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Sample records for aircraft vertical profiles

  1. Vertical Profiles for Turbojet-Powered Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.; Waters, M. H.

    1983-01-01

    OPTIM generates profile of altitude, airspeed, and flightpath angle as function of range between given set or origin and destination points for particular models of transport aircraft. Profile is optimized in sense of minimizing fuel or time or in minimizing direct operating cost expressed as combination of fuel and time.

  2. Computer simulation of an aircraft-based differential absorption and scattering system for retrieval of SO2 vertical profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, J. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of using the differential absorption and scattering technique from aircraft altitudes for remotely measuring the vertical distribution of SO2 was studied via a computer simulation. Particular care was taken in this simulation to use system parameters (i.e., laser energy, telescope size, etc.) which can be accommodated on an aircraft and can be realized with commercially available technology. The vertical molecular and aerosol profiles were chosen to simulate the types of profiles which might be experienced over a large city. Results are presented on the retrieval of the assumed SO2 profile which show the effects of systematic errors due to interfering gases and aerosols, as well as random errors due to shot noise in the return signal, detector and background noise, and instrument-generated noise.

  3. OPTIM: Computer program to generate a vertical profile which minimizes aircraft fuel burn or direct operating cost. User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A profile of altitude, airspeed, and flight path angle as a function of range between a given set of origin and destination points for particular models of transport aircraft provided by NASA is generated. Inputs to the program include the vertical wind profile, the aircraft takeoff weight, the costs of time and fuel, certain constraint parameters and control flags. The profile can be near optimum in the sense of minimizing: (1) fuel, (2) time, or (3) a combination of fuel and time (direct operating cost (DOC)). The user can also, as an option, specify the length of time the flight is to span. The theory behind the technical details of this program is also presented.

  4. Vertical profiles of carbon monoxide and ozone from MOZAIC aircraft over Delhi, India during 2003-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Partha S.; Singh, Ramesh P.; Nédélec, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The Indo-Gangetic Plains is one of the most densely populated regions in the world and associated with large anthropogenic pollutants. Aircraft measurements of two such pollutants, ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO) over Delhi, an urban location are analyzed to study monthly and seasonal variations. Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus In-Service Aircraft (MOZAIC) vertical profile data during 2003-2005 are used in the present study. O3 over Delhi exhibits a lower tropospheric (surface to 850 mb) high value during post-monsoon (October and November) and winter (December-February) seasons, upper tropospheric (above 400 mb) enhancement during pre-monsoon and a zone of high values in the mid-troposphere (700-400 mb) during monsoon. The anthropogenic emissions show high CO concentrations below 800 mb during winter and pre-monsoon seasons in addition to transported CO in the upper atmosphere during pre-monsoon. During winter season, convective activities are suppressed as a result O3 and CO concentrations are higher near surface, while during summer season, surface air masses enhance levels of H2O, CO and other trace gases are lifted and subsequently mixed into the large scale circulation that enhance mixing ratios of many trace gases in the upper level anticyclones. MOZAIC observed vertical O3 profiles are compared with three chemistry-climate coupled models from the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase5 (CMIP5) with interactive O3 chemistry. All the models show good agreement with MOZAIC during pre-monsoon, with large biases during winter and monsoon seasons. Finally, monthly variations of MOZAIC observed CO show a good comparison with AIRS and MOPITT satellite data.

  5. Aircraft measurements of black carbon vertical profiles show upper tropospheric variability and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Joshua P.; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Samset, Bjørn H.; Dollner, Maximilian; Heimerl, Katharina; Markovic, Milos Z.; Perring, Anne E.; Ziemba, Luke

    2017-01-01

    We present new data sets of black carbon (BC) aerosol mass mixing ratio (MMR) obtained from aircraft missions over North America, Europe, the Arctic, and the outflow region of Saharan Africa before and after trans-Atlantic transport. The data, collected from 2011 to 2013 with single-particle soot photometers, provide new insight into the variability and distribution of BC over global scales and refine understanding of AeroCom global model ensemble performance. The results indicate extensive global-scale longitudinal mixing of BC above altitude pressures as low as 400 hPa. They also constrain the absolute and temporal variability of upper tropospheric BC MMR and point to opportunities for new tests of global aerosol models in the upper troposphere. A comparison to the AeroCom Phase II results generally reinforces previous estimates of the ensemble performance, except that it also strengthens confidence that the ensemble actually is biased high in the Arctic in all seasons.

  6. Vertical Cloud Climatology During TC4 Derived from High-Altitude Aircraft Merged Lidar and Radar Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlavka, Dennis; Tian, Lin; Hart, William; Li, Lihua; McGill, Matthew; Heymsfield, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    Aircraft lidar works by shooting laser pulses toward the earth and recording the return time and intensity of any of the light returning to the aircraft after scattering off atmospheric particles and/or the Earth s surface. The scattered light signatures can be analyzed to tell the exact location of cloud and aerosol layers and, with the aid of a few optical assumptions, can be analyzed to retrieve estimates of optical properties such as atmospheric transparency. Radar works in a similar fashion except it sends pulses toward earth at a much larger wavelength than lidar. Radar records the return time and intensity of cloud or rain reflection returning to the aircraft. Lidar can measure scatter from optically thin cirrus and aerosol layers whose particles are too small for the radar to detect. Radar can provide reflection profiles through thick cloud layers of larger particles that lidar cannot penetrate. Only after merging the two instrument products can accurate measurements of the locations of all layers in the full atmospheric column be achieved. Accurate knowledge of the vertical distribution of clouds is important information for understanding the Earth/atmosphere radiative balance and for improving weather/climate forecast models. This paper describes one such merged data set developed from the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4) experiment based in Costa Rica in July-August 2007 using the nadir viewing Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) and the Cloud Radar System (CRS) on board the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Statistics were developed concerning cloud probability through the atmospheric column and frequency of the number of cloud layers. These statistics were calculated for the full study area, four sub-regions, and over land compared to over ocean across all available flights. The results are valid for the TC4 experiment only, as preferred cloud patterns took priority during mission planning. The TC4 Study Area was a very cloudy region, with cloudy

  7. Vertical flight path steering system for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambregts, Antonius A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a vertical flight path angle steering system for aircraft, utilizing a digital flight control computer which processes pilot control inputs and aircraft response parameters into suitable elevator commands and control information for display to the pilot on a cathode ray tube. The system yields desirable airplane control handling qualities and responses as well as improvements in pilot workload and safety during airplane operation in the terminal area and under windshear conditions.

  8. Offset vertical radar profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witten, A.; Lane, J.

    2003-01-01

    Diffraction tomography imaging was applied to VRP data acquired by vertically moving a receiving antenna in a number of wells. This procedure simulated a vertical downhole receiver array. Similarly, a transmitting antenna was sequentially moved along a series of radial lines extending outward from the receiver wells. This provided a sequence of multistatic data sets and, from each data set, a two-dimensional vertical cross-sectional image of spatial variations in wave speed was reconstructed.

  9. Evaluation of vertical profiles to design continuous descent approach procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, Priyank

    The current research focuses on predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of Continuous Descent Approach (CDA), which is among the key concepts of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). The idle-thrust CDA is a fuel economical, noise and emission abatement procedure, but requires increased separation to accommodate for variability and uncertainties in vertical and speed profiles of arriving aircraft. Although a considerable amount of researches have been devoted to the estimation of potential benefits of the CDA, only few have attempted to explain the predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of CDA. The analytical equations derived using flight dynamics and Base of Aircraft and Data (BADA) Total Energy Model (TEM) in this research gives insight into dependency of vertical profile of CDA on various factors like wind speed and gradient, weight, aircraft type and configuration, thrust settings, atmospheric factors (deviation from ISA (DISA), pressure and density of the air) and descent speed profile. Application of the derived equations to idle-thrust CDA gives an insight into sensitivity of its vertical profile to multiple factors. This suggests fixed geometric flight path angle (FPA) CDA has higher degree of predictability and lesser variability at the cost of non-idle and low thrust engine settings. However, with optimized design this impact can be overall minimized. The CDA simulations were performed using Future ATM Concept Evaluation Tool (FACET) based on radar-track and aircraft type data (BADA) of the real air-traffic to some of the busiest airports in the USA (ATL, SFO and New York Metroplex (JFK, EWR and LGA)). The statistical analysis of the vertical profiles of CDA shows 1) mean geometric FPAs derived from various simulated vertical profiles are consistently shallower than 3° glideslope angle and 2) high level of variability in vertical profiles of idle-thrust CDA even in absence of

  10. Concepts for generating optimum vertical flight profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Algorithms for generating optimum vertical profiles are derived and examined. These algorithms form the basis for the design of onboard flight management concepts. The variations in the optimum vertical profiles (resulting from these concepts) due to variations in wind, takeoff weight, and range-to-destination are presented. Further considerations for mechanizing two different onboard methods of computing near-optimum flight profiles are then outlined. Finally, the results are summarized, and recommendations are made for further work. Technical details of optimum trajectory design, steering requirements for following these trajectories, and off-line computer programs for testing the concepts are included.

  11. Reconstructing the vertical profile of humidity on the basis of the vertical profile of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazlova, T. I.

    1974-01-01

    The vertical profile of humidity in the atmosphere is developed on the basis of the vertical profile of temperature using an empirical formula linking changes in humidity with changes in temperature and altitude. The atmosphere is divided into three layers by altitude, since the condition for the formation of humidity varies with altitude.

  12. Preliminary design of a supersonic Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL) fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian; Borchers, Paul; Gomer, Charlie; Henderson, Dean; Jacobs, Tavis; Lawson, Todd; Peterson, Eric; Ross, Tweed, III; Bellmard, Larry

    1990-01-01

    The preliminary design study of a supersonic Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL) fighter is presented. A brief historical survey of powered lift vehicles was presented, followed by a technology assessment of the latest supersonic STOVL engine cycles under consideration by industry and government in the U.S. and UK. A survey of operational fighter/attack aircraft and the modern battlefield scenario were completed to develop, respectively, the performance requirements and mission profiles for the study. Three configurations were initially investigated with the following engine cycles: a hybrid fan vectored thrust cycle, a lift+lift/cruise cycle, and a mixed flow vectored thrust cycle. The lift+lift/cruise aircraft configuration was selected for detailed design work which consisted of: (1) a material selection and structural layout, including engine removal considerations, (2) an aircraft systems layout, (3) a weapons integration model showing the internal weapons bay mechanism, (4) inlet and nozzle integration, (5) an aircraft suckdown prediction, (6) an aircraft stability and control analysis, including a takeoff, hover, and transition control analysis, (7) a performance and mission capability study, and (8) a life cycle cost analysis. A supersonic fighter aircraft with STOVL capability with the lift+lift/cruise engine cycle seems a viable option for the next generation fighter.

  13. Unsteady aerodynamic characterization of a military aircraft in vertical gusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebozec, A.; Cocquerez, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of 2.5-m/sec vertical gusts on the flight characteristics of a 1:8.6 scale model of a Mirage 2000 aircraft in free flight at 35 m/sec over a distance of 30 m are investigated. The wind-tunnel setup and instrumentation are described; the impulse-response and local-coefficient-identification analysis methods applied are discussed in detail; and the modification and calibration of the gust-detection probes are reviewed. The results are presented in graphs, and good general agreement is obtained between model calculations using the two analysis methods and the experimental measurements.

  14. Advanced composite vertical stabilizer for DC-10 transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, C. O.

    1979-01-01

    Structural design, tooling, fabrication, and test activities are reported for a program to develop an advanced composite vertical stabilizer (CVS) for the DC 10 Commercial Transport Aircraft. Structural design details are described and the status of structural and weight analyses are reported. A structural weight reduction of 21.7% is currently predicted. Test results are discussed for sine wave stiffened shear webs containing representative of the CVS spar webs and for lightning current transfer and tests on a panel representative of the CVS skins.

  15. Aircraft configuration optimization including optimized flight profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccullers, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    The Flight Optimization System (FLOPS) is an aircraft configuration optimization program developed for use in conceptual design of new aircraft and in the assessment of the impact of advanced technology. The modular makeup of the program is illustrated. It contains modules for preliminary weights estimation, preliminary aerodynamics, detailed mission performance, takeoff and landing, and execution control. An optimization module is used to drive the overall design and in defining optimized profiles in the mission performance. Propulsion data, usually received from engine manufacturers, are used in both the mission performance and the takeoff and landing analyses. Although executed as a single in-core program, the modules are stored separately so that the user may select the appropriate modules (e.g., fighter weights versus transport weights) or leave out modules that are not needed.

  16. Vertical Profiling of Air Pollution at RAPCD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newchurch, Michael J.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Bowdle, David A.; Johnson, Steven; Knupp, Kevin; Gillani, Noor; Biazar, Arastoo; Mcnider, Richard T.; Burris, John

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between local and regional pollution levels occurs at the interface of the Planetary Boundary Layer and the Free Troposphere. Measuring the vertical distribution of ozone, aerosols, and winds with high temporal and vertical resolution is essential to diagnose the nature of this interchange and ultimately for accurately forecasting ozone and aerosol pollution levels. The Regional Atmospheric Profiling Center for Discovery, RAPCD, was built and instrumented to address this critical issue. The ozone W DIAL lidar, Nd:YAG aerosol lidar, and 2.1 micron Doppler wind lidar, along with balloon- borne ECC ozonesondes form the core of the W C D instrumentation for addressing this problem. Instrumentation in the associated Mobile Integrated Profiling (MIPS) laboratory includes 91 5Mhz profiler, sodar, and ceilometer. The collocated Applied particle Optics and Radiometry (ApOR) laboratory hosts an FTIR along with MOUDI and optical particle counters. With MODELS-3 analysis by colleagues in the National Space Science and Technology Center on the UAH campus and the co- located National Weather Service Forecasting Office in Huntsville, AL we are developing a unique facility for advancing the state of the science of pollution forecasting.

  17. RADIALLY MAGNETIZED PROTOPLANETARY DISK: VERTICAL PROFILE

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Matthew; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-11-10

    This paper studies the response of a thin accretion disk to an external radial magnetic field. Our focus is on protoplanetary disks (PPDs), which are exposed during their later evolution to an intense, magnetized wind from the central star. A radial magnetic field is mixed into a thin surface layer, wound up by the disk shear, and pushed downward by a combination of turbulent mixing and ambipolar and ohmic drift. The toroidal field reaches much greater strengths than the seed vertical field that is usually invoked in PPD models, even becoming superthermal. Linear stability analysis indicates that the disk experiences the magnetorotational instability (MRI) at a higher magnetization than a vertically magnetized disk when both the effects of ambipolar and Hall drift are taken into account. Steady vertical profiles of density and magnetic field are obtained at several radii between 0.06 and 1 AU in response to a wind magnetic field B{sub r} ∼ (10{sup −4}–10{sup −2})(r/ AU){sup −2} G. Careful attention is given to the radial and vertical ionization structure resulting from irradiation by stellar X-rays. The disk is more strongly magnetized closer to the star, where it can support a higher rate of mass transfer. As a result, the inner ∼1 AU of a PPD is found to evolve toward lower surface density. Mass transfer rates around 10{sup −8} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} are obtained under conservative assumptions about the MRI-generated stress. The evolution of the disk and the implications for planet migration are investigated in the accompanying paper.

  18. Advanced composite vertical fin for L-1011 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. C.

    1984-01-01

    The structural box of the L-1011 vertical fin was redesigned using advanced composite materials. The box was fabricated and ground tested to verify the structural integrity. This report summarizes the complete program starting with the design and analysis and proceeds through the process development ancillary test program production readiness verification testing, fabrication of the full-scale fin boxes and the full-scale ground testing. The program showed that advanced composites can economically and effectively be used in the design and fabrication of medium primary structures for commercial aircraft. Static-strength variability was demonstrated to be comparable to metal structures and the long term durability of advanced composite components was demonstrated.

  19. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Optical Properties Over Central Illinois and Comparison with Surface and Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan P. J.; Andrews, E.; Ogren, J A.; Tackett, J. L.; Winker, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Between June 2006 and September 2009, an instrumented light aircraft measured over 400 vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gas properties over eastern and central Illinois. The primary objectives of this program were to (1) measure the in situ aerosol properties and determine their vertical and temporal variability and (2) relate these aircraft measurements to concurrent surface and satellite measurements. Underflights of the CALIPSO satellite show reasonable agreement in a majority of retrieved profiles between aircraft-measured extinction at 532 nm (adjusted to ambient relative humidity) and CALIPSO-retrieved extinction, and suggest that routine aircraft profiling programs can be used to better understand and validate satellite retrieval algorithms. CALIPSO tended to overestimate the aerosol extinction at this location in some boundary layer flight segments when scattered or broken clouds were present, which could be related to problems with CALIPSO cloud screening methods. The in situ aircraft-collected aerosol data suggest extinction thresholds for the likelihood of aerosol layers being detected by the CALIOP lidar. These statistical data offer guidance as to the likelihood of CALIPSO's ability to retrieve aerosol extinction at various locations around the globe.

  20. Tropospheric mercury vertical profiles between 500 and 10 000 m in central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigelt, Andreas; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Pirrone, Nicola; Bieser, Johannes; Bödewadt, Jan; Esposito, Giulio; Slemr, Franz; van Velthoven, Peter F. J.; Zahn, Andreas; Ziereis, Helmut

    2016-03-01

    The knowledge of the vertical distribution of atmospheric mercury (Hg) plays an important role in determining the transport and cycling of mercury. However, measurements of the vertical distribution are rare, because airborne measurements are expensive and labour intensive. Consequently, only a few vertical Hg profile measurements have been reported since the 1970s. Besides the Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container (CARIBIC) observations, the latest vertical profile over Europe was measured in 1996. Within the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) project, four vertical profiles were taken on board research aircraft (CASA-212) in August 2013 in background air over different locations in Slovenia and Germany. Each vertical profile consists of at least seven 5 min horizontal flight sections from 500 m above ground to 3000 m a.s.l. Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and total gaseous mercury (TGM) were measured with Tekran 2537X and Tekran 2537B analysers. In addition to the mercury measurements, SO2, CO, O3, NO, and NO2, basic meteorological parameters (pressure, temperature, relative humidity) have been measured. Additional ground-based mercury measurements at the GMOS master site in Waldhof, Germany and measurements onboard the CARIBIC passenger aircraft were used to extend the profile to the ground and upper troposphere respectively. No vertical gradient was found inside the well-mixed boundary layer (variation of less than 0.1 ng m-3) at different sites, with GEM varying from location to location between 1.4 and 1.6 ng m-3 (standard temperature and pressure, STP: T = 273.15 K, p = 1013.25 hPa). At all locations GEM dropped to 1.3 ng m-3 (STP) when entering the free troposphere and remained constant at higher altitudes. The combination of the vertical profile, measured on 21 August 2013 over Leipzig, Germany, with the CARIBIC measurements during ascent and descent to Frankfurt Airport, Germany, taken at

  1. A Short Take-Off/Vertical Landing (STOVL) Aircraft Carrier (S-CVX).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-01

    and operation of the modem aircraft carrier, assuming availability of short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft, employing gas turbine ship ... propulsion and providing significant capability to support humanitarian operations. In the design study reported here, the authors take a systems

  2. Estimating tropical vertical motion profile shapes from satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, L. E.; Handlos, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The vertical structure of tropical deep convection strongly influences interactions with larger scale circulations and climate. This research focuses on investigating this vertical structure and its relationship with mesoscale tropical weather states. We test the hypothesis that vertical motion shape varies in association with weather state type. We estimate mean state vertical motion profile shapes for six tropical weather states defined using cloud top pressure and optical depth properties from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project. The relationship between vertical motion and the dry static energy budget are utilized to set up a regression analysis that empirically determines two modes of variability in vertical motion from reanalysis data. We use these empirically determined modes, this relationship and surface convergence to estimate vertical motion profile shape from observations of satellite retrievals of rainfall and surface convergence. We find that vertical motion profile shapes vary systematically between different tropical weather states. The "isolated systems" regime exhibits a more ''bottom-heavy'' profile shape compared to the convective/thick cirrus and vigorous deep convective regimes, with maximum upward vertical motion occurring in the lower troposphere rather than the middle to upper troposphere. The variability we observe with our method does not coincide with that expected based on conventional ideas about how stratiform rain fraction and vertical motion are related.

  3. Vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Junxia; Liu, Xingang; Yuan, Liang; Yin, Yan; Li, Zhanqing; Li, Peiren; Ren, Gang; Jin, Lijun; Li, Runjun; Dong, Zipeng; Li, Yiyu; Yang, Junmei

    2015-08-01

    Vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau were measured for the first time during a summertime aircraft campaign, 2013 in Shanxi, China. Data from four flights were analyzed. The vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties including aerosol scattering coefficients (σsc), absorption coefficients (σab), Angström exponent (α), single scattering albedo (ω), backscattering ratio (βsc), aerosol mass scattering proficiency (Qsc) and aerosol surface scattering proficiency (Qsc(')) were obtained. The mean statistical values of σsc were 77.45 Mm(-1) (at 450 nm), 50.72 Mm(-1) (at 550n m), and 32.02 Mm(-1) (at 700 nm). The mean value of σab was 7.62 Mm(-1) (at 550 nm). The mean values of α, βsc and ω were 1.93, 0.15, and 0.91, respectively. Aerosol concentration decreased with altitude. Most effective diameters (ED) of aerosols were less than 0.8 μm. The vertical profiles of σsc,, α, βsc, Qsc and Qsc(') showed that the aerosol scattering properties at lower levels contributed the most to the total aerosol radiative forcing. Both α and βsc had relatively large values, suggesting that most aerosols in the observational region were small particles. The mean values of σsc, α, βsc, Qsc, Qsc('), σab and ω at different height ranges showed that most of the parameters decreased with altitude. The forty-eight hour backward trajectories of air masses during the observation days indicated that the majority of aerosols in the lower level contributed the most to the total aerosol loading, and most of these particles originated from local or regional pollution emissions.

  4. Computer programs for generation and evaluation of near-optimum vertical flight profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.; Waters, M. H.; Patmore, L. C.

    1983-01-01

    Two extensive computer programs were developed. The first, called OPTIM, generates a reference near-optimum vertical profile, and it contains control options so that the effects of various flight constraints on cost performance can be examined. The second, called TRAGEN, is used to simulate an aircraft flying along an optimum or any other vertical reference profile. TRAGEN is used to verify OPTIM's output, examine the effects of uncertainty in the values of parameters (such as prevailing wind) which govern the optimum profile, or compare the cost performance of profiles generated by different techniques. A general description of these programs, the efforts to add special features to them, and sample results of their usage are presented.

  5. Tropospheric mercury vertical profiles between 500 and 10 000 m in central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigelt, A.; Ebinghaus, R.; Pirrone, N.; Bieser, J.; Bödewadt, J.; Esposito, G.; Slemr, F.; van Velthoven, P. F. J.; Zahn, A.; Ziereis, H.

    2015-10-01

    Measurements of the vertical distribution of atmospheric mercury (Hg) are rare, because airborne measurements are expensive and labour intensive. Consequently, only a few vertical Hg profile measurements have been reported since the 1970s. Besides the CARIBIC passenger aircraft observations, the latest vertical profile over Europe was measured in 1996. Within the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) project four vertical profiles were taken on board research aircraft (CASA-212) in August 2013 in background air over different locations in Slovenia and Germany. Each vertical profile consists of at least seven 5 min horizontal flight sections from 500 m above ground to 3000 m a.s.l. Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) was measured with a Tekran 2537X analyser and a Lumex RA-915-AM. Total gaseous mercury (TGM) was measured using a Tekran 2537B analyser and gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) was sampled onto 8 denuders for post flight analysis (one for each profile, three during the transfer flights, and two blanks). In addition to the mercury measurements, SO2, CO, O3, NO, NO2, as well as basic meteorological parameters (pressure, temperature, relative humidity) have been measured. Additional ground based speciated mercury measurements at the GMOS master site in Waldhof (Germany) were used to extend the profile to the ground. No vertical gradient was found inside the well mixed boundary layer (variation by less than 0.1 ng m-3) at different sites with GEM varying from location to location between 1.4 and 1.6 ng m-3 (STP; standard conditions: p = 1013.25 hPa, T = 273.15 K). At all locations GEM dropped to 1.3 ng m-3 (STP) when entering the free troposphere and remained constant at higher altitudes. The combination of the vertical profile, measured on 21 August 2013, over Leipzig (Germany) with the CARIBIC measurements during ascent and descent to Frankfurt airport (Germany) at approximately the same time provide a unique central European vertical profile from inside the

  6. Development and evaluation of a profile negotiation process for integrating aircraft and air traffic control automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Denbraven, Wim; Williams, David H.

    1993-01-01

    The development and evaluation of the profile negotiation process (PNP), an interactive process between an aircraft and air traffic control (ATC) that integrates airborne and ground-based automation capabilities to determine conflict-free trajectories that are as close to an aircraft's preference as possible, are described. The PNP was evaluated in a real-time simulation experiment conducted jointly by NASA's Ames and Langley Research Centers. The Ames Center/TRACON Automation System (CTAS) was used to support the ATC environment, and the Langley Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) piloted cab was used to simulate a 4D Flight Management System (FMS) capable aircraft. Both systems were connected in real time by way of voice and data lines; digital datalink communications capability was developed and evaluated as a means of supporting the air/ground exchange of trajectory data. The controllers were able to consistently and effectively negotiate nominally conflict-free vertical profiles with the 4D-equipped aircraft. The actual profiles flown were substantially closer to the aircraft's preference than would have been possible without the PNP. However, there was a strong consensus among the pilots and controllers that the level of automation of the PNP should be increased to make the process more transparent. The experiment demonstrated the importance of an aircraft's ability to accurately execute a negotiated profile as well as the need for digital datalink to support advanced air/ground data communications. The concept of trajectory space is proposed as a comprehensive approach for coupling the processes of trajectory planning and tracking to allow maximum pilot discretion in meeting ATC constraints.

  7. Dynamics of ultralight aircraft: Motion in vertical gusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    Gust load calculations are extended to the range of conditions encountered by ultralight aircraft such as hang gliders. Having wing loadings of the order of 5 kg/sq m, these gliders acquire a substantial fraction of the motion of a gust within a distance of 1 or 2 m. Comparative loads and displacements for a small powered airplane having a wing loading of 50 kg sq m and for a commercial jet with 500 kg sq m are shown.

  8. Beam Profile Monitor With Accurate Horizontal And Vertical Beam Profiles

    DOEpatents

    Havener, Charles C [Knoxville, TN; Al-Rejoub, Riad [Oak Ridge, TN

    2005-12-26

    A widely used scanner device that rotates a single helically shaped wire probe in and out of a particle beam at different beamline positions to give a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is modified by the addition of a second wire probe. As a result, a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a first beamline position, and a second pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a second beamline position. The simple modification not only provides more accurate beam profiles, but also provides a measurement of the beam divergence and quality in a single compact device.

  9. Advanced composite vertical stabilizer for DC-10 transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, C. O.

    1978-01-01

    The structural design configuration for the Composite Vertical Stabilizer is described and the structural design, analysis, and weight activities are presented. The status of fabrication and test activities for the development test portion of the program is described. Test results are presented for the skin panels, spar web, spar cap to cover, and laminate properties specimens. Engineering drawings of vertification test panels and root fittings, rudder support specimens, titanium fittings, and rear spar specimen analysis models are included.

  10. V-22 Osprey Joint Services Advanced Vertical Lift Aircraft (V-22)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-212 V-22 Osprey Joint Services Advanced Vertical Lift Aircraft (V-22) As of FY 2017...POE - Program Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To

  11. Preliminary design of a supersonic Short-Takeoff and Vertical-Landing (STOVL) fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary study of a supersonic short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) fighter is presented. Three configurations (a lift plus lift/cruise concept, a hybrid fan vectored thrust concept, and a mixed flow vectored thrust concept) were initially investigated with one configuration selected for further design analysis. The selected configuration, the lift plus lift/cruise concept, was successfully integrated to accommodate the powered lift short takeoff and vertical landing requirements as well as the demanding supersonic cruise and point performance requirements. A supersonic fighter aircraft with a short takeoff and vertical landing capability using the lift plus lift/cruise engine concept seems a viable option for the next generation fighter.

  12. Piloting Vertical Flight Aircraft: A Conference on Flying Qualities and Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanken, Christopher L. (Editor); Whalley, Matthew S. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This document contains papers from a specialists' meeting entitled 'Piloting Vertical Flight Aircraft: A Conference on Flying Qualities and Human Factors.' Vertical flight aircraft, including helicopters and a variety of Vertical Takeoff and Landing (VTOL) concepts, place unique requirements on human perception, control, and performance for the conduct of their design missions. The intent of this conference was to examine, for these vehicles, advances in: (1) design of flight control systems for ADS-33C standards; (2) assessment of human factors influences of cockpit displays and operational procedures; (3) development of VTOL design and operational criteria; and (4) development of theoretical methods or models for predicting pilot/vehicle performance and mission suitability. A secondary goal of the conference was to provide an initial venue for enhanced interaction between human factors and handling qualities specialists.

  13. CH4 concentrations over the Amazon from GOSAT consistent with in situ vertical profile data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Alex J.; Bösch, Hartmut; Parker, Robert J.; Gatti, Luciana V.; Gloor, Emanuel; Palmer, Paul I.; Basso, Luana S.; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Correia, Caio S. C.; Domingues, Lucas G.; Feng, Liang; Gonzi, Siegfried; Miller, John B.; Warneke, Thorsten; Wilson, Christopher

    2016-09-01

    The Amazon Basin contains large wetland ecosystems which are important sources of methane (CH4). Spaceborne observations of atmospheric CH4 can provide constraints on emissions from these remote ecosystems, but lack of validation precludes robust estimates. We present the first validation of CH4 columns in the Amazon from the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) using aircraft measurements of CH4 over five sites across the Amazon Basin. These aircraft profiles, combined with stratospheric results from the TOMCAT chemical transport model, are vertically integrated allowing direct comparison to the GOSAT XCH4 measurements (the column-averaged dry air mole fraction of CH4). The measurements agree within uncertainties or show no significant difference at three of the aircraft sites, with differences ranging from -1.9 ppb to 6.6 ppb, while at two sites GOSAT XCH4 is shown to be slightly higher than aircraft measurements, by 8.1 ppb and 9.7 ppb. The seasonality in XCH4 seen by the aircraft profiles is also well captured (correlation coefficients from 0.61 to 0.90). GOSAT observes elevated concentrations in the northwest corner of South America in the dry season and enhanced concentrations elsewhere in the Amazon Basin in the wet season, with the strongest seasonal differences coinciding with regions in Bolivia known to contain large wetlands. Our results are encouraging evidence that these GOSAT CH4 columns are generally in good agreement with in situ measurements, and understanding the magnitude of any remaining biases between the two will allow more confidence in the application of XCH4 to constrain Amazonian CH4 fluxes.

  14. Vertical profiles of cloud condensation nuclei, aerosol hygroscopicity, water uptake, and scattering across the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. J.; Bougiatioti, A.; Nenes, A.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Brock, C. A.; Gordon, T. D.; Lack, D.; Law, D. C.; Liao, J.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Richardson, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Winstead, E.; Wagner, N. L.; Welti, A.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    The evolutions of vertical distributions of aerosol chemical, microphysical, hygroscopic, and optical properties present fundamental challenges to the understanding of ground-level air quality and radiative transfer, and few datasets exist to date for evaluation of atmospheric models. Data collected from recent NASA and NOAA field campaigns in the California Central Valley (DISCOVER-AQ), southeast United States (SENEX, SEAC4RS) and Texas (DISCOVER-AQ) allow for a unique opportunity to constrain vertical profiles of climate-relevant aerosol properties. This work presents in-situ aircraft measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and derivations of aerosol hygroscopicity, water uptake, and light scattering. Aerosol hygroscopicity is derived from CCN and aerosol measurements. Inorganic water uptake is calculated from aerosol composition using ISORROPIA, a chemical thermodynamic model, while organic water uptake is calculated from organic hygroscopicity. Aerosol scattering closure is performed between scattering from water uptake calculations and in-situ scattering measurements.

  15. Radiation profiles through the atmosphere measured by an auto controlled glider aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kräuchi, Andreas; Philipona, Rolf

    2014-05-01

    In 2011 radiation measurements through the atmosphere were made with a balloon borne short- and longwave net radiometer. These measurements were very promising and therefore new and improved sensors from Kipp&Zonen were used to equip a glider aircraft together with the standard Swiss radiosonde from Meteolabor AG. The glider serves as returning platform for the expensive and well calibrated radiation sensors. Double balloon technique is used to prevent pendulum motion during the ascent and to keep the radiation instruments as horizontal as possible. The built-in autopilot allows to return the gliderradiosonde to the launch site or to land it on predefined open space, which makes recovery much easier. The new return gliderradiosonde technique as well as new measurement possibilities will be shown. First measurements show radiation profiles through the atmosphere during different cloud conditions. Radiation profiles during different daytimes show the temporal resolution of vertical radiation profiles trough the atmosphere.

  16. Flight dynamics of a pterosaur-inspired aircraft utilizing a variable-placement vertical tail.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Brian; Lind, Rick; Chatterjee, Sankar

    2011-06-01

    Mission performance for small aircraft is often dependent on the turn radius. Various biologically inspired concepts have demonstrated that performance can be improved by morphing the wings in a manner similar to birds and bats; however, the morphing of the vertical tail has received less attention since neither birds nor bats have an appreciable vertical tail. This paper investigates a design that incorporates the morphing of the vertical tail based on the cranial crest of a pterosaur. The aerodynamics demonstrate a reduction in the turn radius of 14% when placing the tail over the nose in comparison to a traditional aft-placed vertical tail. The flight dynamics associated with this configuration has unique characteristics such as a Dutch-roll mode with excessive roll motion and a skid divergence that replaces the roll convergence.

  17. Black Carbon Vertical Profiles Strongly Affect Its Radiative Forcing Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of black carbon (BC) aerosols on the global radiation balance is not well constrained. Here twelve global aerosol models are used to show that at least 20% of the present uncertainty in modeled BC direct radiative forcing (RF) is due to diversity in the simulated vertical profile of BC mass. Results are from phases 1 and 2 of the global aerosol model intercomparison project (AeroCom). Additionally, a significant fraction of the variability is shown to come from high altitudes, as, globally, more than 40% of the total BC RF is exerted above 5 km. BC emission regions and areas with transported BC are found to have differing characteristics. These insights into the importance of the vertical profile of BC lead us to suggest that observational studies are needed to better characterize the global distribution of BC, including in the upper troposphere.

  18. Black Carbon Vertical Profiles Strongly Affect its Radiative Forcing Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Bellouin, N.; Diehl, T.; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, Stefan; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, Joyce E.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, Kai

    2013-03-01

    The impact of black carbon (BC) aerosols on the global radiation balance is not well constrained. Here twelve global aerosol models are used to show that at least 20% of the present uncertainty in modeled BC direct radiative forcing (RF) is due to diversity in the simulated vertical profile of BC mass. Results are from phases 1 and 2 of the global aerosol model intercomparison project (AeroCom). Additionally, a significant fraction of the variability is shown to come from high altitudes, as, globally, more than 40% of the total BC RF is exerted above 5 km. BC emission regions and areas with transported BC are found to have differing characteristics. These insights into the importance of the vertical profile of BC lead us to suggest that observational studies are needed to better characterize the global distribution of BC, including in the upper troposphere.

  19. A Comparison of Modeled Pollutant Profiles With MOZAIC Aircraft Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we use measurements performed under the MOZAIC program to evaluate vertical profiles of meteorological parameters, CO, and ozone that were simulated for the year 2006 with several versions of the WRF/CMAQ modeling system. Model updates, including WRF nudging strate...

  20. Modeling of Aerosol Vertical Profiles Using GIS and Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Man Sing; Nichol, Janet E.; Lee, Kwon Ho

    2009-01-01

    The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) by climatologists, environmentalists and urban planners for three dimensional modeling and visualization of the landscape is well established. However no previous study has implemented these techniques for 3D modeling of atmospheric aerosols because air quality data is traditionally measured at ground points, or from satellite images, with no vertical dimension. This study presents a prototype for modeling and visualizing aerosol vertical profiles over a 3D urban landscape in Hong Kong. The method uses a newly developed technique for the derivation of aerosol vertical profiles from AERONET sunphotometer measurements and surface visibility data, and links these to a 3D urban model. This permits automated modeling and visualization of aerosol concentrations at different atmospheric levels over the urban landscape in near-real time. Since the GIS platform permits presentation of the aerosol vertical distribution in 3D, it can be related to the built environment of the city. Examples are given of the applications of the model, including diagnosis of the relative contribution of vehicle emissions to pollution levels in the city, based on increased near-surface concentrations around weekday rush-hour times. The ability to model changes in air quality and visibility from ground level to the top of tall buildings is also demonstrated, and this has implications for energy use and environmental policies for the tall mega-cities of the future. PMID:22408531

  1. Vertical soil profiling using a galvanic contact resistivity scanning approach.

    PubMed

    Pan, Luan; Adamchuk, Viacheslav I; Prasher, Shiv; Gebbers, Robin; Taylor, Richard S; Dabas, Michel

    2014-07-23

    Proximal sensing of soil electromagnetic properties is widely used to map spatial land heterogeneity. The mapping instruments use galvanic contact, capacitive coupling or electromagnetic induction. Regardless of the type of instrument, the geometrical configuration between signal transmitting and receiving elements typically defines the shape of the depth response function. To assess vertical soil profiles, many modern instruments use multiple transmitter-receiver pairs. Alternatively, vertical electrical sounding can be used to measure changes in apparent soil electrical conductivity with depth at a specific location. This paper examines the possibility for the assessment of soil profiles using a dynamic surface galvanic contact resistivity scanning approach, with transmitting and receiving electrodes configured in an equatorial dipole-dipole array. An automated scanner system was developed and tested in agricultural fields with different soil profiles. While operating in the field, the distance between current injecting and measuring pairs of rolling electrodes was varied continuously from 40 to 190 cm. The preliminary evaluation included a comparison of scan results from 20 locations to shallow (less than 1.2 m deep) soil profiles and to a two-layer soil profile model defined using an electromagnetic induction instrument.

  2. Vertical Soil Profiling Using a Galvanic Contact Resistivity Scanning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Luan; Adamchuk, Viacheslav I.; Prasher, Shiv; Gebbers, Robin; Taylor, Richard S.; Dabas, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Proximal sensing of soil electromagnetic properties is widely used to map spatial land heterogeneity. The mapping instruments use galvanic contact, capacitive coupling or electromagnetic induction. Regardless of the type of instrument, the geometrical configuration between signal transmitting and receiving elements typically defines the shape of the depth response function. To assess vertical soil profiles, many modern instruments use multiple transmitter-receiver pairs. Alternatively, vertical electrical sounding can be used to measure changes in apparent soil electrical conductivity with depth at a specific location. This paper examines the possibility for the assessment of soil profiles using a dynamic surface galvanic contact resistivity scanning approach, with transmitting and receiving electrodes configured in an equatorial dipole-dipole array. An automated scanner system was developed and tested in agricultural fields with different soil profiles. While operating in the field, the distance between current injecting and measuring pairs of rolling electrodes was varied continuously from 40 to 190 cm. The preliminary evaluation included a comparison of scan results from 20 locations to shallow (less than 1.2 m deep) soil profiles and to a two-layer soil profile model defined using an electromagnetic induction instrument. PMID:25057135

  3. Vertical profile of atmospheric conductivity that matches Schumann resonance observations.

    PubMed

    Nickolaenko, Alexander P; Galuk, Yuri P; Hayakawa, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the vertical profile of atmospheric conductivity in the range from 2 to 98 km. The propagation constant of extremely low frequency (ELF) radio waves was computed for this profile by using the full wave solution. A high correspondence is demonstrated of the data thus obtained to the conventional standard heuristic model of ELF propagation constant derived from the Schumann resonance records performed all over the world. We also suggest the conductivity profiles for the ambient day and ambient night conditions. The full wave solution technique was applied for obtaining the corresponding frequency dependence of propagation constant relevant to these profiles. By using these propagation constants, we computed the power spectra of Schumann resonance in the vertical electric field component for the uniform global distribution of thunderstorms and demonstrate their close similarity in all the models. We also demonstrate a strong correspondence between the wave attenuation rate obtained for these conductivity profiles and the measured ones by using the ELF radio transmissions.

  4. A manual control theory analysis of vertical situation displays for STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, S.; Levison, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    Pilot-vehicle-display systems theory is applied to the analysis of proposed vertical situation displays for manual control in approach-to-landing of a STOL aircraft. The effects of display variables on pilot workload and on total closed-loop system performance was calculated using an optimal-control model for the human operator. The steep approach of an augmentor wing jet STOL aircraft was analyzed. Both random turbulence and mean-wind shears were considered. Linearized perturbation equations were used to describe longitudinal and lateral dynamics of the aircraft. The basic display configuration was one that abstracted the essential status information (including glide-slope and localizer errors) of an EADI display. Proposed flight director displays for both longitudinal and lateral control were also investigated.

  5. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidar, S.; Oetjen, H.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B.; Ortega, I.; Sinreich, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2013-03-01

    The University of Colorado Airborne Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument uses solar stray light to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), formaldehyde (HCHO), water vapor (H2O), nitrous acid (HONO), iodine monoxide (IO), bromine monoxide (BrO), and oxygen dimers (O4) at multiple wavelengths (absorption bands at 360, 477, 577, 632 nm) simultaneously in the open atmosphere. The instrument is unique as it (1) features a motion compensation system that decouples the telescope field of view from aircraft movements in real time (<0.35° accuracy), and (2) includes measurements of solar stray light photons from nadir, zenith, and multiple elevation angles forward and below the plane by the same spectrometer/detector system. Sets of solar stray light spectra collected from nadir to zenith scans provide some vertical profile information within 2 km above and below the aircraft altitude, and the vertical column density (VCD) below the aircraft is measured in nadir view. Maximum information about vertical profiles is derived simultaneously for trace gas concentrations and aerosol extinction coefficients over similar spatial scales and with a vertical resolution of typically 250 m during aircraft ascent/descent. The instrument is described, and data from flights over California during the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) and CARES (Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study) air quality field campaigns is presented. Horizontal distributions of NO2 VCD (below the aircraft) maps are sampled with typically 1 km resolution, and show good agreement with two ground-based MAX-DOAS instruments (slope = 0.95 ± 0.09, R2 = 0.86). As a case study vertical profiles of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, and H2O concentrations and aerosol extinction coefficients, ɛ, at 477 nm calculated from O4 measurements from a low approach at Brackett airfield inside the

  6. Comparison of MADE3-simulated and observed aerosol distributions with a focus on aerosol vertical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Christopher; Hendricks, Johannes; Righi, Mattia; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    aerosol and black carbon mass mixing ratio with altitude than found in the observations. In contrast, measured profiles from the HIPPO project are qualitatively captured well. Similar conclusions hold for the comparison of simulated and measured aerosol particle number concentrations. On the one hand, these results exemplify the difficulty in evaluating the representativeness of the simulated global climatological state of the aerosol by means of comparison with individually measured vertical profiles. On the other hand, it highlights the value of aircraft campaigns with large spatial and temporal coverage for model evaluation.

  7. Flight investigation of a vertical-velocity command system for VTOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, J. R.; Niessen, F. R.; Yenni, K. R.; Person, L. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A flight investigation was undertaken to assess the potential benefits afforded by a vertical-velocity command system (VVCS) for VTOL (vertical take-off and landing) aircraft. This augmentation system was conceived primarily as a means of lowering pilot workload during decelerating approaches to a hover and/or landing under category III instrument meteorological conditions. The scope of the investigation included a determination of acceptable system parameters, a visual flight evaluation, and an instrument flight evaluation which employed a 10 deg, decelerating, simulated instrument approach task. The results indicated that the VVCS, which decouples the pitch and vertical degrees of freedom, provides more accurate glide-path tracking and a lower pilot workload than does the unaugmented system.

  8. Sampling the Vertical Moisture Structure of an Atmospheric River Event Using Airborne GPS Radio Occultation Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, J. S.; Malloy, K.; Murphy, B.; Sussman, J.; Zhang, W.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are of high concern in California, bringing significant rain to the region over extended time periods of up to 5 days, potentially causing floods, and more importantly, contributing to the Sierra snowpack that provides much of the regional water resources. The CalWater project focuses on predicting the variability of the West Coast water supply, including improving AR forecasting. Unfortunately, data collection over the ocean remains a challenge and impacts forecasting accuracy. One novel technique to address this issue includes airborne GPS radio occultation (ARO), using broadcast GPS signals from space to measure the signal ray path bending angle and refractivity to retrieve vertical water vapor profiles. The Global Navigation Satellite System Instrument System for Multistatic and Occultation Sensing (GISMOS) system was developed for this purpose for recording and processing high-sample rate (10MHz) signals in the lower troposphere. Previous studies (Murphy et al, 2014) have shown promising results in acquiring airborne GPS RO data, comparing it to dropsondes and numerical weather models. CalWater launched a field campaign in the beginning of 2015 which included testing GISMOS ARO on the NOAA GIV aircraft for AR data acquisition, flying into the February 6th AR event that brought up to 35 cm of rain to central California. This case study will compare airborne GPS RO refractivity profiles to the NCEP-NCAR final reanalysis model and dropsonde profiles. We will show the data distribution and explain the sampling characteristics, providing high resolution vertical information to the sides of the aircraft in a manner complementary to dropsondes beneath the flight track. We will show how this method can provide additional reliable data during the development of AR storms.

  9. Measuring Vertical Profiles of Wind, Temperature and Humidity within the Atmospheric Boundary Layer using the Research UAVs 'M2AV Carolo'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bange, J.; Martin, S.

    2009-09-01

    The measurement of vertical profiles is important to characterise the vertical structure of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). For instance, the dependence of the potential temperature on altitude defines the thermal stratification. The mechanical shear (i.e. the variation of wind speed and direction) produces turbulence and turbulent fluxes. The top of the ABL is required for scaling approaches (e.g. Deardorff scaling in the convective boundary layer, local scaling in the stable boundary layer). The Meteorological Mini Aerial Vehicles (M²AV) are self-constructed, automatically operating research aircraft of 6 kg in weight (including 1.5 kg scientific payload) and 2 m wingspan. These systems are capable of performing turbulence measurements (wind vector, temperature and humidity) and are used as a new instrument for measuring vertical profiles of the lower troposphere. Compared to a radiosonde, the spatial resolution of the M²AV is significantly higher. Especially the wind measurement is significantly more accurate compared to radiosonde data when using an aircraft that is equipped with a proper flow sensor (mainly a five-hole probe). It is important to maintain flow angles (sideslip and angle of attack) within the calibration range (typically 10 to 20 degree). This limits the vertical speed (the rate of climb and descent) of the research aircraft. In general there are two approaches to measure vertical profiles with research aircraft. Instantaneous profiles (slant flight pattern) are suitable if only little time is available, if the ABL is very in-stationary (or the aircraft is slow), if the dependence of the profile on time is requested (repeated slant flight patterns over one location) or if the dependence of the profile on the location is requested (saw-tooth pattern). For mean profiles (horizontal straight and level flights 'legs' at several altitudes within the ABL) it is necessary to use fast sensors. If the response time is too large, the vertical

  10. Radial-vertical profiles of tropical cyclone derived from dropsondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yifang

    The scopes of this thesis research are two folds: the first one is to the construct the intensity-based composite radial-vertical profiles of tropical cyclones (TC) using GPS-based dropsonde observations and the second one is to identify the major deficiencies of Mathur vortices against the dropsonde composites of TCs. The intensity-based dropsonde composites of TCs advances our understanding of the dynamic and thermal structure of TCs of different intensity along the radial direction in and above the boundary layer where lies the devastating high wind that causes property damages and storm surges. The identification of the major deficiencies of Mathur vortices in representing the radial-vertical profiles of TC of different intensity helps to improve numerical predictions of TCs since most operational TC forecast models need to utilize bogus vortices, such as Mathur vortices, to initialize TC forecasts and simulations. We first screen all available GPS dropsonde data within and round 35 named TCs over the tropical Atlantic basin from 1996 to 2010 and pair them with TC parameters derived from the best-track data provided by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) and select 1149 dropsondes that have continuous coverage in the lower troposphere. The composite radial-vertical profiles of tangential wind speed, temperature, mixing ratio and humidity are based for each TC category ranging from "Tropical Storm" (TS) to "Hurricane Category 1" (H1) through "Hurricane Category 5" (H5). The key findings of the dropsonde composites are: (i) all TCs have the maximum tangential wind within 1 km above the ground and a distance of 1-2 times of the radius of maximum wind (RMW) at the surface; (ii) all TCs have a cold ring surrounding the warm core near the boundary layer at a distance of 1-3 times of the RMW and the cold ring structure gradually diminishes at a higher elevation where the warm core structure prevails along the radial direction; (iii) the existence of such shallow cold

  11. Seasonal variation of vertical distribution of aerosol single scattering albedo over Indian sub-continent: RAWEX aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh Babu, S.; Nair, Vijayakumar S.; Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Krishna Moorthy, K.

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the vertical distribution of aerosols and its seasonality (especially the single scattering albedo, SSA) extensive profiling of aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients have been carried out using an instrumented aircraft from seven base stations spread across the Indian mainland during winter 2012 and spring/pre-monsoon 2013 under the Regional Aerosol Warming Experiment (RAWEX). Spatial variation of the vertical profiles of the asymmetry parameter, the wavelength exponent of the absorption coefficient and the single scattering albedo, derived from the measurements, are used to infer the source characteristics of winter and pre-monsoon aerosols as well as the seasonality of free tropospheric aerosols. The relatively high value of the wavelength exponent of absorption coefficient over most of the regions indicates the contribution from biomass burning and dust aerosols up to lower free tropospheric altitudes. A clear enhancement in aerosol loading and its absorbing nature is seen at lower free troposphere levels (above the planetary boundary layer) over the entire mainland during spring/pre-monsoon season compared to winter, whereas concentration of aerosols within the boundary layer showed a decrease from winter to spring. This could have significant implications on the aerosol heating structure over the Indian region and hence the regional climate.

  12. A mathematical model for Vertical Attitude Takeoff and Landing (VATOL) aircraft simulation. Volume 3: User's manual for VATOL simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortenbaugh, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Instructions for using Vertical Attitude Takeoff and Landing Aircraft Simulation (VATLAS), the digital simulation program for application to vertical attitude takeoff and landing (VATOL) aircraft developed for installation on the NASA Ames CDC 7600 computer system are described. The framework for VATLAS is the Off-Line Simulation (OLSIM) routine. The OLSIM routine provides a flexible framework and standardized modules which facilitate the development of off-line aircraft simulations. OLSIM runs under the control of VTOLTH, the main program, which calls the proper modules for executing user specified options. These options include trim, stability derivative calculation, time history generation, and various input-output options.

  13. Crash Simulation of a Vertical Drop Test of a Commuter-Class Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2004-01-01

    A finite element model of an ATR42-300 commuter-class aircraft was developed and a crash simulation was executed. Analytical predictions were correlated with data obtained from a 30-ft/s (9.14-m/s) vertical drop test of the aircraft. The purpose of the test was to evaluate the structural response of the aircraft when subjected to a severe, but survivable, impact. The aircraft was configured with seats, dummies, luggage, and other ballast. The wings were filled with 8,700 lb. (3,946 kg) of water to represent the fuel. The finite element model, which consisted of 57,643 nodes and 62,979 elements, was developed from direct measurements of the airframe geometry. The seats, dummies, luggage, fuel, and other ballast were represented using concentrated masses. The model was executed in LS-DYNA, a commercial code for performing explicit transient dynamic simulations. Predictions of structural deformation and selected time-history responses were generated. The simulation was successfully validated through extensive test-analysis correlation.

  14. Normalized vertical ice mass flux profiles from vertically pointing 8-mm-wavelength Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Brad W.; Kropfli, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    During the FIRE 2 (First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Regional Experiment) project, NOAA's Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL) operated its 8-mm wavelength Doppler radar extensively in the vertically pointing mode. This allowed for the calculation of a number of important cirrus cloud parameters, including cloud boundary statistics, cloud particle characteristic sizes and concentrations, and ice mass content (imc). The flux of imc, or, alternatively, ice mass flux (imf), is also an important parameter of a cirrus cloud system. Ice mass flux is important in the vertical redistribution of water substance and thus, in part, determines the cloud evolution. It is important for the development of cloud parameterizations to be able to define the essential physical characteristics of large populations of clouds in the simplest possible way. One method would be to normalize profiles of observed cloud properties, such as those mentioned above, in ways similar to those used in the convective boundary layer. The height then scales from 0.0 at cloud base to 1.0 at cloud top, and the measured cloud parameter scales by its maximum value so that all normalized profiles have 1.0 as their maximum value. The goal is that there will be a 'universal' shape to profiles of the normalized data. This idea was applied to estimates of imf calculated from data obtained by the WPL cloud radar during FIRE II. Other quantities such as median particle diameter, concentration, and ice mass content can also be estimated with this radar, and we expect to also examine normalized profiles of these quantities in time for the 1993 FIRE II meeting.

  15. Reconstruction of the vertical electron density profile based on vertical TEC using the simulated annealing algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chunhua; Yang, Guobin; Zhu, Peng; Nishioka, Michi; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Zhou, Chen; Song, Huan; Lan, Ting; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Yuannong

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a new method to reconstruct the vertical electron density profile based on vertical Total Electron Content (TEC) using the simulated annealing algorithm. The present technique used the Quasi-parabolic segments (QPS) to model the bottomside ionosphere. The initial parameters of the ionosphere model were determined from both International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) (Bilitza et al., 2014) and vertical TEC (vTEC). Then, the simulated annealing algorithm was used to search the best-fit parameters of the ionosphere model by comparing with the GPS-TEC. The performance and robust of this technique were verified by ionosonde data. The critical frequency (foF2) and peak height (hmF2) of the F2 layer obtained from ionograms recorded at different locations and on different days were compared with those calculated by the proposed method. The analysis of results shows that the present method is inspiring for obtaining foF2 from vTEC. However, the accuracy of hmF2 needs to be improved in the future work.

  16. Vertical profile of fog microphysics : a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnet, Frédéric; Brilouet, Pierre-Etienne; Mazoyer, Marie; Bourrianne, Thierry; Etcheberry, Jean-Michel; Gaillard, Brigitte; Legain, Dominique; Tzanos, Diane; Barrié, Joel; Barrau, Sébastien; Defoy, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence and development of fogs result from the non-linear interaction of competing radiative, thermodynamic, microphysical and dynamical processes and the forecasting of their life cycle still remains a challenging issue. Several field campaigns have been carried out at the SIRTA observatory in the Paris suburb area (France). These experiments have shown that fog events exhibit large differences of the microphysical properties and various evolutions during their life cycle. To better understand relationships between the different processes and to validate numerical simulations it is necessary however to document the vertical profile of the fog microphysics. A CDP (Cloud Droplet Spectrometer) from DMT (Droplet Measurement Technology, Boulder, CO) has been modified to allow measurements of the droplet size distribution in fog layers with a tethered balloon. This instrumental set-up has been used during a field campaign during the winter 2013-214 in the Landes area in the South West of France. To validate the vertical profiles provided by the modified CDP, a mast was equipped with microphysical instruments at 2 altitude levels with an another CDP at 24 m and a Fog Monitor FM100 at 42 m. The instrumental set-up deployed during this campaign is presented. Data collected during a fog event that occurred during the night of 5-6 March 2014 are analysed. We show that microphysical properties such as droplet number concentration, LWC and mean droplet size, exhibit different time evolution during the fog life cycle depending on the altitude level. Droplet size distribution measurements are also investigated. They reveal sharp variations along the vertical close to the top of the fog layer. In addition it is shown that the shape of the size distributions at the top follows a time evolution typical of a quasi-adiabatic droplet growth.

  17. Piloted simulation of hover and transition of a vertical attitude takeoff and landing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    Piloted simulation studies of candidate control systems for VATOL aircraft were conducted on a six degree of freedom simulator. Hover and transitions from wing-born to hovering flight were performed, with and without turbulence, on a representative high performance fighter configuration. Deflection of the rear engine nozzle provided pitch and yaw control moments in concert with reaction controls for roll. Unique motion cues in hover result from the vertical displacement of the cockpit and the thrust vectoring nozzles. Abundant control power available with moderate engine nozzle deflection combined with rate feedback for stability augmentation provided very satisfactory control.

  18. Design of a Low Cost Short Takeoff-vertical Landing Export Fighter/attack Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, Anne; Bodeker, Dan, III; Miu, Steve; Petro, Laura; Senf, Cary Taylor; Woeltjen, Donald

    1990-01-01

    The design of a supersonic short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft is presented that is suitable for export. An advanced four poster, low bypass turbofan engine is to be used for propulsion. Preliminary aerodynamic analysis is presented covering a determination of CD versus CL, CD versus Mach number, as well as best cruise Mach number and altitude. Component locations are presented and center of gravity determined. Cost minimization is achieved through the use of developed subsystems and standard fabrication techniques using nonexotic materials. Conclusions regarding the viability of the STOVL design are presented.

  19. TOMS Validation Based on Profiles of Aerosol Properties in the Lower Troposphere as Obtained with Light Aircraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prospero, Joseph M.; Maring, Hal; Savoie, Dennis

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the University of Miami Aerosol Group (UMAG) in this project was to make measurements of vertical profiles of aerosol properties and aerosol optical depth using a light aircraft. The UMAG developed a light aircraft aerosol package (LAAP) that was used in light aircraft (Cessna 172) during the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRIDE). This field campaign took place on Puerto Rico during July 2000. Design details and results from the use of the LAAP were presented at TOMS Science team meetings on April 1998, April 1999, and May 2000. Results from the LAAP collected during the PRIDE Experiment were presented at the Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, December 2000. Some of the results from the LAAP collected during the PRIDE Experiment have been accepted for publication in the Journal of Geophysical Research in a "topical section" made up of papers from the PRIDE Program.

  20. Mechanistic simulation of the vertical soil organic matter profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braakhekke, M.; Beer, C.; Reichstein, M.; Hoosbeek, M.; Kruijt, B.; Kabat, P.

    2013-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) constitutes a large global pool of carbon that may play a considerable role for future climate. The vertical distribution of SOM in the profile may be important due to depth-dependence of physical, chemical, and biological conditions, and links to physical processes such as heat and moisture transport. The aim of this thesis is to develop a dynamic and mechanistic representation of the vertical SOM profile that can be applied for large scale simulations as a part of global ecosystem and earth system models. A model structure called SOMPROF was developed that dynamically simulates the SOM profile based on above and below ground litter input, decomposition, bioturbation, and liquid phase transport. Furthermore, three organic surface horizons are explicitly represented. Since the organic matter transport processes have been poorly quantified in the past and are difficult to observe directly, the model was calibrated with a Bayesian approach for two contrasting temperate forest sites in Europe. Different types of data were included in the parameter estimation, including: organic carbon stocks and concentrations, respiration rates, and excess lead-210 activity. The calibrations yielded good fits to the observations, and showed that the two sites differ considerably with respect to the relevance of the different processes. These differences agree well with expectations based on local conditions. However, the results also demonstrate the difficulties arising from convolution of the processes. Several parameters are poorly constrained and for one of the sites, several distinct regions in parameter space exist that yield acceptable fit. In a subsequent study it was found that radiocarbon observations can offer much additional constraint on several parameters, most importantly on the turnover rate of the slowest SOM fraction. Additionally, for one site, a prognostic simulation until 2100 was performed using the resulting a posteriori parameter

  1. Depth profiles and free volume in aircraft primer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Horn, J. D.; Chen, H.; Jean, Y. C.; Zhang, W.; Jaworowski, M. R.

    2015-06-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and associated techniques provide non-destructive methods to study the free volume inside polymeric materials, and to study material characteristics over a depth profile. Cast free films of organic- or aqueous-based, non-chromated aerospace primers, when cured for about one week, had very different water vapour transport (through-plane) behaviour. In addition, both types of primer films showed strong anisotropic behaviour in in-plane versus through-plane water vapour transport rates. We report the differences between the organic- and aqueous-based aircraft primer films samples and their surface depth profiles. In bulk PALS measurements, an aged, organic-based film exhibited typical lifetimes and intensities for a particulate-containing polymer film on both faces. In contrast, aqueous-based films exhibited face oriented-dependent differences. In all aqueous- based samples, the I3 value of the back of the sample was smaller. The primer film samples were also evaluated with mono-energetic positron beam techniques to generate depth profile information. The heterogeneity in the samples was verified by Doppler broadening of energy spectroscopy (DBES). A model for the differences in the faces of the films, and their layered structure is discussed.

  2. How well can we Measure the Vertical Profile of Tropospheric Aerosol Extinction?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Ferrare, R.; Flynn, C.; Elleman, R.; Covert, D.; Strawa, A.; Welton, E.; Turner, D.; Jonsson, H.; Redemann, J.

    2005-01-01

    The recent Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Operations Period (MOP, May 2003) yielded one of the best measurement sets obtained to-date to assess our ability to measure the vertical profile of ambient aerosol extinction sigma(sub ep)(lambda) in the lower troposphere. During one month, a heavily instrumented aircraft with well characterized aerosol sampling ability carrying well proven and new aerosol instrumentation, devoted most of the 60 available flight hours to flying vertical profiles over the heavily instrumented ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF). This allowed us to compare vertical extinction profiles obtained from 6 different instuments: airborne Sun photometer (AATS-14), airborne nephelometer/absorption photometer, airborne cavity ring-down system, ground-based Raman lidar and 2 ground-based elastic backscatter lidars. We find the in-situ measured sigma(sub ep)(lambda) to be lower than the AATS-14 derived values. Bias differences are 0.002 - 0.004 K/m equivalent to 12-17% in the visible, or 45% in the near-infrared. On the other hand, we find that with respect to AATS-14, the lidar sigma(sub ep)(lambda) are higher. An unnoticed loss of sensitivity of the Raman lidar had occurred leading up to AIOP and we expect better agreement from the recently restored system looking at the collective results from 6 field campaigns conducted since 1996, airborne in situ measurements of sigma(sub ep)(lambda) tend to be biased slightly low (17% at visible wavelengths) when compared to airborne Sun photometer sigma(sub ep)(lambda). On the other hand, sigma(sub ep)(lambda) values derived from lidars tend to have no or positive biases. From the bias differences we conclude that the typical systematic error associated with measuring the tropospheric vertical profile of the ambient aerosol extinction with current state of-the art instrumentation is 15-20% at visible wavelengths and potentially larger in

  3. Vertical Profiles of Carbonyl Sulfide, Halocarbons, and Benzene Over North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montzka, S. A.; Calvert, P.; Hall, B.; Elkins, J. W.; Miller, L.; Watson, A.; Sweeney, C.; Tans, P.

    2005-12-01

    A NOAA sampling program to measure vertical profiles of CO{_2}, CH{_4}, N{_2}O, and other gases within the lower atmosphere has been expanded to allow measurements of carbonyl sulfide (COS), CFCs, HCFCs, HFCs, chlorocarbons, bromocarbons, methyl iodide, and benzene. Bimonthly to monthly profiles for these gases have been obtained since September 2004 from flasks collected onboard aircraft at altitudes up to 8 km above sea level at 10 continental and 2 coastal sites in North America. The wide range of gases being measured aid in identifying many different influences on sampled air, such as combustion, input from the oceans, urban emissions, non-urban terrestrial emissions, uptake by vegetation and soils, and vertical mixing. Based upon co-elevated mixing ratios of halocarbons and carbon monoxide or halocarbons and C{_2}Cl{_4}, we anticipate that this sampling program has the potential to provide continental-scale emissions estimates for non-CO{_2} gases that are currently regulated, for example by the Clean Air Act and the Montreal Protocol of Substance that Deplete the Ozone Layer, and for gases listed in the Kyoto Protocol that may be regulated in the future. In addition to the observation of urban pollution and burning plumes, strong and persistent vertical gradients have been observed that vary with season for COS, methyl halides, and chloroform. The results for COS are particularly dramatic, as they show substantially reduced mixing ratios in the continental boundary layer during the growing season. The spatial patterns and seasonality are qualitatively consistent with uptake of COS by photosynthetically active vegetation, though the relative importance of COS loss to soils is poorly constrained. These results will be compared to NOAA ground-based measurements that show strong seasonal variations for COS that are closely tied to those observed for CO{_2}, and the implications of these results on the hypothesis that COS could provide a proxy for gross vegetative

  4. In-situ vertical profiles of greenhouse gases: Why we need them and how we are going to get them in the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, C.; Karion, A.; Tans, P. P.; Butler, J. H.; Crosson, E.

    2009-12-01

    For more than five years the NOAA/ESRL aircraft project has been collecting flask samples at as many as 20 sites throughout North America. A compilation of the data demonstrates that vertical profiles are valuable in many ways. In particular, we have demonstrated that it is possible to make continental-scale flux estimates that depend only on well known horizontal re-analysis winds. We also show how these datasets contribute to our understanding of large scale circulation and chemical processes that dominate the seasonal cycle of these gases. Finally, these datasets have been essential for validating satellite observations and GHG forward and inverse models. As the requirements grow for estimating fluxes at smaller scales, so will the need for a higher density of vertical profiles. The NOAA/ESRL aircraft project has taken a lead role in this with the development a new sampling technology called the AirCore, as well as the validation and testing of Wavelength-Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) technology that is suitable for deployment on commercial aircraft. With this technology we expect to increase the density of vertical profiles made each year by two orders of magnitude with only moderate increases in cost. The increase in vertical profile density will not only help us quantify terrestrial fluxes but also help to understand the key mechanisms driving the variability in fluxes.

  5. Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Company, Washington, DC Boeing Commercial Aircraft Division, Seattle, WA and Long Beach, CA Boeing Military Aircraft and Missile Division, St. Louis, MO and... aircraft ; military fixed-wing aircraft ; rotorcraft (helicopters and tiltrotor aircraft ); and aircraft jet engines. Two companies dominate the commercial... aircraft business, Boeing and Airbus. Four companies dominate the military fixed-wing market, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, BAE Systems, and European

  6. Vertical Profile of Aerosol Properties at Pico Mountain, Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Mazzoleni, L. R.; Dzepina, K.; Hueber, J.; China, S.; Sharma, N.

    2013-12-01

    Pico Mountain (2325m asl) is a dormant volcano in the archipelago of the Azores1500 km west of Lisbon, Portugal in the North Atlantic. It differs from typical mountain ranges such as the Alps or the Rockies, which are large and present a complex orography. Pico Mountain has a simple cone-like structure with only one main peak and is thousands of kilometers away from any other significant mountain range. In summer months, it is typical for air masses to move around the mountain rather than traveling up its face. This implies that often the peak of the mountain lies above the marine boundary layer in the free troposphere, while the lower part of the mountain is affected by marine clouds and marine air-masses. An atmospheric monitoring station, the Pico Mountain Observatory was established in 2001 in the summit caldera of the volcano at 2225m above sea level. The observatory is far from large populations or pollution sources, which makes the station ideal to study atmospheric gases and aerosols transported over long-ranges in the free troposphere. The station is reachable only by foot following a steep and strenuous hiking trail. In the summer of 2013 we began to collect vertical profiles of aerosol by carrying an instrumented backpack up to the summit of the mountain, with the goal of studying the vertical structure of atmospheric aerosols from the marine boundary layer to the free troposphere. The backpack was carried from the base of trail at 1200m asl. The backpack was equipped with the following instruments: 1. Nephelometer to measure light scattering from aerosol 2. 2-size optical particle counter (300-500 nm) 3. Portable micro-aethalometer to measure absorbing aerosols 4. SEM/TEM sampler to collect particles for off-line electron microscopy analysis 5. Battery powered data logger to measure relative humidity, temperature and pressure 6. GPS tracking device We provide a preliminary analysis of data collected in 2013 to gain insight on the vertical distribution

  7. The limitations of using vertical cutoff rigidities determined from the IGRF magnetic field models for computing aircraft radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Smart, D F; Shea, M A

    2003-01-01

    Vertical cutoff rigidities derived from the International Geomagnetic Reference Fields (IGRF) are normally used to compute the radiation dose at a specific location and to organize the radiation dose measurements acquired at aircraft altitudes. This paper presents some of the usually ignored limits on the accuracy of the vertical cutoff rigidity models and describes some of the computational artifacts present in these models. It is noted that recent aircraft surveys of the radiation dose experienced along specific flight paths is sufficiently precise that the secular variation of the geomagnetic field is observable.

  8. Analysis and characterization of the vertical wind profile in UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W.; Ghedira, H.; Ouarda, T.; Gherboudj, I.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, temporal and spatial analysis of the vertical wind profiles in the UAE has been performed to estimate wind resource potential. Due to the very limited number of wind masts (only two wind masts in the UAE, operational for less than three years), the wind potential analysis will be mainly derived from numerical-based models. Additional wind data will be derived from the UAE met stations network (at 10 m elevation) managed by the UAE National Center of Meteorology and Seismology. However, since wind turbines are generally installed at elevations higher than 80 m, it is vital to extrapolate wind speed correctly from low heights to wind turbine hub heights to predict potential wind energy properly. To do so, firstly two boundary layer based models, power law and logarithmic law, were tested to find the best fitting model. Power law is expressed as v/v0 =(H/H0)^α and logarithmic law is represented as v/v0 =[ln(H/Z0))/(ln(H0/Z0)], where V is the wind speed [m/s] at height H [m] and V0 is the known wind speed at a reference height H0. The exponent (α) coefficient is an empirically derived value depending on the atmospheric stability and z0 is the roughness coefficient length [m] that depends on topography, land roughness and spacing. After testing the two models, spatial and temporal analysis for wind profile was performed. Many studies about wind in different regions have shown that wind profile parameters have hourly, monthly and seasonal variations. Therefore, it can be examined whether UAE wind characteristics follow general wind characteristics observed in other regions or have specific wind features due to its regional condition. About 3 years data from August 2008 to February 2011 with 10-minutes resolution were used to derive monthly variation. The preliminary results(Fig.1) show that during that period, wind profile parameters like alpha from power law and roughness length from logarithmic law have monthly variation. Both alpha and roughness have

  9. Study of aerodynamic technology for VSTOL fighter/attack aircraft: Vertical attitude concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhardt, H. A.; Chen, W. S.

