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Sample records for aircraft warning lights

  1. 32 CFR 707.4 - Aircraft warning lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aircraft warning lights. 707.4 Section 707.4... RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.4 Aircraft warning lights. Naval vessels may display... light on each obstruction....

  2. 32 CFR 707.4 - Aircraft warning lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aircraft warning lights. 707.4 Section 707.4... RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.4 Aircraft warning lights. Naval vessels may display... light on each obstruction....

  3. 32 CFR 707.4 - Aircraft warning lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aircraft warning lights. 707.4 Section 707.4... RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.4 Aircraft warning lights. Naval vessels may display... light on each obstruction....

  4. 32 CFR 707.4 - Aircraft warning lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aircraft warning lights. 707.4 Section 707.4... RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.4 Aircraft warning lights. Naval vessels may display... light on each obstruction....

  5. 32 CFR 707.4 - Aircraft warning lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aircraft warning lights. 707.4 Section 707.4... RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.4 Aircraft warning lights. Naval vessels may display... light on each obstruction....

  6. Aircraft Cabin Turbulence Warning Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogue, Rodney K.; Larcher, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    New turbulence prediction technology offers the potential for advance warning of impending turbulence encounters, thereby allowing necessary cabin preparation time prior to the encounter. The amount of time required for passengers and flight attendants to be securely seated (that is, seated with seat belts fastened) currently is not known. To determine secured seating-based warning times, a consortium of aircraft safety organizations have conducted an experiment involving a series of timed secured seating trials. This demonstrative experiment, conducted on October 1, 2, and 3, 2002, used a full-scale B-747 wide-body aircraft simulator, human passenger subjects, and supporting staff from six airlines. Active line-qualified flight attendants from three airlines participated in the trials. Definitive results have been obtained to provide secured seating-based warning times for the developers of turbulence warning technology

  7. 14 CFR 27.1322 - Warning, caution, and advisory lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Warning, caution, and advisory lights. 27.1322 Section 27.1322 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Instruments: Installation § 27.1322 Warning, caution, and advisory...

  8. 14 CFR 23.1322 - Warning, caution, and advisory lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Warning, caution, and advisory lights. 23.1322 Section 23.1322 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Instruments: Installation §...

  9. Light aircraft sound transmission study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, M.; David, J.; Heitman, K.; Crocker, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The revived interest in the design of propeller driven aircraft is based on increasing fuel prices as well as on the need for bigger short haul and commuter aircraft. A major problem encountered with propeller driven aircraft is propeller and exhaust noise that is transmitted through the fuselage sidewall structure. Part of the work which was conducted during the period April 1 to August 31, 1983, on the studies of sound transmission through light aircraft walls is presented.

  10. 33 CFR 143.15 - Lights and warning devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lights and warning devices. 143... (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT General § 143.15 Lights and warning devices. (a) OCS facilities must meet the lights and warning devices requirements under part 67 of...

  11. 33 CFR 143.15 - Lights and warning devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lights and warning devices. 143... (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT General § 143.15 Lights and warning devices. (a) OCS facilities must meet the lights and warning devices requirements under part 67 of...

  12. 33 CFR 143.15 - Lights and warning devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lights and warning devices. 143... (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT General § 143.15 Lights and warning devices. (a) OCS facilities must meet the lights and warning devices requirements under part 67 of...

  13. 33 CFR 143.15 - Lights and warning devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lights and warning devices. 143... (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT General § 143.15 Lights and warning devices. (a) OCS facilities must meet the lights and warning devices requirements under part 67 of...

  14. Light aircraft sound transmission study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heitman, K.; Bernhard, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    The plausibility of using the two microphone sound intensity technique to study noise transmission into light aircraft was investigated. In addition, a simple model to predict the interior sound pressure level of the cabin was constructed.

  15. Aircraft Low Altitude Wind Shear Detection and Warning System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Peter C.; Kuhn, Peter M.

    1991-01-01

    There is now considerable evidence to substantiate the causal relationship between low altitude wind shear (LAWS) and the recent increase in low-altitude aircraft accidents. The National Research Council has found that for the period 1964 to 1982, LAWS was involved in nearly all the weather-related air carrier fatalities. However, at present, there is no acceptable method, technique, or hardware system that provides the necessary safety margins, for spatial and timely detection of LAWS from an aircraft during the critical phases of landing and takeoff. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has addressed this matter and supports the development of an airborne system for detecting hazardous LAWS with at least a one minute warning of the potential hazard to the pilot. One of the purposes of this paper is to show from some of our preliminary flight measurement research that a forward looking infrared radiometer (FLIR) system can be used to successfully detect the cool downdraft of downbursts [microbursts/macrobursts (MB)] and thunderstorm gust front outflows that are responsible for most of the LAWS events. The FLIR system provides a much greater safety margin for the pilot than that provided by reactive designs such as inertial-air speed systems that require the actual penetration of the MB before a pilot warning can be initiated. Our preliminary results indicate that an advanced airborne FLIR system could provide the pilot with remote indication of MB threat, location, movement, and predicted MB hazards along the flight path ahead of the aircraft.In a proof-of-concept experiment, we have flight tested a prototype FLIR system (nonscanning, fixed range) near and within Colorado MBs with excellent detectability. The results show that a minimum warning time of one-four minutes (5×10 km), depending on aircraft speed, is available to the pilot prior to a MB encounter. Analysis of the flight data with respect to a modified `hazard index' indicates the severe hazard

  16. 47 CFR 17.45 - Temporary warning lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Temporary warning lights. 17.45 Section 17.45... warning lights. During construction of an antenna structure, for which red obstruction lighting is required, at least two 116- or 125-watt lamps (A21/TS) enclosed in aviation red obstruction light...

  17. 47 CFR 17.45 - Temporary warning lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Temporary warning lights. 17.45 Section 17.45... warning lights. During construction of an antenna structure, for which red obstruction lighting is required, at least two 116- or 125-watt lamps (A21/TS) enclosed in aviation red obstruction light...

  18. 47 CFR 17.45 - Temporary warning lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Temporary warning lights. 17.45 Section 17.45... warning lights. During construction of an antenna structure, for which red obstruction lighting is required, at least two 116- or 125-watt lamps (A21/TS) enclosed in aviation red obstruction light...

  19. 47 CFR 17.45 - Temporary warning lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Temporary warning lights. 17.45 Section 17.45... warning lights. During construction of an antenna structure, for which red obstruction lighting is required, at least two 116- or 125-watt lamps (A21/TS) enclosed in aviation red obstruction light...

  20. 47 CFR 17.45 - Temporary warning lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Temporary warning lights. 17.45 Section 17.45... warning lights. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 56986, Sept. 24, 2014. During construction of an... (A21/TS) enclosed in aviation red obstruction light globes, shall be installed at the uppermost...

  1. 14 CFR 91.209 - Aircraft lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aircraft lights. 91.209 Section 91.209... Requirements § 91.209 Aircraft lights. No person may: (a) During the period from sunset to sunrise (or, in... position lights; (2) Park or move an aircraft in, or in dangerous proximity to, a night flight...

  2. 14 CFR 91.209 - Aircraft lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aircraft lights. 91.209 Section 91.209... Requirements § 91.209 Aircraft lights. No person may: (a) During the period from sunset to sunrise (or, in... position lights; (2) Park or move an aircraft in, or in dangerous proximity to, a night flight...

  3. 14 CFR 91.209 - Aircraft lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aircraft lights. 91.209 Section 91.209... Requirements § 91.209 Aircraft lights. No person may: (a) During the period from sunset to sunrise (or, in... position lights; (2) Park or move an aircraft in, or in dangerous proximity to, a night flight...

  4. 14 CFR 91.209 - Aircraft lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aircraft lights. 91.209 Section 91.209... Requirements § 91.209 Aircraft lights. No person may: (a) During the period from sunset to sunrise (or, in... position lights; (2) Park or move an aircraft in, or in dangerous proximity to, a night flight...

  5. 14 CFR 91.209 - Aircraft lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aircraft lights. 91.209 Section 91.209... Requirements § 91.209 Aircraft lights. No person may: (a) During the period from sunset to sunrise (or, in... position lights; (2) Park or move an aircraft in, or in dangerous proximity to, a night flight...

  6. Lights and siren: a review of emergency vehicle warning systems.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, R A; Eilers, M A

    1991-12-01

    Emergency medical services providers routinely respond to emergencies using lights and siren. This practice is not without risk of collision. Audible and visual warning devices and vehicle markings are integral to efficient negotiation of traffic and reduction of collision risk. An understanding of warning system characteristics is necessary to implement appropriate guidelines for prehospital transportation systems. The pertinent literature on emergency vehicle warning systems is reviewed, with emphasis on potential health hazards associated with these techniques. Important findings inferred from the literature are 1) red flashing lights alone may not be as effective as other color combinations, 2) there are no data to support a seizure risk with strobe lights, 3) lime-yellow is probably superior to traditional emergency vehicle colors, 4) the siren is an extremely limited warning device, and 5) exposure to siren noise can cause hearing loss. Emergency physicians must ensure that emergency medical services transportation systems consider the pertinent literature on emergency vehicle warning systems. PMID:1746737

  7. Structural analysis of light aircraft using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, M. T.; Bruce, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    An application of NASTRAN to the structural analysis of light aircraft was conducted to determine the cost effectiveness. A model of the Baby Ace D model homebuilt aircraft was used. The NASTRAN model of the aircraft consists of 193 grid points connected by 352 structural members. All members are either rod or beam elements, including bending of unsymmetrical cross sections and torsion of noncircular cross sections. The aerodynamic loads applied to the aircraft were in accordance with FAA regulations governing the utility category aircraft.

  8. 33 CFR 143.15 - Lights and warning devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lights and warning devices. 143.15 Section 143.15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT General § 143.15 Lights and...

  9. 14 CFR 25.1322 - Warning, caution, and advisory lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... may require immediate corrective action); (b) Amber, for caution lights (lights indicating the... following color convention: (i) Red for warning alert indications. (ii) Amber or yellow for caution alert... red, amber, and yellow on the flight deck for functions other than flightcrew alerting must be...

  10. The Ultra Light Aircraft Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard W.

    1993-01-01

    The final report for grant NAG1-345 is presented. Recently, the bulk of the work that the grant has supported has been in the areas of ride quality and the structural analysis and testing of ultralight aircraft. The ride quality work ended in May 1989. Hence, the papers presented in this final report are concerned with ultralight aircraft.

  11. Obstacle detection and warning system for aircraft navigation at airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, Laurent

    2000-06-01

    This paper speaks about work conducted in 1998 and 1999 by AEROSPATIALE MATRA in development of an obstacle detection system, which has been tested on a demonstrator aircraft in Toulouse. The purpose of this mock- up was to verify the feasibility of a passive technology, and to consider the limits of its use.

  12. Daedalus Project's Light Eagle - Human powered aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Michelob Light Eagle is seen here in flight over Rogers Dry Lake at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Light Eagle and Daedalus human powered aircraft were testbeds for flight research conducted at Dryden between January 1987 and March 1988. These unique aircraft were designed and constructed by a group of students, professors, and alumni of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology within the context of the Daedalus project. The construction of the Light Eagle and Daedalus aircraft was funded primarily by the Anheuser Busch and United Technologies Corporations, respectively, with additional support from the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, MIT, and a number of other sponsors. To celebrate the Greek myth of Daedalus, the man who constructed wings of wax and feathers to escape King Minos, the Daedalus project began with the goal of designing, building and testing a human-powered aircraft that could fly the mythical distance, 115 km. To achieve this goal, three aircraft were constructed. The Light Eagle was the prototype aircraft, weighing 92 pounds. On January 22, 1987, it set a closed course distance record of 59 km, which still stands. Also in January of 1987, the Light Eagle was powered by Lois McCallin to set the straight distance, the distance around a closed circuit, and the duration world records for the female division in human powered vehicles. Following this success, two more aircraft were built, the Daedalus 87 and Daedalus 88. Each aircraft weighed approximately 69 pounds. The Daedalus 88 aircraft was the ship that flew the 199 km from the Iraklion Air Force Base on Crete in the Mediterranean Sea, to the island of Santorini in 3 hours, 54 minutes. In the process, the aircraft set new records in distance and endurance for a human powered aircraft. The specific areas of flight research conducted at Dryden included characterizing the rigid body and flexible dynamics of the Light Eagle, investigating sensors for an

  13. Improved portable lighting for visual aircraft inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Shagam, R.N.; Lerner, J.; Shie, R.

    1995-04-01

    The most common tool used by aircraft inspectors is the personal flashlight. While it is compact and very portable, it is generally typified by poor beam quality which can interfere with the ability for an inspector to detect small defects and anomalies, such as cracks and corrosion sites, which may be indicators of major structural problems. A Light Shaping Diffuser{trademark} (LSD) installed in a stock flashlight as a replacement to the lens can improve the uniformity of an average flashlight and improve the quality of the inspection. Field trials at aircraft maintenance facilities have demonstrated general acceptance of the LSD by aircraft inspection and maintenance personnel.

  14. Improved portable lighting for visual aircraft inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagam, Richard N.; Lerner, Jeremy M.; Shie, Rick

    1995-07-01

    The most common tool used by aircraft inspectors is the personal flashlight. While it is compact and very portable, it is generally typified by poor beam quality which can interfere with the ability for an inspector to detect small defects and anomalies, such as cracks and corrosion sites, which may be indicators of major structural problems. A Light Shaping Diffuser TM (LSD) installed in a stock flashlight as a replacement to the lens can improve the uniformity of an average flashlight and improve the quality of the inspection. Field trials at aircraft maintenance facilities have demonstrated general acceptance of the LSD by aircraft inspection and maintenance personnel.

  15. Cueing light configuration for aircraft navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K. (Inventor); Johnson, Walter J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A pattern of light is projected from multiple sources located on an aircraft to form two clusters. The pattern of each cluster changes as the aircraft flies above and below a predetermined nominal altitude. The initial patterns are two horizontal, spaced apart lines. Each is capable of changing to a delta formation as either the altitude or the terrain varies. The direction of the delta cues the pilot as to the direction of corrective action.

  16. 75 FR 70074 - Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft AGENCY: Federal Aviation... provisions of the Sport Pilot and Light-Sport Aircraft rule issued July 16, 2004, and effective September 1, 2004. ASTM International Committee F37 on Light Sport Aircraft developed the revised standards...

  17. 76 FR 45647 - Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... revision process. Background: Under the provisions of the Sport Pilot and Light-Sport Aircraft rule, 69 FR... Federal Aviation Administration Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft AGENCY: Federal Aviation... to the provisions of the Sport Pilot and Light-Sport Aircraft rule issued July 16, 2004,...

  18. Light shaping diffusers{trademark} improve aircraft inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Shagam, R.N.; Shie, R.; Lerner, J.

    1994-11-01

    Physical Optical Corporation has introduced a Light Shaping Diffuser{trademark} (LSD) for the specialized illumination requirements of aircraft inspection. Attached to a handheld, battery-powered flashlight, this light-weight, holographic diffuser element provides bright, even illumination as aircraft inspectors perform the important task of visually examining aircraft for possible structural defects. Field trials conducted by the Aging Aircraft Program at Sandia National Laboratories confirm that the LSD-equipped flashlights are preferred by visual inspectors over stock flashlights.

  19. Strobe Traffic Lights Warn of Approaching Emergency Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelder, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    Strobe-enhanced traffic signals have been developed to aid in the preemption of road intersections for emergency vehicles. The strobe-enhanced traffic signals can be incorporated into both new and pre-existing traffic-control systems in which the traffic-signal heads are of a relatively new type based on arrays of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The strobe-enhanced traffic signals offer a less expensive, less complex alternative to a recently developed system of LED-based warning signs placed next to traffic signals. Because of its visual complexity, the combination of traffic signals and warning signs is potentially confusing to motorists. The strobe-enhanced traffic signals present less visual clutter. In a given traffic-signal head, the strobe-enhanced traffic signal is embedded in the red LED array of the stop signal. Two strobe LED strips one horizontal and one vertical are made capable of operating separately from the rest of the red LED matrix. When no emergency vehicle is approaching, the red LED array functions as a normal stop signal: all the red LEDs are turned on and off together. When the intersection is to be preempted for an approaching emergency vehicle, only the LEDs in one of the strobe strips are lit, and are turned on in a sequence that indicates the direction of approach. For example (see figure), if an emergency vehicle approaches from the right, the strobe LEDs are lit in a sequence moving from right to left. Important to the success of strobe-enhanced traffic signals is conformance to city ordinances and close relation to pre-existing traffic standards. For instance, one key restriction is that new icons must not include arrows, so that motorists will not confuse new icons with conventional arrows that indicate allowed directions of movement. It is also critical that new displays like strobe-enhanced traffic signals be similar to displays used in traffic-control systems in large cities. For example, Charleston, South Carolina uses horizontal

  20. The subjective evaluation of noise from light aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, K. P.

    1976-01-01

    A study was conducted in which subjects evaluated the sounds of a light aircraft and a motorcycle. Particular emphasis was placed on examining the duration of the sounds. Thirty subjects gave annoyance ratings to a total of 50 sounds, with peak levels between 65 and 85dB(A). It was found that aircraft and motorcycles have differing optimum duration corrections. The conventional duration correction used in the calculation of EPNL is far from being the optimum for light aircraft.

  1. 77 FR 24251 - Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft AGENCY: Federal Aviation... availability of three new and three revised consensus standards relating to the provisions of the Sport Pilot and Light-Sport Aircraft rule issued July 16, 2004, and effective September 1, 2004....

  2. 78 FR 35085 - Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft AGENCY: Federal Aviation... availability of one new and seven revised consensus standards relating to the provisions of the Sport Pilot and Light-Sport Aircraft rule issued July 16, 2004, and effective September 1, 2004. ASTM...

  3. Assessing Aircraft Supply Air to Recommend Compounds for Timely Warning of Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Richard B.

    Taking aircraft out of service for even one day to correct fume-in-cabin events can cost the industry roughly $630 million per year in lost revenue. The quantitative correlation study investigated quantitative relationships between measured concentrations of contaminants in bleed air and probability of odor detectability. Data were collected from 94 aircraft engine and auxiliary power unit (APU) bleed air tests from an archival data set between 1997 and 2011, and no relationships were found. Pearson correlation was followed by regression analysis for individual contaminants. Significant relationships of concentrations of compounds in bleed air to probability of odor detectability were found (p<0.05), as well as between compound concentration and probability of sensory irritancy detectability. Study results may be useful to establish early warning levels. Predictive trend monitoring, a method to identify potential pending failure modes within a mechanical system, may influence scheduled down-time for maintenance as a planned event, rather than repair after a mechanical failure and thereby reduce operational costs associated with odor-in-cabin events. Twenty compounds (independent variables) were found statistically significant as related to probability of odor detectability (dependent variable 1). Seventeen compounds (independent variables) were found statistically significant as related to probability of sensory irritancy detectability (dependent variable 2). Additional research was recommended to further investigate relationships between concentrations of contaminants and probability of odor detectability or probability of sensory irritancy detectability for all turbine oil brands. Further research on implementation of predictive trend monitoring may be warranted to demonstrate how the monitoring process might be applied to in-flight application.

