Science.gov

Sample records for aircraft target recognition

  1. Automatic aircraft recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hmam, Hatem; Kim, Jijoong

    2002-08-01

    Automatic aircraft recognition is very complex because of clutter, shadows, clouds, self-occlusion and degraded imaging conditions. This paper presents an aircraft recognition system, which assumes from the start that the image is possibly degraded, and implements a number of strategies to overcome edge fragmentation and distortion. The current vision system employs a bottom up approach, where recognition begins by locating image primitives (e.g., lines and corners), which are then combined in an incremental fashion into larger sets of line groupings using knowledge about aircraft, as viewed from a generic viewpoint. Knowledge about aircraft is represented in the form of whole/part shape description and the connectedness property, and is embedded in production rules, which primarily aim at finding instances of the aircraft parts in the image and checking the connectedness property between the parts. Once a match is found, a confidence score is assigned and as evidence in support of an aircraft interpretation is accumulated, the score is increased proportionally. Finally a selection of the resulting image interpretations with the highest scores, is subjected to competition tests, and only non-ambiguous interpretations are allowed to survive. Experimental results demonstrating the effectiveness of the current recognition system are given.

  2. Aircraft recognition and tracking device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filis, Dimitrios P.; Renios, Christos I.

    2011-11-01

    The technology of aircraft recognition and tracking has various applications in all areas of air navigation, be they civil or military, spanning from air traffic control and regulation at civilian airports to anti-aircraft weapon handling and guidance for military purposes.1, 18 The system presented in this thesis is an alternative implementation of identifying and tracking flying objects, which benefits from the optical spectrum by using an optical camera built into a servo motor (pan-tilt unit). More specifically, through the purpose-developed software, when a target (aircraft) enters the field of view of the camera18, it is both detected and identified.5, 22 Then the servo motor, being provided with data on target position and velocity, tracks the aircraft while it is in constant communication with the camera (Fig. 1). All the features are so designed as to operate under real time conditions.

  3. Aircraft recognition based on the discrepancy of polygon intersection area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiujian; Wang, Yanfang; Feng, Qi

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a new algorithm that based on discrepancy of polygon intersection area for aircraft recognition is presented. The recognition algorithm process involves three parts: generating polygon of aircraft, placing overlapping plane polygons and computing the area of total intersecting polygons. For the purpose of getting the polygon of aircraft, the picture that was ready to be recognized has gone through a series of pre-processing and the smallest circumference polygon algorithm was used to get approximate polygon of the target contour. To make the two compared polygons have the approximate area, the similar principle was utilized. The matching procedure was divided into four steps including computing intersecting points, computing polygon intersecting sets, computing the intersecting area and getting the intersecting rate to recognize the aircraft. The data structure of algorithm is based on doubly liked list principle. A mass of simulations illustrate that the proposed algorithm is effective and reasonable.

  4. Sparsity Motivated Automated Target Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-29

    been suggested for tasks such as face and iris recognition . In this project, we evaluated the effectiveness of such methods for automatic target...Sparsity-based methods have recently been suggested for tasks such as face and iris recognition . In this project, we evaluated the effectiveness of...have recently been suggested for tasks such as face and iris recognition . In this project, we evaluated the effectiveness of such methods for

  5. Automated Optical Target Recognition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    A multi-resolution signal processing approach to object recognition is presented using an optical correlator for generating a wavelet transform . The...This report presents an overview of continuous and discrete wavelet transforms. Both digital and optical implementations of the discrete wavelet ... transform are discussed. Examples of typical wavelet basis functions are compared and the constraints imposed by optical implementations are discussed

  6. Sparsity-motivated automatic target recognition.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vishal M; Nasrabadi, Nasser M; Chellappa, Rama

    2011-04-01

    We present an automatic target recognition algorithm using the recently developed theory of sparse representations and compressive sensing. We show how sparsity can be helpful for efficient utilization of data for target recognition. We verify the efficacy of the proposed algorithm in terms of the recognition rate and confusion matrices on the well known Comanche (Boeing-Sikorsky, USA) forward-looking IR data set consisting of ten different military targets at different orientations.

  7. Aided versus automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hair, Mark A.; Purvis, Bradley D.; Brown, Jeff

    1997-06-01

    Automatic target recognition (ATR) algorithms have offered the promise of recognizing items of military importance over the past 20 years. It is the experience of the authors that greater ATR success would be possible if the ATR were used to 'aid' the human operator instead of automatically 'direct' the operator. ATRs have failed not due to their probability of detection versus false alarm rate, but to neglect of the human component. ATRs are designed to improve overall throughput by relieving the human operator of the need to perform repetitive tasks like scanning vast quantities of imagery for possible targets. ATRs are typically inserted prior to the operator and provide cues, which are then accepted or rejected. From our experience at three field exercises and a current operational deployment to the Bosnian theater, this is not the best way to get total system performance. The human operator makes decisions based on learning, history of past events, and surrounding contextual information. Loss of these factors by providing imagery, latent with symbolic cues on top of the original imagery, actually increases the workload of the operator. This paper covers the lessons learned from the field demonstrations and the operational deployment. The reconnaissance and intelligence community's primary use of an ATR should be to establish prioritized cues of potential targets for an operator to 'pull' from and to be able to 'send' targets identified by the operator for a 'second opinion.' The Army and Air Force are modifying their exploitation workstations over the next 18 months to use ATRs, which operate in this fashion. This will be the future architecture that ATRs for the reconnaissance and intelligence community should integrate into.

  8. Wavelet-based acoustic recognition of aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.; Kercel, S.W.

    1994-09-01

    We describe a wavelet-based technique for identifying aircraft from acoustic emissions during take-off and landing. Tests show that the sensor can be a single, inexpensive hearing-aid microphone placed close to the ground the paper describes data collection, analysis by various technique, methods of event classification, and extraction of certain physical parameters from wavelet subspace projections. The primary goal of this paper is to show that wavelet analysis can be used as a divide-and-conquer first step in signal processing, providing both simplification and noise filtering. The idea is to project the original signal onto the orthogonal wavelet subspaces, both details and approximations. Subsequent analysis, such as system identification, nonlinear systems analysis, and feature extraction, is then carried out on the various signal subspaces.

  9. Small feature recognition of moving targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolnikov, Andre

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an approach related to automated recognition of small features of movable targets including fast moving objects such as airplanes, etc. Small features recognition is a challenging problem in both fields: pattern recognition of particular configurations and of complexes comprising a number of configurations. Specific target details, although well characterized by their features are often arranged in an elaborated way which makes the recognition task very difficult and welcomes new ideas (approaches). On the other hand, the variety of small characters (features) is intrinsically linked to the technology development of the identified targets and is unavoidable. Due to the complexity of possible technological designs, the feature representation is one of the key issues in optical pattern recognition. A flexible hierarchical prediction modeling is proposed with application examples.

  10. Recognition of Hits in a Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semerak, Vojtech; Drahansky, Martin

    This paper describes two possible ways of hit recognition in a target. First method is based on frame differencing with use of a stabilization algorithm to eliminate movements of a target. Second method uses flood fill with random seed point definition to find hits in the target scene.

  11. Automatic recognition of targets from hyperspectra images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampropoulos, George A.; Li, Yifeng; Boulter, James F.

    1998-12-01

    In this paper, we present the formulation of the problem for recognition of targets from hyperspectra images. It is shown that conventional recognition techniques may be extended to hyperspectra images for the distribution process. It is also shown that the recognition process is directly proportional to the number of multispectra frames that represent each target. For the discrimination process we propose a parametric and a nonparametric process in which both are extensions to Fisher and Fukunaga-Mantock methods respectively. Examples that show the composition of hyperspectra features are presented.

  12. Automatic target recognition employing signal compression.

    PubMed

    Ragothaman, Pradeep; Mikhael, Wasfy B; Muise, Robert R; Mahalanobis, Abhijit

    2007-07-20

    Quadratic correlation filters (QCFs) have been used successfully to detect and recognize targets embedded in background clutter. Recently, a QCF called the Rayleigh quotient quadratic correlation filter (RQQCF) was formulated for automatic target recognition (ATR) in IR imagery. Using training images from target and clutter classes, the RQQCF explicitly maximized a class separation metric. What we believe to be a novel approach is presented for ATR that synthesizes the RQQCF using compressed images. The proposed approach considerably reduces the computational complexity and storage requirements while retaining the high recognition accuracy of the original RQQCF technique. The advantages of the proposed scheme are illustrated using sample results obtained from experiments on IR imagery.

  13. Advanced automatic target recognition for police helicopter missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Christoph; Schoppmann, Paul

    2000-08-01

    The results of a case study about the application of an advanced method for automatic target recognition to infrared imagery taken from police helicopter missions are presented. The method consists of the following steps: preprocessing, classification, fusion, postprocessing and tracking, and combines the three paradigms image pyramids, neural networks and bayesian nets. The technology has been developed using a variety of different scenes typical for military aircraft missions. Infrared cameras have been in use for several years at the Bavarian police helicopter forces and are highly valuable for night missions. Several object classes like 'persons' or 'vehicles' are tested and the possible discrimination between persons and animals is shown. The analysis of complex scenes with hidden objects and clutter shows the potentials and limitations of automatic target recognition for real-world tasks. Several display concepts illustrate the achievable improvement of the situation awareness. The similarities and differences between various mission types concerning object variability, time constraints, consequences of false alarms, etc. are discussed. Typical police actions like searching for missing persons or runaway criminals illustrate the advantages of automatic target recognition. The results demonstrate the possible operational benefits for the helicopter crew. Future work will include performance evaluation issues and a system integration concept for the target platform.

  14. Extended target recognition in cognitive radar networks.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yimin; Meng, Huadong; Liu, Yimin; Wang, Xiqin

    2010-01-01

    We address the problem of adaptive waveform design for extended target recognition in cognitive radar networks. A closed-loop active target recognition radar system is extended to the case of a centralized cognitive radar network, in which a generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) based sequential hypothesis testing (SHT) framework is employed. Using Doppler velocities measured by multiple radars, the target aspect angle for each radar is calculated. The joint probability of each target hypothesis is then updated using observations from different radar line of sights (LOS). Based on these probabilities, a minimum correlation algorithm is proposed to adaptively design the transmit waveform for each radar in an amplitude fluctuation situation. Simulation results demonstrate performance improvements due to the cognitive radar network and adaptive waveform design. Our minimum correlation algorithm outperforms the eigen-waveform solution and other non-cognitive waveform design approaches.

  15. Automatic target recognition via classical detection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Douglas R.

    1995-07-01

    Classical Bayesian detection and decision theory applies to arbitrary problems with underlying probabilistic models. When the models describe uncertainties in target type, pose, geometry, surround, scattering phenomena, sensor behavior, and feature extraction, then classical theory directly yields detailed model-based automatic target recognition (ATR) techniques. This paper reviews options and considerations arising under a general Bayesian framework for model- based ATR, including approaches to the major problems of acquiring probabilistic models and of carrying out the indicated Bayesian computations.

  16. Automatic target recognition via sparse representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estabridis, Katia

    2010-04-01

    Automatic target recognition (ATR) based on the emerging technology of Compressed Sensing (CS) can considerably improve accuracy, speed and cost associated with these types of systems. An image based ATR algorithm has been built upon this new theory, which can perform target detection and recognition in a low dimensional space. Compressed dictionaries (A) are formed to include rotational information for a scale of interest. The algorithm seeks to identify y(test sample) as a linear combination of the dictionary elements : y=Ax, where A ∈ Rnxm(n<target. The algorithm can reject clutter and background, which are part of the input image. The detection and recognition problems are solved by finding the sparse-solution to the undetermined system y=Ax via Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) and l1 minimization techniques. Visible and MWIR imagery collected by the Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) was utilized to test the algorithm. Results show an average detection and recognition rates above 95% for targets at ranges up to 3Km for both image modalities.

  17. Automatic target recognition flight prototype for police helicopters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Christoph; Haisch, Stefan; Wolf, Peter

    2002-07-01

    A cooperation between the European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company AG (EADS) and the Bavarian Ministry of the Interior was started at the beginning of 2001 to develop an application for automatic target recognition technology for police helicopter missions. The Bavarian Police Air Support Unit is the main support partner and first user. Bavarian polic helicopters are equipped with a modern infrared system (FLIR) especially for night missions. EADS has extensive knowledge in the area of sensor image exploitation and automatic target recognition (ATR). The technology has been developed for military aircraft reconnaissance missions. The same software kernel is used for a flight prototype which is integrated in a police helicopter. The integration concept presented in this paper is set up so as not to interfere the existing FLIR system in any way. The flight prototype which will be described in detail consists of standard hardware (COTS) components and has the main functionality of detecting pre-selected object classes. With the flight prototype a comprehensive in-flight testing of the automatic target recognition application is enabled. The test procedure and first results of the flight tests are explained with selected examples. The cooperation will go on to further enhance the operational effectiveness of the Bavarian police helicopters.

  18. Structural Target Analysis And Recognition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Harry C.

    1984-06-01

    The structural target analysis and recognition system (STARS) is a pyramid and syntactical based vision system that uniquely classifies targets, using their viewable internal structure. Being a totally structural approach, STARS uses a resolution sequence to develop a hierarchical pyramid organized segmentation and formal language to perform the recognition function. Global structure of the target is derived by the segment connectivity of the inter-resolution levels, while local structure is based on the local relationship of segments at a single level. The relationships of both the global and local structures form a resolution syntax tree (RST). Two targets are said to be structurally similar if they have similar RSTs. The matching process of the RSTs proceeds from the root to the leaves of the tree. The depth to which the match progresses before failure or completion determines the degree of patch in a resolution sense. RSTs from various views of a target are grouped together to form a formal language. The underlying grammar is transformed into a stochastic grammar so as to accommodate segmentation and environmental variations. Recognition metrics are a function of the resolution structure and posterior probability at each resolution level. Because of the inherent resolution sequence, STARS can accommodate both candidate and reference targets from various resolutions.

  19. Laser range profiling for small target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinvall, Ove; Tulldahl, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The detection and classification of small surface and airborne targets at long ranges is a growing need for naval security. Long range ID or ID at closer range of small targets has its limitations in imaging due to the demand on very high transverse sensor resolution. It is therefore motivated to look for 1D laser techniques for target ID. These include vibrometry, and laser range profiling. Vibrometry can give good results but is also sensitive to certain vibrating parts on the target being in the field of view. Laser range profiling is attractive because the maximum range can be substantial, especially for a small laser beam width. A range profiler can also be used in a scanning mode to detect targets within a certain sector. The same laser can also be used for active imaging when the target comes closer and is angular resolved. The present paper will show both experimental and simulated results for laser range profiling of small boats out to 6-7 km range and a UAV mockup at close range (1.3 km). We obtained good results with the profiling system both for target detection and recognition. Comparison of experimental and simulated range waveforms based on CAD models of the target support the idea of having a profiling system as a first recognition sensor and thus narrowing the search space for the automatic target recognition based on imaging at close ranges. The naval experiments took place in the Baltic Sea with many other active and passive EO sensors beside the profiling system. Discussion of data fusion between laser profiling and imaging systems will be given. The UAV experiments were made from the rooftop laboratory at FOI.

  20. Automatic target recognition in acoustics: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacha, John R.

    2002-11-01

    Automatic target recognition (ATR) constitutes one of the major uses for acoustical signal processing. ATR is employed in manned systems for operator workload reduction and performance improvement, as well as in autonomous applications. An overview of some of the major components involved in the architecture of such systems is provided. Feature extraction is the most critical step of ATR and is necessarily application specific. Generic feature selection and ranking methods are presented, including heuristic search and information-theoretic measures. Basic pattern recognition definitions and techniques are reviewed. Commonly used classification paradigms include classical statistical formulations, both parametric and nonparametric, and neural nets; support vector machines and nonmetric methods such as decision forests are some alternative techniques that have received recent attention. A few practical issues often encountered when constructing recognition systems, including training data requirements, ground truth labeling, and performance evaluation methodologies and metrics, are also addressed.

  1. Automatic target recognition on the connection machine

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, J.R. )

    1989-09-01

    Automatic target recognition (ATR) is a computationally intensive problem that benefits from the abilities of the Connection Machine (CM), a massively parallel computer used for data-level parallel computing. The large computational resources of the CM can efficiently handle an approach to ATR that uses parallel stereo-matching and neural-network algorithms. Such an approach shows promise as an ATR system of satisfactory performance. 13 refs.

  2. Unification of automatic target tracking and automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schachter, Bruce J.

    2014-06-01

    The subject being addressed is how an automatic target tracker (ATT) and an automatic target recognizer (ATR) can be fused together so tightly and so well that their distinctiveness becomes lost in the merger. This has historically not been the case outside of biology and a few academic papers. The biological model of ATT∪ATR arises from dynamic patterns of activity distributed across many neural circuits and structures (including retina). The information that the brain receives from the eyes is "old news" at the time that it receives it. The eyes and brain forecast a tracked object's future position, rather than relying on received retinal position. Anticipation of the next moment - building up a consistent perception - is accomplished under difficult conditions: motion (eyes, head, body, scene background, target) and processing limitations (neural noise, delays, eye jitter, distractions). Not only does the human vision system surmount these problems, but it has innate mechanisms to exploit motion in support of target detection and classification. Biological vision doesn't normally operate on snapshots. Feature extraction, detection and recognition are spatiotemporal. When vision is viewed as a spatiotemporal process, target detection, recognition, tracking, event detection and activity recognition, do not seem as distinct as they are in current ATT and ATR designs. They appear as similar mechanism taking place at varying time scales. A framework is provided for unifying ATT and ATR.

  3. Photonics: From target recognition to lesion detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, E. Michael

    1994-01-01

    Since 1989, Martin Marietta has invested in the development of an innovative concept for robust real-time pattern recognition for any two-dimensioanal sensor. This concept has been tested in simulation, and in laboratory and field hardware, for a number of DOD and commercial uses from automatic target recognition to manufacturing inspection. We have now joined Rose Health Care Systems in developing its use for medical diagnostics. The concept is based on determining regions of interest by using optical Fourier bandpassing as a scene segmentation technique, enhancing those regions using wavelet filters, passing the enhanced regions to a neural network for analysis and initial pattern identification, and following this initial identification with confirmation by optical correlation. The optical scene segmentation and pattern confirmation are performed by the same optical module. The neural network is a recursive error minimization network with a small number of connections and nodes that rapidly converges to a global minimum.

  4. Protein-targeted corona phase molecular recognition

    PubMed Central

    Bisker, Gili; Dong, Juyao; Park, Hoyoung D.; Iverson, Nicole M.; Ahn, Jiyoung; Nelson, Justin T.; Landry, Markita P.; Kruss, Sebastian; Strano, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Corona phase molecular recognition (CoPhMoRe) uses a heteropolymer adsorbed onto and templated by a nanoparticle surface to recognize a specific target analyte. This method has not yet been extended to macromolecular analytes, including proteins. Herein we develop a variant of a CoPhMoRe screening procedure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and use it against a panel of human blood proteins, revealing a specific corona phase that recognizes fibrinogen with high selectivity. In response to fibrinogen binding, SWCNT fluorescence decreases by >80% at saturation. Sequential binding of the three fibrinogen nodules is suggested by selective fluorescence quenching by isolated sub-domains and validated by the quenching kinetics. The fibrinogen recognition also occurs in serum environment, at the clinically relevant fibrinogen concentrations in the human blood. These results open new avenues for synthetic, non-biological antibody analogues that recognize biological macromolecules, and hold great promise for medical and clinical applications. PMID:26742890

  5. Protein-targeted corona phase molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Bisker, Gili; Dong, Juyao; Park, Hoyoung D; Iverson, Nicole M; Ahn, Jiyoung; Nelson, Justin T; Landry, Markita P; Kruss, Sebastian; Strano, Michael S

    2016-01-08

    Corona phase molecular recognition (CoPhMoRe) uses a heteropolymer adsorbed onto and templated by a nanoparticle surface to recognize a specific target analyte. This method has not yet been extended to macromolecular analytes, including proteins. Herein we develop a variant of a CoPhMoRe screening procedure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and use it against a panel of human blood proteins, revealing a specific corona phase that recognizes fibrinogen with high selectivity. In response to fibrinogen binding, SWCNT fluorescence decreases by >80% at saturation. Sequential binding of the three fibrinogen nodules is suggested by selective fluorescence quenching by isolated sub-domains and validated by the quenching kinetics. The fibrinogen recognition also occurs in serum environment, at the clinically relevant fibrinogen concentrations in the human blood. These results open new avenues for synthetic, non-biological antibody analogues that recognize biological macromolecules, and hold great promise for medical and clinical applications.

  6. Protein-targeted corona phase molecular recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisker, Gili; Dong, Juyao; Park, Hoyoung D.; Iverson, Nicole M.; Ahn, Jiyoung; Nelson, Justin T.; Landry, Markita P.; Kruss, Sebastian; Strano, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Corona phase molecular recognition (CoPhMoRe) uses a heteropolymer adsorbed onto and templated by a nanoparticle surface to recognize a specific target analyte. This method has not yet been extended to macromolecular analytes, including proteins. Herein we develop a variant of a CoPhMoRe screening procedure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and use it against a panel of human blood proteins, revealing a specific corona phase that recognizes fibrinogen with high selectivity. In response to fibrinogen binding, SWCNT fluorescence decreases by >80% at saturation. Sequential binding of the three fibrinogen nodules is suggested by selective fluorescence quenching by isolated sub-domains and validated by the quenching kinetics. The fibrinogen recognition also occurs in serum environment, at the clinically relevant fibrinogen concentrations in the human blood. These results open new avenues for synthetic, non-biological antibody analogues that recognize biological macromolecules, and hold great promise for medical and clinical applications.

  7. Software for Partly Automated Recognition of Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opitz, David; Blundell, Stuart; Bain, William; Morris, Matthew; Carlson, Ian; Mangrich, Mark

    2003-01-01

    The Feature Analyst is a computer program for assisted (partially automated) recognition of targets in images. This program was developed to accelerate the processing of high-resolution satellite image data for incorporation into geographic information systems (GIS). This program creates an advanced user interface that embeds proprietary machine-learning algorithms in commercial image-processing and GIS software. A human analyst provides samples of target features from multiple sets of data, then the software develops a data-fusion model that automatically extracts the remaining features from selected sets of data. The program thus leverages the natural ability of humans to recognize objects in complex scenes, without requiring the user to explain the human visual recognition process by means of lengthy software. Two major subprograms are the reactive agent and the thinking agent. The reactive agent strives to quickly learn the user s tendencies while the user is selecting targets and to increase the user s productivity by immediately suggesting the next set of pixels that the user may wish to select. The thinking agent utilizes all available resources, taking as much time as needed, to produce the most accurate autonomous feature-extraction model possible.

  8. Software for Partly Automated Recognition of Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opitz, David; Blundell, Stuart; Bain, William; Morris, Matthew; Carlson, Ian; Mangrich, Mark; Selinsky, T.

    2002-01-01

    The Feature Analyst is a computer program for assisted (partially automated) recognition of targets in images. This program was developed to accelerate the processing of high-resolution satellite image data for incorporation into geographic information systems (GIS). This program creates an advanced user interface that embeds proprietary machine-learning algorithms in commercial image-processing and GIS software. A human analyst provides samples of target features from multiple sets of data, then the software develops a data-fusion model that automatically extracts the remaining features from selected sets of data. The program thus leverages the natural ability of humans to recognize objects in complex scenes, without requiring the user to explain the human visual recognition process by means of lengthy software. Two major subprograms are the reactive agent and the thinking agent. The reactive agent strives to quickly learn the user's tendencies while the user is selecting targets and to increase the user's productivity by immediately suggesting the next set of pixels that the user may wish to select. The thinking agent utilizes all available resources, taking as much time as needed, to produce the most accurate autonomous feature-extraction model possible.

  9. Temporal identity in axonal target layer recognition.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Milan; Hummel, Thomas

    2008-12-11

    The segregation of axon and dendrite projections into distinct synaptic layers is a fundamental principle of nervous system organization and the structural basis for information processing in the brain. Layer-specific recognition molecules that allow projecting neurons to stabilize transient contacts and initiate synaptogenesis have been identified. However, most of the neuronal cell-surface molecules critical for layer organization are expressed broadly in the developing nervous system, raising the question of how these so-called permissive adhesion molecules support synaptic specificity. Here we show that the temporal expression dynamics of the zinc-finger protein sequoia is the major determinant of Drosophila photoreceptor connectivity into distinct synaptic layers. Neighbouring R8 and R7 photoreceptors show consecutive peaks of elevated sequoia expression, which correspond to their sequential target-layer innervation. Loss of sequoia in R7 leads to a projection switch into the R8 recipient layer, whereas a prolonged expression in R8 induces a redirection of their axons into the R7 layer. The sequoia-induced axon targeting is mediated through the ubiquitously expressed Cadherin-N cell adhesion molecule. Our data support a model in which recognition specificity during synaptic layer formation is generated through a temporally restricted axonal competence to respond to broadly expressed adhesion molecules. Because developing neurons innervating the same target area often project in a distinct, birth-order-dependent sequence, temporal identity seems to contain crucial information in generating not only cell type diversity during neuronal division but also connection diversity of projecting neurons.

  10. Automatic Target Recognition Based on Cross-Plot

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kelvin Kian Loong; Abbott, Derek

    2011-01-01

    Automatic target recognition that relies on rapid feature extraction of real-time target from photo-realistic imaging will enable efficient identification of target patterns. To achieve this objective, Cross-plots of binary patterns are explored as potential signatures for the observed target by high-speed capture of the crucial spatial features using minimal computational resources. Target recognition was implemented based on the proposed pattern recognition concept and tested rigorously for its precision and recall performance. We conclude that Cross-plotting is able to produce a digital fingerprint of a target that correlates efficiently and effectively to signatures of patterns having its identity in a target repository. PMID:21980508

  11. Automatic target recognition based on cross-plot.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelvin Kian Loong; Abbott, Derek

    2011-01-01

    Automatic target recognition that relies on rapid feature extraction of real-time target from photo-realistic imaging will enable efficient identification of target patterns. To achieve this objective, Cross-plots of binary patterns are explored as potential signatures for the observed target by high-speed capture of the crucial spatial features using minimal computational resources. Target recognition was implemented based on the proposed pattern recognition concept and tested rigorously for its precision and recall performance. We conclude that Cross-plotting is able to produce a digital fingerprint of a target that correlates efficiently and effectively to signatures of patterns having its identity in a target repository.

  12. Drug targeting by macromolecules without recognition unit?

    PubMed

    Hudecz, Ferenc; Reményi, Judit; Szabó, Rita; Kóczán, György; Mezo, Gábor; Kovács, Péter; Gaál, Dezso

    2003-01-01

    his review will summarize available information on the ability of macromolecular conjugates containing no specific recognition motifs to deliver anthracyclines (daunomycin, adriamycin) or methotrexate to target cells such as tumour cells or macrophages. Conjugates with natural (proteins, DNA, carbohydrates) and synthetic macromolecules (linear and branched chain poly-alpha-amino acids, non-biodegradable DIVEMA, HPMA etc.) will be reviewed. Experimental data from several laboratories indicate that these conjugates are taken up by cells mainly by fluid-phase or adsorptive endocytosis. It is believed that these processes do not involve 'specific receptors'. Two examples of methotrexate and daunomycin conjugates will be discussed to show the effect of the chemical structure of branched chain polypeptides on the uptake and antitumour or antiparasitic (Leishmania donovani infection) efficacy of conjugates.

  13. Transformation invariant on-line target recognition.

    PubMed

    Iftekharuddin, Khan M

    2011-06-01

    Transformation invariant automatic target recognition (ATR) has been an active research area due to its widespread applications in defense, robotics, medical imaging and geographic scene analysis. The primary goal for this paper is to obtain an on-line ATR system for targets in presence of image transformations, such as rotation, translation, scale and occlusion as well as resolution changes. We investigate biologically inspired adaptive critic design (ACD) neural network (NN) models for on-line learning of such transformations. We further exploit reinforcement learning (RL) in ACD framework to obtain transformation invariant ATR. We exploit two ACD designs, such as heuristic dynamic programming (HDP) and dual heuristic dynamic programming (DHP) to obtain transformation invariant ATR. We obtain extensive statistical evaluations of proposed on-line ATR networks using both simulated image transformations and real benchmark facial image database, UMIST, with pose variations. Our simulations show promising results for learning transformations in simulated images and authenticating out-of plane rotated face images. Comparing the two on-line ATR designs, HDP outperforms DHP in learning capability and robustness and is more tolerant to noise. The computational time involved in HDP is also less than that of DHP. On the other hand, DHP achieves a 100% success rate more frequently than HDP for individual targets, and the residual critic error in DHP is generally smaller than that of HDP. Mathematical analyses of both our RL-based on-line ATR designs are also obtained to provide a sufficient condition for asymptotic convergence in a statistical average sense.

  14. Automatic target recognition apparatus and method

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgart, Chris W.; Ciarcia, Christopher A.

    2000-01-01

    An automatic target recognition apparatus (10) is provided, having a video camera/digitizer (12) for producing a digitized image signal (20) representing an image containing therein objects which objects are to be recognized if they meet predefined criteria. The digitized image signal (20) is processed within a video analysis subroutine (22) residing in a computer (14) in a plurality of parallel analysis chains such that the objects are presumed to be lighter in shading than the background in the image in three of the chains and further such that the objects are presumed to be darker than the background in the other three chains. In two of the chains the objects are defined by surface texture analysis using texture filter operations. In another two of the chains the objects are defined by background subtraction operations. In yet another two of the chains the objects are defined by edge enhancement processes. In each of the analysis chains a calculation operation independently determines an error factor relating to the probability that the objects are of the type which should be recognized, and a probability calculation operation combines the results of the analysis chains.

  15. Sparsity-Inspired Recognition of Targets in Infrared Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-29

    been suggested for tasks such as face and iris recognition . In this project, we evaluated the effectiveness of such methods for automatic target...Sparsity-based methods have recently been suggested for tasks such as face and iris recognition . In this project, we evaluated the effectiveness of...have recently been suggested for tasks such as face and iris recognition . In this project, we evaluated the effectiveness of such methods for

  16. Recognition of the aircraft navigation light color code.

    PubMed

    Bowman, K J; Cole, B L

    1981-11-01

    Navigation lights are a set of color-coded signals intended to indicate the presence, orientation, and relative direction of aircraft at night, and thereby reduce the possibility of midair collisions. It is known that some people with defective color vision have difficulty with quite simple codes. Accordingly, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has recommended -- and most countries apply -- that applicants for pilot's licences demonstrate the ability to recognise colored light signals. Pilots who fail to meet this requirement are restricted from flying at night. But is the navigation light signal system effective? This paper concludes that the navigation light system at night can serve as a crude screening method to categorize intruder aircraft into "potential threat" and "no threat" categories. An experiment is described which shows that observers with normal color vision can determine intruder aircraft orientation and relative direction from the navigation light code with a moderately high degree of reliability. The reliability of judgement is, however, decreased by the higher-intensity presence lights also displayed by aircraft.

  17. Autonomous learning approach for automatic target recognition processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Lu, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    JPL is developing a comprehensive Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) system that consists of an innovative anomaly detection preprocessing module and an automatic training target recognition module. The anomaly detection module is trained with an imaging data feature retrieved from an imaging sensor suite that represents the states of the normalcy model. The normalcy model is then trained from a self-organizing learning system over a period of time and fed into the anomaly detection module for scene anomaly monitoring and detection. The "abnormal" event detection will be sent to a human operator for further investigation responses. The target recognition will be continuously updated with the "normal' input sensor data. The combination of the anomaly detection preprocessing module to the re-trainable target recognition processor will result in a dynamic ATR system that is capable of automatic detection of anomaly event and provide an early warning to a human operator for in-time warning and response.

  18. Wavelet-Based Signal and Image Processing for Target Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    in target recognition applications. Classical spatial and frequency domain image processing algorithms were generalized to process discrete wavelet ... transform (DWT) data. Results include adaptation of classical filtering, smoothing and interpolation techniques to DWT. From 2003 the research

  19. Target Recognition Using Neural Networks for Model Deformation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Richard W.; Hibler, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Optical measurements provide a non-invasive method for measuring deformation of wind tunnel models. Model deformation systems use targets mounted or painted on the surface of the model to identify known positions, and photogrammetric methods are used to calculate 3-D positions of the targets on the model from digital 2-D images. Under ideal conditions, the reflective targets are placed against a dark background and provide high-contrast images, aiding in target recognition. However, glints of light reflecting from the model surface, or reduced contrast caused by light source or model smoothness constraints, can compromise accurate target determination using current algorithmic methods. This paper describes a technique using a neural network and image processing technologies which increases the reliability of target recognition systems. Unlike algorithmic methods, the neural network can be trained to identify the characteristic patterns that distinguish targets from other objects of similar size and appearance and can adapt to changes in lighting and environmental conditions.

  20. Automatic Target Recognition Classification System Evaluation Methodology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    Testing Example (α=0.1) ....................... 2-16 2.9 Binormal 2AFC ROC Curves...2-17 2.10 Target and Non-target Normal pdfs for a 2AFC Task....................................... 2-20 2.11 Sample N-N ROC Curve...2-23 2.13 Operating Curve Derived from 2AFC Task....................................................... 2-28 2.14 Example

  1. Kernel generalized neighbor discriminant embedding for SAR automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yulin; Pei, Jifang; Yang, Jianyu; Wang, Tao; Yang, Haiguang; Wang, Bing

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new supervised feature extraction algorithm in synthetic aperture radar automatic target recognition (SAR ATR), called generalized neighbor discriminant embedding (GNDE). Based on manifold learning, GNDE integrates class and neighborhood information to enhance discriminative power of extracted feature. Besides, the kernelized counterpart of this algorithm is also proposed, called kernel-GNDE (KGNDE). The experiment in this paper shows that the proposed algorithms have better recognition performance than PCA and KPCA.

  2. Cascaded automatic target recognition (Cascaded ATR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Bradley

    2010-04-01

    The global war on terror has plunged US and coalition forces into a battle space requiring the continuous adaptation of tactics and technologies to cope with an elusive enemy. As a result, technologies that enhance the intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) mission making the warfighter more effective are experiencing increased interest. In this paper we show how a new generation of smart cameras built around foveated sensing makes possible a powerful ISR technique termed Cascaded ATR. Foveated sensing is an innovative optical concept in which a single aperture captures two distinct fields of view. In Cascaded ATR, foveated sensing is used to provide a coarse resolution, persistent surveillance, wide field of view (WFOV) detector to accomplish detection level perception. At the same time, within the foveated sensor, these detection locations are passed as a cue to a steerable, high fidelity, narrow field of view (NFOV) detector to perform recognition level perception. Two new ISR mission scenarios, utilizing Cascaded ATR, are proposed.

  3. Time series modeling for automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolnikov, Andre

    2012-05-01

    Time series modeling is proposed for identification of targets whose images are not clearly seen. The model building takes into account air turbulence, precipitation, fog, smoke and other factors obscuring and distorting the image. The complex of library data (of images, etc.) serving as a basis for identification provides the deterministic part of the identification process, while the partial image features, distorted parts, irrelevant pieces and absence of particular features comprise the stochastic part of the target identification. The missing data approach is elaborated that helps the prediction process for the image creation or reconstruction. The results are provided.

  4. Composite Wavelet Filters for Enhanced Automated Target Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, Jeffrey N.; Zhang, Yuhan; Lu, Thomas T.; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    Automated Target Recognition (ATR) systems aim to automate target detection, recognition, and tracking. The current project applies a JPL ATR system to low-resolution sonar and camera videos taken from unmanned vehicles. These sonar images are inherently noisy and difficult to interpret, and pictures taken underwater are unreliable due to murkiness and inconsistent lighting. The ATR system breaks target recognition into three stages: 1) Videos of both sonar and camera footage are broken into frames and preprocessed to enhance images and detect Regions of Interest (ROIs). 2) Features are extracted from these ROIs in preparation for classification. 3) ROIs are classified as true or false positives using a standard Neural Network based on the extracted features. Several preprocessing, feature extraction, and training methods are tested and discussed in this paper.

  5. Transfer network learning based remote sensing target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Shuiping; Wang, Yuqin; Jiao, Licheng

    2009-10-01

    The target recognition accuracy of remote sensing images is not satisfied. The labels of images acquisition and recollecting are difficult and expensive. In order to solve the problem, we introduce transfer learning into Network Boosting algorithm (NB) and propose Transfer Network Learning algorithm (TNL), in which other out-date data are reused to instruct the remote sensing target recognition. TNL is suitable to improve the performance of remote sensing target recognition, in which instances transfer learning is adopted for domain adaptation. The experimental results on the MSTAR SAR data set and remote sensing data set including two-class planes show that the proposed algorithm has better performance and achieves different domains learning.

  6. Component-based target recognition inspired by human vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yufeng; Agyepong, Kwabena

    2009-05-01

    In contrast with machine vision, human can recognize an object from complex background with great flexibility. For example, given the task of finding and circling all cars (no further information) in a picture, you may build a virtual image in mind from the task (or target) description before looking at the picture. Specifically, the virtual car image may be composed of the key components such as driver cabin and wheels. In this paper, we propose a component-based target recognition method by simulating the human recognition process. The component templates (equivalent to the virtual image in mind) of the target (car) are manually decomposed from the target feature image. Meanwhile, the edges of the testing image can be extracted by using a difference of Gaussian (DOG) model that simulates the spatiotemporal response in visual process. A phase correlation matching algorithm is then applied to match the templates with the testing edge image. If all key component templates are matched with the examining object, then this object is recognized as the target. Besides the recognition accuracy, we will also investigate if this method works with part targets (half cars). In our experiments, several natural pictures taken on streets were used to test the proposed method. The preliminary results show that the component-based recognition method is very promising.

  7. Hybrid ANN-ES architecture for automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Chungte; Ligomenides, Panos A.

    1992-03-01

    Automatic target recognition can benefit from cooperation of artificial neural networks (ANNs) and expert systems (ESs). Bottom-up training and generalization properties of artificial neural networks, and top-down utilization of accumulated knowledge by expert system processors, can be combined to offer robust performance of the automatic target recognition models. In this paper, we propose a modular, flexible and expandable, hybrid architecture which provides cooperative, functional and operational interfaces between expert system and artificial neural networks facilities. In order to make the problem more specific, we apply this architecture to the Multline Optical Character Reader (MLOCR) system, which is being developed to sort the postal mail pieces automatically.

  8. Automatic Target Recognition for Hyperspectral Imagery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    tanks, T-72 Soviet tanks, and HMMWVs with woodland camouflage . Now that an atmospherically compensated radiance signature exists for each item in the... Symposium , Vol. 5, pp. 3379-..82. Chen, Y., Nasrabadi, N. M., & Tran, T. D. (2011). Sparse Representation for Target Detection in Hyperspectral... Radar , Out-of-Library Identification, and Non-Declarations. PhD Thesis AFIT-DS-ENS-07-04, Air Force Institute of Technology, WPAFB. Fumera, G., Roli

  9. EOID Evaluation and Automated Target Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    Electro - Optic IDentification (EOID) sensors into shallow water littoral zone minehunting systems on towed, remotely operated, and autonomous platforms. These downlooking laser-based sensors operate at unparalleled standoff ranges in visible wavelengths to image and identify mine-like objects that have been detected through other sensing means such as magnetic induction and various modes of acoustic imaging. Our long term goal is to provide a robust automated target cueing and identification capability for use with these imaging sensors. It is also our goal to assist the

  10. Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Company, Washington, DC Boeing Commercial Aircraft Division, Seattle, WA and Long Beach, CA Boeing Military Aircraft and Missile Division, St. Louis, MO and... aircraft ; military fixed-wing aircraft ; rotorcraft (helicopters and tiltrotor aircraft ); and aircraft jet engines. Two companies dominate the commercial... aircraft business, Boeing and Airbus. Four companies dominate the military fixed-wing market, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, BAE Systems, and European

  11. Local structure preserving sparse coding for infrared target recognition

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jing; Yue, Jiang; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lianfa

    2017-01-01

    Sparse coding performs well in image classification. However, robust target recognition requires a lot of comprehensive template images and the sparse learning process is complex. We incorporate sparsity into a template matching concept to construct a local sparse structure matching (LSSM) model for general infrared target recognition. A local structure preserving sparse coding (LSPSc) formulation is proposed to simultaneously preserve the local sparse and structural information of objects. By adding a spatial local structure constraint into the classical sparse coding algorithm, LSPSc can improve the stability of sparse representation for targets and inhibit background interference in infrared images. Furthermore, a kernel LSPSc (K-LSPSc) formulation is proposed, which extends LSPSc to the kernel space to weaken the influence of the linear structure constraint in nonlinear natural data. Because of the anti-interference and fault-tolerant capabilities, both LSPSc- and K-LSPSc-based LSSM can implement target identification based on a simple template set, which just needs several images containing enough local sparse structures to learn a sufficient sparse structure dictionary of a target class. Specifically, this LSSM approach has stable performance in the target detection with scene, shape and occlusions variations. High performance is demonstrated on several datasets, indicating robust infrared target recognition in diverse environments and imaging conditions. PMID:28323824

  12. Automated target recognition and tracking using an optical pattern recognition neural network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin

    1991-01-01

    The on-going development of an automatic target recognition and tracking system at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is presented. This system is an optical pattern recognition neural network (OPRNN) that is an integration of an innovative optical parallel processor and a feature extraction based neural net training algorithm. The parallel optical processor provides high speed and vast parallelism as well as full shift invariance. The neural network algorithm enables simultaneous discrimination of multiple noisy targets in spite of their scales, rotations, perspectives, and various deformations. This fully developed OPRNN system can be effectively utilized for the automated spacecraft recognition and tracking that will lead to success in the Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C) of the unmanned Cargo Transfer Vehicle (CTV). One of the most powerful optical parallel processors for automatic target recognition is the multichannel correlator. With the inherent advantages of parallel processing capability and shift invariance, multiple objects can be simultaneously recognized and tracked using this multichannel correlator. This target tracking capability can be greatly enhanced by utilizing a powerful feature extraction based neural network training algorithm such as the neocognitron. The OPRNN, currently under investigation at JPL, is constructed with an optical multichannel correlator where holographic filters have been prepared using the neocognitron training algorithm. The computation speed of the neocognitron-type OPRNN is up to 10(exp 14) analog connections/sec that enabling the OPRNN to outperform its state-of-the-art electronics counterpart by at least two orders of magnitude.

  13. Non-Cooperative Target Recognition by Means of Singular Value Decomposition Applied to Radar High Resolution Range Profiles †

    PubMed Central

    López-Rodríguez, Patricia; Escot-Bocanegra, David; Fernández-Recio, Raúl; Bravo, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Radar high resolution range profiles are widely used among the target recognition community for the detection and identification of flying targets. In this paper, singular value decomposition is applied to extract the relevant information and to model each aircraft as a subspace. The identification algorithm is based on angle between subspaces and takes place in a transformed domain. In order to have a wide database of radar signatures and evaluate the performance, simulated range profiles are used as the recognition database while the test samples comprise data of actual range profiles collected in a measurement campaign. Thanks to the modeling of aircraft as subspaces only the valuable information of each target is used in the recognition process. Thus, one of the main advantages of using singular value decomposition, is that it helps to overcome the notable dissimilarities found in the shape and signal-to-noise ratio between actual and simulated profiles due to their difference in nature. Despite these differences, the recognition rates obtained with the algorithm are quite promising. PMID:25551484

  14. 33 CFR 334.120 - Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.120 Section 334.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....120 Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger zone. A...

  15. Automated Target Acquisition, Recognition and Tracking (ATTRACT). Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Mahmoud A.

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective of phase 1 of this research project is to conduct multidisciplinary research that will contribute to fundamental scientific knowledge in several of the USAF critical technology areas. Specifically, neural networks, signal processing techniques, and electro-optic capabilities are utilized to solve problems associated with automated target acquisition, recognition, and tracking. To accomplish the stated objective, several tasks have been identified and were executed.

  16. Optical-digital-neural network system for aided target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, Keith B.; Hartman, Richard L.

    1995-07-01

    Many military systems have a critical need for aided target recognition, or cuing. This includes several systems with wide field-of-view search missions such as the UAV, EFOG-M, and Comanche. This report discusses one new approach: a multiple region of interest processor based on diffraction pattern sampling and digital neural network processing. In this concept an optical system segments the image into multiple, rectangular regions of interest and in parallel converts each ROI, be it visible, IR, or radar, to a spatial frequency power spectrum and samples that spectrum for 64 features. A neural network learns to correlate those features with target classes or identifications. A digital system uses the network weights to recognize unknown targets. The research discussed in this report using a single ROI processor showed a very high level of performance. Out of 1024 trials with models of five targets of F- 14, F-18, HIND, SCUD, and M1 tanks, there were 1023 correct classifications and 1 incorrect classification. Out of 1514 trials with those images plus 490 real clutter scenes, there were 1514 correct decisions between target or no-target. Of the 1024 target detections, there were 1023 correct classifications. Out of 60 trials with low resolution IR images of real scenes, there were 60 correct decisions between target and no-target. Of the 40 target detections, there were 40 correct classifications.

  17. Structural flexibility of intrinsically disordered proteins induces stepwise target recognition.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Nobu C; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2013-12-14

    An intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) lacks a stable three-dimensional structure, while it folds into a specific structure when it binds to a target molecule. In some IDP-target complexes, not all target binding surfaces are exposed on the outside, and intermediate states are observed in their binding processes. We consider that stepwise target recognition via intermediate states is a characteristic of IDP binding to targets with "hidden" binding sites. To investigate IDP binding to hidden target binding sites, we constructed an IDP lattice model based on the HP model. In our model, the IDP is modeled as a chain and the target is modeled as a highly coarse-grained object. We introduced motion and internal interactions to the target to hide its binding sites. In the case of unhidden binding sites, a two-state transition between the free states and a bound state is observed, and we consider that this represents coupled folding and binding. Introducing hidden binding sites, we found an intermediate bound state in which the IDP forms various structures to temporarily stabilize the complex. The intermediate state provides a scaffold for the IDP to access the hidden binding site. We call this process multiform binding. We conclude that structural flexibility of IDPs enables them to access hidden binding sites and this is a functional advantage of IDPs.

  18. Structural flexibility of intrinsically disordered proteins induces stepwise target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Nobu C.; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2013-12-01

    An intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) lacks a stable three-dimensional structure, while it folds into a specific structure when it binds to a target molecule. In some IDP-target complexes, not all target binding surfaces are exposed on the outside, and intermediate states are observed in their binding processes. We consider that stepwise target recognition via intermediate states is a characteristic of IDP binding to targets with "hidden" binding sites. To investigate IDP binding to hidden target binding sites, we constructed an IDP lattice model based on the HP model. In our model, the IDP is modeled as a chain and the target is modeled as a highly coarse-grained object. We introduced motion and internal interactions to the target to hide its binding sites. In the case of unhidden binding sites, a two-state transition between the free states and a bound state is observed, and we consider that this represents coupled folding and binding. Introducing hidden binding sites, we found an intermediate bound state in which the IDP forms various structures to temporarily stabilize the complex. The intermediate state provides a scaffold for the IDP to access the hidden binding site. We call this process multiform binding. We conclude that structural flexibility of IDPs enables them to access hidden binding sites and this is a functional advantage of IDPs.

  19. DNA bending is a determinant of calicheamicin target recognition.

    PubMed

    Salzberg, A A; Dedon, P C

    2000-06-27

    Calicheamicin is a hydrophobic enediyne antibiotic that binds noncovalently to DNA and causes sequence-selective oxidation of deoxyribose. While the drug makes several base contacts along the minor groove, the diversity of binding-site sequences and the effects of DNA conformation on calicheamicin-induced DNA cleavage suggest that sequence recognition per se is not the primary determinant of target selection. We now present evidence that calicheamicin bends its DNA targets. Using a gel mobility assay, we observed that polymers of oligonucleotide constructs containing AGGA and ACAA binding sites for calicheamicin did not possess intrinsic curvature. Binding of calicheamicin epsilon, the aromatized form of the parent calicheamicin gamma(1)(I), to oligonucleotide constructs containing binding sites in phase with the helical repeat caused a shift to smaller circle sizes in T4 ligase-mediated circle formation assays, with a much smaller shift observed with constructs containing out-of-phase binding sites. It was also observed that binding of calicheamicin epsilon to a 273 bp construct with phased binding sites caused an increase in the molar cyclization factor, J, from 8 x 10(-8) to 9 x 10(-6) M. These results are consistent with DNA bending as part of an induced-fit mechanism of DNA target recognition and with the hypothesis that the preferred targets of calicheamicin, the 3' ends of oligopurine tracts, are characterized by unique conformational properties.

  20. Aerial target recognition using MRA, GVF snakes, and polygon approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhen Z.; Zhang, Taiyi; Xu, Jian

    2003-04-01

    The traditional method to extract target contour from aerial target image is changing the aerial image into a gray level image with multiple thresholds or binary image with single threshold. From the edge of target, contour can be extracted according to the changed value. The traditional method is useful only when contrast between target and background is in the proper degree. Snakes are curves defined within an image domain that can move under the influence of internal force coming from within the curve itself and external forces are defined so that the snake will conform to an object boundary or other desired features within an image. Snakes have been proved an effective method and widely used in image processing and computer vision. Snakes synthesize parametric curves within an image domain and allow them to move toward desired edges. Particular advantages of the GVF(Gradient Vector Flow) snakes over a traditional snakes are its insensitivity to initialization and its ability to move into boundary concavities. Its initializations can be inside, outside, or across the object"s boundary. The GVF snake does not need prior knowledge about whether to shrink or expand toward the boundary. This increased capture range is achieved through a diffusion process that does not blur the edges of themselves. Affected by the light from different incident angle, the brightness of aerial target surface changed greatly in a complicate mode. So the GVF snakes is not fast, accurate and effective all the time for this kind of images. A new contour extracting method, GVF Snakes Combined with wavelet multi-resolution Analysis is proposed in this paper. In this algorithm, bubble wavelet is used iteratively to do the multi resolution analysis in the order of degressive scale before GVF Snakes is used every time to extract accurate contour of target. After accurate contour is extracted, polygon approximation is used to extract characteristics to realize the recognition of aerial target

  1. MicroRNAs: Processing, Maturation, Target Recognition and Regulatory Functions

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Girish C.; Singh, Jagjit; Barik, Sailen

    2012-01-01

    The remarkable discovery of small noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs) and their role in posttranscriptional gene regulation have revealed another fine-tuning step in the expression of genetic information. A large number of cellular pathways, which act in organismal development and are important in health and disease, appear to be modulated by miRNAs. At the molecular level, miRNAs restrain the production of proteins by affecting the stability of their target mRNA and/or by down-regulating their translation. This review attempts to offer a snapshot of aspects of miRNA coding, processing, target recognition and function in animals. Our goal here is to provide the readers with a thought-provoking and mechanistic introduction to the miRNA world rather than with a detailed encyclopedia. PMID:22468167

  2. Feature Extraction and Selection Strategies for Automated Target Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, W. Nicholas; Zhang, Yuhan; Lu, Thomas T.; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2010-01-01

    Several feature extraction and selection methods for an existing automatic target recognition (ATR) system using JPLs Grayscale Optical Correlator (GOC) and Optimal Trade-Off Maximum Average Correlation Height (OT-MACH) filter were tested using MATLAB. The ATR system is composed of three stages: a cursory region of-interest (ROI) search using the GOC and OT-MACH filter, a feature extraction and selection stage, and a final classification stage. Feature extraction and selection concerns transforming potential target data into more useful forms as well as selecting important subsets of that data which may aide in detection and classification. The strategies tested were built around two popular extraction methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA). Performance was measured based on the classification accuracy and free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) output of a support vector machine(SVM) and a neural net (NN) classifier.

  3. Optical correlator based target detection, recognition, classification, and tracking.

    PubMed

    Manzur, Tariq; Zeller, John; Serati, Steve

    2012-07-20

    A dedicated automatic target recognition and tracking optical correlator (OC) system using advanced processing technology has been developed. Rapidly cycling data-cubes with size, shape, and orientation are employed with software algorithms to isolate correlation peaks and enable tracking of targets in maritime environments with future track prediction. The method has been found superior to employing maximum average correlation height filters for which the correlation peak intensity drops off in proportion to the number of training images. The physical dimensions of the OC system may be reduced to as small as 2 in. × 2 in. × 3 in. (51 mm × 51 mm × 76 mm) by modifying and minimizing the OC components.

  4. Colour invariant target recognition in multiple camera CCTV surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soori, Umair; Yuen, P. W. T.; Ibrahim, I.; Han, J.; Tsitiridis, A.; Hong, K.; Chen, T.; Jackman, J.; James, D.; Richardson, M.

    2011-11-01

    People tracking in crowded scene have been a popular, and at the same time a very difficult topic in computer vision. It is mainly because of the difficulty for the acquisition of intrinsic signatures of targets from a single view of the scene. Many factors, such as variable illumination conditions and viewing angles, will induce illusive modification of intrinsic signatures of targets. The objective of this paper is to verify if colour constancy (CC) approach really helps people tracking in CCTV network system. We have testified a number of CC algorithms together with various colour descriptors, to assess the efficiencies of people recognitions from multi-camera i-LIDS data set via receiver operation characteristics (ROC). It is found that when CC is applied together with some form of colour restoration mechanisms such as colour transfer, it does improve people recognition by at least a factor of 2. An elementary luminance based CC coupled with a pixel based colour transfer algorithm have been developed and it is reported in this paper.

  5. Thermodynamics of DNA target site recognition by homing endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Eastberg, Jennifer H.; Smith, Audrey McConnell; Zhao, Lei; Ashworth, Justin; Shen, Betty W.; Stoddard, Barry L.