    1978-01-01

    The aerodynamic technology for a vertical attitude VSTOL (VATOL) supersonic fighter/attack aircraft was studied. The selected configuration features a tailless clipped delta wing with leading-edge extension (LEX), maneuvering flaps, top-side inlet, twin dry engines and vectoring nozzles. A relaxed static stability is employed in conjunction with the maneuvering flaps to optimize transonic performance and minimize supersonic trim drag. Control for subaerodynamic flight is obtained by gimballing the nozzles in combination with wing tip jets. Emphasis is placed on the development of aerodynamic characteristics and the identification of aerodynamic uncertainties. A wind tunnel test program is proposed to resolve these uncertainties and ascertain the feasibility of the conceptual design. Ship interface, flight control integration, crew station concepts, advanced weapons, avionics, and materials are discussed.

  10. ALADINA - an unmanned research aircraft for observing vertical and horizontal distributions of ultrafine particles within the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altstädter, B.; Platis, A.; Wehner, B.; Scholtz, A.; Wildmann, N.; Hermann, M.; Käthner, R.; Baars, H.; Bange, J.; Lampert, A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the unmanned research aircraft Carolo P360 "ALADINA" (Application of Light-weight Aircraft for Detecting IN situ Aerosol) for investigating the horizontal and vertical distribution of ultrafine particles in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). It has a wingspan of 3.6 m, a maximum take-off weight of 25 kg and is equipped with aerosol instrumentation and meteorological sensors. A first application of the system, together with the unmanned research aircraft MASC (Multi-Purpose Airborne Carrier) of the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen (EKUT), is described. As small payload for ALADINA, two condensation particle counters (CPC) and one optical particle counter (OPC) were miniaturised by re-arranging the vital parts and composing them in a space-saving way in the front compartment of the airframe. The CPCs are improved concerning the lower detection threshold and the response time to less than 1.3 s. Each system was characterised in the laboratory and calibrated with test aerosols. The CPCs are operated in this study with two different lower detection threshold diameters of 11 and 18 nm. The amount of ultrafine particles, which is an indicator for new particle formation, is derived from the difference in number concentrations of the two CPCs (ΔN). Turbulence and thermodynamic structure of the boundary layer are described by measurements of fast meteorological sensors that are mounted at the aircraft nose. A first demonstration of ALADINA and a feasibility study were conducted in Melpitz near Leipzig, Germany, at the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) station of the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) on 2 days in October 2013. There, various ground-based instruments are installed for long-term atmospheric monitoring. The ground-based infrastructure provides valuable additional background information to embed the flights in the continuous atmospheric context and is used for validation of the airborne results. The development of the

  11. ALADINA - an unmanned research aircraft for observing vertical and horizontal distributions of ultrafine particles within the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altstädter, B.; Platis, A.; Wehner, B.; Scholtz, A.; Lampert, A.; Wildmann, N.; Hermann, M.; Käthner, R.; Bange, J.; Baars, H.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the unmanned research aircraft Carolo P360 "ALADINA" (Application of Light-weight Aircraft for Detecting IN-situ Aerosol) for investigating the horizontal and vertical distribution of ultrafine particles in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). It has a wingspan of 3.6 m, a maximum take-off weight of 25 kg and is equipped with aerosol instrumentation and meteorological sensors. A first application of the system, together with the unmanned research aircraft MASC (Multi-Purpose Airborne Carrier) of the Eberhard-Karls University of Tübingen (EKUT), is described. As small payload for ALADINA, two condensation particle counters (CPC) and one optical particle counter (OPC) were miniaturized by re-arranging the vital parts and composing them in a space saving way in the front compartment of the airframe. The CPCs are improved concerning the lower detection threshold and the response time. Each system was characterized in the laboratory and calibrated with test aerosols. The CPCs are operated with two different lower detection threshold diameters of 6 and 18 nm. The amount of ultrafine particles, which is an indicator for new particle formation, is derived from the difference in number concentrations of the two CPCs. Turbulence and thermodynamic structure of the boundary layer are described by measurements of fast meteorological sensors that are mounted at the aircraft nose. A first demonstration of ALADINA and a feasibility study were conducted in Melpitz near Leipzig, Germany, at the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) station of the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) on two days in October 2013. There, various ground-based instruments are installed for long-term atmospheric monitoring. The ground-based infrastructure provides valuable additional background information to embed the flights in the continuous atmospheric context and is used for validation of the airborne results. The development of the boundary layer, derived from

  12. MEASURING VERTICAL PROFILES OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY WITH IN SITU DIRECT-PUSH METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) staff developed a field procedure to measure hydraulic conductivity using a direct-push system to obtain vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity. Vertical profiles were obtained using an in situ field device-composed of a
    Geopr...

  13. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: ground based validation, and vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidar, S.; Oetjen, H.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B.; Ortega, I.; Sinreich, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2012-09-01

    The University of Colorado Airborne Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument uses solar stray light remote sensing to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), formaldehyde (HCHO), water vapor (H2O), nitrous acid (HONO), iodine monoxide (IO), bromine monoxide (BrO), and oxygen dimers (O4) at multiple wavelengths (360 nm, 477 nm, 577 nm and 632 nm) simultaneously, and sensitively in the open atmosphere. The instrument is unique, in that it presents the first systematic implementation of MAX-DOAS on research aircraft, i.e. (1) includes measurements of solar stray light photons from nadir, zenith, and multiple elevation angles forward and below the plane by the same spectrometer/detector system, and (2) features a motion compensation system that decouples the telescope field of view (FOV) from aircraft movements in real-time (< 0.35° accuracy). Sets of solar stray light spectra collected from nadir to zenith scans provide some vertical profile information within 2 km above and below the aircraft altitude, and the vertical column density (VCD) below the aircraft is measured in nadir view. Maximum information about vertical profiles is derived simultaneously for trace gas concentrations and aerosol extinction coefficients over similar spatial scales and with a vertical resolution of typically 250 m during aircraft ascent/descent. The instrument is described, and data from flights over California during the CalNex and CARES air quality field campaigns is presented. Horizontal distributions of NO2 VCDs (below the aircraft) maps are sampled with typically 1 km resolution, and show good agreement with two ground based CU MAX-DOAS instruments (slope 0.95 ± 0.09, R2 = 0.86). As a case study vertical profiles of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, and H2O mixing ratios and aerosol extinction coefficients, ɛ, at 477nm calculated from O4 measurements from a low approach at Brackett airfield inside the

  14. Vertical particle concentration profiles around urban office buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang, T. N.; He, C.; Morawska, L.; Knibbs, L. D.; Falk, M.

    2012-06-01

    Despite its role in determining both indoor and outdoor human exposure to anthropogenic particles, there is limited information describing vertical profiles of particle concentrations in urban environments, especially for ultrafine particles. Furthermore, the results of the few studies performed have been inconsistent. As such, this study aimed to assess the influence of vehicle emissions and nucleation formation on particle characteristics (particle number size distribution - PNSD and PM2.5 concentration) at different heights around three urban office buildings located next to busy roads in Brisbane, Australia, and place these results in the broader context of the existing literature. Two sets of instruments were used to simultaneously measure PNSD, particle number (PN) and PM2.5 concentrations, respectively, for up to three weeks at each building. The results showed that both PNSD and PM2.5 concentration around building envelopes were influenced by vehicle emissions and new particle formation, and that they exhibited variability across the three different office buildings. During nucleation events, PN concentration in size range of <30 nm and total PN concentration increased (7-65% and 5-46%, respectively), while PM2.5 concentration decreased (36-52%) with height. This study has shown an under acknowledged role for nucleation in producing particles that can affect large numbers of people, due to the high density and occupancy of urban office buildings and the fact that the vast majority of people's time is spent indoors. These findings highlight important new information related to the previously overlooked role of particle formation in the urban atmosphere and its potential effects on selection of air intake locations and appropriate filter types when designing or upgrading mechanical ventilation systems in urban office buildings. The results also serve to better define particle behaviour and variability around building envelopes, which has implications for

  15. Radiosonde aerosol counter for vertical profiling of atmospheric dust layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulanowski, Z.; Hirst, E.; Kaye, P. H.; Harrison, R. G.; Nicoll, K. A.; Rogers, G.

    2010-05-01

    A low-cost, miniature aerosol particle counter has been developed, intended for use with balloon-borne meteorological radiosondes. It is particularly suitable for airborne mineral dust measurements. Ambient air is drawn into the counter using a diaphragm pump at a rate of 0.5 litre per minute. The counter detects particles in the airstream using a diode laser and a photodiode. Output from the photodiode is digitised into 5 size bins, with minimum particle diameters equivalent to 0.6, 1.4, 2.6, 5.4 and 10.6 micrometers. The counter is interfaced to a Vaisala RS92 radiosonde, which transmits data from the counter together with meteorological parameters and GPS-derived position to a ground based receiver at 1 Hz rate. Statistically significant particle size distributions can be obtained once a second for number concentrations down to about 100,000 particle per litre (within the measured size range), or correspondingly less at lower temporal resolutions. At the same time, the counter is capable of measuring dust number concentrations exceeding a million per litre without incurring significant errors. Soundings during the DREAME campaign in Kuwait (Ulanowski et al. EGU 2010, AS4.7) and on Cape Verde Islands (Nicoll et al. EGU 2010, AS4.7) provided dust concentration profiles with a typical vertical resolution of 4 m. Comparisons with integrated dust column size distribution measurements from AERONET sun photometers showed good agreement in two out of three cases where near-simultaneous retrievals were available. Optical thickness calculations based on the size distributions measured in Kuwait, with the assumption that the dust particles were prolate spheroids, agreed with the AERONET optical thickness at 675 nm to within 15%.

  16. Remote Sensing the Vertical Profile of Cloud Droplet Effective Radius, Thermodynamic Phase, and Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martins, J. V.; Marshak, A.; Remer, L. A.; Rosenfeld, D.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Fernandez-Borda, R.; Koren, I.; Correia, A. L.; Zubko, V.; Artaxo, P.

    2011-01-01

    Cloud-aerosol interaction is a key issue in the climate system, affecting the water cycle, the weather, and the total energy balance including the spatial and temporal distribution of latent heat release. Information on the vertical distribution of cloud droplet microphysics and thermodynamic phase as a function of temperature or height, can be correlated with details of the aerosol field to provide insight on how these particles are affecting cloud properties and their consequences to cloud lifetime, precipitation, water cycle, and general energy balance. Unfortunately, today's experimental methods still lack the observational tools that can characterize the true evolution of the cloud microphysical, spatial and temporal structure in the cloud droplet scale, and then link these characteristics to environmental factors and properties of the cloud condensation nuclei. Here we propose and demonstrate a new experimental approach (the cloud scanner instrument) that provides the microphysical information missed in current experiments and remote sensing options. Cloud scanner measurements can be performed from aircraft, ground, or satellite by scanning the side of the clouds from the base to the top, providing us with the unique opportunity of obtaining snapshots of the cloud droplet microphysical and thermodynamic states as a function of height and brightness temperature in clouds at several development stages. The brightness temperature profile of the cloud side can be directly associated with the thermodynamic phase of the droplets to provide information on the glaciation temperature as a function of different ambient conditions, aerosol concentration, and type. An aircraft prototype of the cloud scanner was built and flew in a field campaign in Brazil.

  17. Turbulence length scales in stably stratified free shear flow analyzed from slant aircraft profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Tjernstroem, M. )

    1993-05-01

    The vertical turbulence structure in the marine atmosphere close to a coastline is investigated using airborne measurements. The measurements are from a field experiment close to the coast in the southeast of Sweden, in the Baltic Sea. The Baltic Sea has two main properties that make it particularly interesting to study: significant annual lag in sea surface temperature compared to inland surface temperatures and the fact that it is surrounded by land in all directions within advection distances of from a few hours up to 10-15 hours in normal meteorological conditions. The present results are mostly from spring or early summer with mainly cool water: with a stable or neutral marine boundary layer but with substantial heating of the land area during daytime. When the daytime inland convective boundary layer is advected out over the cool sea, there is a frictional decoupling in space analogous to the same nocturnal process in time. This sometimes creates a residual layer, a remnant of the inland convective boundary layer, that can be advected for considerable distances over the sea. At the top of this layer, wind shear gives rise to a local increase in turbulent kinetic energy. These layers are used for an analysis of turbulent scales for free shear flow in stable stratification. The analysis is based on different length scales used in numerical model closures for turbulence processes and reveals the asymptotic behavior of different scales in the neutral limit and their functional form, and illustrates the nonlinear relationship between scales for different properties. The profiles from the aircraft are taken from 25 slant soundings performed in connection to low-level boundary-layer flights. The results are calculated from turbulence data extracted through filtering techniques on instantaneous time series (individual profiles). The calculated turbulence parameters from all profiles are grouped and averaged compositely over all profiles. 48 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Development of a Climatology of Vertically Complete Wind Profiles from Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes in detail the QC and splicing methodology for KSC's 50- and 915-MHz DRWP measurements that generates an extensive archive of vertically complete profiles from 0.20-18.45 km. The concurrent POR from each archive extends from April 2000 to December 2009. MSFC NE applies separate but similar QC processes to each of the 50- and 915-MHz DRWP archives. DRWP literature and data examination provide the basis for developing and applying the automated and manual QC processes on both archives. Depending on the month, the QC'ed 50- and 915-MHz DRWP archives retain 52-65% and 16-30% of the possible data, respectively. The 50- and 915-MHz DRWP QC archives retain 84-91% and 85-95%, respectively, of all the available data provided that data exist in the non- QC'ed archives. Next, MSFC NE applies an algorithm to splice concurrent measurements from both DRWP sources. Last, MSFC NE generates a composite profile from the (up to) five available spliced profiles to effectively characterize boundary layer winds and to utilize all possible 915-MHz DRWP measurements at each timestamp. During a given month, roughly 23,000-32,000 complete profiles exist from 0.25-18.45 km from the composite profiles' archive, and approximately 5,000- 27,000 complete profiles exist from an archive utilizing an individual 915-MHz DRWP. One can extract a variety of profile combinations (pairs, triplets, etc.) from this sample for a given application. The sample of vertically complete DRWP wind measurements not only gives launch vehicle customers greater confidence in loads and trajectory assessments versus using balloon output, but also provides flexibility to simulate different DOL situations across applicable altitudes. In addition to increasing sample size and providing more flexibility for DOL simulations in the vehicle design phase, the spliced DRWP database provides any upcoming launch vehicle program with the capability to utilize DRWP profiles on DOL to compute vehicle steering

  19. Reconstruction of Vertical Profile of Permittivity of Layered Media which is Probed Using Vertical Differential Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochanin, Gennadiy P.; Poyedinchuk, Anatoliy Y.; Varianytsia-Roshchupkina, Liudmyla A.; Pochanina, Iryna Ye.

    2016-04-01

    Results of this research are intended to use at GPR investigations of layered media (for example, at roads' inspection) for the processing of collected data and reconstruction of dependence of permittivity on the depth. Recently, an antenna system with a vertical differential configuration of receiving module (Patent UA81652) for GPR was suggested and developed The main advantage of the differential antennas in comparison with bistatic antennas is a high electromagnetic decoupling between the transmitting and receiving modules. The new vertical differential configuration has an additional advantage because it allows collecting GPR data reflected by layered media without any losses of information about these layers [1] and, potentially, it is a more accurate instrument for the layers thickness measurements [2]. The developed antenna system is tested in practice with the GPR at asphalt thickness measurements [3] and shown an accuracy which is better than 0.5 cm. Since this antenna system is good for sounding from above the surface (air coupled technique), the mobile laboratory was equipped with the developed GPR [3]. In order to process big set of GPR data that collected during probing at long routes of the roads, for the data processing it was tested new algorithm of the inverse problem solution. It uses a fast algorithm for calculation of electromagnetic wave diffraction by non-uniform anisotropic layers [4]. The algorithm is based on constructing a special case solution to the Riccati equation for the Cauchy problem and enables a qualitative description of the wave diffraction by the electromagnetic structure of the type within a unitary framework. At this stage as initial data we used synthetic GPR data that were obtained as results of the FDTD simulation of the problem of UWB electromagnetic impulse diffraction on layered media. Differential and bistatic antenna configurations were tested at several different profiles of permittivity. Meanings of permittivity of

  20. GROUND WATER SAMPLING FOR VERTICAL PROFILING OF CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate delineation of plume boundaries and vertical contaminant distribution are necessary in order to adequately characterize waste sites and determine remedial strategies to be employed. However, it is important to consider the sampling objectives, sampling methods, and sampl...

  1. Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment SAMUM 2006: Airborne observations of dust particle properties and vertical dust profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzold, A.; Weinzierl, B.; Esselborn, M.; Fiebig, M.; Fix, A.; Kiemle, C.; Wirth, M.; Müller, D.; Wendisch, M.; Schuetz, L.; Kandler, K.; Kahn, R.; Wagner, F.; Pereira, S.; Virkkula, A.

    2006-12-01

    The Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM) is an initiative of several German institutes. Its goal is the characterisation of optical, physical, chemical, and radiative properties of Saharan dust at the source region. SAMUM data may serve as ground truth data to validate satellite products and atmospheric transport models, and to support the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) mission. The first SAMUM intensive field phase was carried out in May/June 2006 in Southern Morocco. Ground sites were Ouarzazate (30.93° N, 6.9° W), Zagora (30.15° N, 5.37°), and Evora (38.53°N, 7.90°E) in Portugal for long- range transport studies. Research aircraft were operating from Ouarzazate (Partenavia, local flights) and Casablanca (DLR Falcon) at the Moroccan west coast As part of SAMUM, airborne measurements of dust particle properties were conducted using the German research aircraft Falcon. The DLR Falcon was equipped with an extensive set of aerosol physico-chemical instruments for size, volatility, and absorption measurements, impactor sampling for chemical analyses and with a nadir-looking high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) for measuring aerosol extinction at 532 nm, and aerosol backscatter and depolarisation at 532 nm and 1064 nm. The field sites were equipped with aerosol sampling devices and instruments for particle size distribution measurements. During the SAMUM core phase, three large-scale dust events were probed which extended from southern Morocco to Portugal. Vertical (0 10 km) and horizontal (Saharan border to southern Portugal) dust plume structures, aerosol optical depth as well as particle microphysical and optical properties were studied for all cases. The upper boundary of the dust layers was found at altitudes between 4 and 6 km above sea level. The internal structure of the dust layers varied from well mixed to stratified. The influence of the Atlas Mountains on the lifting of the dust layers was monitored

  2. Algorithme d'optimisation du profil vertical pour un segment de vol en croisiere avec une contrainte d'heure d'arrivee requise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dancila, Radu Ioan

    This thesis presents the development of an algorithm that determines the optimal vertical navigation (VNAV) profile for an aircraft flying a cruise segment, along a given lateral navigation (LNAV) profile, with a required time of arrival (RTA) constraint. The algorithm is intended for implementation into a Flight Management System (FMS) as a new feature that gives advisory information regarding the optimal VNAV profile. The optimization objective is to minimize the total cost associated with flying the cruise segment while arriving at the end of the segment within an imposed time window. For the vertical navigation profiles yielding a time of arrival within the imposed limits, the degree of fulfillment of the RTA constraint is quantified by a cost proportional with the absolute value of the difference between the actual time of arrival and the RTA. The VNAV profiles evaluated in this thesis are characterized by identical altitudes at the beginning and at the end of the profile, they have no more than one step altitude and are flown at constant speed. The acceleration and deceleration segments are not taken into account. The altitude and speed ranges to be used for the VNAV profiles are specified as input parameters for the algorithm. The algorithm described in this thesis is developed in MATLAB. At each altitude, in the range of altitudes considered for the VNAV profiles, a binary search is performed in order to identify the speed interval that yields a time of arrival compatible with the RTA constraint and the profile that produces a minimum total cost is retained. The performance parameters that determine the total cost for flying a particular VNAV profile, the fuel burn and the flight time, are calculated based on the aircraft's specific performance data and configuration, climb/descent profile, the altitude at the beginning of the VNAV profile, the VNAV and LNAV profiles and the atmospheric conditions. These calculations were validated using data generated by a

  3. Remote measurements of ozone, water vapor and liquid water content, and vertical profiles of temperature in the lower troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.; Gary, B. L.; Shumate, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    Several advanced atmospheric remote sensing systems developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory were demonstrated under various field conditions to determine how useful they would be for general use by the California Air Resources Board and local air quality districts. One of the instruments reported on is the Laser Absorption Spectrometer (LAS). It has a pair of carbon dioxide lasers with a transmitter and receiver and can be flown in an aircraft to measure the column abundance of such gases as ozone. From an aircraft, it can be used to rapidly survey a large region. The LAS is usually operated from an aircraft, although it can also be used at a fixed location on the ground. Some tests were performed with the LAS to measure ozone over a 2-km horizontal path. Another system reported on is the Microwave Atmospheric Remote Sensing System (MARS). It is tuned to microwave emissions from water vapor, liquid water, and oxygen molecules (for atmospheric temperature). It can measure water vapor and liquid water in the line-of-sight, and can measure the vertical temperature profile.

  4. Vertical velocities within a Cirrus cloud from Doppler lidar and aircraft measurements during FIRE: Implications for particle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gultepe, Ismail; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    1990-01-01

    A large and comprehensive data set taken by the NOAA CO2 Doppler lidar, the NCAR King Air, and rawinsondes on 31 October 1986 during the FIRE (First ISCCP Regional Experiment) field program which took place in Wisconsin are presented. Vertical velocities are determined from the Doppler lidar data, and are compared with velocities derived from the aircraft microphysical data. The data are used for discussion of particle growth and dynamical processes operative within the cloud.

  5. A comparison of vertical velocity in cirrus obtained from aircraft and lidar divergence measurements during FIRE. [First ISCCP Regional Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gultepe, Ismail; Heymsfield, A. J.; Lenschow, D. H.

    1990-01-01

    Techniques are presented to obtain vertical velocity in cirrus clouds from in situ aircraft lateral wind measurements and from ground-based remote Doppler lidar measurements. The approach used is to calculate w from the integral of the divergence of the horizontal velocity around a closed path. Divergence measurements from both aircraft and Doppler lidar are discussed. The principal errors in the calculation of w from aircraft lateral wind measurements are bias in the lateral wind, ground speed errors, and error due to vertical shear of the horizontal wind. For Doppler lidar measurements the principal errors are in the estimate of mean terminal velocity and the zeroth order coefficients of the Fourier series that is fitted to the data. The technique is applied to a cirrus cloud investigated during the FIRE (First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Regional Experiment) Cirrus Intensive Field Observation Program. The results indicate that the error in w is about + or - 14 cm/s from the aircraft technique; this can be reduced to about + or - 2 to 3 cm/s with technical improvements in both ground speed and lateral velocity measurements. The error in w from Doppler lidar measurements, which is about + or - 8 cm/s, can be reduced to about + or - 5 cm/s by improvements in the Doppler velocity measurements with technology that is currently available.

  6. Development of Environmental Profiles for Testing Equipment Installed in Naval Aircraft (Fixed Wing).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-02-01

    Ideetlip by Week usMinAe) This study was undertaken to provide supplementary documentation to assist users when applying MIL- STD -781C requirements for...modification of Appendix B, MIL- STD -781C to assure compati- 46 bility with naval aircraft applications; a sample test profile derived from each mission...MIL- STD -781C requirements for electronic equipment installed in naval fixed- wing aircraft. This standard adopted the concept of "mission analog

  7. Low profile, high load vertical rolling positioning stage

    DOEpatents

    Shu, Deming; Barraza, Juan

    1996-01-01

    A stage or support platform assembly for use in a synchrotron accurately positions equipment to be used in the beam line of the synchrotron. The support platform assembly includes an outer housing in which is disposed a lifting mechanism having a lifting platform or stage at its upper extremity on which the equipment is mounted. A worm gear assembly is located in the housing and is adapted to raise and lower a lifting shaft that is fixed to the lifting platform by an anti-binding connection. The lifting platform is moved vertically as the lifting shaft is moved vertically. The anti-binding connection prevents the shaft from rotating with respect to the platform, but does permit slight canting of the shaft with respect to the lifting platform so as to eliminate binding and wear due to possible tolerance mismatches. In order to ensure that the lifting mechanism does not move in a horizontal direction as it is moved vertically, at least three linear roller bearing assemblies are arranged around the outer-periphery of the lifting mechanism. One of the linear roller bearing assemblies can be adjusted so that the roller bearings apply a loading force against the lifting mechanism. Alternatively, a cam mechanism can be used to provide such a loading force.

  8. Development of an Aircraft Approach and Departure Atmospheric Profile Generation Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Bill K.; Velotas, Steven G.; Rutishauser, David K. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    In support of NASA Virtual Airspace Modeling and Simulation (VAMS) project, an effort was initiated to develop and test techniques for extracting meteorological data from landing and departing aircraft, and for building altitude based profiles for key meteorological parameters from these data. The generated atmospheric profiles will be used as inputs to NASA s Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOLSS) Prediction Algorithm (APA) for benefits and trade analysis. A Wake Vortex Advisory System (WakeVAS) is being developed to apply weather and wake prediction and sensing technologies with procedures to reduce current wake separation criteria when safe and appropriate to increase airport operational efficiency. The purpose of this report is to document the initial theory and design of the Aircraft Approach Departure Atmospheric Profile Generation Algorithm.

  9. Vertical Structure of the Wind Speed Profile at the North Sea Offshore Measurement Platform FINO1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    The vertical wind speed profile in the lowest 100m of the marine atmospheric boundary layer has been characterized from data collected at the FINO1 offshore research platform in the German North Sea sector for 2005. Located in 30m of water, the platform has a dense vertical array of meteorological instrumentation to measure wind speed, air temperature, relative humidity, and atmospheric turbulence characteristics. Along measurements of the ocean temperature and surface waves, the platform is well-equipped to characterize wind properties in the near-surface boundary layer. Preliminary analysis reveals a high incidence of vertical wind speed profiles that deviate significantly from Monin-Obukhov similarity theory with wind speed inflections that suggest decoupled layers near the surface. The presentation shows how the properties of the vertical wind speed profile change mainly depending on the wind speed, wind direction, and time of year. The results are significant because there are few reports of inflections in the vertical wind speed profile over the ocean and there is an a priori assumption that the vertical wind speed profile varies smoothly according to similarity theory. There are possible consequences for the wind energy development in terms of understanding the forces acting on offshore wind turbines whose rotors sweep across heights 150-200m above the sea surface.

  10. A New Rapid Method for Measuring the Vertical Head Profile.

    PubMed

    Keller, Carl

    2017-03-01

    This study describes a new technique for measuring the head profile in a geologic formation. The technique provides rapid, low cost information on the depth of water-producing zones and aquitards in heterogeneous aquifers, yielding estimates of hydraulic heads in each zone while identifying any potential for cross contamination between zones. The measurements can be performed in a typical borehole in just a few hours. The procedure uses both the continuous transmissivity profile obtained by the installation (eversion) of a flexible borehole liner into an open borehole and the subsequent removal (inversion) of the same liner from the borehole. The method is possible because of the continuous transmissivity profile (T profile described by Keller et al. 2014) obtained by measuring the rate of liner eversion under a constant driving head. The hydraulic heads of producing zones are measured using the reverse head profile (RHP) method (patent no. 9,008,971) based on a stepwise inversion of the borehole liner. As each interval of the borehole is uncovered by inversion of the liner, the head beneath the liner is allowed to equilibrate to a steady-state value. The individual hydraulic heads contributing to each measurement are calculated using the measured transmissivity for each zone. Application of the RHP method to a sedimentary bedrock borehole in New Jersey verified that it reproduced the head distribution obtained the same day in the same borehole instrumented with a multilevel sampling system.

  11. Development and application of lightweight instruments for vertical profiling of ozone and carbon monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bognar, John Andrew

    1998-09-01

    This thesis covers the development of low cost, lightweight instrumentation for vertical profiling measurements of ozone and carbon monoxide in the troposphere. These instruments are designed to fly on small, low-payload airborne platforms such as tethered kites and blimps. Thus, they can be used for making measurements from light aircraft as well. Due to their small size and low cost, they are also suitable for use as disposable sondes on released balloons or in dropsondes. The design and test results of a simple single-beam ultraviolet photometer for ozone measurements are presented. A novel airflow system and advanced electronics are among the most important changes from earlier reported systems. The current version of the instrument fits into a package 8 x 8 x 40 cm, weighs under 0.5 kg, and consumes approximately 8 watts of power. Independent measurements of ozone are made every six seconds, with a sensitivity of 0.3 ppbv ozone and a precision of 2%. The design and test results of a simple carbon monoxide detector based on the reducing gas detector principle are also presented. It operates by reacting carbon monoxide with mercuric oxide to produce mercury vapor, which may then be measured via ultraviolet absorption to compute the concentration of carbon monoxide. This instrument has several features which distinguish it from similar carbon monoxide analyzers, all of which contribute to its usefulness on small airborne platforms. It fits a package 10 x 20 x 25 cm, has a mass of 2.0 kg, and consumes an average of 20 watts of power. An independent measurement of carbon monoxide is made every eight seconds, with a sensitivity of 3 ppbv carbon monoxide and a precision of 4%. The packages these instruments are flown in are described, and other associated instruments in the packages are briefly covered. Two major packages are described: one for kites and blimps, and the other for light aircraft. These packages, while having a similar design architecture, have some

  12. Perception of facial profile attractiveness of different antero-posterior and vertical proportions.

    PubMed

    Abu Arqoub, Sarah H; Al-Khateeb, Susan N

    2011-02-01

    This study investigated the influence of changing the antero-posterior (AP) and vertical proportions of the lower face on the rankings of facial attractiveness. Four hundred and fifty-four (219 males and 235 females) native Jordanians of various ages and professions rated the attractiveness of a sequence of antero-posteriorly and vertically altered male and female profile images. Attractiveness ranking scores were obtained from the visual assessment of these digitally altered male and female profile images that represented a range of AP and vertical lower facial proportions. The mean and standard deviation (SD) for the rank scores were calculated. Statistical analyses were employed for comparison between the different age groups, genders, and professions. A Class I male profile with a normal lower face height and Class I female profile with a reduced lower face height were ranked as the most attractive. Class II male and female profiles with increased lower face heights were ranked as least attractive. As the vertical and AP dimensions diverged from normal, attractiveness decreased. Images with Class II profile features and increased lower face heights were considered less attractive than corresponding images with Class III profile features and reduced lower face heights. Gender had a limited influence on the perception of attractiveness. A significant difference was found between dentists and lay people in the perception of profile attractiveness.

  13. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Volume from High Spectral Resolution Infrared Transmission Measurements: Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldering, Annmarie; Kahn, Brian H.; Mills, Franklin P.; Irion, Fredrick W.; Steele, Helen M.; Gunson, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    The high-resolution infrared absorption spectra of the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment are utilized to derive vertical profiles of sulfate aerosol volume density and extinction coefficient. Following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in June 1991, the ATMOS spectra obtained on three Space Shuttle missions (1992, 1993, and 1994) provide a unique opportunity to study the global stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer shortly after a major volcanic eruption and periodically during the decay phase. Synthetic sulfate aerosol spectra are fit to the observed spectra, and a global fitting inversion routine is used to derive vertical profiles of sulfate aerosol volume density. Vertical profiles of sulfate aerosol volume density for the three missions over portions of the globe are presented, with the peak in aerosol volume density occurring from as low as 10 km (polar latitudes) to as high as 20 km (subtropical latitudes). Derived aerosol volume density is as high as 2-3.5 (mu)m(exp 3) per cubic centimeter +/-10% in 1992, decreasing to 0.2-0.5 (mu)m(exp 3) per cubic centimeter +/-20% in 1994, in agreement with other experiments. Vertical extinction profiles derived from ATMOS are compared with profiles from Improved Stratospheric And Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) and Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) that coincide in space and time and show good general agreement. The uncertainty of the ATMOS vertical profiles is similar to CLAES and consistently smaller than ISAMS at similar altitudes.

  14. Use of temperature profiles beneath streams to determine rates of vertical ground-water flow and vertical hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lapham, Wayne W.

    1989-01-01

    The use of temperature profiles beneath streams to determine rates of vertical ground-water flow and effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of sediments was evaluated at three field sites by use of a model that numerically solves the partial differential equation governing simultaneous vertical flow of fluid and heat in the Earth. The field sites are located in Hardwick and New Braintree, Mass., and in Dover, N.J. In New England, stream temperature varies from about 0 to 25 ?C (degrees Celsius) during the year. This stream-temperature fluctuation causes ground-water temperatures beneath streams to fluctuate by more than 0.1 ?C during a year to a depth of about 35 ft (feet) in fine-grained sediments and to a depth of about 50 ft in coarse-grained sediments, if ground-water velocity is 0 ft/d (foot per day). Upward flow decreases the depth affected by stream-temperature fluctuation, and downward flow increases the depth. At the site in Hardwick, Mass., ground-water flow was upward at a rate of less than 0.01 ft/d. The maximum effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of the sediments underlying this site is 0.1 ft/d. Ground-water velocities determined at three locations at the site in New Braintree, Mass., where ground water discharges naturally from the underlying aquifer to the Ware River, ranged from 0.10 to 0.20 ft/d upward. The effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of the sediments underlying this site ranged from 2.4 to 17.1 ft/d. Ground-water velocities determined at three locations at the Dover, N.J., site, where infiltration from the Rockaway River into the underlying sediments occurs because of pumping, were 1.5 ft/d downward. The effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of the sediments underlying this site ranged from 2.2 to 2.5 ft/d. Independent estimates of velocity at two of the three sites are in general agreement with the velocities determined using temperature profiles. The estimates of velocities and conductivities derived from the

  15. Test-Analysis Correlation of a Crash Simulation of a Vertical Drop Test of a Commuter-Category Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2004-01-01

    A finite element model of an ATR42-300 commuter-class aircraft was developed and a crash simulation was executed. Analytical predictions were correlated with data obtained from a 30-feet per second (9.14-meters per second) vertical drop test of the aircraft. The purpose of the test was to evaluate the structural response of the aircraft when subjected to a severe, but survivable, impact. The aircraft was configured with seats, dummies, luggage, and other ballast. The wings were filled with 8,700 lb. (3,946 kilograms) of water to represent the fuel. The finite element model, which consisted of 57,643 nodes and 62,979 elements, was developed from direct measurements of the airframe geometry. The seats, dummies, luggage, simulated engines and fuel, and other ballast were represented using concentrated masses. The model was executed in LS-DYNA, a commercial finite element code for performing explicit transient dynamic simulations. Analytical predictions of structural deformation and selected time-history responses were correlated with experimental data from the drop test to validate the simulation.

  16. Vertical profile of tritium concentration in air during a chronic atmospheric HT release.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Sumi

    2003-03-01

    The vertical profiles of tritium gas and tritiated water concentrations in air, which would have an influence on the assessment of tritium doses as well as on the environmental monitoring of tritium, were measured in a chronic tritium gas release experiment performed in Canada in 1994. While both of the profiles were rather uniform during the day because of atmospheric mixing, large gradients of the profiles were observed at night. The gradient coefficients of the profiles were derived from the measurements. Correlations were analyzed between the gradient coefficients and meteorological conditions: solar radiation, wind speed, and turbulent diffusivity. It was found that the solar radiation was highly correlated with the gradient coefficients of tritium gas and tritiated water profiles and that the wind speed and turbulent diffusivity showed weaker correlations with those of tritiated water profiles. A one-dimensional tritium transport model was developed to analyze the vertical diffusion of tritiated water re-emitted from the ground into the atmosphere. The model consists of processes of tritium gas deposition to soil including oxidation into tritiated water, reemission of tritiated water, dilution of tritiated water in soil by rain, and vertical diffusion of tritiated water in the atmosphere. The model accurately represents the accumulation of tritiated water in soil water and the time variations and vertical profiles of tritiated water concentrations in air.

  17. Decision-Aiding and Optimization for Vertical Navigation of Long-Haul Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, Nicholas J. M.; Sheridan, Thomas B.

    1996-01-01

    Most decisions made in the cockpit are related to safety, and have therefore been proceduralized in order to reduce risk. There are very few which are made on the basis of a value metric such as economic cost. One which can be shown to be value based, however, is the selection of a flight profile. Fuel consumption and flight time both have a substantial effect on aircraft operating cost, but they cannot be minimized simultaneously. In addition, winds, turbulence, and performance x,ary widely with altitude and time. These factors make it important and difficult for pilots to (a) evaluate the outcomes associated with a particular trajectory before it is flown and (b) decide among possible trajectories. The two elements of this problem considered here are (1) determining, what constitutes optimality, and (2) finding optimal trajectories. Pilots and dispatchers from major U.S. airlines were surveyed to determine which attributes of the outcome of a flight they considered the most important. Avoiding turbulence-for passenger comfort topped the list of items which were not safety related. Pilots' decision making about the selection of flight profile on the basis of flight time, fuel burn, and exposure to turbulence was then observed. Of the several behavioral and prescriptive decision models invoked to explain the pilots' choices, utility maximization is shown to best reproduce the pilots' decisions. After considering more traditional methods for optimizing trajectories, a novel method is developed using a genetic algorithm (GA) operating on a discrete representation of the trajectory search space. The representation is a sequence of command altitudes, and was chosen to be compatible with the constraints imposed by Air Traffic Control, and with the training given to pilots. Since trajectory evaluation for the GA is performed holistically, a wide class of objective functions can be optimized easily. Also, using the GA it is possible to compare the costs associated with

  18. Decision-Aiding and Optimization for Vertical Navigation of Long-Haul Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, Nicholas J. M.; Sheridan, Thomas B.

    1996-01-01

    Most decisions made in the cockpit are related to safety, and have therefore been proceduralized in order to reduce risk. There are very few which are made on the basis of a value metric such as economic cost. One which can be shown to be value based, however, is the selection of a flight profile. Fuel consumption and flight time both have a substantial effect on aircraft operating cost, but they cannot be minimized simultaneously. In addition, winds, turbulence, and performance vary widely with altitude and time. These factors make it important and difficult for pilots to (a) evaluate the outcomes associated with a particular trajectory before it is flown and (b) decide among possible trajectories. The two elements of this problem considered here are: (1) determining what constitutes optimality, and (2) finding optimal trajectories. Pilots and dispatchers from major u.s. airlines were surveyed to determine which attributes of the outcome of a flight they considered the most important. Avoiding turbulence-for passenger comfort-topped the list of items which were not safety related. Pilots' decision making about the selection of flight profile on the basis of flight time, fuel burn, and exposure to turbulence was then observed. Of the several behavioral and prescriptive decision models invoked to explain the pilots' choices, utility maximization is shown to best reproduce the pilots' decisions. After considering more traditional methods for optimizing trajectories, a novel method is developed using a genetic algorithm (GA) operating on a discrete representation of the trajectory search space. The representation is a sequence of command altitudes, and was chosen to be compatible with the constraints imposed by Air Traffic Control, and with the training given to pilots. Since trajectory evaluation for the GA is performed holistically, a wide class of objective functions can be optimized easily. Also, using the GA it is possible to compare the costs associated with

  19. Modeling of the aircraft in-trail-following task during profile descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goka, T.; Sorensen, J. A.; Phatak, A. V.

    1981-01-01

    The cockpit display of traffic information (CDTI) system concepts enable the pilot to observe the surrounding air traffic pattern. The impact of such a system is far reaching in terms of improved safety, pilot and controller workload, and aircraft fuel efficiency. One direct payoff is the ability to distribute the ATC workload to the pilot in such tasks as merging and spacing. The CDTI application of spacing approach aircraft in the terminal area is addressed. In-trail-following/CDTI experiments were performed using realistic cockpit simulators and profile descent approach scenarios. Based on collected experimental simulator data, pilot models were developed which include state estimation, decision making and flight control aspects. These models were coupled with models of aircraft and CDTI equipment to study the dynamic phenomena and stability of strings of aircraft along various approach patterns.

  20. Insights Into Precipitation Processes As Revealed By Profiling Radar, Disdrometer and Aircraft Observations During The MC3E Campaign.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giangrande, S. E.; Toto, T.; Mishra, S.; Ryzhkov, A.; Bansemer, A.; Kumjian, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) was a collaborative campaign led by the National Aeronautic and Space Administration's (NASA's) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. This campaign was held at the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF) in north-central Oklahoma, with the programs joining forces to deploy an extensive array of airborne, radiosonde and ground-based instrumentation towards an unprecedented set of deep convective environment and cloud property observations. An overarching motivation was to capitalize on the wealth of aircraft observations and new multi-frequency dual-polarization radars to provide insights for improving the treatments of cloud processes in convective models. This study considers a coupled aircraft, radar and surface disdrometer approach for identifying key cloud processes and linking those to possible radar-based microphysical fingerprints and/or cloud properties. Our emphasis is on the MC3E observations collected during aircraft spirals over the column of the ARM CF. We focus on those spirals associated with radar 'bright band' signatures and Doppler spectral anomalies observed within trailing stratifrom precipitation. Two cases are highlighted, one following a weaker convective event, and one following a stronger squall line. For each event, we investigate the usefulness of radar to inform on processes including aggregation and riming as viewed by the vertically-pointing ARM wind profiler (915 MHz) and cloud radar Doppler spectral observations (35 GHz). Matching dual-polarization radar signatures from nearby cm-wavelength radar are also consulted for complementary insights. For one event, the successive Citation II aircraft spirals through the melting layer and associated ground observations indicate a fortunate capture of the transition from a region of riming to one favoring aggregation

  1. Minimum-Cost Aircraft Descent Trajectories with a Constrained Altitude Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Minghong G.; Sadovsky, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical formula for solving the speed profile that accrues minimum cost during an aircraft descent with a constrained altitude profile is derived. The optimal speed profile first reaches a certain speed, called the minimum-cost speed, as quickly as possible using an appropriate extreme value of thrust. The speed profile then stays on the minimum-cost speed as long as possible, before switching to an extreme value of thrust for the rest of the descent. The formula is applied to an actual arrival route and its sensitivity to winds and airlines' business objectives is analyzed.

  2. A mathematical model for Vertical Attitude Takeoff and Landing (VATOL) aircraft simulation. Volume 2: Model equations and base aircraft data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortenbaugh, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Equations incorporated in a VATOL six degree of freedom off-line digital simulation program and data for the Vought SF-121 VATOL aircraft concept which served as the baseline for the development of this program are presented. The equations and data are intended to facilitate the development of a piloted VATOL simulation. The equation presentation format is to state the equations which define a particular model segment. Listings of constants required to quantify the model segment, input variables required to exercise the model segment, and output variables required by other model segments are included. In several instances a series of input or output variables are followed by a section number in parentheses which identifies the model segment of origination or termination of those variables.

  3. CALIBRATION OF A VERTICAL-SCAN LONG TRACE PROFILER AT MSFC.

    SciTech Connect

    GUBAREV,M.; KESTER,T.; TAKACS,P.Z.

    2001-07-31

    The long trace profiler (LTP) is the instrument of choice for the surface figure measurement of grazing incidence mirrors. The modification of conventional LTP, the vertical-scan LTP, capable of measuring the surface figure of replicated shell mirrors is now in operation at Marshall Space Flight Center. A few sources of systematic error for vertical-scan LTP are discussed. Status of systematic error reduction is reported.

  4. How Well do State-of-the-Art Techniques Measuring the Vertical Profile of Tropospheric Aerosol Extinction Compare?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B.; Ferrare, R.; Flynn, C.; Elleman, R.; Covert, D.; Strawa, A.; Welton, E.; Turner, D.; Jonsson, H.; Redemann, J.; Eilers, J.; Ricci, K.; Hallar, A. G.; Clayton, M.; Michalsky, J.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B.; Barnard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The recent Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Operations Period (AIOP, May 2003) yielded one of the best measurement sets obtained to date to assess our ability to measure the vertical profile of ambient aerosol extinction sigma(ep)(lambda) in the lower troposphere. During one month, a heavily instrumented aircraft with well-characterized aerosol sampling ability carrying well-proven and new aerosol instrumentation devoted most of the 60 available flight hours to flying vertical profiles over the heavily instrumented ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF). This allowed us to compare vertical extinction profiles obtained from six different instruments: airborne Sun photometer (AATS-14), airborne nephelometer/absorption photometer, airborne cavity ring-down system, groundbased Raman lidar, and two ground-based elastic backscatter lidars. We find the in situ measured sigma(ep)(lambda) to be lower than the AATS-14 derived values. Bias differences are 0.002-0.004 Km!1 equivalent to 13-17% in the visible, or 45% in the near-infrared. On the other hand, we find that with respect to AATS-14, the lidar sigma(ep)(lambda) are higher: Bias differences are 0.004 Km(-1) (13%) and 0.007 Km(-1) (24%) for the two elastic backscatter lidars (MPLNET and MPLARM, lambda = 523 nm) and 0.029 Km(-1) (54%) for the Raman lidar (lambda = 355 nm). An unnoticed loss of sensitivity of the Raman lidar had occurred leading up to AIOP, and we expect better agreement from the recently restored system. Looking at the collective results from six field campaigns conducted since 1996, airborne in situ measurements of sigma(ep)(lambda) tend to be biased slightly low (17% at visible wavelengths) when compared to airborne Sun photometer sigma(ep)(lambda). On the other hand, sigma(ep)(lambda) values derived from lidars tend to have no or positive biases. From the bias differences we conclude that the typical systematic error associated

  5. Daily carbon surface fluxes in the West Ebre (Ebro) watershed from aircraft profiling on late June 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, A.; Morguí, J.-A.; Curcoll, R.; Pouchet, I.; Casals, I.; Rodó, X.

    2010-11-01

    ABSTRACT An intensive aircraft campaign measuring atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios was carried out in the central part of the Ebre watershed on late June 2007 to characterize the CO2 dynamics in the Ebre basin and to calculate the regional cumulative carbon surface flux. CO2 concentrations were obtained from vertical profiles over La Muela (LMU; 41.60°N, 1.1°W) from 900 to 4000 m above the sea level (masl), horizontal transects at ~2000 m 100 km west from LMU, and continuous measurements at ~650 masl. Different estimates of surface flux from changes in the convective boundary layer (CBL) CO2 concentration were obtained following the Integral CBL budgeting equation (ICBL) and the carbon content integration (CCI) method. Values of the mean surface flux calculated from the different approaches range from -2.4 to -7.9 μmolCO2/m2s. Regional surface flux calculated from vertical profiling appears to be consistent in a distance of 70 km away from the measurement site. The ICBL method is very sensitive to the accurate determination of the concentration in the entrainment zone. The overall uncertainty from fluxes calculated from the ICBL method rises to a value of 70%, whereas the uncertainty linked to the CCI method is 55%.

  6. Vertical profiles of black carbon concentration and particle number size distribution in the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, L.; Deng, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The vertical distribution of aerosols is of great importance to our understanding in the impacts of aerosols on radiation balance and climate, as well as air quality and public health. To better understand and estimate the effects of atmospheric components including trace gases and aerosols on atmospheric environment and climate, an intensive field campaign, Vertical Observations of trace Gases and Aerosols in the North China Plain (VOGA-NCP), was carried out from late July to early August 2013 over a rural site in the polluted NCP. During the campaign, vertical profiles of black carbon (BC) concentration and particle number size distribution were measured respectively by a micro-Aethalometer and an optical particle counter attached to a tethered balloon within 1000 m height. Meteorological parameters, including temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and wind direction, were measured simultaneously by a radiosonde also attached to the tethered balloon. Preliminary results showed distinct diurnal variations of the vertical distribution of aerosol total number concentration and BC concentration, following the development of the mixing layer. Generally, there was a well mixing of aerosols within the mixing layer and a sharp decrease above the mixing layer. Particularly, a small peak of BC concentrations was observed around 400-500 m height for several profiles. Further analysis would be needed to explain such phenomenon. It was also found that measured vertical profiles of BC using the filter-based method might be affected by the vertical distribution of relative humidity.

  7. An analysis of the vertical structure equation for arbitrary thermal profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, Stephen E.; Dee, Dick P.

    1987-01-01

    The vertical structure equation is a singular Sturm-Liouville problem whose eigenfunctions describe the vertical dependence of the normal modes of the primitive equations linearized about a given thermal profile. The eigenvalues give the equivalent depths of the modes. The spectrum of the vertical structure equation and the appropriateness of various upper boundary conditions, both for arbitrary thermal profiles were studied. The results depend critically upon whether or not the thermal profile is such that the basic state atmosphere is bounded. In the case of a bounded atmosphere it is shown that the spectrum is always totally discrete, regardless of details of the thermal profile. For the barotropic equivalent depth, which corresponds to the lowest eigen value, upper and lower bounds which depend only on the surface temperature and the atmosphere height were obtained. All eigenfunctions are bounded, but always have unbounded first derivatives. It was proved that the commonly invoked upper boundary condition that vertical velocity must vanish as pressure tends to zero, as well as a number of alternative conditions, is well posed. It was concluded that the vertical structure equation always has a totally discrete spectrum under the assumptions implicit in the primitive equations.

  8. Generation of optimum vertical profiles for an advanced flight management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.; Waters, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    Algorithms for generating minimum fuel or minimum cost vertical profiles are derived and examined. The option for fixing the time of flight is included in the concepts developed. These algorithms form the basis for the design of an advanced on-board flight management system. The variations in the optimum vertical profiles (resulting from these concepts) due to variations in wind, takeoff mass, and range-to-destination are presented. Fuel savings due to optimum climb, free cruise altitude, and absorbing delays enroute are examined.

  9. Measurements of the vertical profile of water vapor abundance in the Martian atmosphere from Mars Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schofield, J. T.; Mccleese, Daniel J.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the Pressure Modulator Infrared Radiometer (PMIRR) capabilities along with how the vertical profiles of water vapor will be obtained. The PMIRR will employ filter and pressure modulation radiometry using nine spectral channels, in both limb scanning and nadir sounding modes, to obtain daily, global maps of temperature, dust extinction, condensate extinction, and water vapor mixing ratio profiles as a function of pressure to half scale height or 5 km vertical resolution. Surface thermal properties will also be mapped, and the polar radiactive balance will be monitored.

  10. TRAGEN: Computer program to simulate an aircraft steered to follow a specified verticle profile. User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The longitudinal dynamics of a medium range twin-jet or tri-jet transport aircraft are simulated. For the climbing trajectory, the thrust is constrained to maximum value, and for descent, the thrust is set at idle. For cruise, the aircraft is held in the trim condition. For climb or descent, the aircraft is steered to follow either (a) a fixed profile which is input to the program or (b) a profile computed at the beginning of that segment of the run. For climb, the aircraft is steered to maintain the given airspeed as a function of altitude. For descent, the aircraft is steered to maintain the given altitude as a function of range-to-go. In both cases, the control variable is angle-of-attack. The given output trajectory is presented and compared with the input trajectory. Step climb is treated just as climb. For cruise, the Breguet equations are used to compute the fuel burned to achieve a given range and to connect given initial and final values of altitude and Mach number.

  11. Vertical profiles of urban aerosol complex refractive index in the frame of ESQUIF airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, J.-C.; Chazette, P.

    2007-07-01

    A synergy between lidar, sunphotometer and in situ measurements has been applied to airborne observations performed during the Etude et Simulation de la QUalité de l'air en Ile-de-France (ESQUIF), enabling the retrieval of vertical profiles for the aerosol complex refractive index (ACRI) and single-scattering albedo with a vertical resolution of 200 m over Paris area. The averaged value over the entire planetary boundary layer (PBL) for the ACRI is close to 1.51(±0.02)-i0.017(±0.003) at 532 nm. The single-scattering albedo of the corresponding aerosols is found to be ~0.9 at the same wavelength. A good agreement is found with previous studies for urban aerosols. A comparison of vertical profiles of ACRI with simulations combining in situ measurements and relative humidity (RH) profiles has highlighted a modification in aerosol optical properties linked to their history and the origin of the air mass. The determination of ACRI in the atmospheric column enabled to retrieve vertical profiles of extinction coefficient in accordance with lidar profiles measurements.

  12. Vertical profiles of urban aerosol complex refractive index in the frame of ESQUIF airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, J.-C.; Chazette, P.

    2008-02-01

    A synergy between lidar, sunphotometer and in situ measurements has been applied to airborne observations performed during the Etude et Simulation de la QUalité de l'air en Ile-de-France (ESQUIF), enabling the retrieval of vertical profiles for the aerosol complex refractive index (ACRI) and single-scattering albedo with a vertical resolution of 200 m over Paris area. The averaged value over the entire planetary boundary layer (PBL) for the ACRI is close to 1.51(±0.02)-i0.017(±0.003) at 532 nm. The single-scattering albedo of the corresponding aerosols is found to be ~0.9 at the same wavelength. A good agreement is found with previous studies for urban aerosols. A comparison of vertical profiles of ACRI with simulations combining in situ measurements and relative humidity (RH) profiles has highlighted a modification in aerosol optical properties linked to their history and the origin of the air mass. The determination of ACRI in the atmospheric column enabled to retrieve vertical profiles of extinction coefficient in accordance with lidar profiles measurements.

  13. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, B.D.; Lissaman, P.B.S.; Morgan, W.R.; Radkey, R.L.

    1998-09-22

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing`s top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gases for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well. 31 figs.

  14. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, Bart D.; Lissaman, Peter B. S.; Morgan, Walter R.; Radkey, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing's top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gasses for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well.

  15. Flight Services and Aircraft Access: Active Flow Control Vertical Tail and Insect Accretion and Mitigation Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    This document serves as the final report for the Flight Services and Aircraft Access task order NNL14AA57T as part of NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project ITD12A+. It includes descriptions of flight test preparations and execution for the Active Flow Control (AFC) Vertical Tail and Insect Accretion and Mitigation (IAM) experiments conducted on the 757 ecoDemonstrator. For the AFC Vertical Tail, this is the culmination of efforts under two task orders. The task order was managed by Boeing Research & Technology and executed by an enterprise-wide Boeing team that included Boeing Research & Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Boeing Defense and Space and Boeing Test and Evaluation. Boeing BR&T in St. Louis was responsible for overall Boeing project management and coordination with NASA. The 757 flight test asset was provided and managed by the BCA ecoDemonstrator Program, in partnership with Stifel Aircraft Leasing and the TUI Group. With this report, all of the required deliverables related to management of this task order have been met and delivered to NASA as summarized in Table 1. In addition, this task order is part of a broader collaboration between NASA and Boeing.

  16. Low-Speed Wind-Tunnel Tests of a Pilotless Aircraft Having Horizontal and Vertical Wings and Cruciform Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastrocola, N; Assadourian, A

    1947-01-01

    Low-speed tests of a pilotless aircraft were conducted in the Langley propeller-research tunnel to provide information for the estimation of the longitudinal stability and. control, to measure the aileron effectiveness, and to calibrate the radome and the Machmeter pitot-static orifices. It was found that the model possessed a stEb.le variation of elevator angle required for trim throughout the speed range at the design angle of attack. A comparison of the airplane with and without JATO units and with an alternate rocket booster showed that a large loss in longitudinal stability and control resulting from the addition of the rocket booster to the aircraft was sufficient to make the rocket-booster assembly unsatisfactory as an alternate for the JATO units. Reversal of the aileron effectiveness was evident at positive deflections of the vertical wing flap indicating that the roll-stabilization system would produce roiling moments in a tight right turn contrary to its design purpose. Vertical-wing-flap deflections caused large errors in the static-pressure reading obtained by the original static-tube installation. A practical installation point on the fuselage was located which should yield reliable measurement of the free-stream static pressure.

  17. An investigation of vertical winds obtained from vertically pointing and tilted beams of a five-beam 915-MHz wind profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulter, R. L.; Martin, T. J.

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has operated a 915-MHz radar wind profiler coupled with a Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) since November 1992 at its Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) central facility in north central Oklahoma. The system is designed to provide continuous wind profiles from near the surface (100 m) to 5 km or more and virtual temperature profiles from near the surface to 1.5 km. During normal operation, the system uses four tilted beams (two each in the north-south and east-west vertical planes) and a single vertical beam to determine mean wind and virtual temperature profiles every hour. In this paper we illustrate and compare different methods for calculating w and several statistical variables from profiler data. The results are compared with those derived when the profiler is operated in a vertical-only mode under similar conditions.

  18. FAME-C: Retrieval of cloud top pressure with vertically inhomogeneous cloud profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henken, Cintia Carbajal; Lindstrot, Rasmus; Filipitsch, Florian; Walther, Andi; Preusker, Rene; Fischer, Jürgen

    2013-05-01

    A synergistic FAME-C (Freie Universität Berlin AATSR-MERIS Cloud Retrieval) algorithm is developed within the frame of the ESA CCI Cloud project. Within FAME-C the ratio of two MERIS measurements (the Oxygen-A absorption channel and a window channel) is used to retrieve cloud top pressure. In case of high, extended clouds the retrieved cloud top pressure is generally too high. This can be understood as an overestimation of extinction in upper cloud layers due to the assumption of vertical homogeneous clouds in the radiative transfer simulations. To include more realistic cloud vertical profiles, one year of data from the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) onboard CloudSat has been used to determine average normalized cloud vertical extinction profiles with a fixed pressure thickness for nine cloud types. The nine cloud types are based on the ISCCP COT-CTP classification table. The retrieved cloud top pressure, now using CloudSat cloud profiles in the forward model, is compared to CPR reflectivities as well as the retrieved cloud top pressure using vertically homogeneous cloud profiles. In the first number of cases under examination the overestimation of cloud top pressure, and therefore the bias, is reduced by a large amount when using CloudSat vertical cloud profiles. Another advantage is that no assumption about the cloud geometrical thickness has to be made in the new retrieval. It should be noted that comparisons between FAME-C products and A-train products can only be made at high latitudes where A-train and ENVISAT have overlapping overflights.

  19. Carbon monoxide (CO) vertical profiles derived from joined TES and MLS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming; Read, William; Kulawik, Susan; Worden, John; Livesey, Nathaniel; Bowman, Kevin; Herman, Robert

    2013-09-01

    (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) nadir and MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) limb measurements from the Aura satellite are used to jointly estimate an atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) profile with extended vertical range compared to profiles retrieved from the individual measurement. We describe the algorithms, the processing procedures, the prototyping results, and the evaluations for this new joint product. TES and MLS "stand-alone" CO profile retrievals are largely complementary, with TES being largely sensitive to lower to middle troposphere while MLS measures CO in the upper troposphere and above. We pair TES nadir and MLS limb tangent locations within 6-8 min and within 220 km. The paired radiance measurements of the two instruments in each location are optimally combined to retrieve a single CO profile along with other trace gases whose signal interferes with that from CO. This combined CO profile has a vertical resolution and vertical range that is an improvement over the two stand-alone products, especially in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere. For example, the degrees of freedom for signal (DOFS) between surface and 50 hPa for TES alone are < 2, and for the combined CO profiles are 2-4. This new Aura CO product will be made available to the public using TES V005 and MLS V003 processing results and will provide a unique data set for studying tropospheric transport of air pollutants and troposphere-stratospheric exchange processes.

  20. Comparison of glyoxal, BrO, and IO vertical profiles derived from both ground-based and airborne MAX-DOAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coburn, Sean; Volkamer, Rainer; Baidar, Sunil; Dix, Barbara; Koenig, Theodore; Ortega, Ivan; Sinreich, Roman; van Roozendael, Michel; Hendrick, Francois; Kinnison, Doug

    2015-04-01

    The information content of ground-based MAX-DOAS retrievals is assessed by collocated aircraft measurements for a ship MAX-DOAS setup over the Eastern tropical Pacific Ocean (TORERO RF17), and a mountain-top MAX-DOAS setup at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii (CONTRAST RF17). During both case studies the CU airborne MAX-DOAS (AMAX-DOAS) instrument aboard the NSF/NCAR GV aircraft measured profiles of glyoxal, BrO, and IO with 12-20 degrees of freedom and up to 500 m vertical resolution. The TORERO field campaign took place in 2012, while CONTRAST in 2014; both campaigns covered the months of January and February. Additional measurements aboard the aircraft helped to provide information/validation of the AMAX-DOAS derived profiles, such as in-situ water vapor from the Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser hygrometer (VCSEL), in-situ hydrocarbon measurements from the Trace Organic Gas Analyzer (TOGA), and aerosol information constrained by the Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS). The AMAX-DOAS profiles are compared with ground-based MAX-DOAS inversions. The latter explores the effect of using either the measured differential slant column density (dSCD) or SCD as input to the optimal estimation inversion, where SCD = dSCD + SCD_ref. SCD_ref is the residual column amount of the trace gas contained within the reference spectrum. For the AMAX-DOAS data, the values of SCD_ref were actively minimized, while SCD_ref is usually unknown for ground-based MAX-DOAS retrievals. In absence of independent measurements to constrain SCD_ref, the current state-of-the-art with ground-based MAX-DOAS applications is to use dSCDs as input to the inversion. Here we assess the effect of uncertain SCD_ref for ground-based MAX-DOAS profiles in form of a sensitivity study. Additionally for the ground-based data, different methods are compared for the determination of SCD_ref: 1) the collocated aircraft profiles described above present the opportunity to forward calculate the SCD

  1. Heterogeneous Vertical Hydraulic Conductivity in an Aquitard as Determined by Head Profiles and Pumping Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, D. J.; Bradbury, K. R.; Cherry, J. A.; Gotkowitz, M. G.; Parker, B. L.

    2005-12-01

    The vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv) of aquitards is one of the most important parameters in groundwater flow systems but presents special challenges for estimation. It determines the role of the aquitard in a flow system and is a measure of the protection given by the aquitard to underlying aquifers. The properties of aquitards vary vertically and estimates of Kv should reflect this heterogeneity. Vertical head profiles in aquitards show this heterogeneity, and are probably the most important data to be collected in aquitard studies. The heads rarely vary in a linear fashion with depth as would be expected in a homogeneous medium. Instead, most head loss is either at the top or the bottom of the identified aquitard, suggesting that some portion of the aquitard has a much lower Kv than the rest. While this portion is the most effective part of the aquitard, the rest of the aquitard can still present a barrier to flow. We determined the Kv profile of a six-meter thick shaley aquitard, the Eau Claire Formation, by measuring head profiles in, above, and below the aquitard before and during a pumping test. The head profile before the pumping test was measured using three systems: a FLUTeTM multi-level system with pressure transducers, a short interval straddle packer, and series of buried pressure transducers. All three measurements of heads gave similar profiles. The head decreased 1.5 meters in the upper five meters of the aquitard with most of the head drop, nine meters, occurring over the lower meter of the aquitard. The vertical component of gradient varied by a factor of 30. During the pumping test, the head profiles were measured with the FLUTe system and the buried pressure transducers. In general the two measurement systems agreed but significant differences occurred in the lowest conductivity part of the aquitard. The head profile measured by the FLUTe system showed variation similar to that in the rest of the aquitard while the head measured by the

  2. Vertical profiles and receptor modeling of volatile organic compounds over Southeastern Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöhrnschimmel, Henry; Márquez, Claudia; Mugica, Violeta; Stahel, Werner A.; Staehelin, Johannes; Cárdenas, Beatriz; Blanco, Salvador

    Tethered balloon flights were carried out over Southeastern Mexico City in April 2003, providing vertical profiles of ozone (0-1000 m above ground) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs, 0-200 m above ground). The objective of this study was to provide insight into the processes that drive ozone formation in Mexico City. In this paper, we discuss the atmospheric chemistry, emission sources and transport processes that influence the observed profiles. Characteristic ozone profiles were measured in the morning with the highest concentrations recorded in the residual layer. Maximum ozone concentrations, as high as 170 ppb, were measured at ground level in the afternoon. For the shape of VOC vertical profiles, no unique patterns were found. High concentrations were measured for propane, butane and toluene. Diurnal variations in VOC concentrations imply a strong effect of vertical dilution with an increasing mixing layer. Two different receptor models were used to relate observed VOC concentrations to emission sources. Results from a chemical mass balance (CMB) model suggest that the main contributors to total VOCs and the related ozone formation potential are gasoline vehicle exhaust and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). A linear unmixing analysis reproduced satisfactorily the measured source profiles of the main sources. The relative source activities calculated by the CMB and the linear unmixing models coincide well for the LPG contribution; however, the vehicle exhaust contribution is underestimated and solvent emissions are overestimated by linear unmixing relative to the CMB model.

  3. Coarse-fine vertical scanning based optical profiler for structured surface measurement with large step height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Liu, Xiaojun; Lei, Zili; Li, Qian; Yang, Xiao; Chen, Liangzhou; Lu, Wenlong

    2015-02-01

    White light interference (WLI) optical profiler had been used widely for structured surface measurement. To achieve high measuring accuracy, piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) was usually used as the vertical scanning unit, which was normally less than 100um and only for small range structured surface measurement. With the development of advanced manufacturing technology, precision structured surfaces with large step height were appearing. To satisfy the measurement requirements of this kind of precision structured surfaces, WLI optical profiler with large range had to be developed. In this paper, an optical profiler was proposed, in which a coarse-fine vertical scanning system was adopted to expand its measurement range to 10mm while its resolution still at nanometer level.

  4. Aircraft observations of the vertical structure of stratiform precipitation relevant to microwave radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, A.T.C. ); Barnes, A.; Glass, M. ); Kakar, R. ); Wilheit, T.T. )

    1993-06-01

    The retrieval of rainfall intensity over the oceans from passive microwave observations is based on a radiative transfer model. direct rainfall observations of oceanic rainfall are virtually nonexistent making validation of the retrievals extremely difficult. Observations of the model assumptions provide an alternative approach for improving and developing confidence in the rainfall retrievals. In the winter of 1983, the NASA CV-990 aircraft was equipped with a payload suitable for examining several of the model assumptions. The payload included microwave and infrared radiometers, mirror hygrometers, temperature probes, and PMS probes. On two occasions the aircraft ascended on a spiral track through stratiform precipitation providing an opportunity to study the atmospheric parameters. The assumptions concerning liquid hydrometeors, water vapor, lapse rate, and nonprecipitating clouds were studied. Model assumptions seem to be supported by these observations. 23 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Aircraft observations of the vertical structure of stratiform precipitation relevant to microwave radiative transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Barnes, A.; Glass, M.; Kakar, R.; Wilheit, T. T.

    1993-01-01

    The retrieval of rainfall intensity over the oceans from passive microwave observations is based on a radiative transfer model. Direct rainfall observations of oceanic rainfall are virtually nonexistent making validation of the retrievals extremely difficult. Observations of the model assumptions provide an alternative approach for improving and developing confidence in the rainfall retrievals. In the winter of 1983, the NASA CV-990 aircraft was equipped with a payload suitable for examining several of the model assumptions. The payload included microwave and infrared radiometers, mirror hygrometers, temperature probes, and PMS probes. On two occasions the aircraft ascended on a spiral track through stratiform precipitation providing an opportunity to study the atmospheric parameters. The assumptions concerning liquid hydrometeors, water vapor, lapse rate, and nonprecipitating clouds were studied. Model assumptions seem to be supported by these observations.

  6. Software-Defined Avionics and Mission Systems in Future Vertical Lift Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    and inhibits efficient resource pooling. • Unneeded memory or processing capacity in one functional unit or branch is essentially “trapped” – it...throughput to as much as 50 Mbps. As network throughput increased and parallel advances were made in processor speed and memory capacity, aircraft...including memory ), a shared processing environment might allow multiple low-or-medium-priority functions to dangerously draw resources away from the

  7. CO2 vertical profile retrieval from ground-based IR atmospheric spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravian, Kobra; Loehnert, Ulrich; Turner, David; Ebell, Kerstin

    2016-04-01

    CO2 vertical profile retrieval from ground-based IR atmospheric spectra In this study, we developed an algorithm for retrieving the CO2 vertical profile from atmospheric ground-based zenith spectra in the mid IR. Providing the CO2 profile from continuous (24h/day) ground-based spectra would be a great potential for studying the carbon cycle, the evaluation of satellite measurements or the assessment of numerical models, which forecast the near-surface CO2 flux. In order to retrieve the CO2 profile, we used observations of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) that was installed at the JOYCE (Jülich ObservatorY for Cloud Evolution), Germany in 2012. AERI measures downwelling infrared radiances from 520 cm-1 (3.3 μm) to 3020 cm-1 (19 μm) with a spectral resolution of 1 cm-1 and a temporal resolution of 1 minute. In a first step, we performed sensitivity studies for finding the most-suited spectral bands with highest sensitivity to the mean column amount of CO2 volume mixing ratio (VMR). Then an algorithm, known as AERIoe (Turner and Löhnert 2014), was applied to retrieve the mean column amount of CO2 VMR using simulated radiances in clear sky cases. AERIoe is a variational retrieval algorithm to provide information on Temperature, humidity, trace gases and clouds. The simulated AERI radiances were generated by a line by line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) using model temperature, humidity and CO2 profile. The retrieval results of mean column amount of CO2 VMR are in good agreement with the true ones. In addition to the mean column amount, we modified AERIoe to retrieve the CO2 vertical profile. First results reveal that there is more than 1 degree of freedom for CO2 profile. We will show results how the retrieval method is refined to optimally exploit the information on the CO2 profile contained in the AERI measurements.