  4. User involvement in the early stages of the development of an aircraft warning system.

    PubMed

    Noyes, J M; Starr, A F; Frankish, C R

    1996-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness of the importance and the benefits to be attained from consulting the end-users during system and product development. Although the rationale of utilizing the expertise of end-users in the system development life cycle appears to provide an apparently straightforward, even 'ideal' approach, there are many difficulties associated with eliciting the required knowledge from experts, both general and specific to every user group. Furthermore, many developers do not know how to involve users, or if they do, they do not utilize them to best effect. In the avionics sphere, the wealth of knowledge possessed by line pilots and flight engineers represents a vital information resource for the design of future flight-deck systems. As a specific example, this paper overviews some of the considerations which arose from working with these end-users in the early stages of the development of a warning and diagnostic system for civil aircraft. The end-goal of this particular phase of the work was the generation of guidelines for the design of the interface for the software engineers to use when building the prototype, and the methodological approach taken to achieve this is reported here. PMID:11541759

  5. Conceptual design of single turbofan engine powered light aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, F. S.; Voorhees, C. G.; Heinrich, A. M.; Baisden, D. N.

    1977-01-01

    The conceptual design of a four place single turbofan engine powered light aircraft was accomplished utilizing contemporary light aircraft conventional design techniques as a means of evaluating the NASA-Ames General Aviation Synthesis Program (GASP) as a preliminary design tool. In certain areas, disagreement or exclusion were found to exist between the results of the conventional design and GASP processes. Detail discussion of these points along with the associated contemporary design methodology are presented.

  6. Very Light Aircraft: Revitalization through Certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zyskowski, Michael K.

    1995-01-01

    As the future of the general aviation industry seems to be improving, a cultural paradigm shift may be imminent with the implementation of an advanced, revolutionary transportation system within the United States. By observing the support of government and industry for this idea, near and long term effects must be addressed if this change is going to occur. The high certification costs associated with general aviation aircraft must be reduced without compromising safety if a new transportation system is to be developed in the future. With the advent of new, streamlined rules recently issued for the certification of small aircraft, it seems as though new opportunities are now available to the general aviation industry. Not only will immediate benefits be realized with increased sales of certified small aircraft, but there would now be a way of introducing the advanced concepts of future aircraft at varying degrees of technology and cost as options to the customer.

  7. Annoyance caused by light aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The correlation between objective and noise stresses and subjectively perceived disturbance from general aviation aircraft was studied at 6 Swiss airports. Noise levels calculated for these airports are given. Survey results are analyzed.

  8. Annoyance caused by light aircraft noise

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The correlation between objective and noise stresses and subjectively perceived disturbance from general aviation aircraft was studied at 6 Swiss airports. Noise levels calculated for these airports are given. Survey results are analyzed.

  9. Methods of validating the Advanced Diagnosis and Warning system for aircraft ICing Environments (ADWICE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosczyk, S.; Hauf, T.; Leifeld, C.

    2003-04-01

    In-flight icing is one of the most hazardous problems in aviation. It was determined as contributing factor in more than 800 incidents worldwide. And though the meteorological factors of airframe icing become more and more transparent, they have to be integrated into the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) certification rules first. Therefore best way to enhance aviational safety is to know the areas of dangerous icing conditions in order to prevent flying in them. For this reason the German Weather Service (DWD), the Institute for Atmospheric Physics at the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) and the Institute of Meteorology and Climatology (ImuK) of the University of Hanover started developingADWICE - theAdvanced Diagnosis and Warning system for aircraft ICing Environments - in 1998. This algorithm is based on the DWDLocal Model (LM) forecast of temperature and humidity, in fusion with radar and synop and, coming soon, satellite data. It gives an every-hour nowcast of icing severity and type - divided into four categories: freezing rain, convective, stratiform and general - for the middle European area. A first validation of ADWICE took place in 1999 with observational data from an in-flight icing campaign during EURICE in 1997. The momentary validation deals with a broader database. As first step the output from ADWICE is compared to observations from pilots (PIREPs) to get a statistic of the probability of detecting icing and either no-icing conditions within the last icing-seasons. There were good results of this method with the AmericanIntegrated Icing Diagnostic Algorithm (IIDA). A problem though is the small number of PIREPs from Europe in comparison to the US. So a temporary campaign of pilots (including Lufthansa and Aerolloyd) collecting cloud and icing information every few miles is intended to solve this unpleasant situation. Another source of data are the measurements of theFalcon - a DLR research aircraft carrying an icing sensor. In addition to that

  10. Aircraft Instrument, Fire Protection, Warning, Communication, Navigation and Cabin Atmosphere Control System (Course Outline), Aviation Mechanics 3 (Air Frame): 9067.04.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This document presents an outline for a 135-hour course designed to familiarize the student with manipulative skills and theoretical knowledge concerning aircraft instrument systems like major flight and engine instruments; fire protection and fire fighting systems; warning systems and navigation systems; aircraft cabin control systems, such as…

  11. High performance dash-on-warning air mobile missile system. [first strike avoidance for retaliatory aircraft-borne ICBM counterattack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hague, D. S.; Levin, A. D.

    1978-01-01

    Because fixed missile bases have become increasingly vulnerable to strategic nuclear attack, an air-mobile missile system is proposed, whereby ICBMs can be launched from the hold of large subsonic aircraft following a missile-assisted supersonic dash of the aircraft to a safe distance from their base (about 50 n mi). Three major categories of vehicle design are presented: staged, which employs vertical take-off and a single solid rocket booster similar to that used on the Space Shuttle; unstaged, which employs vertical take-off and four internally-carried reusable liquid rocket engines; and alternative concepts, some using horizontal take-off with duct-burning afterburners. Attention is given to the economics of maintaining 200 ICBMs airborne during an alert (about $600 million for each fleet alert, exclusive of acquisition costs). The chief advantages of the system lie in its reduced vulnerability to suprise attack, because it can be launched on warning, and in the possibility for recall of the aircraft if the warning proves to be a false alarm.

  12. Light weight escape capsule for fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robert, James A.

    1988-01-01

    Emergency crew escape capabilities have been less than adequate for fighter aircraft since before WW II. From the over-the-side bailout of those days through the current ejection seat with a rocket catapult, escaping from a disabled aircraft has been risky at best. Current efforts are underway toward developing a high-tech, smart ejection seat that will give fighter pilots more room to live in the sky, but an escape capsule is needed to meet current and future fighter envelopes. Escape capsules have a bad reputation due to past examples of high weight, poor performance and great complexity. However, the advantages available demand that a capsule be developed. This capsule concept will minimize the inherent disavantages and incorporate the benefits while integrating all aspects of crew station design. The resulting design is appropriate for a crew station of the year 2010 and includes improved combat acceleration protection, chemical or biological combat capability, improved aircraft to escape system interaction, and the highest level of escape performance achievable. The capsule is compact, which can allow a reduced aircraft size and weighs only 1200 lb. The escape system weight penalty is only 120 lb higher than that for the next ejection seat and the capsule has a corresponding increase in performance.

  13. 14 CFR 27.1322 - Warning, caution, and advisory lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... lights; and (d) Any other color, including white, for lights not described in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, provided the color differs sufficiently from the colors prescribed in paragraphs...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1322 - Warning, caution, and advisory lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) Green, for safe operation lights; and (d) Any other color, including white, for lights not described in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, provided the color differs sufficiently from the...

  15. 14 CFR 25.1322 - Warning, caution, and advisory lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... lights; and (d) Any other color, including white, for lights not described in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, provided the color differs sufficiently from the colors prescribed in paragraphs...

  16. 14 CFR 27.1322 - Warning, caution, and advisory lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... lights; and (d) Any other color, including white, for lights not described in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, provided the color differs sufficiently from the colors prescribed in paragraphs...

  17. 14 CFR 29.1322 - Warning, caution, and advisory lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... lights; and (d) Any other color, including white, for lights not described in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, provided the color differs sufficiently from the colors prescribed in paragraphs...

  18. 14 CFR 29.1322 - Warning, caution, and advisory lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... lights; and (d) Any other color, including white, for lights not described in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, provided the color differs sufficiently from the colors prescribed in paragraphs...

  19. 14 CFR 23.1322 - Warning, caution, and advisory lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) Green, for safe operation lights; and (d) Any other color, including white, for lights not described in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, provided the color differs sufficiently from the...

  20. 14 CFR 27.1322 - Warning, caution, and advisory lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... lights; and (d) Any other color, including white, for lights not described in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, provided the color differs sufficiently from the colors prescribed in paragraphs...

  1. 14 CFR 27.1322 - Warning, caution, and advisory lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... lights; and (d) Any other color, including white, for lights not described in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, provided the color differs sufficiently from the colors prescribed in paragraphs...

  2. 14 CFR 29.1322 - Warning, caution, and advisory lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... lights; and (d) Any other color, including white, for lights not described in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, provided the color differs sufficiently from the colors prescribed in paragraphs...

  3. 14 CFR 29.1322 - Warning, caution, and advisory lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... lights; and (d) Any other color, including white, for lights not described in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, provided the color differs sufficiently from the colors prescribed in paragraphs...

  4. 14 CFR 29.1322 - Warning, caution, and advisory lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... lights; and (d) Any other color, including white, for lights not described in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, provided the color differs sufficiently from the colors prescribed in paragraphs...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1322 - Warning, caution, and advisory lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) Green, for safe operation lights; and (d) Any other color, including white, for lights not described in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, provided the color differs sufficiently from the...

  6. 14 CFR 23.1322 - Warning, caution, and advisory lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) Green, for safe operation lights; and (d) Any other color, including white, for lights not described in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, provided the color differs sufficiently from the...

  7. LOFT. Detail in basement (TAN650). Radiation hazard warning lights (red, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOFT. Detail in basement (TAN-650). Radiation hazard warning lights (red, amber, green) in turnaround area. Camera facing west. Date: May 2004. INEEL negative no. HD-39-15-4 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. Interior noise levels of two propeller-driven light aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catherines, J. J.; Mayes, W. H.

    1975-01-01

    The relationships between aircraft operating conditions and interior noise and the degree to which ground testing can be used in lieu of flight testing for performing interior noise research were studied. The results show that the noise inside light aircraft is strongly influenced by the rotational speed of the engine and propeller. Both the overall noise and low frequency spectra levels were observed to decrease with increasing high speed rpm operations during flight. This phenomenon and its significance is not presently understood. Comparison of spectra obtained in flight with spectra obtained on the ground suggests that identification of frequency components and relative amplitude of propeller and engine noise sources may be evaluated on stationary aircraft.

  9. Fly-by-light aircraft closed loop test program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halski, Don J.; Kessler, Bradley L.; Mattes, Robert E.; Wanamaker, Michael F.; Baumbick, Robert J.

    1995-05-01

    The Fly-by-Light Aircraft Closed-Loop Test (FACT) program is a flight test program sponsored by NASA-Lewis Research Center. The objectives of the FACT program are to demonstrate optical closed-loop control of flight critical and non-flight critical control surfaces and to demonstrate installation and maintenance aspects of fiber optics for application to commercial aircraft. This paper summarizes the FACT program optical maintenance, test architecture, and hardware developments to be flight tested on the NASA-Dryden F/A-18 Systems Research Aircraft (SRA). The modifications include replacing Fly-By-Wire (FBW) main ram feedback LVDT's with optic position sensors and an electro-optic decoder, and using electrical to optic converters and reverse for commands. The performance and handling qualities will be validated by laboratory, ground, and flight tests. The goal is to demonstrate system performance equivalent to the production system.

  10. 14 CFR 65.107 - Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft): Eligibility, privileges, and limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft... CREWMEMBERS Repairmen § 65.107 Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft): Eligibility, privileges, and...-sport aircraft) and appropriate rating: To be eligible for You must (1) A repairman certificate...

  11. 14 CFR 65.107 - Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft): Eligibility, privileges, and limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft... CREWMEMBERS Repairmen § 65.107 Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft): Eligibility, privileges, and...-sport aircraft) and appropriate rating: To be eligible for You must (1) A repairman certificate...

  12. 14 CFR 65.107 - Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft): Eligibility, privileges, and limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft... CREWMEMBERS Repairmen § 65.107 Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft): Eligibility, privileges, and...-sport aircraft) and appropriate rating: To be eligible for You must (1) A repairman certificate...

  13. 14 CFR 65.107 - Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft): Eligibility, privileges, and limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft... CREWMEMBERS Repairmen § 65.107 Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft): Eligibility, privileges, and...-sport aircraft) and appropriate rating: To be eligible for You must (1) A repairman certificate...

  14. 14 CFR 65.107 - Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft): Eligibility, privileges, and limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft... CREWMEMBERS Repairmen § 65.107 Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft): Eligibility, privileges, and...-sport aircraft) and appropriate rating: To be eligible for You must (1) A repairman certificate...

  15. Laser warning receiver to identify the wavelength and angle of arrival of incident laser light

    DOEpatents

    Sinclair; Michael B.; Sweatt, William C.

    2010-03-23

    A laser warning receiver is disclosed which has up to hundreds of individual optical channels each optically oriented to receive laser light from a different angle of arrival. Each optical channel has an optical wedge to define the angle of arrival, and a lens to focus the laser light onto a multi-wavelength photodetector for that channel. Each multi-wavelength photodetector has a number of semiconductor layers which are located in a multi-dielectric stack that concentrates the laser light into one of the semiconductor layers according to wavelength. An electrical signal from the multi-wavelength photodetector can be processed to determine both the angle of arrival and the wavelength of the laser light.

  16. Overall design of imaging spectrometer on-board light aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Zhongqi, H.; Zhengkui, C.; Changhua, C.

    1996-11-01

    Aerial remote sensing is the earliest remote sensing technical system and has gotten rapid development in recent years. The development of aerial remote sensing was dominated by high to medium altitude platform in the past, and now it is characterized by the diversity platform including planes of high-medium-low flying altitude, helicopter, airship, remotely controlled airplane, glider, and balloon. The widely used and rapidly developed platform recently is light aircraft. Early in the close of 1970s, Beijing Research Institute of Uranium Geology began aerial photography and geophysical survey using light aircraft, and put forward the overall design scheme of light aircraft imaging spectral application system (LAISAS) in 19905. LAISAS is comprised of four subsystem. They are called measuring platform, data acquiring subsystem, ground testing and data processing subsystem respectively. The principal instruments of LAISAS include measuring platform controlled by inertia gyroscope, aerial spectrometer with high spectral resolution, imaging spectrometer, 3-channel scanner, 128-channel imaging spectrometer, GPS, illuminance-meter, and devices for atmospheric parameters measuring, ground testing, data correction and processing. LAISAS has the features of integrity from data acquisition to data processing and to application; of stability which guarantees the image quality and is comprised of measuring, ground testing device, and in-door data correction system; of exemplariness of integrated the technology of GIS, GPS, and Image Processing System; of practicality which embodied LAISAS with flexibility and high ratio of performance to cost. So, it can be used in the fields of fundamental research of Remote Sensing and large-scale mapping for resource exploration, environmental monitoring, calamity prediction, and military purpose.

  17. Light transport and general aviation aircraft icing research requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breeze, R. K.; Clark, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    A short term and a long term icing research and technology program plan was drafted for NASA LeRC based on 33 separate research items. The specific items listed resulted from a comprehensive literature search, organized and assisted by a computer management file and an industry/Government agency survey. Assessment of the current facilities and icing technology was accomplished by presenting summaries of ice sensitive components and protection methods; and assessments of penalty evaluation, the experimental data base, ice accretion prediction methods, research facilities, new protection methods, ice protection requirements, and icing instrumentation. The intent of the research plan was to determine what icing research NASA LeRC must do or sponsor to ultimately provide for increased utilization and safety of light transport and general aviation aircraft.

  18. 76 FR 5 - Feathering Propeller Systems for Light-Sport Aircraft Powered Gliders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... Aircraft and Airmen for the Operation of Light-Sport Aircraft'' (Sport Pilot Rule) (69 FR 44772, July 27... pilot training requirements were important. In that NPRM (67 FR 5376), we stated that ``a light sport... (65 FR 19477-78) or you may visit http://DocketsInfo.dot.gov . ] Docket: To read background...

  19. Development and system identification of a light unmanned aircraft for flying qualities research

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, M.E.; Andrisani, D. II

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the design, construction, flight testing and system identification of a light weight remotely piloted aircraft and its use in studying flying qualities in the longitudinal axis. The short period approximation to the longitudinal dynamics of the aircraft was used. Parameters in this model were determined a priori using various empirical estimators. These parameters were then estimated from flight data using a maximum likelihood parameter identification method. A comparison of the parameter values revealed that the stability derivatives obtained from the empirical estimators were reasonably close to the flight test results. However, the control derivatives determined by the empirical estimators were too large by a factor of two. The aircraft was also flown to determine how the longitudinal flying qualities of light weight remotely piloted aircraft compared to full size manned aircraft. It was shown that light weight remotely piloted aircraft require much faster short period dynamics to achieve level I flying qualities in an up-and-away flight task.

  20. Design and certification of low-cost distributed Control-By-Light aircraft control systems for part 25 aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Brian D.; Robillard, Michael N.

    1996-10-01

    Raytheon has developed and is certifying fault-tolerant low- cost distributed Control-By-LightTM technology for use in the next generation of Civil, Regional, and General Aviation aircraft. Distributed Control-By-LightTM holds significant promise when applied to complex sensor/actuator systems such as aircraft controls. CBLTM systems replace mechanical, hydraulic and electrical controls presently used to monitor, control and display flight, engine, and utility functions, and has substantial weight, cost, safety, and performance advantages over today's mechanical and Fly-By- Wire techniques. This paper describes the system concepts and outlines the formal certification program presently underway.

  1. New Mobile Lidar Systems Aboard Ultra-Light Aircrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazette, Patrick; Shang, Xiaoxia; Totems, Julien; Marnas, Fabien; Sanak, Joseph

    2013-04-01

    Two lidar systems embedded on ultra light aircraft (ULA) flew over the Rhone valley, south-east of France, to characterize the vertical extend of pollution aerosols in this area influenced by large industrial sites. The main industrial source is the Etang de Berre (43°28' N, 5°01' E), close to Marseille city. The emissions are mainly due to metallurgy and petrochemical factories. Traffic related to Marseille's area contribute to pollution with its ~1500000 inhabitants. Note that the maritime traffic close to Marseille may play an important role due to its position as the leading French harbor . For the previous scientific purpose and for the first time on ULA, we flew a mini-N2 Raman lidar system to help the assessment of the aerosol optical properties. Another Ultra-Violet Rayleigh-Mie lidar has been integrated aboard a second ULA. The lidars are compact and eye safe instruments. They operate at the wavelength of 355 nm with a sampling along the line-of-sight of 0.75 m. Different flights plans were tested to use the two lidars in synergy. We will present the different approaches and discuss both their advantages and limitations. Acknowledgements: the lidar systems have been developed by CEA. They have been deployed with the support of FERRING France. We acknowledge the ULA pilots Franck Toussaint, François Bernard and José Coutet, and the Air Creation ULA Company for logistical help during the ULA campaign.