    2007-01-01

    The thermodynamic profiles of target site recognition have been surveyed for homing endonucleases from various structural families. Similar to DNA-binding proteins that recognize shorter target sites, homing endonucleases display a narrow range of binding free energies and affinities, mediated by structural interactions that balance the magnitude of enthalpic and entropic forces. While the balance of ΔH and TΔS are not strongly correlated with the overall extent of DNA bending, unfavorable ΔHbinding is associated with unstacking of individual base steps in the target site. The effects of deleterious basepair substitutions in the optimal target sites of two LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases, and the subsequent effect of redesigning one of those endonucleases to accommodate that DNA sequence change, were also measured. The substitution of base-specific hydrogen bonds in a wild-type endonuclease/DNA complex with hydrophobic van der Waals contacts in a redesigned complex reduced the ability to discriminate between sites, due to nonspecific ΔSbinding. PMID:17947319

  6. Modularized reconfigurable system for target recognition with multi-DSP processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun; Li, Huili; Xie, Xiaoming

    2013-10-01

    A modularized reconfigurable system for target recognition with multi-DSP processing is designed to reconfigure the target recognition modules and update the distributed target feature libraries through the serial channel to adapt to the varied application. The system is separated into three independent modules and two work modes running at different time slides based on project switch. The modularized reconfiguration module is designed as a minimum security kernel separated from the target recognition module to decrease their coupling and interrelationship. This kind of multi-project design based on cyclic redundancy check presents a more independent and reliable target recognition system with modularized reconfiguration ability.

  7. Ultrafast Target Recognition via Super-Parallel Holograph Based Correlator, RAM and Associative Memory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-11

    CORRELATOR In many pattern- recognition and target tracking applications, the speed of the detection system is of critical importance [1-3]. Optical...time target identification and recognition is usually performed by correlating an acquired image with images stored in a database. Current image... recognition and target -tracking applications, the speed of the detection system is of critical importance [1-3]. Optical correlation techniques in which

  8. Multi-Stage System for Automatic Target Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Lu, Thomas T.; Ye, David; Edens, Weston; Johnson, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    A multi-stage automated target recognition (ATR) system has been designed to perform computer vision tasks with adequate proficiency in mimicking human vision. The system is able to detect, identify, and track targets of interest. Potential regions of interest (ROIs) are first identified by the detection stage using an Optimum Trade-off Maximum Average Correlation Height (OT-MACH) filter combined with a wavelet transform. False positives are then eliminated by the verification stage using feature extraction methods in conjunction with neural networks. Feature extraction transforms the ROIs using filtering and binning algorithms to create feature vectors. A feedforward back-propagation neural network (NN) is then trained to classify each feature vector and to remove false positives. The system parameter optimizations process has been developed to adapt to various targets and datasets. The objective was to design an efficient computer vision system that can learn to detect multiple targets in large images with unknown backgrounds. Because the target size is small relative to the image size in this problem, there are many regions of the image that could potentially contain the target. A cursory analysis of every region can be computationally efficient, but may yield too many false positives. On the other hand, a detailed analysis of every region can yield better results, but may be computationally inefficient. The multi-stage ATR system was designed to achieve an optimal balance between accuracy and computational efficiency by incorporating both models. The detection stage first identifies potential ROIs where the target may be present by performing a fast Fourier domain OT-MACH filter-based correlation. Because threshold for this stage is chosen with the goal of detecting all true positives, a number of false positives are also detected as ROIs. The verification stage then transforms the regions of interest into feature space, and eliminates false positives using an

  9. A proposal for combining mapping, localization and target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grönwall, Christina; Hendeby, Gustaf; Sinivaara, Kristian

    2015-10-01

    Simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) is a well-known positioning approach in GPS-denied environments such as urban canyons and inside buildings. Autonomous/aided target detection and recognition (ATR) is commonly used in military application to detect threats and targets in outdoor environments. This papers present approaches to combine SLAM with ATR in ways that compensate for the drawbacks in each method. The methods use physical objects that are recognizable by ATR as unambiguous features in SLAM, while SLAM provides the ATR with better position estimates. Landmarks in the form of 3D point features based on normal aligned radial features (NARF) are used in conjunction with identified objects and 3D object models that replace landmarks when possible. This leads to a more compact map representation with fewer landmarks, which partly compensates for the introduced cost of the ATR. We analyze three approaches to combine SLAM and 3D-data; point-point matching ignoring NARF features, point-point matching using the set of points that are selected by NARF feature analysis, and matching of NARF features using nearest neighbor analysis. The first two approaches are is similar to the common iterative closest point (ICP). We propose an algorithm that combines EKF-SLAM and ATR based on rectangle estimation. The intended application is to improve the positioning of a first responder moving through an indoor environment, where the map offers localization and simultaneously helps locate people, furniture and potentially dangerous objects such as gas canisters.

  10. Microwave imaging of aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Bernard D.

    1988-12-01

    Three methods of imaging aircraft from the ground with microwave radar with quality suitable for aircraft target recognition are described. The imaging methods are based on a self-calibration procedure called adaptive beamforming that compensates for the severe geometric distortion inherent in any imaging system that is large enough to achieve the high angular resolution necessary for two-dimensional target imaging. The signal processing algorithm is described and X-band (3-cm)-wavelength experiments demonstrate its success on commercial aircraft flying into Philadelphia International Airport.

  11. A study on target recognition fusion algorithm based on fuzzy theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Feng; Yang, WanHai

    2008-03-01

    In the process of the multi-sensors target recognition fusion, focused on the problem that it is difficult to determine the reliability of each sensor and how the data measured by different sensors are fused, a multi-sensor target recognition fusion method based on fuzzy theory is proposed. The mutual supportability of multiple sensors is obtained from the correlation function. Then by the membership function, the reliability of information provide by each sensor is gained. Finally, the supposed fusion result of multi-sensors target recognition can be produced on the basis of fuzzy integration function. The method is simple computationally and can objectively reflect the reliability of each sensor and interrelationship between these sensors. By applying the method to the target recognition, the simulation experiment shows that it can identify the target accurately and is an effective and feasible multi-sensors target recognition fusion method.

  12. A Pathogenic Nematode Targets Recognition Proteins to Avoid Insect Defenses

    PubMed Central

    Toubarro, Duarte; Avila, Mónica Martinez; Montiel, Rafael; Simões, Nelson

    2013-01-01

    Steinernemacarpocapsae is a nematode pathogenic in a wide variety of insect species. The great pathogenicity of this nematode has been ascribed to its ability to overcome the host immune response; however, little is known about the mechanisms involved in this process. The analysis of an expressed sequence tags (EST) library in the nematode during the infective phase was performed and a highly abundant contig homologous to serine protease inhibitors was identified. In this work, we show that this contig is part of a 641-bp cDNA that encodes a BPTI-Kunitz family inhibitor (Sc-KU-4), which is up-regulated in the parasite during invasion and installation. Recombinant Sc-KU-4 protein was produced in Escherichia coli and shown to inhibit chymotrypsin and elastase activities in a dose-dependent manner by a competitive mechanism with Ki values of 1.8 nM and 2.6 nM, respectively. Sc-KU-4 also inhibited trypsin and thrombin activities to a lesser extent. Studies of the mode of action of Sc-KU-4 and its effects on insect defenses suggest that although Sc-KU-4 did not inhibit the activation of hemocytes or the formation of clotting fibers, it did inhibit hemocyte aggregation and the entrapment of foreign particles by fibers. Moreover, Sc-KU-4 avoided encapsulation and the deposition of clotting materials, which usually occurs in response to foreign particles. We show by protein-protein interaction that Sc-KU-4 targets recognition proteins of insect immune system such as masquerade-like and serine protease-like homologs. The interaction of Sc-KU-4 with these proteins explains the ability of the nematode to overcome host reactions and its large pathogenic spectrum, once these immune proteins are well conserved in insects. The discovery of this inhibitor targeting insect recognition proteins opens new avenues for the development of S. carpocapsae as a biological control agent and provides a new tool to study host-pathogen interactions. PMID:24098715

  13. Random subspace ensemble for target recognition of ladar range image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng-Jun; Li, Qi; Wang, Qi

    2013-02-01

    Laser detection and ranging (ladar) range images have attracted considerable attention in the field of automatic target recognition. Generally, it is difficult to collect a mass of range images for ladar in real applications. However, with small samples, the Hughes effect may occur when the number of features is larger than the size of the training samples. A random subspace ensemble of support vector machine (RSE-SVM) is applied to solve the problem. Three experiments were performed: (1) the performance comparison among affine moment invariants (AMIs), Zernike moment invariants (ZMIs) and their combined moment invariants (CMIs) based on different size training sets using single SVM; (2) the impact analysis of the different number of features about the RSE-SVM and semi-random subspace ensemble of support vector machine; (3) the performance comparison between the RSE-SVM and the CMIs with SVM ensembles. The experiment's results demonstrate that the RSE-SVM is able to relieve the Hughes effect and perform better than ZMIs with single SVM and CMIs with SVM ensembles.

  14. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, B.D.; Lissaman, P.B.S.; Morgan, W.R.; Radkey, R.L.

    1998-09-22

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing`s top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gases for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well. 31 figs.

  15. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, Bart D.; Lissaman, Peter B. S.; Morgan, Walter R.; Radkey, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing's top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gasses for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well.

  16. QF-4B Aircraft Target Final Shop Checkout Procedure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CONVERTIBLE PLANES, *TARGET DRONES, CONVERSION, SETTING(ADJUSTING), OPERATIONAL READINESS, JET FIGHTERS, HYDRAULIC EQUIPMENT, ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT, LANDING GEAR, CHECKOUT PROCEDURES, KITS, CHECKOUT EQUIPMENT.

  17. The research on high speed underwater target recognition based on fuzzy logic inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiang-Dong; Yang, De-Sen; Shi, Sheng-Guo; Li, Si-Chun

    2006-06-01

    The underwater target recognition is a key technology in acoustic confrontation and underwater defence. In this article, a recognition system based of fuzzy logic inference (FLI) is set up. This system is mainly composed of three parts: the fuzzy input module, the fuzzy logic inference module with a set of inference rules and the de-fuzzy output module. The inference result shows the recognition system is effective in most conditions.

  18. Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    national power. But with the recent events such as the war with Iraq, the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak, some major carriers... TITLE AND SUBTITLE 2003 Industry Studies: Aircraft 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  19. A universal entropy-driven mechanism for thioredoxin–target recognition

    PubMed Central

    Palde, Prakash B.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine residues in cytosolic proteins are maintained in their reduced state, but can undergo oxidation owing to posttranslational modification during redox signaling or under conditions of oxidative stress. In large part, the reduction of oxidized protein cysteines is mediated by a small 12-kDa thiol oxidoreductase, thioredoxin (Trx). Trx provides reducing equivalents for central metabolic enzymes and is implicated in redox regulation of a wide number of target proteins, including transcription factors. Despite its importance in cellular redox homeostasis, the precise mechanism by which Trx recognizes target proteins, especially in the absence of any apparent signature binding sequence or motif, remains unknown. Knowledge of the forces associated with the molecular recognition that governs Trx–protein interactions is fundamental to our understanding of target specificity. To gain insight into Trx–target recognition, we have thermodynamically characterized the noncovalent interactions between Trx and target proteins before S-S reduction using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Our findings indicate that Trx recognizes the oxidized form of its target proteins with exquisite selectivity, compared with their reduced counterparts. Furthermore, we show that recognition is dependent on the conformational restriction inherent to oxidized targets. Significantly, the thermodynamic signatures for multiple Trx targets reveal favorable entropic contributions as the major recognition force dictating these protein–protein interactions. Taken together, our data afford significant new insight into the molecular forces responsible for Trx–target recognition and should aid the design of new strategies for thiol oxidoreductase inhibition. PMID:26080424

  20. A Comparison of Two Flashcard Drill Methods Targeting Word Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volpe, Robert J.; Mule, Christina M.; Briesch, Amy M.; Joseph, Laurice M.; Burns, Matthew K.

    2011-01-01

    Traditional drill and practice (TD) and incremental rehearsal (IR) are two flashcard drill instructional methods previously noted to improve word recognition. The current study sought to compare the effectiveness and efficiency of these two methods, as assessed by next day retention assessments, under 2 conditions (i.e., opportunities to respond…

  1. Detecting Tactical Targets with Motion Pictures from Low Slow Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    lhis was cit iii so that heol’ ill iculcKntm Iim cit(c re’sp ond I4111611ing tle mlater test rinns andlitt let litil knlow what tic eml ect’ alot...kipper ;caltit cf(lthe thisAcla) it ber t.arget.% iiscinll11 firsl c’aiiit iintco tilt% it icc Its tic c l’ct igt’ts tit lecnge’r vlsaits. 11wi%’ wttre...htiiland owl rllallý eiwsrilcedl it tic (lilt’ t’St aciniisr lle itdg hcehliticl buttl, %A ithIhis r’ighit hand tIhe s~lcje’’t 1cjiirssed tile

  2. Aircraft target onboard detecting technology via Circular Information Matching method for remote sensing satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Huachao; Zhou, Quan; Li, Li

    2015-10-01

    Image information onboard processing is one o f important technology to rapidly achieve intelligence for remote sensing satellites. As a typical target, aircraft onboard detection has been getting more attention. In this paper, we propose an efficient method of aircraft detection for remote sensing satellite onboard processing. According to the feature of aircraft performance in remote sensing image, the detection algorithm consists of two steps: First Salient Object Detection (SOD) is employed to reduce the amount of calculation on large remote sensing image. SOD uses Gabor filtering and a simple binary test between pixels in a filtered image. White points are connected as regions. Plane candidate regions are screened from white regions by area, length and width of connected region. Next a new algorithm, called Circumferential Information Matching method, is used to detect aircraft on candidate regions. The results of tests show circumference curve around the plane center is stable shape, so the candidate region can be accurately detecting with this feature. In order to rotation invariant, we use circle matched filter to detect target. And discrete fast Fourier transform (DFFT) is used to accelerate and reduce calculation. Experiments show the detection accuracy rate of proposed algorithm is 90% with less than 0.5s processing time. In addition, the calculation of the proposed method through quantitative anglicized is very small. Experimental results and theoretical analysis show that the proposed method is reasonable and highly-efficient.

  3. Automatic Target Recognition, Executive Summary and Annotated Brief (PR)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    development and the staring sensor called the “ Gotcha ” radar. The Advanced Recognition Capability (ARC) Lab is a critical node for the assessment...enthusiastically Innovative new concepts being addressed Creative mix of physics, phenomenology and M&S 3D Ladar development and GOTCHA staring radar...the UAV can autonomously taxi, take off, fly, remain on station capturing imagery, return and land. Gotcha Radar is a persistent radar with temporal

  4. Enhanced synthetic aperture radar automatic target recognition method based on novel features.

    PubMed

    Ning, Chen; Liu, Wenbo; Zhang, Gong; Yin, Jiejun; Ji, Xiuxia

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposes a set of uncommonly rich feature representations for automatic target recognition (ATR) in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The proposed novel feature representations capture both the spatial and spectral properties of a target in a unified framework, while simultaneously offering discrimination and robustness to aspect variations. Specifically, the proposed features are mainly derived from the ideas of the monogenic signal and polar mapping. The applicability of the monogenic signal within the field of SAR target recognition is demonstrated by its capability of capturing both the broad spectral information and spatial localization with compact support. Further, to reduce the influence of inevitable variations due to aspect changes in SAR images, the monogenic components are transformed from Cartesian to polar coordinates through polar mapping. Additionally, a new target-shadow feature is also presented to compensate for the important discriminative information about target geometry, which exists in the shadow area. Finally, the proposed features are jointly considered into a unified multiple kernel learning framework for target recognition. Experiments on the moving and stationary target acquisition and recognition (MSTAR) public dataset demonstrate the strength and applicability of the proposed representations to SAR ATR. Moreover, it is also shown that overall high recognition accuracy can be obtained by the established unified framework.

  5. Time course of target recognition in visual search.

    PubMed

    Kotowicz, Andreas; Rutishauser, Ueli; Koch, Christof

    2010-01-01

    VISUAL SEARCH IS A UBIQUITOUS TASK OF GREAT IMPORTANCE: it allows us to quickly find the objects that we are looking for. During active search for an object (target), eye movements are made to different parts of the scene. Fixation locations are chosen based on a combination of information about the target and the visual input. At the end of a successful search, the eyes typically fixate on the target. But does this imply that target identification occurs while looking at it? The duration of a typical fixation ( approximately 170 ms) and neuronal latencies of both the oculomotor system and the visual stream indicate that there might not be enough time to do so. Previous studies have suggested the following solution to this dilemma: the target is identified extrafoveally and this event will trigger a saccade towards the target location. However this has not been experimentally verified. Here we test the hypothesis that subjects recognize the target before they look at it using a search display of oriented colored bars. Using a gaze-contingent real-time technique, we prematurely stopped search shortly after subjects fixated the target. Afterwards, we asked subjects to identify the target location. We find that subjects can identify the target location even when fixating on the target for less than 10 ms. Longer fixations on the target do not increase detection performance but increase confidence. In contrast, subjects cannot perform this task if they are not allowed to move their eyes. Thus, information about the target during conjunction search for colored oriented bars can, in some circumstances, be acquired at least one fixation ahead of reaching the target. The final fixation serves to increase confidence rather then performance, illustrating a distinct role of the final fixation for the subjective judgment of confidence rather than accuracy.

  6. 33 CFR 334.10 - Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS § 334.10 Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger zone. A circular area with a radius of 1.5 nautical miles, having its center just easterly of Seal... of each bombing practice, the area will be patrolled by a naval aircraft or surface vessel to...

  7. Target recognition of log-polar ladar range images using moment invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenze; Han, Shaokun; Cao, Jie; Yu, Haoyong

    2017-01-01

    The ladar range image has received considerable attentions in the automatic target recognition field. However, previous research does not cover target recognition using log-polar ladar range images. Therefore, we construct a target recognition system based on log-polar ladar range images in this paper. In this system combined moment invariants and backpropagation neural network are selected as shape descriptor and shape classifier, respectively. In order to fully analyze the effect of log-polar sampling pattern on recognition result, several comparative experiments based on simulated and real range images are carried out. Eventually, several important conclusions are drawn: (i) if combined moments are computed directly by log-polar range images, translation, rotation and scaling invariant properties of combined moments will be invalid (ii) when object is located in the center of field of view, recognition rate of log-polar range images is less sensitive to the changing of field of view (iii) as object position changes from center to edge of field of view, recognition performance of log-polar range images will decline dramatically (iv) log-polar range images has a better noise robustness than Cartesian range images. Finally, we give a suggestion that it is better to divide field of view into recognition area and searching area in the real application.

  8. Fearful contextual expression impairs the encoding and recognition of target faces: an ERP study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huiyan; Schulz, Claudia; Straube, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Previous event-related potential (ERP) studies have shown that the N170 to faces is modulated by the emotion of the face and its context. However, it is unclear how the encoding of emotional target faces as reflected in the N170 is modulated by the preceding contextual facial expression when temporal onset and identity of target faces are unpredictable. In addition, no study as yet has investigated whether contextual facial expression modulates later recognition of target faces. To address these issues, participants in the present study were asked to identify target faces (fearful or neutral) that were presented after a sequence of fearful or neutral contextual faces. The number of sequential contextual faces was random and contextual and target faces were of different identities so that temporal onset and identity of target faces were unpredictable. Electroencephalography (EEG) data was recorded during the encoding phase. Subsequently, participants had to perform an unexpected old/new recognition task in which target face identities were presented in either the encoded or the non-encoded expression. ERP data showed a reduced N170 to target faces in fearful as compared to neutral context regardless of target facial expression. In the later recognition phase, recognition rates were reduced for target faces in the encoded expression when they had been encountered in fearful as compared to neutral context. The present findings suggest that fearful compared to neutral contextual faces reduce the allocation of attentional resources towards target faces, which results in limited encoding and recognition of target faces. PMID:26388751

  9. Target recognition of ladar range images using even-order Zernike moments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng-Jun; Li, Qi; Xia, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Qi

    2012-11-01

    Ladar range images have attracted considerable attention in automatic target recognition fields. In this paper, Zernike moments (ZMs) are applied to classify the target of the range image from an arbitrary azimuth angle. However, ZMs suffer from high computational costs. To improve the performance of target recognition based on small samples, even-order ZMs with serial-parallel backpropagation neural networks (BPNNs) are applied to recognize the target of the range image. It is found that the rotation invariance and classified performance of the even-order ZMs are both better than for odd-order moments and for moments compressed by principal component analysis. The experimental results demonstrate that combining the even-order ZMs with serial-parallel BPNNs can significantly improve the recognition rate for small samples.

  10. 33 CFR 334.60 - Cape Cod Bay south of Wellfleet Harbor, Mass.; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS § 334.60 Cape Cod Bay south of Wellfleet Harbor, Mass.; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger zone. A circular area with a radius of 1,000 yards having its center on the...

  11. Superconducting gravity gradiometers for underground target recognition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adriaans, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    One of the most formidable intelligence challenges existing in the non-proliferation community is the detection of buried targets. The physical parameter that all buried targets share, whether the target is buried armaments, a tunnel or a bunker, is mass. In the case of buried armaments, there is an excess mass (higher density) compared to the surrounding area; for a tunnel or bunker, the mass is missing. In either case, this difference in mass generates a distinct gravitational signature. The Superconducting Gravity Gradiometer project at Sandia worked toward developing an airborne device for the detection of these underground structures.

  12. Design of miniature hybrid target recognition system with combination of FPGA+DSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shishang; Li, Xiujian; Jia, Hui; Hu, Wenhua; Nie, Yongming; Chang, Shengli

    2010-10-01

    With advantages of flexibility, high bandwidth, high spatial resolution and high-speed parallel operation, the opto-electronic hybrid target recognition system can be applied in many civil and military areas, such as video surveillance, intelligent navigation and robot vision. A miniature opto-electronic hybrid target recognition system based on FPGA+DSP is designed, which only employs single Fourier lens and with a focal length. With the precise timing control of the FPGA and images pretreatment of the DSP, the system performs both Fourier transform and inverse Fourier transform with all optical process, which can improve recognition speed and reduce the system volume remarkably. We analyzed the system performance, and a method to achieve scale invariant pattern recognition was proposed on the basis of lots of experiments.

  13. Structural basis of diverse membrane target recognitions by ankyrins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Wei, Zhiyi; Chen, Keyu; Ye, Fei; Yu, Cong; Bennett, Vann; Zhang, Mingjie

    2014-11-10

    Ankyrin adaptors together with their spectrin partners coordinate diverse ion channels and cell adhesion molecules within plasma membrane domains and thereby promote physiological activities including fast signaling in the heart and nervous system. Ankyrins specifically bind to numerous membrane targets through their 24 ankyrin repeats (ANK repeats), although the mechanism for the facile and independent evolution of these interactions has not been resolved. Here we report the structures of ANK repeats in complex with an inhibitory segment from the C-terminal regulatory domain and with a sodium channel Nav1.2 peptide, respectively, showing that the extended, extremely conserved inner groove spanning the entire ANK repeat solenoid contains multiple target binding sites capable of accommodating target proteins with very diverse sequences via combinatorial usage of these sites. These structures establish a framework for understanding the evolution of ankyrins' membrane targets, with implications for other proteins containing extended ANK repeat domains.

  14. Target recognitions in multiple-camera closed-circuit television using color constancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soori, Umair; Yuen, Peter; Han, Ji Wen; Ibrahim, Izzati; Chen, Wentao; Hong, Kan; Merfort, Christian; James, David; Richardson, Mark

    2013-04-01

    People tracking in crowded scenes from closed-circuit television (CCTV) footage has been a popular and challenging task in computer vision. Due to the limited spatial resolution in the CCTV footage, the color of people's dress may offer an alternative feature for their recognition and tracking. However, there are many factors, such as variable illumination conditions, viewing angles, and camera calibration, that may induce illusive modification of intrinsic color signatures of the target. Our objective is to recognize and track targets in multiple camera views using color as the detection feature, and to understand if a color constancy (CC) approach may help to reduce these color illusions due to illumination and camera artifacts and thereby improve target recognition performance. We have tested a number of CC algorithms using various color descriptors to assess the efficiency of target recognition from a real multicamera Imagery Library for Intelligent Detection Systems (i-LIDS) data set. Various classifiers have been used for target detection, and the figure of merit to assess the efficiency of target recognition is achieved through the area under the receiver operating characteristics (AUROC). We have proposed two modifications of luminance-based CC algorithms: one with a color transfer mechanism and the other using a pixel-wise sigmoid function for an adaptive dynamic range compression, a method termed enhanced luminance reflectance CC (ELRCC). We found that both algorithms improve the efficiency of target recognitions substantially better than that of the raw data without CC treatment, and in some cases the ELRCC improves target tracking by over 100% within the AUROC assessment metric. The performance of the ELRCC has been assessed over 10 selected targets from three different camera views of the i-LIDS footage, and the averaged target recognition efficiency over all these targets is found to be improved by about 54% in AUROC after the data are processed by

  15. Heterogeneous Sensor Webs for Automated Target Recognition and Tracking in Urban Terrain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-09

    Recognition, Target Tracking, Data Fusion S. Shankar Sastry University of California - Berkeley Sponsored Projects Office The Regents of the University of...Parvez Ahammad, Lung-Chung Chang, Phoebus Chen, Kirak Hong, Leon Lin, Edgar Lobaton, Nikhil Naikal, Songhwai Oh, Shankar Sastry, Doug Tygar, Simon Wang...Malik, S. Shankar Sastry. Multiple-View Object Recognition in Band-Limited Distributed Camera Networks, , ( ): . doi: 2009/07/12 20:38:11 26 Manish

  16. Photon counting passive 3D image sensing for automatic target recognition.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Seokwon; Javidi, Bahram; Watson, Edward

    2005-11-14

    In this paper, we propose photon counting three-dimensional (3D) passive sensing and object recognition using integral imaging. The application of this approach to 3D automatic target recognition (ATR) is investigated using both linear and nonlinear matched filters. We find there is significant potential of the proposed system for 3D sensing and recognition with a low number of photons. The discrimination capability of the proposed system is quantified in terms of discrimination ratio, Fisher ratio, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on photon counting 3D passive sensing and ATR with integral imaging.

  17. Three-dimensional target recognition using the phase information from a Fourier transform profilometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Debesh; Takeda, Mitsuo

    2003-11-01

    We propose a new technique for three-dimensional (3D) target recognition using the phase information from a Fourier transform profilometer (FTP). Instead of cross-correlating the 3D target/nontargets-induced distorted grating patterns or the associated phase differences directly, the phase information are rather utilized to synthesize two complex harmonic functions, spatial frequency distributions of which are proportional to the computed profilometric phase maps of the target and the nontargets and hence to respective shape information. These complex harmonic functions due to the target and the nontargets are cross-correlated to produce highest correlation peak at the target location and almost no correlation peak for others. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated by detailed simulations and experiments showing an excellent discrimination capability for 3D target recognition.

  18. Pattern-Recognition System for Approaching a Known Target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terrance; Cheng, Yang

    2008-01-01

    A closed-loop pattern-recognition system is designed to provide guidance for maneuvering a small exploratory robotic vehicle (rover) on Mars to return to a landed spacecraft to deliver soil and rock samples that the spacecraft would subsequently bring back to Earth. The system could be adapted to terrestrial use in guiding mobile robots to approach known structures that humans could not approach safely, for such purposes as reconnaissance in military or law-enforcement applications, terrestrial scientific exploration, and removal of explosive or other hazardous items. The system has been demonstrated in experiments in which the Field Integrated Design and Operations (FIDO) rover (a prototype Mars rover equipped with a video camera for guidance) is made to return to a mockup of Mars-lander spacecraft. The FIDO rover camera autonomously acquires an image of the lander from a distance of 125 m in an outdoor environment. Then under guidance by an algorithm that performs fusion of multiple line and texture features in digitized images acquired by the camera, the rover traverses the intervening terrain, using features derived from images of the lander truss structure. Then by use of precise pattern matching for determining the position and orientation of the rover relative to the lander, the rover aligns itself with the bottom of ramps extending from the lander, in preparation for climbing the ramps to deliver samples to the lander. The most innovative aspect of the system is a set of pattern-recognition algorithms that govern a three-phase visual-guidance sequence for approaching the lander. During the first phase, a multifeature fusion algorithm integrates the outputs of a horizontal-line-detection algorithm and a wavelet-transform-based visual-area-of-interest algorithm for detecting the lander from a significant distance. The horizontal-line-detection algorithm is used to determine candidate lander locations based on detection of a horizontal deck that is part of the

  19. Aircraft target identification based on 2D ISAR images using multiresolution analysis wavelet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qiang; Xiao, Huaitie; Hu, Xiangjiang

    2001-09-01

    The formation of 2D ISAR images for radar target identification hold much promise for additional distinguish- ability between targets. Since an image contains important information is a wide range of scales, and this information is often independent from one scale to another, wavelet analysis provides a method of identifying the spatial frequency content of an image and the local regions within the image where those spatial frequencies exist. In this paper, a multiresolution analysis wavelet method based on 2D ISAR images was proposed for use in aircraft radar target identification under the wide band high range resolution radar background. The proposed method was performed in three steps; first, radar backscatter signals were processed in the form of 2D ISAR images, then, Mallat's wavelet algorithm was used in the decomposition of images, finally, a three layer perceptron neural net was used as classifier. The result of experiments demonstrated that the feasibility of using multiresolution analysis wavelet for target identification.

  20. Target recognition in passive terahertz image of human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ran; Zhao, Yuan-meng; Deng, Chao; Zhang, Cun-lin; Li, Yue

    2014-11-01

    THz radiation can penetrate through many nonpolar dielectric materials and can be used for nondestructive/noninvasive sensing and imaging of targets under nonpolar, nonmetallic covers or containers. Thus using THz systems to "see through" concealing barriers (i.e. packaging, corrugated cardboard, clothing) has been proposed as a new security screening method. Objects that can be detected by THz include concealed weapons, explosives, and chemical agents under clothing. Passive THz imaging system can detect THz wave from human body without transmit any electromagnetic wave, and the suspicious objects will become visible because the THz wave is blocked by this items. We can find out whether or not someone is carrying dangerous objects through this image. In this paper, the THz image enhancement, segmentation and contour extraction algorithms were studied to achieve effective target image detection. First, the terahertz images are enhanced and their grayscales are stretched. Then we apply global threshold segmentation to extract the target, and finally the targets are marked on the image. Experimental results showed that the algorithm proposed in this paper can extract and mark targets effectively, so that people can identify suspicious objects under clothing quickly. The algorithm can significantly improve the usefulness of the terahertz security apparatus.

  1. Testing of a Composite Wavelet Filter to Enhance Automated Target Recognition in SONAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, Jeffrey N.

    2011-01-01

    Automated Target Recognition (ATR) systems aim to automate target detection, recognition, and tracking. The current project applies a JPL ATR system to low resolution SONAR and camera videos taken from Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs). These SONAR images are inherently noisy and difficult to interpret, and pictures taken underwater are unreliable due to murkiness and inconsistent lighting. The ATR system breaks target recognition into three stages: 1) Videos of both SONAR and camera footage are broken into frames and preprocessed to enhance images and detect Regions of Interest (ROIs). 2) Features are extracted from these ROIs in preparation for classification. 3) ROIs are classified as true or false positives using a standard Neural Network based on the extracted features. Several preprocessing, feature extraction, and training methods are tested and discussed in this report.

  2. Evaluation of Waveform Structure Features on Time Domain Target Recognition under Cross Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selver, M. A.; Seçmen, M.; Zoral, E. Y.

    2016-08-01

    Classification of aircraft targets from scattered electromagnetic waves is a challenging application, which suffers from aspect angle dependency. In order to eliminate the adverse effects of aspect angle, various strategies were developed including the techniques that rely on extraction of several features and design of suitable classification systems to process them. Recently, a hierarchical method, which uses features that take advantage of waveform structure of the scattered signals, is introduced and shown to have effective results. However, this approach has been applied to the special cases that consider only a single planar component of electric field that cause no-cross polarization at the observation point. In this study, two small scale aircraft models, Boeing-747 and DC-10, are selected as the targets and various polarizations are used to analyse the cross-polarization effects on system performance of the aforementioned method. The results reveal the advantages and the shortcomings of using waveform structures in time-domain target identification.

  3. Structural basis of diverse membrane target recognitions by ankyrins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Wei, Zhiyi; Chen, Keyu; Ye, Fei; Yu, Cong; Bennett, Vann; Zhang, Mingjie

    2014-01-01

    Ankyrin adaptors together with their spectrin partners coordinate diverse ion channels and cell adhesion molecules within plasma membrane domains and thereby promote physiological activities including fast signaling in the heart and nervous system. Ankyrins specifically bind to numerous membrane targets through their 24 ankyrin repeats (ANK repeats), although the mechanism for the facile and independent evolution of these interactions has not been resolved. Here we report the structures of ANK repeats in complex with an inhibitory segment from the C-terminal regulatory domain and with a sodium channel Nav1.2 peptide, respectively, showing that the extended, extremely conserved inner groove spanning the entire ANK repeat solenoid contains multiple target binding sites capable of accommodating target proteins with very diverse sequences via combinatorial usage of these sites. These structures establish a framework for understanding the evolution of ankyrins' membrane targets, with implications for other proteins containing extended ANK repeat domains. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04353.001 PMID:25383926

  4. Target recognition by maximizing heterogeneity of signal samples collected for discrimination with respect to an observed signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechval, Nicholas A.

    1995-07-01

    This paper deals with the problem of how to identify targets or signals in noise, which represents, mathematically, the problem of classifying an observed target data sample as coming from one of several populations. Some of the information about the alternative distributions of populations has been obtained from signal data samples collected for discrimination. Each sample is declared to be realization of a specific stochastic process. By this step each sample is attached to just one out of a set of possible signals with distinct characteristics. We are dealing with the case when the alternative distributions of populations are multivariate normal with different mean vectors and covariance matrices. It is assumed that all parameters are unknown. Also, the univariate case is considered. It is shown how certain tests of homogeneity or normality of several samples of the data can be used to transform a set of signal data samples into some statistic that measures either distance from homogeneity or distance from normality of these samples, respectively. This statistic is then used to construct sample based discriminant rule which either maximizes distance from homogeneity or minimizes distance from normality, respectively, with respect to an observed signal. The above discriminant rules are applied to obtain new procedures of target recognition which are relatively simple to carry out and can be easily used, say, for bird recognition by radar in order to preclude the possibility of collisions between aircraft and birds, etc. In those situations when we deal with small samples of the data, the procedures proposed herein are recommended. An illustrative numerical example is given.

  5. Knowledge-based goal-driven approach for information extraction and decision making for target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Roderick D.; Wilson, Anitra C.

    1996-06-01

    This paper presents a novel goal-driven approach for designing a knowledge-based system for information extraction and decision-making for target recognition. The underlying goal-driven model uses a goal frame tree schema for target organization, a hybrid rule-based pattern- directed formalism for target structural encoding, and a goal-driven inferential control strategy. The knowledge-base consists of three basic structures for the organization and control of target information: goals, target parameters, and an object-rulebase. Goal frames represent target recognition tasks as goals and subgoals in the knowledge base. Target parameters represent characteristic attributes of targets that are encoded as information atoms. Information atoms may have one or more assigned values and are used for information extraction. The object-rulebase consists of pattern/action assertional implications that describe the logical relationships existing between target parameter values. A goal realization process formulates symbolic patten expressions whose atomic values map to target parameters contained a priori in a hierarchical database of target state information. Symbolic pattern expression creation is accomplished via the application of a novel goal-driven inference strategy that logically prunes an AND/OR tree constructed object-rulebase. Similarity analysis is performed via pattern matching of query symbolic patterns and a priori instantiated target parameters.

  6. Vibration-based damage detection in an aircraft wing scaled model using principal component analysis and pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendafilova, I.; Cartmell, M. P.; Ostachowicz, W.

    2008-06-01

    This study deals with vibration-based fault detection in structures and suggests a viable methodology based on principal component analysis (PCA) and a simple pattern recognition (PR) method. The frequency response functions (FRFs) of the healthy and the damaged structure are used as initial data. A PR procedure based on the nearest neighbour principle is applied to recognise between the categories of the damaged and the healthy wing data. A modified PCA method is suggested here, which not only reduces the dimensionality of the FRFs but in addition makes the PCA transformed data from the two categories more differentiable. It is applied to selected frequency bands of FRFs which permits the reduction of the PCA transformed FRFs to two new variables, which are used as damage features. In this study, the methodology is developed and demonstrated using the vibration response of a scaled aircraft wing simulated by a finite element (FE) model. The suggested damage detection methodology is based purely on the analysis of the vibration response of the structure. This makes it quite generic and permits its potential development and application for measured vibration data from real aircraft wings as well as for other real and complex structures.

  7. Pattern-Theoretic Foundations of Automatic Target Recognition in Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-30

    area has continued past the September 2006 end date via discretionary funds provided to Aaron Lanterman through the Demetrius T. Paris Junior...support to continue the work past August 2006 provided by the Demetrius T. Paris Professorship. Pri- mary developer of ATR theory and algorithms for target...Oustanding Junior Teacher Award (2006), as voted on by the senior class. A.D. Lanterman, named the Demetrius T. Paris Junior Professor beginning in

  8. Optimization of OT-MACH Filter Generation for Target Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Oliver C.; Edens, Weston; Lu, Thomas T.; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2009-01-01

    An automatic Optimum Trade-off Maximum Average Correlation Height (OT-MACH) filter generator for use in a gray-scale optical correlator (GOC) has been developed for improved target detection at JPL. While the OT-MACH filter has been shown to be an optimal filter for target detection, actually solving for the optimum is too computationally intensive for multiple targets. Instead, an adaptive step gradient descent method was tested to iteratively optimize the three OT-MACH parameters, alpha, beta, and gamma. The feedback for the gradient descent method was a composite of the performance measures, correlation peak height and peak to side lobe ratio. The automated method generated and tested multiple filters in order to approach the optimal filter quicker and more reliably than the current manual method. Initial usage and testing has shown preliminary success at finding an approximation of the optimal filter, in terms of alpha, beta, gamma values. This corresponded to a substantial improvement in detection performance where the true positive rate increased for the same average false positives per image.

  9. Interdomain interface-mediated target recognition by the Scribble PDZ34 supramodule.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jinqi; Feng, Lei; Bai, Yujie; Pei, Haohong; Yuan, Zengqiang; Feng, Wei

    2015-05-15

    Tandem-arranged PDZ [PSD-95 (postsynaptic density-95), Dlg (discs large homologue) and ZO-1 (zonula occludens-1)] domains often form structural and functional supramodules with distinct target-binding properties. In the present study, we found that the two PDZ domains within the PDZ34 tandem of Scribble, a cell polarity regulator, tightly pack in a 'front-to-back' mode to form a compact supramodule. Although PDZ4 contains a distorted αB/βB pocket, the attachment of PDZ4 to PDZ3 generates an unexpected interdomain pocket that is adjacent to and integrates with the canonical αB/βB pocket of PDZ3 to form an expanded target-binding groove. The structure of the PDZ34-target peptide complex further demonstrated that the peptide binds to this expanded target-binding groove with its upstream residues anchoring into the interdomain pocket directly. Mutations of the interdomain pocket and disruptions of the PDZ34 supramodule both interfere with its target-binding capacity. Therefore, the interdomain interface between the PDZ34 supramodule is intrinsically required for its target recognition and determines its target-binding specificity. This interdomain interface-mediated specific recognition may represent a novel mode of target recognition and would broaden the target-binding versatility for PDZ supramodules. The supramodular nature and target recognition mode of the PDZ34 tandem found in the present study would also help to identify the new binding partners of Scribble and thus may direct further research on the PDZ domain-mediated assembly of Scribble polarity complexes.

  10. Sense and avoid requirements for unmanned aircraft systems using a target level of safety approach.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Richard; Schrage, Daniel; Volovoi, Vitali; Jimenez, Hernando

    2014-10-01

    One of the most critical challenges to full integration of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) into the National Airspace System (NAS) is the requirement to comply with CFR 14 Part 91.113 to "see and avoid" other aircraft. Various attempts have been made to develop systems to "sense and avoid" other aircraft so UAS can comply with the intent of the regulation. This article proposes a framework to develop effectiveness requirements for any SAA system by linking UAS characteristics and operating environments to midair collision risk quantified by a fatality rate. The framework consists of a target level of safety (TLS) approach using an event tree format. Safety has been identified as the most important consideration in the UAS integration process. While safety can be defined in many ways, the authors propose using a fatality rate metric that follows other statistics used in the industry. This metric allows for the use of a TLS approach to the development of SAA requirements for system certification. Failure to adequately link system requirements to safety could result in the implementation of SAA systems that either do not adequately mitigate the risk associated with UAS operations or are overdesigned, resulting in increased cost and complexity. This article demonstrates the use of the proposed framework to develop specific SAA effectiveness standards based on UAS weight and airspace class combinations.

  11. Anodal tDCS targeting the right orbitofrontal cortex enhances facial expression recognition

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Jillian M.; Ridley, Nicole J.; Vercammen, Ans

    2015-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) has been implicated in the capacity to accurately recognise facial expressions. The aim of the current study was to determine if anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) targeting the right OFC in healthy adults would enhance facial expression recognition, compared with a sham condition. Across two counterbalanced sessions of tDCS (i.e. anodal and sham), 20 undergraduate participants (18 female) completed a facial expression labelling task comprising angry, disgusted, fearful, happy, sad and neutral expressions, and a control (social judgement) task comprising the same expressions. Responses on the labelling task were scored for accuracy, median reaction time and overall efficiency (i.e. combined accuracy and reaction time). Anodal tDCS targeting the right OFC enhanced facial expression recognition, reflected in greater efficiency and speed of recognition across emotions, relative to the sham condition. In contrast, there was no effect of tDCS to responses on the control task. This is the first study to demonstrate that anodal tDCS targeting the right OFC boosts facial expression recognition. This finding provides a solid foundation for future research to examine the efficacy of this technique as a means to treat facial expression recognition deficits, particularly in individuals with OFC damage or dysfunction. PMID:25971602

  12. Anodal tDCS targeting the right orbitofrontal cortex enhances facial expression recognition.

    PubMed

    Willis, Megan L; Murphy, Jillian M; Ridley, Nicole J; Vercammen, Ans

    2015-12-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) has been implicated in the capacity to accurately recognise facial expressions. The aim of the current study was to determine if anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) targeting the right OFC in healthy adults would enhance facial expression recognition, compared with a sham condition. Across two counterbalanced sessions of tDCS (i.e. anodal and sham), 20 undergraduate participants (18 female) completed a facial expression labelling task comprising angry, disgusted, fearful, happy, sad and neutral expressions, and a control (social judgement) task comprising the same expressions. Responses on the labelling task were scored for accuracy, median reaction time and overall efficiency (i.e. combined accuracy and reaction time). Anodal tDCS targeting the right OFC enhanced facial expression recognition, reflected in greater efficiency and speed of recognition across emotions, relative to the sham condition. In contrast, there was no effect of tDCS to responses on the control task. This is the first study to demonstrate that anodal tDCS targeting the right OFC boosts facial expression recognition. This finding provides a solid foundation for future research to examine the efficacy of this technique as a means to treat facial expression recognition deficits, particularly in individuals with OFC damage or dysfunction.

  13. [Research on Multi-Spectral Target Recognition System Based on the Magneto-Optical Modulation].

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiao-yan; Qin, Jian-min; Qiao, Ji-pin

    2016-03-01

    The technology of target recognition based on characteristic multi-spectrum has many advantages, such as strong detection capability and discriminating capability of target species. But there are some problems, it requires that you obtain the background spectrum as a priori knowledge, and it requires that the change of background spectrum is small with time. Thereby its application of real-time object recognition is limited in the new environment, or the complex environment. Based on magneto-optical modulation and characteristic multi-spectrum the method is designed, and the target is identified without prior access to the background spectrum. In order to achieve the function of the target information in the one acquisition time for tested, compared to conventional methods in terms of target detection, it's adaptability is better than before on the battlefield, and it is of more practical significance. Meanwhile, the magneto-optical modulator is used to suppress the interference of stray light background, thereby improving the probability of target recognition. Since the magneto-optical modulation provides incremental iterative target spectral information, therefore, even if the unknown background spectrum or background spectrum change is large, it can significantly improve the recognition accuracy of information through an iterative target spectrum. Different test targets back shimmering light intensity and background intensity values were analyzed during experiments, results showed that three targets for linearly polarized reflectance modulation is significantly stronger than the background. And it was of great influence to visible imaging target identification when measured target used camouflage color, but the system of polarization modulation type can still recognize target well. On this basis, the target range within 0.5 km x 2 km multi-wavelength characteristics of the target species were identified. When using three characteristic wavelengths, the

  14. Autonomous space target recognition and tracking approach using star sensors based on a Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tao; Zhou, Fuqiang

    2015-04-10

    When imaged by detectors, space targets (including satellites and debris) and background stars have similar point-spread functions, and both objects appear to change as detectors track targets. Therefore, traditional tracking methods cannot separate targets from stars and cannot directly recognize targets in 2D images. Consequently, we propose an autonomous space target recognition and tracking approach using a star sensor technique and a Kalman filter (KF). A two-step method for subpixel-scale detection of star objects (including stars and targets) is developed, and the combination of the star sensor technique and a KF is used to track targets. The experimental results show that the proposed method is adequate for autonomously recognizing and tracking space targets.

  15. Performance of an optimum receiver designed for pattern recognition with nonoverlapping target and scene noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javidi, Bahram; Fazlollahi, Amir; Willett, Peter; Réfrégier, Philippe

    1995-07-01

    The design of an optimum receiver for pattern recognition is based on multiple-alternative hypothesis testing with unknown parameters for detecting and locating a noisy target or a noise-free target in scene noise that is spatially nonoverlapping with this target. The optimum receiver designed for a noise-free target has the interesting property of detecting, without error, a noise-free target that has unknown illumination by using operations that are independent of the scene-noise statistics. We investigate the performance of the optimum receiver designed for nonoverlapping target and scene noise in terms of rotation and scale sensitivity of the input targets and discrimination against similar objects. Because it is not possible in practical systems to have a completely noise-free target, we examine how the performance of the optimum receiver designed for a noise-free target is affected when there is some overlapping noise on the target. The application of the optimum receiver to binary character recognition is described. Computer simulation results are provided.

  16. Feature Extraction Using Attributed Scattering Center Models for Model-Based Automatic Target Recognition (ATR)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    systems employing synthetic aperture radar . This report summarizes the major technical accomplishments that were realized. We developed a set of...automatic target recognition, ATR performance prediction, synthetic aperture radar 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON...Std. Z39-18 Contents 1 INTRODUCTION 1 2 ATTRIBUTED SCATTERING MODELS FOR SYNTHETIC APER- TURE RADAR 6 2.1 Introduction

  17. Synthetic Aperture Radar Target Recognition with Feature Fusion Based on a Stacked Autoencoder

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Miao; Ji, Kefeng; Leng, Xiangguang; Xing, Xiangwei; Zou, Huanxin

    2017-01-01

    Feature extraction is a crucial step for any automatic target recognition process, especially in the interpretation of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. In order to obtain distinctive features, this paper proposes a feature fusion algorithm for SAR target recognition based on a stacked autoencoder (SAE). The detailed procedure presented in this paper can be summarized as follows: firstly, 23 baseline features and Three-Patch Local Binary Pattern (TPLBP) features are extracted. These features can describe the global and local aspects of the image with less redundancy and more complementarity, providing richer information for feature fusion. Secondly, an effective feature fusion network is designed. Baseline and TPLBP features are cascaded and fed into a SAE. Then, with an unsupervised learning algorithm, the SAE is pre-trained by greedy layer-wise training method. Capable of feature expression, SAE makes the fused features more distinguishable. Finally, the model is fine-tuned by a softmax classifier and applied to the classification of targets. 10-class SAR targets based on Moving and Stationary Target Acquisition and Recognition (MSTAR) dataset got a classification accuracy up to 95.43%, which verifies the effectiveness of the presented algorithm. PMID:28117689

  18. Synthetic Aperture Radar Target Recognition with Feature Fusion Based on a Stacked Autoencoder.

    PubMed

    Kang, Miao; Ji, Kefeng; Leng, Xiangguang; Xing, Xiangwei; Zou, Huanxin

    2017-01-20

    Feature extraction is a crucial step for any automatic target recognition process, especially in the interpretation of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. In order to obtain distinctive features, this paper proposes a feature fusion algorithm for SAR target recognition based on a stacked autoencoder (SAE). The detailed procedure presented in this paper can be summarized as follows: firstly, 23 baseline features and Three-Patch Local Binary Pattern (TPLBP) features are extracted. These features can describe the global and local aspects of the image with less redundancy and more complementarity, providing richer information for feature fusion. Secondly, an effective feature fusion network is designed. Baseline and TPLBP features are cascaded and fed into a SAE. Then, with an unsupervised learning algorithm, the SAE is pre-trained by greedy layer-wise training method. Capable of feature expression, SAE makes the fused features more distinguishable. Finally, the model is fine-tuned by a softmax classifier and applied to the classification of targets. 10-class SAR targets based on Moving and Stationary Target Acquisition and Recognition (MSTAR) dataset got a classification accuracy up to 95.43%, which verifies the effectiveness of the presented algorithm.

  19. Cat-eye effect target recognition with single-pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Weijian; Li, Li; Zhang, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    A prototype of cat-eye effect target recognition with single-pixel detectors is proposed. Based on the framework of compressive sensing, it is possible to recognize cat-eye effect targets by projecting a series of known random patterns and measuring the backscattered light with three single-pixel detectors in different locations. The prototype only requires simpler, less expensive detectors and extends well beyond the visible spectrum. The simulations are accomplished to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed prototype. We compared our results to that obtained from conventional cat-eye effect target recognition methods using area array sensor. The experimental results show that this method is feasible and superior to the conventional method in dynamic and complicated backgrounds.

  20. A probability of error-constrained sequential decision algorithm for data-rich automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Irwin O.; DeVore, Michael D.; Beling, Peter A.; Horowitz, Barry M.

    2010-04-01

    This paper illustrates an approach to sequential hypothesis testing designed not to minimize the amount of data collected but to reduce the overall amount of processing required, while still guaranteeing pre-specified conditional probabilities of error. The approach is potentially useful when sensor data are plentiful but time and processing capability are constrained. The approach gradually reduces the number of target hypotheses under consideration as more sensor data are processed, proportionally allocating time and processing resources to the most likely target classes. The approach is demonstrated on a multi-class ladar-based target recognition problem and compared with uniform-computation tests.

  1. Optimal-tradeoff circular harmonic function filters for 3D target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaya Kumar, Bhagavatula V. K.; Xie, Chunyan; Mahalanobis, Abhijit

    2003-09-01

    3D target recognition is of significant interest because representing the object in 3D space couuld essentially provide a solution to pose variation and self-occlusion problems that are big challenges in 2D pattern recognition. Correlation filers have been used in a variety of 2D pattern matching applications and many correlation filter designs have been developed to handle problems such as rotations. Correlation filters also offer other benefits such as shift-invariance, graceful degradation and closed-form solutions. The 3D extension of correlation filter is a natural extension to handle 3D pattern recognition problem. In this paper, we propose a 3D correlation filter design method based on cylindrical circular harmonic function (CCHF) and use LADAR imagery to illustrate the good performance of CCHF filters.

  2. Optical correlation recognition of infrared target based on wavelet multi-scale product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fang-han; Wang, Wen-sheng

    2011-06-01

    As one of the most successful optical correlation recognizers, hybrid optoelectronic joint transform correlator (HOJTC) has received more and more attraction than the purely electronic way in the field of target detection and recognition. It primarily because that HOJTC has the advantages of optics as well as those of electronics. This kind of combination determines that the performance of HOJTC is closely related to optical configuration of system and digital image processing technology. For the stability of optical part, a lot of efforts concerning image processing methods have been made in recent years for improving the power of recognition of HOJTC. Edge contours play a decisive role in target detection. In order to obtain adequate contour feature of target, the solution of edge extraction based on wavelet multi-scale product is proposed. Normalized maximum and argument of each point could be defined utilizing wavelet coefficient of image. Both of them contain the relation of coefficient product between each scale. Edge points synthesized the information of multi-scale are extracted by searching local maxima along the direction of gradient. The way adopted fully exploited the character of multi-resolution of wavelet. Simulation experiments and optical experiments indicate that the energy of correlation peaks is obviously enhanced after the original image is processed by wavelet multi-scale product, and it successfully realizes detection and recognition of infrared target.

  3. A fast recognition method of warhead target in boost phase using kinematic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Xu, Shiyou; Tian, Biao; Wu, Jianhua; Chen, Zengping

    2015-12-01

    The radar targets number increases from one to more when the ballistic missile is in the process of separating the lower stage rocket or casting covers or other components. It is vital to identify the warhead target quickly among these multiple targets for radar tracking. A fast recognition method of the warhead target is proposed to solve this problem by using kinematic features, utilizing fuzzy comprehensive method and information fusion method. In order to weaken the influence of radar measurement noise, an extended Kalman filter with constant jerk model (CJEKF) is applied to obtain more accurate target's motion information. The simulation shows the validity of the algorithm and the effects of the radar measurement precision upon the algorithm's performance.

