity of these factors and recommends avenues for further research.

  17. Effects of higher order control systems on aircraft approach and landing longitudinal handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasha, M. A.; Dazzo, J. J.; Silverthorn, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation of approach and landing longitudinal flying qualities, based on data generated using a variable stability NT-33 aircraft combined with significant control system dynamics is described. An optimum pilot lead time for pitch tracking, flight path angle tracking, and combined pitch and flight path angle tracking tasks is determined from a closed loop simulation using integral squared error (ISE) as a performance measure. Pilot gain and lead time were varied in the closed loop simulation of the pilot and aircraft to obtain the best performance for different control system configurations. The results lead to the selection of an optimum lead time using ISE as a performance criterion. Using this value of optimum lead time, a correlation is then found between pilot rating and performance with changes in the control system and in the aircraft dynamics. It is also shown that pilot rating is closely related to pilot workload which, in turn, is related to the amount of lead which the pilot must generate to obtain satisfactory response. The results also indicate that the pilot may use pitch angle tracking for the approach task and then add flight path angle tracking for the flare and touchdown.

  18. Sense and avoid requirements for unmanned aircraft systems using a target level of safety approach.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Richard; Schrage, Daniel; Volovoi, Vitali; Jimenez, Hernando

    2014-10-01

    One of the most critical challenges to full integration of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) into the National Airspace System (NAS) is the requirement to comply with CFR 14 Part 91.113 to "see and avoid" other aircraft. Various attempts have been made to develop systems to "sense and avoid" other aircraft so UAS can comply with the intent of the regulation. This article proposes a framework to develop effectiveness requirements for any SAA system by linking UAS characteristics and operating environments to midair collision risk quantified by a fatality rate. The framework consists of a target level of safety (TLS) approach using an event tree format. Safety has been identified as the most important consideration in the UAS integration process. While safety can be defined in many ways, the authors propose using a fatality rate metric that follows other statistics used in the industry. This metric allows for the use of a TLS approach to the development of SAA requirements for system certification. Failure to adequately link system requirements to safety could result in the implementation of SAA systems that either do not adequately mitigate the risk associated with UAS operations or are overdesigned, resulting in increased cost and complexity. This article demonstrates the use of the proposed framework to develop specific SAA effectiveness standards based on UAS weight and airspace class combinations. PMID:24724619

  19. Aircraft Engine Noise Scattering by Fuselage and Wings: A Computational Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Stanescu, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents a time-domain method for computation of sound radiation from aircraft engine sources to the far field. The effects of non-uniform flow around the aircraft and scattering of sound by fuselage and wings are accounted for in the formulation. The approach is based on the discretization of the inviscid flow equations through a collocation form of the discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method. An isoparametric representation of the underlying geometry is used in order to take full advantage of the spectral accuracy of the method. Large-scale computations are made possible by a parallel implementation based on message passing. Results obtained for radiation from an axisymmetric nacelle alone are compared with those obtained when the same nacelle is installed in a generic configuration, with and without a wing. 0 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Tracy-Widom distribution based fault detection approach: application to aircraft sensor/actuator fault detection.

    PubMed

    Hajiyev, Ch

    2012-01-01

    The fault detection approach based on the Tracy-Widom distribution is presented and applied to the aircraft flight control system. An operative method of testing the innovation covariance of the Kalman filter is proposed. The maximal eigenvalue of the random Wishart matrix is used as the monitoring statistic, and the testing problem is reduced to determine the asymptotics for the largest eigenvalue of the Wishart matrix. As a result, an algorithm for testing the innovation covariance based on the Tracy-Widom distribution is proposed. In the simulations, the longitudinal and lateral dynamics of the F-16 aircraft model is considered, and detection of sensor and control surface faults in the flight control system which affect the innovation covariance, are examined. PMID:21855060

  1. Aircraft Engine Noise Scattering by Fuselage and Wings: A Computational Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanescu, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Farassat, F.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents a time-domain method for computation of sound radiation from aircraft engine sources to the far-field. The effects of nonuniform flow around the aircraft and scattering of sound by fuselage and wings are accounted for in the formulation. The approach is based on the discretization of the inviscid flow equations through a collocation form of the Discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method. An isoparametric representation of the underlying geometry is used in order to take full advantage of the spectral accuracy of the method. Large-scale computations are made possible by a parallel implementation based on message passing. Results obtained for radiation from an axisymmetric nacelle alone are compared with those obtained when the same nacelle is installed in a generic configuration, with and without a wing.

  2. Aircraft Engine Noise Scattering By Fuselage and Wings: A Computational Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanescu, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Farassat, F.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents a time-domain method for computation of sound radiation from aircraft engine sources to the far-field. The effects of nonuniform flow around the aircraft and scattering of sound by fuselage and wings are accounted for in the formulation. The approach is based on the discretization of the inviscid flow equations through a collocation form of the Discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method. An isoparametric representation of the underlying geometry is used in order to take full advantage of the spectral accuracy of the method. Large-scale computations are made possible by a parallel implementation based on message passing. Results obtained for radiation from an axisymmetric nacelle alone are compared with those obtained when the same nacelle is installed in a generic configuration, with and without a wing.

  3. Aerodynamic Analysis of the Truss-Braced Wing Aircraft Using Vortex-Lattice Superposition Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Eric Bi-Wen; Reynolds, Kevin Wayne; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Totah, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    The SUGAR Truss-BracedWing (TBW) aircraft concept is a Boeing-developed N+3 aircraft configuration funded by NASA ARMD FixedWing Project. This future generation transport aircraft concept is designed to be aerodynamically efficient by employing a high aspect ratio wing design. The aspect ratio of the TBW is on the order of 14 which is significantly greater than those of current generation transport aircraft. This paper presents a recent aerodynamic analysis of the TBW aircraft using a conceptual vortex-lattice aerodynamic tool VORLAX and an aerodynamic superposition approach. Based on the underlying linear potential flow theory, the principle of aerodynamic superposition is leveraged to deal with the complex aerodynamic configuration of the TBW. By decomposing the full configuration of the TBW into individual aerodynamic lifting components, the total aerodynamic characteristics of the full configuration can be estimated from the contributions of the individual components. The aerodynamic superposition approach shows excellent agreement with CFD results computed by FUN3D, USM3D, and STAR-CCM+. XXXXX Demand for green aviation is expected to increase with the need for reduced environmental impact. Most large transports today operate within the best cruise L/D range of 18-20 using the conventional tube-and-wing design. This configuration has led to marginal improvements in aerodynamic efficiency over this past century, as aerodynamic improvements tend to be incremental. A big opportunity has been shown in recent years to significantly reduce structural weight or trim drag, hence improved energy efficiency, with the use of lightweight materials such as composites. The Boeing 787 transport is an example of a modern airframe design that employs lightweight structures. High aspect ratio wing design can provide another opportunity for further improvements in energy efficiency. Historically, the study of high aspect ratio wings has been intimately tied to the study of

  4. Knowledge-Based Aircraft Automation: Managers Guide on the use of Artificial Intelligence for Aircraft Automation and Verification and Validation Approach for a Neural-Based Flight Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broderick, Ron

    1997-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this report was to integrate the powerful tools of artificial intelligence into the traditional process of software development. To maintain the US aerospace competitive advantage, traditional aerospace and software engineers need to more easily incorporate the technology of artificial intelligence into the advanced aerospace systems being designed today. The future goal was to transition artificial intelligence from an emerging technology to a standard technology that is considered early in the life cycle process to develop state-of-the-art aircraft automation systems. This report addressed the future goal in two ways. First, it provided a matrix that identified typical aircraft automation applications conducive to various artificial intelligence methods. The purpose of this matrix was to provide top-level guidance to managers contemplating the possible use of artificial intelligence in the development of aircraft automation. Second, the report provided a methodology to formally evaluate neural networks as part of the traditional process of software development. The matrix was developed by organizing the discipline of artificial intelligence into the following six methods: logical, object representation-based, distributed, uncertainty management, temporal and neurocomputing. Next, a study of existing aircraft automation applications that have been conducive to artificial intelligence implementation resulted in the following five categories: pilot-vehicle interface, system status and diagnosis, situation assessment, automatic flight planning, and aircraft flight control. The resulting matrix provided management guidance to understand artificial intelligence as it applied to aircraft automation. The approach taken to develop a methodology to formally evaluate neural networks as part of the software engineering life cycle was to start with the existing software quality assurance standards and to change these standards to include neural network

  5. Terminal-Area Aircraft Intent Inference Approach Based on Online Trajectory Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Jun; Cai, Kai-quan

    2015-01-01

    Terminal-area aircraft intent inference (T-AII) is a prerequisite to detect and avoid potential aircraft conflict in the terminal airspace. T-AII challenges the state-of-the-art AII approaches due to the uncertainties of air traffic situation, in particular due to the undefined flight routes and frequent maneuvers. In this paper, a novel T-AII approach is introduced to address the limitations by solving the problem with two steps that are intent modeling and intent inference. In the modeling step, an online trajectory clustering procedure is designed for recognizing the real-time available routes in replacing of the missed plan routes. In the inference step, we then present a probabilistic T-AII approach based on the multiple flight attributes to improve the inference performance in maneuvering scenarios. The proposed approach is validated with real radar trajectory and flight attributes data of 34 days collected from Chengdu terminal area in China. Preliminary results show the efficacy of the presented approach. PMID:26171417

  6. A Systematic Approach to Sensor Selection for Aircraft Engine Health Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Donald L.; Garg, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    A systematic approach for selecting an optimal suite of sensors for on-board aircraft gas turbine engine health estimation is presented. The methodology optimally chooses the engine sensor suite and the model tuning parameter vector to minimize the Kalman filter mean squared estimation error in the engine s health parameters or other unmeasured engine outputs. This technique specifically addresses the underdetermined estimation problem where there are more unknown system health parameters representing degradation than available sensor measurements. This paper presents the theoretical estimation error equations, and describes the optimization approach that is applied to select the sensors and model tuning parameters to minimize these errors. Two different model tuning parameter vector selection approaches are evaluated: the conventional approach of selecting a subset of health parameters to serve as the tuning parameters, and an alternative approach that selects tuning parameters as a linear combination of all health parameters. Results from the application of the technique to an aircraft engine simulation are presented, and compared to those from an alternative sensor selection strategy.

  7. A high precision instrument to measure angular and binocular deviation introduced by aircraft windscreens by using a shadow casting technique

    SciTech Connect

    Shivananju, B. N.; Yamdagni, S.; Vasu, R. M.; Asokan, S.

    2012-12-15

    Objects viewed through transparent sheets with residual non-parallelism and irregularity appear shifted and distorted. This distortion is measured in terms of angular and binocular deviation of an object viewed through the transparent sheet. The angular and binocular deviations introduced are particularly important in the context of aircraft windscreens and canopies as they can interfere with decision making of pilots especially while landing, leading to accidents. In this work, we have developed an instrument to measure both the angular and binocular deviations introduced by transparent sheets. This instrument is especially useful in the qualification of aircraft windscreens and canopies. It measures the deviation in the geometrical shadow cast by a periodic dot pattern trans-illuminated by the distorted light beam from the transparent test specimen compared to the reference pattern. Accurate quantification of the shift in the pattern is obtained by cross-correlating the reference shadow pattern with the specimen shadow pattern and measuring the location of the correlation peak. The developed instrument is handy to use and computes both angular and binocular deviation with an accuracy of less than {+-}0.1 mrad ( Almost-Equal-To 0.036 mrad) and has an excellent repeatability with an error of less than 2%.

  8. Simplified Aircraft-Based Paired Approach: Concept Definition and Initial Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sally C.; Lohr, Gary W.; McKissick, Burnell T.; Abbott, Terence S.; Geurreiro, Nelson M.; Volk, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Simplified Aircraft-based Parallel Approach (SAPA) is an advanced concept proposed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to support dependent parallel approach operations to runways with lateral spacing closer than 2500 ft. At the request of the FAA, NASA performed an initial assessment of the potential performance and feasibility of the SAPA concept, including developing and assessing an operational implementation of the concept and conducting a Monte Carlo wake simulation study to examine the longitudinal spacing requirements. The SAPA concept was shown to have significant operational advantages in supporting the pairing of aircraft with dissimilar final approach speeds. The wake simulation study showed that support for dissimilar final approach speeds could be significantly enhanced through the use of a two-phased altitudebased longitudinal positioning requirement, with larger longitudinal positioning allowed for higher altitudes out of ground effect and tighter longitudinal positioning defined for altitudes near and in ground effect. While this assessment is preliminary and there are a number of operational issues still to be examined, it has shown the basic SAPA concept to be technically and operationally feasible.

  9. Landmark navigation and autonomous landing approach with obstacle detection for aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerst, Simon; Werner, Stefan; Dickmanns, Dirk; Dickmanns, Ernst D.

    1997-06-01

    A machine perception system for aircraft and helicopters using multiple sensor data for state estimation is presented. By combining conventional aircraft sensor like gyros, accelerometers, artificial horizon, aerodynamic measuring devices and GPS with vision data taken by conventional CCD-cameras mounted on a pan and tilt platform, the position of the craft can be determined as well as the relative position to runways and natural landmarks. The vision data of natural landmarks are used to improve position estimates during autonomous missions. A built-in landmark management module decides which landmark should be focused on by the vision system, depending on the distance to the landmark and the aspect conditions. More complex landmarks like runways are modeled with different levels of detail that are activated dependent on range. A supervisor process compares vision data and GPS data to detect mistracking of the vision system e.g. due to poor visibility and tries to reinitialize the vision system or to set focus on another landmark available. During landing approach obstacles like trucks and airplanes can be detected on the runway. The system has been tested in real-time within a hardware-in-the-loop simulation. Simulated aircraft measurements corrupted by noise and other characteristic sensor errors have been fed into the machine perception system; the image processing module for relative state estimation was driven by computer generated imagery. Results from real-time simulation runs are given.

  10. Longitudinal-control design approach for high-angle-of-attack aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, Aaron J.; Proffitt, Melissa S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a control synthesis methodology that emphasizes a variable-gain output feedback technique that is applied to the longitudinal channel of a high-angle-of-attack aircraft. The aircraft is a modified F/A-18 aircraft with thrust-vectored controls. The flight regime covers a range up to a Mach number of 0.7; an altitude range from 15,000 to 35,000 ft; and an angle-of-attack (alpha) range up to 70 deg, which is deep into the poststall region. A brief overview is given of the variable-gain mathematical formulation as well as a description of the discrete control structure used for the feedback controller. This paper also presents an approximate design procedure with relationships for the optimal weights for the selected feedback control structure. These weights are selected to meet control design guidelines for high-alpha flight controls. Those guidelines that apply to the longitudinal-control design are also summarized. A unique approach is presented for the feed-forward command generator to obtain smooth transitions between load factor and alpha commands. Finally, representative linear analysis results and nonlinear batch simulation results are provided.

  11. Parametric Study for Increasing On-Station Duration via Unconventional Aircraft Launch Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhl, Christopher A.; Moses, Robert W.; Croom, Mark A.; Sandford, Stephen P.

    2004-01-01

    The need for better atmospheric predictions is causing the atmospheric science community to look for new ways to obtain longer, higher-resolution measurements over several diurnal cycles. The high resolution, in-situ measurements required to study many atmospheric phenomena can be achieved by an Autonomous Aerial Observation System (AAOS); however, meeting the long on-station time requirements with an aerial platform poses many challenges. Inspired by the half-scale drop test of the deployable Aerial Regional-scale Environmental Survey (ARES) Mars airplane, a study was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine the possibility of increasing on-station time by launching an airplane directly at the desired altitude. The ARES Mars airplane concept was used as a baseline for Earth atmospheric flight, and parametric analyses of fundamental configuration elements were performed to study their impact on achieving desired on-station time with this class of airplane. The concept involved lifting the aircraft from the ground to the target altitude by means of an air balloon, thereby unburdening the airplane of ascent requirements. The parameters varied in the study were aircraft wingspan, payload, fuel quantity, and propulsion system. The results show promising trends for further research into aircraft-payload design using this unconventional balloon-based launch approach.

  12. Strategic planning for aircraft noise route impact analysis: A three dimensional approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragdon, C. R.; Rowan, M. J.; Ahuja, K. K.

    1993-01-01

    The strategic routing of aircraft through navigable and controlled airspace to minimize adverse noise impact over sensitive areas is critical in the proper management and planning of the U.S. based airport system. A major objective of this phase of research is to identify, inventory, characterize, and analyze the various environmental, land planning, and regulatory data bases, along with potential three dimensional software and hardware systems that can be potentially applied for an impact assessment of any existing or planned air route. There are eight data bases that have to be assembled and developed in order to develop three dimensional aircraft route impact methodology. These data bases which cover geographical information systems, sound metrics, land use, airspace operational control measures, federal regulations and advisories, census data, and environmental attributes have been examined and aggregated. A three dimensional format is necessary for planning, analyzing space and possible noise impact, and formulating potential resolutions. The need to develop this three dimensional approach is essential due to the finite capacity of airspace for managing and planning a route system, including airport facilities. It appears that these data bases can be integrated effectively into a strategic aircraft noise routing system which should be developed as soon as possible, as part of a proactive plan applied to our FAA controlled navigable airspace for the United States.

  13. Analysis of fuel-conservative curved decelerating approach trajectories for powered-lift and CTOL jet aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, F.

    1980-01-01

    A method for determining fuel conservative terminal approaches that include changes in altitude, speed, and heading are described. Three different guidance system concepts for STOL aircraft were evaluated in flight: (1) a fixed trajectory system; (2) a system that included a fixed path and a real time synthesized capture flight path; and (3) a trajectory synthesizing system. Simulation results for the augmentor wing jet STOL research aircraft and for the Boeing 727 aircraft are discussed. The results indicate that for minimum fuel consumption, two guidance deceleration segments are required.

  14. A Simulation Based Approach for Contingency Planning for Aircraft Turnaround Operation System Activities in Airline Hubs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adeleye, Sanya; Chung, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Commercial aircraft undergo a significant number of maintenance and logistical activities during the turnaround operation at the departure gate. By analyzing the sequencing of these activities, more effective turnaround contingency plans may be developed for logistical and maintenance disruptions. Turnaround contingency plans are particularly important as any kind of delay in a hub based system may cascade into further delays with subsequent connections. The contingency sequencing of the maintenance and logistical turnaround activities were analyzed using a combined network and computer simulation modeling approach. Experimental analysis of both current and alternative policies provides a framework to aid in more effective tactical decision making.

  15. The potential of small unmanned aircraft systems and structure-from-motion for topographic surveys: A test of emerging integrated approaches at Cwm Idwal, North Wales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonkin, T. N.; Midgley, N. G.; Graham, D. J.; Labadz, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Novel topographic survey methods that integrate both structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetry and small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) are a rapidly evolving investigative technique. Due to the diverse range of survey configurations available and the infancy of these new methods, further research is required. Here, the accuracy, precision and potential applications of this approach are investigated. A total of 543 images of the Cwm Idwal moraine-mound complex were captured from a light (< 5 kg) semi-autonomous multi-rotor unmanned aircraft system using a consumer-grade 18 MP compact digital camera. The images were used to produce a DSM (digital surface model) of the moraines. The DSM is in good agreement with 7761 total station survey points providing a total vertical RMSE value of 0.517 m and vertical RMSE values as low as 0.200 m for less densely vegetated areas of the DSM. High-precision topographic data can be acquired rapidly using this technique with the resulting DSMs and orthorectified aerial imagery at sub-decimetre resolutions. Positional errors on the total station dataset, vegetation and steep terrain are identified as the causes of vertical disagreement. Whilst this aerial survey approach is advocated for use in a range of geomorphological settings, care must be taken to ensure that adequate ground control is applied to give a high degree of accuracy.

  16. Monitoring estuarine circulation and ocean waste dispersion using an integrated satellite-aircraft-drogue approach. [Continental Shelf and Delaware Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator); Davis, G. R.; Wang, H.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An integrated satellite-aircraft-drogue approach was developed which employs remotely tracked expendable drogues together with satellite and aircraft observations of oil slicks, waste plumes, and natural tracers, such as suspended sediment. Tests conducted on the Continental Shelf and in Delaware Bay indicate that the system provides a cost effective means of monitoring current circulation and verifying oil slick and ocean waste dispersion models even under severe environmental conditions.

  17. A Systematic Approach for Model-Based Aircraft Engine Performance Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Donald L.; Garg, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    A requirement for effective aircraft engine performance estimation is the ability to account for engine degradation, generally described in terms of unmeasurable health parameters such as efficiencies and flow capacities related to each major engine module. This paper presents a linear point design methodology for minimizing the degradation-induced error in model-based aircraft engine performance estimation applications. The technique specifically focuses on the underdetermined estimation problem, where there are more unknown health parameters than available sensor measurements. A condition for Kalman filter-based estimation is that the number of health parameters estimated cannot exceed the number of sensed measurements. In this paper, the estimated health parameter vector will be replaced by a reduced order tuner vector whose dimension is equivalent to the sensed measurement vector. The reduced order tuner vector is systematically selected to minimize the theoretical mean squared estimation error of a maximum a posteriori estimator formulation. This paper derives theoretical estimation errors at steady-state operating conditions, and presents the tuner selection routine applied to minimize these values. Results from the application of the technique to an aircraft engine simulation are presented and compared to the estimation accuracy achieved through conventional maximum a posteriori and Kalman filter estimation approaches. Maximum a posteriori estimation results demonstrate that reduced order tuning parameter vectors can be found that approximate the accuracy of estimating all health parameters directly. Kalman filter estimation results based on the same reduced order tuning parameter vectors demonstrate that significantly improved estimation accuracy can be achieved over the conventional approach of selecting a subset of health parameters to serve as the tuner vector. However, additional development is necessary to fully extend the methodology to Kalman filter

  18. Fan noise reduction from a supersonic inlet during simulated aircraft approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuckolls, W. E.; Ng, W. F.

    1995-04-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to investigate the radiation of fan noise from a supersonic inlet during a simulated aircraft approach. A scaled-down model of an axisymmetric, mixed-compression, supersonic inlet (P-inlet) was used in conjunction with a 10.4 cm (4.1 in) diameter turbofan engine simulator as the noise source. The tests were conducted at an outdoor facility under static conditions. The main goal of the experiment was to reduce the forward radiating fan noise by modifying the auxiliary inlet doors. The modified doors are designed to reduce the inlet distortion to the fan face. In addition, the new door design also uses a converging flow passage in order to take advantage of the noise attenuation due to the choking effect at the auxiliary door. The simulator was tested at 60 percent design speed in an attempt to match the simulator noise source to that of a real aircraft engine on approach. Both aerodynamic and acoustic measurements were taken in the experiments. The results show that when compared to the original design, the modified auxiliary inlet doors reduced the circumferential inlet distortion to the fan face by a factor of two. The key result is that the blade passing frequency tone has been decreased by an average of 6 dB in the forward sector for the modified door design. Results from the closed auxiliary inlet door case are also presented to provide additional comparisons.

  19. An Integrated Approach for Aircraft Engine Performance Estimation and Fault Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    imon, Donald L.; Armstrong, Jeffrey B.

    2012-01-01

    A Kalman filter-based approach for integrated on-line aircraft engine performance estimation and gas path fault diagnostics is presented. This technique is specifically designed for underdetermined estimation problems where there are more unknown system parameters representing deterioration and faults than available sensor measurements. A previously developed methodology is applied to optimally design a Kalman filter to estimate a vector of tuning parameters, appropriately sized to enable estimation. The estimated tuning parameters can then be transformed into a larger vector of health parameters representing system performance deterioration and fault effects. The results of this study show that basing fault isolation decisions solely on the estimated health parameter vector does not provide ideal results. Furthermore, expanding the number of the health parameters to address additional gas path faults causes a decrease in the estimation accuracy of those health parameters representative of turbomachinery performance deterioration. However, improved fault isolation performance is demonstrated through direct analysis of the estimated tuning parameters produced by the Kalman filter. This was found to provide equivalent or superior accuracy compared to the conventional fault isolation approach based on the analysis of sensed engine outputs, while simplifying online implementation requirements. Results from the application of these techniques to an aircraft engine simulation are presented and discussed.

  20. 3W approach to the investigation, analysis, and prevention of human-error aircraft accidents.

    PubMed

    Ricketson, D S; Brown, W R; Graham, K N

    1980-09-01

    Human error is the largest cause of U.S. Army aircraft accidents. An approach to this problem is presented which is based on a model of the human-error accident. This 3W approach identifies what task error (TE) caused or contributed to the accident, what inadequacy (I) in the aviation system caused or allowed the TE to occur, and what remedial measure (R) is required to correct the I. There were 82 human-error accidents analyzed to identify TEIR information. Statistically important is were identified which could be remedied based on accident costs. Then, potentially cost-effective remedial actions were ranked on a cost-benefit totem pole. The totem pole was given to the aviation system manager as a management tool to assist in determining priorities for corrective actions. PMID:7417175

  1. Piloted simulator investigations of a civil tilt-rotor aircraft on steep instrument approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, William A.

    1992-01-01

    NASA-Ames has used its Vertical Motion Simulator to investigate steep-glideslope instrument approaches for a civil transport tilt-rotor aircraft in two different cases: (1) where pilots used raw glideslope and localized error data for 6-25 deg slopes, terminating in slow roll-on landings, and (2) where a flight director commanded manual conversion from fixed-wing to helicopter modes and a deceleration on the glideslope led to a vertical landing on a small urban helipad. In the former, there occurred control problems directly ascribable to the slow approach speed; in the latter, the four-cue flight director's cockpit augmentation furnished adequate pilot ratings up to 15-deg glideslope.

  2. Noise measurements at Stockton Airport obtained during engineering evaluation of two-segment approaches in a 727-222 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, R. E.; Tanner, C. S.

    1973-01-01

    The results of acoustic measurements made on a 727-222 aircraft during standard ILS and two-segment approaches are presented. The aircraft was equipped with a special purpose glide slope computer to provide the capability of making two-segment noise abatement approaches. For upper segment computations, the computer used barometric-corrected pressure altitude and the slant range to a DME transmitter which was colocated with the glide slope transmitter. The computer used the ILS glide slope deviation for lower segment computations. Additional measurements were made on 737 revenue aircraft using the Stockton Airport. The purpose of the acoustical portion of the test was to measure and identify the noise levels during the various approaches.

  3. Hybrid Kalman Filter: A New Approach for Aircraft Engine In-Flight Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Takahisa; Simon, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a uniquely structured Kalman filter is developed for its application to in-flight diagnostics of aircraft gas turbine engines. The Kalman filter is a hybrid of a nonlinear on-board engine model (OBEM) and piecewise linear models. The utilization of the nonlinear OBEM allows the reference health baseline of the in-flight diagnostic system to be updated to the degraded health condition of the engines through a relatively simple process. Through this health baseline update, the effectiveness of the in-flight diagnostic algorithm can be maintained as the health of the engine degrades over time. Another significant aspect of the hybrid Kalman filter methodology is its capability to take advantage of conventional linear and nonlinear Kalman filter approaches. Based on the hybrid Kalman filter, an in-flight fault detection system is developed, and its diagnostic capability is evaluated in a simulation environment. Through the evaluation, the suitability of the hybrid Kalman filter technique for aircraft engine in-flight diagnostics is demonstrated.

  4. Monitoring estuarine circulation and ocean waste dispersion using an integrated satellite-aircraft-drogue approach. [Delaware coast and Delaware Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator); Davis, G.; Wang, H.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An inexpensive, integrated drogue-aircraft-satellite approach was developed which is based on the Lagrangian technique and employs remotely tracked drogues and dyes together with satellite observation of natural tracers, such as suspended sediment. Results include current circulation studies in Delaware Bay in support of an oil slick movement model; investigations of the dispersion and movement of acid wastes dumped 40 miles off the Delaware coast; and coastal current circulation. In each case, the integrated drogue-aircraft-satellite approach compares favorably with other techniques on the basis of accuracy, cost effectiveness, and performance under severe weather conditions.

  5. Feasibility of collision warning, precision approach and landing using GPS, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruedger, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of GPS, with an appropriately configured data link, to enhance general aviation avionic functions encountered in the terminal area and on approach was investigated with emphasis on approach and landing guidance and collision warning. The feasibility of using differential GPS to obtain the precision navigation solutions required for landing was studied. Results show that the concept is sound. An experimental program was developed to demonstrate this concept. The collision avoidance/warning concept was examined through the development of a functional system specification.

  6. The Simplified Aircraft-Based Paired Approach With the ALAS Alerting Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Raleigh B.; Madden, Michael M.; Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo; Butler, Ricky W.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation of a proposed concept for closely spaced parallel runways called the Simplified Aircraft-based Paired Approach (SAPA). This procedure depends upon a new alerting algorithm called the Adjacent Landing Alerting System (ALAS). This study used both low fidelity and high fidelity simulations to validate the SAPA procedure and test the performance of the new alerting algorithm. The low fidelity simulation enabled a determination of minimum approach distance for the worst case over millions of scenarios. The high fidelity simulation enabled an accurate determination of timings and minimum approach distance in the presence of realistic trajectories, communication latencies, and total system error for 108 test cases. The SAPA procedure and the ALAS alerting algorithm were applied to the 750-ft parallel spacing (e.g., SFO 28L/28R) approach problem. With the SAPA procedure as defined in this paper, this study concludes that a 750-ft application does not appear to be feasible, but preliminary results for 1000-ft parallel runways look promising.

  7. Flight evaluation of configuration management system concepts during transition to the landing approach for a powered-lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Innis, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    Flight experiments were conducted to evaluate two control concepts for configuration management during the transition to landing approach for a powered-lift STOL aircraft. NASA Ames' augmentor wing research aircraft was used in the program. Transitions from nominal level-flight configurations at terminal area pattern speeds were conducted along straight and curved descending flightpaths. Stabilization and command augmentation for attitude and airspeed control were used in conjunction with a three-cue flight director that presented commands for pitch, roll, and throttle controls. A prototype microwave system provided landing guidance. Results of these flight experiments indicate that these configuration management concepts permit the successful performance of transitions and approaches along curved paths by powered-lift STOL aircraft. Flight director guidance was essential to accomplish the task.

  8. Aircraft wing structural design optimization based on automated finite element modelling and ground structure approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weizhu; Yue, Zhufeng; Li, Lei; Wang, Peiyan

    2016-01-01

    An optimization procedure combining an automated finite element modelling (AFEM) technique with a ground structure approach (GSA) is proposed for structural layout and sizing design of aircraft wings. The AFEM technique, based on CATIA VBA scripting and PCL programming, is used to generate models automatically considering the arrangement of inner systems. GSA is used for local structural topology optimization. The design procedure is applied to a high-aspect-ratio wing. The arrangement of the integral fuel tank, landing gear and control surfaces is considered. For the landing gear region, a non-conventional initial structural layout is adopted. The positions of components, the number of ribs and local topology in the wing box and landing gear region are optimized to obtain a minimum structural weight. Constraints include tank volume, strength, buckling and aeroelastic parameters. The results show that the combined approach leads to a greater weight saving, i.e. 26.5%, compared with three additional optimizations based on individual design approaches.

  9. A Mixed-Fidelity Approach for Design of Low-Boom Supersonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Shields, Elwood; Geiselhart, Karl A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper documents a mixed-fidelity approach for the design of low-boom supersonic aircraft as a viable approach for designing a practical low-boom supersonic configuration. A low-boom configuration that is based on low-fidelity analysis is used as the baseline. Tail lift is included to help tailor the aft portion of the ground signature. A comparison of low- and high-fidelity analysis results demonstrates the necessity of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis in a low-boom supersonic configuration design process. The fuselage shape is modified iteratively to obtain a configuration with a CFD equivalent-area distribution that matches a predetermined low-boom target distribution. The mixed-fidelity approach can easily refine the low-fidelity low-boom baseline into a low-boom configuration with the use of CFD equivalent-area analysis. The ground signature of the final configuration is calculated by using a state-of-the-art CFD-based boom analysis method that generates accurate midfield pressure distributions for propagation to the ground with ray tracing. The ground signature that is propagated from a midfield pressure distribution has a shaped ramp front, which is similar to the ground signature that is propagated from the CFD equivalent-area distribution. This result confirms the validity of the low-boom supersonic configuration design by matching a low-boom equivalent-area target, which is easier to accomplish than matching a low-boom midfield pressure target.

  10. A fixed-base simulation study of two STOL aircraft flying curved, descending instrument approach paths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, M. S.; Sawyer, R. H.; Mclaughlin, M. D.

    1973-01-01

    A real-time, fixed-base simulation study has been conducted to determine the curved, descending approach paths (within passenger-comfort limits) that would be acceptable to pilots, the flight-director-system logic requirements for curved-flight-path guidance, and the paths which can be flown within proposed microwave landing system (MLS) coverage angles. Two STOL aircraft configurations were used in the study. Generally, no differences in the results between the two STOL configurations were found. The investigation showed that paths with a 1828.8 meter turn radius and a 1828.8 meter final-approach distance were acceptable without winds and with winds up to at least 15 knots for airspeeds from 75 to 100 knots. The altitude at roll-out from the final turn determined which final-approach distances were acceptable. Pilots preferred to have an initial straight leg of about 1 n. mi. after MLS guidance acquisition before turn intercept. The size of the azimuth coverage angle necessary to meet passenger and pilot criteria depends on the size of the turn angle: plus or minus 60 deg was adequate to cover all paths execpt ones with a 180 deg turn.

  11. Novel Diagnostic and Monitoring Tools in Stroke: an Individualized Patient-Centered Precision Medicine Approach.

    PubMed

    de Villiers, Sulette; Swanepoel, Albe; Bester, Janette; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2016-05-01

    Central to the pathogenesis of ischaemic stroke are the normally protective processes of platelet adhesion and activation. Experimental evidence has shown that the ligand-receptor interactions in ischaemic stroke represent a thrombo-inflammatory cascade, which presents research opportunities into new treatment. However, as anti-platelet drugs have the potential to cause severe side effects in ischaemic stroke patients (as well as other vascular disease patients), it is important to carefully monitor the risk of bleeding and risk of thrombus in patients receiving treatment. Because thrombo-embolic ischaemic stroke is a major health issue, we suggest that the answer to adequate treatment is based on an individualized patient-centered approach, inline with the latest NIH precision medicine approach. A combination of viscoelastic methodologies may be used in a personalized patient-centered regime, including thromboelastography (TEG®) and the lesser used scanning electron microscopy approach (SEM). Thromboelastography provides a dynamic measure of clot formation, strength, and lysis, whereas SEM is a visual structural tool to study patient fibrin structure in great detail. Therefore, we consider the evidence for TEG® and SEM as unique means to confirm stroke diagnosis, screen at-risk patients, and monitor treatment efficacy. Here we argue that the current approach to stroke treatment needs to be restructured and new innovative thought patterns need to be applied, as even approved therapies require close patient monitoring to determine efficacy, match treatment regimens to each patient's individual needs, and assess the risk of dangerous adverse effects. TEG® and SEM have the potential to be a useful tool and could potentially alter the clinical approach to managing ischaemic stroke. As envisaged in the NIH precision medicine approach, this will involve a number of role players and innovative new research ideas, with benefits that will ultimately only be realized in a

  12. An approach for filtering hyperbolically positioned underwater acoustic telemetry data with position precision estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meckley, Trevor D.; Holbrook, Christopher M.; Wagner, C. Michael; Binder, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The use of position precision estimates that reflect the confidence in the positioning process should be considered prior to the use of biological filters that rely on a priori expectations of the subject’s movement capacities and tendencies. Position confidence goals should be determined based upon the needs of the research questions and analysis requirements versus arbitrary selection, in which filters of previous studies are adopted. Data filtering with this approach ensures that data quality is sufficient for the selected analyses and presents the opportunity to adjust or identify a different analysis in the event that the requisite precision was not attained. Ignoring these steps puts a practitioner at risk of reporting errant findings.

  13. System level airworthiness tool: A comprehensive approach to small unmanned aircraft system airworthiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, David A.

    One of the pillars of aviation safety is assuring sound engineering practices through airworthiness certification. As Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) grow in popularity, the need for airworthiness standards and verification methods tailored for UAS becomes critical. While airworthiness practices for large UAS may be similar to manned aircraft, it is clear that small UAS require a paradigm shift from the airworthiness practices of manned aircraft. Although small in comparison to manned aircraft these aircraft are not merely remote controlled toys. Small UAS may be complex aircraft flying in the National Airspace System (NAS) over populated areas for extended durations and beyond line of sight of the operators. A comprehensive systems engineering framework for certifying small UAS at the system level is needed. This work presents a point based tool that evaluates small UAS by rewarding good engineering practices in design, analysis, and testing. The airworthiness requirements scale with vehicle size and operational area, while allowing flexibility for new technologies and unique configurations.

  14. Efficient Multidisciplinary Analysis Approach for Conceptual Design of Aircraft with Large Shape Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chwalowski, Pawel; Samareh, Jamshid A.; Horta, Lucas G.; Piatak, David J.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.

    2009-01-01

    The conceptual and preliminary design processes for aircraft with large shape changes are generally difficult and time-consuming, and the processes are often customized for a specific shape change concept to streamline the vehicle design effort. Accordingly, several existing reports show excellent results of assessing a particular shape change concept or perturbations of a concept. The goal of the current effort was to develop a multidisciplinary analysis tool and process that would enable an aircraft designer to assess several very different morphing concepts early in the design phase and yet obtain second-order performance results so that design decisions can be made with better confidence. The approach uses an efficient parametric model formulation that allows automatic model generation for systems undergoing radical shape changes as a function of aerodynamic parameters, geometry parameters, and shape change parameters. In contrast to other more self-contained approaches, the approach utilizes off-the-shelf analysis modules to reduce development time and to make it accessible to many users. Because the analysis is loosely coupled, discipline modules like a multibody code can be easily swapped for other modules with similar capabilities. One of the advantages of this loosely coupled system is the ability to use the medium- to high-fidelity tools early in the design stages when the information can significantly influence and improve overall vehicle design. Data transfer among the analysis modules are based on an accurate and automated general purpose data transfer tool. In general, setup time for the integrated system presented in this paper is 2-4 days for simple shape change concepts and 1-2 weeks for more mechanically complicated concepts. Some of the key elements briefly described in the paper include parametric model development, aerodynamic database generation, multibody analysis, and the required software modules as well as examples for a telescoping wing

  15. Piloted simulation study of an ILS approach of a twin-pusher business/commuter turboprop aircraft configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Donald R.; Brandon, Jay M.; Glaab, Louis J.

    1994-01-01

    A six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear simulation of a twin-pusher, turboprop business/commuter aircraft configuration representative of the Cessna ATPTB (Advanced turboprop test bed) was developed for use in piloted studies with the Langley General Aviation Simulator. The math models developed are provided, simulation predictions are compared with with Cessna flight-test data for validation purposes, and results of a handling quality study during simulated ILS (instrument landing system) approaches and missed approaches are presented. Simulated flight trajectories, task performance measures, and pilot evaluations are presented for the ILS approach and missed-approach tasks conducted with the vehicle in the presence of moderate turbulence, varying horizontal winds and engine-out conditions. Six test subjects consisting of two research pilots, a Cessna test pilot, and three general aviation pilots participated in the study. This effort was undertaken in cooperation with the Cessna Aircraft Company.

  16. A systematic approach for precision electrostatic mode tuning of a MEMS gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Z. X.; Gallacher, B. J.; Burdess, J. S.; Bowles, S. R.; Grigg, H. T. D.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper a systematic approach to precision electrostatic frequency tuning of the operational modes of a MEMS ring vibratory gyroscope is presented. In both rate and rate integrating gyroscopes the frequency split between the two modes of vibration which detect the Coriolis acceleration is one of the principal factors in determining the sensitivity and noise floor of the sensor. In high precision applications in the defence/aerospace sector a frequency split of the order of 10 mHz or less is highly desirable. In the ground-breaking Hemispherical Resonator Gyroscope (HRG) electrostatic tuning has been employed as a tuning mechanism. However, a description of the procedure is not available in the literature. The tuning scheme described here involves assessing mode mistuning by the ratio of the in-phase and quadrature components of the response to an external force that has similar properties to the gyroscopic force resulting from Coriolis action, and choosing the tuning voltages so that independent modification of the elements of the system stiffness matrix can be achieved. Experiments on a commercially available gyroscope with a natural frequency of 14 kHz show that the frequency split can be reduced from 1.5 Hz to 6 mHz. This represents a frequency precision of better than 1 part in a million.

  17. Deriving PWV from BDS Observations with PPP approach and Precision Analysis in China Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min

    2014-05-01

    The precipitable water vapour (PWV) is the key parameter of the weather analysis and numerical weather prediction. And it is now widely adopted to derive PWV with the zenithtropospheric delay (ZTD) estimated from GNSS observations. The BeiDou System (BDS) now has 14 satellites in service and provides a good coverage over the China region with its GEO and IGSO constellations. In this contribution, we concentrate on PWV inversion using only BDS observations and its precision evaluation with the PANDA software developed at Wuhan University. The BDS/GPS dual-frequency dual-mode data from June 1 to September 1 2013 are collected at 8 stations in the China region. By the PPP approach, the ZTDs are estimated every 2-hour at each station using a piecewise constant model with BDS precise orbit and clock products, which are generated from the BETS(BeiDou Experiment Tracking Stations) network with 14 stations distributed globally. Then the PWVs are obtained by the conversion factor and zenith wet delays (ZWDs) retrieved from the estimated ZTDs. Firstly the PPP-inferred BDS-PWV is compared to that provided by the AERONET. And then the 3-month GPS-PWV at these 8 stations isalso estimatedin the same way, and used as reference values for BDS-PWV comparison.Their precision differences are further discussed.

  18. Fine-tuning patient-derived xenograft models for precision medicine approaches in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Francis, Olivia L; Milford, Terry-Ann M; Beldiman, Cornelia; Payne, Kimberly J

    2016-03-01

    Many leukemias are characterized by well-known mutations that drive oncogenesis. Mice engineered with these mutations provide a foundation for understanding leukemogenesis and identifying therapies. However, data from whole genome studies provide evidence that malignancies are characterized by multiple genetic alterations that vary between patients, as well as inherited genetic variation that can also contribute to oncogenesis. Improved outcomes will require precision medicine approaches-targeted therapies tailored to malignancies in each patient. Preclinical models that reflect the range of mutations and the genetic background present in patient populations are required to develop and test the combinations of therapies that will be used to provide precision medicine therapeutic strategies. Patient-derived xenografts (PDX) produced by transplanting leukemia cells from patients into immune deficient mice provide preclinical models where disease mechanisms and therapeutic efficacy can be studied in vivo in context of the genetic variability present in patient tumors. PDX models are possible because many elements in the bone marrow microenvironment show cross-species activity between mice and humans. However, several cytokines likely to impact leukemia cells are species-specific with limited activity on transplanted human leukemia cells. In this review we discuss the importance of PDX models for developing precision medicine approaches to leukemia treatment. We illustrate how PDX models can be optimized to overcome a lack of cross-species cytokine activity by reviewing a recent strategy developed for use with a high-risk form of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) that is characterized by overexpression of CRLF2, a receptor component for the cytokine, TSLP. PMID:26912005

  19. A new approach on restoration of dynamic measurement uncertainties in optical precision coordinate metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, S.; Reetz, E.; Linß, G.

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a new approach to the restoration of dynamic influenced measurement uncertainties in optical precision coordinate metrology (OPCM) using image sensors to measure geometrical features. Dynamic measurements within the context of this paper are based upon relative motion between the imaging setup (CCD-camera and optical system) and the measuring object respectively the measuring scene. The dynamic image acquisition causes image motion blur effects, which downgrades the uncertainties of the measurand. The approach presented deals with a new technique to restore motion degraded images using different methods to analyze important image features by extending the famous state of the art Richardson-Lucy image restoration technique using a new convergence criteria based on the variation of the detectable sub-pixel edge position of each iteration.

  20. Development and flight test of a weather radar precision approach concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clary, G. R.; Anderson, D. J.; Chisholm, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    In order to make full use of the helicopter's unique capability of remote-site, off-airport landings, it would be desirable to employ a self-contained navigation system requiring minimum groundable-based equipment. For this reason, research is being conducted with the aim to develop the use of airborne weather radar as a primary navigation aid for helicopter approach and landing in instrument flight rules (IFR) conditions. Anderson et al. (1982) have reported about the first phase of this effort, taking into account the detection of passive ground-based corner reflectors with the aid of an 'echo processor'. The technology of passive-reflector detection in the overland environment provides the pilot with the range and bearing to the landing site. The present investigation is concerned with a second research phase, which was undertaken with the objective to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a weather radar-based precision approach concept. Preliminary flight test results are considered.

  1. Correction: Towards improved precision in the quantification of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factors: a renewed approach.

    PubMed

    Sivanesan, Arumugam; Adamkiewicz, Witold; Kalaivani, Govindasamy; Kamińska, Agnieszka; Waluk, Jacek; Hołyst, Robert; Izake, Emad L

    2015-01-21

    Correction for 'Towards improved precision in the quantification of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factors: a renewed approach' by Arumugam Sivanesan et al., Analyst, 2015, DOI:10.1039/c4an01778a PMID:25453040

  2. An Approach to Estimate the Localized Effects of an Aircraft Crash on a Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, C; Sanzo, D; Sharirli, M

    2004-04-19

    Aircraft crashes are an element of external events required to be analyzed and documented in facility Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) and Nuclear Explosive Safety Studies (NESSs). This paper discusses the localized effects of an aircraft crash impact into the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), given that the aircraft hits the facility. This was done to gain insight into the robustness of the DAF and to account for the special features of the DAF that enhance its ability to absorb the effects of an aircraft crash. For the purpose of this paper, localized effects are considered to be only perforation or scabbing of the facility. This paper presents an extension to the aircraft crash risk methodology of Department of Energy (DOE) Standard 3014. This extension applies to facilities that may find it necessary or desirable to estimate the localized effects of an aircraft crash hit on a facility of nonuniform construction or one that is shielded in certain directions by surrounding terrain or buildings. This extension is not proposed as a replacement to the aircraft crash risk methodology of DOE Standard 3014 but rather as an alternate method to cover situations that were not considered.