  2. 75 FR 41986 - Certification of Aircraft and Airmen for the Operation of Light-Sport Aircraft; Modifications to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... Sport Pilot Rating'' was published in the Federal Register (75 FR 5204). In that rule, the FAA amended... Operation of Light- Sport Aircraft; Modifications to Rules for Sport Pilots and Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating; OMB Approval of Information Collection AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration,...

  3. 75 FR 5203 - Certification of Aircraft and Airmen for the Operation of Light-Sport Aircraft; Modifications to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... Sport Pilot Rating'' (73 FR 20181). The NPRM proposed to address airman certification issues that have... Airmen for the Operation of Light-Sport Aircraft; Modifications to Rules for Sport Pilots and Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 75 , No. 20 / Monday,...

  4. 75 FR 15609 - Certification of Aircraft and Airmen for the Operation of Light-Sport Aircraft; Modifications to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ...; Modifications to Rules for Sport Pilots and Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating'' (75 FR 5204). In that... of the final rule. Corrections In final rule FR Doc. 2010-2056, beginning on page 5204 in the Federal... Operation of Light- Sport Aircraft; Modifications to Rules for Sport Pilots and Flight Instructors With...

  5. Load test set-up for the Airmass Sunburst Ultra-Light Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krug, Daniel W.; Smith, Howard W.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to set up, instrument, and test a Sunburst Ultra-Light aircraft. The intentions of the project were that the aircraft would need to be suspended from the test stand, leveled in the stand, the strain gauges tested and wired to the test equipment, and finally, the aircraft would be destroyed to obtain the failing loads. All jobs were completed, except for the destruction of the aircraft. This notebook shows the group's progress as these tasks were completed, and the following section attempts to explain the photographs in the notebook.

  6. Noise effects on passenger communication in light aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rupf, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper considers the effect of noise on conversation between two persons seated in a close, side-by-side position such as in a small aircraft. Twelve pairs of subjects were required to converse while being exposed to noises of various levels and spectra similar to those currently found in general aviation aircraft. After a period of noise exposure, subjects rated the disruptive effect of the noise on conversation and judged the acceptability of the noise. Subjective estimates of the maximum times for pleasant conversation in the noises were also obtained.

  7. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, B.D.; Lissaman, P.B.S.; Morgan, W.R.; Radkey, R.L.

    1998-09-22

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing`s top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gases for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well. 31 figs.

  8. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, Bart D.; Lissaman, Peter B. S.; Morgan, Walter R.; Radkey, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing's top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gasses for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well.

  9. Immediate skin responses to laser and light treatments: Warning endpoints: How to avoid side effects.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Molly; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Avram, Mathew M; Anderson, R Rox

    2016-05-01

    Lasers are versatile, commonly used treatment tools in dermatology. While it is tempting to follow manufacturer's guidelines or other "recipes" for laser treatment, this approach alone can be a recipe for disaster. Specific and immediate skin responses or endpoints exist and are clinically useful because they correlate with underlying mechanisms that are either desirable (ie, therapeutic), undesirable (ie, warning signs of injury or side effects), or incidental. The observation of clinical endpoints is a safe and reliable guide for appropriate treatment. This article presents the warning endpoints during specific dermatologic laser treatments, and the accompanying article presents the therapeutic endpoints, their underlying mechanisms, and the utility of these endpoints. PMID:27085227

  10. Methods and costs associated with outfitting light aircraft for remote sensing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, O. L.; Zetka, E. F.

    1973-01-01

    This document was designed to provide the potential user of a light aircraft remote sensor platform/data gathering system with general information on aircraft definition, implementation complexity, costs, scheduling and operational factors involved in this type of activity. Most of the subject material was developed from actual situations and problem areas encountered during the build-up cycle and early phases of flight operations.

  11. 14 CFR 21.190 - Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... certificate for a light-sport category aircraft. 21.190 Section 21.190 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Airworthiness Certificates § 21.190 Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft. (a) Purpose. The FAA issues a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category...

  12. 14 CFR 21.190 - Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... certificate for a light-sport category aircraft. 21.190 Section 21.190 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Airworthiness Certificates § 21.190 Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft. (a) Purpose. The FAA issues a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category...

  13. 14 CFR 21.190 - Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... certificate for a light-sport category aircraft. 21.190 Section 21.190 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Airworthiness Certificates § 21.190 Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft. (a) Purpose. The FAA issues a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category...

  14. 14 CFR 21.190 - Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... certificate for a light-sport category aircraft. 21.190 Section 21.190 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Airworthiness Certificates § 21.190 Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft. (a) Purpose. The FAA issues a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category...

  15. 14 CFR 21.190 - Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... certificate for a light-sport category aircraft. 21.190 Section 21.190 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Airworthiness Certificates § 21.190 Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft. (a) Purpose. The FAA issues a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category...

  16. Ultra-light alloys and their utilization on aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portevin, A M; Defleury, R

    1924-01-01

    We will arbitrarily call alloys having a specific gravity of less than 2 "ultra-light", in order to distinguish them from "light" alloys with a specific gravity of 2 to 3. Thus far it has been possible to make ultra-light alloys only by employing a large proportion of magnesium.

  17. General Aviation Light Aircraft Propulsion: From the 1940's to the Next Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkardt, Leo A.

    1998-01-01

    Current general aviation light aircraft are powered by engines that were originally designed in the 1940's. This paper gives a brief history of light aircraft engine development, explaining why the air-cooled, horizontally opposed piston engine became the dominant engine for this class of aircraft. Current engines are fairly efficient, and their designs have been updated through the years, but their basic design and operational characteristics are archaic in comparison to modem engine designs, such as those used in the automotive industry. There have been some innovative engine developments, but in general they have not been commercially successful. This paper gives some insight into the reasons for this lack of success. There is now renewed interest in developing modem propulsion systems for light aircraft, in the fore-front of which is NASA's General Aviation Propulsion (GAP) program. This paper gives an overview of the engines being developed in the GAP program, what they will mean to the general aviation community, and why NASA and its industry partners believe that these new engine developments will bring about a new era in general aviation light aircraft.

  18. Light Absorption of Stratospheric Aerosols: Long-Term Trend and Contribution by Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel , R. F.; Gore, Waren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of aerosol light-absorption coefficients are useful for studies of radiative transfer and heating rates. Ogren appears to have published the first light- absorption coefficients in the stratosphere in 1981, followed by Clarke in 1983 and Pueschel in 1992. Because most stratospheric soot appears to be due to aircraft operations, application of an aircraft soot aerosol emission index to projected fuel consumption suggests a threefold increase of soot loading and light absorption by 2025. Together, those four data sets indicate an increase in mid-visible light extinction at a rate of 6 % per year. This trend is similar to the increase per year of sulfuric acid aerosol and of commercial fleet size. The proportionality between stepped-up aircraft operations above the tropopause and increases in stratospheric soot and sulfuric acid aerosol implicate aircraft as a source of stratospheric pollution. Because the strongly light-absorbing soot and the predominantly light-scattering sulfuric acid aerosol increase at similar rates, however, the mid-visible stratospheric aerosol single scatter albedo is expected to remain constant and not approach a critical value of 0.98 at which stratospheric cooling could change to warming.

  19. A design study for a simple-to-fly, constant attitude light aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetana, F. O.; Humphreys, D. E.; Montoya, R. J.; Rickard, W. W.; Wilkinson, I. E.

    1973-01-01

    The activities during a four-year study by doctoral students to evolve in detail a design for a simple-to-fly, constant attitude light airplane are described. The study indicated that such aircraft could materially reduce the hazards to light airplane occupants which arise from the high pilot work load and poor visibility that occur during landing. Preliminary cost studies indicate that in volume production this system would increase the cost of the aircraft in roughly the same fashion that automatic transmission, power steering, power brakes, and cruise control increase the cost of a compact car.

  20. Graphene-Based Ultra-Light Batteries for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Carlos I.; Kaner, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Develop a graphene-based ultracapacitor prototype that is flexible, thin, lightweight, durable, low cost, and safe and that will demonstrate the feasibility for use in aircraft center dot These graphene-based devices store charge on graphene sheets and take advantage of the large accessible surface area of graphene (2,600 m2/g) to increase the electrical energy that can be stored. center dot The proposed devices should have the electrical storage capacity of thin-film-ion batteries but with much shorter charge/discharge cycle times as well as longer lives center dot The proposed devices will be carbon-based and so will not have the same issues with flammability or toxicity as the standard lithium-based storage cells There are two main established methods for the storage and delivery of electrical energy: center dot Batteries - Store energy with electrochemical reactions - High energy densities - Slow charge/discharge cycles - Used in applications requiring large amounts of energy ? aircraft center dot Electrochemical capacitors - Store energy in electrochemical double layers - Fast charge/discharge cycles - Low energy densities - Used in electronics devices - Large capacitors are used in truck engine cranking

  1. 14 CFR 61.327 - Are there specific endorsement requirements to operate a light-sport aircraft based on VH?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to operate a light-sport aircraft based on VH? 61.327 Section 61.327 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.327 Are there specific endorsement requirements to operate a light-sport aircraft based on VH? (a) Except as specified in paragraph (c) of this section,...

  2. 14 CFR 61.327 - Are there specific endorsement requirements to operate a light-sport aircraft based on VH?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... to operate a light-sport aircraft based on VH? 61.327 Section 61.327 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.327 Are there specific endorsement requirements to operate a light-sport aircraft based on VH? (a) Except as specified in paragraph (c) of this section,...

  3. 14 CFR 61.327 - Are there specific endorsement requirements to operate a light-sport aircraft based on VH?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to operate a light-sport aircraft based on VH? 61.327 Section 61.327 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.327 Are there specific endorsement requirements to operate a light-sport aircraft based on VH? (a) Except as specified in paragraph (c) of this section,...

  4. 14 CFR 61.327 - Are there specific endorsement requirements to operate a light-sport aircraft based on VH?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to operate a light-sport aircraft based on VH? 61.327 Section 61.327 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.327 Are there specific endorsement requirements to operate a light-sport aircraft based on VH? (a) Except as specified in paragraph (c) of this section,...

  5. 77 FR 38463 - Issuance of Special Airworthiness Certificates for Light-Sport Category Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... Operation of Light-Sport Aircraft, was published in the Federal Register (69 FR 44772). The rule established... Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78) or you may...://www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html . You can also get a copy by sending a request to the Federal...

  6. Design developments for advanced general aviation aircraft. [using Fly By Light Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, Jan; Gomer, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Design study results are presented for two advanced general-aviation aircraft incorporating fly-by-light/fly-by-wire controls and digital avionics and cockpit displays. The design exercise proceeded from a database of information derived from a market survey for the 4-10 passenger aircraft range. Pusher and tractor propeller configurations were treated, and attention was given to the maximization of passenger comfort. 'Outside-in' tooling methods were assumed for the primary structures of both configurations, in order to achieve surface tolerances which maximize the rearward extent of laminar flow.

  7. Investigation of acoustic properties of a rigid foam with application to noise reduction in light aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmer, C. I.

    1972-01-01

    A analytic model of sound transmission into an aircraft cabin was developed as well as test procedures which appropriately rank order properties which affect sound transmission. The proposed model agrees well with available data, and reveals that the pertinent properties of an aircraft cabin for sound transmission include: stiffness of cabin walls at low frequencies (as this reflects on impedance of the walls) and cabin wall transmission loss and interior absorption at mid and high frequencies. Below 315 Hz the foam contributes substantially to wall stiffness and sound transmission loss of typical light aircraft cabin construction, and could potentially reduce cabin noise levels by 3-5 db in this frequency range at a cost of about 0:2 lb/sq. ft. of treated cabin area. The foam was found not to have significant sound absorbing properties.

  8. Preliminary study of advanced turboprop and turboshaft engines for light aircraft. [cost effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knip, G.; Plencner, R. M.; Eisenberg, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of engine configuration, advanced component technology, compressor pressure ratio and turbine rotor-inlet temperature on such figures of merit as vehicle gross weight, mission fuel, aircraft acquisition cost, operating, cost and life cycle cost are determined for three fixed- and two rotary-wing aircraft. Compared with a current production turboprop, an advanced technology (1988) engine results in a 23 percent decrease in specific fuel consumption. Depending on the figure of merit and the mission, turbine engine cost reductions required to achieve aircraft cost parity with a current spark ignition reciprocating (SIR) engine vary from 0 to 60 percent and from 6 to 74 percent with a hypothetical advanced SIR engine. Compared with a hypothetical turboshaft using currently available technology (1978), an advanced technology (1988) engine installed in a light twin-engine helicopter results in a 16 percent reduction in mission fuel and about 11 percent in most of the other figures of merit.

  9. Application of fiber Bragg grating sensors in light aircraft: ground and flight test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Hyuk; Shrestha, Pratik; Park, Yurim; Kim, Chun-Gon

    2014-05-01

    Fiber optic sensors are being spotlighted as the means to monitoring aircraft conditions due to their excellent characteristics. This paper presents an affordable structural health monitoring system based on a fiber Bragg grating sensor (FBG) for application in light aircrafts. A total of 24 FBG sensors were installed in the main wing of the test bed aircraft. In the ground test, the intactness of the installed sensors and device operability were confirmed. During the flight test, the strain and temperature responses of the wing structure were measured by the on-board low-speed FBG interrogator. The measured strains were successfully converted into the flight load history through the load calibration coefficient obtained from the ground calibration test.

  10. A study of interior noise levels, noise sources and transmission paths in light aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, R. E.; Murray, B. S.; Theobald, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The interior noise levels and spectral characteristics of 18 single-and twin-engine propeller-driven light aircraft, and source-path diagnosis of a single-engine aircraft which was considered representative of a large part of the fleet were studied. The purpose of the flight surveys was to measure internal noise levels and identify principal noise sources and paths under a carefully controlled and standardized set of flight procedures. The diagnostic tests consisted of flights and ground tests in which various parts of the aircraft, such as engine mounts, the engine compartment, exhaust pipe, individual panels, and the wing strut were instrumented to determine source levels and transmission path strengths using the transfer function technique. Predominant source and path combinations are identified. Experimental techniques are described. Data, transfer function calculations to derive source-path contributions to the cabin acoustic environment, and implications of the findings for noise control design are analyzed.

  11. A study of interior noise levels, noise sources and transmission paths in light aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, R. E.; Murray, B. S.; Theobald, M. A.

    1983-07-01

    The interior noise levels and spectral characteristics of 18 single-and twin-engine propeller-driven light aircraft, and source-path diagnosis of a single-engine aircraft which was considered representative of a large part of the fleet were studied. The purpose of the flight surveys was to measure internal noise levels and identify principal noise sources and paths under a carefully controlled and standardized set of flight procedures. The diagnostic tests consisted of flights and ground tests in which various parts of the aircraft, such as engine mounts, the engine compartment, exhaust pipe, individual panels, and the wing strut were instrumented to determine source levels and transmission path strengths using the transfer function technique. Predominant source and path combinations are identified. Experimental techniques are described. Data, transfer function calculations to derive source-path contributions to the cabin acoustic environment, and implications of the findings for noise control design are analyzed.

  12. Driving-Simulator-Based Test on the Effectiveness of Auditory Red-Light Running Vehicle Warning System Based on Time-To-Collision Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xuedong; Xue, Qingwan; Ma, Lu; Xu, Yongcun

    2014-01-01

    The collision avoidance warning system is an emerging technology designed to assist drivers in avoiding red-light running (RLR) collisions at intersections. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the effect of auditory warning information on collision avoidance behaviors in the RLR pre-crash scenarios and further to examine the casual relationships among the relevant factors. A driving-simulator-based experiment was designed and conducted with 50 participants. The data from the experiments were analyzed by approaches of ANOVA and structural equation modeling (SEM). The collisions avoidance related variables were measured in terms of brake reaction time (BRT), maximum deceleration and lane deviation in this study. It was found that the collision avoidance warning system can result in smaller collision rates compared to the without-warning condition and lead to shorter reaction times, larger maximum deceleration and less lane deviation. Furthermore, the SEM analysis illustrate that the audio warning information in fact has both direct and indirect effect on occurrence of collisions, and the indirect effect plays a more important role on collision avoidance than the direct effect. Essentially, the auditory warning information can assist drivers in detecting the RLR vehicles in a timely manner, thus providing drivers more adequate time and space to decelerate to avoid collisions with the conflicting vehicles. PMID:24566631

  13. Flight test results for the Daedalus and Light Eagle human powered aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R. Bryan; Zerweckh, Siegfried H.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the flight test program of the Daedalus and Light Eagle human powered aircraft in the winter of 1987/88 are given. The results from experiments exploring the Light Eagle's rigid body and structural dynamics are presented. The interactions of these dynamics with the autopilot design are investigated. Estimates of the power required to fly the Daedalus aircraft are detailed. The system of sensors, signal conditioning boards, and data acquisition equipment used to record the flight data is also described. In order to investigate the dynamics of the aircraft, flight test maneuvers were developed to yield maximum data quality from the point of view of estimating lateral and longitudinal stability derivatives. From this data, structural flexibility and unsteady aerodynamics have been modeled in an ad hoc manner and are used to augment the equations of motion with flexibility effects. Results of maneuvers that were flown are compared with the predictions from the flexibility model. To extend the ad hoc flexibility model, a fully flexible aeroelastic model has been developed. The model is unusual in the approximate equality of many structural natural frequencies and the importance of unsteady aerodynamic effects. the Gossamer Albatross. It is hypothesized that this inverse ground effect is caused by turbulence in the Earth's boundary layer. The diameters of the largest boundary layer eddies (which represent most of the turbulent kinetic energy) are proportional to altitude; thus, closer to the ground, the energy in the boundary layer becomes concentrated in eddies of smaller and smaller diameter. Eventually the eddies become sufficiently small (approximately 0.5 cm) that they trip the laminar boundary layer on the wing. As a result, a greater percentage of the wing area is covered with turbulent flow. Consequently the aircraft's drag and the pow er required both increase as the aircraft flies closer to the ground. The results of the flight test program are

  14. 14 CFR 91.327 - Aircraft having a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category: Operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... certificate in the light-sport category: Operating limitations. 91.327 Section 91.327 Aeronautics and Space... special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category: Operating limitations. (a) No person may operate an aircraft that has a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category...

  15. 14 CFR 91.327 - Aircraft having a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category: Operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... certificate in the light-sport category: Operating limitations. 91.327 Section 91.327 Aeronautics and Space... special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category: Operating limitations. (a) No person may operate an aircraft that has a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category...