  4. High-resolution crystal structure reveals molecular details of target recognition by bacitracin

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Nicoleta J.; Cocklin, Simon; Loll, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacitracin is a metalloantibiotic agent that is widely used as a medicine and feed additive. It interferes with bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding undecaprenyl-pyrophosphate, a lipid carrier that serves as a critical intermediate in cell wall production. Despite bacitracin’s broad use, the molecular details of its target recognition have not been elucidated. Here we report a crystal structure for the ternary complex of bacitracin A, zinc, and a geranyl-pyrophosphate ligand at a resolution of 1.1 Å. The antibiotic forms a compact structure that completely envelopes the ligand’s pyrophosphate group, together with flanking zinc and sodium ions. The complex adopts a highly amphipathic conformation that offers clues to antibiotic function in the context of bacterial membranes. Bacitracin’s efficient sequestration of its target represents a previously unseen mode for the recognition of lipid pyrophosphates, and suggests new directions for the design of next-generation antimicrobial agents. PMID:23940351

  5. Integrated approach for automatic target recognition using a network of collaborative sensors.

    PubMed

    Mahalanobis, Abhijit; Van Nevel, Alan

    2006-10-01

    We introduce what is believed to be a novel concept by which several sensors with automatic target recognition (ATR) capability collaborate to recognize objects. Such an approach would be suitable for netted systems in which the sensors and platforms can coordinate to optimize end-to-end performance. We use correlation filtering techniques to facilitate the development of the concept, although other ATR algorithms may be easily substituted. Essentially, a self-configuring geometry of netted platforms is proposed that positions the sensors optimally with respect to each other, and takes into account the interactions among the sensor, the recognition algorithms, and the classes of the objects to be recognized. We show how such a paradigm optimizes overall performance, and illustrate the collaborative ATR scheme for recognizing targets in synthetic aperture radar imagery by using viewing position as a sensor parameter.

  6. Target Recognition Using Late-Time Returns from Ultra-Wideband, Short-Pulse Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    neglecting terms associated with surface resistance. The recognition sensor illuminates the target with a series of ultra-wideband, short radar pulses...the incident radar wave . Picture yourself looking into a mirror. If you can see your own face, you see the broadside of the mirror. Broadside is used...as an azimuth reference. Broadside illumination occurs when the incident wave approaches the object’s surface in a direction parallel to the surface

  7. Background characterization techniques for target detection using scene metrics and pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noah, Paul V.; Noah, Meg A.; Schroeder, John W.; Chernick, Julian A.

    1990-09-01

    The U.S. Army has a requirement to develop systems for the detection and identification of ground targets in a clutter environment. Autonomous Homing Munitions (AHM) using infrared, visible, millimeter wave and other sensors are being investigated for this application. Advanced signal processing and computational approaches using pattern recognition and artificial intelligence techniques combined with multisensor data fusion have the potential to meet the Army's requirements for next generation ARM.

  8. Effects of expected-value information and display format on recognition of aircraft subsystem abnormalities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Michael T.; Abbott, Kathy H.

    1994-01-01

    This study identifies improved methods to present system parameter information for detecting abnormal conditions and to identify system status. Two workstation experiments were conducted. The first experiment determined if including expected-value-range information in traditional parameter display formats affected subject performance. The second experiment determined if using a nontraditional parameter display format, which presented relative deviation from expected value, was better than traditional formats with expected-value ranges included. The inclusion of expected-value-range information onto traditional parameter formats was found to have essentially no effect. However, subjective results indicated support for including this information. The nontraditional column deviation parameter display format resulted in significantly fewer errors compared with traditional formats with expected-value-ranges included. In addition, error rates for the column deviation parameter display format remained stable as the scenario complexity increased, whereas error rates for the traditional parameter display formats with expected-value ranges increased. Subjective results also indicated that the subjects preferred this new format and thought that their performance was better with it. The column deviation parameter display format is recommended for display applications that require rapid recognition of out-of-tolerance conditions, especially for a large number of parameters.

  9. Tank target recognition used in infrared imaging fuze based on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Ke-yong; Song, Cheng-tian; Jiang, Yi-Ming

    2009-07-01

    Infrared imaging fuze is invulnerable to the electromagnetic interference, and it has the ability to recognize the local image of the target. At present, the infrared imaging fuze technology has become one of the key technologies which perform the target detection and the ignition of the warhead in the complex tactical environment. According to the scanning mechanism of the infrared imaging fuze, based on the analysis of features of the infrared image of tank target, this paper presents a feature extraction method based on knowledge to recognize infrared gray image. The geometric features and gray level features are extracted. The geometric features include the corner features and angular features. The corners of the image are extracted through the SUSAN corner detection principle,the angular feature is extracted by Freeman chain code. The hot-zone gray feature is extracted by the template matching and image binarization principle. In order to realize real-time recognition, this paper uses FPGA technology to achieve recognition circuit. The experiments show that the recognition method has a certain anti-interference ability.

  10. RNA-based recognition and targeting: sowing the seeds of specificity.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Stanislaw A; Vogel, Jörg; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2017-04-01

    RNA is involved in the regulation of multiple cellular processes, often by forming sequence-specific base pairs with cellular RNA or DNA targets that must be identified among the large number of nucleic acids in a cell. Several RNA-based regulatory systems in eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea, including microRNAs (miRNAs), small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) and small RNAs (sRNAs) that are dependent on the RNA chaperone protein Hfq, achieve specificity using similar strategies. Central to their function is the presentation of short 'seed sequences' within a ribonucleoprotein complex to facilitate the search for and recognition of targets.

  11. A hierarchical classifier using new support vector machines for automatic target recognition.

    PubMed

    Casasent, David; Wang, Yu-Chiang

    2005-01-01

    A binary hierarchical classifier is proposed for automatic target recognition. We also require rejection of non-object (non-target) inputs, which are not seen during training or validation, thus producing a very difficult problem. The SVRDM (support vector representation and discrimination machine) classifier is used at each node in the hierarchy, since it offers good generalization and rejection ability. Using this hierarchical SVRDM classifier with magnitude Fourier transform (|FT|) features, which provide shift-invariance, initial test results on infra-red (IR) data are excellent.

  12. RNA-guided complex from a bacterial immune system enhances target recognition through seed sequence interactions.

    PubMed

    Wiedenheft, Blake; van Duijn, Esther; Bultema, Jelle B; Bultema, Jelle; Waghmare, Sakharam P; Waghmare, Sakharam; Zhou, Kaihong; Barendregt, Arjan; Westphal, Wiebke; Heck, Albert J R; Heck, Albert; Boekema, Egbert J; Boekema, Egbert; Dickman, Mark J; Dickman, Mark; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2011-06-21

    Prokaryotes have evolved multiple versions of an RNA-guided adaptive immune system that targets foreign nucleic acids. In each case, transcripts derived from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) are thought to selectively target invading phage and plasmids in a sequence-specific process involving a variable cassette of CRISPR-associated (cas) genes. The CRISPR locus in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA14) includes four cas genes that are unique to and conserved in microorganisms harboring the Csy-type (CRISPR system yersinia) immune system. Here we show that the Csy proteins (Csy1-4) assemble into a 350 kDa ribonucleoprotein complex that facilitates target recognition by enhancing sequence-specific hybridization between the CRISPR RNA and complementary target sequences. Target recognition is enthalpically driven and localized to a "seed sequence" at the 5' end of the CRISPR RNA spacer. Structural analysis of the complex by small-angle X-ray scattering and single particle electron microscopy reveals a crescent-shaped particle that bears striking resemblance to the architecture of a large CRISPR-associated complex from Escherichia coli, termed Cascade. Although similarity between these two complexes is not evident at the sequence level, their unequal subunit stoichiometry and quaternary architecture reveal conserved structural features that may be common among diverse CRISPR-mediated defense systems.

  13. 33 CFR 334.10 - Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gulf of Maine off Seal Island... REGULATIONS § 334.10 Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger zone. A circular area with a radius of 1.5 nautical miles, having its center just easterly of...

  14. 33 CFR 334.10 - Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gulf of Maine off Seal Island... REGULATIONS § 334.10 Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger zone. A circular area with a radius of 1.5 nautical miles, having its center just easterly of...

  15. 33 CFR 334.10 - Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gulf of Maine off Seal Island... REGULATIONS § 334.10 Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger zone. A circular area with a radius of 1.5 nautical miles, having its center just easterly of...

  16. 33 CFR 334.40 - Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles of Shoals; naval aircraft bombing target...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles of Shoals; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.40 Section 334.40... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.40 Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles...

  17. 33 CFR 334.40 - Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles of Shoals; naval aircraft bombing target...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles of Shoals; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.40 Section 334.40... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.40 Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles...

  18. 33 CFR 334.40 - Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles of Shoals; naval aircraft bombing target...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles of Shoals; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.40 Section 334.40... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.40 Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles...

  19. 33 CFR 334.10 - Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gulf of Maine off Seal Island... REGULATIONS § 334.10 Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger zone. A circular area with a radius of 1.5 nautical miles, having its center just easterly of...

  20. 33 CFR 334.40 - Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles of Shoals; naval aircraft bombing target...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles of Shoals; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.40 Section 334.40... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.40 Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles...

  1. 33 CFR 334.40 - Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles of Shoals; naval aircraft bombing target...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles of Shoals; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.40 Section 334.40... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.40 Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles...

  2. Understanding Molecular Recognition by G protein βγ Subunits on the Path to Pharmacological Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins, composed of Gα and Gβγ subunits, transduce extracellular signals via G-protein-coupled receptors to modulate many important intracellular responses. The Gβγ subunits hold a central position in this signaling system and have been implicated in multiple aspects of physiology and the pathophysiology of disease. The Gβ subunit belongs to a large family of WD40 repeat proteins with a circular β-bladed propeller structure. This structure allows Gβγ to interact with a broad range of proteins to play diverse roles. How Gβγ interacts with and regulates such a wide variety of partners yet maintains specificity is an interesting problem in protein-protein molecular recognition in signal transduction, where signal transfer by proteins is often driven by modular conserved recognition motifs. Evidence has accumulated that one mechanism for Gβγ multitarget recognition is through an intrinsically flexible protein surface or “hot spot” that accommodates multiple modes of binding. Because each target has a unique recognition mode for Gβγ subunits, it suggests that these interactions could be selectively manipulated with small molecules, which could have significant therapeutic potential. PMID:21737569

  3. 33 CFR 334.60 - Cape Cod Bay south of Wellfleet Harbor, Mass.; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cape Cod Bay south of Wellfleet... REGULATIONS § 334.60 Cape Cod Bay south of Wellfleet Harbor, Mass.; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a... bombing target hulk James Longstreet in Cape Cod Bay at latitude 41°49′46″, longitude 70°02′54″. (b)...

  4. 33 CFR 334.60 - Cape Cod Bay south of Wellfleet Harbor, Mass.; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cape Cod Bay south of Wellfleet... REGULATIONS § 334.60 Cape Cod Bay south of Wellfleet Harbor, Mass.; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a... bombing target hulk James Longstreet in Cape Cod Bay at latitude 41°49′46″, longitude 70°02′54″. (b)...

  5. 33 CFR 334.60 - Cape Cod Bay south of Wellfleet Harbor, Mass.; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cape Cod Bay south of Wellfleet... REGULATIONS § 334.60 Cape Cod Bay south of Wellfleet Harbor, Mass.; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a... bombing target hulk James Longstreet in Cape Cod Bay at latitude 41°49′46″, longitude 70°02′54″. (b)...

  6. 33 CFR 334.60 - Cape Cod Bay south of Wellfleet Harbor, Mass.; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cape Cod Bay south of Wellfleet... REGULATIONS § 334.60 Cape Cod Bay south of Wellfleet Harbor, Mass.; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a... bombing target hulk James Longstreet in Cape Cod Bay at latitude 41°49′46″, longitude 70°02′54″. (b)...

  7. A simulation-based approach towards automatic target recognition of high resolution space borne radar signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglberger, H.; Kempf, T.

    2016-10-01

    Specific imaging effects that are caused mainly by the range measurement principle of a radar device, its much lower frequency range as compared to the optical spectrum, the slanted imaging geometry and certainly the limited spatial resolution complicates the interpretation of radar signatures decisively. Especially the coherent image formation which causes unwanted speckle noise aggravates the problem of visually recognizing target objects. Fully automatic approaches with acceptable false alarm rates are therefore an even harder challenge. At the Microwaves and Radar Institute of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) the development of methods to implement a robust overall processing workflow for automatic target recognition (ATR) out of high resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image data is under progress. The heart of the general approach is to use time series exploitation for the former detection step and simulation-based signature matching for the subsequent recognition. This paper will show the overall ATR chain as a proof of concept for the special case of airplane recognition on image data from the space borne SAR sensor TerraSAR-X.

  8. STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY. A Cas9-guide RNA complex preorganized for target DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fuguo; Zhou, Kaihong; Ma, Linlin; Gressel, Saskia; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2015-06-26

    Bacterial adaptive immunity uses CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-associated (Cas) proteins together with CRISPR transcripts for foreign DNA degradation. In type II CRISPR-Cas systems, activation of Cas9 endonuclease for DNA recognition upon guide RNA binding occurs by an unknown mechanism. Crystal structures of Cas9 bound to single-guide RNA reveal a conformation distinct from both the apo and DNA-bound states, in which the 10-nucleotide RNA "seed" sequence required for initial DNA interrogation is preordered in an A-form conformation. This segment of the guide RNA is essential for Cas9 to form a DNA recognition-competent structure that is poised to engage double-stranded DNA target sequences. We construe this as convergent evolution of a "seed" mechanism reminiscent of that used by Argonaute proteins during RNA interference in eukaryotes.

  9. Water-mediated recognition of t1-adenosine anchors Argonaute2 to microRNA targets

    PubMed Central

    Schirle, Nicole T; Sheu-Gruttadauria, Jessica; Chandradoss, Stanley D; Joo, Chirlmin; MacRae, Ian J

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) direct post-transcriptional regulation of human genes by guiding Argonaute proteins to complementary sites in messenger RNAs (mRNAs) targeted for repression. An enigmatic feature of many conserved mammalian miRNA target sites is that an adenosine (A) nucleotide opposite miRNA nucleotide-1 confers enhanced target repression independently of base pairing potential to the miRNA. In this study, we show that human Argonaute2 (Ago2) possesses a solvated surface pocket that specifically binds adenine nucleobases in the 1 position (t1) of target RNAs. t1A nucleotides are recognized indirectly through a hydrogen-bonding network of water molecules that preferentially interacts with the N6 amine on adenine. t1A nucleotides are not utilized during the initial binding of Ago2 to its target, but instead function by increasing the dwell time on target RNA. We also show that N6 adenosine methylation blocks t1A recognition, revealing a possible mechanism for modulation of miRNA target site potency. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07646.001 PMID:26359634

  10. An automated target recognition technique for image segmentation and scene analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgart, C.W.; Ciarcia, C.A.

    1994-02-01

    Automated target recognition software has been designed to perform image segmentation and scene analysis. Specifically, this software was developed as a package for the Army`s Minefield and Reconnaissance and Detector (MIRADOR) program. MIRADOR is an on/off road, remote control, multi-sensor system designed to detect buried and surface-emplaced metallic and non-metallic anti-tank mines. The basic requirements for this ATR software were: (1) an ability to separate target objects from the background in low S/N conditions; (2) an ability to handle a relatively high dynamic range in imaging light levels; (3) the ability to compensate for or remove light source effects such as shadows; and (4) the ability to identify target objects as mines. The image segmentation and target evaluation was performed utilizing an integrated and parallel processing approach. Three basic techniques (texture analysis, edge enhancement, and contrast enhancement) were used collectively to extract all potential mine target shapes from the basic image. Target evaluation was then performed using a combination of size, geometrical, and fractal characteristics which resulted in a calculated probability for each target shape. Overall results with this algorithm were quite good, though there is a trade-off between detection confidence and the number of false alarms. This technology also has applications in the areas of hazardous waste site remediation, archaeology, and law enforcement.

  11. Nonlinear techniques in optical synthetic aperture radar image generation and target recognition.

    PubMed

    Weaver, S; Wagner, K

    1995-07-10

    One of the most successful optical signal-processing applications to date has been the use of optical processors to convert synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data into images of the radar reflectivity of the ground. We have demonstrated real-time input to a high-space-bandwidth optical SAR imagegeneration system by using a dynamic organic holographic recording medium and SAR phase-history data. Real-time speckle reduction in optically processed SAR imagery has been accomplished by the use of multilook averaging to achieve nonlinear modulus-squared accumulation of subaperture images. We designed and assembled an all-optical system that accomplished real-time target recognition in SAR imagery. This system employed a simple square-law nonlinearity in the form of an optically addressed spatial light modulator at the SAR image plane to remove the effects of speckle phase profiles returned from complex SAR targets. The detection stage enabled the creation of an optical SAR automatic target recognition system as a nonlinear cascade of an optical SAR image generator and an optical correlator.

  12. Role for the propofol hydroxyl in anesthetic protein target molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Woll, Kellie A; Weiser, Brian P; Liang, Qiansheng; Meng, Tao; McKinstry-Wu, Andrew; Pinch, Benika; Dailey, William P; Gao, Wei Dong; Covarrubias, Manuel; Eckenhoff, Roderic G

    2015-06-17

    Propofol is a widely used intravenous general anesthetic. We synthesized 2-fluoro-1,3-diisopropylbenzene, a compound that we call "fropofol", to directly assess the significance of the propofol 1-hydroxyl for pharmacologically relevant molecular recognition in vitro and for anesthetic efficacy in vivo. Compared to propofol, fropofol had a similar molecular volume and only a small increase in hydrophobicity. Isothermal titration calorimetry and competition assays revealed that fropofol had higher affinity for a protein site governed largely by van der Waals interactions. Within another protein model containing hydrogen bond interactions, propofol demonstrated higher affinity. In vivo, fropofol demonstrated no anesthetic efficacy, but at high concentrations produced excitatory activity in tadpoles and mice; fropofol also antagonized propofol-induced hypnosis. In a propofol protein target that contributes to hypnosis, α1β2γ2L GABAA receptors, fropofol demonstrated no significant effect alone or on propofol positive allosteric modulation of the ion channel, suggesting an additional requirement for the 1-hydroxyl within synaptic GABAA receptor site(s). However, fropofol caused similar adverse cardiovascular effects as propofol by a dose-dependent depression of myocardial contractility. Our results directly implicate the propofol 1-hydroxyl as contributing to molecular recognition within protein targets leading to hypnosis, but not necessarily within protein targets leading to side effects of the drug.

  13. Interim results from a neural network 3-D automatic target recognition program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoet, William; Rainey, Timothy G.; Slutz, Lee A.; Weingard, Fred

    1992-09-01

    Recent results from the Artificial Neural VIsion Learning (ANVIL) program are presented. The focus of the ANVIL program is to apply neural network technologies to the air-to-surface 3D automatic target recognition (ATR) problem. The 3D Multiple Object Detection and Location System (MODALS) neural network was developed under the ANVIL program to simultaneously detect, locate, segment, and identify multiple targets. The performance results show a very high identification accuracy, a high detection rate, and low false alarm rate, even for areas with high clutter and shadowing. The results are shown as detection/false alarm curves and identification/false alarm curves. In addition, positional detection accuracy is shown for various scale sizes. To provide data for the program, visible terrain board imagery was collected under a variety of background and lighting conditions. Tests were made on over 500 targets of five types and two classes. These targets varied in scale by up to -25%, varied in azimuth by up to 120 degrees, and varied in elevation by up to 10 degrees. The performance results are shown for targets with resolution ranging from 9 to 700 pixels on target. This work is being performed under contract to Wright Laboratory AAAT-1.

  14. ANVIL neural network program for three-dimensional automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoet, William; Rainey, Timothy G.; Brettle, Dean W.; Slutz, Lee A.; Weingard, Fred

    1992-12-01

    The focus of the artificial neural vision learning (ANVIL) program is to apply neural network technologies to the air-to-surface 3-D automatic target recognition (ATR) problem. The 3-D multiple object detection and location system (MODALS) neural network was developed under the ANVIL program to simultaneously detect, locate, segment, and identify multiple targets. The performance results show a very high identification accuracy, a high detection rate, and a low false alarm rate, even for areas with high clutter and shadowing. The results are shown as detection/false alarm curves and identification/false alarm curves. In addition, positional detection accuracy is shown for various scale sizes. To provide data for the program, visible terrain board imagery was collected under a variety of background and lighting conditions. Tests were made on more than 500 targets of five types and two classes. These targets varied in scale by up to -25%, varied in azimuth by up to 120 deg, and varied in elevation by up to 10 deg. The performance results are shown for targets with resolution ranging from 9 to 700 pixels on target.

  15. Optical implementation of a feature-based neural network with application to automatic target recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Stoner, William W.

    1993-01-01

    An optical neural network based on the neocognitron paradigm is introduced. A novel aspect of the architecture design is shift-invariant multichannel Fourier optical correlation within each processing layer. Multilayer processing is achieved by feeding back the ouput of the feature correlator interatively to the input spatial light modulator and by updating the Fourier filters. By training the neural net with characteristic features extracted from the target images, successful pattern recognition with intraclass fault tolerance and interclass discrimination is achieved. A detailed system description is provided. Experimental demonstrations of a two-layer neural network for space-object discrimination is also presented.

  16. Automatic target recognition using a feature-based optical neural network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin

    1992-01-01

    An optical neural network based upon the Neocognitron paradigm (K. Fukushima et al. 1983) is introduced. A novel aspect of the architectural design is shift-invariant multichannel Fourier optical correlation within each processing layer. Multilayer processing is achieved by iteratively feeding back the output of the feature correlator to the input spatial light modulator and updating the Fourier filters. By training the neural net with characteristic features extracted from the target images, successful pattern recognition with intra-class fault tolerance and inter-class discrimination is achieved. A detailed system description is provided. Experimental demonstration of a two-layer neural network for space objects discrimination is also presented.

  17. The recognition of extended targets - SAR images for level and hilly terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiles, J. A.; Frost, V. S.; Holtzman, J. C.; Shanmugam, K. S.

    1982-01-01

    Radar image simulation techniques are used to determine the character of SAR images of area-extensive targets, for the cases of flat underlying terrain and of moderate relief, with a view to the severity of elevation change effects on the detection and recognition of boundaries and shapes. The experiment, which demonstrated these effects on shapes and boundaries, was performed in order to establish Seasat-A SAR performance. Attention is given to the geometry/propagation effects in range perspective imaging that must be known for information extraction.

  18. Advances in image compression and automatic target recognition; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Mar. 30, 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Tescher, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on image compression and automatic target recognition are presented. Individual topics addressed include: target cluster detection in cluttered SAR imagery, model-based target recognition using laser radar imagery, Smart Sensor front-end processor for feature extraction of images, object attitude estimation and tracking from a single video sensor, symmetry detection in human vision, analysis of high resolution aerial images for object detection, obscured object recognition for an ATR application, neural networks for adaptive shape tracking, statistical mechanics and pattern recognition, detection of cylinders in aerial range images, moving object tracking using local windows, new transform method for image data compression, quad-tree product vector quantization of images, predictive trellis encoding of imagery, reduced generalized chain code for contour description, compact architecture for a real-time vision system, use of human visibility functions in segmentation coding, color texture analysis and synthesis using Gibbs random fields.

  19. Pattern recognition of the targets with help of polarization properties of the signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomaryov, Volodymyr I.; de Rivera, Luis N.; Castellanos, Aldo B.; Popov, Anatoly V.

    1999-10-01

    We proposed to use the possibility of recognition of the targets on background of the scattering from the surface, weather objects with the help of polarimetric 3-cm radar. It has been investigated such polarization characteristics: the amplitudes of the polarization matrix elements; an anisotropy coefficient; depolarization coefficient; asymmetry coefficient; the energy section was less than 1 dB at ranges up to 15 km and less than 1.5 dB at ranges up to 100 km. During the experiments urban objects and 6 various ships of small displacement having the closest values of the backscattering cross-section were used. The analysis has shown: the factor of the polarization selection for anisotropy objects and weather objects had the values about 0.02-0.08 Isotropy had the values of polarimetric correlation factor for hydrometers about 0.7-0.8, for earth surface about 0.8-0.9, for sea surface - from 0.33 to 0.7. The results of the work of recognition algorithm of a class 'concrete objects', and 'metal objects' are submitted as example in the paper. The result of experiments have shown that the probability of correct recognition of the identified objects was in the limits from 0.93 to 0.97.

  20. Versatile TPR domains accommodate different modes of target protein recognition and function.

    PubMed

    Allan, Rudi Kenneth; Ratajczak, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    The tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motif is one of many repeat motifs that form structural domains in proteins that can act as interaction scaffolds in the formation of multi-protein complexes involved in numerous cellular processes such as transcription, the cell cycle, protein translocation, protein degradation and host defence against invading pathogens. The crystal structures of many TPR domain-containing proteins have been determined, showing TPR motifs as two anti-parallel α-helices packed in tandem arrays to form a structure with an amphipathic groove which can bind a target peptide. This is however not the only mode of target recognition by TPR domains, with short amino acid insertions and alternative TPR motif conformations also shown to contribute to protein interactions, highlighting diversity in TPR domains and the versatility of this structure in mediating biological events.

  1. Clutter metric based on the Cramer-Rao lower bound on automatic target recognition.

    PubMed

    He, Guojing; Zhang, Jianqi; Liu, Delian; Chang, Honghua

    2008-10-10

    This is a performance evaluation on the implementation of the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) for background clutter measurement on automatic target recognition (ATR). In essence the background clutter evaluation problem for ATR is consistent with the deterministic parameter estimation problem. Thus, useful concepts and theories of deterministic parameter estimation can be introduced into the investigation of background clutter. In this paper, the CRLB is employed as a metric for clutter measurement. Requirements needed for this application are analyzed, and the approach for obtaining the CRLB of a scene image is produced. The flexibility of the CRLB metric is analyzed. Discussion and comparison are made on the relationship between the CRLB metric and the Sims signal-to-clutter metric. Finally, we illustrate how this metric defines the potential for false alarms by determining the correspondence level between a target and background through the application of the CRLB.

  2. Target recognition at the tips of postsynaptic filopodia: accumulation and function of Capricious.

    PubMed

    Kohsaka, Hiroshi; Nose, Akinao

    2009-04-01

    While much evidence suggests that postsynaptic dynamism contributes to the formation of synapses, few studies have addressed its possible role in target selection. Do postsynaptic motile structures seek specific synaptic partner cells, as does the presynaptic growth cone? Here we studied the dynamics of myopodia, postsynaptic filopodia in Drosophila muscles, and the role of Capricious (CAPS) during the process of synaptic matchmaking. CAPS is a target recognition molecule with an extracellular domain containing leucine-rich repeat sequences. It is expressed in specific subsets of embryonic/larval body wall muscles, including muscle 12 (M12). We provide evidence that implicates the tips of myopodia as loci of initial neuromuscular recognition: (1) CAPS, expressed as a GFP-fusion protein in M12, accumulated at the tips of myopodia; and (2) simultaneous live imaging of presynaptic motoneurons and postsynaptic myopodia revealed that initial neuromuscular contacts occur at the tips of myopodia. The live imaging also showed that individual postsynaptic myopodia appear to be able to discriminate partner and non-partner presynaptic cells: whereas many myopodial contacts with the partner motoneurons are stabilized to form synapses, those with non-partner neurons are retracted. In caps mutants, or in double mutants lacking both CAPS and the closely related protein Tartan, we observed fewer contacts between myopodia of M12 and the presynaptic growth cones during the process of initial neuromuscular interaction. The nascent synaptic sites of M12 were also reduced. These results provide evidence for the sensing function of postsynaptic filopodia, and implicate Caps-mediated recognition at the tips of myopodia in synaptic matching.

  3. The TCF C-clamp DNA binding domain expands the Wnt transcriptome via alternative target recognition

    PubMed Central

    Hoverter, Nate P.; Zeller, Michael D.; McQuade, Miriam M.; Garibaldi, Angela; Busch, Anke; Selwan, Elizabeth M.; Hertel, Klemens J.; Baldi, Pierre; Waterman, Marian L.

    2014-01-01

    LEF/TCFs direct the final step in Wnt/β-catenin signalling by recruiting β-catenin to genes for activation of transcription. Ancient, non-vertebrate TCFs contain two DNA binding domains, a High Mobility Group box for recognition of the Wnt Response Element (WRE; 5′-CTTTGWWS-3′) and the C-clamp domain for recognition of the GC-rich Helper motif (5′-RCCGCC-3′). Two vertebrate TCFs (TCF-1/TCF7 and TCF-4/TCF7L2) use the C-clamp as an alternatively spliced domain to regulate cell-cycle progression, but how the C-clamp influences TCF binding and activity genome-wide is not known. Here, we used a doxycycline inducible system with ChIP-seq to assess how the C-clamp influences human TCF1 binding genome-wide. Metabolic pulse-labeling of nascent RNA with 4′Thiouridine was used with RNA-seq to connect binding to the Wnt transcriptome. We find that the C-clamp enables targeting to a greater number of gene loci for stronger occupancy and transcription regulation. The C-clamp uses Helper sites concurrently with WREs for gene targeting, but it also targets TCF1 to sites that do not have readily identifiable canonical WREs. The coupled ChIP-seq/4′Thiouridine-seq analysis identified new Wnt target genes, including additional regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, C-clamp containing isoforms of TCFs are potent transcriptional regulators with an expanded transcriptome directed by C-clamp-Helper site interactions. PMID:25414359

  4. Ribosome-messenger recognition: mRNA target sites for ribosomal protein S1.

    PubMed Central

    Boni, I V; Isaeva, D M; Musychenko, M L; Tzareva, N V

    1991-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S1 is known to play an important role in translational initiation, being directly involved in recognition and binding of mRNAs by 30S ribosomal particles. Using a specially developed procedure based on efficient crosslinking of S1 to mRNA induced by UV irradiation, we have identified S1 binding sites on several phage RNAs in preinitiation complexes. Targets for S1 on Q beta and fr RNAs are localized upstream from the coat protein gene and contain oligo(U)-sequences. In the case of Q beta RNA, this S1 binding site overlaps the S-site for Q beta replicase and the site for S1 binding within a binary complex. It is reasonable that similar U-rich sequences represent S1 binding sites on bacterial mRNAs. To test this idea we have used E. coli ssb mRNA prepared in vitro with the T7 promoter/RNA polymerase system. By the methods of toeprinting, enzymatic footprinting, and UV crosslinking we have shown that binding of the ssb mRNA to 30S ribosomes is S1-dependent. The oligo(U)-sequence preceding the SD domain was found to be the target for S1. We propose that S1 binding sites, represented by pyrimidine-rich sequences upstream from the SD region, serve as determinants involved in recognition of mRNA by the ribosome. Images PMID:2011495

  5. Joint Infrared Target Recognition and Segmentation Using a Shape Manifold-Aware Level Set

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Liangjiang; Fan, Guoliang; Gong, Jiulu; Havlicek, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    We propose new techniques for joint recognition, segmentation and pose estimation of infrared (IR) targets. The problem is formulated in a probabilistic level set framework where a shape constrained generative model is used to provide a multi-class and multi-view shape prior and where the shape model involves a couplet of view and identity manifolds (CVIM). A level set energy function is then iteratively optimized under the shape constraints provided by the CVIM. Since both the view and identity variables are expressed explicitly in the objective function, this approach naturally accomplishes recognition, segmentation and pose estimation as joint products of the optimization process. For realistic target chips, we solve the resulting multi-modal optimization problem by adopting a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm and then improve the computational efficiency by implementing a gradient-boosted PSO (GB-PSO). Evaluation was performed using the Military Sensing Information Analysis Center (SENSIAC) ATR database, and experimental results show that both of the PSO algorithms reduce the cost of shape matching during CVIM-based shape inference. Particularly, GB-PSO outperforms other recent ATR algorithms, which require intensive shape matching, either explicitly (with pre-segmentation) or implicitly (without pre-segmentation). PMID:25938202

  6. Joint infrared target recognition and segmentation using a shape manifold-aware level set.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liangjiang; Fan, Guoliang; Gong, Jiulu; Havlicek, Joseph P

    2015-04-29

    We propose new techniques for joint recognition, segmentation and pose estimation of infrared (IR) targets. The problem is formulated in a probabilistic level set framework where a shape constrained generative model is used to provide a multi-class and multi-view shape prior and where the shape model involves a couplet of view and identity manifolds (CVIM). A level set energy function is then iteratively optimized under the shape constraints provided by the CVIM. Since both the view and identity variables are expressed explicitly in the objective function, this approach naturally accomplishes recognition, segmentation and pose estimation as joint products of the optimization process. For realistic target chips, we solve the resulting multi-modal optimization problem by adopting a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm and then improve the computational efficiency by implementing a gradient-boosted PSO (GB-PSO). Evaluation was performed using the Military Sensing Information Analysis Center (SENSIAC) ATR database, and experimental results show that both of the PSO algorithms reduce the cost of shape matching during CVIM-based shape inference. Particularly, GB-PSO outperforms other recent ATR algorithms, which require intensive shape matching, either explicitly (with pre-segmentation) or implicitly (without pre-segmentation).

  7. Increase in Speech Recognition Due to Linguistic Mismatch between Target and Masker Speech: Monolingual and Simultaneous Bilingual Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calandruccio, Lauren; Zhou, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine whether improved speech recognition during linguistically mismatched target-masker experiments is due to linguistic unfamiliarity of the masker speech or linguistic dissimilarity between the target and masker speech. Method: Monolingual English speakers (n = 20) and English-Greek simultaneous bilinguals (n = 20) listened to…

  8. The use of parametric cost estimating relationships for transport aircraft systems in establishing initial Design to Cost Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beltramo, M. N.; Anderson, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of Design to Cost (DTC). Problems inherent in attempting to estimate costs are discussed, along with techniques and types of models that have been developed to estimate aircraft costs. A set of cost estimating relationships that estimate the total production cost of commercial and military transport aircraft at the systems level is presented and the manner in which these equations might be used effectively in developing initial DTC targets is indicated. The principal point made in this paper is that, by using a disagregated set of equations to estimate transport aircraft costs at the systems level, reasonably accurate preliminary cost estimates may be achieved. These estimates may serve directly as initial DTC targets, or adjustments may be made to the estimates obtained for some of the systems to estimate the production cost impact of alternative designs or manufacturing technologies. The relative ease by which estimates may be made with this model, the flexibility it provides by being disaggregated, and the accuracy of the estimates it provides make it a unique and useful tool in establishing initial DTC targets.

  9. CRISPR RNA binding and DNA target recognition by purified Cascade complexes from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Beloglazova, Natalia; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Flick, Robert; Datsenko, Kirill A; Brown, Greg; Popovic, Ana; Lemak, Sofia; Semenova, Ekaterina; Severinov, Konstantin; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2015-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and their associated Cas proteins comprise a prokaryotic RNA-guided adaptive immune system that interferes with mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids and phages. The type I-E CRISPR interference complex Cascade from Escherichia coli is composed of five different Cas proteins and a 61-nt-long guide RNA (crRNA). crRNAs contain a unique 32-nt spacer flanked by a repeat-derived 5' handle (8 nt) and a 3' handle (21 nt). The spacer part of crRNA directs Cascade to DNA targets. Here, we show that the E. coli Cascade can be expressed and purified from cells lacking crRNAs and loaded in vitro with synthetic crRNAs, which direct it to targets complementary to crRNA spacer. The deletion of even one nucleotide from the crRNA 5' handle disrupted its binding to Cascade and target DNA recognition. In contrast, crRNA variants with just a single nucleotide downstream of the spacer part bound Cascade and the resulting ribonucleotide complex containing a 41-nt-long crRNA specifically recognized DNA targets. Thus, the E. coli Cascade-crRNA system exhibits significant flexibility suggesting that this complex can be engineered for applications in genome editing and opening the way for incorporation of site-specific labels in crRNA.

  10. Multi-Aircraft Video - Human/Automation Target Recognition Studies: Video Display Size in Unaided Target Acquisition Involving Multiple Videos

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    Questionnaires ……………………………………………………... 25 B Candidate Video Display Formats for DVR Implementation ……………. 32 FIGURES 1 Computer monitors used to...were displayed on the left monitor and the videos were displayed on the right monitor. Figure 1. Computer monitors used to display pictures of the

  11. AM3 modulates dendritic cell pathogen recognition capabilities by targeting DC-SIGN.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Gómez, Diego; Martínez-Nuñez, Rocío T; Sierra-Filardi, Elena; Izquierdo, Nuria; Colmenares, María; Pla, Jesús; Rivas, Luis; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesús; Alonso-Lebrero, José Luis; González, Salvador; Corbí, Angel L

    2007-07-01

    AM3 (Inmunoferon) is an orally effective immunomodulator that influences the regulatory and effector functions of the immune system whose molecular mechanisms of action are mostly unknown. We hypothesized that the polysaccharide moiety of AM3 (IF-S) might affect immune responses by modulating the lectin-dependent pathogen recognition abilities of human dendritic cells. IF-S inhibited binding of viral, fungal, and parasite pathogens by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells in a dose-dependent manner. IF-S specifically impaired the pathogen recognition capabilities of DC-SIGN, as it reduced the attachment of Candida, Aspergillus, and Leishmania to DC-SIGN transfectants. IF-S also inhibited the interaction of DC-SIGN with both its cellular counterreceptor (intercellular adhesion molecule 3) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 gp120 protein and blocked the DC-SIGN-dependent capture of HIV virions and the HIV trans-infection capability of DC-SIGN transfectants. IF-S promoted DC-SIGN internalization in DCs without affecting mannose receptor expression, and (1)D saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance demonstrated that IF-S directly interacts with DC-SIGN on the cell surface. Therefore, the polysaccharide moiety of AM3 directly influences pathogen recognition by dendritic cells by interacting with DC-SIGN. Our results indicate that DC-SIGN is the target for an immunomodulator and imply that the adjuvant and immunomodulatory actions of AM3 are mediated, at least in part, by alteration of the DC-SIGN functional activities.

  12. Minimum probability of error recognition of three-dimensional laser-scanned targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, Michael D.; Zhou, Xin

    2006-05-01

    Shape measurements form powerful features for recognizing objects, and many imaging modalities produce three-dimensional shape information. Stereo-photogrammetric techniques have been extensively developed, and many researchers have looked at related techniques such as shape from motion, shape from accommodation, and shape from shading. Recently, considerable attention has focused on laser radar systems for imaging distant objects, such as automobiles from an airborne platform, and on laser-based active stereo imaging for close-range objects, such as part scanners for automated inspection. Each use of these laser imagers generally results in a range image, an array of distance measurements as a function of direction. For multi-look data or data fused from multiple sensors, we may more generally treat the data as a 3D point-cloud, an unordered collection of 3D points measured from the surface of the scene. This paper presents a general approach to object recognition in the presence of significant clutter, that is suitable for application to a wide range of 3D imaging systems. The approach relies on a probabilistic framework relating 3D point-cloud data and the objects from which they are measured. Through this framework a minimum probability of error recognition algorithm is derived that accounts for both obscuring and nonobscuring clutter, and that accommodates arbitrary (range and cross-range) measurement errors. The algorithm is applied to a problem of target recognition from actual 3D point-cloud data measured in the laboratory from scale models of civilian automobiles. Noisy 3D measurements are used to train models of the automobiles, and these models are used to classify the automobiles when present in a scene containing natural and man-made clutter.

  13. Unsupervised learning in persistent sensing for target recognition by wireless ad hoc networks of ground-based sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    2008-04-01

    In previous work by the author, effective persistent and pervasive sensing for recognition and tracking of battlefield targets were seen to be achieved, using intelligent algorithms implemented by distributed mobile agents over a composite system of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for persistence and a wireless network of unattended ground sensors for pervasive coverage of the mission environment. While simulated performance results for the supervised algorithms of the composite system are shown to provide satisfactory target recognition over relatively brief periods of system operation, this performance can degrade by as much as 50% as target dynamics in the environment evolve beyond the period of system operation in which the training data are representative. To overcome this limitation, this paper applies the distributed approach using mobile agents to the network of ground-based wireless sensors alone, without the UAV subsystem, to provide persistent as well as pervasive sensing for target recognition and tracking. The supervised algorithms used in the earlier work are supplanted by unsupervised routines, including competitive-learning neural networks (CLNNs) and new versions of support vector machines (SVMs) for characterization of an unknown target environment. To capture the same physical phenomena from battlefield targets as the composite system, the suite of ground-based sensors can be expanded to include imaging and video capabilities. The spatial density of deployed sensor nodes is increased to allow more precise ground-based location and tracking of detected targets by active nodes. The "swarm" mobile agents enabling WSN intelligence are organized in a three processing stages: detection, recognition and sustained tracking of ground targets. Features formed from the compressed sensor data are down-selected according to an information-theoretic algorithm that reduces redundancy within the feature set, reducing the dimension of samples used in the target

  14. A Compact Methodology to Understand, Evaluate, and Predict the Performance of Automatic Target Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanpeng; Li, Xiang; Wang, Hongqiang; Chen, Yiping; Zhuang, Zhaowen; Cheng, Yongqiang; Deng, Bin; Wang, Liandong; Zeng, Yonghu; Gao, Lei

    2014-01-01

    This paper offers a compacted mechanism to carry out the performance evaluation work for an automatic target recognition (ATR) system: (a) a standard description of the ATR system's output is suggested, a quantity to indicate the operating condition is presented based on the principle of feature extraction in pattern recognition, and a series of indexes to assess the output in different aspects are developed with the application of statistics; (b) performance of the ATR system is interpreted by a quality factor based on knowledge of engineering mathematics; (c) through a novel utility called “context-probability” estimation proposed based on probability, performance prediction for an ATR system is realized. The simulation result shows that the performance of an ATR system can be accounted for and forecasted by the above-mentioned measures. Compared to existing technologies, the novel method can offer more objective performance conclusions for an ATR system. These conclusions may be helpful in knowing the practical capability of the tested ATR system. At the same time, the generalization performance of the proposed method is good. PMID:24967605

  15. Structural Code for DNA Recognition Revealed in Crystal Structures of Papillomavirus E2-DNA Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenberg, Haim; Rabinovich, Dov; Frolow, Felix; Hegde, Rashmi S.; Shakked, Zippora

    1998-12-01

    Transcriptional regulation in papillomaviruses depends on sequence-specific binding of the regulatory protein E2 to several sites in the viral genome. Crystal structures of bovine papillomavirus E2 DNA targets reveal a conformational variant of B-DNA characterized by a roll-induced writhe and helical repeat of 10.5 bp per turn. A comparison between the free and the protein-bound DNA demonstrates that the intrinsic structure of the DNA regions contacted directly by the protein and the deformability of the DNA region that is not contacted by the protein are critical for sequence-specific protein/DNA recognition and hence for gene-regulatory signals in the viral system. We show that the selection of dinucleotide or longer segments with appropriate conformational characteristics, when positioned at correct intervals along the DNA helix, can constitute a structural code for DNA recognition by regulatory proteins. This structural code facilitates the formation of a complementary protein-DNA interface that can be further specified by hydrogen bonds and nonpolar interactions between the protein amino acids and the DNA bases.

  16. A compact methodology to understand, evaluate, and predict the performance of automatic target recognition.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanpeng; Li, Xiang; Wang, Hongqiang; Chen, Yiping; Zhuang, Zhaowen; Cheng, Yongqiang; Deng, Bin; Wang, Liandong; Zeng, Yonghu; Gao, Lei

    2014-06-25

    This paper offers a compacted mechanism to carry out the performance evaluation work for an automatic target recognition (ATR) system: (a) a standard description of the ATR system's output is suggested, a quantity to indicate the operating condition is presented based on the principle of feature extraction in pattern recognition, and a series of indexes to assess the output in different aspects are developed with the application of statistics; (b) performance of the ATR system is interpreted by a quality factor based on knowledge of engineering mathematics; (c) through a novel utility called "context-probability" estimation proposed based on probability, performance prediction for an ATR system is realized. The simulation result shows that the performance of an ATR system can be accounted for and forecasted by the above-mentioned measures. Compared to existing technologies, the novel method can offer more objective performance conclusions for an ATR system. These conclusions may be helpful in knowing the practical capability of the tested ATR system. At the same time, the generalization performance of the proposed method is good.

  17. Dynamic Data Driven Applications Systems (DDDAS) modeling for automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik; Seetharaman, Guna; Darema, Frederica

    2013-05-01

    The Dynamic Data Driven Applications System (DDDAS) concept uses applications modeling, mathematical algorithms, and measurement systems to work with dynamic systems. A dynamic systems such as Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) is subject to sensor, target, and the environment variations over space and time. We use the DDDAS concept to develop an ATR methodology for multiscale-multimodal analysis that seeks to integrated sensing, processing, and exploitation. In the analysis, we use computer vision techniques to explore the capabilities and analogies that DDDAS has with information fusion. The key attribute of coordination is the use of sensor management as a data driven techniques to improve performance. In addition, DDDAS supports the need for modeling from which uncertainty and variations are used within the dynamic models for advanced performance. As an example, we use a Wide-Area Motion Imagery (WAMI) application to draw parallels and contrasts between ATR and DDDAS systems that warrants an integrated perspective. This elementary work is aimed at triggering a sequence of deeper insightful research towards exploiting sparsely sampled piecewise dense WAMI measurements - an application where the challenges of big-data with regards to mathematical fusion relationships and high-performance computations remain significant and will persist. Dynamic data-driven adaptive computations are required to effectively handle the challenges with exponentially increasing data volume for advanced information fusion systems solutions such as simultaneous target tracking and ATR.

  18. A distributed automatic target recognition system using multiple low resolution sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Zhanfeng; Lakshmi Narasimha, Pramod; Topiwala, Pankaj

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a multi-agent system which uses swarming techniques to perform high accuracy Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) in a distributed manner. The proposed system can co-operatively share the information from low-resolution images of different looks and use this information to perform high accuracy ATR. An advanced, multiple-agent Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) systems-based approach is proposed which integrates the processing capabilities, combines detection reporting with live video exchange, and swarm behavior modalities that dramatically surpass individual sensor system performance levels. We employ real-time block-based motion analysis and compensation scheme for efficient estimation and correction of camera jitter, global motion of the camera/scene and the effects of atmospheric turbulence. Our optimized Partition Weighted Sum (PWS) approach requires only bitshifts and additions, yet achieves a stunning 16X pixel resolution enhancement, which is moreover parallizable. We develop advanced, adaptive particle-filtering based algorithms to robustly track multiple mobile targets by adaptively changing the appearance model of the selected targets. The collaborative ATR system utilizes the homographies between the sensors induced by the ground plane to overlap the local observation with the received images from other UAVs. The motion of the UAVs distorts estimated homography frame to frame. A robust dynamic homography estimation algorithm is proposed to address this, by using the homography decomposition and the ground plane surface estimation.

  19. User acceptance of intelligent avionics: A study of automatic-aided target recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Curtis A.; Hayes, Brian C.; Gorman, Patrick C.

    1991-01-01

    User acceptance of new support systems typically was evaluated after the systems were specified, designed, and built. The current study attempts to assess user acceptance of an Automatic-Aided Target Recognition (ATR) system using an emulation of such a proposed system. The detection accuracy and false alarm level of the ATR system were varied systematically, and subjects rated the tactical value of systems exhibiting different performance levels. Both detection accuracy and false alarm level affected the subjects' ratings. The data from two experiments suggest a cut-off point in ATR performance below which the subjects saw little tactical value in the system. An ATR system seems to have obvious tactical value only if it functions at a correct detection rate of 0.7 or better with a false alarm level of 0.167 false alarms per square degree or fewer.

  20. Structural Insights Into the Recognition of Peroxisomal Targeting Signal 1 By Trypanosoma Brucei Peroxin 5

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, P.; Roach, C.; Michels, P.A.M.; Hol, W.G.J.

    2009-05-27

    Glycosomes are peroxisome-like organelles essential for trypanosomatid parasites. Glycosome biogenesis is mediated by proteins called 'peroxins,' which are considered to be promising drug targets in pathogenic Trypanosomatidae. The first step during protein translocation across the glycosomal membrane of peroxisomal targeting signal 1 (PTS1)-harboring proteins is signal recognition by the cytosolic receptor peroxin 5 (PEX5). The C-terminal PTS1 motifs interact with the PTS1 binding domain (P1BD) of PEX5, which is made up of seven tetratricopeptide repeats. Obtaining diffraction-quality crystals of the P1BD of Trypanosoma brucei PEX5 (TbPEX5) required surface entropy reduction mutagenesis. Each of the seven tetratricopeptide repeats appears to have a residue in the alpha(L) conformation in the loop connecting helices A and B. Five crystal structures of the P1BD of TbPEX5 were determined, each in complex with a hepta- or decapeptide corresponding to a natural or nonnatural PTS1 sequence. The PTS1 peptides are bound between the two subdomains of the P1BD. These structures indicate precise recognition of the C-terminal Leu of the PTS1 motif and important interactions between the PTS1 peptide main chain and up to five invariant Asn side chains of PEX5. The TbPEX5 structures reported here reveal a unique hydrophobic pocket in the subdomain interface that might be explored to obtain compounds that prevent relative motions of the subdomains and interfere selectively with PTS1 motif binding or release in trypanosomatids, and would therefore disrupt glycosome biogenesis and prevent parasite growth.

  1. Structural Basis for Conserved Regulation and Adaptation of the Signal Recognition Particle Targeting Complex.

    PubMed

    Wild, Klemens; Bange, Gert; Motiejunas, Domantas; Kribelbauer, Judith; Hendricks, Astrid; Segnitz, Bernd; Wade, Rebecca C; Sinning, Irmgard

    2016-07-17

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ribonucleoprotein complex with a key role in targeting and insertion of membrane proteins. The two SRP GTPases, SRP54 (Ffh in bacteria) and FtsY (SRα in eukaryotes), form the core of the targeting complex (TC) regulating the SRP cycle. The architecture of the TC and its stimulation by RNA has been described for the bacterial SRP system while this information is lacking for other domains of life. Here, we present the crystal structures of the GTPase heterodimers of archaeal (Sulfolobus solfataricus), eukaryotic (Homo sapiens), and chloroplast (Arabidopsis thaliana) SRP systems. The comprehensive structural comparison combined with Brownian dynamics simulations of TC formation allows for the description of the general blueprint and of specific adaptations of the quasi-symmetric heterodimer. Our work defines conserved external nucleotide-binding sites for SRP GTPase activation by RNA. Structural analyses of the GDP-bound, post-hydrolysis states reveal a conserved, magnesium-sensitive switch within the I-box. Overall, we provide a general model for SRP cycle regulation by RNA.

  2. Mechanism of CRISPR-RNA guided recognition of DNA targets in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    van Erp, Paul B G; Jackson, Ryan N; Carter, Joshua; Golden, Sarah M; Bailey, Scott; Wiedenheft, Blake

    2015-09-30

    In bacteria and archaea, short fragments of foreign DNA are integrated into Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR) loci, providing a molecular memory of previous encounters with foreign genetic elements. In Escherichia coli, short CRISPR-derived RNAs are incorporated into a multi-subunit surveillance complex called Cascade (CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense). Recent structures of Cascade capture snapshots of this seahorse-shaped RNA-guided surveillance complex before and after binding to a DNA target. Here we determine a 3.2 Å x-ray crystal structure of Cascade in a new crystal form that provides insight into the mechanism of double-stranded DNA binding. Molecular dynamic simulations performed using available structures reveal functional roles for residues in the tail, backbone and belly subunits of Cascade that are critical for binding double-stranded DNA. Structural comparisons are used to make functional predictions and these predictions are tested in vivo and in vitro. Collectively, the results in this study reveal underlying mechanisms involved in target-induced conformational changes and highlight residues important in DNA binding and protospacer adjacent motif recognition.

  3. Study on the recognition of camouflage targets with hyper-spectral detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jia-chun; Wang, Qi-chao; Lin, Zhi-dan; Zhao, Da-peng; Shi, Jia-ming; Chen, Zong-sheng

    2015-10-01

    In order to acquire more information of the scene to improve the veracity of recognition of camouflage targets, an electrically tunable hyper-spectral detection system, which is based on acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF), was designed. The system includes collimated optical system, AOTF and its controller, imaging lens, CCD sensor and so on. The system has a property of being fast and electronically tunable, so a quick scan of spectrum over the waveband of 550 nm ~ 900nm can be realized. A series of hyper-spectral imaging experiments about a camouflage aluminum plane, coated with three typical camouflage pigments (dark green, light green and khaki) within a complex meadow environment were accomplished at specific wavelengths from 580 nm to 840 nm with 10 nm spectral resolution. The hyper-spectral characteristics of three pigments and various backgrounds were acquired to deduce the intensity contrast information between them. The experimental results demonstrated that the reflex characteristic of three typical camouflage pigments were different from that of natural background. The several wavelengths or wave bands, which were used to detect and recognize the man-made targets placed in typical woodland environment, were obtained by analyzing the experimental data.

  4. Robust method for the matching of attributed scattering centers with application to synthetic aperture radar automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Baiyuan; Wen, Gongjian; Zhong, Jinrong; Ma, Conghui; Yang, Xiaoliang

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a robust method for the matching of attributed scattering centers (ASCs) with application to synthetic aperture radar automatic target recognition (ATR). For the testing image to be classified, ASCs are extracted to match with the ones predicted by templates. First, Hungarian algorithm is employed to match those two ASC sets initially. Then, a precise matching is carried out through a threshold method. Point similarity and structure similarity are calculated, which are fused to evaluate the overall similarity of the two ASC sets based on the Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence. Finally, the target type is determined by such similarities between the testing image and various types of targets. Experiments on the moving and stationary target acquisition and recognition data verify the validity of the proposed method.

  5. Target-context unitization effect on the familiarity-related FN400: a face recognition exclusion task.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Fabrice; Etienne, Yann

    2015-03-01

    Using two exclusion tasks, the present study examined how the ERP correlates of face recognition are affected by the nature of the information to be retrieved. Intrinsic (facial expression) and extrinsic (background scene) visual information were paired with face identity and constituted the exclusion criterion at test time. Although perceptual information had to be taken into account in both situations, the FN400 old-new effect was observed only for old target faces on the expression-exclusion task, whereas it was found for both old target and old non-target faces in the background-exclusion situation. These results reveal that the FN400, which is generally interpreted as a correlate of familiarity, was modulated by the retrieval of intra-item and intrinsic face information, but not by the retrieval of extrinsic information. The observed effects on the FN400 depended on the nature of the information to be retrieved and its relationship (unitization) to the recognition target. On the other hand, the parietal old-new effect (generally described as an ERP correlate of recollection) reflected the retrieval of both types of contextual features equivalently. The current findings are discussed in relation to recent controversies about the nature of the recognition processes reflected by the ERP correlates of face recognition.