  3. Mixed-Fidelity Approach for Design of Low-Boom Supersonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Shields, Elwood; Geiselhart, Karl

    2011-01-01

    This paper documents a mixed-fidelity approach for the design of low-boom supersonic aircraft with a focus on fuselage shaping.A low-boom configuration that is based on low-fidelity analysis is used as the baseline. The fuselage shape is modified iteratively to obtain a configuration with an equivalent-area distribution derived from computational fluid dynamics analysis that attempts to match a predetermined low-boom target area distribution and also yields a low-boom ground signature. The ground signature of the final configuration is calculated by using a state-of-the-art computational-fluid-dynamics-based boom analysis method that generates accurate midfield pressure distributions for propagation to the ground with ray tracing. The ground signature that is propagated from a midfield pressure distribution has a shaped ramp front, which is similar to the ground signature that is propagated from the computational fluid dynamics equivalent-area distribution. This result supports the validity of low-boom supersonic configuration design by matching a low-boom equivalent-area target, which is easier to accomplish than matching a low-boom midfield pressure target.

  4. A Model-Based Anomaly Detection Approach for Analyzing Streaming Aircraft Engine Measurement Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Donald L.; Rinehart, Aidan Walker

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based anomaly detection architecture designed for analyzing streaming transient aircraft engine measurement data. The technique calculates and monitors residuals between sensed engine outputs and model predicted outputs for anomaly detection purposes. Pivotal to the performance of this technique is the ability to construct a model that accurately reflects the nominal operating performance of the engine. The dynamic model applied in the architecture is a piecewise linear design comprising steady-state trim points and dynamic state space matrices. A simple curve-fitting technique for updating the model trim point information based on steadystate information extracted from available nominal engine measurement data is presented. Results from the application of the model-based approach for processing actual engine test data are shown. These include both nominal fault-free test case data and seeded fault test case data. The results indicate that the updates applied to improve the model trim point information also improve anomaly detection performance. Recommendations for follow-on enhancements to the technique are also presented and discussed.

  5. A Model-Based Anomaly Detection Approach for Analyzing Streaming Aircraft Engine Measurement Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Donald L.; Rinehart, Aidan W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based anomaly detection architecture designed for analyzing streaming transient aircraft engine measurement data. The technique calculates and monitors residuals between sensed engine outputs and model predicted outputs for anomaly detection purposes. Pivotal to the performance of this technique is the ability to construct a model that accurately reflects the nominal operating performance of the engine. The dynamic model applied in the architecture is a piecewise linear design comprising steady-state trim points and dynamic state space matrices. A simple curve-fitting technique for updating the model trim point information based on steadystate information extracted from available nominal engine measurement data is presented. Results from the application of the model-based approach for processing actual engine test data are shown. These include both nominal fault-free test case data and seeded fault test case data. The results indicate that the updates applied to improve the model trim point information also improve anomaly detection performance. Recommendations for follow-on enhancements to the technique are also presented and discussed.

  6. A hybrid PCA-CART-MARS-based prognostic approach of the remaining useful life for aircraft engines.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Lasheras, Fernando; García Nieto, Paulino José; de Cos Juez, Francisco Javier; Mayo Bayón, Ricardo; González Suárez, Victor Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Prognostics is an engineering discipline that predicts the future health of a system. In this research work, a data-driven approach for prognostics is proposed. Indeed, the present paper describes a data-driven hybrid model for the successful prediction of the remaining useful life of aircraft engines. The approach combines the multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) technique with the principal component analysis (PCA), dendrograms and classification and regression trees (CARTs). Elements extracted from sensor signals are used to train this hybrid model, representing different levels of health for aircraft engines. In this way, this hybrid algorithm is used to predict the trends of these elements. Based on this fitting, one can determine the future health state of a system and estimate its remaining useful life (RUL) with accuracy. To evaluate the proposed approach, a test was carried out using aircraft engine signals collected from physical sensors (temperature, pressure, speed, fuel flow, etc.). Simulation results show that the PCA-CART-MARS-based approach can forecast faults long before they occur and can predict the RUL. The proposed hybrid model presents as its main advantage the fact that it does not require information about the previous operation states of the input variables of the engine. The performance of this model was compared with those obtained by other benchmark models (multivariate linear regression and artificial neural networks) also applied in recent years for the modeling of remaining useful life. Therefore, the PCA-CART-MARS-based approach is very promising in the field of prognostics of the RUL for aircraft engines. PMID:25806876

  7. A Hybrid PCA-CART-MARS-Based Prognostic Approach of the Remaining Useful Life for Aircraft Engines

    PubMed Central

    Lasheras, Fernando Sánchez; Nieto, Paulino José García; de Cos Juez, Francisco Javier; Bayón, Ricardo Mayo; Suárez, Victor Manuel González

    2015-01-01

    Prognostics is an engineering discipline that predicts the future health of a system. In this research work, a data-driven approach for prognostics is proposed. Indeed, the present paper describes a data-driven hybrid model for the successful prediction of the remaining useful life of aircraft engines. The approach combines the multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) technique with the principal component analysis (PCA), dendrograms and classification and regression trees (CARTs). Elements extracted from sensor signals are used to train this hybrid model, representing different levels of health for aircraft engines. In this way, this hybrid algorithm is used to predict the trends of these elements. Based on this fitting, one can determine the future health state of a system and estimate its remaining useful life (RUL) with accuracy. To evaluate the proposed approach, a test was carried out using aircraft engine signals collected from physical sensors (temperature, pressure, speed, fuel flow, etc.). Simulation results show that the PCA-CART-MARS-based approach can forecast faults long before they occur and can predict the RUL. The proposed hybrid model presents as its main advantage the fact that it does not require information about the previous operation states of the input variables of the engine. The performance of this model was compared with those obtained by other benchmark models (multivariate linear regression and artificial neural networks) also applied in recent years for the modeling of remaining useful life. Therefore, the PCA-CART-MARS-based approach is very promising in the field of prognostics of the RUL for aircraft engines. PMID:25806876

  8. Slant Wet Delays from GNSS observations - Precise Point Positioning vs. Double Difference Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Gregor; Weber, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The tropospheric parameter SWD (Slant Wet Delay) is the path delay caused by the highly variable amount of humidity in the atmosphere at altitudes below 12 km. It can be derived from Numerical Weather Predication data or even more precisely from dual- or multi-frequency observations of a regional GNSS reference network. In order to find the most adequate processing strategy dual GNSS observations of a small network of reference stations were simulated and tropospheric parameters were estimated in Precise Point Positioning (PPP) and in Double Difference (DD) mode. In DD mode the integer character of the phase ambiguities remains which allows to fix them to their true values and to obtain the tropospheric zenith delay as well as north and east (N/E) gradients with highest precision over very short time periods. In PPP mode orbit and clock errors are not cancelled out which affects the quality of the tropospheric estimates. On the other hand it has the advantage that the GNSS observations are processed undifferenced. Latter is important because the Zero Difference Residuals (ZDR) contain the azimuthal-anisotropic part of the tropospheric delay which is not covered by the estimated parameters. From Double Difference Residuals (DDR) the ZDR can be recovered too but only conditionally since common tropospheric effects have been cancelled out in advance by differencing. In this presentation we show how good the anisotropic slant path delays can be obtained from GNSS observations processed using both concepts - the PPP and the DD approach. Therefore tropospheric zenith delays and N/E gradients were estimated and Pseudo-ZDR were reconstructed from DDR and afterwards compared with ZDR derived from the PPP solution. In addition it is shown how good both concepts are applicable for observations at very low elevation angles and under extreme weather conditions. The IGS final and ultra-rapid service products were taken into account to define the best strategy not only for post

  9. A novel approach for high precision rapid potentiometric titrations: Application to hydrazine assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, P.; Malathi, N.; Ananthanarayanan, R.; Praveen, K.; Murali, N.

    2011-11-01

    We propose a high precision rapid personal computer (PC) based potentiometric titration technique using a specially designed mini-cell to carry out redox titrations for assay of chemicals in quality control laboratories attached to industrial, R&D, and nuclear establishments. Using this technique a few microlitre of sample (50-100 μl) in a total volume of ˜2 ml solution can be titrated and the waste generated after titration is extremely low comparing to that obtained from the conventional titration technique. The entire titration including online data acquisition followed by immediate offline analysis of data to get information about concentration of unknown sample is completed within a couple of minutes (about 2 min). This facility has been created using a new class of sensors, viz., pulsating sensors developed in-house. The basic concept in designing such instrument and the salient features of the titration device are presented in this paper. The performance of the titration facility was examined by conducting some of the high resolution redox titrations using dilute solutions--hydrazine against KIO3 in HCl medium, Fe(II) against Ce(IV) and uranium using Davies-Gray method. The precision of titrations using this innovative approach lies between 0.048% and 1.0% relative standard deviation in different redox titrations. With the evolution of this rapid PC based titrator it was possible to develop a simple but high precision potentiometric titration technique for quick determination of hydrazine in nuclear fuel dissolver solution in the context of reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel in fast breeder reactors.

  10. 78 FR 18932 - Public Meeting: Unmanned Aircraft Systems Test Site Program; Privacy Approach

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... the Federal Register on February 22, 2013 (78 FR 12259), Docket No. FAA-2013-0061. In that document... operation of unmanned aircraft systems within the test site program (78 FR 12259). The proposed...

  11. Control and display requirements for decelerating approach and landing of fixed- and rotary-wing VSTOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebacqz, J. V.; Merrick, V. K.; Franklin, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews the results of several simulation investigations of rotary-wing and fixed-wing VSTOL aircraft performing terminal-area operations that include decelerating approaches under instrument conditions and recovery to either fixed landing pads or a ship. By concentrating on instrument decelerating approaches and the hover and landing, it is possible to compare directly the control and display requirements for similar tasks for aircraft with and without vectored thrust capability. Collectively, the results from these experiments, together with other simulator and flight experiments and operational experience, provide a consistent view of control and display complexity required for similar operational capability in adverse weather for the two types of VSTOL configurations. Some initial data showing influence of the transition corridor on flying qualities during transition are pesented and lead to a general discussion of the problem of operating margin definition.

  12. Mesoplasticity approach to studies of the cutting mechanism in ultra-precision machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Rongbin W. B.; Wang, Hao; To, Suet; Cheung, Chi Fai; Chan, Chang Yuen

    2014-03-01

    There have been various theoretical attempts by researchers worldwide to link up different scales of plasticity studies from the nano-, micro- and macro-scale of observation, based on molecular dynamics, crystal plasticity and continuum mechanics. Very few attempts, however, have been reported in ultra-precision machining studies. A mesoplasticity approach advocated by Lee and Yang is adopted by the authors and is successfully applied to studies of the micro-cutting mechanisms in ultra-precision machining. Traditionally, the shear angle in metal cutting, as well as the cutting force variation, can only be determined from cutting tests. In the pioneering work of the authors, the use of mesoplasticity theory enables prediction of the fluctuation of the shear angle and micro-cutting force, shear band formation, chip morphology in diamond turning and size effect in nano-indentation. These findings are verified by experiments. The mesoplasticity formulation opens up a new direction of studies to enable how the plastic behaviour of materials and their constitutive representations in deformation processing, such as machining can be predicted, assessed and deduced from the basic properties of the materials measurable at the microscale.

  13. The F-12 series aircraft approach to design for control system reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, F. L.; Mcmaster, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The F-12 series aircraft control system design philosophy is reviewed as it pertains to functional reliability. The basic control system, i.e., cables, mixer, feel system, trim devices, and hydraulic systems are described and discussed. In addition, the implementation of the redundant stability augmentation system in the F-12 aircraft is described. Finally, the functional reliability record that has been achieved is presented.

  14. A Computational Intelligence (CI) Approach to the Precision Mars Lander Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birge, Brian; Walberg, Gerald

    2002-01-01

    A Mars precision landing requires a landed footprint of no more than 100 meters. Obstacles to reducing the landed footprint include trajectory dispersions due to initial atmospheric entry conditions such as entry angle, parachute deployment height, environment parameters such as wind, atmospheric density, parachute deployment dynamics, unavoidable injection error or propagated error from launch, etc. Computational Intelligence (CI) techniques such as Artificial Neural Nets and Particle Swarm Optimization have been shown to have great success with other control problems. The research period extended previous work on investigating applicability of the computational intelligent approaches. The focus of this investigation was on Particle Swarm Optimization and basic Neural Net architectures. The research investigating these issues was performed for the grant cycle from 5/15/01 to 5/15/02. Matlab 5.1 and 6.0 along with NASA's POST were the primary computational tools.

  15. A Flight Examination of Operating Problems of V/STOL Aircraft in STOL-Type Landing and Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Innis, Robert C.; Quigley, Hervey C.

    1961-01-01

    A flight investigation has been conducted using a large twin-engine cargo aircraft to isolate the problems associated with operating propeller-driven aircraft in the STOL speed range where appreciable engine power is used to augment aerodynamic lift. The problems considered would also be representative of those of a large overloaded VTOL aircraft operating in an STOL manner with comparable thrust-to-weight ratios. The study showed that operation at low approach speeds was compromised by the necessity of maintaining high thrust to generate high lift and yet achieving the low lift-drag ratios needed for steep descents. The useable range of airspeed and flight path angle was limited by the pilot's demand for a positive climb margin at the approach speed, a suitable stall margin, and a control and/or performance margin for one engine inoperative. The optimum approach angle over an obstacle was found to be a compromise between obtaining the shortest air distance and the lowest touchdown velocity. In order to realize the greatest low-speed potential from STOL designs, the stability and control characteristics must be satisfactory.

  16. Cable Tensiometer for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The invention is a cable tensiometer that can be used on aircraft for real-time, in-flight cable tension measurements. The invention can be used on any aircraft cables with high precision. The invention is extremely light-weight, hangs on the cable being tested and uses a dual bending beam design with a high mill-volt output to determine tension.

  17. Noise measurements for a twin-engine commercial jet aircraft during 3 deg approaches and level flyovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, E. C., Jr.; Shanks, R. E.; Mueller, A. W.

    1976-01-01

    Noise measurements have been made with a twin-engine commercial jet aircraft making 3 deg approaches and level flyovers. The flight-test data showed that, in the standard 3 deg approach configuration with 40 deg flaps, effective perceived noise level (EPNL) had a value of 109.5 effective perceived noise decibels (EPNdB). This result was in agreement with unpublished data obtained with the same type of aircraft during noise certification tests; the 3 deg approaches made with 30 deg flaps and slightly reduced thrust reduced the EPNL value by 1 EPNdB. Extended center-line noise determined during the 3 deg approaches with 40 deg flaps showed that the maximum reference A-weighted sound pressure level (LA,max)ref varied from 100.0 A-weighted decibels 2.01 km (108 n. mi.) from the threshold to 87.4 db(A) at 6.12 km (3.30 n. mi.) from the threshold. These test values were about 3 db(A) higher than estimates used for comparison. The test data along the extended center line during approaches with 30 deg flaps were 1 db(A) lower than those for approaches with 40 deg flaps. Flight-test data correlating (LA,max)ref with thrust at altitudes of 122 m (400 ft) and 610 m (2000 ft) were in agreement with reference data used for comparison.

  18. An approach to segment lung pleura from CT data with high precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelats, E.; Chaisaowong, K.; Knepper, A.; Kraus, T.; Aach, T.

    2008-03-01

    A new approach to segment pleurae from CT data with high precision is introduced. This approach is developed in the segmentation's framework of an image analysis system to automatically detect pleural thickenings. The new technique to carry out the 3D segmentation of lung pleura is based on supervised range-constrained thresholding and a Gibbs-Markov random field model. An initial segmentation is done using the 3D histogram by supervised range-constrained thresholding. 3D connected component labelling is then applied to find the thorax. In order to detect and remove trachea and bronchi therein, the 3D histogram of connected pulmonary organs is modelled as a finite mixture of Gaussian distributions. Parameters are estimated using the Expectation-Maximization algorithm, which leads to the classification of that pulmonary region. As consequence left and right lungs are separated. Finally we apply a Gibbs-Markov random field model to our initial segmentation in order to achieve a high accuracy segmentation of lung pleura. The Gibbs- Markov random field is combined with maximum a posteriori estimation to estimate optimal pleural contours. With these procedures, a new segmentation strategy is developed in order to improve the reliability and accuracy of the detection of pleural contours and to achieve a better assessment performance of pleural thickenings.

  19. Pitch attitude, flight path, and airspeed control during approach and landing of a powered lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Innis, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical investigations and piloted moving base simulator evaluations were conducted for manual control of pitch attitude, flight path, and airspeed for the approach and landing of a powered lift jet STOL aircraft. Flight path and speed response characteristics were described analytically and were evaluated for the simulation experiments which were carried out on a large motion simulator. The response characteristics were selected and evaluated for a specified path and speed control technique. These charcteristics were: (1) the initial pitch response and steady pitch rate sensitivity for control of attitude with a pitch rate command/ attitude hold system, (2) the initial flight path response, flight path overshoot, and flight path-airspeed coupling in response to a change in thrust, and (3) the sensitivity of airspeed to pitch attitude changes. Results are presented in the form of pilot opinion ratings and commentary, substantiated where appropriate by response time histories and aircraft states at the point of touchdown.

  20. Development of a portable precision landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. J.; Clary, G. R.; Macdonald, S. L.

    1986-01-01

    A portable, tactical approach guidance (PTAG) system, based on a novel, X-band, precision approach concept, was developed and flight tested as a part of NASA's Rotorcraft All-Weather Operations Research Program. The system is based on state-of-the-art X-band technology and digital processing techniques. The PTAG airborne hardware consists of an X-band receiver and a small microprocessor installed in conjunction with the aircraft instrument landing system (ILS) receiver. The microprocessor analyzes the X-band, PTAG pulses and outputs ILS compatible localizer and glide slope signals. The ground stations are inexpensive, portable units, each weighing less than 85 lb, including battery, that can be quickly deployed at a landing site. Results from the flight test program show that PTAG has a significant potential for providing tactical aircraft with low cost, portable, precision instrument approach capability.

  1. System of systems design: Evaluating aircraft in a fleet context using reliability and non-deterministic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frommer, Joshua B.

    , the analysis of the vehicle for high-speed attack combined with a long loiter period is considerably different from that for quick cruise to an area combined with a low speed search. However, the framework developed to solve this class of system-of-systems problem handles both scenarios and leads to a solution type for this kind of problem. On the vehicle-level of the problem, different technology can have an impact on the fleet-level. One such technology is Morphing, the ability to change shape, which is an ideal candidate technology for missions with dissimilar segments, such as the aforementioned two. A framework, using surrogate models based on optimally-sized aircraft, and using probabilistic parameters to define a concept of operations, is investigated; this has provided insight into the setup of the optimization problem, the use of the reliability metric, and the measurement of fleet level impacts of morphing aircraft. The research consisted of four phases. The two initial phases built and defined the framework to solve system-of-systems problem; these investigations used the search-and-find scenario as the example application. The first phase included the design of fixed-geometry and morphing aircraft for a range of missions and evaluated the aircraft capability using non-deterministic mission parameters. The second phase introduced the idea of multiple aircraft in a fleet, but only considered a fleet consisting of one aircraft type. The third phase incorporated the simultaneous design of a new vehicle and allocation into a fleet for the search-and-find scenario; in this phase, multiple types of aircraft are considered. The fourth phase repeated the simultaneous new aircraft design and fleet allocation for the SEAD scenario to show that the approach is not specific to the search-and-find scenario. The framework presented in this work appears to be a viable approach for concurrently designing and allocating constituents in a system, specifically aircraft in a

  2. A fundamental approach to the sticking of insect residues to aircraft wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiss, N. S., Jr.; Wightman, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The sticking of insect residues to aircraft wings is investigated. The major topics of this review are: Experimentally tested methods, testing techniques, the effect of surface roughness height on aerodynamic drag, materials tested and, the adhesive properties of insect body fluids are reviewed.

  3. Besides Precision & Recall: Exploring Alternative Approaches to Evaluating an Automatic Indexing Tool for MEDLINE

    PubMed Central

    Névéol, Aurélie; Zeng, Kelly; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    Objective This paper explores alternative approaches for the evaluation of an automatic indexing tool for MEDLINE, complementing the traditional precision and recall method. Materials and methods The performance of MTI, the Medical Text Indexer used at NLM to produce MeSH recommendations for biomedical journal articles is evaluated on a random set of MEDLINE citations. The evaluation examines semantic similarity at the term level (indexing terms). In addition, the documents retrieved by queries resulting from MTI index terms for a given document are compared to the PubMed related citations for this document. Results Semantic similarity scores between sets of index terms are higher than the corresponding Dice similarity scores. Overall, 75% of the original documents and 58% of the top ten related citations are retrieved by queries based on the automatic indexing. Conclusions The alternative measures studied in this paper confirm previous findings and may be used to select particular documents from the test set for a more thorough analysis. PMID:17238409

  4. A new approach to driving and controlling precision lasers for cold-atom science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luey, Ben; Shugrue, Jeremy; Anderson, Mike

    2014-05-01

    Vescent's Integrated Control Electronics (ICE) Platform is a new approach to controlling and driving lasers and other electoral devices in complex atomic and optical experiments. By employing low-noise, high-bandwidth analog electronics with digital control, ICE combines the performance of analog design with the convenience of the digital world. Utilizing a simple USB COM port interface, ICE can easily be controlled via LabView, Python, or an FPGA. High-speed TTL inputs enable precise external timing or triggering. ICE is capable of generating complex timing internally, enabling ICE to drive an entire experiment or it can be directed by an external control program. The system is capable of controlling up to 8 unique ICE slave boards providing flexibility to tailor an assortment of electronics hardware to the needs of a specific experiment. Examples of ICE slave boards are: a current controller and peak-lock laser servo, a four channel temperature controller, a current controller and offset phase lock servo. A single ensemble can drive, stabilize, and frequency lock 3 lasers in addition to powering an optical amplifier, while still leaving 2 remaining slots for further control needs. Staff Scientist

  5. Opportunities for Sentinel-2 in an Integrated Sensor Approach to Support Decision Making in Precision Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooistra, L.; Clevers, J.; Beza, E.; van Vliet, P.; van den Borne, J.; van der Velde, W.

    2012-04-01

    With the upcoming availability of the Sentinel-2 sensor, an important new data stream is becoming available which will provide images with high spatial, spectral and temporal resolution relevant for operational support of precision agricultural practices. The objective of the study presented in this paper is to develop innovative approaches for the integration and analysis of information from multiple sensors which allow timely detection and diagnosis of crop status in precision agriculture. Our hypothesis was that sensing based nutrient management of crops can be improved by combining structure and bio-chemistry based vegetation indices and also taking into account the spectral changes over the growing season. Based on controlled fertilization experiments sensor based decision rules were developed which in a next stage were applied to steer near-real variable rate fertilizer application within a parcel. As a case study, a detailed field experiment was conducted for two potato fields in the South of the Netherlands. In the field sub-plots (30*30 m) were prepared with four levels of nitrogen fertilization including two replicates. For all fields, detailed spectral measurements were made over the 2010 and 2011 growing season on a weekly basis using field spectrometers (Fieldspec FR, Cropscan) and commercial near-sensing instruments (Greenseeker, Yara, Cropcircle, Isaria) on the spraying boom of a tractor. In addition, satellite based remote sensing data (WorldView-2, DMC, Rapid-Eye) for a selection of dates were available. The nitrogen status of the crop was measured bi-weekly using the Minolta Spad instrument in the field and soil and crop nutrient status of the plots was also measured monthly by sampling and wet-chemistry analysis. In this paper we present the first results of the field experiment which will focus on three aspects: 1) investigate existing spectral indices for their ability to characterize crop nitrogen status in potato; 2) investigate the added

  6. An approach to the determination of aircraft handling qualities using pilot transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. J.; Hatch, H. G., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    It was shown that a correlation exists between pilot-aircraft system closed-loop characteristics, determined by using analytical expressions for pilot response along with the analytical expression for the aircraft response, and pilot ratings obtained in many previous flight and simulation studies. Two different levels of preferred pilot response were used. These levels were: (1) a static gain and a second-order lag function with a lag time constant of 0.2 second; and (2) a static gain, a lead time constant of 1 second, and a 0.2-second lag time constant. If a system response with a pitch-angle time constant of 2.6 seconds and a stable oscillatory mode of motion with a period of 2.5 seconds could be achieved with the first-level pilot model, it was shown that the pilot rating will be satisfactory for that vehicle.

  7. A head-up display format for transport aircraft approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, R. S.; Scott, B. C.

    1981-01-01

    An electronic flight-guidance display format was designed for use in evaluations of the collimated head-up display concept applied to transport aircraft landing. In the design process of iterative evaluation and modification, some general principles, or guidelines, applicable to electronic flight displays were suggested. The usefulness of an indication of instantaneous inertial flightpath was clearly demonstrated. Evaluator pilot acceptance of the unfamiliar display concepts was very positive when careful attention was given to indoctrination and training.

  8. Computational model of precision grip in Parkinson's disease: a utility based approach

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ankur; Balasubramani, Pragathi P.; Chakravarthy, V. Srinivasa

    2013-01-01

    We propose a computational model of Precision Grip (PG) performance in normal subjects and Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients. Prior studies on grip force generation in PD patients show an increase in grip force during ON medication and an increase in the variability of the grip force during OFF medication (Ingvarsson et al., 1997; Fellows et al., 1998). Changes in grip force generation in dopamine-deficient PD conditions strongly suggest contribution of the Basal Ganglia, a deep brain system having a crucial role in translating dopamine signals to decision making. The present approach is to treat the problem of modeling grip force generation as a problem of action selection, which is one of the key functions of the Basal Ganglia. The model consists of two components: (1) the sensory-motor loop component, and (2) the Basal Ganglia component. The sensory-motor loop component converts a reference position and a reference grip force, into lift force and grip force profiles, respectively. These two forces cooperate in grip-lifting a load. The sensory-motor loop component also includes a plant model that represents the interaction between two fingers involved in PG, and the object to be lifted. The Basal Ganglia component is modeled using Reinforcement Learning with the significant difference that the action selection is performed using utility distribution instead of using purely Value-based distribution, thereby incorporating risk-based decision making. The proposed model is able to account for the PG results from normal and PD patients accurately (Ingvarsson et al., 1997; Fellows et al., 1998). To our knowledge the model is the first model of PG in PD conditions. PMID:24348373

  9. Computational model of precision grip in Parkinson's disease: a utility based approach.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ankur; Balasubramani, Pragathi P; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa

    2013-01-01

    We propose a computational model of Precision Grip (PG) performance in normal subjects and Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients. Prior studies on grip force generation in PD patients show an increase in grip force during ON medication and an increase in the variability of the grip force during OFF medication (Ingvarsson et al., 1997; Fellows et al., 1998). Changes in grip force generation in dopamine-deficient PD conditions strongly suggest contribution of the Basal Ganglia, a deep brain system having a crucial role in translating dopamine signals to decision making. The present approach is to treat the problem of modeling grip force generation as a problem of action selection, which is one of the key functions of the Basal Ganglia. The model consists of two components: (1) the sensory-motor loop component, and (2) the Basal Ganglia component. The sensory-motor loop component converts a reference position and a reference grip force, into lift force and grip force profiles, respectively. These two forces cooperate in grip-lifting a load. The sensory-motor loop component also includes a plant model that represents the interaction between two fingers involved in PG, and the object to be lifted. The Basal Ganglia component is modeled using Reinforcement Learning with the significant difference that the action selection is performed using utility distribution instead of using purely Value-based distribution, thereby incorporating risk-based decision making. The proposed model is able to account for the PG results from normal and PD patients accurately (Ingvarsson et al., 1997; Fellows et al., 1998). To our knowledge the model is the first model of PG in PD conditions. PMID:24348373

  10. Precision medical communication to optimize stakeholder information exchange: a '4M-Quadrant' approach.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazy, Rebecca

    2016-07-01

    Personalized and precision medicine concepts have transformed the healthcare delivery environment from research and development to commercialization. Precision medical communication (PMC) represents a strategy to maximize personalized healthcare elements in medical-related exchanges to optimize value from the activity for the associated stakeholders. It is a discipline of developing the right message through the right mechanism at the right moment to the right healthcare member. PMC enhances the value of information exchange among stakeholders because it integrates data, analytics, and environmental and medical insights to efficiently disseminate more precise content to specified audiences in a balanced and compliant manner. PMID:27032622

  11. Increasing the Sight Vocabulary and Reading Fluency of Children Requiring Reading Support: The Use of a Precision Teaching Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Claire P.; Murtagh, Lelia

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the impact of an eight-week Precision Teaching (PT) intervention on the sight vocabulary, reading fluency and reading attainment scores of a group of Irish primary school pupils. This study also sought to evaluate the role of PT in facilitating formative assessment of pupils' progress. Employing a mixed-method approach, this…

  12. Evaluation of V/STOL research aircraft design. [landing approaches, propulsion/control, piloted moving base simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckert, W. H.; Holzhauser, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    The evaluation and evolution of direct jet lift V/STOL transport aircraft designs are discussed. The V/STOL transport design selected as an example is a lift-fan design that was evaluated as a candidate configuration for a possible future V/STOL research transport. The paper includes discussion of potential advanced V/STOL landing approach profiles as key design requirements for V/STOL aircraft, description and experimental results of an integrated propulsion/control system designed to achieve desired advanced V/STOL near-terminal operating capabilities, and results from evaluating V/STOL designs on piloted moving-base simulators. This paper discusses use of the piloted moving-base simulator as a design tool for evolving satisfactory V/STOL stabilization and propulsion/control systems. Included are problems and solutions identified during simulation of simultaneous decelerating/descent steep curved landing approaches under instrument flight conditions. Simulation results are also compared to flight results obtained with the DO-31 V/STOL research transport.

  13. Analysis and Testing of a LIDAR-Based Approach to Terrain Relative Navigation for Precise Lunar Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Andrew E.; Ivanov, Tonislav I.

    2011-01-01

    To increase safety and land near pre-deployed resources, future NASA missions to the moon will require precision landing. A LIDAR-based terrain relative navigation (TRN) approach can achieve precision landing under any lighting conditions. This paper presents results from processing flash lidar and laser altimeter field test data that show LIDAR TRN can obtain position estimates less than 90m while automatically detecting and eliminating incorrect measurements using internal metrics on terrain relief and data correlation. Sensitivity studies show that the algorithm has no degradation in matching performance with initial position uncertainties up to 1.6 km

  14. An integrated approach toward recognizing, locating and combating targets from a modern interceptor aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyhoff, E. G.; Kloeckner, H. W.

    1985-08-01

    Interceptor aircraft of the future will find themselves in an environment which will not only be significantly more hostile than today but also far more difficult to assess. On the one hand the requirement will be to reduce the detectability of the own aircraft and on the other to enhance the capability of destroying enemy targets. Reduction of detectability can be achieved through a variety of measures such as lowering the radar cross section, the IR emission or the RF emission. Enhancement of the capability to destroy enemy target requires, next to better weapons, longer detection and identification ranges as well as quicker reaction times. Faster reaction times are not only required to gain advantages in combating the designated enemy targets but also to respond to threat situations which may emanate from sources other than the targets. The requirement will exist for an avionic system capable of correlating all relevant data and either reaching decisions itself or presenting the pilot with information in such a way that they support his own making process. This paper describes a typical set of aircraft equipments which would be involved in the data acquisition and decision making processes; it quantifies data volumes and rates and, based on these figures, attempts to define processing and correlation requirements. It then proposes a system architecture which might be suitable for the tasks at hand. The emphasis of the paper will be on assessing the impact of LSI/VHSIC technology on those portions of the avionics system which are utilized in the processes described above.

  15. Covert penetration systems: future strategic aircraft missions will require a new sensor system approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Peter A.

    1987-09-01

    This paper discusses past, present and future strategic aircraft requirements for ingress and egress, then focuses on the tech-nologies of the CO2 Laser Radar and the Automatic Target Recognizer. Present systems currently consist of a mix of various sensors which are not correlated until each is presented to the operator. Additionally, active sensors are highly detectable by threat warning systems, while passive sensors do not provide critical range information. CO2 Laser and AIR tech-nologies will significantly contribute to the resolution of these issues.

  16. An engineering optimization method with application to STOL-aircraft approach and landing trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    An optimization method has been developed that computes the optimal open loop inputs for a dynamical system by observing only its output. The method reduces to static optimization by expressing the inputs as series of functions with parameters to be optimized. Since the method is not concerned with the details of the dynamical system to be optimized, it works for both linear and nonlinear systems. The method and the application to optimizing longitudinal landing paths for a STOL aircraft with an augmented wing are discussed. Noise, fuel, time, and path deviation minimizations are considered with and without angle of attack, acceleration excursion, flight path, endpoint, and other constraints.

  17. Alternatives to relational databases in precision medicine: Comparison of NoSQL approaches for big data storage using supercomputers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, Enrique Israel

    Improvements in medical and genomic technologies have dramatically increased the production of electronic data over the last decade. As a result, data management is rapidly becoming a major determinant, and urgent challenge, for the development of Precision Medicine. Although successful data management is achievable using Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS), exponential data growth is a significant contributor to failure scenarios. Growing amounts of data can also be observed in other sectors, such as economics and business, which, together with the previous facts, suggests that alternate database approaches (NoSQL) may soon be required for efficient storage and management of big databases. However, this hypothesis has been difficult to test in the Precision Medicine field since alternate database architectures are complex to assess and means to integrate heterogeneous electronic health records (EHR) with dynamic genomic data are not easily available. In this dissertation, we present a novel set of experiments for identifying NoSQL database approaches that enable effective data storage and management in Precision Medicine using patients' clinical and genomic information from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). The first experiment draws on performance and scalability from biologically meaningful queries with differing complexity and database sizes. The second experiment measures performance and scalability in database updates without schema changes. The third experiment assesses performance and scalability in database updates with schema modifications due dynamic data. We have identified two NoSQL approach, based on Cassandra and Redis, which seems to be the ideal database management systems for our precision medicine queries in terms of performance and scalability. We present NoSQL approaches and show how they can be used to manage clinical and genomic big data. Our research is relevant to the public health since we are focusing on one of the main

  18. Combined analgesics in (headache) pain therapy: shotgun approach or precise multi-target therapeutics?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pain in general and headache in particular are characterized by a change in activity in brain areas involved in pain processing. The therapeutic challenge is to identify drugs with molecular targets that restore the healthy state, resulting in meaningful pain relief or even freedom from pain. Different aspects of pain perception, i.e. sensory and affective components, also explain why there is not just one single target structure for therapeutic approaches to pain. A network of brain areas ("pain matrix") are involved in pain perception and pain control. This diversification of the pain system explains why a wide range of molecularly different substances can be used in the treatment of different pain states and why in recent years more and more studies have described a superior efficacy of a precise multi-target combination therapy compared to therapy with monotherapeutics. Discussion In this article, we discuss the available literature on the effects of several fixed-dose combinations in the treatment of headaches and discuss the evidence in support of the role of combination therapy in the pharmacotherapy of pain, particularly of headaches. The scientific rationale behind multi-target combinations is the therapeutic benefit that could not be achieved by the individual constituents and that the single substances of the combinations act together additively or even multiplicatively and cooperate to achieve a completeness of the desired therapeutic effect. As an example the fixesd-dose combination of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), paracetamol (acetaminophen) and caffeine is reviewed in detail. The major advantage of using such a fixed combination is that the active ingredients act on different but distinct molecular targets and thus are able to act on more signalling cascades involved in pain than most single analgesics without adding more side effects to the therapy. Summary Multitarget therapeutics like combined analgesics broaden the array of therapeutic

  19. Platform Precision Autopilot Overview and Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, V.; Strovers, B.; Lee, J.; Beck, R.

    2008-01-01

    The Platform Precision Autopilot is an instrument landing system interfaced autopilot system, developed to enable an aircraft to repeatedly fly nearly the same trajectory hours, days, or weeks later. The Platform Precision Autopilot uses a novel design to interface with a NASA Gulfstream III jet by imitating the output of an instrument landing system approach. This technique minimizes, as much as possible, modifications to the baseline Gulfstream III jet and retains the safety features of the aircraft autopilot. The Platform Precision Autopilot requirement is to fly within a 5-m (16.4-ft) radius tube for distances to 200 km (108 nmi) in the presence of light turbulence for at least 90 percent of the time. This capability allows precise repeat-pass interferometry for the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar program, whose primary objective is to develop a miniaturized, polarimetric, L-band synthetic aperture radar. Precise navigation is achieved using an accurate differential global positioning system developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Flight-testing has demonstrated the ability of the Platform Precision Autopilot to control the aircraft within the specified tolerance greater than 90 percent of the time in the presence of aircraft system noise and nonlinearities, constant pilot throttle adjustments, and light turbulence.

  20. Calculation of measurement uncertainty in quantitative analysis of genetically modified organisms using intermediate precision--a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Zel, Jana; Gruden, Kristina; Cankar, Katarina; Stebih, Dejan; Blejec, Andrej

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative characterization of nucleic acids is becoming a frequently used method in routine analysis of biological samples, one use being the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Measurement uncertainty is an important factor to be considered in these analyses, especially where precise thresholds are set in regulations. Intermediate precision, defined as a measure between repeatability and reproducibility, is a parameter describing the real situation in laboratories dealing with quantitative aspects of molecular biology methods. In this paper, we describe the top-down approach to calculating measurement uncertainty, using intermediate precision, in routine GMO testing of food and feed samples. We illustrate its practicability in defining compliance of results with regulations. The method described is also applicable to other molecular methods for a variety of laboratory diagnostics where quantitative characterization of nucleic acids is needed. PMID:17474528

  1. Application of parameter estimation to aircraft stability and control: The output-error approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maine, Richard E.; Iliff, Kenneth W.

    1986-01-01

    The practical application of parameter estimation methodology to the problem of estimating aircraft stability and control derivatives from flight test data is examined. The primary purpose of the document is to present a comprehensive and unified picture of the entire parameter estimation process and its integration into a flight test program. The document concentrates on the output-error method to provide a focus for detailed examination and to allow us to give specific examples of situations that have arisen. The document first derives the aircraft equations of motion in a form suitable for application to estimation of stability and control derivatives. It then discusses the issues that arise in adapting the equations to the limitations of analysis programs, using a specific program for an example. The roles and issues relating to mass distribution data, preflight predictions, maneuver design, flight scheduling, instrumentation sensors, data acquisition systems, and data processing are then addressed. Finally, the document discusses evaluation and the use of the analysis results.

  2. A fundamental approach to the sticking of insect residues to aircraft wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, O.; Eiss, N. S.; Wightman, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    The aircraft industry is concerned with the increase of drag on planes due to the sticking of insects on critical airfoil areas. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the effects of surface energy and elasticity on the number of insects sticking onto the polymer coatings on a modified aircraft wing and to determine the mechanism by which insects stick onto surfaces during high velocity impact. Analyses including scanning electron microscopy, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis and contact angle measurements of uncoated and polymer coated aluminum surfaces were performed. A direct relation between the number of insects sticking on a sample and its surface energy was obtained. Since the sticky liquid from a burst open insect will not spread on the low energy surface, it will ball up providing poor adhesion between the insect debris and the surface. The incoming air flow can easily blow off the insect debris and thus reducing the number of insects that remain stuck on the surface. Also a direct relation between the number of insect sticking onto a surface and their modulus of elasticity was obtained.

  3. Sensor Web Approach For Next-Generation Research Aircraft Platform Data Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorenson, C.; Freudinger, L.; Yarbrough, S.

    2006-12-01

    A NASA project creating sensor web tools has resulted in systems which provide network telemetry for airborne experiments, while also providing traditional data system functions. The Research Environment for Vehicle-Embedded Analysis on Linux (REVEAL) software and hardware has now been tested on many Airborne Science campaigns and on several aircraft platforms, both manned and UAV, with participants across the Internet monitoring and contributing to the success of each mission. The software is a self-configuring, self-documenting framework based on open-standards XML which can wrap any schema such as SensorML to automatically generate metadata. Experimenters can participate by providing real-time instrument data in whatever format is most convenient to them. Buffering middleware enables efficient data distribution across the network, where applications can add value and create live displays, despite very limited air-ground bandwidth for telemetering the merged data streams. The system architecture is described, and plans are described to replace or install systems on several NASA Airborne Science platform aircraft. These new systems will be transparent to legacy instruments while enabling sensor web and telepresence applications, and provide a common interface across the platforms.

  4. A head up display format for application to V/STOL aircraft approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrick, Vernon K.; Farris, Glenn G.; Vanags, Andrejs A.

    1990-01-01

    A head up display (HUD) format developed at NASA Ames Research Center to provide pilots of V/STOL aircraft with complete flight guidance and control information for category-3C terminal-area flight operations, is described in detail. These flight operations cover a large spectrum, from STOL operations on land-based runways to VTOL operations on small ships in high seas. Included in this description is a complete geometrical specification of the HUD elements and their drive laws. The principal features of this display format are the integration of the flightpath and pursuit guidance information into a narrow field of view, easily assimilated by the pilot with a single glance, and the superposition of vertical and horizontal situation information. The display is a derivative of a successful design developed for conventional transport aircraft. The design is the outcome of many piloted simulations conducted over a four-year period. Whereas the concepts on which the display format rests could not be fully exploited because of field-of-view restrictions, and some reservations remain about the acceptability of superimposing vertical and horizontal situation information, the design successfully fulfilled its intended objectives.

  5. A synthesis approach for reproducing the response of aircraft panels to a turbulent boundary layer excitation.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Teresa; Maury, Cédric

    2011-01-01

    Random wall-pressure fluctuations due to the turbulent boundary layer (TBL) are a feature of the air flow over an aircraft fuselage under cruise conditions, creating undesirable effects such as cabin noise annoyance. In order to test potential solutions to reduce the TBL-induced noise, a cost-efficient alternative to in-flight or wind-tunnel measurements involves the laboratory simulation of the response of aircraft sidewalls to high-speed subsonic TBL excitation. Previously published work has shown that TBL simulation using a near-field array of loudspeakers is only feasible in the low frequency range due to the rapid decay of the spanwise correlation length with frequency. This paper demonstrates through theoretical criteria how the wavenumber filtering capabilities of the radiating panel reduces the number of sources required, thus dramatically enlarging the frequency range over which the response of the TBL-excited panel is accurately reproduced. Experimental synthesis of the panel response to high-speed TBL excitation is found to be feasible over the hydrodynamic coincidence frequency range using a reduced set of near-field loudspeakers driven by optimal signals. Effective methodologies are proposed for an accurate reproduction of the TBL-induced sound power radiated by the panel into a free-field and when coupled to a cavity. PMID:21302997

  6. Damage tolerance for commuter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, John W.

    1992-01-01

    The damage tolerance experience in the United States Air Force with military aircraft and in the commercial world with large transport category aircraft indicates that a similar success could be achieved in commuter aircraft. The damage tolerance process is described for the purpose of defining the approach that could be used for these aircraft to ensure structural integrity. Results of some of the damage tolerance assessments for this class of aircraft are examined to illustrate the benefits derived from this approach. Recommendations are given for future damage tolerance assessment of existing commuter aircraft and on the incorporation of damage tolerance capability in new designs.

  7. High-Precise Spectrometry of the Terahertz Frequency Range: The Methods, Approaches and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaks, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    In the paper we present a high precise THz technique (frequency synthesizers and spectrometer) and its applications for noninvasive medical diagnostics and security systems. The cornerstone of the presented devices is multipliers and mixers based on quantum superlattice structures. The multipliers based on superlattice structures are shown to be more effective than Schottky diodes and provide THz radiation up to 8.1 THz.

  8. Assessing Precision of Change Scores in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy: A Generalizability Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagtvet, Knut A.; Hoglend, Per A.

    2008-01-01

    Precision and generalizability for relative and absolute change scores were estimated by means of error/tolerance ratios and generalizability coefficients for 51 patients receiving 1 year of psychodynamic psychotherapy. These estimations involved 6 scale indicators and 3 raters. Practical suggestions are offered for the number of rates needed to…

  9. Airframe Noise Prediction of a Full Aircraft in Model and Full Scale Using a Lattice Boltzmann Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fares, Ehab; Duda, Benjamin; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2016-01-01

    Unsteady flow computations are presented for a Gulfstream aircraft model in landing configuration, i.e., flap deflected 39deg and main landing gear deployed. The simulations employ the lattice Boltzmann solver PowerFLOW(Trademark) to simultaneously capture the flow physics and acoustics in the near field. Sound propagation to the far field is obtained using a Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings acoustic analogy approach. Two geometry representations of the same aircraft are analyzed: an 18% scale, high-fidelity, semi-span model at wind tunnel Reynolds number and a full-scale, full-span model at half-flight Reynolds number. Previously published and newly generated model-scale results are presented; all full-scale data are disclosed here for the first time. Reynolds number and geometrical fidelity effects are carefully examined to discern aerodynamic and aeroacoustic trends with a special focus on the scaling of surface pressure fluctuations and farfield noise. An additional study of the effects of geometrical detail on farfield noise is also documented. The present investigation reveals that, overall, the model-scale and full-scale aeroacoustic results compare rather well. Nevertheless, the study also highlights that finer geometrical details that are typically not captured at model scales can have a non-negligible contribution to the farfield noise signature.