  16. 14 CFR 91.327 - Aircraft having a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category: Operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... certificate in the light-sport category: Operating limitations. 91.327 Section 91.327 Aeronautics and Space... special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category: Operating limitations. (a) No person may operate an aircraft that has a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category...

  17. 14 CFR 91.327 - Aircraft having a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category: Operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... certificate in the light-sport category: Operating limitations. 91.327 Section 91.327 Aeronautics and Space... special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category: Operating limitations. (a) No person may operate an aircraft that has a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category...

  18. 14 CFR 91.327 - Aircraft having a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category: Operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... certificate in the light-sport category: Operating limitations. 91.327 Section 91.327 Aeronautics and Space... special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category: Operating limitations. (a) No person may operate an aircraft that has a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category...

  19. Point and path performance of light aircraft: A review and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetana, F. O.; Summey, D. C.; Johnson, W. D.

    1973-01-01

    The literature on methods for predicting the performance of light aircraft is reviewed. The methods discussed in the review extend from the classical instantaneous maximum or minimum technique to techniques for generating mathematically optimum flight paths. Classical point performance techniques are shown to be adequate in many cases but their accuracies are compromised by the need to use simple lift, drag, and thrust relations in order to get closed form solutions. Also the investigation of the effect of changes in weight, altitude, configuration, etc. involves many essentially repetitive calculations. Accordingly, computer programs are provided which can fit arbitrary drag polars and power curves with very high precision and which can then use the resulting fits to compute the performance under the assumption that the aircraft is not accelerating.

  20. Optimality study of a gust alleviation system for light wing-loading STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komoda, M.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical study was made of an optimal gust alleviation system that employs a vertical gust sensor mounted forward of an aircraft's center of gravity. Frequency domain optimization techniques were employed to synthesize the optimal filters that process the corrective signals to the flaps and elevator actuators. Special attention was given to evaluating the effectiveness of lead time, that is, the time by which relative wind sensor information should lead the actual encounter of the gust. The resulting filter is expressed as an implicit function of the prescribed control cost. A numerical example for a light wing loading STOL aircraft is included in which the optimal trade-off between performance and control cost is systematically studied.

  1. Demonstration results of fly-by-light flight control system architectures for tactical military aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrigan, Jack; Shaw, Brad; Jones, Jack E.

    1996-10-01

    Requirements for future advanced tactical aircraft identify the need for flight control system architectures that provide a higher degree of performance with regard to electromagnetic interference immunity, communication bus data rate, propulsion/utility subsystem integration, and affordability. Evolution for highly centralized, digital, fly-by-light flight/propulsion/utility control system is achieved as modular functions are implemented and integrated by serial digital fiberoptic communication links. These adaptable architectures allow the user to configure the fly- by-light system to meet unique safety requirements, system performance, and design-to-cost targets. This paper presents results of the open and closed loop system demonstrations of Fly-By-Light Advanced System Hardware architecture building blocks integrated with SAE AS-1773 communication bus at MDA.

  2. The Effect of Continuous Weathering on Light Metal Alloys Used in Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutchler, Willard

    1939-01-01

    An investigation of the corrosion of light metal alloys used in aircraft was begun at the National Bureau of Standards in 1925 and has for its purpose causes of corrosion in aluminum-rich and magnesium-rich alloys together with the development of methods for its prevention. The results, obtained in an extensive series of laboratory and weather-exposure tests, reveal the relative durability of a number of commercially available materials and the extent to which the application of various surface coatings of oxide alone and with paint coatings afforded additional protection. The paper may be considered as a supplement to NACA report 490.

  3. Fly-by-light flight control system architectures for tactical military aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrigan, Jack; Jones, Jack E.; Shaw, Brad

    1995-05-01

    Requirements for future advanced tactical aircraft identify the need for flight control system architectures that provide a higher degree of performance with regard to electromagnetic interference immunity, communication bus data rate, propulsion/utility subsystem integration, and affordability. Evolution of highly centralized, digital, fly-by-wire flight/propulsion/utility control system is achieved as modular functions are implemented and integrated by serial, digital, fiber optics communication links. These adaptable architectures allow the user to configure the fly-by-light system to meet unique safety requirements, system performance, and design to cost targets.

  4. A study of low-cost reliable actuators for light aircraft. Part A: Chapters 1-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eijsink, H.; Rice, M.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis involving electro-mechanical, electro-pneumatic, and electro-hydraulic actuators was performed to study which are compatible for use in the primary and secondary flight controls of a single engine light aircraft. Actuator characteristics under investigation include cost, reliability, weight, force, volumetric requirements, power requirements, response characteristics and heat accumulation characteristics. The basic types of actuators were compared for performance characteristics in positioning a control surface model and then were mathematically evaluated in an aircraft to get the closed loop dynamic response characteristics. Conclusions were made as to the suitability of each actuator type for use in an aircraft.

  5. Ultraviolet light propagation under low visibility atmospheric conditions and its application to aircraft landing aid.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Claire; Durand, Gérard; Roblin, Antoine

    2006-12-20

    Light scattering in the atmosphere by particles and molecules gives rise to an aureole surrounding the source image that tends to reduce the contrast of the source with respect to the background. However, UV scattering phase functions of the haze droplets present a very important forward peak. The spreading of a detected signal in the UV is not as important as in the case of a clear atmosphere where Rayleigh scattering predominates. This physical property has to be taken into account to evaluate the potential of UV radiation as an aircraft landing aid under low visibility conditions. Different results characterizing UV runway lights, simulations of UV radiation propagation in the atmosphere, and the use of a simple detection algorithm applied to one particular sensor are presented. PMID:17151753

  6. Development of a multi-sensor airborne investigation platform based on an ultra-light aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herd, Rainer; Holst, Jonathan; Lay, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In the year 2012 the chair Raw Material and Natural Resource Management of Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus, Germany started to develop, construct and assemble a multi-sensor airborne investigation system based on an ultra-light aircraft. The conceptual ideas were born several years before and triggered by the increasing demand of spatial underground information, increasing restrictions to access private property and the lack of affordable commercially operated systems for projects with small budgets. The concept of the presented system comprehends a full composite ultra-light aircraft, the Pipistrel VIRUS which combines a low minimum (65 km/h, a high crusing speed (250 km/h, a long range (1700 km) and a low noise potential. The investigation equipment which can be modified according to the investigation target comprises actually a CsI-y-spectrometer in the fuselage, 2 K-magnetometer at the wing tips and a VLF-EM-receiver underneath the tail. This configuration enables the system to operate for mineral exploration, geological mapping, detection of freshwater resources and brines and different environmental monitoring missions. The development and actual stage of the project will be presented. The first operating flight is scheduled for spring 2013.

  7. The Geostationary Lighting Mapper (GLM) for GOES-R: A New Operational Capability to Improve Storm Forecasts and Warnings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Blakeslee, R.; Koshak, William J.; Petersen, W. A.; Carey, L.; Mah, D.

    2010-01-01

    The next generation Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R) series is a follow on to the existing GOES system currently operating over the Western Hemisphere. Superior spacecraft and instrument technology will support expanded detection of environmental phenomena, resulting in more timely and accurate forecasts and warnings. Advancements over current GOES capabilities include a new capability for total lightning detection (cloud and cloud-to-ground flashes) from the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), and improved spectral (3x), spatial (4x), and temporal (5x) resolution for the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). The GLM, an optical transient detector and imager operating in the near-IR at 777.4 nm will map all (in-cloud and cloud-to-ground) lighting flashes continuously day and night with near-uniform spatial resolution of 8 km with a product refresh rate of less than 20 sec over the Americas and adjacent oceanic regions, from the west coast of Africa (GOES-E) to New Zealand (GOES-W) when the constellation is fully operational. This will aid in forecasting severe storms and tornado activity, and convective weather impacts on aviation safety and efficiency. In parallel with the instrument development (a prototype and 4 flight models), a GOES-R Risk Reduction Team and Algorithm Working Group Lightning Applications Team have begun to develop the Level 2 algorithms and applications. Proxy total lightning data from the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite and regional test beds are being used to develop the pre-launch algorithms and applications, and also improve our knowledge of thunderstorm initiation and evolution. Real time lightning mapping data are being provided in an experimental mode to selected National Weather Service (NWS) national centers and forecast offices via the GOES-R Proving Ground to help improve our understanding of the application of these data in operational settings and

  8. TOMS Validation Based on Profiles of Aerosol Properties in the Lower Troposphere as Obtained with Light Aircraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prospero, Joseph M.; Maring, Hal; Savoie, Dennis

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the University of Miami Aerosol Group (UMAG) in this project was to make measurements of vertical profiles of aerosol properties and aerosol optical depth using a light aircraft. The UMAG developed a light aircraft aerosol package (LAAP) that was used in light aircraft (Cessna 172) during the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRIDE). This field campaign took place on Puerto Rico during July 2000. Design details and results from the use of the LAAP were presented at TOMS Science team meetings on April 1998, April 1999, and May 2000. Results from the LAAP collected during the PRIDE Experiment were presented at the Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, December 2000. Some of the results from the LAAP collected during the PRIDE Experiment have been accepted for publication in the Journal of Geophysical Research in a "topical section" made up of papers from the PRIDE Program.

  9. Warning Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Our Children, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Presents various signs that may indicate emotional problems in children or teens, noting that if children exhibit any of the warning signs, it is important to talk to a doctor, counselor, or mental-health professional. The warning signs are categorized as things that trouble the child, things that limit the child, behavior problems, and sudden…

  10. Airborne measurements performed by a light aircraft during Pegasos spring 2013 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Väänänen, Riikka; Krejci, Radovan; Manninen, Hanna E.; Nieminen, Tuomo; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Kangasluoma, Juha; Pohja, Toivo; Aalto, Pasi P.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku

    2014-05-01

    To fully understand the chemical and physical processes in atmosphere, measuring only on-ground is not sufficient. To extend the measurements into the lower troposphere, the University of Helsinki has performed airborne campaigns since 2009. During spring 2013, a light aircraft was used to measure the aerosol size distribution over boreal forests as a part of the Pegasos 'Norhern Mission'. The aims of the measurements were to quantify the vertical profiles of aerosols up to the altitude of 3.5 km, to study the new particle formation in the lower troposphere, to measure the planetary boundary layer evolution, and to support the measurements performed by Zeppelin NT. We used a Cessna 172 light aircraft as a platform. An aerosol and gas inlet was mounted under the right wing and the sample air was conducted inside the cabin where most of the instruments were placed. The aerosol measurement instruments included a TSI 3776 condensation particle counter (CPC) with a cut-off size of 3 nm, a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), with a size range of 10-350 nm, and a Particle Size Magnifier (PSM) connected with a TSI 3772 condensation particle counter. As the properties of the PSM measuring in airborne conditions were still under testing during the campaign, the setups of the PSM varied between the measurements. Other instruments on board included a Li-Cor Li-840 H2O/Co2-analyzer, a temperature sensor, a relative humidity sensor, and a GPS receiver. Total amount of 45 flights with 118 flight hours were performed between 24th April and 15th June 2013. The majority of the flights were flown around SMEAR II station located in Hyytiälä, and when possible, the flights were synchronized with the Zeppelin flights. Simultaneously, an extensive field campaign to measure aerosol and gas properties was performed on-ground at SMEAR II station. A time series of airborne aerosol data of around 1.5 months allows us to construct statistical vertical profiles of aerosol size

  11. Design of an airborne Fourier transform visible hyperspectral imaging system for light aircraft environmental remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, Leonard John, III; Butler, Eugene W.; Rafert, Bruce; Sellar, R. Glenn

    1995-06-01

    Kestrel Corporation and the Florida Institute of Technology have designed, and are now manufacturing, a Fourier transform visible hyperspectral imager system for use in a single engine light aircraft. The system is composed of a Sagnac-based interferometer optical subsystem, a data management system, and an aircraft attitude and current position sybsystem. The system is designed to have better than 5 nm spectral resolution at 450 nm, operates over the 440 nm to 1150 nm spectral band and has a 2D spatial resolution of 0.8 mrad. An internal calibration source is recorded with every frame of data to retain radiometric accuracy. The entire system fits into a Cessna 206 and uses a conventional downward looking view port located in the baggage compartment. During operation, data are collected at a rate of 15 Mbytes per second and stored direct to a disk array. Data storage has been sized to accommodate 56 minutes of observations. Designed for environmental mapping, this Fourier transform imager has uses in emergency response and military operations.

  12. Kestrel's new FTVHSI instrument for hyperspectral remote sensing from light aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meigs, Andrew D.; Butler, Eugene W.; Jones, Bernard A.; Otten, Leonard John, III; Sellar, R. Glenn; Rafert, Bruce; O'Hair, John R.

    1996-12-01

    During the past year, Kestrel Corporation has designed and built a low cost Fourier transform visible hyperspectral imager (FTVHSI) for deployment in a light aircraft (Cessna TU-206). The instrument is an imaging spectrometer employing a Sagnac (triangle) interferometer, that operates over a range of 450 - 1050 nm with 256 spectral channels, and a 13 degree FOV with an 0.8 mrad pixel IFOV (450 spatial channels). To aid in the calibration of the instrument, calibration and downwelling signals are recorded with every frame. Installed with the optical instrument are attitude sensors and a scene camera. This auxiliary data allows us to place a hyperspectral slice to within less than 5 m of its true position (using selective availability 'on' and differential GPS). We have performed extensive testing and calibration studies, including data collection conducted synchronously with ground measurements at locations including a White Sands radiometric calibration site. This paper reports some of the calibration studies and their results.

  13. Description of a landing site indicator (LASI) for light aircraft operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, H. V.; Outlaw, B. K. E.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental cockpit mounted head-up type display system was developed and evaluated by LaRC pilots during the landing phase of light aircraft operations. The Landing Site Indicator (LASI) system display consists of angle of attack, angle of sideslip, and indicated airspeed images superimposed on the pilot's view through the windshield. The information is made visible to the pilot by means of a partially reflective viewing screen which is suspended directly in frot of the pilot's eyes. Synchro transmitters are operated by vanes, located at the left wing tip, which sense angle of attack and sideslip angle. Information is presented near the center of the display in the form of a moving index on a fixed grid. The airspeed is sensed by a pitot-static pressure transducer and is presented in numerical form at the top center of the display.

  14. 14 CFR 61.303 - If I want to operate a light-sport aircraft, what operating limits and endorsement requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false If I want to operate a light-sport aircraft...) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.303 If I want to operate a light-sport aircraft, what operating limits and endorsement requirements in this...

  15. 14 CFR 61.325 - How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace within, Class B, C, and D airspace, or in... CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.325 How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace within, Class B, C, and...

  16. 14 CFR 61.327 - How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft that has a VH greater than 87 knots...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... light-sport aircraft that has a VH greater than 87 knots CAS? 61.327 Section 61.327 Aeronautics and...: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.327 How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft that has a VH greater than 87 knots CAS? If you hold a sport...

  17. 14 CFR 61.325 - How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace within, Class B, C, and D airspace, or in... CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.325 How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace within, Class B, C, and...

  18. 14 CFR 61.325 - How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace within, Class B, C, and D airspace, or in... CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.325 How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace within, Class B, C, and...

  19. 14 CFR 61.303 - If I want to operate a light-sport aircraft, what operating limits and endorsement requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false If I want to operate a light-sport aircraft...) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.303 If I want to operate a light-sport aircraft, what operating limits and endorsement requirements in this...

  20. 14 CFR 61.321 - How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? 61.321 Section 61.321 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.321 How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? If you hold a sport pilot certificate and seek to operate...

  1. 14 CFR 61.303 - If I want to operate a light-sport aircraft, what operating limits and endorsement requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false If I want to operate a light-sport aircraft...) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.303 If I want to operate a light-sport aircraft, what operating limits and endorsement requirements in this...

  2. 14 CFR 61.303 - If I want to operate a light-sport aircraft, what operating limits and endorsement requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false If I want to operate a light-sport aircraft...) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.303 If I want to operate a light-sport aircraft, what operating limits and endorsement requirements in this...

  3. 14 CFR 61.325 - How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace within, Class B, C, and D airspace, or in... CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.325 How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace within, Class B, C, and...

  4. 14 CFR 61.321 - How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? 61.321 Section 61.321 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.321 How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? If you hold a sport pilot certificate and seek to operate...

  5. 14 CFR 61.321 - How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? 61.321 Section 61.321 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.321 How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? If you hold a sport pilot certificate and seek to operate...

  6. 14 CFR 61.321 - How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? 61.321 Section 61.321 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.321 How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? If you hold a sport pilot certificate and seek to operate...

  7. 14 CFR 61.303 - If I want to operate a light-sport aircraft, what operating limits and endorsement requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false If I want to operate a light-sport aircraft...) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.303 If I want to operate a light-sport aircraft, what operating limits and endorsement requirements in this...

  8. 14 CFR 61.323 - How do I obtain privileges to operate a make and model of light-sport aircraft in the same...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... make and model of light-sport aircraft in the same category and class within a different set of... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.323 How do I obtain privileges to operate a make and model of light-sport aircraft in the...

  9. 14 CFR 61.325 - How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace within, Class B, C, and D airspace, or in... CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.325 How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace within, Class B, C, and...

  10. 14 CFR 61.321 - How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? 61.321 Section 61.321 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.321 How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? If you hold a sport pilot certificate and seek to operate...

  11. 14 CFR 91.603 - Aural speed warning device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aural speed warning device. 91.603 Section... Operating Requirements for Large and Transport Category Aircraft § 91.603 Aural speed warning device. No... aural speed warning device that complies with § 25.1303(c)(1)....

  12. 14 CFR 91.603 - Aural speed warning device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aural speed warning device. 91.603 Section... Operating Requirements for Large and Transport Category Aircraft § 91.603 Aural speed warning device. No... aural speed warning device that complies with § 25.1303(c)(1)....

  13. 14 CFR 91.603 - Aural speed warning device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aural speed warning device. 91.603 Section... Operating Requirements for Large and Transport Category Aircraft § 91.603 Aural speed warning device. No... aural speed warning device that complies with § 25.1303(c)(1)....

  14. 14 CFR 91.603 - Aural speed warning device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aural speed warning device. 91.603 Section... Operating Requirements for Large and Transport Category Aircraft § 91.603 Aural speed warning device. No... aural speed warning device that complies with § 25.1303(c)(1)....

  15. 14 CFR 91.603 - Aural speed warning device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aural speed warning device. 91.603 Section... Operating Requirements for Large and Transport Category Aircraft § 91.603 Aural speed warning device. No... aural speed warning device that complies with § 25.1303(c)(1)....

  16. Simulation investigation of the effect of the NASA Ames 80-by 120-foot wind tunnel exhaust flow on light aircraft operating in the Moffett field trafffic pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streeter, Barry G.