  6. A rectangular-fit classifier for synthetic aperture radar automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghri, John A.; Cary, Daniel A.

    2007-09-01

    The utility of a rectangular-fit classifier for Synthetic Aperture Radar Automatic Target Recognition (SAR ATR) is examined. The target is fitted with and modeled as a rectangle that can best approximate its boundary. The rectangular fit procedure involves 1) a preprocessing phase to remove the background clutter and noise, 2) a pose detection phase to establish the alignment of the rectangle via a least squares straight line fitting algorithm, and 3) size determination phase via stretching the width and the height dimensions of the rectangle in order to encapsulate a pre-specified, e.g., 90%, of the points in the target. A training set composed of approximately half the total images in the MSTAR public imagery database are used to obtain and record the statistical variations in the width and height of the resulting rectangles for each potential target. The remaining half of the images is then used to assess the performance of this classifier. Preliminary results using minimum Euclidean and Mahalanobis distance classifiers show overall accuracies of 44% and 42%, respectively. Although the classification accuracy is relatively low, this technique can be successfully used in combination with other classifiers such as peaks, edges, corners, and shadow-based classifiers to enhance their performances. A unique feature of the rectangular fit classifier is that it is rotation invariant in its present form. However, observation of the dataset reveals that in general the shapes of the targets in SAR imagery are not fully rotation invariant. Thus, the classification accuracy is expected to improve considerably using multiple training sets, i.e., one training set generated and used for each possible pose. The tradeoff is the increased computation complexity which tends to be offset by ever increasing efficiency and speed of the processing hardware and software. The rectangular fit classifier can also be used as a pose detection routine and/or in conjunction with other ATR

  7. Investigation of measureable parameters that correlate with automatic target recognition performance in synthetic aperture sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazagnaire, Julia; Cobb, J. T.; Isaacs, Jason

    2015-05-01

    There is a desire in the Mine Counter Measure community to develop a systematic method to predict and/or estimate the performance of Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) algorithms that are detecting and classifying mine-like objects within sonar data. Ideally, parameters exist that can be measured directly from the sonar data that correlate with ATR performance. In this effort, two metrics were analyzed for their predictive potential using high frequency synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) images. The first parameter is a measure of contrast. It is essentially the variance in pixel intensity over a fixed partition of relatively small size. An analysis was performed to determine the optimum block size for this contrast calculation. These blocks were then overlapped in the horizontal and vertical direction over the entire image. The second parameter is the one-dimensional K-shape parameter. The K-distribution is commonly used to describe sonar backscatter return from range cells that contain a finite number of scatterers. An Ada-Boosted Decision Tree classifier was used to calculate the probability of classification (Pc) and false alarm rate (FAR) for several types of targets in SAS images from three different data sets. ROC curves as a function of the measured parameters were generated and the correlation between the measured parameters in the vicinity of each of the contacts and the ATR performance was investigated. The contrast and K-shape parameters were considered separately. Additionally, the contrast and K-shape parameter were associated with background texture types using previously labeled high frequency SAS images.

  8. Folding versus charge: understanding selective target recognition by the thrombin aptamers.

    PubMed

    Marson, Giuseppe; Palumbo, Manlio; Sissi, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    The use of nucleic acids as drugs represents a consistently growing approach. Different therapeutical strategies take advantage of the biological and biophysical properties of DNA and RNA to properly modulate activity of selected targets. A peculiar characteristic of these molecules is their structural flexibility which allows them to assume distinct foldings depending upon their sequence and/or environment. During the last twenty years this has led to the theoretical and experimental development of oligonucleotide aptamers, short sequences which can recognize a target with specificity and affinity comparable to antibodies. A leading example is represented by the Thrombin aptamer (15fTBA), a 15-mer DNA selected by its high affinity for the exosite I (fibrinogen binding site) of the coagulation factor. The very stable protein-DNA complex formation is the result of complementarities between the two macromolecules promoted by the aptamer sequence and folding as well as of electrostatic interactions generated by the charge balance at the binding site/s. Here, we investigated the relative role of these contributions and their involvement in defining the biological properties of the resulting complex. Thus we compared the Thrombin binding and inhibition properties of TBA to those of unrelated single stranded oligonucleotides. Additionally, the differences between the two protein exosites were assessed by using 29hTBA, a longer (29-mer) aptamer known to bind exosite II (heparin binding site). A subtle balance of aptamer folding and sequence is shown to cooperate with charge density for effective and selective recognition of exosite I or exosite II by TBAs.

  9. RNA Editing TUTase 1: structural foundation of substrate recognition, complex interactions and drug targeting

    PubMed Central

    Rajappa-Titu, Lional; Suematsu, Takuma; Munoz-Tello, Paola; Long, Marius; Demir, Özlem; Cheng, Kevin J.; Stagno, Jason R.; Luecke, Hartmut; Amaro, Rommie E.; Aphasizheva, Inna; Aphasizhev, Ruslan; Thore, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Terminal uridyltransferases (TUTases) execute 3′ RNA uridylation across protists, fungi, metazoan and plant species. Uridylation plays a particularly prominent role in RNA processing pathways of kinetoplastid protists typified by the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, Trypanosoma brucei. In mitochondria of this pathogen, most mRNAs are internally modified by U-insertion/deletion editing while guide RNAs and rRNAs are U-tailed. The founding member of TUTase family, RNA editing TUTase 1 (RET1), functions as a subunit of the 3′ processome in uridylation of gRNA precursors and mature guide RNAs. Along with KPAP1 poly(A) polymerase, RET1 also participates in mRNA translational activation. RET1 is divergent from human TUTases and is essential for parasite viability in the mammalian host and the insect vector. Given its robust in vitro activity, RET1 represents an attractive target for trypanocide development. Here, we report high-resolution crystal structures of the RET1 catalytic core alone and in complex with UTP analogs. These structures reveal a tight docking of the conserved nucleotidyl transferase bi-domain module with a RET1-specific C2H2 zinc finger and RNA recognition (RRM) domains. Furthermore, we define RET1 region required for incorporation into the 3′ processome, determinants for RNA binding, subunit oligomerization and processive UTP incorporation, and predict druggable pockets. PMID:27744351

  10. Improving Recognition of Antimicrobial Peptides and Target Selectivity through Machine Learning and Genetic Programming.

    PubMed

    Veltri, Daniel; Kamath, Uday; Shehu, Amarda

    2017-01-01

    Growing bacterial resistance to antibiotics is spurring research on utilizing naturally-occurring antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as templates for novel drug design. While experimentalists mainly focus on systematic point mutations to measure the effect on antibacterial activity, the computational community seeks to understand what determines such activity in a machine learning setting. The latter seeks to identify the biological signals or features that govern activity. In this paper, we advance research in this direction through a novel method that constructs and selects complex sequence-based features which capture information about distal patterns within a peptide. Comparative analysis with state-of-the-art methods in AMP recognition reveals our method is not only among the top performers, but it also provides transparent summarizations of antibacterial activity at the sequence level. Moreover, this paper demonstrates for the first time the capability not only to recognize that a peptide is an AMP or not but also to predict its target selectivity based on models of activity against only Gram-positive, only Gram-negative, or both types of bacteria. The work described in this paper is a step forward in computational research seeking to facilitate AMP design or modification in the wet laboratory.

  11. Proposed docking interface between peptidoglycan and the target recognition domain of zoocin A

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yinghua; Simmonds, Robin S.; Timkovich, Russell

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Peptidoglycan added to zoocin rTRD perturbs NMR resonances around W115. •Simulations predict docking to a shallow surface groove near W115. •The docking interface is similar to mammalian antibody–antigen sites. •EDTA binds to a distinct surface site. -- Abstract: A docking model is proposed for the target recognition domain of the lytic exoenzyme zoocin A with the peptidoglycan on the outer cell surface of sensitive bacterial strains. Solubilized fragments from such peptidoglycans perturb specific backbone and side chain amide resonances in the recombinant form of the domain designated rTRD as detected in two-dimensional {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N correlation NMR spectra. The affected residues comprise a shallow surface cleft on the protein surface near W115, N53, N117, and Q105 among others, which interacts with the peptide portion of the peptidoglycan. Calculations with AutoDock Vina provide models of the docking interface. There is approximate homology between the rTDR-peptidoglycan docking site and the antigen binding site of Fab antibodies with the immunoglobin fold. EDTA was also found to bind to rTRD, but at a site distinct from the proposed peptidoglycan docking site.

  12. The targeted recognition of Lactococcus lactis phages to their polysaccharide receptors.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Orla; Spinelli, Silvia; Farenc, Carine; Labbé, Myriam; Tremblay, Denise; Blangy, Stéphanie; Oscarson, Stefan; Moineau, Sylvain; Cambillau, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Each phage infects a limited number of bacterial strains through highly specific interactions of the receptor-binding protein (RBP) at the tip of phage tail and the receptor at the bacterial surface. Lactococcus lactis is covered with a thin polysaccharide pellicle (hexasaccharide repeating units), which is used by a subgroup of phages as a receptor. Using L. lactis and phage 1358 as a model, we investigated the interaction between the phage RBP and the pellicle hexasaccharide of the host strain. A core trisaccharide (TriS), derived from the pellicle hexasaccharide repeating unit, was chemically synthesised, and the crystal structure of the RBP/TriS complex was determined. This provided unprecedented structural details of RBP/receptor site-specific binding. The complete hexasaccharide repeating unit was modelled and found to aptly fit the extended binding site. The specificity observed in in vivo phage adhesion assays could be interpreted in view of the reported structure. Therefore, by combining synthetic carbohydrate chemistry, X-ray crystallography and phage plaquing assays, we suggest that phage adsorption results from distinct recognition of the RBP towards the core TriS or the remaining residues of the hexasacchride receptor. This study provides a novel insight into the adsorption process of phages targeting saccharides as their receptors.

  13. Improved local ternary patterns for automatic target recognition in infrared imagery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaosheng; Sun, Junding; Fan, Guoliang; Wang, Zhiheng

    2015-03-16

    This paper presents an improved local ternary pattern (LTP) for automatic target recognition (ATR) in infrared imagery. Firstly, a robust LTP (RLTP) scheme is proposed to overcome the limitation of the original LTP for achieving the invariance with respect to the illumination transformation. Then, a soft concave-convex partition (SCCP) is introduced to add some flexibility to the original concave-convex partition (CCP) scheme. Referring to the orthogonal combination of local binary patterns (OC_LBP), the orthogonal combination of LTP (OC_LTP) is adopted to reduce the dimensionality of the LTP histogram. Further, a novel operator, called the soft concave-convex orthogonal combination of robust LTP (SCC_OC_RLTP), is proposed by combing RLTP, SCCP and OC_LTP. Finally, the new operator is used for ATR along with a blocking schedule to improve its discriminability and a feature selection technique to enhance its efficiency. Experimental results on infrared imagery show that the proposed features can achieve competitive ATR results compared with the state-of-the-art methods.

  14. The role of mnemonic processes in pure-target and pure-foil recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Koop, Gregory J; Criss, Amy H; Malmberg, Kenneth J

    2015-04-01

    Surprisingly, response patterns in a recognition memory test are very similar regardless of whether the test list contains both targets and foils or just one class of items. To better understand these effects, we evaluate performance over the course of testing. Output interference (OI) is the decrease in performance across test trials due to an increase in noise caused by encoded test items. Critically, OI is predicted on pure lists if the mnemonic evidence for each test item is evaluated. In two experiments, participants received accurate feedback, no feedback, or random feedback that was unrelated to the response on each test trial and pure or standard test lists. When no feedback was provided, performance was nearly identical for standard and pure test lists, replicating previous findings. Only in the presence of accurate feedback were participants able to successfully adapt to pure list environments and improve their accuracy. Critically, OI was observed, demonstrating that participants continued to evaluate mnemonic evidence even in pure list conditions. We discuss the implication of these data for models of memory.

  15. Contextual action recognition and target localization with an active allocation of attention on a humanoid robot.

    PubMed

    Ognibene, Dimitri; Chinellato, Eris; Sarabia, Miguel; Demiris, Yiannis

    2013-09-01

    Exploratory gaze movements are fundamental for gathering the most relevant information regarding the partner during social interactions. Inspired by the cognitive mechanisms underlying human social behaviour, we have designed and implemented a system for a dynamic attention allocation which is able to actively control gaze movements during a visual action recognition task exploiting its own action execution predictions. Our humanoid robot is able, during the observation of a partner's reaching movement, to contextually estimate the goal position of the partner's hand and the location in space of the candidate targets. This is done while actively gazing around the environment, with the purpose of optimizing the gathering of information relevant for the task. Experimental results on a simulated environment show that active gaze control, based on the internal simulation of actions, provides a relevant advantage with respect to other action perception approaches, both in terms of estimation precision and of time required to recognize an action. Moreover, our model reproduces and extends some experimental results on human attention during an action perception.

  16. Target pattern recognition by complement proteins of the classical and alternative pathways.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yu-Hoi; Tan, Lee Aun; Carroll, Maria V; Gentle, Madeleine E; Sim, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    The complement system is a major component of the innate defence of animals against invading microorganisms, and is also essential for the recognition and clearance of damaged or structurally-altered host cells or macromolecules. The system is activated by three different pathways, each of which responds, using different recognition molecules, to a very wide range of activators. The recognition protein of the complement classical pathway, C1q is described in detail here, with comparisons to the alternative pathway.

  17. Control of working memory: effects of attention training on target recognition and distractor salience in an auditory selection task.

    PubMed

    Melara, Robert D; Tong, Yunxia; Rao, Aparna

    2012-01-09

    Behavioral and electrophysiological measures of target and distractor processing were examined in an auditory selective attention task before and after three weeks of distractor suppression training. Behaviorally, training improved target recognition and led to less conservative and more rapid responding. Training also effectively shortened the temporal distance between distractors and targets needed to achieve a fixed level of target sensitivity. The effects of training on event-related potentials were restricted to the distracting stimulus: earlier N1 latency, enhanced P2 amplitude, and weakened P3 amplitude. Nevertheless, as distractor P2 amplitude increased, so too did target P3 amplitude, connecting experience-dependent changes in distractor processing with greater distinctiveness of targets in working memory. We consider the effects of attention training on the processing priorities, representational noise, and inhibitory processes operating in working memory.

  18. CID Aircraft in practice flight above target impact site with wing cutters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In this photograph the B-720 is seen making a practice close approach over the prepared impact site. The wing openers, designed to tear open the wings and spill the fuel, are clearly seen on the ground just at the start of the bed of rocks. In a typical aircraft crash, fuel spilled from ruptured fuel tanks forms a fine mist that can be ignited by a number of sources at the crash site. In 1984 the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility (after 1994 a full-fledged Center again) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) teamed-up in a unique flight experiment called the Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID), to test crash a Boeing 720 aircraft using standard fuel with an additive designed to supress fire. The additive, FM-9, a high-molecular-weight long-chain polymer, when blended with Jet-A fuel had demonstrated the capability to inhibit ignition and flame propagation of the released fuel in simulated crash tests. This anti-misting kerosene (AMK) cannot be introduced directly into a gas turbine engine due to several possible problems such as clogging of filters. The AMK must be restored to almost Jet-A before being introduced into the engine for burning. This restoration is called 'degradation' and was accomplished on the B-720 using a device called a 'degrader.' Each of the four Pratt & Whitney JT3C-7 engines had a 'degrader' built and installed by General Electric (GE) to break down and return the AMK to near Jet-A quality. In addition to the AMK research the NASA Langley Research Center was involved in a structural loads measurement experiment, which included having instrumented dummies filling the seats in the passenger compartment. Before the final flight on December 1, 1984, more than four years of effort passed trying to set-up final impact conditions considered survivable by the FAA. During those years while 14 flights with crews were flown the following major efforts were underway: NASA Dryden developed the remote piloting techniques necessary for the B-720

  19. Matching Algorithms and Feature Match Quality Measures for Model-Based Object Recognition with Applications to Automatic Target Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-05-01

    experiment was repeated 1000=T times using independent MonteCarlo simulations. A. Uniform Target Test Set. For each Nk ,...,2,1= a model kM...correct identification (PID) and probability of false alarm (PFA) over T=1000 MonteCarlo realizations of the experiment data. The false alarm rate is

  20. Pulsed holographic interferometry: a technique for the detection of structural faults in aircraft structures and computerized recognition of records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, John M.; Schmidt, Timothy E.; Mew, Jacqueline M.

    1998-03-01

    A method of application of pulsed holographic interferometry together with the associated hardware has been developed and applied as a non-destructive inspection (NDI) tool for application to aluminum aircraft fuselages such as those used in the present air transport fleet. A number of novel techniques are involved in the design features of the holographic camera and the method of excitation to obtain optimum conditions where any structural faults present can be made apparent. The holographic camera system has been designed to be small, portable and ruggedly designed so it is suitable for field operations in aircraft repair stations and hangars. The technique operates by the introduction of a selected single frequency vibration signal into the area undergoing test. The camera system has been designed to record both the relative and actual phase of the vibrationally induced into the structure of the fuselage undergoing excitation and NDI. Results are presented showing structural defects. A computerized technique is being developed for the analysis of the interferogram fringe maps an preliminary results are discussed.

  1. Evaluation of synthetic aperture radar image segmentation algorithms in the context of automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Kefu; Power, Gregory J.; Gregga, Jason B.

    2002-11-01

    Image segmentation is a process to extract and organize information energy in the image pixel space according to a prescribed feature set. It is often a key preprocess in automatic target recognition (ATR) algorithms. In many cases, the performance of image segmentation algorithms will have significant impact on the performance of ATR algorithms. Due to the variations in feature set definitions and the innovations in the segmentation processes, there is large number of image segmentation algorithms existing in ATR world. Recently, the authors have investigated a number of measures to evaluate the performance of segmentation algorithms, such as Percentage Pixels Same (pps), Partial Directed Hausdorff (pdh) and Complex Inner Product (cip). In the research, we found that the combination of the three measures shows effectiveness in the evaluation of segmentation algorithms against truth data (human master segmentation). However, we still don't know what are the impact of those measures in the performance of ATR algorithms that are commonly measured by Probability of detection (PDet), Probability of false alarm (PFA), Probability of identification (PID), etc. In all practical situations, ATR boxes are implemented without human observer in the loop. The performance of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image segmentation should be evaluated in the context of ATR rather than human observers. This research establishes a segmentation algorithm evaluation suite involving segmentation algorithm performance measures as well as the ATR algorithm performance measures. It provides a practical quantitative evaluation method to judge which SAR image segmentation algorithm is the best for a particular ATR application. The results are tabulated based on some baseline ATR algorithms and a typical image segmentation algorithm used in ATR applications.

  2. Integrate knowledge acquisition with target recognition through closed-loop ATR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ssu-Hsin; McLaughlin, Pat; Zatezalo, Aleksandar; Hsiao, Kai-yuh; Boskovic, Jovan

    2015-05-01

    Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) algorithm performance is highly dependent on the sensing conditions under which the input data is collected. Open-loop fly-bys often produce poor results due to less than ideal measurement conditions. In addition, ATR algorithms must be extremely complicated to handle the diverse range of inputs with a resulting reduction in overall performance and increase in complexity. Our approach, closed-loop ATR (CL-ATR), focuses on improving the quality of information input to the ATR algorithms by optimizing motion, sensor settings and team (vehicle-vehicle-human) collaboration to dramatically improve classification accuracy. By managing the data collection guided by predicted ATR performance gain, we increase the information content of the data and thus dramatically improve ATR performance with existing ATR algorithms. CL-ATR has two major functions; first, an ATR utility function, which represents the performance sensitivity of ATR produced classification labels as a function of parameters that correlate to vehicle/sensor states. This utility function is developed off-line and is often available from the original ATR study as a confusion matrix, or it can be derived through simulation without direct access to the inner working of the ATR algorithm. The utility function is inserted into our CLATR framework to autonomously control the vehicle/sensor. Second, an on-board planner maps the utility function into vehicle position and sensor collection plans. Because we only require the utility function on-board, we can activate any ATR algorithm onto a unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platform no matter how complex. This pairing of ATR performance profiles with vehicle/sensor controls creates a unique and powerful active perception behavior.

  3. Type I-E CRISPR-cas systems discriminate target from non-target DNA through base pairing-independent PAM recognition.

    PubMed

    Westra, Edze R; Semenova, Ekaterina; Datsenko, Kirill A; Jackson, Ryan N; Wiedenheft, Blake; Severinov, Konstantin; Brouns, Stan J J

    2013-01-01

    Discriminating self and non-self is a universal requirement of immune systems. Adaptive immune systems in prokaryotes are centered around repetitive loci called CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat), into which invader DNA fragments are incorporated. CRISPR transcripts are processed into small RNAs that guide CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins to invading nucleic acids by complementary base pairing. However, to avoid autoimmunity it is essential that these RNA-guides exclusively target invading DNA and not complementary DNA sequences (i.e., self-sequences) located in the host's own CRISPR locus. Previous work on the Type III-A CRISPR system from Staphylococcus epidermidis has demonstrated that a portion of the CRISPR RNA-guide sequence is involved in self versus non-self discrimination. This self-avoidance mechanism relies on sensing base pairing between the RNA-guide and sequences flanking the target DNA. To determine if the RNA-guide participates in self versus non-self discrimination in the Type I-E system from Escherichia coli we altered base pairing potential between the RNA-guide and the flanks of DNA targets. Here we demonstrate that Type I-E systems discriminate self from non-self through a base pairing-independent mechanism that strictly relies on the recognition of four unchangeable PAM sequences. In addition, this work reveals that the first base pair between the guide RNA and the PAM nucleotide immediately flanking the target sequence can be disrupted without affecting the interference phenotype. Remarkably, this indicates that base pairing at this position is not involved in foreign DNA recognition. Results in this paper reveal that the Type I-E mechanism of avoiding self sequences and preventing autoimmunity is fundamentally different from that employed by Type III-A systems. We propose the exclusive targeting of PAM-flanked sequences to be termed a target versus non-target discrimination mechanism.

  4. FERM-dependent E3 ligase recognition is a conserved mechanism for targeted degradation of lipoprotein receptors

    PubMed Central

    Calkin, Anna C.; Goult, Benjamin T.; Zhang, Li; Fairall, Louise; Hong, Cynthia; Schwabe, John W. R.; Tontonoz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase IDOL (inducible degrader of the LDL receptor) regulates LDL receptor (LDLR)-dependent cholesterol uptake, but its mechanism of action, including the molecular basis for its stringent specificity, is poorly understood. Here we show that IDOL uses a singular strategy among E3 ligases for target recognition. The IDOL FERM domain binds directly to a recognition sequence in the cytoplasmic tails of lipoprotein receptors. This physical interaction is independent of IDOL's really interesting new gene (RING) domain E3 ligase activity and its capacity for autoubiquitination. Furthermore, IDOL controls its own stability through autoubiquitination of a unique FERM subdomain fold not present in other FERM proteins. Key residues defining the IDOL–LDLR interaction and IDOL autoubiquitination are functionally conserved in their insect homologs. Finally, we demonstrate that target recognition by IDOL involves a tripartite interaction between the FERM domain, membrane phospholipids, and the lipoprotein receptor tail. Our data identify the IDOL–LDLR interaction as an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for the regulation of lipid uptake and suggest that this interaction could potentially be exploited for the pharmacologic modulation of lipid metabolism. PMID:22109552

  5. FERM-dependent E3 ligase recognition is a conserved mechanism for targeted degradation of lipoprotein receptors.

    PubMed

    Calkin, Anna C; Goult, Benjamin T; Zhang, Li; Fairall, Louise; Hong, Cynthia; Schwabe, John W R; Tontonoz, Peter

    2011-12-13

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase IDOL (inducible degrader of the LDL receptor) regulates LDL receptor (LDLR)-dependent cholesterol uptake, but its mechanism of action, including the molecular basis for its stringent specificity, is poorly understood. Here we show that IDOL uses a singular strategy among E3 ligases for target recognition. The IDOL FERM domain binds directly to a recognition sequence in the cytoplasmic tails of lipoprotein receptors. This physical interaction is independent of IDOL's really interesting new gene (RING) domain E3 ligase activity and its capacity for autoubiquitination. Furthermore, IDOL controls its own stability through autoubiquitination of a unique FERM subdomain fold not present in other FERM proteins. Key residues defining the IDOL-LDLR interaction and IDOL autoubiquitination are functionally conserved in their insect homologs. Finally, we demonstrate that target recognition by IDOL involves a tripartite interaction between the FERM domain, membrane phospholipids, and the lipoprotein receptor tail. Our data identify the IDOL-LDLR interaction as an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for the regulation of lipid uptake and suggest that this interaction could potentially be exploited for the pharmacologic modulation of lipid metabolism.

  6. Target Achievement Control Test: evaluating real-time myoelectric pattern-recognition control of multifunctional upper-limb prostheses.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ann M; Hargrove, Levi J; Lock, Blair A; Kuiken, Todd A

    2011-01-01

    Despite high classification accuracies (~95%) of myoelectric control systems based on pattern recognition, how well offline measures translate to real-time closed-loop control is unclear. Recently, a real-time virtual test analyzed how well subjects completed arm motions using a multiple-degree of freedom (DOF) classifier. Although this test provided real-time performance metrics, the required task was oversimplified: motion speeds were normalized and unintended movements were ignored. We included these considerations in a new, more challenging virtual test called the Target Achievement Control Test (TAC Test). Five subjects with transradial amputation attempted to move a virtual arm into a target posture using myoelectric pattern recognition, performing the test with various classifier (1- vs 3-DOF) and task complexities (one vs three required motions per posture). We found no significant difference in classification accuracy between the 1- and 3-DOF classifiers (97.2% +/- 2.0% and 94.1% +/- 3.1%, respectively; p = 0.14). Subjects completed 31% fewer trials in significantly more time using the 3-DOF classifier and took 3.6 +/- 0.8 times longer to reach a three-motion posture compared with a one-motion posture. These results highlight the need for closed-loop performance measures and demonstrate that the TAC Test is a useful and more challenging tool to test real-time pattern-recognition performance.

  7. A Tumor-specific MicroRNA Recognition System Facilitates the Accurate Targeting to Tumor Cells by Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yingting; Yao, Yi; Yan, Hao; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Zhenming; Sun, Xiaodan; Zhao, Lingyun; Ao, Xiang; Xie, Zhen; Wu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapy for cancer is a research area of great interest, and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) show great potential as targeted carriers for therapeutics. One important class of cancer biomarkers is microRNAs (miRNAs), which play a significant role in tumor initiation and progression. In this study, a cascade recognition system containing multiple plasmids, including a Tet activator, a lacI repressor gene driven by the TetOn promoter, and a reporter gene repressed by the lacI repressor and influenced by multiple endogenous miRNAs, was used to recognize cells that display miRNA signals that are characteristic of cancer. For this purpose, three types of signal miRNAs with high proliferation and metastasis abilities were chosen (miR-21, miR-145, and miR-9). The response of this system to the human breast cancer MCF-7 cell line was 3.2-fold higher than that to the human breast epithelial HBL100 cell line and almost 7.5-fold higher than that to human embryonic kidney HEK293T cells. In combination with polyethyleneimine-modified MNPs, this recognition system targeted the tumor location in situ in an animal model, and an ~42% repression of tumor growth was achieved. Our study provides a new combination of magnetic nanocarrier and gene therapy based on miRNAs that are active in vivo, which has potential for use in future cancer therapies. PMID:27138178

  8. A Hybrid Neural Network and Feature Extraction Technique for Target Recognition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    target features are extracted, the extracted data being evaluated in an artificial neural network to identify a target at a location within the image scene from which the different viewing angles extend.

  9. Progress on Target and Terrain Recognition Research at Colorado State University.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    3D alignment of target models to range and optical imagery. The term coregistration ’ is introduced to describe target, range and optical sensor...optical and target coregistration , and coregistration space matching. As a precursor to future incorporation of terrain data, the ability to match terrain features to imagery from the UGV Demo C test site is demonstrated.

  10. Interstitial branch formation within the red nucleus by deep cerebellar nuclei-derived commissural axons during target recognition.

    PubMed

    Hara, Satoshi; Kaneyama, Takeshi; Inamata, Yasuyuki; Onodera, Ryota; Shirasaki, Ryuichi

    2016-04-01

    Target recognition by developing axons is one of the fundamental steps for establishing the proper pattern of neuronal connectivity during development. However, knowledge of the mechanisms that underlie this critical event is still limited. In this study, to examine how commissural axons in vertebrates recognize their targets after crossing the midline, we analyzed in detail the behavior of postcrossing commissural axons derived from the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) in the developing mouse cerebellum. For this, we employed a cell-type-specific genetic labeling approach to selectively visualize DCN axons during the time when these axons project to the red nucleus (RN), one of the well-characterized targets of DCN axons. We found that, when DCN axons initially entered the RN at its caudal end, these axons continued to grow rostrally through the RN without showing noticeable morphological signs of axon branching. Interestingly, after a delay, DCN axons started forming interstitial branches from the portion of the axon shaft selectively within the RN. Because commissural axons acquire responsiveness to several guidance cues when they cross the midline, we further addressed whether midline crossing is a prerequisite for subsequent targeting by using a Robo3 knockdown strategy. We found that DCN axons were still capable of forming interstitial branches within the RN even in the absence of midline crossing. These results therefore suggest that the mechanism of RN recognition by DCN axons involves a delayed interstitial branching, and that these axons possess an intrinsic ability to respond to the target-derived cues irrespective of midline crossing.

  11. Automatic target recognition with image/video understanding systems based on network-symbolic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvich, Gary

    2004-09-01

    In past decades, the solution to ATR problem has been thought of as a solution to the Pattern Recognition problem. The reasons that Pattern Recognition problem has never been solved successfully and reliably for real-world images are more serious than lack of appropriate ideas. Vision is a part of a larger system that converts visual information into knowledge structures. These structures drive the vision process, resolving ambiguity and uncertainty via feedback, and provide image understanding, which is an interpretation of visual information in terms of these knowledge models. Vision mechanisms cannot be completely understood apart from the informational processes related to knowledge and intelligence. A reliable solution to the ATR problem is possible only within the solution of a more generic Image Understanding Problem. Biologically inspired Network-Symbolic representation, where both systematic structural/logical methods and neural/statistical methods are parts of a single mechanism, converts visual information into relational Network-Symbolic structures, avoiding precise computations of 3-D models. Logic of visual scenes can be captured in Network-Symbolic models and used for disambiguation of visual information. Network-Symbolic Transformations make possible invariant recognition of a real-world object as exemplar of a class. This allows for creating ATR systems, reliable in field conditions.

  12. Passive Sonar Target Recognition Using a Back-Propagating Neural Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    to train our neural network. Chapter three discusses the development of the sonar target model and some of its properties and assumptions. Chapter...through noise and other disturbances. In applying this property to sonar targets, this means the ability to identify a target even when it undergoes... properties . Some applications have shown that neural networks can learn special kinship patterns among families. After memorizing the genealogies of

  13. Complete automatic target cuer/recognition system for tactical forward-looking infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernisse, Brian E.; Rogers, Steven K.; DeSimio, Martin P.; Raines, Richard A.

    1997-09-01

    A complete forward-looking IR (FLIR) automatic target cuer/recognizer (ATC/R) is presented. The data used for development and testing of this ATC/R are first generation FLIR images collected using a F-15E. The database contains thousands of images with various mission profiles and target arrangements. The specific target of interest is a mobile missile launcher, the primary target. The goal is to locate all vehicles (secondary targets) within a scene and identify the primary targets. The system developed and tested includes an image segmenter, region cluster algorithm, feature extractor, and classifier. Conventional image processing algorithms in conjunction with neural network techniques are used to form a complete ATC/R system. The conventional techniques include hit/miss filtering, difference of Gaussian filtering, and region clustering. A neural network (multilayer perceptron) is used for classification. These algorithms are developed, tested and then combined into a functional ATC/R system. Overall primary target detection rate (cuer) is 84% with a 69% primary target identification (recognizer) rate at ranges relevant to munitions release. Furthermore, the false alarm rate (a nontarget cued as a target) in only 2.3 per scene. The research is being completed with a 10 flight test profile using third generation FLIR images.

  14. Structures and target recognition modes of PDZ domains: recurring themes and emerging pictures.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fei; Zhang, Mingjie

    2013-10-01

    PDZ domains are highly abundant protein-protein interaction modules and are often found in multidomain scaffold proteins. PDZ-domain-containing scaffold proteins regulate multiple biological processes, including trafficking and clustering receptors and ion channels at defined membrane regions, organizing and targeting signalling complexes at specific cellular compartments, interfacing cytoskeletal structures with membranes, and maintaining various cellular structures. PDZ domains, each with ~90-amino-acid residues folding into a highly similar structure, are best known to bind to short C-terminal tail peptides of their target proteins. A series of recent studies have revealed that, in addition to the canonical target-binding mode, many PDZ-target interactions involve amino acid residues beyond the regular PDZ domain fold, which we refer to as extensions. Such extension sequences often form an integral structural and functional unit with the attached PDZ domain, which is defined as a PDZ supramodule. Correspondingly, PDZ-domain-binding sequences from target proteins are frequently found to require extension sequences beyond canonical short C-terminal tail peptides. Formation of PDZ supramodules not only affords necessary binding specificities and affinities demanded by physiological functions of PDZ domain targets, but also provides regulatory switches to be built in the PDZ-target interactions. At the 20th anniversary of the discovery of PDZ domain proteins, we try to summarize structural features and target-binding properties of such PDZ supramodules emerging from studies in recent years.

  15. Convolutional neural network approach for buried target recognition in FL-LWIR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, K.; Keller, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    A convolutional neural network (CNN) approach to recognition of buried explosive hazards in forward-looking long-wave infrared (FL-LWIR) imagery is presented. The convolutional filters in the first layer of the network are learned in the frequency domain, making enforcement of zero-phase and zero-dc response characteristics much easier. The spatial domain representations of the filters are forced to have unit l2 norm, and penalty terms are added to the online gradient descent update to encourage orthonormality among the convolutional filters, as well smooth first and second order derivatives in the spatial domain. The impact of these modifications on the generalization performance of the CNN model is investigated. The CNN approach is compared to a second recognition algorithm utilizing shearlet and log-gabor decomposition of the image coupled with cell-structured feature extraction and support vector machine classification. Results are presented for multiple FL-LWIR data sets recently collected from US Army test sites. These data sets include vehicle position information allowing accurate transformation between image and world coordinates and realistic evaluation of detection and false alarm rates.

  16. Glycosylation as a target for recognition of influenza viruses by the innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Reading, Patrick C; Tate, Michelle D; Pickett, Danielle L; Brooks, Andrew G

    2007-01-01

    Glycosylation clearly plays an important role in the life cycle of influenza viruses and certain glycosylation sites are required for the structural integrity and stability of the HA and NA glycoproteins during biosynthesis and formation of intact virions. Furthermore, glycosylation has been shown to modulate the functions of influenza glycoproteins, in particular the recognition of host cell receptors and in shielding antigenic epitopes on the viral HA. The addition of oligosaccharide moieties to the globular head of the HA does, however, correlate with an increased sensitivity to the antiviral activities of SP-D and to recognition and destruction of virus via the MMR on murine macrophages. Consequently, the degree of glycosylation appears to be an important factor in determining sensitivity to lectin-mediated defences, and therefore in determining the ability of a particular virus strain to replicate in the respiratory tract of mice following intranasal infection. The mouse-adapted PR8 strain which lacks mannose-containing glycans from the head of its HA molecule was largely resistant to the antiviral activities of SP-D and the MMR in vitro and induced severed clinical disease following intranasal infection of mice. The finding that mannan treatment of BJx109-infected mice facilitated an early and dramatic enhancement of disease severity is also consistent with a major role for mannose-specific lectins in limiting influenza virus growth and spread in the respiratory tract.

  17. Proteolytic Characteristics of Cathepsin D Related to the Recognition and Cleavage of Its Target Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Huiying; Lou, Xiaomin; Shan, Qiang; Zhang, Ju; Zhu, Xu; Zhang, Jia; Wang, Yang; Xie, Yingying; Xu, Ningzhi; Liu, Siqi

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsin D (CD) plays an important role in both biological and pathological processes, although the cleavage characteristics and substrate selection of CD have yet to be fully explored. We employed liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to identify the CD cleavage sites in bovine serum albumin (BSA). We found that the hydrophobic residues at P1 were not only a preferential factor for CD cleavage but that the hydrophobicity at P1’ also contributed to CD recognition. The concept of hydrophobic scores of neighbors (HSN) was proposed to describe the hydrophobic microenvironment of CD recognition sites. The survey of CD cleavage characteristics in several proteins suggested that the HSN was a sensitive indicator for judging the favorable sites in peptides for CD cleavage, with HSN values of 0.5–1.0 representing a likely threshold. Ovalbumin (OVA), a protein resistant to CD cleavage in its native state, was easily cleaved by CD after denaturation, and the features of the cleaved peptides were quite similar to those found in BSA, where a higher HSN value indicated greater cleavability. We further conducted two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) to find more proteins that were insensitive to CD cleavage in CD-knockdown cells. Based on an analysis of secondary and three-dimensional structures, we postulated that intact proteins with a structure consisting of all α-helices would be relatively accessible to CD cleavage. PMID:23840360

  18. Multi-source feature extraction and target recognition in wireless sensor networks based on adaptive distributed wavelet compression algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    2008-04-01

    Proposed distributed wavelet-based algorithms are a means to compress sensor data received at the nodes forming a wireless sensor network (WSN) by exchanging information between neighboring sensor nodes. Local collaboration among nodes compacts the measurements, yielding a reduced fused set with equivalent information at far fewer nodes. Nodes may be equipped with multiple sensor types, each capable of sensing distinct phenomena: thermal, humidity, chemical, voltage, or image signals with low or no frequency content as well as audio, seismic or video signals within defined frequency ranges. Compression of the multi-source data through wavelet-based methods, distributed at active nodes, reduces downstream processing and storage requirements along the paths to sink nodes; it also enables noise suppression and more energy-efficient query routing within the WSN. Targets are first detected by the multiple sensors; then wavelet compression and data fusion are applied to the target returns, followed by feature extraction from the reduced data; feature data are input to target recognition/classification routines; targets are tracked during their sojourns through the area monitored by the WSN. Algorithms to perform these tasks are implemented in a distributed manner, based on a partition of the WSN into clusters of nodes. In this work, a scheme of collaborative processing is applied for hierarchical data aggregation and decorrelation, based on the sensor data itself and any redundant information, enabled by a distributed, in-cluster wavelet transform with lifting that allows multiple levels of resolution. The wavelet-based compression algorithm significantly decreases RF bandwidth and other resource use in target processing tasks. Following wavelet compression, features are extracted. The objective of feature extraction is to maximize the probabilities of correct target classification based on multi-source sensor measurements, while minimizing the resource expenditures at

  19. Tracking and Recognition of Multiple Human Targets Moving in a Wireless Pyroelectric Infrared Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Ji; Li, Fangmin; Zhao, Ning; Jiang, Na

    2014-01-01

    With characteristics of low-cost and easy deployment, the distributed wireless pyroelectric infrared sensor network has attracted extensive interest, which aims to make it an alternate infrared video sensor in thermal biometric applications for tracking and identifying human targets. In these applications, effectively processing signals collected from sensors and extracting the features of different human targets has become crucial. This paper proposes the application of empirical mode decomposition and the Hilbert-Huang transform to extract features of moving human targets both in the time domain and the frequency domain. Moreover, the support vector machine is selected as the classifier. The experimental results demonstrate that by using this method the identification rates of multiple moving human targets are around 90%. PMID:24759117

  20. Tracking and recognition of multiple human targets moving in a wireless pyroelectric infrared sensor network.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ji; Li, Fangmin; Zhao, Ning; Jiang, Na

    2014-04-22

    With characteristics of low-cost and easy deployment, the distributed wireless pyroelectric infrared sensor network has attracted extensive interest, which aims to make it an alternate infrared video sensor in thermal biometric applications for tracking and identifying human targets. In these applications, effectively processing signals collected from sensors and extracting the features of different human targets has become crucial. This paper proposes the application of empirical mode decomposition and the Hilbert-Huang transform to extract features of moving human targets both in the time domain and the frequency domain. Moreover, the support vector machine is selected as the classifier. The experimental results demonstrate that by using this method the identification rates of multiple moving human targets are around 90%.

  1. A screening pattern recognition method finds new and divergent targets for drugs and natural products.

    PubMed

    Wassermann, Anne Mai; Lounkine, Eugen; Urban, Laszlo; Whitebread, Steven; Chen, Shanni; Hughes, Kevin; Guo, Hongqiu; Kutlina, Elena; Fekete, Alexander; Klumpp, Martin; Glick, Meir

    2014-07-18

    Computational target prediction methods using chemical descriptors have been applied exhaustively in drug discovery to elucidate the mechanisms-of-action (MOAs) of small molecules. To predict truly novel and unexpected small molecule-target interactions, compounds must be compared by means other than their chemical structure alone. Here we investigated predictions made by a method, HTS fingerprints (HTSFPs), that matches patterns of activities in experimental screens. Over 1,400 drugs and 1,300 natural products (NPs) were screened in more than 200 diverse assays, creating encodable activity patterns. The comparison of these activity patterns to an MOA-annotated reference panel led to the prediction of 5,281 and 2,798 previously unknown targets for the NP and drug sets, respectively. Intriguingly, there was limited overlap among the targets predicted; the drugs were more biased toward membrane receptors and the NPs toward soluble enzymes, consistent with the idea that they represent unexplored pharmacologies. Importantly, HTSFPs inferred targets that were beyond the prediction capabilities of standard chemical descriptors, especially for NPs but also for the more explored drug set. Of 65 drug-target predictions that we tested in vitro, 48 (73.8%) were confirmed with AC50 values ranging from 38 nM to 29 μM. Among these interactions was the inhibition of cyclooxygenases 1 and 2 by the HIV protease inhibitor Tipranavir. These newly discovered targets that are phylogenetically and phylochemically distant to the primary target provide an explanation for spontaneous bleeding events observed for patients treated with this drug, a physiological effect that was previously difficult to reconcile with the drug's known MOA.

  2. Mechanism of intermediate filament recognition by plakin repeat domains revealed by envoplakin targeting of vimentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogl, Claudia; Mohammed, Fiyaz; Al-Jassar, Caezar; Jeeves, Mark; Knowles, Timothy J.; Rodriguez-Zamora, Penelope; White, Scott A.; Odintsova, Elena; Overduin, Michael; Chidgey, Martyn

    2016-03-01

    Plakin proteins form critical connections between cell junctions and the cytoskeleton; their disruption within epithelial and cardiac muscle cells cause skin-blistering diseases and cardiomyopathies. Envoplakin has a single plakin repeat domain (PRD) which recognizes intermediate filaments through an unresolved mechanism. Herein we report the crystal structure of envoplakin's complete PRD fold, revealing binding determinants within its electropositive binding groove. Four of its five internal repeats recognize negatively charged patches within vimentin via five basic determinants that are identified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mutations of the Lys1901 or Arg1914 binding determinants delocalize heterodimeric envoplakin from intracellular vimentin and keratin filaments in cultured cells. Recognition of vimentin is abolished when its residues Asp112 or Asp119 are mutated. The latter slot intermediate filament rods into basic PRD domain grooves through electrosteric complementarity in a widely applicable mechanism. Together this reveals how plakin family members form dynamic linkages with cytoskeletal frameworks.

  3. Identification of the recognition sequence and target proteins for DJ-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Mitsugi, Hitomi; Niki, Takeshi; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Tanimura, Kyoko; Yoshizawa-Kumagaye, Kumiko; Tsunemi, Masahiko; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2013-08-19

    DJ-1, the product of familial Parkinson's disease gene and an oncogene, is a cysteine protease which plays a role in anti-oxidative stress reaction. In this study, we identified the recognition sequence for DJ-1 protease by using recombinant DJ-1 and a peptide library. Protease activity of DJ-1 lacking C-terminal α-helix (DJ-1ΔH9) was stronger than that of full-sized DJ-1, and the most susceptible sequence digested by DJ-1ΔH9 was valine-lysine-valine-alanine (VKVA) under the optimal conditions of pH 5.5 and 0 mM NaCl. Divalent ions, especially Cu²⁺, were inhibitory to DJ-1's protease activity. c-abl oncogene 1 product (ABL1) and kinesin family member 1B (KIF1B) containing VKVA were digested by DJ-1ΔH9.

  4. Mechanism of intermediate filament recognition by plakin repeat domains revealed by envoplakin targeting of vimentin

    PubMed Central

    Fogl, Claudia; Mohammed, Fiyaz; Al-Jassar, Caezar; Jeeves, Mark; Knowles, Timothy J.; Rodriguez-Zamora, Penelope; White, Scott A.; Odintsova, Elena; Overduin, Michael; Chidgey, Martyn

    2016-01-01

    Plakin proteins form critical connections between cell junctions and the cytoskeleton; their disruption within epithelial and cardiac muscle cells cause skin-blistering diseases and cardiomyopathies. Envoplakin has a single plakin repeat domain (PRD) which recognizes intermediate filaments through an unresolved mechanism. Herein we report the crystal structure of envoplakin's complete PRD fold, revealing binding determinants within its electropositive binding groove. Four of its five internal repeats recognize negatively charged patches within vimentin via five basic determinants that are identified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mutations of the Lys1901 or Arg1914 binding determinants delocalize heterodimeric envoplakin from intracellular vimentin and keratin filaments in cultured cells. Recognition of vimentin is abolished when its residues Asp112 or Asp119 are mutated. The latter slot intermediate filament rods into basic PRD domain grooves through electrosteric complementarity in a widely applicable mechanism. Together this reveals how plakin family members form dynamic linkages with cytoskeletal frameworks. PMID:26935805

  5. Early recognition of lung cancer by integrin targeted imaging in K-ras mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ermolayev, Vladimir; Mohajerani, Pouyan; Ale, Angelique; Sarantopoulos, Athanasios; Aichler, Michaela; Kayser, Gian; Walch, Axel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2015-09-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer is characterized by slow progression and high heterogeneity of tumors. Integrins play an important role in lung cancer development and metastasis and were suggested as a tumor marker; however their role in anticancer therapy remains controversial. In this work, we demonstrate the potential of integrin-targeted imaging to recognize early lesions in transgenic mouse model of lung cancer based on spontaneous introduction of mutated human gene bearing K-ras mutation. We conducted ex vivo and fluorescence molecular tomography-X-ray computed tomography (FMT-XCT) in vivo imaging and analysis for specific targeting of early lung lesions and tumors in rodent preclinical model for lung cancer. The lesions and tumors were characterized by histology, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry using a panel of cancer markers. Ex vivo, the integrin-targeted fluorescent signal significantly differed between wild type lung tissue and K-ras pulmonary lesions (PL) at all ages studied. The panel of immunofluorescence experiments demonstrated that PL, which only partially show cancer cell features were detected by αvβ3-integrin targeted imaging. Human patient material analysis confirmed the specificity of target localization in different lung cancer types. Most importantly, small tumors in the lungs of 4-week-old animals could be noninvasively detected in vivo on the fluorescence channel of FMT-XCT. Our findings demonstrated αvβ3-integrin targeted fluorescent imaging to specifically detect premalignant pleural lesions in K-ras mice. Integrin targeted imaging may find application areas in preclinical research and clinical practice, such as early lung cancer diagnostics, intraoperative assistance or therapy monitoring.

  6. CRISPR-Cas9 nuclear dynamics and target recognition in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hanhui; Tu, Li-Chun; Zhang, Shaojie; Grunwald, David

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system has been repurposed for genome engineering, transcription modulation, and chromosome imaging in eukaryotic cells. However, the nuclear dynamics of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)–associated protein 9 (Cas9) guide RNAs and target interrogation are not well defined in living cells. Here, we deployed a dual-color CRISPR system to directly measure the stability of both Cas9 and guide RNA. We found that Cas9 is essential for guide RNA stability and that the nuclear Cas9–guide RNA complex levels limit the targeting efficiency. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching measurements revealed that single mismatches in the guide RNA seed sequence reduce the target residence time from >3 h to as low as <2 min in a nucleotide identity- and position-dependent manner. We further show that the duration of target residence correlates with cleavage activity. These results reveal that CRISPR discriminates between genuine versus mismatched targets for genome editing via radical alterations in residence time. PMID:27551060

  7. Fast pattern recognizer for autonomous target recognition and tracking for advanced naval attack missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastbacka, Al

    2001-10-01

    A FPR System under development for the Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA is funded under a SBIR, Phase II contract as an automatic target recognizer and tracker candidate for Navy fast-reaction, subsonic and supersonic, stand-off weapons. The FPR will autonomously detect, identify, correlate, and track complex surface ship and land based targets in hostile, high-clutter environments in real time. The novel FPR system is proven technology that uses an electronic implementation analogous to an optical correlator system, where the Fourier transform of the incoming image is compared against known target images stored as matched filter templates. FPR demonstrations show that unambiguous target identification is achievable in a ninety-five percent fog obscuration for over ninety-percent of target images tested. The FPR technology employs an acoustic dispersive delay line (DDL) to achieve ultra-fast image correlations in 90 microseconds or 11,000 correlations per second. The massively scalable FPR design is capable of achieving processing speeds of an order of magnitude faster using available ASIC technology. Key benefits of the FPR are dramatically reduced power, size, weight, and cost with increased durability, robustness, and performance - which makes the FPR ideal for onboard missile applications.

  8. Recognition and sensing of low-epitope targets via ternary complexes with oligonucleotides and synthetic receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kyung-Ae; Barbu, Mihaela; Halim, Marlin; Pallavi, Payal; Kim, Benjamin; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M.; Pecic, Stevan; Taylor, Steven; Worgall, Tilla S.; Stojanovic, Milan N.

    2014-11-01

    Oligonucleotide-based receptors or aptamers can interact with small molecules, but the ability to achieve high-affinity and specificity of these interactions depends strongly on functional groups or epitopes displayed by the binding targets. Some classes of targets are particularly challenging: for example, monosaccharides have scarce functionalities and no aptamers have been reported to recognize, let alone distinguish from each other, glucose and other hexoses. Here we report aptamers that differentiate low-epitope targets such as glucose, fructose or galactose by forming ternary complexes with high-epitope organic receptors for monosaccharides. In a follow-up example, we expand this method to isolate high-affinity oligonucleotides against aromatic amino acids complexed in situ with a nonspecific organometallic receptor. The method is general and enables broad clinical use of aptamers for the detection of small molecules in mix-and-measure assays, as demonstrated by monitoring postprandial waves of phenylalanine in human subjects.

  9. ERP correlates of target-distracter differentiation in repeated runs of a continuous recognition task with emotional and neutral faces.

    PubMed

    Treese, Anne-Cécile; Johansson, Mikael; Lindgren, Magnus

    2010-04-01

    The emotional salience of faces has previously been shown to induce memory distortions in recognition memory tasks. This event-related potential (ERP) study used repeated runs of a continuous recognition task with emotional and neutral faces to investigate emotion-induced memory distortions. In the second and third runs, participants made more false alarms to distracters (repeated from previous runs). Emotion did not modulate the amount of errors, but the extent to which recollection was employed to maximise performance as reflected in the putative ERP correlate of recollection; the parietal old-new effect. Targets from all stimulus classes (positive, negative, neutral) were associated with parietal ERP memory effects, but this was also the case for correctly rejected negative distracters. This suggests that recollection was strategically used to correctly reject negative distracters (recall-to-reject). This finding is consistent with the view that facilitated recollection of negative stimuli may be used to decrease the susceptibility to memory errors induced by emotional salience.

  10. Sp1 modulates ncOGT activity to alter target recognition and enhanced thermotolerance in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Riu, In-Hyun; Shin, Il-Soo; Do, Su-Il

    2008-07-18

    cDNAs encoding three isoforms of OGT (ncOGT, mOGT, and sOGT) were expressed in Escherichia coli in which the coexpression system of OGT with target substrates was established in vivo. No endogenous bacterial proteins were significantly O-GlcNAcylated by any type of OGT isoform while co-expressed p62 and Sp1 were strongly O-GlcNAcylated by ncOGT. These results suggest that most of bacterial proteins appear not to be recognized as right substrates by mammalian OGT whereas cytosolic environments may supply UDP-GlcNAc enough to proceed to O-GlcNAcylation in E. coli. Under these conditions, sOGT was auto-O-GlcNAcylated whereas ncOGT and mOGT were not. Importantly, we found that when Sp1 was coexpressed, ncOGT can O-GlcNAcylate not only Sp1 but also many bacterial proteins. Our findings suggest that Sp1 may modulate the capability of target recognition of ncOGT by which ncOGT can be led to newly recognize bacterial proteins as target substrates, finally generating the O-glyco-bacteria. Our results demonstrate that the O-glyco-bacteria showed enhanced thermal resistance to allow cell survival at a temperature as high as 52 degrees C.

  11. Targeting of plant pattern recognition receptor-triggered immunity by bacterial type-III secretion system effectors.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Zipfel, Cyril

    2015-02-01

    During infection, microbes are detected by surface-localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), leading to an innate immune response that prevents microbial ingress. Therefore, successful pathogens must evade or inhibit PRR-triggered immunity to cause disease. In the past decade, a number of type-III secretion system effector (T3Es) proteins from plant pathogenic bacteria have been shown to suppress this layer of innate immunity. More recently, the detailed mechanisms of action have been defined for several of these effectors. Interestingly, effectors display a wide array of virulence targets, being able to prevent activation of immune receptors and to hijack immune signaling pathways. Besides being a fascinating example of pathogen-host co-evolution, effectors have also emerged as valuable tools to dissect important biological processes in host cells.