  10. Is Model-Based Development a Favorable Approach for Complex and Safety-Critical Computer Systems on Commercial Aircraft?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2014-01-01

    A system is safety-critical if its failure can endanger human life or cause significant damage to property or the environment. State-of-the-art computer systems on commercial aircraft are highly complex, software-intensive, functionally integrated, and network-centric systems of systems. Ensuring that such systems are safe and comply with existing safety regulations is costly and time-consuming as the level of rigor in the development process, especially the validation and verification activities, is determined by considerations of system complexity and safety criticality. A significant degree of care and deep insight into the operational principles of these systems is required to ensure adequate coverage of all design implications relevant to system safety. Model-based development methodologies, methods, tools, and techniques facilitate collaboration and enable the use of common design artifacts among groups dealing with different aspects of the development of a system. This paper examines the application of model-based development to complex and safety-critical aircraft computer systems. Benefits and detriments are identified and an overall assessment of the approach is given.

  11. Comparative study of flare control laws. [optimal control of b-737 aircraft approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadkarni, A. A.; Breedlove, W. J., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A digital 3-D automatic control law was developed to achieve an optimal transition of a B-737 aircraft between various initial glid slope conditions and the desired final touchdown condition. A discrete, time-invariant, optimal, closed-loop control law presented for a linear regulator problem, was extended to include a system being acted upon by a constant disturbance. Two forms of control laws were derived to solve this problem. One method utilized the feedback of integral states defined appropriately and augmented with the original system equations. The second method formulated the problem as a control variable constraint, and the control variables were augmented with the original system. The control variable constraint control law yielded a better performance compared to feedback control law for the integral states chosen.

  12. Aircraft landing using GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, David Gary

    The advent of the Global Positioning System (GPS) is revolutionizing the field of navigation. Commercial aviation has been particularly influenced by this worldwide navigation system. From ground vehicle guidance to aircraft landing applications, GPS has the potential to impact many areas of aviation. GPS is already being used for non-precision approach guidance; current research focuses on its application to more critical regimes of flight. To this end, the following contributions were made: (1) Development of algorithms and a flexible software architecture capable of providing real-time position solutions accurate to the centimeter level with high integrity. This architecture was used to demonstrate 110 automatic landings of a Boeing 737. (2) Assessment of the navigation performance provided by two GPS-based landing systems developed at Stanford, the Integrity Beacon Landing System, and the Wide Area Augmentation System. (3) Preliminary evaluation of proposed enhancements to traditional techniques for GPS positioning, specifically, dual antenna positioning and pseudolite augmentation. (4) Introduction of a new concept for positioning using airport pseudolites. The results of this research are promising, showing that GPS-based systems can potentially meet even the stringent requirements of a Category III (zero visibility) landing system. Although technical and logistical hurdles still exist, it is likely that GPS will soon provide aircraft guidance in all phases of flight, including automatic landing, roll-out, and taxi.

  13. GPS/GLONASS time offset monitoring based on combined Precise Point Positioning (PPP) approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, G.; Zhang, Q.; Fu, W.; Guo, H.

    2015-06-01

    A new strategy is proposed to monitor GPS/GLONASS time offsets for common navigation users using a combined GPS/GLONASS Precise Point Positioning (PPP) method based on the orbit and clock products of different time scales. The results of the inter-system GPS/GLONASS time offset, the user time offset and the inter-system device delay difference were obtained using the proposed method. The properties of these results were analyzed in terms of the stability, precision and variation characteristics. Moreover, the practicality of the time offset results in an actual navigation application was tested and demonstrated. The results indicate that the monitoring and prediction of the user time offset, but not the inter-system time offset, has important values for navigation users.

  14. An Integrative Approach to Precision Cancer Medicine Using Patient-Derived Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Yup; Kang, Wonyoung; Han, Jee Yun; Min, Seoyeon; Kang, Jinjoo; Lee, Ahra; Kwon, Jee Young; Lee, Charles; Park, Hansoo

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a heterogeneous disease caused by diverse genomic alterations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Despite recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies and development of targeted therapies, novel cancer drug development is limited due to the high attrition rate from clinical studies. Patient-derived xenografts (PDX), which are established by the transfer of patient tumors into immunodeficient mice, serve as a platform for co-clinical trials by enabling the integration of clinical data, genomic profiles, and drug responsiveness data to determine precisely targeted therapies. PDX models retain many of the key characteristics of patients’ tumors including histology, genomic signature, cellular heterogeneity, and drug responsiveness. These models can also be applied to the development of biomarkers for drug responsiveness and personalized drug selection. This review summarizes our current knowledge of this field, including methodologic aspects, applications in drug development, challenges and limitations, and utilization for precision cancer medicine. PMID:26831452

  15. One-dimensional rings with barriers: a Luttinger liquid approach to precision measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragole, Stephen; Taylor, Jacob

    2015-05-01

    Recent experiments have realized ring shaped traps for ultracold atoms in which the atoms can be manipulated in several interesting ways. Here, we consider 1D ring system with a moving weak barrier within the framework of Luttinger liquid theory. We find that classical theory suggests high precision sensors can be constructed from these systems; we extend these results into the quantum regime. Funding provided by the Physics Frontier Center at the JQI and by DARPA QUASAR.

  16. Reduction of aircraft noise in civil air transport by optimization of flight tracks and takeoff and approach procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottmann, Uwe

    1988-08-01

    Noise optimized design of operational flight procedures for effective noise pollution reduction is analyzed. Power cutback during certain stages of approach and takeoff, extension of distance between sound source and sound receiver, as well as diminution of sound impact time are optimized for specific flight procedures and routings. Five takeoff and three landing procedures are analyzed in acoustic effects. Sound immission is computed by NOISIMSIS (NOISe IMpact SImulation System), a simulation system especially created for this task, under consideration of aircraft type specified sound emission characteristics and performance data as well as different meteorological conditions. The investigations for the example of Frankfurt airport result in formulating a planning guideline with notes and impulses for activities in operational noise abatement.

  17. Flight experiments using the front-side control technique during piloted approach and landing in a powered lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindson, W. S.; Hardy, G. H.; Innis, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The essential features of using pitch attitude for glidepath control in conjunction with longitudinal thrust modulation for speed control are described, using a simple linearized model for a powered-lift STOL aircraft operating on the backside of the drag curve and at a fixed setting of propulsive lift. It is shown that an automatic speed-hold system incorporating heave-damping augmentation can allow use of the front-side control technique with satisfactory handling qualities, and the results of previous flight investigations are reviewed. Manual control considerations, as they might be involved following failure of the automatic system, are emphasized. The influence of alternative cockpit controller configurations and flight-director display features were assessed for their effect on the control task, which consisted of a straight-in steep approach flown at constant speed in simulated instrument conditions.

  18. An Approach to Evaluate Precision and Inter-Laboratory Variability of Flammability Test Methods for Aerospace Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, David; Beeson, Harold D.

    2005-01-01

    Materials selection for spacecraft is based on conventional flammability or ignition sensitivity acceptance tests. Current procedures for determining the inter-laboratory repeatability and reproducibility of aerospace materials flammability tests are not considering the dependence of data variability on test conditions and consequently attempts to characterize the precision of these methods were not successful. The inter-laboratory data variability is determined with tests conducted under arbitrary conditions, which consequently may not provide sufficient information to enable adequate determination of a method's precision. For evaluating the precision of NASA's flammability test methods, the protocol recommended includes selecting critical parameters and determining the 50% failure point by considering the specific failure criteria of each method using the critical parameter as a variable. Upon performing inter-laboratory round robin testing using this approach, the laboratories' performance could be evaluated by comparing the repeatability of the 50% failure point and/or the repeatability of critical conditions where the probabilities of passing and failing are unity, i.e., the transition zone repeatability. When a sufficient amount of data has been acquired with this method, an adequate estimation of precision of aerospace materials flammability test methods will be possible.

  19. Model-Based Control of an Aircraft Engine using an Optimal Tuner Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Chicatelli, Amy; Garg, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    This paper covers the development of a model-based engine control (MBEC) method- ology applied to an aircraft turbofan engine. Here, a linear model extracted from the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40,000 (CMAPSS40k) at a cruise operating point serves as the engine and the on-board model. The on-board model is up- dated using an optimal tuner Kalman Filter (OTKF) estimation routine, which enables the on-board model to self-tune to account for engine performance variations. The focus here is on developing a methodology for MBEC with direct control of estimated parameters of interest such as thrust and stall margins. MBEC provides the ability for a tighter control bound of thrust over the entire life cycle of the engine that is not achievable using traditional control feedback, which uses engine pressure ratio or fan speed. CMAPSS40k is capable of modeling realistic engine performance, allowing for a verification of the MBEC tighter thrust control. In addition, investigations of using the MBEC to provide a surge limit for the controller limit logic are presented that could provide benefits over a simple acceleration schedule that is currently used in engine control architectures.

  20. The PROBIT approach in estimating the prevalence of wasting: revisiting bias and precision

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The PROBIT methodology was presented in the 1995 World Health Organization Technical Report on Anthropometry as an alternative to the standard prevalence based method of measuring malnutrition in children. Theoretically the PROBIT method will always give a smaller standard error than the standard prevalence method in measuring malnutrition. A recent article by Dale et al. assessed the PROBIT method for measuring global acute malnutrition measure and found that the method was biased and the precision was superior only for sample sizes less than 150 when compared to the standard method. In a manner similar to Dale, our study further investigated the bias and precision of the PROBIT method for different sample sizes using simulated populations. Results The PROBIT method showed bias for each of the ten simulated populations, but the direction and magnitude of the average bias was changed depending on the simulated population. For a given simulated population, the average bias was relatively constant for all sample sizes drawn. The 95% half-width confidence interval was lower for the PROBIT method than the standard prevalence method regardless of the sample size or simulated population. The absolute difference in the confidence limits showed the most gains for the PROBIT method for the smaller samples sizes, but the ratio of confidence intervals was relatively constant across all sample sizes. Conclusions The PROBIT method will provide gains in precision regardless of the sample size, but the method may be biased. The direction and magnitude of the bias depends on the population it is drawn from. PMID:23981669

  1. Cold atoms in one-dimensional rings: a Luttinger liquid approach to precision measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragole, Stephen; Taylor, Jacob

    Recent experiments have realized ring shaped traps for ultracold atoms. We consider the one-dimensional limit of these ring systems with a moving weak barrier, such as a blue-detuned laser beam. In this limit, we employ Luttinger liquid theory and find an analogy with the superconducting charge qubit. In particular, we find that strongly-interacting atoms in such a system could be used for precision rotation sensing. We compare the performance of this new sensor to the state of the art non-interacting atom interferometry. Funding provided by the Physics Frontier Center at the JQI and by DARPA QUASAR.

  2. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell APU Feasibility Study for a Long Range Commercial Aircraft Using UTC ITAPS Approach. Volume 1; Aircraft Propulsion and Subsystems Integration Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Hari; Yamanis, Jean; Welch, Rick; Tulyani, Sonia; Hardin, Larry

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this contract effort was to define the functionality and evaluate the propulsion and power system benefits derived from a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) based Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) for a future long range commercial aircraft, and to define the technology gaps to enable such a system. The study employed technologies commensurate with Entry into Service (EIS) in 2015. United Technologies Corporation (UTC) Integrated Total Aircraft Power System (ITAPS) methodologies were used to evaluate system concepts to a conceptual level of fidelity. The technology benefits were captured as reductions of the mission fuel burn and emissions. The baseline aircraft considered was the Boeing 777-200ER airframe with more electric subsystems, Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) engines, and an advanced APU with ceramics for increased efficiency. In addition to the baseline architecture, four architectures using an SOFC system to replace the conventional APU were investigated. The mission fuel burn savings for Architecture-A, which has minimal system integration, is 0.16 percent. Architecture-B and Architecture-C employ greater system integration and obtain fuel burn benefits of 0.44 and 0.70 percent, respectively. Architecture-D represents the highest level of integration and obtains a benefit of 0.77 percent.

  3. Towards obtaining spatiotemporally precise responses to continuous sensory stimuli in humans: a general linear modeling approach to EEG.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Nuno R; Whelan, Robert; Foxe, John J; Lalor, Edmund C

    2014-08-15

    Noninvasive investigation of human sensory processing with high temporal resolution typically involves repeatedly presenting discrete stimuli and extracting an average event-related response from scalp recorded neuroelectric or neuromagnetic signals. While this approach is and has been extremely useful, it suffers from two drawbacks: a lack of naturalness in terms of the stimulus and a lack of precision in terms of the cortical response generators. Here we show that a linear modeling approach that exploits functional specialization in sensory systems can be used to rapidly obtain spatiotemporally precise responses to complex sensory stimuli using electroencephalography (EEG). We demonstrate the method by example through the controlled modulation of the contrast and coherent motion of visual stimuli. Regressing the data against these modulation signals produces spatially focal, highly temporally resolved response measures that are suggestive of specific activation of visual areas V1 and V6, respectively, based on their onset latency, their topographic distribution and the estimated location of their sources. We discuss our approach by comparing it with fMRI/MRI informed source analysis methods and, in doing so, we provide novel information on the timing of coherent motion processing in human V6. Generalizing such an approach has the potential to facilitate the rapid, inexpensive spatiotemporal localization of higher perceptual functions in behaving humans. PMID:24736185

  4. Combining non-precise historical information with instrumental measurements for flood frequency estimation: a fuzzy Bayesian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Jose Luis; Kiss, Andrea; Viglione, Alberto; Blöschl, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Efforts of the historical environmental extremes community during the last decades have resulted in the obtention of long time series of historical floods, which in some cases range longer than 500 years in the past. In hydrological engineering, historical floods are useful because they give additional information which improves the estimates of discharges with low annual exceedance probabilities, i.e. with high return periods, and additionally might reduce the uncertainty in those estimates. In order to use the historical floods in formal flood frequency analysis, the precise value of the peak discharges would ideally be known, but in most of the cases, the information related to historical floods is given, quantitatively, in a non-precise manner. This work presents an approach on how to deal with the non-precise historical floods, by linking the descriptions in historical records to fuzzy numbers representing discharges. These fuzzy historical discharges are then introduced in a formal Bayesian inference framework, taking into account the arithmetics of non-precise numbers modelled by fuzzy logic theory, to obtain a fuzzy version of the flood frequency curve combining the fuzzy historical flood events and the instrumental data for a given location. Two case studies are selected from the historical literature, representing different facets of the fuzziness present in the historical sources. The results from the cases studies are given in the form of the fuzzy estimates of the flood frequency curves together with the fuzzy 5% and 95% Bayesian credibility bounds for these curves. The presented fuzzy Bayesian inference framework provides a flexible methodology to propagate in an explicit way the imprecision from the historical records into the flood frequency estimate, which allows to assess the effect that the incorporation of non-precise historical information can have in the flood frequency regime.

  5. Bibliography for aircraft parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Maine, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    An extensive bibliography in the field of aircraft parameter estimation has been compiled. This list contains definitive works related to most aircraft parameter estimation approaches. Theoretical studies as well as practical applications are included. Many of these publications are pertinent to subjects peripherally related to parameter estimation, such as aircraft maneuver design or instrumentation considerations.

  6. Multilevel probabilistic approach to evaluate manufacturing defect in composite aircraft structures

    SciTech Connect

    Caracciolo, Paola

    2014-05-15

    In this work it is developed a reliable approach and its feasibility to the design and analysis of a composite structures. The metric is compared the robustness and reliability designs versus the traditional design, to demonstrate the gain that can be achieved with a probabilistic approach. The use of the stochastic approach of the uncertain parameteters in combination with the multi-scale levels analysis is the main objective of this paper. The work is dedicated to analyze the uncertainties in the design, tests, manufacturing process, and key gates such as materials characteristic.

  7. Molecular Classification and Pharmacogenetics of Primary Plasma Cell Leukemia: An Initial Approach toward Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Simeon, Vittorio; Todoerti, Katia; La Rocca, Francesco; Caivano, Antonella; Trino, Stefania; Lionetti, Marta; Agnelli, Luca; De Luca, Luciana; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Neri, Antonino; Musto, Pellegrino

    2015-01-01

    Primary plasma cell leukemia (pPCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of multiple myeloma (MM) which may represent a valid model for high-risk MM. This disease is associated with a very poor prognosis, and unfortunately, it has not significantly improved during the last three decades. New high-throughput technologies have allowed a better understanding of the molecular basis of this disease and moved toward risk stratification, providing insights for targeted therapy studies. This knowledge, added to the pharmacogenetic profile of new and old agents in the analysis of efficacy and safety, could contribute to help clinical decisions move toward a precision medicine and a better clinical outcome for these patients. In this review, we describe the available literature concerning the genomic characterization and pharmacogenetics of plasma cell leukemia (PCL). PMID:26263974

  8. Molecular Classification and Pharmacogenetics of Primary Plasma Cell Leukemia: An Initial Approach toward Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Simeon, Vittorio; Todoerti, Katia; La Rocca, Francesco; Caivano, Antonella; Trino, Stefania; Lionetti, Marta; Agnelli, Luca; De Luca, Luciana; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Neri, Antonino; Musto, Pellegrino

    2015-01-01

    Primary plasma cell leukemia (pPCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of multiple myeloma (MM) which may represent a valid model for high-risk MM. This disease is associated with a very poor prognosis, and unfortunately, it has not significantly improved during the last three decades. New high-throughput technologies have allowed a better understanding of the molecular basis of this disease and moved toward risk stratification, providing insights for targeted therapy studies. This knowledge, added to the pharmacogenetic profile of new and old agents in the analysis of efficacy and safety, could contribute to help clinical decisions move toward a precision medicine and a better clinical outcome for these patients. In this review, we describe the available literature concerning the genomic characterization and pharmacogenetics of plasma cell leukemia (PCL). PMID:26263974

  9. A flight test method for pilot/aircraft analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehler, R.; Buchacker, E.

    1986-01-01

    In high precision flight maneuvres a pilot is a part of a closed loop pilot/aircraft system. The assessment of the flying qualities is highly dependent on the closed loop characteristics related to precision maneuvres like approach, landing, air-to-air tracking, air-to-ground tracking, close formation flying and air-to air refueling of the receiver. The object of a research program at DFVLR is the final flight phase of an air to ground mission. In this flight phase the pilot has to align the aircraft with the target, correct small deviations from the target direction and keep the target in his sights for a specific time period. To investigate the dynamic behavior of the pilot-aircraft system a special ground attack flight test technique with a prolonged tracking maneuvres was developed. By changing the targets during the attack the pilot is forced to react continously on aiming errors in his sights. Thus the closed loop pilot/aircraft system is excited over a wide frequency range of interest, the pilot gets more information about mission oriented aircraft dynamics and suitable flight test data for a pilot/aircraft analysis can be generated.

  10. Aircraft measurements, modelled stratospheric [NO2]/[NO] ratio and photochemical steady-state approach within the frame of ENVISAT satellite data validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostadinov, Ivan; Bortoli, Daniele; Giovanelli, Giorgio; Heland, J.; Petritoli, Andrea; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Schlager, H.; Ulanovsky, Aleksey; Yuzhkov, Vladimir

    2003-08-01

    The scientific payload aboard the stratospheric aircraft M55 Geophysica consists of both in-situ and remote sensing instruments deployed to validate the ENVISAT chemical payload - SCIAMACHY, MIPAS-E and GOMOS during dedicated field campaigns: July and October 2002, Forli (Italy) and February - March 2003, Kiruna (Sweden). Along with the precise measurements required for correct validation procedures, it is necessary to provide additional information related to certain relationships between the available geophysical parameters in order to allow us to better interpret retrieved results, both from the space and from the aircraft measurements. In this regard NO2/NO ratio is inferred/tested along the flight tracks and used to verify the existence of a steady state photochemical equilibrium, using the data obtained by GASCOD-A/4π, FOZAN and SIOUX instruments. The obtained experimental ratio is compared to that derived from model calculations. A short description of the instruments and flight conditions are described also.

  11. Flight-test evaluation of STOL control and flight director concepts in a powered-lift aircraft flying curved decelerating approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindson, W. S.; Hardy, G. H.; Innis, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Flight tests were carried out to assess the feasibility of piloted steep curved, and decelerating approach profiles in powered lift STOL aircraft. Several STOL control concepts representative of a variety of aircraft were evaluated in conjunction with suitably designed flight directions. The tests were carried out in a real navigation environment, employed special electronic cockpit displays, and included the development of the performance achieved and the control utilization involved in flying 180 deg turning, descending, and decelerating approach profiles to landing. The results suggest that such moderately complex piloted instrument approaches may indeed be feasible from a pilot acceptance point of view, given an acceptable navigation environment. Systems with the capability of those used in this experiment can provide the potential of achieving instrument operations on curved, descending, and decelerating landing approaches to weather minima corresponding to CTOL Category 2 criteria, while also providing a means of realizing more efficient operations during visual flight conditions.

  12. A flight-test and simulation evaluation of the longitudinal final approach and landing performance of an automatic system for a light wing loading STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, S. C.; Hardy, G. H.; Hindson, W. S.

    1983-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive flight-test program of STOL operating systems for the terminal area, an automatic landing system was developed and evaluated for a light wing loading turboprop aircraft. The aircraft utilized an onboard advanced digital avionics system. Flight tests were conducted at a facility that included a STOL runway site with a microwave landing system. Longitudinal flight-test results were presented and compared with available (basically CTOL) criteria. These comparisons were augmented by results from a comprehensive simulation of the controlled aircraft which included representations of navigation errors that were encountered in flight and atmospheric disturbances. Acceptable performance on final approach and at touchdown was achieved by the autoland (automatic landing) system for the moderate winds and turbulence conditions encountered in flight. However, some touchdown performance goals were marginally achieved, and simulation results suggested that difficulties could be encountered in the presence of more extreme atmospheric conditions. Suggestions were made for improving performance under those more extreme conditions.

  13. Precise Point Positioning in the Airborne Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mowafy, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is widely used for positioning in the airborne mode such as in navigation as a supplementary system and for geo-referencing of cameras in mapping and surveillance by aircrafts and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV). The Precise Point Positioning (PPP) approach is an attractive positioning approach based on processing of un-differenced observations from a single GPS receiver. It employs precise satellite orbits and satellite clock corrections. These data can be obtained via the internet from several sources, e.g. the International GNSS Service (IGS). The data can also broadcast from satellites, such as via the LEX signal of the new Japanese satellite system QZSS. The PPP can achieve positioning precision and accuracy at the sub-decimetre level. In this paper, the functional and stochastic mathematical modelling used in PPP is discussed. Results of applying the PPP method in an airborne test using a small fixed-wing aircraft are presented. To evaluate the performance of the PPP approach, a reference trajectory was established by differential positioning of the same GPS observations with data from a ground reference station. The coordinate results from the two approaches, PPP and differential positioning, were compared and statistically evaluated. For the test at hand, positioning accuracy at the cm-to-decimetre was achieved for latitude and longitude coordinates and doubles that value for height estimation.

  14. Analysis and Testing of a LIDAR-Based Approach to Terrain Relative Navigation for Precise Lunar Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Andrew E.; Ivanov, Tonislav I.

    2010-01-01

    Capability for precise lunar landing is the goal for future NASA missions. A LIDAR-based terrain relative navigation (TRN) approach lets us achieve this goal and also land under any illumination conditions. Results from field test data showed that the LIDAR TRN algorithm obtained position estimates with mean error of about 20 meters and standard deviations of about 10 meters. Moreover, the algorithm was capable of providing 99 percent correct estimates by assessing the local terrain relief in the data. Also, the algorithm was able to handle initial position uncertainty of up to 1.6 kilometers without performance degradation.

  15. An Approach for High-precision Stand-alone Positioning in a Dynamic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halis Saka, M.; Metin Alkan, Reha; Ozpercin, Alişir

    2015-04-01

    In this study, an algorithm is developed for precise positioning in dynamic environment utilizing a single geodetic GNSS receiver using carrier phase data. In this method, users should start the measurement on a known point near the project area for a couple of seconds making use of a single dual-frequency geodetic-grade receiver. The technique employs iono-free carrier phase observations with precise products. The equation of the algorithm is given below; Sm(t(i+1))=SC(ti)+[ΦIF (t(i+1) )-ΦIF (ti)] where, Sm(t(i+1)) is the phase-range between satellites and the receiver, SC(ti) is the initial range computed from the initial known point coordinates and the satellite coordinates and ΦIF is the ionosphere-free phase measurement (in meters). Tropospheric path delays are modelled using the standard tropospheric model. To accomplish the process, an in-house program was coded and some functions were adopted from Easy-Suite available at http://kom.aau.dk/~borre/easy. In order to assess the performance of the introduced algorithm in a dynamic environment, a dataset from a kinematic test measurement was used. The data were collected from a kinematic test measurement in Istanbul, Turkey. In the test measurement, a geodetic dual-frequency GNSS receiver, Ashtech Z-Xtreme, was set up on a known point on the shore and a couple of epochs were recorded for initialization. The receiver was then moved to a vessel and data were collected for approximately 2.5 hours and the measurement was finalized on a known point on the shore. While the kinematic measurement on the vessel were carried out, another GNSS receiver was set up on a geodetic point with known coordinates on the shore and data were collected in static mode to calculate the reference trajectory of the vessel using differential technique. The coordinates of the vessel were calculated for each measurement epoch with the introduced method. With the purpose of obtaining more robust results, all coordinates were calculated

  16. Development of the NASA VALT digital navigation system. [for approach and landing procedures of VTOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, W. J., Jr.; Skutecki, E. R.; Calzado, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    The research to develop and fabricate a terminal area navigation system for use in the NASA VTOL Approach and Landing Technology (VALT) program. The results of that effort are reported. The navigation system developed and fabricated was based on a general purpose airborne digital computer. A set of flight hardware units was fabricated to create the necessary analog, digital and human interface with the computer. A comprehensive package of software was created to implement the control and guidance laws required for automatic and flight director approaches that are curved in two planes. A technique was developed that enables the generation of randomly shaped lateral paths from simple input data. The lateral path concept combines straight line and elliptical-curved segments to fit a continuous curved path to the data points. A simple, fixed base simulation was put together to assist in developing and evaluating the system. The simulation was used to obtain system performance data during simulated curved-path approaches.

  17. Intelligent Aircraft Damage Assessment, Trajectory Planning, and Decision-Making under Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Israel; Sarigul-Klijn, Nesrin

    Situational awareness and learning are necessary to identify and select the optimal set of mutually non-exclusive hypothesis in order to maximize mission performance and adapt system behavior accordingly. This paper presents a hierarchical and decentralized approach for integrated damage assessment and trajectory planning in aircraft with uncertain navigational decision-making. Aircraft navigation can be safely accomplished by properly addressing the following: decision-making, obstacle perception, aircraft state estimation, and aircraft control. When in-flight failures or damage occur, rapid and precise decision-making under imprecise information is required in order to regain and maintain control of the aircraft. To achieve planned aircraft trajectory and complete safe landing, the uncertainties in system dynamics of the damaged aircraft need to be learned and incorporated at the level of motion planning. The damaged aircraft is simulated via a simplified kinematic model. The different sources and perspectives of uncertainties in the damage assessment process and post-failure trajectory planning are presented and classified. The decision-making process for an emergency motion planning and landing is developed via the Dempster-Shafer evidence theory. The objective of the trajectory planning is to arrive at a target position while maximizing the safety of the aircraft given uncertain conditions. Simulations are presented for an emergency motion planning and landing that takes into account aircraft dynamics, path complexity, distance to landing site, runway characteristics, and subjective human decision.

  18. A Vision-Based Relative Navigation Approach for Autonomous Multirotor Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leishman, Robert C.

    Autonomous flight in unstructured, confined, and unknown GPS-denied environments is a challenging problem. Solutions could be tremendously beneficial for scenarios that require information about areas that are difficult to access and that present a great amount of risk. The goal of this research is to develop a new framework that enables improved solutions to this problem and to validate the approach with experiments using a hardware prototype. In Chapter 2 we examine the consequences and practical aspects of using an improved dynamic model for multirotor state estimation, using only IMU measurements. The improved model correctly explains the measurements available from the accelerometers on a multirotor. We provide hardware results demonstrating the improved attitude, velocity and even position estimates that can be achieved through the use of this model. We propose a new architecture to simplify some of the challenges that constrain GPS-denied aerial flight in Chapter 3. At the core, the approach combines visual graph-SLAM with a multiplicative extended Kalman filter (MEKF). More importantly, we depart from the common practice of estimating global states and instead keep the position and yaw states of the MEKF relative to the current node in the map. This relative navigation approach provides a tremendous benefit compared to maintaining estimates with respect to a single global coordinate frame. We discuss the architecture of this new system and provide important details for each component. We verify the approach with goal-directed autonomous flight-test results. The MEKF is the basis of the new relative navigation approach and is detailed in Chapter 4. We derive the relative filter and show how the states must be augmented and marginalized each time a new node is declared. The relative estimation approach is verified using hardware flight test results accompanied by comparisons to motion capture truth. Additionally, flight results with estimates in the control

  19. Psoriatic arthritis in Japan: difference in clinical features and approach to precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2016-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory arthritis that is common among patients with psoriasis, often resulting in permanent damage of joints and spines. Recent report indicates that the prevalence of PsA among Japanese patients with psoriasis is 14.3%, which is similar or slightly less than that of PsA in Caucasian, 6-42%. Skin disorders precede arthritis in 60-80% of Japanese patients with PsA and oligoarthritis or polyarthritis is the dominant pattern of them. The genotypic backgrounds appear different among Japanese and Caucasians. Biological DMARDs (bDMARDs) targeting cytokines IL-12/IL-23, TNF and IL-17 involved in the pathogenesis of PsA, have been emerging for the treatment. Although background characteristics are various among studies, anti-IL-17 seemed to be slightly better in Japanese than in global, whereas anti-IL-12/23 and anti-TNF tended to be better in global than in Japanese. Because PsA is a clinically heterogeneous disorder, we have tried to classify PsA by phenotypic differences of peripheral lymphocyte using 8-color flow cytometry and found that PsA can be divided to four types, activated Th17-dominant, Th1-dominant, both of them and neither of them. We currently try to treat patients with different bDMARDs based on the difference of lymphocyte phenotype, which may lead to precision medicine of PsA. PMID:27586804

  20. A simplified fuel control approach for low cost aircraft gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, H.

    1973-01-01

    Reduction in the complexity of gas turbine fuel controls without loss of control accuracy, reliability, or effectiveness as a method for reducing engine costs is discussed. A description and analysis of hydromechanical approach are presented. A computer simulation of the control mechanism is given and performance of a physical model in engine test is reported.

  1. High-precision radiometric tracking for planetary approach and encounter in the inner solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, C. S.; Thurman, S. W.; Davidson, J. M.; Finger, M. H.; Folkner, W. M.

    1989-01-01

    The benefits of improved radiometric tracking data have been studied for planetary approach within the inner Solar System using the Mars Rover Sample Return trajectory as a model. It was found that the benefit of improved data to approach and encounter navigation was highly dependent on the a priori uncertainties assumed for several non-estimated parameters, including those for frame-tie, Earth orientation, troposphere delay, and station locations. With these errors at their current levels, navigational performance was found to be insensitive to enhancements in data accuracy. However, when expected improvements in these errors are modeled, performance with current-accuracy data significantly improves, with substantial further improvements possible with enhancements in data accuracy.

  2. Pilot performance in zero-visibility precision approach. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ephrath, A. R.

    1975-01-01

    The pilot's short-term decisions regarding performance assessment and failure monitoring is examined. The performance of airline pilots who flew simulated zero-visibility landing approaches is reported. Results indicate that the pilot's mode of participation in the control task has a strong effect on his workload, the induced workload being lowest when the pilot acts as a monitor during a coupled approach and highest when the pilot is an active element in the control loop. A marked increase in workload at altitudes below 500 ft. is documented at all participation modes; this increase is inversely related to distance-to-go. The participation mode is shown to have a dominant effect on failure-detection performance, with a failure in a monitored (coupled) axis being detected faster than a comparable failure in a manually-controlled axis. Touchdown performance is also documented. It is concluded that the conventional instrument panel and its associated displays are inadequate for zero-visibility operations in the final phases of the landing approach.

  3. Precise segmentation of multiple organs in CT volumes using learning-based approach and information theory.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chao; Zheng, Yefeng; Birkbeck, Neil; Zhang, Jingdan; Kohlberger, Timo; Tietjen, Christian; Boettger, Thomas; Duncan, James S; Zhou, S Kevin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method by incorporating information theory into the learning-based approach for automatic and accurate pelvic organ segmentation (including the prostate, bladder and rectum). We target 3D CT volumes that are generated using different scanning protocols (e.g., contrast and non-contrast, with and without implant in the prostate, various resolution and position), and the volumes come from largely diverse sources (e.g., diseased in different organs). Three key ingredients are combined to solve this challenging segmentation problem. First, marginal space learning (MSL) is applied to efficiently and effectively localize the multiple organs in the largely diverse CT volumes. Second, learning techniques, steerable features, are applied for robust boundary detection. This enables handling of highly heterogeneous texture pattern. Third, a novel information theoretic scheme is incorporated into the boundary inference process. The incorporation of the Jensen-Shannon divergence further drives the mesh to the best fit of the image, thus improves the segmentation performance. The proposed approach is tested on a challenging dataset containing 188 volumes from diverse sources. Our approach not only produces excellent segmentation accuracy, but also runs about eighty times faster than previous state-of-the-art solutions. The proposed method can be applied to CT images to provide visual guidance to physicians during the computer-aided diagnosis, treatment planning and image-guided radiotherapy to treat cancers in pelvic region. PMID:23286081

  4. Simulated vortex encounters by a twin-engine commercial transport aircraft during final approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, E. C., Jr.; Keyser, G. L., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Piloted simulations of encounters with vortices of various ages and degrees of attenuation were performed with the Visual Motion Simulator. In the simulations, a twin-engine, commercial transport on final approach encountered the modeled vortices of a four-engine, wide-body, commercial transport. The data in this report show the effect of vortex age and ground effect on the severity of the initial upset, as well as the effect of the vortex encounters on the landing capability.

  5. Towards improved precision in the quantification of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factors: a renewed approach.

    PubMed

    Sivanesan, Arumugam; Adamkiewicz, Witold; Kalaivani, Govindasamy; Kamińska, Agnieszka; Waluk, Jacek; Hołyst, Robert; Izake, Emad L

    2015-01-21

    This paper demonstrates a renewed procedure for the quantification of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factors with improved precision. The principle of this method relies on deducting the resonance Raman scattering (RRS) contribution from surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) to end up with the surface enhancement (SERS) effect alone. We employed 1,8,15,22-tetraaminophthalocyanato-cobalt(II) (4α-Co(II)TAPc), a resonance Raman- and electrochemically redox-active chromophore, as a probe molecule for RRS and SERRS experiments. The number of 4α-Co(II)TAPc molecules contributing to RRS and SERRS phenomena on plasmon inactive glassy carbon (GC) and plasmon active GC/Au surfaces, respectively, has been precisely estimated by cyclic voltammetry experiments. Furthermore, the SERS substrate enhancement factor (SSEF) quantified by our approach is compared with the traditionally employed methods. We also demonstrate that the present approach of SSEF quantification can be applied for any kind of different SERS substrates by choosing an appropriate laser line and probe molecule. PMID:25374971

  6. New approach for precise computation of Lyman-α forest power spectrum with hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borde, Arnaud; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Rossi, Graziano; Viel, Matteo; Bolton, James S.; Yèche, Christophe; LeGoff, Jean-Marc; Rich, Jim

    2014-07-01

    Current experiments are providing measurements of the flux power spectrum from the Lyman-α forests observed in quasar spectra with unprecedented accuracy. Their interpretation in terms of cosmological constraints requires specific simulations of at least equivalent precision. In this paper, we present a suite of cosmological N-body simulations with cold dark matter and baryons, specifically aiming at modeling the low-density regions of the inter-galactic medium as probed by the Lyman-α forests at high redshift. The simulations were run using the GADGET-3 code and were designed to match the requirements imposed by the quality of the current SDSS-III/BOSS or forthcoming SDSS-IV/eBOSS data. They are made using either 2 × 7683 simeq 1 billion or 2 × 1923 simeq 14 million particles, spanning volumes ranging from (25 Mpc h-1)3 for high-resolution simulations to (100 Mpc h-1)3 for large-volume ones. Using a splicing technique, the resolution is further enhanced to reach the equivalent of simulations with 2 × 30723 simeq 58 billion particles in a (100 Mpc h-1)3 box size, i.e. a mean mass per gas particle of 1.2 × 105Msolar h-1. We show that the resulting power spectrum is accurate at the 2% level over the full range from a few Mpc to several tens of Mpc. We explore the effect on the one-dimensional transmitted-flux power spectrum of four cosmological parameters (ns, σ8, Ωm and H0) and two astrophysical parameters (T0 and γ) that are related to the heating rate of the intergalactic medium. By varying the input parameters around a central model chosen to be in agreement with the latest Planck results, we built a grid of simulations that allows the study of the impact on the flux power spectrum of these six relevant parameters. We improve upon previous studies by not only measuring the effect of each parameter individually, but also probing the impact of the simultaneous variation of each pair of parameters. We thus provide a full second-order expansion, including

  7. Experimental approaches for addressing fundamental biological questions in living, functioning cells with single molecule precision

    PubMed Central

    Lenn, Tchern; Leake, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, single molecule experimentation has allowed researchers to observe biological processes at the sensitivity level of single molecules in actual functioning, living cells, thereby allowing us to observe the molecular basis of the key mechanistic processes in question in a very direct way, rather than inferring these from ensemble average data gained from traditional molecular and biochemical techniques. In this short review, we demonstrate the impact that the application of single molecule bioscience experimentation has had on our understanding of various cellular systems and processes, and the potential that this approach has for the future to really address very challenging and fundamental questions in the life sciences. PMID:22773951

  8. A simplified fuel control approach for low-cost aircraft gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, H.

    1973-01-01

    A hydromechanical approach to the problem of reducing the compexity and cost of turbine fuel controls without impairing performance and reliability is described and analyzed. The study applies to the modification of long-range high-performance turbine engines to meet short-range missile requirements. The generalized acceleration and deceleration control parameters are studied, and variable-orifice relations for acceleration and deceleration limits are derived. The hydromechanical speed-sensing and multiplying circuit and the fuel control schematic diagram are discussed.

  9. General aviation approach and landing practices. [by pilots of light aircraft at uncontrolled airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. C.; Goode, M. W.

    1976-01-01

    The characteristics of air traffic patterns at uncontrolled airports and techniques used by a group of general aviation pilots in landing light airplanes are documented. The results of some 1,600 radar tracks taken at four uncontrolled airports and some 600 landings made by 22 pilots in two, four place, single engine light airplanes show that the uncontrolled traffic pattern is highly variable. The altitudes, distances, and piloting procedures utilized may affect the ability for pilots to see-and-avoid in this environment. Most landing approaches were conducted at an airspeed above recommended, resulting in significant floating during flare and touchdowns that were relatively flat and often nose-low.

  10. A precise and minimally invasive approach to optogenetics in the awake primate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassi, Jonathan J.; Cetin, Ali H.; Roe, Anna W.; Callaway, Edward M.; Deisseroth, Karl; Reynolds, John H.

    2013-03-01

    Optogenetics has proven to be a powerful tool for understanding the function of specific cell types and circuits within the central nervous system and establishing a causal link between their activity and behavior. Its application in non-human primates has been slow to develop. One challenge has been the damage caused by transdural delivery of viruses and light to the brain. Here, we report optogenetic activation of neuronal responses in the alert and behaving monkey after replacement of the native dura with a transparent artificial dura. This approach enables the use of fine glass micropipettes to inject virus with minimal damage and transdural illumination, obviating the damage that would otherwise occur as a result of lowering optical fibers into the brain. It also permits visualization of the underlying cortical micro-vasculature, which has proven to be helpful in targeting electrodes and laser illumination to the virus location. This approach promises to greatly assist in the dissection of cortical circuits underlying visual perception and behavior.

  11. Approach towards sensor placement, selection and fusion for real-time condition monitoring of precision machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Er, Poi Voon; Teo, Chek Sing; Tan, Kok Kiong

    2016-02-01

    Moving mechanical parts in a machine will inevitably generate vibration profiles reflecting its operating conditions. Vibration profile analysis is a useful tool for real-time condition monitoring to avoid loss of performance and unwanted machine downtime. In this paper, we propose and validate an approach for sensor placement, selection and fusion for continuous machine condition monitoring. The main idea is to use a minimal series of sensors mounted at key locations of a machine to measure and infer the actual vibration spectrum at a critical point where it is not suitable to mount a sensor. The locations for sensors' mountings which are subsequently used for vibration inference are identified based on sensitivity calibration at these locations moderated with normalized Fisher Information (NFI) associated with the measurement quality of the sensor at that location. Each of the identified sensor placement location is associated with one or more sensitive frequencies for which it ranks top in terms of the moderated sensitivities calibrated. A set of Radial Basis Function (RBF), each of them associated with a range of sensitive frequencies, is used to infer the vibration at the critical point for that frequency. The overall vibration spectrum of the critical point is then fused from these components. A comprehensive set of experimental results for validation of the proposed approach is provided in the paper.

  12. Community-based Approaches to Improving Accuracy, Precision, and Reproducibility in U-Pb and U-Th Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, N. M.; Condon, D. J.; Bowring, S. A.; Schoene, B.; Dutton, A.; Rubin, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    The last two decades have seen a grassroots effort by the international geochronology community to "calibrate Earth history through teamwork and cooperation," both as part of the EARTHTIME initiative and though several daughter projects with similar goals. Its mission originally challenged laboratories "to produce temporal constraints with uncertainties approaching 0.1% of the radioisotopic ages," but EARTHTIME has since exceeded its charge in many ways. Both the U-Pb and Ar-Ar chronometers first considered for high-precision timescale calibration now regularly produce dates at the sub-per mil level thanks to instrumentation, laboratory, and software advances. At the same time new isotope systems, including U-Th dating of carbonates, have developed comparable precision. But the larger, inter-related scientific challenges envisioned at EARTHTIME's inception remain - for instance, precisely calibrating the global geologic timescale, estimating rates of change around major climatic perturbations, and understanding evolutionary rates through time - and increasingly require that data from multiple geochronometers be combined. To solve these problems, the next two decades of uranium-daughter geochronology will require further advances in accuracy, precision, and reproducibility. The U-Th system has much in common with U-Pb, in that both parent and daughter isotopes are solids that can easily be weighed and dissolved in acid, and have well-characterized reference materials certified for isotopic composition and/or purity. For U-Pb, improving lab-to-lab reproducibility has entailed dissolving precisely weighed U and Pb metals of known purity and isotopic composition together to make gravimetric solutions, then using these to calibrate widely distributed tracers composed of artificial U and Pb isotopes. To mimic laboratory measurements, naturally occurring U and Pb isotopes were also mixed in proportions to mimic samples of three different ages, to be run as internal

  13. Elastomeric Structural Attachment Concepts for Aircraft Flap Noise Reduction - Challenges and Approaches to Hyperelastic Structural Modeling and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sreekantamurthy, Thammaiah; Turner, Travis L.; Moore, James B.; Su, Ji

    2014-01-01

    Airframe noise is a significant part of the overall noise of transport aircraft during the approach and landing phases of flight. Airframe noise reduction is currently emphasized under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) and Fixed Wing (FW) Project goals of NASA. A promising concept for trailing-edge-flap noise reduction is a flexible structural element or link that connects the side edges of the deployable flap to the adjacent main-wing structure. The proposed solution is distinguished by minimization of the span-wise extent of the structural link, thereby minimizing the aerodynamic load on the link structure at the expense of increased deformation requirement. Development of such a flexible structural link necessitated application of hyperelastic materials, atypical structural configurations and novel interface hardware. The resulting highly-deformable structural concept was termed the FLEXible Side Edge Link (FLEXSEL) concept. Prediction of atypical elastomeric deformation responses from detailed structural analysis was essential for evaluating feasible concepts that met the design constraints. The focus of this paper is to describe the many challenges encountered with hyperelastic finite element modeling and the nonlinear structural analysis of evolving FLEXSEL concepts. Detailed herein is the nonlinear analysis of FLEXSEL concepts that emerged during the project which include solid-section, foamcore, hollow, extended-span and pre-stressed concepts. Coupon-level analysis performed on elastomeric interface joints, which form a part of the FLEXSEL topology development, are also presented.