  8. Development of a Climatology of Vertically Complete Wind Profiles from Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbre, Robert, Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of space vehicle loads and trajectories during design requires a large sample of wind profiles at the altitudes where winds affect the vehicle. Traditionally, this altitude region extends from near 8-14 km to address maximum dynamic pressure upon ascent into space, but some applications require knowledge of measured wind profiles at lower altitudes. Such applications include crew capsule pad abort and plume damage analyses. Two Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) systems exist at the United States Air Force (USAF) Eastern Range and at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Kennedy Space Center. The 50-MHz DRWP provides wind profiles every 3-5 minutes from roughly 2.5-18.5 km, and five 915-MHz DRWPs provide wind profiles every 15 minutes from approximately 0.2-3.0 km. Archived wind profiles from all systems underwent rigorous quality control (QC) processes, and concurrent measurements from the QC'ed 50- and 915-MHz DRWP archives were spliced into individual profiles that extend from about 0.2-18.5 km. The archive contains combined profiles from April 2000 to December 2009, and thousands of profiles during each month are available for use by the launch vehicle community. This paper presents the details of the QC and splice methodology, as well as some attributes of the archive.

  9. Experimental study of vertical stress profiles of a confined granular bed under static and dynamic conditions.

    PubMed

    Mandato, S; Cuq, B; Ruiz, T

    2012-07-01

    In a wet agglomeration process inside a low shear mixer, the blade function is to induce i) homogenization of the liquid sprayed on the powder surface and ii) a stress field able to transfer the mechanical energy at the particle scale. In this work we study the mechanical state of a confined powder bed through the analysis of stress distributions (by force measurements) in a rectangular cell in two cases: for a classical model powder (i.e. glass beads) and a complex powder (i.e. wheat semolina). Two types of vertical stress profiles are obtained according to the type of measurements carried out in the powder bed, either locally (at different positions in the cell) or globally (at the entire base). The global vertical stress profile follows Janssen's model and the local vertical stress profile highlights a critical length, identified as the percolation threshold of the force network, and a shielding length near the bottom, which is similar to an influence length of the side walls. In the context of wet agglomeration, the results allow to consider the role of the characteristic lengths in the mixing bowl under vertical mechanical solicitation.

  10. Field evaluation of a direct push deployed sensor probe for vertical soil water content profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vienken, Thomas; Reboulet, Ed; Leven, Carsten; Kreck, Manuel; Zschornack, Ludwig; Dietrich, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Reliable high-resolution information about vertical variations in soil water content, i.e. total porosity in the saturated zone, is essential for flow and transport predictions within the subsurface. However, porosity measurements are often associated with high efforts and high uncertainties, e.g. caused by soil disturbance during sampling or sensor installation procedures. In hydrogeological practice, commonly applied tools for the investigation of vertical soil water content distribution include gravimetric laboratory analyses of soil samples and neutron probe measurements. A yet less well established technique is the use of direct push-deployed sensor probes. Each of these methods is associated with inherent advantages and limitations due to their underlying measurement principles and operation modes. The presented study describes results of a joint field evaluation of the individual methods under different depositional and hydrogeological conditions with special focus on the performance on the direct push-deployed water content profiler. Therefore, direct push-profiling results from three different test sites are compared with results obtained from gravimetric analysis of soil cores and neutron probe measurements. In direct comparison, the applied direct push-based sensor probe proved to be a suitable alternative for vertical soil water content profiling to neutron probe technology, and, in addition, proved to be advantageous over gravimetric analysis in terms vertical resolution and time efficiency. Results of this study identify application-specific limitations of the methods and thereby highlight the need for careful data evaluation, even though neutron probe measurements and gravimetric analyses of soil samples are well established techniques (see Vienken et al. 2013). Reference: Vienken, T., Reboulet, E., Leven, C., Kreck, M., Zschornack, L., Dietrich, P., 2013. Field comparison of selected methods for vertical soil water content profiling. Journal of

  11. Vertical and Spatial Profiling of Arctic Black Carbon on the North Slope of Alaska 2015: Comparison of Model and Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, A. J., III; Feng, Y.; Biraud, S.; Springston, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    One of the major issues confronting aerosol climate simulations of the Arctic and Antarctic Cryospheres is the lack of detailed data on the vertical and spatial distribution of aerosols with which to test these models. This is due, in part, to the inherent difficulty of conducting such measurements in extreme environments. One class of under measured radiative forcing agents in the Polar Region is the absorbing aerosol - black carbon and brown carbon. In particular, vertical profile information of BC is critical in reducing uncertainty in model assessment of aerosol radiative impact at high latitudes. During the summer of 2015, a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) was deployed aboard the Department of Energy (DOE) Gultstream-1 (G-1) aircraft to measure refractory BC (rBC) concentrations as part of the DOE-sponsored ACME-V (ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements) campaign. This campaign was conducted from June through to mid-September along the North Slope of Alaska and was punctuated by vertical profiling over 5 sites (Atquasuk, Barrow, Ivotuk, Oliktok, and Toolik). In addition, measurement of CO, CO2 and CH4were also taken to provide information on the spatial and seasonal differences in GHG sources and how these sources correlate with BC. Lastly, these aerosol and gas measurements provide an important dataset to assess the representativeness of ground sites at regional scales. Comparisons between observations and a global climate model (CAM5) simulations will be agumented with a discussion on the capability of the model to capture observed monthly mean profiles of BC and stratified aerosol layers. Additionally, the ability of the SP2 to partition rBC-containing particles into nascent or aged species allows an evaluation of how well the CAM5 model captures aging of long distant transported carbonaceous aerosols. Finally model sensitivity studies will be aso be presented that investigated the relative importance of the different emission sectors to the summer Arctic

  12. Convective cloud vertical velocity and mass-flux characteristics from radar wind profiler observations during GoAmazon2014/5: VERTICAL VELOCITY GOAMAZON2014/5

    SciTech Connect

    Giangrande, Scott E.; Toto, Tami; Jensen, Michael P.; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Feng, Zhe; Protat, Alain; Williams, Christopher R.; Machado, Luiz

    2016-11-15

    A radar wind profiler data set collected during the 2 year Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) campaign is used to estimate convective cloud vertical velocity, area fraction, and mass flux profiles. Vertical velocity observations are presented using cumulative frequency histograms and weighted mean profiles to provide insights in a manner suitable for global climate model scale comparisons (spatial domains from 20 km to 60 km). Convective profile sensitivity to changes in environmental conditions and seasonal regime controls is also considered. Aggregate and ensemble average vertical velocity, convective area fraction, and mass flux profiles, as well as magnitudes and relative profile behaviors, are found consistent with previous studies. Updrafts and downdrafts increase in magnitude with height to midlevels (6 to 10 km), with updraft area also increasing with height. Updraft mass flux profiles similarly increase with height, showing a peak in magnitude near 8 km. Downdrafts are observed to be most frequent below the freezing level, with downdraft area monotonically decreasing with height. Updraft and downdraft profile behaviors are further stratified according to environmental controls. These results indicate stronger vertical velocity profile behaviors under higher convective available potential energy and lower low-level moisture conditions. Sharp contrasts in convective area fraction and mass flux profiles are most pronounced when retrievals are segregated according to Amazonian wet and dry season conditions. During this deployment, wet season regimes favored higher domain mass flux profiles, attributed to more frequent convection that offsets weaker average convective cell vertical velocities.

  13. Comparison of Profiling Microwave Radiometer, Aircraft, and Radiosonde Measurements From the Alliance Icing Research Study (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.

    2001-01-01

    Measurements from a profiling microwave radiometer are compared to measurements from a research aircraft and radiosondes. Data compared is temperature, water vapor, and liquid water profiles. Data was gathered at the Alliance Icing Research Study (AIRS) at Mirabel Airport outside Montreal, Canada during December 1999 and January 2000. All radiometer measurements were found to lose accuracy when the radome was wet. When the radome was not wetted, the radiometer was seen to indicate an inverted distribution of liquid water within a cloud. When the radiometer measurements were made at 15 deg. instead of the standard zenith, the measurements were less accurate.

  14. Characteristics of high resolution hydraulic head profiles and vertical gradients in fractured sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Jessica R.; Parker, Beth L.; Cherry, John A.

    2014-09-01

    Accurately identifying the position of vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv) contrasts is critical to the delineation of hydrogeologic units that serve as the basis for conceptual and numerical models of groundwater flow. High resolution head profiles have identified the position and thickness of Kv contrasts in clayey aquitards but this potential has not yet been thoroughly evaluated in sedimentary rocks. This paper describes an experiment in which head profiles with the highest, technically feasible resolution were obtained using Westbay® multilevel systems (MLS) installed in 15 cored holes at three sedimentary rock research sites with contrasting geologic and flow system conditions. MLSs were installed to maximum depths between 90 and 260 m with 2-5 monitoring zones per 10 m. Head profiles were measured over multiyear periods. The vertical component of hydraulic gradient (i.e., vertical gradient) was calculated for each pair of adjacent monitoring intervals in every MLS and then categorized based on its repeatability to facilitate interpretation of Kv contrasts and comparisons within boreholes, between boreholes at the same site, and between sites. The head and vertical gradient profiles from all three sites display systematic (i.e., simple, geometric) shapes defined by repeatable intervals of no to minimal vertical gradient, indicating relatively high Kv units, bounded by shorter depth intervals with large (up to -50 m/m) vertical gradients, indicating relatively low Kv units. The systematic nature of the profiles suggests flow in regular and interconnected fracture networks rather than dominated by a few key fractures with irregular orientations. The low Kv units were typically thin, with their positions and thicknesses not predicted by lithostratigraphy or detailed lithologic, geophysical, and horizontal hydraulic conductivity data. Hence, the position and thickness of units with contrasting Kv would not be evident if MLSs with the conventional number of

  15. Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    national power. But with the recent events such as the war with Iraq, the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak, some major carriers... TITLE AND SUBTITLE 2003 Industry Studies: Aircraft 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  16. Calibration of the total carbon column observing network using aircraft profile data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunch, D.; Toon, G. C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wofsy, S. C.; Stephens, B. B.; Fischer, M. L.; Uchino, O.; Abshire, J. B.; Bernath, P.; Biraud, S. C.; Blavier, J.-F. L.; Boone, C.; Bowman, K. P.; Browell, E. V.; Campos, T.; Connor, B. J.; Daube, B. C.; Deutscher, N. M.; Diao, M.; Elkins, J. W.; Gerbig, C.; Gottlieb, E.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Hurst, D. F.; Jiménez, R.; Keppel-Aleks, G.; Kort, E.; Macatangay, R.; Machida, T.; Matsueda, H.; Moore, F.; Morino, I.; Park, S.; Robinson, J.; Roehl, C. M.; Sawa, Y.; Sherlock, V.; Sweeney, C.; Tanaka, T.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2010-06-01

    The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) produces precise measurements of the column average dry-air mole fractions of CO2, CO, CH4, N2O and H2O at a variety of sites worldwide. These observations rely on spectroscopic parameters that are not known with sufficient accuracy to compute total columns that can be used in combination with in situ measurements. The TCCON must therefore be calibrated to World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in situ trace gas measurement scales. We present a calibration of TCCON data using WMO-scale instrumentation aboard aircraft that measured profiles over four TCCON stations during 2008 and 2009. The aircraft campaigns are the Stratosphere-Troposphere Analyses of Regional Transport 2008 (START-08), which included a profile over the Park Falls site, the HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO-1) campaign, which included profiles over the Lamont and Lauder sites, a series of Learjet profiles over the Lamont site, and a Beechcraft King Air profile over the Tsukuba site. These calibrations are compared with similar observations made during the INTEX-NA (2004), COBRA-ME (2004) and TWP-ICE (2006) campaigns. A single, global calibration factor for each gas accurately captures the TCCON total column data within error.

  17. Calibration of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network using Aircraft Profile Data

    SciTech Connect

    Wunch, Debra; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Stephens, Britton B.; Fischer, Marc L.; Uchino, Osamu; Abshire, James B.; Bernath, Peter; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Blavier, Jean-Francois L.; Boone, Chris; Bowman, Kenneth P.; Browell, Edward V.; Campos, Teresa; Connor, Brian J.; Daube, Bruce C.; Deutscher, Nicholas M.; Diao, Minghui; Elkins, James W.; Gerbig, Christoph; Gottlieb, Elaine; Griffith, David W. T.; Hurst, Dale F.; Jimenez, Rodrigo; Keppel-Aleks, Gretchen; Kort, Eric; Macatangay, Ronald; Machida, Toshinobu; Matsueda, Hidekazu; Moore, Fred; Morino, Isamu; Park, Sunyoung; Robinson, John; Roehl, Coleen M.; Sawa, Yusuke; Sherlock, Vanessa; Sweeney, Colm; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Zondlo, Mark A.

    2010-03-26

    The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) produces precise measurements of the column average dry-air mole fractions of CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O at a variety of sites worldwide. These observations rely on spectroscopic parameters that are not known with sufficient accuracy to compute total columns that can be used in combination with in situ measure ments. The TCCON must therefore be calibrated to World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in situ trace gas measurement scales. We present a calibration of TCCON data using WMO-scale instrumentation aboard aircraft that measured profiles over four TCCON stations during 2008 and 2009. The aircraft campaigns are the Stratosphere-Troposphere Analyses of Regional Transport 2008 (START-08), which included a profile over the Park Falls site, the HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO-1) campaign, which included profiles over the Lamont and Lauder sites, a series of Learjet profiles over the Lamont site, and a Beechcraft King Air profile over the Tsukuba site. These calibrations are compared with similar observations made during the INTEX-NA (2004), COBRA-ME (2004) and TWP-ICE (2006) campaigns. A single, global calibration factor for each gas accurately captures the TCCON total column data within error.

  18. Processed and interpreted US Geological Survey seismic reflection profile and vertical seismic profile, Powder River and Custer Counties, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Balch, A.H.; Miller, J.J.; Lee, M.W.; Ryder, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    A US Geological Survey Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) at the USGS Madison Limestone Test Well No. 2 was run on August 3-5, 1977. The seismic energy source was a single 60 in./sup 3/ Bolt LSS-3/sup 4/ land air gun, operated at 2000 psi. The recording interval was 25 feet from 7900 ft to 3800 ft; 40 ft from 3800 ft to 1500 ft; and 50 ft from 1500 ft to the surface. VSP data were digitally recorded, edited, composited, wavelet shaped, velocity filtered, time shifted, and vertically summed. A band pass filter was applied to match the surface recording frequency band. The surface reflection data were recorded October 15-19, 1978. The energy source was supplied by four Pelco vibrators spaced at 73 ft, with 16 sweeps over a 440 ft line segment. The geophone pattern was 36 detectors in a line 220 ft. long, 48 channels per source point with a five station gap across the source. Major reflecting events on the surface data, shown as continuous lines on the profile, were tied to the summed vertical seismic profile at the USGS Madison Limestone Test Well No. 2. For positive identification, these events were then tracked vertically on the VSP to their point of origin in the earth, and tied at that point to the lithologic log shown in the lower portion of this chart. Formation names corresponding to the lithologic log are also shown. Heavy lines on the lower figure generally correspond to principal geologic formation boundaries. The lighter lines show the general arrangement of lesser reflectors. This data aids petroleum and natural gas investigatons. (DP)

  19. Interpretation of combined wind profiler and aircraft-measured tropospheric winds and clear air turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, D. W.; Syrett, William J.; Fairall, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    In the first experiment, it was found that wind profilers are far better suited for the detailed examination of jet stream structure than are weather balloons. The combination of good vertical resolution with not previously obtained temporal resolution reveals structural details not seen before. Development of probability-derived shear values appears possible. A good correlation between pilot reports of turbulence and wind shear was found. In the second experiment, hourly measurements of wind speed and direction obtained using two wind profiling Doppler radars during two prolonged jet stream occurrences over western Pennsylvania were analyzed. In particular, the time-variant characteristics of derived shear profiles were examined. Profiler data dropouts were studied in an attempt to determine possible reasons for the apparently reduced performance of profiling radar operating beneath a jet stream. Richardson number and wind shear statistics were examined along with pilot reports of turbulence in the vicinity of the profiler.

  20. Long-term aerosol study on continental scale through EARLINET vertical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Linne, Holger; Wandinger, Ulla

    2015-04-01

    Lidar techniques offer the opportunity for investigating the aerosol vertical profiles, which is an important information for climatological, meteorological and air quality issues. EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) has been providing aerosol optical properties vertical profiles over Europe since May 2000. Long-term aerosol observations performed within EARLINET allows a climatological study of aerosol properties over Europe. All EARLINET stations perform almost simultaneously measurements three times per week following a scheduling established in 2000. Besides these climatological measurements, additional measurements are performed in order to monitor special events (as volcanic eruptions and desert dust intrusion), for satellite data evaluation and integrated studies and during intensive measurements campaigns. Aerosol optical properties vertical profiles are freely available at www.earlinet.org and through ACRIS data center http://www.actris.net/. This data are currently published on the CERA database with an associated doi number. Based mainly on Raman technique, EARLINET stations typically provide direct measurement of extinction profiles, and therefore of the aerosol optical depth (AOD), a key parameter for understanding the aerosol role on radiation budget. The free troposphere contribution to AOD and altitude of lofted layers are provided thanks to the vertical profiling capability of lidar technique. The representativeness of EARLINET regular scheduling for climatological studies is investigating through the comparison with AERONET and MODIS measurements. We find that the regular measurements schedule is typically sufficient for climatological studies. In addition lidar punctual measurements are representative for a larger area (1°x1°) in a climatological sense. Long term analysis of EARLINET profiles shows that the AOD in generally decreasing over Europe in agreement with both passive-sensors and in situ measurements. Mean vertical

  1. Inter-comparison of MAX-DOAS Retrieved Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Extinction, SO2 and NO2 in the Alberta Oil Sands with LIDAR Data and GEM-MACH Air Quality Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Zoe; Friess, Udo; Strawbridge, Kevin; Whiteway, James; Aggarwal, Monika; Makar, Paul; Li, Shao-Meng; O'Brien, Jason; Baray, Sabour; Schnitzler, Elijah; Olfert, Jason S.; Osthoff, Hans D.; Lobo, Akshay; McLaren, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Understanding industrial emissions of trace gas pollutants in the Alberta oil sands is essential to maintaining air quality standards and informing public policy. Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements of trace gases can improve knowledge of pollutant levels, vertical distribution and chemical transformation. During an intensive air measurement campaign to study emissions, transport, transformation and deposition of oil sands air pollutants from August to September of 2013, a MAX-DOAS instrument was deployed at a site north of Fort McMurray, Alberta to determine the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, NO2 and SO2 through retrieval from the MAX-DOAS spectral measurements using an optimal estimation method. The large complement of data collected from multiple instruments deployed during this field campaign provides a unique opportunity to validate and characterize the performance of the MAX-DOAS vertical profile retrievals. Aerosol extinction profiles determined from two Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) instruments, one collocated and the other on a Twin Otter aircraft that flew over the site during the study, will be compared to the MAX-DOAS aerosol extinction profile retrievals. Vertical profiles of NO2 and SO2 retrieved from the MAX-DOAS measurements will be further compared with the composite vertical profiles measured from the flights of a second aircraft, the NRC-Convair 580, over the field site during the same measurement period. Finally, the MAX-DOAS retrieved tropospheric vertical column densities (VCDs) of SO2 and NO2 will be compared to the predicted VCDs from Environment and Climate Change Canada's Global Environmental Multi-scale - Modelling Air quality and Chemistry (GEM-MACH) air quality model over the grid cell containing the field site. Emission estimates of SO2 from the major oil mining facility Syncrude Mildred Lake using the MAX-DOAS VCD results, validated through the detailed characterization above

  2. Aircraft Dynamic Response to Damaged Runways.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    translation freedoms, - Aircraft flexible normal modes. - Nose and main gear lever rotations. - Several tyre models. - Brake torque time- history ... history of a force or acceleration (see Figure 3) at som point of interest on the aircraft. Figure 3 also shows a comparison of computed versus measured...EXPERIMENTAL PSA CBA 0 5 10 TIME ISECI Fix.3 Plotted time history vertical accelerations READ PROFILE READ AIRCRAFT CONFIGURATION DELTA = 0 ~1

  3. High-resolution Vertical Profiling of Ocean Velocity and Water Properties Under Hurricane Frances in September 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, T. B.; D'Asarp, E. A.; Girton, J. B.; Price, J. F.; Webb, D. C.

    2006-12-01

    In ONR's CBLAST Hurricane research program observations were made of the upper ocean's response to Hurricane Frances. Three EM-APEX floats (velocity sensing versions of Webb Research APEX floats) and two Lagrangian floats were deployed north of Hispaniola from a C-130 aircraft ahead of Hurricane Frances in September 2004. The EM-APEX floats measured T, S and V over the upper 500 m starting about a day before the storm's arrival. The Lagrangian floats measured temperature and salinity while following the three- dimensional boundary layer turbulence in the upper 40 m. One EM-APEX float was directly under the track of the storm's eye, another EM-APEX and two Lagrangian floats went in about 50 km to the right of the track (where the surface winds are strongest) and the third float was about 100 km to the right. The EM-APEX floats profiled for 10 hours from the surface to 200 m, then continued profiling between 35 and 200 m with excursions to 500 m every half inertial period. After 5 days, the EM-APEX floats surfaced and transmitted the accumulated processed observations, then the floats profiled to 500 m every half inertial period until recovered early in October aided by GPS and Iridium. The float array sampled in unprecedented detail the upper-ocean turbulence, momentum, and salt and heat changes in response to the hurricane. The buildup of surface gravity waves in advance of the storm was also observed in the velocity profiles, with significant wave heights of up to 11 m. Rapid acceleration of inertial currents in the surface mixing layer (SML) to over 1 m/s stimulated vertical mixing by shear instability at the SML base, as indicated by low Richardson numbers and SML deepening from about 40 m to 120 m under the strongest wind forcing. Surface cooling of about 2.5 C was primarily due to the SML deepening and entrainment of colder water, with a small contribution from surface heat flux. Intense inertial pumping was observed under the eye, with vertical excursions of

  4. Measuring vertical oxygen profiles in the hyporheic zone using planar optodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieweg, M.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Schmidt, C.

    2012-04-01

    On of the key parameters, controlling biogeochemical reactions in the hyporheic zone (HZ) is the distribution of oxygen. A reliable measurement of the vertical oxygen distribution is an important tool to understand the dynamic fluctuations of the aerobic zone within the HZ. With repeated measurements of continuous profiles, mixing of surface water and groundwater as well as the consumption of oxygen can be evaluated. We present a novel approach for the in situ measurements of vertical oxygen distribution in the riverbed using a planar optode. The luminescence based optode measurement enables a non invasive measurement without consumption of oxygen, no creation of preferential flow paths and only minimal disturbance of the flow field. Possible atmospheric contamination by pumping pore water into a vessel can be avoided and the readings are independent of flow velocity. A self manufactured planar optode is wrapped around an acrylic tube and installed in the riverbed. The measurement is performed by vertically moving a profiler-piston inside the acrylic tube. The piston holds a robust polymer optical fibre which emits a modulated light signal through the acrylic glass to the optode-foil and transmits the induced luminescence signal back to a commercially available trace oxygen meter. Temperature compensation is accomplished using a depth-oriented temperature probe nearby and processing the raw data within a Matlab script. Robust and unbiased oxygen profiles are obtained by averaging multiple consecutive measurements. To ensure a constant velocity of the profiler for replicating the exact measuring depths, an electric motor device is used. First results at our test site show a variable oxygen profile down to 40 cm depth which is strongly influenced by stream level and upwelling groundwater conditions. The measured oxygen profiles will serve as input parameter for a 3D solute transport and chemical reaction subsurface model of the HZ.

  5. Ground-based lidar and microwave radiometry synergy for high vertical resolution absolute humidity profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera-Verdejo, María; Crewell, Susanne; Löhnert, Ulrich; Orlandi, Emiliano; Di Girolamo, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Continuous monitoring of atmospheric humidity profiles is important for many applications, e.g., assessment of atmospheric stability and cloud formation. Nowadays there are a wide variety of ground-based sensors for atmospheric humidity profiling. Unfortunately there is no single instrument able to provide a measurement with complete vertical coverage, high vertical and temporal resolution and good performance under all weather conditions, simultaneously. For example, Raman lidar (RL) measurements can provide water vapor with a high vertical resolution, albeit with limited vertical coverage, due to sunlight contamination and the presence of clouds. Microwave radiometers (MWRs) receive water vapor information throughout the troposphere, though their vertical resolution is poor. In this work, we present an MWR and RL system synergy, which aims to overcome the specific sensor limitations. The retrieval algorithm combining these two instruments is an optimal estimation method (OEM), which allows for an uncertainty analysis of the retrieved profiles. The OEM combines measurements and a priori information, taking the uncertainty of both into account. The measurement vector consists of a set of MWR brightness temperatures and RL water vapor profiles. The method is applied to a 2-month field campaign around Jülich (Germany), focusing on clear sky periods. Different experiments are performed to analyze the improvements achieved via the synergy compared to the individual retrievals. When applying the combined retrieval, on average the theoretically determined absolute humidity uncertainty is reduced above the last usable lidar range by a factor of ˜ 2 with respect to the case where only RL measurements are used. The analysis in terms of degrees of freedom per signal reveal that most information is gained above the usable lidar range, especially important during daytime when the lidar vertical coverage is limited. The retrieved profiles are further evaluated using

  6. Continuous wavelet transform for micro-component profile measurement using vertical scanning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Quan, C.; Tay, C. J.

    2008-10-01

    White-light interferometric techniques have been widely used in three-dimensional (3D) profiling. This paper presents a new method based on vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) for the 3D profile measurement of a micro-component that contains sharp steps. The use of a white-light source in the system overcomes the phase ambiguity problem often encountered in monochromatic interferometry and also reduces speckle noises. A new algorithm based on the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) is used to retrieve the phase of an interferogram. The algorithm accurately determines local fringe peak and improves the vertical resolution of the measurement. The proposed method is highly resistant to noise and is able to achieve high accuracy. A micro-component (lamellar grating) fabricated by sacrificial etching technique is used as a test specimen to verify the proposed method. The measurement uncertainty of the experimental results is discussed.

  7. Observed changes in the vertical profile of stratopheric nitrous oxide at Thule, Greenland, February - March 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmons, Louisa K.; Reeves, John M.; Shindell, Drew T.; Dezafra, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    Using a ground-based mm-wave spectrometer, we have observed stratospheric N2O over Thule, Greenland (76.3 N, 68.4 W) during late February and March, 1992. Vertical profiles of mixing ratio ranging from 16 to 50 km were recovered from molecular emission spectra. The profiles of early March show an abrupt increase in the lower-stratosphere N2O mixing ratio similar to the spring-to-summer change associated with the break up of the Antarctic polar vortex. This increase is correlated with changes in potential vorticity, air temperature, and ozone mixing ratio.

  8. Assessment of Cabin Dimensions to Accommodate Infantry Soldiers for the Future Vertical Lift/Joint Multi-Role Medium-Class Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    infantry Soldiers for the Future Vertical Lift/Joint Multi-Role (FVL/JMR) medium-class aircraft. An adjustable mockup was used to conduct the assessment...1 1.2 Cabin Mockup ...43 Appendix A. Mockup Dimensions (all measurements in inches and feet) 45 Appendix

  9. The power of vertical geolocation of atmospheric profiles from GNSS radio occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherllin-Pirscher, Barbara; Steiner, Andrea K.; Kirchengast, Gottfried; Schwärz, Marc; Leroy, Stephen S.

    2017-02-01

    High-resolution measurements from Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) provide atmospheric profiles with independent information on altitude and pressure. This unique property is of crucial advantage when analyzing atmospheric characteristics that require joint knowledge of altitude and pressure or other thermodynamic atmospheric variables. Here we introduce and demonstrate the utility of this independent information from RO and discuss the computation, uncertainty, and use of RO atmospheric profiles on isohypsic coordinates - mean sea level altitude and geopotential height - as well as on thermodynamic coordinates (pressure and potential temperature). Using geopotential height as vertical grid, we give information on errors of RO-derived temperature, pressure, and potential temperature profiles and provide an empirical error model which accounts for seasonal and latitudinal variations. The observational uncertainty of individual temperature/pressure/potential temperature profiles is about 0.7 K/0.15%/1.4 K in the tropopause region. It gradually increases into the stratosphere and decreases toward the lower troposphere. This decrease is due to the increasing influence of background information. The total climatological error of mean atmospheric fields is, in general, dominated by the systematic error component. We use sampling error-corrected climatological fields to demonstrate the power of having different and accurate vertical coordinates available. As examples we analyze characteristics of the location of the tropopause for geopotential height, pressure, and potential temperature coordinates as well as seasonal variations of the midlatitude jet stream core. This highlights the broad applicability of RO and the utility of its versatile vertical geolocation for investigating the vertical structure of the troposphere and stratosphere.

  10. Calcite: rates of dissolution in a vertical profile in the central pacific.

    PubMed

    Peterson, M N

    1966-12-23

    Rate of dissoluton of calcium carbonate (calcite) was determined for a vertical profile 5000 mizeters deep in the central Pacific by measuring the loss of weight of optical calcite spheres arrayed on a mooring. Waters of the Pacific are undersaturated in all but the upper several hundred meters. A sharp increase in the rate of dissolution occurs at a depth of about 3700 meters, which corresponds closely to the depth below which calcite hias been dissolved from the sediments.

  11. In situ vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, mass, and composition over the southeast United States during SENEX and SEAC4RS: observations of a modest aerosol enhancement aloft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, N. L.; Brock, C. A.; Angevine, W. M.; Beyersdorf, A.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; de Gouw, J. A.; Diskin, G. S.; Gordon, T. D.; Graus, M. G.; Huey, G.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lack, D. A.; Liao, J.; Liu, X.; Markovic, M. Z.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Mikoviny, T.; Peischl, J.; Perring, A. E.; Richardson, M. S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Schwarz, J. P.; Warneke, C.; Welti, A.; Wisthaler, A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Murphy, D. M.

    2015-02-01

    Vertical profiles of submicron aerosol over the southeastern United States (SEUS) during the summertime from in situ aircraft-based measurements were used to construct aggregate profiles of chemical, microphysical, and optical properties. Shallow cumulus convection was observed during many profiles. These conditions enhance vertical transport of trace gases and aerosol and create a cloudy transition layer on top of the sub-cloud mixed layer. The trace gas and aerosol concentrations in the transition layer were modeled as a mixture with contributions from the mixed layer below and the free troposphere above. The amount of vertical mixing, or entrainment of air from the free troposphere, was quantified using the observed mixing ratio of carbon monoxide (CO). Although the median aerosol mass, extinction, and volume decreased with altitude in the transition layer, they were ~10% larger than expected from vertical mixing alone. This enhancement was likely due to secondary aerosol formation in the transition layer. Although the transition layer enhancements of the particulate sulfate and organic aerosol (OA) were both similar in magnitude, only the enhancement of sulfate was statistically significant. The column integrated extinction, or aerosol optical depth (AOD), was calculated for each individual profile, and the transition layer enhancement of extinction typically contributed less than 10% to the total AOD. Our measurements and analysis were motivated by two recent studies that have hypothesized an enhanced layer of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) aloft to explain the summertime enhancement of AOD (2-3 times greater than winter) over the southeastern United States. In contrast to this hypothesis, the modest enhancement we observed in the transition layer was not dominated by OA and was not a large fraction of the summertime AOD.

  12. Observing the Great Plains Low-Level Jet Using the Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System (ACARS): A Comparison with Boundary Layer Profiler Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, P. S.; Basu, S.

    2009-12-01

    Wind resources derived from the nocturnal low-level jet of the Great Plains of the United States are a driving factor in the proliferation of wind energy facilities across the region. Accurate diagnosis and forecasting of the low-level jet is important to not only assess the wind resource but to estimate the potential for shear-induced stress generation on turbine rotors. This study will examine the utility of Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System (ACARS) observations in diagnosing low-level jet events across the Texas Panhandle. ACARS observations from Lubbock International Airport (KLBB) will be compared to observations from a 915 MHZ Doppler radar vertical boundary-layer profiler with 60m vertical resolution located at the field experiment site of Texas Tech University. The ability of ACARS data to adequately observe low-level jet events during the spring and summer of 2009 will be assessed and presented.

  13. Conceptual design of high speed supersonic aircraft: A brief review on SR-71 (Blackbird) aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Hui; Khawaja, H.; Moatamedi, M.

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents the conceptual design of high-speed supersonic aircraft. The study focuses on SR-71 (Blackbird) aircraft. The input to the conceptual design is a mission profile. Mission profile is a flight profile of the aircraft defined by the customer. This paper gives the SR-71 aircraft mission profile specified by US air force. Mission profile helps in defining the attributes the aircraft such as wing profile, vertical tail configuration, propulsion system, etc. Wing profile and vertical tail configurations have direct impact on lift, drag, stability, performance and maneuverability of the aircraft. A propulsion system directly influences the performance of the aircraft. By combining the wing profile and the propulsion system, two important parameters, known as wing loading and thrust to weight ratio can be calculated. In this work, conceptual design procedure given by D. P. Raymer (AIAA Educational Series) is applied to calculate wing loading and thrust to weight ratio. The calculated values are compared against the actual values of the SR-71 aircraft. Results indicates that the values are in agreement with the trend of developments in aviation.

  14. Vertical profile of elemental concentrations in aerosol particles in the Bermuda area during GCE/CASE/WATOX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennis, G.; Sievering, H.

    1990-06-01

    During the 1988 Global Change Expedition/Coordinated Air-Sea Experiment/Western Atlantic Ocean Experiment (GCE/CASE/WATOX) joint effort, research was conducted to determine elemental concentrations in atmospheric aerosol particles near Bermuda, to construct a three-level (15, 150, and 2600 m ASL) vertical profile of these concentrations, and to ascertain the source of the particles. Samples were collected by the NOAA King Air aircraft and NOAA ship Mt. Mitchell on July 24-28, 1988. Concentration determinations were made for 16 elements through the use of an X ray fluorescence instrument designed for analysis of small-mass samples. A layering effect was found; concentrations of several elements at 150 m were more than twice their respective concentrations at 15 m and 2600 m. Enrichment factors, V/Mn ratio, and correlations between concentrations suggest a Saharan mineral source, despite air mass back trajectories that show no direct continental input for up to 10 days prior to sample collection. Estimated total mineral aerosol concentrations at 15 m, 150 m, and 2600 m are 1.5, 4.1, and 2.1 μg m-3.

  15. A general framework for modelling the vertical organic matter profile in mineral and organic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braakhekke, Maarten; Ahrens, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    The vertical distribution of soil organic matter (SOM) within the mineral soil and surface organic layer is an important property of terrestrial ecosystems that affects carbon and nutrient cycling and soil heat and moisture transport. The overwhelming majority of models of SOM dynamics are zero-dimensional, i.e. they do not resolve heterogeneity of SOM concentration along the vertical profile. In recent years, however, a number of new vertically explicit SOM models or vertically explicit versions of existing models have been published. These models describe SOM in units of concentration (mass per unit volume) by means of a reactive-transport model that includes diffusion and/or advection terms for SOM transport, and vertically resolves SOM inputs and factors that influence decomposition. An important assumption behind these models is that the volume of soil elements is constant over time, i.e. not affected by SOM dynamics. This assumption only holds if the SOM content is negligible compared to the mineral content. When this is not the case, SOM input or loss in a soil element may cause a change in volume of the element rather than a change in SOM concentration. Furthermore, these volume changes can cause vertical shifts of material relative to the surface. This generally causes material in an organic layer to gradually move downward, even in absence of mixing processes. Since the classical reactive-transport model of the SOM profile can only be applied to the mineral soil, the surface organic layer is usually either treated separately or not explicitly considered. We present a new and elegant framework that treats the surface organic layer and mineral soil as one continuous whole. It explicitly accounts for volume changes due to SOM dynamics and changes in bulk density. The vertical shifts resulting from these volume changes are included in an Eulerian representation as an additional advective transport flux. Our approach offers a more elegant and realistic

  16. Studying Vertical Microbiome Transmission from Mothers to Infants by Strain-Level Metagenomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Manara, Serena; Truong, Duy Tin; Armanini, Federica; Ferretti, Pamela; Gorfer, Valentina; Pedrotti, Anna

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gut microbiome becomes shaped in the first days of life and continues to increase its diversity during the first months. Links between the configuration of the infant gut microbiome and infant health are being shown, but a comprehensive strain-level assessment of microbes vertically transmitted from mother to infant is still missing. We collected fecal and breast milk samples from multiple mother-infant pairs during the first year of life and applied shotgun metagenomic sequencing followed by computational strain-level profiling. We observed that several specific strains, including those of Bifidobacterium bifidum, Coprococcus comes, and Ruminococcus bromii, were present in samples from the same mother-infant pair, while being clearly distinct from those carried by other pairs, which is indicative of vertical transmission. We further applied metatranscriptomics to study the in vivo gene expression of vertically transmitted microbes and found that transmitted strains of Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium species were transcriptionally active in the guts of both adult and infant. By combining longitudinal microbiome sampling and newly developed computational tools for strain-level microbiome analysis, we demonstrated that it is possible to track the vertical transmission of microbial strains from mother to infants and to characterize their transcriptional activity. Our work provides the foundation for larger-scale surveys to identify the routes of vertical microbial transmission and its influence on postinfancy microbiome development. IMPORTANCE Early infant exposure is important in the acquisition and ultimate development of a healthy infant microbiome. There is increasing support for the idea that the maternal microbial reservoir is a key route of microbial transmission, and yet much is inferred from the observation of shared species in mother and infant. The presence of common species, per se, does not necessarily equate to vertical transmission, as

  17. First characterization and validation of FORLI-HNO3 vertical profiles retrieved from IASI/Metop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronsmans, Gaétane; Langerock, Bavo; Wespes, Catherine; Hannigan, James W.; Hase, Frank; Kerzenmacher, Tobias; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Schneider, Matthias; Smale, Dan; Hurtmans, Daniel; De Mazière, Martine; Clerbaux, Cathy; Coheur, Pierre-François

    2016-09-01

    Knowing the spatial and seasonal distributions of nitric acid (HNO3) around the globe is of great interest and allows us to comprehend the processes regulating stratospheric ozone, especially in the polar regions. Due to its unprecedented spatial and temporal sampling, the nadir-viewing Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) is capable of sounding the atmosphere twice a day globally, with good spectral resolution and low noise. With the Fast Optimal Retrievals on Layers for IASI (FORLI) algorithm, we are retrieving, in near real time, columns as well as vertical profiles of several atmospheric species, among which is HNO3. We present in this paper the first characterization of the FORLI-HNO3 profile products, in terms of vertical sensitivity and error budgets. We show that the sensitivity of IASI to HNO3 is highest in the lower stratosphere (10-20 km), where the largest amounts of HNO3 are found, but that the vertical sensitivity of IASI only allows one level of information on the profile (degrees of freedom for signal, DOFS; ˜ 1). The sensitivity near the surface is negligible in most cases, and for this reason, a partial column (5-35 km) is used for the analyses. Both vertical profiles and partial columns are compared to FTIR ground-based measurements from the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) to characterize the accuracy and precision of the FORLI-HNO3 product. The profile validation is conducted through the smoothing of the raw FTIR profiles by the IASI averaging kernels and gives good results, with a slight overestimation of IASI measurements in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) at the six chosen stations (Thule, Kiruna, Jungfraujoch, Izaña, Lauder and Arrival Heights). The validation of the partial columns (5-35 km) is also conclusive with a mean correlation of 0.93 between IASI and the FTIR measurements. An initial survey of the HNO3 spatial and seasonal variabilities obtained from IASI

  18. Development of balloon-borne CO2 sonde: CO2 vertical profile (0-10km) observations and comparison with the air craft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchi, M.; Matsumi, Y.; Nakayama, T.; Machida, T.; Matsueda, H.; Sawa, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Morino, I.; Uchino, O.

    2012-12-01

    The atmospheric CO2 concentration has drastically increased since the Industrial Revolution due to the mass consumption of fossil fuels and natural gas by human activities. CO2 is considered to be a major factor of global warming; therefore it is important to measure CO2 correctly. CO2 vertical profile measurement is the key to estimate CO2 sources and sinks in high precision. However, current CO2 monitoring sites are limited and there are few CO2 vertical profile measurements. We have been developing a balloon-borne instrument that can measure the vertical distribution of CO2 in any place in the world under any kind of weather conditions (CO2 sonde). The target specifications of altitude range is from surface to 10 km. Time resolution is 1min. The CO2 sensor, originally developed for upper air sounding by our team, is based on the non-dispersed infrared absorption spectroscopy technique (NDIR) at the wavelengths of 4.0 and 4.3 micrometer. The data of the optical infrared absorption are transmitted through a GPS sonde with temperature, humidity and GPS data every second. In this study, we will show simultaneous measurement campaigns of the balloon-borne instruments and in-situ aircraft measurements in January and February 2011 in the Tokyo metropolitan area in Japan. We will present the comparisons between the results of CO2 sonde (5 flights) and two types of aircraft measurements. One is observed by the CONTRAIL (Comprehensive Observation Network for TRace gases by AIrLiner) and the other is chartered flight measurements operated by NIES/JAXA.

  19. Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties and the solar heating rate estimated by combining sky radiometer and lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Rei; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Aoyagi, Toshinori

    2016-07-01

    The SKYLIDAR algorithm was developed to estimate vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties from sky radiometer (SKYNET) and lidar (AD-Net) measurements. The solar heating rate was also estimated from the SKYLIDAR retrievals. The algorithm consists of two retrieval steps: (1) columnar properties are retrieved from the sky radiometer measurements and the vertically mean depolarization ratio obtained from the lidar measurements and (2) vertical profiles are retrieved from the lidar measurements and the results of the first step. The derived parameters are the vertical profiles of the size distribution, refractive index (real and imaginary parts), extinction coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor. Sensitivity tests were conducted by applying the SKYLIDAR algorithm to the simulated sky radiometer and lidar data for vertical profiles of three different aerosols, continental average, transported dust, and pollution aerosols. The vertical profiles of the size distribution, extinction coefficient, and asymmetry factor were well estimated in all cases. The vertical profiles of the refractive index and single-scattering albedo of transported dust, but not those of transported pollution aerosol, were well estimated. To demonstrate the performance and validity of the SKYLIDAR algorithm, we applied the SKYLIDAR algorithm to the actual measurements at Tsukuba, Japan. The detailed vertical structures of the aerosol optical properties and solar heating rate of transported dust and smoke were investigated. Examination of the relationship between the solar heating rate and the aerosol optical properties showed that the vertical profile of the asymmetry factor played an important role in creating vertical variation in the solar heating rate. We then compared the columnar optical properties retrieved with the SKYLIDAR algorithm to those produced with the more established scheme SKYRAD.PACK, and the surface solar irradiance calculated from the SKYLIDAR

  20. Evaluation of the Rotational Throttle Interface for Converting Aircraft Utilizing the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozovski, David; Theodore, Colin R.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to compare a conventional helicopter Thrust Control Lever (TCL) to the Rotational Throttle Interface (RTI) for tiltrotor aircraft. The RTI is designed to adjust its orientation to match the angle of the tiltrotor s nacelles. The underlying principle behind the design is to increase pilot awareness of the vehicle s configuration state (i.e. nacelle angle). Four test pilots flew multiple runs on seven different experimental courses. Three predominant effects were discovered in the testing of the RTI: 1. Unintentional binding along the control axis resulted in difficulties with precision power setting, 2. Confusion in which way to move the throttle grip was present during RTI transition modes, and 3. Pilots were not able to distinguish small angle differences during RTI transition. In this experiment the pilots were able to successfully perform all of the required tasks with both inceptors although the handling qualities ratings were slightly worse for the RTI partly due to unforeseen deficiencies in the design. Pilots did however report improved understanding of nacelle movement during transitions with the RTI.

  1. Hemispheric aerosol vertical profiles: anthropogenic impacts on optical depth and cloud nuclei.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Antony; Kapustin, Vladimir

    2010-09-17

    Understanding the effect of anthropogenic combustion upon aerosol optical depth (AOD), clouds, and their radiative forcing requires regionally representative aerosol profiles. In this work, we examine more than 1000 vertical profiles from 11 major airborne campaigns in the Pacific hemisphere and confirm that regional enhancements in aerosol light scattering, mass, and number are associated with carbon monoxide from combustion and can exceed values in unperturbed regions by more than one order of magnitude. Related regional increases in a proxy for cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and AOD imply that direct and indirect aerosol radiative effects are coupled issues linked globally to aged combustion. These profiles constrain the influence of combustion on regional AOD and CCN suitable for challenging climate model performance and informing satellite retrievals.

  2. Characteristics of ozone vertical profile observed in the boundary layer around Beijing in autumn.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Xiaoling; Xu, Jing; Zhao, Xiujuan; Meng, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In the autumn of 2008, the vertical profiles of ozone and meteorological parameters in the low troposphere (0-1000 m) were observed at two sites around Beijing, specifically urban Nanjiao and rural Shangdianzi. At night and early morning, the lower troposphere divided into two stratified layers due to temperature inversion. Ozone in the lower layer showed a large gradient due to the titration of NO. Air flow from the southwest brought ozone-rich air to Beijing, and the ozone profiles were marked by a continuous increase in the residual layer at night. The accumulated ozone in the upper layer played an important role in the next day's surface peak ozone concentration, and caused a rapid increase in surface ozone in the morning. Wind direction shear and wind speed shear exhibited different influences on ozone profiles and resulted in different surface ozone concentrations in Beijing.

  3. Global profiles of the direct aerosol effect using vertically resolved aerosol data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korras Carraca, Marios Bruno; Pappas, Vasilios; Matsoukas, Christos; Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Vardavas, Ilias

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, both natural and anthropogenic, can cause climate change through their direct, indirect, and semi-direct effects on the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. In general, aerosols cause cooling of the surface and the planet, while they warm the atmosphere due to scattering and absorption of incoming solar radiation. The importance of vertically resolved direct radiative effect (DRE) and heating/cooling effects of aerosols is strong, while large uncertainties still lie with their magnitudes. In order to be able to quantify them throughout the atmosphere, a detailed vertical profile of the aerosol effect is required. Such data were made available recently by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite. CALIOP is the first polarization lidar to fly in space and has been acquiring unique data on aerosols and clouds since June 2006. The aim of this study is to investigate both the vertically resolved geographic and seasonal variation of the DRE due to aerosols. The vertical profile of DRE under all-sky and clear-sky conditions is computed using the deterministic spectral radiative transfer model FORTH. From the DRE, the effect on atmospheric heating/cooling rate profiles due to aerosols can also be derived. We use CALIOP Level 2-Version 3 Layer aerosol optical depth data as input to our radiation transfer model, for a period of 3 complete years (2007-2009). These data are provided on a 5 km horizontal resolution and in up to 8 vertical layers and have been regridded on our model horizontal and vertical resolutions. We use cloud data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), while the aerosol asymmetry factor and single scattering albedo are taken from the Global Aerosol Data Set (GADS). The model computations are performed on a monthly, 2.5°× 2.5° resolution on global scale, at 40

  4. Effects of control laws and relaxed static stability on vertical ride quality of flexible aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, P. A.; Swaim, R. L.; Schmidt, D. K.; Hinsdale, A. J.

    1977-01-01

    State variable techniques are utilized to generate the RMS vertical load factors for the B-52H and B-1 bombers at low level, mission critical, cruise conditions. A ride quality index is proposed to provide meaningful comparisons between different controls or conditions. Ride quality is shown to be relatively invariant under various popular control laws. Handling quality variations are shown to be major contributors to ride quality variations on both vehicles. Relaxed static stability is artificially implemented on the study vehicles to investigate its effects on ride quality. The B-52H ride quality is generally degraded when handling characteristics are automatically restored by a feedback control to the original values from relaxed stability conditions. The B-1 airplane shows little ride quality sensitivity to the same analysis due to the small rigid body contribution to load factors at the flight condition investigated.

  5. Determining long-term effective groundwater recharge by analyzing vertical soil temperature profiles at meteorological stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheviron, Bruno; Guérin, Roger; Tabbagh, Alain; Bendjoudi, Hocine

    2005-09-01

    Vertical water seepage in soils results in convective heat transport that modifies the temperature profiles and their variations with time; consequently, there is a relationship between temperature profile variations with time and the vertical Darcy velocity associated with the seepage. Considering the annual sinusoidal time variation of the temperature at the soil surface, it can be shown that convective heat transport has a significant effect on the amplitude damping with depth and a negligible effect on the phase lag with depth of the temperature time signal. Standard meteorological stations constitute a relatively dense network, and we show that their routinely collected data can be used to determine an average value of the vertical Darcy velocity, uz, representing the effective annual recharge over long time periods (several years). A new procedure for determining uz from these temperature records is presented. First, the layering of the medium is determined by an electrical sounding. Then the thermal properties of each layer are inferred from the phase lag with depth. Finally, uz is calculated from the amplitude damping. After having tested this approach with synthetic data, we used the 1984-2001 Abbeville (Somme, France) data to determine the average recharge over six 3-year periods. The results are in good agreement with classical meteorological recharge estimates and show a significant increase in the recharge during the last 3-year period, consistent with the observed phreatic 2001 flood event. Specific temperature measurements at appropriate depths and time steps could drastically improve the sensitivity of the method.

  6. Indoor and outdoor measurements of vertical concentration profiles of airborne particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Micallef, A; Deuchar, C N; Colls, J J

    1998-05-04

    Vertical concentration profiles of various particle size ranges of airborne particulate matter were measured from ground level up to 3 m, in outdoor and indoor environments. Indoor measurements were carried out in an electronics workshop, while two outdoor environments were chosen: a street canyon cutting across a town and an open field situated in a semi-rural environment. The novel measurement technique employed in this experimental work, which can also be used to determine vertical concentration gradients of pollutants other than airborne particles in different environments, is given particular attention. Analyses of the collected data for the environments considered are presented and some conclusions and plausible explanations of the profiles are discussed. The workshop and street canyon environments exhibited larger concentrations and vertical concentration gradients as compared to the sports field. This indicates that people breathing at different heights are subjected to different concentrations of airborne particulate matter, which has implications for sitting air pollution monitors intended for protection of public health and estimation of human exposure.

  7. Variability of the vertical profile of wind speed: characterization at various time scales and analytical approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdier, Bénédicte; Plougonven, Riwal; Drobinski, Philippe; Dupont, Jean-Charles

    2014-05-01

    Wind measurements are key for the wind resource assessment. But as wind turbines get higher, wind measurement masts are often lower than the future wind turbine hub height. Therefore one of the first steps in the energy yield assessment is the vertical extrapolation of wind measurements. Such extrapolation is often done by approximating the vertical profile of wind speed with an analytical expression: either a logarithmic law which has a theoretical basis in Monin-Obukhov similarity theory; or a power law which is empirical. The present study analyzes the variability of the wind profile and how this variability affects the results of the vertical extrapolation methods. The study is conducted with data from the SIRTA observatory, 20km south of Paris (France). A large set of instrumentation is available, including sonic anemometers at 10 and 30 meters, a LIDAR measuring wind speeds from 40 to 200 meters and a SODAR measuring wind speeds starting from 100m up to 1km. The comparison between the instruments enables to characterize the measurements uncertainties. The observations show that close to the ground the wind is stronger during daytime and weaker at night while higher, around 150 m, the wind is weaker during daytime and stronger at night. Indeed the wind shear has a pronounced diurnal cycle. The vertical extrapolation methods currently used in the industry do not usually take into account the strong variability of the wind profile. The often fit the parameters of the extrapolation law, not on each time step, but on time-averaged profiles. The averaging period may be the whole measurement period or some part of it: there may be one constant parameter computed on the wind profile that was averaged on the whole year of measures, or the year of measures may be divided into a small number of cases (for example into night or daytime data, or into 4 seasons) and the parameter is adjusted for each case. The study analyzes thoroughly the errors generated by both

  8. Investigation of blast-induced fracture in rock mass using reversed vertical seismic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, D. H.; Wu, Y. K.

    2001-10-01

    The rock mass on quarry and pit wall surfaces is usually fractured during production blasting. Quantitative investigations of the fractured zones are needed for stabilization of the rock walls. In this study, the principle of reversed vertical seismic profiling (RVSP) was applied. A set of seismic geophones were arranged on the horizontal bench surface and seismic signals were generated along the vertical rock wall using a free-swinging hammer. The travel times of seismic rays were recorded and the P-wave velocities of the rock mass were analyzed using the Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique (SIRT). A series of site tests have been carried out on the rock walls at a granite quarry that are characterized by fractures. The fracture depth at various locations on the wall surface is thereby determined. The results indicate that RVSP provides an easy and reliable method to quantitatively evaluate the blasting-induced fractures in the rock mass.

  9. Long-Term Mean Vertical Motion over the Tropical Pacific: Wind-Profiling Doppler Radar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gage, K. S.; McAfee, J. R.; Carter, D. A.; Ecklund, W. L.; Riddle, A. C.; Reid, G. C.; Balsley, B. B.

    1991-12-01

    Measurement from Christmas Island (2^circN, 157^circW) of long-term mean vertical motions in the tropical atmosphere using very-high-frequency wind-profiling Doppler radar show that there is a transition from downward motion in the free troposphere to upward motion in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The observations in the free troposphere are consistent with a balance between adiabatic and diabatic heating and cooling rates in a clear atmosphere. Comparison of the results at Christmas Island during El Nino and non-El Nino conditions with earlier results obtained for stratiform rain conditions over Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia, show that cirrus clouds in the vicinity of the tropopause likely play an important role in determining the sense and magnitude of vertical motions in this region. These results have implications for the exchange of mass between the troposphere and stratosphere over the tropics.

  10. Vertical distribution of organochlorine pesticides in humus along Alpine altitudinal profiles in relation to ambiental parameters.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, M; Faus-Kessler, T; Jakobi, G; Levy, W; Henkelmann, B; Bernhöft, S; Kotalik, J; Zsolnay, A; Bassan, R; Belis, C; Kräuchi, N; Moche, W; Simoncic, P; Uhl, M; Weiss, P; Schramm, K-W

    2009-12-01

    In forest soils along vertical profiles located in different parts of the Alps, concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), namely organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCH), heptachlor, aldrin, dieldrin and mirex, were measured. Though local characteristics of the sites are influenced by numerous factors like orographic and meteorological parameters, forest stand characteristics and humus parameters, we ascertained a marked vertical increase of concentrations of some organochlorine compounds in the soil. On the basis of climatological values of each site, we found that the contamination increase with altitude can be ascribed to a certain 'cold condensation effect'. In addition, the perennial atmospheric deposition of POPs is controlled by precipitation. Other key parameters explaining the accumulation of POPs are the soil organic carbon stocks, the turnover times, the re-volatilisation and degradation processes, which vary with altitude.

  11. Vertical profiles of heating derived from IR-based precipitation estimates during FGGE SOP-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Vincent, Dayton G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper examines a technique for retrieving from geostationary IR data the vertical profiles of heating and cooling due to moist diabatic processes. First, GOES IR imagery is used to estimate precipitation fields which are independent of fields inferred from residuals in heat budget analysis based on the FGGE level III-b data. Vertical distributions of the associated heating are then obtained using thermodynamic data from the level III-b analysis, one-dimensional cloud models, and the satellite-estimated precipitation. The technique was applied to infer heating in the South Pacific convergence zone during a portion of FGEE SOP-1, and the results were compared with heat-budget calculations made using the ECMWF analyses.

  12. A comparison of vertical velocity variance measurements from wind profiling radars and sonic anemometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, Katherine; Bianco, Laura; Johnston, Paul; Wilczak, James M.

    2017-03-01

    Observations of turbulence in the planetary boundary layer are critical for developing and evaluating boundary layer parameterizations in mesoscale numerical weather prediction models. These observations, however, are expensive and rarely profile the entire boundary layer. Using optimized configurations for 449 and 915 MHz wind profiling radars during the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA), improvements have been made to the historical methods of measuring vertical velocity variance through the time series of vertical velocity, as well as the Doppler spectral width. Using six heights of sonic anemometers mounted on a 300 m tower, correlations of up to R2 = 0. 74 are seen in measurements of the large-scale variances from the radar time series and R2 = 0. 79 in measurements of small-scale variance from radar spectral widths. The total variance, measured as the sum of the small and large scales, agrees well with sonic anemometers, with R2 = 0. 79. Correlation is higher in daytime convective boundary layers than nighttime stable conditions when turbulence levels are smaller. With the good agreement with the in situ measurements, highly resolved profiles up to 2 km can be accurately observed from the 449 MHz radar and 1 km from the 915 MHz radar. This optimized configuration will provide unique observations for the verification and improvement to boundary layer parameterizations in mesoscale models.

  13. Turbulence velocity profiling for high sensitivity and vertical-resolution atmospheric characterization with Stereo-SCIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, J.; Butterley, T.; Townson, M. J.; Reeves, A. P.; Morris, T. J.; Wilson, R. W.

    2017-02-01

    As telescopes become larger, into the era of ˜40 m Extremely Large Telescopes, the high-resolution vertical profile of the optical turbulence strength is critical for the validation, optimization and operation of optical systems. The velocity of atmospheric optical turbulence is an important parameter for several applications including astronomical adaptive optics systems. Here, we compare the vertical profile of the velocity of the atmospheric wind above La Palma by means of a comparison of Stereo-SCIntillation Detection And Ranging (Stereo-SCIDAR) with the Global Forecast System models and nearby balloon-borne radiosondes. We use these data to validate the automated optical turbulence velocity identification from the Stereo-SCIDAR instrument mounted on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope, La Palma. By comparing these data we infer that the turbulence velocity and the wind velocity are consistent and that the automated turbulence velocity identification of the Stereo-SCIDAR is precise. The turbulence velocities can be used to increase the sensitivity of the turbulence strength profiles, as weaker turbulence that may be misinterpreted as noise can be detected with a velocity vector. The turbulence velocities can also be used to increase the altitude resolution of a detected layer, as the altitude of the velocity vectors can be identified to a greater precision than the native resolution of the system. We also show examples of complex velocity structure within a turbulent layer caused by wind shear at the interface of atmospheric zones.

  14. Vertical Tracer Concentration Profiles Measured During the Joint Urban 2003 Dispersion Study

    SciTech Connect

    Flaherty, Julia E.; Lamb, Brian K.; Allwine, K Jerry; Allwine, Eugene J.

    2007-12-01

    An atmospheric tracer dispersion study known as Joint Urban 2003 was conducted in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma during the summer of 2003. As part of this field program, vertical concentration profiles were measured at approximately 1 km from downtown tracer gas release locations. These profiles indicated that the urban landscape was very effective in mixing the plume vertically. The height of the plume centerline (as determined by the maximum concentration over the depth of the measurements) for any specific 30 min period varied over the 65 m measurement range. Most of the variations in tracer concentration observed in the profile time series were related to changes in wind direction as opposed to changes in turbulence. As a simple analysis tool for emergency response, maximum normalized concentration curves were developed with 5-minute averaged measurements. These curves give the maximum concentration (normalized by the release rate) that would be observed as a function of downwind distance in an urban area. The 5-min data resulted in greater concentrations than predicted with a simple Gaussian plume model. However, the curve compared well with results from a computational fluid dynamics simulation. This dispersion dataset is a valuable asset not only for refining air quality models, but also for developing new tools for emergency response personnel in the event of a toxic release.

  15. Non-homogeneous vertical distribution of methane over Indian region using surface, aircraft and satellite based data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, M.; Nair, Prabha R.

    2016-09-01

    The upper tropospheric methane (UCH4) data from Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container (CARIBIC), the column average mixing ratio of methane (XCH4) from SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) and near-surface methane at two locations- Cape Rama, Goa, a Commonwealth Scientific Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) network station and Ahmedabad (23.03°N; 72.45°E) were analysed to understand vertical inhomogenities in methane mixing ratio and the seasonal changes in the latitude sector 13°-24°N over India. XCH4 and UCH4 were found to follow more or less similar pattern over all the three latitude sectors, with the peak occurring in July-August, and minimum in late winter. The seasonal amplitude in XCH4 is less at low latitude sector (∼64 ppbv) compared to that of high latitudes (∼101 ppbv at 18°-22°N and 88 ppbv at 22°-24°N). On the other hand, the near surface methane shows opposite pattern peaking in winter attaining low in monsoon. During monsoon when methane sources are active at the surface, XCH4 > UCH4 and during other seasons UCH4 > XCH4 indicating presence of high altitude layers. This analysis revealed non-homogeneous distribution of methane in the troposphere indicative of stratified layers. The role of convective activity, boundary layer meteorology and long-range transport in controlling the seasonal changes in the vertical distribution of methane are examined in this study.

  16. Spatial structures of CO2, H2O, temperature and vertical wind velocity observed by aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selbach, Christoph; Schween, Jan; Crewell, Susanne; Geiss, Heiner; Neininger, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    During the FLUXPAT campaigns in 2008 and 2009 the MetAir Dimona research aricraft performed several fligths above a patchy, agricultural dominated landscape near Juelich/Germany. The measurements are aimed to capture the variability of water vapor and CO2 and derive turbulent fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer close to the ground. Flights took place at two main levels around 150 m and 250 m above ground. Agriculture in this region is dominated by two different crops: sugar beet and wheat. Flights were scheduled in April and August as at these times of the year strong contrasts can be found between different fields. In April sugar beet is usually just seeded whereas wheat already forms a closed canopy. In August wheat unlike sugar beat is already harvested. We analyse the correlation lengths (L*) of CO2, H2O, temperature and vertical wind velocity on flight legs. L* is the median of the power spectrum i.e. 50 percent of the variance is in structures larger than L*. For the different quantities L* shows different behaviours during the day and between different flight levels. The structure lengthscales of CO2 have a large dependency on daytime and strongly decrease during noon and afternoon. We will present some approaches to explain this behaviour.

  17. Static and damage tolerance tests of an advanced composite vertical fin for L-1011 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorward, F.; Ketola, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    This paper recounts the significant events which took place during the structural verification testing of two graphite/epoxy material, full-size vertical stabilizers. The ground test articles were tested to a high bending dynamic lateral gust condition. The first unit failed during static testing at 98 percent Design Ultimate Load. Failure began within the front spar cap. A detailed review of the failure was performed to identify all possible modes. This review resulted in a 'production line' type fix being designed for incorporation in the second ground test article prior to installation in the test fixture. The modified second unit sustained 106 percent of Design Ultimate Load without incident. One lifetime (36,000 flights) of damage tolerance testing was accomplished with the specimen purposely damaged at five locations. A fail-safe loading was performed successfully after simulating lightning strike damage to the fin box cover. A large area repair was substantiated by completing a second lifetime of spectrum loadings. The residual static strength was determined to be 119.7 percent of Design Ultimate Load.

  18. Vertical and horizontal corneal epithelial thickness profiles determined by ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chixin; Wang, Jianhua; Cui, Lele; Shen, Meixiao; Yuan, Yimin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To measure vertical and horizontal thickness profiles of the central and peripheral corneal epithelium and determine if daytime changes occur. Methods Forty eyes of 20 normal subjects were imaged by ultra-high resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography to profile the corneal epithelial thickness from the edge of Bowman’s layer to the central cornea across the vertical and horizontal meridians. Measurements were made at 10:00 AM and again at 6, 8 hours later. Results The baseline vertical meridional epithelial thickness was thinnest, 42.9±4.1 μm, at the edge of Bowman’s layer in the superior region. It increased in thickness (p<0.01), towards the central cornea. The central epithelium averaged 52.5±2.4 μm, becoming thickest, 55.2±2.5 μm, in the inferior pericentral region. It thinned towards the inferior periphery, reaching 51.3±5.1 μm at the edge of Bowman’s layer (p<0.01). Along the horizontal meridian, the epithelium was thickest at the nasal side, 58.6±5.1 μm, and temporal side, 59.3±6.6 μm, near the edges of Bowman’s layer. It thinned towards the central cornea. There were no significant changes in the epithelial thickness at any location over 8 hours. Conclusion Epithelial thickness varied over the horizontal and vertical meridians and appeared stable during the daytime. PMID:22357393

  19. Measurements of Aerosol Vertical Profiles and Optical Properties during INDOEX 1999 Using Micro-Pulse Lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Flatau, Piotr J.; Markowicz, Krzysztof; Campbell, James R.; Spinhirne, James D.; Gordon, Howard R.; Johnson, James E.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    lower troposphere) calculates extinction near the surface in agreement with the ship-level measurements only when the MBL aerosols are well mixed with aerosols above. Finally, a review of the MPL extinction profiles showed that the model of aerosol vertical extinction developed during an earlier INDOEX field campaign (at the Maldives) did not correctly describe the true vertical distribution over the greater Indian Ocean region. Using the average extinction profile and AOD obtained during marine conditions, a new model of aerosol vertical extinction was determined for marine atmospheres over the Indian Ocean. A new model of aerosol vertical extinction for polluted marine atmospheres was also developed using the average extinction profile and AOD obtained during marine conditions influenced by continental aerosols.

  20. ACTRIS aerosol vertical profile data and observations: potentiality and first examples of integrated studies with models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Benedetti, Angela; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Myhre, Cathrine Lund; Schulz, Michael; Wandinger, Ulla; Laj, Paolo; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    The ACTRIS-2 project, funded by Horizon 2020, addresses the scope of integrating state-of-the-art European ground-based stations for long term observations of aerosols, clouds and short lived gases, capitalizing on the work of FP7-ACTRIS. It aims at achieving the construction of a user-oriented RI, unique in the EU-RI landscape for providing 4-D integrated high-quality data from near-surface to high altitude (vertical profiles and total-column) which are relevant to climate and air-quality research. ACTRIS-2 develops and implements, in a large network of stations in Europe and beyond, observational protocols that permit the harmonization of collected data and their dissemination. ACTRIS secures provision and dissemination of a unique set of data and data-products that would not otherwise be available with the same level of quality and standardization. This results from a 10-year plus effort in constructing a research infrastructure capable of responding to community needs and requirements, and has been engaged since the start of the FP5 EU commission program. ACTRIS ensures compliance with reporting requirements (timing, format, traceability) defined by the major global observing networks. EARLINET (European Aerosol research Lidar NETwork), the aerosol vertical profiling component of ACTRIS, is providing since May 2000 vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and backscatter over Europe. A new structure of the EARLINET database has been designed in a more user oriented approach reporting new data products which are more effective for specific uses of different communities. In particular, a new era is starting with the Copernicus program during which the aerosol vertical profiling capability will be fundamental for assimilation and validation purposes. The new data products have been designed thanks to a strong link with EARLINET data users, first of all modeling and satellite communities, established since the beginning of EARLINET and re-enforced within ACTRIS2

  1. A look inside the San Andreas Fault at Parkfield through vertical seismic profiling.

    PubMed

    Chavarria, J Andres; Malin, Peter; Catchings, Rufus D; Shalev, Eylon

    2003-12-05

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth pilot hole is located on the southwestern side of the Parkfield San Andreas fault. This observatory includes a vertical seismic profiling (VSP) array. VSP seismograms from nearby microearthquakes contain signals between the P and S waves. These signals may be P and S waves scattered by the local geologic structure. The collected scattering points form planar surfaces that we interpret as the San Andreas fault and four other secondary faults. The scattering process includes conversions between P and S waves, the strengths of which suggest large contrasts in material properties, possibly indicating the presence of cracks or fluids.

  2. A Look Inside the San Andreas fault at Parkfield Through Vertical Seismic Profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chavarria, J.A.; Malin, P.; Catchings, R.D.; Shalev, E.

    2003-01-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth pilot hole is located on the southwestern side of the Parkfield San Andreas fault. This observatory includes a vertical seismic profiling (VSP) array. VSP seismograms from nearby micro-earthquakes contain signals between the P and S waves. These signals may be P and S waves scattered by the local geologic structure. The collected scattering points form planar surfaces that we interpret as the San Andreas fault and four other secondary faults. The scattering process includes conversions between P and S waves, the strengths of which suggest large contrasts in material properties, possibly indicating the presence of cracks or fluids.

  3. Vertical profiling of ozone and meteorological parameters in the lower atmosphere using kite and balloon platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Karl Glenn

    Vertical profiles of ozone mixing ratio, water vapor mixing ratio, temperature and pressure collected as part of the North Atlantic Regional Experiment (NARE) are presented. Two field campaigns to the Maritime Provinces of Canada are described. Thirty-nine profiles collected at Cape Sable Island, Nova Scotia, Canada during the period August 8-28, 1993 illustrate the complex vertical stratification and temporal variability of the lower atmosphere during periods of transport of pollutants to the sampling site. Transport phenomena resulted in pollution events in which ozone at ground level remained in the 20-40 ppbv range while mixing ratios of 90-130 ppbv were observed above ~300 meters. Back trajectories indicate that these highly elevated levels of ozone are attributable to source regions in the eastern United States. Vertical stratification of the lower atmosphere was also present during transport of Canadian air to the sampling site, while marine air did not exhibit layering characteristic of air masses originating from continental source regions. Vertical profiles collected at Ferryland Downs, Newfoundland, Canada during August 3-13, 1995 suggest a potentially important upper atmospheric summertime source of ozone to the Maritime Provinces of Canada. Thirty-four profiles collected during an intensive sampling period, from August 4-7, exhibit layers of ozone reaching 100 ppbv associated with water vapor mixing ratios as low as 0.1 g kg-1. These layers were observed between 2 and 5 km in altitude, with no evidence of dry, ozone-rich layers observed at ground level. Data from free launch balloon soundings during the two weeks prior to the kite/tethered-balloon experiment provide evidence that the dry, ozone-rich air originated at the tropopause. A newly discovered chemiluminescence reaction of nitrogen dioxide with an oxalate ester is described. This reaction is found to be highly solvent specific, and selective to nitrogen dioxide. No chemiluminescence reaction

  4. In situ vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, mass, and composition over the southeast United States during SENEX and SEAC4RS: observations of a modest aerosol enhancement aloft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, N. L.; Brock, C. A.; Angevine, W. M.; Beyersdorf, A.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D.; de Gouw, J. A.; Diskin, G. S.; Gordon, T. D.; Graus, M. G.; Holloway, J. S.; Huey, G.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lack, D. A.; Liao, J.; Liu, X.; Markovic, M. Z.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Mikoviny, T.; Peischl, J.; Perring, A. E.; Richardson, M. S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Schwarz, J. P.; Warneke, C.; Welti, A.; Wisthaler, A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Murphy, D. M.