  12. General Metropolis-Hastings jump diffusions for automatic target recognition in infrared scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanterman, Aaron D.; Miller, Michael I.; Snyder, Donald L.

    1997-04-01

    To locate and recognize ground-based targets in forward- looking IR (FLIR) images, 3D faceted models with associated pose parameters are formulated to accommodate the variability found in FLIR imagery. Taking a Bayesian approach, scenes are simulated from the emissive characteristics of the CAD models and compared with the collected data by a likelihood function based on sensor statistics. This likelihood is combined with a prior distribution defined over the set of possible scenes to form a posterior distribution. To accommodate scenes with variable numbers of targets, the posterior distribution is defined over parameter vectors of varying dimension. An inference algorithm based on Metropolis-Hastings jump- diffusion processes empirically samples from the posterior distribution, generating configurations of templates and transformations that match the collected sensor data with high probability. The jumps accommodate the addition and deletion of targets and the estimation of target identities; diffusions refine the hypotheses by drifting along the gradient of the posterior distribution with respect to the orientation and position parameters. Previous results on jumps strategies analogous to the Metropolis acceptance/rejection algorithm, with proposals drawn from the prior and accepted based on the likelihood, are extended to encompass general Metropolis-Hastings proposal densities. In particular, the algorithm proposes moves by drawing from the posterior distribution over computationally tractible subsets of the parameter space. The algorithm is illustrated by an implementation on a Silicon Graphics Onyx/Reality Engine.

  13. Global identification of target recognition and cleavage by the Microprocessor in human ES cells.

    PubMed

    Seong, Youngmo; Lim, Do-Hwan; Kim, Augustine; Seo, Jae Hong; Lee, Young Sik; Song, Hoseok; Kwon, Young-Soo

    2014-11-10

    The Microprocessor plays an essential role in canonical miRNA biogenesis by facilitating cleavage of stem-loop structures in primary transcripts to yield pre-miRNAs. Although miRNA biogenesis has been extensively studied through biochemical and molecular genetic approaches, it has yet to be addressed to what extent the current miRNA biogenesis models hold true in intact cells. To address the issues of in vivo recognition and cleavage by the Microprocessor, we investigate RNAs that are associated with DGCR8 and Drosha by using immunoprecipitation coupled with next-generation sequencing. Here, we present global protein-RNA interactions with unprecedented sensitivity and specificity. Our data indicate that precursors of canonical miRNAs and miRNA-like hairpins are the major substrates of the Microprocessor. As a result of specific enrichment of nascent cleavage products, we are able to pinpoint the Microprocessor-mediated cleavage sites per se at single-nucleotide resolution. Unexpectedly, a 2-nt 3' overhang invariably exists at the ends of cleaved bases instead of nascent pre-miRNAs. Besides canonical miRNA precursors, we find that two novel miRNA-like structures embedded in mRNAs are cleaved to yield pre-miRNA-like hairpins, uncoupled from miRNA maturation. Our data provide a framework for in vivo Microprocessor-mediated cleavage and a foundation for experimental and computational studies on miRNA biogenesis in living cells.

  14. Conformational Rigidity within Plasticity Promotes Differential Target Recognition of Nerve Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, Francesca; de Chiara, Cesira; Kelly, Geoff; Covaceuszach, Sonia; Malerba, Francesca; Yan, Robert; Lamba, Doriano; Cattaneo, Antonino; Pastore, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), the prototype of the neurotrophin family, is essential for maintenance and growth of different neuronal populations. The X-ray crystal structure of NGF has been known since the early '90s and shows a β-sandwich fold with extensive loops that are involved in the interaction with its binding partners. Understanding the dynamical properties of these loops is thus important for molecular recognition. We present here a combined solution NMR/molecular dynamics study which addresses the question of whether and how much the long loops of NGF are flexible and describes the N-terminal intrinsic conformational tendency of the unbound NGF molecule. NMR titration experiments allowed identification of a previously undetected epitope of the anti-NGF antagonist antibody αD11 which will be of crucial importance for future drug lead discovery. The present study thus recapitulates all the available structural information and unveils the conformational versatility of the relatively rigid NGF loops upon functional ligand binding. PMID:28083536

  15. Structural basis for specific recognition of multiple mRNA targets by a PUF regulatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yeming; Opperman, Laura; Wickens, Marvin; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.

    2011-11-02

    Caenorhabditis elegans fem-3 binding factor (FBF) is a founding member of the PUMILIO/FBF (PUF) family of mRNA regulatory proteins. It regulates multiple mRNAs critical for stem cell maintenance and germline development. Here, we report crystal structures of FBF in complex with 6 different 9-nt RNA sequences, including elements from 4 natural mRNAs. These structures reveal that FBF binds to conserved bases at positions 1-3 and 7-8. The key specificity determinant of FBF vs. other PUF proteins lies in positions 4-6. In FBF/RNA complexes, these bases stack directly with one another and turn away from the RNA-binding surface. A short region of FBF is sufficient to impart its unique specificity and lies directly opposite the flipped bases. We suggest that this region imposes a flattened curvature on the protein; hence, the requirement for the additional nucleotide. The principles of FBF/RNA recognition suggest a general mechanism by which PUF proteins recognize distinct families of RNAs yet exploit very nearly identical atomic contacts in doing so.

  16. Target recognition, resistance, immunity and genome mining of class II bacteriocins from Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kjos, Morten; Borrero, Juan; Opsata, Mona; Birri, Dagim J; Holo, Helge; Cintas, Luis M; Snipen, Lars; Hernández, Pablo E; Nes, Ingolf F; Diep, Dzung B

    2011-12-01

    Due to their very potent antimicrobial activity against diverse food-spoiling bacteria and pathogens and their favourable biochemical properties, peptide bacteriocins from Gram-positive bacteria have long been considered promising for applications in food preservation or medical treatment. To take advantage of bacteriocins in different applications, it is crucial to have detailed knowledge on the molecular mechanisms by which these peptides recognize and kill target cells, how producer cells protect themselves from their own bacteriocin (self-immunity) and how target cells may develop resistance. In this review we discuss some important recent progress in these areas for the non-lantibiotic (class II) bacteriocins. We also discuss some examples of how the current wealth of genome sequences provides an invaluable source in the search for novel class II bacteriocins.

  17. Position, scale, rotation invariant (PSRI) target recognition in range imagery using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troxel, S. E.; Rogers, S. K.; Kabrisky, M.; Mills, J. P.

    1988-08-01

    A method for classifying objects invariant to position, rotation, or scale is presented. Objects to be classified were multifunction laser radar data of tanks and trucks at various aspect angles. A segmented doppler image was used to mask the range image into candidate targets. Each target is then compared to stored templates representing the different classes. The template and the image were transformed into the magnitude of the Fourier transform with log radial and angle axis, lF (Ln r , 0)1, feature space. The classification is accomplished using the shape of the correlation peak of the IF (Ln r , 0)1 planes of an image and a template. A neural network was used to perform the classification with a classification accuracy near 100%. The neural network used in this study was a multilayer perception using a back propagation algorithm.

  18. Application of Sequence Comparison Methods to Multisensor Data Fusion and Target Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-18

    Discussion ...................... C-20 C.7 Equations for Direction Cosine Matrix ( DCM ) Generation . C-26 C.7.1 DCM for Sensor-to-Inertial Frame...Transformation C-26 C.7.2 DCM for Target Lift-to-Inertial Frame Transformation C-30 Vita ........... .......................................... VITA- I...5-5 CRLB (Cramrr-Rao lower bound) .............................. 2-85 DCM (direction cosine matrix) ................................. C-26 DOF

  19. Recognition and targeting mechanisms by chaperones in flagellum assembly and operation

    PubMed Central

    Khanra, Nandish; Rossi, Paolo; Economou, Anastassios; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.

    2016-01-01

    The flagellum is a complex bacterial nanomachine that requires the proper assembly of several different proteins for its function. Dedicated chaperones are central in preventing aggregation or undesired interactions of flagellar proteins, including their targeting to the export gate. FliT is a key flagellar chaperone that binds to several flagellar proteins in the cytoplasm, including its cognate filament-capping protein FliD. We have determined the solution structure of the FliT chaperone in the free state and in complex with FliD and the flagellar ATPase FliI. FliT adopts a four-helix bundle and uses a hydrophobic surface formed by the first three helices to recognize its substrate proteins. We show that the fourth helix constitutes the binding site for FlhA, a membrane protein at the export gate. In the absence of a substrate protein FliT adopts an autoinhibited structure wherein both the binding sites for substrates and FlhA are occluded. Substrate binding to FliT activates the complex for FlhA binding and thus targeting of the chaperone–substrate complex to the export gate. The activation and targeting mechanisms reported for FliT appear to be shared among the other flagellar chaperones. PMID:27528687

  20. Recognition and targeting mechanisms by chaperones in flagellum assembly and operation.

    PubMed

    Khanra, Nandish; Rossi, Paolo; Economou, Anastassios; Kalodimos, Charalampos G

    2016-08-30

    The flagellum is a complex bacterial nanomachine that requires the proper assembly of several different proteins for its function. Dedicated chaperones are central in preventing aggregation or undesired interactions of flagellar proteins, including their targeting to the export gate. FliT is a key flagellar chaperone that binds to several flagellar proteins in the cytoplasm, including its cognate filament-capping protein FliD. We have determined the solution structure of the FliT chaperone in the free state and in complex with FliD and the flagellar ATPase FliI. FliT adopts a four-helix bundle and uses a hydrophobic surface formed by the first three helices to recognize its substrate proteins. We show that the fourth helix constitutes the binding site for FlhA, a membrane protein at the export gate. In the absence of a substrate protein FliT adopts an autoinhibited structure wherein both the binding sites for substrates and FlhA are occluded. Substrate binding to FliT activates the complex for FlhA binding and thus targeting of the chaperone-substrate complex to the export gate. The activation and targeting mechanisms reported for FliT appear to be shared among the other flagellar chaperones.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of target recognition by lipid GPCRs: relevance for cancer.

    PubMed

    van Jaarsveld, M T M; Houthuijzen, J M; Voest, E E

    2016-08-04

    Over the past decade the importance of lipids for cancer cell metabolism and cancer-related processes such as proliferation, metastasis and chemotherapy resistance has become more apparent. The mechanisms by which lipid signals are transduced are poorly understood, but frequently involve G-protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs), which can be explored as druggable targets. Here, we discuss how GPCRs recognize four classes of cancer-relevant lipids (lysophospholipids, phospholipids, fatty acids and eicosanoids). We compare the ligand-binding properties of >50 lipid receptors, we examine how their dysregulation contributes to tumorigenesis and how they may be therapeutically exploited.

  2. The Development of the Automatic Target Recognition System for the UGV/RSTA LADAR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-21

    Vol. 1960, Orlando, FL, 14-16 April 1993, pp. 57-71. 6. J.E. Nettleton and S. Holder, "Active/passive laser radar field test (Fort A.P. Hill, VA...is to develop the automatic target recogni- tion (ATR) system that will process the imagery from the RSTA laser radar (ladar). A real-time...ix 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. IMAGE DATA BASES 5 2.1 Introduction 5 2.2 Tri-Service Laser -Radar (TSLR) Data 5 2.3 Hobby Shop (HBS) Laser -Radar Data 11

  3. Communication target object recognition for D2D connection with feature size limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ok, Jiheon; Kim, Soochang; Kim, Young-hoon; Lee, Chulhee

    2015-03-01

    Recently, a new concept of device-to-device (D2D) communication, which is called "point-and-link communication" has attracted great attentions due to its intuitive and simple operation. This approach enables user to communicate with target devices without any pre-identification information such as SSIDs, MAC addresses by selecting the target image displayed on the user's own device. In this paper, we present an efficient object matching algorithm that can be applied to look(point)-and-link communications for mobile services. Due to the limited channel bandwidth and low computational power of mobile terminals, the matching algorithm should satisfy low-complexity, low-memory and realtime requirements. To meet these requirements, we propose fast and robust feature extraction by considering the descriptor size and processing time. The proposed algorithm utilizes a HSV color histogram, SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) features and object aspect ratios. To reduce the descriptor size under 300 bytes, a limited number of SIFT key points were chosen as feature points and histograms were binarized while maintaining required performance. Experimental results show the robustness and the efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  4. Engineering self-contained DNA circuit for proximity recognition and localized signal amplification of target biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Ang, Yan Shan; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry

    2014-08-01

    Biomolecular interactions have important cellular implications, however, a simple method for the sensing of such proximal events is lacking in the current molecular toolbox. We designed a dynamic DNA circuit capable of recognizing targets in close proximity to initiate a pre-programmed signal transduction process resulting in localized signal amplification. The entire circuit was engineered to be self-contained, i.e. it can self-assemble onto individual target molecules autonomously and form localized signal with minimal cross-talk. α-thrombin was used as a model protein to evaluate the performance of the individual modules and the overall circuit for proximity interaction under physiologically relevant buffer condition. The circuit achieved good selectivity in presence of non-specific protein and interfering serum matrix and successfully detected for physiologically relevant α-thrombin concentration (50 nM-5 μM) in a single mixing step without any further washing. The formation of localized signal at the interaction site can be enhanced kinetically through the control of temperature and probe concentration. This work provides a basic general framework from which other circuit modules can be adapted for the sensing of other biomolecular or cellular interaction of interest.

  5. Binding of LL-37 to model biomembranes: insight into target vs host cell recognition.

    PubMed

    Sood, Rohit; Domanov, Yegor; Pietiäinen, Milla; Kontinen, Vesa P; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2008-04-01

    Pursuing the molecular mechanisms of the concentration dependent cytotoxic and hemolytic effects of the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 on cells, we investigated the interactions of this peptide with lipids using different model membranes, together with fluorescence spectroscopy for the Trp-containing mutant LL-37(F27W). Minimum concentrations inhibiting bacterial growth and lipid interactions assessed by dynamic light scattering and monolayer penetration revealed the mutant to retain the characteristics of native LL-37. Although both LL-37 and the mutant intercalated effectively into zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine membranes the presence of acidic phospholipids caused augmented membrane binding. Interestingly, strongly attenuated intercalation of LL-37 into membranes containing both cholesterol and sphingomyelin (both at X=0.3) was observed. Accordingly, the distinction between target and host cells by LL-37 is likely to derive from i) acidic phospholipids causing enhanced association with the former cells as well as ii) from attenuated interactions with the outer surface of the plasma membrane of the peptide secreting host, imposed by its high content of cholesterol and sphingomyelin. Our results further suggest that LL-37 may exert its antimicrobial effects by compromising the membrane barrier properties of the target microbes by a mechanism involving cytotoxic oligomers, similarly to other peptides forming amyloid-like fibers in the presence of acidic phospholipids.

  6. A Hierarchical Target Extraction, Recognition, and Tracking (HiTert) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jun; Andrisani, Dominick, II; Tenorio, M. F.

    1992-03-01

    This research contributed to the development of a hierarchical target extraction, identification, and tracking system based on imaging sensors. The work suggests that passive tracking of ground targets is a desirable possibility. Our work involved computer rendering of a color image database containing 1000 images of a maneuvering tank; the use of image derived data to help track a violently maneuvering tank; the use of the Cantata Visual Programming Language to design the multiple interconnected algorithms in an intuitive and extensible manner; the delivery of this software to the U.S. Army Armament Research and Development Center (ARDEC) at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey; and presentation of a one day short course to engineers at ARDEC concerning the design and use of the software. This final report describes that software. Our research has suggested the need for the following future work: improved realism in the computer generated image database; development of additional higher level image processing and tracking modules using Cantata; and implementation of a way to communicate between competing algorithms.

  7. Structures of the Signal Recognition Particle Receptor From the Archaeon Pyrococcus Furiosus: Implications for the Targeting Step at the Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Egea, P.F.; Tsuruta, H.; Leon, G.P.de; Napetschnig, J.; Walter, P.; Stroud, R.M.

    2009-05-18

    In all organisms, a ribonucleoprotein called the signal recognition particle (SRP) and its receptor (SR) target nascent proteins from the ribosome to the translocon for secretion or membrane insertion. We present the first X-ray structures of an archeal FtsY, the receptor from the hyper-thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu), in its free and GDP {center_dot} magnesium-bound forms. The highly charged N-terminal domain of Pfu-FtsY is distinguished by a long N-terminal helix. The basic charges on the surface of this helix are likely to regulate interactions at the membrane. A peripheral GDP bound near a regulatory motif could indicate a site of interaction between the receptor and ribosomal or SRP RNAs. Small angle X-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation indicate that the crystal structure of Pfu-FtsY correlates well with the average conformation in solution. Based on previous structures of two sub-complexes, we propose a model of the core of archeal and eukaryotic SRP {center_dot} SR targeting complexes.

  8. Cancer cell-selective promoter recognition accompanies antitumor effect by glucocorticoid receptor-targeted gold nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sau, Samaresh; Agarwalla, Pritha; Mukherjee, Sudip; Bag, Indira; Sreedhar, Bojja; Pal-Bhadra, Manika; Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Banerjee, Rajkumar

    2014-05-01

    Nanoparticles, such as gold nanoparticles (GNP), upon convenient modifications perform multi tasks catering to many biomedical applications. However, GNP or any other type of nanoparticles is yet to achieve the feat of intracellular regulation of endogenous genes of choice such as through manipulation of a gene-promoter in a chromosome. As for gene modulation and delivery, GNP (or other nanoparticles) showed only limited gene therapy potential, which relied on the delivery of `exogenous' genes invoking gene knockdown or replacement. Practically, there are no instances for the nanoparticle-mediated promoter regulation of `endogenous' genes, more so, as a cancer selective phenomenon. In this regard, we report the development of a simple, easily modifiable GNP-formulation, which promoted/up-regulated the expression of a specific category of `endogenous' genes, the glucocorticoid responsive genes. This genetic up-regulation was induced in only cancer cells by modified GNP-mediated transcriptional activation of its cytoplasmic receptor, glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Normal cells and their GR remained primarily unperturbed by this GNP-formulation. The most potent gene up-regulating GNP-formulation down-regulated a cancer-specific proliferative signal, phospho-Akt in cancer cells, which accompanied retardation of tumor growth in the murine melanoma model. We show that GR-targeted GNPs may find potential use in the targeting and modulation of genetic information in cancer towards developing novel anticancer therapeutics.Nanoparticles, such as gold nanoparticles (GNP), upon convenient modifications perform multi tasks catering to many biomedical applications. However, GNP or any other type of nanoparticles is yet to achieve the feat of intracellular regulation of endogenous genes of choice such as through manipulation of a gene-promoter in a chromosome. As for gene modulation and delivery, GNP (or other nanoparticles) showed only limited gene therapy potential, which relied

  9. Cellular recognition and macropinocytosis-like internalization of nanoparticles targeted to integrin α2β1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankaanpää, P.; Tiitta, S.; Bergman, L.; Puranen, A.-B.; von Haartman, E.; Lindén, M.; Heino, J.

    2015-10-01

    Targeting nanoparticles to desired intracellular compartments is a major challenge. Integrin-type adhesion receptors are connected to different endocytosis routes in a receptor-specific manner. According to our previous observations, the internalization of an α2β1-integrin-echovirus-1 complex takes place via a macropinocytosis-like mechanism, suggesting that the receptor could be used to target nanoparticles to this specific entry route. Here, silica-based nanoparticles, carrying monoclonal antibodies against the α2β1 integrin as address labels, were synthesized. Studies with flow cytometry, atomic force microscopy and confocal microscopy showed the particles to attach to the cell surface via the α2β1 integrin. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of nanoparticle trafficking inside the cell performed with the BioImageXD software indicated that the particles enter cells via a macropinocytosis-like process and end up in caveolin-1 positive structures. Thus, we suggest that different integrins can guide particles to distinct endocytosis routes and, subsequently, also to specific intracellular compartments. In addition, we show that with the BioImageXD software it is possible to conduct sensitive and complex analyses of the behavior of small fluorescent particles inside cells, using basic confocal microscopy images.Targeting nanoparticles to desired intracellular compartments is a major challenge. Integrin-type adhesion receptors are connected to different endocytosis routes in a receptor-specific manner. According to our previous observations, the internalization of an α2β1-integrin-echovirus-1 complex takes place via a macropinocytosis-like mechanism, suggesting that the receptor could be used to target nanoparticles to this specific entry route. Here, silica-based nanoparticles, carrying monoclonal antibodies against the α2β1 integrin as address labels, were synthesized. Studies with flow cytometry, atomic force microscopy and confocal microscopy showed the

  10. Development of biohybrid immuno-selective membranes for target antigen recognition.

    PubMed

    Militano, Francesca; Poerio, Teresa; Mazzei, Rosalinda; Salerno, Simona; Bartolo, Loredana De; Giorno, Lidietta

    2017-02-03

    Membranes are gaining increasing interest in solid-phase analytical assay and biosensors applications, in particular as functional surface for bioreceptors immobilization and stabilization as well as for the concentration of target molecules in microsystems. In this work, regenerated cellulose immuno-affinity membranes were developed and they were used for the selective capture of interleukin-6 (IL-6) as targeted antigen. Protein G was covalently linked on the membrane surface and it was successfully used for the oriented site-specific antibody immobilization. The antibody binding capacity of the protein G-coupled membrane was evaluated. The specific anti IL-6 antibody was immobilized and a quantitative analysis of the amount of IL-6 captured by the immuno-affinity membrane was performed. The immobilization procedure was optimized to eliminate the non-specific binding of antigen on the membrane surface. Additionally, the interaction between anti IL-6 antibody and protein G was stabilized by chemical cross-linking with glutaraldehyde and the capture ability of immuno-affinity membranes, with and without the cross-linker, was compared. The maximum binding capacity of the protein G-coupled membrane was 43.8µg/cm(2) and the binding efficiency was 88%. The immuno-affinity membranes showed a high IL-6 capture efficiency at very low antigen concentration, up to a maximum of 91%, the amount of captured IL-6 increased linearly as increasing the initial concentration. The cross-linked surface retained the antigen binding capacity demonstrating its robustness in being reused, without antibody leakage or reduction in antibody binding capacity. The overall results demonstrated the possibility of a reliable application of the immuno-affinity membrane developed for biosensors and bioassays also in multiple use.

  11. Single cell molecular recognition of migrating and invading tumor cells using a targeted fluorescent probe to receptor PTPmu.

    PubMed

    Burden-Gulley, Susan M; Qutaish, Mohammed Q; Sullivant, Kristin E; Tan, Mingqian; Craig, Sonya E L; Basilion, James P; Lu, Zheng-Rong; Wilson, David L; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M

    2013-04-01

    Detection of an extracellular cleaved fragment of a cell-cell adhesion molecule represents a new paradigm in molecular recognition and imaging of tumors. We previously demonstrated that probes that recognize the cleaved extracellular domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase mu (PTPmu) label human glioblastoma brain tumor sections and the main tumor mass of intracranial xenograft gliomas. In this article, we examine whether one of these probes, SBK2, can label dispersed glioma cells that are no longer connected to the main tumor mass. Live mice with highly dispersive glioma tumors were injected intravenously with the fluorescent PTPmu probe to test the ability of the probe to label the dispersive glioma cells in vivo. Analysis was performed using a unique three-dimensional (3D) cryo-imaging technique to reveal highly migratory and invasive glioma cell dispersal within the brain and the extent of colabeling by the PTPmu probe. The PTPmu probe labeled the main tumor site and dispersed cells up to 3.5 mm away. The cryo-images of tumors labeled with the PTPmu probe provide a novel, high-resolution view of molecular tumor recognition, with excellent 3D detail regarding the pathways of tumor cell migration. Our data demonstrate that the PTPmu probe recognizes distant tumor cells even in parts of the brain where the blood-brain barrier is likely intact. The PTPmu probe has potential translational significance for recognizing tumor cells to facilitate molecular imaging, a more complete tumor resection and to serve as a molecular targeting agent to deliver chemotherapeutics to the main tumor mass and distant dispersive tumor cells.

  12. New detection targets for amyloid-reactive probes: spectroscopic recognition of bacterial spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Guilford, II; Landsman, Pavel

    2005-05-01

    We report characteristic changes in fluorescence of amyloid-binding dyes Thioflavin T (TfT), pinacyanol (PIN) and related dyes, caused by their interaction with suspended Bacillus spore cultures (B. subtilis, B thuringiensis). The gain in TfT emission in the presence of spores allowed their immediate detection in aqueous suspensions, with a sensitivity limit of < 105 spores per ml. The spectroscopic signatures are consistent with a large number of binding sites for the two dyes on spore coats. The possible structural relationship of these dye binding loci with characteristic motifs (β-stacks) of amyloid deposits and other misfolded protein formations suggests new designs for probing biocontamination and also for clinical studies of non-microbial human pathogens (e.g., amyloid-related protein aggregates in prion-related transmissible encephalopathies or in Alzheimer's disease). Also reported is a special screening technique that was designed and used herein for calibration of new detection probes and assays for spore detection. It employed spectroscopic interactions between the candidate amyloid stains and poly(vinylpyrrolidone)-coated colloid silica (Percoll) nanoparticles that also display remarkable parallelism with the corresponding dye-amyloid and dye-spore reactivities. Percoll may thus find new applications as a convenient non-biological structural model mimicking the putative probe-targeted motifs in both classes of bioanalytes. These findings are important in the design of new probes and assays for important human pathogens (i.e. bacterial spores and amyloidogenic protein aggregates).

  13. A Targeted "Capture" and "Removal" Scavenger toward Multiple Pollutants for Water Remediation based on Molecular Recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Shen, Haijing; Hu, Xiaoxia; Li, Yan; Li, Zhihao; Xu, Jinfan; Song, Xiufeng; Zeng, Haibo; Yuan, Quan

    2016-03-01

    For the water remediation techniques based on adsorption, the long-standing contradictories between selectivity and multiple adsorbability, as well as between affinity and recyclability, have put it on weak defense amid more and more severe environment crisis. Here, a pollutant-targeting hydrogel scavenger is reported for water remediation with both high selectivity and multiple adsorbability for several pollutants, and with strong affinity and good recyclability through rationally integrating the advantages of multiple functional materials. In the scavenger, aptamers fold into binding pockets to accommodate the molecular structure of pollutants to afford perfect selectivity, and Janus nanoparticles with antibacterial function as well as anisotropic surfaces to immobilize multiple aptamers allow for simultaneously handling different kinds of pollutants. The scavenger exhibits high efficiencies in removing pollutants from water and it can be easily recycled for many times without significant loss of loading capacities. Moreover, the residual concentrations of each contaminant are well below the drinking water standards. Thermodynamic behavior of the adsorption process is investigated and the rate-controlling process is determined. Furthermore, a point of use device is constructed and it displays high efficiency in removing pollutants from environmental water. The scavenger exhibits great promise to be applied in the next generation of water purification systems.

  14. A multispectral automatic target recognition application for maritime surveillance, search, and rescue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonmaker, Jon; Reed, Scott; Podobna, Yuliya; Vazquez, Jose; Boucher, Cynthia

    2010-04-01

    Due to increased security concerns, the commitment to monitor and maintain security in the maritime environment is increasingly a priority. A country's coast is the most vulnerable area for the incursion of illegal immigrants, terrorists and contraband. This work illustrates the ability of a low-cost, light-weight, multi-spectral, multi-channel imaging system to handle the environment and see under difficult marine conditions. The system and its implemented detecting and tracking technologies should be organic to the maritime homeland security community for search and rescue, fisheries, defense, and law enforcement. It is tailored for airborne and ship based platforms to detect, track and monitor suspected objects (such as semi-submerged targets like marine mammals, vessels in distress, and drug smugglers). In this system, automated detection and tracking technology is used to detect, classify and localize potential threats or objects of interest within the imagery provided by the multi-spectral system. These algorithms process the sensor data in real time, thereby providing immediate feedback when features of interest have been detected. A supervised detection system based on Haar features and Cascade Classifiers is presented and results are provided on real data. The system is shown to be extendable and reusable for a variety of different applications.

  15. Aircraft electromagnetic compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Clifton A.; Larsen, William E.

    1987-01-01

    Illustrated are aircraft architecture, electromagnetic interference environments, electromagnetic compatibility protection techniques, program specifications, tasks, and verification and validation procedures. The environment of 400 Hz power, electrical transients, and radio frequency fields are portrayed and related to thresholds of avionics electronics. Five layers of protection for avionics are defined. Recognition is given to some present day electromagnetic compatibility weaknesses and issues which serve to reemphasize the importance of EMC verification of equipment and parts, and their ultimate EMC validation on the aircraft. Proven standards of grounding, bonding, shielding, wiring, and packaging are laid out to help provide a foundation for a comprehensive approach to successful future aircraft design and an understanding of cost effective EMC in an aircraft setting.

  16. Automated pattern recognition to support geological mapping and exploration target generation - A case study from southern Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, Detlef; Hutchins, David; Das, Sonali; Majumdar, Anandamayee; Paasche, Hendrik

    2015-06-01

    to the result obtained from unsupervised fuzzy clustering. Furthermore, a comparison of the aposterior probability of class assignment with the trustworthiness values provided by fuzzy clustering also indicates only slight differences. These observed differences can be explained by the exponential class probability term which tends to deliver either fairly high or low probability values. The methodology and results presented here demonstrate that automated objective pattern recognition can essentially contribute to geological mapping of large study areas and mineral exploration target generation. This methodology is considered well suited to a number of African countries whose large territories have recently been covered by high resolution airborne geophysical data, but where existing geological mapping is poor, incomplete or outdated.

  17. ERP Correlates of Target-Distracter Differentiation in Repeated Runs of a Continuous Recognition Task with Emotional and Neutral Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treese, Anne-Cecile; Johansson, Mikael; Lindgren, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    The emotional salience of faces has previously been shown to induce memory distortions in recognition memory tasks. This event-related potential (ERP) study used repeated runs of a continuous recognition task with emotional and neutral faces to investigate emotion-induced memory distortions. In the second and third runs, participants made more…

  18. Infrared Target Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    infrared sensors, however, Laser RADAR (LADAR), Synthetic Aperature RADAR (SAR) and Millimeter Wave (MMW) are three other sensors also being tested... inverse FFT. Ev.ry fing but the sharp changes which require higher frequency components can be restored. Based on this reasoning, Fourier com,)onents...very close approximation of an image with an inverse FFT. A 4x7 window was placed around the DC from the FFT image and the 28 components were used as

  19. Divergent target recognition by coexpressed 5'-isomiRs of miR-142-3p and selective viral mimicry.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Mark; Forte, Eleonora; Raja, Archana N; Schipma, Matthew J; Gottwein, Eva

    2015-09-01

    Sequence heterogeneity at the ends of mature microRNAs (miRNAs) is well documented, but its effects on miRNA function are largely unexplored. Here we studied the impact of miRNA 5'-heterogeneity, which affects the seed region critical for target recognition. Using the example of miR-142-3p, an emerging regulator of the hematopoietic lineage in vertebrates, we show that naturally coexpressed 5'-variants (5'-isomiRs) can recognize largely distinct sets of binding sites. Despite this, both miR-142-3p isomiRs regulate exclusive and shared targets involved in actin dynamics. Thus, 5'-heterogeneity can substantially broaden and enhance regulation of one pathway. Other 5'-isomiRs, in contrast, recognize largely overlapping sets of binding sites. This is exemplified by two herpesviral 5'-isomiRs that selectively mimic one of the miR-142-3p 5'-isomiRs. We hypothesize that other cellular and viral 5'-isomiRs can similarly be grouped into those with divergent or convergent target repertoires, based on 5'-sequence features. Taken together, our results provide a detailed characterization of target recognition by miR-142-3p and its 5'-isomiR-specific viral mimic. We furthermore demonstrate that miRNA 5'-end variation leads to differential targeting and can thus broaden the target range of miRNAs.

  20. Identification of the RNA recognition element of the RBPMS family of RNA-binding proteins and their transcriptome-wide mRNA targets.

    PubMed

    Farazi, Thalia A; Leonhardt, Carl S; Mukherjee, Neelanjan; Mihailovic, Aleksandra; Li, Song; Max, Klaas E A; Meyer, Cindy; Yamaji, Masashi; Cekan, Pavol; Jacobs, Nicholas C; Gerstberger, Stefanie; Bognanni, Claudia; Larsson, Erik; Ohler, Uwe; Tuschl, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies implicated the RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (RBPMS) family of proteins in oocyte, retinal ganglion cell, heart, and gastrointestinal smooth muscle development. These RNA-binding proteins contain a single RNA recognition motif (RRM), and their targets and molecular function have not yet been identified. We defined transcriptome-wide RNA targets using photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) in HEK293 cells, revealing exonic mature and intronic pre-mRNA binding sites, in agreement with the nuclear and cytoplasmic localization of the proteins. Computational and biochemical approaches defined the RNA recognition element (RRE) as a tandem CAC trinucleotide motif separated by a variable spacer region. Similar to other mRNA-binding proteins, RBPMS family of proteins relocalized to cytoplasmic stress granules under oxidative stress conditions suggestive of a support function for mRNA localization in large and/or multinucleated cells where it is preferentially expressed.

  1. Engineering Duplex RNAs for Challenging Targets: Recognition of GGGGCC/CCCCGG Repeats at the ALS/FTD C9orf72 Locus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiaxin; Liu, Jing; Li, Liande; Gagnon, Keith T; Corey, David R

    2015-11-19

    A GGGGCC expansion within an intronic region of the C9orf72 gene forms RNA foci that are associated with one-third of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and one-quarter of frontotemporal dementia. The C9orf72 locus also expresses an antisense transcript with a CCCCGG expansion that forms foci and may contribute to disease. Synthetic agents that bind these hexanucleotide repeats and block foci would be leads for therapeutic discovery. We have engineered duplex RNAs to enable them to recognize difficult C/G targets. Recognition inhibits foci formed by both GGGGCC and CCCCGG RNA. Our findings show that a single duplex RNA can be used to recognize both disease-related C9orf72 transcripts. More broadly, we extend RNAi to previously inaccessible C/G sequences and provide another example of target recognition in human cells by nuclear RNAi.

  2. Aircraft Flutter Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Wilmer Reed gained international recognition for his innovative research, contributions and patented ideas relating to flutter and aeroelasticity of aerospace vehicles at Langley Research Center. In the early 1980's, Reed retired from Langley and joined the engineering staff of Dynamic Engineering Inc. While at DEI, Reed conceived and patented the DEI Flutter Exciter, now used world-wide in flight flutter testing of new or modified aircraft designs. When activated, the DEI Flutter Exciter alternately deflects the airstream upward and downward in a rapid manner, creating a force similar to that produced by an oscillating trailing edge flap. The DEI Flutter Exciter is readily adaptable to a variety of aircraft.

  3. Design and Function of Supramolecular Recognition Systems Based on Guest-Targeting Probe-Modified Cyclodextrin Receptors for ATP.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kyohhei; Fujiwara, Shoji; Yamada, Tatsuru; Tsuchido, Yuji; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Hayashita, Takashi

    2017-01-20

    In this study, we have developed a rational design strategy to obtain highly selective supramolecular recognition systems of cyclodextrins (CyDs) on the basis of the lock and key principle. We designed and synthesized dipicolylamine (dpa)-modified γ-CyD-Cu(2+) complexes possessing an azobenzene unit (Cu·1-γ-CyD) and examined how they recognized phosphoric acid derivatives in water. The results revealed that Cu·1-γ-CyD recognized ATP with high selectivity over other phosphoric acid derivatives. The significant blue shift in the UV-vis spectra and (1)H NMR analysis suggested that the selective ATP recognition was based on the multipoint interactions between the adenine moiety of ATP and both the CyD cavity and the azobenzene unit in addition to the recognition of phosphoric moieties by the Cu-dpa complex site. Our unique receptor made it capable of distinguishing ATP from AMP and ADP, revealing the discrimination of even a length of one phosphoric group. This study demonstrates that, compared to conventional recognition systems of CyDs, this multipoint recognition system confers a higher degree of selectivity for certain organic molecules, such as ATP, over their similar derivatives.

  4. Conspicuity of target lights: The influence of flash rate and brightness. [collision avoidance - visual discrimination/pilot performance, aircraft lights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, M. M.

    1975-01-01

    The stimulus characteristics of lights that might aid a pilot to see and avoid, by alerting him to a potential threat were studied. The relative conspicuity of foveally equated, point-source, steady and flashing lights of several brightnesses, seen against a star background was examined. From the subject's viewpoint, these target lights could appear anywhere within a large (40 deg horizontal by 35 deg vertical) field of view. The lights appeared at random time intervals while the subject was periodically distracted by a simulated cockpit task. The results indicate that correct target detection increases and reaction time decreases with increased target intensity. Steady lights are missed more frequently and acquired more slowly than flashing lights, but no significant differences are found among the wide range of flash rates employed. The intensity of the light has a greater effect on both detection and reaction time to steady lights than to flashing lights. These results are compared with results of other researchers who used targets which appeared at fixed locations. The longest reaction times were recorded to lights which appeared either at the extremes or at the very center of the visual field.

  5. A comparison between the impact of noise from aircraft, road traffic and trains on long-term recall and recognition of a text in children aged 12-14 years.

    PubMed

    Hygge, S

    1993-01-01

    A total of 417 students in the seventh grade, 12-14 old, took part in three 15 min learning sessions in their ordinary class-rooms. Their task was to read a text, and they were tested one week later with difficult recall questions and less difficult recognition items on the text. The first session was a pretest for their learning abilities. This session was run in ambient noise conditions and all the students read the very same text. The scores from this session were employed to split the pupils along the median into two groups of learning ability. Sessions two and three were counterbalanced as a noise condition or an ambient noise condition. In these sessions two other texts were employed, and they appeared equally often under the noise and ambient conditions, as well as under the two different presentation orders. Three subgroups of the pupils were exposed to aircraft noise, train noise and road-traffic noise. The noise types were of the same equivalent level (66 dB(A) Leq) in all subgroups. The design of the study permitted two different analyses of long-term learning. First, in a within subject analysis, the difference scores between the noise and ambient noise conditions in session 2 and 3 were calculated, and crossed with learning ability (high and low) and type of noise. In a second between subject analysis, the difference scores in session 1 and 2 were crossed with the group factor whether they had noise or ambient conditions in session 2, and the ability and noise type factors. Both analyses yielded the same results. Noise impaired long-term recall of the difficult items. Degree of impairment on the recall items did not interact with noise source or learning ability. The average impairment due to aircraft and road traffic noise was around 23% of the scores. Train noise had no effect. For the easy recognition items there were no effects of noise exposure, nor of its interaction with noise source and learning ability. Since the number of pages read did not

  6. Pre-Experimental Familiarization Increases Hippocampal Activity for Both Targets and Lures in Recognition Memory: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Zubicaray, Greig I.; McMahon, Katie L.; Hayward, Lydia; Dunn, John C.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, items pre-exposed in a familiarization series were included in a list discrimination task to manipulate memory strength. At test, participants were required to discriminate strong targets and strong lures from weak targets and new lures. This resulted in a concordant pattern of increased "old" responses to strong targets and…

  7. The Tyrosine Kinase Pyk-2/Raftk Regulates Natural Killer (Nk) Cell Cytotoxic Response, and Is Translocated and Activated upon Specific Target Cell Recognition and Killing

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, David; Nieto, Marta; Llano, Manuel; Rodríguez-Fernández, José L.; Tejedor, Reyes; Avraham, Shalom; Cabañas, Carlos; López-Botet, Miguel; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2000-01-01

    The compartmentalization of plasma membrane proteins has a key role in regulation of lymphocyte activation and development of immunity. We found that the proline-rich tyrosine kinase-2 (PYK-2/RAFTK) colocalized with the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) at the trailing edge of migrating natural killer (NK) cells. When polyclonal NK cells bound to K562 targets, PYK-2 translocated to the area of NK–target cell interaction. The specificity of this process was assessed with NK cell clones bearing activatory or inhibitory forms of CD94/NKG2. The translocation of PYK-2, MTOC, and paxillin to the area of NK–target cell contact was regulated upon specific recognition of target cells through NK cell receptors, controlling target cell killing. Furthermore, parallel in vitro kinase assays showed that PYK-2 was activated in response to signals that specifically triggered its translocation and NK cell mediated cytotoxicity. The overexpression of both the wt and a dominant-negative mutant of PYK-2, but not ZAP-70 wt, prevented the specific translocation of the MTOC and paxillin, and blocked the cytotoxic response of NK cells. Our data indicate that subcellular compartmentalization of PYK-2 correlates with effective signal transduction. Furthermore, they also suggest an important role for PYK-2 on the assembly of the signaling complexes that regulate the cytotoxic response. PMID:10851022

  8. An Exquisitely Specific PDZ/Target Recognition Revealed by the Structure of INAD PDZ3 in Complex with TRP Channel Tail.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fei; Liu, Wei; Shang, Yuan; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-03-01

    The vast majority of PDZ domains are known to bind to a few C-terminal tail residues of target proteins with modest binding affinities and specificities. Such promiscuous PDZ/target interactions are not compatible with highly specific physiological functions of PDZ domain proteins and their targets. Here, we report an unexpected PDZ/target binding occurring between the scaffold protein inactivation no afterpotential D (INAD) and transient receptor potential (TRP) channel in Drosophila photoreceptors. The C-terminal 15 residues of TRP are required for the specific interaction with INAD PDZ3. The INAD PDZ3/TRP peptide complex structure reveals that only the extreme C-terminal Leu of TRP binds to the canonical αB/βB groove of INAD PDZ3. The rest of the TRP peptide, by forming a β hairpin structure, binds to a surface away from the αB/βB groove of PDZ3 and contributes to the majority of the binding energy. Thus, the INAD PDZ3/TRP channel interaction is exquisitely specific and represents a new mode of PDZ/target recognitions.

  9. An on-chip imaging droplet-sorting system: a real-time shape recognition method to screen target cells in droplets with single cell resolution

    PubMed Central

    Girault, Mathias; Kim, Hyonchol; Arakawa, Hisayuki; Matsuura, Kenji; Odaka, Masao; Hattori, Akihiro; Terazono, Hideyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    A microfluidic on-chip imaging cell sorter has several advantages over conventional cell sorting methods, especially to identify cells with complex morphologies such as clusters. One of the remaining problems is how to efficiently discriminate targets at the species level without labelling. Hence, we developed a label-free microfluidic droplet-sorting system based on image recognition of cells in droplets. To test the applicability of this method, a mixture of two plankton species with different morphologies (Dunaliella tertiolecta and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) were successfully identified and discriminated at a rate of 10 Hz. We also examined the ability to detect the number of objects encapsulated in a droplet. Single cell droplets sorted into collection channels showed 91 ± 4.5% and 90 ± 3.8% accuracy for D. tertiolecta and P. tricornutum, respectively. Because we used image recognition to confirm single cell droplets, we achieved highly accurate single cell sorting. The results indicate that the integrated method of droplet imaging cell sorting can provide a complementary sorting approach capable of isolating single target cells from a mixture of cells with high accuracy without any staining. PMID:28059147

  10. Epitope imprinted polymer coating CdTe quantum dots for specific recognition and direct fluorescent quantification of the target protein bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Qiong; He, Xi-Wen; Wang, Yi-Zhi; Li, Wen-You; Zhang, Yu-Kui

    2014-04-15

    A novel epitope molecularly imprinted polymer (EMIP) for specific recognition and direct fluorescent quantification of the target protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) was demonstrated where polymerization was performed on the surface of silica nanospheres embedded CdTe quantum dots (QDs). The synthetic peptide derived from the surface-exposed C-terminus of bovine serum albumin (BSA, residues 599-607) was selected as the template molecule. The resulting EMIP film was able to selectively capture the template peptide and the corresponding target protein BSA via the recognition cavities. Based on the fluorescence quenching, the EMIP-coated QDs (molecular imprinted polymer coating CdTe QDs using epitope as the template) nanospheres were successfully applied to the direct fluorescence quantification of BSA. Compared with BMIP-coated QDs (molecular imprinted polymer coating CdTe QDs using BSA as the template), the imprinting factor and adsorption capacity of EMIP-coated QDs were greatly increased. The prepared EMIP-coated QDs can also discriminate even one mismatched sequences from the original sequences of the epitope of the BSA. The practical analytical performance of the EMIP-coated QDs was examined by evaluating the detection of BSA in the bovine calf serum sample with satisfactory results. In addition, the resulting EMIP-coated QDs nanospheres were also successfully applied to separating BSA from the bovine blood sample.

  11. An on-chip imaging droplet-sorting system: a real-time shape recognition method to screen target cells in droplets with single cell resolution.

    PubMed

    Girault, Mathias; Kim, Hyonchol; Arakawa, Hisayuki; Matsuura, Kenji; Odaka, Masao; Hattori, Akihiro; Terazono, Hideyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2017-01-06

    A microfluidic on-chip imaging cell sorter has several advantages over conventional cell sorting methods, especially to identify cells with complex morphologies such as clusters. One of the remaining problems is how to efficiently discriminate targets at the species level without labelling. Hence, we developed a label-free microfluidic droplet-sorting system based on image recognition of cells in droplets. To test the applicability of this method, a mixture of two plankton species with different morphologies (Dunaliella tertiolecta and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) were successfully identified and discriminated at a rate of 10 Hz. We also examined the ability to detect the number of objects encapsulated in a droplet. Single cell droplets sorted into collection channels showed 91 ± 4.5% and 90 ± 3.8% accuracy for D. tertiolecta and P. tricornutum, respectively. Because we used image recognition to confirm single cell droplets, we achieved highly accurate single cell sorting. The results indicate that the integrated method of droplet imaging cell sorting can provide a complementary sorting approach capable of isolating single target cells from a mixture of cells with high accuracy without any staining.

  12. An on-chip imaging droplet-sorting system: a real-time shape recognition method to screen target cells in droplets with single cell resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, Mathias; Kim, Hyonchol; Arakawa, Hisayuki; Matsuura, Kenji; Odaka, Masao; Hattori, Akihiro; Terazono, Hideyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    A microfluidic on-chip imaging cell sorter has several advantages over conventional cell sorting methods, especially to identify cells with complex morphologies such as clusters. One of the remaining problems is how to efficiently discriminate targets at the species level without labelling. Hence, we developed a label-free microfluidic droplet-sorting system based on image recognition of cells in droplets. To test the applicability of this method, a mixture of two plankton species with different morphologies (Dunaliella tertiolecta and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) were successfully identified and discriminated at a rate of 10 Hz. We also examined the ability to detect the number of objects encapsulated in a droplet. Single cell droplets sorted into collection channels showed 91 ± 4.5% and 90 ± 3.8% accuracy for D. tertiolecta and P. tricornutum, respectively. Because we used image recognition to confirm single cell droplets, we achieved highly accurate single cell sorting. The results indicate that the integrated method of droplet imaging cell sorting can provide a complementary sorting approach capable of isolating single target cells from a mixture of cells with high accuracy without any staining.

  13. Salient Feature Identification and Analysis using Kernel-Based Classification Techniques for Synthetic Aperture Radar Automatic Target Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    combinations of these HRR projections represent the overall measured reflectivity of the target scene, g(s, φ), and can be expressed using the Radon ...collected in phase history and the target scene f (x, y) is desired, the inverse radon transform, or the backprojection operation, is more appropriate for

  14. Bipartite recognition of target RNAs activates DNA cleavage by the Type III-B CRISPR–Cas system

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Joshua R.; Sheppard, Nolan F.; Ramia, Nancy; Deighan, Trace; Li, Hong; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR–Cas systems eliminate nucleic acid invaders in bacteria and archaea. The effector complex of the Type III-B Cmr system cleaves invader RNAs recognized by the CRISPR RNA (crRNA ) of the complex. Here we show that invader RNAs also activate the Cmr complex to cleave DNA. As has been observed for other Type III systems, Cmr eliminates plasmid invaders in Pyrococcus furiosus by a mechanism that depends on transcription of the crRNA target sequence within the plasmid. Notably, we found that the target RNA per se induces DNA cleavage by the Cmr complex in vitro. DNA cleavage activity does not depend on cleavage of the target RNA but notably does require the presence of a short sequence adjacent to the target sequence within the activating target RNA (rPAM [RNA protospacer-adjacent motif]). The activated complex does not require a target sequence (or a PAM) in the DNA substrate. Plasmid elimination by the P. furiosus Cmr system also does not require the Csx1 (CRISPR-associated Rossman fold [CARF] superfamily) protein. Plasmid silencing depends on the HD nuclease and Palm domains of the Cmr2 (Cas10 superfamily) protein. The results establish the Cmr complex as a novel DNA nuclease activated by invader RNAs containing a crRNA target sequence and a rPAM. PMID:26848045

  15. PAM-Dependent Target DNA Recognition and Cleavage by C2c1 CRISPR-Cas Endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hui; Gao, Pu; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2016-12-01

    C2c1 is a newly identified guide RNA-mediated type V-B CRISPR-Cas endonuclease that site-specifically targets and cleaves both strands of target DNA. We have determined crystal structures of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris C2c1 (AacC2c1) bound to sgRNA as a binary complex and to target DNAs as ternary complexes, thereby capturing catalytically competent conformations of AacC2c1 with both target and non-target DNA strands independently positioned within a single RuvC catalytic pocket. Moreover, C2c1-mediated cleavage results in a staggered seven-nucleotide break of target DNA. crRNA adopts a pre-ordered five-nucleotide A-form seed sequence in the binary complex, with release of an inserted tryptophan, facilitating zippering up of 20-bp guide RNA:target DNA heteroduplex on ternary complex formation. Notably, the PAM-interacting cleft adopts a “locked” conformation on ternary complex formation. Structural comparison of C2c1 ternary complexes with their Cas9 and Cpf1 counterparts highlights the diverse mechanisms adopted by these distinct CRISPR-Cas systems, thereby broadening and enhancing their applicability as genome editing tools.

  16. Quiet aircraft design and operational characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Charles G.

    1991-01-01

    The application of aircraft noise technology to the design and operation of aircraft is discussed. Areas of discussion include the setting of target airplane noise levels, operational considerations and their effect on noise, and the sequencing and timing of the design and development process. Primary emphasis is placed on commercial transport aircraft of the type operated by major airlines. Additionally, noise control engineering of other types of aircraft is briefly discussed.