  14. Genomic instability in pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a new step towards precision medicine and novel therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ibrahim H; Lowery, Maeve A; Stadler, Zsofia K; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Kelsen, David P; O'Reilly, Eileen M

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most challenging cancers. Whole genome sequencing studies have been conducted to elucidate the underlying fundamentals underscoring disease behavior. Studies have identified a subgroup of pancreatic cancer patients with distinct molecular and clinical features. Genetic fingerprinting of these tumors is consistent with an unstable genome and defective DNA repair pathways, which creates unique susceptibility to agents inducing DNA damage. BRCA1/2 mutations, both germline and somatic, which lead to impaired DNA repair, are found to be important biomarkers of genomic instability as well as of response to DNA damaging agents. Recent studies have elucidated that PARP inhibitors and platinum agents may be effective to induce tumor regression in solid tumors bearing an unstable genome including pancreatic cancer. In this review we discuss the characteristics of genomic instability in pancreatic cancer along with its clinical implications and the utility of DNA targeting agents particularly PARP inhibitors as a novel treatment approach. PMID:26881472

  15. Multimission Fuel-Burn Minimization in Aircraft Design: A Surrogate-Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liem, Rhea Patricia

    Aerodynamic shape and aerostructural design optimizations that maximize the performance at a single flight condition result in designs with unacceptable off-design performance. While considering multiple flight conditions in the optimization improves the robustness of the designs, there is a need to develop a rational strategy for choosing the flight conditions and their relative emphases such that multipoint optimizations reflect the true objective function. In addition, there is a need to consider uncertain missions and flight conditions. In this thesis, the strategies to formulate the multipoint objective functions for aerodynamic shape and aerostructural optimization are presented. To determine the flight conditions and their corresponding weights, a novel surrogate-based mission analysis is developed to efficiently analyze hundreds of actual mission data to emulate their flight condition distribution. Using accurate and reliable surrogate models to approximate the aerodynamic coefficients used in the analysis makes this procedure computationally tractable. A mixture of experts (ME) approach is developed to overcome the limitations of conventional surrogate models in modeling the complex transonic drag profile. The ME approach combines multiple surrogate models probabilistically based on the divide-andconquer strategy. Using this model in the mission analysis significantly improves the range estimation accuracy, as compared to other conventional surrogate models. As expected, the multipoint aerodynamic shape and aerostructural optimizations demonstrate a consistent drag reduction, instead of the localized improvement by the single-point optimizations. The improved robustness in the multipoint optimized designs was also observed in terms of the improved range performance and more consistent fuel-burn reduction across the different missions. The results presented in this thesis show that the surrogate-model-assisted multipoint optimization produces a robust

  16. Multimission Fuel-Burn Minimization in Aircraft Design: A Surrogate-Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liem, Rhea Patricia

    Aerodynamic shape and aerostructural design optimizations that maximize the performance at a single flight condition result in designs with unacceptable off-design performance. While considering multiple flight conditions in the optimization improves the robustness of the designs, there is a need to develop a rational strategy for choosing the flight conditions and their relative emphases such that multipoint optimizations reflect the true objective function. In addition, there is a need to consider uncertain missions and flight conditions. In this thesis, the strategies to formulate the multipoint objective functions for aerodynamic shape and aerostructural optimization are presented. To determine the flight conditions and their corresponding weights, a novel surrogate-based mission analysis is developed to efficiently analyze hundreds of actual mission data to emulate their flight-condition distribution. Using accurate and reliable surrogate models to approximate the aerodynamic coefficients used in the analysis makes this procedure computationally tractable. A mixture of experts (ME) approach is developed to overcome the limitations of conventional surrogate models in modeling the complex transonic drag profile. The ME approach combines multiple surrogate models probabilistically based on the divide-and-conquer strategy. Using this model in the mission analysis significantly improves the range estimation accuracy, as compared to other conventional surrogate models. As expected, the multipoint aerodynamic shape and aerostructural optimizations demonstrate a consistent drag reduction, instead of the localized improvement by the single-point optimizations. The improved robustness in the multipoint optimized designs was also observed in terms of the improved range performance and more consistent fuel-burn reduction across the different missions. The results presented in this thesis show that the surrogate-model-assisted multipoint optimization produces a robust

  17. Bird impact at aircraft structure - Damage analysis using Coupled Euler Lagrangian Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smojver, I.; Ivancevic, D.

    2010-06-01

    Numerical bird strike damage prediction procedure has been applied on the very detailed large airplane secondary structure consisting of sandwich, composite and metallic structural items. The impacted inboard flap finite element model is modelled using 3D, shell and continuum shell elements, coupled with appropriate kinematic constraints. The bird has been modelled using Coupled Euler Lagrangian approach, in order to avoid the numerical difficulties connected with mesh distortion. Various failure modes, such as Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) face layer rupture, failure of composite matrix, damage initiation / evolution in the sandwich structure Nomex core and elastoplastic failure of a metallic structure have been investigated. Besides, general contact has been applied as to efficiently capture the contact between Eulerian bird material and the structure, as well as large deformations of the different structural components. Compared to the classic Lagrangian modelling of the bird, the analysis has proven to be more stable, and the results, such as damage areas, physically more realistic. The impact has been applied in the area that is the most probably subjected to the impact damage during exploitation.

  18. An Approach to Detect and Mitigate Ice Particle Accretion in Aircraft Engine Compression Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Simon, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    The accretion of ice in the compression system of commercial gas turbine engines operating in high ice water content conditions is a safety issue being studied by the aviation sector. While most of the research focuses on the underlying physics of ice accretion and the meteorological conditions in which accretion can occur, a systems-level perspective on the topic lends itself to potential near-term operational improvements. This work focuses on developing an accurate and reliable algorithm for detecting the accretion of ice in the low pressure compressor of a generic 40,000 lbf thrust class engine. The algorithm uses only the two shaft speed sensors and works regardless of engine age, operating condition, and power level. In a 10,000-case Monte Carlo simulation, the detection approach was found to have excellent capability at determining ice accretion from sensor noise with detection occurring when ice blocks an average of 6.8 percent of the low pressure compressor area. Finally, an initial study highlights a potential mitigation strategy that uses the existing engine actuators to raise the temperature in the low pressure compressor in an effort to reduce the rate at which ice accretes.

  19. Novel approaches for alleviation of electrical hazards of graphite-fiber composites. [aircraft safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K.

    1979-01-01

    Four basically different approaches were considered: gasification of fibers, retention in the matrix, clumping to prevent entrainment, and electrical insulation of fibers. The techniques used to achieve them are described in some detail. These involved surface treatment of fibers to improve the wettability of fibers and coating the fibers with the selected substances before laying them up for composite fabrication. Thermogravimetric analyses were performed on the plain and treated fibers in inert (nitrogen, argon) and reactive (air) atmospheres. The treated fibers embedded in epoxy were ignited in a Bunsen flame to determine the efficiency of these treatments. A simple apparatus was assembled to detect the time for the first short circuit (in a typical electrical circuit) when exposed to the combustion products from a graphite fiber composite fire. The state-of-the-art and treated fibers cast in typical epoxy were burned and ranked for potential success. It was inferred that the gasification schemes appear promising when reduction or oxidation is tried. It was also found that some very promising candidates were available for the clumping and for the electrical insulation of fibers.

  20. An Approach to Detect and Mitigate Ice Particle Accretion in Aircraft Engine Compression Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Simon, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    The accretion of ice in the compression system of commercial gas turbine engines operating in high ice water content conditions is a safety issue being studied by the aviation sector. While most of the research focuses on the underlying physics of ice accretion and the meteorological conditions in which accretion can occur, a systems-level perspective on the topic lends itself to potential near-term operational improvements. This work focuses on developing an accurate and reliable algorithm for detecting the accretion of ice in the low pressure compressor of a generic 40,000 lbf thrust class engine. The algorithm uses only the two shaft speed sensors and works regardless of engine age, operating condition, and power level. In a 10,000-case Monte Carlo simulation, the detection approach was found to have excellent capability at determining ice accretion from sensor noise with detection occurring when ice blocks an average of 6.8% of the low pressure compressor area. Finally, an initial study highlights a potential mitigation strategy that uses the existing engine actuators to raise the temperature in the low pressure compressor in an effort to reduce the rate at which ice accretes.

  1. Aircraft optical cable plant program plan: the approach for the physical layer for fly-by-light control networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Thomas L.; Murdock, John K.

    1995-05-01

    A program was created with joint industry and government funding to apply fiber optic technologies to aircraft. The technology offers many potential benefits. Among them are increased electromagnetic interference immunity and the possibility of reduced weight, increased reliability, and enlarged capability by redesigning architectures to use the large bandwidth of fiber optics. Those benefits will only be realized if fiber optics meets the unique requirements of aircraft networks. Over the past two decades, considerable effort has been expended on applying photonic technologies to aircraft. Great successes have occurred in optoelectronic components development. In the development of these systems to link those components, known as the cable plant, progress has also been made, but only recently has it been organized in a coordinated, systems-oriented fashion. The FLASH program will expand on the nascent cable plant systems efforts by building upon recent work in individual components, and integrating that work into a cohesive aircraft cable plant. Therefore, the FLASH program will develop the low cost, reliable cables, connectors, splices, backplanes, manufacturing and installation methods, test methods, support equipment, and training systems needed to form a true optical cable plant for transport aircraft, tactical aircraft, and helicopters.

  2. Reversible and Precise Self-Assembly of Janus Metal-Organosilica Nanoparticles through a Linker-Free Approach.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huicheng; Ji, Fei; Xu, Yong; Yu, Jiaqi; Liu, Qipeng; Chen, Lei; Chen, Qian; Wen, Peng; Lifshitz, Yeshayahu; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Qiao; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2016-08-23

    Reversible self-assembly of nanoparticles into ordered structures is essential for both fundamental study and practical applications. Although extensive work has been conducted, the demand for simple, cheap, reversible, and versatile ordering methods is still a central issue in current nanoscience and nanotechnology. Here we report a reversible and precise self-assembly of nanoparticles through a linker-free and fast approach by manipulating the interparticle forces, e.g., van der Waals (VDW) force and electrostatic force. Because VDW force is nondirectional, an oriented interaction is achieved to induce the directional binding of nanoparticles utilizing the Janus nanostructure. An effective sol-gel approach has been developed to synthesize metal-organosilica Janus nanoparticles. Dimers and trimers can be obtained by tuning the steric hindrance. After assembly, "hot-spots" can be generated between adjacent nanoparticles, and dramatic enhancement has been observed in surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The present strategy overcomes several limitations of existing approaches and allows the controlled assembly of small particles into various structures. PMID:27392069

  3. An on-axis self-calibration approach for precision rotary metrology stages based on an angular artifact plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chuxiong; Zhu, Yu; Hu, Jinchun; Xu, Dengfeng; Zhang, Ming

    2013-08-01

    Precision rotary metrology stages need calibration technology to determine the stage error for the compensation and improvement of angle measurement accuracy. Departing from previous perspectives, we present an on-axis angle self-calibration approach for rotary metrology stages with the utilization of an angular artifact plate. Specifically, the artifact plate with angular mark lines, whose accuracy is not precisely known, is first presented as the assistant tool. Then, the artifact plate is placed in the uncalibrated rotary metrology stage with different alignments to construct independent measurement views. The measurement deviation of each mark line from its nominal angle position is rigidly modeled as a combination of stage error, artifact error, misalignment error and random measurement noise. Based on the circle closure principle and the mathematical definition of axis orientation, the misalignment error of each measurement view can be directly determined by algebraic processing. With the comparison of the different measurement views, transitivity and redundancy can be obtained, and a least-squares calculation law is synthesized to determine the stage error and to meet the challenge of random measurement noise. The designed artifact plate is developed for the explanation of a standard angle self-calibration procedure, and a practical description of how to measure the angular marks of different measurement views is also provided in detail. Computer simulation finally validates that the proposed method can realize the stage error accurately even when there exist various random measurement noises. The proposed strategy essentially provides a novel on-axis angle self-calibration approach with accuracy, simplicity and robustness orientation to meet industrial requirements.

  4. Computation of maximum gust loads in nonlinear aircraft using a new method based on the matched filter approach and numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pototzky, Anthony S.; Heeg, Jennifer; Perry, Boyd, III

    1990-01-01

    Time-correlated gust loads are time histories of two or more load quantities due to the same disturbance time history. Time correlation provides knowledge of the value (magnitude and sign) of one load when another is maximum. At least two analysis methods have been identified that are capable of computing maximized time-correlated gust loads for linear aircraft. Both methods solve for the unit-energy gust profile (gust velocity as a function of time) that produces the maximum load at a given location on a linear airplane. Time-correlated gust loads are obtained by re-applying this gust profile to the airplane and computing multiple simultaneous load responses. Such time histories are physically realizable and may be applied to aircraft structures. Within the past several years there has been much interest in obtaining a practical analysis method which is capable of solving the analogous problem for nonlinear aircraft. Such an analysis method has been the focus of an international committee of gust loads specialists formed by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration and was the topic of a panel discussion at the Gust and Buffet Loads session at the 1989 SDM Conference in Mobile, Alabama. The kinds of nonlinearities common on modern transport aircraft are indicated. The Statical Discrete Gust method is capable of being, but so far has not been, applied to nonlinear aircraft. To make the method practical for nonlinear applications, a search procedure is essential. Another method is based on Matched Filter Theory and, in its current form, is applicable to linear systems only. The purpose here is to present the status of an attempt to extend the matched filter approach to nonlinear systems. The extension uses Matched Filter Theory as a starting point and then employs a constrained optimization algorithm to attack the nonlinear problem.

  5. Speed Control Law for Precision Terminal Area In-Trail Self Spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Terence S.

    2002-01-01

    This document describes a speed control law for precision in-trail airborne self-spacing during final approach. This control law was designed to provide an operationally viable means to obtain a desired runway threshold crossing time or minimum distance, one aircraft relative to another. The control law compensates for dissimilar final approach speeds between aircraft pairs and provides guidance for a stable final approach. This algorithm has been extensively tested in Monte Carlo simulation and has been evaluated in piloted simulation, with preliminary results indicating acceptability from operational and workload standpoints.

  6. Aircraft routing with minimal climate impact: the REACT4C climate cost function modelling approach (V1.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewe, V.; Frömming, C.; Matthes, S.; Brinkop, S.; Ponater, M.; Dietmüller, S.; Jöckel, P.; Garny, H.; Tsati, E.; Dahlmann, K.; Søvde, O. A.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Berntsen, T. K.; Shine, K. P.; Irvine, E. A.; Champougny, T.; Hullah, P.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to CO2, the climate impact of aviation is strongly influenced by non-CO2 emissions, such as nitrogen oxides, influencing ozone and methane, and water vapour, which can lead to the formation of persistent contrails in ice-supersaturated regions. Because these non-CO2 emission effects are characterised by a short lifetime, their climate impact largely depends on emission location and time; that is to say, emissions in certain locations (or times) can lead to a greater climate impact (even on the global average) than the same emission in other locations (or times). Avoiding these climate-sensitive regions might thus be beneficial to climate. Here, we describe a modelling chain for investigating this climate impact mitigation option. This modelling chain forms a multi-step modelling approach, starting with the simulation of the fate of emissions released at a certain location and time (time-region grid points). This is performed with the chemistry-climate model EMAC, extended via the two submodels AIRTRAC (V1.0) and CONTRAIL (V1.0), which describe the contribution of emissions to the composition of the atmosphere and to contrail formation, respectively. The impact of emissions from the large number of time-region grid points is efficiently calculated by applying a Lagrangian scheme. EMAC also includes the calculation of radiative impacts, which are, in a second step, the input to climate metric formulas describing the global climate impact of the emission at each time-region grid point. The result of the modelling chain comprises a four-dimensional data set in space and time, which we call climate cost functions and which describes the global climate impact of an emission at each grid point and each point in time. In a third step, these climate cost functions are used in an air traffic simulator (SAAM) coupled to an emission tool (AEM) to optimise aircraft trajectories for the North Atlantic region. Here, we describe the details of this new modelling

  7. Aircraft routing with minimal climate impact: the REACT4C climate cost function modelling approach (V1.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewe, V.; Frömming, C.; Matthes, S.; Brinkop, S.; Ponater, M.; Dietmüller, S.; Jöckel, P.; Garny, H.; Tsati, E.; Søvde, O. A.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Berntsen, T. K.; Shine, K. P.; Irvine, E. A.; Champougny, T.; Hullah, P.

    2013-08-01

    In addition to CO2, the climate impact of aviation is strongly influenced by non-CO2 emissions, such as nitrogen oxides, influencing ozone and methane, and water vapour, forming contrails. Because these non-CO2 emission effects are characterised by a short lifetime, their climate impact largely depends on emission location and time, i.e. emissions in certain locations (or times) can lead to a greater climate impact (even on the global average) than the same emission in other locations (or times). Avoiding these climate sensitive regions might thus be beneficial to climate. Here, we describe a modelling chain for investigating this climate impact mitigation option. It forms a multi-step modelling approach, starting with the simulation of the fate of emissions released at a certain location and time (time-region). This is performed with the chemistry-climate model EMAC, extended by the two submodels AIRTRAC 1.0 and CONTRAIL 1.0, which describe the contribution of emissions to the composition of the atmosphere and the contrail formation. Numerous time-regions are efficiently calculated by applying a Lagrangian scheme. EMAC also includes the calculation of radiative impacts, which are, in a second step, the input to climate metric formulas describing the climate impact of the time-region emission. The result of the modelling chain comprises a four dimensional dataset in space and time, which we call climate cost functions, and which describe at each grid point and each point in time, the climate impact of an emission. In a third step, these climate cost functions are used in a traffic simulator (SAAM), coupled to an emission tool (AEM) to optimise aircraft trajectories for the North Atlantic region. Here, we describe the details of this new modelling approach and show some example results. A number of sensitivity analyses are performed to motivate the settings of individual parameters. A stepwise sanity check of the results of the modelling chain is undertaken to

  8. A compilation and analysis of typical approach and landing data for a simulator study of an externally blown flap STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, D. B.; Bergeron, H. P.

    1974-01-01

    A piloted simulation study has been made of typical landing approaches with an externally blown flap STOL aircraft to ascertain a realistic dispersion of parameter values at both the flare window and touchdown. The study was performed on a fixed-base simulator using standard cockpit instrumentation. Six levels of stability and control augmentation were tested during a total of 60 approaches (10 at each level). A detached supplement containing computer printouts of the flare-window and touchdown conditions for all 60 runs has been prepared.

  9. New strategies for high precision surgery of the temporal bone using a robotic approach for cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Klenzner, Thomas; Ngan, Chiu Chun; Knapp, Felix Bernhard; Knoop, Hayo; Kromeier, Jan; Aschendorff, Antje; Papastathopoulos, Evangelos; Raczkowsky, Joerg; Wörn, Heinz; Schipper, Joerg

    2009-07-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate a collision-free trajectory of an instrument through the facial recess to the site of planned cochleostomy guided by a surgery robot. The indication for cochlear implantation is still expanding toward more substantial residual hearing. A cochleostomy as atraumatic as possible will influence the preservation of inner ear function. The employment of a highly precise instrument guidance using a robot could represent a feasible solution for a constant reproducible surgical procedure. Screw markers for a point-based registration were fixed on a human temporal bone specimen prepared with a mastoidectomy and posterior tympanotomy. A DICOM dataset has been generated thereof in a 64-multislice computer tomography (CT). A virtual trajectory in a 3D model has been planned representing the path of instrumentation toward the desired spot of cochleostomy. A 1.9-mm endoscope has been mounted onto the robot system RobaCKa (Staeubli RX90CR) to visualize this trajectory. The target registration error added up to 0.25 mm, which met the desirable tolerance of <0.5 mm. A collision-free propagation of the endoscope into the tympanic cavity via the facial recess has been performed by the robot and the spot of cochleostomy could be visualized through the endoscope. Using a DICOM dataset of a high-resolution CT and a robot as a positioning platform for surgical instruments could be a feasible approach to perform a highly precise and constant reproducible cochleostomy. Furthermore, it could be a crucial step to preserve substantial residual hearing in terms of expanding the indications for cochlear implantation. PMID:19015866

  10. Inplementation of an automated signal processing approach for the analysis of chemical spectral signatures collected from FT-IR mounted in an aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Kroutil, Robert T

    2008-01-01

    The automated detection of chemical spectral signatures using a passive infrared Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectrometer mounted in an aircraft is a difficult challenge due to the small total infrared energy contribution of a particular chemical species compared to the background signature. The detection of spectral signatures is complicated by the fact that a large, widely varying infrared background is present that is coupled with the presence of a number of chemical interferents in the atmosphere. This paper describes a mathematical technique that has been demonstrated to automatically detect specific chemical species in an automated processing environment. The data analysis methodology has been demonstrated to be effective using data of low spectral resolution at low aircraft altitudes. An overview of the implementation and basic concepts of the approach are presented.

  11. Development and evaluation of an air quality modeling approach to assess near-field impacts of lead emissions from piston-engine aircraft operating on leaded aviation gasoline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Edward; Lee, Mark; Marin, Kristen; Holder, Christopher; Hoyer, Marion; Pedde, Meredith; Cook, Rich; Touma, Jawad

    2011-10-01

    Since aviation gasoline is now the largest remaining source of lead (Pb) emissions to the air in the United States, there is increased interest by regulatory agencies and the public in assessing the impacts on residents living in close proximity to these sources. An air quality modeling approach using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD) was developed and evaluated for estimating atmospheric concentrations of Pb at and near general aviation airports where leaded aviation gasoline (avgas) is used. These detailed procedures were made to accurately characterize emissions and dispersion leading to improved model performance for a pollutant with concentrations that vary rapidly across short distances. The new aspects of this work included a comprehensive Pb emission inventory that incorporated sub-daily time-in-mode (TIM) activity data for piston-engine aircraft, aircraft-induced wake turbulence, plume rise of the aircraft exhaust, and allocation of approach and climb-out emissions to 50-m increments in altitude. To evaluate the modeling approach used here, ambient Pb concentrations were measured upwind and downwind of the Santa Monica Airport (SMO) and compared to modeled air concentrations. Modeling results paired in both time and space with monitoring data showed excellent overall agreement (absolute fractional bias of 0.29 winter, 0.07 summer). The modeling results on individual days show Pb concentration gradients above the urban background concentration of 10 ng m-3 extending downwind up to 900 m from the airport, with a crosswind extent of 400 m. Three-month average modeled concentrations above the background were found to extend to a maximum distance of approximately 450 m beyond the airport property in summer and fall. Modeling results show aircraft engine “run-up” is the most important source contribution to the maximum Pb concentration. Sensitivity analysis

  12. Aircraft electromagnetic compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Clifton A.; Larsen, William E.

    1987-01-01

    Illustrated are aircraft architecture, electromagnetic interference environments, electromagnetic compatibility protection techniques, program specifications, tasks, and verification and validation procedures. The environment of 400 Hz power, electrical transients, and radio frequency fields are portrayed and related to thresholds of avionics electronics. Five layers of protection for avionics are defined. Recognition is given to some present day electromagnetic compatibility weaknesses and issues which serve to reemphasize the importance of EMC verification of equipment and parts, and their ultimate EMC validation on the aircraft. Proven standards of grounding, bonding, shielding, wiring, and packaging are laid out to help provide a foundation for a comprehensive approach to successful future aircraft design and an understanding of cost effective EMC in an aircraft setting.

  13. Aircraft electromagnetic compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Clifton A.; Larsen, William E.

    1987-06-01

    Illustrated are aircraft architecture, electromagnetic interference environments, electromagnetic compatibility protection techniques, program specifications, tasks, and verification and validation procedures. The environment of 400 Hz power, electrical transients, and radio frequency fields are portrayed and related to thresholds of avionics electronics. Five layers of protection for avionics are defined. Recognition is given to some present day electromagnetic compatibility weaknesses and issues which serve to reemphasize the importance of EMC verification of equipment and parts, and their ultimate EMC validation on the aircraft. Proven standards of grounding, bonding, shielding, wiring, and packaging are laid out to help provide a foundation for a comprehensive approach to successful future aircraft design and an understanding of cost effective EMC in an aircraft setting.

  14. Knowledge-based processing for aircraft flight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Painter, John H.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose is to develop algorithms and architectures for embedding artificial intelligence in aircraft guidance and control systems. With the approach adopted, AI-computing is used to create an outer guidance loop for driving the usual aircraft autopilot. That is, a symbolic processor monitors the operation and performance of the aircraft. Then, based on rules and other stored knowledge, commands are automatically formulated for driving the autopilot so as to accomplish desired flight operations. The focus is on developing a software system which can respond to linguistic instructions, input in a standard format, so as to formulate a sequence of simple commands to the autopilot. The instructions might be a fairly complex flight clearance, input either manually or by data-link. Emphasis is on a software system which responds much like a pilot would, employing not only precise computations, but, also, knowledge which is less precise, but more like common-sense. The approach is based on prior work to develop a generic 'shell' architecture for an AI-processor, which may be tailored to many applications by describing the application in appropriate processor data bases (libraries). Such descriptions include numerical models of the aircraft and flight control system, as well as symbolic (linguistic) descriptions of flight operations, rules, and tactics.

  15. Aircraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H. (Inventor); Uden, Edward (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention is an aircraft wing design that creates a bell shaped span load, which results in a negative induced drag (induced thrust) on the outer portion of the wing; such a design obviates the need for rudder control of an aircraft.

  16. Aircraft Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Ulf; Dobrzynski, Werner; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Delfs, Jan; Isermann, Ullrich; Obermeier, Frank

    Aircraft industry is exposed to increasing public pressure aiming at a continuing reduction of aircraft noise levels. This is necessary to both compensate for the detrimental effect on noise of the expected increase in air traffic and improve the quality of living in residential areas around airports.

  17. An analytical approach to air defense: cost, effectiveness and SWOT analysis of employing fighter aircraft and modern SAM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kus, Orcun; Kocaman, Ibrahim; Topcu, Yucel; Karaca, Volkan

    2012-05-01

    The problem of defending a specific airspace is among the main issues a military commander to solve. Proper protection of own airspace is crucial for mission success at the battlefield. The military doctrines of most world armed forces involve two main options of defending the airspace. One of them is utilizing formations of fighter aircraft, which is a flexible choice. The second option is deploying modern SAM (Surface to Air Missile) systems, which is more expansive. On the other hand the decision makers are to cope with miscellaneous restrictions such as the budgeting problems. This study defines air defense concept according to modern air warfare doctrine. It considers an air defense scenario over an arbitrary airspace and compares the performance and cost-effectiveness of employing fighter aircraft and SAM systems. It also presents SWOT (Strenghts - Weakness - Opportunities - Threats) analyses of air defense by fighter aircraft and by modern SAMs and tries to point out whichever option is better. We conclude that deploying SAMs has important advantages over using fighter aircraft by means of interception capacity within a given time period and is cost-effective.

  18. Simultaneous multi-design point approach to gas turbine on-design cycle analysis for aircraft engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutte, Jeffrey Scott

    Gas turbine engines for aircraft applications are required to meet multiple performance and sizing requirements, subject to constraints established by the best available technology level, that are both directly and indirectly associated with the aerothermodynamic cycle. The performance requirements and limiting values of constraints that are considered by the cycle analyst conducting an engine cycle design occur at multiple operating conditions. The traditional approach to cycle analysis chooses a single design point with which to perform the on-design analysis. Additional requirements and constraints not transpiring at the design point must be evaluated in off-design analysis and therefore do not influence the cycle design. Such an approach makes it difficult to design the cycle to meet more than a few requirements and limits the number of different aerothermodynamic cycle designs that can reasonably be evaluated. Engine manufacturers have developed computational methods to create aerothermodynamic cycles that meet multiple requirements, but such methods are closely held secrets of their design process. This thesis presents a transparent and publicly available on-design cycle analysis method for gas turbine engines which generates aerothermodynamic cycles that simultaneously meet performance requirements and constraints at numerous design points. Such a method provides the cycle analyst the means to control all aspects of the aerothermodynamic cycle and provides the ability to parametrically create candidate engine cycles in greater numbers to comprehensively populate the cycle design space. The cycle design space represents all of the candidate engine cycles that meet the performance requirements for a particular application from which a "best" engine can be selected. This thesis develops the multi-design point on-design cycle analysis method labeled simultaneous MDP. The method is divided into three different phases resulting in an 11 step process to generate a

  19. Analysis and Simulation of the Simplified Aircraft-Based Paired Approach Concept With the ALAS Alerting Algorithm in Conjunction With Echelon and Offset Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo; Madden, Michael M.; Butler, Rickey W.; Perry, Raleigh B.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents analytical and simulation results of an investigation into proposed operational concepts for closely spaced parallel runways, including the Simplified Aircraft-based Paired Approach (SAPA) with alerting and an escape maneuver, MITRE?s echelon spacing and no escape maneuver, and a hybrid concept aimed at lowering the visibility minima. We found that the SAPA procedure can be used at 950 ft separations or higher with next-generation avionics and that 1150 ft separations or higher is feasible with current-rule compliant ADS-B OUT. An additional 50 ft reduction in runway separation for the SAPA procedure is possible if different glideslopes are used. For the echelon concept we determined that current generation aircraft cannot conduct paired approaches on parallel paths using echelon spacing on runways less than 1400 ft apart and next-generation aircraft will not be able to conduct paired approach on runways less than 1050 ft apart. The hybrid concept added alerting and an escape maneuver starting 1 NM from the threshold when flying the echelon concept. This combination was found to be effective, but the probability of a collision can be seriously impacted if the turn component of the escape maneuver has to be disengaged near the ground (e.g. 300 ft or below) due to airport buildings and surrounding terrain. We also found that stabilizing the approach path in the straight-in segment was only possible if the merge point was at least 1.5 to 2 NM from the threshold unless the total system error can be sufficiently constrained on the offset path and final turn.

  20. A novel approach for pulse width measurements with a high precision (8 ps RMS) TDC in an FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugur, C.; Linev, S.; Michel, J.; Schweitzer, T.; Traxler, M.

    2016-01-01

    High precision time measurements are a crucial element in particle identification experiments, which likewise require pulse width information for Time-over-Threshold (ToT) measurements and charge measurements (correlated with pulse width). In almost all of the FPGA-based TDC applications, pulse width measurements are implemented using two of the TDC channels for leading and trailing edge time measurements individually. This method however, requires twice the number of resources. In this paper we present the latest precision improvements in the high precision TDC (8 ps RMS) developed before [1], as well as the novel way of measuring ToT using a single TDC channel, while still achieving high precision (as low as 11.7 ps RMS). The effect of voltage, generated by a DC-DC converter, over the precision is also discussed. Finally, the outcome of the temperature change over the pulse width measurement is shown and a correction method is suggested to limit the degradation.

  1. Scheduling of an aircraft fleet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paltrinieri, Massimo; Momigliano, Alberto; Torquati, Franco

    1992-01-01

    Scheduling is the task of assigning resources to operations. When the resources are mobile vehicles, they describe routes through the served stations. To emphasize such aspect, this problem is usually referred to as the routing problem. In particular, if vehicles are aircraft and stations are airports, the problem is known as aircraft routing. This paper describes the solution to such a problem developed in OMAR (Operative Management of Aircraft Routing), a system implemented by Bull HN for Alitalia. In our approach, aircraft routing is viewed as a Constraint Satisfaction Problem. The solving strategy combines network consistency and tree search techniques.

  2. Study of cross-correlation signals in a data-driven approach for damage classification in aircraft wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho-Navarro, Jhonatan; Ruiz, Magda; Villamizar, Rodolfo; Mujica, Luis; Güemes, Alfredo; González-Requema, Ignacio

    2015-07-01

    This paper discusses, experimental results of classifying several mass adding in a wing aircraft structure, using cross-correlated piezoelectric signals, represented by principal components. Piezoelectric signals are applied and recorded at specific points of the structure under analysis. Then, statistical features are obtained by means of principal component analysis to the correlation between excitation and response signals. Unsupervised learning is implemented to the reduced feature space, in order to identify clusters of damaged cases. The main result of this paper is the advantage resulting from using cross-correlated signals, evaluated through the performance of clustering indexes. Experimental data are collected from two test structures: i.) A turbine blade of a commercial aircraft and ii.) The skin panel of the torsion box of a wing. Damages are induced adding masses at different locations of the wing section surface. The results obtained show the effectiveness of the methodology to distinguish between different damage cases.

  3. Space Weather Effects on Aircraft Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, J. C.; Cade, W. B.

    2012-12-01

    Many aircraft today use satellites for GPS navigation, arrival and departure to and from airspaces, and for "shooting" non-precision and precision Instrument Approaches into airports. Also in development is an Air Traffic Control system based on satellite technology that seeks to modernize current air traffic control and improve safety, eventually phasing out radar (though not yet in the very near future). Due to the general, commercial, and military aviation fields all becoming more and more reliant on satellite and GPS technologies, the effects of space weather events on these systems is of paramount concern to militaries, airlines, private pilots, and other aviation operators. In this study we analyze data from airlines and other resources regarding effects on satellite and GPS systems, which is crucial to the conduct of safe flight operations now and improving systems for future and continued use.

  4. NDE: An effective approach to improved reliability and safety. A technology survey. [nondestructive testing of aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Stuhrke, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    Technical abstracts are presented for about 100 significant documents relating to nondestructive testing of aircraft structures or related structural testing and the reliability of the more commonly used evaluation methods. Particular attention is directed toward acoustic emission; liquid penetrant; magnetic particle; ultrasonics; eddy current; and radiography. The introduction of the report includes an overview of the state-of-the-art represented in the documents that have been abstracted.

  5. The Small Aircraft Transportation System Higher Volume Operations (SATS HVO) Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Daniel M.; Murdoch, Jennifer L.; Adams, Catherine H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of conclusions from the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) Higher Volume Operations (HVO) Flight Experiment which NASA conducted to determine pilot acceptability of the HVO concept for normal conditions. The SATS HVO concept improves efficiency at non-towered, non-radar airports in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) while achieving a level of safety equal to today s system. Reported are results from flight experiment data that indicate that the SATS HVO concept is viable. The success of the SATS HVO concept is based on acceptable pilot workload, performance, and subjective criteria when compared to the procedural control operations in use today at non-towered, non-radar controlled airfields in IMC. The HVO Flight Experiment, flown on NASA's Cirrus SR22, used a subset of the HVO Simulation Experiment scenarios and evaluation pilots in order to validate the simulation experiment results. HVO and Baseline (today s system) scenarios flown included: single aircraft arriving for a GPS non-precision approach; aircraft arriving for the approach with multiple traffic aircraft; and aircraft arriving for the approach with multiple traffic aircraft and then conducting a missed approach. Results reveal that all twelve low-time instrument-rated pilots preferred SATS HVO when compared to current procedural separation operations. These pilots also flew the HVO procedures safely and proficiently without additional workload in comparison to today s system (Baseline). Detailed results of pilot flight technical error, and their subjective assessments of workload and situation awareness are presented in this paper.

  6. 14 CFR 93.155 - Aircraft operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aircraft operations. 93.155 Section 93.155... § 93.155 Aircraft operations. (a) When an advisory is received from the Ketchikan Flight Service Station stating that an aircraft is on final approach to the Ketchikan International Airport, no...

  7. Motion-base simulator study of control of an externally blown flap STOL transport aircraft after failure of an outboard engine during landing approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, D. B.; Hurt, G. J., Jr.; Bergeron, H. P.; Patton, J. M., Jr.; Deal, P. L.; Champine, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A moving-base simulator investigation of the problems of recovery and landing of a STOL aircraft after failure of an outboard engine during final approach was made. The approaches were made at 75 knots along a 6 deg glide slope. The engine was failed at low altitude and the option to go around was not allowed. The aircraft was simulated with each of three control systems, and it had four high-bypass-ratio fan-jet engines exhausting against large triple-slotted wing flaps to produce additional lift. A virtual-image out-the-window television display of a simulated STOL airport was operating during part of the investigation. Also, a simple heads-up flight director display superimposed on the airport landing scene was used by the pilots to make some of the recoveries following an engine failure. The results of the study indicated that the variation in visual cues and/or motion cues had little effect on the outcome of a recovery, but they did have some effect on the pilot's response and control patterns.

  8. Multi-aircraft dynamics, navigation and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houck, Sharon Wester

    Air traffic control stands on the brink of a revolution. Fifty years from now, we will look back and marvel that we ever flew by radio beacons and radar alone, much as we now marvel that early aviation pioneers flew by chronometer and compass alone. The microprocessor, satellite navigation systems, and air-to-air data links are the technical keys to this revolution. Many airports are near or at capacity now for at least portions of the day, making it clear that major increases in airport capacity will be required in order to support the projected growth in air traffic. This can be accomplished by adding airports, adding runways at existing airports, or increasing the capacity of the existing runways. Technology that allows use of ultra closely spaced (750 ft to 2500 ft) parallel approaches would greatly reduce the environmental impact of airport capacity increases. This research tackles the problem of multi aircraft dynamics, navigation, and operation, specifically in the terminal area, and presents new findings on how ultra closely spaced parallel approaches may be accomplished. The underlying approach considers how multiple aircraft are flown in visual conditions, where spacing criteria is much less stringent, and then uses this data to study the critical parameters for collision avoidance during an ultra closely spaced parallel approach. Also included is experimental and analytical investigations on advanced guidance systems that are critical components of precision approaches. Together, these investigations form a novel approach to the design and analysis of parallel approaches for runways spaced less than 2500 ft apart. This research has concluded that it is technically feasible to reduce the required runway spacing during simultaneous instrument approaches to less than the current minimum of 3400 ft with the use of advanced navigation systems while maintaining the currently accepted levels of safety. On a smooth day with both pilots flying a tunnel

  9. Transport aircraft accident dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cominsky, A.

    1982-01-01

    A study was carried out of 112 impact survivable jet transport aircraft accidents (world wide) of 27,700 kg (60,000 lb.) aircraft and up extending over the last 20 years. This study centered on the effect of impact and the follow-on events on aircraft structures and was confined to the approach, landing and takeoff segments of the flight. The significant characteristics, frequency of occurrence and the effect on the occupants of the above data base were studied and categorized with a view to establishing typical impact scenarios for use as a basis of verifying the effectiveness of potential safety concepts. Studies were also carried out of related subjects such as: (1) assessment of advanced materials; (2) human tolerance to impact; (3) merit functions for safety concepts; and (4) impact analysis and test methods.

  10. Effective L/D: A Theoretical Approach to the Measurement of Aero-Structural Efficiency in Aircraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    There are many trade-offs in aircraft design that ultimately impact the overall performance and characteristics of the final design. One well recognized and well understood trade-off is that of wing weight and aerodynamic efficiency. Higher aerodynamic efficiency can be obtained by increasing wing span, usually at the expense of higher wing weight. The proper balance of these two competing factors depends on the objectives of the design. For example, aerodynamic efficiency is preeminent for sailplanes and long slender wings result. Although the wing weight-drag trade is universally recognized, aerodynamic efficiency and structural efficiency are not usually considered in combination. This paper discusses the concept of "aero-structural efficiency," which combines weight and drag characteristics. A metric to quantify aero-structural efficiency, termed effective L/D, is then derived and tested with various scenarios. Effective L/D is found to be a practical and robust means to simultaneously characterize aerodynamic and structural efficiency in the context of aircraft design. The primary value of the effective L/D metric is as a means to better communicate the combined system level impacts of drag and structural weight.

  11. An inverse modelling approach for frequency response correction of capacitive humidity sensors in ABL research with small unmanned aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildmann, N.; Kaufmann, F.; Bange, J.

    2014-05-01

    The measurement of water-vapour concentration in the atmosphere is an ongoing challenge in environmental research. Satisfactory solutions are present for ground-based meteorological stations and measurements of mean values. However, advanced research of thermodynamic processes also aloft, above the surface layer and especially in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), requires the resolution of small-scale turbulence. Sophisticated optical instruments are used in airborne meteorology with manned aircraft to achieve the necessary fast response measurements in the order of 1 Hz (e.g. LiCor 7500). Since these instruments are too large and heavy for the application on the promising platforms of small remotely piloted aircraft (RPA), a method is presented in this study, that enhances small capacitive humidity sensors to be able to resolve turbulent eddies in the order of 10 m. For this purpose a physical and dynamical model of such a sensor is described and inverted in order to restore original water vapour fluctuations from sensor measurements. Examples of flight measurements show how the method can be used to correct vertical profiles and resolve turbulence spectra up to about 3 Hz.

  12. Navigation for space shuttle approach and landing using an inertial navigation system augmented by data from a precision ranging system or a microwave scan beam landing guidance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, L. A.; Smith, G. L.; Hegarty, D. M.; Merrick, R. B.; Carson, T. M.; Schmidt, S. F.

    1970-01-01

    A preliminary study has been made of the navigation performance which might be achieved for the high cross-range space shuttle orbiter during final approach and landing by using an optimally augmented inertial navigation system. Computed navigation accuracies are presented for an on-board inertial navigation system augmented (by means of an optimal filter algorithm) with data from two different ground navigation aids; a precision ranging system and a microwave scanning beam landing guidance system. These results show that augmentation with either type of ground navigation aid is capable of providing a navigation performance at touchdown which should be adequate for the space shuttle. In addition, adequate navigation performance for space shuttle landing is obtainable from the precision ranging system even with a complete dropout of precision range measurements as much as 100 seconds before touchdown.

  13. STOL Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Michael E. Fisher, President of AeroVisions International, has introduced the Culex light twin engine aircraft which offers economy of operation of a single engine plane, the ability to fly well on one engine, plus the capability of flying from short, unimproved fields of takeoff and landing distances less than 35 feet. Key element of design is an airfoil developed by Langley. Culex was originally intended to be factory built aircraft for special utility markets. However, it is now offered as a build-it-yourself kit plane.

  14. An original approach combining aircraft observations and 1D modelling to quantify the role of deep convection on formaldehyde in tropical UT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borbon, A.; Ruiz, M.; Bechara, J.; Afif, C.; Huntrieser, H.; Mills, G.; Mari, C.; Reeves, C.; Schlager, H.

    2010-12-01

    Deep convection plays a key role in determining global atmospheric composition of the upper troposphere by the fast uplift of HOx radical and ozone precursors to the upper troposphere. Formaldehyde (HCHO) is one important gas precursor. It is the most abundant carbonyl compound originating from both primary processes and photooxidation of volatile organic compounds. Thus, determining its source strength to the upper troposphere is important for estimating ozone production. However processes governing its fate are multiple and complex including dynamics (entrainment and detrainment), multiphase chemistry and cloud microphysics. As a result, the flux of formaldehyde to the upper troposphere is still uncertain. The goal of this study is to examine the redistribution of formaldehyde in tropical mesoscale convective systems (MSC) and to estimate its sources and sinks during convective transport to the upper troposphere. The novelty here is to combine 1D modelling (Meso NH model) and formaldehyde aircraft observations. Observations were collected over West Africa during the monsoon period (July-August 2006) of the AMMA experiment. Four aircrafts (English BAe-146, French ATR-42 and Falcon-20 and German Falcon-20) were deployed over a large domain (long.: -8°E-5°W, lat. 4°N-20°N, alt.: 0 12 km) with formaldehyde measuring instruments on board. First, this presentation will point out the construction of a comprehensive and consistent data set of formaldehyde by ensuring data comparability thanks to aircraft intercomparison flights, multiple chemical tracer approach (CO, O3 and relative humidity) and a spatial gridding of the domain. Then formaldehyde spatial variability will be examined under background and convective conditions. Finally, the relative importance of transport (entrainment) and wet scavenging will be discussed from selected AMMA flights. For that purpose, the following equation system has been resolved [HCHO]transported to UT=[HCHO]measured - [HCHO

  15. A Cost-effective Satellite-aircraft-drogue Approach for Studying Estuarine Circulation and Shelf Waste Dispersion. [Delaware Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator); Davis, G.; Wang, H.; Whelan, W.; Tornatore, G.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Satellites, such as ERTS-1, can be used to obtain a synoptic view of current circulation over large coastal areas. Since in turbid coastal regions suspended sediment acts as a natural tracer, cost is minimized by eliminating the need for expensive injections of large volumes of dye such as Rhodamine-B. One of the principal shortcomings of satellite imaging of coastal currents was its inability to determine current magnitude and to penetrate beyond the upper few meters of the water column. These objections were overcome by complementing satellite observations with drogues tracking currents at various selected depths. By combining the satellite's wide coverage with aircraft or shore stations capable of tracking expendable drogues, a cost effective, integrated system was devised for monitoring currents over large areas, various depths, and under severe environmental conditions.

  16. Precision Pointing System Development

    SciTech Connect

    BUGOS, ROBERT M.

    2003-03-01

    The development of precision pointing systems has been underway in Sandia's Electronic Systems Center for over thirty years. Important areas of emphasis are synthetic aperture radars and optical reconnaissance systems. Most applications are in the aerospace arena, with host vehicles including rockets, satellites, and manned and unmanned aircraft. Systems have been used on defense-related missions throughout the world. Presently in development are pointing systems with accuracy goals in the nanoradian regime. Future activity will include efforts to dramatically reduce system size and weight through measures such as the incorporation of advanced materials and MEMS inertial sensors.

  17. Aircraft cybernetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The use of computers for aircraft control, flight simulation, and inertial navigation is explored. The man-machine relation problem in aviation is addressed. Simple and self-adapting autopilots are described and the assets and liabilities of digital navigation techniques are assessed.

  18. Fabrication of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) Optics: A Deterministic, Precision Engineering Approach to Optical Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    The mirror assembly of the AXAF observatory consists of four concentric, confocal, Wolter type 1 telescopes. Each telescope includes two conical grazing incidence mirrors, a paraboloid followed by a hyperboloid. Fabrication of these state-or-the-art optics is now complete, with predicted performance that surpasses the goals of the program. The fabrication of these optics, whose size and requirements exceed those of any previous x-ray mirrors, presented a challenging task requiring the use of precision engineering in many different forms. Virtually all of the equipment used for this effort required precision engineering. Accurate metrology required deterministic support of the mirrors in order to model the gravity distortions which will not be present on orbit. The primary axial instrument, known as the Precision Metrology Station (PMS), was a unique scanning Fizeau interferometer. After metrology was complete, the optics were placed in specially designed Glass Support Fixtures (GSF's) for installation on the Automated Cylindrical Grinder/Polishers (ACG/P's). The GSF's were custom molded for each mirror element to match the shape of the outer surface to minimize distortions of the inner surface. The final performance of the telescope is expected to far exceed the original goals and expectations of the program.

  19. An unconventional approach to imaging radar calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenner, R. G.; Reid, S. C.; Schaber, G. G.

    1978-01-01

    An unconventional approach to imaging radar calibration was considered for the entire system, including the imaging processing as a measurement instrument. The technique made use of a calibrated aircraft scatterometer as a secondary standard to measure the backscatter (sigma zero) of large units of constant roughness. These measured roughness units when viewed by an imaging radar system can be used to provide gray scale level, corresponding to known degrees of roughness. To obtain a calibrated aircraft scatterometer, a homogeneous smooth surface was measured by both the aircraft scatterometer and a sphere calibrated ground system. This provided a measure of the precision and accuracy of the aircraft system. The aircraft system was then used to measure large roughness units in the Death Valley, California area. Transfer of the measured roughness units to radar imagery was demonstrated.