    1986-01-01

    A preliminary study of the exhaust flow from the Ames Research Center 80 by 120 Foot Wind Tunnel indicated that the flow might pose a hazard to low-flying light aircraft operating in the Moffett Field traffic pattern. A more extensive evaluation of the potential hazard was undertaken using a fixed-base, piloted simulation of a light, twin-engine, general-aviation aircraft. The simulated aircraft was flown through a model of the wind tunnel exhaust by pilots of varying experience levels to develop a data base of aircraft and pilot reactions. It is shown that a light aircraft would be subjected to a severe disturbance which, depending upon entry condition and pilot reaction, could result in a low-altitude stall or cause damage to the aircraft tail structure.

  17. Aircraft multifrequency passive microwave observations of light precipitation over the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert F.; Hakkarinen, Ida M.

    1991-01-01

    Aircraft passive microwave observations at 18, 37, 92, and 183 GHz of light oceanic precipitation are studied in conjunction with visible and infrared observations and ground-based radar data. Microwave signatures for clear, cloudy, and precipitating conditions are defined, with results in general agreement with previous theoretical results. Emission signatures are evident at 18, 37, and 92 GHz with clouds and precipitation producing an increase in brightness temperature over that observed over the low-emissivity ocean background. Polarization differences at 18 and 37 GHz also decrease in precipitation areas to minima of 30 K at 18 GHz and 15 K at 37 GHz. The 92-GHz brightness temperature shows a double-valued relationship, with an increase in cloudy and very lightly raining areas and a subsequent decrease for higher rain rates and deeper clouds where the ice scattering process becomes important. The 183-GHz observations display a distinct sensitivity to small amounts of ice. Simple channel differences are shown to compare favorably to the rain field, including polarization differences at 18 and 37 GHz and frequency differences between 92 and 37 GHz and between 183 and 92 GHz.

  18. NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structures technology program supplement: Aluminum-based materials for high speed aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, E. A., Jr. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This report on the NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structure technology program supplement: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft covers the period from July 1, 1992. The objective of the research is to develop aluminum alloys and aluminum matrix composites for the airframe which can efficiently perform in the HSCT environment for periods as long as 60,000 hours (certification for 120,000 hours) and, at the same time, meet the cost and weight requirements for an economically viable aircraft. Current industry baselines focus on flight at Mach 2.4. The research covers four major materials systems: (1) Ingot metallurgy 2XXX, 6XXX, and 8XXX alloys, (2) Powder metallurgy 2XXX alloys, (3) Rapidly solidified, dispersion strengthened Al-Fe-X alloys, and (4) Discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites. There are ten major tasks in the program which also include evaluation and trade-off studies by Boeing and Douglas aircraft companies.

  19. Experimental and analytical determination of characteristics affecting light aircraft landing-gear dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, E. L.; Mcgehee, J. R.; Pappas, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation was conducted to determine which characteristics of a light aircraft landing gear influence gear dynamic behavior significantly. The investigation focused particularly on possible modification for load control. Pseudostatic tests were conducted to determine the gear fore-and-aft spring constant, axial friction as a function of drag load, brake pressure-torque characteristics, and tire force-deflection characteristics. To study dynamic tire response, vertical drops were conducted at impact velocities of 1.2, 1.5, and 1.8 m/s onto a level surface; to determine axial-friction effects, a second series of vertical drops were made at 1.5 m/s onto surfaces inclined 5 deg and 10 deg to the horizontal. An average dynamic axial-friction coefficient of 0.15 was obtained by comparing analytical data with inclined surface drop test data. Dynamic strut bending and associated axial friction were found to be severe for the drop tests on the 10 deg surface.

  20. Light aircraft lift, drag, and moment prediction: A review and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetana, F. O.; Summey, D. C.; Smith, N. S.; Carden, R. K.

    1975-01-01

    The historical development of analytical methods for predicting the lift, drag, and pitching moment of complete light aircraft configurations in cruising flight is reviewed. Theoretical methods, based in part on techniques described in the literature and in part on original work, are developed. These methods form the basis for understanding the computer programs given to: (1) compute the lift, drag, and moment of conventional airfoils, (2) extend these two-dimensional characteristics to three dimensions for moderate-to-high aspect ratio unswept wings, (3) plot complete configurations, (4) convert the fuselage geometric data to the correct input format, (5) compute the fuselage lift and drag, (6) compute the lift and moment of symmetrical airfoils to M = 1.0 by a simplified semi-empirical procedure, and (7) compute, in closed form, the pressure distribution over a prolate spheroid at alpha = 0. Comparisons of the predictions with experiment indicate excellent lift and drag agreement for conventional airfoils and wings. Limited comparisons of body-alone drag characteristics yield reasonable agreement. Also included are discussions for interference effects and techniques for summing the results above to obtain predictions for complete configurations.

  1. Development and evaluation of automatic landing control laws for light wing loading STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinreich, B.; Degani, O.; Gevaert, G.

    1981-01-01

    Automatic flare and decrab control laws were developed for NASA's experimental Twin Otter. This light wing loading STOL aircraft was equipped with direct lift control (DLC) wing spoilers to enhance flight path control. Automatic landing control laws that made use of the spoilers were developed, evaluated in a simulation and the results compared with these obtained for configurations that did not use DLC. The spoilers produced a significant improvement in performance. A simulation that could be operated faster than real time in order to provide statistical landing data for a large number of landings over a wide spectrum of disturbances in a short time was constructed and used in the evaluation and refinement of control law configurations. A longitudinal control law that had been previously developed and evaluated in flight was also simulated and its performance compared with that of the control laws developed. Runway alignment control laws were also defined, evaluated, and refined to result in a final recommended configuration. Good landing performance, compatible with Category 3 operation into STOL runways, was obtained.

  2. 30 CFR 27.23 - Automatic warning device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Automatic warning device. 27.23 Section 27.23... Automatic warning device. (a) An automatic warning device shall be suitably constructed for incorporation in... automatic warning device shall include an alarm signal (audible or colored light), which shall be made...

  3. 49 CFR 230.85 - Audible warning device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Audible warning device. 230.85 Section 230.85... Tenders Cabs, Warning Signals, Sanders and Lights § 230.85 Audible warning device. (a) General provisions. Each steam locomotive shall be equipped with an audible warning device that produces a minimum...

  4. Exploratory tests of a simple aero-mechanical ride comfort system for lightly loaded aircraft. [evaluation of gust alleviating aircraft control surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewes, D. E.; Stewart, E. C.

    1974-01-01

    Some exploratory wind tunnel and radio-controlled free-flight tests were made with a small high-wing airplane model (1.23m wing span) to study the concept of a simple aero mechanical system intended to alleviate gust loads and improve ride comfort of lightly loaded aircraft. The system consisted essentially of the outer portions of each wing being hinged in the chordwise direction and connected directly to the wing flaps using internal counter weights to provide neutral mass balance. When the wing experienced a change in velocity or angle of attack, the movable wing panels, acting as sensors and flap actuators, deflected in response to the changes in lift on the wing. The corresponding movements of the interconnected flaps tended to reduce the changes in the wing lift.

  5. Aircraft optical cable plant: the physical layer for fly-by-light control networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Thomas L.

    1996-10-01

    A program was completed with joint industry and government funding to apply fiber optic technologies to aircraft. The technology offers many potential benefits. Among them are increased electromagnetic interference immunity and the possibility of reduced weight, increased reliability, and enlarged capability by redesigning architectures to use the large bandwidth of fiber optics. Those benefits can be realized if fiber optics meets the unique requirements of aircraft networks. Many independent efforts have been made in the development of the systems, known as cable plants, to link opto-electronic components. The FLASH program built on that work. Over the last two years, FLASH expanded on the cable plant efforts by building components based on a cohesive aircraft plant system concept. The concept was rooted in not just optical performance, but also cost, manufacturing, installation, maintenance, and support. To do that, the FLASH team evaluated requirements, delineated environmental and use conditions, designed, built, and tested components, such as cables, connectors, splices and backplanes for transport aircraft, tactical aircraft, and helicopters. In addition, the FLASH team developed installation and test methods, and support equipment for aircraft optical cable plants. The results of that design, development, and test effort are reported here.

  6. NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structure technology program supplement: Aluminum-based materials for high speed aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, E. A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This report on the NASA-UVa Light Aerospace Alloy and Structure Technology Program Supplement: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft covers the period from January 1, 1992 to June 30, 1992. The objective of the research is to develop aluminum alloys and aluminum matrix composites for the airframe which can efficiently perform in the HSCT environment for periods as long as 60,000 hours (certification for 120,000 hours) and, at the same time, meet the cost and weight requirements for an economically viable aircraft. Current industry baselines focus on flight at Mach 2.4. The research covers four major materials systems: (1) ingot metallurgy 2XXX, 6XXX, and 8XXX alloys, (2) powder metallurgy 2XXX alloys, (3) rapidly solidified, dispersion strengthened Al-Fe-X alloys, and (4) discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites. There are ten major tasks in the program which also include evaluation and trade-off studies by Boeing and Douglas aircraft companies.

  7. Flight testing a highly flexible aircraft - Case study on the MIT Light Eagle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerweckh, S. H.; Von Flotow, A. H.; Murray, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the techniques developed for a flight test program of a human powered aircraft, the application of these techniques in the winter of 1987/88 and the results of the flight testing. A system of sensors, signal conditioning and data recording equipment was developed and installed in the aircraft. Flight test maneuvers which do not exceed the aircraft's limited capability were developed and refined in an iterative sequence of test flights. The test procedures were adjusted to yield maximum data quality from the point of view of estimating lateral and longitudinal stability derivatives. Structural flexibility and unsteady aerodynamics are modeled in an ad hoc manner, capturing the effects observed during the test flights. A model with flexibility-extended equations of motion is presented. Results of maneuvers that were flown are compared with the predictions of that model and analyzed. Finally the results of the flight test program are examined critically, especially with respect to future applications, and suggestions are made in order to improve maneuvers for parameter estimation of very flexible aircraft.

  8. DC-to-DC power supply for light aircraft flight testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, S. R.

    1980-01-01

    The power supply unit was developed to serve as the power source for a loran-C receiver. The power supply can be connected directly to the aircraft's electrical system, and is compatible with either 14 or 28 volt electrical systems. Design specifications are presented for the unit along with a description of the circuit design.

  9. Investigation of the Applicability of the Free-wing Principle to Light, General Aviation Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. F.; Luce, R. G.; Brown, J. H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Gust-alleviation benefits for aircraft employing an unconventional wing, free to pivot about a spanwise axis forward of its aerodynamic center and subject only to aerodynamic pitching moments imposed by lift and drag forces and a trailing-edge control surface are reviewed.

  10. Warning Signs After Birth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy > Postpartum care > Warning signs after birth Warning signs after birth E-mail to a friend Please ... infection Postpartum bleeding Postpartum depression (PPD) What warning signs should you look for? Call your provider if ...

  11. Stroke Warning Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Advocate Stroke Warning Signs Quiz Stroke Warning Signs and Symptoms THINK YOU ARE HAVING A STROKE? ... Learn more stroke signs and symptoms >>>> Stroke Warning Signs Hip-Hop F.A.S.T. Video Updated Guidelines ...

  12. Flight test evaluation of predicted light aircraft drag, performance, and stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetana, F. O.; Fox, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    A technique was developed which permits simultaneous extraction of complete lift, drag, and thrust power curves from time histories of a single aircraft maneuver such as a pull up (from V max to V stall) and pushover (to V max for level flight). The technique, which is an extension of nonlinear equations of motion of the parameter identification methods of Iliff and Taylor and includes provisions for internal data compatibility improvement as well, was shown to be capable of correcting random errors in the most sensitive data channel and yielding highly accurate results. Flow charts, listings, sample inputs and outputs for the relevant routines are provided as appendices. This technique was applied to flight data taken on the ATLIT aircraft. Lack of adequate knowledge of the correct full throttle thrust horsepower true airspeed variation and considerable internal data inconsistency made it impossible to apply the trajectory matching features of the technique.

  13. A simulator evaluation of the use of spoilers on a light aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, C. H.; Kohlman, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    A fixed-base flight simulator was used to evaluate wing spoilers for longitudinal flight path control on a modified Cessna Cardinal aircraft. Spoilers which generated the proper pitching moment to maintain aircraft trim C sub L constant could be used as an effective descent rate control. More than 100 simulated ILS approaches were flown by evaluation pilots using both conventional methods and spoiler descent rate control. Three spoiler control schemes were evaluated during the ILS approaches. Using the spoilers for control, instrument approaches could be flown smoothly and precisely with constant airspeed and pitch attitude. While the spoilers could adequately control ILS approaches, a spoiler system with greater authority would be desirable for use in visual approaches.

  14. Accuracy and speed of response to different voice types in a cockpit voice warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, J.; Rumbaugh, W. A.

    1983-09-01

    Voice warning systems (VWS) in aircraft cockpits provide a valuable means of warning identification. Improvements in technology have made the VWS a viable addition to aircraft warning systems. This thesis was an experiment to determine the best voice type (male, female, or neutral machine) for use in a VWS for military aircraft. Different levels of engine background noise, signal to noise ratio of the warning message, and precursor delivery formats were used. The experiment had ten subjects performing a primary tracking task; at random intervals a voice warning was interjected, requiring that the subjects respond by pushing the correct button. The results of this experiment contradict some previous beliefs and findings. The male voice was associated with more accurate responses for voice warning systems in the military aircraft environment. For speed of response the results were more complicated; the male voice was generally more closely associated with faster response times for accurate responses.

  15. Wide field of view laser beacon system for three-dimensional aircraft position measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, L. M.; Miles, R. B.; Webb, S. G.; Wong, E. Y.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a new wide field of view laser beacon system for measurement, in three dimensions, of aircraft or other remote objects. The system is developed for aircraft collision hazard warning independent of ground-based hardware, as well as for flight research, helicopter-assisted construction and rescue, and robotic manipulation applications. Accurate information describing the relative range, elevation, and azimuth of the aircraft are generated by the sweep of a low-power fan-shaped rotating laser beacon past an array of optical detectors. The system achieves a wide angle of acceptance of laser beacon light through use of compound parabolic concentrators, which collimate the light for spectral filtering to minimize solar interference. An on-board microprocessor system converts the pulse sequence to aircraft position in real time. System reliability and performance are enhanced through narrow pass filtering of the pulse signals, digital logic design to mask spurious signals, and adaptive modulation of trigger threshold levels.

  16. Flight test evaluation of predicted light aircraft drag, performance, and stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetana, F. O.; Fox, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    A technique was developed which permits simultaneous extraction of complete lift, drag, and thrust power curves from time histories of a single aircraft maneuver such as a pullup (from V sub max to V sub stall) and pushover (to sub V max for level flight.) The technique is an extension to non-linear equations of motion of the parameter identification methods of lliff and Taylor and includes provisions for internal data compatibility improvement as well. The technique was show to be capable of correcting random errors in the most sensitive data channel and yielding highly accurate results. This technique was applied to flight data taken on the ATLIT aircraft. The drag and power values obtained from the initial least squares estimate are about 15% less than the 'true' values. If one takes into account the rather dirty wing and fuselage existing at the time of the tests, however, the predictions are reasonably accurate. The steady state lift measurements agree well with the extracted values only for small values of alpha. The predicted value of the lift at alpha = 0 is about 33% below that found in steady state tests while the predicted lift slope is 13% below the steady state value.

  17. Warning systems and public warning response

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, J.H.

    1993-09-01

    This background paper reviews current knowledge on warning systems and human response to warnings. It expands on an earlier paper prepared for a workshop on the Second Assessment on Natural Hazards, held in Estes Park, Colorado in July 1992. Although it has a North American perspective, many of the lessons learned are universally applicable. The paper addresses warning systems in terms of dissemination and does not cover physical science issues associated with prediction and forecast. Finally, it covers hazards with relatively short lead times -- 48 hours or less. It does not address topics such as long-term forecasts of earthquakes or volcanic eruptions or early famine warning systems.

  18. Report on ice formation on aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1939-01-01

    The physical phenomena involved in the icing of aircraft have been analyzed and measured. Recommendations on warning devices are made as well as the different types of ice and glazing that can occur on airplanes are examined and discussed.

  19. STOL Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Michael E. Fisher, President of AeroVisions International, has introduced the Culex light twin engine aircraft which offers economy of operation of a single engine plane, the ability to fly well on one engine, plus the capability of flying from short, unimproved fields of takeoff and landing distances less than 35 feet. Key element of design is an airfoil developed by Langley. Culex was originally intended to be factory built aircraft for special utility markets. However, it is now offered as a build-it-yourself kit plane.

  20. Small-scale (flash) flood early warning in the light of operational requirements: opportunities and limits with regard to user demands, driving data, and hydrologic modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, Andy; Kerl, Florian; Büttner, Uwe; Metzkes, Christine; Singer, Thomas; Wagner, Michael; Schütze, Niels

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the Free State of Saxony (Eastern Germany) was repeatedly hit by both extensive riverine flooding, as well as flash flood events, emerging foremost from convective heavy rainfall. Especially after a couple of small-scale, yet disastrous events in 2010, preconditions, drivers, and methods for deriving flash flood related early warning products are investigated. This is to clarify the feasibility and the limits of envisaged early warning procedures for small catchments, hit by flashy heavy rain events. Early warning about potentially flash flood prone situations (i.e., with a suitable lead time with regard to required reaction-time needs of the stakeholders involved in flood risk management) needs to take into account not only hydrological, but also meteorological, as well as communication issues. Therefore, we propose a threefold methodology to identify potential benefits and limitations in a real-world warning/reaction context. First, the user demands (with respect to desired/required warning products, preparation times, etc.) are investigated. Second, focusing on small catchments of some hundred square kilometers, two quantitative precipitation forecasts are verified. Third, considering the user needs, as well as the input parameter uncertainty (i.e., foremost emerging from an uncertain QPF), a feasible, yet robust hydrological modeling approach is proposed on the basis of pilot studies, employing deterministic, data-driven, and simple scoring methods.

  1. Development and field testing of a Light Aircraft Oil Surveillance System (LAOSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, W.; Herz, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental device consisting of a conventional TV camera with a low light level photo image tube and motor driven polarized filter arrangement was constructed to provide a remote means of discriminating the presence of oil on water surfaces. This polarized light filtering system permitted a series of successive, rapid changes between the vertical and horizontal components of reflected polarized skylight and caused the oil based substances to be more easily observed and identified as a flashing image against a relatively static water surface background. This instrument was flight tested, and the results, with targets of opportunity and more systematic test site data, indicate the potential usefulness of this airborne remote sensing instrument.

  2. General aviation approach and landing practices. [by pilots of light aircraft at uncontrolled airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. C.; Goode, M. W.