  17. An amphiphilic region in the cytoplasmic domain of KdpD is recognized by the signal recognition particle and targeted to the Escherichia coli membrane

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Katja S; Hubich, Stefanie; Liebhart, Helga; Krauss, Susanne; Kuhn, Andreas; Facey, Sandra J

    2008-01-01

    The sensor protein KdpD of Escherichia coli is composed of a large N-terminal hydrophilic region (aa 1–400), four transmembrane regions (aa 401–498) and a large hydrophilic region (aa 499–894) at the C-terminus. KdpD requires the signal recognition particle (SRP) for its targeting to the membrane. Deletions within KdpD show that the first 50 residues are required for SRP-driven membrane insertion. A fusion protein of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) with KdpD is found localized at the membrane only when SRP is present. The membrane targeting of GFP was not observed when the first 50 KdpD residues were deleted. A truncated mutant of KdpD containing only the first 25 amino acids fused to GFP lost its ability to specifically interact with SRP, whereas a specific interaction between SRP and the first 48 amino acids of KdpD fused to GFP was confirmed by pull-down experiments. Conclusively, a small amphiphilic region of 27 residues within the amino-terminal domain of KdpD (aa 22–48) is recognized by SRP and targets the protein to the membrane. This shows that membrane proteins with a large N-terminal region in the cytoplasm can be membrane-targeted early on to allow co-translational membrane insertion of their distant transmembrane regions. PMID:18433452

  18. Aptamer Recognition Induced Target-Bridged Strategy for Proteins Detection Based on Magnetic Chitosan and Silver/Chitosan Nanoparticles Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    He, Jincan; Li, Gongke; Hu, Yuling

    2015-11-03

    Poor selectivity and biocompability remain problems in applying surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for direct detection of proteins due to similar spectra of most proteins and overlapping Raman bands in complex mixtures. To solve these problems, an aptamer recognition induced target-bridged strategy based on magnetic chitosan (MCS) and silver/chitosan nanoparticles (Ag@CS NPs) using SERS was developed for detection of protein benefiting from specific affinity of aptamers and biocompatibility of chitosan (CS). In this process, one aptamer (or antibody) modified MCS worked as capture probes through the affinity binding site of protein. The other aptamer modified Raman report molecules encapsulated Ag@CS NPs were used as SERS sensing probes based on the other binding site of protein. The sandwich complexes of aptamer (antibody)/protein/aptamer were separated easily with a magnet from biological samples, and the concentration of protein was indirectly reflected by the intensity variation of SERS signal of Raman report molecules. To explore the universality of the strategy, three different kinds of proteins including thrombin, platelet derived growth factor BB (PDGF BB) and immunoglobulin E (lgE) were investigated. The major advantages of this aptamer recognition induced target-bridged strategy are convenient operation with a magnet, stable signal expressing resulting from preventing loss of report molecules with the help of CS shell, and the avoidance of slow diffusion-limited kinetics problems occurring on a solid substrate. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed strategy, the method was applied to detection of PDGF BB in clinical samples. The limit of detection (LOD) of PDGF BB was estimated to be 3.2 pg/mL. The results obtained from human serum of healthy persons and cancer patients using the proposed strategy showed good agreement with that of the ELISA method but with wider linear range, more convenient operation, and lower cost. The proposed

  19. Mechanism of target cell recognition by natural killer cells: characterization of a novel triggering molecule restricted to CD3- large granular lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to identify a molecule in target recognition by CD3- large granular lymphocytes (LGL), we have generated a rabbit antiidiotypic (anti-ID) serum against a monoclonal antibody (mAb 36) that reacted with the cell membrane of K562. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that the anti-ID serum bound selectively to CD3- LGL and that F(ab')2 fragments of the anti-ID serum blocked both target cell binding and lysis by NK cells. Stimulation of CD3- LGL with F(ab')2 fragments resulted in the release of serine esterases and the secretion of interferon gamma. Furthermore, anti-ID F(ab')2 antibodies crosslinked to anti-DNP F(ab')2 mediated directed cytotoxicity of a non- natural killer (NK)-susceptible mouse target (YAC-1) via this surface ligand. These functional reactivities were only removed by adsorption with the specific idiotype. Protein analysis showed that the anti-ID serum immunoprecipitated 80-, 110-, and 150-kD proteins. Using this anti-ID, a partial cDNA was cloned and an antipeptide antiserum was made against the portion of the predicted amino acid sequence that corresponded to a portion of the ID binding region. This antipeptide serum exhibited similar functional and biochemical reactivities to those observed with the anti-ID serum. These data suggest that the cell surface moiety recognized by the anti-ID and anti-p104 is novel and is selectively involved in both recognition and triggering of NK-mediated lytic function. PMID:1720812

  20. 150 Passenger Commercial Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucovsky, Adrian; Romli, Fairuz I.; Rupp, Jessica

    2002-01-01

    It has been projected that the need for a short-range mid-sized, aircraft is increasing. The future strategy to decrease long-haul flights will increase the demand for short-haul flights. Since passengers prefer to meet their destinations quickly, airlines will increase the frequency of flights, which will reduce the passenger load on the aircraft. If a point-to-point flight is not possible, passengers will prefer only a one-stop short connecting flight to their final destination. A 150-passenger aircraft is an ideal vehicle for these situations. It is mid-sized aircraft and has a range of 3000 nautical miles. This type of aircraft would market U.S. domestic flights or inter-European flight routes. The objective of the design of the 150-passenger aircraft is to minimize fuel consumption. The configuration of the aircraft must be optimized. This aircraft must meet CO2 and NOx emissions standards with minimal acquisition price and operating costs. This report contains all the work that has been performed for the completion of the design of a 150 passenger commercial aircraft. The methodology used is the Technology Identification, Evaluation, and Selection (TIES) developed at Georgia Tech Aerospace Systems Design laboratory (ASDL). This is an eight-step conceptual design process to evaluate the probability of meeting the design constraints. This methodology also allows for the evaluation of new technologies to be implemented into the design. The TIES process begins with defining the problem with a need established and a market targeted. With the customer requirements set and the target values established, a baseline concept is created. Next, the design space is explored to determine the feasibility and viability of the baseline aircraft configuration. If the design is neither feasible nor viable, new technologies can be implemented to open up the feasible design space and allow for a plausible solution. After the new technologies are identified, they must be evaluated

  1. Aircraft accidents : method of analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    This report on a method of analysis of aircraft accidents has been prepared by a special committee on the nomenclature, subdivision, and classification of aircraft accidents organized by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in response to a request dated February 18, 1928, from the Air Coordination Committee consisting of the Assistant Secretaries for Aeronautics in the Departments of War, Navy, and Commerce. The work was undertaken in recognition of the difficulty of drawing correct conclusions from efforts to analyze and compare reports of aircraft accidents prepared by different organizations using different classifications and definitions. The air coordination committee's request was made "in order that practices used may henceforth conform to a standard and be universally comparable." the purpose of the special committee therefore was to prepare a basis for the classification and comparison of aircraft accidents, both civil and military. (author)

  2. Aircraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H. (Inventor); Uden, Edward (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention is an aircraft wing design that creates a bell shaped span load, which results in a negative induced drag (induced thrust) on the outer portion of the wing; such a design obviates the need for rudder control of an aircraft.

  3. Finding a Needle in a Haystack: The Role of Electrostatics in Target Lipid Recognition by PH Domains

    PubMed Central

    Lumb, Craig N.; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between protein domains and lipid molecules play key roles in controlling cell membrane signalling and trafficking. The pleckstrin homology (PH) domain is one of the most widespread, binding specifically to phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs) in cell membranes. PH domains must locate specific PIPs in the presence of a background of approximately 20% anionic lipids within the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. We investigate the mechanism of such recognition via a multiscale procedure combining Brownian dynamics (BD) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the GRP1 PH domain interacting with phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5)P3). The interaction of GRP1-PH with PI(3,4,5)P3 in a zwitterionic bilayer is compared with the interaction in bilayers containing different levels of anionic ‘decoy’ lipids. BD simulations reveal both translational and orientational electrostatic steering of the PH domain towards the PI(3,4,5)P3-containing anionic bilayer surface. There is a payoff between non-PIP anionic lipids attracting the PH domain to the bilayer surface in a favourable orientation and their role as ‘decoys’, disrupting the interaction of GRP1-PH with the PI(3,4,5)P3 molecule. Significantly, approximately 20% anionic lipid in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the bilayer is nearly optimal to both enhance orientational steering and to localise GRP1-PH proximal to the surface of the membrane without sacrificing its ability to locate PI(3,4,5)P3 within the bilayer plane. Subsequent MD simulations reveal binding to PI(3,4,5)P3, forming protein-phosphate contacts comparable to those in X-ray structures. These studies demonstrate a computational framework which addresses lipid recognition within a cell membrane environment, offering a link between structural and cell biological characterisation. PMID:22844242

  4. [Multi-Target Recognition of Internal and External Defects of Potato by Semi-Transmission Hyperspectral Imaging and Manifold Learning Algorithm].

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Li, Xiao-yu; Jin, Rui; Ku, Jing; Xu, Sen-miao; Xu, Meng-ling; Wu, Zhen-zhong; Kong, De-guo

    2015-04-01

    The present paper put forward a non-destructive detection method which combines semi-transmission hyperspectral imaging technology with manifold learning dimension reduction algorithm and least squares support vector machine (LSSVM) to recognize internal and external defects in potatoes simultaneously. Three hundred fifteen potatoes were bought in farmers market as research object, and semi-transmission hyperspectral image acquisition system was constructed to acquire the hyperspectral images of normal external defects (bud and green rind) and internal defect (hollow heart) potatoes. In order to conform to the actual production, defect part is randomly put right, side and back to the acquisition probe when the hyperspectral images of external defects potatoes are acquired. The average spectrums (390-1,040 nm) were extracted from the region of interests for spectral preprocessing. Then three kinds of manifold learning algorithm were respectively utilized to reduce the dimension of spectrum data, including supervised locally linear embedding (SLLE), locally linear embedding (LLE) and isometric mapping (ISOMAP), the low-dimensional data gotten by manifold learning algorithms is used as model input, Error Correcting Output Code (ECOC) and LSSVM were combined to develop the multi-target classification model. By comparing and analyzing results of the three models, we concluded that SLLE is the optimal manifold learning dimension reduction algorithm, and the SLLE-LSSVM model is determined to get the best recognition rate for recognizing internal and external defects potatoes. For test set data, the single recognition rate of normal, bud, green rind and hollow heart potato reached 96.83%, 86.96%, 86.96% and 95% respectively, and he hybrid recognition rate was 93.02%. The results indicate that combining the semi-transmission hyperspectral imaging technology with SLLE-LSSVM is a feasible qualitative analytical method which can simultaneously recognize the internal and

  5. Changing within-trial array location and target object position enhances rats' (Rattus norvegicus) missing object recognition accuracy.

    PubMed

    Arain, Marium; Parameswaran, Varakini; Cohen, Jerome

    2012-09-01

    Six rats were trained to find a previously missing target or 'jackpot' object in a square array of four identical or different objects (the test segment of a trial) after first visiting and collecting sunflower seeds from under the other three objects (the study segment of a trial). During training, objects' local positions within the array and their global positions within the larger foraging array were varied over trials but were not changed between segments within a trial. Following this training, rats were tested on their accuracy for finding the target object when a trial's test array was sometimes moved to a different location in the foraging arena or when the position of the target object within the test array had been changed. Either of these manipulations initially slightly reduced rats' accuracy for finding the missing object but then enhanced it. Relocating test arrays of identical objects enhanced rats' performance only after 10-min inter-segment intervals (ISIs). Relocating test arrays of different objects enhanced rats' performance only after 2-min ISIs. Rats also improved their performance when they encountered the target object in a new position in test arrays of different objects. This enhancement effect occurred after either 2- or 30-min ISIs. These findings suggest that rats separately retrieved a missing (target) object's spatial and non-spatial information when they were relevant but not when they were irrelevant in a trial. The enhancement effects provide evidence for rats' limited retrieval capacity in their visuo-spatial working memory.

  6. Selective recognition and stabilization of new ligands targeting the potassium form of the human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Hwa; Chuang, Show-Mei; Wu, Pei-Ching; Chen, Chun-Liang; Jeyachandran, Sivakamavalli; Lo, Shou-Chen; Huang, Hsu-Shan; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2016-01-01

    The development of a ligand that is capable of distinguishing among the wide variety of G-quadruplex structures and targeting telomeres to treat cancer is particularly challenging. In this study, the ability of two anthraquinone telomerase inhibitors (NSC749235 and NSC764638) to target telomeric G-quadruplex DNA was probed. We found that these ligands specifically target the potassium form of telomeric G-quadruplex DNA over the DNA counterpart. The characteristic interaction with the telomeric G-quadruplex DNA and the anticancer activities of these ligands were also explored. The results of this present work emphasize our understanding of the binding selectivity of anthraquinone derivatives to G-quadruplex DNA and assists in future drug development for G-quadruplex-specific ligands. PMID:27511133

  7. Selective recognition and stabilization of new ligands targeting the potassium form of the human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Hwa; Chuang, Show-Mei; Wu, Pei-Ching; Chen, Chun-Liang; Jeyachandran, Sivakamavalli; Lo, Shou-Chen; Huang, Hsu-Shan; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2016-08-01

    The development of a ligand that is capable of distinguishing among the wide variety of G-quadruplex structures and targeting telomeres to treat cancer is particularly challenging. In this study, the ability of two anthraquinone telomerase inhibitors (NSC749235 and NSC764638) to target telomeric G-quadruplex DNA was probed. We found that these ligands specifically target the potassium form of telomeric G-quadruplex DNA over the DNA counterpart. The characteristic interaction with the telomeric G-quadruplex DNA and the anticancer activities of these ligands were also explored. The results of this present work emphasize our understanding of the binding selectivity of anthraquinone derivatives to G-quadruplex DNA and assists in future drug development for G-quadruplex-specific ligands.

  8. Stochastic and reversible assembly of a multiprotein DNA repair complex ensures accurate target site recognition and efficient repair

    PubMed Central

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S.; von Bornstaedt, Gesa; Gourdin, Audrey M.; Politi, Antonio Z.; Moné, Martijn J.; Warmerdam, Daniël O.; Goedhart, Joachim; Vermeulen, Wim

    2010-01-01

    To understand how multiprotein complexes assemble and function on chromatin, we combined quantitative analysis of the mammalian nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) machinery in living cells with computational modeling. We found that individual NER components exchange within tens of seconds between the bound state in repair complexes and the diffusive state in the nucleoplasm, whereas their net accumulation at repair sites evolves over several hours. Based on these in vivo data, we developed a predictive kinetic model for the assembly and function of repair complexes. DNA repair is orchestrated by the interplay of reversible protein-binding events and progressive enzymatic modifications of the chromatin substrate. We demonstrate that faithful recognition of DNA lesions is time consuming, whereas subsequently, repair complexes form rapidly through random and reversible assembly of NER proteins. Our kinetic analysis of the NER system reveals a fundamental conflict between specificity and efficiency of chromatin-associated protein machineries and shows how a trade off is negotiated through reversibility of protein binding. PMID:20439997

  9. Genome-Wide Targets Regulated by the OsMADS1 Transcription Factor Reveals Its DNA Recognition Properties1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Khanday, Imtiyaz; Das, Sanjukta; Chongloi, Grace L; Vijayraghavan, Usha

    2016-01-01

    OsMADS1 controls rice (Oryza sativa) floral fate and organ development. Yet, its genome-wide targets and the mechanisms underlying its role as a transcription regulator controlling developmental gene expression are unknown. We identify 3112 gene-associated OsMADS1-bound sites in the floret genome. These occur in the vicinity of transcription start sites, within gene bodies, and in intergenic regions. Majority of the bound DNA contained CArG motif variants or, in several cases, only A-tracts. Sequences flanking the binding peak had a higher AT nucleotide content, implying that broader DNA structural features may define in planta binding. Sequences for binding by other transcription factor families like MYC, AP2/ERF, bZIP, etc. are enriched in OsMADS1-bound DNAs. Target genes implicated in transcription, chromatin remodeling, cellular processes, and hormone metabolism were enriched. Combining expression data from OsMADS1 knockdown florets with these DNA binding data, a snapshot of a gene regulatory network was deduced where targets, such as AP2/ERF and bHLH transcription factors and chromatin remodelers form nodes. We show that the expression status of these nodal factors can be altered by inducing the OsMADS1-GR fusion protein and present a model for a regulatory cascade where the direct targets of OsMADS1, OsbHLH108/SPT, OsERF034, and OsHSF24, in turn control genes such as OsMADS32 and OsYABBY5. This cascade, with other similar relationships, cumulatively contributes to floral organ development. Overall, OsMADS1 binds to several regulatory genes and, probably in combination with other factors, controls a gene regulatory network that ensures rice floret development. PMID:27457124

  10. Decision Integration and Support Engine (DISE) for dynamic aircraft and ISR asset tasking/retasking decision support for the AOC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VonPlinsky, Michael J.; Crowder, Ed

    2002-07-01

    The Decision Integration and Support Environment (DISE) is a Bayesian network (BN) based modeling and simulation of the target nomination and aircraft tasking decision processes. DISE operates in event driven interactions with FTI's AOC model, being triggered from within the Time Critical Target (TCT) Operations cell. As new target detections are received by the AOC from off-board ISR sources and processed by the Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) module in the AOC, DISE is called to determine if the target should be prosecuted, and if so, which of the available aircraft should be tasked to attack it. A range of decision criteria, with priorities established off-line and input into the tool, are associated with this process. DISE, when running in its constructive mode, automatically selects the best-suited aircraft and assigns the new target. In virtual mode, with a human operator, DISE presents the user with a suitability ranked list of the available aircraft for assignment. Recent DISE enhancements are applying this concept to the prioritization and scheduling of ISR support requests from Users to support both latent and dynamic tasking and scheduling of both space-based and airborne ISR assets.

  11. Quantification of susceptibility change at high-concentrated SPIO-labeled target by characteristic phase gradient recognition.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haitao; Nie, Binbin; Liu, Hua; Guo, Hua; Demachi, Kazuyuki; Sekino, Masaki; Shan, Baoci

    2016-05-01

    Phase map cross-correlation detection and quantification may produce highlighted signal at superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, and distinguish them from other hypointensities. The method may quantify susceptibility change by performing least squares analysis between a theoretically generated magnetic field template and an experimentally scanned phase image. Because characteristic phase recognition requires the removal of phase wrap and phase background, additional steps of phase unwrapping and filtering may increase the chance of computing error and enlarge the inconsistence among algorithms. To solve problem, phase gradient cross-correlation and quantification method is developed by recognizing characteristic phase gradient pattern instead of phase image because phase gradient operation inherently includes unwrapping and filtering functions. However, few studies have mentioned the detectable limit of currently used phase gradient calculation algorithms. The limit may lead to an underestimation of large magnetic susceptibility change caused by high-concentrated iron accumulation. In this study, mathematical derivation points out the value of maximum detectable phase gradient calculated by differential chain algorithm in both spatial and Fourier domain. To break through the limit, a modified quantification method is proposed by using unwrapped forward differentiation for phase gradient generation. The method enlarges the detectable range of phase gradient measurement and avoids the underestimation of magnetic susceptibility. Simulation and phantom experiments were used to quantitatively compare different methods. In vivo application performs MRI scanning on nude mice implanted by iron-labeled human cancer cells. Results validate the limit of detectable phase gradient and the consequent susceptibility underestimation. Results also demonstrate the advantage of unwrapped forward differentiation compared with differential chain algorithms for susceptibility

  12. Aircraft Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-19

    NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 AIRCRAFT STEELS by E. U. Lee R. Taylor C. Lei H. C. Sanders 19 February 2009...MARYLAND NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 19 February 2009 AIRCRAFT STEELS by E. U. Lee R. Taylor C. Lei H. C. Sanders...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 ii SUMMARY Five high strength and four stainless steels have been studied, identifying their

  13. Structure of an IgNAR-AMA1 complex: targeting a conserved hydrophobic cleft broadens malarial strain recognition.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Kylie A; Streltsov, Victor A; Coley, Andrew M; Dolezal, Olan; Hudson, Peter J; Batchelor, Adrian H; Gupta, Aditi; Bai, Tao; Murphy, Vincent J; Anders, Robin F; Foley, Michael; Nuttall, Stewart D

    2007-11-01

    Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) is essential for invasion of erythrocytes and hepatocytes by Plasmodium parasites and is a leading malarial vaccine candidate. Although conventional antibodies to AMA1 can prevent such invasion, extensive polymorphisms within surface-exposed loops may limit the ability of these AMA1-induced antibodies to protect against all parasite genotypes. Using an AMA1-specific IgNAR single-variable-domain antibody, we performed targeted mutagenesis and selection against AMA1 from three P. falciparum strains. We present cocrystal structures of two antibody-AMA1 complexes which reveal extended IgNAR CDR3 loops penetrating deep into a hydrophobic cleft on the antigen surface and contacting residues conserved across parasite species. Comparison of a series of affinity-enhancing mutations allowed dissection of their relative contributions to binding kinetics and correlation with inhibition of erythrocyte invasion. These findings provide insights into mechanisms of single-domain antibody binding, and may enable design of reagents targeting otherwise cryptic epitopes in pathogen antigens.

  14. Testing of Haar-Like Feature in Region of Interest Detection for Automated Target Recognition (ATR) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Yuhan; Lu, Dr. Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to develop a ROI (Region of Interest) detector using Haar-like feature similar to the face detection in Intel's OpenCV library, implement it in Matlab code, and test the performance of the new ROI detector against the existing ROI detector that uses Optimal Trade-off Maximum Average Correlation Height filter (OTMACH). The ROI detector included 3 parts: 1, Automated Haar-like feature selection in finding a small set of the most relevant Haar-like features for detecting ROIs that contained a target. 2, Having the small set of Haar-like features from the last step, a neural network needed to be trained to recognize ROIs with targets by taking the Haar-like features as inputs. 3, using the trained neural network from the last step, a filtering method needed to be developed to process the neural network responses into a small set of regions of interests. This needed to be coded in Matlab. All the 3 parts needed to be coded in Matlab. The parameters in the detector needed to be trained by machine learning and tested with specific datasets. Since OpenCV library and Haar-like feature were not available in Matlab, the Haar-like feature calculation needed to be implemented in Matlab. The codes for Adaptive Boosting and max/min filters in Matlab could to be found from the Internet but needed to be integrated to serve the purpose of this project. The performance of the new detector was tested by comparing the accuracy and the speed of the new detector against the existing OTMACH detector. The speed was referred as the average speed to find the regions of interests in an image. The accuracy was measured by the number of false positives (false alarms) at the same detection rate between the two detectors.

  15. Stepwise phosphorylation of p65 promotes NF-κB activation and NK cell responses during target cell recognition

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyung-Joon; Choi, Go-Eun; Ryu, Sangryeol; Kwon, Soon Jae; Kim, Sun Chang; Booth, Claire; Nichols, Kim E.; Kim, Hun Sik

    2016-01-01

    NF-κB is a key transcription factor that dictates the outcome of diverse immune responses. How NF-κB is regulated by multiple activating receptors that are engaged during natural killer (NK)-target cell contact remains undefined. Here we show that sole engagement of NKG2D, 2B4 or DNAM-1 is insufficient for NF-κB activation. Rather, cooperation between these receptors is required at the level of Vav1 for synergistic NF-κB activation. Vav1-dependent synergistic signalling requires a separate PI3K-Akt signal, primarily mediated by NKG2D or DNAM-1, for optimal p65 phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. Vav1 controls downstream p65 phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. Synergistic signalling is defective in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP1) NK cells entailing 2B4 dysfunction and required for p65 phosphorylation by PI3K-Akt signal, suggesting stepwise signalling checkpoint for NF-κB activation. Thus, our study provides a framework explaining how signals from different activating receptors are coordinated to determine specificity and magnitude of NF-κB activation and NK cell responses. PMID:27221592

  16. A Targeted “Capture” and “Removal” Scavenger toward Multiple Pollutants for Water Remediation based on Molecular Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Shen, Haijing; Hu, Xiaoxia; Li, Yan; Li, Zhihao; Xu, Jinfan; Song, Xiufeng; Zeng, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    For the water remediation techniques based on adsorption, the long‐standing contradictories between selectivity and multiple adsorbability, as well as between affinity and recyclability, have put it on weak defense amid more and more severe environment crisis. Here, a pollutant‐targeting hydrogel scavenger is reported for water remediation with both high selectivity and multiple adsorbability for several pollutants, and with strong affinity and good recyclability through rationally integrating the advantages of multiple functional materials. In the scavenger, aptamers fold into binding pockets to accommodate the molecular structure of pollutants to afford perfect selectivity, and Janus nanoparticles with antibacterial function as well as anisotropic surfaces to immobilize multiple aptamers allow for simultaneously handling different kinds of pollutants. The scavenger exhibits high efficiencies in removing pollutants from water and it can be easily recycled for many times without significant loss of loading capacities. Moreover, the residual concentrations of each contaminant are well below the drinking water standards. Thermodynamic behavior of the adsorption process is investigated and the rate‐controlling process is determined. Furthermore, a point of use device is constructed and it displays high efficiency in removing pollutants from environmental water. The scavenger exhibits great promise to be applied in the next generation of water purification systems. PMID:27774394

  17. Accumulation of specific sterol precursors targets a MAP kinase cascade mediating cell-cell recognition and fusion.

    PubMed

    Weichert, Martin; Lichius, Alexander; Priegnitz, Bert-Ewald; Brandt, Ulrike; Gottschalk, Johannes; Nawrath, Thorben; Groenhagen, Ulrike; Read, Nick D; Schulz, Stefan; Fleißner, André

    2016-10-18

    Sterols are vital components of eukaryotic cell membranes. Defects in sterol biosynthesis, which result in the accumulation of precursor molecules, are commonly associated with cellular disorders and disease. However, the effects of these sterol precursors on the metabolism, signaling, and behavior of cells are only poorly understood. In this study, we show that the accumulation of only ergosterol precursors with a conjugated double bond in their aliphatic side chain specifically disrupts cell-cell communication and fusion in the fungus Neurospora crassa Genetically identical germinating spores of this fungus undergo cell-cell fusion, thereby forming a highly interconnected supracellular network during colony initiation. Before fusion, the cells use an unusual signaling mechanism that involves the coordinated and alternating switching between signal sending and receiving states of the two fusion partners. Accumulation of only ergosterol precursors with a conjugated double bond in their aliphatic side chain disrupts this coordinated cell-cell communication and suppresses cell fusion. These specific sterol precursors target a single ERK-like mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (MAK-1)-signaling cascade, whereas a second MAP kinase pathway (MAK-2), which is also involved in cell fusion, is unaffected. These observations indicate that a minor specific change in sterol structure can exert a strong detrimental effect on a key signaling pathway of the cell, resulting in the absence of cell fusion.

  18. Recognition Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Stuart; He, Jin; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Zhang, Peiming; Chang, Shuai; Huang, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically-functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode (“tethered molecule-pair” configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the “free analyte” configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. PMID:20522930

  19. Aircraft cybernetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The use of computers for aircraft control, flight simulation, and inertial navigation is explored. The man-machine relation problem in aviation is addressed. Simple and self-adapting autopilots are described and the assets and liabilities of digital navigation techniques are assessed.

  20. Aircraft Sensor Platform Has Increased Angular Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, Philip W.; Bhardwaj, Suneel

    1995-01-01

    Mechanism rotates and translates instrument platform within pressure housing in aircraft to aim remote-sensing instrument toward target on ground below. Enables instrument to look under aircraft structure at larger fore and aft angles without having to deploy instrument into air stream outside. Also provides 10 degrees of yaw compensation, reducing further need for adjustment of attitude of aircraft to keep target in sight. With yaw compensation, pilot can fly with wings level and nose pointed into crosswind while on desired flight path over target.

  1. Aircraft Corrosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    chlore mais dans une proportion semblable b cells d’une eau de vil)e ; - lea solides, d’aprbs lea analyses chimique et criatallographique, paraissaiont...IATA member airlines at $100 million based on 1976 operations. Thus the numbers are large, but detailed analyses on specific aircraft types, in known...demonstrate this in any quantitative way with accurate figures. Better information is required on the cost of corrosion, together with analyses of the

  2. Aircraft Ducting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Templeman Industries developed the Ultra-Seal Ducting System, an environmental composite air duct with a 50 percent weight savings over current metallic ducting, but could not find a commercial facility with the ability to test it. Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a structural evaluation of the duct, equivalent to 86 years of take-offs and landings in an aircraft. Boeing Commercial Airplane Group and McDonnell Douglas Corporation are currently using the ducts.

  3. Diversity in the Architecture of ATLs, a Family of Plant Ubiquitin-Ligases, Leads to Recognition and Targeting of Substrates in Different Cellular Environments

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Hernández, Victor; Aguilar-Henonin, Laura; Guzmán, Plinio

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitin-ligases or E3s are components of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) that coordinate the transfer of ubiquitin to the target protein. A major class of ubiquitin-ligases consists of RING-finger domain proteins that include the substrate recognition sequences in the same polypeptide; these are known as single-subunit RING finger E3s. We are studying a particular family of RING finger E3s, named ATL, that contain a transmembrane domain and the RING-H2 finger domain; none of the member of the family contains any other previously described domain. Although the study of a few members in A. thaliana and O. sativa has been reported, the role of this family in the life cycle of a plant is still vague. To provide tools to advance on the functional analysis of this family we have undertaken a phylogenetic analysis of ATLs in twenty-four plant genomes. ATLs were found in all the 24 plant species analyzed, in numbers ranging from 20–28 in two basal species to 162 in soybean. Analysis of ATLs arrayed in tandem indicates that sets of genes are expanding in a species-specific manner. To get insights into the domain architecture of ATLs we generated 75 pHMM LOGOs from 1815 ATLs, and unraveled potential protein-protein interaction regions by means of yeast two-hybrid assays. Several ATLs were found to interact with DSK2a/ubiquilin through a region at the amino-terminal end, suggesting that this is a widespread interaction that may assist in the mode of action of ATLs; the region was traced to a distinct sequence LOGO. Our analysis provides significant observations on the evolution and expansion of the ATL family in addition to information on the domain structure of this class of ubiquitin-ligases that may be involved in plant adaptation to environmental stress. PMID:21887349

  4. Educating with Aircraft Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Hobie

    1976-01-01

    Described is utilization of aircraft models, model aircraft clubs, and model aircraft magazines to promote student interest in aerospace education. The addresses for clubs and magazines are included. (SL)

  5. Aircraft Electric Secondary Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Technologies resulted to aircraft power systems and aircraft in which all secondary power is supplied electrically are discussed. A high-voltage dc power generating system for fighter aircraft, permanent magnet motors and generators for aircraft, lightweight transformers, and the installation of electric generators on turbine engines are among the topics discussed.

  6. Differential cellular recognition pattern to M. tuberculosis targets defined by IFN-γ and IL-17 production in blood from TB + patients from Honduras as compared to health care workers: TB and immune responses in patients from Honduras

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A better understanding of the quality of cellular immune responses directed against molecularly defined targets will guide the development of TB diagnostics and identification of molecularly defined, clinically relevant M.tb vaccine candidates. Methods Recombinant proteins (n = 8) and peptide pools (n = 14) from M. tuberculosis (M.tb) targets were used to compare cellular immune responses defined by IFN-γ and IL-17 production using a Whole Blood Assay (WBA) in a cohort of 148 individuals, i.e. patients with TB + (n = 38), TB- individuals with other pulmonary diseases (n = 81) and individuals exposed to TB without evidence of clinical TB (health care workers, n = 29). Results M.tb antigens Rv2958c (glycosyltransferase), Rv2962c (mycolyltransferase), Rv1886c (Ag85B), Rv3804c (Ag85A), and the PPE family member Rv3347c were frequently recognized, defined by IFN-γ production, in blood from healthy individuals exposed to M.tb (health care workers). A different recognition pattern was found for IL-17 production in blood from M.tb exposed individuals responding to TB10.4 (Rv0288), Ag85B (Rv1886c) and the PPE family members Rv0978c and Rv1917c. Conclusions The pattern of immune target recognition is different in regard to IFN-γ and IL-17 production to defined molecular M.tb targets in PBMCs from individuals frequently exposed to M.tb. The data represent the first mapping of cellular immune responses against M.tb targets in TB patients from Honduras. PMID:23497342

  7. Human serum albumin supported lipid patterns for the targeted recognition of microspheres coated by membrane based on ss-DNA hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaoming; He Qiang; Duan Li; Li Junbai . E-mail: jbli@iccas.ac.cn

    2006-10-27

    Human serum albumin (HSA) patterns have been successfully fabricated for the deposition of lipid bilayer, 1,2-dimyristoyl-sglycerophosphate (DMPA), by making use of the micro-contact printing ({mu}CP) technique and liposome fusion. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) results indicate that lipid bilayer has been assembled in HSA patterns with a good stability. Such well-defined lipid patterns formed on HSA surface create possibility to incorporate specific components like channels or receptors for specific recognition. In view of this, microspheres coated with lipid membranes were immobilized in HSA-supported lipid patterns via the hybridization of complementary ss-DNAs. This procedure enables to transfer solid materials to a soft surface through a specific recognition.

  8. Military applications of automatic speech recognition and future requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beek, Bruno; Cupples, Edward J.

    1977-01-01

    An updated summary of the state-of-the-art of automatic speech recognition and its relevance to military applications is provided. A number of potential systems for military applications are under development. These include: (1) digital narrowband communication systems; (2) automatic speech verification; (3) on-line cartographic processing unit; (4) word recognition for militarized tactical data system; and (5) voice recognition and synthesis for aircraft cockpit.

  9. Propulsion controlled aircraft computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogan, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A low-cost, easily retrofit Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) system for use on a wide range of commercial and military aircraft consists of an propulsion controlled aircraft computer that reads in aircraft data including aircraft state, pilot commands and other related data, calculates aircraft throttle position for a given maneuver commanded by the pilot, and then displays both current and calculated throttle position on a cockpit display to show the pilot where to move throttles to achieve the commanded maneuver, or is automatically sent digitally to command the engines directly.

  10. Strategy of integrated evaluation on treatment of traditional Chinese medicine as 'interaction of system to system' and establishment of novel fuzzy target contribution recognition with herb-pairs, a case study on Astragali Radix-Fructus Corni.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yu; Pei, Ke; Cai, Hao; Tu, Sicong; Cheng, Xinwei; Zhang, Zhengwei; Fan, Kailei; Qiao, Fengxian; Qin, Kunming; Cai, Baochang

    2016-10-15

    To date, in the struggle against diseases and the development of TCM, what we lack is wisdom rather than knowledge. Studies on pharmacology of traditional Chinese medicine are facing critical challenges on how to select the proper parameters or targets to represent the pharmacological evaluation system. With seven steps of optimized modules established by ourselves, we can re-evaluate TCM in a panorama view with a proper pharmacological evaluation system. In this article, with the treatment of TCM as 'interaction of system to system', a novel and generally applicable approach called fuzzy target contribution recognition was established and agents from Astragali Radix-Fructus Corni in resisting diabetic nephropathy were successfully discovered for the first time. CG6, a promising agent from this herb-pair on the treatment of diabetic nephropathy, was finally acquired and its possible molecular mechanism was explored through a nuclear factor erythroid 2-Like 2 (NFE2L2) activation-dependent pathway.

  11. Wind tunnel test of model target thrust reversers for the Pratt and Whitney aircraft JT8D-100 series engines installed on a 727-200 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambly, D.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a low speed wind tunnel test of 0.046 scale model target thrust reversers installed on a 727-200 model airplane are presented. The full airplane model was mounted on a force balance, except for the nacelles and thrust reversers, which were independently mounted and isolated from it. The installation had the capability of simulating the inlet airflows and of supplying the correct proportions of primary and secondary air to the nozzles. The objectives of the test were to assess the compatibility of the thrust reversers target door design with the engine and airplane. The following measurements were made: hot gas ingestion at the nacelle inlets; model lift, drag, and pitching moment; hot gas impingement on the airplane structure; and qualitative assessment of the rudder effectiveness. The major parameters controlling hot gas ingestion were found to be thrust reverser orientation, engine power setting, and the lip height of the bottom thrust reverser doors on the side nacelles. The thrust reversers tended to increase the model lift, decrease the drag, and decrease the pitching moment.

  12. Bioelectric Control of a 757 Class High Fidelity Aircraft Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles; Wheeler, Kevin; Stepniewski, Slawomir; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents results of a recent experiment in fine grain Electromyographic (EMG) signal recognition, We demonstrate bioelectric flight control of 757 class simulation aircraft landing at San Francisco International Airport. The physical instrumentality of a pilot control stick is not used. A pilot closes a fist in empty air and performs control movements which are captured by a dry electrode array on the arm, analyzed and routed through a flight director permitting full pilot outer loop control of the simulation. A Vision Dome immersive display is used to create a VR world for the aircraft body mechanics and flight changes to pilot movements. Inner loop surfaces and differential aircraft thrust is controlled using a hybrid neural network architecture that combines a damage adaptive controller (Jorgensen 1998, Totah 1998) with a propulsion only based control system (Bull & Kaneshige 1997). Thus the 757 aircraft is not only being flown bioelectrically at the pilot level but also demonstrates damage adaptive neural network control permitting adaptation to severe changes in the physical flight characteristics of the aircraft at the inner loop level. To compensate for accident scenarios, the aircraft uses remaining control surface authority and differential thrust from the engines. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time real time bioelectric fine-grained control, differential thrust based control, and neural network damage adaptive control have been integrated into a single flight demonstration. The paper describes the EMG pattern recognition system and the bioelectric pattern recognition methodology.

  13. The Drosophila hnRNP F/H Homolog Glorund Uses Two Distinct RNA-Binding Modes to Diversify Target Recognition.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Joel V; Teramoto, Takamasa; Chatterjee, Seema; Hall, Traci M Tanaka; Gavis, Elizabeth R

    2017-04-04

    The Drosophila hnRNP F/H homolog, Glorund (Glo), regulates nanos mRNA translation by interacting with a structured UA-rich motif in the nanos 3' untranslated region. Glo regulates additional RNAs, however, and mammalian homologs bind G-tract sequences to regulate alternative splicing, suggesting that Glo also recognizes G-tract RNA. To gain insight into how Glo recognizes both structured UA-rich and G-tract RNAs, we used mutational analysis guided by crystal structures of Glo's RNA-binding domains and identified two discrete RNA-binding surfaces that allow Glo to recognize both RNA motifs. By engineering Glo variants that favor a single RNA-binding mode, we show that a subset of Glo's functions in vivo is mediated solely by the G-tract binding mode, whereas regulation of nanos requires both recognition modes. Our findings suggest a molecular mechanism for the evolution of dual RNA motif recognition in Glo that may be applied to understanding the functional diversity of other RNA-binding proteins.

  14. Unmanned aircraft systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unmanned platforms have become increasingly more common in recent years for acquiring remotely sensed data. These aircraft are referred to as Unmanned Airborne Vehicles (UAV), Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA), Remotely Piloted Vehicles (RPV), or Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), the official term used...

  15. Live-cell single-molecule tracking reveals co-recognition of H3K27me3 and DNA targets polycomb Cbx7-PRC1 to chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Chao Yu; Tatavosian, Roubina; Huynh, Thao Ngoc; Duc, Huy Nguyen; Das, Raibatak; Kokotovic, Marko; Grimm, Jonathan B; Lavis, Luke D; Lee, Jun; Mejia, Frances J; Li, Yang; Yao, Tingting; Ren, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    The Polycomb PRC1 plays essential roles in development and disease pathogenesis. Targeting of PRC1 to chromatin is thought to be mediated by the Cbx family proteins (Cbx2/4/6/7/8) binding to histone H3 with a K27me3 modification (H3K27me3). Despite this prevailing view, the molecular mechanisms of targeting remain poorly understood. Here, by combining live-cell single-molecule tracking (SMT) and genetic engineering, we reveal that H3K27me3 contributes significantly to the targeting of Cbx7 and Cbx8 to chromatin, but less to Cbx2, Cbx4, and Cbx6. Genetic disruption of the complex formation of PRC1 facilitates the targeting of Cbx7 to chromatin. Biochemical analyses uncover that the CD and AT-hook-like (ATL) motif of Cbx7 constitute a functional DNA-binding unit. Live-cell SMT of Cbx7 mutants demonstrates that Cbx7 is targeted to chromatin by co-recognizing of H3K27me3 and DNA. Our data suggest a novel hierarchical cooperation mechanism by which histone modifications and DNA coordinate to target chromatin regulatory complexes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17667.001 PMID:27723458

  16. Conjoint Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainerd, C. J.; Reyna, V. F.; Mojardin, A. H.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews some limiting properties of the process-dissociation model as it applies to the study of dual-process conceptions of memory. A second-generation model (conjoint recognition) is proposed to address these limitations and supply additional capabilities. Worked applications to data are provided. (Author/GCP)

  17. Method and device for landing aircraft dependent on runway occupancy time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghalebsaz Jeddi, Babak (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A technique for landing aircraft using an aircraft landing accident avoidance device is disclosed. The technique includes determining at least two probability distribution functions; determining a safe lower limit on a separation between a lead aircraft and a trail aircraft on a glide slope to the runway; determining a maximum sustainable safe attempt-to-land rate on the runway based on the safe lower limit and the probability distribution functions; directing the trail aircraft to enter the glide slope with a target separation from the lead aircraft corresponding to the maximum sustainable safe attempt-to-land rate; while the trail aircraft is in the glide slope, determining an actual separation between the lead aircraft and the trail aircraft; and directing the trail aircraft to execute a go-around maneuver if the actual separation approaches the safe lower limit. Probability distribution functions include runway occupancy time, and landing time interval and/or inter-arrival distance.

  18. Using doppler radar images to estimate aircraft navigational heading error

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W; Jordan, Jay D; Kim, Theodore J

    2012-07-03

    A yaw angle error of a motion measurement system carried on an aircraft for navigation is estimated from Doppler radar images captured using the aircraft. At least two radar pulses aimed at respectively different physical locations in a targeted area are transmitted from a radar antenna carried on the aircraft. At least two Doppler radar images that respectively correspond to the at least two transmitted radar pulses are produced. These images are used to produce an estimate of the yaw angle error.

  19. Aircraft landing gear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, John A. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Topics presented include the laboratory simulation of landing gear pitch-plane dynamics, a summary of recent aircraft/ground vehicle friction measurement tests, some recent aircraft tire thermal studies, and an evaluation of critical speeds in high-speed aircraft. Also presented are a review of NASA antiskid braking research, titanium matrix composite landing gear development, the current methods and perspective of aircraft flotation analysis, the flow rate and trajectory of water spray produced by an aircraft tire, and spin-up studies of the Space Shuttle Orbiter main gear tire.

  20. Insight into the recognition, binding, and reactivity of catalytic metallodrugs targeting stem loop IIb of hepatitis C IRES RNA.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Seth S; Ross, Martin James; Fidai, Insiya; Cowan, James A

    2014-06-01

    The complex Cu-GGHYrFK-amide (1-Cu) was previously reported as a novel metallotherapeutic that catalytically inactivates stem loop IIb (SLIIb) of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) RNA and demonstrates significant antiviral activity in a cellular HCV replicon assay. Herein we describe additional studies focused on understanding the cleavage mechanism as well as the relationship of catalyst configuration to structural recognition and site-selective cleavage of the structured RNA motif. These are advanced by use of a combination of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, melting temperature determinations, and computational analysis to develop a structural model for binding and reactivity toward SLIIb of the IRES RNA. In addition, the binding, reactivity, and structural chemistry of the all-D-amino acid form of this metallopeptide, complex 2-Cu, are reported and compared with those of complex 1-Cu. In vitro RNA binding and cleavage assays for complex 2-Cu show a KD value of 76 ± 3 nM, and Michaelis-Menten parameters of kcat =0.14 ± 0.01 min(-1) and KM =7.9 ± 1.2 μM, with a turnover number exceeding 40. In a luciferase-based cellular replicon assay Cu-GGhyrfk-amide shows activity similar to that of the 1-Cu parent peptide, with an IC50 value of 1.9 ± 0.4 μM and cytotoxicity exceeding 100 μM. RT-PCR experiments confirm a significant decrease in HCV RNA levels in replicon assays for up to nine days when treated with complex 1-Cu in three-day dosing increments. This study shows the influence that the α-carbon stereocenter has for this new class of compounds, while detailed mass spectrometry and computational analyses provide new insight into the mechanisms of recognition, binding, and reactivity.

  1. Small transport aircraft technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    Information on commuter airline trends and aircraft developments is provided to upgrade the preliminary findings of a NASA-formed small transport aircraft technology (STAT) team, established to determine whether the agency's research and development programs could help commuter aircraft manufacturers solve technical problems related to passenger acceptance and use of 19- to 50-passenger aircraft. The results and conclusions of the full set of completed STAT studies are presented. These studies were performed by five airplane manufacturers, five engine manufacturers, and two propeller manufacturers. Those portions of NASA's overall aeronautics research and development programs which are applicable to commuter aircraft design are summarized. Areas of technology that might beneficially be expanded or initiated to aid the US commuter aircraft manufacturers in the evolution of improved aircraft for the market are suggested.

  2. Image-based air target identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glais, Thierry; Ayoun, Andre

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents the main results obtained through a study on aircraft identification and attitude estimation conducted by Thomson TRT Defense for the French Ministry of Defense/Direction Generale de l'Armement/Direction des Constructions Aeronautiques. The purpose of this study was automatic assistance to aircraft identification. Indeed, modern fight airplanes are equipped with optronic systems capable of detecting and tracking enemy aircraft. In order to react quickly, the pilot must know at least the target type and possibly its identity. Recognition of the target type and attitude is obtained by matching the observed image with patterns belonging to a database. Two matching algorithms, which have been tested, are presented. The first one, based on the contour Fourier transform, needs the complete target silhouette extraction. The second one, belonging to the class of prediction and verification algorithms, compares the individual parts of the target to the database and is able to recognize the target, even when it is partially occluded or ill-segmented due to the lack of contrast between the target and its environment. An original feature of the algorithm stays in a validation process which increases the reliability of transmitted answers. In case of low confidence, no answer is provided. In addition, successive answers are consolidated. This strategy is interesting especially for image sequences where the tracked airplane achieves attitude evolution or even simply flies over various backgrounds. The main output of this study is the parametric analysis of various factors which influence performance such as contrast, background complexity, distance, attitude and type. The evaluation method, largely based on image synthesis (including image sequences), allows fine interpretation of statistical results. Misclassification errors occur when resolution is not sufficient or when complex backgrounds cause erroneous segmentation. Best results are obtained when the

  3. Directional monitoring terminal for aircraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genescà, M.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a concept of an aircraft noise monitoring terminal (NMT) that reduces background noise and the influence of ground reflection, in comparison with a single microphone. Also, it automatically identifies aircraft sound events based on the direction of arrival of the sound rather than on the sound pressure level (or radar data). And moreover, it provides an indicator of the quality of the sound pressure level measurement, i.e. if it is possibly disturbed by extraneous sources. The performance of this NMT is experimentally tested under real conditions in a measurement site close to Zurich airport. The results show that the NMT unambiguously identifies the noise events generated by the target aircraft, correctly detects those aircraft noise events that may be disturbed by the presence of other sources, and offers a substantial reduction in background and ground reflected sound.

  4. Conjoint recognition.

    PubMed

    Brainerd, C J; Reyna, V F; Mojardin, A H

    1999-01-01

    The process-dissociation model has stimulated important advances in the study of dual-process conceptions of memory. The authors review some limiting properties of that model and consider the degree of support for its parent theory (the recollection-familiarity distinction). A 2nd-generation model (conjoint recognition) is proposed that addresses these limitations and supplies additional capabilities, such as goodness-of-fit tests, the ability to measure dual processes for false-memory responses, and statistical procedures for testing within- and between-conditions hypotheses about its parameters. The conjoint-recognition model also implements an alternative theoretical interpretation (the identity-similarity distinction of fuzzy-trace theory). Worked applications to data are provided.

  5. Recognition of H3K9 methylation by GLP is required for efficient establishment of H3K9 methylation, rapid target gene repression, and mouse viability

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nan; Zhang, Zhuqiang; Jiang, Yonghua; Meng, Lingjun; Xiong, Jun; Zhao, Zuodong; Zhou, Xiaohua; Li, Jia; Li, Hong; Zheng, Yong; Chen, She; Cai, Tao; Gao, Shaorong

    2015-01-01

    GLP and G9a are major H3K9 dimethylases and are essential for mouse early embryonic development. GLP and G9a both harbor ankyrin repeat domains that are capable of binding H3K9 methylation. However, the functional significance of their recognition of H3K9 methylation is unknown. Here, we report that the histone methyltransferase activities of GLP and G9a are stimulated by neighboring nucleosomes that are premethylated at H3K9. These stimulation events function in cis and are dependent on the H3K9 methylation binding activities of ankyrin repeat domains of GLP and G9a. Disruption of the H3K9 methylation-binding activity of GLP in mice causes growth retardation of embryos, ossification defects of calvaria, and postnatal lethality due to starvation of the pups. In mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) harboring a mutant GLP that lacks H3K9me1-binding activity, critical pluripotent genes, including Oct4 and Nanog, display inefficient establishment of H3K9me2 and delayed gene silencing during differentiation. Collectively, our study reveals a new activation mechanism for GLP and G9a that plays an important role in ESC differentiation and mouse viability. PMID:25637356

  6. Human target acquisition performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teaney, Brian P.; Du Bosq, Todd W.; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Thompson, Roger; Aghera, Sameer; Moyer, Steven K.; Flug, Eric; Espinola, Richard; Hixson, Jonathan

    2012-06-01

    The battlefield has shifted from armored vehicles to armed insurgents. Target acquisition (identification, recognition, and detection) range performance involving humans as targets is vital for modern warfare. The acquisition and neutralization of armed insurgents while at the same time minimizing fratricide and civilian casualties is a mounting concern. U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD has conducted many experiments involving human targets for infrared and reflective band sensors. The target sets include human activities, hand-held objects, uniforms & armament, and other tactically relevant targets. This paper will define a set of standard task difficulty values for identification and recognition associated with human target acquisition performance.

  7. Evaluation of signal and noise and identification of a suitable target function in the tuning of an ESI ion trap mass spectrometer by multivariate pattern recognition tools.

    PubMed

    Marengo, Emilio; Robotti, Elisa; Gosetti, Fabio; Zerbinati, Orfeo; Gennaro, Maria Carla

    2009-10-01

    When mass spectrometry is not combined to separation techniques, the evaluation of signal and noise in a complex mass spectrum is not trivial. The tuning of the spectrometer based only on the increase of the signal of a selected number of m/z values does not ensure the achievement of the best experimental conditions: signal could improve and noise could increase as well. The scope of this work is the development of a function separating signal and noise (for evaluating the S/N) from complex mass spectra for potential use as target function for the automatic tuning of the instrument. Two different methods were applied: the first is based on the separation of a pool of m/z values attributable to the signal from the m/z values due to the noise, while the second is based on the application of principal component analysis to separate the signal (present in the significant components) from the noise (present in the residuals). The comparison of the two methods was carried out by the evaluation of the stability of the signal and the target functions obtained, and the evaluation of the variation of the target functions as a function of concentration.

  8. Raptors and aircraft

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.G.; Ellis, D.H.; Johnson, T.H.; Glinski, Richard L.; Pendleton, Beth Giron; Moss, Mary Beth; LeFranc, Maurice N.=; Millsap, Brian A.; Hoffman, Stephen W.

    1988-01-01

    Less than 5% of all bird strikes of aircraft are by raptor species, but damage to airframe structure or jet engine dysfunction are likely consequences. Beneficial aircraft-raptor interactions include the use of raptor species to frighten unwanted birds from airport areas and the use of aircraft to census raptor species. Many interactions, however, modify the raptor?s immediate behavior and some may decrease reproduction of sensitive species. Raptors may respond to aircraft stimuli by exhibiting alarm, increased heart rate, flushing or fleeing and occasionally by directly attacking intruding aircraft. To date, most studies reveal that raptor responses to aircraft are brief and do not limit reproduction; however, additional study is needed.

  9. Requirements for the protection against aircraft noise.

    PubMed

    Wende, H; Ortscheid, J

    2004-01-01

    In preparation of the revised edition of the Air Traffic Noise Act the Federal Environmental Agency formulated targets for aircraft noise control. They were prepared oriented to the Federal Immission Control Act. The assessment periods were chosen analogously to the regulations on other traffic noise sources (rail traffic, road traffic). The control targets cover the following affected areas * aural, extra-aural health * night's sleep * annoyance * communication * recreation Considerable nuisance can be avoided by limiting the exposure to aircraft noise(outside) to equivalent levels below 55 dB(A) by day and 45 dB(A) at night, and impairment of health can be avoided by limiting the exposure to aircraft noise (outside) to equivalent levels below 60 dB(A) by day and 50 dB(A) at night.

  10. Aircraft Survivability. Spring 2009

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Surviving an Aircraft Crash with Airbag Restraintsby Thomas Barth Inflatable restraint solutions have improved the survivability of commercial...Surviving an Aircraft Crash with Airbag Restraints by Thomas Barth Transport Aircraft Interiors The AmSafe Aviation Airbag entered service on commercial...all night.” Keithley also noted that, in his early days at BRL, Walt teamed up with a group of like-minded innovators, including Jim Foulk, Roland

  11. Lightning effects on aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Direct and indirect effects of lightning on aircraft were examined in relation to aircraft design. Specific trends in design leading to more frequent lightning strikes were individually investigated. These trends included the increasing use of miniaturized, solid state components in aircraft electronics and electric power systems. A second trend studied was the increasing use of reinforced plastics and other nonconducting materials in place of aluminum skins, a practice that reduces the electromagnetic shielding furnished by a conductive skin.

  12. A general strategy to characterize calmodulin-calcium complexes involved in CaM-target recognition: DAPK and EGFR calmodulin binding domains interact with different calmodulin-calcium complexes.

    PubMed

    Dagher, Rania; Peng, Shan; Gioria, Sophie; Fève, Marie; Zeniou, Maria; Zimmermann, Michael; Pigault, Claire; Haiech, Jacques; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2011-05-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca(2+) sensor regulating many biochemical processes in eukaryotic cells. Its interaction with a great variety of different target proteins has led to the fundamental question of its mechanism of action. CaM exhibits four "EF hand" type Ca(2+) binding sites. One way to explain CaM functioning is to consider that the protein interacts differently with its target proteins depending on the number of Ca(2+) ions bound to it. To test this hypothesis, the binding properties of three entities known to interact with CaM (a fluorescent probe and two peptide analogs to the CaM binding sites of death associated protein kinase (DAPK) and of EGFR) were investigated using a quantitative approach based on fluorescence polarization (FP). Probe and peptide interactions with CaM were studied using a titration matrix in which both CaM and calcium concentrations were varied. Experiments were performed with SynCaM, a hybrid CaM able to activate CaM dependent enzymes from mammalian and plant cells. Results show that the interaction between CaM and its targets is regulated by the number of calcium ions bound to the protein, namely one for the DAPK peptide, two for the probe and four for the EGFR peptide. The approach used provides a new tool to elaborate a typology of CaM-targets, based on their recognition by the various CaM-Ca(n) (n=0-4) complexes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 11th European Symposium on Calcium.

  13. Hypersonic aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkamhawi, Hani; Greiner, Tom; Fuerst, Gerry; Luich, Shawn; Stonebraker, Bob; Wray, Todd

    1990-01-01

    A hypersonic aircraft is designed which uses scramjets to accelerate from Mach 6 to Mach 10 and sustain that speed for two minutes. Different propulsion systems were considered and it was decided that the aircraft would use one full scale turbofan-ramjet. Two solid rocket boosters were added to save fuel and help the aircraft pass through the transonic region. After considering aerodynamics, aircraft design, stability and control, cooling systems, mission profile, and landing systems, a conventional aircraft configuration was chosen over that of a waverider. The conventional design was chosen due to its landing characteristics and the relative expense compared to the waverider. Fuel requirements and the integration of the engine systems and their inlets are also taken into consideration in the final design. A hypersonic aircraft was designed which uses scramjets to accelerate from Mach 6 to Mach 10 and sustain that speed for two minutes. Different propulsion systems were considered and a full scale turbofan-ramjet was chosen. Two solid rocket boosters were added to save fuel and help the aircraft pass through the transonic reqion. After the aerodynamics, aircraft design, stability and control, cooling systems, mission profile, landing systems, and their physical interactions were considered, a conventional aircraft configuration was chosen over that of a waverider. The conventional design was chosen due to its landing characteristics and the relative expense compared to the waverider. Fuel requirements and the integration of the engine systems and their inlets were also considered in the designing process.

  14. Structureborne noise in aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevenson, S. A.; Metcalf, V. L.

    1987-01-01

    The amount of noise reaching an aircraft's interior by structureborne paths, when high levels of other noises are present, involves the measurement of transfer functions between vibrating levels on the wing and interior noise. The magnitude of the structureborne noise transfer function is established by exciting the aircraft with an electrodynamic shaker; a second transfer function is measured using the same sensor locations with the aircraft engines operating. Attention is given to the case of a twin-turboprop OV-10A aircraft; the resulting transfer function values at the discrete frequencies corresponding to the propeller blade passage frequency and its first four harmonics are tabulated and illustrated.