  20. A novel systems engineering approach to the design of a precision radial velocity spectrograph: the GMT-Consortium Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorski, William; Bean, Jacob; Bergner, Henry; Chun, Moo-Young; Crane, Jeffrey; Evans, Ian; Evans, Janet; Furesz, Gabor; Guzman, Dani; Kim, Kang-Min; McCracken, Kenneth; Mueller, Mark; Norton, Timothy; Park, Chan; Park, Sang; Plummer, David; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Uomoto, Alan; Yuk, In-Soo

    2014-07-01

    One of the first light instruments for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) will be the GMT-Consortium Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF). It is an optical band echelle spectrograph that is fiber fed to enable high stability. One of the key capabilities of G-CLEF will be its extremely precise radial velocity (PRV) measurement capability. The RV precision goal is 10 cm/sec, which is expected to be achieved with advanced calibration methods and the use of the GMT adaptive optics system. G-CLEF, as part of the GMT suite of instruments, is being designed within GMT's automated requirements management system. This includes requirements flow down, traceability, error budgeting, and systems compliance. Error budgeting is being employed extensively to help manage G-CLEF technical requirements and ensure that the top level requirements are met efficiently. In this paper we discuss the G-CLEF error budgeting process, concentrating on the PRV precision and instrument throughput budgets. The PRV error budgeting process is covered in detail, as we are taking a detailed systems error budgeting approach to the PRV requirement. This has proven particularly challenging, as the precise measurement of radial velocity is a complex process, with error sources that are difficult to model and a complex calibration process that is integral to the RV measurement. The PRV budget combines traditional modeling and analysis techniques, where applicable, with semi-empirical techniques, as necessary. Extrapolation from existing PRV instruments is also used in the budgeting process.

  1. Assessing the precision of high-throughput computational and laboratory approaches for the genome-wide identification of protein subcellular localization in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Sébastien; Gardy, Jennifer L; Brinkman, Fiona SL

    2005-01-01

    Background Identification of a bacterial protein's subcellular localization (SCL) is important for genome annotation, function prediction and drug or vaccine target identification. Subcellular fractionation techniques combined with recent proteomics technology permits the identification of large numbers of proteins from distinct bacterial compartments. However, the fractionation of a complex structure like the cell into several subcellular compartments is not a trivial task. Contamination from other compartments may occur, and some proteins may reside in multiple localizations. New computational methods have been reported over the past few years that now permit much more accurate, genome-wide analysis of the SCL of protein sequences deduced from genomes. There is a need to compare such computational methods with laboratory proteomics approaches to identify the most effective current approach for genome-wide localization characterization and annotation. Results In this study, ten subcellular proteome analyses of bacterial compartments were reviewed. PSORTb version 2.0 was used to computationally predict the localization of proteins reported in these publications, and these computational predictions were then compared to the localizations determined by the proteomics study. By using a combined approach, we were able to identify a number of contaminants and proteins with dual localizations, and were able to more accurately identify membrane subproteomes. Our results allowed us to estimate the precision level of laboratory subproteome studies and we show here that, on average, recent high-precision computational methods such as PSORTb now have a lower error rate than laboratory methods. Conclusion We have performed the first focused comparison of genome-wide proteomic and computational methods for subcellular localization identification, and show that computational methods have now attained a level of precision that is exceeding that of high-throughput laboratory

  2. Model-Based Control of a Nonlinear Aircraft Engine Simulation using an Optimal Tuner Kalman Filter Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Csank, Jeffrey Thomas; Chicatelli, Amy; Kilver, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    This paper covers the development of a model-based engine control (MBEC) methodology featuring a self tuning on-board model applied to an aircraft turbofan engine simulation. Here, the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40,000 (CMAPSS40k) serves as the MBEC application engine. CMAPSS40k is capable of modeling realistic engine performance, allowing for a verification of the MBEC over a wide range of operating points. The on-board model is a piece-wise linear model derived from CMAPSS40k and updated using an optimal tuner Kalman Filter (OTKF) estimation routine, which enables the on-board model to self-tune to account for engine performance variations. The focus here is on developing a methodology for MBEC with direct control of estimated parameters of interest such as thrust and stall margins. Investigations using the MBEC to provide a stall margin limit for the controller protection logic are presented that could provide benefits over a simple acceleration schedule that is currently used in traditional engine control architectures.

  3. Energy Index For Aircraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chidester, Thomas R. (Inventor); Lynch, Robert E. (Inventor); Lawrence, Robert E. (Inventor); Amidan, Brett G. (Inventor); Ferryman, Thomas A. (Inventor); Drew, Douglas A. (Inventor); Ainsworth, Robert J. (Inventor); Prothero, Gary L. (Inventor); Romanowski, Tomothy P. (Inventor); Bloch, Laurent (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Method and system for analyzing, separately or in combination, kinetic energy and potential energy and/or their time derivatives, measured or estimated or computed, for an aircraft in approach phase or in takeoff phase, to determine if the aircraft is or will be put in an anomalous configuration in order to join a stable approach path or takeoff path. A 3 reference value of kinetic energy andor potential energy (or time derivatives thereof) is provided, and a comparison index .for the estimated energy and reference energy is computed and compared with a normal range of index values for a corresponding aircraft maneuver. If the computed energy index lies outside the normal index range, this phase of the aircraft is identified as anomalous, non-normal or potentially unstable.

  4. Human Computer Interactions in Next-Generation of Aircraft Smart Navigation Management Systems: Task Analysis and Architecture under an Agent-Oriented Methodological Approach

    PubMed Central

    Canino-Rodríguez, José M.; García-Herrero, Jesús; Besada-Portas, Juan; Ravelo-García, Antonio G.; Travieso-González, Carlos; Alonso-Hernández, Jesús B.

    2015-01-01

    The limited efficiency of current air traffic systems will require a next-generation of Smart Air Traffic System (SATS) that relies on current technological advances. This challenge means a transition toward a new navigation and air-traffic procedures paradigm, where pilots and air traffic controllers perform and coordinate their activities according to new roles and technological supports. The design of new Human-Computer Interactions (HCI) for performing these activities is a key element of SATS. However efforts for developing such tools need to be inspired on a parallel characterization of hypothetical air traffic scenarios compatible with current ones. This paper is focused on airborne HCI into SATS where cockpit inputs came from aircraft navigation systems, surrounding traffic situation, controllers’ indications, etc. So the HCI is intended to enhance situation awareness and decision-making through pilot cockpit. This work approach considers SATS as a system distributed on a large-scale with uncertainty in a dynamic environment. Therefore, a multi-agent systems based approach is well suited for modeling such an environment. We demonstrate that current methodologies for designing multi-agent systems are a useful tool to characterize HCI. We specifically illustrate how the selected methodological approach provides enough guidelines to obtain a cockpit HCI design that complies with future SATS specifications. PMID:25746092

  5. Human computer interactions in next-generation of aircraft smart navigation management systems: task analysis and architecture under an agent-oriented methodological approach.

    PubMed

    Canino-Rodríguez, José M; García-Herrero, Jesús; Besada-Portas, Juan; Ravelo-García, Antonio G; Travieso-González, Carlos; Alonso-Hernández, Jesús B

    2015-01-01

    The limited efficiency of current air traffic systems will require a next-generation of Smart Air Traffic System (SATS) that relies on current technological advances. This challenge means a transition toward a new navigation and air-traffic procedures paradigm, where pilots and air traffic controllers perform and coordinate their activities according to new roles and technological supports. The design of new Human-Computer Interactions (HCI) for performing these activities is a key element of SATS. However efforts for developing such tools need to be inspired on a parallel characterization of hypothetical air traffic scenarios compatible with current ones. This paper is focused on airborne HCI into SATS where cockpit inputs came from aircraft navigation systems, surrounding traffic situation, controllers' indications, etc. So the HCI is intended to enhance situation awareness and decision-making through pilot cockpit. This work approach considers SATS as a system distributed on a large-scale with uncertainty in a dynamic environment. Therefore, a multi-agent systems based approach is well suited for modeling such an environment. We demonstrate that current methodologies for designing multi-agent systems are a useful tool to characterize HCI. We specifically illustrate how the selected methodological approach provides enough guidelines to obtain a cockpit HCI design that complies with future SATS specifications. PMID:25746092

  6. Commercial transport aircraft composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    The role that analysis plays in the development, production, and substantiation of aircraft structures is discussed. The types, elements, and applications of failure that are used and needed; the current application of analysis methods to commercial aircraft advanced composite structures, along with a projection of future needs; and some personal thoughts on analysis development goals and the elements of an approach to analysis development are discussed.

  7. A simulator evaluation of the use of spoilers on a light aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, C. H.; Kohlman, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    A fixed-base flight simulator was used to evaluate wing spoilers for longitudinal flight path control on a modified Cessna Cardinal aircraft. Spoilers which generated the proper pitching moment to maintain aircraft trim C sub L constant could be used as an effective descent rate control. More than 100 simulated ILS approaches were flown by evaluation pilots using both conventional methods and spoiler descent rate control. Three spoiler control schemes were evaluated during the ILS approaches. Using the spoilers for control, instrument approaches could be flown smoothly and precisely with constant airspeed and pitch attitude. While the spoilers could adequately control ILS approaches, a spoiler system with greater authority would be desirable for use in visual approaches.

  8. Noise control mechanisms of inside aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zverev, A. Ya.

    2016-07-01

    World trends in the development of methods and approaches to noise reduction in aircraft cabins are reviewed. The paper discusses the mechanisms of passive and active noise and vibration control, application of "smart" and innovative materials, new approaches to creating all fuselage-design elements, and other promising directions of noise control inside aircraft.

  9. Assessment of precipitable water vapor derived from ground-based BeiDou observations with Precise Point Positioning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Li, Wenwen; Shi, Chuang; Zhao, Qile; Su, Xing; Qu, Lizhong; Liu, Zhizhao

    2015-01-01

    Precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimation from Global Positioning System (GPS) has been extensively studied and used for meteorological applications. However PWV estimation using the emerging BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) is very limited. In this paper the PWV estimation strategy and the evaluation of the results inferred from ground-based BDS observations using Precise Point Positioning (PPP) method are presented. BDS and GPS data from 10 stations distributed in the Asia-Pacific and West Indian Ocean regions during the year 2013 are processed using the PANDA (Position and Navigation Data Analyst) software package. The BDS-PWV and GPS-PWV are derived from the BDS-only and GPS-only observations, respectively. The PPP positioning differences between BDS-only and GPS-only show a standard deviation (STD) <1 cm in the east and north components and 1-3 cm in vertical component. The BDS-PWV and GPS-PWV at the HKTU station (Hong Kong, China) is compared with PWV derived from a radiosonde station (about 1 km distance) over a 6-month period. The GPS-PWV shows a good agreement with radiosonde-PWV with a bias of 0.002 mm and a STD of 2.49 mm while BDS-PWV has with a bias of -2.04 mm and STD 2.68 mm with respect to radiosonde-PWV. This indicates that the PWV estimated from the BDS can achieve similar precision as PWV from GPS. The BDS-PWV is compared to GPS-PWV at 10 stations. The mean bias and STD of their differences at 10 stations are 0.78 mm and 1.77 mm, respectively. The mean root mean square (RMS) value is 2.00 mm by considering the GPS-PWV as reference truth. This again confirms that the BDS-PWV has a good agreement with the GPS-PWV. It clearly indicates that the BDS is ready for the high precision meteorological applications in the Asia-Pacific and West Indian Ocean regions and that BDS alone can be used for PWV estimation with an accuracy comparable to GPS.

  10. Airborne Precision Spacing for Dependent Parallel Operations Interface Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Paul M.; Takallu, M. A.; Hoffler, Keith D.; Weiser, Jarold; Turner, Dexter

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a usability study of proposed cockpit interfaces to support Airborne Precision Spacing (APS) operations for aircraft performing dependent parallel approaches (DPA). NASA has proposed an airborne system called Pair Dependent Speed (PDS) which uses their Airborne Spacing for Terminal Arrival Routes (ASTAR) algorithm to manage spacing intervals. Interface elements were designed to facilitate the input of APS-DPA spacing parameters to ASTAR, and to convey PDS system information to the crew deemed necessary and/or helpful to conduct the operation, including: target speed, guidance mode, target aircraft depiction, and spacing trend indication. In the study, subject pilots observed recorded simulations using the proposed interface elements in which the ownship managed assigned spacing intervals from two other arriving aircraft. Simulations were recorded using the Aircraft Simulation for Traffic Operations Research (ASTOR) platform, a medium-fidelity simulator based on a modern Boeing commercial glass cockpit. Various combinations of the interface elements were presented to subject pilots, and feedback was collected via structured questionnaires. The results of subject pilot evaluations show that the proposed design elements were acceptable, and that preferable combinations exist within this set of elements. The results also point to potential improvements to be considered for implementation in future experiments.

  11. Simulation Results for Airborne Precision Spacing along Continuous Descent Arrivals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Abbott, Terence S.; Capron, William R.; Baxley, Brian T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a fast-time simulation experiment and a high-fidelity simulator validation with merging streams of aircraft flying Continuous Descent Arrivals through generic airspace to a runway at Dallas-Ft Worth. Aircraft made small speed adjustments based on an airborne-based spacing algorithm, so as to arrive at the threshold exactly at the assigned time interval behind their Traffic-To-Follow. The 40 aircraft were initialized at different altitudes and speeds on one of four different routes, and then merged at different points and altitudes while flying Continuous Descent Arrivals. This merging and spacing using flight deck equipment and procedures to augment or implement Air Traffic Management directives is called Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing, an important subset of a larger Airborne Precision Spacing functionality. This research indicates that Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing initiated while at cruise altitude and well prior to the Terminal Radar Approach Control entry can significantly contribute to the delivery of aircraft at a specified interval to the runway threshold with a high degree of accuracy and at a reduced pilot workload. Furthermore, previously documented work has shown that using a Continuous Descent Arrival instead of a traditional step-down descent can save fuel, reduce noise, and reduce emissions. Research into Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing is a cooperative effort between government and industry partners.

  12. Operational Concept for Flight Crews to Participate in Merging and Spacing of Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxley, Brian T.; Barmore, Bryan E.; Abbott, Terence S.; Capron, William R.

    2006-01-01

    The predicted tripling of air traffic within the next 15 years is expected to cause significant aircraft delays and create a major financial burden for the airline industry unless the capacity of the National Airspace System can be increased. One approach to improve throughput and reduce delay is to develop new ground tools, airborne tools, and procedures to reduce the variance of aircraft delivery to the airport, thereby providing an increase in runway throughput capacity and a reduction in arrival aircraft delay. The first phase of the Merging and Spacing Concept employs a ground based tool used by Air Traffic Control that creates an arrival time to the runway threshold based on the aircraft s current position and speed, then makes minor adjustments to that schedule to accommodate runway throughput constraints such as weather and wake vortex separation criteria. The Merging and Spacing Concept also employs arrival routing that begins at an en route metering fix at altitude and continues to the runway threshold with defined lateral, vertical, and velocity criteria. This allows the desired spacing interval between aircraft at the runway to be translated back in time and space to the metering fix. The tool then calculates a specific speed for each aircraft to fly while enroute to the metering fix based on the adjusted land timing for that aircraft. This speed is data-linked to the crew who fly this speed, causing the aircraft to arrive at the metering fix with the assigned spacing interval behind the previous aircraft in the landing sequence. The second phase of the Merging and Spacing Concept increases the timing precision of the aircraft delivery to the runway threshold by having flight crews using an airborne system make minor speed changes during enroute, descent, and arrival phases of flight. These speed changes are based on broadcast aircraft state data to determine the difference between the actual and assigned time interval between the aircraft pair. The

  13. An Assessment of Commuter Aircraft Noise Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fidell, Sanford; Pearsons, Karl S.; Silvati, Laura; Sneddon, Matthew

    1996-01-01

    This report examines several approaches to understanding 'the commuter aircraft noise problem.' The commuter aircraft noise problem in the sense addressed in this report is the belief that some aspect(s) of community response to noise produced by commuter aircraft operations may not be fully assessed by conventional environmental noise metrics and methods. The report offers alternate perspectives and approaches for understanding this issue. The report also develops a set of diagnostic screening questions; describes commuter aircraft noise situations at several airports; and makes recommendations for increasing understanding of the practical consequences of greater heterogeneity in the air transport fleet serving larger airports.

  14. Evaluation of Loran-C enroute navigation and non-precision approaches within the State of Vermont

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackenzie, F. D.; Lytle, C. D.

    1980-01-01

    Results obtained in completing 257 nonprecision approaches and 44 data flights are discussed. The flights were initiated in the summer months and extended through four seasons and practically all weather conditions typical of the northeastern U.S. A preliminary assessment of the available data indicates that Loran-C signals are suitable as a means of navigation during enroute, terminal, and nonprecision approach operations and that the performance exceeds the minimum accuracy criteria specified by the applicable FAA advisory circular. Enroute operations are found to remain within + or - 0.75 nm of the desired track, compared with the requirement of + or - 2.5 nm. Terminal operations remained within + or - 0.65 nm of the desired track, compared with the FAA circular's requirement of + or - 1.5 nm; the nonprecision final approach operations were within the limit of + or - 0.6 nm for all operations.

  15. A piloted simulator investigation of helicopter precision decelerating approaches to hover to determine single-pilot IFR /SPIFR/ requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phatak, A. V.; Peach, L. L., Jr.; Hess, R. A.; Ross, V. L.; Hall, G. W.; Gerdes, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    The results of single-pilot instrument flight rules (SPIFR) experiments conducted on the NASA-Ames V/STOLAND simulator are presented. Several factors having a significant impact on requirements for helicopter SPIFR decelerating, steep approaches to landing are considered: (1) approach weather conditions, (2) flight path geometry, (3) deceleration guidance law, (4) level of stability and command augmentation, (5) cockpit display sophistication, (6) accuracy of navigation aids, and (7) helipad lighting and visual aids. Particular emphasis is placed on the relative effects of deceleration profile, control augmentation, and flight director parameters on pilot performance, workload, and opinion rating. Problems associated with the development of a pilot acceptance analytical methodology are outlined.

  16. Precision digital control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyskub, V. G.; Rozov, B. S.; Savelev, V. I.

    This book is concerned with the characteristics of digital control systems of great accuracy. A classification of such systems is considered along with aspects of stabilization, programmable control applications, digital tracking systems and servomechanisms, and precision systems for the control of a scanning laser beam. Other topics explored are related to systems of proportional control, linear devices and methods for increasing precision, approaches for further decreasing the response time in the case of high-speed operation, possibilities for the implementation of a logical control law, and methods for the study of precision digital control systems. A description is presented of precision automatic control systems which make use of electronic computers, taking into account the existing possibilities for an employment of computers in automatic control systems, approaches and studies required for including a computer in such control systems, and an analysis of the structure of automatic control systems with computers. Attention is also given to functional blocks in the considered systems.

  17. Aircraft turbofan noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, J. F.; Rice, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    Turbofan noise generation and suppression in aircraft engines are reviewed. The chain of physical processes which connect unsteady flow interactions with fan blades to far field noise is addressed. Mechanism identification and description, duct propagation, radiation and acoustic suppression are discussed. The experimental technique of fan inflow static tests are discussed. Rotor blade surface pressure and wake velocity measurements aid in the determination of the types and strengths of the generation mechanisms. Approaches to predicting or measuring acoustic mode content, optimizing treatment impedance to maximize attenuation, translating impedance into porous wall structure and interpreting far field directivity patterns are illustrated by comparisons of analytical and experimental results. The interdependence of source and acoustic treatment design to minimize far field noise is emphasized. Area requiring further research are discussed and the relevance of aircraft turbofan results to quieting other turbomachinery installations is addressed.

  18. Educating with Aircraft Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Hobie

    1976-01-01

    Described is utilization of aircraft models, model aircraft clubs, and model aircraft magazines to promote student interest in aerospace education. The addresses for clubs and magazines are included. (SL)

  19. A novel approach for precisely controlled multiple cell patterning in microfluidic chips by inkjet printing and the detection of drug metabolism and diffusion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Fengming; He, Ziyi; Ma, Yuan; Uchiyama, Katsumi; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2016-05-10

    In this work we report the use of inkjet printing as a precise and convenient means for microscale cell patterning in microfluidic chips followed by cell co-culture, stimulation and analysis. A self-made inkjet printing device was manufactured with adjustable parameters, which was capable of multiple cell printing within biocompatible materials. Sodium alginate was used as a printing matrix for cell encapsulation, and precisely distributed cell arrays on glass slides were obtained by accurate software controlled printing. By covering a PDMS layer with the corresponding microchannels onto the cell array substrate and subsequently injecting an ion cross-linking reagent, the cells containing alginate arrays gelated immediately and were immobilized on the bottom of the microchip, which could be utilized for cell culture and analysis. HepG2 cells and U251 cells were successfully co-patterned in the microchip and used for drug metabolism and diffusion experiment to imitate the in vivo situation, as a means to ascertain the capability of the system for precise microscale cell patterning in a microchip. The prodrug tegafur was metabolized by HepG2 cells into the active anticancer compound 5-fluorouracil and this produced an adverse gradient effect on U251 cells according to the distance from the HepG2 cells. The developed approach presented a feasible way to integrate inkjet cell printing and microfluidic chips for the first time, which is proved to be capable of spatially controlled printing of multiple kinds of cells into a microchip for cell culture, stimulation and analysis, which could be applied to tissue engineering, drug testing and related areas. We envision that the approach will help significantly increase the cell patterning efficacy in microfluidic chips as well as reduce the extent of laborious experimental work. PMID:27045202

  20. The Path(way) Less Traveled: A Pathway-Oriented Approach to Providing Information about Precision Cancer Medicine on My Cancer Genome12

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alexandria D.; Micheel, Christine M.; Anderson, Ingrid A.; Levy, Mia A.; Lovly, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    This perspective describes the motivation, development, and implementation of pathway-based content for My Cancer Genome, an online precision medicine knowledge resource describing clinical implications of genetic alterations in cancer. As researchers uncover more about cancer pathogenesis, we are learning more not only about the specific genes and proteins involved but also about how those genes and proteins interact with others along cell signaling pathways. This knowledge has led researchers and clinicians to begin to think about cancer therapy using a pathway-based approach. To facilitate this approach, My Cancer Genome used a list of more than 800 cancer-related genes to identify 20 cancer-relevant pathways and then created content focused on demonstrating the therapeutic relevance of these pathways. PMID:27084433

  1. Preliminary results of simulated vortex encounters by a twin-engine, commercial aircraft during final landing approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, E. C., Jr.; Holbrook, G. T.; Keyser, G. L., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Piloted simulations of encounters with vortices of various ages and degrees of attenuation were performed with the Visual Motion Simulator. In the simulations, a twin engine, commercial transport on final approach, encountered the modeled vortices of a four engine, wide body, commercial transport. The data show the effect of vortex age and attenuation on the severity of the initial upset, as well as the effect of the vortex encounters on the landing capability.

  2. Features versus Context: An approach for precise and detailed detection and delineation of faces and facial features

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Liya; Martinez, Aleix M.

    2013-01-01

    The appearance-based approach to face detection has seen great advances in the last several years. In this approach, we learn the image statistics describing the texture pattern (appearance) of the object class we want to detect, e.g., the face. However, this approach has had a limited success in providing an accurate and detailed description of the internal facial features, i.e., eyes, brows, nose and mouth. In general, this is due to the limited information carried by the learned statistical model. While the face template is relatively rich in texture, facial features (e.g., eyes, nose and mouth) do not carry enough discriminative information to tell them apart from all possible background images. We resolve this problem by adding the context information of each facial feature in the design of the statistical model. In the proposed approach, the context information defines the image statistics most correlated with the surroundings of each facial component. This means that when we search for a face or facial feature we look for those locations which most resemble the feature yet are most dissimilar to its context. This dissimilarity with the context features forces the detector to gravitate toward an accurate estimate of the position of the facial feature. Learning to discriminate between feature and context templates is difficult however, because the context and the texture of the facial features vary widely under changing expression, pose and illumination, and may even resemble one another. We address this problem with the use of subclass divisions. We derive two algorithms to automatically divide the training samples of each facial feature into a set of subclasses, each representing a distinct construction of the same facial component (e.g., closed versus open eyes) or its context (e.g., different hairstyles). The first algorithm is based on a discriminant analysis formulation. The second algorithm is an extension of the AdaBoost approach. We provide extensive

  3. Characteristics of future aircraft impacting aircraft and airport compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    Results are reported of an opinion survey of selected individuals at the decision-making level within the five major manufacturers of transport aircraft in the United States and Europe. Opinions were obtained concerning both possible and probable existence of over 50 compatibility-related characteristics of transport aircraft in use in the years 1990, 2000, and 2010. The maximum size of aircraft is expected to increase, at a roughly uniform rate, to the year 2010 by 85 percent in passengers, 55 percent in airfreighter payload, and 35 percent in gross weight weight. Companion to the expected growth in payloads and gross weight was the identification of probable increases in aircraft geometrical dimensions and component capability, and use of fully double-decked passenger compartments. Wing span will increase considerably more than normally expected to provide wings of higher aspect ratio. New aircraft features coming into probable use include large turboprops, synthetic jet-A fuel, winglets, wake-vortex-reducing devices and laminar flow control. New operational concepts considered probable include steep approaches, high-speed turnoffs, and taxiway towing for the aircraft, plus passenger bypass of the terminal building, expedited handling of belly cargo and an intermodal cargo container for the payloads.

  4. Moving-base visual simulation study of decoupled controls during approach and landing of a STOL transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, G. K., Jr.; Deal, P. L.

    1975-01-01

    The simulation employed all six rigid-body degrees of freedom and incorporated aerodynamic characteristics based on wind-tunnel data. The flight instrumentation included a localizer and a flight director which was used to capture and to maintain a two-segment glide slope. A closed-circuit television display of a STOLport provided visual cues during simulations of the approach and landing. The decoupled longitudinal controls used constant prefilter and feedback gains to provide steady-state decoupling of flight-path angle, pitch angle, and forward velocity. The pilots were enthusiastic about the decoupled longitudinal controls and believed that the simulator motion was an aid in evaluating the decoupled controls, although a minimum turbulence level with root-mean-square gust intensity of 0.3 m/sec (1 ft/sec) was required to mask undesirable characteristics of the moving-base simulator.

  5. Technologies for Aircraft Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    2006-01-01

    Technologies for aircraft noise reduction have been developed by NASA over the past 15 years through the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program and the Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) project. This presentation summarizes highlights from these programs and anticipated noise reduction benefits for communities surrounding airports. Historical progress in noise reduction and technologies available for future aircraft/engine development are identified. Technologies address aircraft/engine components including fans, exhaust nozzles, landing gear, and flap systems. New "chevron" nozzles have been developed and implemented on several aircraft in production today that provide significant jet noise reduction. New engines using Ultra-High Bypass (UHB) ratios are projected to provide about 10 EPNdB (Effective Perceived Noise Level in decibels) engine noise reduction relative to the average fleet that was flying in 1997. Audio files are embedded in the presentation that estimate the sound levels for a 35,000 pound thrust engine for takeoff and approach power conditions. The predictions are based on actual model scale data that was obtained by NASA. Finally, conceptual pictures are shown that look toward future aircraft/propulsion systems that might be used to obtain further noise reduction.

  6. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.; Crawford, Daniel W.

    1984-01-01

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  7. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, R.P.; Crawford, D.W.

    1982-03-09

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  8. Comparative analysis of various electrostatic potentials on docking precision against cyclin-dependent kinase 2 protein: a multiple docking approach.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Sunil K; Soundarya, Rajendran Naga; Singh, Poonam; Singh, Sanjeev K

    2015-02-01

    The fundamental of molecular modeling is the interaction and binding to form a complex, because it explains the action of most drugs to a receptor active site. In the present study, different semiempirical (RM1, AM1, PM3, MNDO) and ab initio (HF, DFT) charge models were investigated for their performance in prediction of docking pose against CDK2 proteins with their respective inhibitor. Further, multiple docking approaches and Prime/MM-GBSA calculations were applied to predict the binding mode with respective charge model against CDK2 inhibitors. A reliable docking result was obtained using RRD, which showed significance improvement on ligand binding poses and docking score accuracy to the IFD. The combined use of RRD and Prime/MM-GBSA method could give a high correlation between the predicted binding free energy and experimental biological activity. The preliminary results point out that AM1 could be a precious charge model for design of new drugs with enhanced success rate. As a very similar result was also found for a different system of the protein-ligand binding, the suggested scoring function based on AM1 method seems to be applicable in drug design. The results from this study can provide insights into highest success rate for design of potent and selective CDK2 inhibitors. PMID:24923208

  9. 14 CFR 93.155 - Aircraft operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Station stating that an aircraft is on final approach to the Ketchikan International Airport, no person... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aircraft operations. 93.155 Section 93.155 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR...

  10. 14 CFR 93.155 - Aircraft operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Station stating that an aircraft is on final approach to the Ketchikan International Airport, no person... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aircraft operations. 93.155 Section 93.155 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR...

  11. 14 CFR 93.155 - Aircraft operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Station stating that an aircraft is on final approach to the Ketchikan International Airport, no person... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aircraft operations. 93.155 Section 93.155 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR...

  12. 14 CFR 93.155 - Aircraft operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Station stating that an aircraft is on final approach to the Ketchikan International Airport, no person... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aircraft operations. 93.155 Section 93.155 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR...

  13. Flight directors for STOl aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, U. H.

    1983-01-01

    Flight director logic for flight path and airspeed control of a powered-lift STOL aircraft in the approach, transition, and landing configurations are developed. The methods for flight director design are investigated. The first method is based on the Optimal Control Model (OCM) of the pilot. The second method, proposed here, uses a fixed dynamic model of the pilot in a state space formulation similar to that of the OCM, and includes a pilot work-load metric. Several design examples are presented with various aircraft, sensor, and control configurations. These examples show the strong impact of throttle effectiveness on the performance and pilot work-load associated with manual control of powered-lift aircraft during approach. Improved performed and reduced pilot work-load can be achieved by using direct-lift-control to increase throttle effectiveness.

  14. Aircraft Electric Secondary Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Technologies resulted to aircraft power systems and aircraft in which all secondary power is supplied electrically are discussed. A high-voltage dc power generating system for fighter aircraft, permanent magnet motors and generators for aircraft, lightweight transformers, and the installation of electric generators on turbine engines are among the topics discussed.

  15. World commercial aircraft accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, C.Y.

    1993-01-01

    This report is a compilation of all accidents world-wide involving aircraft in commercial service which resulted in the loss of the airframe or one or more fatality, or both. This information has been gathered in order to present a complete inventory of commercial aircraft accidents. Events involving military action, sabotage, terrorist bombings, hijackings, suicides, and industrial ground accidents are included within this list. Included are: accidents involving world commercial jet aircraft, world commercial turboprop aircraft, world commercial pistonprop aircraft with four or more engines and world commercial pistonprop aircraft with two or three engines from 1946 to 1992. Each accident is presented with information in the following categories: date of the accident, airline and its flight numbers, type of flight, type of aircraft, aircraft registration number, construction number/manufacturers serial number, aircraft damage, accident flight phase, accident location, number of fatalities, number of occupants, cause, remarks, or description (brief) of the accident, and finally references used. The sixth chapter presents a summary of the world commercial aircraft accidents by major aircraft class (e.g. jet, turboprop, and pistonprop) and by flight phase. The seventh chapter presents several special studies including a list of world commercial aircraft accidents for all aircraft types with 100 or more fatalities in order of decreasing number of fatalities, a list of collision accidents involving commercial aircrafts, and a list of world commercial aircraft accidents for all aircraft types involving military action, sabotage, terrorist bombings, and hijackings.

  16. Vision assisted aircraft lateral navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohideen, Mohamed Ibrahim; Ramegowda, Dinesh; Seiler, Peter

    2013-05-01

    Surface operation is currently one of the least technologically equipped phases of aircraft operation. The increased air traffic congestion necessitates more aircraft operations in degraded weather and at night. The traditional surface procedures worked well in most cases as airport surfaces have not been congested and airport layouts were less complex. Despite the best efforts of FAA and other safety agencies, runway incursions continue to occur frequently due to incorrect surface operation. Several studies conducted by FAA suggest that pilot induced error contributes significantly to runway incursions. Further, the report attributes pilot's lack of situational awareness - local (e.g., minimizing lateral deviation), global (e.g., traffic in the vicinity) and route (e.g., distance to next turn) - to the problem. An Enhanced Vision System (EVS) is one concept that is being considered to resolve these issues. These systems use on-board sensors to provide situational awareness under poor visibility conditions. In this paper, we propose the use of an Image processing based system to estimate the aircraft position and orientation relative to taxiway markings to use as lateral guidance aid. We estimate aircraft yaw angle and lateral offset from slope of the taxiway centerline and horizontal position of vanishing line. Unlike automotive applications, several cues such as aircraft maneuvers along assigned route with minimal deviations, clear ground markings, even taxiway surface, limited aircraft speed are available and enable us to implement significant algorithm optimizations. We present experimental results to show high precision navigation accuracy with sensitivity analysis with respect to camera mount, optics, and image processing error.

  17. Capabilities of unmanned aircraft vehicles for low altitude weed detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflanz, Michael; Nordmeyer, Henning

    2014-05-01

    Sustainable crop production and food security require a consumer and environmental safe plant protection. It is recently known, that precise weed monitoring approaches could help apply pesticides corresponding to field variability. In this regard the site-specific weed management may contribute to an application of herbicides with higher ecologically aware and economical savings. First attempts of precision agriculture date back to the 1980's. Since that time, remote sensing from satellites or manned aircrafts have been investigated and used in agricultural practice, but are currently inadequate for the separation of weeds in an early growth stage from cultivated plants. In contrast, low-cost image capturing at low altitude from unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAV) provides higher spatial resolution and almost real-time processing. Particularly, rotary-wing aircrafts are suitable for precise path or stationary flight. This minimises motion blur and provides better image overlapping for stitching and mapping procedures. Through improved image analyses and the recent increase in the availability of microcontrollers and powerful batteries for UAVs, it can be expected that the spatial mapping of weeds will be enhanced in the future. A six rotors microcopter was equipped with a modified RGB camera taking images from agricultural fields. The hexacopter operates within predefined pathways at adjusted altitudes (from 5 to 10 m) by using GPS navigation. Different scenarios of optical weed detection have been carried out regarding to variable altitude, image resolution, weed and crop growth stages. Our experiences showed high capabilities for site-specific weed control. Image analyses with regard to recognition of weed patches can be used to adapt herbicide application to varying weed occurrence across a field.

  18. High precision dating of mass extinction events: a combined zircon geochronology, apatite tephrochronology, and Bayesian age modelling approach of the Permian-Triassic boundary extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baresel, Björn; Bucher, Hugo; Brosse, Morgane; Bagherpour, Borhan; Schaltegger, Urs

    2016-04-01

    Chemical abrasion isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (CA-ID-TIMS) U-Pb dating of single-zircon crystals is preferably applied to tephra beds intercalated in sedimentary sequences. By assuming that the zircon crystallization age closely approximate that of the volcanic eruption and ash deposition, U-Pb zircon geochronology is the preferred approach for dating mass extinction events (such as the Permian-Triassic boundary mass extinction) in the sedimentary record. As tephra from large volcanic eruptions is often transported over long distances, it additionally provide an invaluable tool for stratigraphic correlation across distant geologic sections. Therefore, the combination of high-precision zircon geochronology with apatite chemistry of the same tephra bed (so called apatite tephrochronology) provides a robust fingerprint of one particular volcanic eruption. In addition we provide coherent Bayesian model ages for the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) mass extinction, then compare it with PTB model ages at Meishan after Burgess et al. (2014). We will present new high-precision U-Pb zircon dates for a series of volcanic ash beds in deep- and shallow-marine Permian-Triassic sections in the Nanpanjiang Basin, South China. In addition, apatite crystals out of the same ash beds were analysed focusing on their halogen (F, Cl) and trace-element (e.g. Fe, Mg, REE) chemistry. We also show that Bayesian age models produce reproducible results from different geologic sections. On the basis of these data, including litho- and biostratigraphic correlations, we can precisely and accurately constrain the Permian-Triassic boundary in an equatorial marine setting, and correlate tephra beds over different sections and facies in the Nanpanjiang Basin independently from litho-, bio- or chemostratigraphic criteria. The results evidence that data produced in laboratories associated to the global EARTHTIME consortium can provide age information at the 0.05% level of 206

  19. System for indicating fuel-efficient aircraft altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, B. L. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for indicating the altitude at which an aircraft should fly so the W/d ratio (weight of the aircraft divided by the density of air) more closely approaches the optimum W/d for the aircraft. A passive microwave radiometer on the aircraft is directed at different angles with respect to the horizon to determine the air temperature, and therefore the density of the air, at different altitudes. The weight of the aircraft is known. The altitude of the aircraft is changed to fly the aircraft at an altitude at which is W/d ratio more closely approaches the optimum W/d ratio for that aircraft.

  20. Small Aircraft Data Distribution System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chazanoff, Seth L.; Dinardo, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    The CARVE Small Aircraft Data Distribution System acquires the aircraft location and attitude data that is required by the various programs running on a distributed network. This system distributes the data it acquires to the data acquisition programs for inclusion in their data files. It uses UDP (User Datagram Protocol) to broadcast data over a LAN (Local Area Network) to any programs that might have a use for the data. The program is easily adaptable to acquire additional data and log that data to disk. The current version also drives displays using precision pitch and roll information to aid the pilot in maintaining a level-level attitude for radar/radiometer mapping beyond the degree available by flying visually or using a standard gyro-driven attitude indicator. The software is designed to acquire an array of data to help the mission manager make real-time decisions as to the effectiveness of the flight. This data is displayed for the mission manager and broadcast to the other experiments on the aircraft for inclusion in their data files. The program also drives real-time precision pitch and roll displays for the pilot and copilot to aid them in maintaining the desired attitude, when required, during data acquisition on mapping lines.

  1. Ball lightning risk to aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doe, R.; Keul, A.

    2009-04-01

    Lightning is a rare but regular phenomenon for air traffic. Aircraft are designed to withstand lightning strikes. Research on lightning and aircraft can be called detailed and effective. In the last 57 years, 18 reported lightning aviation disasters with a fatality figure of at least 714 persons occurred. For comparison, the last JACDEC ten-year average fatality figure was 857. The majority encountered lightning in the climb, descent, approach and/or landing phase. Ball lightning, a metastable, rare lightning type, is also seen from and even within aircraft, but former research only reported individual incidents and did not generate a more detailed picture to ascertain whether it constitutes a significant threat to passenger and aircraft safety. Lacking established incident report channels, observations were often only passed on as "air-travel lore". In an effort to change this unsatisfactory condition, the authors have collected a first international dataset of 38 documented ball lightning aircraft incidents from 1938 to 2001 involving 13 reports over Europe, 13 over USA/Canada, and 7 over Russia. 18 (47%) reported ball lightning outside the aircraft, 18 (47%) inside, 2 cases lacked data. 8 objects caused minor damage, 8 major damage (total: 42%), only one a crash. No damage was reported in 18 cases. 3 objects caused minor crew injury. In most cases, ball lightning lasted several seconds. 11 (29%) incidents ended with an explosion of the object. A cloud-aircraft lightning flash was seen in only 9 cases (24%) of the data set. From the detailed accounts of air personnel in the last 70 years, it is evident that ball lightning is rarely, but consistently observed in connection with aircraft and can also occur inside the airframe. Reports often came from multiple professional witnesses and in several cases, damages were investigated by civil or military authorities. Although ball lightning is no main air traffic risk, the authors suggest that incident and accident

  2. Machine vision-based night landing aids for aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterji, Gano Broto

    The development of machine vision based pilot aids to help reduce night approach and landing accidents is explored in this thesis. The techniques developed in this thesis are motivated by the desire to use the available information sources for navigation such as the airport lighting layout, attitude sensors and Global Positioning System to derive more precise aircraft position and orientation information. The fact that airport lighting geometry is known and that images of airport lighting can be acquired by the camera, has lead to the synthesis of machine vision based algorithms for runway relative aircraft position and orientation estimation. The main contribution of this research is the synthesis of seven navigation algorithms based on two broad families of solutions. The first family of solution methods consists of techniques that reconstruct the airport lighting layout from the camera image and then estimate the aircraft position components by comparing the reconstructed lighting layout geometry with the known model of the airport lighting layout geometry. The second family of methods is comprised of techniques that synthesize the image of the airport lighting layout using a camera model and estimate the aircraft position and orientation by comparing this image with the actual image of the airport lighting acquired by the camera. Algorithms I through IV belong to the first family of solutions while Algorithms V through VII belong to the second family of solutions. Algorithms I and II are parameter optimization methods, Algorithms III and IV are feature correspondence methods and Algorithms V through VII are Kalman filter centered algorithms. In order to take advantage of the aircraft dynamics and the multiple images available along the glide path, the position estimates provided by Algorithms I through IV are used for driving a six-state Kalman filter for providing improved estimates of the aircraft position and inertial velocity components. Algorithms V

  3. Aircraft Dynamic Modeling in Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; Cunninham, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    A method for accurately identifying aircraft dynamic models in turbulence was developed and demonstrated. The method uses orthogonal optimized multisine excitation inputs and an analytic method for enhancing signal-to-noise ratio for dynamic modeling in turbulence. A turbulence metric was developed to accurately characterize the turbulence level using flight measurements. The modeling technique was demonstrated in simulation, then applied to a subscale twin-engine jet transport aircraft in flight. Comparisons of modeling results obtained in turbulent air to results obtained in smooth air were used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  4. Aircraft gas turbine emissions challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Koff, B.L. )

    1994-07-01

    The new generation of jet powered aircraft faces a significant challenge to reduce pollutant emissions while increasing fuel efficiency. Carbon monoxide (CO) and unburned hydrocarbon (HC) emissions are already very low and continued control of these pollutants is expected as engine temperatures and pressure ratios are increased. In contrast, significant system design improvements are needed to reduce oxides of nitrogen (NO[sub x]) emissions because of their harmful effect on the earth's ozone layer. This paper discusses the prospects and technical approaches for significant NO[sub x] reductions in current and future subsonic and supersonic aircraft.

  5. Propulsion controlled aircraft computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogan, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A low-cost, easily retrofit Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) system for use on a wide range of commercial and military aircraft consists of an propulsion controlled aircraft computer that reads in aircraft data including aircraft state, pilot commands and other related data, calculates aircraft throttle position for a given maneuver commanded by the pilot, and then displays both current and calculated throttle position on a cockpit display to show the pilot where to move throttles to achieve the commanded maneuver, or is automatically sent digitally to command the engines directly.

  6. Agricultural Aircraft for Site-Specific Agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural aircraft provide a convenient platform to aid in precision agriculture, in which pesticide, fertilizer or other field inputs are applied only where they are needed. This saves on chemical and farm resources, and reduces environmental loading. Remote sensing is used to spot areas of the ...

  7. A simulator investigation of the influence of engine response characteristics on the approach and landing for an externally blown flap aircraft. Part 1: Description of the simulation and discussion of results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Koenig, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the influence of engine response characteristics on approach and landing operations of a powered lift aircraft were carried out in a piloted ground-based simulator. The aircraft simulated was a four engine, externally-blown jet-flap configuration having an 80 pound wing loading and .56 thrust to weight ratio. Results indicate that for ideal operating conditions and minimal pilot reaction delay, substantial reductions in engine-out wave-off altitude increment and touchdown sink rate for engine-out landings can be achieved with the fast engine compared to the slow engine response. However, delays in pilot reaction of one to two seconds diminish the advantage of rapid thrust response. A need exists for some form of automatic cueing of the pilot or automatic engine control to enable the potential of rapid thrust response to be realized in improving safety in the event of an engine failure.

  8. Turboprop aircraft against terrorism: a SWOT analysis of turboprop aircraft in CAS operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Murat; Akkas, Ali; Aslan, Yavuz

    2012-06-01

    Today, the threat perception is changing. Not only for countries but also for defence organisations like NATO, new threat perception is pointing terrorism. Many countries' air forces become responsible of fighting against terorism or Counter-Insurgency (COIN) Operations. Different from conventional warfare, alternative weapon or weapon systems are required for such operatioins. In counter-terrorism operations modern fighter jets are used as well as helicopters, subsonic jets, Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), turboprop aircraft, baloons and similar platforms. Succes and efficiency of the use of these platforms can be determined by evaluating the conditions, the threats and the area together. Obviously, each platform has advantages and disadvantages for different cases. In this research, examples of turboprop aircraft usage against terrorism and with a more general approach, turboprop aircraft for Close Air Support (CAS) missions from all around the world are reviewed. In this effort, a closer look is taken at the countries using turboprop aircraft in CAS missions while observing the fields these aircraft are used in, type of operations, specifications of the aircraft, cost and the maintenance factors. Thus, an idea about the convenience of using these aircraft in such operations can be obtained. A SWOT analysis of turboprop aircraft in CAS operations is performed. This study shows that turboprop aircraft are suitable to be used in counter-terrorism and COIN operations in low threat environment and is cost benefical compared to jets.

  9. AIRCRAFT DEPAINTING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical paint strippers historically used for aircraft contained toxic and hazardous components; aircraft depainting operations are a major source of hazardous waste generation in DOD. Federal and state agencies have begun to restrict using these hazardous materials and Governme...

  10. PRECISION FARMING FOR NITROGEN MANAGEMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Approaches to precision nitrogen management vary from region to region depending on crop, soils, landscape, and climate yet all strategies essentially attempt to estimate crop nitrogen demand or plant available nitrogen. In this chapter, we provide case studies that illustrate precision nitrogen ma...

  11. Lightning threat to aircraft: Do we know all we need to know?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazur, Vladislav

    1991-01-01

    The problem of lightning threat to aircraft has two aspects: strike avoidance and aircraft protection. These two issues are addressed under the following topics: (1) lightning strikes, weather conditions, and natural lightning rate; (2) the engineering vs. scientific approach to aircraft protection; and (3) the additional information needed to understand lightning threat to aircraft.