    2015-06-01

    Vertical profiles of submicron aerosol from in situ aircraft-based measurements were used to construct aggregate profiles of chemical, microphysical, and optical properties. These vertical profiles were collected over the southeastern United States (SEUS) during the summer of 2013 as part of two separate field studies: the Southeast Nexus (SENEX) study and the Study of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds, and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS). Shallow cumulus convection was observed during many profiles. These conditions enhance vertical transport of trace gases and aerosol and create a cloudy transition layer on top of the sub-cloud mixed layer. The trace gas and aerosol concentrations in the transition layer were modeled as a mixture with contributions from the mixed layer below and the free troposphere above. The amount of vertical mixing, or entrainment of air from the free troposphere, was quantified using the observed mixing ratio of carbon monoxide (CO). Although the median aerosol mass, extinction, and volume decreased with altitude in the transition layer, they were ~10 % larger than expected from vertical mixing alone. This enhancement was likely due to secondary aerosol formation in the transition layer. Although the transition layer enhancements of the particulate sulfate and organic aerosol (OA) were both similar in magnitude, only the enhancement of sulfate was statistically significant. The column integrated extinction, or aerosol optical depth (AOD), was calculated for each individual profile, and the transition layer enhancement of extinction typically contributed less than 10 % to the total AOD. Our measurements and analysis were motivated by two recent studies that have hypothesized an enhanced layer of secondary aerosol aloft to explain the summertime enhancement of AOD (2-3 times greater than winter) over the southeastern United States. The first study attributes the layer aloft to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) while

  5. The effect of aerosol vertical profiles on satellite-estimated surface particle sulfate concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Zifeng; Wang, Jun; Ferrare, Richard A.; Newsom, Rob K.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2011-02-15

    The aerosol vertical distribution is an important factor in determining the relationship between satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) and ground-level fine particle pollution concentrations. We evaluate how aerosol profiles measured by ground-based lidar and simulated by models can help improve the association between AOD retrieved by the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and fine particle sulfate (SO4) concentrations using matched data at two lidar sites. At the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) site, both lidar and model aerosol profiles marginally improve the association between SO4 concentrations and MISR fractional AODs, as the correlation coefficient between cross-validation (CV) and observed SO4 concentrations changes from 0.87 for the no-scaling model to 0.88 for models scaled with aerosol vertical profiles. At the GSFC site, a large amount of urban aerosols resides in the well-mixed boundary layer so the column fractional AODs are already excellent indicators of ground-level particle pollution. In contrast, at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) site with relatively low aerosol loadings, scaling substantially improves model performance. The correlation coefficient between CV and observed SO4 concentrations is increased from 0.58 for the no-scaling model to 0.76 in the GEOS-Chem scaling model, and the model bias is reduced from 17% to 9%. In summary, despite the inaccuracy due to the coarse horizontal resolution and the challenges of simulating turbulent mixing in the boundary layer, GEOS-Chem simulated aerosol profiles can still improve methods for estimating surface aerosol (SO4) mass from satellite-based AODs, particularly in rural areas where aerosols in the free troposphere and any long-range transport of aerosols can significantly contribute to the column AOD.

  6. Assessing the Role of Vegetation Fires in CO Vertical Profile Anomalies in 2002-2012 with MOZAIC-IAGOS Airborne Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petetin, H.

    2015-12-01

    Vegetation fires represent a major source of pollution throughout the troposphere, with strong impacts on the atmospheric composition, air quality and radiative balance. Among the myriad of compounds emitted by these fires, carbon monoxide represents one of the dominant species, and due to its long lifetime, can be transported over very large distances. In the framework of the MOZAIC-IAGOS program, carbon monoxide is routinely measured since 2002 by several commercial aircraft, which provides a unique dataset of CO vertical profiles throughout troposphere. In this study, we investigate the role of vegetation fires in the strong CO anomalies observed in troposphere during the 2002-2012 period. FLEXPART backward simulations coupled with anthropogenic and biomass burning emission inventories are used to trace the geographical origin of these anomalies, which provides valuable informations on the long-range transport of vegetation fire plumes and their subsequent impact on downwind regions.

  7. Vertical velocity and turbulence aspects during Mistral events as observed by UHF wind profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccia, J.; Guénard, V.; Benech, B.; Campistron, B.; Drobinski, P.

    2004-11-01

    The general purpose of this paper is to experimentally study mesoscale dynamical aspects of the Mistral in the coastal area located at the exit of the Rhône-valley. The Mistral is a northerly low-level flow blowing in southern France along the Rhône-valley axis, located between the French Alps and the Massif Central, towards the Mediterranean Sea. The experimental data are obtained by UHF wind profilers deployed during two major field campaigns, MAP (Mesoscale Alpine Program) in autumn 1999, and ESCOMPTE (Expérience sur Site pour COntraindre les Modèles de Pollution atmosphériques et de Transports d'Emission) in summer 2001. Thanks to the use of the time evolution of the vertical profile of the horizontal wind vector, recent works have shown that the dynamics of the Mistral is highly dependent on the season because of the occurrence of specific synoptic patterns. In addition, during summer, thermal forcing leads to a combination of sea breeze with Mistral and weaker Mistral due to the enhanced friction while, during autumn, absence of convective turbulence leads to substantial acceleration as low-level jets are generated in the stably stratified planetary boundary layer. At the exit of the Rhône valley, the gap flow dynamics dominates, whereas at the lee of the Alps, the dynamics is driven by the relative contribution of "flow around" and "flow over" mechanisms, upstream of the Alps. This paper analyses vertical velocity and turbulence, i.e. turbulent dissipation rate, with data obtained by the same UHF wind profilers during the same Mistral events. In autumn, the motions are found to be globally and significantly subsident, which is coherent for a dry, cold and stable flow approaching the sea, and the turbulence is found to be of pure dynamical origin (wind shears and mountain/lee wave breaking), which is coherent with non-convective situations. In summer, due to the ground heating and to the interactions with thermal circulation, the vertical motions are

  8. Vertical velocity variance in the mixed layer from radar wind profilers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eng, K.; Coulter, R.L.; Brutsaert, W.

    2003-01-01

    Vertical velocity variance data were derived from remotely sensed mixed layer turbulence measurements at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) facility in Butler County, Kansas. These measurements and associated data were provided by a collection of instruments that included two 915 MHz wind profilers, two radio acoustic sounding systems, and two eddy correlation devices. The data from these devices were available through the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE) database operated by Argonne National Laboratory. A signal processing procedure outlined by Angevine et al. was adapted and further built upon to derive vertical velocity variance, w_pm???2, from 915 MHz wind profiler measurements in the mixed layer. The proposed procedure consisted of the application of a height-dependent signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) filter, removal of outliers plus and minus two standard deviations about the mean on the spectral width squared, and removal of the effects of beam broadening and vertical shearing of horizontal winds. The scatter associated with w_pm???2 was mainly affected by the choice of SNR filter cutoff values. Several different sets of cutoff values were considered, and the optimal one was selected which reduced the overall scatter on w_pm???2 and yet retained a sufficient number of data points to average. A similarity relationship of w_pm???2 versus height was established for the mixed layer on the basis of the available data. A strong link between the SNR and growth/decay phases of turbulence was identified. Thus, the mid to late afternoon hours, when strong surface heating occurred, were observed to produce the highest quality signals.

  9. Tropical Forest Biomass Estimation from Vertical Fourier Transforms of Lidar and InSAR Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treuhaft, R. N.; Goncalves, F.; Drake, J.; Hensley, S.; Chapman, B. D.; Michel, T.; Dos Santos, J. R.; Dutra, L.; Graca, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    Structural forest biomass estimation from lidar or interferometric SAR (InSAR) has demonstrated better performance than radar-power-based approaches for the higher biomasses (>150 Mg/ha) found in tropical forests. Structural biomass estimation frequently regresses field biomass to some function of forest height. With airborne, 25-m footprint lidar data and fixed-baseline C-band InSAR data over tropical wet forests of La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica, we compare the use of Fourier transforms of vertical profiles at a few frequencies to the intrinsically low-frequency “average height”. RMS scatters of Fourier-estimated biomass about field-measured biomass improved by 40% and 20% over estimates base on average height from lidar and fixed-baseline InSAR, respectively. Vertical wavelengths between 14 and 100 m were found to best estimate biomass. The same airborne data acquisition over La Selva was used to generate many 10’s of repeat-track L-band InSAR baselines with time delays of 1-72 hours, and vertical wavelengths of 5-100 m. We will estimate biomass from the Fourier transforms of L-band radar power profiles (InSAR complex coherence). The effects of temporal decorrelation will be modeled in the Fourier domain to try to model and reduce their impact. Using L-band polarimetric interferometry, average heights will be estimated as well and biomass regression performance compared to the Fourier transform approach. The more traditional approach of using L-band radar polarimetry will also be compared to structural biomass estimation.

  10. One year of vertical wind profiles measurements at a Mediterranean coastal site of South Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calidonna, Claudia Roberta; Avolio, Elenio; Federico, Stefano; Gullì, Daniel; Lo Feudo, Teresa; Sempreviva, Anna Maria

    2015-04-01

    In order to develop wind farms projects is challenging to site them on coastal areas both onshore and offshore as suitable sites. Developing projects need high quality databases under a wide range of atmospheric conditions or high resolution models that could resolve the effect of the coastal discontinuity in the surface properties. New parametrizations are important and high quality databases are also needed for formulating them. Ground-based remote sensing devices such as lidars have been shown to be functional for studying the evolution of the vertical wind structure coastal atmospheric boundary layer both on- and offshore. Here, we present results from a year of vertical wind profiles, wind speed and direction, monitoring programme at a site located in the Italian Calabria Region, Central Mediterranean, 600m from the Thyrrenian coastline, where a Lidar Doppler, ZephIr (ZephIr ltd) has been operative since July 2013. The lidar monitors wind speed and direction from 10m up to 300m at 10 vertical levels with an average of 10 minutes and it is supported by a metmast providing: Atmospheric Pressure, Solar Radiation, Precipitation, Relative Humidity, Temperature,Wind Speed and Direction at 10m. We present the characterization of wind profiles during one year period according to the time of the day to transition periods night/day/night classified relating the local scale, breeze scale, to the large scale conditions. The dataset is also functional for techniques for short-term prediction of wind for the renewable energy integration in the distribution grids. The site infrastructure is funded within the Project "Infrastructure of High Technology for Environmental and Climate Monitoring" (I-AMICA) (PONa3_00363) by the Italian National Operative Program (PON 2007-2013) and European Regional Development Fund. Real-time data are show on http://www.i-amica.it/i-amica/?page_id=1122.

  11. Vertical structure of the upper ocean from profiles fitted to physically consistent functional forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Pola, César; Fernández-Díaz, Julio M.; Lavín, Alicia

    2007-11-01

    A method for characterizing the upper ocean structure is developed. Each temperature (density) profile is fitted by an ideal function based on the assumption that the permanent and seasonal thermoclines can be approximated respectively by steady state and transients of turbulent-diffusive processes and that the mixed layer can advance sharply under external forcing. The ideal profile is composed of two pieces joined at the mixed layer depth (MLD). The upper part is a constant; the part below the MLD is a product of an exponential decay and a Gaussian, representing the seasonal thermocline and decaying asymptotically to a straight line that describes the permanent thermocline. The composition of an exponential decay and a Gaussian accurately fits a wide family of solutions of the diffusion equation and includes the case of a shift of the boundary. The ideal fit for each profile relies on six adjustable parameters including the MLD. As the function is non-linear and non-differentiable, a Differential Evolution optimization algorithm is proposed to make the fitting. The solution gives a good estimate of the MLD based on the topology of the profile. It also provides a measure of the gradient and the shape of each profile, which are intuitive parameters for characterizing the upper ocean structure with direct applicability in ecosystem models. The algorithm is applied to a time series of monthly conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) profiles from a hydrographical station in the southern Bay of Biscay. The construction of a local climatology of the vertical structure evolution (mixed layer development) is presented as a practical application. Other potential uses of the method are also discussed.

  12. High-latitude topside ionospheric vertical electron density profile changes in response to large magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Fainberg, Joseph; Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Truhlik, Vladimir; Wang, Yongli; Bilitza, Dieter; Fung, Shing F.

    2016-05-01

    Large magnetic-storm-induced changes were detected in high-latitude topside vertical electron density profiles Ne(h) in a database of profiles and digital topside ionograms, from the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program, that enabled Ne(h) profiles to be obtained in nearly the same region of space before, during, and after a major magnetic storm (Dst < -100 nT). Storms where Ne(h) profiles were available in the high-latitude Northern Hemisphere had better coverage of solar wind parameters than storms with available Ne(h) profiles in the high-latitude Southern Hemisphere. Large Ne(h) changes were observed during all storms, with enhancements and depletions sometimes near a factor of 10 and 0.1, respectively, but with substantial differences in the responses in the two hemispheres. Large spatial and/or temporal Ne(h) changes were often observed during Dst minimum and during the storm recovery phase. The storm-induced Ne(h) changes were the most pronounced and consistent in the Northern Hemisphere in that large enhancements were observed during winter nighttime and large depletions during winter and spring daytime. The limited available cases suggested that these Northern Hemisphere enhancements increased with increases of the time-shifted solar wind velocity v, magnetic field B, and with more negative values of the B components except for the highest common altitude (1100 km) of the profiles. There was also some evidence suggesting that the Northern Hemisphere depletions were related to changes in the solar wind parameters. Southern Hemisphere storm-induced enhancements and depletions were typically considerably less with depletions observed during summer nighttime conditions and enhancements during summer daytime and fall nighttime conditions.

  13. Vertical profiles of optical and microphysical particle properties above the northern Indian Ocean during CARDEX 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höpner, F.; Bender, F. A.-M.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Praveen, P. S.; Bosch, C.; Ogren, J. A.; Andersson, A.; Gustafsson, Ö.; Ramanathan, V.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed analysis of optical and microphysical properties of aerosol particles during the dry winter monsoon season above the northern Indian Ocean is presented. The Cloud Aerosol Radiative Forcing Experiment (CARDEX), conducted from 16 February to 30 March 2012 at the Maldives Climate Observatory on Hanimaadhoo island (MCOH) in the Republic of the Maldives, used autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (AUAV) to perform vertical in situ measurements of particle number concentration, particle number size distribution as well as particle absorption coefficients. These measurements were used together with surface- based Mini Micro Pulse Lidar (MiniMPL) observations and aerosol in situ and off-line measurements to investigate the vertical distribution of aerosol particles.Air masses were mainly advected over the Indian subcontinent and the Arabian Peninsula. The mean surface aerosol number concentration was 1717 ± 604 cm-3 and the highest values were found in air masses from the Bay of Bengal and Indo-Gangetic Plain (2247 ± 370 cm-3). Investigations of the free tropospheric air showed that elevated aerosol layers with up to 3 times higher aerosol number concentrations than at the surface occurred mainly during periods with air masses originating from the Bay of Bengal and the Indo-Gangetic Plain. This feature is different compared to what was observed during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) conducted in winter 1999, where aerosol number concentrations generally decreased with height. In contrast, lower particle absorption at the surface (σabs(520 nm) = 8.5 ± 4.2 Wm-1) was found during CARDEX compared to INDOEX 1999.Layers with source region specific single-scattering albedo (SSA) values were derived by combining vertical in situ particle absorption coefficients and scattering coefficients calculated with Mie theory. These SSA layers were utilized to calculate vertical particle absorption profiles from MiniMPL profiles. SSA surface values for 550 nm for dry

  14. Ground based lidar and microwave radiometry synergy for high vertically resolved thermodynamic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera-Verdejo, M.; Crewell, S.; Löhnert, U.; Orlandi, E.; Di Girolamo, P.

    2015-05-01

    Continuous monitoring of atmospheric humidity and temperature profiles is important for many applications, e.g. assessment of atmospheric stability and cloud formation. While lidar measurements can provide high vertical resolution albeit with limited coverage, microwave radiometers receive information throughout the troposphere though their vertical resolution is poor. In order to overcome these specific limitations the synergy of a Microwave Radiometer (MWR) and a Raman Lidar (RL) system is presented in this work. The retrieval algorithm that combines these two instruments is an Optimal Estimation Method (OEM) that allows for a uncertainty analysis of the retrieved profiles. The OEM combines measurements and a priori information taking the uncertainty of both into account. The measurement vector consists of a set of MWR brightness temperatures and RL water vapor profiles. The method is applied for a two month field campaign around Jülich, Germany for clear sky periods. Different experiments are performed to analyse the improvements achieved via the synergy compared to the individual retrievals. When applying the combined retrieval, on average the theoretically determined absolute humidity error can be reduced by 59.8% (37.9%) with respect to the retrieval using only-MWR (only-RL) data. The analysis in terms of degrees of freedom for signal reveals that most information is gained above the usable lidar range. The retrieved profiles are further evaluated using radiosounding and GPS water vapor measurements. Within a single case study we also explore the potential of the OEM for deriving the relative humidity profile, which is especially interesting to study cloud formation in the vicinity of cloud edges. To do so temperature information is added both from RL and MWR. For temperature, it is shown that the error is reduced by 47.1% (24.6%) with respect to the only-MWR (only-RL) profile. Due to the use of MWR brightness temperatures at multiple elevation angles, the

  15. First regional vertical profiles of CO2: Can we verify reported emissions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindenmaier, R.; Hase, F.; Dubey, M.; Lee, S.; Costigan, K. R.; Henderson, B. G.

    2013-12-01

    CO2 is known as the most important greenhouse gas (GHG), its rising levels in the Earth's atmosphere resulting in global warming. Both atmospheric CO2 and climate change are accelerating, urging scientists to find solutions to stabilize CO2 and other GHGs. Power plants are the largest contributors to the manmade CO2 emissions. Remote observations of CO2 provide a method to verify CO2 emissions for an enforceable climate treaty. Column CO2 measurements are made routinely by the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and satellites. The column CO2 signals of power plants are typically small 1-10 ppm that are much smaller than the signals in the boundary layer (20-100 ppm). We resolve the vertical profile of CO2 in a power plant dominated area for the first time. We directly interrogate the power plant plume and see large signals in the lower troposphere. We demonstrate that in addition to the total columns, CO2 vertical profiles determined from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra can be used to detect the enhancement of CO2 in the boundary layer. Measurements were made at the Four Corners site, in the San Juan Basin, an arid region with two large coal-fired power plants that emit approximately 30 Mton CO2/year. We used the PROFFIT profile retrieval software to show that the power plants' signatures are visible in our CO2 profiles. We also compare the results with the World Research and Forecasting-Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model driven with real time emissions monitored in the stack of the power plants. The measured profiles indicate the presence of the power plant plume within the first 7 km, and are in good agreement with the modeled profiles. We show that the model simulations are found to be within 4% of the measurements, demonstrating that we can verify emissions to better than 5%. Results from a preliminary exploration of the compact low-resolution mini FTS will be also presented. This new robust off-the shelf instrument permits the study

  16. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Vertical Air Motion (williams-vertair)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  17. Vertical radar profiles for the calibration of unsaturated flow models under dynamic water table conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, G.; Gallotti, L.; Ventura, V.; Andreotti, G.

    2003-04-01

    The identification of flow and transport characteristics in the vadose zone is a fundamental step towards understanding the dynamics of contaminated sites and the resulting risk of groundwater pollution. Borehole radar has gained popularity for the monitoring of moisture content changes, thanks to its apparent simplicity and its high resolution characteristics. However, cross-hole radar requires closely spaced (a few meters), plastic-cased boreholes, that are rarely available as a standard feature in sites of practical interest. Unlike cross-hole applications, Vertical Radar Profiles (VRP) require only one borehole, with practical and financial benefits. High-resolution, time-lapse VRPs have been acquired at a crude oil contaminated site in Trecate, Northern Italy, on a few existing boreholes originally developed for remediation via bioventing. The dynamic water table conditions, with yearly oscillations of roughly 5 m from 6 to 11 m bgl, offers a good opportunity to observe via VRP a field scale drainage-imbibition process. Arrival time inversion has been carried out using a regularized tomographic algorithm, in order to overcome the noise introduced by first arrival picking. Interpretation of the vertical profiles in terms of moisture content has been based on standard models (Topp et al., 1980; Roth et al., 1990). The sedimentary sequence manifests itself as a cyclic pattern in moisture content over most of the profiles. We performed preliminary Richards' equation simulations with time varying later table boundary conditions, in order to estimate the unsaturated flow parameters, and the results have been compared with laboratory evidence from cores.

  18. Vertical and horizontal profiles of airborne particulate matter near major roads in Macao, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ye; Hao, Jiming; Fu, Lixin; Wang, Zhishi; Tang, Uwa

    Vertical profiles, horizontal profiles and size distribution of airborne particulate matter were measured near major roads in Macao using DustTrak and TEOM monitors. A significant decrease in the concentrations of PM 10, PM 2.5 and PM 1, as the height above the ground increases from 2 to 79 m, was found. At the height of 79 m, the concentrations of PM 10, PM 2.5 and PM 1, decrease to about 60%, 62% and 80% of the maximum occurring at 2 m above the ground, respectively. However, the horizontal profiles near another major road revealed there was no significant trend of decrease in concentrations of particulate matter as the distance from the road increases. Over the total measured distance (0-228 m), the maximum decreases of PM 10, PM 2.5 and PM 1 are only 7%, 9% and 10%, of the maximum occurring at 2 m from the road, respectively. The daytime averaged PM 2.5 and PM 1 contribute 66-67% and 51-60%, respectively, of the total PM 10 mass after the particle readings by DustTrak were recalibrated by TEOM. It showed that fine particles and submicrometer particles contributed a major part of PM 10 at the roadside in Macao, which is most likely attributed to the combinations of local sources including exhausted particulate matter from vehicles and resuspended fine dust, and secondary particles (sulfate, nitrate and ammonium) of regional scales.

  19. Vertical distribution and environmental significance of PAHs in soil profiles in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Bu, Qing Wei; Zhang, Zhi Huan; Lu, Song; He, Feng Peng

    2009-02-01

    Vertical distribution of both the concentration and composition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ten profiles in Beijing has been investigated. The results showed that PAH concentrations and compositions in topsoil from different sampling sites were different. PAH concentrations were much higher in topsoil of the investigated urban area, industrial region, and paddy field with wastewater irrigation than in other areas. Moreover, PAH concentrations in topsoil were much higher than those at greater depth, where the concentrations were relatively consistent in most soil profiles. The fingerprints of PAHs in the samples from topsoil (0-30 cm) in the same profiles were similar and were obviously different from those at greater depth, suggesting that PAH sources were consistent in topsoil samples and were discriminating between topsoil and deeper soils. PAHs in topsoil mainly arose from mixed sources of combustion of liquid fuel, coal, and/or wood, as well as wastewater irrigation, while those at greater depth were derived from soil genesis and the process of soil formation.

  20. Effects of aircraft and flight parameters on energy-efficient profile descents in time-based metered traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejarnette, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of several parameters on the time required to fly a nominal profile descent of a B-737 from an entry fix to a metering fix 75 n.mi. away was studied. The ground distance for the constant speed segment was adjusted in each case so that the aircraft would always arrive at the metering fix position at the completion of the five segments of the profile descent. The influence of eight parameters on the same nominal profile descent is outlined, but the method used for the off nominal cases was changed. The time calculated for the constant speed segment in the nominal case is used for all off nominal cases. This method allows the aircraft to arrive at the metering fix before or after the profile descent is complete. It is shown that descent Mach number and wind speed have a large effect on the time error, whereas weight was a much smaller effect.

  1. Convection Fingerprints on the Vertical Profiles of Q1 and Q2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Lin, H.; Chou, C.

    2013-12-01

    Different types of tropical convection left their fingerprints on vertical structures of apparent heat source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2). Profile of deep convection on condensation heating and drying has been well-documented, yet direct assessment of shallow convection remains to be explored. Shallow convection prevails over subtropical ocean, where large-scale subsidence is primarily balanced by radiative cooling and moistening due to surface evaporation instead of moist convection. In this study a united framework is designed to investigate the vertical structures of tropical marine convections in three reanalysis data, including ERA-Interim, MERRA, and CFSR. It starts by sorting and binning data from the lightest to the heaviest rain. Then the differences between two neighboring bins are used to examine the direct effects for precipitation change, in light of the fact that non-convective processes would change slowly from bin to bin. It is shown that all three reanalyses reveal the shallow convective processes in light rain bins, featured by re-evaporating and detraining at the top of boundary layer and lower free troposphere. For heavy rain bins, three reanalyses mainly differ in their numbers and altitudes of heating and drying peaks, implying no universal agreement has been reached on partitioning of cloud populations. Coherent variations in temperature, moisture, and vertical motion are also discussed. This approach permits a systematical survey and comparison of tropical convection in GCM-type models, and preliminary studies of three reanalyses suggest certain degree of inconsistency in simulated convective feedback to large-scale heat and moisture budgets.

  2. Computation of vertical profiles of longwave radiative cooling over the equatorial Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Perry G.; Vincent, Dayton G.

    1995-01-01

    An important quantity whose magnitude has not been throughly examined is the vertical distribution of heating in the Tropics. The details of the vertical distribution of heating have a significant impact on a number of phenomena, including the 30-60 day oscillation, sometimes known as the intraseasonal oscillation. Prior attempts to establish the structure of the heating relied on limited field data or assimilated data, coupled with climatological radiative heating parameters. The availability of high quality global-scale datasets has made it possible to make more accurate calculations than were possible a few years ago. An important component of the apparent heat budget is the longwave radiative cooling, which in this paper is found by using the ECMWF/WCRP/TOGA Archive 2 and ISCCP C1 datasets, together with a well-established parameterization scheme. A method is developed that can be used to estimate the vertical structure of cloud amounts based on top-of-atmosphere cloud observations, and the results are used with a wide-band longwave parameterization to produce longwave cooling rates over the tropical Pacific Ocean. Outgoing longwave radiation is calculated and compared the ERBE results. The calculated values are generally higher than those from ERBE, though the spatial distributions are similar. Some significant problems exist with the ECMWF upper-tropospheric water vapor amounts, which could imply uncertainties of 0.5 C/day in the calculated cooling rates. This is comparable to the differences associated with the minimum or random overlap assumptions used to generate cloud profiles.

  3. Characterizing leaf area index (LAI) and vertical foliage profile (VFP) over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H.; Ganguly, S.; Zhang, G.; Hofton, M. A.; Nelson, R. F.; Dubayah, R.

    2016-01-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) and vertical foliage profile (VFP) are among the important canopy structural variables. Recent advances in lidar remote sensing technology have demonstrated the capability of accurately mapping LAI and VFP over large areas. The primary objective of this study was to derive and validate a LAI and VFP product over the contiguous United States (CONUS) using spaceborne waveform lidar data. This product was derived at the footprint level from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) using a biophysical model. We validated GLAS-derived LAI and VFP across major forest biomes using airborne waveform lidar. The comparison results showed that GLAS retrievals of total LAI were generally accurate with little bias (r2 = 0.67, bias = -0.13, RMSE = 0.75). The derivations of GLAS retrievals of VFP within layers were not as accurate overall (r2 = 0.36, bias = -0.04, RMSE = 0.26), and these varied as a function of height, increasing from understory to overstory - 0 to 5 m layer: r2 = 0.04, bias = 0.09, RMSE = 0.31; 10 to 15 m layer: r2 = 0.53, bias = -0.08, RMSE = 0.22; and 15 to 20 m layer: r2 = 0.66, bias = -0.05, RMSE = 0.20. Significant relationships were also found between GLAS LAI products and different environmental factors, in particular elevation and annual precipitation. In summary, our results provide a unique insight into vertical canopy structure distribution across North American ecosystems. This data set is a first step towards a baseline of canopy structure needed for evaluating climate and land use induced forest changes at the continental scale in the future, and should help deepen our understanding of the role of vertical canopy structure in terrestrial ecosystem processes across varying scales.

  4. Vertical Profiles of Ammonia in the Colorado Front Range: Impacts of Source Region and Meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tevlin, A.; Kaushik, A.; Noone, D. C.; Ortega, J. V.; Smith, J. N.; Brophy, P.; Kirkland, J.; Link, M. F.; Farmer, D. K.; Wolfe, D. E.; Dube, W. P.; McDuffie, E. E.; Brown, S. S.; Zaragoza, J.; Fischer, E. V.; Murphy, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric ammonia plays an important role in aerosol particle formation and growth, as well as in nitrogen deposition to sensitive ecosystems. However, significant uncertainties are associated with the distribution and strength of emission sources, and many of the processes that control its atmospheric fate are not fully understood. The high density of agricultural and urban sources located in close proximity to more pristine mountainous areas to the west make the Colorado Front Range a unique area for studying atmospheric ammonia. The meteorology of the region, where heavy monsoon rains can be followed by rapid evaporation, can also impact surface-atmosphere partitioning of ammonia. As part of the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ), vertical profiles of ammonia were measured throughout the boundary layer aboard a moveable platform on the 300 m Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) tower. Changes in ammonia concentration and its vertical structure were driven not only by changes in wind direction and estimated source region, but also by fluctuations in surface and atmosphere water content. For example, large increases in atmospheric ammonia mixing ratios were observed following rain events. This may be explained by surface-atmosphere exchange of wet-deposited ammonia associated with rapid evaporation following the event, and likely impacts particle formation. This may also play a role in transport from ammonia-rich agricultural areas towards the mountainous regions to the west during periods of upslope flow. The vertical ammonia concentration gradients observed throughout the structured early morning boundary layer also provide insight into the possible causes of early morning spikes in ammonia - a phenomenon that has been well-documented in many other locations. A box model was used to assess the relative importance of surface emissions due to the evaporation of morning dew versus entrainment of ammonia-rich air from above the

  5. An Algorithm to Estimate the Heating Budget from Vertical Hydrometeor Profiles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne; Lang, Stephen; McCumber, Michael; Adler, Robert; Penc, Richard

    1990-12-01

    A simple algorithm to estimate the latent heating of cloud systems from their vertical hydrometer profiles is proposed. The derivation as well as the validation of the algorithm is based on output generated by a non-hydrostatic cloud model with parameterized microphysical processes. Mature and decaying stages of a GATE squall-type convective system have been tested. The algorithm-derived heating budget is in reasonable agreement with the budget predicted by the cloud model. The input to the proposed algorithm can be obtained from either a rain retrieval technique based on information from multichannel passive microwave signals or a kinematic cloud model based on information from Doppler radar wind fields and radar reflectivity patterns. Such an application would have significant implications for spaceborne remote sensing and the large-scale weather prediction data assimilation problem.

  6. Multiple Frequency Contrast Source Inversion Method for Vertical Electromagnetic Profiling: 2D Simulation Results and Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinghe; Song, Linping; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-02-01

    A simultaneous multiple frequency contrast source inversion (CSI) method is applied to reconstructing hydrocarbon reservoir targets in a complex multilayered medium in two dimensions. It simulates the effects of a salt dome sedimentary formation in the context of reservoir monitoring. In this method, the stabilized biconjugate-gradient fast Fourier transform (BCGS-FFT) algorithm is applied as a fast solver for the 2D volume integral equation for the forward computation. The inversion technique with CSI combines the efficient FFT algorithm to speed up the matrix-vector multiplication and the stable convergence of the simultaneous multiple frequency CSI in the iteration process. As a result, this method is capable of making quantitative conductivity image reconstruction effectively for large-scale electromagnetic oil exploration problems, including the vertical electromagnetic profiling (VEP) survey investigated here. A number of numerical examples have been demonstrated to validate the effectiveness and capacity of the simultaneous multiple frequency CSI method for a limited array view in VEP.

  7. Shear source multiazimuth near- and far-offset vertical seismic profiles, Asal Rift, Republic of Djibouti

    SciTech Connect

    Hirn, A.; Magnier, S.A. )

    1992-12-10

    A three-component borehole seismic data set obtained in the Asal rift zone shows that azimuthal anisotropy may be present with the fast propagation direction aligned with the present-day rift axis. This is seen on the near- and far-offset vertical seismic profile (VSP) data from the two source points lying parallel to the rift axis. The third orthogonal source point gives propagation times characteristic of near-horizontal paths along the detected slow direction. The reflected VSP wave field contains both P and S energy. The main P and S reflections correlate well and correspond to thin clay and siltstone layers interspersed within the lava flow series. Some evidence exists for a change with depth of the amount or direction of the anisotropy found in the uppermost 400 m.

  8. Algorithmic identification of limnological features in vertical profiles from the Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wietsma, T.; Collingsworth, P.; Minsker, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    High volume collection of environmental data in digital format presents a range of challenges for the researcher, from quality control and data management to efficient interpretation of the signal and the development of requisite information technology skills. These challenges have been termed the "data deluge". To aid in efficient data interpretation, we describe several algorithmic approaches for feature identification in signal streams, including gradient estimation, spectral analysis, and the hidden Markov model. These approaches are calibrated and evaluated over vertical temperature profiles from the Great Lakes obtained through the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. To demonstrate the value of this data science approach, we describe how the algorithms can be integrated with the historical sampling record to yield an expert system that assists field technicians with adaptive sampling.

  9. Does the vertical profile of ethane contain more insight into mixing layer height than carbon monoxide?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndon, Scott; Yacovitch, Tara; Pusede, Sally; Diskin, Glenn; DiGangi, Joshua; Sachse, Glenn; Crawford, James

    2015-04-01

    To improve the interpretation of satellite data measurements near the surface, the DISCOVER-AQ project embarked on a four year campaign to produce an integrated dataset of airborne and surface based measurements at various locations in North America. One of the key metrics when pursuing the the goal of measuring the surface air quality from space is the mixing layer height. The measurement phase in 2014 included the novel 1-Hz Aerodyne Research, Inc. fast Ethane Spectrometer to distinguish the methane emissions from thermogenic (oil&gas) and biogenic sources in the Denver-Julesberg basin. A second potential use of ethane as a determinant of mixing layer height is revealed in the analysis of 213 vertical profiles collected at 7 points during 21 flights. The findings are evaluated relative to other in-situ metrics, such as carbon monoxide and remote sensing attributions of mixing layer height.

  10. An algorithm to estimate the heating budget from vertical hydrometeor profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne; Mccumber, Michael; Adler, Robert; Lang, Stephen

    1990-01-01

    A simple algorithm to estimate the latent heating of cloud systems from their vertical hydrometeor profiles is proposed. The derivation as well as the validation of the algorithm is based on output generated by a nonhydrostatic cloud model with parameterized microphysical processes. Mature and decaying stages of a GATE squall-type convective system have been tested. The algorithm-derived heating budget is in reasonable agreement with the budget predicted by the cloud model. The input to the proposed algoritm can be obtained from either a rain retrieval technique based on information from multichannel passive microwave signals or a kinematic cloud model based on information from Doppler radar wind fields and radar reflectivity patterns. Such an application would have significant implications for spaceborne remote sensing and the large-scale weather prediction data assimilation problem.

  11. Study of aerosol microphysical properties profiles retrieved from ground-based remote sensing and aircraft in-situ measurements during a Saharan dust event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Bravo-Aranda, J. A.; Baumgardner, D.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.; Navas-Guzmán, F.; Veselovskii, I.; Lyamani, H.; Valenzuela, A.; Olmo, F. J.; Titos, G.; Andrey, J.; Chaikovsky, A.; Dubovik, O.; Gil-Ojeda, M.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present an analysis of mineral dust optical and microphysical properties obtained from different retrieval techniques applied to active and passive remote sensing measurements, including a comparison with simultaneous in-situ aircraft measurements. Data were collected in a field campaign performed during a mineral dust outbreak a Granada, Spain, experimental site (37.16° N, 3.61° W, 680 m a.s.l.) on the 27 June 2011. Column-integrated properties are provided by sun- and star-photometry which allows a continuous evaluation of the mineral dust optical properties during both day and night-time. Both the Linear Estimation and AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) inversion algorithms are applied for the retrieval of the column-integrated microphysical particle properties. In addition, vertically-resolved microphysical properties are obtained from a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system included in EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network), by using both LIRIC (Lidar Radiometer Inversion Code) algorithm during daytime and an algorithm applied to the Raman measurements based on the regularization technique during night-time. LIRIC retrievals reveal several dust layers between 3 and 5 km a.s.l. with volume concentrations of the coarse spheroid mode up to 60 μm3 cm-3. The combined use of the regularization and LIRIC methods reveals the night-to-day evolution of the vertical structure of the mineral dust microphysical properties and offers complementary information to that from column-integrated variables retrieved from passive remote sensing. Additionally, lidar depolarization profiles and LIRIC retrieved volume concentration are compared with aircraft in-situ measurements. This study presents for the first time a comparison of both volume concentration and dust particle polarization ratios measured with in-situ and remote sensing techniques. Results for the depolarization measurements in the dust layer indicate reasonable agreement within the

  12. An evaluation and comparison of vertical profile data from the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    A statistical evaluation is used to compared vertical profiles of temperature and moisture derived from VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) with three different algorithms to that of corresponding rawinsonde measurements for a clear cold environment. To account for time and space discrepancies between the data sets, rawinsonde data were adjusted to be representative of the satellite sounding times. Both rawinsonde and satellite sounding data were objectively analyzed onto a mesoscale grid. These grid point values were compared at 50 mb pressure increments from the surface up to 100 mb. The data were analyed for horizontal and vertical structure, representatives of derived parameters, and significant departure (improvement) from the apriori (first guess) information. Results indicate some rather strong temperature and moisture biases exist in the satellite soundings. Temperature biases of 1 to 4 C and dewpoint biases of 2 to 6 C generally occur in layers where strong inversions are present and vary with time as these atmospheric features evolve. The biases also changes as a function retrieval scheme suggesting limitations and restrictions on the applications of the various techniques. Standard temperature deviations range from 1 to 2 C for each retrieval scheme with maximum values around 800 and 400 mb. Derived parameters (precipitable water and thickness) suffer from similar biases, though to a somewhat lesser extent. Gradients of basic and derived parameters are generally weaker but have good horizontal structure where magnitudes of the parameters are relatively strong. Integrated thermal (temperature) and moisture (precipitable water) parameters show mixed results.

  13. Use of vertical electrical resistivity profiles to characterize the riverbed of losing-disconnected rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontagne, Sebastien; Davis, Aaron; Crosbie, Russell; Taylor, Andrew; Munday, Tim

    2014-05-01

    There are few field techniques available to estimate infiltration rates from losing-disconnected rivers, where infiltration rates are often constrained by the presence of clay layers with a low hydraulic conductivity. It is hypothesized that, in this environment, the bulk of the infiltration would occur in 'hotspots' where the clay layer is thin or absent. Infiltration was estimated over a 2 km section of Billabong Creek (Murray-Darling Basin, Australia) using vertical electrical sounding (VES) resistivity to characterize the continuity and thickness of the riverbed clay layer. Both a towed in-river survey over the whole study reach and three fixed array measurements at the shoreline at selected areas were used. Using locations with measured high and low resistivity, the resistivity profiles were constrained by coring the riverbed to measure vertical variations in riverbed texture, porewater content and porewater salinity. The VES showed that the clay layer was continuous along the study reach and varied in thickness between 1 m and >4 m. Using a simple steady-state model, infiltration rates along the study reach were estimated to vary between 1700 and 7800 m3 km-1 year-1, with an average of 3400 m3 km-1 year-1. This methodology can provide independent estimates of infiltration rates at a scale suitable for the calibration of regional groundwater models.

  14. The vertical age profile in sea ice: Theory and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lietaer, Olivier; Deleersnijder, Eric; Fichefet, Thierry; Vancoppenolle, Martin; Comblen, Richard; Bouillon, Sylvain; Legat, Vincent

    The sea ice age is an interesting diagnostic tool because it may provide a proxy for the sea ice thickness and is easier to infer from observations than the sea ice thickness. Remote sensing algorithms and modeling approaches proposed in the literature indicate significant methodological uncertainties, leading to different ice age values and physical interpretations. In this work, we focus on the vertical age distribution in sea ice. Based on the age theory developed for marine modeling, we propose a vertically-variable sea ice age definition which gives a measure of the time elapsed since the accretion of the ice particle under consideration. An analytical solution is derived from Stefan's law for a horizontally homogeneous ice layer with a periodic ice thickness seasonal cycle. Two numerical methods to solve the age equation are proposed. In the first one, the domain is discretized adaptively in space thanks to Lagrangian particles in order to capture the age profile and its discontinuities. The second one focuses on the mean age of the ice using as few degrees of freedom as possible and is based on an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) spatial discretization and the finite element method. We observe an excellent agreement between the Lagrangian particles and the analytical solution. The mean value and the standard deviation of the finite element solution agree with the analytical solution and a linear approximation is found to represent the age profile the better, the older the ice gets. Both methods are finally applied to a stand-alone thermodynamic sea ice model of the Arctic. Computing the vertically-averaged ice age reduces by a factor of about 2 the simulated ice age compared to the oldest particle of the ice columns. A high correlation is found between the ice thickness and the age of the oldest particle. However, whether or not this will remain valid once ice dynamics is included should be investigated. In addition, the present study, based on

  15. Vertical Profiles of SO2 and NO2 in the Alberta Oil Sands: MAX-DOAS Measurements and Comparison to in-situ Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Zoe; Lobo, Akshay; McLaren, Robert

    2015-04-01

    complex (e.g. elevated layers). Retrieved trace gas vertical profiles were compared with aircraft composite profiles from flights over the site. Trace gas surface retrievals were compared with results from a co-located active-DOAS instrument. The degree of agreement between the DOAS instruments appear to be related to pollution levels and meteorological conditions. Significant observed pollution events were associated with particular meteorological conditions such as South-Westerly winds. Maximum observed SO2 and NO2 retrieved mixing ratios were 250ppb and 60ppb, respectively, at approximately 300m above the surface while maximum surface concentrations measured by the active-DOAS were 77ppb and 20 ppb, respectively. The observed spatial complexity in the trace gas profiles indicates that comprehensive air quality monitoring in the oil sands requires instruments with boundary layer spatial profiling capabilities.

  16. Effect of shear on aircraft landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luers, J. K.; Reeves, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    A simulation study was conducted to determine the effect of wind shear on aircraft landings. The landing of various type of commercial and military aircraft was digitally simulated starting from an initial altitude of 300 feet. Assuming no pilot feedback during descent, the deviation in touchdown point due to vertical profiles of wind shear was determined. The vertical profiles of wind shear are defined in terms of surface roughness, Z sub 0, and stability, L, parameters. The effects on touchdown due to Z sub 0 and L have been calculated for the different type aircraft. Comparisons were made between the following types of aircraft: (1) C-130E, (2) C-135A, (3) C-141, (4) DC-8, (5) Boeing 747, and (6) an augmentor-wing STOL. In addition, the wind shear effect on touchdown resulting from different locations of the center of gravity and gross weights was also analyzed.

  17. Multi-component vertical profile retrievals for ground-based MAX-DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, Hitoshi; Kanaya, Yugo; Takashima, Hisahiro; van Roozendael, Michel; Wittrock, Folkard; Piters, Ankie

    2010-05-01

    We attempt to retrieve lower-tropospheric vertical profile information for 8 components from ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements. The components retrieved include aerosol extinction coefficients (AEC) at two wavelengths 357 and 476 nm, NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, H2O, SO2, and O3 volume mixing ratios (VMRs). This method was applied to MAX-DOAS observations performed at Cabauw, the Netherlands (52.0°N, 4.9°E) in June-July 2009 during the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI) campaign. For the lowest layer of retrieved profiles at 0-1 km, two channels of AEC values reveal consistent variations. NO2 showed typical diurnal variations with maximum in early morning and minimum in the afternoon. Positive correlations between HCHO and CHOCHO were often seen. H2O VMR agreed well with that derived from NCEP surface data, and was used to judge cloudy cases after conversion to relative humidity. All these results support the capability of MAX-DOAS observations applicable to various air quality studies. Similar multi-component retrievals applied to observations in Japan are also presented in this talk.

  18. Analytical solution for the vertical profile of daily production in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovač, Žarko; Platt, Trevor; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Morović, Mira

    2016-05-01

    Photosynthesis parameters are routinely estimated from in vitro measurements of primary production under constant light reaching each incubation bottle, by fitting a photosynthesis-irradiance function to the measurements. Here we take one such function and integrate it in time for variable light input, similar to natural conditions, to obtain the analytical solution for the vertical profile of daily phytoplankton production in the field. This solution is then fitted to in situ measurements of primary production profiles in the same manner as a photosynthesis-irradiance function is fitted to in vitro measurements under controlled and constant light conditions to retrieve the photosynthesis-irradiance parameters. The method is tested on the Hawaii Ocean Time-series data set. The solution explained 97.88% of the variance in measured normalized production at individual depths. The recovered parameters were then used to model the normalized daily water-column production. The model explained 99.21% of variance in normalized watercolumn production of the entire data set. The seasonal cycle of the photosynthesis parameters recovered with the analytical solution was further studied for the Hawaii Ocean Time-series. With respect to the photosynthesis parameter determination, the solution bridges the gap between classical photosynthesis-irradiance measurements under controlled light conditions and in situ measurements which are made under natural, variable light conditions. It presents a new tool for the estimation of photosynthesis parameters from in situ measurements of primary production.

  19. Vertical profiles of aerosol volume from high-spectral-resolution infrared transmission measurements. I. Methodology.

    PubMed

    Eldering, A; Irion, F W; Chang, A Y; Gunson, M R; Mills, F P; Steele, H M

    2001-06-20

    The wavelength-dependent aerosol extinction in the 800-1250-cm(-1) region has been derived from ATMOS (atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy) high-spectral-resolution IR transmission measurements. Using models of aerosol and cloud extinction, we have performed weighted nonlinear least-squares fitting to determine the aerosol-volume columns and vertical profiles of stratospheric sulfate aerosol and cirrus cloud volume. Modeled extinction by use of cold-temperature aerosol optical constants for a 70-80% sulfuric-acid-water solution shows good agreement with the measurements, and the derived aerosol volumes for a 1992 occultation are consistent with data from other experiments after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. The retrieved sulfuric acid aerosol-volume profiles are insensitive to the aerosol-size distribution and somewhat sensitive to the set of optical constants used. Data from the nonspherical cirrus extinction model agree well with a 1994 mid-latitude measurement indicating the presence of cirrus clouds at the tropopause.

  20. Structure and Evolution of Formaldehyde Vertical Profiles in the Po Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Jennifer; . Wolfe, Glenn M.; Keutsch, Frank N.; Ganzeveld, Laurens N.; Broch, Sebastian; Bohn, Birger; Fuchs, Hendrik; Gomm, Sebastian; Häseler, Rolf; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Holland, Frank; Jäger, Julia; Lu, Keding; Li, Xin; Lohse, Insa; Rohrer, Franz; Wegener, Robert; Mentel, Thomas F.; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    As both a source of HO2 radicals and an intermediate in the oxidation of most volatile organic compounds (VOCs), formaldehyde (HCHO) is a useful tracer for the oxidative processing of hydrocarbons that leads to the formation of secondary pollutants. During the Pan-European Gas-AeroSOls Climate Interaction Study (PEGASOS), Zeppelin-based observations allowed for high spatial and temporal mapping of HCHO throughout the planetary boundary. Here, we focus on one flight in the Po Valley in Northern Italy, where clear delineations between the nocturnal boundary layer, residual layer, and growing mixed layer are observable. Early morning profiles demonstrate an inversion in HCHO concentrations, which gradually reverses as the mixed layer develops throughout the day. In the later morning, as little as 1.4 ppb HCHO is observed in the residual layer, while 3.8 ppb HCHO is observed in the mixed layer. Preliminary analysis shows oxidized VOCs are the dominant source of HCHO throughout the planetary boundary layer. Using a 1-D box model, we further examine the role of dynamics and chemistry in the structure and evolution of HCHO vertical profiles. Acknowledgement: PEGASOS project funded by the European Commission under the Framework Programme 7 (FP7-ENV-2010-265148). Additional support provided by NSF GRFP DGE-1256259, and NSF AGS-1051338.

  1. Vertical profiles of HDO/H2O in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehhalt, D. H.; Rohrer, F.; Fried, A.

    2005-07-01

    This paper reanalyzes the measurements of the D content in tropospheric water vapor by Ehhalt (1974) correcting for the isotopic contamination by wall water in the sampling tubes. The resulting corrections decrease the original D content. They are small for the data from the flights through 1967, which extended from the surface to 9 km altitude, but are large for the flights beginning 1971, which ranged from 6 to 13 km altitude and collected smaller amounts of water vapor. No correction therefore was attempted for the latter. The corrected data of the earlier flights are presented in the form of seasonally averaged profiles over Scotts Bluff, Nebraska; Death Valley, California; and the Pacific offshore of San Luis Obispo, California. As to be expected, the vertical profiles from the earlier flights show a decrease in the D content with altitude and a seasonal variation at all altitudes. However, when plotted against the water vapor mixing ratio, the D data from all seasons collapse on a line which closely follows that given by Rayleigh condensation with a fractionation factor α = 1.1, constant with altitude. These data can be explained by a simple one-dimensional convection model and the assumption that condensed water is lofted along with the water vapor.

  2. Comparing the Cloud Vertical Structure Derived from Several Methods Based on Radiosonde Profiles and Ground-based Remote Sensing Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Costa-Suros, M.; Calbo, J.; Gonzalez, J. A.; Long, Charles N.

    2014-08-27

    The cloud vertical distribution and especially the cloud base height, which is linked to cloud type, is an important characteristic in order to describe the impact of clouds in a changing climate. In this work several methods to estimate the cloud vertical structure (CVS) based on atmospheric sounding profiles are compared, considering number and position of cloud layers, with a ground based system which is taken as a reference: the Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL). All methods establish some conditions on the relative humidity, and differ on the use of other variables, the thresholds applied, or the vertical resolution of the profile. In this study these methods are applied to 125 radiosonde profiles acquired at the ARM Southern Great Plains site during all seasons of year 2009 and endorsed by GOES images, to confirm that the cloudiness conditions are homogeneous enough across their trajectory. The overall agreement for the methods ranges between 44-88%; four methods produce total agreements around 85%. Further tests and improvements are applied on one of these methods. In addition, we attempt to make this method suitable for low resolution vertical profiles, which could be useful in atmospheric modeling. The total agreement, even when using low resolution profiles, can be improved up to 91% if the thresholds for a moist layer to become a cloud layer are modified to minimize false negatives with the current data set, thus improving overall agreement.

  3. Assimilation of Ground-Penetrating Radar Data to Update Vertical Soil Moisture Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Phuong; Vanclooster, Marnik; Lambot, Sébastien

    2013-04-01

    The root zone soil moisture has been long recognized as important information for hydrological, meteorological and agricultural research. In this study, we propose a closed-loop data assimilation procedure to update the vertical soil moisture profile from time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data. The hydrodynamic model, Hydrus-1D (Simunek et al., 2009), is used to propagate the system state in time and a radar electromagnetic model (Lambot et al., 2004) to link the state variable (soil moisture profile) with the observation data (GPR data), which enables us to update the soil moisture profile by directly assimilating the GPR data. The assimilation was performed within the maximum likelihood ensemble filter (MLEF) framework developed by Zupanski et al., (2005), for which the problem of nonlinear observation operator is solved much more effectively than the Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) techniques. The method estimates the optimal state as the maximum of the probability density function (PDF) instead of the minimum variance like in most of the other ensemble data assimilation methods. Direct assimilation of GPR data is a prominent advantage of our approach. It avoids solving the time-consuming inverse problem as well as the estimation errors of the soil moisture caused by inversion. In addition, instead of using only surface soil moisture, the approach allows to use the information of the whole soil moisture profile, which is reflected via the ultra wideband (UWB) GPR data, for the assimilation. The use of the UWB antenna in this study is also an advantage as it provides more information about soil moisture profile with a better depth resolution compared to other classical remote sensing techniques. Our approach was validated by a synthetic study. We constructed a synthetic soil column with a depth of 80 cm and analyzed the effects of the soil type on the data assimilation by considering 3 soil types, namely, loamy sand, silt and clay. The assimilation of GPR

  4. Vertical profiling of methane and carbon dioxide using high resolution near-infrared heterodyne spectroscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, Alexander; Klimchuk, Artem; Churbanov, Dmitry; Pereslavtseva, Anastasia; Spiridonov, Maxim; Nadezhdinskyi, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    We present new method of monitoring greenhouse gases using spectroscopic observations of solar radiation passed through the atmosphere with spectral resolution ΛvδΛ up to 108. Such a high resolution is achieved by heterodyne technique and allows to retrieve full information about spectral line shape which, in turn, is used to distinguish contribution of different atmospheric layers to the resulting absorption. Weak absorption line at 6056.5 cm-1 was selected for CO2 measurements and a quartet of lines centered at 6057 cm-1for CH4. The instrument setup includes Sun tracker with a microtelescope and chopper, diode DFB laser used as a local oscillator, a bundle of single mode optical fibers that provides medium for radiation transfer and beam coupling, reference cell with depressurized methane for LO frequency stabilization, and Fabry-Perot etalon for LO frequency calibration. A commercial p-i-n diode with squared detector replaces a mixer and IF spectrometer, providing measurement of heterodyne beating within a bandpass of few MHz, which determines the effective spectral resolution of the instrument. Spectral coverage within narrow range (about 1 cm-1) is provided by ramping the LO frequency based on feedback from the reference channel. Observations of Sun in the Moscow region have resulted for the first time in measurements of the atmospheric transmission near 1.65 μm with sub-Doppler spectral resolution. In order to retrieve vertical profiles of methane and carbon dioxide we developed the inversion algorithm implementing Tikhonov regularization approach. With measured transmission having S/N ratio of 100 or higher, the uncertainty of CH4 profile is about 10 ppb, with the uncertainty of CO2 profile at 1 ppm. This techniques is promising an affordable opportunity or widespread monitoring of greenhouse gases and may be implemented on existing ground-based stations. This work has been supported by the grant of Russian Ministry of education and science #11.G34.31.0074

  5. Vertical profiles of trapped greenhouse gases in Alaskan permafrost active layers before the spring thaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Eunji; Yang, Ji-woong; Kim, Yongwon; Ahn, Jinho

    2015-04-01

    Seasonally frozen ground over permafrost is important in controlling annual greenhouse gas exchange between permafrost and atmosphere. Soil microbes decompose soil carbon and generate carbon dioxide and methane when they become activated. However, the actual greenhouse gas emission follows various efflux pathways. For example, seasonal freezing of the top soil layers can either restrain or press the gas emission from deeper layers. It has been reported that abrupt release of methane during spring is attributable to the emission of trapped gases that had failed to be released instantly after formation (1, 2). In order to examine the seasonally trapped greenhouse gases, we drilled five Alaskan permafrost cores before spring thaw; one from coastal tundra, two from typical boreal forests, one from area where fire occurred, and one from peat accumulated sites. Vertical profiles of carbon dioxide and methane concentrations were obtained with 5-10 cm depth intervals. We found methane peaks from two cores, indicating inhibition of methane efflux. We also analyzed organic carbon, nitrogen and water contents and compared them with the greenhouse gas profiles. We are continuing analysis for the soil temperature profiles of the sampling boreholes because the detailed temperature information might be related to microbial activity, and can be used as indirect indicators of soil water freezing and latent heat influences at some active layer depth (zero curtain effects). All the high-resolution analyses for subsurface environments may help to improve understanding greenhouse gas emission from permafrost regions. 1. Mastepanov M, et al. (2008) Large tundra methane burst during onset of freezing. Nature 456(7222):628-630. 2. Song C, et al. (2012) Large methane emission upon spring thaw from natural wetlands in the northern permafrost region. Environmental Research Letters 7(3):034009.

  6. Improvement of vertical profiles of raindrop size distribution from micro rain radar using 2D video disdrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adirosi, E.; Baldini, L.; Roberto, N.; Gatlin, P.; Tokay, A.

    2016-03-01

    A measurement scheme aimed at investigating precipitation properties based on collocated disdrometer and profiling instruments is used in many experimental campaigns. Raindrop size distribution (RSD) estimated by disdrometer is referred to the ground level; the collocated profiling instrument is supposed to provide complementary estimation at different heights of the precipitation column above the instruments. As part of the Special Observation Period 1 of the HyMeX (Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment) project, conducted between 5 September and 6 November 2012, a K-band vertically pointing micro rain radar (MRR) and a 2D video disdrometer (2DVD) were installed close to each other at a site in the historic center of Rome (Italy). The raindrop size distributions collected by 2D video disdrometer are considered to be fairly accurate within the typical sizes of drops. Vertical profiles of raindrop sizes up to 1085 m are estimated from the Doppler spectra measured by the micro rain radar with a height resolution of 35 m. Several issues related to vertical winds, attenuation correction, Doppler spectra aliasing, and range-Doppler ambiguity limit the performance of MRR in heavy precipitation or in convection, conditions that frequently occur in late summer or in autumn in Mediterranean regions. In this paper, MRR Doppler spectra are reprocessed, exploiting the 2DVD measurements at ground to estimate the effects of vertical winds at 105 m (the most reliable MRR lower height), in order to provide a better estimation of vertical profiles of raindrop size distribution from MRR spectra. Results show that the reprocessing procedure leads to a better agreement between the reflectivity computed at 105 m from the reprocessed MRR spectra and that obtained from the 2DVD data. Finally, vertical profiles of MRR-estimated RSDs and their relevant moments (namely median volume diameter and reflectivity) are presented and discussed in order to investigate the

  7. Leaf morphology and photosynthetic adjustments among deciduous broad-leaved trees within the vertical canopy profile.

    PubMed

    Koike, T; Kitao, M; Maruyama, Y; Mori, S; Lei, T T

    2001-08-01

    Photosynthetic acclimation of deciduous broad-leaved tree species was studied along a vertical gradient within the canopy of a multi-species deciduous forest in northern Japan. We investigated variations in (1) local light regime and CO2 concentration ([CO2]), and (2) morphological (area, thickness and area per mass), biochemical (nitrogen and chlorophyll concentrations) and physiological (light-saturated photosynthetic rate) attributes of leaves of seven major species on three occasions (June, August and October). We studied early successional species, alder (Alnus hirsuta (Spach) Rupr.) and birch (Betula platyphylla var. japonica (Miq.) Hara); gap phase species, walnut (Juglans ailanthifolia Carrière) and ash (Fraxinus mandshurica var. japonica Rupr.); mid-successional species, basswood (Tilia japonica (Miq.) Simonk.) and elm (Ulmus davidiana var. japonica (Rehd.) Nakai); and the late-successional species, maple (Acer mono Bunge). All but maple initiated leaf unfolding from the lower part of the crown. The [CO2] within the vertical profile ranged from 320-350 ppm in the upper canopy to 405-560 ppm near the ground. The lowest and highest ambient [CO2] occurred during the day and during the night, respectively. This trend was observed consistently during the summer, but not when trees were leafless. Chlorophyll concentration was positively related to maximum photosynthetic rate within, but not among, species. Leaf senescence started from the inner part of the crown in alder and birch, but started either in the outer or top portion of the canopy of ash, basswood and maple. Chlorophyll (Chl) to nitrogen ratio in leaves increased with decreasing photon flux density. However, Chl b concentration in all species remained stable until the beginning of leaf senescence. Maximum photosynthetic rates observed in sun leaves of early successional species, gap phase or mid-successional species, and late successional species were 12.5-14.8 micromol m(-2) s(-1), 4.1-7.8 micromol

  8. Wintertime characteristics of aerosols over middle Indo-Gangetic Plain: Vertical profile, transport and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M.; Raju, M. P.; Singh, R. K.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, R. S.; Banerjee, T.

    2017-01-01

    Winter-specific characteristics of airborne particulates over middle Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) were evaluated in terms of aerosol chemical and micro-physical properties under three-dimensional domain. Emphases were made for the first time to identify intra-seasonal variations of aerosols sources, horizontal and vertical transport, effects of regional meteorology and estimating composite aerosol short-wave radiative forcing over an urban region (25°10‧-25°19‧N; 82°54‧-83°4‧E) at middle-IGP. Space-borne passive (Aqua and Terra MODIS, Aura OMI) and active sensor (CALIPSO-CALIOP) based observations were concurrently used with ground based aerosol mass measurement for entire winter and pre-summer months (December, 1, 2014 to March, 31, 2015). Exceptionally high aerosol mass loading was recorded for both PM10 (267.6 ± 107.0 μg m- 3) and PM2.5 (150.2 ± 89.4 μg m- 3) typically exceeding national standard. Aerosol type was mostly dominated by fine particulates (particulate ratio: 0.61) during pre to mid-winter episodes before being converted to mixed aerosol types (ratio: 0.41-0.53). Time series analysis of aerosols mass typically identified three dissimilar aerosol loading episodes with varying attributes, well resemble to that of previous year's observation representing its persisting nature. Black carbon (9.4 ± 3.7 μg m- 3) was found to constitute significant proportion of fine particulates (2-27%) with a strong diurnal profile. Secondary inorganic ions also accounted a fraction of particulates (PM2.5: 22.5%; PM10: 26.9%) having SO4- 2, NO3- and NH4+ constituting major proportion. Satellite retrieved MODIS-AOD (0.01-2.30) and fine mode fractions (FMF: 0.01-1.00) identified intra-seasonal variation with transport of aerosols from upper to middle-IGP through continental westerly. Varying statistical association of columnar and surface aerosol loading both in terms of fine (r; PM2.5: MODIS-AOD: 0.51) and coarse particulates (PM10: MODIS-AOD: 0.53) was

  9. AROTAL Ozone and Temperature Vertical Profile Measurements from the NASA DC-8 during the SOLVE II Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Thomas J.; Twigg, Laurence; Sumnicht, Grant; Hoegy, Walter; Burris, John; Silbert, Donald; Heaps, William; Neuber, R.; Trepte, C. R.

    2004-01-01

    The AROTAL instrument (Airborne Raman Ozone Temperature and Aerosol Lidar) - a collaboration between scientists at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and Langley Research Center - was flown on the NASA DC-8 during the SOLVE II Campaign during January and February, 2003. The flights were flown from the Arena Arctica in Kiruna, Sweden. We report measurements of temperature and ozone profiles showing approximately a 600 ppbv loss in ozone near 17.5 km, over the time frame of the aircraft campaign. Comparisons of ozone profiles from AROTAL are made with the SAGE III instrument.

  10. Constraining Early Cenozoic exhumation of the British Isles with vertical profile modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doepke, Daniel; Cogné, Nathan; Chew, David

    2016-04-01

    Despite decades of research is the Early Cenozoic exhumation history of Ireland and Britain still poorly understood and subject to contentious debate (e.g., Davis et al., 2012 and subsequent comments). One reason for this debate is the difficultly of constraining the evolution of onshore parts of the British Isles in both time and space. The paucity of Mesozoic and Cenozoic onshore outcrops makes direct analysis of this time span difficult. Furthermore, Ireland and Britain are situated at a passive margin, where the amount of post-rift exhumation is generally very low. Classical thermochronological tools are therefore near the edge of their resolution and make precise dating of post-rift cooling events challenging. In this study we used the established apatite fission track and (U-Th-Sm)/He techniques, but took advantage of the vertical profile approach of Gallagher et al. (2005) implemented in the QTQt modelling package (Gallagher, 2012), to better constrain the thermal histories. This method allowed us to define the geographical extent of a Late Cretaceous - Early Tertiary cooling event and to show that it was centered around the Irish Sea. Thus, we argue that this cooling event is linked to the underplating of hot material below the crust centered on the Irish Sea (Jones et al., 2002; Al-Kindi et al., 2003), and demonstrate that such conclusion would have been harder, if not impossible, to draw by modelling the samples individually without the use of the vertical profile approach. References Al-Kindi, S., White, N., Sinha, M., England, R., and Tiley, R., 2003, Crustal trace of a hot convective sheet: Geology, v. 31, no. 3, p. 207-210. Davis, M.W., White, N.J., Priestley, K.F., Baptie, B.J., and Tilmann, F.J., 2012, Crustal structure of the British Isles and its epeirogenic consequences: Geophysical Journal International, v. 190, no. 2, p. 705-725. Jones, S.M., White, N., Clarke, B.J., Rowley, E., and Gallagher, K., 2002, Present and past influence of the Iceland

  11. Vertical profiling of aerosol hygroscopic properties in the planetary boundary layer during the PEGASOS campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, Bernadette; Gysel, Martin; Rubach, Florian; Mentel, Thomas F.; Goger, Brigitta; Poulain, Laurent; Schlag, Patrick; Miettinen, Pasi; Pajunoja, Aki; Virtanen, Annele; Klein Baltink, Henk; Bas Henzing, J. S.; Größ, Johannes; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Decesari, Stefano; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Weingartner, Ernest; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-06-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol particles hygroscopic properties, their mixing state as well as chemical composition were measured above northern Italy and the Netherlands. An aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS; for chemical composition) and a white-light humidified optical particle spectrometer (WHOPS; for hygroscopic growth) were deployed on a Zeppelin NT airship within the PEGASOS project. This allowed one to investigate the development of the different layers within the planetary boundary layer (PBL), providing a unique in situ data set for airborne aerosol particles properties in the first kilometre of the atmosphere. Profiles measured during the morning hours on 20 June 2012 in the Po Valley, Italy, showed an increased nitrate fraction at ˜ 100 m above ground level (a.g.l.) coupled with enhanced hygroscopic growth compared to ˜ 700 m a. g. l. This result was derived from both measurements of the aerosol composition and direct measurements of the hygroscopicity, yielding hygroscopicity parameters (κ) of 0.34 ± 0.12 and 0.19 ± 0.07 for 500 nm particles, at ˜ 100 and ˜ 700 m a. g. l., respectively. The difference is attributed to the structure of the PBL at this time of day which featured several independent sub-layers with different types of aerosols. Later in the day the vertical structures disappeared due to the mixing of the layers and similar aerosol particle properties were found at all probed altitudes (mean κ ≈ 0.18 ± 0.07). The aerosol properties observed at the lowest flight level (100 m a. g. l.) were consistent with parallel measurements at a ground site, both in the morning and afternoon. Overall, the aerosol particles were found to be externally mixed, with a prevailing hygroscopic fraction. The flights near Cabauw in the Netherlands in the fully mixed PBL did not feature altitude-dependent characteristics. Particles were also externally mixed and had an even larger hygroscopic fraction compared to the results in Italy. The mean κ from

  12. Power output in vertical jumps: does optimum loading depend on activity profiles?

    PubMed

    Pazin, Nemanja; Berjan, Bobana; Nedeljkovic, Aleksandar; Markovic, Goran; Jaric, Slobodan

    2013-03-01

    The previously proposed maximum dynamic output hypothesis (MDO: i.e. the optimum load for maximizing the power output during jumping is one's own body) was tested on individuals of various activity profiles. Forty males (10 strength-trained athletes, 10 speed-trained athletes, 10 physically active non-athletes, and 10 sedentary individuals) performed different vertical jumps on a force plate while a pulley system was used to either reduce or increase the subject's body weight by 10-30 %. As expected, an increase in external loading resulted in a significant increase (p < 0.001) in force output and a concomitant decrease of peak jumping velocity in all groups of participants. The main finding, however, was that all groups revealed the maximum peak and mean power output at approximately the subjects' own body weight although their weight represented prominently different percentage of their maximum dynamic strength. While a significant (p < 0.05), albeit moderate, 'group × load' interaction in one jump was observed for the peak power output, the individual optimum load for maximizing the power output number did not differ among the groups. Although apparently further research on various types of movements is needed, the present results provide, so far, the strongest support of the MDO hypothesis.