    1976-01-01

    The characteristics of air traffic patterns at uncontrolled airports and techniques used by a group of general aviation pilots in landing light airplanes are documented. The results of some 1,600 radar tracks taken at four uncontrolled airports and some 600 landings made by 22 pilots in two, four place, single engine light airplanes show that the uncontrolled traffic pattern is highly variable. The altitudes, distances, and piloting procedures utilized may affect the ability for pilots to see-and-avoid in this environment. Most landing approaches were conducted at an airspeed above recommended, resulting in significant floating during flare and touchdowns that were relatively flat and often nose-low.

  3. Crashworthiness of light aircraft fuselage structures: A numerical and experimental investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanyaro, A. P.; Tennyson, R. C.; Hansen, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of aircraft fuselage structures subject to various impact conditions was investigated. An analytical model was developed based on a self-consistent finite element (CFE) formulation utilizing shell, curved beam, and stringer type elements. Equations of motion were formulated and linearized (i.e., for small displacements), although material nonlinearity was retained to treat local plastic deformation. The equations were solved using the implicit Newmark-Beta method with a frontal solver routine. Stiffened aluminum fuselage models were also tested in free flight using the UTIAS pendulum crash test facility. Data were obtained on dynamic strains, g-loads, and transient deformations (using high speed photography in the latter case) during the impact process. Correlations between tests and predicted results are presented, together with computer graphics, based on the CFE model. These results include level and oblique angle impacts as well as the free-flight crash test. Comparisons with a hybrid, lumped mass finite element computer model demonstrate that the CFE formulation provides the test overall agreement with impact test data for comparable computing costs.

  4. Wind gust warning verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primo, Cristina

    2016-07-01

    Operational meteorological centres around the world increasingly include warnings as one of their regular forecast products. Warnings are issued to warn the public about extreme weather situations that might occur leading to damages and losses. In forecasting these extreme events, meteorological centres help their potential users in preventing the damage or losses they might suffer. However, verifying these warnings requires specific methods. This is due not only to the fact that they happen rarely, but also because a new temporal dimension is added when defining a warning, namely the time window of the forecasted event. This paper analyses the issues that might appear when dealing with warning verification. It also proposes some new verification approaches that can be applied to wind warnings. These new techniques are later applied to a real life example, the verification of wind gust warnings at the German Meteorological Centre ("Deutscher Wetterdienst"). Finally, the results obtained from the latter are discussed.

  5. Reliable low-cost battery voltage indicator for light aircraft and automobiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Voltage indicator fits into cigarette lighter socket and utilizes light emitting and Zener diodes to display three levels of battery voltage. Indicator is superior to typical conventional electrical system indicators in that it gives a positive discrete indication of battery voltage. It is simple, inexpensive, and rugged.

  6. Study on Design of High Efficiency and Light Weight Composite Propeller Blade for a Regional Turboprop Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Changduk; Lee, Kyungsun

    2013-03-01

    In this study, aerodynamic and structural design of the composite propeller blade for a regional turboprop aircraft is performed. The thin and wide chord propeller blade of high speed turboprop aircraft should have proper strength and stiffness to carry various kinds of loads such as high aerodynamic bending and twisting moments and centrifugal forces. Therefore the skin-spar-foam sandwich structure using high strength and stiffness carbon/epoxy composite materials is used to improve the lightness. A specific design procedure is proposed in this work as follows; firstly the aerodynamic configuration design, which is acceptable for the design requirements, is carried out using the in-house code developed by authors, secondly the structure design loads are determined through the aerodynamic load case analysis, thirdly the spar flange and the skin are preliminarily sized by consideration of major bending moments and shear forces using both the netting rule and the rule of mixture, and finally, the stress analysis is performed to confirm the structural safety and stability using finite element analysis commercial code, MSC. NASTRAN/PATRAN. Furthermore the additional analysis is performed to confirm the structural safety due to bird strike impact on the blade during flight operation using a commercial code, ANSYS. To realize the proposed propeller design, the prototype blades are manufactured by the following procedure; the carbon/epoxy composite fabric prepregs are laid up for skin and spar on a mold using the hand lay-up method and consolidated with a proper temperature and vacuum in the oven. To finalize the structural design, the full-scale static structural test is performed under the simulated aerodynamic loads using 3 point loading method. From the experimental results, it is found that the designed blade has a good structural integrity, and the measured results agree well with the analytical results as well.

  7. A flight-test and simulation evaluation of the longitudinal final approach and landing performance of an automatic system for a light wing loading STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, S. C.; Hardy, G. H.; Hindson, W. S.

    1983-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive flight-test program of STOL operating systems for the terminal area, an automatic landing system was developed and evaluated for a light wing loading turboprop aircraft. The aircraft utilized an onboard advanced digital avionics system. Flight tests were conducted at a facility that included a STOL runway site with a microwave landing system. Longitudinal flight-test results were presented and compared with available (basically CTOL) criteria. These comparisons were augmented by results from a comprehensive simulation of the controlled aircraft which included representations of navigation errors that were encountered in flight and atmospheric disturbances. Acceptable performance on final approach and at touchdown was achieved by the autoland (automatic landing) system for the moderate winds and turbulence conditions encountered in flight. However, some touchdown performance goals were marginally achieved, and simulation results suggested that difficulties could be encountered in the presence of more extreme atmospheric conditions. Suggestions were made for improving performance under those more extreme conditions.

  8. An automated stall-speed warning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilner, D. O.; Bever, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    The development and testing of a stall-speed warning system for the OV-1C was examined. NASA designed and built an automated stall-speed warning system which presents both airspeed and stall speed to the pilot. The airspeed and stall speed are computed in real time by monitoring the basic aerodynamic parameters (dynamic pressure, horizontal and vertical accelerations, and pressure altitude) and other parameters (elevator and flap positions, engine torques, and fuel flow). In addition, an aural warning at predetermined stall margins is presented to the pilot through a voice synthesizer. Once the system was designed and installed in the aircraft, a flight-test program of less than 20 hrs was anticipated to determine the stall-speed software coefficients. These coefficients would then be inserted in the system's software and then test flown over a period of about 10 hr for the purpose of evaluation.

  9. NASA-UVa Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, E. A., Jr. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This report is concerned with 'Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft' which was initiated to identify the technology needs associated with advanced, low-cost aluminum base materials for use as primary structural materials. Using a reference baseline aircraft, these materials concept will be further developed and evaluated both technically and economically to determine the most attractive combinations of designs, materials, and manufacturing techniques for major structural sections of an HSCT. Once this has been accomplished, the baseline aircraft will be resized, if applicable, and performance objectives and economic evaluations made to determine aircraft operating costs. The two primary objectives of this study are: (1) to identify the most promising aluminum-based materials with respect to major structural use on the HSCT and to further develop those materials, and (2) to assess these materials through detailed trade and evaluation studies with respect to their structural efficiency on the HSCT.

  10. Aircraft optical cable plant program plan: the approach for the physical layer for fly-by-light control networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Thomas L.; Murdock, John K.

    1995-05-01

    A program was created with joint industry and government funding to apply fiber optic technologies to aircraft. The technology offers many potential benefits. Among them are increased electromagnetic interference immunity and the possibility of reduced weight, increased reliability, and enlarged capability by redesigning architectures to use the large bandwidth of fiber optics. Those benefits will only be realized if fiber optics meets the unique requirements of aircraft networks. Over the past two decades, considerable effort has been expended on applying photonic technologies to aircraft. Great successes have occurred in optoelectronic components development. In the development of these systems to link those components, known as the cable plant, progress has also been made, but only recently has it been organized in a coordinated, systems-oriented fashion. The FLASH program will expand on the nascent cable plant systems efforts by building upon recent work in individual components, and integrating that work into a cohesive aircraft cable plant. Therefore, the FLASH program will develop the low cost, reliable cables, connectors, splices, backplanes, manufacturing and installation methods, test methods, support equipment, and training systems needed to form a true optical cable plant for transport aircraft, tactical aircraft, and helicopters.

  11. Cable Tensiometer for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The invention is a cable tensiometer that can be used on aircraft for real-time, in-flight cable tension measurements. The invention can be used on any aircraft cables with high precision. The invention is extremely light-weight, hangs on the cable being tested and uses a dual bending beam design with a high mill-volt output to determine tension.

  12. A Personal Storm Warning Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Although lightning detection systems operated by government agencies, utilities and other businesses provide storm warnings, this information often does not reach the public until some time after the observations have been made. A low-cost personal lightning detector offers a significant safety advantage to private flyers, boaters, golfers and others. Developed by Airborne Research Associates, the detectors originated in Space Shuttle tests of an optical lightning detection technique. The commercial device is pointed toward a cloud to detect invisible intracloud lightning by sensing subtle changes in light presence. The majority of the sales have been to golf courses. Additional products and more advanced applications are in progress.

  13. 36 CFR 327.4 - Aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aircraft. 327.4 Section 327.4... Aircraft. (a) This section pertains to all aircraft including, but not limited to, airplanes, seaplanes, helicopters, ultra-light aircraft, motorized hang gliders, hot air balloons, any non-powered flight devices...

  14. 36 CFR 327.4 - Aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Aircraft. (a) This section pertains to all aircraft including, but not limited to, airplanes, seaplanes, helicopters, ultra-light aircraft, motorized hang gliders, hot air balloons, any non-powered flight devices or... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aircraft. 327.4 Section...

  15. 36 CFR 327.4 - Aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aircraft. 327.4 Section 327.4... Aircraft. (a) This section pertains to all aircraft including, but not limited to, airplanes, seaplanes, helicopters, ultra-light aircraft, motorized hang gliders, hot air balloons, any non-powered flight devices...

  16. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structure Technology Program Supplement: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, E. A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of the study "Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft" which had the objectives (1) to identify the most promising aluminum-based materials with respect to major structural use on the HSCT and to further develop those materials and (2) to assess the materials through detailed trade and evaluation studies with respect to their structural efficiency on the HSCT. The research team consisted of ALCOA, Allied-Signal, Boeing, McDonnell Douglas, Reynolds Metals and the University of Virginia. Four classes of aluminum alloys were investigated: (1) I/M 2XXX containing Li and I/M 2XXX without Li, (2) I/M 6XXX, (3) two P/M 2XXX alloys, and (4) two different aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMC). The I/M alloys were targeted for a Mach 2.0 aircraft and the P/M and MMC alloys were targeted for a Mach 2.4 aircraft. Design studies were conducted using several different concepts including skin/stiffener (baseline), honeycomb sandwich, integrally stiffened and hybrid adaptations (conventionally stiffened thin-sandwich skins). Alloy development included fundamental studies of coarsening behavior, the effect of stress on nucleation and growth of precipitates, and fracture toughness as a function of temperature were an integral part of this program. The details of all phases of the research are described in this final report.

  17. Disaster warning satellite study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The Disaster Warning Satellite System is described. It will provide NOAA with an independent, mass communication system for the purpose of warning the public of impending disaster and issuing bulletins for corrective action to protect lives and property. The system consists of three major segments. The first segment is the network of state or regional offices that communicate with the central ground station; the second segment is the satellite that relays information from ground stations to home receivers; the third segment is composed of the home receivers that receive information from the satellite and provide an audio output to the public. The ground stations required in this system are linked together by two, separate, voice bandwidth communication channels on the Disaster Warning Satellites so that a communications link would be available in the event of disruption of land line service.

  18. Warnings from the Trenches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    The author, as a retired high school teacher, has some bad news for college professors. In case, they do not already see what is happening. The author wants to warn them of what to expect from the students who will be arriving in one's classroom even if they teach in a highly selective institution. No Child Left Behind went into effect for the…

  19. High performance dash on warning air mobile, missile system. [intercontinental ballistic missiles - systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, A. D.; Castellano, C. R.; Hague, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    An aircraft-missile system which performs a high acceleration takeoff followed by a supersonic dash to a 'safe' distance from the launch site is presented. Topics considered are: (1) technological feasibility to the dash on warning concept; (2) aircraft and boost trajectory requirements; and (3) partial cost estimates for a fleet of aircraft which provide 200 missiles on airborne alert. Various aircraft boost propulsion systems were studied such as an unstaged cryogenic rocket, an unstaged storable liquid, and a solid rocket staged system. Various wing planforms were also studied. Vehicle gross weights are given. The results indicate that the dash on warning concept will meet expected performance criteria, and can be implemented using existing technology, such as all-aluminum aircraft and existing high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines.

  20. Analysis of pilot warning indicator performance in terminal area traffic.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruetenik, J. R.; Lange, W. R.; Thompson, J. H.

    1971-01-01

    Three pilot warning indicator concepts for collision hazard avoidance are analyzed using computer fast-time simulation. A hazard measure is defined based on a 1/2-g maximum horizontal acceleration, a maximum climb or dive angle of 10 deg for each aircraft, and a 20-sec warning time, through escape completion. The traffic model is based on flight tracks recorded in the Atlanta terminal area over an 11 hr period during August 1967. The basic PWI concept studied alarms on range to flashing beacons mounted on intruder aircraft as a function of relative azimuth and elevation. The alarm-hazard epoch ratio is about 17/1 to maintain the missed-alarm rate below 10%. Beacon vignetting or range-rate discrimination are shown to reduce the false-alarm rate by about 75%.

  1. A simulator investigation of engine failure compensation for powered-lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieuwenhuijse, A. W.; Franklin, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    A piloted simulator investigation of various engine failure compensation concepts for powered-lift STOL aircraft was carried out at the Ames Research Center. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the influence of engine failure compensation on recovery from an engine failure during the landing approach and on the precision of the STOL landing. The various concepts include: (1) cockpit warning lights to cue the pilot of an engine failure, (2) programmed thrust and roll trim compensation, (3) thrust command and (4) flight-path stabilization. The aircraft simulated was a 150 passenger four-engine, externally blown flap civil STOL transport having a 90 psf wing loading and a .56 thrust to weight ratio. Results of the simulation indicate that the combination of thrust command and flight-path stabilization offered the best engine-out landing performance in turbulence and did so over the entire range of altitudes for which engine failures occurred.

  2. Methods for designing treatments to reduce interior noise of predominant sources and paths in a single engine light aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, Richard E.; Remington, Paul J.; Theobald, Mark A.; Wilby, John F.

    1985-01-01

    The sources and paths by which noise enters the cabin of a small single engine aircraft were determined through a combination of flight and laboratory tests. The primary sources of noise were found to be airborne noise from the propeller and engine casing, airborne noise from the engine exhaust, structureborne noise from the engine/propeller combination and noise associated with air flow over the fuselage. For the propeller, the primary airborne paths were through the firewall, windshield and roof. For the engine, the most important airborne path was through the firewall. Exhaust noise was found to enter the cabin primarily through the panels in the vicinity of the exhaust outlet although exhaust noise entering the cabin through the firewall is a distinct possibility. A number of noise control techniques were tried, including firewall stiffening to reduce engine and propeller airborne noise, to stage isolators and engine mounting spider stiffening to reduce structure-borne noise, and wheel well covers to reduce air flow noise.

  3. In situ measurements of particulate number density and size distribution from an aircraft. [using light scattering particle counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D.

    1974-01-01

    Two different commercial particulate measuring instruments were flown aboard the NASA Convair 990. A condensation nuclei monitor was utilized to measure particles larger than approximately 0.003 micron in diameter. A specially designed pressurization system was used with this monitor at cabin altitude pressure. A near-forward light scattering counter was used to measure the number and size distribution particles in the size range from 0.5 to 5 microns and greater in diameter. Considerable variation in number density was encountered for both classes of particles at the test altitudes ranging from 5 to 12 km. Presence of clouds could be detected by the light scattering instrument because large numbers of particles would then be registered by the instrument, especially in the size range above 5.0 microns in diameter.

  4. NASA technical advances in aircraft occupant safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enders, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    A NASA program to improve aircraft safety is discussed in terms of three areas of concentration: unexpected turbulence encounters, fire, and crash impact. To provide warning of clear air turbulence (CAT) so that the pilot can take evasive action, a laser Doppler system is described, which functions by measuring backscatter frequency radiation occurring in aerosols ahead of the aircraft. The system was found able to detect CAT, but at shorter than optimal ranges (10 km as opposed to 32 km). Fire safety has focused on both the early detection of fires through improved sensing methods, and on the development of fire-retardant materials, i.e., intumescent char-forming protective coatings. Crashworthiness is discussed in terms of the development of a survivable crash envelope and improved seat and restraint systems. To evaluate an aircraft for crashworthiness, finite-element computer programs are currently being developed which analyze both aircraft structural configurations and the intrinsic strength of aircraft materials.

  5. Aircraft Control-Position Indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, D. V.

    1985-01-01

    Aircraft control-position indicator cockpit-mounted instrument that displays positions of elevator and ailerons to pilot. Display is cruciform array of lights: horizontal row of amber lights and vertical row of green lights representing aileron and elevator positions, respectively. Display used extensively in spin testing and has been trouble-free, with no maintenance required after about 30 hours of operation.

  6. Crowdsourced earthquake early warning

    PubMed Central

    Minson, Sarah E.; Brooks, Benjamin A.; Glennie, Craig L.; Murray, Jessica R.; Langbein, John O.; Owen, Susan E.; Heaton, Thomas H.; Iannucci, Robert A.; Hauser, Darren L.

    2015-01-01

    Earthquake early warning (EEW) can reduce harm to people and infrastructure from earthquakes and tsunamis, but it has not been implemented in most high earthquake-risk regions because of prohibitive cost. Common consumer devices such as smartphones contain low-cost versions of the sensors used in EEW. Although less accurate than scientific-grade instruments, these sensors are globally ubiquitous. Through controlled tests of consumer devices, simulation of an Mw (moment magnitude) 7 earthquake on California’s Hayward fault, and real data from the Mw 9 Tohoku-oki earthquake, we demonstrate that EEW could be achieved via crowdsourcing. PMID:26601167

  7. Crowdsourced earthquake early warning.

    PubMed

    Minson, Sarah E; Brooks, Benjamin A; Glennie, Craig L; Murray, Jessica R; Langbein, John O; Owen, Susan E; Heaton, Thomas H; Iannucci, Robert A; Hauser, Darren L

    2015-04-01

    Earthquake early warning (EEW) can reduce harm to people and infrastructure from earthquakes and tsunamis, but it has not been implemented in most high earthquake-risk regions because of prohibitive cost. Common consumer devices such as smartphones contain low-cost versions of the sensors used in EEW. Although less accurate than scientific-grade instruments, these sensors are globally ubiquitous. Through controlled tests of consumer devices, simulation of an M w (moment magnitude) 7 earthquake on California's Hayward fault, and real data from the M w 9 Tohoku-oki earthquake, we demonstrate that EEW could be achieved via crowdsourcing. PMID:26601167

  8. 49 CFR 234.259 - Warning time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Warning time. 234.259 Section 234.259..., Inspection, and Testing Inspections and Tests § 234.259 Warning time. Each crossing warning system shall be tested for the prescribed warning time at least once every 12 months and when the warning system...

  9. 49 CFR 234.259 - Warning time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Warning time. 234.259 Section 234.259..., Inspection, and Testing Inspections and Tests § 234.259 Warning time. Each crossing warning system shall be tested for the prescribed warning time at least once every 12 months and when the warning system...