  12. Aircraft noise problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    The problems related to aircraft noise were studied. Physical origin (sound), human reaction (noise), quantization of noise and sound sources of aircraft noise are discussed. Noise abatement at the source, technical, fleet-political and air traffic measures are explained. The measurements and future developments are also discussed. The position of Lufthansa as regards aircraft noise problems is depicted.

  13. Unmanned aircraft systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unmanned platforms have become increasingly more common in recent years for acquiring remotely sensed data. These aircraft are referred to as Unmanned Airborne Vehicles (UAV), Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA), Remotely Piloted Vehicles (RPV), or Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), the official term used...

  14. Research Of Airborne Precision Spacing to Improve Airport Arrival Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Baxley, Brian T.; Murdoch, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    In September 2004, the European Organization for the Safety of Air Navigation (EUROCONTROL) and the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation to mutually develop, modify, test, and evaluate systems, procedures, facilities, and devices to meet the need for safe and efficient air navigation and air traffic control in the future. In the United States and Europe, these efforts are defined within the architectures of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) Program and Single European Sky Air Traffic Management Research (SESAR) Program respectively. Both programs have identified Airborne Spacing as a critical component, with Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) as a key enabler. Increased interest in reducing airport community noise and the escalating cost of aviation fuel has led to the use of Continuous Descent Arrival (CDA) procedures to reduce noise, emissions, and fuel usage compared to current procedures. To provide these operational enhancements, arrival flight paths into terminal areas are planned around continuous vertical descents that are closer to an optimum trajectory than those in use today. The profiles are designed to be near-idle descents from cruise altitude to the Final Approach Fix (FAF) and are typically without any level segments. By staying higher and faster than conventional arrivals, CDAs also save flight time for the aircraft operator. The drawback is that the variation of optimized trajectories for different types and weights of aircraft requires the Air Traffic Controller to provide more airspace around an aircraft on a CDA than on a conventional arrival procedure. This additional space decreases the throughput rate of the destination airport. Airborne self-spacing concepts have been developed to increase the throughput at high-demand airports by managing the inter-arrival spacing to be more precise and consistent using on-board guidance. It has been proposed that the

  15. Comparison of Predictive Modeling Methods of Aircraft Landing Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diallo, Ousmane H.

    2012-01-01

    Expected increases in air traffic demand have stimulated the development of air traffic control tools intended to assist the air traffic controller in accurately and precisely spacing aircraft landing at congested airports. Such tools will require an accurate landing-speed prediction to increase throughput while decreasing necessary controller interventions for avoiding separation violations. There are many practical challenges to developing an accurate landing-speed model that has acceptable prediction errors. This paper discusses the development of a near-term implementation, using readily available information, to estimate/model final approach speed from the top of the descent phase of flight to the landing runway. As a first approach, all variables found to contribute directly to the landing-speed prediction model are used to build a multi-regression technique of the response surface equation (RSE). Data obtained from operations of a major airlines for a passenger transport aircraft type to the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport are used to predict the landing speed. The approach was promising because it decreased the standard deviation of the landing-speed error prediction by at least 18% from the standard deviation of the baseline error, depending on the gust condition at the airport. However, when the number of variables is reduced to the most likely obtainable at other major airports, the RSE model shows little improvement over the existing methods. Consequently, a neural network that relies on a nonlinear regression technique is utilized as an alternative modeling approach. For the reduced number of variables cases, the standard deviation of the neural network models errors represent over 5% reduction compared to the RSE model errors, and at least 10% reduction over the baseline predicted landing-speed error standard deviation. Overall, the constructed models predict the landing-speed more accurately and precisely than the current state-of-the-art.

  16. Aircraft landing gear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, John A. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Topics presented include the laboratory simulation of landing gear pitch-plane dynamics, a summary of recent aircraft/ground vehicle friction measurement tests, some recent aircraft tire thermal studies, and an evaluation of critical speeds in high-speed aircraft. Also presented are a review of NASA antiskid braking research, titanium matrix composite landing gear development, the current methods and perspective of aircraft flotation analysis, the flow rate and trajectory of water spray produced by an aircraft tire, and spin-up studies of the Space Shuttle Orbiter main gear tire.

  17. Small transport aircraft technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    Information on commuter airline trends and aircraft developments is provided to upgrade the preliminary findings of a NASA-formed small transport aircraft technology (STAT) team, established to determine whether the agency's research and development programs could help commuter aircraft manufacturers solve technical problems related to passenger acceptance and use of 19- to 50-passenger aircraft. The results and conclusions of the full set of completed STAT studies are presented. These studies were performed by five airplane manufacturers, five engine manufacturers, and two propeller manufacturers. Those portions of NASA's overall aeronautics research and development programs which are applicable to commuter aircraft design are summarized. Areas of technology that might beneficially be expanded or initiated to aid the US commuter aircraft manufacturers in the evolution of improved aircraft for the market are suggested.

  18. Prompt and Precise Prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    For Sanders Design International, Inc., of Wilton, New Hampshire, every passing second between the concept and realization of a product is essential to succeed in the rapid prototyping industry where amongst heavy competition, faster time-to-market means more business. To separate itself from its rivals, Sanders Design aligned with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to develop what it considers to be the most accurate rapid prototyping machine for fabrication of extremely precise tooling prototypes. The company's Rapid ToolMaker System has revolutionized production of high quality, small-to-medium sized prototype patterns and tooling molds with an exactness that surpasses that of computer numerically-controlled (CNC) machining devices. Created with funding and support from Marshall under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, the Rapid ToolMaker is a dual-use technology with applications in both commercial and military aerospace fields. The advanced technology provides cost savings in the design and manufacturing of automotive, electronic, and medical parts, as well as in other areas of consumer interest, such as jewelry and toys. For aerospace applications, the Rapid ToolMaker enables fabrication of high-quality turbine and compressor blades for jet engines on unmanned air vehicles, aircraft, and missiles.

  19. Arrival Metering Precision Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prevot, Thomas; Mercer, Joey; Homola, Jeffrey; Hunt, Sarah; Gomez, Ashley; Bienert, Nancy; Omar, Faisal; Kraut, Joshua; Brasil, Connie; Wu, Minghong, G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the background, method and results of the Arrival Metering Precision Study (AMPS) conducted in the Airspace Operations Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center in May 2014. The simulation study measured delivery accuracy, flight efficiency, controller workload, and acceptability of time-based metering operations to a meter fix at the terminal area boundary for different resolution levels of metering delay times displayed to the air traffic controllers and different levels of airspeed information made available to the Time-Based Flow Management (TBFM) system computing the delay. The results show that the resolution of the delay countdown timer (DCT) on the controllers display has a significant impact on the delivery accuracy at the meter fix. Using the 10 seconds rounded and 1 minute rounded DCT resolutions resulted in more accurate delivery than 1 minute truncated and were preferred by the controllers. Using the speeds the controllers entered into the fourth line of the data tag to update the delay computation in TBFM in high and low altitude sectors increased air traffic control efficiency and reduced fuel burn for arriving aircraft during time based metering.

  20. Future aircraft networks and schedules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Yan

    2011-07-01

    Because of the importance of air transportation scheduling, the emergence of small aircraft and the vision of future fuel-efficient aircraft, this thesis has focused on the study of aircraft scheduling and network design involving multiple types of aircraft and flight services. It develops models and solution algorithms for the schedule design problem and analyzes the computational results. First, based on the current development of small aircraft and on-demand flight services, this thesis expands a business model for integrating on-demand flight services with the traditional scheduled flight services. This thesis proposes a three-step approach to the design of aircraft schedules and networks from scratch under the model. In the first step, both a frequency assignment model for scheduled flights that incorporates a passenger path choice model and a frequency assignment model for on-demand flights that incorporates a passenger mode choice model are created. In the second step, a rough fleet assignment model that determines a set of flight legs, each of which is assigned an aircraft type and a rough departure time is constructed. In the third step, a timetable model that determines an exact departure time for each flight leg is developed. Based on the models proposed in the three steps, this thesis creates schedule design instances that involve almost all the major airports and markets in the United States. The instances of the frequency assignment model created in this thesis are large-scale non-convex mixed-integer programming problems, and this dissertation develops an overall network structure and proposes iterative algorithms for solving these instances. The instances of both the rough fleet assignment model and the timetable model created in this thesis are large-scale mixed-integer programming problems, and this dissertation develops subproblem schemes for solving these instances. Based on these solution algorithms, this dissertation also presents

  1. Recent Progress in V/STOL Aircraft Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, L.; Deckert, W.; Hickey, D.

    1981-01-01

    Results from wind tunnel and flight tests investigations for V/STOL aircraft are reviewed. Primary emphasis is given to technical results relating to three types of subsonic aircraft: a quiet STOL aircraft; a tilt rotor aircraft; and a turbofan V/STOL aircraft. Comparison and correlation between theoretical and experimental results and between wind tunnel and flight test results, is made. The quiet STOL aircraft technology results are primarily those derived from the NASA/Boeing Quiet Short Haul Technology (QSRA) program. The QSRA aircraft uses an upper surface blown flap and develops a usable engine-out landing approach lift coefficient of 5.5 and landing distances less than 1,000 ft. The tilt rotor aircraft technology results are those obtained from the NASA/Army/Navy/Bell (XV-15-TRRA) aircraft flight investigations. The TRRA is a twin rotor research aircraft capable of vertical takeoff and landing and cruise speeds of 300 knots. The turbofan V/STOL aircraft technology results are from static ground facility and wind tunnel investigations of a NASA/NAVY/Grumman full scale lift/cruise fan aircraft model, which features two tilting nacelles with TF-34 engines.

  2. Modification to area navigation equipment for instrument two-segment approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A two-segment aircraft landing approach concept utilizing an area random navigation (RNAV) system to execute the two-segment approach and eliminate the requirements for co-located distance measuring equipment (DME) was investigated. This concept permits non-precision approaches to be made to runways not equipped with ILS systems, down to appropriate minima. A hardware and software retrofit kit for the concept was designed, built, and tested on a DC-8-61 aircraft for flight evaluation. A two-segment approach profile and piloting procedure for that aircraft that will provide adequate safety margin under adverse weather, in the presence of system failures, and with the occurrence of an abused approach, was also developed. The two-segment approach procedure and equipment was demonstrated to line pilots under conditions which are representative of those encountered in air carrier service.

  3. A simulator investigation of engine failure compensation for powered-lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieuwenhuijse, A. W.; Franklin, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    A piloted simulator investigation of various engine failure compensation concepts for powered-lift STOL aircraft was carried out at the Ames Research Center. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the influence of engine failure compensation on recovery from an engine failure during the landing approach and on the precision of the STOL landing. The various concepts include: (1) cockpit warning lights to cue the pilot of an engine failure, (2) programmed thrust and roll trim compensation, (3) thrust command and (4) flight-path stabilization. The aircraft simulated was a 150 passenger four-engine, externally blown flap civil STOL transport having a 90 psf wing loading and a .56 thrust to weight ratio. Results of the simulation indicate that the combination of thrust command and flight-path stabilization offered the best engine-out landing performance in turbulence and did so over the entire range of altitudes for which engine failures occurred.

  4. A Risk Assessment Model for Reduced Aircraft Separation: A Quantitative Method to Evaluate the Safety of Free Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Rick; Smith, Alex; Connors, Mary; Wojciech, Jack; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    As new technologies and procedures are introduced into the National Airspace System, whether they are intended to improve efficiency, capacity, or safety level, the quantification of potential changes in safety levels is of vital concern. Applications of technology can improve safety levels and allow the reduction of separation standards. An excellent example is the Precision Runway Monitor (PRM). By taking advantage of the surveillance and display advances of PRM, airports can run instrument parallel approaches to runways separated by 3400 feet with the same level of safety as parallel approaches to runways separated by 4300 feet using the standard technology. Despite a wealth of information from flight operations and testing programs, there is no readily quantifiable relationship between numerical safety levels and the separation standards that apply to aircraft on final approach. This paper presents a modeling approach to quantify the risk associated with reducing separation on final approach. Reducing aircraft separation, both laterally and longitudinally, has been the goal of several aviation R&D programs over the past several years. Many of these programs have focused on technological solutions to improve navigation accuracy, surveillance accuracy, aircraft situational awareness, controller situational awareness, and other technical and operational factors that are vital to maintaining flight safety. The risk assessment model relates different types of potential aircraft accidents and incidents and their contribution to overall accident risk. The framework links accident risks to a hierarchy of failsafe mechanisms characterized by procedures and interventions. The model will be used to assess the overall level of safety associated with reducing separation standards and the introduction of new technology and procedures, as envisaged under the Free Flight concept. The model framework can be applied to various aircraft scenarios, including parallel and in

  5. Design and Evaluation of the Terminal Area Precision Scheduling and Spacing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, Harry N.; Thipphavong, Jane; Sadovsky, Alex; Chen, Liang; Sullivan, Chris; Martin, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the design, development and results from a high fidelity human-in-the-loop simulation of an integrated set of trajectory-based automation tools providing precision scheduling, sequencing and controller merging and spacing functions. These integrated functions are combined into a system called the Terminal Area Precision Scheduling and Spacing (TAPSS) system. It is a strategic and tactical planning tool that provides Traffic Management Coordinators, En Route and Terminal Radar Approach Control air traffic controllers the ability to efficiently optimize the arrival capacity of a demand-impacted airport while simultaneously enabling fuel-efficient descent procedures. The TAPSS system consists of four-dimensional trajectory prediction, arrival runway balancing, aircraft separation constraint-based scheduling, traffic flow visualization and trajectory-based advisories to assist controllers in efficient metering, sequencing and spacing. The TAPSS system was evaluated and compared to today's ATC operation through extensive series of human-in-the-loop simulations for arrival flows into the Los Angeles International Airport. The test conditions included the variation of aircraft demand from a baseline of today's capacity constrained periods through 5%, 10% and 20% increases. Performance data were collected for engineering and human factor analysis and compared with similar operations both with and without the TAPSS system. The engineering data indicate operations with the TAPSS show up to a 10% increase in airport throughput during capacity constrained periods while maintaining fuel-efficient aircraft descent profiles from cruise to landing.

  6. Survival analysis of aging aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, Samuel

    work demonstrates the development of a probabilistic corrosion failure model using survival analysis methods and techniques. Using a parsimonious approach, the coefficients of a Cox proportional hazards model were derived from a set of environmental, geographical and operational predictor variables. To determine if the variables satisfied the proportional hazard assumption, numerous statistical tests were performed---such as the equivalence tests of the log rank, Wilcoxon, Peto-Peto and Fleming-Harrington---and graphical plots generated such as observed-versus-expected plots and log(-log) survival curves. Finally, in a paradigm enhancement to current design methodologies, this dissertation place sets survival analysis modeling in the context of an emerging holistic structural integrity philosophy. While traditional aircraft design and life prediction methodologies consider only the cyclic fatigue domain without consideration to the environmental or unique operating spectrum that aircraft may fly in, a holistic approach considers the cradle-to-grave driving forces in the life of a component, such as corrosion assisted crack nucleation in a material. This dissertation, which uses real-world failure data obtained from structural aircraft components, is poised to narrow the cradle-to-grave loop and provide holistic feedback in the understanding of aircraft structural system failures.

  7. Development and flight test of a helicopter compact, portable, precision landing system concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clary, G. R.; Bull, J. S.; Davis, T. J.; Chisholm, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    An airborne, radar-based, precision approach concept is being developed and flight tested as a part of NASA's Rotorcraft All-Weather Operations Research Program. A transponder-based beacon landing system (BLS) applying state-of-the-art X-band radar technology and digital processing techniques, was built and is being flight tested to demonstrate the concept feasibility. The BLS airborne hardware consists of an add-on microprocessor, installed in conjunction with the aircraft weather/mapping radar, which analyzes the radar beacon receiver returns and determines range, localizer deviation, and glide-slope deviation. The ground station is an inexpensive, portable unit which can be quickly deployed at a landing site. Results from the flight test program show that the BLS concept has a significant potential for providing rotorcraft with low-cost, precision instrument approach capability in remote areas.

  8. Control of Next Generation Aircraft and Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The first part of this talk will describe some of the exciting new next generation aircraft that NASA is proposing for the future. These aircraft are being designed to reduce aircraft fuel consumption and environmental impact. Reducing the aircraft weight is one approach that will be used to achieve these goals. A new control framework will be presented that enables lighter, more flexible aircraft to maintain aircraft handling qualities, while preventing the aircraft from exceeding structural load limits. The second part of the talk will give an overview of utility-scale wind turbines and their control. Results of collaboration with Dr. Balas will be presented, including new theory to adaptively control the turbine in the presence of structural modes, with the focus on the application of this theory to a high-fidelity simulation of a wind turbine.

  9. Raptors and aircraft

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.G.; Ellis, D.H.; Johnson, T.H.

    1988-01-01

    Less than 5% of all bird strikes of aircraft are by raptor species, but damage to airframe structure or jet engine dysfunction are likely consequences. Beneficial aircraft-raptor interactions include the use of raptor species to frighten unwanted birds from airport areas and the use of aircraft to census raptor species. Many interactions, however, modify the raptor?s immediate behavior and some may decrease reproduction of sensitive species. Raptors may respond to aircraft stimuli by exhibiting alarm, increased heart rate, flushing or fleeing and occasionally by directly attacking intruding aircraft. To date, most studies reveal that raptor responses to aircraft are brief and do not limit reproduction; however, additional study is needed.

  10. Lightning effects on aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Direct and indirect effects of lightning on aircraft were examined in relation to aircraft design. Specific trends in design leading to more frequent lightning strikes were individually investigated. These trends included the increasing use of miniaturized, solid state components in aircraft electronics and electric power systems. A second trend studied was the increasing use of reinforced plastics and other nonconducting materials in place of aluminum skins, a practice that reduces the electromagnetic shielding furnished by a conductive skin.

  11. Aircraft fire safety research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botteri, Benito P.

    1987-01-01

    During the past 15 years, very significant progress has been made toward enhancing aircraft fire safety in both normal and hostile (combat) operational environments. Most of the major aspects of the aircraft fire safety problem are touched upon here. The technology of aircraft fire protection, although not directly applicable in all cases to spacecraft fire scenarios, nevertheless does provide a solid foundation to build upon. This is particularly true of the extensive research and testing pertaining to aircraft interior fire safety and to onboard inert gas generation systems, both of which are still active areas of investigation.

  12. Hypersonic aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkamhawi, Hani; Greiner, Tom; Fuerst, Gerry; Luich, Shawn; Stonebraker, Bob; Wray, Todd

    1990-01-01

    A hypersonic aircraft is designed which uses scramjets to accelerate from Mach 6 to Mach 10 and sustain that speed for two minutes. Different propulsion systems were considered and it was decided that the aircraft would use one full scale turbofan-ramjet. Two solid rocket boosters were added to save fuel and help the aircraft pass through the transonic region. After considering aerodynamics, aircraft design, stability and control, cooling systems, mission profile, and landing systems, a conventional aircraft configuration was chosen over that of a waverider. The conventional design was chosen due to its landing characteristics and the relative expense compared to the waverider. Fuel requirements and the integration of the engine systems and their inlets are also taken into consideration in the final design. A hypersonic aircraft was designed which uses scramjets to accelerate from Mach 6 to Mach 10 and sustain that speed for two minutes. Different propulsion systems were considered and a full scale turbofan-ramjet was chosen. Two solid rocket boosters were added to save fuel and help the aircraft pass through the transonic reqion. After the aerodynamics, aircraft design, stability and control, cooling systems, mission profile, landing systems, and their physical interactions were considered, a conventional aircraft configuration was chosen over that of a waverider. The conventional design was chosen due to its landing characteristics and the relative expense compared to the waverider. Fuel requirements and the integration of the engine systems and their inlets were also considered in the designing process.

  13. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    large molecular weight, net negative charge and hydrophilicity of synthetic small interfering RNAs makes it hard for the molecules to cross the plasma membrane and enter the cell cytoplasm. Immune responses can also diminish the effectiveness of this approach. In this issue, Shiri Weinstein and Dan Peer from Tel Aviv University provide an overview of the challenges and recent progress in the use of nanocarriers for delivering RNAi effector molecules into target tissues and cells more effectively [5]. Also in this issue, researchers in Korea report new results that demonstrate the potential of nanostructures in neural network engineering [6]. Min Jee Jang et al report directional growth of neurites along linear carbon nanotube patterns, demonstrating great progress in neural engineering and the scope for using nanotechnology to treat neural diseases. Modern medicine cannot claim to have abolished the pain and suffering that accompany disease. But a comparison between the ghastly and often ineffective iron implements of early medicine and the smart gadgets and treatments used in hospitals today speaks volumes for the extraordinary progress that has been made, and the motivation behind this research. References [1] Wallis F 2000 Signs and senses: diagnosis and prognosis in early medieval pulse and urine texts Soc. Hist. Med. 13 265-78 [2] Arntz Y, Seelig J D, Lang H P, Zhang J, Hunziker P, Ramseyer J P, Meyer E, Hegner M and Gerber Ch 2003 Label-free protein assay based on a nanomechanical cantiliever array Nanotechnology 14 86-90 [3] Gowtham S, Scheicher R H, Pandey R, Karna S P and Ahuja R 2008 First-principles study of physisorption of nucleic acid bases on small-diameter carbon nanotubes Nanotechnology 19 125701 [4] Wang H-N and Vo-Dinh T 2009 Multiplex detection of breast cancer biomarkers using plasmonic molecular sentinel nanoprobes Nanotechnology 20 065101 [5] Weinstein S and Peer D 2010 RNAi nanomedicines: challenges and opportunities within the immune system

  14. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    large molecular weight, net negative charge and hydrophilicity of synthetic small interfering RNAs makes it hard for the molecules to cross the plasma membrane and enter the cell cytoplasm. Immune responses can also diminish the effectiveness of this approach. In this issue, Shiri Weinstein and Dan Peer from Tel Aviv University provide an overview of the challenges and recent progress in the use of nanocarriers for delivering RNAi effector molecules into target tissues and cells more effectively [5]. Also in this issue, researchers in Korea report new results that demonstrate the potential of nanostructures in neural network engineering [6]. Min Jee Jang et al report directional growth of neurites along linear carbon nanotube patterns, demonstrating great progress in neural engineering and the scope for using nanotechnology to treat neural diseases. Modern medicine cannot claim to have abolished the pain and suffering that accompany disease. But a comparison between the ghastly and often ineffective iron implements of early medicine and the smart gadgets and treatments used in hospitals today speaks volumes for the extraordinary progress that has been made, and the motivation behind this research. References [1] Wallis F 2000 Signs and senses: diagnosis and prognosis in early medieval pulse and urine texts Soc. Hist. Med. 13 265-78 [2] Arntz Y, Seelig J D, Lang H P, Zhang J, Hunziker P, Ramseyer J P, Meyer E, Hegner M and Gerber Ch 2003 Label-free protein assay based on a nanomechanical cantiliever array Nanotechnology 14 86-90 [3] Gowtham S, Scheicher R H, Pandey R, Karna S P and Ahuja R 2008 First-principles study of physisorption of nucleic acid bases on small-diameter carbon nanotubes Nanotechnology 19 125701 [4] Wang H-N and Vo-Dinh T 2009 Multiplex detection of breast cancer biomarkers using plasmonic molecular sentinel nanoprobes Nanotechnology 20 065101 [5] Weinstein S and Peer D 2010 RNAi nanomedicines: challenges and opportunities within the immune system

  15. Large scale, regional, CH4 and net CO2 fluxes using nested chamber, tower, aircraft flux, remote sensing, and modeling approaches in Arctic Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oechel, Walter; Moreaux, Virginie; Kalhori, Aram; Losacco, Salvatore; Murphy, Patrick; Wilkman, Eric; Zona, Donatella

    2014-05-01

    The topographic, environmental, biotic, and metabolic heterogeneity of terrestrial ecosystems and landscapes can be large even despite a seemingly homogeneous landscape. The error of estimating and simulating fluxes due to extant heterogeneity is commonly overlooked in regional and global estimates. We evaluate the pattern and controls on spatial heterogeneity on GHG fluxes over varying spatial scales and compare to standard estimates of NEE and other greenhouse gas fluxes. Data from the north slope of Alaska from up to a 16 year flux record from up to 7 permanent towers, over 20 portable tower locations, and hundreds of hours of aircraft fluxes, are used to evaluate the spatial variability of fluxes and to better estimate regional fluxes. Significant heterogeneity of fluxes is identified at varying scales from sub-meter scale to >100km. A careful consideration of the effect that heterogeneity causes when estimating ecosystem fluxes is critical to reliable regional and global estimates. The combination of tower, flux aircraft, remote sensing, and modeling can be used to provide reliable, accurate, regional assessments of CH4and CO2 fluxes or large areas of heterogeneous landscape.

  16. Heterogeneity of CH4 and net CO2 Fluxes Using Nested Chamber, Tower, Aircraft, Remote Sensing, and Modeling Approaches in Arctic Alaska for Regional Flux Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oechel, W. C.; Moreaux, V.; Kalhori, A. A. M.; Murphy, P.; Wilkman, E.; Sturtevant, C. S.; Zhuang, Q.; Miller, C. E.; Dinardo, S. J.; Fisher, J. B.; Gioli, B.; Zona, D.

    2014-12-01

    The topographic, environmental, biotic, and metabolic heterogeneity of terrestrial ecosystems and landscapes can be large even despite a seemingly homogeneous landscape. The error of estimating and simulating fluxes due to extant heterogeneity is commonly overlooked in regional and global estimates. Here we evaluate the pattern and controls on spatial heterogeneity on CH4 and CO2 fluxes over varying spatial scales. Data from the north slope of Alaska from chambers, up to a 16 year CO2 flux record from up to 7 permanent towers, over 20 portable tower locations, eddy covariance CH4 fluxes over several years and sites, new year-around CO2 and CH4 flux installations, hundreds of hours of aircraft concentration and fluxes, and terrestrial biosphere and flux inverse modeling, are used to evaluate the spatial variability of fluxes and to better estimate regional fluxes. Significant heterogeneity of fluxes is identified at varying scales from sub-meter scale to >100km. A careful consideration of the effect that heterogeneity causes when estimating ecosystem fluxes is critical to reliable regional and global estimates. The combination of eddy covariance tower flux, aircraft, remote sensing, and modeling can be used to provide reliable, accurate, regional assessments of CH4 and CO2 fluxes from large areas of heterogeneous landscape.

  17. An inverse-modelling approach for frequency response correction of capacitive humidity sensors in ABL research with small remotely piloted aircraft (RPA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildmann, N.; Kaufmann, F.; Bange, J.

    2014-09-01

    The measurement of water vapour concentration in the atmosphere is an ongoing challenge in environmental research. Satisfactory solutions exist for ground-based meteorological stations and measurements of mean values. However, carrying out advanced research of thermodynamic processes aloft as well, above the surface layer and especially in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), requires the resolution of small-scale turbulence. Sophisticated optical instruments are used in airborne meteorology with manned aircraft to achieve the necessary fast-response measurements of the order of 10 Hz (e.g. LiCor 7500). Since these instruments are too large and heavy for the application on small remotely piloted aircraft (RPA), a method is presented in this study that enhances small capacitive humidity sensors to be able to resolve turbulent eddies of the order of 10 m. The sensor examined here is a polymer-based sensor of the type P14-Rapid, by the Swiss company Innovative Sensor Technologies (IST) AG, with a surface area of less than 10 mm2 and a negligible weight. A physical and dynamical model of this sensor is described and then inverted in order to restore original water vapour fluctuations from sensor measurements. Examples of flight measurements show how the method can be used to correct vertical profiles and resolve turbulence spectra up to about 3 Hz. At an airspeed of 25 m s-1 this corresponds to a spatial resolution of less than 10 m.

  18. A flight-test and simulation evaluation of the longitudinal final approach and landing performance of an automatic system for a light wing loading STOL aircraft equipped with wing spoilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, S. C.; Hardy, G. H.; Hindson, W. S.

    1984-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive flight-test investigation of short takeoff and landing (STOL) operating systems for the terminal systems for the terminal area, an automatic landing system has been developed and evaluated for a light wing-loading turboprop-powered aircraft. An advanced digital avionics system performed display, navigation, guidance, and control functions for the test aircraft. Control signals were generated in order to command powered actuators for all conventional controls and for a set of symmetrically driven wing spoilers. This report describes effects of the spoiler control on longitudinal autoland (automatic landing) performance. Flight-test results, with and without spoiler control, are presented and compared with available (basically, conventional takeoff and landing) performance criteria. These comparisons are augmented by results from a comprehensive simulation of the controlled aircraft that included representations of the microwave landing system navigation errors that were encountered in flight as well as expected variations in atmospheric turbulence and wind shear. Flight-test results show that the addition of spoiler control improves the touchdown performance of the automatic landing system. Spoilers improve longitudinal touchdown and landing pitch-attitude performance, particularly in tailwind conditions. Furthermore, simulation results indicate that performance would probably be satisfactory for a wider range of atmospheric disturbances than those encountered in flight. Flight results also indicate that the addition of spoiler control during the final approach does not result in any measurable change in glidepath track performance, and results in a very small deterioration in airspeed tracking. This difference contrasts with simulations results, which indicate some improvement in glidepath tracking and no appreciable change in airspeed tracking. The modeling problem in the simulation that contributed to this discrepancy with flight was

  19. Instrument Attitude Precision Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    2004-01-01

    A novel approach is presented in this paper to analyze attitude precision and control for an instrument gimbaled to a spacecraft subject to an internal disturbance caused by a moving component inside the instrument. Nonlinear differential equations of motion for some sample cases are derived and solved analytically to gain insight into the influence of the disturbance on the attitude pointing error. A simple control law is developed to eliminate the instrument pointing error caused by the internal disturbance. Several cases are presented to demonstrate and verify the concept presented in this paper.

  20. On the efficacy of per-relation basis performance evaluation for PPI extraction and a high-precision rule-based approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most previous Protein Protein Interaction (PPI) studies evaluated their algorithms' performance based on "per-instance" precision and recall, in which the instances of an interaction relation were evaluated independently. However, we argue that this standard evaluation method should be revisited. In a large corpus, the same relation can be described in various different forms and, in practice, correctly identifying not all but a small subset of them would often suffice to detect the given interaction. Methods In this regard, we propose a more pragmatic "per-relation" basis performance evaluation method instead of the conventional per-instance basis method. In the per-relation basis method, only a subset of a relation's instances needs to be correctly identified to make the relation positive. In this work, we also introduce a new high-precision rule-based PPI extraction algorithm. While virtually all current PPI extraction studies focus on improving F-score, aiming to balance the performance on both precision and recall, in many realistic scenarios involving large corpora, one can benefit more from a high-precision algorithm than a high-recall counterpart. Results We show that our algorithm not only achieves better per-relation performance than previous solutions but also serves as a good complement to the existing PPI extraction tools. Our algorithm improves the performance of the existing tools through simple pipelining. Conclusion The significance of this research can be found in that this research brought new perspective to the performance evaluation of PPI extraction studies, which we believe is more important in practice than existing evaluation criteria. Given the new evaluation perspective, we also showed the importance of a high-precision extraction tool and validated the efficacy of our rule-based system as the high-precision tool candidate. PMID:23566263

  1. Method and device for landing aircraft dependent on runway occupancy time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghalebsaz Jeddi, Babak (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A technique for landing aircraft using an aircraft landing accident avoidance device is disclosed. The technique includes determining at least two probability distribution functions; determining a safe lower limit on a separation between a lead aircraft and a trail aircraft on a glide slope to the runway; determining a maximum sustainable safe attempt-to-land rate on the runway based on the safe lower limit and the probability distribution functions; directing the trail aircraft to enter the glide slope with a target separation from the lead aircraft corresponding to the maximum sustainable safe attempt-to-land rate; while the trail aircraft is in the glide slope, determining an actual separation between the lead aircraft and the trail aircraft; and directing the trail aircraft to execute a go-around maneuver if the actual separation approaches the safe lower limit. Probability distribution functions include runway occupancy time, and landing time interval and/or inter-arrival distance.

  2. Human Factors In Aircraft Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, Charles

    1995-01-01

    Report presents survey of state of art in human factors in automation of aircraft operation. Presents examination of aircraft automation and effects on flight crews in relation to human error and aircraft accidents.

  3. Flight Safety Aircraft Risk: A Growing Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growing awareness of the need to have appropriate criteria for protection of aircraft from debris resulting from the flight termination of a malfunctioning space booster. There have been several sequences of events that have interacted to bring us to the current risk management problem. With the advent of the US initiative to have common flight safety analysis processes and criteria, it was recognized that the traditional aircraft protection approach was inadequate. It did not consider the added public concern for catastrophic events. While the probability may have been small for downing a large commercial passenger plane, the public outrage if it happened would not be adequately measured by the individual risk to passengers nor the collective (societal risk) presented by a single airplane. Over a period of a number of years the US has developed and evolved a criterion to address catastrophic risk protection. Beginning in the same time period, it was recognized the assertion that all debris with masses greater than one gram were lethal to aircraft was unduly conservative. Over this same period initiatives have been developed to refine aircraft vulnerability models. There were, however, two significant unconservative assumptions that were made in the early years. It was presumed that significant risk to aircraft could only occur in the launch area. In addition, aircraft risk assessments, when they were made were based on debris lists designed to protect people on the ground (typically debris with an impact kinetic energy greater than 11 ft-lb). Good debris lists for aircraft protection do not yet exist. However, it has become increasingly clear that even with partial breakup lists large regions were required from which aircraft flight would be restricted using the normal exclusion approaches. We provide a review of these events and an indication of the way forward.

  4. General Aviation Aircraft Reliability Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Duane; Turnbull, Andrew; Roelant, Henk A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This reliability study was performed in order to provide the aviation community with an estimate of Complex General Aviation (GA) Aircraft System reliability. To successfully improve the safety and reliability for the next generation of GA aircraft, a study of current GA aircraft attributes was prudent. This was accomplished by benchmarking the reliability of operational Complex GA Aircraft Systems. Specifically, Complex GA Aircraft System reliability was estimated using data obtained from the logbooks of a random sample of the Complex GA Aircraft population.

  5. Lightning protection of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, F. A.; Plumer, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The current knowledge concerning potential lightning effects on aircraft and the means that are available to designers and operators to protect against these effects are summarized. The increased use of nonmetallic materials in the structure of aircraft and the constant trend toward using electronic equipment to handle flight-critical control and navigation functions have served as impetus for this study.

  6. Civil aircraft accident investigation.

    PubMed

    Haines, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This talk reviews some historic aircraft accidents and some more recent. It reflects on the division of accident causes, considering mechanical failures and aircrew failures, and on aircrew training. Investigation results may lead to improved aircraft design, and to appropriate crew training. PMID:24057309

  7. Precision controllability of the F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisk, T. R.; Matheny, N. W.

    1979-01-01

    A flying qualities evaluation conducted on a preproduction F-15 airplane permitted an assessment to be made of its precision controllability in the high subsonic and low transonic flight regime over the allowable angle of attack range. Precision controllability, or gunsight tracking, studies were conducted in windup turn maneuvers with the gunsight in the caged pipper mode and depressed 70 mils. This evaluation showed the F-15 airplane to experience severe buffet and mild-to-moderate wing rock at the higher angles of attack. It showed the F-15 airplane radial tracking precision to vary from approximately 6 to 20 mils over the load factor range tested. Tracking in the presence of wing rock essentially doubled the radial tracking error generated at the lower angles of attack. The stability augmentation system affected the tracking precision of the F-15 airplane more than it did that of previous aircraft studied.

  8. Precision powder feeder

    DOEpatents

    Schlienger, M. Eric; Schmale, David T.; Oliver, Michael S.

    2001-07-10

    A new class of precision powder feeders is disclosed. These feeders provide a precision flow of a wide range of powdered materials, while remaining robust against jamming or damage. These feeders can be precisely controlled by feedback mechanisms.

  9. Aircraft operations management manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA aircraft operations program is a multifaceted, highly diverse entity that directly supports the agency mission in aeronautical research and development, space science and applications, space flight, astronaut readiness training, and related activities through research and development, program support, and mission management aircraft operations flights. Users of the program are interagency, inter-government, international, and the business community. This manual provides guidelines to establish policy for the management of NASA aircraft resources, aircraft operations, and related matters. This policy is an integral part of and must be followed when establishing field installation policy and procedures covering the management of NASA aircraft operations. Each operating location will develop appropriate local procedures that conform with the requirements of this handbook. This manual should be used in conjunction with other governing instructions, handbooks, and manuals.

  10. Why aircraft disinsection?

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, N. G.; Steffen, R.; Cocksedge, W.

    2000-01-01

    A serious problem is posed by the inadvertent transport of live mosquitoes aboard aircraft arriving from tropical countries where vector-borne diseases are endemic. Surveys at international airports have found many instances of live insects, particularly mosquitoes, aboard aircraft arriving from countries where malaria and arboviruses are endemic. In some instances mosquito species have been established in countries in which they have not previously been reported. A serious consequence of the transport of infected mosquitoes aboard aircraft has been the numerous cases of "airport malaria" reported from Europe, North America and elsewhere. There is an important on-going need for the disinsection of aircraft coming from airports in tropical disease endemic areas into nonendemic areas. The methods and materials available for use in aircraft disinsection and the WHO recommendations for their use are described. PMID:10994283

  11. Hypersonic reconnaissance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulk, Tim; Chiarini, David; Hill, Kevin; Kunszt, Bob; Odgen, Chris; Truong, Bon

    1992-01-01

    A conceptual design of a hypersonic reconnaissance aircraft for the U.S. Navy is discussed. After eighteen weeks of work, a waverider design powered by two augmented turbofans was chosen. The aircraft was designed to be based on an aircraft carrier and to cruise 6,000 nautical miles at Mach 4;80,000 feet and above. As a result the size of the aircraft was only allowed to have a length of eighty feet, fifty-two feet in wingspan, and roughly 2,300 square feet in planform area. Since this is a mainly cruise aircraft, sixty percent of its 100,000 pound take-off weight is JP fuel. At cruise, the highest temperature that it will encounter is roughly 1,100 F, which can be handled through the use of a passive cooling system.

  12. Cyclone: A close air support aircraft for tomorrow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, George; Croulet, Donald; Dunn, James; Graham, Michael; Ip, Phillip; Low, Scott; Vance, Gregg; Volckaert, Eric

    1991-01-01

    To meet the threat of the battlefield of the future, the U.S. ground forces will require reliable air support. To provide this support, future aircrews demand a versatile close air support aircraft capable of delivering ordinance during the day, night, or in adverse weather with pin-point accuracy. The Cyclone aircraft meets these requirements, packing the 'punch' necessary to clear the way for effective ground operations. Possessing anti-armor, missile, and precision bombing capability, the Cyclone will counter the threat into the 21st Century. Here, it is shown that the Cyclone is a realistic, economical answer to the demand for a capable close air support aircraft.

  13. Escorting commercial aircraft to reduce the MANPAD threat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, Nicholas; Richardson, M. A.; Butters, B.; Walmsley, R.; Ayling, R.; Taylor, B.

    2005-11-01

    This paper studies the Man-Portable Air Defence System (MANPADS) threat against large commercial aircraft using flight profile analysis, engagement modelling and simulation. Non-countermeasure equipped commercial aircraft are at risk during approach and departure due to the large areas around airports that would need to be secured to prevent the use of highly portable and concealable MANPADs. A software model (CounterSim) has been developed and was used to simulate an SA-7b and large commercial aircraft engagement. The results of this simulation have found that the threat was lessened when a escort fighter aircraft is flown in the 'Centreline Low' position, or 25 m rearward from the large aircraft and 15 m lower, similar to the Air-to-Air refuelling position. In the model a large aircraft on approach had a 50% chance of being hit or having a near miss (within 20m) whereas escorted by a countermeasure equipped F-16 in the 'Centerline Low' position, this was reduced to only 14%. Departure is a particularly vulnerable time for large aircraft due to slow climb rates and the inability to fly evasive manoeuvres. The 'Centreline Low' escorted departure greatly reduced the threat to 16% hit or near miss from 62% for an unescorted heavy aircraft. Overall the CounterSim modelling has showed that escorting a civilian aircraft on approach and departure can reduce the MANPAD threat by 3 to 4 times.

  14. Body weight of hypersonic aircraft, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, Mark D.

    1988-01-01

    The load bearing body weight of wing-body and all-body hypersonic aircraft is estimated for a wide variety of structural materials and geometries. Variations of weight with key design and configuration parameters are presented and discussed. Both hot and cool structure approaches are considered in isotropic, organic composite, and metal matrix composite materials; structural shells are sandwich or skin-stringer. Conformal and pillow-tank designs are investigated for the all-body shape. The results identify the most promising hypersonic aircraft body structure design approaches and their weight trends. Geometric definition of vehicle shapes and structural analysis methods are presented in appendices.

  15. Impact of composites on future transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinder, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    In the current environment, new technology must be cost-effective in addition to improving operability. Various approaches have been used to determine the 'hurdle' or 'breakthrough' return that must be achieved to gain customer commitment for a new product or aircraft, or in this case, a new application of the technology. These approaches include return-on-investment, payback period, and addition to net worth. An easily understood figure-of-merit and one used by our airline customers is improvement in direct operating cost per seat-mile. Any new technology must buy its way onto the aircraft through reduction in direct operating cost (DOC).

  16. Aircraft vulnerability analysis by modeling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willers, Cornelius J.; Willers, Maria S.; de Waal, Alta

    2014-10-01

    guidance acceleration and seeker sensitivity. For the purpose of this investigation the aircraft is equipped with conventional pyrotechnic decoy flares and the missile has no counter-countermeasure means (security restrictions on open publication). This complete simulation is used to calculate the missile miss distance, when the missile is launched from different locations around the aircraft. The miss distance data is then graphically presented showing miss distance (aircraft vulnerability) as a function of launch direction and range. The aircraft vulnerability graph accounts for aircraft and missile characteristics, but does not account for missile deployment doctrine. A Bayesian network is constructed to fuse the doctrinal rules with the aircraft vulnerability data. The Bayesian network now provides the capability to evaluate the combined risk of missile launch and aircraft vulnerability. It is shown in this paper that it is indeed possible to predict the aircraft vulnerability to missile attack in a comprehensive modelling and a holistic process. By using the appropriate real-world models, this approach is used to evaluate the effectiveness of specific countermeasure techniques against specific missile threats. The use of a Bayesian network provides the means to fuse simulated performance data with more abstract doctrinal rules to provide a realistic assessment of the aircraft vulnerability.

  17. Predicting visibility of aircraft.

    PubMed

    Watson, Andrew; Ramirez, Cesar V; Salud, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Visual detection of aircraft by human observers is an important element of aviation safety. To assess and ensure safety, it would be useful to be able to be able to predict the visibility, to a human observer, of an aircraft of specified size, shape, distance, and coloration. Examples include assuring safe separation among aircraft and between aircraft and unmanned vehicles, design of airport control towers, and efforts to enhance or suppress the visibility of military and rescue vehicles. We have recently developed a simple metric of pattern visibility, the Spatial Standard Observer (SSO). In this report we examine whether the SSO can predict visibility of simulated aircraft images. We constructed a set of aircraft images from three-dimensional computer graphic models, and measured the luminance contrast threshold for each image from three human observers. The data were well predicted by the SSO. Finally, we show how to use the SSO to predict visibility range for aircraft of arbitrary size, shape, distance, and coloration. PMID:19462007

  18. Predicting Visibility of Aircraft

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Andrew; Ramirez, Cesar V.; Salud, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Visual detection of aircraft by human observers is an important element of aviation safety. To assess and ensure safety, it would be useful to be able to be able to predict the visibility, to a human observer, of an aircraft of specified size, shape, distance, and coloration. Examples include assuring safe separation among aircraft and between aircraft and unmanned vehicles, design of airport control towers, and efforts to enhance or suppress the visibility of military and rescue vehicles. We have recently developed a simple metric of pattern visibility, the Spatial Standard Observer (SSO). In this report we examine whether the SSO can predict visibility of simulated aircraft images. We constructed a set of aircraft images from three-dimensional computer graphic models, and measured the luminance contrast threshold for each image from three human observers. The data were well predicted by the SSO. Finally, we show how to use the SSO to predict visibility range for aircraft of arbitrary size, shape, distance, and coloration. PMID:19462007

  19. Scheduling Aircraft Landings under Constrained Position Shifting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, Hamsa; Chandran, Bala

    2006-01-01

    Optimal scheduling of airport runway operations can play an important role in improving the safety and efficiency of the National Airspace System (NAS). Methods that compute the optimal landing sequence and landing times of aircraft must accommodate practical issues that affect the implementation of the schedule. One such practical consideration, known as Constrained Position Shifting (CPS), is the restriction that each aircraft must land within a pre-specified number of positions of its place in the First-Come-First-Served (FCFS) sequence. We consider the problem of scheduling landings of aircraft in a CPS environment in order to maximize runway throughput (minimize the completion time of the landing sequence), subject to operational constraints such as FAA-specified minimum inter-arrival spacing restrictions, precedence relationships among aircraft that arise either from airline preferences or air traffic control procedures that prevent overtaking, and time windows (representing possible control actions) during which each aircraft landing can occur. We present a Dynamic Programming-based approach that scales linearly in the number of aircraft, and describe our computational experience with a prototype implementation on realistic data for Denver International Airport.

  20. Study of quiet turbofan STOL aircraft for short haul transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, T. P.; Stout, E. G.; Sweet, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    Conceptual designs of Quiet Turbofan STOL Short-Haul Transport Aircraft for the mid-1980 time period are developed and analyzed to determine their technical, operational, and economic feasibility. A matrix of aircraft using various high-lift systems and design parameters are considered. Variations in aircraft characteristics, airport geometry and location, and operational techniques are analyzed systematically to determine their effects on the market, operating economics, and community acceptance. In these studies, the total systems approach is considered to be critically important in analyzing the potential of STOL aircraft to reduce noise pollution and alleviate the increasing air corridor and airport congestion.