  13. Aircraft measurements of bromine monoxide, iodine monoxide, and glyoxal profiles in the tropics: comparison with ship-based and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkamer, R.; Baidar, S.; Campos, T. L.; Coburn, S.; DiGangi, J. P.; Dix, B.; Koenig, T. K.; Ortega, I.; Pierce, B. R.; Reeves, M.; Sinreich, R.; Wang, S.; Zondlo, M. A.; Romashkin, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric chemistry of halogens and organic carbon over tropical oceans modifies ozone and atmospheric aerosols, yet atmospheric models remain largely untested for lack of vertically resolved measurements of bromine monoxide (BrO), iodine monoxide (IO), and small oxygenated hydrocarbons like glyoxal (CHOCHO) in the tropical troposphere. BrO, IO, glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), water vapor (H2O) and O2-O2 collision complexes (O4) were measured by the CU Airborne Multi AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument, in situ aerosol size distributions by an Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS), and in situ H2O by Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser hygrometer (VCSEL). Data are presented from two research flights (RF12, RF17) aboard the NSF/NCAR GV aircraft over the tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean (tEPO) as part of the "Tropical Ocean tRoposphere Exchange of Reactive halogens and Oxygenated hydrocarbons" (TORERO) project. We assess the accuracy of O4 slant column density (SCD) measurements in the presence and absence of aerosols, and find O4-inferred aerosol extinction profiles at 477 nm agree within 5% with Mie calculations of extinction profiles constrained by UHSAS. CU AMAX-DOAS provides a flexible choice of geometry which we exploit to minimize the SCD in the reference spectrum (SCDREF, maximize signal-to-noise), and to test the robustness of BrO, IO, and glyoxal differential SCDs. The RF12 case study was conducted in pristine marine and free tropospheric air. The RF17 case study was conducted above the NOAA RV Ka'imimoana (TORERO cruise, KA-12-01), and provides independent validation data from ship-based in situ Cavity Enhanced- and MAX-DOAS. Inside the marine boundary layer (MBL) no BrO was detected (smaller than 0.5 pptv), and 0.2-0.55 pptv IO and 32-36 pptv glyoxal were observed. The near surface concentrations agree within 20% (IO) and 10% (glyoxal) between ship and aircraft. The BrO concentration strongly

  14. Estimation of surface-level PM concentration from satellite observation taking into account the aerosol vertical profiles and hygroscopicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwanchul; Lee, Kwon H; Kim, Ji I; Noh, Youngmin; Shin, Dong H; Shin, Sung K; Lee, Dasom; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young J; Song, Chul H

    2016-01-01

    Surface-level PM10 distribution was estimated from the satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products, taking the account of vertical profiles and hygroscopicity of aerosols over Jeju, Korea during March 2008 and October 2009. In this study, MODIS AOD data from the Terra and Aqua satellites were corrected with aerosol extinction profiles and relative humidity data. PBLH (Planetary Boundary Layer Height) was determined from MPLNET lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficient profiles. Through statistical analysis, better agreement in correlation (R = 0.82) between the hourly PM10 concentration and hourly average Sunphotometer AOD was the obtained when vertical fraction method (VFM) considering Haze Layer Height (HLH) and hygroscopic growth factor f(RH) was used. The validity of the derived relationship between satellite AOD and surface PM10 concentration clearly demonstrates that satellite AOD data can be utilized for remote sensing of spatial distribution of regional PM10 concentration.

  15. Airdata calibration of a high-performance aircraft for measuring atmospheric wind profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Edward A., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The research airdata system of an instrumented F-104 aircraft has been calibrated to measure winds aloft in support of the Space Shuttle wind measurement investigation. The F-104 aircraft was equipped with a research pitot-static noseboom with integral angle-of-attack and flank angle-of-attack vanes and a ring-laser-gyro inertial reference unit. The F-104 aircraft and instrumentation configuration, flight test maneuvers, data corrections, calibration techniques, and resulting calibrations and data repeatability are presented. Recommendations for future airdata systems on aircraft used to measure winds aloft are also given.

  16. An investigation into the vertical axis control power requirements for landing VTOL type aircraft onboard nonaviation ships in various sea states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, M. E.; Roskam, J.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of determining the vertical axis control requirements for landing a VTOL aircraft on a moving ship deck in various sea states is examined. Both a fixed-base piloted simulation and a nonpiloted simulation were used to determine the landing performance as influenced by thrust-to-weight ratio, vertical damping, and engine lags. The piloted simulation was run using a fixed-based simulator at Ames Research center. Simplified versions of an existing AV-8A Harrier model and an existing head-up display format were used. The ship model used was that of a DD963 class destroyer. Simplified linear models of the pilot, aircraft, ship motion, and ship air-wake turbulence were developed for the nonpiloted simulation. A unique aspect of the nonpiloted simulation was the development of a model of the piloting strategy used for shipboard landing. This model was refined during the piloted simulation until it provided a reasonably good representation of observed pilot behavior.

  17. The potential of LIRIC to validate the vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration estimated by an air quality model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siomos, Nikolaos; Filoglou, Maria; Poupkou, Anastasia; Liora, Natalia; Dimopoulos, Spyros; Melas, Dimitris; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Balis, Dimitris

    2015-04-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived by a retrieval algorithm that uses combined sunphotometer and LIDAR data (LIRIC) were used in order to validate the mass concentration profiles estimated by the air quality model CAMx. LIDAR and CIMEL measurements of the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki were used for this validation.The aerosol mass concentration profiles of the fine and coarse mode derived by CAMx were compared with the respective profiles derived by the retrieval algorithm. For the coarse mode particles, forecasts of the Saharan dust transportation model BSC-DREAM8bV2 were also taken into account. Each of the retrieval algorithm's profiles were matched to the models' profile with the best agreement within a time window of four hours before and after the central measurement. OPAC, a software than can provide optical properties of aerosol mixtures, was also employed in order to calculate the angstrom exponent and the lidar ratio values for 355nm and 532nm for each of the model's profiles aiming in a comparison with the angstrom exponent and the lidar ratio values derived by the retrieval algorithm for each measurement. The comparisons between the fine mode aerosol concentration profiles resulted in a good agreement between CAMx and the retrieval algorithm, with the vertical mean bias error never exceeding 7 μgr/m3. Concerning the aerosol coarse mode concentration profiles both CAMx and BSC-DREAM8bV2 values are severely underestimated, although, in cases of Saharan dust transportation events there is an agreement between the profiles of BSC-DREAM8bV2 model and the retrieval algorithm.

  18. Health Profile of U.S. Navy Pilots of Electronically Modified Aircraft.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    cardiovascular disease and alcoholism in the control group whereas no significant increases were noted for pilots of electronic models. Pilots in the latter group had low rates for conditions postulated as related to radiation exposure. Such results indicated that pilots of electronically modified aircraft were not at increased risk for illness or injury because of the aircraft models they primarily flew.

  19. Vertical profiling of aerosol hygroscopic properties in the planetary boundary layer during the PEGASOS campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, B.; Gysel, M.; Rubach, F.; Mentel, T. F.; Goger, B.; Poulain, L.; Schlag, P.; Miettinen, P.; Pajunoja, A.; Virtanen, A.; Bialek, J.; Klein Baltink, H.; Henzing, J. S.; Größ, J.; Gobbi, G. P.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; O'Dowd, C.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-03-01

    Airborne measurements of the aerosol hygroscopic and optical properties as well as chemical composition were performed in the Netherlands and northern Italy on board of a Zeppelin NT airship during the PEGASOS field campaigns in 2012. The vertical changes in aerosol properties during the development of the mixing layer were studied. Hygroscopic growth factors (GF) at 95% relative humidity were determined using the white-light humidified optical particles spectrometer (WHOPS) for dry diameters of 300 and 500 nm particles. These measurements were supplemented by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and an aethalometer providing information on the aerosol chemical composition. Several vertical profiles between 100 and 700 m a.g. were flown just after sunrise close to the San Pietro Capofiume ground station in the Po Valley, Italy. During the early morning hours the lowest layer (newly developing mixing layer) contained a high nitrate fraction (20%) which was coupled with enhanced hygroscopic growth. In the layer above (residual layer) small nitrate fractions of ~ 2% were measured as well as low GFs. After full mixing of the layers, typically around noon and with increased temperature, the nitrate fraction decreased to 2% at all altitudes and led to similar hygroscopicity values as found in the residual layer. These distinct vertical and temporal changes underline the importance of airborne campaigns to study aerosol properties during the development of the mixed layer. The aerosol was externally mixed with 22 and 67% of the 500 nm particles in the range GF < 1.1 and GF > 1.5, respectively. Contributors to the non-hygroscopic mode in the observed size range are most likely mineral dust and biological material. Mean hygroscopicity parameters (κ) were 0.34, 0.19 and 0.18 for particles in the newly forming mixing layer, residual layer and fully mixed layer, respectively. These results agree well with those from chemical analysis which found values of κ = 0.27, 0.21 and 0

  20. Influence of the vertical absorption profile of mixed Asian dust plumes on aerosol direct radiative forcing over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Young Min; Lee, Kwonho; Kim, Kwanchul; Shin, Sung-Kyun; Müller, Detlef; Shin, Dong Ho

    2016-08-01

    We estimate the aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) and heating rate profiles of mixed East Asian dust plumes in the solar wavelength region ranging from 0.25 to 4.0 μm using the Santa Barbara Discrete Ordinate Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) code. Vertical profiles of aerosol extinction coefficients and single-scattering albedos (SSA) were derived from measurements with a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system. The data are used as input parameters for our radiative transfer calculations. We considered four cases of radiative forcing in SBDART: 1. dust, 2. pollution, 3. mixed dust plume and the use of vertical profiles of SSA, and 4. mixed dust plumes and the use of column-averaged values of SSA. In our sensitivity study we examined the influence of SSA and aerosol layer height on our results. The ADRF at the surface and in the atmosphere shows a small dependence on the specific shape of the aerosol extinction vertical profile and its light-absorption property for all four cases. In contrast, at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), the ADRF is largely affected by the vertical distribution of the aerosols extinction. This effect increases if the light-absorption capacity (decrease of SSA) of the aerosols increases. We find different radiative effects in situations in which two layers of aerosols had different light-absorption properties. The largest difference was observed at the TOA for an absorbing aerosol layer at high altitude in which we considered in one case the vertical profile of SSA and in another case the column-averaged SSA only. The ADRF at the TOA increases when the light-absorbing aerosol layer is located above 3 km altitude. The differences between height-resolved SSA, which can be obtained from lidar data, and total layer-mean SSA indicates that the use of a layer-mean SSA can be rather misleading as it can induce a large error in the calculation of the ADRF at the TOA, which in turn may cause errors in the vertical profiles of heating rates.

  1. Application of a new vertical profiling tool (ESASS) for sampling groundwater quality during hollow-stem auger drilling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, P.T.; Flanagan, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    A new tool called ESASS (Enhanced Screen Auger Sampling System) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The use of ESASS, because of its unique U.S. patent design (U.S. patent no. 7,631,705 B1), allows for the collection of representative, depth-specific groundwater samples (vertical profiling) in a quick and efficient manner using a 0.305-m long screen auger during hollow-stem auger drilling. With ESASS, the water column in the flights above the screen auger is separated from the water in the screen auger by a specially designed removable plug and collar. The tool fits inside an auger of standard inner diameter (82.55 mm). The novel design of the system constituted by the plug, collar, and A-rod allows the plug to be retrieved using conventional drilling A-rods. After retrieval, standard-diameter (50.8 mm) observation wells can be installed within the hollow-stem augers. Testing of ESASS was conducted at one waste-disposal site with tetrachloroethylene (PCE) contamination and at two reference sites with no known waste-disposal history. All three sites have similar geology and are underlain by glacial, stratified-drift deposits. For the applications tested, ESASS proved to be a useful tool in vertical profiling of groundwater quality. At the waste site, PCE concentrations measured with ESASS profiling at several depths were comparable (relative percent difference <25%) to PCE concentrations sampled from wells. Vertical profiling with ESASS at the reference sites illustrated the vertical resolution achievable in the profile system; shallow groundwater quality varied by a factor of five in concentration of some constituents (nitrate and nitrite) over short (0.61 m) distances. Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation ?? 2011, National Ground Water Association. No claim to original US government works.

  2. Application of a new vertical profiling tool (ESASS) for sampling groundwater quality during hollow-stem auger drilling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.; Flanagan, Sarah M.

    2011-01-01

    A new tool called ESASS (Enhanced Screen Auger Sampling System) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The use of ESASS, because of its unique U.S. patent design (U.S. patent no. 7,631,705 B1), allows for the collection of representative, depth-specific groundwater samples (vertical profiling) in a quick and efficient manner using a 0.305-m long screen auger during hollow-stem auger drilling. With ESASS, the water column in the flights above the screen auger is separated from the water in the screen auger by a specially designed removable plug and collar. The tool fits inside an auger of standard inner diameter (82.55 mm). The novel design of the system constituted by the plug, collar, and A-rod allows the plug to be retrieved using conventional drilling A-rods. After retrieval, standard-diameter (50.8 mm) observation wells can be installed within the hollow-stem augers. Testing of ESASS was conducted at one waste-disposal site with tetrachloroethylene (PCE) contamination and at two reference sites with no known waste-disposal history. All three sites have similar geology and are underlain by glacial, stratified-drift deposits. For the applications tested, ESASS proved to be a useful tool in vertical profiling of groundwater quality. At the waste site, PCE concentrations measured with ESASS profiling at several depths were comparable (relative percent difference <25%) to PCE concentrations sampled from wells. Vertical profiling with ESASS at the reference sites illustrated the vertical resolution achievable in the profile system; shallow groundwater quality varied by a factor of five in concentration of some constituents (nitrate and nitrite) over short (0.61 m) distances.

  3. Vertical profile and components of marine planktonic archaea in the Pacific sector of the Arctic Oceean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, S.; Amano (Sato), C.; Uchida, M.; Utsumi, M.

    2011-12-01

    Ocean was carried out during a cruise, with R/V Mirai from September to October 2008 (MR08-04). We focused on 3 stations located in Mendeleyev Ridge, Northwind Ridge and Canada Basin. CARD-FISH and clone library techniques targeted on archaeal specific 16S rRNA gene were used to investigate vertical profile of marine planktonic archaeal abundance and characterize their community structure. The results showed that their community structure comprised Group I Crenarchaeota, Group II, III and IV Euryarchaeota. Group I Crenarchaeota outnumbered Group II Euryarchaeota through the water column (0.0064-2.5 x 104 and 0.0038-1.3 x 104 cells/mL, respectively). Although their abundance decreased exponentially with depth, Group I Crenarchaeota relative abundance of the toltal bacteria were high in > 200 m depth at all station. Besides, Group III Euryarchaeota sequences were more frequently detected than other oceans (24 of 115 sequences; 20.9%). It could be said that Group III Euryarchaeota is more predominant in this ocean. Moreover, it was observed that vertical profile of their abundance and components were different depending on the stations and depth.

  4. Interpretation of MODIS Cloud Images by CloudSat/CALIPSO Cloud Vertical Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Fetzer, E. J.; Wong, S.; Yue, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Clouds observed by passive remote-sensing imager (Aqua-MODIS) are collocated to cloud vertical profiles observed by active profiling sensors (CloudSat radar and CALIPSO lidar) at the pixel-scale. By comparing different layers of cloud types classified in the 2B-CLDCLASS-LIDAR product from CloudSat+CALIPSO to those cloud properties observed by MODIS, we evaluate the occurrence frequencies of cloud types and cloud-overlap in CloudSat+CALIPSO for each MODIS cloud regime defined by cloud optical depth (τ) and cloud-top pressure (P) histograms. We find that about 70% of MODIS clear sky agrees with the clear category in CloudSat+CALIPSO; whereas the remainder is either single layer (~25%) cirrus (Ci), low-level cumulus (Cu), stratocumulus (Sc), or multi-layer (<5%) clouds in CloudSat+CALIPSO. Under MODIS cloudy conditions, 60%, 28%, and 8% of the occurrences show single-, double-, and triple-layer clouds, respectively in CloudSat+CALIPSO. When MODIS identifies single-layer clouds, 50-60% of the MODIS low-level clouds are categorized as stratus (Sc) in CloudSat+CALIPSO. Over the tropics, ~70% of MODIS high and optically thin clouds (considered as cirrus in the histogram) is also identified as Ci in CloudSat+CALIPSO, and ~40% of MODIS high and optically thick clouds (considered as convective in the histogram) agrees with CloudSat+CALIPSO deep convections (DC). Over mid-latitudes these numbers drop to 45% and 10%, respectively. The best agreement occurs in tropical single-layer cloud regimes, where 90% of MODIS high-thin clouds are identified as Ci by CloudSat+CALIPSO and 60% of MODIS high-thick clouds are identified as DC. Worst agreement is found for multi-layer clouds, where cirrus on top of low- and mid-level clouds in MODIS are frequently categorized as high-thick clouds by passive imaging - among these only 5-12% are DC in CloudSat+CALIPSO. It is encouraging that both MODIS low-level clouds (regardless of optical thickness) and high-level thin clouds are consistently

  5. Vertical Profiling of Atmospheric Backscatter with a Raman-Aerosol Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deleva, Atanaska D.; Peshev, Zahary Y.; Slesar, Alexander S.; Denisov, Sergey; Avramov, Lachezar A.; Stoyanov, Dimitar V.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols have a strong impact on the planet's thermal balance, air quality, and a variety of atmospheric processes and phenomena. In this work we present some results from a long term lidar observation of tropospheric aerosols over the city of Sofia, Bulgaria, within the framework of the European project "EARLINET-ASSOS." Vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient and range corrected lidar signals are processed and analyzed. The temporal evolution and the spatial distribution of atmospheric aerosol fields are illustrated by 2D-colormaps in height-time coordinates. We present here several cases of aerosol loading: transport of Saharan dust (at altitudes from 3 km to 5 km), highly situated layers (from 9 km to 15 km), and anthropogenic smog (up to 2 km). All measurements were performed by using the two aerosol spectral channels of a combined Raman-aerosol lidar developed in the Laser Radar Lab, Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. It is based on a Q-switched powerful frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (output pulse power: up to 1 J at 1064 nm; up to 100 mJ at 532 nm; pulse duration 15 ns FWHM; repetition rate 2 Hz). A Cassegrain telescope (35 cm diameter, 200 cm focal length) collects the backscattered radiation. The lidar receiving system is based on novel smart high sensitive photo-receiving modules. The acquisition system provides signal registration with spatial resolution of 15 m (100 MHz 14-bit ADC). It allows for detection, storage, and processing of large volume lidar data. Our observations are in good agreement with the forecasts of Barcelona Supercomputing Center, concerning Saharan dust transport.

  6. Flight Investigation of the Stability and Control Characteristics of a 1/4-Scale Model of a Tilt-Wing Vertical-Take-Off-and-Landing Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tosti, Louis P.

    1959-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the dynamic stability and control characteristics of a tilt-wing vertical-take-off-and-landing aircraft with the use of a remotely controlled 1/4-scale free-flight model. The model had two propellers with hinged (flapping) blades mounted on the wing which could be tilted up to an incidence angle of nearly 90 deg for vertical take-off and landing. The investigation consisted of hovering flights in still air, vertical take-offs and landings, and slow constant-altitude transitions from hovering to forward flight. The stability and control characteristics of the model were generally satisfactory except for the following characteristics. In hovering flight, the model had an unstable pitching oscillation of relatively long period which the pilots were able to control without artificial stabilization but which could not be considered entirely satisfactory. At very low speeds and angles of wing incidence on the order of 70 deg, the model experienced large nose-up pitching moments which severely limited the allowable center-of-gravity range.

  7. Development of a Ground-Based Differential Absorption Lidar for High Accurate Measurements of Vertical CO2 Concentration Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, Chikao; Abo, Makoto; Shibata, Yasukuni; Nagai, Tomohiro; Nakazato, Masahisa; Sakai, Tetsu; Tsukamoto, Makoto; Sakaizawa, Daisuku

    2010-05-01

    High-accurate vertical carbon dioxide (CO2) profiles are highly desirable in the inverse method to improve quantification and understanding of the global sink and source of CO2, and also global climate change. We have developed a ground based 1.6μm differential absorption lidar (DIAL) to achieve high accurate measurements of vertical CO2 profiles in the atmosphere. The DIAL system is constructed from the optical parametric oscillation(OPO) transmitter and the direct detection receiving system that included a near-infrared photomultiplier tube operating at photon counting mode. The primitive DIAL measurement was achieved successfully the vertical CO2 profile up to 7 km altitude with an error less than 1.0 % by integration time of 50 minutes and vertical resolution of 150m. We are developing the next generation 1.6 μm DIAL that can measure simultaneously the vertical CO2 concentration, temperature and pressure profiles in the atmosphere. The output laser of the OPO is 20mJ at a 500 Hz repetition rate and a 600mm diameter telescope is employed for this measurement. A very narrow interference filter (0.5nm FWHM) is used for daytime measurement. As the spectra of absorption lines of any molecules are influenced basically by the temperature and pressure in the atmosphere, it is important to measure them simultaneously so that the better accuracy of the DIAL measurement may be realized. Moreover, the value of the retrieved CO2 concentration will be improved remarkably by processing the iteration assignment of CO2 concentration, temperature and pressure, which measured by DIAL techniques. This work was financially supported by the Japan EOS Promotion Program by the MEXT Japan and System Development Program for Advanced Measurement and Analysis by the JST. Reference D. Sakaizawa, C. Nagasawa, T. Nagai, M. Abo, Y. Shibata, H. Nagai, M. Nakazato, and T. Sakai, Development of a 1.6μm differential absorption lidar with a quasi-phase-matching optical parametric oscillator and

  8. Vertical profiles of the 3-D wind velocity retrieved from multiple wind lidars performing triple range-height-indicator scans

    DOE PAGES

    Debnath, Mithu; Iungo, G. Valerio; Ashton, Ryan; ...

    2017-02-06

    Vertical profiles of 3-D wind velocity are retrieved from triple range-height-indicator (RHI) scans performed with multiple simultaneous scanning Doppler wind lidars. This test is part of the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA) campaign carried out at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory. The three wind velocity components are retrieved and then compared with the data acquired through various profiling wind lidars and high-frequency wind data obtained from sonic anemometers installed on a 300 m meteorological tower. The results show that the magnitude of the horizontal wind velocity and the wind direction obtained from the triple RHI scans are generally retrieved with goodmore » accuracy. However, poor accuracy is obtained for the evaluation of the vertical velocity, which is mainly due to its typically smaller magnitude and to the error propagation connected with the data retrieval procedure and accuracy in the experimental setup.« less

  9. EFFECTS OF NITROGEN PHOTOABSORPTION CROSS SECTION RESOLUTION ON MINOR SPECIES VERTICAL PROFILES IN TITAN’S UPPER ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Luspay-Kuti, A.; Mandt, K. E.; Greathouse, T. K.; Plessis, S.

    2015-03-01

    The significant variations in both measured and modeled densities of minor species in Titan’s atmosphere call for the evaluation of possible influencing factors in photochemical modeling. The effect of nitrogen photoabsorption cross section selection on the modeled vertical profiles of minor species is analyzed here, with particular focus on C{sub 2}H{sub 6} and HCN. Our results show a clear impact of cross sections used on all neutral and ion species studied. Affected species include neutrals and ions that are not primary photochemical products, including species that do not even contain nitrogen. The results indicate that photochemical models that employ low-resolution cross sections may significantly miscalculate the vertical profiles of minor species. Such differences are expected to have important implications for Titan’s overall atmospheric structure and chemistry.

  10. Vertical profiles of the 3-D wind velocity retrieved from multiple wind lidars performing triple range-height-indicator scans

    SciTech Connect

    Debnath, Mithu; Iungo, G. Valerio; Ashton, Ryan; Brewer, W. Alan; Choukulkar, Aditya; Delgado, Ruben; Lundquist, Julie K.; Shaw, William J.; Wilczak, James M.; Wolfe, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Vertical profiles of 3-D wind velocity are retrieved from triple range-height-indicator (RHI) scans performed with multiple simultaneous scanning Doppler wind lidars. This test is part of the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA) campaign carried out at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory. The three wind velocity components are retrieved and then compared with the data acquired through various profiling wind lidars and high-frequency wind data obtained from sonic anemometers installed on a 300 m meteorological tower. The results show that the magnitude of the horizontal wind velocity and the wind direction obtained from the triple RHI scans are generally retrieved with good accuracy. However, poor accuracy is obtained for the evaluation of the vertical velocity, which is mainly due to its typically smaller magnitude and to the error propagation connected with the data retrieval procedure and accuracy in the experimental setup.

  11. Vertical profiles of the 3-D wind velocity retrieved from multiple wind lidars performing triple range-height-indicator scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Mithu; Valerio Iungo, G.; Ashton, Ryan; Brewer, W. Alan; Choukulkar, Aditya; Delgado, Ruben; Lundquist, Julie K.; Shaw, William J.; Wilczak, James M.; Wolfe, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Vertical profiles of 3-D wind velocity are retrieved from triple range-height-indicator (RHI) scans performed with multiple simultaneous scanning Doppler wind lidars. This test is part of the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA) campaign carried out at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory. The three wind velocity components are retrieved and then compared with the data acquired through various profiling wind lidars and high-frequency wind data obtained from sonic anemometers installed on a 300 m meteorological tower. The results show that the magnitude of the horizontal wind velocity and the wind direction obtained from the triple RHI scans are generally retrieved with good accuracy. However, poor accuracy is obtained for the evaluation of the vertical velocity, which is mainly due to its typically smaller magnitude and to the error propagation connected with the data retrieval procedure and accuracy in the experimental setup.

  12. Saharan Desert Dust Sources: New Insights Based on Aerosol Vertical Profiles Retrieved from Thermal Infrared Measurements by IASI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbussche, S.; Kumps, N.; Vandaele, A. C.; De Maziere, M.

    2015-11-01

    Desert dust is a major actor in the climate and one of the least characterized with respect to its radiative forcing, both direct and indirect. Studies of dust atmospheric load and sources are therefore of great scientific interest. In the last years, we have developed and improved a retrieval strategy to obtain desert dust aerosols vertical profiles, from thermal infrared measurements by IASI. This strategy has been used to process significant amount of IASI data above North Africa. This dataset allows a new insight in the study of Saharan desert dust sources: it provides twice a day, at interesting times considering the dust emission diurnal cycle, vertical profiles of desert dust (not only optical depth), making possible to distinguish local emissions from transported dust.

  13. Local fluctuations of ozone from 16 km to 45 km deduced from in situ vertical ozone profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreau, G.; Robert, C.

    1994-01-01

    A vertical ozone profile obtained by an in situ ozone sonde from 16 km to 45 km, has allowed to observe local ozone concentration variations. These variations can be observed, thanks to a fast measurement system based on a UV absorption KrF excimer laser beam in a multipass cell. Ozone standard deviation versus altitude calculated from the mean is derived. Ozone variations or fluctuations are correlated with the different dynamic zones of the stratosphere.

  14. A sensitivity study on the retrieval of aerosol vertical profiles using the oxygen A-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele Colosimo, Santo; Natraj, Vijay; Sander, Stanley P.; Stutz, Jochen

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric absorption in the O2 A-band (12 950-13 200 cm-1) offers a unique opportunity to retrieve aerosol extinction profiles from space-borne measurements due to the large dynamic range of optical thickness in that spectral region. Absorptions in strong O2 lines are saturated; therefore, any radiance measured in these lines originates from scattering in the upper part of the atmosphere. Outside of O2 lines, or in weak lines, the atmospheric column absorption is small, and light penetrates to lower atmospheric layers, allowing for the quantification of aerosols and other scatterers near the surface.

    While the principle of aerosol profile retrieval using O2 A-band absorption from space is well-known, a thorough quantification of the information content, i.e., the amount of vertical profile information that can be obtained, and the dependence of the information content on the spectral resolution of the measurements, has not been thoroughly conducted. Here, we use the linearized vector radiative transfer model VLIDORT to perform spectrally resolved simulations of atmospheric radiation in the O2 A-band for four different aerosol extinction profile scenarios: urban (urban-rural areas), highly polluted (megacity areas with large aerosol extinction), elevated layer (identifying elevated plumes, for example for biomass burning) and low extinction (representative of small aerosol extinction, such as vegetated, marine and arctic areas). The high-resolution radiances emerging from the top of the atmosphere measurements are degraded to different spectral resolutions, simulating spectrometers with different resolving powers. We use optimal estimation theory to quantify the information content in the aerosol profile retrieval with respect to different aerosol parameters and instrument spectral resolutions. The simulations show that better spectral resolution generally leads to an increase in the total amount of information that can be retrieved, with the number of

  15. Vertical Profiles of Light Scattering, Light Absorption, and Single Scattering Albedo during the Dry, Biomass Burning Season in Southern Africa and Comparisons of In Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magi, Brian I.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Schmid, Beat; Redermann, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Airborne in situ measurements of vertical profiles of aerosol light scattering, light absorption, and single scattering albedo (omega (sub 0)) are presented for a number of locations in southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season. Features of the profiles include haze layers, clean air slots, and marked decreases in light scattering in passing from the boundary layer into the free troposphere. Frequency distributions of omega (sub 0) reflect the strong influence of smoke from biomass burning. For example, during a period when heavy smoke was advected into the region from the north, the mean value of omega (sub 0) in the boundary layer was 0.81 +/- 0.02 compared to 0.89 +/- 0.03 prior to this intrusion. Comparisons of layer aerosol optical depths derived from the in situ measurements with those measured by a Sun photometer aboard the aircraft show excellent agreement.

  16. Vertical profiles of ozone, VOCs and meteorological parameters in within and outside of Mexico City during the MILAGRO field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquez, C.; Greenberg, J.; Bueno, E.; Bernabe, R.; Aguilar, J.; Blanco, S.; Wöhrnschimmel, H.; Guenther, A.; Cardenas, B.; Turnipseed, A.

    2007-05-01

    High ozone levels with maxima over 250 ppb have been an air quality problem in Mexico City for more than a decade. This ozone is produced in the daytime by photochemical reactions, initiated by its precursors, nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of solar ultraviolet radiation. The objective of this work is to contribute to the understanding of the evolution of these air pollutants at different heights of the boundary layer by means of vertical profile measurements. Ozone, VOCs and meteorological vertical profiles were determined in Northern Mexico City (T0 site) using a tethered balloon for 10 days during the MILAGRO field Campaign 2006, between 4 AM and 4 PM. Measurements were done up to 1000 meter above ground (ozone and meteorological parameters) and up to 200 m above ground for VOCs. VOCs samples were collected during 4 minutes in canisters and analyzed with GC-FID to identify 13 species (ethane, propane, propylene, butane, acetylene, pentane, hexane, heptane, benzene, octane, toluene, nonane and o-xylene). For 4 of the days, VOC integrated samples were also taken using personal pumps and absorbent cartridges at height between 200 and 1000 m. Sample cartridges were analyzed by GC-MS for volatile organic compounds (n-butane, i-pentane, n- pentane, benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, o-xylene, m&p-xylene, 1,2,4-tri-methyl-benzene and C3-benzenes). Ozone vertical profiles, frequently presented high concentrations above 400 m in the early morning. During the daytime, more homogeneous profiles indicate an increased vertical mixing. VOCs profiles show similar concentrations for all heights at dawn. In the morning, highest concentrations were determined at a height of about 100 meter, whereas at noon and in the afternoon concentrations decreased with height. Comparing VOC concentrations during the course of a day, highest values are measured in the morning. The highest VOC concentrations were propane, butane, and toluene. For some

  17. Relation of Cloud Occurrence Frequency, Overlap, and Effective Thickness Derived from CALIPSO and CloudSat Merged Cloud Vertical Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, Seiji; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Miller, Walter F.; Rose, Fred G.; Chen, Yan; Minnis, Patrick; Wielicki, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    A cloud frequency of occurrence matrix is generated using merged cloud vertical profile derived from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR). The matrix contains vertical profiles of cloud occurrence frequency as a function of the uppermost cloud top. It is shown that the cloud fraction and uppermost cloud top vertical pro les can be related by a set of equations when the correlation distance of cloud occurrence, which is interpreted as an effective cloud thickness, is introduced. The underlying assumption in establishing the above relation is that cloud overlap approaches the random overlap with increasing distance separating cloud layers and that the probability of deviating from the random overlap decreases exponentially with distance. One month of CALIPSO and CloudSat data support these assumptions. However, the correlation distance sometimes becomes large, which might be an indication of precipitation. The cloud correlation distance is equivalent to the de-correlation distance introduced by Hogan and Illingworth [2000] when cloud fractions of both layers in a two-cloud layer system are the same.

  18. Vertical profiles of ozone, water vapor and meteorological parameters and boundary-layer conditions at Summit, Greenland during June 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmig, D.; Alfieri, J. G.; Alfieri, J. G.; Boulter, J.; Boulter, J.; David, D.; Birks, J.; Cullen, N.; Cullen, N.; Steffen, K.; Steffen, K.; Johnson, B.; Oltmans, S.

    2001-12-01

    The temporal and spatial distribution of boundary-layer ozone was studied during June 2000 at Summit, Greenland by surface-level measurements and vertical profiling from a tethered balloon. Three weeks of continuous ozone surface data and 133 meteorological and 82 ozone vertical profile data sets were collected from the surface to a maximum altitude of 1400 m above ground. The lower atmosphere at Summit was characterized by the prevalence of high stability conditions with strong surface temperature inversions. These inversions succumbed to neutral to slightly unstable conditions between appr. 9.00 and 18.00 hrs local time with the formation of shallow mixing heights of typically 70-250 m above the surface. Surface ozone ranged from 39 to 68 ppbv and occasionally had rapid changes of up to 20 ppb in 12 hours. The diurnal mean ozone mixing ratio showed distinct cycles indicating meteorological and photochemical controls of surface ozone. Vertical profiles were within the range of 37 to 76 ppb and showed strong stratification in the lower troposphere. A high correlation of high ozone/low water vapor indicated the transport of high tropospheric/low stratospheric air into the lower boundary layer. An appr. 1 to 4 ppb decline of ozone towards the surface was frequently observed within the neutrally stable mixed layer during midday hours. These observations suggest that the boundary-layer ozone and ozone depletion/deposition to the snowpack are influenced by photochemical processes that follow diurnal dependencies.

  19. Moving Toward Continuous Satellite Monitoring of PM2.5 Using the GOES Aerosol/Smoke Product (GASP) and Aircraft Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehr, J. W.; Kondragunta, S.; Anderson, D. C.; Arkinson, H.; Brent, L. C.; Goldberg, D.; He, H.; Liaskos, C.; Ring, A.; Dickerson, R. R.; Carpenter, S.; Ciren, P.; Xu, C.

    2012-12-01

    The NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) makes measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) every 30 minutes during daylight hours. Those measurements then feed the Automated Smoke Detection and Tracking algorithm that uses fire counts, trajectory modeling and pattern recognition to identify fire plumes, especially in the western U.S. Tying these satellite measurements to surface measurements of fine particles (PM2.5) would be a considerable benefit to the air quality community and to people who live in areas with elevated fine particle concentrations. Currently, these retrievals are useful in identifying areas of elevated PM2.5 concentrations and in forecasting PM2.5 by federal, state and local agencies, but are largely limited to qualitative measures of fine particle loading. Among other issues, layers of fine particles well above ground level, cloud contamination, and particle growth by addition of water in areas of high relative humidity are examples of barriers to a direct relationship between surface PM2.5 and satellite AOD. We have identified a path forward by using aircraft profiles to determine the vertical distribution of aerosol scattering in the atmosphere. In addition, long-term measurements of scattering and rapid measurements of PM2.5 at ground-based field sites have provided a relationship between scattering and mass. Simultaneous measurements of relative humidity and temperature allow one to calculate scattering the particles would have in a dry environment and relate that to fine particle mass measurements. A relationship between rapid scattering measurements and much slower PM2.5 mass measurements is then developed, which is used to tie rapid aircraft measurements of scattering to mass. In turn, aircraft profiles are then used to tie column measurements to those at the ground and to identify cases when satellite retrievals are likely to fail. The resulting algorithm should apply throughout much of the eastern U.S., so long

  20. A Mathematical Model for Vertical Attitude Takeoff and Landing (VATOL) Aircraft Simulation. Volume 1; Model Description Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortenbaugh, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    A mathematical model of a high performance airplane capable of vertical attitude takeoff and landing (VATOL) was developed. An off line digital simulation program incorporating this model was developed to provide trim conditions and dynamic check runs for the piloted simulation studies and support dynamic analyses of proposed VATOL configuration and flight control concepts. Development details for the various simulation component models and the application of the off line simulation program, Vertical Attitude Take-Off and Landing Simulation (VATLAS), to develop a baseline control system for the Vought SF-121 VATOL airplane concept are described.

  1. How does the Vertical Profile of Baroclinicity Affect the Wave Instability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, T.; Kodama, C.

    2011-12-01

    The global warming is expected to decrease the baroclinicity in the lower troposphere but increase it in the upper troposphere. It is unknown how the vertical profile of baroclinicity affects the wave instability. In order to study this problem, the growth rate of instability waves is generalized to consider the realistic atmosphere on the basis of wave-mean flow interactions in the mass-weighted isentropic zonal mean (MIM). Energy conversion diagram in MIM becomes a cascade type, which is different from the four box scheme in the conventional Eurelian mean framework. The wave energy W is converted from the zonal mean kinetic energy Kz and the integrated conversion rate is proportional to the mean zonal flow difference between the Eliassen-Palm (E-P) flux convergence and divergence areas. The space-mean growth rate is defined as the half of energy conversion rate divided by the wave energy 0.5/. In the Eady waves, the generalized growth rate becomes identical to the conventional one. Sensitivity of growth rate to the UT-LS baroclinicity was studied using an aqua-planet simulation. The UT-LS baroclinicity is enhanced (reduced) in winter (summer) hemisphere, when the solar condition is modified with the SST unchanged. Wave energy and energy conversions integrated over hemispheres are increased (decreased) in the winter (summer) hemisphere from the spring/fall hemisphere. Peak positions of wave energy and its generation rate shift poleward (equatorward) in winter (summer). Generalized growth rate is increased (decreased) in the winter (summer) hemisphere. The UT-LS baroclinicity is considered to enhance growth rates of existing waves and accordingly increases wave energy as well as the low-level baroclinicity does.The growth rate is diagnosed of aqua-planet simulation under equinox/solstice solar conditions with equinox SST. The result suggests that the growth rate may be sensitive to baroclinicity in the upper troposphere as well as that in the

  2. Vertical profiling of SO 2 and SO above Venus' clouds by SPICAV/SOIR solar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Denis A.; Montmessin, Franck; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Mahieux, Arnaud; Fedorova, Anna A.; Korablev, Oleg I.; Marcq, Emmanuel; Yung, Yuk L.; Zhang, Xi

    2012-02-01

    New measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO 2) and monoxide (SO) in the atmosphere of Venus by SPICAV/SOIR instrument onboard Venus Express orbiter provide ample statistics to study the behavior of these gases above Venus' clouds. The instrument (a set of three spectrometers) is capable to sound atmospheric structure above the clouds in several observation modes (nadir, solar and stellar occultations) either in the UV or in the near IR spectral ranges. We present the results from solar occultations in the absorption ranges of SO 2 (190-230 nm, and at 4 μm) and SO (190-230 nm). The dioxide was detected by the SOIR spectrometer at the altitudes of 65-80 km in the IR and by the SPICAV spectrometer at 85-105 km in the UV. The monoxide's absorption was measured only by SPICAV at 85-105 km. We analyzed 39 sessions of solar occultation, where boresights of both spectrometers are oriented identically, to provide complete vertical profiling of SO 2 of the Venus' mesosphere (65-105 km). Here we report the first firm detection and measurements of two SO 2 layers. In the lower layer SO 2 mixing ratio is within 0.02-0.5 ppmv. The upper layer, also conceivable from microwave measurements by Sandor et al. (Sandor, B.J., Todd Clancy, R., Moriarty-Schieven, G., Mills, F.P. [2010]. Icarus 208, 49-60) is characterized by SO 2 increasing with the altitude from 0.05 to 2 ppmv, and the [SO 2]/[SO] ratio varying from 1 to 5. The presence of the high-altitude SO x species could be explained by H 2SO 4 photodissociation under somewhat warmer temperature conditions in Venus mesosphere. At 90-100 km the content of the sulfur dioxide correlates with temperature increasing from 0.1 ppmv at 165-170 K to 0.5-1 ppmv at 190-192 K. It supports the hypothesis of SO 2 production by the evaporation of H 2SO 4 from droplets and its subsequent photolysis at around 100 km.

  3. A Method for Evaluation of Model-Generated Vertical Profiles of Meteorological Variables

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    profilers and lidar for wind, microwave radiometers for temperature and moisture parameters, and radio acoustic sounding systems (RASSs) for virtual...3 2.1 RAOB Soundings and WRF Output for Profile Generation 3 2.2 Height-Based Profiles 5 2.3 Pressure-Based Profiles 5 3. Comparisons 8 4...values (MD, MAD, SD, and RMSD) for vector wind magnitude and temperature for the user-defined height levels along with the number of samples for each

  4. Retrieval of Vertical LAI Profiles Over Tropical Rain Forests using Waveform Lidar at La Selva, Costa Rica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Hao; Dubayah, Ralph; Swatantra, Anu; Hofton, Michelle; Sheldon, Sage; Clark, David B.; Blair, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the potential of waveform lidar in mapping the vertical and spatial distributions of leaf area index (LAI) over the tropical rain forest of La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. Vertical profiles of LAI were derived at 0.3 m height intervals from the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) data using the Geometric Optical and Radiative Transfer (GORT) model. Cumulative LAI profiles obtained from LVIS were validated with data from 55 ground to canopy vertical transects using a modular field tower to destructively sample all vegetation. Our results showed moderate agreement between lidar and field derived LAI (r2=0.42, RMSE=1.91, bias=-0.32), which further improved when differences between lidar and tower footprint scales (r2=0.50, RMSE=1.79, bias=0.27) and distance of field tower from lidar footprint center (r2=0.63, RMSE=1.36, bias=0.0) were accounted for. Next, we mapped the spatial distribution of total LAI across the landscape and analyzed LAI variations over different land cover types. Mean values of total LAI were 1.74, 5.20, 5.41 and 5.62 over open pasture, secondary forests, regeneration forests after selective-logging and old-growth forests respectively. Lastly, we evaluated the sensitivities of our LAI retrieval model to variations in canopy/ground reflectance ratio and to waveform noise such as induced by topographic slopes. We found for both, that the effects were not significant for moderate LAI values (about 4). However model derivations of LAI might be inaccurate in areas of high-slope and high LAI (about 8) if ground return energies are low. This research suggests that large footprint waveform lidar can provide accurate vertical LAI profile estimates that do not saturate even at the high LAI levels in tropical rain forests and may be a useful tool for understanding the light transmittance within these canopies.

  5. Global distribution of vertical wavenumber spectra in the lower stratosphere observed using high-vertical-resolution temperature profiles from COSMIC GPS radio occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noersomadi; Tsuda, T.

    2016-02-01

    We retrieved temperature (T) profiles with a high vertical resolution using the full spectrum inversion (FSI) method from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) GPS radio occultation (GPS-RO) data from January 2007 to December 2009. We studied the characteristics of temperature perturbations in the stratosphere at 20-27 km altitude. This height range does not include a sharp jump in the background Brunt-Väisälä frequency squared (N2) near the tropopause, and it was reasonably stable regardless of season and latitude. We analyzed the vertical wavenumber spectra of gravity waves (GWs) with vertical wavelengths ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 km, and we integrated the (total) potential energy EpT. Another integration of the spectra from 0.5 to 1.75 km was defined as EpS for short vertical wavelength GWs, which was not studied with the conventional geometrical optics (GO) retrievals. We also estimated the logarithmic spectral slope (p) for the saturated portion of spectra with a linear regression fitting from 0.5 to 1.75 km.Latitude and time variations in the spectral parameters were investigated in two longitudinal regions: (a) 90-150° E, where the topography was more complicated, and (b) 170-230° E, which is dominated by oceans. We compared EpT, EpS, and p, with the mean zonal winds (U) and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). We also show a ratio of EpS to EpT and discuss the generation source of EpS. EpT and p clearly showed an annual cycle, with their maximum values in winter at 30-50° N in region (a), and 50-70° N in region (b), which was related to the topography. At 30-50° N in region (b), EpT and p exhibited some irregular variations in addition to an annual cycle. In the Southern Hemisphere, we also found an annual oscillation in EpT and p, but it showed a time lag of about 2 months relative to U. Characteristics of EpTand p in the tropical region seem to be related to convective activity. The ratio of EpT to the

  6. Modified power law equations for vertical wind profiles. [in investigation of windpower plant siting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.; Richards, T. R.

    1979-01-01

    In an investigation of windpower plant siting, equations are presented and evaluated for a wind profile model which incorporates both roughness and wind speed effects, while retaining the basic simplicity of the Hellman power law. These equations recognize the statistical nature of wind profiles and are compatible with existing analytical models and recent wind profile data. Predictions of energy output based on the proposed profile equations are 10% to 20% higher than those made with the 1/7 power law. In addition, correlation between calculated and observed blade loads is significantly better at higher wind speeds when the proposed wind profile model is used than when a constant power model is used.

  7. Aircraft Measurements of BrO, IO, Glyoxal, NO2, H2O, O2-O2 and Aerosol Extinction Profiles in the Tropics: Comparison with Aircraft-/Ship-Based in Situ and Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkamer, R.; Baidar, S.; Campos, T. L.; Coburn, S.; DiGangi, J. P.; Dix, B.; Eloranta, E. W.; Koenig, T. K.; Morley, B.; Ortega, I.; Pierce, B. R.; Reeves, M.; Sinreich, R.; Wang, S.; Zondlo, M. A.; Romashkin, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric chemistry of halogens and organic carbon over tropical oceans modifies ozone and atmospheric aerosols, yet atmospheric models remain largely untested for lack of vertically resolved measurements of bromine monoxide (BrO), iodine monoxide (IO) and small oxygenated hydrocarbons like glyoxal (CHOCHO) in the tropical troposphere. BrO, IO, glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), water vapor (H2O) and O2-O2 collision complexes (O4/ were measured by the University of Colorado Airborne Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAXDOAS) instrument, aerosol extinction by high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL), in situ aerosol size distributions by an ultra high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer (UHSAS) and in situ H2O by vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) hygrometer. Data are presented from two research flights (RF12, RF17) aboard the National Science Foundation/ National Center for Atmospheric Research Gulfstream V aircraft over the tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean (tEPO) as part of the "Tropical Ocean tRoposphere Exchange of Reactive halogens and Oxygenated hydrocarbons" (TORERO) project (January/February 2012). We assess the accuracy of O4 slant column density (SCD) measurements in the presence and absence of aerosols. Our O4-inferred aerosol extinction profiles at 477 nm agree within 6% with HSRL in the boundary layer and closely resemble the renormalized profile shape of Mie calculations constrained by UHSAS at low (sub-Rayleigh) aerosol extinction in the free troposphere. CU AMAX-DOAS provides a flexible choice of geometry, which we exploit to minimize the SCD in the reference spectrum (SCDREF, maximize signal-to-noise ratio) and to test the robustness of BrO, IO and glyoxal differential SCDs. The RF12 case study was conducted in pristine marine and free tropospheric air. The RF17 case study was conducted above the NOAA RV Ka'imimoana (TORERO cruise, KA-12-01) and provides independent validation data from ship-based in situ cavity

  8. Aircraft measurements of BrO, IO, glyoxal, NO2, H2O, O2-O2 and aerosol extinction profiles in the tropics: comparison with aircraft-/ship-based in situ and lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkamer, R.; Baidar, S.; Campos, T. L.; Coburn, S.; DiGangi, J. P.; Dix, B.; Eloranta, E. W.; Koenig, T. K.; Morley, B.; Ortega, I.; Pierce, B. R.; Reeves, M.; Sinreich, R.; Wang, S.; Zondlo, M. A.; Romashkin, P. A.

    2015-05-01

    Tropospheric chemistry of halogens and organic carbon over tropical oceans modifies ozone and atmospheric aerosols, yet atmospheric models remain largely untested for lack of vertically resolved measurements of bromine monoxide (BrO), iodine monoxide (IO) and small oxygenated hydrocarbons like glyoxal (CHOCHO) in the tropical troposphere. BrO, IO, glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), water vapor (H2O) and O2-O2 collision complexes (O4) were measured by the University of Colorado Airborne Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument, aerosol extinction by high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL), in situ aerosol size distributions by an ultra high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer (UHSAS) and in situ H2O by vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) hygrometer. Data are presented from two research flights (RF12, RF17) aboard the National Science Foundation/National Center for Atmospheric Research Gulfstream V aircraft over the tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean (tEPO) as part of the "Tropical Ocean tRoposphere Exchange of Reactive halogens and Oxygenated hydrocarbons" (TORERO) project (January/February 2012). We assess the accuracy of O4 slant column density (SCD) measurements in the presence and absence of aerosols. Our O4-inferred aerosol extinction profiles at 477 nm agree within 6% with HSRL in the boundary layer and closely resemble the renormalized profile shape of Mie calculations constrained by UHSAS at low (sub-Rayleigh) aerosol extinction in the free troposphere. CU AMAX-DOAS provides a flexible choice of geometry, which we exploit to minimize the SCD in the reference spectrum (SCDREF, maximize signal-to-noise ratio) and to test the robustness of BrO, IO and glyoxal differential SCDs. The RF12 case study was conducted in pristine marine and free tropospheric air. The RF17 case study was conducted above the NOAA RV Ka'imimoana (TORERO cruise, KA-12-01) and provides independent validation data from ship-based in situ cavity

  9. Airdata calibration of a high-performance aircraft for measuring atmospheric wind profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Edward A., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The research airdata system of an instrumented F-104 aircraft has been calibrated to measure winds aloft in support of the space shuttle wind measurement investigation at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames Research Center Dryden Flight Research Facility. For this investigation, wind measurement accuracies comparable to those obtained from Jimsphere balloons were desired. This required an airdata calibration more accurate than needed for most aircraft research programs. The F-104 aircraft was equipped with a research pilot-static noseboom with integral angle-of-attack and flank angle-of-attack vanes and a ring-laser-gyro inertial reference unit. Tower fly-bys and radar acceleration-decelerations were used to calibrate Mach number and total temperature. Angle of attack and angle of sideslip were calibrated with a trajectory reconstruction technique using a multiple-state linear Kalman filter. The F-104 aircraft and instrumentation configuration, flight test maneuvers, data corrections, calibration techniques, and resulting calibrations and data repeatability are presented. Recommendations for future airdata systems on aircraft used to measure winds aloft are also given.

  10. Vertical profiling and determination of landscape fluxes of biogenic nonmethane hydrocarbons within the planetary boundary layer in the Peruvian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmig, Detlev; Balsley, Ben; Davis, Kenneth; Kuck, Laura R.; Jensen, Mike; Bognar, John; Smith, Tyrrel; Arrieta, Rosaura Vasquez; RodríGuez, Rodolfo; Birks, John W.

    1998-10-01

    Vertical profiles of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) within the convective boundary layer (CBL) were measured at a tropical forest site in the Peruvian Amazon during July 1996 from a tethered balloon sampling platform. A profiling technique based on the collection of VOCs onto solid adsorbent cartridges was used to take samples at altitudes up to 1600 m above ground. VOC analysis was performed by thermal desorption with gas chromatographic separation and mass spectrometric and flame ionization detection. A total of 26 VOCs were structurally identified. VOCs were dominated by biogenic compounds. Highest concentrations were observed for isoprene, followed by α-pinene, p-cymene, and β-pinene. Combined, all monoterpenes accounted for approximately 15-20% of the total carbon from biogenic VOCs (BVOCs). The isoprene oxidation products methacrolein (MAC), methylvinylketone (MVK), and 3-methylfuran were observed throughout the CBL. Besides the ubiquitous chlorofluorocarbons, anthropogenic VOC concentrations were at the lower end of concentration ranges observed in rural air. From the vertical profiles, BVOC surface flux estimates were derived. Emission rates were estimated from five vertical profiles using the mixed-layer gradient and CBL budget methods. Emission estimates varied depending on method and choice of statistics, but were within 3000-8200 μg compound m-2 h-1 for isoprene, 120-370 μg m-2 h-1 for α-pinene, 40-75 μg m-2 h-1 for β-pinene, about 16 μg m-2 h-1 for p-cymene, and 40-50 μg m-2 h-1 for camphene. The changes in the ratios of MAC and MVK to isoprene with altitude were utilized to estimate the mixing times between the surface layer, mixed layer and lower troposphere.

  11. Estimation of raindrop drop size distribution vertical profile from simultaneous micro rain radar and 2D video disdrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adirosi, Elisa; Baldini, Luca; Roberto, Nicoletta; Montopoli, Mario; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Gatlin, Patrick; Tokay, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Experimental field campaigns of rain precipitation usually require the coexistence of several ground and satellite based observations in order to guarantee a more complete analysis of the collected case studies at the various spatial and temporal scales of interest. In the framework of the Ground Validation programme of the NASAA/JAXA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, several climate regions of the Earth have been interested by various field campaigns involving experimental setup which include one or more ground based disdrometers and profilers. In such situation a typical implementation of the measurement scheme consists of a pair of K-band vertically pointing micro rain radar (MRR) and a 2D video disdrometer (2DVD) installed close each other. Since 2DVD estimates are referred to the ground level, the co-located MRR is supposed to provide complementary vertical profiles of drop size distribution (DSD) measurements. However, if not properly processed MRR and 2DVD raw data can lead to erroneous interpretations of the underlying microphysics. In this work, we investigate some typical issues occurring when dealing with MRR and 2DVD observations proposing techniques to ensure the adequate data quality required in typical field validation campaigns. More in detail, MRR is an affordable continuous wave frequency-modulated radar (CWFM) typically used at vertical incidence. In the MMR configuration used, DSD profiles are estimated from Doppler spectra determined by drops falling at different velocities and at different heights from 1000 meters almost up to the ground level with a vertical resolution of 35 meters and time resolution up to 10 seconds. The importance of the microphysical measurements from MRR are related to the effects of the vertical gradients of rain precipitation at the sub-resolution scale of the measurements based remote sensing instruments such as those provided by the dual frequency radar of GPM as well as by ground based weather radars

  12. Investigation the optical and radiative properties of aerosol vertical profile of boundary layer by lidar and ground based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Chou, C.; Lin, P.; Wang, S.

    2011-12-01

    The planetary boundary layer is the air layer near the ground directly affected by diurnal heat, moisture, aerosol, and cloud transfer to or from the surface. In the daytime solar radiation heats the surface, initiating thermal instability or convection. Whereas, the scattering and absorption of aerosols or clouds might decrease the surface radiation or heat atmosphere which induce feedbacks such as the enhanced stratification and change in relative humidity in the boundary layer. This study is aimed to understand the possible radiative effect of aerosols basing on ground based aerosol measurements and lidar installed in National Taiwan University in Taipei. The optical and radiative properties of aerosols are dominated by aerosol composition, particle size, hygroscopicity property, and shape. In this study, aerosol instruments including integrating nephelometer, open air nephelometer, aethalometer are applied to investigate the relationship between aerosol hygroscopicity properties and aerosol types. The aerosol hygroscopicity properties are further applied to investigate the effect of relative humidity on aerosol vertical profiles measured by a dual-wavelength and depolarization lidar. The possible radiative effect of aerosols are approached by vertical atmospheric extinction profiles measured by lidar. Calculated atmospheric and aerosol heating effects was compared with vertical meteorological parameters measured by radiosonde. The result shows light-absorbing aerosol has the potential to affect the stability of planetary boundary layer.

  13. Characteristics of tropospheric ozone variability over an urban site in Southeast Asia: A study based on MOZAIC and MOZART vertical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, L. K.; Sheel, Varun; Kajino, M.; Gunthe, Sachin S.; Thouret, ValéRie; Nedelec, P.; Smit, Herman G.

    2013-08-01

    Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus In-Service Aircraft (MOZAIC) profiles of O3 and CO were analyzed to study their variation in the troposphere over Bangkok. Mixing ratios of O3 and CO were enhanced in planetary boundary layer (PBL) being highest in winter followed by summer and wet seasons. The daytime profiles of O3 show higher values compared to nighttime observations in PBL region, but little differences were observed in the free troposphere. The decreasing mixing ratios of O3 in the lower and upper troposphere were associated with shallow and deep convections, respectively. Back trajectory and fire count data indicate that the seasonal variations in trace gases were caused mainly by the regional shift in long-range transport and biomass-burning patterns. In wet season, flow of oceanic air and negligible presence of local biomass burning resulted in lowest O3 and CO, while their high levels in dry season were due to extensive biomass burning and transport of continental air masses. The Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers (MOZART) underestimated both O3 and CO in the PBL region but overestimated these in the free troposphere. Simulations of O3 and CO also show the daytime/nighttime differences but do not capture several key features observed in the vertical distributions. The observed and simulated values of O3 and CO during September-November 2006 were significantly higher than the same period of 2005. The year-to-year differences were mainly due to El Niño-led extensive fires in Indonesia during 2006 but normal condition during 2005.

  14. Effects of a nonuniform vertical profile of chlorophyll concentration on remote-sensing reflectance of the ocean.

    PubMed

    Stramska, Malgorzata; Stramski, Dariusz

    2005-03-20

    Numerical simulations of radiative transfer were used to examine the effects of a nonuniform vertical profile of the inherent optical properties of the water column associated with the vertical profile of chlorophyll concentration, Chl(z), on the spectral remote-sensing reflectance, Rrs(gamma), of the ocean. Using the Gaussian function that describes the Chl(z) profile, we simulated a relatively broad range of open-ocean conditions characterized by the presence of a subsurface Chl maximum at depths greater than or equal to 20 m. The simulations for a vertically nonuniform Chl(z) were compared with reference simulations for a homogeneous ocean whose Chl was identical to the surface Chl of inhomogeneous cases. The range of values for the Gaussian parameters that produce significant differences in Rrs(gamma) (> 5%) was determined. For some vertical structures of Chl(z) considered, the magnitude of Rrs(gamma) and the blue-to-green band ratios of Rrs(gamma) differ significantly from the reference values of homogeneous ocean (> 70% in extreme cases of low surface chlorophyll of 0.02 mg m(-3) and shallow pigment maximum at 20 m). The differences are small or negligible when the nonuniform profiles are characterized by a surface Chl greater than 0.4 mg m(-3) or a depth of Chl maximum greater than 45 m (65 m in extremely clear waters with a surface Chl of 0.02 mg m(-3) or less). The comparison of modeling results with the current algorithm for retrieving the global distribution of chlorophyll from satellite imagery of ocean color suggests that strong effects of the subsurface chlorophyll maximum on reflectance at low surface chlorophyll concentrations can lead to a severalfold overestimation in the algorithm-derived surface chlorophyll. Examples of field data from the Sea of Japan and the north polar Atlantic Ocean are used to illustrate various nonuniform pigment profiles and their effect on the blue-to-green ratio of Rrs(gamma).

  15. Results of the measurement of the vertical profile of ozone up to a height of 70 km by means of the MR-12 and M-100 sounding rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brezgin, N. I.; Kuznetsov, G. I.; Chizhov, A. F.; Shtyrkov, O. V.

    1979-01-01

    The photometers used and methods of calculation of the vertical ozone concentration profile are described. The results obtained in several series of MR-12 and M-100 sounding rocket launchings are presented and discussed.

  16. A model for the vertical sound speed and absorption profiles in Titan's atmosphere based on Cassini-Huygens data.

    PubMed

    Petculescu, Andi; Achi, Peter

    2012-05-01

    Measurements of thermodynamic quantities in Titan's atmosphere during the descent of Huygens in 2005 are used to predict the vertical profiles for the speed and intrinsic attenuation (or absorption) of sound. The calculations are done using one author's previous model modified to accommodate non-ideal equations of state. The vertical temperature profile places the tropopause about 40 km above the surface. In the model, a binary nitrogen-methane composition is assumed for Titan's atmosphere, quantified by the methane fraction measured by the gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GCMS) onboard Huygens. To more accurately constrain the acoustic wave number, the variation of thermophysical properties (specific heats, viscosity, and thermal conductivity) with altitude is included via data extracted from the NIST Chemistry WebBook [URL webbook.nist.gov, National Institute of Standards and Technology Chemistry WebBook (Last accessed 10/20/2011)]. The predicted speed of sound profile fits well inside the spread of the data recorded by Huygens' active acoustic sensor. In the N(2)-dominated atmosphere, the sound waves have negligible relaxational dispersion and mostly classical (thermo-viscous) absorption. The cold and dense environment of Titan can sustain acoustic waves over large distances with relatively small transmission losses, as evidenced by the small absorption. A ray-tracing program is used to assess the bounds imposed by the zonal wind-measured by the Doppler Wind Experiment on Huygens-on long-range propagation.

  17. High-Latitude Topside Ionospheric Vertical Electron-Density-Profile Changes in Response to Large Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Fainberg, Joseph; Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Truhlik, Vladimir; Wang, Yongli; Bilitza, Dieter; Fung, Shing F.

    2015-01-01

    Large magnetic-storm induced changes have been detected in high-latitude topside vertical electron-density profiles Ne(h). The investigation was based on the large database of topside Ne(h) profiles and digital topside ionograms from the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program available from the NASA Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) at http://spdf.gsfc.nasa.gov/isis/isis-status.html. This large database enabled Ne(h) profiles to be obtained when an ISIS satellite passed through nearly the same region of space before, during, and after a major magnetic storm. A major goal was to relate the magnetic-storm induced high-latitude Ne(h) profile changes to solar-wind parameters. Thus an additional data constraint was to consider only storms where solar-wind data were available from the NASA/SPDF OMNIWeb database. Ten large magnetic storms (with Dst less than -100 nT) were identified that satisfied both the Ne(h) profile and the solar-wind data constraints. During five of these storms topside ionospheric Ne(h) profiles were available in the high-latitude northern hemisphere and during the other five storms similar ionospheric data were available in the southern hemisphere. Large Ne(h) changes were observed during each one of these storms. Our concentration in this paper is on the northern hemisphere. The data coverage was best for the northern-hemisphere winter. Here Ne(h) profile enhancements were always observed when the magnetic local time (MLT) was between 00 and 03 and Ne(h) profile depletions were always observed between 08 and 10 MLT. The observed Ne(h) deviations were compared with solar-wind parameters, with appropriate time shifts, for four storms.

  18. Principal component analysis of vertical profiles of Q[sub 1] and Q[sub 2] in the tropics

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, G.D.; Young, G.S.; Ledvina, D.V. )

    1993-02-01

    Rotated principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to the combined vertical profiles of apparent heat source Q[sub 1] and apparent moisture sink Q[sub 2] from both disturbed and undisturbed periods of the Australian summer monsoon season. The data represent the heating and drying within two radiosonde arrays afforded by the Australian Monsoon Experiment (AMEX). The aim here is to identify dominant modes of variability in combined vertical profiles of Q[sub 1] and Q[sub 2]. Rotation of the principal components (PCs) - done to assure stable, physically meaningful components - yields several PCs, deemed here to be statistically significant. The variation of individual Q[sub 1] and Q[sub 2] profiles from the mean profile can be expressed as linear combinations of the PCs; therefore, determination of the relative importance of each PC (through examination of its score) during differing convective conditions provides insight into their physical meaning. For instance, the contribution of PC 1 (that mode of variability that explains the maximum amount of variance between the profiles) is largest when mature cloud-cluster coverage is most expansive. Therefore, this PC is attributable to that combination of deep convection and associated stratiform anvil typical of mature cloud clusters. The remaining PCs fall into two categories: those whose contributions vary with the evolution of a convective system and those whose contributions vary diurnally. Principal components of the former group represent the effects of convection from shallow cumulus to stratiform anvil precipitation. Principal components of the latter group, those that show heating and drying patterns confined to the extremities of the troposphere, are attributable to diabatic boundary-layer fluxes and radiative processes at the top of the troposphere. 64 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Aircraft landing control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambregts, Antonius A. (Inventor); Hansen, Rolf (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Upon aircraft landing approach, flare path command signals of altitude, vertical velocity and vertical acceleration are generated as functions of aircraft position and velocity with respect to the ground. The command signals are compared with corresponding actual values to generate error signals which are used to control the flight path.

  20. Vertical profiles of black carbon measured by a micro-aethalometer in summer in the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Liang; Deng, Zhaoze; Xu, Xiaobin; Yan, Peng; Lin, Weili; Wang, Ying; Tian, Ping; Wang, Pucai; Pan, Weilin; Lu, Daren

    2016-08-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a dominant absorber in the visible spectrum and a potent factor in climatic effects. Vertical profiles of BC were measured using a micro-aethalometer attached to a tethered balloon during the Vertical Observations of trace Gases and Aerosols (VOGA) field campaign, in summer 2014 at a semirural site in the North China Plain (NCP). The diurnal cycle of BC vertical distributions following the evolution of the mixing layer (ML) was investigated for the first time in the NCP region. Statistical parameters including identified mixing height (Hm) and average BC mass concentrations within the ML (Cm) and in the free troposphere (Cf) were obtained for a selected dataset of 67 vertical profiles. Hm was usually lower than 0.2 km in the early morning and rapidly rose thereafter due to strengthened turbulence. The maximum height of the ML was reached in the late afternoon. The top of a full developed ML exceeded 1 km on sunny days in summer, while it stayed much lower on cloudy days. The sunset triggered the collapse of the ML, and a stable nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) gradually formed. Accordingly, the highest level Cm was found in the early morning and the lowest was found in the afternoon. In the daytime, BC was almost uniformly distributed within the ML and significantly decreased above the ML. During the field campaign, Cm averaged about 5.16 ± 2.49 µg m-3, with a range of 1.12 to 14.49 µg m-3, comparable with observational results in many polluted urban areas such as Milan in Italy and Shanghai in China. As evening approached, BC gradually built up near the surface and exponentially declined with height. In contrast to the large variability found both in Hm and Cm, Cf stayed relatively unaffected through the day. Cf was less than 10 % of the ground level under clean conditions, while it amounted to half of the ground level in some polluted cases. In situ measurements of BC vertical profiles would hopefully have an important implication for

  1. The vertical profile of radar reflectivity of convective cells: A strong indicator of storm intensity and lightning probability?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zipser, Edward J.; Lutz, Kurt R.

    1994-01-01

    Reflectivity data from Doppler radars are used to construct vertical profiles of radar reflectivity (VPRR) of convective cells in mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in three different environmental regimes. The National Center for Atmospheric Research CP-3 and CP-4 radars are used to calculate median VPRR for MCSs in the Oklahoma-Kansas Preliminary Regional Experiment for STORM-Central in 1985. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere radar in Darwin, Australia, is used to calculate VPRR for MCSs observed both in oceanic, monsoon regimes and in continental, break period regimes during the wet seasons of 1987/88 and 1988/89. The midlatitude and tropical continental VPRRs both exhibit maximum reflectivity somewhat above the surface and have a gradual decrease in reflectivity with height above the freezing level. In sharp contrast, the tropical oceanic profile has a maximum reflectivity at the lowest level and a very rapid decrease in reflectivity with height beginning just above the freezing level. The tropical oceanic profile in the Darwin area is almost the same shape as that for two other tropical oceanic regimes, leading to the conclustion that it is characteristic. The absolute values of reflectivity in the 0 to 20 C range are compared with values in the literature thought to represent a threshold for rapid storm electrification leading to lightning, about 40 dBZ at -10 C. The large negative vertical gradient of reflectivity in this temperature range for oceanic storms is hypothesized to be a direct result of the characteristically weaker vertical velocities observed in MCSs over tropical oceans. It is proposed, as a necessary condition for rapid electrification, that a convective cell must have its updraft speed exceed some threshold value. Based upon field program data, a tentative estimate for the magnitude of this threshold is 6-7 m/s for mean speed and 10-12 m/s for peak speed.

  2. Estimating Oceanic Primary Production Using Vertical Irradiance and Chlorophyll Profiles from Ocean Gliders in the North Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Victoria S; Smyth, Timothy J; Martin, Adrian P; Frajka-Williams, Eleanor; Thompson, Andrew F; Damerell, Gillian; Painter, Stuart C

    2015-10-06

    An autonomous underwater vehicle (Seaglider) has been used to estimate marine primary production (PP) using a combination of irradiance and fluorescence vertical profiles. This method provides estimates for depth-resolved and temporally evolving PP on fine spatial scales in the absence of ship-based calibrations. We describe techniques to correct for known issues associated with long autonomous deployments such as sensor calibration drift and fluorescence quenching. Comparisons were made between the Seaglider, stable isotope ((13)C), and satellite estimates of PP. The Seaglider-based PP estimates were comparable to both satellite estimates and stable isotope measurements.

  3. Cooperative Suction by Vertical Capillary Array Pump for Controlling Flow Profiles of Microfluidic Sensor Chips

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Katsuyoshi; Seyama, Michiko; Inoue, Suzuyo; Tamechika, Emi

    2012-01-01

    A passive pump consisting of integrated vertical capillaries has been developed for a microfluidic chip as an useful component with an excellent flow volume and flow rate. A fluidic chip built into a passive pump was used by connecting the bottoms of all the capillaries to a top surface consisting of a thin layer channel in the microfluidic chip where the thin layer channel depth was smaller than the capillary radius. As a result the vertical capillaries drew fluid cooperatively rather than independently, thus exerting the maximum suction efficiency at every instance. This meant that a flow rate was realized that exhibited little variation and without any external power or operation. A microfluidic chip built into this passive pump had the ability to achieve a quasi-steady rather than a rapidly decreasing flow rate, which is a universal flow characteristic in an ordinary capillary. PMID:23202035

  4. Cooperative suction by vertical capillary array pump for controlling flow profiles of microfluidic sensor chips.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Katsuyoshi; Seyama, Michiko; Inoue, Suzuyo; Tamechika, Emi

    2012-10-18

    A passive pump consisting of integrated vertical capillaries has been developed for a microfluidic chip as an useful component with an excellent flow volume and flow rate. A fluidic chip built into a passive pump was used by connecting the bottoms of all the capillaries to a top surface consisting of a thin layer channel in the microfluidic chip where the thin layer channel depth was smaller than the capillary radius. As a result the vertical capillaries drew fluid cooperatively rather than independently, thus exerting the maximum suction efficiency at every instance. This meant that a flow rate was realized that exhibited little variation and without any external power or operation. A microfluidic chip built into this passive pump had the ability to achieve a quasi-steady rather than a rapidly decreasing flow rate, which is a universal flow characteristic in an ordinary capillary.