  15. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Sensor and Targeting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-27

    crown configuration. 5.5 Detect large game (e.g., deer, antelope, elk, and moose ) in a meadow. 5.6 6 Detect natural objects (e.g., tree stumps...5.5) Identify tree species on the basis of crown configuration. (NIIRS 5.5) Detect large game (e.g., deer, antelope, elk, and moose ) in a meadow

  16. Event identification by acoustic signature recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.; Kercel, S.W.

    1995-07-01

    Many events of interest to the security commnnity produce acoustic emissions that are, in principle, identifiable as to cause. Some obvious examples are gunshots, breaking glass, takeoffs and landings of small aircraft, vehicular engine noises, footsteps (high frequencies when on gravel, very low frequencies. when on soil), and voices (whispers to shouts). We are investigating wavelet-based methods to extract unique features of such events for classification and identification. We also discuss methods of classification and pattern recognition specifically tailored for acoustic signatures obtained by wavelet analysis. The paper is divided into three parts: completed work, work in progress, and future applications. The completed phase has led to the successful recognition of aircraft types on landing and takeoff. Both small aircraft (twin-engine turboprop) and large (commercial airliners) were included in the study. The project considered the design of a small, field-deployable, inexpensive device. The techniques developed during the aircraft identification phase were then adapted to a multispectral electromagnetic interference monitoring device now deployed in a nuclear power plant. This is a general-purpose wavelet analysis engine, spanning 14 octaves, and can be adapted for other specific tasks. Work in progress is focused on applying the methods previously developed to speaker identification. Some of the problems to be overcome include recognition of sounds as voice patterns and as distinct from possible background noises (e.g., music), as well as identification of the speaker from a short-duration voice sample. A generalization of the completed work and the work in progress is a device capable of classifying any number of acoustic events-particularly quasi-stationary events such as engine noises and voices and singular events such as gunshots and breaking glass. We will show examples of both kinds of events and discuss their recognition likelihood.

  17. Recognition without Awareness: Encoding and Retrieval Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craik, Fergus I. M.; Rose, Nathan S.; Gopie, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    The article reports 4 experiments that explore the notion of recognition without awareness using words as the material. Previous work by Voss and associates has shown that complex visual patterns were correctly selected as targets in a 2-alternative forced-choice (2-AFC) recognition test although participants reported that they were guessing. The…

  18. Aircraft vulnerability analysis by modeling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willers, Cornelius J.; Willers, Maria S.; de Waal, Alta

    2014-10-01

    Infrared missiles pose a significant threat to civilian and military aviation. ManPADS missiles are especially dangerous in the hands of rogue and undisciplined forces. Yet, not all the launched missiles hit their targets; the miss being either attributable to misuse of the weapon or to missile performance restrictions. This paper analyses some of the factors affecting aircraft vulnerability and demonstrates a structured analysis of the risk and aircraft vulnerability problem. The aircraft-missile engagement is a complex series of events, many of which are only partially understood. Aircraft and missile designers focus on the optimal design and performance of their respective systems, often testing only in a limited set of scenarios. Most missiles react to the contrast intensity, but the variability of the background is rarely considered. Finally, the vulnerability of the aircraft depends jointly on the missile's performance and the doctrine governing the missile's launch. These factors are considered in a holistic investigation. The view direction, altitude, time of day, sun position, latitude/longitude and terrain determine the background against which the aircraft is observed. Especially high gradients in sky radiance occur around the sun and on the horizon. This paper considers uncluttered background scenes (uniform terrain and clear sky) and presents examples of background radiance at all view angles across a sphere around the sensor. A detailed geometrical and spatially distributed radiometric model is used to model the aircraft. This model provides the signature at all possible view angles across the sphere around the aircraft. The signature is determined in absolute terms (no background) and in contrast terms (with background). It is shown that the background significantly affects the contrast signature as observed by the missile sensor. A simplified missile model is constructed by defining the thrust and mass profiles, maximum seeker tracking rate, maximum

  19. General Aviation Aircraft Reliability Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Duane; Turnbull, Andrew; Roelant, Henk A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This reliability study was performed in order to provide the aviation community with an estimate of Complex General Aviation (GA) Aircraft System reliability. To successfully improve the safety and reliability for the next generation of GA aircraft, a study of current GA aircraft attributes was prudent. This was accomplished by benchmarking the reliability of operational Complex GA Aircraft Systems. Specifically, Complex GA Aircraft System reliability was estimated using data obtained from the logbooks of a random sample of the Complex GA Aircraft population.

  20. CDTI target selection criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, C. L.; Davis, C. M.; Jackson, C. B.; Mcclellan, V. A.

    1984-01-01

    A Cockpit Display of Traffic Information (CDTI) is a cockpit instrument which provides information to the aircrew on the relative location of aircraft traffic in the vicinity of their aircraft (township). In addition, the CDTI may provide information to assist in navigation and in aircraft control. It is usually anticipated that the CDTI will be integrated with a horizontal situation indicator used for navigational purposes and/or with a weather radar display. In this study, several sets of aircraft traffic data are analyzed to determine statistics on the number of targets that will be displayed on a CDTI using various target selection criteria. Traffic data were obtained from an Atlanta Terminal Area Simulation and from radar tapes recorded at the Atlanta and Miami terminal areas. Results are given in the form of plots showing the average percentage of time (or probability) that an aircraft equipped with a CDTI would observe from 0 to 10 other aircraft on the display for range settings on the CDTI up to 30 n. mi. and using various target discrimination techniques.

  1. Improved design of hammerhead ribozyme for selective digestion of target RNA through recognition of site-specific adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Masatora; Kurihara, Kei; Yamaguchi, Shota; Oyama, Yui; Deshimaru, Masanobu

    2014-03-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is an endogenous regulatory mechanism involved in various biological processes. Site-specific, editing-state-dependent degradation of target RNA may be a powerful tool both for analyzing the mechanism of RNA editing and for regulating biological processes. Previously, we designed an artificial hammerhead ribozyme (HHR) for selective, site-specific RNA cleavage dependent on the A-to-I RNA editing state. In the present work, we developed an improved strategy for constructing a trans-acting HHR that specifically cleaves target editing sites in the adenosine but not the inosine state. Specificity for unedited sites was achieved by utilizing a sequence encoding the intrinsic cleavage specificity of a natural HHR. We used in vitro selection methods in an HHR library to select for an extended HHR containing a tertiary stabilization motif that facilitates HHR folding into an active conformation. By using this method, we successfully constructed highly active HHRs with unedited-specific cleavage. Moreover, using HHR cleavage followed by direct sequencing, we demonstrated that this ribozyme could cleave serotonin 2C receptor (HTR2C) mRNA extracted from mouse brain, depending on the site-specific editing state. This unedited-specific cleavage also enabled us to analyze the effect of editing state at the E and C sites on editing at other sites by using direct sequencing for the simultaneous quantification of the editing ratio at multiple sites. Our approach has the potential to elucidate the mechanism underlying the interdependencies of different editing states in substrate RNA with multiple editing sites.

  2. Improved design of hammerhead ribozyme for selective digestion of target RNA through recognition of site-specific adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Masatora; Kurihara, Kei; Yamaguchi, Shota; Oyama, Yui; Deshimaru, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is an endogenous regulatory mechanism involved in various biological processes. Site-specific, editing-state–dependent degradation of target RNA may be a powerful tool both for analyzing the mechanism of RNA editing and for regulating biological processes. Previously, we designed an artificial hammerhead ribozyme (HHR) for selective, site-specific RNA cleavage dependent on the A-to-I RNA editing state. In the present work, we developed an improved strategy for constructing a trans-acting HHR that specifically cleaves target editing sites in the adenosine but not the inosine state. Specificity for unedited sites was achieved by utilizing a sequence encoding the intrinsic cleavage specificity of a natural HHR. We used in vitro selection methods in an HHR library to select for an extended HHR containing a tertiary stabilization motif that facilitates HHR folding into an active conformation. By using this method, we successfully constructed highly active HHRs with unedited-specific cleavage. Moreover, using HHR cleavage followed by direct sequencing, we demonstrated that this ribozyme could cleave serotonin 2C receptor (HTR2C) mRNA extracted from mouse brain, depending on the site-specific editing state. This unedited-specific cleavage also enabled us to analyze the effect of editing state at the E and C sites on editing at other sites by using direct sequencing for the simultaneous quantification of the editing ratio at multiple sites. Our approach has the potential to elucidate the mechanism underlying the interdependencies of different editing states in substrate RNA with multiple editing sites. PMID:24448449

  3. Cable Tensiometer for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The invention is a cable tensiometer that can be used on aircraft for real-time, in-flight cable tension measurements. The invention can be used on any aircraft cables with high precision. The invention is extremely light-weight, hangs on the cable being tested and uses a dual bending beam design with a high mill-volt output to determine tension.

  4. Lightning protection of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, F. A.; Plumer, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The current knowledge concerning potential lightning effects on aircraft and the means that are available to designers and operators to protect against these effects are summarized. The increased use of nonmetallic materials in the structure of aircraft and the constant trend toward using electronic equipment to handle flight-critical control and navigation functions have served as impetus for this study.

  5. Aircraft landing control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambregts, Antonius A. (Inventor); Hansen, Rolf (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Upon aircraft landing approach, flare path command signals of altitude, vertical velocity and vertical acceleration are generated as functions of aircraft position and velocity with respect to the ground. The command signals are compared with corresponding actual values to generate error signals which are used to control the flight path.

  6. Predicting Aircraft Availability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    ENS- GRP -13-J-2 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio...AFIT-ENS- GRP -13-J-2 PREDICTING AIRCRAFT AVAILABILITY GRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT Presented to the Faculty Department of Operational...APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT-ENS- GRP -13-J-2 PREDICTING AIRCRAFT AVAILABILITY Mark A. Chapa

  7. Target signature modeling and bistatic scattering measurement studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnside, W. D.; Lee, T. H.; Rojas, R.; Marhefka, R. J.; Bensman, D.

    1989-01-01

    Four areas of study are summarized: bistatic scattering measurements studies for a compact range; target signature modeling for test and evaluation hardware in the loop situation; aircraft code modification study; and SATCOM antenna studies on aircraft.

  8. Why aircraft disinsection?

    PubMed

    Gratz, N G; Steffen, R; Cocksedge, W

    2000-01-01

    A serious problem is posed by the inadvertent transport of live mosquitoes aboard aircraft arriving from tropical countries where vector-borne diseases are endemic. Surveys at international airports have found many instances of live insects, particularly mosquitoes, aboard aircraft arriving from countries where malaria and arboviruses are endemic. In some instances mosquito species have been established in countries in which they have not previously been reported. A serious consequence of the transport of infected mosquitoes aboard aircraft has been the numerous cases of "airport malaria" reported from Europe, North America and elsewhere. There is an important on-going need for the disinsection of aircraft coming from airports in tropical disease endemic areas into nonendemic areas. The methods and materials available for use in aircraft disinsection and the WHO recommendations for their use are described.

  9. Why aircraft disinsection?

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, N. G.; Steffen, R.; Cocksedge, W.

    2000-01-01

    A serious problem is posed by the inadvertent transport of live mosquitoes aboard aircraft arriving from tropical countries where vector-borne diseases are endemic. Surveys at international airports have found many instances of live insects, particularly mosquitoes, aboard aircraft arriving from countries where malaria and arboviruses are endemic. In some instances mosquito species have been established in countries in which they have not previously been reported. A serious consequence of the transport of infected mosquitoes aboard aircraft has been the numerous cases of "airport malaria" reported from Europe, North America and elsewhere. There is an important on-going need for the disinsection of aircraft coming from airports in tropical disease endemic areas into nonendemic areas. The methods and materials available for use in aircraft disinsection and the WHO recommendations for their use are described. PMID:10994283

  10. Aircraft operations management manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA aircraft operations program is a multifaceted, highly diverse entity that directly supports the agency mission in aeronautical research and development, space science and applications, space flight, astronaut readiness training, and related activities through research and development, program support, and mission management aircraft operations flights. Users of the program are interagency, inter-government, international, and the business community. This manual provides guidelines to establish policy for the management of NASA aircraft resources, aircraft operations, and related matters. This policy is an integral part of and must be followed when establishing field installation policy and procedures covering the management of NASA aircraft operations. Each operating location will develop appropriate local procedures that conform with the requirements of this handbook. This manual should be used in conjunction with other governing instructions, handbooks, and manuals.

  11. Hypersonic reconnaissance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulk, Tim; Chiarini, David; Hill, Kevin; Kunszt, Bob; Odgen, Chris; Truong, Bon

    1992-01-01

    A conceptual design of a hypersonic reconnaissance aircraft for the U.S. Navy is discussed. After eighteen weeks of work, a waverider design powered by two augmented turbofans was chosen. The aircraft was designed to be based on an aircraft carrier and to cruise 6,000 nautical miles at Mach 4;80,000 feet and above. As a result the size of the aircraft was only allowed to have a length of eighty feet, fifty-two feet in wingspan, and roughly 2,300 square feet in planform area. Since this is a mainly cruise aircraft, sixty percent of its 100,000 pound take-off weight is JP fuel. At cruise, the highest temperature that it will encounter is roughly 1,100 F, which can be handled through the use of a passive cooling system.

  12. Characterization of molecular recognition in gas sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hierlemann, A.; Ricco, A.J.; Bodenhoefer, K.; Goepel, W.

    1998-08-01

    Molecular recognition is an important topic when searching for new, selective coating materials for chemical sensing. Recently, the general idea of molecular recognition in the gas phase was challenged by Grate et al. However, in earlier thickness-shear mode resonator (TSMR) investigations, convincing evidence was presented for specific recognition of particular analyte target molecules. In this study, the authors systematically investigated coatings previously shown to be highly selective, such as the bucket-like cyclodextrins for chiral recognition, Ni-camphorates for the specific detection of the bases pyridine and DMMP (dimethylmethylphosphonate), and phthalocyanines to specifically detect benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX).

  13. A computer application for parametric aircraft design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraqueiro, Filipe R.; Albuquerque, Pedro F.; Gamboa, Pedro V.

    2016-11-01

    The present work describes the development and final result of a graphical user interface tailored for a mission-based parametric aircraft design optimization code which targets the preliminary design phase of unmanned aerial vehicles. This development was built from the XFLR5 open source platform and further benefits from two-dimensional aerodynamic data obtained from XFOIL. For a better understanding, the most important graphical windows are shown. In order to demonstrate the graphical user interface interaction with the aircraft designer, the results of a case study which maximizes payload are presented.

  14. Automatic TLI recognition system, user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Lassahn, G.D.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes how to use an automatic target recognition system (version 14). In separate volumes are a general description of the ATR system, Automatic TLI Recognition System, General Description, and a programmer`s manual, Automatic TLI Recognition System, Programmer`s Guide.

  15. Predicting Visibility of Aircraft

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Andrew; Ramirez, Cesar V.; Salud, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Visual detection of aircraft by human observers is an important element of aviation safety. To assess and ensure safety, it would be useful to be able to be able to predict the visibility, to a human observer, of an aircraft of specified size, shape, distance, and coloration. Examples include assuring safe separation among aircraft and between aircraft and unmanned vehicles, design of airport control towers, and efforts to enhance or suppress the visibility of military and rescue vehicles. We have recently developed a simple metric of pattern visibility, the Spatial Standard Observer (SSO). In this report we examine whether the SSO can predict visibility of simulated aircraft images. We constructed a set of aircraft images from three-dimensional computer graphic models, and measured the luminance contrast threshold for each image from three human observers. The data were well predicted by the SSO. Finally, we show how to use the SSO to predict visibility range for aircraft of arbitrary size, shape, distance, and coloration. PMID:19462007

  16. Predicting visibility of aircraft.

    PubMed

    Watson, Andrew; Ramirez, Cesar V; Salud, Ellen

    2009-05-20

    Visual detection of aircraft by human observers is an important element of aviation safety. To assess and ensure safety, it would be useful to be able to be able to predict the visibility, to a human observer, of an aircraft of specified size, shape, distance, and coloration. Examples include assuring safe separation among aircraft and between aircraft and unmanned vehicles, design of airport control towers, and efforts to enhance or suppress the visibility of military and rescue vehicles. We have recently developed a simple metric of pattern visibility, the Spatial Standard Observer (SSO). In this report we examine whether the SSO can predict visibility of simulated aircraft images. We constructed a set of aircraft images from three-dimensional computer graphic models, and measured the luminance contrast threshold for each image from three human observers. The data were well predicted by the SSO. Finally, we show how to use the SSO to predict visibility range for aircraft of arbitrary size, shape, distance, and coloration.

  17. Some fighter aircraft trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, L.

    1985-01-01

    Some basic trends in fighters are traced from the post World II era. Beginning with the first operational jet fighter, the P-80, the characteristics of subsequent fighter aircraft are examined for performance, mission capability, effectiveness, and cost. Characteristics presented include: power loading, wing loading, maximum speed, rate of climb, turn rate, weight and weight distribution, cost and cost distribution. The characteristics of some USSR aircraft are included for comparison. The trends indicate some of the rationale for certain fighter designs and some likely characteristics to be sought in future fighter aircraft designs.

  18. Loftin Collection - Boeing Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1933-01-01

    Either a F2B-1 or F3B-1, both aircraft were built by Boeing and both were powered by Pratt and Whitney Wasp engines. These fighters were intended for Navy shipboard use. Boeing F3B-1: While most Boeing F3B-1s served the U. S. Navy aircraft carriers the Lexington and the Saratoga, this example flew in NACA hands at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in the late 1920's. Also known as the Boeing Model 77, the aircraft was the next to last F3B-1 build in November 1928.

  19. Tropospheric sampling with aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Daum, P.H.; Springston, S.R.

    1991-03-01

    Aircraft constitute a unique environment which places stringent requirements on the instruments used to measure the concentrations of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. Some of these requirements such as minimization of size, weight, and power consumption are general; others are specific to individual techniques. This review presents the basic principles and considerations governing the deployment of trace gas and aerosol instrumentation on an aircraft. An overview of common instruments illustrates these points and provides guidelines for designing and using instruments on aircraft-based measurement programs.

  20. Aircraft compass characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John B; Smith, Clyde W

    1937-01-01

    A description of the test methods used at the National Bureau of Standards for determining the characteristics of aircraft compasses is given. The methods described are particularly applicable to compasses in which mineral oil is used as the damping liquid. Data on the viscosity and density of certain mineral oils used in United States Navy aircraft compasses are presented. Characteristics of Navy aircraft compasses IV to IX and some other compasses are shown for the range of temperatures experienced in flight. Results of flight tests are presented. These results indicate that the characteristic most desired in a steering compass is a short period and, in a check compass, a low overswing.

  1. OVRhyp, Scramjet Test Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslan, J.; Bisard, T.; Dallinga, S.; Draper, K.; Hufford, G.; Peters, W.; Rogers, J.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary design for an unmanned hypersonic research vehicle to test scramjet engines is presented. The aircraft will be launched from a carrier aircraft at an altitude of 40,000 feet at Mach 0.8. The vehicle will then accelerate to Mach 6 at an altitude of 100,000 feet. At this stage the prototype scramjet will be employed to accelerate the vehicle to Mach 10 and maintain Mach 10 flight for 2 minutes. The aircraft will then decelerate and safely land.

  2. Testing Aircraft Instruments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-11

    AD-A095 680 ARMY TEST AND EVALUATION COMMAND ABERDEEN PROVING GRO--ETC F/S 1/4 TESTING AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENTS .(U) FEB 81 CLASSIFIED TOP-6-3-013 ML I...Test and Evaluation Command -?Final 7, Ts .to .. eg----- ( -4_ Fia - / + I ORG REPORT STesting Aircraft Instruments , j P I- I. AUTHOR(es) S. CONTRACT...Identify by block number) This document presents information and procedures for testing aircraft flight and systems performance instruments in the functional

  3. Maximizing Strike Planning Efficiency for a Given Class of Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    at the same time. In general, the aircraft attack target groups and the target groups contain several single targets. In this research, it is assumed...that every strike package attacks a 4 single target in a target group and returns to base. Therefore, aircraft do not carry different types of weapons...However, different strike packages from different bases can be assigned to a target group containing several single targets where each strike package may

  4. A Grounded Theory Study of Aircraft Maintenance Technician Decision-Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norcross, Robert

    Aircraft maintenance technician decision-making and actions have resulted in aircraft system errors causing aircraft incidents and accidents. Aircraft accident investigators and researchers examined the factors that influence aircraft maintenance technician errors and categorized the types of errors in an attempt to prevent similar occurrences. New aircraft technology introduced to improve aviation safety and efficiency incur failures that have no information contained in the aircraft maintenance manuals. According to the Federal Aviation Administration, aircraft maintenance technicians must use only approved aircraft maintenance documents to repair, modify, and service aircraft. This qualitative research used a grounded theory approach to explore the decision-making processes and actions taken by aircraft maintenance technicians when confronted with an aircraft problem not contained in the aircraft maintenance manuals. The target population for the research was Federal Aviation Administration licensed aircraft and power plant mechanics from across the United States. Nonprobability purposeful sampling was used to obtain aircraft maintenance technicians with the experience sought in the study problem. The sample population recruitment yielded 19 participants for eight focus group sessions to obtain opinions, perceptions, and experiences related to the study problem. All data collected was entered into the Atlas ti qualitative analysis software. The emergence of Aircraft Maintenance Technician decision-making themes regarding Aircraft Maintenance Manual content, Aircraft Maintenance Technician experience, and legal implications of not following Aircraft Maintenance Manuals surfaced. Conclusions from this study suggest Aircraft Maintenance Technician decision-making were influenced by experience, gaps in the Aircraft Maintenance Manuals, reliance on others, realizing the impact of decisions concerning aircraft airworthiness, management pressures, and legal concerns

  5. Perceptual fluency and affect without recognition.

    PubMed

    Anand, P; Sternthal, B

    1991-05-01

    A dichotic listening task was used to investigate the affect-without-recognition phenomenon. Subjects performed a distractor task by responding to the information presented in one ear while ignoring the target information presented in the other ear. The subjects' recognition of and affect toward the target information as well as toward foils was measured. The results offer evidence for the affect-without-recognition phenomenon. Furthermore, the data suggest that the subjects' affect toward the stimuli depended primarily on the extent to which the stimuli were perceived as familiar (i.e., subjective familiarity), and this perception was influenced by the ear in which the distractor or the target information was presented. These data are interpreted in terms of current models of recognition memory and hemispheric lateralization.

  6. Evaluation of a voice recognition system for the MOTAS pseudo pilot station function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Langley Research Center has undertaken a technology development activity to provide a capability, the mission oriented terminal area simulation (MOTAS), wherein terminal area and aircraft systems studies can be performed. An experiment was conducted to evaluate state-of-the-art voice recognition technology and specifically, the Threshold 600 voice recognition system to serve as an aircraft control input device for the MOTAS pseudo pilot station function. The results of the experiment using ten subjects showed a recognition error of 3.67 percent for a 48-word vocabulary tested against a programmed vocabulary of 103 words. After the ten subjects retrained the Threshold 600 system for the words which were misrecognized or rejected, the recognition error decreased to 1.96 percent. The rejection rates for both cases were less than 0.70 percent. Based on the results of the experiment, voice recognition technology and specifically the Threshold 600 voice recognition system were chosen to fulfill this MOTAS function.

  7. Solar thermal aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2007-09-18

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  8. Aircraft parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.

    1987-01-01

    The aircraft parameter estimation problem is used to illustrate the utility of parameter estimation, which applies to many engineering and scientific fields. Maximum likelihood estimation has been used to extract stability and control derivatives from flight data for many years. This paper presents some of the basic concepts of aircraft parameter estimation and briefly surveys the literature in the field. The maximum likelihood estimator is discussed, and the basic concepts of minimization and estimation are examined for a simple simulated aircraft example. The cost functions that are to be minimized during estimation are defined and discussed. Graphic representations of the cost functions are given to illustrate the minimization process. Finally, the basic concepts are generalized, and estimation from flight data is discussed. Some of the major conclusions for the simulated example are also developed for the analysis of flight data from the F-14, highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT), and space shuttle vehicles.

  9. Laminar Flow Aircraft Certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Various topics telative to laminar flow aircraft certification are discussed. Boundary layer stability, flaps for laminar flow airfoils, computational wing design studies, manufacturing requirements, windtunnel tests, and flow visualization are among the topics covered.

  10. Pollution reducing aircraft propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, R. M.

    1985-05-28

    Aircraft engine exhaust is mixed with air and fuel and recombusted. Air is drawn into the secondary combustion chamber from suction surfaces on wings. Exhaust of the secondary combustion chamber is blown over wing and fuselage surfaces.

  11. The Aircraft Morphing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wlezien, R. W.; Horner, G. C.; McGowan, A. R.; Padula, S. L.; Scott, M. A.; Silcox, R. J.; Simpson, J. O.

    1998-01-01

    In the last decade smart technologies have become enablers that cut across traditional boundaries in materials science and engineering. Here we define smart to mean embedded actuation, sensing, and control logic in a tightly coupled feedback loop. While multiple successes have been achieved in the laboratory, we have yet to see the general applicability of smart devices to real aircraft systems. The NASA Aircraft Morphing program is an attempt to couple research across a wide range of disciplines to integrate smart technologies into high payoff aircraft applications. The program bridges research in seven individual disciplines and combines the effort into activities in three primary program thrusts. System studies are used to assess the highest- payoff program objectives, and specific research activities are defined to address the technologies required for development of smart aircraft systems. In this paper we address the overall program goals and programmatic structure, and discuss the challenges associated with bringing the technologies to fruition.

  12. Aircraft Engine Emissions. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A conference on a aircraft engine emissions was held to present the results of recent and current work. Such diverse areas as components, controls, energy efficient engine designs, and noise and pollution reduction are discussed.

  13. Depreciation of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P

    1922-01-01

    There is a widespread, and quite erroneous, impression to the effect that aircraft are essentially fragile and deteriorate with great rapidity when in service, so that the depreciation charges to be allowed on commercial or private operation are necessarily high.

  14. Aircraft Morphing program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlezien, Richard W.; Horner, Garnett C.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Padula, Sharon L.; Scott, Michael A.; Silcox, Richard J.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.

    1998-06-01

    In the last decade smart technologies have become enablers that cut across traditional boundaries in materials science and engineering. Here we define smart to mean embedded actuation, sensing, and control logic in a tightly coupled feedback loop. While multiple successes have been achieved in the laboratory, we have yet to see the general applicability of smart devices to real aircraft systems. The NASA Aircraft Morphing program is an attempt to couple research across a wide range of disciplines to integrate smart technologies into high payoff aircraft applications. The program bridges research in seven individual disciplines and combines the effort into activities in three primary program thrusts. System studies are used to assess the highest-payoff program objectives, and specific research activities are defined to address the technologies required for development of smart aircraft systems. In this paper we address the overall program goals and programmatic structure, and discuss the challenges associated with bringing the technologies to fruition.

  15. Advanced hypersonic aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utzinger, Rob; Blank, Hans-Joachim; Cox, Craig; Harvey, Greg; Mckee, Mike; Molnar, Dave; Nagy, Greg; Petersen, Steve

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this design project is to develop the hypersonic reconnaissance aircraft to replace the SR-71 and to complement existing intelligence gathering devices. The initial design considerations were to create a manned vehicle which could complete its mission with at least two airborne refuelings. The aircraft must travel between Mach 4 and Mach 7 at an altitude of 80,000 feet for a maximum range of 12,000 nautical miles. The vehicle should have an air breathing propulsion system at cruise. With a crew of two, the aircraft should be able to take off and land on a 10,000 foot runway, and the yearly operational costs were not to exceed $300 million. Finally, the aircraft should exhibit stealth characteristics, including a minimized radar cross-section (RCS) and a reduced sonic boom. The technology used in this vehicle should allow for production between the years 1993 and 1995.

  16. ANALYSIS OF AIRCRAFT MOTIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed by Ames Research Center, in cooperation with the National Transportation Safety Board, as a technique for deriving time histories of an aircraft's motion from Air Traffic Control (ATC) radar records. This technique uses the radar range and azimuth data, along with the downlinked altitude data, to derive an expanded set of data which includes airspeed, lift, attitude angles (pitch, roll, and heading), etc. This technique should prove useful as a source of data in the investigation of commercial airline accidents and in the analysis of accidents involving aircraft which do not have onboard data recorders (e.g., military, short-haul, and general aviation). The technique used to determine the aircraft motions involves smoothing of raw radar data. These smoothed results, in combination with other available information (wind profiles and aircraft performance data), are used to derive the expanded set of data. This program uses a cubic least-square fit to smooth the raw data. This moving-arc procedure provides a smoothed time history of the aircraft position, the inertial velocities, and accelerations. Using known winds, these inertial data are transformed to aircraft stability axes to provide true airspeed, thrust-drag, lift, and roll angle. Further derivation, based on aircraft dependent performance data, can determine the aircraft angle of attack, pitch, and heading angle. Results of experimental tests indicate that values derived from ATC radar records using this technique agree favorably with airborne measurements. This program is written in FORTRAN IV to be executed in the batch mode, and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of 64k (octal) of 60 bit words.

  17. Aircraft Survivability. Spring 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    advancing and applying technology to predict, evaluate , and improve combat survivability of US flight vehicles. John graduated from the University of...support for most of the aircraft and anti-aircraft programs conducted to date under LFT&E statutory requirements. A number of these test and evaluation ...initiatives to improve the state-of-the-art of LFT&E, to place greater emphasis on the evaluation of human casualties, to integrate Battle Damage

  18. Alternative jet aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Potential changes in jet aircraft fuel specifications due to shifts in supply and quality of refinery feedstocks are discussed with emphasis on the effects these changes would have on the performance and durability of aircraft engines and fuel systems. Combustion characteristics, fuel thermal stability, and fuel pumpability at low temperature are among the factors considered. Combustor and fuel system technology needs for broad specification fuels are reviewed including prevention of fuel system fouling and fuel system technology for fuels with higher freezing points.

  19. Aircraft as Research Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Aeronautical research usually begins with computers, wind tunnels, and flight simulators, but eventually the theories must fly. This is when flight research begins, and aircraft are the primary tools of the trade. Flight research involves doing precision maneuvers in either a specially built experimental aircraft or an existing production airplane that has been modified. For example, the AD-1 was a unique airplane made only for flight research, while the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) was a standard fighter aircraft that was transformed into a one-of-a-kind aircraft as it was fitted with new propulsion systems, flight controls, and scientific equipment. All research aircraft are able to perform scientific experiments because of the onboard instruments that record data about its systems, aerodynamics, and the outside environment. Since the 1970's, NASA flight research has become more comprehensive, with flights involving everything form Space Shuttles to ultralights. NASA now flies not only the fastest airplanes, but some of the slowest. Flying machines continue to evolve with new wing designs, propulsion systems, and flight controls. As always, a look at today's experimental research aircraft is a preview of the future.

  20. A flight test method for pilot/aircraft analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehler, R.; Buchacker, E.

    1986-01-01

    In high precision flight maneuvres a pilot is a part of a closed loop pilot/aircraft system. The assessment of the flying qualities is highly dependent on the closed loop characteristics related to precision maneuvres like approach, landing, air-to-air tracking, air-to-ground tracking, close formation flying and air-to air refueling of the receiver. The object of a research program at DFVLR is the final flight phase of an air to ground mission. In this flight phase the pilot has to align the aircraft with the target, correct small deviations from the target direction and keep the target in his sights for a specific time period. To investigate the dynamic behavior of the pilot-aircraft system a special ground attack flight test technique with a prolonged tracking maneuvres was developed. By changing the targets during the attack the pilot is forced to react continously on aiming errors in his sights. Thus the closed loop pilot/aircraft system is excited over a wide frequency range of interest, the pilot gets more information about mission oriented aircraft dynamics and suitable flight test data for a pilot/aircraft analysis can be generated.

  1. Airport take-off noise assessment aimed at identify responsible aircraft classes.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Perez, Luis A; Sanchez-Fernandez, Luis P; Shaout, Adnan; Suarez-Guerra, Sergio

    2016-01-15

    Assessment of aircraft noise is an important task of nowadays airports in order to fight environmental noise pollution given the recent discoveries on the exposure negative effects on human health. Noise monitoring and estimation around airports mostly use aircraft noise signals only for computing statistical indicators and depends on additional data sources so as to determine required inputs such as the aircraft class responsible for noise pollution. In this sense, the noise monitoring and estimation systems have been tried to improve by creating methods for obtaining more information from aircraft noise signals, especially real-time aircraft class recognition. Consequently, this paper proposes a multilayer neural-fuzzy model for aircraft class recognition based on take-off noise signal segmentation. It uses a fuzzy inference system to build a final response for each class p based on the aggregation of K parallel neural networks outputs Op(k) with respect to Linear Predictive Coding (LPC) features extracted from K adjacent signal segments. Based on extensive experiments over two databases with real-time take-off noise measurements, the proposed model performs better than other methods in literature, particularly when aircraft classes are strongly correlated to each other. A new strictly cross-checked database is introduced including more complex classes and real-time take-off noise measurements from modern aircrafts. The new model is at least 5% more accurate with respect to previous database and successfully classifies 87% of measurements in the new database.

  2. Radar Target Recognition Using Bispectrum Correlation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    21 2. Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar ...................................................22 3. Range Profiles...characteristics need to be stored. 2. Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar We often identify things based on pictures and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is an...By taking multiple discrete measurements while translating the radar , a larger effective aperture can be created. Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar

  3. Precise Aircraft Guidance Techniques for NASA's Operation IceBridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonntag, J. G.; Russell, R.

    2013-12-01

    We present a suite of novel aircraft guidance techniques we designed, developed and now operationally utilize to precisely guide large NASA aircraft and their sensor suites over polar science targets. Our techniques are based on real-time, non-differential Global Positioning System (GPS) data. They interact with the flight crew and the aircraft using a combination of yoke-mounted computer displays and an electronic interface to the aircraft's autopilot via the aircraft's Instrument Landing System (ILS). This ILS interface allows the crew to 'couple' the autopilot to our systems, which then guide the aircraft over science targets with considerably better accuracy than it can using its internal guidance. We regularly demonstrate errors in cross-track aircraft positioning of better than 4 m standard deviation and better than 2 m in mean offset over lengthy great-circle routes across the ice sheets. Our system also has a mode allowing for manual aircraft guidance down a predetermined path of arbitrary curvature, such as a sinuous glacier centerline. This mode is in general not as accurate as the coupled technique but is more versatile. We employ both techniques interchangeably and seamlessly during a typical Operation IceBridge science flight. Flight crews find the system sufficiently intuitive so that little or no familiarization is required prior to their accurately flying science lines. We regularly employ the system on NASA's P-3B and DC-8 aircraft, and since the interface to the aircraft's autopilot operates through the ILS, it should work well on any ILS-equipped aircraft. Finally, we recently extended the system to provide precise, three-dimensional landing approach guidance to the aircraft, thus transforming any approach into a precise ILS approach, even to a primitive runway. This was intended to provide a backup to the aircraft's internal landing systems in the event of a zero-visibility landing to a non-ILS equipped runway, such as the McMurdo sea ice runway

  4. Proposed study to determine potential flight applications and human factors design guidelines of voice recognition/synthesis systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergeron, H. P.

    1983-01-01

    An effort to evaluate the human factors aspects and potential of voice recognition/synthesis techniques and the application of present and near-future (5 years) voice recognition/synthesis systems as a pilot/aircraft cockpit interface capability in an operational environment is discussed. The analysis will emphasize applications for single pilot instrument flight rules operations but will also include applications for other categories of aircraft with various levels of complexity.

  5. Measures of Short-Term Recognition Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ley, Ronald; Karker, Jurgen

    The primary purpose of the present study was to compare three measures of recognition memory. One hundred and forty-four high school students were instructed to study silently 36 CVCVC verbal units (target items) at a 4-sec. rate of presentation. The Ss were then given one of three tasks which required them to identify target items from among…

  6. Automatic TLI recognition system beta prototype testing

    SciTech Connect

    Lassahn, G.D.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the beta prototype automatic target recognition system ATR3, and some performance tests done with this system. This is a fully operational system, with a high computational speed. It is useful for findings any kind of target in digitized image data, and as a general purpose image analysis tool.

  7. Brightness Invariant Port Recognition for Robotic Aircraft Refueling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-13

    autonomous robotic systems for many possible military applications. One such application that the robotics research group at the Air Force Institute of...1.1 Motivation Currently, the development of autonomous robotic systems is a major interest to the Air Force. With the reduction of resources and...to help alleviate or eliminate manpower intensive activities, it is becoming more critical to use autonomous robotic systems to perform some logistic

  8. Design of an Intelligent Tutoring System for Aircraft Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    auspices of the U S Dearirrient of Energy \\B Tr[ O Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos,New Mexico 87545 , AM W 636 F" ST~b NoMstl2 Li 093...student model, and a communication Tail flats mid-mounted on fuselage, protocol. Storyboards and screen design are then or swept-back with rounded tips

  9. Aircraft Survivability: Survivability in The Low Altitude Regime, Summer 2009

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    highly dependent on the source of crude oil and the manufacturer, but generally JP-8 fuel (very similar to Jet A) consists of 75 to 90% paraffins, both...in the field and onboard ships to regenerate damage aircraft to sustain warfighting capability. In 1988, Al was selected as the head of the...aircraft skin . The targets had to be as smooth as possible, while exhibiting flat, singly and doubly curved surfaces. PRISM selected the

  10. High altitude reconnaissance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yazdo, Renee Anna; Moller, David

    1990-01-01

    At the equator the ozone layer ranges from 65,000 to 130,000 plus feet, which is beyond the capabilities of the ER-2, NASA's current high altitude reconnaissance aircraft. The Universities Space Research Association, in cooperation with NASA, is sponsoring an undergraduate program which is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer at the equator. This aircraft must be able to cruise at 130,000 feet for six hours at Mach 0.7, while carrying 3,000 lbs. of payload. In addition, the aircraft must have a minimum range of 6,000 miles. In consideration of the novel nature of this project, the pilot must be able to take control in the event of unforeseen difficulties. Three aircraft configurations were determined to be the most suitable - a joined-wing, a biplane, and a twin-boom conventional airplane. The performance of each configuration was analyzed to investigate the feasibility of the project.

  11. Identification of Aircraft Hazards

    SciTech Connect

    K. Ashley

    2006-12-08

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174235], Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based upon limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and upon crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a monitored geologic repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain, using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987 [DIRS 103124], Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of identified aircraft hazards based upon the criteria that apply to Category 1 and Category 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 [DIRS 176544] (Section 4). The scope of this report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the repository at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (Section 7).

  12. IDENTIFICATION OF AIRCRAFT HAZARDS

    SciTech Connect

    K.L. Ashley

    2005-03-23

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in the ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2004, Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based on limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and on crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987, Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. NUREG-0800 is being used here as a reference because some of the same considerations apply. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of the identified aircraft hazards based on the criteria that apply to Category 1 and 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 (see Section 4). The scope of this technical report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the MGR at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (see Section 7).

  13. Aircraft noise synthesis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, David A.; Grandle, Robert E.

    1987-02-01

    A second-generation Aircraft Noise Synthesis System has been developed to provide test stimuli for studies of community annoyance to aircraft flyover noise. The computer-based system generates realistic, time-varying, audio simulations of aircraft flyover noise at a specified observer location on the ground. The synthesis takes into account the time-varying aircraft position relative to the observer; specified reference spectra consisting of broadband, narrowband, and pure-tone components; directivity patterns; Doppler shift; atmospheric effects; and ground effects. These parameters can be specified and controlled in such a way as to generate stimuli in which certain noise characteristics, such as duration or tonal content, are independently varied, while the remaining characteristics, such as broadband content, are held constant. The system can also generate simulations of the predicted noise characteristics of future aircraft. A description of the synthesis system and a discussion of the algorithms and methods used to generate the simulations are provided. An appendix describing the input data and providing user instructions is also included.

  14. Aircraft noise synthesis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccurdy, David A.; Grandle, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    A second-generation Aircraft Noise Synthesis System has been developed to provide test stimuli for studies of community annoyance to aircraft flyover noise. The computer-based system generates realistic, time-varying, audio simulations of aircraft flyover noise at a specified observer location on the ground. The synthesis takes into account the time-varying aircraft position relative to the observer; specified reference spectra consisting of broadband, narrowband, and pure-tone components; directivity patterns; Doppler shift; atmospheric effects; and ground effects. These parameters can be specified and controlled in such a way as to generate stimuli in which certain noise characteristics, such as duration or tonal content, are independently varied, while the remaining characteristics, such as broadband content, are held constant. The system can also generate simulations of the predicted noise characteristics of future aircraft. A description of the synthesis system and a discussion of the algorithms and methods used to generate the simulations are provided. An appendix describing the input data and providing user instructions is also included.

  15. Aircraft Operations Classification System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlow, Charles; Zhu, Weihong

    2001-01-01

    Accurate data is important in the aviation planning process. In this project we consider systems for measuring aircraft activity at airports. This would include determining the type of aircraft such as jet, helicopter, single engine, and multiengine propeller. Some of the issues involved in deploying technologies for monitoring aircraft operations are cost, reliability, and accuracy. In addition, the system must be field portable and acceptable at airports. A comparison of technologies was conducted and it was decided that an aircraft monitoring system should be based upon acoustic technology. A multimedia relational database was established for the study. The information contained in the database consists of airport information, runway information, acoustic records, photographic records, a description of the event (takeoff, landing), aircraft type, and environmental information. We extracted features from the time signal and the frequency content of the signal. A multi-layer feed-forward neural network was chosen as the classifier. Training and testing results were obtained. We were able to obtain classification results of over 90 percent for training and testing for takeoff events.

  16. Aircraft icing instrumentation: Unfilled needs. [rotary wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitchens, P. F.

    1980-01-01

    A list of icing instrumentation requirements are presented. Because of the Army's helicopter orientation, many of the suggestions are specific to rotary wing aircraft; however, some of the instrumentation are also suitable for general aviation aircraft.

  17. Commercial aircraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. J.

    The history of aircraft noise control development is traced with an eye to forecasting the future. Noise control became imperative with the advent of the first generation of commercial jet aircraft, which were extremely loud. The steady increases in the size of turbofans have nearly matched the progress in noise reduction capabilities in recent years. Only 5 dB of reduction in fleet noise has been achieved since early standards were met. Current engine design is concentrated on increasing fuel efficiency rather than lowering noise emissions. Further difficulties exist because of continued flights with older aircraft. Gains in noise reduction have been made mainly by decreasing exhaust velocities from 600-700 m/sec to 300-400 m/sec. New techniques being explored comprise mixing the core and bypass flows, interaction tone control, reduction of broadband sources, development of acoustic liner technology and alterations in the number of fan blades and stage spacing.

  18. Transport aircraft accident dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cominsky, A.

    1982-01-01

    A study was carried out of 112 impact survivable jet transport aircraft accidents (world wide) of 27,700 kg (60,000 lb.) aircraft and up extending over the last 20 years. This study centered on the effect of impact and the follow-on events on aircraft structures and was confined to the approach, landing and takeoff segments of the flight. The significant characteristics, frequency of occurrence and the effect on the occupants of the above data base were studied and categorized with a view to establishing typical impact scenarios for use as a basis of verifying the effectiveness of potential safety concepts. Studies were also carried out of related subjects such as: (1) assessment of advanced materials; (2) human tolerance to impact; (3) merit functions for safety concepts; and (4) impact analysis and test methods.

  19. Alternative aircraft fuels technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1976-01-01

    NASA is studying the characteristics of future aircraft fuels produced from either petroleum or nonpetroleum sources such as oil shale or coal. These future hydrocarbon based fuels may have chemical and physical properties that are different from present aviation turbine fuels. This research is aimed at determining what those characteristics may be, how present aircraft and engine components and materials would be affected by fuel specification changes, and what changes in both aircraft and engine design would be required to utilize these future fuels without sacrificing performance, reliability, or safety. This fuels technology program was organized to include both in-house and contract research on the synthesis and characterization of fuels, component evaluations of combustors, turbines, and fuel systems, and, eventually, full-scale engine demonstrations. A review of the various elements of the program and significant results obtained so far are presented.

  20. Aircraft Design Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The helicopter pictured is the twin-turbine S-76, produced by Sikorsky Aircraft division of United Technologies, Stratford, Connecticut. It is the first transport helicopter ever dey n e d purely as a commercial vehicle rather than an adaptation of a military design. Being built in large numbers for customers in 16 countries, the S-76 is intended for offshore oil rig support, executive transportation and general utility service. The craft carries 12 passengers plus a crew of two and has a range of more than 450 miles-yet it weighs less than 10,000 pounds. Significant weight reduction was achieved by use of composite materials, which are generally lighter but stronger than conventional aircraft materials. NASA composite technology played a part in development of the S-76. Under contract with NASA's Langley Research Center, Sikorsky Aircraft designed and flight-tested a helicopter airframe of advanced composite materials.

  1. Pathfinder aircraft flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Pathfinder research aircraft's wing structure is clearly defined as it soars under a clear blue sky during a test flight from Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in November of 1996. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration. (See the Pathfinder Plus photos and project description.)

  2. Optical communications for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Optical communications for transport aircraft are discussed. The problem involves: increasing demand for radio-frequency bands from an enlarging pool of users (aircraft, ground and sea vehicles, fleet operators, traffic control centers, and commercial radio and television); desirability of providing high-bandwidth dedicated communications to and from every aircraft in the National Airspace System; need to support communications, navigation, and surveillance for a growing number of aircraft; and improved meteorological observations by use of probe aircraft. The solution involves: optical signal transmission support very high data rates; optical transmission of signals between aircraft, orbiting satellites, and ground stations, where unobstructed line-of-sight is available; conventional radio transmissions of signals between aircraft and ground stations, where optical line-of-sight is unavailable; and radio priority given to aircraft in weather.

  3. Study on Information Fusion Based Check Recognition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong

    Automatic check recognition techniques play an important role in financial systems, especially in risk management. This paper presents a novel check recognition system based on multi-cue information fusion theory. For Chinese bank check, the amount can be independently determined by legal amount, courtesy amount, or E13B code. The check recognition algorithm consists of four steps: preprocessing, check layout analysis, segmentation and recognition, and information fusion. For layout analysis, an adaptive template matching algorithm is presented to locate the target recognition regions on the check. The hidden markov model is used to segment and recognize legal amount. Courtesy and E13B code are recognized by artificial neural network method, respectively. Finally, D-S evidence theory is then introduced to fuse above three recognition results for better recognition performance. Experimental results demonstrate that the system can robustly recognize checks and the information fusion based algorithm improves the recognition rate by 5~10 percent.

  4. Atmospheric Electricity - Aircraft Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    flux may leak inside the aircraft through apertures such as windows , radomes. canopies, seams, and joints. Other fields may arise inside the aircraft...fields of other origins are considered. The third type of c-"pling involves electric fields passing directly through aper- tures, such as windows or...Transistors Microwave Diodes Low Power Transistors 0.001 0.01 0.1 1 10 100 0.01 0.1 1 10 100 Damage Constant. K Damage Constant. K Figure 29 - Ranges

  5. Aircraft Laminar Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.

    1998-01-01

    Aircraft laminar flow control (LFC) from the 1930's through the 1990's is reviewed and the current status of the technology is assessed. Examples are provided to demonstrate the benefits of LFC for subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Early studies related to the laminar boundary-layer flow physics, manufacturing tolerances for laminar flow, and insect-contamination avoidance are discussed. LFC concept studies in wind-tunnel and flight experiments are the major focus of the paper. LFC design tools are briefly outlined for completeness.

  6. Combat aircraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgarbozza, M.; Depitre, A.

    1992-04-01

    A discussion of the characteristics and the noise levels of combat aircraft and of a transport aircraft in taking off and landing are presented. Some methods of noise reduction are discussed, including the following: operational anti-noise procedures; and concepts of future engines (silent post-combustion and variable cycle). Some measurement results concerning the noise generated in flight at great speeds and low altitude will also be examined. Finally, the protection of the environment of French air bases against noise will be described and the possibilities of regulation examined.

  7. Aircraft surface coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Liquid, spray on elastomeric polyurethanes are selected and investigated as best candidates for aircraft external protective coatings. Flight tests are conducted to measure drag effects of these coatings compared to paints and a bare metal surface. The durability of two elastometric polyurethanes are assessed in airline flight service evaluations. Laboratory tests are performed to determine corrosion protection properties, compatibility with aircraft thermal anti-icing systems, the effect of coating thickness on erosion durability, and the erosion characteristics of composite leading edges-bare and coated. A cost and benefits assessment is made to determine the economic value of various coating configurations to the airlines.

  8. Alternative aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longwell, J. P.; Grobman, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    The efficient utilization of fossil fuels by future jet aircraft may necessitate the broadening of current aviation turbine fuel specifications. The most significant changes in specifications would be an increased aromatics content and a higher final boiling point in order to minimize refinery energy consumption and costs. These changes would increase the freezing point and might lower the thermal stability of the fuel, and could cause increased pollutant emissions, increased combustor liner temperatures, and poorer ignition characteristics. The effects that broadened specification fuels may have on present-day jet aircraft and engine components and the technology required to use fuels with broadened specifications are discussed.

  9. Aircraft engines. II

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of the design features and prospective performance gains of ultrahigh bypass subsonic propulsion configurations and various candidate supersonic commercial aircraft powerplants. The supersonic types, whose enhanced thermodynamic cycle efficiency is considered critical to the economic viability of a second-generation SST, are the variable-cycle engine, the variable stream control engine, the turbine-bypass engine, and the supersonic-throughflow fan. Also noted is the turboramjet concept, which will be applicable to hypersonic aircraft whose airframe structure materials can withstand the severe aerothermodynamic conditions of this flight regime.

  10. Aircraft engine pollution reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of engine operation on the types and levels of the major aircraft engine pollutants is described and the major factors governing the formation of these pollutants during the burning of hydrocarbon fuel are discussed. Methods which are being explored to reduce these pollutants are discussed and their application to several experimental research programs are pointed out. Results showing significant reductions in the levels of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, and oxides of nitrogen obtained from experimental combustion research programs are presented and discussed to point out potential application to aircraft engines.

  11. Solar powered aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, W.H.

    1983-11-15

    A cruciform wing structure for a solar powered aircraft is disclosed. Solar cells are mounted on horizontal wing surfaces. Wing surfaces with spanwise axis perpendicular to surfaces maintain these surfaces normal to the sun's rays by allowing aircraft to be flown in a controlled pattern at a large bank angle. The solar airplane may be of conventional design with respect to fuselage, propeller and tail, or may be constructed around a core and driven by propeller mechanisms attached near the tips of the airfoils.

  12. Aircraft Fuel Systems Career Ladder.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    type fittings remove and install fuel cells clean work areas inspect aircraft for safety pin installation purge tanks or cells using blow purge method...INSPECT AIRCRAFT FOR SAFETY PIN INSTALLATION 84 H254 PURGE TANKS OR CELLS USING BLOW PURGE METHOD 83 H227 CHECK AIRCRAFT FOR LIQUID OXYGEN (LOX...H243 INSPECT AIRCRAFT FOR SAFETY PIN INSTALLATION 52 M483 MIX SEALANTS BY HAND 48 K372 CONNECT OR DISCONNECT WIGGINS TYPE FITTINGS 48 H236 DISCONNECT

  13. Aircraft community noise impact studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The objectives of the study are to: (1) conduct a program to determine the community noise impact of advanced technology engines when installed in a supersonic aircraft, (2) determine the potential reduction of community noise by flight operational techniques for the study aircraft, (3) estimate the community noise impact of the study aircraft powered by suppressed turbojet engines and by advanced duct heating turbofan engines, and (4) compare the impact of the two supersonic designs with that of conventional commercial DC-8 aircraft.

  14. Do black ducks and wood ducks habituate to aircraft disturbance?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conomy, J.T.; Dubovsky, J.A.; Collazo, J.A.; Fleming, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Requests to increase military aircraft activity in some training facilities in the United States have raised the need to determine if waterfowl and other wildlife are adversely affected by aircraft disturbance. We hypothesized that habituation was a possible proximate factor influencing the low proportion of free-ranging ducks reacting to military aircraft activities in a training range in coastal North Carolina during winters 1991 and 1992. To test this hypothesis, we subjected captive, wild-strain American black ducks (Anas rubripes) and wood ducks (Aix sponsa) to actual and simulated activities of jet aircraft. In the first experiment, we placed black ducks in an enclosure near the center of aircraft activities on Piney Island, a military aircraft target range in coastal North Carolina. The proportion of times black ducks reacted (e.g., alert posture, fleeing response) to visual and auditory aircraft activity decreased from 38 to 6% during the first 17 days of confinement. Response rates remained stable at 5.8% thereafter. In the second experiment, black ducks and wood ducks were exposed to 6 different recordings of jet noise. The proportion of times black ducks reacted to noise decreased (P 0.05) in time-activity budgets of black ducks between pre-exposure to noise and 24 hr after first exposure. Unlike black ducks, wood duck responses to jet noise did not decrease uniformly among experimental groups following initial exposure to noise (P = 0.01). We conclude that initial exposure to aircraft noise elicits behavioral responses from black ducks and wood ducks. With continued exposure of aircraft noise, black ducks may become habituated. However, wood ducks did not exhibit the same pattern of response, suggesting that the ability of waterfowl to habituate to aircraft noise may be species specific.