  1. A new approach to precise upward and downward continuation and gridding land-based gravity data based on Hessian matrix computation, applied for exploration studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AllahTavakoli, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Precise (upward and downward) continuation and gridding of land-based gravity data require precise information about the all second derivatives of gravity potential field. Approximating Harmonic term of gravity potential and its derivatives and its (upward and downward) continuations in harmonic space can routinely be done by the solution of the involved GBVPs (Geodetic Boundary Value Problems) but it should not be disregarded that the potential has another non-Harmonic term which behavior is not as clear as Harmonic term. The non-Harmonic anomalies are usually ignored in geodetic studies after the topography corrections while they are so important in exploration studies and they have an essential role in detecting earth's mass-density anomalies of the geological structures. The precise continuations and gridding of the gravity data need precise approximating all terms of gravity potential. Hence, the paper presents a methodology for precise approximating complete Hessian Matrix of earth gravity potential (including all Harmonic and non-Harmonic terms). The paper shows that the Hessian matrix can connect the gravity data in each station with the gravity data in the other locations where the gravity data needs to be interpolated or upward continued to. Also, the paper performs an approximating method of all Hessian matrices in all gravity stations. This procedure is simultaneously done with the gridding and the continuations. Herein it is showed that this method can be implemented by least-squares collocation method. Least-squares collocation method needs knowledge about the correlation and cross-correlation matrices, so the Hessian Matrix can be employed to provide the correlation matrices. The author applied the methodology in a case study in coastal Fars of Iran for exploration studies. In the case study, it is required to detect geological salt structures by some land-based gravity data. For this purpose, the method is applied to downward continue the anomaly

  2. Loftin Collection - Boeing Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1933-01-01

    Either a F2B-1 or F3B-1, both aircraft were built by Boeing and both were powered by Pratt and Whitney Wasp engines. These fighters were intended for Navy shipboard use. Boeing F3B-1: While most Boeing F3B-1s served the U. S. Navy aircraft carriers the Lexington and the Saratoga, this example flew in NACA hands at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in the late 1920's. Also known as the Boeing Model 77, the aircraft was the next to last F3B-1 build in November 1928.

  3. OVRhyp, Scramjet Test Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslan, J.; Bisard, T.; Dallinga, S.; Draper, K.; Hufford, G.; Peters, W.; Rogers, J.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary design for an unmanned hypersonic research vehicle to test scramjet engines is presented. The aircraft will be launched from a carrier aircraft at an altitude of 40,000 feet at Mach 0.8. The vehicle will then accelerate to Mach 6 at an altitude of 100,000 feet. At this stage the prototype scramjet will be employed to accelerate the vehicle to Mach 10 and maintain Mach 10 flight for 2 minutes. The aircraft will then decelerate and safely land.

  4. Some fighter aircraft trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, L.

    1985-01-01

    Some basic trends in fighters are traced from the post World II era. Beginning with the first operational jet fighter, the P-80, the characteristics of subsequent fighter aircraft are examined for performance, mission capability, effectiveness, and cost. Characteristics presented include: power loading, wing loading, maximum speed, rate of climb, turn rate, weight and weight distribution, cost and cost distribution. The characteristics of some USSR aircraft are included for comparison. The trends indicate some of the rationale for certain fighter designs and some likely characteristics to be sought in future fighter aircraft designs.

  5. Tropospheric sampling with aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Daum, P.H.; Springston, S.R.

    1991-03-01

    Aircraft constitute a unique environment which places stringent requirements on the instruments used to measure the concentrations of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. Some of these requirements such as minimization of size, weight, and power consumption are general; others are specific to individual techniques. This review presents the basic principles and considerations governing the deployment of trace gas and aerosol instrumentation on an aircraft. An overview of common instruments illustrates these points and provides guidelines for designing and using instruments on aircraft-based measurement programs.

  6. Aircraft compass characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John B; Smith, Clyde W

    1937-01-01

    A description of the test methods used at the National Bureau of Standards for determining the characteristics of aircraft compasses is given. The methods described are particularly applicable to compasses in which mineral oil is used as the damping liquid. Data on the viscosity and density of certain mineral oils used in United States Navy aircraft compasses are presented. Characteristics of Navy aircraft compasses IV to IX and some other compasses are shown for the range of temperatures experienced in flight. Results of flight tests are presented. These results indicate that the characteristic most desired in a steering compass is a short period and, in a check compass, a low overswing.

  7. Microwave imaging of aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Bernard D.

    1988-12-01

    Three methods of imaging aircraft from the ground with microwave radar with quality suitable for aircraft target recognition are described. The imaging methods are based on a self-calibration procedure called adaptive beamforming that compensates for the severe geometric distortion inherent in any imaging system that is large enough to achieve the high angular resolution necessary for two-dimensional target imaging. The signal processing algorithm is described and X-band (3-cm)-wavelength experiments demonstrate its success on commercial aircraft flying into Philadelphia International Airport.

  8. General Models for Assessing Hazards Aircraft Pose to Surface Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    G.E. Ragan

    2002-11-18

    This paper derives formulas for estimating the frequency of accidental aircraft crashes into surface facilities. Objects unintentionally dropped from aircraft are also considered. The approach allows the facility to be well within the flight area; inside the flight area, but close to the edge; or completely outside the flight area.

  9. Application of active controls to civil transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The impact of active controls on civil transport aircraft and some of the complex problems involved are described. The approach taken by NASA as part of the Active Control Technology Program is discussed to integrate active controls in the conceptual design phase. It is shown that when handled correctly, active controls improve aircraft performance.

  10. Considerations of Unmanned Aircraft Classification for Civil Airworthiness Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, Jeffrey M.; Hayhurst, Kelly J.; Morris, A. Terry; Verstynen, Harry A.

    2013-01-01

    The use of unmanned aircraft in the National Airspace System (NAS) has been characterized as the next great step forward in the evolution of civil aviation. Although use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) in military and public service operations is proliferating, civil use of UAS remains limited in the United States today. This report focuses on one particular regulatory challenge: classifying UAS to assign airworthiness standards. Classification is useful for ensuring that meaningful differences in design are accommodated by certification to different standards, and that aircraft with similar risk profiles are held to similar standards. This paper provides observations related to how the current regulations for classifying manned aircraft, based on dimensions of aircraft class and operational aircraft categories, could apply to UAS. This report finds that existing aircraft classes are well aligned with the types of UAS that currently exist; however, the operational categories are more difficult to align to proposed UAS use in the NAS. Specifically, the factors used to group manned aircraft into similar risk profiles do not necessarily capture all relevant UAS risks. UAS classification is investigated through gathering approaches to classification from a broad spectrum of organizations, and then identifying and evaluating the classification factors from these approaches. This initial investigation concludes that factors in addition to those currently used today to group manned aircraft for the purpose of assigning airworthiness standards will be needed to adequately capture risks associated with UAS and their operations.

  11. Predicting Aircraft Noise Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    Computer program developed for predicting aircraft noise levels either in flight or in ground tests. Noise sources include fan inlet and exhaust jet flap (for powered lift), core (combustor), turbine and airframe. Program written in FORTRAN IV.

  12. Aircraft parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.

    1987-01-01

    The aircraft parameter estimation problem is used to illustrate the utility of parameter estimation, which applies to many engineering and scientific fields. Maximum likelihood estimation has been used to extract stability and control derivatives from flight data for many years. This paper presents some of the basic concepts of aircraft parameter estimation and briefly surveys the literature in the field. The maximum likelihood estimator is discussed, and the basic concepts of minimization and estimation are examined for a simple simulated aircraft example. The cost functions that are to be minimized during estimation are defined and discussed. Graphic representations of the cost functions are given to illustrate the minimization process. Finally, the basic concepts are generalized, and estimation from flight data is discussed. Some of the major conclusions for the simulated example are also developed for the analysis of flight data from the F-14, highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT), and space shuttle vehicles.

  13. Aircraft Engine Emissions. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A conference on a aircraft engine emissions was held to present the results of recent and current work. Such diverse areas as components, controls, energy efficient engine designs, and noise and pollution reduction are discussed.

  14. Solar thermal aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2007-09-18

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  15. Aircraft Safety Improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, G.

    1985-01-01

    Fabrication and testing of honeycomb sandwich aircraft panels are discussed. Also described is the use of the following instruments: thermogravimetric analyzer, differential scanning calorimeter, limiting oxygen index, and infrared spectrometer.

  16. Laminar Flow Aircraft Certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Various topics telative to laminar flow aircraft certification are discussed. Boundary layer stability, flaps for laminar flow airfoils, computational wing design studies, manufacturing requirements, windtunnel tests, and flow visualization are among the topics covered.

  17. The Aircraft Morphing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wlezien, R. W.; Horner, G. C.; McGowan, A. R.; Padula, S. L.; Scott, M. A.; Silcox, R. J.; Simpson, J. O.

    1998-01-01

    In the last decade smart technologies have become enablers that cut across traditional boundaries in materials science and engineering. Here we define smart to mean embedded actuation, sensing, and control logic in a tightly coupled feedback loop. While multiple successes have been achieved in the laboratory, we have yet to see the general applicability of smart devices to real aircraft systems. The NASA Aircraft Morphing program is an attempt to couple research across a wide range of disciplines to integrate smart technologies into high payoff aircraft applications. The program bridges research in seven individual disciplines and combines the effort into activities in three primary program thrusts. System studies are used to assess the highest- payoff program objectives, and specific research activities are defined to address the technologies required for development of smart aircraft systems. In this paper we address the overall program goals and programmatic structure, and discuss the challenges associated with bringing the technologies to fruition.

  18. Advanced hypersonic aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utzinger, Rob; Blank, Hans-Joachim; Cox, Craig; Harvey, Greg; Mckee, Mike; Molnar, Dave; Nagy, Greg; Petersen, Steve

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this design project is to develop the hypersonic reconnaissance aircraft to replace the SR-71 and to complement existing intelligence gathering devices. The initial design considerations were to create a manned vehicle which could complete its mission with at least two airborne refuelings. The aircraft must travel between Mach 4 and Mach 7 at an altitude of 80,000 feet for a maximum range of 12,000 nautical miles. The vehicle should have an air breathing propulsion system at cruise. With a crew of two, the aircraft should be able to take off and land on a 10,000 foot runway, and the yearly operational costs were not to exceed $300 million. Finally, the aircraft should exhibit stealth characteristics, including a minimized radar cross-section (RCS) and a reduced sonic boom. The technology used in this vehicle should allow for production between the years 1993 and 1995.

  19. Aircraft of the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeger, S.

    1985-01-01

    Some basic problems connected with attempts to increase the size and capacity of transport aircraft are discussed. According to the square-cubic law, the increase in structural weight is proportional to the third power of the increase in the linear dimensions of the aircraft when geomettric similarity is maintained, while the surface area of the aircraft increases according to the second power. A consequence is that the fraction of useful weight will decrease as aircraft increase in size. However, in flying-wing designs in which the whole load on the wing is proportional to the distribution of lifting forces, the total bending moment on the wing will be sharply reduced, enabling lighter construction. Flying wings may have an ultimate capacity of 3000 passengers.

  20. Depreciation of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P

    1922-01-01

    There is a widespread, and quite erroneous, impression to the effect that aircraft are essentially fragile and deteriorate with great rapidity when in service, so that the depreciation charges to be allowed on commercial or private operation are necessarily high.

  1. CID Aircraft slap-down

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    , 1984, more than four years of effort passed trying to set-up final impact conditions considered survivable by the FAA. During those years while 14 flights with crews were flown the following major efforts were underway: NASA Dryden developed the remote piloting techniques necessary for the B-720 to fly as a drone aircraft; General Electric installed and tested four degraders (one on each engine); and the FAA refined AMK (blending, testing, and fueling a full-size aircraft). The 15 flights had 15 takeoffs, 14 landings and a larger number of approaches to about 150 feet above the prepared crash site under remote control. These flight were used to introduce AMK one step at a time into some of the fuel tanks and engines while monitoring the performance of the engines. On the final flight (No. 15) with no crew, all fuel tanks were filled with a total of 76,000 pounds of AMK and the remotely-piloted aircraft landed on Rogers Dry Lakebed in an area prepared with posts to test the effectiveness of the AMK in a controlled impact. The CID, which some wags called the Crash in the Desert, was spectacular with a large fireball enveloping and burning the B-720 aircraft. From the standpoint of AMK the test was a major set-back, but for NASA Langley, the data collected on crashworthiness was deemed successful and just as important.

  2. NASA's Research in Aircraft Vulnerability Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Cheryl L.

    2005-01-01

    Since its inception in 1958, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) role in civil aeronautics has been to develop high-risk, high-payoff technologies to meet critical national aviation challenges. Following the events of Sept. 11, 2001, NASA recognized that it now shared the responsibility for improving homeland security. The NASA Strategic Plan was modified to include requirements to enable a more secure air transportation system by investing in technologies and collaborating with other agencies, industry, and academia. NASA is conducting research to develop and advance innovative and commercially viable technologies that will reduce the vulnerability of aircraft to threats or hostile actions, and identify and inform users of potential vulnerabilities in a timely manner. Presented in this paper are research plans and preliminary status for mitigating the effects of damage due to direct attacks on civil transport aircraft. The NASA approach to mitigation includes: preventing loss of an aircraft due to a hit from man-portable air defense systems; developing fuel system technologies that prevent or minimize in-flight vulnerability to small arms or other projectiles; providing protection from electromagnetic energy attacks by detecting directed energy threats to aircraft and on/off-board systems; and minimizing the damage due to high-energy attacks (explosions and fire) by developing advanced lightweight, damage-resistant composites and structural concepts. An approach to preventing aircraft from being used as weapons of mass destruction will also be discussed.

  3. Alternative jet aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Potential changes in jet aircraft fuel specifications due to shifts in supply and quality of refinery feedstocks are discussed with emphasis on the effects these changes would have on the performance and durability of aircraft engines and fuel systems. Combustion characteristics, fuel thermal stability, and fuel pumpability at low temperature are among the factors considered. Combustor and fuel system technology needs for broad specification fuels are reviewed including prevention of fuel system fouling and fuel system technology for fuels with higher freezing points.

  4. ANALYSIS OF AIRCRAFT MOTIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed by Ames Research Center, in cooperation with the National Transportation Safety Board, as a technique for deriving time histories of an aircraft's motion from Air Traffic Control (ATC) radar records. This technique uses the radar range and azimuth data, along with the downlinked altitude data, to derive an expanded set of data which includes airspeed, lift, attitude angles (pitch, roll, and heading), etc. This technique should prove useful as a source of data in the investigation of commercial airline accidents and in the analysis of accidents involving aircraft which do not have onboard data recorders (e.g., military, short-haul, and general aviation). The technique used to determine the aircraft motions involves smoothing of raw radar data. These smoothed results, in combination with other available information (wind profiles and aircraft performance data), are used to derive the expanded set of data. This program uses a cubic least-square fit to smooth the raw data. This moving-arc procedure provides a smoothed time history of the aircraft position, the inertial velocities, and accelerations. Using known winds, these inertial data are transformed to aircraft stability axes to provide true airspeed, thrust-drag, lift, and roll angle. Further derivation, based on aircraft dependent performance data, can determine the aircraft angle of attack, pitch, and heading angle. Results of experimental tests indicate that values derived from ATC radar records using this technique agree favorably with airborne measurements. This program is written in FORTRAN IV to be executed in the batch mode, and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of 64k (octal) of 60 bit words.

  5. Evaluation of the relative precision of space-geodetic techniques at ITRF co-located sites with the Three Corner Hat approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbondanza, C.; Chin, T. M.; Gross, R. S.; Heflin, M. B.; Wu, X.

    2012-04-01

    The International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) is a linear reference frame consisting of regularized positions and velocities for a set of global stations. It relies on the combination of station positions, velocities and Earth orientation parameters (EOPs) acquired by GPS, VLBI, SLR and DORIS at co-located sites. To properly combine the individual reference frames and suitably scale the variance-covariance information from the 4 space-geodetic solutions, an a-priori knowledge of the relative precisions of the four techniques is mandatory. In this study, focusing on the station position time series derived from GNSS, VLBI, SLR and DORIS at ITRF co-locations, we aim at assessing the relative uncertainty of the co-located space geodetic instruments contributing to ITRF. The investigation relies on the idea of pair-wise differencing station position time series of at least three co-located instruments in order to remove common geophysical signals. By computing the variances of the differenced time series, the relative precision of each time series can be recovered with the Three Corner Hat technique, under the assumption of absence of correlation between the noise processes of the different techniques. Results of the Three Corner Hat analysis of co-located station position time series will be presented.

  6. SMACK - SMOOTHING FOR AIRCRAFT KINEMATICS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bach, R.

    1994-01-01

    The computer program SMACK (SMoothing for AirCraft Kinematics) is designed to provide flightpath reconstruction of aircraft forces and motions from measurements that are noisy or incomplete. Additionally, SMACK provides a check on instrument accuracy and data consistency. The program can be used to analyze data from flight-test experiments prior to their use in performance, stability and control, or aerodynamic modeling calculations. It can also be used in the analysis of aircraft accidents, where the actual forces and motions may have to be determined from a very limited data set. Application of a state-estimation method for flightpath reconstruction is possible because aircraft forces and motions are related by well-known equations of motion. The task of postflight state estimation is known as a nonlinear, fixed-interval smoothing problem. SMACK utilizes a backward-filter, forward-smoother algorithm to solve the problem. The equations of motion are used to produce estimates that are compared with their corresponding measurement time histories. The procedure is iterative, providing improved state estimates until a minimum squared-error measure is achieved. In the SMACK program, the state and measurement models together represent a finite-difference approximation for the six-degree-of-freedom dynamics of a rigid body. The models are used to generate time histories which are likely to be found in a flight-test measurement set. These include onboard variables such as Euler angles, angular rates, and linear accelerations as well as tracking variables such as slant range, bearing, and elevation. Any bias or scale-factor errors associated with the state or measurement models are appended to the state vector and treated as constant but unknown parameters. The SMACK documentation covers the derivation of the solution algorithm, describes the state and measurement models, and presents several application examples that should help the analyst recognize the potential

  7. Precision Efficacy Analysis for Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Gordon P.

    When multiple linear regression is used to develop a prediction model, sample size must be large enough to ensure stable coefficients. If the derivation sample size is inadequate, the model may not predict well for future subjects. The precision efficacy analysis for regression (PEAR) method uses a cross- validity approach to select sample sizes…

  8. Airworthiness criteria development for powered-lift aircraft: A program summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffley, R. K.; Stapleford, R. L.; Rumold, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    A four-year simulation program to develop airworthiness criteria for powered-lift aircraft is summarized. All flight phases affected by use of powered lift (approach, landing, takeoff) are treated with regard to airworthiness problem areas (limiting flight conditions and safety margins: stability, control, and performance; and systems failure). The general features of powered-lift aircraft are compared to conventional aircraft.

  9. A new approach to detect local correlations of tropospheric acetone and carbon monoxide sampled onboard the IAGOS-CARIBIC passenger aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischbeck, Garlich; Neumaier, Marco; Safadi, Layal; Zahn, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Since 2005 a Lufthansa passenger aircraft is regularly used as a platform for in-situ measurements in the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere (UTLMS). Accommodated in a modified airfreight container 15 instruments are deployed in the cargo bay of the aircraft on four selected intercontinental flights per month measuring ~100 species and aerosol parameters. In contrast to other projects of this scope, using a chemical mass spectrometer also volatile organic compounds like acetone (CH3COCH3) and acetonitrile (CH3CN) are detected enabling an investigation of their relationship with other tracers. On a global scale acetone is predominantly emitted from the biosphere (~37 Tg/a; MEGAN-MACC, Sinderarova et al. 2014) and comparably small amounts are directly emitted from biomass burning (~2 Tg/a; GFED3, Van der Werf et al. 2010) and other anthropogenic sources (~1 Tg/a; MACCity, Granier et al. 2011). However, at local levels the contributions from the different sources can strongly differ. Acetone is also secondarily produced in the atmosphere by the oxidation of various precursors, e.g. pinene and propane. The emissions of these precursors and their contribution to the total acetone source are not well known and a topic of ongoing discussions. In this context it is initially surprising that generally a good correlation between acetone and carbon monoxide (CO) has been observed in the lower atmosphere by different authors (e.g. de Reus et al. 2003). As a product of incomplete combustion CO is regularly used as a tracer for anthropogenic pollution and biomass burning. In this study we present an improved method to detect local correlations in IAGOS-CARIBIC flights instead of mixing data from different flights or measured over great distances. Furthermore, a cluster analysis is applied to prevent the consideration of artificial correlations between two well separated clouds of data points. We use the concept of enhancement ratios (EnR) and a simple box model to

  10. Aircraft sensor analysis package system description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. L.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of the capabilities of the Aircraft Sensor Analysis Package (ASAP) is presented. The approach is non-technical, and several output products are illustrated. The major features of the system are described in more detail than is found in the User's Guide to a potential user, or to a user looking for a specific capability to be incorporated in another system.

  11. Simulation Packages Expand Aircraft Design Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    In 2001, NASA released a new approach to computational fluid dynamics that allows users to perform automated analysis on complex vehicle designs. In 2010, Palo Alto, California-based Desktop Aeronautics acquired a license from Ames Research Center to sell the technology. Today, the product assists organizations in the design of subsonic aircraft, space planes, spacecraft, and high speed commercial jets.

  12. 150 Passenger Commercial Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucovsky, Adrian; Romli, Fairuz I.; Rupp, Jessica

    2002-01-01

    It has been projected that the need for a short-range mid-sized, aircraft is increasing. The future strategy to decrease long-haul flights will increase the demand for short-haul flights. Since passengers prefer to meet their destinations quickly, airlines will increase the frequency of flights, which will reduce the passenger load on the aircraft. If a point-to-point flight is not possible, passengers will prefer only a one-stop short connecting flight to their final destination. A 150-passenger aircraft is an ideal vehicle for these situations. It is mid-sized aircraft and has a range of 3000 nautical miles. This type of aircraft would market U.S. domestic flights or inter-European flight routes. The objective of the design of the 150-passenger aircraft is to minimize fuel consumption. The configuration of the aircraft must be optimized. This aircraft must meet CO2 and NOx emissions standards with minimal acquisition price and operating costs. This report contains all the work that has been performed for the completion of the design of a 150 passenger commercial aircraft. The methodology used is the Technology Identification, Evaluation, and Selection (TIES) developed at Georgia Tech Aerospace Systems Design laboratory (ASDL). This is an eight-step conceptual design process to evaluate the probability of meeting the design constraints. This methodology also allows for the evaluation of new technologies to be implemented into the design. The TIES process begins with defining the problem with a need established and a market targeted. With the customer requirements set and the target values established, a baseline concept is created. Next, the design space is explored to determine the feasibility and viability of the baseline aircraft configuration. If the design is neither feasible nor viable, new technologies can be implemented to open up the feasible design space and allow for a plausible solution. After the new technologies are identified, they must be evaluated

  13. Approaches for achieving long-term accuracy and precision of δ18O and δ2H for waters analyzed using laser absorption spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Wassenaar, Leonard I; Coplen, Tyler B; Aggarwal, Pradeep K

    2014-01-21

    The measurement of δ(2)H and δ(18)O in water samples by laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) are adopted increasingly in hydrologic and environmental studies. Although LAS instrumentation is easy to use, its incorporation into laboratory operations is not as easy, owing to extensive offline data manipulation required for outlier detection, derivation and application of algorithms to correct for between-sample memory, correcting for linear and nonlinear instrumental drift, VSMOW-SLAP scale normalization, and in maintaining long-term QA/QC audits. Here we propose a series of standardized water-isotope LAS performance tests and routine sample analysis templates, recommended procedural guidelines, and new data processing software (LIMS for Lasers) that altogether enables new and current LAS users to achieve and sustain long-term δ(2)H and δ(18)O accuracy and precision for these important isotopic assays. PMID:24328223

  14. An Approach to Precise Nitrogen Management Using Hand-Held Crop Sensor Measurements and Winter Wheat Yield Mapping in a Mediterranean Environment

    PubMed Central

    Quebrajo, Lucía; Pérez-Ruiz, Manuel; Rodriguez-Lizana, Antonio; Agüera, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Regardless of the crop production system, nutrients inputs must be controlled at or below a certain economic threshold to achieve an acceptable level of profitability. The use of management zones and variable-rate fertilizer applications is gaining popularity in precision agriculture. Many researchers have evaluated the application of final yield maps and geo-referenced geophysical measurements (e.g., apparent soil electrical conductivity-ECa) as a method of establishing relatively homogeneous management zones within the same plot. Yield estimation models based on crop conditions at certain growth stages, soil nutrient statuses, agronomic factors, moisture statuses, and weed/pest pressures are a primary goal in precision agriculture. This study attempted to achieve the following objectives: (1) to investigate the potential for predicting winter wheat yields using vegetation measurements (the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index—NDVI) at the beginning of the season, thereby allowing for a yield response to nitrogen (N) fertilizer; and (2) evaluate the feasibility of using inexpensive optical sensor measurements in a Mediterranean environment. A field experiment was conducted in two commercial wheat fields near Seville, in southwestern Spain. Yield data were collected at harvest using a yield monitoring system (RDS Ceres II-volumetric meter) installed on a combine. Wheat yield and NDVI values of 3498 ± 481 kg ha−1 and 0.67 ± 0.04 nm nm−1 (field 1) and 3221 ± 531 kg ha−1 and 0.68 ± 0.05 nm nm−1 (field 2) were obtained. In both fields, the yield and NDVI exhibited a strong Pearson correlation, with rxy = 0.64 and p < 10−4 in field 1 and rxy = 0.78 and p < 10−4 in field 2. The preliminary results indicate that hand-held crop sensor-based N management can be applied to wheat production in Spain and has the potential to increase agronomic N-use efficiency on a long-term basis. PMID:25756861

  15. Evaluation of Airborne Precision Spacing in a Human-in-the-Loop Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Abbott, Terence S.; Capron, William R.

    2005-01-01

    A significant bottleneck in the current air traffic system occurs at the runway. Expanding airports and adding new runways will help solve this problem; however, this comes with significant costs: financially, politically and environmentally. A complementary solution is to safely increase the capacity of current runways. This can be achieved by precisely spacing aircraft at the runway threshold, with a resulting reduction in the spacing bu er required under today s operations. At NASA's Langley Research Center, the Airspace Systems program has been investigating airborne technologies and procedures that will assist the flight crew in achieving precise spacing behind another aircraft. A new spacing clearance allows the pilot to follow speed cues from a new on-board guidance system called Airborne Merging and Spacing for Terminal Arrivals (AMSTAR). AMSTAR receives Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) reports from an assigned, leading aircraft and calculates the appropriate speed for the ownship to fly to achieve the desired spacing interval, time- or distance-based, at the runway threshold. Since the goal is overall system capacity, the speed guidance algorithm is designed to provide system-wide benefits and stability to a string of arriving aircraft. An experiment was recently performed at the NASA Langley Air Traffic Operations Laboratory (ATOL) to test the flexibility of Airborne Precision Spacing operations under a variety of operational conditions. These included several types of merge and approach geometries along with the complementary merging and in-trail operations. Twelve airline pilots and four controllers participated in this simulation. Performance and questionnaire data were collected from a total of eighty-four individual arrivals. The pilots were able to achieve precise spacing with a mean error of 0.5 seconds and a standard deviation of 4.7 seconds. No statistically significant di erences in spacing performance were found between in

  16. Aerodynamic design trends for commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbig, R.; Koerner, H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent research on advanced-configuration commercial aircraft at DFVLR is surveyed, with a focus on aerodynamic approaches to improved performance. Topics examined include transonic wings with variable camber or shock/boundary-layer control, wings with reduced friction drag or laminarized flow, prop-fan propulsion, and unusual configurations or wing profiles. Drawings, diagrams, and graphs of predicted performance are provided, and the need for extensive development efforts using powerful computer facilities, high-speed and low-speed wind tunnels, and flight tests of models (mounted on specially designed carrier aircraft) is indicated.

  17. Offsite radiological consequence analysis for the bounding aircraft crash accident

    SciTech Connect

    OBERG, B.D.

    2003-03-22

    The purpose of this calculation note is to quantitatively analyze a bounding aircraft crash accident for comparison to the DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'', Appendix A, Evaluation Guideline of 25 rem. The potential of aircraft impacting a facility was evaluated using the approach given in DOE-STD-3014-96, ''Accident Analysis for Aircraft Crash into Hazardous Facilities''. The following aircraft crash frequencies were determined for the Tank Farms in RPP-11736, ''Assessment Of Aircraft Crash Frequency For The Hanford Site 200 Area Tank Farms'': (1) The total aircraft crash frequency is ''extremely unlikely.'' (2) The general aviation crash frequency is ''extremely unlikely.'' (3) The helicopter crash frequency is ''beyond extremely unlikely.'' (4) For the Hanford Site 200 Areas, other aircraft type, commercial or military, each above ground facility, and any other type of underground facility is ''beyond extremely unlikely.'' As the potential of aircraft crash into the 200 Area tank farms is more frequent than ''beyond extremely unlikely,'' consequence analysis of the aircraft crash is required.

  18. Nonclassical Flight Control for Unhealthy Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ping

    1997-01-01

    This research set out to investigate flight control of aircraft which has sustained damage in regular flight control effectors, due to jammed control surfaces or complete loss of hydraulic power. It is recognized that in such an extremely difficult situation unconventional measures may need to be taken to regain control and stability of the aircraft. Propulsion controlled aircraft (PCA) concept, initiated at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. represents a ground-breaking effort in this direction. In this approach, the engine is used as the only flight control effector in the rare event of complete loss of normal flight control system. Studies and flight testing conducted at NASA Dryden have confirmed the feasibility of the PCA concept. During the course of this research (March 98, 1997 to November 30, 1997), a comparative study has been done using the full nonlinear model of an F-18 aircraft. Linear controllers and nonlinear controllers based on a nonlinear predictive control method have been designed for normal flight control system and propulsion controlled aircraft. For the healthy aircraft with normal flight control, the study shows that an appropriately designed linear controller can perform as well as a nonlinear controller. On the other hand. when the normal flight control is lost and the engine is the only available means of flight control, a nonlinear PCA controller can significantly increase the size of the recoverable region in which the stability of the unstable aircraft can be attained by using only thrust modulation. The findings and controller design methods have been summarized in an invited paper entitled.

  19. Precise Countersinking Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Eric S.; Smith, William N.

    1992-01-01

    Tool countersinks holes precisely with only portable drill; does not require costly machine tool. Replaceable pilot stub aligns axis of tool with centerline of hole. Ensures precise cut even with imprecise drill. Designed for relatively low cutting speeds.

  20. Longitudinal Handling Qualities of the Tu-144LL Airplane and Comparisons With Other Large, Supersonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Timothy H.; Marshall, Alisa

    2000-01-01

    Four flights have been conducted using the Tu-144LL supersonic transport aircraft with the dedicated objective of collecting quantitative data and qualitative pilot comments. These data are compared with the following longitudinal flying qualities criteria: Neal-Smith, short-period damping, time delay, control anticipation parameter, phase delay (omega(sp)*T(theta(2))), pitch bandwidth as a function of time delay, and flight path as a function of pitch bandwidth. Determining the applicability of these criteria and gaining insight into the flying qualities of a large, supersonic aircraft are attempted. Where appropriate, YF-12, XB-70, and SR-71 pilot ratings are compared with the Tu-144LL results to aid in the interpretation of the Tu-144LL data and to gain insight into the application of criteria. The data show that approach and landing requirements appear to be applicable to the precision flightpath control required for up-and-away flight of large, supersonic aircraft. The Neal-Smith, control anticipation parameter, and pitch-bandwidth criteria tend to correlate with the pilot comments better than the phase delay criterion, omega(sp)*T(theta(2)). The data indicate that the detrimental flying qualities implication of decoupled pitch-attitude and flightpath responses occurring for high-speed flight may be mitigated by requiring the pilot to close the loop on flightpath or vertical speed.

  1. Precision protection through indirect correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yao

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of the quantum Fisher information of the parameters of the initial atomic state is studied, in the framework of open quantum systems, for a pair of static two-level atoms coupled to a bath of fluctuating vacuum scalar fields. Our results show that the correlations between the two atoms as well as the precision limit in quantum metrology are determined by the separation between the two atoms. Remarkably, when the separation between the two atoms approaches zero, the quantum Fisher information, thus the precision limit of the estimation of the parameters of the initial atomic state will be survived from the vacuum fluctuations after long time evolution.

  2. Advanced fuel system technology for utilizing broadened property aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reck, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    Possible changes in fuel properties are identified based on current trends and projections. The effect of those changes with respect to the aircraft fuel system are examined and some technological approaches to utilizing those fuels are described.

  3. Technology Advancements Enhance Aircraft Support of Experiment Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vachon, Jacques J.

    2009-01-01

    For over 30 years, the NASA Airborne Science Program has provided airborne platforms for space bound instrument development, for calibrating new and existing satellite systems, and for making in situ and remote sensing measurements that can only be made from aircraft. New technologies have expanded the capabilities of aircraft that are operated for these missions. Over the last several years a new technology investment portfolio has yielded improvements that produce better measurements for the airborne science communities. These new technologies include unmanned vehicles, precision trajectory control and advanced telecommunications capabilities. We will discuss some of the benefits of these new technologies and systems which aim to provide users with more precision, lower operational costs, quicker access to data, and better management of multi aircraft and multi sensor campaigns.

  4. Pathfinder Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Pathfinder research aircraft's wing structure was clearly defined as it soared under a clear blue sky during a test flight July 27, 1995, from Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The center section and outer wing panels of the aircraft had ribs constructed of thin plastic foam, while the ribs in the inner wing panels are fabricated from lightweight composite material. Developed by AeroVironment, Inc., the Pathfinder was one of several unmanned aircraft being evaluated under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long- duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar- powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus

  5. Pathfinder aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Pathfinder research aircraft's wing structure was clearly defined as it soared under a clear blue sky during a test flight July 27, 1995, from Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The center section and outer wing panels of the aircraft had ribs constructed of thin plastic foam, while the ribs in the inner wing panels are fabricated from lightweight composite material. Developed by AeroVironment, Inc., the Pathfinder was one of several unmanned aircraft being evaluated under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus

  6. "Precision" drug development?

    PubMed

    Woodcock, J

    2016-02-01

    The concept of precision medicine has entered broad public consciousness, spurred by a string of targeted drug approvals, highlighted by the availability of personal gene sequences, and accompanied by some remarkable claims about the future of medicine. It is likely that precision medicines will require precision drug development programs. What might such programs look like? PMID:26331240

  7. Precision agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision agriculture is a new farming practice that has been developing since late 1980s. It has been variously referred to as precision farming, prescription farming, site-specific crop management, to name but a few. There are numerous definitions for precision agriculture, but the central concept...

  8. High temperature aircraft research furnace facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James E., Jr.; Cashon, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Focus is on the design, fabrication, and development of the High Temperature Aircraft Research Furnace Facilities (HTARFF). The HTARFF was developed to process electrically conductive materials with high melting points in a low gravity environment. The basic principle of operation is to accurately translate a high temperature arc-plasma gas front as it orbits around a cylindrical sample, thereby making it possible to precisely traverse the entire surface of a sample. The furnace utilizes the gas-tungsten-arc-welding (GTAW) process, also commonly referred to as Tungsten-Inert-Gas (TIG). The HTARFF was developed to further research efforts in the areas of directional solidification, float-zone processing, welding in a low-gravity environment, and segregation effects in metals. The furnace is intended for use aboard the NASA-JSC Reduced Gravity Program KC-135A Aircraft.

  9. Aircraft noise synthesis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccurdy, David A.; Grandle, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    A second-generation Aircraft Noise Synthesis System has been developed to provide test stimuli for studies of community annoyance to aircraft flyover noise. The computer-based system generates realistic, time-varying, audio simulations of aircraft flyover noise at a specified observer location on the ground. The synthesis takes into account the time-varying aircraft position relative to the observer; specified reference spectra consisting of broadband, narrowband, and pure-tone components; directivity patterns; Doppler shift; atmospheric effects; and ground effects. These parameters can be specified and controlled in such a way as to generate stimuli in which certain noise characteristics, such as duration or tonal content, are independently varied, while the remaining characteristics, such as broadband content, are held constant. The system can also generate simulations of the predicted noise characteristics of future aircraft. A description of the synthesis system and a discussion of the algorithms and methods used to generate the simulations are provided. An appendix describing the input data and providing user instructions is also included.

  10. High altitude reconnaissance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yazdo, Renee Anna; Moller, David

    1990-01-01

    At the equator the ozone layer ranges from 65,000 to 130,000 plus feet, which is beyond the capabilities of the ER-2, NASA's current high altitude reconnaissance aircraft. The Universities Space Research Association, in cooperation with NASA, is sponsoring an undergraduate program which is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer at the equator. This aircraft must be able to cruise at 130,000 feet for six hours at Mach 0.7, while carrying 3,000 lbs. of payload. In addition, the aircraft must have a minimum range of 6,000 miles. In consideration of the novel nature of this project, the pilot must be able to take control in the event of unforeseen difficulties. Three aircraft configurations were determined to be the most suitable - a joined-wing, a biplane, and a twin-boom conventional airplane. The performance of each configuration was analyzed to investigate the feasibility of the project.

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF AIRCRAFT HAZARDS

    SciTech Connect

    K.L. Ashley

    2005-03-23

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in the ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2004, Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based on limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and on crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987, Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. NUREG-0800 is being used here as a reference because some of the same considerations apply. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of the identified aircraft hazards based on the criteria that apply to Category 1 and 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 (see Section 4). The scope of this technical report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the MGR at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (see Section 7).

  12. Identification of Aircraft Hazards

    SciTech Connect

    K. Ashley

    2006-12-08

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174235], Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based upon limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and upon crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a monitored geologic repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain, using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987 [DIRS 103124], Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of identified aircraft hazards based upon the criteria that apply to Category 1 and Category 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 [DIRS 176544] (Section 4). The scope of this report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the repository at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (Section 7).

  13. Aircraft Operations Classification System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlow, Charles; Zhu, Weihong

    2001-01-01

    Accurate data is important in the aviation planning process. In this project we consider systems for measuring aircraft activity at airports. This would include determining the type of aircraft such as jet, helicopter, single engine, and multiengine propeller. Some of the issues involved in deploying technologies for monitoring aircraft operations are cost, reliability, and accuracy. In addition, the system must be field portable and acceptable at airports. A comparison of technologies was conducted and it was decided that an aircraft monitoring system should be based upon acoustic technology. A multimedia relational database was established for the study. The information contained in the database consists of airport information, runway information, acoustic records, photographic records, a description of the event (takeoff, landing), aircraft type, and environmental information. We extracted features from the time signal and the frequency content of the signal. A multi-layer feed-forward neural network was chosen as the classifier. Training and testing results were obtained. We were able to obtain classification results of over 90 percent for training and testing for takeoff events.

  14. Aircraft control position indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Dale V. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An aircraft control position indicator was provided that displayed the degree of deflection of the primary flight control surfaces and the manner in which the aircraft responded. The display included a vertical elevator dot/bar graph meter display for indication whether the aircraft will pitch up or down, a horizontal aileron dot/bar graph meter display for indicating whether the aircraft will roll to the left or to the right, and a horizontal dot/bar graph meter display for indicating whether the aircraft will turn left or right. The vertical and horizontal display or displays intersect to form an up/down, left/right type display. Internal electronic display driver means received signals from transducers measuring the control surface deflections and determined the position of the meter indicators on each dot/bar graph meter display. The device allows readability at a glance, easy visual perception in sunlight or shade, near-zero lag in displaying flight control position, and is not affected by gravitational or centrifugal forces.

  15. Rapid measurement of emissions from military aircraft turbine engines by downstream extractive sampling of aircraft on the ground: Results for C-130 and F-15 aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, Chester W.; Holdren, Michael W.; Cowen, Kenneth A.; Joseph, Darrell W.; Satola, Jan; Goodwin, Bradley; Mayfield, Howard; Laskin, Alexander; Lizabeth Alexander, M.; Ortega, John V.; Newburn, Matthew; Kagann, Robert; Hashmonay, Ram

    Aircraft emissions affect air quality on scales from local to global. More than 20% of the jet fuel used in the U.S. is consumed by military aircraft, and emissions from this source are facing increasingly stringent environmental regulations, so improved methods for quickly and accurately determining emissions from existing and new engines are needed. This paper reports results of a study to advance the methods used for detailed characterization of military aircraft emissions, and provides emission factors for two aircraft: the F-15 fighter and the C-130 cargo plane. The measurements involved outdoor ground-level sampling downstream behind operational military aircraft. This permits rapid change-out of the aircraft so that engines can be tested quickly on operational aircraft. Measurements were made at throttle settings from idle to afterburner using a simple extractive probe in the dilute exhaust. Emission factors determined using this approach agree very well with those from the traditional method of extractive sampling at the exhaust exit. Emission factors are reported for CO 2, CO, NO, NO x, and more than 60 hazardous and/or reactive organic gases. Particle size, mass and composition also were measured and are being reported separately. Comparison of the emissions of nine hazardous air pollutants from these two engines with emissions from nine other aircraft engines is discussed.

  16. Allowable response delay for large aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, R. T.; Tingas, S. A.; Grantham, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    The degree of permissible time delay in an airliner flight control system is presently sought by means of a pilot-in-the-loop moving base flight simulator, assuming the characteristics of an advanced L-1011 aircraft variant. Test pilots and engineers from the U.S. Navy, the airliner manufacturer, and NASA Langley were used in a task which encompassed approach and landing after recovery from offsets in localizer and glide slope, during calm, turbulent, and cross-wind conditions. The data obtained in the course of 279 runs included statistics on pilot workload and performance as well as pilot opinion. Preliminary results indicate that requirements for a 0.1-sec maximum delay in aircraft response are excessively conservative for large aircraft, where an offset landing maneuver is the critical design task. Lateral axis delays appear to be more critical than longitudinal ones.

  17. UAS remote sensing for precision agriculture: An independent assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) are recognized as potentially important remote-sensing platforms for precision agriculture. However, research is required to determine which sensors and data processing methods are required to use sUAS in an efficient and cost-effective manner. Oregon State U...

  18. Detection of nitrogen deficiency in potatoes using unmanned aircraft systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) are recognized as potentially important remote-sensing platforms for precision agriculture. We set up a nitrogen rate experiment in 2013 with ‘Ranger Russet’ potatoes by applying four rates of nitrogen fertilizer (112, 224, 337, and 449 kg N/ha) in a randomized...

  19. A new general approach for solving the self-calibration problem on large area 2D ultra-precision coordinate measurement machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekberg, Peter; Stiblert, Lars; Mattsson, Lars

    2014-05-01

    The manufacturing of flat panel displays requires a number of photomasks for the placement of pixel patterns and supporting transistor arrays. For large area photomasks, dedicated ultra-precision writers have been developed for the production of these chromium patterns on glass or quartz plates. The dimensional tolerances in X and Y for absolute pattern placement on these plates, with areas measured in square meters, are in the range of 200-300 nm (3σ). To verify these photomasks, 2D ultra-precision coordinate measurement machines are used having even tighter tolerance requirements. This paper will present how the world standard metrology tool used for verifying large masks, the Micronic Mydata MMS15000, is calibrated without any other references than the wavelength of the interferometers in an extremely well-controlled temperature environment. This process is called self-calibration and is the only way to calibrate the metrology tool, as no square-meter-sized large area 2D traceable artifact is available. The only parameter that cannot be found using self-calibration is the absolute length scale. To make the MMS15000 traceable, a 1D reference rod, calibrated at a national metrology lab, is used. The reference plates used in the calibration of the MMS15000 may have sizes up to 1 m2 and a weight of 50 kg. Therefore, standard methods for self-calibration on a small scale with exact placements cannot be used in the large area case. A new, more general method had to be developed for the purpose of calibrating the MMS15000. Using this method, it is possible to calibrate the measurement tool down to an uncertainty level of <90 nm (3σ) over an area of (0.8 × 0.8) m2. The method used, which is based on the concept of iteration, does not introduce any more noise than the random noise introduced by the measurements, resulting in the lowest possible noise level that can be achieved by any self-calibration method.

  20. An approach to precise nitrogen management using hand-held crop sensor measurements and winter wheat yield mapping in a Mediterranean environment.

    PubMed

    Quebrajo, Lucía; Pérez-Ruiz, Manuel; Rodriguez-Lizana, Antonio; Agüera, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Regardless of the crop production system, nutrients inputs must be controlled at or below a certain economic threshold to achieve an acceptable level of profitability. The use of management zones and variable-rate fertilizer applications is gaining popularity in precision agriculture. Many researchers have evaluated the application of final yield maps and geo-referenced geophysical measurements (e.g., apparent soil electrical conductivity-ECa) as a method of establishing relatively homogeneous management zones within the same plot. Yield estimation models based on crop conditions at certain growth stages, soil nutrient statuses, agronomic factors, moisture statuses, and weed/pest pressures are a primary goal in precision agriculture. This study attempted to achieve the following objectives: (1) to investigate the potential for predicting winter wheat yields using vegetation measurements (the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index-NDVI) at the beginning of the season, thereby allowing for a yield response to nitrogen (N) fertilizer; and (2) evaluate the feasibility of using inexpensive optical sensor measurements in a Mediterranean environment. A field experiment was conducted in two commercial wheat fields near Seville, in southwestern Spain. Yield data were collected at harvest using a yield monitoring system (RDS Ceres II-volumetric meter) installed on a combine. Wheat yield and NDVI values of 3498 ± 481 kg ha(-1) and 0.67 ± 0.04 nm nm(-1) (field 1) and 3221 ± 531 kg ha(-1) and 0.68 ± 0.05 nm nm(-1) (field 2) were obtained. In both fields, the yield and NDVI exhibited a strong Pearson correlation, with r(xy) = 0.64 and p < 10(-4) in field 1 and r(xy) = 0.78 and p < 10(-4) in field 2. The preliminary results indicate that hand-held crop sensor-based N management can be applied to wheat production in Spain and has the potential to increase agronomic N-use efficiency on a long-term basis. PMID:25756861

  1. Civil aircraft. [composite materials for airframes and engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, N. J.