  5. Balloon measurements of the vertical ionization profile over southern Israel and comparison to mid-latitude observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaniv, Roy; Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin; Nicoll, Keri; Harrison, Giles; Artamonov, Anton; Usoskin, Ilya

    2016-11-01

    Airborne measurements using meteorological balloons were conducted for the first time from southern Israel (geographic 30°35'N, 34°45'E geomagnetic 27°6'N 112°23'E) for measuring the vertical ionization profile during solar cycle 24. The results show the differences (increase of 30%) in count rates as we proceed from solar maximum toward solar minimum. The observed altitude of maximum ionization (the Regener-Pfotzer maximum) was between 17-20 km, and it agrees well with results from other simultaneous measurements conducted at different latitudes (Reading, UK and Zaragoza-Barcelona, Spain). When compared with predictions of an analytical model, we find a highly significant correlation (R2=0.97) between our observations and the computed ionization profiles. The difference in count rates can be attributed to the height of the tropopause due to the model using a US standard atmosphere that differs from the measured atmospheric parameters above Israel.

  6. Temporal variability of the trade wind inversion: Measured with a boundary layer vertical profiler. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Grindinger, C.M.

    1992-05-01

    This study uses Hawaiian Rainband Project (HaRP) data, from the summer of 1991, to show a boundary layer wind profiler can be used to measure the trade wind inversion. An algorithm has been developed for the profiler that objectively measures the depth of the moist oceanic boundary layer. The Hilo inversion, measured by radiosonde, is highly correlated with the moist oceanic boundary layer measured by the profiler at Paradise Park. The inversion height on windward Hawaii is typically 2253 + or - 514 m. The inversion height varies not only on a daily basis, but on less than an hourly basis. It has a diurnal, as well as a three to four day cycle. There appears to be no consistent relationship between inversion height and precipitation. Currently, this profiler is capable of making high frequency (12 minute) measurements of the inversion base variation, as well as other features.

  7. Noise generated by a flight weight, air flow control valve in a vertical takeoff and landing aircraft thrust vectoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the NASA Lewis Research Center's Powered Lift Facility to experimentally evaluate the noise generated by a flight weight, 12 in. butterfly valve installed in a proposed vertical takeoff and landing thrust vectoring system. Fluctuating pressure measurements were made in the circular duct upstream and downstream of the valve. This data report presents the results of these tests. The maximum overall sound pressure level is generated in the duct downstream of the valve and reached a value of 180 dB at a valve pressure ratio of 2.8. At the higher valve pressure ratios the spectra downstream of the valve is broad banded with its maximum at 1000 Hz.

  8. Oxygen profile and clogging in vertical flow sand filters for on-site wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Petitjean, A; Forquet, N; Boutin, C

    2016-04-01

    13 million people (about 20% of the population) use on-site wastewater treatment in France. Buried vertical sand filters are often built, especially when the soil permeability is not sufficient for septic tank effluent infiltration in undisturbed soil. Clogging is one of the main problems deteriorating the operation of vertical flow filters for wastewater treatment. The extent of clogging is not easily assessed, especially in buried vertical flow sand filters. We suggest examining two possible ways of detecting early clogging: (1) NH4-N/NO3-N outlet concentration ratio, and (2) oxygen measurement within the porous media. Two pilot-scale filters were equipped with probes for oxygen concentration measurements and samples were taken at different depths for pollutant characterization. Influent and effluent grab-samples were taken three times a week. The systems were operated using batch-feeding of septic tank effluent. Qualitative description of oxygen transfer processes under unclogged and clogged conditions is presented. NH4-N outlet concentration appears to be useless for early clogging detection. However, NO3-N outlet concentration and oxygen content allows us to diagnose the early clogging of the system.

  9. Use of Collocated KWAJEX Satellite, Aircraft, and Ground Measurements for Understanding Ambiguities in TRMM Radiometer Rain Profile Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Fiorino, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Coordinated ground, aircraft, and satellite observations are analyzed from the 1999 TRMM Kwajalein Atoll field experiment (KWAJEX) to better understand the relationships between cloud microphysical processes and microwave radiation intensities in the context of physical evaluation of the Level 2 TRMM radiometer rain profile algorithm and uncertainties with its assumed microphysics-radiation relationships. This talk focuses on the results of a multi-dataset analysis based on measurements from KWAJEX surface, air, and satellite platforms to test the hypothesis that uncertainties in the passive microwave radiometer algorithm (TMI 2a12 in the nomenclature of TRMM) are systematically coupled and correlated with the magnitudes of deviation of the assumed 3-dimensional microphysical properties from observed microphysical properties. Re-stated, this study focuses on identifying the weaknesses in the operational TRMM 2a12 radiometer algorithm based on observed microphysics and radiation data in terms of over-simplifications used in its theoretical microphysical underpinnings. The analysis makes use of a common transform coordinate system derived from the measuring capabilities of the aircraft radiometer used to survey the experimental study area, i.e., the 4-channel AMPR radiometer flown on the NASA DC-8 aircraft. Normalized emission and scattering indices derived from radiometer brightness temperatures at the four measuring frequencies enable a 2-dimensional coordinate system that facilities compositing of Kwajalein S-band ground radar reflectivities, ARMAR Ku-band aircraft radar reflectivities, TMI spacecraft radiometer brightness temperatures, PR Ku-band spacecraft radar reflectivities, bulk microphysical parameters derived from the aircraft-mounted cloud microphysics laser probes (including liquid/ice water contents, effective liquid/ice hydrometeor radii, and effective liquid/ice hydrometeor variances), and rainrates derived from any of the individual ground, aircraft

  10. Impact of spatial inhomogeneities on stratospheric species vertical profiles from remote-sensing balloon-borne instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthet, Gwenael; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Catoire, Valery; Huret, Nathalie; Lefevre, Franck; Hauchecorne, Alain; Chartier, Michel; Robert, Claude

    Remote-sensing balloon observations have recurrently revealed high concentrations of polar stratospheric NO2 in particular in the lower stratosphere as can be seen in various published vertical profiles. A balloon campaign dedicated to the investigation of this problem through comparisons between remote-sensing (SALOMON) and in situ (SPIRALE) measurements of NO2 inside the polar vortex was conducted in January 2006. The published results show unexpected strong enhancements in the slant column densities of NO2 with respect to the elevation angle and displacement of the balloon. These fluctuations result from NO2 spatial inhomogeneities located above the balloon float altitude resulting from mid-latitude air intrusion as revealed by Potential Vorticity (PV) maps. The retrieval of the NO2 vertical profile is subsequently biased in the form of artificial excesses of NO2 concentrations. A direct implication is that the differences previously observed between measurements of NO2 and OClO and model results are probably mostly due to the improper inversion of NO2 in presence of either perturbed dynamical conditions or when mesospheric production events occur as recently highlighted from ENVISAT data. Through the occurrence of such events, we propose to re-examine formerly published high-latitude profiles from the remote-sensing instruments AMON and SALOMON using in parallel PV maps from the MIMOSA advection contour model and the REPROBUS CTM outputs. Mid-latitude profiles of NO2 will also be investigated since they are likely to be biased if presence of air from other latitudes was present at the time of the observations.

  11. How Informative are the Vertical Buoyancy and the Prone Gliding Tests to Assess Young Swimmers' Hydrostatic and Hydrodynamic Profiles?

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Tiago M; Costa, Mário J; Morais, Jorge E; Moreira, Marc; Silva, António J; Marinho, Daniel A

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this research was to develop a path-flow analysis model to highlight the relationships between buoyancy and prone gliding tests and some selected anthropometrical and biomechanical variables. Thirty-eight young male swimmers (12.97 ± 1.05 years old) with several competitive levels were evaluated. It were assessed the body mass, height, fat mass, body surface area, vertical buoyancy, prone gliding after wall push-off, stroke length, stroke frequency and velocity after a maximal 25 [m] swim. The confirmatory model included the body mass, height, fat mass, prone gliding test, stroke length, stroke frequency and velocity. All theoretical paths were verified except for the vertical buoyancy test that did not present any relationship with anthropometrical and biomechanical variables nor with the prone gliding test. The good-of-fit from the confirmatory path-flow model, assessed with the standardized root mean square residuals (SRMR), is considered as being close to the cut-off value, but even so not suitable of the theory (SRMR = 0.11). As a conclusion, vertical buoyancy and prone gliding tests are not the best techniques to assess the swimmer's hydrostatic and hydrodynamic profile, respectively.

  12. Profiling the PM2.5 mass concentration vertical distribution in the boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Z.; Wang, Z.; Yang, S.; Shan, H.; Ma, X.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, S.; Liu, D.; Xie, C.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Fine particle (PM2.5) affects human life and activities directly; the detection of PM2.5 mass concentration profile is very essential due to its practical and scientific meanings (such as, quantifying of air quality and its variability, and improving air quality forecast and assessment). But so far, it is difficult to detect PM2.5 mass concentration profile. The proposed methodology to study the relationship between aerosol extinction coefficient and PM2.5 mass concentration is described, which indicates that the PM2.5 mass concentration profile could be retrieved by combining a charge-coupled device (CCD) side-scatter lidar and a PM2.5 sampling detector. When the relative humidity is less than 70 %, PM2.5 mass concentration is proportional to aerosol extinction coefficient, and then the specific coefficient can be calculated. Using this specific coefficient, aerosol extinction profile is converted to PM2.5 mass concentration profile. Three cases of clean night (on 21 September 2014), pollutant night (on 17 March 2014), and heavy pollutant night (on 13 February 2015) are studied. The characteristic of PM2.5 mass concentration profile in near-ground during these three nights' cases in the western suburb of Hefei city was discussed. The PM2.5 air pollutant concentration is comparatively large in close surface varying with time and altitude. The experiment results show that the CCD side-scatter lidar combined with a PM2.5 detector is an effective and new method to explore pollutant mass concentration profile in near-ground.

  13. Profiling the PM2.5 mass concentration vertical distribution in the boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zongming; Wang, Zhenzhu; Yang, Shijun; Shan, Huihui; Ma, Xiaomin; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Sugui; Liu, Dong; Xie, Chenbo; Wang, Yingjian

    2016-04-01

    Fine particles (PM2.5) affect human life and activities directly; the detection of PM2.5 mass concentration profile is very essential due to its practical and scientific significance (such as the quantification of air quality and its variability as well as the assessment of improving air quality forecast). But so far, it has been difficult to detect PM2.5 mass concentration profile. The proposed methodology to study the relationship between aerosol extinction coefficient and PM2.5 mass concentration is described, which indicates that the PM2.5 mass concentration profile could be retrieved by combining a charge-coupled device (CCD) side-scatter lidar with a PM2.5 sampling detector. When the relative humidity is less than 70 %, PM2.5, mass concentration is proportional to the aerosol extinction coefficient, and then the specific coefficient can be calculated. Through this specific coefficient, aerosol extinction profile is converted to PM2.5 mass concentration profile. Three cases of clean night (on 21 September 2014), pollutant night (on 17 March 2014), and heavy pollutant night (on 13 February 2015) are studied. The characteristics of PM2.5 mass concentration profile at the near-ground level during the cases of these 3 nights in the western suburb of Hefei city were discussed. The PM2.5 air pollutant concentration is comparatively large close to the surface and varies with time and altitude. The experiment results show that the CCD side-scatter lidar combined with a PM2.5 detector is an effective and new method to explore pollutant mass concentration profile at the near-ground level.

  14. Changes in the vertical profile of the Indonesian Throughflow during Termination II: Evidence from the Timor Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian; Kuhnt, Wolfgang; Holbourn, Ann; Andersen, Nils; Bartoli, Gretta

    2006-12-01

    We use a multiproxy approach to monitor changes in the vertical profile of the Indonesian Throughflow as well as monsoonal wind and precipitation patterns in the Timor Sea on glacial-interglacial, precessional, and suborbital timescales. We focus on an interval of extreme climate change and sea level variation: marine isotope (MIS) 6 to MIS 5e. Paleoproductivity fluctuations in the Timor Sea follow a precessional beat related to the intensity of the Australian (NW) monsoon. Paired Mg/Ca and δ18O measurements of surface- and thermocline-dwelling planktonic foraminifers (G. ruber and P. obliquiloculata) indicate an increase of >4°C in both surface and thermocline water temperatures during Termination II. Tropical sea surface temperature changed synchronously with ice volume (benthic δ18O) during deglaciation, implying a direct coupling of high- and low-latitude climate via atmospheric and/or upper ocean circulation. Substantial cooling and freshening of thermocline waters occurred toward the end of Termination II and during MIS 5e, indicating a change in the vertical profile of the Indonesian Throughflow from surface- to thermocline-dominated flow.

  15. Comparison of improved Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) CO2 with HIPPO and SGP aircraft profile measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kulawik, S. S.; Worden, J. R.; Wofsy, S. C.; Biraud, S. C.; Nassar, R.; Jones, D. B. A.; Olsen, E. T.; Osterman, and the TES and HIPPO teams, G. B.

    2012-01-01

    Comparisons are made between mid-tropospheric Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) satellite measurements and ocean profiles from three Hiaper Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) campaigns and land aircraft profiles from the United States Southern Great Plains (SGP) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site over a 4-yr period. These comparisons are used to characterize the bias in the TES CO{sub 2} estimates and to assess whether calculated and actual uncertainties and sensitivities are consistent. The HIPPO dataset is one of the few datasets spanning the altitude range where TES CO{sub 2} estimates are sensitive, which is especially important for characterization of biases. We find that TES CO{sub 2} estimates capture the seasonal and latitudinal gradients observed by HIPPO CO{sub 2} measurements; actual errors range from 0.8–1.2 ppm, depending on the campaign, and are approximately 1.4 times larger than the predicted errors. The bias of TES versus HIPPO is within 0.85 ppm for each of the 3 campaigns; however several of the sub-tropical TES CO{sub 2} estimates are lower than expected based on the calculated errors. Comparisons of aircraft flask profiles, which are measured from the surface to 5 km, to TES CO{sub 2} at the SGP ARM site show good agreement with an overall bias of 0.1 ppm and rms of 1.0 ppm. We also find that the predicted sensitivity of the TES CO{sub 2} estimates is too high, which results from using a multi-step retrieval for CO{sub 2} and temperature. We find that the averaging kernel in the TES product corrected by a pressure-dependent factor accurately reflects the sensitivity of the TES CO{sub 2} product.

  16. Convective cloud vertical velocity and mass-flux characteristics from radar wind profiler observations during GoAmazon2014/5

    DOE PAGES

    Giangrande, Scott E.; Toto, Tami; Jensen, Michael P.; ...

    2016-10-21

    A radar wind profiler (RWP) data set collected during the 2 year Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) campaign is used to estimate convective cloud vertical velocity, area fraction, and mass flux profiles. Vertical velocity observations are presented using cumulative frequency histograms and weighted mean profiles to provide insights in a manner suitable for global climate model scale comparisons (spatial domains from 20 km to 60 km). Convective profile sensitivity to changes in environmental conditions and seasonal regime controls is also considered. Aggregate and ensemble average vertical velocity, convective area fraction,more » and mass flux profiles, as well as magnitudes and relative profile behaviors, are found consistent with previous studies. Updrafts and downdrafts increase in magnitude with height to midlevels (6 to 10 km), with updraft area also increasing with height. Updraft mass flux profiles similarly increase with height, showing a peak in magnitude near 8 km. Downdrafts are observed to be most frequent below the freezing level, with downdraft area monotonically decreasing with height. Updraft and downdraft profile behaviors are further stratified according to environmental controls. These results indicate stronger vertical velocity profile behaviors under higher convective available potential energy and lower low-level moisture conditions. Sharp contrasts in convective area fraction and mass flux profiles are most pronounced when retrievals are segregated according to Amazonian wet and dry season conditions. Lastly, during this deployment, wet season regimes favored higher domain mass flux profiles, attributed to more frequent convection that offsets weaker average convective cell vertical velocities.« less

  17. Convective cloud vertical velocity and mass-flux characteristics from radar wind profiler observations during GoAmazon2014/5

    SciTech Connect

    Giangrande, Scott E.; Toto, Tami; Jensen, Michael P.; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Feng, Zhe; Protat, Alain; Williams, Christopher R.; Schumacher, Courtney; Machado, Luiz

    2016-10-21

    A radar wind profiler (RWP) data set collected during the 2 year Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) campaign is used to estimate convective cloud vertical velocity, area fraction, and mass flux profiles. Vertical velocity observations are presented using cumulative frequency histograms and weighted mean profiles to provide insights in a manner suitable for global climate model scale comparisons (spatial domains from 20 km to 60 km). Convective profile sensitivity to changes in environmental conditions and seasonal regime controls is also considered. Aggregate and ensemble average vertical velocity, convective area fraction, and mass flux profiles, as well as magnitudes and relative profile behaviors, are found consistent with previous studies. Updrafts and downdrafts increase in magnitude with height to midlevels (6 to 10 km), with updraft area also increasing with height. Updraft mass flux profiles similarly increase with height, showing a peak in magnitude near 8 km. Downdrafts are observed to be most frequent below the freezing level, with downdraft area monotonically decreasing with height. Updraft and downdraft profile behaviors are further stratified according to environmental controls. These results indicate stronger vertical velocity profile behaviors under higher convective available potential energy and lower low-level moisture conditions. Sharp contrasts in convective area fraction and mass flux profiles are most pronounced when retrievals are segregated according to Amazonian wet and dry season conditions. Lastly, during this deployment, wet season regimes favored higher domain mass flux profiles, attributed to more frequent convection that offsets weaker average convective cell vertical velocities.

  18. Convective cloud vertical velocity and mass-flux characteristics from radar wind profiler observations during GoAmazon2014/5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giangrande, Scott E.; Toto, Tami; Jensen, Michael P.; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Feng, Zhe; Protat, Alain; Williams, Christopher R.; Schumacher, Courtney; Machado, Luiz

    2016-11-01

    A radar wind profiler data set collected during the 2 year Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) campaign is used to estimate convective cloud vertical velocity, area fraction, and mass flux profiles. Vertical velocity observations are presented using cumulative frequency histograms and weighted mean profiles to provide insights in a manner suitable for global climate model scale comparisons (spatial domains from 20 km to 60 km). Convective profile sensitivity to changes in environmental conditions and seasonal regime controls is also considered. Aggregate and ensemble average vertical velocity, convective area fraction, and mass flux profiles, as well as magnitudes and relative profile behaviors, are found consistent with previous studies. Updrafts and downdrafts increase in magnitude with height to midlevels (6 to 10 km), with updraft area also increasing with height. Updraft mass flux profiles similarly increase with height, showing a peak in magnitude near 8 km. Downdrafts are observed to be most frequent below the freezing level, with downdraft area monotonically decreasing with height. Updraft and downdraft profile behaviors are further stratified according to environmental controls. These results indicate stronger vertical velocity profile behaviors under higher convective available potential energy and lower low-level moisture conditions. Sharp contrasts in convective area fraction and mass flux profiles are most pronounced when retrievals are segregated according to Amazonian wet and dry season conditions. During this deployment, wet season regimes favored higher domain mass flux profiles, attributed to more frequent convection that offsets weaker average convective cell vertical velocities.

  19. Retrieved Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Using TRMM Rainfall Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Olson, W. S.; Meneghini, R.; Yang, S.; Simpson, J.; Kummerow, C.; Smith, E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper represents the first attempt to use TRMM rainfall information to estimate the four dimensional latent heating structure over the global tropics for February 1998. The mean latent heating profiles over six oceanic regions (TOGA COARE IFA, Central Pacific, S. Pacific Convergence Zone, East Pacific, Indian Ocean and Atlantic Ocean) and three continental regions (S. America, Central Africa and Australia) are estimated and studied. The heating profiles obtained from the results of diagnostic budget studies over a broad range of geographic locations are used to provide comparisons and indirect validation for the heating algorithm estimated heating profiles. Three different latent heating algorithms, the Goddard Convective-Stratiform (CSH) heating, the Goddard Profiling (GPROF) heating, and the Hydrometeor heating (HH) are used and their results are intercompared. The horizontal distribution or patterns of latent heat release from the three different heating retrieval methods are quite similar. They all can identify the areas of major convective activity (i.e., a well defined ITCZ in the Pacific, a distinct SPCZ) in the global tropics. The magnitude of their estimated latent heating release is also not in bad agreement with each other and with those determined from diagnostic budget studies. However, the major difference among these three heating retrieval algorithms is the altitude of the maximum heating level. The CSH algorithm estimated heating profiles only show one maximum heating level, and the level varies between convective activity from various geographic locations. These features are in good agreement with diagnostic budget studies. By contrast, two maximum heating levels were found using the GPROF heating and HH algorithms. The latent heating profiles estimated from all three methods can not show cooling between active convective events. We also examined the impact of different TMI (Multi-channel Passive Microwave Sensor) and PR (Precipitation Radar

  20. LWS Investigation of Middle-Latitude Topside Ionospheric Vertical Electron-Density Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, R. F.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Webb, P. A.

    2005-05-01

    A Living With a Star (LWS) Targeted Research and Technology (TR&T) proposal has been selected to determine the dependence of the mid-latitude topside ionospheric electron-density (Ne) altitude distributions on long-term solar-cycle variations and short-term solar-wind and magnetic disturbances. The main focus is on Ne profiles from the height of the ionospheric Ne maximum to ~3,000 km as deduced from ISIS (International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies) topside-sounder data. These data, obtained over an 18-year time interval, can be used to investigate secular changes in the topside Ne profiles, which reflect altitude changes in plasma temperature and ion composition, over more than a solar cycle. In addition to providing average distributions the data, which extend from the O+ dominated high-altitude F region to the H+ dominated plasmasphere, provide a unique framework for delineating the altitude dependence of mid-latitude ionospheric structures associated with the plasmapause, plasmaspheric tails and Storm Enhanced Densities (SEDs). The approach used is to determine the locations of mid-latitude O+/H+ transition altitudes by fitting the topside Ne profiles with modeled H+ and O+ profiles that have the base electron temperature and temperature gradient at 400 km as variables. The investigation makes use of existing topside Ne profiles obtained from 1960's manual scaling of 35-mm film-format ionograms, available from ftp://nssdcftp.gsfc.nasa.gov/, and profiles deduced from digital topside ionograms available from http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/space/isis/isis-status.html.

  1. Empirical model for estimating vertical concentration profiles of re-suspended, sediment-associated contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H. W.; Cheng, P. D.; Li, W.; Chen, J. H.; Pang, Y.; Wang, D. Z.

    2017-03-01

    Vertical distribution processes of sediment contaminants in water were studied by flume experiments. Experimental results show that settling velocity of sediment particles and turbulence characteristics are the major hydrodynamic factors impacting distribution of pollutants, especially near the bottom where particle diameter is similar in size to vortex structure. Sediment distribution was uniform along the distance, while contaminant distribution slightly lagged behind the sediment. The smaller the initial sediment concentration was, the more time it took to achieve a uniform concentration distribution for suspended sediment. A contaminants transportation equation was established depending on mass conservation equations. Two mathematical estimation models of pollutant distribution in the overlying water considering adsorption and desorption were devised based on vertical distribution of suspended sediment: equilibrium partition model and dynamic micro-diffusion model. The ratio of time scale between the sediment movement and sorption can be used as the index of the models. When this ratio was large, the equilibrium assumption was reasonable, but when it was small, it might require dynamic micro-diffusion model.

  2. Dynamic Vertical Profiles of Peat Porewater Chemistry in a Northern Peatland

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, Natalie A.; Sebestyen, Stephen D.

    2016-10-14

    We measured pH, cations, nutrients, and total organic carbon (TOC) over 3 years to examine weekly to monthly variability in porewater chemistry depth profiles (0–3.0 m) in an ombrotrophic bog in Minnesota, USA. We also compared temporal variation at one location to spatial variation in depth profiles at 16 locations across the bog. Most solutes exhibited large gradients with depth. pH increased by two units and calcium concentrations increased over 20 fold with depth, and may reflect peatland development from minerotrophic to ombrotrophic conditions. Ammonium concentrations increased almost 20 fold and TOC concentrations decreased by half with depth, and these patterns likely reflect mineralization of peat or decomposition of TOC. There was also considerable temporal variation in the porewater chemistry depth profiles. Ammonium, soluble reactive phosphorus, and potassium showed greater temporal variation in near-surface porewater, while pH, calcium, and TOC varied more at depth. This variation demonstrates that deep peat porewater chemistry is not static. Lastly, temporal variation in solute chemistry depth profiles was greater than spatial variation in several instances, especially in shallow porewaters. In conclusion, characterizing both temporal and spatial variability is necessary to ensure representative sampling in peatlands, especially when calculating solute pools and fluxes and parameterizing process-based models.

  3. Dynamic Vertical Profiles of Peat Porewater Chemistry in a Northern Peatland

    DOE PAGES

    Griffiths, Natalie A.; Sebestyen, Stephen D.

    2016-10-14

    We measured pH, cations, nutrients, and total organic carbon (TOC) over 3 years to examine weekly to monthly variability in porewater chemistry depth profiles (0–3.0 m) in an ombrotrophic bog in Minnesota, USA. We also compared temporal variation at one location to spatial variation in depth profiles at 16 locations across the bog. Most solutes exhibited large gradients with depth. pH increased by two units and calcium concentrations increased over 20 fold with depth, and may reflect peatland development from minerotrophic to ombrotrophic conditions. Ammonium concentrations increased almost 20 fold and TOC concentrations decreased by half with depth, and thesemore » patterns likely reflect mineralization of peat or decomposition of TOC. There was also considerable temporal variation in the porewater chemistry depth profiles. Ammonium, soluble reactive phosphorus, and potassium showed greater temporal variation in near-surface porewater, while pH, calcium, and TOC varied more at depth. This variation demonstrates that deep peat porewater chemistry is not static. Lastly, temporal variation in solute chemistry depth profiles was greater than spatial variation in several instances, especially in shallow porewaters. In conclusion, characterizing both temporal and spatial variability is necessary to ensure representative sampling in peatlands, especially when calculating solute pools and fluxes and parameterizing process-based models.« less

  4. Validation of GOMOS vertical profiles using the stratospheric balloon-borne AMON and SALOMON UV-Visible spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, J. B.; Chartier, M.; Berthet, G.; Robert, C.; Lemaire, T.; Pepe, F.; George, M.; Pirre, M.

    2003-04-01

    The stratospheric balloon-borne UV-visible spectrometers AMON and SALOMON, which uses stars and Moon as light source, respectively, were involved in the validation of the UV-visible spectrometer GOMOS onboard ENVISAT, which uses also stars as light source. A low spectral resolution UV-visible spectrometer, AMON-RA, is also implanted in the AMON gondola, for the validation of the GOMOS algorithm dedicated to the correction of the chromatic scintillation effect. A flight of SALOMON occurred in September 19, 2002, at mid latitude from Aire sur l’Adour, France. The night-time SALOMON and GOMOS measurements were conducted at the same time (around 21h30 TU) and with a spatial coincidence less than 250 km. Comparison of vertical profiles was done for an altitude in the 15-40 km range. While the global shape of the GOMOS and SALOMON ozone profiles are quite in agreement, the GOMOS NO2 and NO3 profiles are unrealistic when compared to SALOMON profiles. A reanalysis of the GOMOS transmission using algorithms already developed for SALOMON shows that accurate NO2 and NO3 profiles can be retrieved if DOAS technique and dedicated spectral windows are used. An AMON (and AMON-RA) flight and a new SALOMON flight should occurred at high latitude from Kiruna (northern Sweden) in January and March 2003, respectively. The same analyses as for the September 2002 flight will be conducted, including this time the OClO and aerosols extinction coefficient retrievals. Taking into account the effect of the chromatic scintillation on the transmission spectra, recommendations will be proposed in order to improve the GOMOS retrievals.

  5. Vertical profiles of atmospheric fluorescent aerosols observed by a mutil-channel lidar spectrometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Huang, J.; Zhou, T.; Sugimoto, N.; Bi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Zhongwei Huang1*, Jianping Huang1, Tian Zhou1, Nobuo Sugimoto2, Jianrong Bi1 and Jinsen Shi11Key Laboratory for Semi-Arid Climate Change of the Ministry of Education, College of Atmospheric Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China. 2Atmospheric Environment Division, National Institutes for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan Email: huangzhongwei@lzu.edu.cn Abstract Atmospheric aerosols have a significant impact on regional and globe climate. The challenge in quantifying aerosol direct radiative forcing and aerosol-cloud interactions arises from large spatial and temporal heterogeneity of aerosol concentrations, compositions, sizes, shape and optical properties (IPCC, 2007). Lidar offers some remarkable advantages for determining the vertical structure of atmospheric aerosols and their related optical properties. To investigate the characterization of atmospheric aerosols (especially bioaerosols) with high spatial and temporal resolution, we developed a Raman/fluorescence/polarization lidar system employed a multi-channel spectrometer, with capabilities of providing measurements of Raman scattering and laser-induced fluorescence excitation at 355 nm from atmospheric aerosols. Meanwhile, the lidar system operated polarization measurements both at 355nm and 532nm wavelengths, aiming to obtain more information of aerosols. It employs a high power pulsed laser and a received telescope with 350mm diameter. The receiver could simultaneously detect a wide fluorescent spectrum about 178 nm with spectral resolution 5.7 nm, mainly including an F/3.7 Crossed Czerny-Turner spectrograph, a grating (1200 gr/mm) and a PMT array with 32 photocathode elements. Vertical structure of fluorescent aerosols in the atmosphere was observed by the developed lidar system at four sites across northwest China, during 2014 spring field observation that conducted by Lanzhou University. It has been proved that the developed lidar could detect the fluorescent aerosols with high temporal and

  6. Low-Profile Vertically Polarized Omnidirectional Antennas for Ground Sensor Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    easily deployable microsensors are highly desired for applications such as weapon targeting or area denial. Antenna miniaturization is then an...discussed. The basic structure of the low-profile antenna is composed of microstrip resonators fed by a single probe at a proper location. Quarter-wave...lateral dimension of the miniaturized multi- element monopole antenna (MMA) is minimized to 0.08 λ × 0.08 λ. The proposed antenna features a

  7. Polarimetric remote sensing in oxygen A and B bands: sensitivity study and information content analysis for vertical profile of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Shouguo; Wang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoguang

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical analysis is conducted to reveal the information content of aerosol vertical profile in space-borne measurements of the backscattered radiance and degree of linear polarization (DOLP) in oxygen (O2) A and B bands. Assuming a quasi-Gaussian shape for aerosol vertical profile characterized by peak height H and half width γ (at half maximum), the Unified Linearized Vector Radiative Transfer Model (UNL-VRTM) is used to simulate the Stokes four-vector elements of upwelling radiation at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and their Jacobians with respect to H and γ. Calculations for different aerosol types and different combinations of H and γ values show that the wide range of gas absorption optical depth in O2 A and B band enables the sensitivity of backscattered DOLP and radiance at TOA to the aerosol layer at different altitudes. Quantitatively, DOLP in O2 A and B bands is found to be more sensitive to H and γ than radiance, especially over the bright surfaces (with large visible reflectance). In many O2 absorption wavelengths, the degree of freedom of signal (DFS) for retrieving H (or γ) generally increases with H (and γ) and can be close to unity in many cases, assuming that the composite uncertainty from surface and aerosol scattering properties as well as measurements is less than 5 %. Further analysis demonstrates that DFS needed for simultaneous retrieval of H and γ can be obtained from a combined use of DOLP measurements at ˜ 10-100 O2 A and B absorption wavelengths (or channels), depending on the specific values of H. The higher the aerosol layer, the fewer number of channels for DOLP measurements in O2 A and B bands are needed for characterizing H and γ. Future hyperspectral measurements of DOLP in O2 A and B bands are needed to continue studying their potential and their combination with radiance and DOLP in atmospheric window channels for retrieving the vertical profiles of aerosols, especially highly scattering aerosols, over land.

  8. A New Inversion Routine to Produce Vertical Electron-Density Profiles from Ionospheric Topside-Sounder Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yongli; Benson, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Two software applications have been produced specifically for the analysis of some million digital topside ionograms produced by a recent analog-to-digital conversion effort of selected analog telemetry tapes from the Alouette-2, ISIS-1 and ISIS-2 satellites. One, TOPIST (TOPside Ionogram Scalar with True-height algorithm) from the University of Massachusetts Lowell, is designed for the automatic identification of the topside-ionogram ionospheric-reflection traces and their inversion into vertical electron-density profiles Ne(h). TOPIST also has the capability of manual intervention. The other application, from the Goddard Space Flight Center based on the FORTRAN code of John E. Jackson from the 1960s, is designed as an IDL-based interactive program for the scaling of selected digital topside-sounder ionograms. The Jackson code has also been modified, with some effort, so as to run on modern computers. This modification was motivated by the need to scale selected ionograms from the millions of Alouette/ISIS topside-sounder ionograms that only exist on 35-mm film. During this modification, it became evident that it would be more efficient to design a new code, based on the capabilities of present-day computers, than to continue to modify the old code. Such a new code has been produced and here we will describe its capabilities and compare Ne(h) profiles produced from it with those produced by the Jackson code. The concept of the new code is to assume an initial Ne(h) and derive a final Ne(h) through an iteration process that makes the resulting apparent-height profile fir the scaled values within a certain error range. The new code can be used on the X-, O-, and Z-mode traces. It does not assume any predefined profile shape between two contiguous points, like the exponential rule used in Jackson s program. Instead, Monotone Piecewise Cubic Interpolation is applied in the global profile to keep the monotone nature of the profile, which also ensures better smoothness

  9. LIDAR vertical profiles over the Oil Sands Region: an important tool in understanding atmospheric particulate matter transport, mixing and transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawbridge, K. B.

    2013-12-01

    LIDAR technology is an excellent tool to probe the complex vertical structure of the atmosphere at high spatial and temporal resolution. This provides the critical vertical context for the interpretation of ground-based chemistry measurements, airborne measurements and model verification and validation. In recent years, Environment Canada has designed an autonomous aerosol LIDAR system that can be deployed to remote areas such as the oil sands. Currently two autonomous LIDAR systems are making measurements in the oil sands region, one since December, 2012 and the other since July, 2013. The LIDAR transmitter emits two wavelengths (1064nm and 532nm) and the detector assembly collects four channels (1064nm backscatter, 532nm backscatter and 532nm depolarization, 607 nm nitrogen channel). Aerosol profiles from near ground to 20 km are collected every 10-60 s providing sufficient resolution to probe atmospheric dynamics, mixing and transport. The depolarization channel provides key information in identifying and discriminating the various aerosol layers aloft such as dust, forest fire plumes, industrial plume sources or ice crystals. The vertical resolution of the LIDAR can determine whether industrial plumes remain aloft or mix down to the surface and also provide estimates as to the concentration of the particulate at various altitudes. It operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week except during precipitation events. The system is operated remotely and the data are updated every hour to a website to allow near real-time capability. An intensive measurement campaign will be carried out in August and September of 2013 and will provide coincident airborne and ground-based measurements for the two LIDAR systems. The first results from this field study will be presented as well as some statistics on the frequency and evolution of plume events that were detected by the LIDARs.

  10. Seasonal distribution of metals in vertical and horizontal profiles of sheltered and exposed beaches on Polish coast.

    PubMed

    Bigus, Katarzyna; Astel, Aleksander; Niedzielski, Przemysław

    2016-05-15

    The distribution of alkali and heavy metals in coastal sediments of three Polish beaches was assessed. In all locations there are sandy beaches of different characteristics according to the anthropogenic impact and degree of sheltering. Core sediments collected in Czołpino and Ustka were characterized by the highest concentration of Cd, Ag, Ba, and Al, Cu, Cr, Bi, Na, respectively. Among the alkaline metals core sediments were the most abundant with Ca, Bi, Mg and Na, presenting almost stable decreasing order in all beaches. The majority of dredge material collected can be classified as light or trace contaminated by Cr, Cu, Zn, Cd and Hg. An abundance of mineralogical components in core sediments in Ustka increases in Summer and Autumn, while in Puck is stable throughout the year. The content of studied metals in core sediments collected in three Polish beaches changes both in the vertical and horizontal profiles of the beach.

  11. Validation of GOMOS vertical profiles using the stratospheric balloon-borne AMON and SALOMON UV-visible spetrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, J.-B.; Chartier, M.; Berthet, G.; Robert, C.; Lemaire, T.; Pepe, F.; George, M.; Pirre, M.

    2003-08-01

    The stratospheric balloon-borne UV-visible spectrometers AMON and SALOMON, which use stars and Moon as light source, respectively, are involved in the validation of the UV-visible spectrometer GOMOS onboard ENVISAT, which uses also stars as light source. A low spectral resolution UV-visible spectrometer, AMON-RA, is also implanted in the AMON gondola, for the analysis of the chromatic scintillation effect. A flight of SALOMON occurred in September 19, 2002, at mid latitude from Aire sur l'Adour, France. An AMON (and AMON-RA) flight occurred at high latitude from Kiruna (northern Sweden) on March 1, 2003. The vertical profiles are compared to those obtained by GOMOS. Taking into account the effect of the chromatic scintillation on the transmission spectra, recommendations will be proposed in order to improve the GOMOS retrievals.

  12. Experimental observation of the influence of furnace temperature profile on convection and segregation in the vertical Bridgman crystal growth technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G. T.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Azulene-doped naphtalene was directionally solidified using the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. Doping homogeneity and convection are determined as a function of the temperature profile in the furnace and the freezing rate. Convective velocities are two orders of magnitude lower when the temperature increases with height. The cross sectional variation in azulene concentration tends to be asymmetric. Neither rotation of the ampoule nor deliberate introduction of thermal asymmetries during solidification had a significant influence on cross sectional variations in doping. It is predicted that slow directional solidification under microgravity conditions can produce greater inhomogeneities than on earth. Thus when low freezing rates are necessary in order to avoid constitutional supercooling, it may be necessary to combine microgravity and magnetic fields in order to achieve homogeneous crystals.

  13. Tethered balloon-based particle number concentration, and size distribution vertical profiles within the lower troposphere of Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Dongfang; Bian, Qinggen; Duan, Yusen; Zhao, Mengfei; Fei, Dongnian; Xiu, Guangli; Fu, Qingyan

    2017-04-01

    A tethered balloon-based measurement campaign of particle number concentration (PNC) and particle number size distribution (PNSD) in the size range of 15.7-661.2 nm was conducted within the lower troposphere of 1000 m in Shanghai, a Chinese megacity, during December of 2015. The meteorological conditions, PNC, and PNSD were synchronously measured at the ground-based station as well as by the tethered balloon. On ground level, the 88.2 nm particles were found to have the highest PNC. The Pearson correlation analysis based on the ground level data showed NO2 had a strong correlation with PNC. The synchronous measurement of PNC and PNSD at the ground station and on the tethered balloon showed that the 15.7-200 nm particles had higher PNC on ground level, but the PNC of 200-661.2 nm particles was higher at 400 m. One haze event (Dec 22nd-Dec 23rd) was selected for detailed discussion on the variation of vertical profiles of PNSD and PNC. The vertical distribution of characteristics of PNC and PNSD were observed and compared. Results indicated that the highest MaxDm (the diameter with the highest PNC) during those three launches all appeared at a high altitude, usually above 300 m. Compared to the clean days, the relatively bigger MaxDm at each height in the haze days also indicated regional transport of pollutants might contribute to more to that haze event.

  14. Vertical distribution profiles and diagenetic fate of synthetic surfactants in marine and freshwater sediments.

    PubMed

    Corada-Fernández, Carmen; Lara-Martín, Pablo A; Candela, Lucila; González-Mazo, Eduardo

    2013-09-01

    This manuscript deals with the presence and degradation of the most commonly-used surfactants, including anionic (linear alkylbenzene sulfonates, LAS, and alkyl ethoxysulfates, AES) and non-ionic (alcohol polyethoxylates, AEOs, and nonylphenol polyethoxylates, NPEOs) compounds, in sediments and pore water from several aquatic environments (Southwest, Spain). Different vertical distributions were observed according to the respective sources, uses, production volumes and physicochemical properties of each surfactant. Levels of nonionics (up to 10 mg kg(-1)) were twice as high as anionics in industrial areas and harbors, whereas the opposite was found near urban wastewater discharge outlets. Sulfophenyl carboxylic acids (SPCs), LAS degradation products, were identified at anoxic depths at some sampling stations. Their presence was related to in situ anaerobic degradation of LAS in marine sediments, whereas the occurrence of these metabolites in freshwater sediments was attributed to the existence of wastewater sources nearby. No significant changes in the average length of AEO and NPEO ethoxylated chains were observed along the sediment cores, suggesting that their biodegradation was very limited in the sampling area. This may be directly related to their lower bioavailability, as their calculated sediment-pore water distribution coefficients (log K(sw)), which showed that non-ionic surfactants examined in this study had greater sorption affinity than the anionic surfactants (e.g., 2.3±0.3 for NPEOs).

  15. Double Bright Band Observations with High-Resolution Vertically Pointing Radar, Lidar, and Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emory, Amber E.; Demoz, Belay; Vermeesch, Kevin; Hicks, Michael

    2014-01-01

    On 11 May 2010, an elevated temperature inversion associated with an approaching warm front produced two melting layers simultaneously, which resulted in two distinct bright bands as viewed from the ER-2 Doppler radar system, a vertically pointing, coherent X band radar located in Greenbelt, MD. Due to the high temporal resolution of this radar system, an increase in altitude of the melting layer of approximately 1.2 km in the time span of 4 min was captured. The double bright band feature remained evident for approximately 17 min, until the lower atmosphere warmed enough to dissipate the lower melting layer. This case shows the relatively rapid evolution of freezing levels in response to an advancing warm front over a 2 h time period and the descent of an elevated warm air mass with time. Although observations of double bright bands are somewhat rare, the ability to identify this phenomenon is important for rainfall estimation from spaceborne sensors because algorithms employing the restriction of a radar bright band to a constant height, especially when sampling across frontal systems, will limit the ability to accurately estimate rainfall.

  16. Analytical solution to transient Richards' equation with realistic water profiles for vertical infiltration and parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    A general analytical model for one-dimensional transient vertical infiltration is presented. The model is based on a combination of the Brooks and Corey soil water retention function and a generalized hydraulic conductivity function. This leads to power law diffusivity and convective term for which the exponents are functions of the inverse of the pore size distribution index. Accordingly, the proposed analytical solution covers many existing realistic models in the literature. The general form of the analytical solution is simple and it expresses implicitly the depth as function of water content and time. It can be used to model infiltration through semi-infinite dry soils with prescribed water content or flux boundary conditions. Some mathematical expressions of practical importance are also derived. The general form solution is useful for comparison between models, validation of numerical solutions and for better understanding the effect of some hydraulic parameters. Based on the analytical expression, a complete inverse procedure which allows the estimation of the hydraulic parameters from water content measurements is presented.

  17. Vertical profiles of aerosol and black carbon in the Arctic: a seasonal phenomenology along 2 years (2011-2012) of field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, Luca; Cappelletti, David; Busetto, Maurizio; Mazzola, Mauro; Lupi, Angelo; Lanconelli, Christian; Becagli, Silvia; Traversi, Rita; Caiazzo, Laura; Giardi, Fabio; Moroni, Beatrice; Crocchianti, Stefano; Fierz, Martin; Močnik, Griša; Sangiorgi, Giorgia; Perrone, Maria G.; Maturilli, Marion; Vitale, Vito; Udisti, Roberto; Bolzacchini, Ezio

    2016-10-01

    We present results from a systematic study of vertical profiles of aerosol number size distribution and black carbon (BC) concentrations conducted in the Arctic, over Ny-Ålesund (Svalbard). The campaign lasted 2 years (2011-2012) and resulted in 200 vertical profiles measured by means of a tethered balloon (up to 1200 m a.g.l.) during the spring and summer seasons. In addition, chemical analysis of filter samples, aerosol size distribution and a full set of meteorological parameters were determined at ground. The collected experimental data allowed a classification of the vertical profiles into different typologies, which allowed us to describe the seasonal phenomenology of vertical aerosol properties in the Arctic. During spring, four main types of profiles were found and their behavior was related to the main aerosol and atmospheric dynamics occurring at the measuring site. Background conditions generated homogenous profiles. Transport events caused an increase of aerosol concentration with altitude. High Arctic haze pollution trapped below thermal inversions promoted a decrease of aerosol concentration with altitude. Finally, ground-based plumes of locally formed secondary aerosol determined profiles with decreasing aerosol concentration located at different altitude as a function of size. During the summer season, the impact from shipping caused aerosol and BC pollution plumes to be constrained close to the ground, indicating that increasing shipping emissions in the Arctic could bring anthropogenic aerosol and BC in the Arctic summer, affecting the climate.

  18. Vertical profile, contamination assessment, and source apportionment of heavy metals in sediment cores of Kaohsiung Harbor, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Feng; Ju, Yun-Ru; Chen, Chiu-Wen; Dong, Cheng-Di

    2016-12-01

    Six sediment cores collected at the Kaohsiung Harbor of Taiwan were analyzed to evaluate their vertical profiles, enrichments, accumulations, and source apportionments of heavy metals. This was performed to investigate any potential ecological risks posed by heavy metals. Results indicated that the mean heavy metal content (mg kg(-1)) in the six sediment cores was as follows: Hg (0.4-6.4), Cd (<0.05-2.4), Cr (18-820), Cu (16-760), Pb (31-140), and Zn (76-1900). The patterns of heavy metal content in the sediment cores differed substantially among the four river mouths. However, the vertical profiles of metals were relatively stable, indicating that wastewater has the constant characteristics and has been discharged into the rivers for a long period of time. Results of pollution assessment of enrichment factor, geo-accumulation index, and pollution load index revealed that river mouths experience severe enrichment, strong accumulation, and high contamination from the primary heavy metals. It was not consistent in the assessment results of mean effect range median quotient, potential ecological risk index, and total toxic unit method. Potential ecological risks caused by Hg in the sediments at Canon River and Love River mouths on aquatic organisms were extremely high. The estimates derived from the receptor modeling of multiple linear regression of the absolute principal component scores indicated that the contributions of the composite heavy metals derived from the Canon River and the Love River on the potential toxicity and risks to the water environment of Kaohsiung Harbor were highest, followed by those derived from Salt River and Jen-Gen River.

  19. The results of complex optical measurements of vertical temperature profile of the atmos-phere in the winter in Yakutsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolashkin, Semyen; Ignatyev, V. M.; Ammosov, Petr; Koltovskoy, Igor; Titov, Semen; Reshetnikov, Alexander

    The results of simultaneous measurements of atmospheric temperature from 0 to 100 km by lidar, spectrometric and interferometric methods in winter 2008 in Yakutsk are presented. Temperature measurements for the surface layer from 0 to 20-25 km were obtained from radio-sonde data on upper-air station in Yakutsk. Measuring the temperature of the middle atmosphere from 25 to 55-60 km made using Rayleigh Lidar near Yakutsk, with the following parameters: a transmitter Nd-YAG laser at a wavelength of 532 nm and a pulse energy of 200 mJ receiver - a telescope with a primary mirror diameter of 60 cm and a focal length of 200 cm, with a photon counting system and a spectrum analyzer. The temperature of the upper atmosphere was meas-ured at three altitude levels: by hydroxyl emission layer at the mesopause (6,2 band) , molecular oxygen radiation using an infrared spectrograph with a CCD camera and atomic oxygen emission line 557.7 nm with Fabry-Perot spectrometer (FPS) at the Maimaga optic range. FPS aperture was 15 cm, gap 1.5 cm, plate’s reflectance 0.85 and finess12. Thus, in this work, we covered by the temperature measuring most of the atmosphere ex-cept for a layer of the mesosphere from 60 to 87 km. For comparison, also are used CIRA model and the AURA MLS instrument (MicroLimb Sounder) temperature profiles data. Data analysis showed that there is a wave-like change in the vertical temperature profile, which is the result of vertical transmission features planetary waves during a stratospheric warming. This work is supported by the Integration project of the SB RAS No. 106 and RFBR grant No. 12-05-98547-r-vostok-a.

  20. Variability of the CO2 vertical soil profile production and its isotopic composition in a beech forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delogu, E.; Plain, C.; Epron, D.; Longdoz, B.

    2015-12-01

    The use of stable isotopes has become a useful research tool to understand the complexity of processes involved in the variability of the vertical profile of CO2 production (P). In this context, an approach considering diffusion as the only gas transport, the Flux-Gradient Approach (FGA) is used to relate the temporal variation in soil P and its isotopic composition (δ13P). P of the different soil layers ([1] 0 cm - -10 cm / [2] -10 cm - -20 cm / [3] -20 cm - -40 cm) and their isotopic signature can be computed from continuous measurements of the vertical soil CO2 concentration profile and its isotopic signature and combined to simultaneous measurements of the soil efflux, trunk efflux, their respective isotopic signature and eddy flux measurements. The field campaign was conducted at the beech forest of Hesse (France) in 2011 from April to September. The results show significant temporal variations in P and δ13P. For P, large intra and inter day fluctuations are observed and are explained by a dependence on temperature specific to each layer. For δ13P, the horizon 2 show significant daily fluctuations which are related to lag-timed soil moisture and water use efficiency. These fluctuations dependency appears to be consistent with a response of P sources to environment and to the impact of photosynthetic δ13C fluctuations on δ13P. Comparison of isoprod, defined as the product of CO2 production and its isotopic composition, and soil and trunk isofluxes shows that horizon 2, the largest contributor to soil P (50 % to 77 % of total soil P depending on the period) is mainly affected by root respiration. The fluctuations of horizon 1 isoprod are influenced both by autotrophic and heterotrophic sources. Moreover, some fluctuations can be generated by other physical processes inducing P and δ13P variability, highlighting methodological issues that need to be taken into account to improve FGA.

  1. Vertical profiling of atmospheric refractivity using GPS STD data from a single ground-based station: Simulations and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zus, F.; Dick, G.; Heise, S.; Wickert, J.; Ramatschi, M.

    2013-12-01

    We developed a ray-tracing operator to compute the signal travel time delay due to the neutral atmosphere, known as Slant Total Delay (STD), between a GPS satellite and a ground-based receiving station. Having developed a rapid and precise forward operator we constructed the tangent-linear (adjoint) operator to estimate refractivity in the vicinity of a single station. The refractivity retrievals potentially complement refractivity retrievals from radio occultation data and can be considered a valuable input for Numerical Weather Prediction. In a first experiment (simulation) we study the feasibility for vertical profiling of refractivity using STDs from a single station. The simulation cycle consists of the computation of STDs given a refractivity profile, the addition of noise to mimic observation errors and the retrieval of a refractivity profile from the artificial STDs by a non-linear least-square analysis. Clearly, besides the noise level, the elevation range plays an important role regarding the quality of the refractivity retrieval; near-horizon STDs corrupted by noise allow a significantly better refractivity retrieval than STDs close to the zenith without any noise. The simulation study suggests that near-horizon STDs provide additional information when compared to Zenith Total Delays (ZTDs). In a second experiment (application) we replace the artificial STDs in the simulation by STDs retrieved from GPS phase-observations. The procedure is repeated station-by-station for 200 stations in Germany. We do not find a significant benefit from STDs over ZTDs in the retrieved refractivity profile since near-horizon STDs are rarely available and representative errors due to asymmetry are non-negligable. We attempt to mitigate the latter problem by the additional estimation of horizontal gradients, and indeed, we find strong evidence that STDs retrieved from GPS phase-observations contain asymmetric information. The former problem still poses a serious limitation

  2. Comparison of SMOS measurements of sea surface salinity during SPURS using a high-resolution, vertical profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walesby, Kieran; Sutherland, Graigory; Ten Doeschate, Anneke; Reverdin, Gilles; Font, Jordi; Ward, Brian

    2014-05-01

    The European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite was launched in 2009 and, for the first time, provides measurements of sea surface salinity on a global scale. Ocean salinity is a key parameter for climate change, being closely associated with the global hydrological cycle and an important driver in determining overall ocean circulation. This makes the advent of satellite measurements of salinity a significant advance. During the Salinity Processes in the Upper Ocean Regional Study (SPURS) field experiments, in September 2012 and March 2013, a variety of in-situ platforms were deployed with the purpose of validating the salinity observations from SMOS. One of these platforms was the Air-Sea Interaction Profiler, a microstructure profiler which provides high-resolution profiles of salinity, temperature and turbulence right up to the surface. This last capability is crucial. Most oceanic microstructure profilers operate when travelling downwards, and are therefore unable to accurately observe the layer of the ocean immediately below the surface. It is this top layer, approximately 1 cm in thickness, which satellites observe. In contrast, ASIP is upwardly-rising, allowing it to sample the same part of the water column as satellites, such as SMOS. This is important since large thermal and haline stratifications can develop close to the surface, particularly under conditions of strong evaporation. Although sea surface salinity in the open ocean is largely determined by the balance between evaporation and precipitation, the effects of various vertical mixing processes also contribute. ASIP is extremely well-suited to understanding the impact of these on differences between ASIP and SMOS, and some results are also presented here which demonstrate the important effect of such processes.

  3. Methane production potentials, pathways, and communities of methanogens in vertical sediment profiles of river Sitka

    PubMed Central

    Mach, Václav; Blaser, Martin B.; Claus, Peter; Chaudhary, Prem P.; Rulík, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Biological methanogenesis is linked to permanent water logged systems, e.g., rice field soils or lake sediments. In these systems the methanogenic community as well as the pathway of methane formation are well-described. By contrast, the methanogenic potential of river sediments is so far not well-investigated. Therefore, we analyzed (a) the methanogenic potential (incubation experiments), (b) the pathway of methane production (stable carbon isotopes and inhibitor studies), and (c) the methanogenic community composition (terminal restriction length polymorphism of mcrA) in depth profiles of sediment cores of River Sitka, Czech Republic. We found two depth-related distinct maxima for the methanogenic potentials (a) The pathway of methane production was dominated by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis (b) The methanogenic community composition was similar in all depth layers (c) The main TRFs were representative for Methanosarcina, Methanosaeta, Methanobacterium, and Methanomicrobium species. The isotopic signals of acetate indicated a relative high contribution of chemolithotrophic acetogenesis to the acetate pool. PMID:26052322

  4. Evaluation of Vertical Lacunarity Profiles in Forested Areas Using Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Székely, B.; Kania, A.; Standovár, T.; Heilmeier, H.

    2016-06-01

    The horizontal variation and vertical layering of the vegetation are important properties of the canopy structure determining the habitat; three-dimensional (3D) distribution of objects (shrub layers, understory vegetation, etc.) is related to the environmental factors (e.g., illumination, visibility). It has been shown that gaps in forests, mosaic-like structures are essential to biodiversity; various methods have been introduced to quantify this property. As the distribution of gaps in the vegetation is a multi-scale phenomenon, in order to capture it in its entirety, scale-independent methods are preferred; one of these is the calculation of lacunarity. We used Airborne Laser Scanning point clouds measured over a forest plantation situated in a former floodplain. The flat topographic relief ensured that the tree growth is independent of the topographic effects. The tree pattern in the plantation crops provided various quasi-regular and irregular patterns, as well as various ages of the stands. The point clouds were voxelized and layers of voxels were considered as images for two-dimensional input. These images calculated for a certain vicinity of reference points were taken as images for the computation of lacunarity curves, providing a stack of lacunarity curves for each reference points. These sets of curves have been compared to reveal spatial changes of this property. As the dynamic range of the lacunarity values is very large, the natural logarithms of the values were considered. Logarithms of lacunarity functions show canopy-related variations, we analysed these variations along transects. The spatial variation can be related to forest properties and ecology-specific aspects.

  5. Vertical profiles of sediment methanogenic potential and communities in two plateau freshwater lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuyin; Li, Ningning; Wang, Wei; Li, Bingxin; Xie, Shuguang; Liu, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Microbial methanogenesis in sediment plays a crucial role in CH4 emission from freshwater lake ecosystems. However, knowledge of the layer-depth-related changes of methanogen community structure and activities in freshwater lake sediment is still limited. The present study was conducted to characterize the methanogenesis potential in different sediment-layer depths and the vertical distribution of microbial communities in two freshwater lakes of different trophic status on the Yunnan Plateau (China). Incubation experiments and inhibitor studies were carried out to determine the methanogenesis potential and pathways. 16S rRNA and mcrA genes were used to investigate the abundance and structure of methanogen and archaeal communities, respectively. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was mainly responsible for methane production in sediments of both freshwater lakes. The layer-depth-related changes of methanogenesis potential and the abundance and community structure of methanogens were observed in both Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake. Archaeal 16S rRNA and mcrA genes displayed a similar abundance change pattern in both lakes, and the relative abundance of methanogens decreased with increasing sediment-layer depth. Archaeal communities differed considerably in Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake, but methanogen communities showed a slight difference between these two lakes. However, methanogen communities illustrated a remarkable layer-depth-related change. Order Methanomicrobiales was the dominant methanogen group in all sediments, while Methanobacteriales showed a high proportion only in upper layer sediments. The trophic status of the lake might have a notable influence on the depth-related change pattern of methanogenesis activity, while the methanogen community structure was mainly influenced by sediment depth.

  6. Anthropometric profile, vertical jump, and throwing velocity in elite female handball players by playing positions.

    PubMed

    Vila, Helena; Manchado, Carmen; Rodriguez, Nuria; Abraldes, José Arturo; Alcaraz, Pedro Emilio; Ferragut, Carmen

    2012-08-01

    Women's handball is a sport, which has seen an accelerated development over the last decade. Although anthropometric and physical characteristics have been studied for male sports teams, in women's handball, studies are scarce. The aim of this study was twofold: first, to describe the anthropometric characteristics, throwing velocity, hand grip, and muscular power of the lower limbs in female handball players and second, to identify the possible differences in these parameters in terms of individual playing positions (center, back, wing, pivot, and goalkeeper). A total of 130 elite female Spanish handball players participated in the study (age 25.74 ± 4.84 years; playing experience 14.92 ± 4.88 years). Anthropometric assessment was performed for all the subjects following the International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry protocols. Furthermore, all the subjects performed a vertical jump test (squat jump and countermovement jump). Hand grip and throwing velocity in several situations were also assessed. A 1-way analysis of variance and a Tukey post hoc test were used to study the differences among individual playing positions. Wings were less heavy, shorter, and showed a smaller arm span than did goalkeepers, backs and pivots (p ≤ 0.001). Additionally, pivots were heavier than centers. Backs and pivots exhibited higher muscular mass than did wings. Total players' somatotype was mesomorphy endomorphy (3.89-4.28-2.29). Centers showed higher throwing velocity levels than did wings in 9-m throws from just behind the line, with a goalkeeper. Backs exhibited higher hand-grip values than did wings. Statistical differences have been established between wings and other specific playing positions, especially with pivot and backs. Coaches can use this information to select players for the different specific positions.

  7. Combined analysis of surface reflection imaging and vertical seismic profiling at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.M.; Majer, E.L.; Karageorgi, E.

    1994-08-01

    This report presents results from surface and borehole seismic profiling performed by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) on Yucca Mountain. This work was performed as part of the site characterization effort for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository. Their objective was to provide seismic imaging from the near surface (200 to 300 ft. depth) to the repository horizon and below, if possible. Among the issues addressed by this seismic imaging work are location and depth of fracturing and faulting, geologic identification of reflecting horizons, and spatial continuity of reflecting horizons. The authors believe their results are generally positive, with tome specific successes. This was the first attempt at this scale using modem seismic imaging techniques to determine geologic features on Yucca Mountain. The principle purpose of this report is to present the interpretation of the seismic reflection section in a geologic context. Three surface reflection profiles were acquired and processed as part of this study. Because of environmental concerns, all three lines were on preexisting roads. Line 1 crossed the mapped surface trace of the Ghost Dance fault and it was intended to study the dip and depth extent of the fault system. Line 2 was acquired along Drill Hole wash and was intended to help the ESF north ramp design activities. Line 3 was acquired along Yucca Crest and was designed to image geologic horizons which were thought to be less faulted along the ridge. Unfortunately, line 3 proved to have poor data quality, in part because of winds, poor field conditions and limited time. Their processing and interpretation efforts were focused on lines 1 and 2 and their associated VSP studies.

  8. Retrieval of vertical profiles of multiple trace gases from MAX-DOAS observations during the MADCAT Campaign in Mainz, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Xie, Pinhua; Wagner, Thomas; Li, Ang; Luo, Yuhan; Remmers, Julia; Horbanski, Martin; Friess, Udo

    2014-05-01

    In order to promote the development of passive DOAS technique and solve some critical problems including e.g. accurate retrievals of trace gas slant column densities (SCD), profile retrievals of trace gases and aerosol, and the effects of cloud, the Multi Axis DOAS-Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) was held at the Max-Planck institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany from June to August 2013. Within this campaign, spectra of scattered sun light were taken by our two-dimensional scanning MAX-DOAS (2D-MAX-DOAS) instrument and a Mini-MAX-DOAS instrument from the Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. In this presentation, firstly we show the retrieved differential SCDs of O4, NO2, HCHO, HONO and CHOCHO based on the observations of the 2D-MAX-DOAS. Based on these dSCDs we acquired the vertical profiles of these trace gases and aerosol extinction using optimal estimation method. We compare the aerosol optical depth (AOD) from MAX-DOAS with simultaneous observations from an AERONET instrument as well as the near surface volume mixing ratio (VMR) of NO2 from MAX-DOAS with those from a CE-DOAS instrument from the IUP Heidelberg group and found in general good agreement. In addition we apply a cloud classification scheme based on our MAX-DOAS observations to identify different kinds of weather during the MAD-CAT campaign.

  9. Water vapor on Titan: the stratospheric vertical profile from Cassini/CIRS infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottini, V.; Jennings, D. E.; Nixon, C. A.; Anderson, C. M.; Gorius, N.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Coustenis, A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Teanby, N. A.; de Kok, R.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Bézard, B.; Lellouch, E.; Flasar, F. M.; Bampasidis, G.

    2012-04-01

    Water vapor in Titan’s middle atmosphere has previously been detected only by disk-average observations from the Infrared Space Observatory (Coustenis et al., 1998). We report here the successful detection of stratospheric water vapor using the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS, Flasar et al., 2004) following an earlier null result (de Kok et al., 2007a). CIRS senses water emissions in the far-infrared spectral region near 50 microns, which we have modeled using two independent radiative transfer and inversion codes (NEMESIS, Irwin et al 2008 and ART, Coustenis et al., 2010). From the analysis of nadir spectra we have derived a mixing ratio of (0.14 ± 0.05) ppb at 100 km, corresponding to a column abundance of approximately (3.7 ± 1.3) × 10^14 mol/cm2. Using limb observations, we obtained mixing ratios of (0.13 ± 0.04) ppb at 125 km and (0.45 ± 0.15) ppb at 225 km of altitude, confirming that the water abundance has a positive vertical gradient as predicted by photochemical models. In the latitude range (80˚S - 30˚N) we see no evidence for latitudinal variations in these abundances within the error bars. References: Coustenis, A.; Salama, A.; Lellouch, E.; Encrenaz, Th.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Samuelson, R. E.; de Graauw, Th.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Kessler, M. F., 1998. Evidence for water vapor in Titan's atmosphere from ISO/SWS data. Astronomy and Astrophysics, v.336, p.L85-L89 Coustenis, A.; Jennings, D. E.; Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Lavvas, P.; Vinatier, S.; Teanby, N. A.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Carlson, R. C.; Piani, L.; Bampasidis, G.; Flasar, F. M.; Romani, P. N., 2010. Titan trace gaseous composition from CIRS at the end of the Cassini-Huygens prime mission. Icarus, Volume 207, Issue 1, p. 461-476. de Kok, R.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Teanby, N. A.; Lellouch, E.; Bézard, B.; Vinatier, S.; Nixon, C. A.; Fletcher, L.; Howett, C.; Calcutt, S. B.; Bowles, N. E.; Flasar, F. M.; Taylor, F. W. , 2007a. Oxygen compounds in Titan's stratosphere as observed by

  10. [Seasonal Variations in Vertical Profile of Hg Species and the Influential Factors in Changshou Reservior].

    PubMed

    Bai, Wei-yang; Zhang, Cheng; Tang, Zhen-ya; Zhao, Zheng; Wang, Ding-yong

    2015-10-01

    The vertical distribution of mercury (Hg) species were investigated in water and porewater of Changshou reservoir during the period from September 2013 to July 2014. Water samples were collected seasonally from five sampling sites, and the concentrations of Hg species were evaluated. Diffusion fluxes of Hg from sediment to overlaying water were also obtained. The results showed that the average concentrations of total Hg and total methylmercury (MeHg) were (14.77 ± 12.24) ng x L(-1) and (0.41 ± 0.47) ng x L(1), respectively. The concentrations of dissolved MeHg (DMeHg) was highest in 4-8 m under surface water, and then decreased with the increasing water depth with a subsequent increase in the bottom of Changshou Reservior. Peak particulate MeHg (PMeHg) values were found in 8-20 m under surface water, but not in the interface of sediment-water, suggesting that the increasing PMeHg might be related to the deposition of MeHg adsorbed to particulates from upper water. Two peak MeHg levels in pore water appeared in 16 and 28 cm under sediment surface, probably due to the extension of living region for sulfate reduction bacteria (SRB) to deeper sediment which resulted in increased methylation rate there. The diffusion fluxes of DMeHg from pore water to overlaying water were 28.2 ng x (m2 x d)(1) and 30.0 ng x (m2 x d)(-1) in autumn and summer, which were significantly higher than that in winter 3.8 ng x (m2 x d)(-1). It may be associated with the higher temperature in those two seasons. An obvious negative correlation was observed between DMeHg and dissolved oxygen (DO) in summer and spring (r = -0.482**, P < 0.05; r = -0.339, P < 0.01); however, similar correlations were not found in autumn and winter.

  11. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in vertical peat profiles of natural and drained boreal peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykänen, Hannu; Mpamah, Promise; Rissanen, Antti; Pitkänen, Aki; Turunen, Jukka; Simola, Heikki

    2015-04-01

    Peatlands form a significant carbon pool in the global carbon cycle. Change in peat hydrology, due to global warming is projected to change microbiological processes and peat carbon pool. We tested if bulk stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes serve as indicators of severe long term drying in peatlands drained for forestry. Depth profile analysis of peat, for their carbon and nitrogen content as well as their carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic signatures, were conducted for peatlands in southern and eastern Finland, having ombrotrophic and minerotrophic natural and corresponding drained pairs or separate drained sites. The selection of sites allowed us to compare changes due to different fertility and changes due to long term artificial drying. Drainage lasting over 40 years has led to changes in hydrology, vegetation, nutrient mineralization and respiration. Furthermore, increased nutrient uptake and possible recycling of peat nitrogen and carbon trough vegetation back to the peat surface, also possibly has an effect on the stable isotopic composition of peat carbon and nitrogen. We think that drainage induced changes somehow correspond to those caused by changed hydrology due to climate change. We will present data from these measurements and discuss their implications for carbon and nitrogen flows in peatlands.

  12. Monitoring atmospheric turbulence profiles with high vertical resolution using PML/PBL instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blary, F.; Ziad, A.; Borgnino, J.; Fantéï-Caujolle, Y.; Aristidi, Eric; Lantéri, H.

    2014-07-01

    Wide-Field Adaptive Optics (WFAO) have been proposed for the next generation of telescopes. In order to be efficient, correction using WFAO require knowledge of atmospheric turbulence parameters. The structure constant of index-of-refraction fluctuations (C2 N ) being one of them. Indirect methods implemented in instruments as SCIDAR, MASS, SLODAR, CO-SLIDAR and MOSP have been proposed to measure C2 N (h) pro le through different layers of the atmosphere. A new monitor called the Profiler of Moon Limb (PML) is presented. In this instrument, C2 N (h) pro les are retrieved from the transverse covariance via minimization of a maximum likelihood criterion under positivity constraint using an iterative gradient method. An other approach using a regularization method (RM) is also studied. Instrument errors are mainly related to the detection of the Moon limb position and are mostly due to photon noise. Numerical simulations have been used to evaluate the error on the extracted pro le and its propagation from the detection to the inverse technique.

  13. Electric Field Profiles over Hurricanes, Tropical Cyclones, and Thunderstorms with an Instrumented ER-2 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Doug M.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Bateman, Monte G.; Bailey, Jeff C.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past several years, we have flown a set of calibrated electric field meters (FMs) on the NASA high altitude ER-2 aircraft over oceanic and landbased storms in a number of locations. These included tropical oceanic cyclones and hurricanes in the Caribbean and Atlantic ocean during the Third and Fourth Convection And Moisture EXperiment (CAMEX-3,1998; CAMEX-4, 2001), thunderstorms in Florida during the TExas FLorida UNderflight (TEFLUN, 1998) experiment, tropical thunderstorms in Brazil during the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission - Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (TRMM LBA, 1999), and finally, hurricanes and tropical cyclones in the Caribbean and Western Pacific and thunderstorms in Central America during the Tropical Cloud Systems and Processes (TCSP, 2005) mission. Between these various missions we have well over 50 sorties that provide a unique insights on the different electrical environment, evolution and activity occurring in and around these various types of storms. In general, the electric fields over the tropical oceanic storms and hurricanes were less than a few kilovolts per meter at the ER-2 altitude, while the lightning rates were low. Land-based thunderstorms often produced high lightning activity and correspondingly higher electric fields.