  10. Satellite Threat Warning and Attack Reporting

    SciTech Connect

    Hilland, D.; Phipps, G.; Jingle, C.; Newton, G.

    1997-12-31

    The Air Force Research Laboratory`s Satellite Threat Warning and Attack Reporting (STW/AR) program will provide technologies for advanced threat warning and reporting of radio frequency (RF) and laser threats. The STW/AR program objectives are: (a) develop cost- effective technologies to detect, identify, locate, characterize, and report attacks or interference against U.S. and Allied satellites. (b) demonstrate innovative, light-weight, low-power, laser and RF sensors. The program focuses on the demonstration of RF and laser sensors. The RF sensor effort includes the investigation of interferometric antenna arrays, multi-arm spiral and butler matrix antennas, wideband receivers, adaptive processors, and improved processing algorithms. The laser sensor effort includes the investigation of alternative detectors, broadband grating and optical designs, active pixel sensing, and improved processing algorithms.

  11. Aircraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H. (Inventor); Uden, Edward (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention is an aircraft wing design that creates a bell shaped span load, which results in a negative induced drag (induced thrust) on the outer portion of the wing; such a design obviates the need for rudder control of an aircraft.

  12. Aircraft Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Ulf; Dobrzynski, Werner; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Delfs, Jan; Isermann, Ullrich; Obermeier, Frank

    Aircraft industry is exposed to increasing public pressure aiming at a continuing reduction of aircraft noise levels. This is necessary to both compensate for the detrimental effect on noise of the expected increase in air traffic and improve the quality of living in residential areas around airports.

  13. Single particles measured by a light scattering module coupled to a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer onboard the NOAA P-3 aircraft during SENEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, J.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Welti, A.; Sueper, D.; Murphy, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Single particles in the eastern US were characterized by a light scattering module coupled to a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (LS-ToF-AMS) onboard the NOAA P-3 aircraft during the Southeastern Nexus (SENEX) campaign. Single particle data were collected for 30 seconds every 5 minutes. Aerosols larger than 200-300 nm in vacuum aerodynamic diameter can be optically detected by the 405 nm crystal laser and trigger the saving of single particle mass spectra. The measured single particles are internally-mixed as expected. The single particles were classified as prompt, delayed, and null based on the chemical ion signal arrival time difference between prediction from the light scattering signal and measurement by mass spectrometer and the presence or absence of a mass spectrum. On average the number fraction of particles detected as prompt, delayed, and null (no spectrum) is about 30%, 10%, and 60%. The number fraction of these three particle types varied with aerosol size, chemical composition and the investigation region and will be discussed in detail. For example, the number fraction of prompt particles was significantly higher for the flight to the Pennsylvania natural gas shale region on July 6, 2013, which is probably related to the chemical composition (more acidic) and phase of the ambient particles. These particle types and detection efficiency are related to the bouncing effect on the vaporizer and may provide insight into the non-unit AMS collection efficiency. Moreover, most of the particles larger than 800 nm in vacuum aerodynamic diameter sized with the traditional AMS PToF mode are delayed particles and their mass spectral signals appear to be affected by this process.

  14. Lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  15. The 1979 Southeastern Virginia Urban Plume Study. Volume 2: Data listings for NASA Cessna aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Lee, R. B., III; Mathis, J. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The data reported are these measured onboard the NASA Langley chartered Cessna aircraft. Data include ozone, nitrogen oxides, light scattering coefficient, temperature, dewpoint, and aircraft altitude.

  16. Airborne Turbulence Detection and Warning ACLAIM Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannon, Stephen M.; Bagley, Hal R.; Soreide, Dave C.; Bowdle, David A.; Bogue, Rodney K.; Ehernberger, L. Jack

    1999-01-01

    The Airborne Coherent Lidar for Advanced Inflight Measurements (ACLAIM) is a NASA/Dryden-lead program to develop and demonstrate a 2 micrometers pulsed Doppler lidar for airborne look-ahead turbulence detection and warning. Advanced warning of approaching turbulence can significantly reduce injuries to passengers and crew aboard commercial airliners. The ACLAIM instrument is a key asset to the ongoing Turbulence component of NASA's Aviation Safety Program, aimed at reducing the accident rate aboard commercial airliners by a factor of five over the next ten years and by a factor of ten over the next twenty years. As well, the advanced turbulence warning capability can prevent "unstarts" in the inlet of supersonic aircraft engines by alerting the flight control computer which then adjusts the engine to operate in a less fuel efficient, and more turbulence tolerant, mode. Initial flight tests of the ACLAIM were completed in March and April of 1998. This paper and presentation gives results from these initial flights, with validated demonstration of Doppler lidar wind turbulence detection several kilometers ahead of the aircraft.

  17. 33 CFR 83.34 - Maneuvering and warning signals (Rule 34).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maneuvering and warning signals (Rule 34). 83.34 Section 83.34 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES RULES Sound and Light Signals § 83.34 Maneuvering and warning signals (Rule 34). (a) Whistle signals. When...

  18. The Emotional Impact and Ease of Recall of Warning Signs for Suicide: A Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, M. David; Mandrusiak, Michael; Joiner, Thomas E., Jr.; Berman, Alan L.; Van Orden, Kimberly A.; Hollar, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    In light of concerns about potential iatrogenic effects of information about suicide, in the current study we examined the emotional impact of reading a list of warning signs for suicide in comparison to comparable lists for heart attacks and diabetes. All participants read two sets of warning signs, with the experimental group reading the suicide…

  19. 49 CFR 176.325 - Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs... Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs. (a) Smoking or the use of open flame is prohibited in... material. (b) A sign carrying the legend: FLAMMABLE VAPORS KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY NO SMOKING must...

  20. 49 CFR 176.325 - Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs... Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs. (a) Smoking or the use of open flame is prohibited in... material. (b) A sign carrying the legend: FLAMMABLE VAPORS KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY NO SMOKING must...

  1. 49 CFR 176.325 - Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs... Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs. (a) Smoking or the use of open flame is prohibited in... material. (b) A sign carrying the legend: FLAMMABLE VAPORS KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY NO SMOKING must...

  2. 49 CFR 176.325 - Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs... Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs. (a) Smoking or the use of open flame is prohibited in... material. (b) A sign carrying the legend: FLAMMABLE VAPORS KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY NO SMOKING must...

  3. 49 CFR 176.325 - Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs... Smoking or open flame and posting of warning signs. (a) Smoking or the use of open flame is prohibited in... material. (b) A sign carrying the legend: FLAMMABLE VAPORS KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY NO SMOKING must...

  4. 40 CFR 82.110 - Form of label bearing warning statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... warning statement shall be the standard chemical name of the substance as listed in 40 CFR part 82... matter on the label. The warning statement shall appear in sharp contrast to any background upon which it... contrast are: black letters on a dark blue or dark green background, dark red letters on a light...

  5. 40 CFR 82.110 - Form of label bearing warning statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... warning statement shall be the standard chemical name of the substance as listed in 40 CFR part 82... matter on the label. The warning statement shall appear in sharp contrast to any background upon which it... contrast are: black letters on a dark blue or dark green background, dark red letters on a light...

  6. 40 CFR 82.110 - Form of label bearing warning statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... warning statement shall be the standard chemical name of the substance as listed in 40 CFR part 82... matter on the label. The warning statement shall appear in sharp contrast to any background upon which it... contrast are: black letters on a dark blue or dark green background, dark red letters on a light...

  7. 40 CFR 82.110 - Form of label bearing warning statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... warning statement shall be the standard chemical name of the substance as listed in 40 CFR part 82... matter on the label. The warning statement shall appear in sharp contrast to any background upon which it... contrast are: black letters on a dark blue or dark green background, dark red letters on a light...

  8. Early Warning: Development of Confidential Incident Reporting Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OLeary, Mike J.; Chappell, Sheryl L.; Connell, Linda (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Accidents hardly ever happen without warning. The combination, or sequence, of failures and mistakes that cause an accident may indeed be unique but the individual failures and mistakes rarely are. In the USA in 1974 the crews on two different aircraft misunderstood the same aeronautical chart and descended towards their destination dangerously early towards a mountain. The first crew were in good weather conditions and could see the mountain and resolved their misinterpretation of the chart. The second crew six weeks later were not so lucky. In cloud they had no clues to point out their mistake nor the presence of the mountain. The resulting crash and the ensuing inquiry, which brought to light the previous incident, shocked the country but gave it the impetus to instigate a safety reporting system. This system eventually became the NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS). The programme collects incident reports from pilots, controllers, mechanics, cabin attendants and many others involved in aviation operations. By disseminating this safety information the ASRS has helped enormously to give US airlines and airspace the highest safety standards. Accident prevention is a goal sought by everyone in the aviation industry and establishing effective incident reporting programmes can go a long way toward achieving that goal. This article will describe the steps and issues required to establish an incident reporting system. The authors summarize the lessons learned from the ASRS, now in its twentieth year of operation and from the Confidential Human Factors Reporting (HER) Programme run by British Airways, an airline that is a recognized world leader in safety reporting and analysis. The differences between government and airline operation of confidential safety reporting systems will be addressed.

  9. 7 CFR 318.13-11 - Posting of warning notice and distribution of baggage declarations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Posting of warning notice and distribution of baggage...) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE STATE OF HAWAII AND TERRITORIES... and distribution of baggage declarations. (a) Before any aircraft or any ship, vessel, or...

  10. Design and evaluation of multimedia security warnings for the interaction between humans and industrial robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruth, Jana; Kraetzer, Christian; Dittmann, Jana

    2011-01-01

    In this document a multi-media security warning design approach for automated production scenarios with industrial robots is introduced. This first approach is based on and adapts design principles of common security programs and a German VDI standard for safety warnings design. We focus on direct human-to-robot interaction scenarios, e.g. the online-programming of industrial robots, because of their potential indirect safety impacts, which could be caused by malicious codes infection of a robots control computer. We designed ten different multi-media security warnings, composed of visual and acoustical information. Visual information of warnings is transported via a traffic light metaphor (symbolizing three different threat levels), different warn icons (symbolizing properties of malicious codes) and instructions icons to programmers or operators and additional textual information. With an acknowledgment button in the middle of the warning, the programmer's confirmation of the reception of the warning is verified. Additionally, three different acoustical signals also indicate the threat level of the warning. Furthermore, an evaluation is presented, which uses concepts known from usability testing (method of loud thinking, questionnaire, time measurement). The aim is to evaluate general design criteria of our developed security warnings and tendency of user perception for further advancement of our warnings design.

  11. 49 CFR 234.259 - Warning time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Warning time. 234.259 Section 234.259... time. Each crossing warning system shall be tested for the prescribed warning time at least once every... devices that accurately determine actual warning time may be used in performing such tests....

  12. 16 CFR 307.2 - Required warnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... on the package or in the advertisement (unless the advertisement is an outdoor billboard) of a smokeless tobacco product. The warning statements required by the Act are as follows: WARNING: THIS PRODUCT MAY CAUSE MOUTH CANCER WARNING: THIS PRODUCT MAY CAUSE GUM DISEASE AND TOOTH LOSS WARNING:...

  13. 49 CFR 234.259 - Warning time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Warning time. 234.259 Section 234.259... time. Each crossing warning system shall be tested for the prescribed warning time at least once every... devices that accurately determine actual warning time may be used in performing such tests....

  14. 49 CFR 234.259 - Warning time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Warning time. 234.259 Section 234.259... time. Each crossing warning system shall be tested for the prescribed warning time at least once every... devices that accurately determine actual warning time may be used in performing such tests....

  15. Early warning indicators for monitoring nuclear plant performance

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, R.J.

    1997-12-01

    Florida Power & Light Company`s (FP&L`s) Nuclear Division has developed a set of early warning indicators that are used to provide precursor indications of future plant performance. These indicators are monitored by management and safety committees to enable early detection of negative performance so that corrective actions may be taken prior to experiencing a significant decline in plant performance.

  16. 46 CFR 78.70-5 - Warning notice posted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Warning notice posted. 78.70-5 Section 78.70-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS OPERATIONS De-Energizing of Cargo Hold Lighting Circuits When Grain or Other Combustible Bulk Cargo is Carried § 78.70-5...

  17. 46 CFR 97.55-5 - Warning notice posted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Warning notice posted. 97.55-5 Section 97.55-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS OPERATIONS De-Energizing of Cargo Hold Lighting Circuits When Grain or Other Combustible Bulk Cargo Is Carried §...

  18. Aircraft cybernetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The use of computers for aircraft control, flight simulation, and inertial navigation is explored. The man-machine relation problem in aviation is addressed. Simple and self-adapting autopilots are described and the assets and liabilities of digital navigation techniques are assessed.

  19. 33 CFR 83.34 - Maneuvering and warning signals (Rule 34).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... shall be about 1 second; and (3) The light used for this signal shall, if fitted, be one all-round white... SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES RULES Sound and Light Signals § 83.34 Maneuvering and warning signals... agreement is made. (b) Light signals. A vessel may supplement the whistle signals prescribed in paragraph...

  20. Russian eruption warning systems for aviation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, C.; Girina, O.; Senyukov, S.; Rybin, A.; Osiensky, J.; Izbekov, P.; Ferguson, G.

    2009-01-01

    More than 65 potentially active volcanoes on the Kamchatka Peninsula and the Kurile Islands pose a substantial threat to aircraft on the Northern Pacific (NOPAC), Russian Trans-East (RTE), and Pacific Organized Track System (PACOTS) air routes. The Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) monitors and reports on volcanic hazards to aviation for Kamchatka and the north Kuriles. KVERT scientists utilize real-time seismic data, daily satellite views of the region, real-time video, and pilot and field reports of activity to track and alert the aviation industry of hazardous activity. Most Kurile Island volcanoes are monitored by the Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT) based in Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk. SVERT uses daily moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite images to look for volcanic activity along this 1,250-km chain of islands. Neither operation is staffed 24 h per day. In addition, the vast majority of Russian volcanoes are not monitored seismically in real-time. Other challenges include multiple time-zones and language differences that hamper communication among volcanologists and meteorologists in the US, Japan, and Russia who share the responsibility to issue official warnings. Rapid, consistent verification of explosive eruptions and determination of cloud heights remain significant technical challenges. Despite these difficulties, in more than a decade of frequent eruptive activity in Kamchatka and the northern Kuriles, no damaging encounters with volcanic ash from Russian eruptions have been recorded. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  1. Warning Signs of Vision Problems in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Warning Signs of Vision Problems in Infants & Children Page Content ​Eye exams ... treated successfully. What are warning signs of a vision problem? Babies up to 1 year of age: ...

  2. FDA Bolsters Warnings about Class of Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... html FDA Bolsters Warnings About Class of Antibiotics Fluoroquinolones such as Cipro, Levaquin should be reserved for ... label warnings on a class of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones because the drugs can lead to disabling side ...

  3. Affordable MMW aircraft collision avoidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almsted, Larry D.; Becker, Robert C.; Zelenka, Richard E.

    1997-06-01

    Collision avoidance is of concern to all aircraft, requiring the detection and identification of hazardous terrain or obstacles in sufficient time for clearance maneuvers. The collision avoidance requirement is even more demanding for helicopters, as their unique capabilities result in extensive operations at low-altitude, near to terrain and other hazardous obstacles. TO augment the pilot's visual collision avoidance abilities, some aircraft are equipped with 'enhanced-vision' systems or terrain collision warning systems. Enhanced-vision systems are typically very large and costly systems that are not very covert and are also difficult to install in a helicopter. The display is typically raw images from infrared or radar sensors, and can require a high degree of pilot interpretation and attention. Terrain collision warning system that rely on stored terrain maps are often of low resolution and accuracy and do not represent hazards to the aircraft placed after map sampling. Such hazards could include aircraft parked on runway, man- made towers or buildings and hills. In this paper, a low cost dual-function scanning pencil-beam, millimeter-wave radar forward sensor is used to determine whether an aircraft's flight path is clear of obstructions. Due to the limited space and weight budget in helicopters, the system is a dual function system that is substituted in place of the existing radar altimeter. The system combines a 35 GHz forward looking obstacle avoidance radar and a 4.3 GHz radar altimeter. The forward looking 35 GHz 3D radar's returns are used to construct a terrain and obstruction database surrounding an aircraft, which is presented to the pilot as a synthetic perspective display. The 35 GHz forward looking radar and the associated display was evaluated in a joint NASA Honeywell flight test program in 1996. The tests were conducted on a NASA/Army test helicopter. The test program clearly demonstrated the systems potential usefulness for collision avoidance.

  4. 14 CFR 25.207 - Stall warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... warning for flight in icing conditions must be provided by the same means as stall warning for flight in non-icing conditions. (c) When the speed is reduced at rates not exceeding one knot per second, stall... icing conditions, the stall warning margin in straight and turning flight must be sufficient to...

  5. 14 CFR 25.207 - Stall warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... warning for flight in icing conditions must be provided by the same means as stall warning for flight in non-icing conditions. (c) When the speed is reduced at rates not exceeding one knot per second, stall... icing conditions, the stall warning margin in straight and turning flight must be sufficient to...

  6. 14 CFR 25.207 - Stall warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... warning for flight in icing conditions must be provided by the same means as stall warning for flight in non-icing conditions. (c) When the speed is reduced at rates not exceeding one knot per second, stall... icing conditions, the stall warning margin in straight and turning flight must be sufficient to...

  7. 30 CFR 56.14214 - Train warnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14214 Train warnings. A warning that is audible above... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Train warnings. 56.14214 Section 56.14214 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL...

  8. 30 CFR 56.14214 - Train warnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14214 Train warnings. A warning that is audible above... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Train warnings. 56.14214 Section 56.14214 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL...

  9. 30 CFR 57.14214 - Train warnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14214 Train warnings. A warning that is audible... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Train warnings. 57.14214 Section 57.14214 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL...

  10. 30 CFR 57.14214 - Train warnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14214 Train warnings. A warning that is audible... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Train warnings. 57.14214 Section 57.14214 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL...

  11. 30 CFR 57.14214 - Train warnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14214 Train warnings. A warning that is audible... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Train warnings. 57.14214 Section 57.14214 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL...

  12. 30 CFR 56.14214 - Train warnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14214 Train warnings. A warning that is audible above... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Train warnings. 56.14214 Section 56.14214 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL...

  13. 46 CFR 154.1830 - Warning sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Warning sign. 154.1830 Section 154.1830 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1830 Warning sign. (a) The master... a warning sign: (1) At the gangway facing the shore so that the sign may be seen from the shore;...

  14. 46 CFR 154.1830 - Warning sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Warning sign. 154.1830 Section 154.1830 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1830 Warning sign. (a) The master... a warning sign: (1) At the gangway facing the shore so that the sign may be seen from the shore;...

  15. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously placed along each protective enclosure at intervals so that at least one sign is recognizable at night from...