    1974-01-01

    This study deals with aircraft material and structural requirements, advantages of composites, airframe and engine applications, design procedures, problem areas, and future trends in civil aircraft. The selection of materials and design of structure for any given component or part must be made not only on the basis of the mechanical and structural functions, but must also consider the operational and cost parameters for civil aircraft. Composites have caused the orientation to shift from a metal-based philosophy for design, where only incremental improvements could be anticipated, to one where substantial changes in design approaches are possible. Future designs are likely to include a combination of new approaches and composite materials.

  2. Aircraft icing instrumentation: Unfilled needs. [rotary wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitchens, P. F.

    1980-01-01

    A list of icing instrumentation requirements are presented. Because of the Army's helicopter orientation, many of the suggestions are specific to rotary wing aircraft; however, some of the instrumentation are also suitable for general aviation aircraft.

  3. AIRTV: Broadband Direct to Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorbello, R.; Stone, R.; Bennett, S. B.; Bertenyi, E.

    2002-01-01

    over the poles. The system consists of a constellation of 4 geostationary satellites covering the earth and delivering its signals to the aircraft at S band (2.52 -2.67 GHz). The S-band spectrum is ideal for this application since it is allocated on a primary basis by the ITU for global broadcast service. The AirTV service is expected to begin in 2004 and should be unencumbered by adjacent satellite interference due to near completion of the ITU coordination process. Each satellite will deliver four 20 Mbps QPSK data streams consisting of multiplexed compressed digital video channels and IP data over the full global beam coverage. The 80 Mbps capacity of each satellite will provide approximately 60 video channels while still allocating 40 Mbits to data services. The combined constellation capacity of 320 Mbits will significantly exceed the capacity of any similar existing or currently planned global satellite system. In addition, the simplicity of the 4-satellite approach is the most cost effective means to deliver high bandwidth globally. Return links, which are required for internet service, will be provided through the existing Inmarsat Aero-H system already onboard virtually all long haul aircraft and will provide return data rates from the aircraft as high as 432 kbps. integrated receiver/decoder (IRD) assembly. The phased array antenna, a key technology element, is being developed by AirTV's strategic partner, CMC Electronics. This antenna is a scaled version of CMC's Inmarsat Aero H antenna and is capable of scanning to 5 degrees above the horizon. Wide angle scanning up to 85 degrees from zenith is necessary for aircraft traversing the northernmost latitudes on transoceanic routes. AirTV has designed both the satellite coverage and aircraft antenna performance to ensure that high signal quality is maintained along all non-polar airline routes. AirTV will be the future of aeronautical broadband delivery. It has been designed specifically for global services and

  4. A Grounded Theory Study of Aircraft Maintenance Technician Decision-Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norcross, Robert

    Aircraft maintenance technician decision-making and actions have resulted in aircraft system errors causing aircraft incidents and accidents. Aircraft accident investigators and researchers examined the factors that influence aircraft maintenance technician errors and categorized the types of errors in an attempt to prevent similar occurrences. New aircraft technology introduced to improve aviation safety and efficiency incur failures that have no information contained in the aircraft maintenance manuals. According to the Federal Aviation Administration, aircraft maintenance technicians must use only approved aircraft maintenance documents to repair, modify, and service aircraft. This qualitative research used a grounded theory approach to explore the decision-making processes and actions taken by aircraft maintenance technicians when confronted with an aircraft problem not contained in the aircraft maintenance manuals. The target population for the research was Federal Aviation Administration licensed aircraft and power plant mechanics from across the United States. Nonprobability purposeful sampling was used to obtain aircraft maintenance technicians with the experience sought in the study problem. The sample population recruitment yielded 19 participants for eight focus group sessions to obtain opinions, perceptions, and experiences related to the study problem. All data collected was entered into the Atlas ti qualitative analysis software. The emergence of Aircraft Maintenance Technician decision-making themes regarding Aircraft Maintenance Manual content, Aircraft Maintenance Technician experience, and legal implications of not following Aircraft Maintenance Manuals surfaced. Conclusions from this study suggest Aircraft Maintenance Technician decision-making were influenced by experience, gaps in the Aircraft Maintenance Manuals, reliance on others, realizing the impact of decisions concerning aircraft airworthiness, management pressures, and legal concerns

  5. Precise thermal NDE for quantifying structural damage

    SciTech Connect

    Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.

    1995-09-18

    The authors demonstrated a fast, wide-area, precise thermal NDE imaging system to quantify aircraft corrosion damage, such as percent metal loss, above a threshold of 5% with 3% overall uncertainties. The DBIR precise thermal imaging and detection method has been used successfully to characterize defect types, and their respective depths, in aircraft skins, and multi-layered composite materials used for wing patches, doublers and stiffeners. This precise thermal NDE inspection tool has long-term potential benefits to evaluate the structural integrity of airframes, pipelines and waste containers. They proved the feasibility of the DBIR thermal NDE imaging system to inspect concrete and asphalt-concrete bridge decks. As a logical extension to the successful feasibility study, they plan to inspect a concrete bridge deck from a moving vehicle to quantify the volumetric damage within the deck and the percent of the deck which has subsurface delaminations. Potential near-term benefits are in-service monitoring from a moving vehicle to inspect the structural integrity of the bridge deck. This would help prioritize the repair schedule for a reported 200,000 bridge decks in the US which need substantive repairs. Potential long-term benefits are affordable, and reliable, rehabilitation for bridge decks.

  6. Precision laser automatic tracking system.

    PubMed

    Lucy, R F; Peters, C J; McGann, E J; Lang, K T

    1966-04-01

    A precision laser tracker has been constructed and tested that is capable of tracking a low-acceleration target to an accuracy of about 25 microrad root mean square. In tracking high-acceleration targets, the error is directly proportional to the angular acceleration. For an angular acceleration of 0.6 rad/sec(2), the measured tracking error was about 0.1 mrad. The basic components in this tracker, similar in configuration to a heliostat, are a laser and an image dissector, which are mounted on a stationary frame, and a servocontrolled tracking mirror. The daytime sensitivity of this system is approximately 3 x 10(-10) W/m(2); the ultimate nighttime sensitivity is approximately 3 x 10(-14) W/m(2). Experimental tests were performed to evaluate both dynamic characteristics of this system and the system sensitivity. Dynamic performance of the system was obtained, using a small rocket covered with retroreflective material launched at an acceleration of about 13 g at a point 204 m from the tracker. The daytime sensitivity of the system was checked, using an efficient retroreflector mounted on a light aircraft. This aircraft was tracked out to a maximum range of 15 km, which checked the daytime sensitivity of the system measured by other means. The system also has been used to track passively stars and the Echo I satellite. Also, the system tracked passively a +7.5 magnitude star, and the signal-to-noise ratio in this experiment indicates that it should be possible to track a + 12.5 magnitude star. PMID:20048888

  7. Emissions from queuing aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Segal, H.

    1980-01-01

    The ability of the FAA (U.S. Federal Aviation Administration) Simplex mathematical model, which employs a simple point-source algorithm with provisions for selecting a particular plume height and initial box size for each aircraft being analyzed, to predict air quality through modeling emissions released from queuing aircraft was verified by measurements of carbon monoxide emissions from such aircraft during a five-day period at Los Angeles International Airport. The model predicted carbon monoxide concentrations of 4 ppm (National Ambient Air Quality Standard limit value is 35 ppm) at expected populated locations during the highest activity hour monitored. This study should also apply to other engine exhaust gases such as NO/sub x/.

  8. Scaling aircraft noise perception.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollerhead, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    Following a brief review of the background to the study, an extensive experiment is described which was undertaken to assess the practical differences between numerous alternative methods for calculating the perceived levels of individual aircraft flyover wounds. One hundred and twenty recorded sounds, including jets, turboprops, piston aircraft and helicopters were rated by a panel of subjects in a pair comparison test. The results were analyzed to evaluate a number of noise rating procedures, in terms of their ability to accurately estimate both relative and absolute perceived noise levels over a wider dynamic range (84-115 dB SPL) than had generally been used in previous experiments. Performances of the different scales were examined in detail for different aircraft categories, and the merits of different band level summation procedures, frequency weighting functions, duration and tone corrections were investigated.

  9. Alternative aircraft fuels technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1976-01-01

    NASA is studying the characteristics of future aircraft fuels produced from either petroleum or nonpetroleum sources such as oil shale or coal. These future hydrocarbon based fuels may have chemical and physical properties that are different from present aviation turbine fuels. This research is aimed at determining what those characteristics may be, how present aircraft and engine components and materials would be affected by fuel specification changes, and what changes in both aircraft and engine design would be required to utilize these future fuels without sacrificing performance, reliability, or safety. This fuels technology program was organized to include both in-house and contract research on the synthesis and characterization of fuels, component evaluations of combustors, turbines, and fuel systems, and, eventually, full-scale engine demonstrations. A review of the various elements of the program and significant results obtained so far are presented.

  10. Pathfinder aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The unique Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing, is shown during a checkout flight from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. This two-hour low-altitude flight over Rogers Dry Lake, Nov. 19, 1996, served to test aircraft systems and functional procedures, according to officials of AeroVironment, Inc., Pathfinder's developer and operator. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration. (See the Pathfinder Plus photos and project description.)

  11. Pathfinder aircraft flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Pathfinder research aircraft's wing structure is clearly defined as it soars under a clear blue sky during a test flight from Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in November of 1996. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration. (See the Pathfinder Plus photos and project description.)

  12. Precision guided antiaircraft munition

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1987-01-01

    A small diameter, 20 mm to 50 mm, guided projectile is used in antiaircraft defense. A pulsing laser designator illuminates the target aircraft. Energy reflected from the aircraft is received by the guided projectile. The guided projectile is fired from a standard weapon but the spining caused by the riflings are removed before active tracking and guidance occurs. The received energy is focused by immersion optics onto a bridge cell. AC coupling and gating removes background and allows steering signals to move extended vanes by means of piezoelectric actuators in the rear of the guided projectile.

  13. Aircraft surface coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Liquid, spray on elastomeric polyurethanes are selected and investigated as best candidates for aircraft external protective coatings. Flight tests are conducted to measure drag effects of these coatings compared to paints and a bare metal surface. The durability of two elastometric polyurethanes are assessed in airline flight service evaluations. Laboratory tests are performed to determine corrosion protection properties, compatibility with aircraft thermal anti-icing systems, the effect of coating thickness on erosion durability, and the erosion characteristics of composite leading edges-bare and coated. A cost and benefits assessment is made to determine the economic value of various coating configurations to the airlines.

  14. Aircraft Flutter Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Wilmer Reed gained international recognition for his innovative research, contributions and patented ideas relating to flutter and aeroelasticity of aerospace vehicles at Langley Research Center. In the early 1980's, Reed retired from Langley and joined the engineering staff of Dynamic Engineering Inc. While at DEI, Reed conceived and patented the DEI Flutter Exciter, now used world-wide in flight flutter testing of new or modified aircraft designs. When activated, the DEI Flutter Exciter alternately deflects the airstream upward and downward in a rapid manner, creating a force similar to that produced by an oscillating trailing edge flap. The DEI Flutter Exciter is readily adaptable to a variety of aircraft.

  15. Aircraft Laminar Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.

    1998-01-01

    Aircraft laminar flow control (LFC) from the 1930's through the 1990's is reviewed and the current status of the technology is assessed. Examples are provided to demonstrate the benefits of LFC for subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Early studies related to the laminar boundary-layer flow physics, manufacturing tolerances for laminar flow, and insect-contamination avoidance are discussed. LFC concept studies in wind-tunnel and flight experiments are the major focus of the paper. LFC design tools are briefly outlined for completeness.

  16. Alternative aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longwell, J. P.; Grobman, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    The efficient utilization of fossil fuels by future jet aircraft may necessitate the broadening of current aviation turbine fuel specifications. The most significant changes in specifications would be an increased aromatics content and a higher final boiling point in order to minimize refinery energy consumption and costs. These changes would increase the freezing point and might lower the thermal stability of the fuel, and could cause increased pollutant emissions, increased combustor liner temperatures, and poorer ignition characteristics. The effects that broadened specification fuels may have on present-day jet aircraft and engine components and the technology required to use fuels with broadened specifications are discussed.

  17. Aircraft engine pollution reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of engine operation on the types and levels of the major aircraft engine pollutants is described and the major factors governing the formation of these pollutants during the burning of hydrocarbon fuel are discussed. Methods which are being explored to reduce these pollutants are discussed and their application to several experimental research programs are pointed out. Results showing significant reductions in the levels of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, and oxides of nitrogen obtained from experimental combustion research programs are presented and discussed to point out potential application to aircraft engines.

  18. Aircraft engines. II

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of the design features and prospective performance gains of ultrahigh bypass subsonic propulsion configurations and various candidate supersonic commercial aircraft powerplants. The supersonic types, whose enhanced thermodynamic cycle efficiency is considered critical to the economic viability of a second-generation SST, are the variable-cycle engine, the variable stream control engine, the turbine-bypass engine, and the supersonic-throughflow fan. Also noted is the turboramjet concept, which will be applicable to hypersonic aircraft whose airframe structure materials can withstand the severe aerothermodynamic conditions of this flight regime.

  19. The Precise Observation System for the Safe Use of Medicines (POSSUM): An Approach for Studying Medication Administration Errors in the Field.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Johanna I; Raban, Magdalena Z; Lehnbom, Elin C; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Medication administration errors (MAEs) in hospital are frequent and significantly more likely to result in serious harm to patients than other medication error types. Many interventions have been proposed in order reduce MAEs and the amount of harm associated with these errors. A major limitation in assessing the effectiveness of these interventions has been the lack of robust measures for assessing changes in MAEs and associated harms. Drawing upon extensive foundational research we have developed a robust approach and data collection software to be applied in direct observational studies of nurses to allow measurement of changes in MAE rates. We report how this approach is being applied in a large stepped-wedge cluster randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of an electronic medication management system to reduce MAEs in a paediatric hospital. PMID:27577460

  20. A High Precision Approach to Calibrate a Structured Light Vision Sensor in a Robot-Based Three-Dimensional Measurement System.

    PubMed

    Wu, Defeng; Chen, Tianfei; Li, Aiguo

    2016-01-01

    A robot-based three-dimensional (3D) measurement system is presented. In the presented system, a structured light vision sensor is mounted on the arm of an industrial robot. Measurement accuracy is one of the most important aspects of any 3D measurement system. To improve the measuring accuracy of the structured light vision sensor, a novel sensor calibration approach is proposed to improve the calibration accuracy. The approach is based on a number of fixed concentric circles manufactured in a calibration target. The concentric circle is employed to determine the real projected centres of the circles. Then, a calibration point generation procedure is used with the help of the calibrated robot. When enough calibration points are ready, the radial alignment constraint (RAC) method is adopted to calibrate the camera model. A multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPNN) is then employed to identify the calibration residuals after the application of the RAC method. Therefore, the hybrid pinhole model and the MLPNN are used to represent the real camera model. Using a standard ball to validate the effectiveness of the presented technique, the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed novel calibration approach can achieve a highly accurate model of the structured light vision sensor. PMID:27589752

  1. Optical communications for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Optical communications for transport aircraft are discussed. The problem involves: increasing demand for radio-frequency bands from an enlarging pool of users (aircraft, ground and sea vehicles, fleet operators, traffic control centers, and commercial radio and television); desirability of providing high-bandwidth dedicated communications to and from every aircraft in the National Airspace System; need to support communications, navigation, and surveillance for a growing number of aircraft; and improved meteorological observations by use of probe aircraft. The solution involves: optical signal transmission support very high data rates; optical transmission of signals between aircraft, orbiting satellites, and ground stations, where unobstructed line-of-sight is available; conventional radio transmissions of signals between aircraft and ground stations, where optical line-of-sight is unavailable; and radio priority given to aircraft in weather.

  2. Light aircraft sound transmission study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, M.; David, J.; Heitman, K.; Crocker, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The revived interest in the design of propeller driven aircraft is based on increasing fuel prices as well as on the need for bigger short haul and commuter aircraft. A major problem encountered with propeller driven aircraft is propeller and exhaust noise that is transmitted through the fuselage sidewall structure. Part of the work which was conducted during the period April 1 to August 31, 1983, on the studies of sound transmission through light aircraft walls is presented.

  3. Aircraft community noise impact studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The objectives of the study are to: (1) conduct a program to determine the community noise impact of advanced technology engines when installed in a supersonic aircraft, (2) determine the potential reduction of community noise by flight operational techniques for the study aircraft, (3) estimate the community noise impact of the study aircraft powered by suppressed turbojet engines and by advanced duct heating turbofan engines, and (4) compare the impact of the two supersonic designs with that of conventional commercial DC-8 aircraft.

  4. The variable density aircraft concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, A. C.

    1975-01-01

    In the variable density aircraft concept the aircraft's density is varied by varying its volume. This is accomplished by combining a variable volume hull, which is called the dynapod, with intrinsic means for the controlled variation of a mass of working fluid or substance within the aircraft. The dynapod is a hinged structure and follows the volumetric variations of the working fluid. The result is a variable density hull, which with the attachment of power plants, etc., becomes a variable density aircraft.

  5. Precision performance lamp technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Dean A.; Kiesa, James E.; Dean, Raymond A.

    1997-09-01

    A principal function of a lamp is to produce light output with designated spectra, intensity, and/or geometric radiation patterns. The function of a precision performance lamp is to go beyond these parameters and into the precision repeatability of performance. All lamps are not equal. There are a variety of incandescent lamps, from the vacuum incandescent indictor lamp to the precision lamp of a blood analyzer. In the past the definition of a precision lamp was described in terms of wattage, light center length (LCL), filament position, and/or spot alignment. This paper presents a new view of precision lamps through the discussion of a new segment of lamp design, which we term precision performance lamps. The definition of precision performance lamps will include (must include) the factors of a precision lamp. But what makes a precision lamp a precision performance lamp is the manner in which the design factors of amperage, mscp (mean spherical candlepower), efficacy (lumens/watt), life, not considered individually but rather considered collectively. There is a statistical bias in a precision performance lamp for each of these factors; taken individually and as a whole. When properly considered the results can be dramatic to the system design engineer, system production manage and the system end-user. It can be shown that for the lamp user, the use of precision performance lamps can translate to: (1) ease of system design, (2) simplification of electronics, (3) superior signal to noise ratios, (4) higher manufacturing yields, (5) lower system costs, (6) better product performance. The factors mentioned above are described along with their interdependent relationships. It is statistically shown how the benefits listed above are achievable. Examples are provided to illustrate how proper attention to precision performance lamp characteristics actually aid in system product design and manufacturing to build and market more, market acceptable product products in the

  6. Aircraft performance and control in downburst wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, Richard S.

    1986-01-01

    The methods developed for analyses of the winds and of aircraft performance during an investigation of a downburst wind-shear-induced accident have been utilized in a more general study of aircraft performance in such encounters. The computed responses of a generic, large transport aircraft to take-off and approach encounters with a downburst wind field were used in examining the effects of performance factors and control procedures on the ability of the aircraft to survive. Obvious benefits are seen for higher initial encounter speeds, maximum thrust-weight values typical of two-engined aircraft, and immediacy of pilot response. The results of controlling to a constant, predetermined, pitch attitude are demonstrated. Control algorithms that sacrifice altitude for speed appear to provide a higher level of survivability, but guidance displays more explicitly defining flightpath than those commonly in use might be required.

  7. Aircraft stress sequence development: A complex engineering process made simple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, K. H.; Butts, D. G.; Sparks, W. A.

    1994-01-01

    Development of stress sequences for critical aircraft structure requires flight measured usage data, known aircraft loads, and established relationships between aircraft flight loads and structural stresses. Resulting cycle-by-cycle stress sequences can be directly usable for crack growth analysis and coupon spectra tests. Often, an expert in loads and spectra development manipulates the usage data into a typical sequence of representative flight conditions for which loads and stresses are calculated. For a fighter/trainer type aircraft, this effort is repeated many times for each of the fatigue critical locations (FCL) resulting in expenditure of numerous engineering hours. The Aircraft Stress Sequence Computer Program (ACSTRSEQ), developed by Southwest Research Institute under contract to San Antonio Air Logistics Center, presents a unique approach for making complex technical computations in a simple, easy to use method. The program is written in Microsoft Visual Basic for the Microsoft Windows environment.

  8. Annoyance judgements of aircraft with and without acoustically treated nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsky, P. N.; Leonard, S.

    1973-01-01

    A series of subjective response laboratory tests were conducted to determine the effectiveness of reducing aircraft noise by treating the aircraft engine nacelles with acoustically absorbent material. A total of 108 subjects participated in the magnitude estimation tests. The subjects were selected from persons who had previously been interviewed and classified according to selected psychological characteristics. The subjects lived in three general areas located at three specified distances from New York's Kennedy Airport. The aircraft signals used in the tests consisted of tape recordings of the landing approach noise of a B-727 aircraft under normal operating conditions. These recordings were electronically altered to simulate an aircraft with acoustically treated nacelles to achieve noise reductions of approximately 6 EPNdB and 12 EPNdB. The results from these tests indicate that significant reductions in annoyance resulted from the synthesized nacelle treatments.

  9. Probabilistic Modeling of Aircraft Trajectories for Dynamic Separation Volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    With a proliferation of new and unconventional vehicles and operations expected in the future, the ab initio airspace design will require new approaches to trajectory prediction for separation assurance and other air traffic management functions. This paper presents an approach to probabilistic modeling of the trajectory of an aircraft when its intent is unknown. The approach uses a set of feature functions to constrain a maximum entropy probability distribution based on a set of observed aircraft trajectories. This model can be used to sample new aircraft trajectories to form an ensemble reflecting the variability in an aircraft's intent. The model learning process ensures that the variability in this ensemble reflects the behavior observed in the original data set. Computational examples are presented.

  10. AIRTV: Broadband Direct to Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorbello, R.; Stone, R.; Bennett, S. B.; Bertenyi, E.

    2002-01-01

    over the poles. The system consists of a constellation of 4 geostationary satellites covering the earth and delivering its signals to the aircraft at S band (2.52 -2.67 GHz). The S-band spectrum is ideal for this application since it is allocated on a primary basis by the ITU for global broadcast service. The AirTV service is expected to begin in 2004 and should be unencumbered by adjacent satellite interference due to near completion of the ITU coordination process. Each satellite will deliver four 20 Mbps QPSK data streams consisting of multiplexed compressed digital video channels and IP data over the full global beam coverage. The 80 Mbps capacity of each satellite will provide approximately 60 video channels while still allocating 40 Mbits to data services. The combined constellation capacity of 320 Mbits will significantly exceed the capacity of any similar existing or currently planned global satellite system. In addition, the simplicity of the 4-satellite approach is the most cost effective means to deliver high bandwidth globally. Return links, which are required for internet service, will be provided through the existing Inmarsat Aero-H system already onboard virtually all long haul aircraft and will provide return data rates from the aircraft as high as 432 kbps. integrated receiver/decoder (IRD) assembly. The phased array antenna, a key technology element, is being developed by AirTV's strategic partner, CMC Electronics. This antenna is a scaled version of CMC's Inmarsat Aero H antenna and is capable of scanning to 5 degrees above the horizon. Wide angle scanning up to 85 degrees from zenith is necessary for aircraft traversing the northernmost latitudes on transoceanic routes. AirTV has designed both the satellite coverage and aircraft antenna performance to ensure that high signal quality is maintained along all non-polar airline routes. AirTV will be the future of aeronautical broadband delivery. It has been designed specifically for global services and

  11. Advanced irrigation engineering: Precision and Precise

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation advances in precision irrigation (PI) or site-specific irrigation (SSI) have been considerable in research; however commercialization lags. A primary necessity for it is variability in soil texture that affects soil water holding capacity and crop yield. Basically, SSI/PI uses variable ra...

  12. Advanced irrigation engineering: Precision and Precise

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation advances in precision irrigation (PI) or site specific irrigation (SSI) have been considerable in research; however commercialization lags. A primary necessity for PI/SSI is variability in soil texture that affects soil water holding capacity and crop yield. Basically, SSI/PI uses variabl...

  13. Towards Intelligent Control for Next Generation Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Diana Michelle; KrishnaKumar, Kalmanje Srinvas; Frost, Susan Alane

    2008-01-01

    NASA Aeronautics Subsonic Fixed Wing Project is focused on mitigating the environmental and operation impacts expected as aviation operations triple by 2025. The approach is to extend technological capabilities and explore novel civil transport configurations that reduce noise, emissions, fuel consumption and field length. Two Next Generation (NextGen) aircraft have been identified to meet the Subsonic Fixed Wing Project goals - these are the Hybrid Wing-Body (HWB) and Cruise Efficient Short Take-Off and Landing (CESTOL) aircraft. The technologies and concepts developed for these aircraft complicate the vehicle s design and operation. In this paper, flight control challenges for NextGen aircraft are described. The objective of this paper is to examine the potential of state-of-the-art control architectures and algorithms to meet the challenges and needed performance metrics for NextGen flight control. A broad range of conventional and intelligent control approaches are considered, including dynamic inversion control, integrated flight-propulsion control, control allocation, adaptive dynamic inversion control, data-based predictive control and reinforcement learning control.

  14. Aircraft noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippone, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    This contribution addresses the state-of-the-art in the field of aircraft noise prediction, simulation and minimisation. The point of view taken in this context is that of comprehensive models that couple the various aircraft systems with the acoustic sources, the propagation and the flight trajectories. After an exhaustive review of the present predictive technologies in the relevant fields (airframe, propulsion, propagation, aircraft operations, trajectory optimisation), the paper addresses items for further research and development. Examples are shown for several airplanes, including the Airbus A319-100 (CFM engines), the Bombardier Dash8-Q400 (PW150 engines, Dowty R408 propellers) and the Boeing B737-800 (CFM engines). Predictions are done with the flight mechanics code FLIGHT. The transfer function between flight mechanics and the noise prediction is discussed in some details, along with the numerical procedures for validation and verification. Some code-to-code comparisons are shown. It is contended that the field of aircraft noise prediction has not yet reached a sufficient level of maturity. In particular, some parametric effects cannot be investigated, issues of accuracy are not currently addressed, and validation standards are still lacking.

  15. Aircraft Wake RCS Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilson, William H.

    1994-01-01

    A series of multi-frequency radar measurements of aircraft wakes at altitudes of 5,000 to 25,00 ft. were performed at Kwajalein, R.M.I., in May and June of 1990. Two aircraft were tested, a Learjet 35 and a Lockheed C-5A. The cross-section of the wake of the Learjet was too small for detection at Kwajalein. The wake of the C-5A, although also very small, was detected and measured at VHF, UHF, L-, S-, and C-bands, at distances behind the aircraft ranging from about one hundred meters to tens of kilometers. The data suggest that the mechanism by which aircraft wakes have detectable radar signatures is, contrary to previous expectations, unrelated to engine exhaust but instead due to turbulent mixing by the wake vortices of pre-existing index of refraction gradients in the ambient atmosphere. These measurements were of necessity performed with extremely powerful and sensitive instrumentation radars, and the wake cross-section is too small for most practical applications.

  16. Counterrotating aircraft propulsor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Joey L. (Inventor); Elston, III, Sidney B. (Inventor); Tseng, Wu-Yang (Inventor); Hemsworth, Martin C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A propulsor blade for an aircraft engine includes an airfoil section formed in the shape of a scimitar. A metallic blade spar is interposed between opposed surfaces of the blade and is bonded to the surfaces to establish structural integrity of the blade. The metallic blade spar includes a root end allowing attachment of the blade to the engine.

  17. Counterrotating aircraft propulsor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Joey L. (Inventor); Elston, III, Sidney B. (Inventor); Tseng, Wu-Yang (Inventor); Hemsworth, Martin C. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A propulsor blade for an aircraft engine includes an airfoil section formed in the shape of a scimitar. A metallic blade spar is interposed between opposed surfaces of the blade and is bonded to the surfaces to establish structural integrity of the blade. The metallic blade spar includes a root end allowing attachment of the blade to the engine.

  18. Robots for Aircraft Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center charged USBI (now Pratt & Whitney) with the task of developing an advanced stripping system based on hydroblasting to strip paint and thermal protection material from Space Shuttle solid rocket boosters. A robot, mounted on a transportable platform, controls the waterjet angle, water pressure and flow rate. This technology, now known as ARMS, has found commercial applications in the removal of coatings from jet engine components. The system is significantly faster than manual procedures and uses only minimal labor. Because the amount of "substrate" lost is minimal, the life of the component is extended. The need for toxic chemicals is reduced, as is waste disposal and human protection equipment. Users of the ARMS work cell include Delta Air Lines and the Air Force, which later contracted with USBI for development of a Large Aircraft Paint Stripping system (LARPS). LARPS' advantages are similar to ARMS, and it has enormous potential in military and civil aircraft maintenance. The technology may also be adapted to aircraft painting, aircraft inspection techniques and paint stripping of large objects like ships and railcars.

  19. Aircraft adaptive learning control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, P. S. T.; Vanlandingham, H. F.

    1979-01-01

    The optimal control theory of stochastic linear systems is discussed in terms of the advantages of distributed-control systems, and the control of randomly-sampled systems. An optimal solution to longitudinal control is derived and applied to the F-8 DFBW aircraft. A randomly-sampled linear process model with additive process and noise is developed.

  20. Ozone and aircraft operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    The cabin ozone problem is discussed. Cabin ozone in terms of health effects, the characteristics of ozone encounters by aircraft, a brief history of studies to define the problem, corrective actions taken, and possible future courses of action are examined. It is suggested that such actions include avoiding high ozone concentrations by applying ozone forecasting in flight planning procedures.

  1. New aircraft configurations handling qualities studies based on the aerodynamic invariant concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazile, J.

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes an innovative approach to go deeper in the Handling Qualities knowledge for New Aircraft Configurations based on the Aerodynamic Invariant Concept. By manipulating the Doublet Lattice Method for aerodynamic derivatives computation, an Aerodynamic Invariant can be highlighted. It contributes to many aircraft dynamics parameters and can be considered as "key driver" of the longitudinal aircraft dynamics. The aim of this new approach is to study the impact of this aerodynamic invariant on aircraft Handling Qualities and to ask the question: "Could this aerodynamic invariant be used in parallel with Performance in the conceptual design phase to "seek" New Aircraft configurations capable of achieving further Handling Qualities improvement with Performance benefits?" The enclosed results highlight that the aerodynamic invariant could allow to improve and to optimize the aircraft Handling Qualities by relaxing the aircraft dynamics stability.

  2. Comprehensive analysis of transport aircraft flight performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippone, Antonio

    2008-04-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the art in comprehensive performance codes for fixed-wing aircraft. The importance of system analysis in flight performance is discussed. The paper highlights the role of aerodynamics, propulsion, flight mechanics, aeroacoustics, flight operation, numerical optimisation, stochastic methods and numerical analysis. The latter discipline is used to investigate the sensitivities of the sub-systems to uncertainties in critical state parameters or functional parameters. The paper discusses critically the data used for performance analysis, and the areas where progress is required. Comprehensive analysis codes can be used for mission fuel planning, envelope exploration, competition analysis, a wide variety of environmental studies, marketing analysis, aircraft certification and conceptual aircraft design. A comprehensive program that uses the multi-disciplinary approach for transport aircraft is presented. The model includes a geometry deck, a separate engine input deck with the main parameters, a database of engine performance from an independent simulation, and an operational deck. The comprehensive code has modules for deriving the geometry from bitmap files, an aerodynamics model for all flight conditions, a flight mechanics model for flight envelopes and mission analysis, an aircraft noise model and engine emissions. The model is validated at different levels. Validation of the aerodynamic model is done against the scale models DLR-F4 and F6. A general model analysis and flight envelope exploration are shown for the Boeing B-777-300 with GE-90 turbofan engines with intermediate passenger capacity (394 passengers in 2 classes). Validation of the flight model is done by sensitivity analysis on the wetted area (or profile drag), on the specific air range, the brake-release gross weight and the aircraft noise. A variety of results is shown, including specific air range charts, take-off weight-altitude charts, payload-range performance

  3. Application of QFT to the Problem of Failed In-Flight Controllers During Approach and Landing of a B720 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Hwei-Lan; Biezad, Daniel J.

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies by NASA Dryden have shown the use of throttles for emergency flight control to be extremely difficult, especially for landing. Flight control using only the throttles to achieve safe landing for a large jet transport airplane, the Boeing 720, is investigated using Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT). Results are compared to an augmented control developed in a previous study. The controller corrected unsatisfactory open-loop characteristics by increasing system bandwidth and damping, but improving the control bandwidth substantially proved very difficult. The pitch controller is robust in conditions of no or moderate turbulence. The roll controller performed well in conditions of no turbulence, but is sensitive to moderate turbulence. Handling qualities of the augmented control for approach and landing were evaluated by piloted simulation flights.

  4. Advanced ATC - An aircraft perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Credeur, L.; Williams, D. H.; Howell, W. E.; Spitzer, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    The principal operational improvements desired by commercial aircraft operators in the United States are efficient aircraft operations and delay reductions at the major terminals. This paper describes efforts underway within the Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program at the Langley Research Center to provide a technology basis for reducing delay while improving aircraft efficiency. The principal thrust is the development of time-based traffic control concepts which could be used within the framework of the upgraded National Airspace System and which would allow conventionally equipped aircraft to operate in a manner compatible with advanced aircraft.

  5. Turboprop cargo aircraft systems study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muehlbauer, J. C.; Hewell, J. G., Jr.; Lindenbaum, S. P.; Randall, C. C.; Searle, N.; Stone, R. G., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of using advanced turboprop propulsion systems to reduce the fuel consumption and direct operating costs of cargo aircraft were studied, and the impact of these systems on aircraft noise and noise prints around a terminal area was determined. Parametric variations of aircraft and propeller characteristics were investigated to determine their effects on noiseprint areas, fuel consumption, and direct operating costs. From these results, three aircraft designs were selected and subjected to design refinements and sensitivity analyses. Three competitive turbofan aircraft were also defined from parametric studies to provide a basis for comparing the two types of propulsion.

  6. Advanced ATC: An aircraft perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Credeur, Leonard; Williams, David H.; Howell, William E.; Spitzer, Cary R.

    1986-01-01

    The principal operational improvements desired by commercial aircraft operators in the United States are efficient aircraft operations and delay reductions at the major terminals. Efforts underway within the Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program at the Langley Research Center to provide a technology basis for reducing delay while improving aircraft efficiency are discussed. The principal thrust is the development of time-based traffic control concepts which could be used within the framework of the upgraded National Airspace System and which would allow conventionally equipped aircraft to operate in a manner compatible with advanced aircraft.

  7. Aircraft wing structure detail design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, Garrett L.; Roberts, Ron; Mallon, Bob; Alameri, Mohamed; Steinbach, Bill

    1993-01-01

    The provisions of this project call for the design of the structure of the wing and carry-through structure for the Viper primary trainer, which is to be certified as a utility category trainer under FAR part 23. The specific items to be designed in this statement of work were Front Spar, Rear Spar, Aileron Structure, Wing Skin, and Fuselage Carry-through Structure. In the design of these parts, provisions for the fuel system, electrical system, and control routing were required. Also, the total weight of the entire wing planform could not exceed 216 lbs. Since this aircraft is to be used as a primary trainer, and the SOW requires a useful life of 107 cycles, it was decided that all of the principle stresses in the structural members would be kept below 10 ksi. The only drawback to this approach is a weight penalty.

  8. Multisensor/multimission surveillance aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobe, John T.

    1994-10-01

    The realignment of international powers, and the formation of new nations has resulted in increasing worldwide concern over border security, an expanding refugee problem, protection of fishery and mineral areas, and smuggling of all types. The focus on military services, to protect or defend against these threats of vital, national interest, is shifting to other government agencies and even commercial contractors to apply innovative and cost effective solutions. Previously, airborne surveillance and reconnaissance platforms have been large, mission dedicated military aircraft. The time has arrived for a smaller, more efficient, and more effective airborne capability. This paper briefly outlines a system of systems approach that smaller nations can afford to incorporate in their budgets, while greatly expanding their surveillance capability. The characteristics of specific cameras and sensors are purposely not addressed, so the emphasis can be placed on the integration of multiple sensors and capabilities.

  9. Precision Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease and Hunting Elephants.

    PubMed

    Joyner, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Precision medicine postulates improved prediction, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease based on patient specific factors especially DNA sequence (i.e., gene) variants. Ideas related to precision medicine stem from the much anticipated "genetic revolution in medicine" arising seamlessly from the human genome project (HGP). In this essay I deconstruct the concept of precision medicine and raise questions about the validity of the paradigm in general and its application to cardiovascular disease. Thus far precision medicine has underperformed based on the vision promulgated by enthusiasts. While niche successes for precision medicine are likely, the promises of broad based transformation should be viewed with skepticism. Open discussion and debate related to precision medicine are urgently needed to avoid misapplication of resources, hype, iatrogenic interventions, and distraction from established approaches with ongoing utility. Failure to engage in such debate will lead to negative unintended consequences from a revolution that might never come. PMID:26902518

  10. Twin tilt nacelle V/STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskey, M. A.; Wilson, S. B., III; Valckenaere, W.; Lareau, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the second government-conducted, piloted flight simulation of the Grumman Design 698 V/STOL (vertical and short takeoff and landing) aircraft. Emphasis is on the aircraft's handling qualities as rated by various NASA, Navy, and GAC pilots with flight experience ranging from CTOL (conventional take-off and landing) to V/STOL aircraft. The Design 698 had been modified to resolve the flight problems that were of most concern to the pilots in the first investigation (Phase I). Those problems included an adverse nonminimum phase (NMP) acceleration response in both the longitudinal and lateral axes, a large thrust-response lag, and adverse ground effects. The adverse NMP acceleration is an attribute of the vertical vanes (a Grumman patent) positioned in the fan exhaust flow. The primary modifications included using the vertical-vane deflection as a thrust spoiling method, the addition of the cross-shafted propulsion system, and the implementation of two velocity and attitude control modes (standard and precision) for speeds below 50 knots.

  11. Improving the precision matrix for precision cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz, Dante J.; Sánchez, Ariel G.

    2015-12-01

    The estimation of cosmological constraints from observations of the large-scale structure of the Universe, such as the power spectrum or the correlation function, requires the knowledge of the inverse of the associated covariance matrix, namely the precision matrix, Ψ . In most analyses, Ψ is estimated from a limited set of mock catalogues. Depending on how many mocks are used, this estimation has an associated error which must be propagated into the final cosmological constraints. For future surveys such as Euclid and Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, the control of this additional uncertainty requires a prohibitively large number of mock catalogues. In this work, we test a novel technique for the estimation of the precision matrix, the covariance tapering method, in the context of baryon acoustic oscillation measurements. Even though this technique was originally devised as a way to speed up maximum likelihood estimations, our results show that it also reduces the impact of noisy precision matrix estimates on the derived confidence intervals, without introducing biases on the target parameters. The application of this technique can help future surveys to reach their true constraining power using a significantly smaller number of mock catalogues.

  12. Precision Optics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Robert L.; And Others

    This guide outlines the competency-based, two-year precision optics curriculum that the American Precision Optics Manufacturers Association has proposed to fill the void that it suggests will soon exist as many of the master opticians currently employed retire. The model, which closely resembles the old European apprenticeship model, calls for 300…

  13. Down-to-the-runway enhanced flight vision system (EFVS) approach test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinley, John B.; Heidhausen, Eric; Cramer, James A.; Krone, Norris J., Jr.

    2008-04-01

    Flight tests where conducted at Cambridge-Dorchester Airport (KCGE) and Easton Municipal Airport / Newnam Field (KESN) in a Cessna 402B aircraft using a head-up display (HUD) and a Kollsman Enhanced Vision System (EVS-I) infrared camera. These tests were sponsored by the MITRE Corporation's Center for Advanced Aviation System Development (CAASD) and the Federal Aviation Administration. Imagery of the EVS-I infrared camera, HUD guidance cues, and out-the-window video were each separately recorded at an engineering workstation for each approach, roll-out, and taxi operation. The EVS-I imagery was displayed on the HUD with guidance cues generated by the mission computer. Also separately recorded was the inertial flight path data. Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) approaches were conducted from the final approach fix to runway flare, touchdown, roll-out and taxi using the HUD and EVS-I sensor as the only visual reference. Flight conditions included two-pilot crew, day, night, non-precision course offset approaches, ILS approach, crosswind approaches, and missed approaches. Results confirmed the feasibility for safe conduct of down-to-the-runway precision approaches in low visibility to runways with and without precision approach systems, when consideration is given to proper aircraft instrumentation, pilot training, and acceptable procedures. Operational benefits include improved runway occupancy rates, and reduced delays and diversions.

  14. Integrated engine-generator concept for aircraft electric secondary power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Secunde, R. R.; Macosko, R. P.; Repas, D. S.

    1972-01-01

    The integrated engine-generator concept of locating an electric generator inside an aircraft turbojet or turbofan engine concentric with, and driven by, one of the main engine shafts is discussed. When properly rated, the generator can serve as an engine starter as well as a generator of electric power. The electric power conversion equipment and generator controls are conveniently located in the aircraft. Preliminary layouts of generators in a large engine together with their physical sizes and weights indicate that this concept is a technically feasible approach to aircraft secondary power.

  15. Small Aircraft Transportation System, Higher Volume Operations Concept: Normal Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Terence S.; Jones, Kenneth M.; Consiglio, Maria C.; Williams, Daniel M.; Adams, Catherine A.

    2004-01-01

    This document defines the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS), Higher Volume Operations (HVO) concept for normal conditions. In this concept, a block of airspace would be established around designated non-towered, non-radar airports during periods of poor weather. Within this new airspace, pilots would take responsibility for separation assurance between their aircraft and other similarly equipped aircraft. Using onboard equipment and procedures, they would then approach and land at the airport. Departures would be handled in a similar fashion. The details for this operational concept are provided in this document.

  16. Autonomous aircraft initiative study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewett, Marle D.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a consulting effort to aid NASA Ames-Dryden in defining a new initiative in aircraft automation are described. The initiative described is a multi-year, multi-center technology development and flight demonstration program. The initiative features the further development of technologies in aircraft automation already being pursued at multiple NASA centers and Department of Defense (DoD) research and Development (R and D) facilities. The proposed initiative involves the development of technologies in intelligent systems, guidance, control, software development, airborne computing, navigation, communications, sensors, unmanned vehicles, and air traffic control. It involves the integration and implementation of these technologies to the extent necessary to conduct selected and incremental flight demonstrations.

  17. Aircraft Design Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Successful commercialization of the AirCraft SYNThesis (ACSYNT) tool has resulted in the creation of Phoenix Integration, Inc. ACSYNT has been exclusively licensed to the company, an outcome of a seven year, $3 million effort to provide unique software technology to a focused design engineering market. Ames Research Center formulated ACSYNT and in working with the Virginia Polytechnic Institute CAD Laboratory, began to design and code a computer-aided design for ACSYNT. Using a Joint Sponsored Research Agreement, Ames formed an industry-government-university alliance to improve and foster research and development for the software. As a result of the ACSYNT Institute, the software is becoming a predominant tool for aircraft conceptual design. ACSYNT has been successfully applied to high- speed civil transport configuration, subsonic transports, and supersonic fighters.

  18. Aircraft engine pollution reduction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of engine operation on the types and levels of the major aircraft engine pollutants is described and the major factors governing the formation of these pollutants during the burning of hydrocarbon fuel are discussed. Methods which are being explored to reduce these pollutants are discussed and their application to several experimental research programs are pointed out. Results showing significant reductions in the levels of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, and oxides of nitrogen obtained from experimental combustion research programs are presented and discussed to point out potential application to aircraft engines. An experimental program designed to develop and demonstrate these and other advanced, low pollution combustor design methods is described. Results that have been obtained to date indicate considerable promise for reducing advanced engine exhaust pollutants to levels significantly below current engines.

  19. Air pollution from aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heywood, J. B.; Fay, J. A.; Chigier, N. A.

    1979-01-01

    Forty-one annotated abstracts of reports generated at MIT and the University of Sheffield are presented along with summaries of the technical projects undertaken. Work completed includes: (1) an analysis of the soot formation and oxidation rates in gas turbine combustors, (2) modelling the nitric oxide formation process in gas turbine combustors, (3) a study of the mechanisms causing high carbon monoxide emissions from gas turbines at low power, (4) an analysis of the dispersion of pollutants from aircraft both around large airports and from the wakes of subsonic and supersonic aircraft, (5) a study of the combustion and flow characteristics of the swirl can modular combustor and the development and verification of NO sub x and CO emissions models, (6) an analysis of the influence of fuel atomizer characteristics on the fuel-air mixing process in liquid fuel spray flames, and (7) the development of models which predict the stability limits of fully and partially premixed fuel-air mixtures.

  20. Project report: Aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Baughcum, S.; Metwally, M.; Seals, R.

    1994-04-01

    Analyses of scenarios of past and possible future emissions are an important aspect of assessing the potential environmental effects from aircraft, including the proposed high speed civil transport (HSCT). The development of a detailed three-dimensional database that accurately represents the integration of all aircraft emissions along realistic flight paths for such scenarios requires complex computational modeling capabilities. Such a detailed data set is required for the scenarios evaluated in this interim assessment. Within the NASA High-Speed Research Program, the Emissions Scenarios Committee provides a forum for identifying the required scenarios and evaluating the resulting database being developed with the advanced emissions modeling capabilities at the Boeing Company and McDonnell Douglas Corporation.