  14. Applying the seismic interferometry method to vertical seismic profile data using tunnel excavation noise as source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Teixido, Teresa; Martin, Elena; Segarra, Miguel; Segura, Carlos

    2013-04-01

    In the frame of the research conducted to develop efficient strategies for investigation of rock properties and fluids ahead of tunnel excavations the seismic interferometry method was applied to analyze the data acquired in boreholes instrumented with geophone strings. The results obtained confirmed that seismic interferometry provided an improved resolution of petrophysical properties to identify heterogeneities and geological structures ahead of the excavation. These features are beyond the resolution of other conventional geophysical methods but can be the cause severe problems in the excavation of tunnels. Geophone strings were used to record different types of seismic noise generated at the tunnel head during excavation with a tunnelling machine and also during the placement of the rings covering the tunnel excavation. In this study we show how tunnel construction activities have been characterized as source of seismic signal and used in our research as the seismic source signal for generating a 3D reflection seismic survey. The data was recorded in vertical water filled borehole with a borehole seismic string at a distance of 60 m from the tunnel trace. A reference pilot signal was obtained from seismograms acquired close the tunnel face excavation in order to obtain best signal-to-noise ratio to be used in the interferometry processing (Poletto et al., 2010). The seismic interferometry method (Claerbout 1968) was successfully applied to image the subsurface geological structure using the seismic wave field generated by tunneling (tunnelling machine and construction activities) recorded with geophone strings. This technique was applied simulating virtual shot records related to the number of receivers in the borehole with the seismic transmitted events, and processing the data as a reflection seismic survey. The pseudo reflective wave field was obtained by cross-correlation of the transmitted wave data. We applied the relationship between the transmission

  15. Aerosols and lightning activity: The effect of vertical profile and aerosol type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proestakis, E.; Kazadzis, S.; Lagouvardos, K.; Kotroni, V.; Amiridis, V.; Marinou, E.; Price, C.; Kazantzidis, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite has been utilized for the first time in a study regarding lightning activity modulation due to aerosols. Lightning activity observations, obtained by the ZEUS long range Lightning Detection Network, European Centre for Medium range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) data and Cloud Fraction (CF) retrieved by MODIS on board Aqua satellite have been combined with CALIPSO CALIOP data over the Mediterranean basin and for the period March to November, from 2007 to 2014. The results indicate that lightning activity is enhanced during days characterized by higher Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) values, compared to days with no lightning. This study contributes to existing studies on the link between lightning activity and aerosols, which have been based just on columnar AOD satellite retrievals, by performing a deeper analysis into the effect of aerosol profiles and aerosol types. Correlation coefficients of R = 0.73 between the CALIPSO AOD and the number of lightning strikes detected by ZEUS and of R = 0.93 between ECMWF CAPE and lightning activity are obtained. The analysis of extinction coefficient values at 532 nm indicates that at an altitudinal range exists, between 1.1 km and 2.9 km, where the values for extinction coefficient of lightning-active and non-lightning-active cases are statistically significantly different. Finally, based on the CALIPSO aerosol subtype classification, we have investigated the aerosol conditions of lightning-active and non-lightning-active cases. According to the results polluted dust aerosols are more frequently observed during non-lightning-active days, while dust and smoke aerosols are more abundant in the atmosphere during the lightning-active days.

  16. Huygens/HASI 2002 balloon test campaign: Probe trajectory and atmospheric vertical profiles reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaborit, V.; Fulchignoni, M.; Colombatti, G.; Ferri, F.; Bettanini, C.

    2004-08-01

    In the framework of the activities going on in preparation for the mission of the Huygens probe in Titan's atmosphere (January 2005), the Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument (HASI) team scheduled and performed several balloon campaigns to test the HASI sensors' performance in flight conditions in the Earth's atmosphere. In particular, pressure conditions reached during each test are similar to those expected in Titan's lower atmosphere. A 1:1 scaled mock-up of the Huygens probe was launched with a stratospheric balloon in 2001 (Br. Assoc. Adv. Sci. 33 (2001) 1109) and in 2002 (Br. Assoc. Adv. Sci. 34 (2002) 911; Adv. Space. Sci. (2003)) from the G. Broglio base of the Italian Space Agency, located in Trapani Milo (Sicily). In both cases the mock-up was dropped from an altitude higher than 27 and 32 km, respectively, and recovered on the ground after a parachuted descent. In this paper, we describe the results obtained in reconstructing (i) the probe descent trajectory and (ii) the profiles of the physical quantities characterizing the Earth's atmosphere, on the basis of a complete analysis of the data obtained during the HASI 2002 balloon flight experiment. Using temperature and pressure measurements, we are able to reach an accuracy of the order of 0.5% on the altitude reconstruction during the descent. We validate both the models used for trajectory reconstruction and to check the sensors' performance. We describe the problems faced in determining the Huygens probe descent trajectory in Titan's atmosphere focusing our discussion on the critical aspects of the descent reconstruction (such as the uncertainties due to measurement errors, limited knowledge of the atmospheric composition, etc.) and the validity of the adopted assumptions.

  17. Vertical profiles of soil water content as influenced by environmental factors in a small catchment on the hilly-gully Loess Plateau.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Wen, Fenxiang; Wu, Jiangtao; Wang, Xiaojun; Hu, Yani

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of soil water content (SWC) profiles at catchment scale has profound implications for understanding hydrological processes of the terrestrial water cycle, thereby contributing to sustainable water management and ecological restoration in arid and semi-arid regions. This study described the vertical profiles of SWC at the small catchment scale on the hilly and gully Loess Plateau in Northeast China, and evaluated the influences of selected environmental factors (land-use type, topography and landform) on average SWC within 300 cm depth. Soils were sampled from 101 points across a small catchment before and after the rainy season. Cluster analysis showed that soil profiles with high-level SWC in a stable trend (from top to bottom) were most commonly present in the catchment, especially in the gully related to terrace. Woodland soil profiles had low-level SWC with vertical variations in a descending or stable trend. Most abandoned farmland and grassland soil profiles had medium-level SWC with vertical variations in varying trends. No soil profiles had low-level SWC with vertical variations in an ascending trend. Multi-regression analysis showed that average SWC was significantly affected by land-use type in different soil layers (0-20, 20-160, and 160-300 cm), generally in descending order of terrace, abandoned farmland, grassland, and woodland. There was a significant negative correlation between average SWC and gradient along the whole profile (P<0.05). Landform significantly affected SWC in the surface soil layer (0-20 cm) before the rainy season but throughout the whole profile after the rainy season, with lower levels on the ridge than in the gully. Altitude only strongly affected SWC after the rainy season. The results indicated that land-use type, gradient, landform, and altitude should be considered in spatial SWC estimation and sustainable water management in these small catchments on the Loess Plateau as well as in other complex terrains

  18. Measurement of water column primary production using photosynthesis-irradiance relations for surface phytoplankton, the vertical chlorophyll profile, and underwater light intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, A. B.; Gagarin, V. I.; Mosharov, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    A method has been developed to measure water column integrated primary production (PPint) in the water column using photosynthesis-irradiance relations for surface phytoplankton, the vertical profile of chlorophyll a concentration, and the underwater light intensity. Good correlation has been found for the results calculated with this method and light dependences in situ. The advantages of this method are the independence of PPint calculation from CTD profiling and water sampling, and thus optimization (reduction) of the station working time.

  19. The Potential of The Synergy of Sunphotometer and Lidar Data to Validate Vertical Profiles of The Aerosol Mass Concentration Estimated by An Air Quality Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siomos, N.; Filioglou, M.; Poupkou, A.; Liora, N.; Dimopoulos, S.; Melas, D.; Chaikovsky, A.; Balis, D. S.

    2016-06-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived by the Lidar/Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC), that uses combined sunphotometer and lidar data, were used in order to validate the aerosol mass concentration profiles estimated by the air quality model CAMx. Lidar and CIMEL measurements performed at the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece (40.5N, 22.9E) from the period 2013-2014 were used in this study.

  20. Vertical Profiles of Soil Water Content as Influenced by Environmental Factors in a Small Catchment on the Hilly-Gully Loess Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Wen, Fenxiang; Wu, Jiangtao; Wang, Xiaojun; Hu, Yani

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of soil water content (SWC) profiles at catchment scale has profound implications for understanding hydrological processes of the terrestrial water cycle, thereby contributing to sustainable water management and ecological restoration in arid and semi-arid regions. This study described the vertical profiles of SWC at the small catchment scale on the hilly and gully Loess Plateau in Northeast China, and evaluated the influences of selected environmental factors (land-use type, topography and landform) on average SWC within 300 cm depth. Soils were sampled from 101 points across a small catchment before and after the rainy season. Cluster analysis showed that soil profiles with high-level SWC in a stable trend (from top to bottom) were most commonly present in the catchment, especially in the gully related to terrace. Woodland soil profiles had low-level SWC with vertical variations in a descending or stable trend. Most abandoned farmland and grassland soil profiles had medium-level SWC with vertical variations in varying trends. No soil profiles had low-level SWC with vertical variations in an ascending trend. Multi-regression analysis showed that average SWC was significantly affected by land-use type in different soil layers (0–20, 20–160, and 160–300 cm), generally in descending order of terrace, abandoned farmland, grassland, and woodland. There was a significant negative correlation between average SWC and gradient along the whole profile (P<0.05). Landform significantly affected SWC in the surface soil layer (0–20 cm) before the rainy season but throughout the whole profile after the rainy season, with lower levels on the ridge than in the gully. Altitude only strongly affected SWC after the rainy season. The results indicated that land-use type, gradient, landform, and altitude should be considered in spatial SWC estimation and sustainable water management in these small catchments on the Loess Plateau as well as in other complex

  1. Determination of seismic anisotropy parameters from multicomponent vertical seismic profiles for improved seismic imaging and reservoir characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamimi, Naser

    Multicomponent vertical seismic profile (VSP) data can be used to determine seismic anisotropy more accurately. First, I modify the slowness-polarization method by including both P- and SV-wave data for estimating the anisotropy parameters delta and eta of VTI (transversely isotropic with vertical symmetry axis) media. Then I apply the technique to a multicomponent VSP dataset from the Wattenberg Field in Colorado, USA. The importance of the derived anisotropic velocity model from the joint P- and SV- wave slowness-polarization method for reservoir characterization at the Wells Ranch VSP area is: 1) identifying the possible existence of open fracture networks in the Niobrara Formation at the VSP well location, 2) improving the quality of the Niobrara Formation image which is vital for future drilling programs, 3) accurately depicting the structure in the well vicinity and finally 4) determining elastic properties of the Niobrara reservoir. To identify the existence of open fracture networks, azimuthal AVO response of top of the Niobrara Formation at the VSP well is analyzed. To correct the azimuthal AVO response for propagation phenomena, using the anisotropic velocity model from the joint slowness- polarization method, I modified the moveout-based anisotropic spreading correction (MASC) technique for the VSP data. The azimuthal AVO analysis shows very weak azimuthal anisotropy at the top of Niobrara Formation near the VSP well. This result indicates the lack of open natural fractures at the Niobrara Formation in this area and explains the low production associated with the well. In addition, I used the anisotropic velocity model obtained from the joint slowness-polarization method to build a 2D VSP image. Comparing the final VSP images using the isotropic and anisotropic velocity models with well data shows that the anisotropic image is more accurately depicted and if inverted would give more robust elastic parameter definition.

  2. A new method to measure Bowen ratios using high-resolution vertical dry and wet bulb temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euser, T.; Luxemburg, W. M. J.; Everson, C. S.; Mengistu, M. G.; Clulow, A. D.; Bastiaanssen, W. G. M.

    2014-06-01

    The Bowen ratio surface energy balance method is a relatively simple method to determine the latent heat flux and the actual land surface evaporation. The Bowen ratio method is based on the measurement of air temperature and vapour pressure gradients. If these measurements are performed at only two heights, correctness of data becomes critical. In this paper we present the concept of a new measurement method to estimate the Bowen ratio based on vertical dry and wet bulb temperature profiles with high spatial resolution. A short field experiment with distributed temperature sensing (DTS) in a fibre optic cable with 13 measurement points in the vertical was undertaken. A dry and a wetted section of a fibre optic cable were suspended on a 6 m high tower installed over a sugar beet trial plot near Pietermaritzburg (South Africa). Using the DTS cable as a psychrometer, a near continuous observation of vapour pressure and air temperature at 0.20 m intervals was established. These data allowed the computation of the Bowen ratio with a high spatial and temporal precision. The daytime latent and sensible heat fluxes were estimated by combining the Bowen ratio values from the DTS-based system with independent measurements of net radiation and soil heat flux. The sensible heat flux, which is the relevant term to evaluate, derived from the DTS-based Bowen ratio (BR-DTS) was compared with that derived from co-located eddy covariance (R2 = 0.91), surface layer scintillometer (R2 = 0.81) and surface renewal (R2 = 0.86) systems. By using multiple measurement points instead of two, more confidence in the derived Bowen ratio values is obtained.

  3. Seven years of IASI ozone retrievals from FORLI: validation with independent total column and vertical profile measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynard, Anne; Hurtmans, Daniel; Koukouli, Mariliza E.; Goutail, Florence; Bureau, Jérôme; Safieddine, Sarah; Lerot, Christophe; Hadji-Lazaro, Juliette; Wespes, Catherine; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Pazmino, Andrea; Zyrichidou, Irene; Balis, Dimitris; Barbe, Alain; Mikhailenko, Semen N.; Loyola, Diego; Valks, Pieter; Van Roozendael, Michel; Coheur, Pierre-François; Clerbaux, Cathy

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an extensive intercomparison and validation for the ozone (O3) product measured by the two Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometers (IASIs) launched on board the MetOp-A and MetOp-B satellites in 2006 and in 2012 respectively. IASI O3 total columns and vertical profiles obtained from Fast Optimal Retrievals on Layers for IASI (FORLI) v20140922 software (running up until recently) are validated against independent observations during the period 2008-2014 on a global scale. On average for the period 2013-2014, IASI-A and IASI-B total ozone columns (TOCs) retrieved using FORLI are consistent, with IASI-B providing slightly lower values with a global difference of only 0.2 ± 0.8 %. The comparison between IASI-A and IASI-B O3 vertical profiles shows differences within ± 2 % over the entire altitude range. Global validation results for 7 years of IASI TOCs from FORLI against the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) launched on board MetOp-A and Brewer-Dobson data show that, on average, IASI overestimates the ultraviolet (UV) data by 5-6 % with the largest differences found in the southern high latitudes. The comparison with UV-visible SAOZ (Système d'Analyse par Observation Zénithale) measurements shows a mean bias between IASI and SAOZ TOCs of 2-4 % in the midlatitudes and tropics and 7 % at the polar circle. Part of the discrepancies found at high latitudes can be attributed to the limited information content in the observations due to low brightness temperatures. The comparison with ozonesonde vertical profiles (limited to 30 km) shows that on average IASI with FORLI processing underestimates O3 by ˜ 5-15 % in the troposphere while it overestimates O3 by ˜ 10-40 % in the stratosphere, depending on the latitude. The largest relative differences are found in the tropical tropopause region; this can be explained by the low O3 amounts leading to large relative errors. In this study, we also evaluate an updated version of FORLI-O3

  4. Vertical Seismic Profiling at riser drilling site in the rupture area of the 1944 Tonankai Earthquake, Japan (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, R.; Kinoshita, M.; Araki, E.; Byrne, T. B.; McNeill, L. C.; Saffer, D. M.; Eguchi, N. O.; Takahashi, K.; Toczko, S.

    2009-12-01

    A series of scientific drilling expeditions is in operation in the Nankai Trough to reveal the faulting mechanism of the magathrust earthquakes, through clarifying composition, fine structure, mechanical behavior, and environmental variables of the seismogenic faults. In the studied area, extensive seismic surveys for site characterization have been made to image detailed geometry of the fault complex in the accretionary prism as well as Vp distribution around the faults. Although these previous surveys provided invaluable information for understanding seismotectonic processes in this subduction zone, more complete knowledge is needed to be acquired to predict dynamic behavior of the faults, such as geometrical irregularities in short wavelength, Vs and seismic attenuation which are sensitive to fluid distribution in and around fault zones. It is expected that estimation of these parameters would be improved considerably by a seismic exploration using a vertical array of seismographs installed in a deep borehole (VSP: vertical seismic profiling). In July 2009, we made a VSP at one of the drilling sites located just above the rupture area of the 1994 Tonankai Earthquake (M 8.1), during the IODP Exp.319. The well site of our VSP was made by the riser drilling of D/V Chikyu. The seismic array, lowered from Chikyu into the hole, was composed of a three-component accelerometer and vertical separation of the array elements was 15.12 m. The VSP was composed of offset VSP and zero-offset VSP. In the offset VSP, a tuned airgun array towed by R/V Kairei was shot along one straight line (walk-away VSP) and another circular line (walk-around VSP) and seismic signals were recorded by an array consisting of 16 elements installed from 907 to 1,135 m in depth from seafloor. The object of the walk-away VSP is to obtain fine image of the faults using reflection arrivals with less attenuation. It is also expected to obtain spatial variation of Vs from arrival time tomography of

  5. Dynamic links between shape of the eddy viscosity profile and the vertical structure of tidal current amplitude in bays and estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; de Swart, Huib E.

    2016-03-01

    Several field studies in bays and estuaries have revealed pronounced subsurface maxima in the vertical profiles of the current amplitude of the principal tidal harmonic, or of its vertical shear, over the water column. To gain fundamental understanding about these phenomena, a semi-analytical model is designed and analysed, with focus on the sensitivity of the vertical structure of the tidal current amplitude to formulations of the vertical shape of the eddy viscosity. The new analytical solutions for the tidal current amplitude are used to explore their dependence on the degree of surface mixing, the vertical shape of eddy viscosity in the upper part of the water column and the density stratification. Sources of surface mixing are wind and whitecapping. Results show three types of current amplitude profiles of tidal harmonics, characterised by monotonically decreasing shear towards the surface, "surface jumps" (vertical shear of tidal current amplitude has a subsurface maximum) and "subsurface jets" (maximum tidal current amplitude below the surface), respectively. The "surface jumps" and "subsurface jets" both occur for low turbulence near the surface, whilst additionally the surface jumps only occur if the eddy viscosity in the upper part of the water column decreases faster than linearly to the surface. Furthermore, "surface jumps" take place for low density stratification, while and "subsurface jets" occur for high density stratification. The physics causing the presence of surface jumps and subsurface jets is also discussed.

  6. Field-of-View Requirements for Approach and Landing of V/STOL (Vertical/Short Take-Off and Landing) Aircraft.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-08-01

    orthogonal) coordinate of a point of regard in the field of view defined with respect to the point where the aircraft longitudinal body reference...and 1i except that the origin of FOVi , FOVui in the picture plane is where the aircraft longitudinal body reference axis inter- cepts the picture

  7. Model predictions of wind and turbulence profiles associated with an ensemble of aircraft accidents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, G. G.; Lewellen, W. S.; Teske, M. E.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of predicting conditions under which wind/turbulence environments hazardous to aviation operations exist is studied by examining a number of different accidents in detail. A model of turbulent flow in the atmospheric boundary layer is used to reconstruct wind and turbulence profiles which may have existed at low altitudes at the time of the accidents. The predictions are consistent with available flight recorder data, but neither the input boundary conditions nor the flight recorder observations are sufficiently precise for these studies to be interpreted as verification tests of the model predictions.

  8. Seasonal variation of surface and vertical profile of aerosol properties over a tropical urban station Hyderabad, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, P. R.; Manchanda, R. K.; Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Kumar, Y. B.; Sreenivasan, S.

    2013-01-01

    One year measurement of vertical profiles of volume backscatter and extinction coefficient, aerosol optical depth (AOD), mass concentration of black carbon (BC) and composite aerosol along with thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere has been carried out over an urban tropical location of Hyderabad(17.47°N, 78.58°E), India, during April 2009 to March 2010. The mean mixing layer height (MLH) exhibits large seasonality exceeding 4 km in pre-monsoon period whereas in winter it comes down to ~1.5 km with an annual mean value of 2.35 ± 1.02 km. Surface BC mass fraction (FBC) shows marked seasonal variation from winter (13 ± 1.9%), pre-monsoon (8.19 ± 2.16%), monsoon (7.3 ± 1.8%) to post-monsoon (11.8 ± 0.18%). The profiles of volume backscatter and extinction coefficients reveal presence of elevated aerosol layers from 2 to 4 km and strong oscillations during pre-monsoon (March-May) and monsoon (June-September) seasons, respectively, while in post-monsoon (October-November) and winter (December-February), the aerosols are well within the lower boundary layer and also exhibit a drastic decrease with increasing altitude. These elevated aerosol layers and vertical distribution appear to be closely linked to the thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere. The aerosol optical properties in conjunction with air mass back trajectory analysis indicate that the observed elevated aerosol layers during pre-monsoon and monsoon could contain significant fraction of coarse mode particles with a mix of dust and marine aerosols. Further analysis reveals that the aerosols within atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) dominate the column aerosol loading with ABL-AOD contributing to ~77.7 ± 17.0%, with significant seasonal variation from winter (86.2 ± 13.1%), pre-monsoon (76.6 ± 12.8%), monsoon (54.2 ± 15.6%) to post monsoon (80.8 ± 14.8%). Seasonal variation of ABL-AOD and BC mass fraction follows similar pattern in the ABL indicating that BC may be an important contributor to

  9. Source apportionment of PAHs and n-alkanes in respirable particles in Tehran, Iran by wind sector and vertical profile.

    PubMed

    Moeinaddini, Mazaher; Esmaili Sari, Abbas; Riyahi bakhtiari, Alireza; Chan, Andrew Yiu-Chung; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Hawker, Darryl; Connell, Des

    2014-06-01

    The vertical concentration profiles and source contributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and n-alkanes in respirable particle samples (PM4) collected at 10, 100, 200 and 300-m altitude from the Milad Tower of Tehran, Iran during fall and winter were investigated. The average concentrations of total PAHs and total n-alkanes were 16.7 and 591 ng/m(3), respectively. The positive matrix factorization (PMF) model was applied to the chemical composition and wind data to apportion the contributing sources. The five PAH source factors identified were: 'diesel' (56.3% of total PAHs on average), 'gasoline' (15.5%), 'wood combustion, and incineration' (13%), 'industry' (9.2%), and 'road soil particle' (6.0%). The four n-alkane source factors identified were: 'petrogenic' (65% of total n-alkanes on average), 'mixture of petrogenic and biomass burning' (15%), 'mixture of biogenic and fossil fuel' (11.5%), and 'biogenic' (8.5%). Source contributions by wind sector were also estimated based on the wind sector factor loadings from PMF analysis. Directional dependence of sources was investigated using the conditional probability function (CPF) and directional relative strength (DRS) methods. The calm wind period was found to contribute to 4.4% of total PAHs and 5.0% of total n-alkanes on average. Highest average concentrations of PAHs and n-alkanes were found in the 10 and 100 m samples, reflecting the importance of contributions from local sources. Higher average concentrations in the 300 m samples compared to those in the 200 m samples may indicate contributions from long-range transport. The vertical profiles of source factors indicate the gasoline and road soil particle-associated PAHs, and the mixture from biogenic and fossil fuel source-associated n-alkanes were mostly from local emissions. The smaller average contribution of diesel-associated PAHs in the lower altitude samples also indicates that the restriction of diesel-fueled vehicle use in the central area

  10. Improving the Automatic Inversion of Digital ISIS-2 Ionogram Reflection Traces into Topside Vertical Electron-Density Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, R. F.; Truhlik, V.; Huang, X.; Wang, Y.; Bilitza, D.

    2011-01-01

    The topside-sounders on the four satellites of the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program were designed as analog systems. The resulting ionograms were displayed on 35-mm film for analysis by visual inspection. Each of these satellites, launched between 1962 and 1971, produced data for 10 to 20 years. A number of the original telemetry tapes from this large data set have been converted directly into digital records. Software, known as the TOPside Ionogram Scalar with True-height (TOPIST) algorithm has been produced that enables the automatic inversion of ISIS-2 ionogram reflection traces into topside vertical electron-density profiles Ne(h). More than million digital Alouette/ISIS topside ionograms have been produced and over 300,000 are from ISIS 2. Many of these ISIS-2 ionograms correspond to a passive mode of operation for the detection of natural radio emissions and thus do not contain ionospheric reflection traces. TOPIST, however, is not able to produce Ne(h) profiles from all of the ISIS-2 ionograms with reflection traces because some of them did not contain frequency information. This information was missing due to difficulties encountered during the analog-to-digital conversion process in the detection of the ionogram frame-sync pulse and/or the frequency markers. Of the many digital topside ionograms that TOPIST was able to process, over 200 were found where direct comparisons could be made with Ne(h) profiles that were produced by manual scaling in the early days of the ISIS program. While many of these comparisons indicated excellent agreement (<10% average difference over the entire profile) there were also many cases with large differences (more than a factor of two). Here we will report on two approaches to improve the automatic inversion process: (1) improve the quality of the digital ionogram database by remedying the missing frequency-information problem when possible, and (2) using the above-mentioned comparisons as

  11. Value of corneal epithelial and Bowman’s layer vertical thickness profiles generated by UHR-OCT for sub-clinical keratoconus diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhe; Jiang, Jun; Yang, Chun; Huang, Shenghai; Peng, Mei; Li, Weibo; Cui, Lele; Wang, Jianhua; Lu, Fan; Shen, Meixiao

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT) can image the corneal epithelium and Bowman’s layer and measurement the thicknesses. The purpose of this study was to validate the diagnostic power of vertical thickness profiles of the corneal epithelium and Bowman’s layer imaged by UHR-OCT in the diagnosis of sub-clinical keratoconus (KC). Each eye of 37 KC patients, asymptomatic fellow eyes of 32 KC patients, and each eye of 81 normal subjects were enrolled. Vertical thickness profiles of the corneal epithelium and Bowman’s layer were measured by UHR-OCT. Diagnostic indices were calculated from vertical thickness profiles of each layer and output values of discriminant functions based on individual indices. Receiver operating characteristic curves were determined, and the accuracy of the diagnostic indices were assessed as the area under the curves (AUC). Among all of the individual indices, the maximum ectasia index for epithelium had the highest ability to discriminate sub-clinical KC from normal corneas (AUC = 0.939). The discriminant function containing maximum ectasia indices of epithelium and Bowman’s layer further increased the AUC value (AUC = 0.970) for sub-clinical KC diagnosis. UHR-OCT-derived thickness indices from the entire vertical thickness profiles of the corneal epithelium and Bowman’s layer can provide valuable diagnostic references to detect sub-clinical KC. PMID:27511620

  12. The Retrieval of Vertical Air Motion from an Airborne W-Band using Mie Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, E.; Albrecht, B. A.; Kollias, P.

    2010-12-01

    Raindrops have diameters comparable to the wavelength (3.2 mm) of a 95-GHz radar. As a result, the Rayleigh scattering approximation is not valid and the full Mie scattering theory is required to explain the oscillations of the backscattering cross section between successive peaks and valleys as a function of the raindrop diameter. At radar wavelengths of 3 mm, the first minimum in the backscattering cross section occurs at a raindrop diameter equals to 1.7 mm. Since raindrop diameters often exceed this size, these oscillations are captured in the radar Doppler spectrum and thus can be used as reference for the retrieval of the vertical air motion. This technique, which has been successfully developed for surface-based radars, is applied to radar Doppler spectra from an airborne, upward pointing W-band radar operated during the Barbados Aerosol Cloud Experiment (BACEX) from precipitating cumulus. Before the technique is applied to the airborne W-band radar data, the observed Doppler velocities are corrected for aircraft motions and attitude as recorded by the aircraft navigation system. The first order corrections to the vertical component of the Doppler velocity involve the pitch and speed of the aircraft and the vertical motion of aircraft itself for the radar operating in an upward pointing configuration. The vertical air velocity can then be deduced form the difference between the terminal velocity of a raindrop with a diameter of 1.7mm and the value of observed first minimum in the Doppler spectrum. An air density correction for the terminal velocity is made using the mean profile of density. The vertical air velocity retrieved from the technique is extrapolated to the level of aircraft (the radar has a dead zone of approximately ~50m) for comparison with the vertical air motion obtained from the aircraft sensors. Possible applications of this technique for airborne observations of the vertical profiles of air vertical velocities and the relative drop

  13. Seasonal variability of aerosol vertical profiles over east US and west Europe: GEOS-Chem/APM simulation and comparison with CALIPSO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoyan; Yu, Fangqun

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we employed 5 years (2007-2011) of the CALIPSO level-3 monthly aerosol extinction product to compare with the GEOS-Chem/APM simulations for the same time period over two major industrial regions (east US and west Europe). The objective is to understand which aerosol types or species significantly determine the vertical profiles by comparing the seasonal variability between the simulations and observations. Our study shows that the model successfully produces the magnitude of aerosol extinction, profile shape, and their seasonal variability observed by CALIPSO over both east US (EUS) and west Europe (WEU). The extinctions below 1 km make up 44-79% to the total, from either the model simulations or satellite retrievals, with larger percentages in winter seasons (62-79%) and smaller percentages in summer seasons (44-57%) associated with the strength of vertical transport. The shape of the vertical profiles has, therefore, a distinct seasonal variability, with a more like quasi-exponential shape in DJF (December, January, and February) and SON (September, October, and November) than in MAM (March, April, and May) and JJA (June, July, and August), which have been discerned from both measurements and simulations. Analysis of modeled aerosol species indicates that secondary particles (SP), containing sulfate, ammonia, nitrate, and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs), predominantly determine the total aerosol vertical profiles while black carbon (BC), primary organic carbon (OC), and sea salt (SS), only account for a small fraction and are also limited near the surface. Mineral dust (DS) contributes more to the total extinction over WEU than over EUS, particularly in MAM, a result of being adjacent to the North Africa desert. Secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA, i.e. sulfate, ammonia, and nitrate) contributes most of the total SP mass in DJF and SON while SOA is particularly important in MAM and JJA when the emissions from leafed plants are active. Our study also

  14. Vertical profiling and modelling of E. coli decay in a shallow maturation pond operating in a tropical climate.

    PubMed

    Dias, Daniel F C; Sperling, Marcos von

    2017-03-23

    Maturation ponds are excellent natural treatment systems for disinfecting domestic wastewater from pathogenic bacteria because of great sunlight exposure through depth and high pH and DO values within its environment, all of which are important factors for disinfection. E. coli removal is higher closer to the surface of the pond and proceeds to decrease due to the limited amount of sunlight penetrating through deeper depths. In order to quantify the decay coefficients (Kb) of E. coli in a shallow maturation pond, quartz vessels were used to create isolated batch experiments and submerged at different depths inside the pond during different periods of the day (morning and afternoon). Kb values ranged from 0.48 to 0.28 h(-1) considering different depths and both periods. A dark control vessel was also used to quantify dark decay rates (Kd) at the same depth and periods as the quartz vessels, and ranged from 0.14 to 0.04 h(-1). Environmental variables did not show to influence overall disinfection. Two models for estimating final E. coli concentrations were proposed considering the kinetic coefficients obtained in the batch experiments and the dispersed flow regime for continuous-flow ponds and resulted in very good fittings with monitoring data and demonstrated the vertical profiling of E. coli concentration.

  15. Microstructures, deformation mechanisms and strain patterns in a vertical profile, inner appalachian fold-thrust belt, Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Schuman

    1993-02-01

    A core from the American Anniston No. 1 well, drilled in the Pell City thrust sheet, Calhoun County, Alabama, provides an excellent scientific opportunity to study in a vertical profile the deformation mechanisms and strain patterns associated with large-scale structures. The core contains stratigraphic units from Cambrian to Mississippian in age and two major thrust faults. A detailed structural analysis revealed two deformation episodes, a pre-orogenic deformation and Alleghanian orogenic deformation. In the pre-orogenic deformation, synsedimentary folds and growth faults are the characteristic early structures, and normal faults formed in lithifield rocks later. During Alleghanian deformation, earlier fractures are overprinted by later S1 penetrative structures. In limestone, shale and siltstone within thrust sheets, S1 is solution cleavage. Dolomites in the thrust sheets were deformed by fracturing, and no penetrative cleavages formed. In major fault zones, S1 mylonitic foliation formed in limestone, shale and siltstone. Fault-related dolomites were deformed cataclastically and no S surfaces formed. Strain magnitude increases towards major thrust faults in both the hanging walls and footwalls. For the typical fault configuration in the core with limestone-dolomite in the hanging wall and shale-siltstone in the footwall, strain is mainly caused by pressure solution and cataclasis in the hanging wall and by plastic deformation in the footwall.

  16. Identification and uncertainty estimation of vertical reflectivity profiles using a Lagrangian approach to support quantitative precipitation measurements by weather radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazenberg, P.; Torfs, P. J. J. F.; Leijnse, H.; Delrieu, G.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to estimate the vertical profile of reflectivity (VPR) from volumetric weather radar data using both a traditional Eulerian as well as a newly proposed Lagrangian implementation. For this latter implementation, the recently developed Rotational Carpenter Square Cluster Algorithm (RoCaSCA) is used to delineate precipitation regions at different reflectivity levels. A piecewise linear VPR is estimated for either stratiform or neither stratiform/convective precipitation. As a second aspect of this paper, a novel approach is presented which is able to account for the impact of VPR uncertainty on the estimated radar rainfall variability. Results show that implementation of the VPR identification and correction procedure has a positive impact on quantitative precipitation estimates from radar. Unfortunately, visibility problems severely limit the impact of the Lagrangian implementation beyond distances of 100 km. However, by combining this procedure with the global Eulerian VPR estimation procedure for a given rainfall type (stratiform and neither stratiform/convective), the quality of the quantitative precipitation estimates increases up to a distance of 150 km. Analyses of the impact of VPR uncertainty shows that this aspect accounts for a large fraction of the differences between weather radar rainfall estimates and rain gauge measurements.

  17. Vertical microphysical profiles of convective clouds as a tool for obtaining aerosol cloud-mediated climate forcings

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Daniel

    2015-12-23

    Quantifying the aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative effect at a global scale requires simultaneous satellite retrievals of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and cloud base updraft velocities (Wb). Hitherto, the inability to do so has been a major cause of high uncertainty regarding anthropogenic aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative forcing. This can be addressed by the emerging capability of estimating CCN and Wb of boundary layer convective clouds from an operational polar orbiting weather satellite. Our methodology uses such clouds as an effective analog for CCN chambers. The cloud base supersaturation (S) is determined by Wb and the satellite-retrieved cloud base drop concentrations (Ndb), which is the same as CCN(S). Developing and validating this methodology was possible thanks to the ASR/ARM measurements of CCN and vertical updraft profiles. Validation against ground-based CCN instruments at the ARM sites in Oklahoma, Manaus, and onboard a ship in the northeast Pacific showed a retrieval accuracy of ±25% to ±30% for individual satellite overpasses. The methodology is presently limited to boundary layer not raining convective clouds of at least 1 km depth that are not obscured by upper layer clouds, including semitransparent cirrus. The limitation for small solar backscattering angles of <25º restricts the satellite coverage to ~25% of the world area in a single day. This methodology will likely allow overcoming the challenge of quantifying the aerosol indirect effect and facilitate a substantial reduction of the uncertainty in anthropogenic climate forcing.

  18. Experimental observation of the influence of furnace temperature profile on convection and segregation in the vertical Bridgman crystal growth technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G. T.; Wilcox, William R.

    1992-01-01

    Azulene-doped naphthalene was directionally solidified during the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. Doping homogeneity and convection were determined as a function of the temperature profile in the furnace and the freezing rate. Convection velocities were two orders of magnitude lower when the temperature increased with height. Rarely was the convection pattern axisymmetric, even though the temperature varied less than 0.1 K around the circumference of the growth ampoule. Correspondingly the cross sectional variation in azulene concentration tended to be asymmetric, especially when the temperature increased with height. This cross sectional variation changed dramatically along the ingot, reflecting changes in convection presumably due to the decreasing height of the melt. Although there was large scatter and irreproducibility in the cross sectional variation in doping, this variation tended to be least when the growth rate was low and the convection was vigorous. It is expected that compositional variations would also be small at high growth rates with weak convection and flat interfaces, although this was not investigated in the present experiments. Neither rotation of the ampoule nor deliberate introduction of thermal asymmetries during solidification had a significant influence on cross sectional variations in doping. It is predicted that slow directional solidification under microgravity conditions could produce greater inhomogeneities than on Earth. Combined use of microgravity and magnetic fields would be required to achieve homogeneity when it is necessary to freeze slowly in order to avoid constitutional supercooling.

  19. A Comparative Analysis of a CV Helicopter and a JVX (Joint Services Advanced Vertical Lift) Tilt-Rotor Aircraft in an Aircraft Carrier Based ASW (anti-Submarine Warfare)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    D. SEARCH AND RESCUE -------------------------- 36 E. SUMMARY ------------------------------------ 45 III . COMPARISON OF THE AIRCRAFT IN A SIMULATED...aircraft may respond to contacts generated by remote sources either from an airborne or an on-deck five minute alert status. Once the dipping sonar...scenarios are modeled. The model and results are described in Chapter III . Conclusions and recommendations for further study are contained in Chapter

  20. Sensing Horizontal Heading in Aircraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowdin, K. T.

    1986-01-01

    Modified gyroscopic system indicates geographic heading even in nearly vertical flight. Gyroscopes and gimbals of system assume this configuration when aircraft has pitched into vertical dive. Outer roll gimbal fixed with respect to aircraft frame in this orientation. Now, azimuth signal in modified system indicates what aircraft heading would be if it were to resume level flight from climb or dive.

  1. Vertical distribution of heavy metals in soil profile in a seasonally waterlogging agriculture field in Eastern Ganges Basin.

    PubMed

    Rajmohan, N; Prathapar, S A; Jayaprakash, M; Nagarajan, R

    2014-09-01

    The accumulation of heavy metals in soil and water is a serious concern due to their persistence and toxicity. This study investigated the vertical distribution of heavy metals, possible sources and their relation with soil texture in a soil profile from seasonally waterlogged agriculture fields of Eastern Ganges basin. Fifteen samples were collected at ~0.90-m interval during drilling of 13.11 mbgl and analysed for physical parameters (moisture content and grain size parameters: sand, silt, clay ratio) and heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn, Co, Ni and Cd). The average metal content was in the decreasing order of Fe > Mn > Cr > Zn > Ni > Cu > Co > Pb > Cd. Vertical distribution of Fe, Mn, Zn and Ni shows more or less similar trends, and clay zone records high concentration of heavy metals. The enrichment of heavy metals in clay zone with alkaline pH strongly implies that the heavy metal distributions in the study site are effectively regulated by soil texture and reductive dissolution of Fe and Mn oxy-hydroxides. Correlation coefficient analysis indicates that most of the metals correlate with Fe, Mn and soil texture (clay and silt). Soil quality assessment was carried out using geoaccumulation index (I(geo)), enrichment factor (EF) and contamination factor (CF). The enrichment factor values were ranged between 0.66 (Mn) and 2.34 (Co) for the studied metals, and the contamination factor values varied between 0.79 (Mn) and 2.55 (Co). Results suggest that the elements such as Cu and Co are categorized as moderate to moderately severe contamination, which are further confirmed by I(geo) values (0.69 for Cu and 0.78 for Co). The concentration of Ni exceeded the effects-range median values, and the biological adverse effect of this metal is 87%. The average concentration of heavy metals was compared with published data such as concentration of heavy metals in Ganga River sediments, Ganga Delta sediments and upper continental crust (UCC

  2. Atmospheric dust charging, vertical profiles and optical properties measured in the Arabian Peninsula during the DREAME campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulanowski, Z.; Sabbah, I.; Harrison, R. G.; Nicoll, K. A.; Hirst, E.; Kaye, P. H.; Al-Abbadi, N.; Rogers, G.

    2010-05-01

    Polarimetric observations of atmospheric Saharan dust over the Canary Islands have provided strong evidence for the presence of vertically aligned particles. The alignment was thought to be due to the electric field present because of dust charging. It was concluded that the charging and consequent partial alignment could be a common feature of atmospheric mineral dust layers, influencing the optical properties of dust layers and possibly also dust transport (Atmos. Chem. Phys. 7, 6161, 2007). We show preliminary results from the DREAME campaign, aimed at investigating these phenomena. DREAME used simultaneous and collocated measurements from specially developed aerosol radiosondes, and ground-based sun photometers and electric field meters. The radiosondes provided vertical profiles of dust size distribution and electric charge density, in addition to standard meteorological parameters (Ulanowski et al. EGU 2010, AS3.16). The electric field was measured in Kuwait between late April and November 2009, and at Solar Village (Riyadh, Saudi Arabia) between May and June 2009. The measurements were supplemented by satellite retrievals of aerosol properties. Similar measurements but without electric field meters were carried out on Cape Verde Islands in August 2009 (Nicoll et al. EGU 2010, AS4.7). The electric field measured on the ground in Kuwait showed strong variability, particularly in the presence of atmospheric dust, when polarity reversals from the normal positive potential gradient (PG) clear-sky pattern were frequently observed. In the absence of clouds the negative PG excursions were often down to -800 V/m and reached -1300 V/m. The PG was strongly correlated with the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from the sun photometer: the correlation coefficient was about -0.51 at visible and near infra-red wavelengths and a few percent less in the UV. Slightly lower correlation was present for satellite AOT: -0.4 for MODIS AOT at 550 nm, and -0.3 for OMI AOT at 483.5 nm

  3. Using a fibre-optic cable as Distributed Acoustic Sensor for Vertical Seismic Profiling - Overview of various field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, Julia; Lüth, Stefan; Henninges, Jan; Reinsch, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Fibre-optic Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) or Distributed Vibration Sensing (DVS) is a technology, where an optical fibre cable is used as a sensor for acoustic signals. An ambient seismic wavefield, which is coupled by friction or pressure to the optical fibre, induces dynamic strain changes along the cable. The DAS/DVS technology offers the possibility to record an optoelectronic signal which is linearly related to the time dependent local strain. The DAS/DVS technology is based on the established technique of phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometry (phi-OTDR). Coherent laser pulses are launched into the fibre to monitor changes in the resulting elastic Rayleigh backscatter with time. Dynamic strain changes lead to small displacements of the scattering elements (non-uniformities within the glass structure of the optical fibre), and therefore to variations of the relative phases of the backscattered photons. The fibre behaves as a series of interferometers whose output is sensitive to small changes of the strain at any point along its length. To record the ground motion not only in space but also in time, snapshots of the wavefield are created by repeatedly firing laser pulses into the fibre at sampling frequencies much higher than seismic frequencies. DAS/DVS is used e.g. for continuous monitoring of pipelines, roads or borders and for production monitoring from within the wellbore. Within the last years, the DAS/DVS technology was further developed to record seismic data. We focus on the recording of Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) data with DAS/DVS and present an overview of various field tests published between 2011 and 2014. Here, especially CO2 storage pilot sites provided the opportunity to test this new technology for geophysical reservoir monitoring. DAS/DVS-VSP time-lapse measurements have been published for the Quest CO2 storage site in Canada. The DAS/DVS technology was also tested at the CO2 storage sites in Rousse (France), Citronelle

  4. Methane at Ascension Island, southern tropical Atlantic Ocean: continuous ground measurement and vertical profiling above the Trade-Wind Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, David; Brownlow, Rebecca; Fisher, Rebecca; Nisbet, Euan; Lanoisellé, Mathias; France, James; Thomas, Rick; Mackenzie, Rob; Richardson, Tom; Greatwood, Colin; Freer, Jim; Cain, Michelle; Warwick, Nicola; Pyle, John

    2015-04-01

    δ13CCH4. The marine boundary layer at the surface has CH4 mixing ratios below 1800ppb. In the mixing layer of the TWI, values increase, and above 2000m, methane is above 1820ppb. Back trajectory analysis shows that these inputs are from African savanna and wetland emissions. After vertical mixing events the difference across the TWI reduces to less than 10ppb. The experiment has demonstrated the feasibility of UAV work to observe methane at Ascension. In effect, Ascension becomes a 'virtual mountain observatory' - measurements here can both use the Trade Winds to monitor the wide South Atlantic and Southern Ocean, and also the air above the TWI to assess inputs from tropical Africa and S. America. Comparison of continuous ground measurements, vertical UAV profiles and data from the Ascension TCCON site, potentially allows observation of a complete atmospheric profile. Acknowledgement This work is supported by the Natural Environment Research Council Grant NE/K005979/1

  5. Partitions and vertical profiles of 9 endocrine disrupting chemicals in an estuarine environment: Effect of tide, particle size and salinity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lihua; Cheng, Qiao; Lin, Li; Wang, Xiaowei; Chen, Baowei; Luan, Tiangang; Tam, Nora F Y

    2016-04-01

    Phenolic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in an estuarine water column in a depth profile of five water layers (0.05 D, 0.20 D, 0.60 D, 0.80 D and 0.90 D, D = Depth, 10.7 ± 0.7 m) and their corresponding environmental parameters (tide, salinity and particle size) were investigated over a year. Water sample from each layer was further separated into three fractions, which were dissolved, coarse (SPM-D, Φ ≥ 2.7 μm) and fine (SPM-F, 2.7 μm > Φ ≥ 0.7 μm) suspended particulate matters. Most of EDCs in the water column were presented in the dissolved fraction. Vertical profiles of salinity fluctuations showed that the upper water layer was most influenced by upstream flow. Estriol (E3), mestranol (Mes) and 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) concentrations were significantly higher in ebb tide than in flood tide, indicating that EDCs mainly came from terrestrial source, the upstream flow. Dissolved EDCs also exhibited high levels in the surface layer (0.05 D) due to the upstream source and atmosphere deposition, followed by the bottom layer (0.90 D) owing to the re-suspension of EDCs-containing sediment. Compared to the dissolved phase, the contents of BPA, Mes and EE2 in the solid phase were affected by particle size and exhibited a trend of SPM-F > SPM-D > sediment. On the other hand, the concentrations of octylphenol (OP) and t-nonylphenol (NP), the degradation products from common nonionic surfactants, in sediment were higher than those in suspended particles, and NP concentration was higher in flood tide than that in ebb tide. For both SPM-D and SPM-F, their corresponding EDCs concentrations were negatively related to SPM concentrations due to particle concentration effect (PCE). Owing to the "salting-out effect", salinity pushed EDCs from dissolved fraction to particulate or sedimentary phase.

  6. The effects of vehicle emissions and nucleation events on vertical particle concentration profiles around urban office buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang, T. N.; He, C.; Morawska, L.; Knibbs, L. D.; Falk, M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite its role in determining both indoor and outdoor human exposure to anthropogenic particles, there is limited information describing vertical profiles of particle concentrations in urban environments, especially for ultrafine particles. Furthermore, the results of the few studies performed have been inconsistent. As such this study aimed to assess the influence of vehicle emissions and nucleation formation on particle concentrations (PN and PM2.5) at different heights around three urban office buildings located next to busy roads in Brisbane, Australia, and place these results in the broader context of the existing literature. Two sets of instruments were used to simultaneously measure PN size distribution, PN and PM2.5 concentrations, respectively, for up to three weeks each at three office buildings. The results showed that both PN and PM2.5 concentrations around building envelope were influenced by vehicle emissions and new particle formation, and that they exhibited variability across the three different office buildings. During the nucleation event, PN concentrations increased (21-46%), while PM2.5 concentrations decreased (36-52%) with height at all three buildings. This study has shown an underappreciated role of nucleation in producing particles that can affect large numbers of people, due to the high density and occupancy of urban office buildings and the fact that the vast majority of people's time is spent indoors. These findings highlight important new information related to the previously overlooked role of particle formation in the urban atmosphere and its potential effects on selection of air intake locations and appropriate filter types when designing or upgrading mechanical ventilation systems in urban office buildings. The results also serve to better define particle behaviour and variability around building envelopes, which has implications for studies of both human exposure and particle dynamics.

  7. Type 1 and type 2 cytokine profiles in children exposed to or infected with vertically transmitted human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, B N; Lu, J G; Kline, M W; Paul, M; Doyle, M; Kozinetz, C; Shearer, W T; Reuben, J M

    1996-01-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, cytokine production profiles switch from predominantly type 1 (interleukin-2 [IL-2] and gamma interferon [IFN-gamma]) to type 2 (IL-4 and IL-10) cytokines with disease progression. To test this hypothesis in vertically HIV-infected children, we measured cytokine transcription and production in rapid progressors (RPs), seroreverters (SRs), and those children exposed to HIV in utero (P0s). Production of type 1 and type 2 cytokines was measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures of 8 SR, 25 P0, and 11 RP children. Unstimulated cultures, irrespective of infection and stage of disease, produced similar levels of IL-2, IFN-gamma, IL-4, and IL-10. Upon stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) plus phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), RP children produced less IL-2 (P < 0.01) and IFN-gamma (P < 0.02) than SR children and also expressed significantly less IFN-gamma mRNA (P < 0.01) than SR children. RP children expressed significantly higher levels of IL-4 mRNA than P0 children (P < 0.03). There were no differences in the production of IL-10 by PHA-PMA-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures among the three groups of children. Our data with these pediatric patients suggest that a deficiency in mitogen-stimulated type 1 cytokine production and excess type 2 cytokine (IL-4) transcription correlate with disease progression. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are needed to test further the hypothesis of the type 1-to-type 2 cytokine switch in children infected with HIV. PMID:8877124

  8. A new method to measure bowen ratios using high resolution vertical dry and wet bulb temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euser, T.; Luxemburg, W.; Everson, C.; Mengistu, M.; Clulow, A.; Bastiaanssen, W.

    2013-06-01

    The Bowen ratio surface energy balance method is a relatively simple method to determine the latent heat flux and the actual land surface evaporation. Despite its simplicity, the Bowen ratio method is generally considered to be unreliable due to the use of two-level sensors that are installed by default in operational Bowen ratio systems. In this paper we present the concept of a new measurement methodology to estimate the Bowen ratio from high resolution vertical dry and wet bulb temperature profiles. A short field experiment with Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) in a fibre optic cable having 13 levels was undertaken. A dry and a wetted section of a fibre optic cable were suspended on a 6 m high tower installed over a sugar beet trial near Pietermaritzburg (South Africa). Using the DTS cable as a psychrometer, a near continuous observation of vapour pressure and temperature at 0.20 m intervals was established. These data allows the computation of the Bowen ratio with a high precision. By linking the Bowen ratio to net radiation and soil heat flux, the daytime latent heat flux was estimated. The latent heat flux derived from DTS-based Bowen ratio (BR-DTS) showed consistent agreement (correlation coefficients between 0.97 and 0.98) with results derived from eddy covariance, surface layer scintillometer and surface renewal techniques. The latent heat from BR-DTS overestimated the latent heat derived with the eddy covariance by 4% and the latent heat derived with the surface layer scintillometer by 8%. Through this research, a new window is opened to engage on simplified, inexpensive and easy to interpret in situ measurement techniques for measuring evaporation.

  9. Long Term Three-dimensional Model Parameterization and Evaluation By The Use of Combined Continuous Ozone Lidar Profiles, Vertical Wind Profiles and Ground Based Monitors Obtained During The Escompte Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frejafon, E.; Robin, D.; Kalthoff, N.; Pesch, M.

    ESCOMPTE 2001 is a field experiment that took place in the southeast of France, in order to understand chemical transformation and transport and then to improve numer- ical models devoted to pollution study and forecasting. To achieve this goal, a stand alone ozone LIDAR was installed from June 11th to July 13th in Cadarache, 30 km northeast of the cities of Marseilles and Aix-en-Provence, downwind from the ozone precursors emissions zones in case of sea-breeze development conditions. This full automatic LIDAR provided vertical profiles of ozone concentration and also the mix- ing height dynamics, between 100 m and 2 500 m, with a spatial resolution of less than 100 m and a temporal resolution of 3 minutes. Data obtained with the LIDAR were connected to ground based ozone monitor installed on the same location by the air quality network, in order to evaluate the data quality and to obtain ozone verti- cal profiles from the ground level up to the free troposphere, which is an optimized support for tree-dimensional photochemical models parameterization and evaluation. The ozone diurnal cycles and the daily atmospheric stratification recorded during this month show the fast dynamics during pollution episodes, resulting from combined photochemical and transport effects in case of sea-breeze. They also specify the re- maining ozone vertical structure during non polluted episodes. Such long-term infor- mation is then a consistent support for model parameterization and evaluation, as it can specify the ozone concentration and the PBL dynamics from the beginning to the last end of a pollution episode. This one month vertical ozone profiles, which were compiled in a movie, will be presented and discussed more precisely. The obtained results, combined with continuous vertical wind profiles obtained with a SODAR and a ground based meteorological station installed on the same location, give access to the continuous ozone flux vertical profiles and the PBL dynamics.

  10. Development of a computer technique for the prediction of transport aircraft flight profile sonic boom signatures. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coen, Peter G.

    1991-01-01

    A new computer technique for the analysis of transport aircraft sonic boom signature characteristics was developed. This new technique, based on linear theory methods, combines the previously separate equivalent area and F function development with a signature propagation method using a single geometry description. The new technique was implemented in a stand-alone computer program and was incorporated into an aircraft performance analysis program. Through these implementations, both configuration designers and performance analysts are given new capabilities to rapidly analyze an aircraft's sonic boom characteristics throughout the flight envelope.

  11. Development and validation of software to process radio occultation data: From time series of frequency residuals to vertical profiles of atmospheric and ionospheric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, L.; Withers, P.; Cahoy, K.; Beerer, I.; Hu, R.; Kennedy, K.; Kingsbury, R.; Webber, M.

    2012-12-01

    For most planetary science instruments, expertise in data processing is widely distributed across the planetary science community. This is not the case for radio occultation observations, which provide vertical profiles of atmospheric and ionospheric properties from measurements of the frequency of radio signals. Increasing the population of radio occultation processing experts will have positive consequences for this field. Here we report the latest results from a project to develop and disseminate capabilities to process radio occultation data. We describe how to obtain vertical profiles of atmospheric and ionospheric properties from time series of frequency residuals, emphasizing issues important for practical implementation that are not obvious in published work. Our methods have been demonstrated successfully on data from a Mars Global Surveyor occultation at Mars. Small differences exist between our results and those archived by the Mars Global Surveyor team, indicating that our techniques, though promising, have not yet been perfected.

  12. Instrumental intercomparison investigating vertical profiles of optical turbulence and wind speed in the lower atmospheric boundary layer during frontal passages in northwestern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprung, Detlev; Stein, Karin; Sucher, Erik; Englander, Abraham; Fastig, Salomon; Porat, Omar

    2016-10-01

    The German-Israeli intercomparison experiment on the investigation of vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed and optical turbulence in the lower atmospheric boundary layer from 4th to 7th May 2015 was characterized by frontal activity in the atmosphere. The newly developed remote LIDAR-device of the Soreq institute for the investigation of the vertical wind and turbulence field was compared to the routinely performed measurements at the VerTurM (Vertical Turbulence Measurements) field site in Meppen, Germany. The long-term experiment VerTurM is focused on measurements of the optical turbulence and comprises scintillometer measurements close to the ground (1.15 m height), sonic anemometer measurements on a tall tower at 4 m, 8 m, 32 m, and 64 m and a SODAR-RASS-system. The temporal development of the vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed and optical turbulence Cn 2 during the frontal passage is investigated. Additional radiosonde measurements were performed to characterize the boundary layer height during the day.

  13. A direct detection 1.6μm DIAL with three wavelengths for high accuracy measurements of vertical CO2 concentration and temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Yasukuni; Nagasawa, Chikao; Abo, Makoto

    2013-10-01

    The accurate vertical CO2 profiles in the troposphere are highly desirable in the inverse techniques to improve quantification and understanding of the global budget of CO2 and also global climate changes. Moreover, wind information is an important parameter for transport simulations and inverse estimation of surface CO2 flux. A differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is an attractive method for obtaining vertical CO2 profiles and we have developed an 1.6μm DIAL system to perform simultaneous measurements of CO2 concentration, atmospheric temperature profile and wind profile. The absorption cross sections of gas and air density depends on atmospheric temperature and pressure. Then precise temperature and pressure profiles are necessary for accurate CO2 mixing ratio measurement by DIAL. Laser beams of three wavelengths around a CO2 absorption line are transmitted alternately to the atmosphere for simultaneous measurements of CO2 concentration and temperature. The receiving optics include the near-infrared photomultiplier tube and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) filter to detect a Doppler shift.

  14. Inversely estimating the vertical profile of the soil CO2 production rate in a deciduous broadleaf forest using a particle filtering method.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Gen; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Kishimoto-Mo, Ayaka W; Murayama, Shohei; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Yokozawa, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux from the soil surface, which is a major source of CO2 from terrestrial ecosystems, represents the total CO2 production at all soil depths. Although many studies have estimated the vertical profile of the CO2 production rate, one of the difficulties in estimating the vertical profile is measuring diffusion coefficients of CO2 at all soil depths in a nondestructive manner. In this study, we estimated the temporal variation in the vertical profile of the CO2 production rate using a data assimilation method, the particle filtering method, in which the diffusion coefficients of CO2 were simultaneously estimated. The CO2 concentrations at several soil depths and CO2 efflux from the soil surface (only during the snow-free period) were measured at two points in a broadleaf forest in Japan, and the data were assimilated into a simple model including a diffusion equation. We found that there were large variations in the pattern of the vertical profile of the CO2 production rate between experiment sites: the peak CO2 production rate was at soil depths around 10 cm during the snow-free period at one site, but the peak was at the soil surface at the other site. Using this method to estimate the CO2 production rate during snow-cover periods allowed us to estimate CO2 efflux during that period as well. We estimated that the CO2 efflux during the snow-cover period (about half the year) accounted for around 13% of the annual CO2 efflux at this site. Although the method proposed in this study does not ensure the validity of the estimated diffusion coefficients and CO2 production rates, the method enables us to more closely approach the "actual" values by decreasing the variance of the posterior distribution of the values.

  15. Inversely Estimating the Vertical Profile of the Soil CO2 Production Rate in a Deciduous Broadleaf Forest Using a Particle Filtering Method

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Gen; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Kishimoto-Mo, Ayaka W.; Murayama, Shohei; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Yokozawa, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux from the soil surface, which is a major source of CO2 from terrestrial ecosystems, represents the total CO2 production at all soil depths. Although many studies have estimated the vertical profile of the CO2 production rate, one of the difficulties in estimating the vertical profile is measuring diffusion coefficients of CO2 at all soil depths in a nondestructive manner. In this study, we estimated the temporal variation in the vertical profile of the CO2 production rate using a data assimilation method, the particle filtering method, in which the diffusion coefficients of CO2 were simultaneously estimated. The CO2 concentrations at several soil depths and CO2 efflux from the soil surface (only during the snow-free period) were measured at two points in a broadleaf forest in Japan, and the data were assimilated into a simple model including a diffusion equation. We found that there were large variations in the pattern of the vertical profile of the CO2 production rate between experiment sites: the peak CO2 production rate was at soil depths around 10 cm during the snow-free period at one site, but the peak was at the soil surface at the other site. Using this method to estimate the CO2 production rate during snow-cover periods allowed us to estimate CO2 efflux during that period as well. We estimated that the CO2 efflux during the snow-cover period (about half the year) accounted for around 13% of the annual CO2 efflux at this site. Although the method proposed in this study does not ensure the validity of the estimated diffusion coefficients and CO2 production rates, the method enables us to more closely approach the “actual” values by decreasing the variance of the posterior distribution of the values. PMID:25793387

  16. Vertical profiling using a complementary kite and tethered balloon platform at Ferryland Downs, Newfoundland, Canada: Observation of a dry, ozone-rich plume in the free troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, K. G.; Jensen, M. L.; Balsley, B. B.; Bognar, J. A.; Oltmans, S. J.; Smith, T. W.; Birks, J. W.

    1998-06-01

    Vertical profiles of ozone mixing ratio, water vapor mixing ratio, and temperature obtained during August 3-13, 1995, at Ferryland Downs, Newfoundland, Canada, as part of the North Atlantic Regional Experiment (NARE) demonstrate the use of high-altitude tethered balloons and kites as measurement platforms. In combination with a novel, fast winching system, previously developed for use with kites, tethered balloons were used for profiling chemical species and meteorological parameters to altitudes as high as 7.6 km. Tethered balloon profiling complements profiling with kite systems by expanding the range of wind conditions over which data can be obtained. A total of 65 profiles were collected using these platforms. Elevated ozone mixing ratios highly anticorrelated with water vapor mixing ratios observed during August 4-7 suggest an upper atmospheric source for ozone-rich air during summertime in the Maritime Provinces of Canada. Ozone mixing ratios reaching 100 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) in this air mass were associated with water vapor mixing ratios as low as 0.1 g kg-1. Profiles collected during August 11-13 demonstrate the use of kite and balloon systems to obtain vertical profiles over a wide range of wind conditions. Ozone mixing ratios of 65 ppbv were observed at 1 km altitude on August 12, while profiles collected on August 13 exhibit no evidence of elevated ozone. These results document the rapid transport of an air mass containing elevated ozone levels over the sampling site that would not have been possible with either system alone.

  17. Airborne in situ vertical profiling of HDO/H216O in the subtropical troposphere during the MUSICA remote sensing validation campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyroff, C.; Sanati, S.; Christner, E.; Zahn, A.; Balzer, M.; Bouquet, H.; McManus, J. B.; González-Ramos, Y.; Schneider, M.

    2015-01-01

    Vertical profiles of water vapor (H2O) and its isotope ratio D / H expressed as δ D(H2O were measured in situ by the ISOWAT II diode-laser spectrometer during the MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water (MUSICA) airborne campaign. We present recent modifications of the instrument design. The instrument calibration on the ground as well as in flight is described. Based on the calibration measurements, the humidity-dependent uncertainty of our airborne data is determined. For the majority of the airborne data we achieved an accuracy (uncertainty of the mean) of Δ(δ D) ≈ 10‰. Vertical profiles between 150 and ~7000 m were obtained during 7 days in July and August 2013 over the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean near Tenerife. The flights were coordinated with ground-based (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change, NDACC) and space-based (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer, IASI) FTIR remote-sensing measurements of δ D(H2O) as a means to validate the remote sensing humidity and δ D(H2O) data products. The results of the validation are presented in detail in a separate paper (Schneider et al., 2014). The profiles were obtained with a high vertical resolution of around 3 m. By analyzing humidity and δ D(H2O) correlations we were able to identify different layers of airmasses with specific isotopic signatures. The results are discussed.

  18. Airborne in situ vertical profiling of HDO / H216O in the subtropical troposphere during the MUSICA remote sensing validation campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyroff, C.; Sanati, S.; Christner, E.; Zahn, A.; Balzer, M.; Bouquet, H.; McManus, J. B.; Gonzalez-Ramos, Y.; Schneider, M.

    2015-05-01

    Vertical profiles of water vapor (H2O) and its isotope ratio D / H expressed as δD(H2O) were measured in situ by the ISOWAT II diode-laser spectrometer during the MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water (MUSICA) airborne campaign. We present recent modifications of the instrument design. The instrument calibration on the ground as well as in flight is described. Based on the calibration measurements, the humidity-dependent uncertainty of our airborne data is determined. For the majority of the airborne data we achieved an accuracy (uncertainty of the mean) of Δ(δD) ≈10‰. Vertical profiles between 150 and ~7000 m were obtained during 7 days in July and August 2013 over the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean near Tenerife. The flights were coordinated with ground-based (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change, NDACC) and space-based (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer, IASI) FTIR remote sensing measurements of δD(H2O) as a means to validate the remote sensing humidity and δD(H2O) data products. The results of the validation are presented in detail in a separate paper (Schneider et al., 2014). The profiles were obtained with a high vertical resolution of around 3 m. By analyzing humidity and δD(H2O) correlations we were able to identify different layers of air masses with specific isotopic signatures. The results are discussed.

  19. Seasonal Ice Zone Reconnaissance Surveys Coordination and Ocean Profiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    coordination, this grant covers our profile measurements of temperature , salinity, velocity and mixing across the SIZ, with the long-term goal of understanding...expendable CTD (AXCTD) vertical profiles of ocean temperature and salinity plus aircraft expendable current profiler (AXCP) ocean velocity shear...Morison), UpTempO buoy measurements of sea surface temperature (SST), sea level atmospheric pressure (SLP), and velocity (Steele), and dropsonde

  20. Near Real Time Vertical Profiles of Clouds and Aerosols from the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Nowottnick, E. P.

    2015-12-01

    Plumes from hazardous events, such as ash from volcanic eruptions and smoke from wildfires, can have a profound impact on the climate system, human health and the economy. Global aerosol transport models are very useful for tracking hazardous plumes and predicting the transport of these plumes. However aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties are a major weakness of global aerosol transport models, yet a key component of tracking and forecasting smoke and ash. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is an elastic backscatter lidar designed to provide vertical profiles of clouds and aerosols while also demonstrating new in-space technologies for future Earth Science missions. CATS has been operating on the Japanese Experiment Module - Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) of the International Space Station (ISS) since early February 2015. The ISS orbit provides more comprehensive coverage of the tropics and mid-latitudes than sun-synchronous orbiting sensors, with nearly a three-day repeat cycle. The ISS orbit also provides CATS with excellent coverage over the primary aerosol transport tracks, mid-latitude storm tracks, and tropical convection. Data from CATS is used to derive properties of clouds and aerosols including: layer height, layer thickness, backscatter, optical depth, extinction, and depolarization-based discrimination of particle type. The measurements of atmospheric clouds and aerosols provided by the CATS payload have demonstrated several science benefits. CATS provides near-real-time observations of cloud and aerosol vertical distributions that can be used as inputs to global models. The infrastructure of the ISS allows CATS data to be captured, transmitted, and received at the CATS ground station within several minutes of data collection. The CATS backscatter and vertical feature mask are part of a customized near real time (NRT) product that the CATS processing team produces within 6 hours of collection. The continuous near real time CATS data

  1. Raindrop size distribution and vertical velocity characteristics in the rainband of Hurricane Bolaven (2012) observed by a 1290 MHz wind profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Kyun; Lee, Dong-In

    2017-03-01

    Microphysics and vertical velocity characteristics between weak and strong rainband regions of Hurricane Bolaven were investigated primarily from 1290 MHz (UHF) wind profiler measurements on 27-28 August 2012. With a focus on regions with radar reflectivities greater than 30 dBZ below a melting level, raindrop size distributions (DSDs) and related rain parameters retrieved from profiler Doppler spectra were examined. Temporal variations in vertical structure and bright band from a widespread stratiform to a relatively narrow, intense rainband were examined as the rainbands move over the land in the southern coast of Korea. Based on vertical characteristics in radar reflectivity, Doppler velocity, and vertical air motion (w) profiles, the rainbands were classified into a stratiform (S) region with a strong bright band and mixed stratiform-convective (S-C) region with a weak or non-existent bright band. The retrieved w fields showed that updrafts were dominant in the mixed S-C region and downdrafts in the S region. More broad histograms in both radar reflectivity (Z) and mass-weighted mean diameter (Dm) were found in the S period. Compared to the Z distribution, rain rate (R) was more widely distributed in the mixed S-C region than in the S region. This is largely because R values were more variable in association with stronger updrafts in this region since they depend on fall velocities of raindrops. Higher R and smaller Dm mean values were analyzed within relatively strong updrafts in the mixed S-C period compared to those in the S period. Even when the w correction is applied, the mean Dm was still slightly smaller in the mixed S-C region, indicating that there is a relatively larger number of small drops than those in the S region.

  2. Rain cell-based identification of the vertical profile of reflectivity as observed by weather radar and its use for precipitation uncertainty estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazenberg, P.; Torfs, P. J. J. F.; Leijnse, H.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2012-04-01

    The wide scale implementation of weather radar systems over the last couple of decades has increased our understanding concerning spatio-temporal precipitation dynamics. However, the quantitative estimation of precipitation by these devices is affected by many sources of error. A very dominant source of error results from vertical variations in the hydrometeor size distribution known as the vertical profile of reflectivity (VPR). Since the height of the measurement as well as the beam volume increases with distance from the radar, for stratiform precipitation this results in a serious underestimation (overestimation) of the surface reflectivity while sampling within the snow (bright band) region. This research presents a precipitation cell-based implementation to correct volumetric weather radar measurements for VPR effects. Using the properties of a flipping carpenter square, a contour-based identification technique was developed, which is able to identify and track precipitation cells in real time, distinguishing between convective, stratiform and undefined precipitation. For the latter two types of systems, for each individual cell, a physically plausible vertical profile of reflectivity is estimated using a Monte Carlo optimization method. Since it can be expected that the VPR will vary within a given precipitation cell, a method was developed to take the uncertainty of the VPR estimate into account. As a result, we are able to estimate the amount of precipitation uncertainty as observed by weather radar due to VPR for a given precipitation type and storm cell. We demonstrate the possibilities of this technique for a number of winter precipitation systems observed within the Belgian Ardennes. For these systems, in general, the precipitation uncertainty estimate due to vertical reflectivity profile variations varies between 10-40%.