  15. Hierarchical Context Modeling for Video Event Recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyang; Ji, Qiang

    2016-10-11

    Current video event recognition research remains largely target-centered. For real-world surveillance videos, targetcentered event recognition faces great challenges due to large intra-class target variation, limited image resolution, and poor detection and tracking results. To mitigate these challenges, we introduced a context-augmented video event recognition approach. Specifically, we explicitly capture different types of contexts from three levels including image level, semantic level, and prior level. At the image level, we introduce two types of contextual features including the appearance context features and interaction context features to capture the appearance of context objects and their interactions with the target objects. At the semantic level, we propose a deep model based on deep Boltzmann machine to learn event object representations and their interactions. At the prior level, we utilize two types of prior-level contexts including scene priming and dynamic cueing. Finally, we introduce a hierarchical context model that systematically integrates the contextual information at different levels. Through the hierarchical context model, contexts at different levels jointly contribute to the event recognition. We evaluate the hierarchical context model for event recognition on benchmark surveillance video datasets. Results show that incorporating contexts in each level can improve event recognition performance, and jointly integrating three levels of contexts through our hierarchical model achieves the best performance.

  16. Multimission Aircraft Design Study, Payload

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    number MC2A Multisensor Command and Control Aircraft MC2A-X Multisensor Command and Control Aircraft Experiment MIDS Multifunctional Information and...reconnaissance (ISR) fleet. The MMA is alternately designated as the Multisensor Command and Control Aircraft (MC2A) as indicated in this text. Figure

  17. Bibliography for aircraft parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Maine, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    An extensive bibliography in the field of aircraft parameter estimation has been compiled. This list contains definitive works related to most aircraft parameter estimation approaches. Theoretical studies as well as practical applications are included. Many of these publications are pertinent to subjects peripherally related to parameter estimation, such as aircraft maneuver design or instrumentation considerations.

  18. Protospacer recognition motifs

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shiraz A.; Erdmann, Susanne; Mojica, Francisco J.M.; Garrett, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    Protospacer adjacent motifs (PAMs) were originally characterized for CRISPR-Cas systems that were classified on the basis of their CRISPR repeat sequences. A few short 2–5 bp sequences were identified adjacent to one end of the protospacers. Experimental and bioinformatical results linked the motif to the excision of protospacers and their insertion into CRISPR loci. Subsequently, evidence accumulated from different virus- and plasmid-targeting assays, suggesting that these motifs were also recognized during DNA interference, at least for the recently classified type I and type II CRISPR-based systems. The two processes, spacer acquisition and protospacer interference, employ different molecular mechanisms, and there is increasing evidence to suggest that the sequence motifs that are recognized, while overlapping, are unlikely to be identical. In this article, we consider the properties of PAM sequences and summarize the evidence for their dual functional roles. It is proposed to use the terms protospacer associated motif (PAM) for the conserved DNA sequence and to employ spacer acqusition motif (SAM) and target interference motif (TIM), respectively, for acquisition and interference recognition sites. PMID:23403393

  19. Aircraft to Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This video discusses how the technology of computer modeling can improve the design and durability of artificial joints for human joint replacement surgery. Also, ultrasound, originally used to detect structural flaws in aircraft, can also be used to quickly assess the severity of a burn patient's injuries, thus aiding the healing process.

  20. Counterrotating aircraft propulsor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Joey L. (Inventor); Elston, III, Sidney B. (Inventor); Tseng, Wu-Yang (Inventor); Hemsworth, Martin C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A propulsor blade for an aircraft engine includes an airfoil section formed in the shape of a scimitar. A metallic blade spar is interposed between opposed surfaces of the blade and is bonded to the surfaces to establish structural integrity of the blade. The metallic blade spar includes a root end allowing attachment of the blade to the engine.

  1. Counterrotating aircraft propulsor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Joey L. (Inventor); Elston, III, Sidney B. (Inventor); Tseng, Wu-Yang (Inventor); Hemsworth, Martin C. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A propulsor blade for an aircraft engine includes an airfoil section formed in the shape of a scimitar. A metallic blade spar is interposed between opposed surfaces of the blade and is bonded to the surfaces to establish structural integrity of the blade. The metallic blade spar includes a root end allowing attachment of the blade to the engine.

  2. Robots for Aircraft Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center charged USBI (now Pratt & Whitney) with the task of developing an advanced stripping system based on hydroblasting to strip paint and thermal protection material from Space Shuttle solid rocket boosters. A robot, mounted on a transportable platform, controls the waterjet angle, water pressure and flow rate. This technology, now known as ARMS, has found commercial applications in the removal of coatings from jet engine components. The system is significantly faster than manual procedures and uses only minimal labor. Because the amount of "substrate" lost is minimal, the life of the component is extended. The need for toxic chemicals is reduced, as is waste disposal and human protection equipment. Users of the ARMS work cell include Delta Air Lines and the Air Force, which later contracted with USBI for development of a Large Aircraft Paint Stripping system (LARPS). LARPS' advantages are similar to ARMS, and it has enormous potential in military and civil aircraft maintenance. The technology may also be adapted to aircraft painting, aircraft inspection techniques and paint stripping of large objects like ships and railcars.

  3. Aircraft Wake RCS Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilson, William H.

    1994-01-01

    A series of multi-frequency radar measurements of aircraft wakes at altitudes of 5,000 to 25,00 ft. were performed at Kwajalein, R.M.I., in May and June of 1990. Two aircraft were tested, a Learjet 35 and a Lockheed C-5A. The cross-section of the wake of the Learjet was too small for detection at Kwajalein. The wake of the C-5A, although also very small, was detected and measured at VHF, UHF, L-, S-, and C-bands, at distances behind the aircraft ranging from about one hundred meters to tens of kilometers. The data suggest that the mechanism by which aircraft wakes have detectable radar signatures is, contrary to previous expectations, unrelated to engine exhaust but instead due to turbulent mixing by the wake vortices of pre-existing index of refraction gradients in the ambient atmosphere. These measurements were of necessity performed with extremely powerful and sensitive instrumentation radars, and the wake cross-section is too small for most practical applications.

  4. Aircraft noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippone, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    This contribution addresses the state-of-the-art in the field of aircraft noise prediction, simulation and minimisation. The point of view taken in this context is that of comprehensive models that couple the various aircraft systems with the acoustic sources, the propagation and the flight trajectories. After an exhaustive review of the present predictive technologies in the relevant fields (airframe, propulsion, propagation, aircraft operations, trajectory optimisation), the paper addresses items for further research and development. Examples are shown for several airplanes, including the Airbus A319-100 (CFM engines), the Bombardier Dash8-Q400 (PW150 engines, Dowty R408 propellers) and the Boeing B737-800 (CFM engines). Predictions are done with the flight mechanics code FLIGHT. The transfer function between flight mechanics and the noise prediction is discussed in some details, along with the numerical procedures for validation and verification. Some code-to-code comparisons are shown. It is contended that the field of aircraft noise prediction has not yet reached a sufficient level of maturity. In particular, some parametric effects cannot be investigated, issues of accuracy are not currently addressed, and validation standards are still lacking.

  5. Aircraft adaptive learning control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, P. S. T.; Vanlandingham, H. F.

    1979-01-01

    The optimal control theory of stochastic linear systems is discussed in terms of the advantages of distributed-control systems, and the control of randomly-sampled systems. An optimal solution to longitudinal control is derived and applied to the F-8 DFBW aircraft. A randomly-sampled linear process model with additive process and noise is developed.

  6. Aircraft Wheel Life Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    responsible for a significant amount of aircraft dam - age. Many such wheel failures have been catastrophic, resulting in a sudden loss of tire inflation...Fatigue Crack Growth," Fatigue and Fracture in Engineering Materials and Structures, Vol. 10, 419-428, 1987. Cox, B. N., Pardee , W., and Morris, W. L

  7. Advanced ATC: An aircraft perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Credeur, Leonard; Williams, David H.; Howell, William E.; Spitzer, Cary R.

    1986-01-01

    The principal operational improvements desired by commercial aircraft operators in the United States are efficient aircraft operations and delay reductions at the major terminals. Efforts underway within the Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program at the Langley Research Center to provide a technology basis for reducing delay while improving aircraft efficiency are discussed. The principal thrust is the development of time-based traffic control concepts which could be used within the framework of the upgraded National Airspace System and which would allow conventionally equipped aircraft to operate in a manner compatible with advanced aircraft.

  8. Turboprop cargo aircraft systems study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muehlbauer, J. C.; Hewell, J. G., Jr.; Lindenbaum, S. P.; Randall, C. C.; Searle, N.; Stone, R. G., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of using advanced turboprop propulsion systems to reduce the fuel consumption and direct operating costs of cargo aircraft were studied, and the impact of these systems on aircraft noise and noise prints around a terminal area was determined. Parametric variations of aircraft and propeller characteristics were investigated to determine their effects on noiseprint areas, fuel consumption, and direct operating costs. From these results, three aircraft designs were selected and subjected to design refinements and sensitivity analyses. Three competitive turbofan aircraft were also defined from parametric studies to provide a basis for comparing the two types of propulsion.

  9. Cryogenic system options for a superconducting aircraft propulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, F.; Palmer, J.; Bertola, L.; Miller, Paul; Dodds, Graham

    2015-12-01

    There is a perceived need in the future for a move away from traditional aircraft designs in order to meet ambitious emissions and fuel burn targets. High temperature superconducting distributed propulsion may be an enabler for aircraft designs that have better propulsive efficiency and lower drag. There has been significant work considering the electrical systems required, but less on the cryogenics to enable it. This paper discusses some of the major choices to be faced in cryocooling for aircraft. The likely need for a disposable cryogen to reduce power demand is explained. A set of cryocooling methods are considered in a sensitivity study, which shows that the feasibility of the cryogenic system will depend strongly on the superconducting technology and the aircraft platform. It is argued that all three aspects must be researched and designed in close collaboration to reach a viable solution.

  10. Microwave holographic imaging of aircraft with spaceborne illuminating source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkowitz, R. S.; Dzekov, T. A.

    1976-01-01

    The conceptual development of a method for the high angular resolution and accurate angular position estimates for the surveillance and traffic control of aircraft is considered. A target volume several hundred kilometers in diameter is illuminated by a CW microwave source located on a satellite in geosynchronous orbit. Signals are received by a large array of random, conformally located receiving elements. Each element receives the direct signal from the satellite plus signals reflected from aircraft in the illuminated volume. Coherent combination of the signals received from the individual elements permits the equivalent of holographic imaging or multiple beam formation from which the useful target data can be obtained.

  11. 19 CFR 10.183 - Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components, and... aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including their parts, components, and... United States Coast Guard, aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including...

  12. 19 CFR 10.183 - Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components, and... aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including their parts, components, and... United States Coast Guard, aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including...

  13. 19 CFR 10.183 - Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components, and... aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including their parts, components, and... United States Coast Guard, aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including...

  14. 19 CFR 10.183 - Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components, and... aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including their parts, components, and... United States Coast Guard, aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including...

  15. 19 CFR 10.183 - Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components, and... aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including their parts, components, and... United States Coast Guard, aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including...

  16. Aircraft family design using enhanced collaborative optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Brian Douglas

    Significant progress has been made toward the development of multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) methods that are well-suited to practical large-scale design problems. However, opportunities exist for further progress. This thesis describes the development of enhanced collaborative optimization (ECO), a new decomposition-based MDO method. To support the development effort, the thesis offers a detailed comparison of two existing MDO methods: collaborative optimization (CO) and analytical target cascading (ATC). This aids in clarifying their function and capabilities, and it provides inspiration for the development of ECO. The ECO method offers several significant contributions. First, it enhances communication between disciplinary design teams while retaining the low-order coupling between them. Second, it provides disciplinary design teams with more authority over the design process. Third, it resolves several troubling computational inefficiencies that are associated with CO. As a result, ECO provides significant computational savings (relative to CO) for the test cases and practical design problems described in this thesis. New aircraft development projects seldom focus on a single set of mission requirements. Rather, a family of aircraft is designed, with each family member tailored to a different set of requirements. This thesis illustrates the application of decomposition-based MDO methods to aircraft family design. This represents a new application area, since MDO methods have traditionally been applied to multidisciplinary problems. ECO offers aircraft family design the same benefits that it affords to multidisciplinary design problems. Namely, it simplifies analysis integration, it provides a means to manage problem complexity, and it enables concurrent design of all family members. In support of aircraft family design, this thesis introduces a new wing structural model with sufficient fidelity to capture the tradeoffs associated with component

  17. Development Cycle Time Simulation for Civil Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitz, William; Berardino, Frank; Golaszewski, Richard; Johnson, Jesse

    2001-01-01

    Cycle Time Reduction (CTR) will be one of the major factors affecting the future of the civil aerospace industry. This focus is the end reflection of the level of competition in the commercial large carrier aircraft industry. Aircraft manufacturer must minimize costs and pass a portion of those savings onto buyers. CTR is one strategy used to move the manufacturing firm down the cost curve. The current NASA Airframe Development Cycle Time Reduction Goal is 50% by year 2022. This goal is not achievable based on the program analysis done by the LMI/GRA team. This may mean that the current roster of NASA CTR programs needs to be reexamined or that the program technology progress factors, as determined by the NASA experts, were understated. Programs that duplicate the reductions of others should be replaced with non-duplicative programs. In addition, new programs targeting a specific part of the cycle can be developed.

  18. Image Recognition Based on Biometric Pattern Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuliang; Chen, Zhong; Liu, Chenglian; Guo, Yongning; Lin, Xueyun

    2011-09-01

    A new method, biomimetric pattern recognition, is mentioned to recognize images. At first, the image is pretreatment and feature extraction, then a high vector is got. A biomimetric pattern recognition model is designed. The judgment function is used to discriminate the classification of the samples. It is showed that the method is effective for little samples by experiment. It would be useful in many fields in future.

  19. Adaptive infrared target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Jonah C.; Stevens, Mark R.; Eaton, Ross S.; Snorrason, Magnus S.

    2004-09-01

    Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) algorithms are extremely sensitive to differences between the operating conditions under which they are trained and the extended operating conditions (EOCs) in which the fielded algorithms are tested. These extended operating conditions can cause a target's signature to be drastically different from training exemplars/models. For example, a target's signature can be influenced by: the time of day, the time of year, the weather, atmospheric conditions, position of the sun or other illumination sources, the target surface and material properties, the target composition, the target geometry, sensor characteristics, sensor viewing angle and range, the target surroundings and environment, and the target and scene temperature. Recognition rates degrade if an ATR is not trained for a particular EOC. Most infrared target detection techniques are based on a very simple probabilistic theory. This theory states that a pixel should be assigned the label of "target" if a set of measurements (features) is more likely to have come from an assumed (or learned) distribution of target features than from the distribution of background features. However, most detection systems treat these learned distributions as static and they are not adapted to changing EOCs. In this paper, we present an algorithm for assigning a pixel the label of target or background based on a statistical comparison of the distributions of measurements surrounding that pixel in the image. This method provides a feature-level adaptation to changing EOCs. Results are demonstrated on infrared imagery containing several military vehicles.

  20. Autonomous aircraft initiative study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewett, Marle D.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a consulting effort to aid NASA Ames-Dryden in defining a new initiative in aircraft automation are described. The initiative described is a multi-year, multi-center technology development and flight demonstration program. The initiative features the further development of technologies in aircraft automation already being pursued at multiple NASA centers and Department of Defense (DoD) research and Development (R and D) facilities. The proposed initiative involves the development of technologies in intelligent systems, guidance, control, software development, airborne computing, navigation, communications, sensors, unmanned vehicles, and air traffic control. It involves the integration and implementation of these technologies to the extent necessary to conduct selected and incremental flight demonstrations.

  1. Air pollution from aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heywood, J. B.; Fay, J. A.; Chigier, N. A.

    1979-01-01

    Forty-one annotated abstracts of reports generated at MIT and the University of Sheffield are presented along with summaries of the technical projects undertaken. Work completed includes: (1) an analysis of the soot formation and oxidation rates in gas turbine combustors, (2) modelling the nitric oxide formation process in gas turbine combustors, (3) a study of the mechanisms causing high carbon monoxide emissions from gas turbines at low power, (4) an analysis of the dispersion of pollutants from aircraft both around large airports and from the wakes of subsonic and supersonic aircraft, (5) a study of the combustion and flow characteristics of the swirl can modular combustor and the development and verification of NO sub x and CO emissions models, (6) an analysis of the influence of fuel atomizer characteristics on the fuel-air mixing process in liquid fuel spray flames, and (7) the development of models which predict the stability limits of fully and partially premixed fuel-air mixtures.

  2. Aircraft turbofan noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, J. F.; Rice, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    Turbofan noise generation and suppression in aircraft engines are reviewed. The chain of physical processes which connect unsteady flow interactions with fan blades to far field noise is addressed. Mechanism identification and description, duct propagation, radiation and acoustic suppression are discussed. The experimental technique of fan inflow static tests are discussed. Rotor blade surface pressure and wake velocity measurements aid in the determination of the types and strengths of the generation mechanisms. Approaches to predicting or measuring acoustic mode content, optimizing treatment impedance to maximize attenuation, translating impedance into porous wall structure and interpreting far field directivity patterns are illustrated by comparisons of analytical and experimental results. The interdependence of source and acoustic treatment design to minimize far field noise is emphasized. Area requiring further research are discussed and the relevance of aircraft turbofan results to quieting other turbomachinery installations is addressed.

  3. Energy efficient aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, R.; Miller, B.

    1979-01-01

    The three engine programs that constitute the propulsion portion of NASA's Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program are described, their status indicated, and anticipated improvements in SFC discussed. The three engine programs are: (1) engine component improvement, directed at current engines, (2) energy efficient engine, directed at new turbofan engines, and (3) advanced turboprops, directed at technology for advanced turboprop-powered aircraft with cruise speeds to Mach 0.8. Unique propulsion system interactive ties to the airframe resulting from engine design features to reduce fuel consumption are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the advanced turboprop since it offers the largest potential fuel savings of the three propulsion programs and also has the strongest interactive ties to the airframe.

  4. Energy efficient aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, R.; Miller, B.

    1979-01-01

    The three engine programs that constitute the propulsion portion of NASA's Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program are described, their status indicated, and anticipated improvements in SFC discussed. The three engine programs are (1) Engine Component Improvement--directed at current engines, (2) Energy Efficiency Engine directed at new turbofan engines, and (3) Advanced Turboprops--directed at technology for advanced turboprop--powered aircraft with cruise speeds to Mach 0.8. Unique propulsion system interactive ties to the airframe resulting from engine design features to reduce fuel consumption are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the advanced turboprop since it offers the largest potential fuel savings of the three propulsion programs and also has the strongest interactive ties to the airframe.

  5. Aircraft Survivability. Fall 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft Survivability Program (JASP) Short Course was held 17-20 May at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey, CA. 52 students attended the...Postgraduate School where he earned his MBA in Financial Management. Jimmy earned his BS in General Science from the United States Naval Academy...Answering these questions requires credible threat models supported by high -fidelity test characterizations of the MANPADS missile threat. Based on

  6. X-29: Research Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary look at the Ames Dryden Flight Research Center in the context of the X-29 aircraft is provided. The uses of the X-29's 30 deg forward swept wing are examined. The video highlights the historical development of the forward swept wing, and its unique blend of speed, agility, and slow flight potential. The central optimization of the wing, the forward canard, and the rear flaps by an onboard flight computer is also described.

  7. Aircraft Survivability. Summer 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Survivability Program Office SUMMER 2011 craShworthineSS & personnel casualties Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public...unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Aircraft Survivability is published three times a year by the Joint...and stroking seats. The knowledge gained from studying Vietnam crash data was consolidated into the Crash Survival Design Guide (CSDG), which

  8. Electrical Thermometers for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John B; Womack, S H J

    1937-01-01

    Electrical thermometers commonly used on aircraft are the thermoelectric type for measuring engine-cylinder temperatures, the resistance type for measuring air temperatures, and the superheat meters of thermoelectric and resistance types for use on airships. These instruments are described and their advantages and disadvantages enumerated. Methods of testing these instruments and the performance to be expected from each are discussed. The field testing of engine-cylinder thermometers is treated in detail.

  9. Aircraft EMP Isolation Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    also influence the formation of streamers. If electrons are swept away from the electrode surface , additional electrons must leave the surface , if...presented. The dielectric materials to be used in the proposed solutions are discussed. In order to simulate the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) of a nuclear...structure. Therefore, the flashover to ground of the aircraft structure (at the point of the sharp projection) depends on the amplitude and pulse shape of the

  10. Slotted Aircraft Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLean, James D. (Inventor); Witkowski, David P. (Inventor); Campbell, Richard L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A swept aircraft wing includes a leading airfoil element and a trailing airfoil element. At least one full-span slot is defined by the wing during at least one transonic condition of the wing. The full-span slot allows a portion of the air flowing along the lower surface of the leading airfoil element to split and flow over the upper surface of the trailing airfoil element so as to achieve a performance improvement in the transonic condition.

  11. Optical Pattern Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Francis T. S.; Jutamulia, Suganda

    2008-10-01

    Contributors; Preface; 1. Pattern recognition with optics Francis T. S. Yu and Don A. Gregory; 2. Hybrid neural networks for nonlinear pattern recognition Taiwei Lu; 3. Wavelets, optics, and pattern recognition Yao Li and Yunglong Sheng; 4. Applications of the fractional Fourier transform to optical pattern recognition David Mendlovic, Zeev Zalesky and Haldum M. Oxaktas; 5. Optical implementation of mathematical morphology Tien-Hsin Chao; 6. Nonlinear optical correlators with improved discrimination capability for object location and recognition Leonid P. Yaroslavsky; 7. Distortion-invariant quadratic filters Gregory Gheen; 8. Composite filter synthesis as applied to pattern recognition Shizhou Yin and Guowen Lu; 9. Iterative procedures in electro-optical pattern recognition Joseph Shamir; 10. Optoelectronic hybrid system for three-dimensional object pattern recognition Guoguang Mu, Mingzhe Lu and Ying Sun; 11. Applications of photrefractive devices in optical pattern recognition Ziangyang Yang; 12. Optical pattern recognition with microlasers Eung-Gi Paek; 13. Optical properties and applications of bacteriorhodopsin Q. Wang Song and Yu-He Zhang; 14. Liquid-crystal spatial light modulators Aris Tanone and Suganda Jutamulia; 15. Representations of fully complex functions on real-time spatial light modulators Robert W. Cohn and Laurence G. Hassbrook; Index.

  12. Automatic TLI recognition system, programmer`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Lassahn, G.D.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the software of an automatic target recognition system (version 14), from a programmer`s point of view. The intent is to provide information that will help people who wish to modify the software. In separate volumes are a general description of the ATR system, Automatic TLI Recognition System, General Description, and a user`s manual, Automatic TLI Recognition System, User`s Guide. 2 refs.

  13. Automatic TLI recognition system, general description

    SciTech Connect

    Lassahn, G.D.

    1997-02-01

    This report is a general description of an automatic target recognition system developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the Department of Energy. A user`s manual is a separate volume, Automatic TLI Recognition System, User`s Guide, and a programmer`s manual is Automatic TLI Recognition System, Programmer`s Guide. This system was designed as an automatic target recognition system for fast screening of large amounts of multi-sensor image data, based on low-cost parallel processors. This system naturally incorporates image data fusion, and it gives uncertainty estimates. It is relatively low cost, compact, and transportable. The software is easily enhanced to expand the system`s capabilities, and the hardware is easily expandable to increase the system`s speed. In addition to its primary function as a trainable target recognition system, this is also a versatile, general-purpose tool for image manipulation and analysis, which can be either keyboard-driven or script-driven. This report includes descriptions of three variants of the computer hardware, a description of the mathematical basis if the training process, and a description with examples of the system capabilities.

  14. Mutational analysis of Escherichia coli σ28 and its target promoters reveal recognition of a composite −10 region, comprised of an “extended −10 motif” and a core-10 element

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Byoung-Mo; Rhodius, Virgil A.; Campbell, Elizabeth A.; Gross, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary σ28 controls the expression of flagella related genes and is the most widely distributed alternative σ factor, present in motile gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The distinguishing feature of σ28 promoters is a long −10 region (GCCGATAA). Despite the fact that the upstream GC is highly conserved, previous studies have not indicated a functional role for this motif. Here we examine the functional relevance of the GCCG motif and determine which residues in σ28 participate in its recognition. We find that the GCCG motif is a functionally important composite element. The upstream GC constitutes an extended −10 motif and is recognized by R91, a residue in Domain 3 of σ28. The downstream CG is the upstream edge of −10 region of the promoter; two residues in Region 2.4, D81 and R84, participate in its recognition. Consistent with their role in base-specific recognition of the promoter, R91, D81 and D84 are universally conserved in σ28 orthologues. σ28 is the second Group 3 σ shown to use an extended −10 region in promoter recognition, raising the possibility that other Group 3 σs will do so as well. PMID:19400790

  15. Interaction of Aircraft Wakes From Laterally Spaced Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.

    2009-01-01

    Large Eddy Simulations are used to examine wake interactions from aircraft on closely spaced parallel paths. Two sets of experiments are conducted, with the first set examining wake interactions out of ground effect (OGE) and the second set for in ground effect (IGE). The initial wake field for each aircraft represents a rolled-up wake vortex pair generated by a B-747. Parametric sets include wake interactions from aircraft pairs with lateral separations of 400, 500, 600, and 750 ft. The simulation of a wake from a single aircraft is used as baseline. The study shows that wake vortices from either a pair or a formation of B-747 s that fly with very close lateral spacing, last longer than those from an isolated B-747. For OGE, the inner vortices between the pair of aircraft, ascend, link and quickly dissipate, leaving the outer vortices to decay and descend slowly. For the IGE scenario, the inner vortices ascend and last longer, while the outer vortices decay from ground interaction at a rate similar to that expected from an isolated aircraft. Both OGE and IGE scenarios produce longer-lasting wakes for aircraft with separations less than 600 ft. The results are significant because concepts to increase airport capacity have been proposed that assume either aircraft formations and/or aircraft pairs landing on very closely spaced runways.

  16. The effects of road traffic and aircraft noise exposure on children's episodic memory: the RANCH project.

    PubMed

    Matheson, Mark; Clark, Charlotte; Martin, Rocio; van Kempen, Elise; Haines, Mary; Barrio, Isabel Lopez; Hygge, Staffan; Stansfeld, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have found that chronic exposure to aircraft noise has a negative effect on children's performance on tests of episodic memory. The present study extended the design of earlier studies in three ways: firstly, by examining the effects of two noise sources, aircraft and road traffic, secondly, by examining exposure-effect relationships, and thirdly, by carrying out parallel field studies in three European countries, allowing cross-country comparisons to be made. A total of 2844 children aged between 8 years 10 months and 12 years 10 months (mean age 10 years 6 months) completed classroom-based tests of cued recall, recognition memory and prospective memory. Questionnaires were also completed by the children and their parents in order to provide information about socioeconomic context. Multilevel modeling analysis revealed aircraft noise to be associated with an impairment of recognition memory in a linear exposure-effect relationship. The analysis also found road traffic noise to be associated with improved performance on cued recall in a linear exposure-effect relationship. No significant association was found between exposure to aircraft noise and cued recall or prospective memory. Likewise, no significant association was found between road traffic noise and recognition or prospective memory. Taken together, these findings indicate that exposure to aircraft noise and road traffic noise can impact on certain aspects of children's episodic memory.

  17. The Elite: A high speed, low-cost general aviation aircraft for Aeroworld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rueter, Amy; Fay, Jonathan; Staudmeister, Douglas; Avis, Daniel; Le, Tuan; Stem, Steven

    1994-01-01

    The Elite is a six passenger, general aviation aircraft targeted at the upper middle class private pilot. The Elite is a low wing, conventional monoplane utilizing rudder, ailerons, and a stabilator. The Elite will create a new class of aircraft in Aeroworld. This class of aircraft will demonstrate a substantial improvement in cruise speed over the current existing commercial fleet of aircraft in Aeroworld. This new class will be capable of servicing all existing airstrips in Aeroworld, including rough and short airways. The drivers of this design were aesthetics, a high cruise speed, and take-off distance.

  18. In flight image processing on multi-rotor aircraft for autonomous landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Richard, Jr.

    An estimated $6.4 billion was spent during the year 2013 on developing drone technology around the world and is expected to double in the next decade. However, drone applications typically require strong pilot skills, safety, responsibilities and adherence to regulations during flight. If the flight control process could be safer and more reliable in terms of landing, it would be possible to further develop a wider range of applications. The objective of this research effort is to describe the design and evaluation of a fully autonomous Unmanned Aerial system (UAS), specifically a four rotor aircraft, commonly known as quad copter for precise landing applications. The full landing autonomy is achieved by image processing capabilities during flight for target recognition by employing the open source library OpenCV. In addition, all imaging data is processed by a single embedded computer that estimates a relative position with respect to the target landing pad. Results shows a reduction on the average offset error by 67.88% in comparison to the current return to lunch (RTL) method which only relies on GPS positioning. The present work validates the need for relying on image processing for precise landing applications instead of the inexact method of a commercial low cost GPS dependency.

  19. 19 CFR 122.64 - Other aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Other aircraft. 122.64 Section 122.64 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Clearance of Aircraft and Permission To Depart § 122.64 Other aircraft. Clearance or permission to depart shall be requested by the aircraft commander or agent for aircraft...

  20. 19 CFR 122.64 - Other aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Other aircraft. 122.64 Section 122.64 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Clearance of Aircraft and Permission To Depart § 122.64 Other aircraft. Clearance or permission to depart shall be requested by the aircraft commander or agent for aircraft...

  1. 19 CFR 122.64 - Other aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Other aircraft. 122.64 Section 122.64 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Clearance of Aircraft and Permission To Depart § 122.64 Other aircraft. Clearance or permission to depart shall be requested by the aircraft commander or agent for aircraft...

  2. 40 CFR 87.6 - Aircraft safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aircraft safety. 87.6 Section 87.6... POLLUTION FROM AIRCRAFT AND AIRCRAFT ENGINES General Provisions § 87.6 Aircraft safety. The provisions of... be met within the specified time without creating a hazard to aircraft safety....

  3. 19 CFR 122.64 - Other aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Other aircraft. 122.64 Section 122.64 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Clearance of Aircraft and Permission To Depart § 122.64 Other aircraft. Clearance or permission to depart shall be requested by the aircraft commander or agent for aircraft...

  4. 40 CFR 87.6 - Aircraft safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Aircraft safety. 87.6 Section 87.6... POLLUTION FROM AIRCRAFT AND AIRCRAFT ENGINES General Provisions § 87.6 Aircraft safety. The provisions of... be met within the specified time without creating a hazard to aircraft safety....

  5. 19 CFR 122.64 - Other aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Other aircraft. 122.64 Section 122.64 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Clearance of Aircraft and Permission To Depart § 122.64 Other aircraft. Clearance or permission to depart shall be requested by the aircraft commander or agent for aircraft...

  6. Vocational Training and European Standardisation of Qualifications: The Case of Aircraft Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Joachim; Ourtau, Maurice

    2009-01-01

    Initiatives to standardise the conditions for practising certain regulated activities are being taken at European level, particularly in light of the free movement of people and the recognition of qualifications in Member states. This paper looks at the introduction of european licences for aircraft maintenance engineers. It follows an in-depth…

  7. Improving protein fold recognition by random forest

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recognizing the correct structural fold among known template protein structures for a target protein (i.e. fold recognition) is essential for template-based protein structure modeling. Since the fold recognition problem can be defined as a binary classification problem of predicting whether or not the unknown fold of a target protein is similar to an already known template protein structure in a library, machine learning methods have been effectively applied to tackle this problem. In our work, we developed RF-Fold that uses random forest - one of the most powerful and scalable machine learning classification methods - to recognize protein folds. Results RF-Fold consists of hundreds of decision trees that can be trained efficiently on very large datasets to make accurate predictions on a highly imbalanced dataset. We evaluated RF-Fold on the standard Lindahl's benchmark dataset comprised of 976 × 975 target-template protein pairs through cross-validation. Compared with 17 different fold recognition methods, the performance of RF-Fold is generally comparable to the best performance in fold recognition of different difficulty ranging from the easiest family level, the medium-hard superfamily level, and to the hardest fold level. Based on the top-one template protein ranked by RF-Fold, the correct recognition rate is 84.5%, 63.4%, and 40.8% at family, superfamily, and fold levels, respectively. Based on the top-five template protein folds ranked by RF-Fold, the correct recognition rate increases to 91.5%, 79.3% and 58.3% at family, superfamily, and fold levels. Conclusions The good performance achieved by the RF-Fold demonstrates the random forest's effectiveness for protein fold recognition. PMID:25350499

  8. Kin Recognition in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wall, Daniel

    2016-09-08

    The ability of bacteria to recognize kin provides a means to form social groups. In turn these groups can lead to cooperative behaviors that surpass the ability of the individual. Kin recognition involves specific biochemical interactions between a receptor(s) and an identification molecule(s). Recognition specificity, ensuring that nonkin are excluded and kin are included, is critical and depends on the number of loci and polymorphisms involved. After recognition and biochemical perception, the common ensuing cooperative behaviors include biofilm formation, quorum responses, development, and swarming motility. Although kin recognition is a fundamental mechanism through which cells might interact, microbiologists are only beginning to explore the topic. This review considers both molecular and theoretical aspects of bacterial kin recognition. Consideration is also given to bacterial diversity, genetic relatedness, kin selection theory, and mechanisms of recognition.

  9. Multimodal eye recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi; Du, Yingzi; Thomas, N. L.; Delp, Edward J., III

    2010-04-01

    Multimodal biometrics use more than one means of biometric identification to achieve higher recognition accuracy, since sometimes a unimodal biometric is not good enough used to do identification and classification. In this paper, we proposed a multimodal eye recognition system, which can obtain both iris and sclera patterns from one color eye image. Gabor filter and 1-D Log-Gabor filter algorithms have been applied as the iris recognition algorithms. In sclera recognition, we introduced automatic sclera segmentation, sclera pattern enhancement, sclera pattern template generation, and sclera pattern matching. We applied kernelbased matching score fusion to improve the performance of the eye recognition system. The experimental results show that the proposed eye recognition method can achieve better performance compared to unimodal biometric identification, and the accuracy of our proposed kernel-based matching score fusion method is higher than two classic linear matching score fusion methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA).

  10. Mission management aircraft operations manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This manual prescribes the NASA mission management aircraft program and provides policies and criteria for the safe and economical operation, maintenance, and inspection of NASA mission management aircraft. The operation of NASA mission management aircraft is based on the concept that safety has the highest priority. Operations involving unwarranted risks will not be tolerated. NASA mission management aircraft will be designated by the Associate Administrator for Management Systems and Facilities. NASA mission management aircraft are public aircraft as defined by the Federal Aviation Act of 1958. Maintenance standards, as a minimum, will meet those required for retention of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airworthiness certification. Federal Aviation Regulation Part 91, Subparts A and B, will apply except when requirements of this manual are more restrictive.

  11. Advanced aircraft for atmospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P.; Wegener, S.; Langford, J.; Anderson, J.; Lux, D.; Hall, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    The development of aircraft for high-altitude research is described in terms of program objectives and environmental, technological limitations, and the work on the Perseus A aircraft. The need for these advanced aircraft is proposed in relation to atmospheric science issues such as greenhouse trapping, the dynamics of tropical cyclones, and stratospheric ozone. The implications of the study on aircraft design requirements is addressed with attention given to the basic categories of high-altitude, long-range, long-duration, and nap-of-the-earth aircraft. A strategy is delineated for a platform that permits unique stratospheric measurements and is a step toward a more advanced aircraft. The goal of Perseus A is to carry scientific air sampling payloads weighing at least 50 kg to altitudes of more than 25 km. The airfoils are designed for low Reynolds numbers, the structural weight is very low, and the closed-cycle power plant runs on liquid oxygen.

  12. Aircraft cockpit vision: Math model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashir, J.; Singh, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed to describe the field of vision of a pilot seated in an aircraft. Given the position and orientation of the aircraft, along with the geometrical configuration of its windows, and the location of an object, the model determines whether the object would be within the pilot's external vision envelope provided by the aircraft's windows. The computer program using this model was implemented and is described.

  13. Radar Detectability of Light Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    the aircraft is mounted on a structure that enables the viewing angle (aspect) presented to the radar to be varied. For each aircraft type, the RCS...environment; there are no spurious reflections from the ground or from the supporting structure ; and the effects of propeller rotation, small aircraft...motions due to c-ntrol action or atmospheric turbulence, and structural deflections due to inertial and aerodynamic loading, are properly represented

  14. Focus on the Forms: Recognition Practice in Chinese Vocabulary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Michael; Jiang, Wenying

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the effect of recognition-based retrieval practice on vocabulary learning in a university Chinese class. Students (N=26) were given practice retrieving new vocabulary (single or two-character words) in a series of simple form recognition tests administered over four weeks. The test sets consisted of target vocabulary that…

  15. Encoding Specificity: Retrieval in the Recognition Failure Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartling, Carl A.; Thompson, Charles P.

    1977-01-01

    The paradigm producing recognition failure of recallable words was investigated in a series of three experiments. Results indicate that retrieval asymmetry: (a) exists in the recognition failure paradigm directly following list study, (b) increases significantly following a free-association task aimed at generation of the target words from the…

  16. Intelligent aircraft/airspace systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wangermann, John P.

    1995-01-01

    Projections of future air traffic predict at least a doubling of the number of revenue passenger miles flown by the year 2025. To meet this demand, an Intelligent Aircraft/Airspace System (IAAS) has been proposed. The IAAS operates on the basis of principled negotiation between intelligent agents. The aircraft/airspace system today consists of many agents, such as airlines, control facilities, and aircraft. All the agents are becoming increasingly capable as technology develops. These capabilities should be exploited to create an Intelligent Aircraft/Airspace System (IAAS) that would meet the predicted traffic levels of 2005.

  17. Scheduling of an aircraft fleet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paltrinieri, Massimo; Momigliano, Alberto; Torquati, Franco

    1992-01-01

    Scheduling is the task of assigning resources to operations. When the resources are mobile vehicles, they describe routes through the served stations. To emphasize such aspect, this problem is usually referred to as the routing problem. In particular, if vehicles are aircraft and stations are airports, the problem is known as aircraft routing. This paper describes the solution to such a problem developed in OMAR (Operative Management of Aircraft Routing), a system implemented by Bull HN for Alitalia. In our approach, aircraft routing is viewed as a Constraint Satisfaction Problem. The solving strategy combines network consistency and tree search techniques.

  18. NASA research in aircraft propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    A broad overview of the scope of research presently being supported by NASA in aircraft propulsion is presented with emphasis on Lewis Research Center activities related to civil air transports, CTOL and V/STOL systems. Aircraft systems work is performed to identify the requirements for the propulsion system that enhance the mission capabilities of the aircraft. This important source of innovation and creativity drives the direction of propulsion research. In a companion effort, component research of a generic nature is performed to provide a better basis for design and provides an evolutionary process for technological growth that increases the capabilities of all types of aircraft. Both are important.

  19. Intelligent Aircraft Damage Assessment, Trajectory Planning, and Decision-Making under Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Israel; Sarigul-Klijn, Nesrin

    Situational awareness and learning are necessary to identify and select the optimal set of mutually non-exclusive hypothesis in order to maximize mission performance and adapt system behavior accordingly. This paper presents a hierarchical and decentralized approach for integrated damage assessment and trajectory planning in aircraft with uncertain navigational decision-making. Aircraft navigation can be safely accomplished by properly addressing the following: decision-making, obstacle perception, aircraft state estimation, and aircraft control. When in-flight failures or damage occur, rapid and precise decision-making under imprecise information is required in order to regain and maintain control of the aircraft. To achieve planned aircraft trajectory and complete safe landing, the uncertainties in system dynamics of the damaged aircraft need to be learned and incorporated at the level of motion planning. The damaged aircraft is simulated via a simplified kinematic model. The different sources and perspectives of uncertainties in the damage assessment process and post-failure trajectory planning are presented and classified. The decision-making process for an emergency motion planning and landing is developed via the Dempster-Shafer evidence theory. The objective of the trajectory planning is to arrive at a target position while maximizing the safety of the aircraft given uncertain conditions. Simulations are presented for an emergency motion planning and landing that takes into account aircraft dynamics, path complexity, distance to landing site, runway characteristics, and subjective human decision.

  20. Seat Capacity Selection for an Advanced Short-Haul Aircraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marien, Ty V.

    2016-01-01

    A study was performed to determine the target seat capacity for a proposed advanced short-haul aircraft concept projected to enter the fleet by 2030. This analysis projected the potential demand in the U.S. for a short-haul aircraft using a transportation theory approach, rather than selecting a target seat capacity based on recent industry trends or current market demand. A transportation systems model was used to create a point-to-point network of short-haul trips and then predict the number of annual origin-destination trips on this network. Aircraft of varying seat capacities were used to meet the demand on this network, assuming a single aircraft type for the entire short-haul fleet. For each aircraft size, the ticket revenue and operational costs were used to calculate a total market profitability metric for all feasible flights. The different aircraft sizes were compared, based on this market profitability metric and also the total number of annual round trips and markets served. Sensitivity studies were also performed to determine the effect of changing the aircraft cruise speed and maximum trip length. Using this analysis, the advanced short-haul aircraft design team was able to select a target seat capacity for their design.

  1. Software development for electromagnetic scattering of aircraft in near space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, WangLong; Han, YiPing

    2016-11-01

    By using Intel Visual Fortran and Visual Studio 2013, a software for calculating radar cross section of the metal and the plasma three-dimensional composite target are given, based on the method of MOM and FDTD. This software can calculate radar cross section of the near space aircraft covered the plasma sheath, and this work has an important strategic significance in the future.

  2. Night time aircraft noise exposure and children's cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Stansfeld, Stephen; Hygge, Staffan; Clark, Charlotte; Alfred, Tamuno

    2010-01-01

    Chronic aircraft noise exposure in children is associated with impairment of reading and long-term memory. Most studies have not differentiated between day or nighttime noise exposure. It has been hypothesized that sleep disturbance might mediate the association of aircraft noise exposure and cognitive impairment in children. This study involves secondary analysis of data from the Munich Study and the UK Road Traffic and Aircraft Noise Exposure and Children's Cognition and Health (RANCH) Study sample to test this. In the Munich study, 330 children were assessed on cognitive measures in three measurement waves a year apart, before and after the switchover of airports. Self-reports of sleep quality were analyzed across airports, aircraft noise exposure and measurement wave to test whether changes in nighttime noise exposure had any effect on reported sleep quality, and whether this showed the same pattern as for changes in cognitive performance. For the UK sample of the RANCH study, night noise contour information was linked to the children's home and related to sleep disturbance and cognitive performance. In the Munich study, analysis of sleep quality questions showed no consistent interactions between airport, noise, and measurement wave, suggesting that poor sleep quality does not mediate the association between noise exposure and cognition. Daytime and nighttime aircraft noise exposure was highly correlated in the RANCH study. Although night noise exposure was significantly associated with impaired reading and recognition memory, once home night noise exposure was centered on daytime school noise exposure, night noise had no additional effect to daytime noise exposure. These analyses took advantage of secondary data available from two studies of aircraft noise and cognition. They were not initially designed to examine sleep disturbance and cognition, and thus, there are methodological limitations which make it less than ideal in giving definitive answers to these

  3. Hydrogen aircraft technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive evaluation is conducted of the technology development status, economics, commercial feasibility, and infrastructural requirements of LH2-fueled aircraft, with additional consideration of hydrogen production, liquefaction, and cryostorage methods. Attention is given to the effects of LH2 fuel cryotank accommodation on the configurations of prospective commercial transports and military airlifters, SSTs, and HSTs, as well as to the use of the plentiful heatsink capacity of LH2 for innovative propulsion cycles' performance maximization. State-of-the-art materials and structural design principles for integral cryotank implementation are noted, as are airport requirements and safety and environmental considerations.

  4. Aircraft Electromagnetic Compatibility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    subsystems (fig ire 1. 1-4). If uncontrolled, it appears as radio tones, static, or 400-Hz hum on the passenger entertainment systems. It can show up as...lavatories; galleys; and video entertainment : These are the well-known hallmarks of a commercial transport aircraft (figure 2.1-1). The necessary control of...19 ligh nt o Maagm ete CRuotrotl Reore rv Engines ComputeSystemo IRU EICAS -9 ~Contro R~ Airplane Fiur 2.t 1-1 ElcroiiEgne C nto Om~uLOW _W IndRANGEn

  5. Aircraft surface coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A series of studies in which films and liquid spray-on materials were evaluated in the laboratory for transport aircraft external surface coatings are summarized. Elastomeric polyurethanes were found to best meet requirements. Two commercially available products, CAAPCO B-274 and Chemglaze M313, were subjected to further laboratory testing, airline service evaluations, and drag-measurement flight tests. It was found that these coatings were compatible with the severe operating environment of airlines and that coatings reduced airplane drag. An economic analysis indicated significant dollar benefits to airlines from application of the coatings.

  6. Aircraft propeller control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Stanley G. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    In the invention, the speeds of both propellers in a counterrotating aircraft propeller pair are measured. Each speed is compared, using a feedback loop, with a demanded speed and, if actual speed does not equal demanded speed for either propeller, pitch of the proper propeller is changed in order to attain the demanded speed. A proportional/integral controller is used in the feedback loop. Further, phase of the propellers is measured and, if the phase does not equal a demanded phase, the speed of one propeller is changed, by changing pitch, until the proper phase is attained.

  7. Commercial Aircraft Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, David A.

    2016-10-26

    This report summarizes the results of theoretical research performed during 3 years of P371 Project implementation. In results of such research a new scientific conceptual technology of quasi-passive individual infrared protection of heat-generating objects – Spatial Displacement of Thermal Image (SDTI technology) was developed. Theoretical substantiation and description of working processes of civil aircraft individual IR-protection system were conducted. The mathematical models and methodology were presented, there were obtained the analytical dependencies which allow performing theoretical research of the affect of intentionally arranged dynamic field of the artificial thermal interferences with variable contrast onto main parameters of optic-electronic tracking and homing systems.

  8. Slotted Aircraft Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassberg, John C. (Inventor); Gea, Lie-Mine (Inventor); McLean, James D. (Inventor); Witowski, David P. (Inventor); Krist, Steven E. (Inventor); Campbell, Richard L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An aircraft wing includes a leading airfoil element and a trailing airfoil element. At least one slot is defined by the wing during at least one transonic condition of the wing. The slot may either extend spanwise along only a portion of the wingspan, or it may extend spanwise along the entire wingspan. In either case, the slot allows a portion of the air flowing along the lower surface of the leading airfoil element to split and flow over the upper surface of the trailing airfoil element so as to achieve a performance improvement in the transonic condition.

  9. Aircraft Speed Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beij, K Hilding

    1933-01-01

    This report presents a concise survey of the measurement of air speed and ground speed on board aircraft. Special attention is paid to the pitot-static air-speed meter which is the standard in the United States for airplanes. Air-speed meters of the rotating vane type are also discussed in considerable detail on account of their value as flight test instruments and as service instruments for airships. Methods of ground-speed measurement are treated briefly, with reference to the more important instruments. A bibliography on air-speed measurement concludes the report.

  10. Automated Inspection of Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    Phase/Quadrature Versus Time Display 52 55 Alarm Region on an Impedance-Plane Display 53 56 Video Subsystem 55 57 Video-Processing Computer 56 58...The robot was demonstrated on a DC-9 nose section during the 1994 Air Transport Association (ATA) NDT Forum hosted by the FAA’s Aging Aircraft NDI...The stabilizer bridge can travel a maximum distance of 15 inches (38 cm) along the spine assembly, and the stroke of the bridge’s lead screw assembly

  11. Optics in aircraft engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachon, James; Malhotra, Subhash

    The authors describe optical IR&D (independent research and development) programs designed to demonstrate and evaluate optical technologies for incorporation into next-generation military and commercial aircraft engines. Using a comprehensive demonstration program to validate this technology in an on-engine environment, problems encountered can be resolved early and risk can be minimized. In addition to specific activities related to the optics demonstration on the fighter engine, there are other optical programs underway, including a solenoid control system, a light off detection system, and an optical communication link. Research is also underway in simplifying opto-electronics and exploiting multiplexing to further reduce cost and weight.

  12. X-29 aircraft takeoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Two X-29 aircraft, featuring one of the most unusual designs in aviation history, were flown at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., as technology demonstrators to investigate a host of advanced concepts and technologies. This movie clip runs 26 seconds and begins with a rear view of the X-29 in full afterburner at brake release, then a chase plane shot as it rotates off the runway beginning a rapid climb and finally an air-to-air view of the tail as the chase plane with the camera moves from right to left.

  13. The progesterone-induced enhancement of object recognition memory consolidation involves activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways in the dorsal hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Orr, Patrick T; Rubin, Amanda J; Fan, Lu; Kent, Brianne A; Frick, Karyn M

    2012-04-01

    Although much recent work has elucidated the biochemical mechanisms underlying the modulation of memory by 17β-estradiol, little is known about the signaling events through which progesterone (P) regulates memory. We recently demonstrated that immediate post-training infusion of P into the dorsal hippocampus enhances object recognition memory consolidation in young ovariectomized female mice (Orr et al., 2009). The goal of the present study was to identify the biochemical alterations that might underlie this mnemonic enhancement. We hypothesized that the P-induced enhancement of object recognition would be dependent on activation of the ERK and mTOR pathways. In young ovariectomized mice, we found that bilateral dorsal hippocampal infusion of P significantly increased levels of phospho-p42 ERK and the mTOR substrate S6K in the dorsal hippocampus 5 min after infusion. Phospho-p42 ERK levels were downregulated 15 min after infusion and returned to baseline 30 min after infusion, suggesting a biphasic effect of P on ERK activation. Dorsal hippocampal ERK and mTOR activation were necessary for P to facilitate memory consolidation, as suggested by the fact that inhibitors of both pathways infused into the dorsal hippocampus immediately after training blocked the P-induced enhancement of object recognition. Collectively, these data provide the first demonstration that the ability of P to enhance memory consolidation depends on the rapid activation of cell signaling and protein synthesis pathways in the dorsal hippocampus.

  14. Swarms of UAVs and fighter aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.; Stantz, K.M.; Gray, P.C.; Robinett, R.

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes a method of modeling swarms of UAVs and/or fighter aircraft using particle simulation concepts. Recent investigations into the use of genetic algorithms to design neural networks for the control of autonomous vehicles (i.e., robots) led to the examination of methods of simulating large collections of robots. This paper describes the successful implementation of a model of swarm dynamics using particle simulation concepts. Several examples of the complex behaviors achieved in a target/interceptor scenario are presented.

  15. Throughput and delay characteristics for a slow-frequency hopped aircraft-to-aircraft packet radio network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Scott Russell

    1990-03-01

    Current lack of data transfer capability between tactical aircraft results in decreased mission effectiveness or the need to equip every aircraft with all the sensors and data processing equipment to perform each task expected of them. In the Air Force, these developments established the need for aircraft-to-aircraft data communications so that navigation, threat and targeting information could be shared within a flight and so that digital voice communications could also be maintained. Data rates within a flight of fighter aircraft to support these requirements will need to be between 100 and 250 kilobits/second (KBPS) and between 2.4 KBPS and 16 KBPS between the flight and a command and control aircraft. Other sources place the former figure as high as 512 KBPS. To increase the security of these radio channels, against both jamming and intrusion, anti-jam and low probability of interception (LPI) techniques must be used. One method of achieving these capabilities is to use spread spectrum techniques such as frequency hopping. The Air Force is currently concentrating its efforts around the Joint Tactical Information Distribution System (JTIDS).

  16. Moreland Recognition Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreland Elementary School District, San Jose, CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: Recognition for special effort and achievement has been noted as a component of effective schools. Schools in the Moreland School District have effectively improved standards of discipline and achievement by providing forty-six different ways for children to receive positive recognition. Good…

  17. +Gz-induced loss of consciousness and aircraft recovery.

    PubMed

    Whinnery, J E; Glaister, D H; Burton, R R

    1987-06-01

    Aircrew incapacitation resulting from very high onset sustained +Gz stress has resulted in significant losses of aircraft and aircrew. Enhanced protection and training toward prevention of +Gz-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC) will continue to be vital. Techniques for reduction of the time of incapacitation, should G-LOC occur, must also be explored and developed. Current capability of aircraft autorecovery as demonstrated by the Advanced Fighter Technology Integration F-16 (AFTI/F-16) promises to enhance safety from the acute incapacitation resulting from G-LOC (and spatial disorientation). Physiologic monitoring for determining G-LOC has certain advantages especially in the aerial combat arena. The optimum physiologic monitoring technique would be direct determination of failure of brain cell function at the cellular or subcellular level. Complete investigation of G-LOC is necessary to understand the phenomenon and to develop methods for enhancing recognition and recovery. This paper discusses aircraft autorecovery technology and potential methods for physiologic monitoring of G-LOC. Integration of physiologic monitoring techniques into aircraft autorecovery systems requires a broad approach for optimal development.

  18. The Ultra Light Aircraft Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard W.

    1993-01-01

    The final report for grant NAG1-345 is presented. Recently, the bulk of the work that the grant has supported has been in the areas of ride quality and the structural analysis and testing of ultralight aircraft. The ride quality work ended in May 1989. Hence, the papers presented in this final report are concerned with ultralight aircraft.

  19. Fuel conservative aircraft engine technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nored, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Technology developments for more fuel-efficiency subsonic transport aircraft are reported. Three major propulsion projects were considered: (1) engine component improvement - directed at current engines; (2) energy efficient engine - directed at new turbofan engines; and (3) advanced turboprops - directed at technology for advanced turboprop-powered aircraft. Each project is reviewed and some of the technologies and recent accomplishments are described.

  20. Aircraft wiring program status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Rex

    1995-01-01

    In this Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) Aircraft Division status report, the general and wire and cable component activities, the systems engineering activities, the aircraft wiring lead maintenance activities, the NAVAIR/NASA interface activities, and the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Commission recommendations are presented.