  3. Indoor air quality investigation on commercial aircraft.

    PubMed

    Lee, S C; Poon, C S; Li, X D; Luk, F

    1999-09-01

    Sixteen flights had been investigated for indoor air quality (IAQ) on Cathay Pacific aircraft from June 1996 to August 1997. In general, the air quality on Cathay Pacific aircraft was within relevant air quality standards because the average age of aircraft was less than 2 years. Carbon dioxide (CO2) levels on all flights measured were below the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) standard (30,000 ppm). The CO2 level was substantially higher during boarding and de-boarding than cruise due to low fresh air supply. Humidity on the aircraft was low, especially for long-haul flights. Minimum humidity during cruise was below the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) minimum humidity standard (20%). The average temperature was within a comfortable temperature range of 23 +/- 2 degrees C. The vertical temperature profile on aircraft was uniform and below the International Standard Organization (ISO) standard. Carbon monoxide levels were below the FAA standard (50 ppm). Trace amount of ozone detected ranged from undetectable to 90 ppb, which was below the FAA standard. Particulate level was low for most non-smoking flights, but peaks were observed during boarding and de-boarding. The average particulate level in smoking flights (138 micrograms/m3) was higher than non-smoking flights (7.6 micrograms/m3). The impact on IAQ by switching from low-mode to high-mode ventilation showed a reduction in CO2 levels, temperature, and relative humidity.

  4. Retrieval of vertical trace gas profiles from ground-based infrared absorption spectra inside and outside the Antarctic vortex using SFIT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, S. W.; Jones, N. B.; Rinsland, C. P.; Goldman, A.; Connor, B. J.; Stephen, T. M.; Lawrence, B. N.; Murcray, F. J.

    2001-05-01

    SFIT2 has been developed by NIWA, NASA Langley and the University of Denver for the retrieval of vertical trace-gas profiles from high-resolution ground-based infrared absorption spectra measured with Fourier transform spectrometers. Such measurements are made at a number of sites around the world as part of the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC). The vertical profile information in the measurement is due to the pressure broadening of atmospheric absorption lines in the spectra. The retrieval method is optimal estimation, which uses information from the measurement and supplied a priori information to construct an optimal solution based on the assumed uncertainties of these two information sources. We have used SFIT2 to analyse high spectral resolution (0.0035 cm-1) infrared solar absorption spectra recorded at Arrival Heights in Antarctica (78o S), from shortly after sunrise (day 240) to the end of the year in 1999. The motion of the Antarctic vortex, and the chemical processes within it, cause large changes in the vertical profiles of most of the trace gases measured over the site. We have made use of analyses of scaled potential vorticity (sPV) from UKMO data to classify measurements as inside or outside the vortex. This information has been incorporated into the selection of a priori profile information for the analyses of a number of trace gases that are chemically active or act as tracers, including O3, HNO3, N2O, CH4, HCl and ClONO2. The retrieved mixing ratios of these gases in the lower stratosphere show that the station sampled primarily vortex air during the spring period while the vortex existed, but had brief periods outside the vortex near day 290 and again close to vortex breakdown. Comparison with independent measurements, such as the sPV calculations, satellite temperature measurements and correlative TOMS total ozone measurements, are consistent with these retrievals.

  5. Biases of CO2 Storage in Eddy Flux Measurements pertinent to Vertical Configurations of a Profile System and CO2 Density Averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bai; Hanson, Paul J; Riggs, Jeffery S; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Hosman, K. P.; Meyers, T. P.; Wullschleger, Stan D; Gu, Lianhong; Heuer, Mark

    2007-01-01

    CO2 storage in a 30-minute period in a tall forest canopy often makes significant contributions to net ecosystem exchange (NEE) in the early morning and at night. When CO2 storage is properly measured and taken into account, underestimations of NEE on calm nights can be greatly reduced. Using CO2 data from a 12-level profile, we demonstrate that the lower canopy layer (below the thermal inversion) is a disproportional contributor to the total CO2 storage. This is because time derivative of CO2 density ( c/ t) generally shows increasing magnitude of mean and standard deviation with decreasing heights at night and from sunrise to 1000 hr in both growing and dormant seasons. Effects of resolution and configuration in a profiling system on the accuracy of CO2 storage estimation are evaluated by comparing subset profiles to the 12-level benchmark profile. It is demonstrated that the effectiveness of a profiling system in estimating CO2 storage is not only determined by its number of sampling levels but, more importantly, by its vertical configuration. To optimize a profile, one needs to balance the influence of two factors, c/ t and layer thickness, among all vertical sections within a forest. As a key contributor to the total CO2 storage, the lower canopy (with relatively large means and standard deviations of c/ t) requires a higher resolution in a profile system than the layers above. However, if the upper canopy is over-sparsely sampled relative to the lower canopy, the performance of a profile system might be degraded since, in such a situation, the influence of layer thickness dominates over that of c/ t. We also find that, because of different level of complexity in canopy structure, more sampling levels are necessary at our site in order to achieve the same level of accuracy as at a boreal aspen site. These results suggest that, in order to achieve an adequate accuracy in CO2 storage measurements, the number of sampling levels in a profile and its design should

  6. Positioning for capitation in long-term care: a profile of vertical integration strategies in health and social service organizations.

    PubMed

    Walsh, A M

    1998-01-01

    During the next decade, the population over age 65 is expected to increase by 11% while the population over age 85 is expected to increase by 42%. These projections suggest that many organizations which currently provide services to the aged will be required to design a range of new products and services for this diverse population. Vertically integrated services provide a viable opportunity to competitively position an organization to respond to the diverse needs of an aged market. Since vertical integration will be essential in negotiating capitate contracts for the aged in the future, this study examined the extent of vertical integration in 116 health and social service organizations in an urban market with an expanding geriatric population.

  7. A direct algorithm for convective adjustment of the vertical temperature profile for an arbitrary critical lapse rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akmaev, Rashid A.

    1991-01-01

    An efficient direct algorithm of convective adjustment for an arbitrary critical value of the vertical temperature lapse rate gamma is proposed. The algorithm provides an exact and unique solution of a standard convective adjustment problem for models with temperature specified either on nonuniformly spaced levels or for layers of different thicknesses in pressure, sigma, or other vertical coordinate related to pressure. The algorithm may be recommended for use either directly in atmospheric models not explicitly including a hydrologic cycle with prescribed gamma, or as a part of more complicated parameterizations of moist convection, where gamma may be calculated depending on relative humidity.

  8. Pi-MAX: a new parametrized algorithm to retrieve vertical profiles of trace gases and aerosols from MAX-DOAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remmers, Julia; Beirle, Steffen; Doerner, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Multi-Axis (MAX-) DOAS instruments observe scattered sunlight under various mostly slant elevation angles. From such observations information on tropospheric profiles of trace gases and aerosols can be retrieved. MAX-DOAS observations can be used to quantify emissions and to study chemical processes in the atmosphere. Measuring (horizontally and vertically) averaged concentrations the technique can be used as a link between in-situ and satellite measurements. Thus satellite observations of tropospheric trace gases can be validated. IMAX (Parametrized Inversion for MAX-DOAS measurements) is a parametrized method to retrieve vertical profiles of trace gases (such as H2O, NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO) and aerosols. No online calculations are necessary, since look-up tables (LUT) calculated with a Monte Carlo based radiative Transport Model are used. In this manner it is user-friendly, easy to distribute and applicable to every measurement location. The here shown measurements took place in the Maldives in March, 2012, during the CARDEX campaign. Simultaneous sun photometry-, Lidar- and UAV-measurements provide the possibility to validate the new algorithm. We present time series of profiles of trace gas concentrations and aerosol extinction We discuss the effects of clouds on the retrieved results.

  9. Parabolic Flights with Single-Engine Aerobatic Aircraft: Flight Profile and a Computer Simulator for its Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigos, Miguel; Perez-Poch, Antoni; Alpiste, Francesc; Torner, Jordi; González Alonso, Daniel Ventura

    2014-11-01

    We report the results of residual acceleration obtained from initial tests of parabolic flights (more than 100 hours) performed with a small single-engine aerobatic aircraft (CAP10B), and propose a method that improves these figures. Such aircraft have proved capable of providing researchers with periods of up to 8 seconds of reduced gravity in the cockpit, with a gravity quality in the range of 0.1 g 0, where g 0 is the gravitational acceleration of the Earth. Such parabolas may be of interest to experimenters in the reduced gravity field, when this range of reduced gravity is acceptable for the experiment undertaken. They have also proven to be useful for motivational and educational campaigns. Furthermore, these flights may be of interest to researchers as a test-bed for obtaining a proof-of-concept for subsequent access to parabolic flights with larger aircraft or other microgravity platforms. The limited cost of the operations with these small aircraft allows us to perform them as part of a non-commercial joint venture between the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya - BarcelonaTech (UPC), the Barcelona cluster BAIE and the Aeroclub Barcelona-Sabadell. Any improvements in the length and quality of reduced gravity would increase the capabilities of these small aircraft. To that end, we have developed a method based on a simulator for training aerobatic pilots. The simulation is performed with the CAD software for mechanical design Solidworks Motion{circledR }, which is widely distributed in industry and in universities. It specifically simulates the parabolic flight manoeuvre for our small aircraft and enables us to improve different aspects of the manoeuvre. The simulator is first validated with experimental data from the test flights. We have conducted an initial intensive period of specific pilot training with the aid of the simulator output. After such initial simulation-aided training, results show that the reduced gravity quality has significantly

  10. Hypersonic aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkamhawi, Hani; Greiner, Tom; Fuerst, Gerry; Luich, Shawn; Stonebraker, Bob; Wray, Todd

    1990-01-01

    A hypersonic aircraft is designed which uses scramjets to accelerate from Mach 6 to Mach 10 and sustain that speed for two minutes. Different propulsion systems were considered and it was decided that the aircraft would use one full scale turbofan-ramjet. Two solid rocket boosters were added to save fuel and help the aircraft pass through the transonic region. After considering aerodynamics, aircraft design, stability and control, cooling systems, mission profile, and landing systems, a conventional aircraft configuration was chosen over that of a waverider. The conventional design was chosen due to its landing characteristics and the relative expense compared to the waverider. Fuel requirements and the integration of the engine systems and their inlets are also taken into consideration in the final design. A hypersonic aircraft was designed which uses scramjets to accelerate from Mach 6 to Mach 10 and sustain that speed for two minutes. Different propulsion systems were considered and a full scale turbofan-ramjet was chosen. Two solid rocket boosters were added to save fuel and help the aircraft pass through the transonic reqion. After the aerodynamics, aircraft design, stability and control, cooling systems, mission profile, landing systems, and their physical interactions were considered, a conventional aircraft configuration was chosen over that of a waverider. The conventional design was chosen due to its landing characteristics and the relative expense compared to the waverider. Fuel requirements and the integration of the engine systems and their inlets were also considered in the designing process.

  11. Comparisons of refractive index gradient and stability profiles measured by balloons and the MU radar at a high vertical resolution in the lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, H.; Hassenpflug, G.; Yamamoto, M.; Fukao, S.

    2007-02-01

    Many experimental studies have demonstrated that VHF Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST) radar echo power is proportional to the generalized refractive index gradient squared M2 when using a vertically oriented beam. Because humidity is generally negligible above the tropopause, VHF ST radars can thus provide information on the static stability (quantified by the squared Brunt-Väisälä frequency N2) at stratospheric heights and this capability is useful for many scientific applications. Most studies have been performed until now at a vertical resolution of 150 m or more. In the present paper, results of comparisons between radar- and (balloon borne) radiosonde-derived M2 and N2 are shown at a better vertical resolution of 50 m with the MU radar (34.85° N, 136.15° E; Japan) by benefiting from the range resolution improvement provided by the multi-frequency range imaging technique, using the Capon processing method. Owing to favorable winds in the troposphere, the radiosondes did not drift horizontally more than about 30 km from the MU radar site by the time they reached an altitude of 20 km. The measurements were thus simultaneous and almost collocated. Very good agreements have been obtained between both high resolution profiles of M2, as well as profiles of N2. It is also shown that this agreement can still be improved by taking into account a frozen-in advection of the air parcels by a horizontally uniform wind. Therefore, it can be concluded that 1) the range imaging technique with the Capon method really provides substantial range resolution improvement, despite the relatively weak Signal-to-Noise Ratios (SNR) over the analyzed region of the lower stratosphere, 2) the proportionality of the radar echo power to M2 at a vertical scale down to 50 m in the lower stratosphere is experimentally demonstrated, 3) the MU radar can provide stability profiles with a vertical resolution of 50 m at heights where humidity is negligible, 4) stable stratospheric layers as thin

  12. Particle pH Inferred from Aircraft Data: Validation and Geographical, Vertical and Seasonal Characteristics with Case Studies from the WINTER Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H.; Weber, R. J.; Nenes, A.; Sullivan, A.; Thornton, J. A.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Schroder, J. C.; Dibb, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Particle pH is a critical but poorly understood factor that affects many aerosol processes and properties, including aerosol composition, concentrations, geochemical cycles, and aerosol toxicity. Here we assess the prediction of pH from aircraft data, report pH as a function of geographical location and altitude for different seasons, and investigate causes for variability in pH-dependent aerosol components, such as nitrate. pH is generally predicted with a thermodynamic model since it is difficult to measure directly. We used ISORROPIA-II with particle and selected gas inorganic species, along with RH and T as inputs to calculate aerosol pH. Data are from three aircraft studies: WINTER (2015 Feb-Mar) and NEAQS (2004 July-Aug), both over the northeastern US, and SENEX (2013 Jun-July) over the southeastern US. pH was validated by comparing measured and predicted partitioning of ammonia and nitric acid. The effect of inevitable sample heating associated with aircraft measurements was minimal since partitioning of measured semi-volatile components based on ambient T and RH were accurately predicted. Overall, pH determined from WINTER, NEAQS, and SENEX for altitudes up to 5000 m ranged between -0.4 and 1.9 (10-90% percentiles, mean±SD=0.9±1.0), similar to what we have observed at ground-based sites in the southeastern US. Coupling between water vapor concentrations, temperature, particle composition, liquid water content and particle pH on partitioning of nitric acid-nitrate observed during the WINTER campaign will be investigated.

  13. Seasonal dependence of the long-range transport and vertical distribution of free tropospheric aerosols over east Asia: On the basis of aircraft and lidar measurements and isentropic trajectory analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuki, Atsushi; Iwasaka, Yasunobu; Osada, Kazuo; Matsunaga, Katsuji; Kido, Mizuka; Inomata, Yayoi; Trochkine, Dmitri; Nishita, Chiharu; Nezuka, Takayoshi; Sakai, Tetsu; Zhang, Daizhou; Kwon, Soung-An

    2003-12-01

    Seasonal changes in the vertical structure of free tropospheric aerosols over east Asia, on the basis of aircraft-borne and lidar measurements, and on the pathway of the long-range transport of Asian dust particles inferred from isentropic trajectory analysis are discussed. Aircraft-borne measurements held in situ in the free troposphere over central Japan in 2000-2001 revealed a small in scale yet steady transport of dust in the lower-middle free troposphere (2-6 km altitude) during spring including days with no evident dust outbreak. Such dust, found as background, was observed even in summer in the regions higher than 4 km under the influence of remaining westerly winds but not in the lower regions. From a series of lidar observations over Nagoya (35°N, 137°E), Japan, noticeable changes in aerosol characteristics were obtained in the free troposphere from spring to summer. Taklimakan desert is suggested as possible important source of the background dust.

  14. Influence of atmospheric parameters on vertical profiles and horizontal transport of aerosols generated in the surf zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, J.; Tedeschi, G.; Van Eijk, A. M. J.; Piazzola, J.

    2013-10-01

    The vertical and horizontal transport of aerosols generated over the surf zone is discussed. Experimental data were collected during the second campaign of the Surf Zone Aerosol Experiment that took place in Duck NC (USA) in November 2007. The Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) method was used to analyze the vertical concentration gradients, and allowed separating the surf aerosols from aerosols advected from elsewhere. The numerical Marine Aerosol Concentration Model (MACMod) supported the analysis by confirming that the concentration gradients are more pronounced under stable conditions and that aerosol plumes are then more confined to the surface. The model also confirmed the experimental observations made during two boat runs along the offshore wind vector that surf-generated aerosols are efficiently advected out to sea over several tens of kilometers.

  15. Comparisons of cloud ice mass content retrieved from the radar-infrared radiometer method with aircraft data during the second international satellite cloud climatology project regional experiment (FIRE-II)

    SciTech Connect

    Matrosov, S.Y. |; Heymsfield, A.J.; Kropfli, R.A.; Snider, J.B.

    1996-04-01

    Comparisons of remotely sensed meteorological parameters with in situ direct measurements always present a challenge. Matching sampling volumes is one of the main problems for such comparisons. Aircraft usually collect data when flying along a horizontal leg at a speed of about 100 m/sec (or even greater). The usual sampling time of 5 seconds provides an average horizontal resolution of the order of 500 m. Estimations of vertical profiles of cloud microphysical parameters from aircraft measurements are hampered by sampling a cloud at various altitudes at different times. This paper describes the accuracy of aircraft horizontal and vertical coordinates relative to the location of the ground-based instruments.

  16. A Sensitivity Study of the Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) Wake Predictor Algorithm to the Resolution of Input Meteorological Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutishauser, David K.; Butler, Patrick; Riggins, Jamie

    2004-01-01

    The AVOSS project demonstrated the feasibility of applying aircraft wake vortex sensing and prediction technologies to safe aircraft spacing for single runway arrivals. On average, AVOSS provided spacing recommendations that were less than the current FAA prescribed spacing rules, resulting in a potential airport efficiency gain. Subsequent efforts have included quantifying the operational specifications for future Wake Vortex Advisory Systems (WakeVAS). In support of these efforts, each of the candidate subsystems for a WakeVAS must be specified. The specifications represent a consensus between the high-level requirements and the capabilities of the candidate technologies. This report documents the beginnings of an effort to quantify the capabilities of the AVOSS Prediction Algorithm (APA). Specifically, the APA horizontal position and circulation strength output sensitivity to the resolution of its wind and turbulence inputs is examined. The results of this analysis have implications for the requirements of the meteorological sensing and prediction systems comprising a WakeVAS implementation.

  17. Leaf water (18) O and (2) H enrichment along vertical canopy profiles in a broadleaved and a conifer forest tree.

    PubMed

    Bögelein, Rebekka; Thomas, Frank M; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2017-01-01

    Distinguishing meteorological and plant-mediated drivers of leaf water isotopic enrichment is prerequisite for ecological interpretations of stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in plant tissue. We measured input and leaf water δ(2) H and δ(18) O as well as micrometeorological and leaf morpho-physiological variables along a vertical gradient in a mature angiosperm (European beech) and gymnosperm (Douglas fir) tree. We used these variables and different enrichment models to quantify the influence of Péclet and non-steady state effects and of the biophysical drivers on leaf water enrichment. The two-pool model accurately described the diurnal variation of leaf water enrichment. The estimated unenriched water fraction was linked to leaf dry matter content across the canopy heights. Non-steady state effects and reduced stomatal conductance caused a higher enrichment of Douglas fir compared to beech leaf water. A dynamic effect analyses revealed that the light-induced vertical gradients of stomatal conductance and leaf temperature outbalanced each other in their effects on evaporative enrichment. We conclude that neither vertical canopy gradients nor the Péclet effect is important for estimates and interpretation of isotopic leaf water enrichment in hypostomatous trees. Contrarily, species-specific non-steady state effects and leaf temperatures as well as the water vapour isotope composition need careful consideration.

  18. Vertical Force-deflection Characteristics of a Pair of 56-inch-diameter Aircraft Tires from Static and Drop Tests with and Without Prerotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smiley, Robert F; Horne, Walter B

    1957-01-01

    The vertical force-deflection characteristics were experimentally determined for a pair of 56-inch-diameter tires under static and drop-test conditions with and without prerotation. For increasing force, the tires were found to be least stiff for static tests, almost the same as for the static case for prerotation drop tests as long as the tires remain rotating, and appreciably stiffer for drop tests without prerotation.

  19. Seismic anisotropy in gas-hydrate- and gas-bearing sediments on the Blake Ridge, from a walkaway vertical seismic profile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pecher, I.A.; Holbrook, W.S.; Sen, M.K.; Lizarralde, D.; Wood, W.T.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Dillon, William P.; Hoskins, H.; Stephen, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    We present results from an analysis of anisotropy in marine sediments using walkaway vertical seismic profiles from the Blake Ridge, offshore South Carolina. We encountered transverse isotropy (TI) with a vertical symmetry axis in a gas-hydrate-bearing unit of clay and claystone with Thomsen parameters ?? = 0.05 ?? 0.02 and ?? = 0.04 ?? 0.06. TI increased to ?? = 0.16 ?? 0.04 and ?? = 0.19 ?? 0.12 in the underlying gas zone. Rock physics modeling suggests that the observed TI is caused by a partial alignment of clay particles rather than high-velocity gas-hydrate veins. Similarly, the increase of TI in the gas zone is not caused by thin low-velocity gas layers but rather, we speculate, by the sharp contrast between seismic properties of an anisotropic sediment frame and elongated gas-bearing pore voids. Our results underscore the significance of anisotropy for integrating near-vertical and wide-angle seismic data.

  20. Diel variation in the vertical distribution of particulate matter (>0.15 mm) in the NW Mediterranean Sea investigated with the Underwater Video Profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemmann, Lars; Picheral, Marc; Gorsky, Gabriel

    2000-03-01

    Day/night variations in the size distribution of the particulate matter >0.15 mm (PM) were studied in May 1995 during the DYNAPROC time-series cruise in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. Data on vertical distributions of PM (>0.15 mm) and zooplankton were collected with the Underwater Video Profiler (UVP). The comparisons of the UVP data with plankton net data and POC data from water bottles indicated that more than 97% of the particles detected by the UVP were non-living particles (0.15 mm) and that the PM contributed 4-34% of the total dry weight measured on GF/F filters. Comparison of seven pairs of day and night vertical profiles performed during the cruise showed that in the upper 800 m, the mean size and the volume of particles was higher at night than during the day. During the night, the integrated volume of the PM increased on average by 32±20%. This increase corresponded to a shift of smaller size classes (<0.5 mm) towards the larger ones (>0.5 mm). During the day, the pattern was reversed, and the quantity of PM >0.5 mm decreased. During the study period, the standing stock of PM (60-800 m) decreased from 7.5 to less than 2 g m -2 but the diel variations persisted, except for two short periods in the superficial layer following a wind event. The cyclic feeding activity induced by the diel vertical migration of zooplankton could be the best candidate to explain the observed diel fluctuations in the size classes of PM in the water column. However, our results also suggest that in the upper layer additional driving forces such as the increase of the level of turbulence after a wind event or the modification of the zoo- and phytoplankton community can influence the PM temporal evolution.

  1. First look at the NOAA Aircraft-based Tropospheric Ozone Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, M.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; McClure-Begley, A.; Lin, M.; Tarasick, D.; Johnson, B. J.; Oltmans, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network's aircraft program has operated since the 1990s as part of the NOAA Global Monitoring Division network to capture spatial and temporal variability in greenhouse tracers (i.e. CO2, CO, N2O, methane, SF6, halo- and hydro-carbons). Since 2005 the suite of airborne measurements also includes ozone, humidity and temperature profiling through the troposphere (up to 8 km). Light commercial aircraft are equipped with modified 2B Technology ozone monitors (Model 205DB), incorporate temperature and humidity probes, and include global positioning system instrumentation. The dataset was analyzed for tropospheric ozone variability at five continental US stations. As site locations within the Tropospheric Aircraft Ozone Measurement Program have flights only once (four times at one site) a month and begun a decade ago, this raises the question of whether this sampling frequency allows the derivation of an accurate vertical climatology of ozone values. We interpret the representativeness of the vertical and seasonal ozone distribution from aircraft measurements using multi-decadal hindcast simulations conducted with the GFDL AM3 chemistry-climate model. When available, climatology derived from co-located ozone-sonde data will be used for comparisons. The results of the comparisons are analyzed to establish altitude ranges in the troposphere where the aircraft climatology would be deemed to be the most representative. Aircraft-based climatologies are tested from two approaches: comparing the aircraft-based climatology to the daily sampled model and to the subset of model data with matching aircraft dates. Whenever the model and aircraft climatologies show significant seasonal differences, further information is gathered from a seasonal Gaussian distribution plot. We will report on the minimum frequency in flights that can provide adequate climatological representation of seasonal and vertical variability in tropospheric ozone.

  2. NONLINEAR-APPROXIMATION TECHNIQUE FOR DETERMINING VERTICAL OZONE-CONCENTRATION PROFILES WITH A DIFFERENTIAL-ABSORPTION LIDAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new technique is presented for the retrieval of ozone concentration profiles from backscattered signals obtained by a multi-wavelength differential-absorption lidar (DIAL). The technique makes it possible to reduce erroneous local fluctuations induced in the ozone-concentration...

  3. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  4. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America ) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model. Review of other latent heating algorithms will be discussed in the workshop.

  5. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics Using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in straitform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMXX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM- LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  6. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM rainfall products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2001. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DE 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs. west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in strtaiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  7. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  8. Ground-based Measurements of Vertical Profiles and Columns of Atmospheric Trace Gases Over Toronto Using a New High-Resolution Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiacek, A.; Yashcov, D.; Strong, K.; Boudreau, L.; Rochette, L.; Roy, C.

    2002-12-01

    The University of Toronto Atmospheric Observatory (TAO) has recently been established at Toronto, Canada. TAO includes several instruments, with a DA8 Fourier Transform Spectrometer (DA8 FTS, manufactured by ABB Bomem Inc., Québec, Canada) serving as the primary instrument at the facility. The geographic position of TAO (43.66°N, 79.40°W) makes it well suited for long-term measurements of mid-latitude stratospheric ozone and related species, while its urban setting enables measurements of tropospheric pollution. The DA8 FTS is based on a Michelson interferometer with a maximum optical path difference of 250 cm, providing a maximum unapodized resolution of 0.0026 cm-1. It is currently equipped with KBr and CaF2 beamsplitters, and InSb and HgCdTe detectors, for coverage of the spectral range from 700 to 4100 cm-1. A new heliostat (manufactured by Aim Controls Inc., California, USA) provides active solar tracking, collecting the incoming solar radiation and directing it into the FTS. The TAO DA8 FTS incorporates a new optical design recently developed by ABB Bomem Inc., which results in a fixed optical axis through the beamsplitter (and a fixed focal point on the detector) as well as a more stable modulation efficiency. The new instrument optics will be discussed. Next, the performance of the instrument will be examined in the context of standard NDSC (Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change) trace gas column and vertical profile retrieval techniques, which use least squares fitting algorithms (SFIT, SFIT2). TAO has been operational (weather permitting) since October 2001. We have been retrieving columns and vertical profiles of HCl, HF, CH4, OCS, C2H6, CO, N2O and NO2 since May 2002. A detailed error analysis of retrieved columns and vertical profiles has been undertaken for the above species. Future plans for the TAO FTS include comparing our measurements with satellite measurements made by MOPITT, OSIRIS, and the upcoming ACE and MAESTRO instruments

  9. Vertical profiling of Asian dust with multi-wavelength aerosol depolarization Raman lidar in Gwangju, Korea during DRAGON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, D.; Mueller, D.; Noh, Y.; Shin, S.; Kim, Y. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) campaign, which was carried out in Korea from March to May 2013, aimed at validating satellite remote sensing data of aerosol optical and microphysical parameters. Anthropogenic pollution and Asian dust from the East Asian Mainland prevailed over the Korean peninsula during the DRAGON campaign. Validation of the data products requires knowledge on the vertical distribution of aerosol pollution and the knowledge of aerosol types, e.g., urban haze and dust. For this purpose we operated a multi-wavelength aerosol depolarization Raman lidar on the campus of the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST) in Gwangju, Korea (35.10° N, 126.53° E). The system provides us with particle backscatter coefficients at 355, 532 and 1064 nm, extinction coefficients at 355 and 532nm, and the linear particle depolarization ratio at 532nm. Two upgraded sun photometers of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) with improved capabilities for dust measurements were also deployed. In our contribution we will present optical properties of Asian dust on the basis of lidar and sun photometer observations. One sun photometer was equipped with a measurement channel at 1640 nm channel and the second sun photometer carried out polarization measurements. Data could be collected on thirty-eight days We analyzed the geometrical and optical properties of Asian dust on the basis of backward trajectories in order to identify the main source regions of the observed dust layers. The height resolved statistical analysis of the DRAGON dataset reveals that the geometrical depth of the Asian dust layers was between 1 km and 4 km in 72% of all cases. Geometrical depths above 4 km were found in 20% of all cases. We found geometrical depths of 10 km in 3.3% of all cases. The vertical distribution of the dust layers was typically located in two different heights. In 51.5% of the measurements we observed Asian dust between 4 and 11km

  10. General comparison of ozone vertical profiles obtained by various techniques during the 1983 MAP/GLOBUS campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, W. A.; Aimedieu, P.; Megie, G.; Pelon, J.; Attmannspacher, W.; Komhyr, W.; Marche, P.; De La Noe, J.; Rigaud, P.; Robbins, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    As part of the 1983 MAP/GLOBUS campaign, atmospheric ozone profile measurements were made using a large variety of different techniques both from balloon platforms and the ground. It is shown that, for most techniques, the measured height distributions agree to within + or - 5 percent with the exception of the remote visible absorption method. This + or - 5 percent uncertainty is of the order of the individual intersystem accuracy. It is suggested that since the differences with the visible absorption method are in magnitude rather than in form, the absorption cross-section data could be the possible cause for the discrepancy.

  11. Calculation of zero-offset vertical seismic profiles generated by a horizontal point force acting on the surface of an elastic half-space

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi-Ping, Liu

    1990-01-01

    Impulse responses including near-field terms have been obtained in closed form for the zero-offset vertical seismic profiles generated by a horizontal point force acting on the surface of an elastic half-space. The method is based on the correspondence principle. Through transformation of variables, the Fourier transform of the elastic impulse response is put in a form such that the Fourier transform of the corresponding anelastic impulse response can be expressed as elementary functions and their definite integrals involving distance angular frequency, phase velocities, and attenuation factors. These results are used for accurate calculation of shear-wave arrival rise times of synthetic seismograms needed for data interpretation of anelastic-attenuation measurements in near-surface sediment. -Author

  12. A vertical/horizontal integration wind-induced circulation model (VH13D): A method for including surface and bottom logarithmic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian; Tsanis, Ioannis K.

    A three-dimensional model called VH13D is developed using the vertical/horizontal integration (VHI) approach. The double-logarithmic velocity profile including both the surface and bottom sublayer characteristic lengths is employed to accurately evaluate the bottom shear stress and depth-averaged advective terms. The model is verified using analytical solutions and laboratory data for shear-induced countercurrent flows and is compared with other two- and three-dimensional circulation models in a simplified basin. It is demonstrated that the newly developed model improves the conventional two-dimensional depth-averaged and Quasi-3D models and provides a new approach to the three-dimensional wind-induced circulation model. It can efficiently simulate the wind-induced 3D current structure in lakes and estuaries under isothermal conditions.

  13. Synergic estimation of columnar integrated aerosol properties and their vertical resolved profiles in respect to the scenarios of dust intrusions over Granada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandija, Florian; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Lyamani, Hassan; Granados-Muñoz, María José; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present a study of the columnar and vertically resolved aerosol optical properties over Granada (Spain) during dust events detected during July-August in the period 2012-2013. For this purpose, we classified the events according to their origins and pathways. The analyzed aerosol properties include; columnar aerosol optical properties like aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Angstrom exponent (AE), as well as the lidar products, like backscatter-related Angstrom exponent and linear particle depolarization ratio (LDPR). The lidar profiles are used for determination of the geometrical structure of dust layers and the aerosol optical parameters inside dust layers. There are identified 58 dusty days over Granada during the periods July-August, 2012-2013. In 71% of the dust, event analyzed the dust plume over Granada is located between 3000 and 4000 m a.g.l. Mean values of AOD500 according to the Atlantic and Mediterranean pathway were 0.28 ± 0.10 and 0.93 ± 0.17. Meanwhile, the mean values of AE440-870 were 0.57 ± 0.25 and 0.43 ± 0.20. Three region are identified as the main dust sources affecting the dust intrusions over Granada. Two principal pathways of air masses during dust intrusion over Granada were observed: through Atlantic (52.7%) and through Mediterranean (47.3%). Air masses which come through the Mediterranean present larger AOD and lower Angstrom exponent values than those air masses coming through Atlantic. Lidar measurements show different vertical distributions on particle backscatter coefficient, during different scenarios of dust intrusions. The lidar profiles indicate that average base and top heights of all dust during the investigation period were 2.1 ± 0.7 and 4.8 ± 0.9 km, and their center of mass and thickness were 3.3 ± 0.7 and 2.8 ± 1.0 km a.g.l. The AE355/532 profiles for the dust intrusions present some differences depending on the source regions and path followed by the dust. On the other hand, the profiles of LPDRat

  14. Vertical profiles of pollutant gases measured with passive DOAS in the Po Valley devoted to satellite and chemical model data comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masieri, S.; Petritoli, A.; Kostadinov, I.; Bortoli, D.; Premuda, M.; Ravegnani, F.; Giovanelli, G.

    2009-04-01

    whose profile depends strongly on altitude [7][8]. Due to this it is also possible gain information about the atmospheric aerosol profile to set better the parameters in AMF Calculation, and then retrieve gas concentration's profiles. The NO2 concentrations measured were in the range of 0.5-25 ppb, as we expect for summer periods in rural area. GAMES (Gas Aerosol Modelling Evaluation System) model [9] was used in this work to have a reference about vertical distribution of gases (the model provides concentration profiles along 4km of altitude, with 11 growing thickness levels). Result of comparison with profile caculate by the model and profile calulate by the Multi-axis DOAS technique, is presented and then it is compared with Satellite column retrieved (with our satellite Data processor) from SCIAMACHY sensor (onboard on ENVISAT platform) and (directly NO2 Tropospheric Vertical Column provided by KNMI) from OMI (onboard on AURA platform). Good agreements between used series are shown and improvements for this methodology are discussed. One month of measurement has been taken in consideration starting from 15 May to 15 June of 2007. Vertical structure of most important trace gases calculated with model has strong correlation with the off-axis DOAS one (in some cases with R2=0,8), so better understanding of profiles and chemistry behaviour can be studied. The experience acquired within QUITSAT activity appears valuable contribution for enlargement of the DOAS applications what concern atmospheric chemistry studies, operative monitoring of the air quality over regional scale as well as satellite data validation. Deployed approaches are not restricted to NO2 but could be applied to other gases e.g. ozone, formaldehyde etc.. Key words: Off axis DOAS, NO2, CTM, AMF, gas profiles, satellite data validation, 1 2. BIBLIOGRAPHY [1] F. Evangelisti, A. Baroncelli, P. Bonasoni, G. Giovanelli, And F. Ravegnani, "Differential optical absorption spectrometer for measurement of

  15. Measuring and modelling the intra-day variability of the 13CO2 & 12CO2 vertical soil profile production in a Scots pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longdoz, Bernard; Goffin, Stéphanie; Parent, Florian; Plain, Caroline; Epron, Daniel; Wylock, Christophe; Haut, Benoit; Aubinet, Marc; Maier, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Vertical profile of CO2 production (Ps) and transport, as well as their isotopic discrimination (13CO2/12CO2) should be considered to improve the soil CO2 efflux (Fs) mechanistic understanding and especially its short-term temporal variations. In this context, we propose a new methodology able to measure continuously and simultaneously Fs, the vertical soil CO2 concentration ([CO2]) profile and their respective isotopic signature (δFs and δCO2) [1]. The Ps of the different soil layers and their isotopic signature (δPs) can then be determined from these measurements by an approach considering diffusion as the only gas transport. A field campaign was conducted with this device at the Scots Pine Hartheim forest (Germany). The results [2] show (i) a Ps dependence on local temperature specific for each layer, (ii) an enrichment of δPs with soil drought, (iii) Fs and [CO2] large intra-day fluctuations non explained by the soil temperature and moisture. These fluctuations can be generated by other processes creating Ps and/or transport variability. To investigate about the nature of these processes, some sensitivity analyses have been performed with a soil CO2 model simulating both production and transport. The impacts of the introduction of advection, dispersion and phloem pressure concentration wave (through dependence of Ps on vapour pressure deficit) on intra-day Fs and [CO2] variations have been quantified. We conclude that these variations are significantly better represented when the phloem pressure wave expression is included in the simulations. The study of the processes related to CO2 production seems to be a better option than an investigation about transport to explain the intra-day Fs variability.

  16. An Efficient Algorithm for Commercial Aircraft Trajectory Optimization in the Air Traffic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devulapalli, Raghuveer

    A discrete search strategy is presented to determine optimal aircraft trajectories which can be unconstrained or regulated to follow current Air Traffic Control (ATC) procedures. The heuristic based Astar (A*) search algorithm has been selected for its efficiency and its inherent ability to handle numerous constraints as a discrete method. A point-mass aircraft model is assumed to accurately simulate commercial aircraft dynamics for the provided trajectories. The two dimensional space and the states of aircraft have been divided into discrete pieces. To show the effectiveness of the algorithm, two-dimensional vertical and horizontal profile are simulated. Simulation results compare optimal trajectories that range from unconstrained to those that completely adhere to strict ATC procedures. Those trajectories following ATC procedures follow a segmented flight pattern where each segment follows specified objectives, terminating when certain criteria has been met. Trajectories are optimized for a combination of time and fuel with an emphasis on reducing fuel consumption.

  17. Numerical simulation of vertical ground-water flux of the Rio Grande from ground-water temperature profiles, central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartolino, James R.; Niswonger, Richard G.

    1999-01-01

    An important gap in the understanding of the hydrology of the Middle Rio Grande Basin, central New Mexico, is the rate at which water from the Rio Grande recharges the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. Several methodologies-including use of the Glover-Balmer equation, flood pulses, and channel permeameters- have been applied to this problem in the Middle Rio Grande Basin. In the work presented here, ground-water temperature profiles and ground-water levels beneath the Rio Grande were measured and numerically simulated at four sites. The direction and rate of vertical ground-water flux between the river and underlying aquifer was simulated and the effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of the sediments underlying the river was estimated through model calibration. Seven sets of nested piezometers were installed during July and August 1996 at four sites along the Rio Grande in the Albuquerque area, though only four of the piezometer nests were simulated. In downstream order, these four sites are (1) the Bernalillo site, upstream from the New Mexico State Highway 44 bridge in Bernalillo (piezometer nest BRN02); (2) the Corrales site, upstream from the Rio Rancho sewage treatment plant in Rio Rancho (COR01); (3) the Paseo del Norte site, upstream from the Paseo del Norte bridge in Albuquerque (PDN01); and (4) the Rio Bravo site, upstream from the Rio Bravo bridge in Albuquerque (RBR01). All piezometers were completed in the inner-valley alluvium of the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. Ground-water levels and temperatures were measured in the four piezometer nests a total of seven times in the 24-month period from September 1996 through August 1998. The flux between the surface- and ground-water systems at each of the field sites was quantified by one-dimensional numerical simulation of the water and heat exchange in the subsurface using the heat and water transport model VS2DH. Model calibration was aided by the use of PEST, a model-independent computer program that uses

  18. Vertical partitioning and controlling factors of gradient-based soil carbon dioxide fluxes in two contrasted soil profiles along a loamy hillslope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiaux, F.; Vanclooster, M.; Van Oost, K.

    2015-08-01

    In this study we aim to elucidate the role of physical conditions and gas transfer mechanism along soil profiles in the decomposition and storage of soil organic carbon (OC) in subsoil layers. We use a qualitative approach showing the temporal evolution and the vertical profile description of CO2 fluxes and abiotic variables. We assessed soil CO2 fluxes throughout two contrasted soil profiles (i.e. summit and footslope positions) along a hillslope in the central loess belt of Belgium. We measured the time series of soil temperature, soil moisture and CO2 concentration at different depths in the soil profiles for two periods of 6 months. We then calculated the CO2 flux at different depths using Fick's diffusion law and horizon specific diffusivity coefficients. The calculated fluxes allowed assessing the contribution of different soil layers to surface CO2 fluxes. We constrained the soil gas diffusivity coefficients using direct observations of soil surface CO2 fluxes from chamber-based measurements and obtained a good prediction power of soil surface CO2 fluxes with an R2 of 92 %. We observed that the temporal evolution of soil CO2 emissions at the summit position is mainly controlled by temperature. In contrast, at the footslope, we found that long periods of CO2 accumulation in the subsoil alternates with short peaks of important CO2 release. This was related to the high water filled pore space that limits the transfer of CO2 along the soil profile at this slope position. Furthermore, the results show that approximately 90 to 95 % of the surface CO2 fluxes originate from the first 10 cm of the soil profile at the footslope. This indicates that soil OC in this depositional context can be stabilized at depth, i.e. below 10 cm. This study highlights the need to consider soil physical properties and their dynamics when assessing and modeling soil CO2 emissions. Finally, changes in the physical environment of depositional soils (e.g. longer dry periods) may affect the

  19. An overview of millimeter-wave spectroscopic measurements of chlorine monoxide at Thule, Greenland, February-March, 1992: Vertical profiles, diurnal variation, and longer-term trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Zafra, R. L.; Emmons, L. K.; Reeves, J. M.; Shindell, D. T.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of chlorine monoxide in the stratosphere over Thule, Greenland (73.6 N, 68.4 W) were made quasi-continuously during the period February 8 to March 24, 1992, using a high-sensitivity ground based mm-wave spectrometer. These observations give diurnal, short term, and long term changes in the mixing ratio and vertical distribution of ClO. At an equivalent time after the Antarctic winter solstice, very large concentrations (up to approximately 1.5 ppbv) occur in lower stratospheric ClO, resulting in massive ozone destruction. We saw no evidence for large (approximately 1 top 1.5 ppbv) amounts of ClO in the 16-25 km range over Thule in February or March, in agreement with UARS (satellite) observations by the MLS mm-wave spectrometer for this period, and in marked contrast to UARS/MLS and ER-2 aircraft measurements over northern Europe and eastern Canada, respectively, during January, 1992. We have evidence for smaller enhancements (approximately 0.2 to 0.5 ppbv) in the 18-30 km range during late February-early March, which could result from transport of residual low NO2 air following earlier polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) processing (the last of which occurred at least one month earlier, however) or the result of chemical processing by Pinatubo aerosols. Direct influence of Pinatubo aerosols on Arctic ozone during the spring of 1992 has been difficult to assess, and this enhancement of low-altitude ClO might be a significant indicator of aerosol effects.

  20. Combined SAGE II-GOMOS ozone profile data set for 1984-2011 and trend analysis of the vertical distribution of ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrölä, E.; Laine, M.; Sofieva, V.; Tamminen, J.; Päivärinta, S.-M.; Tukiainen, S.; Zawodny, J.; Thomason, L.

    2013-11-01

    We have studied data from two satellite occultation instruments in order to generate a high vertical resolution homogeneous ozone time series of 26 yr. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II solar occultation instrument and the Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS) instrument measured ozone profiles in the stratosphere and mesosphere from 1984-2005 and 2002-2012, respectively. Global coverage, good vertical resolution, and the self-calibrating measurement method make data from these instruments valuable for the detection of changes in vertical distribution of ozone over time. As both instruments share a common measurement period from 2002-2005, it is possible to inter-calibrate the data sets. We investigate how well these measurements agree with each other and combine all the data to produce a new stratospheric ozone profile data set. Above 55 km, SAGE II measurements show much less ozone than the GOMOS nighttime measurements as a consequence of the well-known diurnal variation of ozone in the mesosphere. Between 35-55 km, SAGE II sunrise and sunset measurements differ from GOMOS' measurements to different extents. Sunrise measurements show 2% less ozone than GOMOS, whereas sunset measurements show 4% more ozone than GOMOS. Differences can be explained qualitatively by the diurnal variation of ozone in the stratosphere recently observed by SMILES and modeled by chemical transport models. Between 25-35 km, SAGE II sunrise and sunset measurements and GOMOS measurements agree within 1%. The observed ozone bias between collocated measurements of SAGE II sunrise/sunset and GOMOS night measurements is used to align the two data sets. The combined data set covers the time period 1984-2011, latitudes 60° S-60° N, and the altitude range of 20-60 km. Profile data are given on a 1 km vertical grid, and with a resolution of 1 month in time and 10° in latitude. The combined ozone data set is analyzed by fitting a time series model to the

  1. Combined SAGE II-GOMOS ozone profile data set 1984-2011 and trend analysis of the vertical distribution of ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrölä, E.; Laine, M.; Sofieva, V.; Tamminen, J.; Päivärinta, S.-M.; Tukiainen, S.; Zawodny, J.; Thomason, L.

    2013-04-01

    We have studied data from two satellite occultation instruments in order to generate a high vertical resolution homogeneous ozone time series of 26 yr. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experimen (SAGE) II solar occultation instrument from 1984-2005 and the Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars instrument (GOMOS) from 2002-2012 measured ozone profiles in the stratosphere and mesosphere. Global coverage, good vertical resolution and the self calibrating measurement method make data from these instruments valuable for the detection of changes in vertical distribution of ozone over time. As both instruments share a common measurement period from 2002-2005, it is possible to intercalibrate the data sets. We investigate how well these measurements agree with each other and combine all the data to produce a new stratospheric ozone profile data set. Above 55 km SAGE II measurements show much less ozone than the GOMOS nighttime measurements as a consequence of the well-known diurnal variation of ozone in the mesosphere. Between 35-55 km SAGE II sunrise and sunset measurements differ from each other. Sunrise measurements show 2% less ozone than GOMOS whereas sunset measurements show 4% more ozone than GOMOS. Differences can be explained qualitatively by the diurnal variation of ozone in the stratosphere recently observed by SMILES and modelled by chemical transport models. For 25-35 km SAGE II sunrise and sunset and GOMOS agree within 1%. The observed ozone bias between collocated measurements of SAGE II sunrise/sunset and GOMOS night measurements is used to align the two data sets. The combined data set covers the time period 1984-2011, latitudes 60° S-60° N and the altitude range of 20-60 km. Profile data are given on a 1 km vertical grid, and with a resolution of one month in time and ten degrees in latitude. The combined ozone data set is analyzed by fitting a time series model to the data. We assume a linear trend with an inflexion point (so-called "hockey

  2. Utilization of satellite imagery by in-flight aircraft. [for weather information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luers, J. K.

    1976-01-01

    Present and future utilization of satellite weather data by commercial aircraft while in flight was assessed. Weather information of interest to aviation that is available or will become available with future geostationary satellites includes the following: severe weather areas, jet stream location, weather observation at destination airport, fog areas, and vertical temperature profiles. Utilization of this information by in-flight aircraft is especially beneficial for flights over the oceans or over remote land areas where surface-based observations and communications are sparse and inadequate.

  3. The influence of the tangential velocity of inner rotating wall on axial velocity profile of flow through vertical annular pipe with rotating inner surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharf, Abdusalam M.; Jawan, Hosen A.; Almabsout, Fthi A.

    2014-03-01

    In the oil and gas industries, understanding the behaviour of a flow through an annulus gap in a vertical position, whose outer wall is stationary whilst the inner wall rotates, is a significantly important issue in drilling wells. The main emphasis is placed on experimental (using an available rig) and computational (employing CFD software) investigations into the effects of the rotation speed of the inner pipe on the axial velocity profiles. The measured axial velocity profiles, in the cases of low axial flow, show that the axial velocity is influenced by the rotation speed of the inner pipe in the region of almost 33% of the annulus near the inner pipe, and influenced inversely in the rest of the annulus. The position of the maximum axial velocity is shifted from the centre to be nearer the inner pipe, by increasing the rotation speed. However, in the case of higher flow, as the rotation speed increases, the axial velocity is reduced and the position of the maximum axial velocity is skewed towards the centre of the annulus. There is a reduction of the swirl velocity corresponding to the rise of the volumetric flow rate.

  4. Vertically-resolved profiles of mass concentrations and particle backscatter coefficients of Asian dust plumes derived from lidar observations of silicon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Noh, Youngmin; Müller, Detlef; Shin, Sung-Kyun; Shin, Dongho; Kim, Young J

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a method to retrieve vertically-resolved profiles of dust mass concentrations by analyzing Raman lidar signals of silicon dioxide (quartz) at 546nm. The observed particle plumes consisted of mixtures of East Asian dust with anthropogenic pollution. Our method for the first time allows for extracting the contribution of the aerosol component "pure dust" contained in the aerosol type "polluted dust". We also propose a method that uses OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds) and the mass concentrations profiles of dust in order to derive profiles of backscatter coefficients of pure dust in mixed dust/pollution plumes. The mass concentration of silicon dioxide (quartz) in the atmosphere can be estimated from the backscatter coefficient of quartz. The mass concentration of dust is estimated by the weight percentage (38-77%) of mineral quartz in Asian dust. The retrieved dust mass concentrations are classified into water soluble, nucleation, accumulation, mineral-transported and coarse mode according to OPAC. The mass mixing ratio of 0.018, 0.033, 0.747, 0.130 and 0.072, respectively, is used. Dust extinction coefficients at 550nm were calculated by using OPAC and prescribed number concentrations for each of the 5 components. Dust backscatter coefficients were calculated from the dust extinction coefficients on the basis of a lidar ratio of 45±3sr at 532nm. We present results of quartz-Raman measurements carried out on the campus of the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (35.10°N, 126.53°E) on 15, 16, and 21 March 2010.

  5. The impact of cloud vertical profile on liquid water path retrieval based on the bispectral method: A theoretical study based on large-eddy simulations of shallow marine boundary layer clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Daniel J.; Zhang, Zhibo; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Platnick, Steven; Baum, Bryan A.

    2016-04-01

    Passive optical retrievals of cloud liquid water path (LWP), like those implemented for Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), rely on cloud vertical profile assumptions to relate optical thickness (τ) and effective radius (re) retrievals to LWP. These techniques typically assume that shallow clouds are vertically homogeneous; however, an adiabatic cloud model is plausibly more realistic for shallow marine boundary layer cloud regimes. In this study a satellite retrieval simulator is used to perform MODIS-like satellite retrievals, which in turn are compared directly to the large-eddy simulation (LES) output. This satellite simulator creates a framework for rigorous quantification of the impact that vertical profile features have on LWP retrievals, and it accomplishes this while also avoiding sources of bias present in previous observational studies. The cloud vertical profiles from the LES are often more complex than either of the two standard assumptions, and the favored assumption was found to be sensitive to cloud regime (cumuliform/stratiform). Confirming previous studies, drizzle and cloud top entrainment of dry air are identified as physical features that bias LWP retrievals away from adiabatic and toward homogeneous assumptions. The mean bias induced by drizzle-influenced profiles was shown to be on the order of 5-10 g/m2. In contrast, the influence of cloud top entrainment was found to be smaller by about a factor of 2. A theoretical framework is developed to explain variability in LWP retrievals by introducing modifications to the adiabatic re profile. In addition to analyzing bispectral retrievals, we also compare results with the vertical profile sensitivity of passive polarimetric retrieval techniques.

  6. Vertical distribution and temporal changes of 137Cs in soil profiles under various land uses after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Junko; Tamura, Kenji; Suda, Tomoya; Matsumura, Ryo; Onda, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    We monitored the vertical distribution of (137)Cs in soil profiles under eight different land uses for the 2 y after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, and discussed the temporal changes in the early-stage of the migration and the determinants of the initial distribution. The soil samples were collected for four surveys using a scraper plate at each study site, which consisted of three forests (mixed forest, mature cedar, and young cedar), two grasslands (pasture and meadow) and three abandoned agricultural fields (farm land, tobacco field, and paddy field). The land use patterns have a large influence on some soil properties and the migration processes of (137)Cs above ground, resulting in different distribution of (137)Cs in those soil profiles. Specifically, the secondary deposition of (137)Cs from the coniferous canopy, retention of (137)Cs by litter layer, and the homogenization of (137)Cs concentrations in surface soil by natural soil mixing such as the disturbance by cattle grazing, roots growing and the formation of needle ice were important to cause redistribution of the deposited (137)Cs. Only in the paddy field, the (137)Cs inventory in subsurface soils (5-10 cm) gradually increased and comprised 26% of the total (137)Cs in 2 y, showing the downward migration of (137)Cs to subsurface soil. In the other sites, it was considered that (137)Cs were strongly adsorbed by soil particles and rarely migrated downward as soluble form. Vertical distributions during the first survey were able to be used as the initial distributions and were well fitted to the exponential equation. The distribution parameters α (relaxation depth) and β (relaxation mass depth), calculated by the exponential equation were correlated with RIP (r = -0.806, p < 0.05), macro pore (r = 0.651, p = 0.11), and dispersible fine particle content (r = 0.856, p < 0.05). It indicated that the initial distribution would be influenced by the Cs fixation ability of

  7. Vertical profile, source apportionment, and toxicity of PAHs in sediment cores of a wharf near the coal-based steel refining industrial zone in Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Feng; Chen, Chiu-Wen; Ju, Yun-Ru; Dong, Cheng-Di

    2016-03-01

    Three sediment cores were collected from a wharf near a coal-based steel refining industrial zone in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Analyses for 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of the US Environmental Protection Agency priority list in the core sediment samples were conducted using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The vertical profiles of PAHs in the core sediments were assessed, possible sources and apportionment were identified, and the toxicity risk of the core sediments was determined. The results from the sediment analyses showed that total concentrations of the 16 PAHs varied from 11774 ± 4244 to 16755 ± 4593 ng/g dry weight (dw). Generally, the vertical profiles of the PAHs in the sediment cores exhibited a decreasing trend from the top to the lower levels of the S1 core and an increasing trend of PAHs from the top to the lower levels of the S2 and S3 cores. Among the core sediment samples, the five- and six-ring PAHs were predominantly in the S1 core, ranging from 42 to 54 %, whereas the composition of the PAHs in the S2 and S3 cores were distributed equally across three groups: two- and three-ring, four-ring, and five- and six-ring PAHs. The results indicated that PAH contamination at the site of the S1 core had a different source. The molecular indices and principal component analyses with multivariate linear regression were used to determine the source contributions, with the results showing that the contributions of coal, oil-related, and vehicle sources were 38.6, 35.9, and 25.5 %, respectively. A PAH toxicity assessment using the mean effect range-median quotient (m-ERM-q, 0.59-0.79), benzo[a]pyrene toxicity equivalent (TEQ(carc), 1466-1954 ng TEQ/g dw), and dioxin toxicity equivalent (TEQ(fish), 3036-4174 pg TEQ/g dw) identified the wharf as the most affected area. The results can be used for regular monitoring, and future pollution prevention and management should target the coal-based industries in this region for pollution reduction.

  8. The influence of snow grain size and impurities on the vertical profiles of actinic flux and associated NOx emissions on the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatko, M. C.; Grenfell, T. C.; Alexander, B.; Doherty, S. J.; Thomas, J. L.; Yang, X.

    2013-04-01

    We use observations of the absorption properties of black carbon and non-black carbon impurities in near-surface snow collected near the research stations at South Pole and Dome C, Antarctica, and Summit, Greenland, combined with a snowpack actinic flux parameterization to estimate the vertical profile and e-folding depth of ultraviolet/near-visible (UV/near-vis) actinic flux in the snowpack at each location. We have developed a simple and broadly applicable parameterization to calculate depth and wavelength dependent snowpack actinic flux that can be easily integrated into large-scale (e.g., 3-D) models of the atmosphere. The calculated e-folding depths of actinic flux at 305 nm, the peak wavelength of nitrate photolysis in the snowpack, are 8-12 cm near the stations and 15-31 cm away (>11 km) from the stations. We find that the e-folding depth is strongly dependent on impurity content and wavelength in the UV/near-vis region, which explains the relatively shallow e-folding depths near stations where local activities lead to higher snow impurity levels. We calculate the lifetime of NOx in the snowpack interstitial air produced by photolysis of snowpack nitrate against wind pumping (τwind pumping) from the snowpack, and compare this to the calculated lifetime of NOx against chemical conversion to HNO3 (τchemical) to determine whether the NOx produced at a given depth can escape from the snowpack to the overlying atmosphere. Comparison of τwind pumping and τchemical suggests efficient escape of photoproduced NOx in the snowpack to the overlying atmosphere throughout most of the photochemically active zone. Calculated vertical actinic flux profiles and observed snowpack nitrate concentrations are used to estimate the potential flux of NOx from the snowpack. Calculated NOx fluxes of 4.4 × 108-3.8 × 109 molecules cm-2 s-1 in remote polar locations and 3.2-8.2 × 108 molecules cm-2 s-1 near polar stations for January at Dome C and South Pole and June at Summit

  9. The influence of snow grain size and impurities on the vertical profiles of actinic flux and associated NOx emissions on the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatko, M. C.; Grenfell, T. C.; Alexander, B.; Doherty, S. J.; Thomas, J. L.; Yang, X.

    2012-06-01

    We use observations of the absorption properties of black carbon and non-black-carbon impurities in near-surface snow collected near the research stations at South Pole and Dome C, Antarctica and Summit, Greenland combined with a snowpack actinic flux parameterization to estimate the vertical profile and e-folding depth of ultraviolet/near-visible (UV/near-vis) actinic flux in the snowpack at each location. We have developed a simple and broadly applicable parameterization to calculate depth and wavelength dependent snowpack actinic flux that can be easily integrated into large scale (e.g. 3-D) models of the atmosphere. The calculated e-folding depths of actinic flux at 305 nm, the peak wavelength of nitrate photolysis in the snowpack, are 8-12 cm near the stations and 15-31 cm away (>11 km) from the stations. We find that the e-folding depth is strongly dependent on impurity content and wavelength in the UV/near-vis region, which explains the relatively shallow e-folding depths near stations where local activities lead to higher impurity levels. We calculate the lifetime of NOx in the snowpack interstitial air produced by photolysis of snowpack nitrate against escape (τescape) from the snowpack via diffusion and windpumping and compare this to the calculated lifetime of NOx against chemical conversion to HNO3 (τchemical) to determine whether the NOx produced at a given depth can escape from the snowpack to the overlying atmosphere. Comparison of τescape and τchemical suggests efficient escape of photoproduced NOx in the snowpack to the overlying atmosphere. Calculated vertical actinic flux profiles and observed snowpack nitrate concentrations are used to determine the flux of NOx from the snowpack. Calculated NOx fluxes of 4.4 × 108-2.8 × 109 molecules cm-2 s7-1 in remote polar locations and 3.2-8.2 × 108 molecules cm-2 s-1 near polar stations for January at Dome C and South Pole and June at Summit suggest that NOx flux measurements near stations are likely

  10. Powered-lift aircraft technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckert, W. H.; Franklin, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    Powered lift aircraft have the ability to vary the magnitude and direction of the force produced by the propulsion system so as to control the overall lift and streamwise force components of the aircraft, with the objective of enabling the aircraft to operate from minimum sized terminal sites. Power lift technology has contributed to the development of the jet lift Harrier and to the forth coming operational V-22 Tilt Rotor and the C-17 military transport. This technology will soon be expanded to include supersonic fighters with short takeoff and vertical landing capability, and will continue to be used for the development of short- and vertical-takeoff and landing transport. An overview of this field of aeronautical technology is provided for several types of powered lift aircraft. It focuses on the description of various powered lift concepts and their operational capability. Aspects of aerodynamics and flight controls pertinent to powered lift are also discussed.

  11. Carbon Dioxide and Methane Column Abundances Retrieved from Ground-Based Near-Infrared Solar Spectra and Comparison with In Situ Aircraft Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Toon, G. C.; Blavier, J.; Wennberg, P. O.; Yang, Z.; Vay, S. A.; Sachse, G. W.; Blake, D. R.; Matross, D. M.; Gerbig, C.

    2004-12-01

    We have developed an automated observatory for measuring ground-based column abundances of CO2, CH4, CO, N2O, O2, H2O, and HF. Near-infrared spectra of the direct sun are measured between 3,900 - 15,600 cm-1 (0.67 - 2.56 μ m) by a Bruker 125HR Fourier Transform Spectrometer. This is the first laboratory in a proposed network of ground-based solar observatories that will be used for carbon cycle studies and validation of spaceborne column measurements of greenhouse gases. The laboratory was assembled in Pasadena, California and then permanently deployed to northern Wisconsin during May 2004. It is located in the heavily forested Chequamegon National Forest at the WLEF Tall Tower site, 14 km east of Park Falls, Wisconsin. This site was chosen because NOAA CMDL and other groups conduct intensive measurements in the area, including continuous monitoring of CO2 at six heights on the 447-m tall tower. CO2 and CH4 column abundances for May - November 2004 demonstrate ˜0.1% precision. The seasonal drawdown of CO2 is recognizable within the late-May column abundances. As part of the INTEX and COBRA campaigns, the DC-8 or King Air recorded in situ measurements during profiles over the WLEF site during five dates in July and August 2004. We will compare the column abundances of CO2, CH4, and CO with these in situ aircraft measurements.

  12. Vertical profiles of particulate organic matter and its relationship with chlorophyll- a in the upper layer of the NE Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ediger, Dilek; Tuğrul, Süleyman; Yılmaz, Ayşen

    2005-04-01

    Particulate organic matter (POM), nutrients, chlorophyll- a (CHL) and primary production measurements were performed in the upper layer of three different regions (cyclonic, anticyclonic and frontal+peripherial) of the NE Mediterranean Sea in 1991-1994. Depth profiles of bulk POM exhibited a subsurface maximum, coinciding with the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) established near the base of the euphotic zone of the Rhodes cyclone and its periphery, where the nutricline was situated just below the euphotic zone for most of the year. Moreover, the POM peaks were broader and situated at shallower depths in late winter-early spring as compared to its position in the summer-autumn period. Under prolonged winter conditions, as experienced in March 1992, the characteristic POM feature disappeared in the center of the Rhodes cyclone, where the upper layer was entirely occupied by nutrient-rich Levantine deep water. Deep convective processes in the cyclonic gyre led to the formation of vertically uniform POM profiles with low concentrations of particulate organic carbon (POC) (2.1 μM), nitrogen (0.21 μM), total particulate phosphorus (PP) (0.02 μM) and chlorophyll- a (0.5 μg/L) in the euphotic zone. Though the Levantine deep waters ascended up to the surface layer with the nitrate/phosphate molar ratios (28-29) in March 1992, the N/P molar ratio of bulk POM in the upper layer was low as 10-12, indicating luxury consumption of phosphate during algal production. Depth-integrated primary production in the euphotic zone ranged from 38.5 for oligotrophic autumn to 457 mg C m -2 day -1 for moderately mesotrophic cool winter conditions.

  13. Comparison of Commercial Aircraft Fuel Requirements in Regards to FAR, Flight Profile Simulation, and Flight Operational Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitzman, Nicholas

    There are significant fuel consumption consequences for non-optimal flight operations. This study is intended to analyze and highlight areas of interest that affect fuel consumption in typical flight operations. By gathering information from actual flight operators (pilots, dispatch, performance engineers, and air traffic controllers), real performance issues can be addressed and analyzed. A series of interviews were performed with various individuals in the industry and organizations. The wide range of insight directed this study to focus on FAA regulations, airline policy, the ATC system, weather, and flight planning. The goal is to highlight where operational performance differs from design intent in order to better connect optimization with actual flight operations. After further investigation and consensus from the experienced participants, the FAA regulations do not need any serious attention until newer technologies and capabilities are implemented. The ATC system is severely out of date and is one of the largest limiting factors in current flight operations. Although participants are pessimistic about its timely implementation, the FAA's NextGen program for a future National Airspace System should help improve the efficiency of flight operations. This includes situational awareness, weather monitoring, communication, information management, optimized routing, and cleaner flight profiles like Required Navigation Performance (RNP) and Continuous Descent Approach (CDA). Working off the interview results, trade-studies were performed using an in-house flight profile simulation of a Boeing 737-300, integrating NASA legacy codes EDET and NPSS with a custom written mission performance and point-performance "Skymap" calculator. From these trade-studies, it was found that certain flight conditions affect flight operations more than others. With weather, traffic, and unforeseeable risks, flight planning is still limited by its high level of precaution. From this

  14. Treatability of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbon-contaminated soils of different textures along a vertical profile by mechanical soil aeration: A laboratory test.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Shi, Yi; Hou, Deyi; Zhang, Xi; Chen, Jiaqi; Wang, Zhifen; Xu, Zhu; Li, Fasheng; Du, Xiaoming

    2017-04-01

    Mechanical soil aeration is a simple, effective, and low-cost soil remediation technology that is suitable for sites contaminated with volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons (VCHs). Conventionally, this technique is used to treat the mixed soil of a site without considering the diversity and treatability of different soils within the site. A laboratory test was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of mechanical soil aeration for remediating soils of different textures (silty, clayey, and sandy soils) along a vertical profile at an abandoned chloro-alkali chemical site in China. The collected soils were artificially contaminated with chloroform (TCM) and trichloroethylene (TCE). Mechanical soil aeration was effective for remediating VCHs (removal efficiency >98%). The volatilization process was described by an exponential kinetic function. In the early stage of treatment (0-7hr), rapid contaminant volatilization followed a pseudo-first order kinetic model. VCH concentrations decreased to low levels and showed a tailing phenomenon with very slow contaminant release after 8hr. Compared with silty and sandy soils, clayey soil has high organic-matter content, a large specific surface area, a high clay fraction, and a complex pore structure. These characteristics substantially influenced the removal process, making it less efficient, more time consuming, and consequently more expensive. Our findings provide a potential basis for optimizing soil remediation strategy in a cost-effective manner.

  15. Effects of aircraft and flight parameters on energy-efficient profile descents in time-based metered traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejarnette, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    Concepts to save fuel while preserving airport capacity by combining time based metering with profile descent procedures were developed. A computer algorithm is developed to provide the flight crew with the information needed to fly from an entry fix to a metering fix and arrive there at a predetermined time, altitude, and airspeed. The flight from the metering fix to an aim point near the airport was calculated. The flight path is divided into several descent and deceleration segments. Descents are performed at constant Mach numbers or calibrated airspeed, whereas decelerations occur at constant altitude. The time and distance associated with each segment are calculated from point mass equations of motion for a clean configuration with idle thrust. Wind and nonstandard atmospheric properties have a large effect on the flight path. It is found that uncertainty in the descent Mach number has a large effect on the predicted flight time. Of the possible combinations of Mach number and calibrated airspeed for a descent, only small changes were observed in the fuel consumed.

  16. Pilot Preferences on Displayed Aircraft Control Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Gregory, Irene M.

    2013-01-01

    The experiments described here explored how pilots want available maneuver authority information transmitted and how this information affects pilots before and after an aircraft failure. The aircraft dynamic variables relative to flight performance were narrowed to energy management variables. A survey was conducted to determine what these variables should be. Survey results indicated that bank angle, vertical velocity, and airspeed were the preferred variables. Based on this, two displays were designed to inform the pilot of available maneuver envelope expressed as bank angle, vertical velocity, and airspeed. These displays were used in an experiment involving control surface failures. Results indicate the displayed limitations in bank angle, vertical velocity, and airspeed were helpful to the pilots during aircraft surface failures. However, the additional information did lead to a slight increase in workload, a small decrease in perceived aircraft flying qualities, and no effect on aircraft situation awareness.

  17. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  18. Characteristics of vertical air motion in isolated convective clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; French, Jeffrey R.

    2016-08-01

    The vertical velocity and air mass flux in isolated convective clouds are statistically analyzed using aircraft in situ data collected from three field campaigns: High-Plains Cumulus (HiCu) conducted over the midlatitude High Plains, COnvective Precipitation Experiment (COPE) conducted in a midlatitude coastal area, and Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T) conducted over a tropical ocean. The results show that small-scale updrafts and downdrafts (< 500 m in diameter) are frequently observed in the three field campaigns, and they make important contributions to the total air mass flux. The probability density functions (PDFs) and profiles of the observed vertical velocity are provided. The PDFs are exponentially distributed. The updrafts generally strengthen with height. Relatively strong updrafts (> 20 m s-1) were sampled in COPE and ICE-T. The observed downdrafts are stronger in HiCu and COPE than in ICE-T. The PDFs of the air mass flux are exponentially distributed as well. The observed maximum air mass flux in updrafts is of the order 104 kg m-1 s-1. The observed air mass flux in the downdrafts is typically a few times smaller in magnitude than that in the updrafts. Since this study only deals with isolated convective clouds, and there are many limitations and sampling issues in aircraft in situ measurements, more observations are needed to better explore the vertical air motion in convective clouds.

  19. Trajectory Control for Very Flexible Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-30

    total airspeed and the classic aircraft longitudinal , lateral, and vertical velocity components are u positive out the nose, v positive out the right...wing flexibility is a secondary and minimal contribution to aircraft longitudinal motion. Using this assumption and the previous assumptions of

  20. ANALYSIS OF AIRCRAFT MOTIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed by Ames Research Center, in cooperation with the National Transportation Safety Board, as a technique for deriving time histories of an aircraft's motion from Air Traffic Control (ATC) radar records. This technique uses the radar range and azimuth data, along with the downlinked altitude data, to derive an expanded set of data which includes airspeed, lift, attitude angles (pitch, roll, and heading), etc. This technique should prove useful as a source of data in the investigation of commercial airline accidents and in the analysis of accidents involving aircraft which do not have onboard data recorders (e.g., military, short-haul, and general aviation). The technique used to determine the aircraft motions involves smoothing of raw radar data. These smoothed results, in combination with other available information (wind profiles and aircraft performance data), are used to derive the expanded set of data. This program uses a cubic least-square fit to smooth the raw data. This moving-arc procedure provides a smoothed time history of the aircraft position, the inertial velocities, and accelerations. Using known winds, these inertial data are transformed to aircraft stability axes to provide true airspeed, thrust-drag, lift, and roll angle. Further derivation, based on aircraft dependent performance data, can determine the aircraft angle of attack, pitch, and heading angle. Results of experimental tests indicate that values derived from ATC radar records using this technique agree favorably with airborne measurements. This program is written in FORTRAN IV to be executed in the batch mode, and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of 64k (octal) of 60 bit words.