  16. 33 CFR 127.1113 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Warning signs. 127.1113 Section... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Design and Construction § 127.1113 Warning signs. (a) The marine transfer area for LHG must have warning signs that— (1) Meet paragraph (b) of this...

  17. 46 CFR 154.1830 - Warning sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Warning sign. 154.1830 Section 154.1830 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1830 Warning sign. (a) The master... a warning sign: (1) At the gangway facing the shore so that the sign may be seen from the shore;...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously placed along each protective enclosure at intervals so that at least one sign is recognizable at night from...

  19. 46 CFR 154.1830 - Warning sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Warning sign. 154.1830 Section 154.1830 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1830 Warning sign. (a) The master... a warning sign: (1) At the gangway facing the shore so that the sign may be seen from the shore;...

  20. 33 CFR 127.1113 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Warning signs. 127.1113 Section... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Design and Construction § 127.1113 Warning signs. (a) The marine transfer area for LHG must have warning signs that— (1) Meet paragraph (b) of this...

  1. 46 CFR 154.1830 - Warning sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Warning sign. 154.1830 Section 154.1830 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1830 Warning sign. (a) The master... a warning sign: (1) At the gangway facing the shore so that the sign may be seen from the shore;...

  2. 33 CFR 127.113 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Warning signs. 127.113 Section... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas § 127.113 Warning signs. (a) The marine transfer area for LNG must have warning signs that— (1) Meet paragraph (b) of this section; (2) Can be seen from...

  3. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously placed along each protective enclosure at intervals so that at least one sign is recognizable at night from...

  4. 33 CFR 127.113 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Warning signs. 127.113 Section... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas § 127.113 Warning signs. (a) The marine transfer area for LNG must have warning signs that— (1) Meet paragraph (b) of this section; (2) Can be seen from...

  5. 33 CFR 127.113 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Warning signs. 127.113 Section... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas § 127.113 Warning signs. (a) The marine transfer area for LNG must have warning signs that— (1) Meet paragraph (b) of this section; (2) Can be seen from...

  6. 33 CFR 127.113 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Warning signs. 127.113 Section... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas § 127.113 Warning signs. (a) The marine transfer area for LNG must have warning signs that— (1) Meet paragraph (b) of this section; (2) Can be seen from...

  7. 33 CFR 127.1113 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Warning signs. 127.1113 Section... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Design and Construction § 127.1113 Warning signs. (a) The marine transfer area for LHG must have warning signs that— (1) Meet paragraph (b) of this...

  8. 33 CFR 127.1113 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Warning signs. 127.1113 Section... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Design and Construction § 127.1113 Warning signs. (a) The marine transfer area for LHG must have warning signs that— (1) Meet paragraph (b) of this...

  9. 33 CFR 127.1113 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Warning signs. 127.1113 Section... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Design and Construction § 127.1113 Warning signs. (a) The marine transfer area for LHG must have warning signs that— (1) Meet paragraph (b) of this...

  10. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously placed along each protective enclosure at intervals so that at least one sign is recognizable at night from...

  11. 33 CFR 127.113 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Warning signs. 127.113 Section... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas § 127.113 Warning signs. (a) The marine transfer area for LNG must have warning signs that— (1) Meet paragraph (b) of this section; (2) Can be seen from...

  12. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously placed along each protective enclosure at intervals so that at least one sign is recognizable at night from...

  13. 30 CFR 56.14208 - Warning devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Warning devices. 56.14208 Section 56.14208 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14208 Warning devices. (a) Visible warning devices...

  14. 30 CFR 56.14208 - Warning devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Warning devices. 56.14208 Section 56.14208 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14208 Warning devices. (a) Visible warning devices...

  15. 30 CFR 57.14208 - Warning devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Warning devices. 57.14208 Section 57.14208... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14208 Warning devices. (a) Visible warning devices shall be used when parked mobile equipment creates a hazard to persons in other mobile...

  16. 30 CFR 57.14208 - Warning devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Warning devices. 57.14208 Section 57.14208... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14208 Warning devices. (a) Visible warning devices shall be used when parked mobile equipment creates a hazard to persons in other mobile...

  17. The Cleveland Aircraft Fire Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenneman, James J.; Heine, Donald A.

    1968-01-01

    On June 30 and July 1, 1966, tests were conducted to evaluate high expansion foam's ability to extend the time for which an aircraft passenger cabin environment would remain survivable during a post-crash fire. While some results tend to confirm those of similar tests, others may shed new light on the problem.

  18. [Pictorial health warnings on tobacco products packages as a part of tobacco epidemic control].

    PubMed

    Kaleta, Dorota; Kozieł, Anna; Miśkiewicz, Paulina

    2009-01-01

    The use of tobacco products has been described by the World Health Organization as the risk factor responsible for six out of eight causes of death in the world. Informing about the harm of smoking may be presented in many ways like media campaigns, text warnings, or graphic warnings placed on tobacco products. The aim of this article is to describe the role of graphic warnings placed on tobacco products in light of tobacco control. In this work, the available current data, including researches and reports of WHO, have been used. Graphic warnings may be a very valuable source of knowledge about health consequences of smoking. They are also much more visible, draw attention much better compared with text warnings and more clearly communicate the threats of tobacco use. They also have a stronger impact, are better memorized and better motivate to quit smoking. Pictorial warnings are also approved by the society. Smokers themselves perceive them as more effective than text warnings. Moreover, this kind of labeling makes tobacco products less attractive. The introduction of legal regulations enforcing these types of warnings does not cost anybody but the tobacco companies. This kind of solution helps to gain public acceptance for other methods of tobacco control like totally free tobacco smoke places. PMID:19999044

  19. Advanced Air Data Systems for Commercial Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    It is possible to get a crude estimate of wind speed and direction while driving a car at night in the rain, with the motion of the raindrop reflections in the headlights providing clues about the wind. The clues are difficult to interpret, though, because of the relative motions of ground, car, air, and raindrops. More subtle interpretation is possible if the rain is replaced by fog, because the tiny droplets would follow the swirling currents of air around an illuminated object, like, for example, a walking pedestrian. Microscopic particles in the air (aerosols) are better for helping make assessments of the wind, and reflective air molecules are best of all, providing the most refined measurements. It takes a bright light to penetrate fog, so it is easy to understand how other factors, like replacing the headlights with the intensity of a searchlight, can be advantageous. This is the basic principle behind a lidar system. While a radar system transmits a pulse of radiofrequency energy and interprets the received reflections, a lidar system works in a similar fashion, substituting a near-optical laser pulse. The technique allows the measurement of relative positions and velocities between the transmitter and the air, which allows measurements of relative wind and of air temperature (because temperature is associated with high-frequency random motions on a molecular level). NASA, as well as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), have interests in this advanced lidar technology, as much of their explorative research requires the ability to measure winds and turbulent regions within the atmosphere. Lidar also shows promise for providing warning of turbulent regions within the National Airspace System to allow commercial aircraft to avoid encounters with turbulence and thereby increase the safety of the traveling public. Both agencies currently employ lidar and optical sensing for a variety of weather-related research projects, such as analyzing

  20. Nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Savignac, Noel Felix; Gomez, Leo S; Yelton, William Graham; Robinson, Alex; Limmer, Steven

    2013-06-04

    This invention is a nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance of silver-silver halide on an interdigitated electrode to detect light or radiation comprised of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, X rays, and/or neutrons. The detector is comprised of an interdigitated electrode covered by a layer of silver halide. After exposure to alpha particles, beta particles, X rays, gamma rays, neutron radiation, or light, the silver halide is reduced to silver in the presence of a reducing solution. The change from the high electrical resistance (impedance) of silver halide to the low resistance of silver provides the radiation warning that detected radiation levels exceed a predetermined radiation dose threshold.

  1. Educating with Aircraft Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Hobie

    1976-01-01

    Described is utilization of aircraft models, model aircraft clubs, and model aircraft magazines to promote student interest in aerospace education. The addresses for clubs and magazines are included. (SL)

  2. Airborne in-situ investigations of the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash plume on Iceland and over north-western Germany with light aircrafts and optical particle counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, K.; Eliasson, J.; Vogel, A.; Fischer, C.; Pohl, T.; van Haren, G.; Meier, M.; Grobéty, B.; Dahmann, D.

    2012-03-01

    During the time period of the eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in April/May 2010 the Duesseldorf University of Applied Sciences has performed 14 research flights in situations with and without the volcanic ash plume over Germany. In parallel to the research flights in Germany three measurement flights have been performed by the University of Iceland in May 2010 over the western part of Iceland. During two of these flights the outskirts of the eruption plume were entered directly, delivering most direct measurements within the eruption plume during this eruptive event. For all the measurement flights reported here, light durable piston-motor driven aircrafts were used, which were equipped with optical particle counters for in-situ measurements. Real-time monitoring of the particle concentrations was possible during the flights. As different types of optical particle counters have been used in Iceland and Germany, the optical particle counters have been re-calibrated after the flights to the same standard using gravimetric reference methods and original Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash samples. In-situ measurement results with high spatial resolution, directly from the eruption plume in Iceland as well as from the dispersed and several days old plume over Germany, are therefore presented here for the first time. They are normalized to the same ash concentration calibration standard. Moreover, airborne particles could be sampled directly out of the eruption plume in Iceland as well as during the flights over Germany. During the research flights over Iceland from 9 May 2011 to 11 May 2011 the ash emitted from the vent of the volcano turned out to be concentrated in a narrow well-defined plume of about 10 km width at a distance of 45-60 km away from the vent. Outside this plume the airborne ash concentrations could be proved to be below 50 μg m -3 over western Iceland. However, by entering the outskirts of the plume directly the research aircraft could

  3. Human response to aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Clemans A.; Fields, James M.

    1991-01-01

    The human auditory system and the perception of sound are discussed. The major concentration is on the annnoyance response and methods for relating the physical characteristics of sound to those psychosociological attributes associated with human response. Results selected from the extensive laboratory and field research conducted on human response to aircraft noise over the past several decades are presented along with discussions of the methodology commonly used in conducting that research. Finally, some of the more common criteria, regulations, and recommended practices for the control or limitation of aircraft noise are examined in light of the research findings on human response.

  4. A flight-test and simulation evaluation of the longitudinal final approach and landing performance of an automatic system for a light wing loading STOL aircraft equipped with wing spoilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, S. C.; Hardy, G. H.; Hindson, W. S.

    1984-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive flight-test investigation of short takeoff and landing (STOL) operating systems for the terminal systems for the terminal area, an automatic landing system has been developed and evaluated for a light wing-loading turboprop-powered aircraft. An advanced digital avionics system performed display, navigation, guidance, and control functions for the test aircraft. Control signals were generated in order to command powered actuators for all conventional controls and for a set of symmetrically driven wing spoilers. This report describes effects of the spoiler control on longitudinal autoland (automatic landing) performance. Flight-test results, with and without spoiler control, are presented and compared with available (basically, conventional takeoff and landing) performance criteria. These comparisons are augmented by results from a comprehensive simulation of the controlled aircraft that included representations of the microwave landing system navigation errors that were encountered in flight as well as expected variations in atmospheric turbulence and wind shear. Flight-test results show that the addition of spoiler control improves the touchdown performance of the automatic landing system. Spoilers improve longitudinal touchdown and landing pitch-attitude performance, particularly in tailwind conditions. Furthermore, simulation results indicate that performance would probably be satisfactory for a wider range of atmospheric disturbances than those encountered in flight. Flight results also indicate that the addition of spoiler control during the final approach does not result in any measurable change in glidepath track performance, and results in a very small deterioration in airspeed tracking. This difference contrasts with simulations results, which indicate some improvement in glidepath tracking and no appreciable change in airspeed tracking. The modeling problem in the simulation that contributed to this discrepancy with flight was

  5. A survey of the status of and philosophies relating to cockpit warning systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    A survey was taken to study current cockpit caution and warning (c/w) systems, and to examine industry philosophies regarding c/w system design including current efforts to improve them. Guidelines currently in use were outlined and those which appear to have general acceptance, those which are considered ineffective or erroneous, and those with which there is broad disagreement as to validity, were delineated. Major airplane manufacturerd were surveyed and a manufacturer dealing specifically with aircraft instrumentation was consulted.

  6. Aircraft antennas/conformal antennas missile antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solbach, Klaus

    1987-04-01

    Three major areas of airborne microwave antennas are examined. The basic system environment for missile telemetry/telecommand and fuze functions is sketched and the basic antenna design together with practical examples are discussed. The principle requirements of modern nose radar flat plate antennas are shown to result from missile/aircraft system requirements. Basic principles of slotted waveguide antenna arrays are sketched and practical antenna designs are discussed. The present early warning system designs are sketched to point out requirements and performance of practical radar warning and jamming antennas (broadband spiral antennas and horn radiators). With respect to newer developments in the ECM scenario, some demonstrated and proposed antenna systems (lens fed arrays, phased array, active array) are discussed.

  7. Pharmacy Students’ Knowledge of Black Box Warnings

    PubMed Central

    Shireman, Theresa I.; Generali, Joyce; Rigler, Sally; Mayorga, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the progression of pharmacy students’ knowledge of black box warnings across 3 years of didactic training, and to determine how they stay current with new warnings. Methods A cross-sectional survey instrument was administered to pharmacy students in their first (P1), second (P2), and third (P3) professional years. The survey assessed student awareness of medications possessing a black box warning and familiarity with the warning content for 20 medications (15 with and 5 without warnings). Results Mean number of correct responses identifying the presence or absence of a black box warning among the 20 medications were 5.8 ± 3.3, 9.6 ± 4.0, and 14.8 ± 2.8 for the P1, P2, and P3 students, respectively. Knowledge of black box warning content was variable. Students were least aware of the warning content for stavudine and enoxaparin. Students were most familiar with the warning content for paroxetine and estrogen. Conclusion Students’ awareness and understanding of black box warnings was proportional to their educational progression, but their knowledge level was inconsistent across drug groups. PMID:20221356

  8. Type 'A' V/STOL - One aircraft for all support missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelt, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation is conducted regarding the feasibility of developing a single support aircraft type for the Navy, taking into account the current naval inventory of utility aircraft types. Support mission characteristics are examined, giving attention to antisubmarine warfare, airborne early warning, marine assault, carrier on board delivery/vertical on board delivery, the aerial tanker mission, long-range rescue, surface attack, and aspects of combat, search, and rescue. With the aid of a sample design for a V/STOL aircraft with a medium disc loading lift system it is demonstrated that it is now possible to design an aircraft which, with minor modifications, can meet the wide variety of support missions.

  9. Modeling warning times for the Israel's earthquake early warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    In June 2012, the Israeli government approved the offer of the creation of an earthquake early warning system (EEWS) that would provide timely alarms for schools and colleges in Israel. A network configuration was chosen, consisting of a staggered line of ˜100 stations along the main regional faults: the Dead Sea fault and the Carmel fault, and an additional ˜40 stations spread more or less evenly over the country. A hybrid approach to the EEWS alarm was suggested, where a P-wave-based system will be combined with the S-threshold method. The former utilizes first arrivals to several stations closest to the event for prompt location and determination of the earthquake's magnitude from the first 3 s of the waveform data. The latter issues alarms, when the acceleration of the surface movement exceeds a threshold for at least two neighboring stations. The threshold will be chosen to be a peak acceleration level corresponding to a magnitude 5 earthquake at a short distance range (5-10 km). The warning times or lead times, i.e., times between the alarm signal arrival and arrival of the damaging S-waves, are considered for the P, S, and hybrid EEWS methods. For each of the approaches, the P- and the S-wave travel times and the alarm times were calculated using a standard 1D velocity model and some assumptions regarding the EEWS data latencies. Then, a definition of alarm effectiveness was introduced as a measure of the trade-off between the warning time and the shaking intensity. A number of strong earthquake scenarios, together with anticipated shaking intensities at important targets, namely cities with high populations, are considered. The scenarios demonstrated in probabilistic terms how the alarm effectiveness varies depending on the target distance from the epicenter and event magnitude.

  10. Modeling warning times for the Israel's earthquake early warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, Vladimir

    2014-09-01

    In June 2012, the Israeli government approved the offer of the creation of an earthquake early warning system (EEWS) that would provide timely alarms for schools and colleges in Israel. A network configuration was chosen, consisting of a staggered line of ˜100 stations along the main regional faults: the Dead Sea fault and the Carmel fault, and an additional ˜40 stations spread more or less evenly over the country. A hybrid approach to the EEWS alarm was suggested, where a P-wave-based system will be combined with the S-threshold method. The former utilizes first arrivals to several stations closest to the event for prompt location and determination of the earthquake's magnitude from the first 3 s of the waveform data. The latter issues alarms, when the acceleration of the surface movement exceeds a threshold for at least two neighboring stations. The threshold will be chosen to be a peak acceleration level corresponding to a magnitude 5 earthquake at a short distance range (5-10 km). The warning times or lead times, i.e., times between the alarm signal arrival and arrival of the damaging S-waves, are considered for the P, S, and hybrid EEWS methods. For each of the approaches, the P- and the S-wave travel times and the alarm times were calculated using a standard 1D velocity model and some assumptions regarding the EEWS data latencies. Then, a definition of alarm effectiveness was introduced as a measure of the trade-off between the warning time and the shaking intensity. A number of strong earthquake scenarios, together with anticipated shaking intensities at important targets, namely cities with high populations, are considered. The scenarios demonstrated in probabilistic terms how the alarm effectiveness varies depending on the target distance from the epicenter and event magnitude.

  11. Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Audin, L.

    1994-12-31

    EPAct covers a vast territory beyond lighting and, like all legislation, also contains numerous {open_quotes}favors,{close_quotes} compromises, and even some sleight-of-hand. Tucked away under Title XIX, for example, is an increase from 20% to 28% tax on gambling winnings, effective January 1, 1993 - apparently as a way to help pay for new spending listed elsewhere in the bill. Overall, it is a landmark piece of legislation, about a decade overdue. It remains to be seen how the Federal Government will enforce upgrading of state (or even their own) energy codes. There is no mention of funding for {open_quotes}energy police{close_quotes} in EPAct. Merely creating such a national standard, however, provides a target for those who sincerely wish to create an energy-efficient future.

  12. Aircraft Electric Secondary Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Technologies resulted to aircraft power systems and aircraft in which all secondary power is supplied electrically are discussed. A high-voltage dc power generating system for fighter aircraft, permanent magnet motors and generators for aircraft, lightweight transformers, and the installation of electric generators on turbine engines are among the topics discussed.

  13. World commercial aircraft accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, C.Y.

    1993-01-01

    This report is a compilation of all accidents world-wide involving aircraft in commercial service which resulted in the loss of the airframe or one or more fatality, or both. This information has been gathered in order to present a complete inventory of commercial aircraft accidents. Events involving military action, sabotage, terrorist bombings, hijackings, suicides, and industrial ground accidents are included within this list. Included are: accidents involving world commercial jet aircraft, world commercial turboprop aircraft, world commercial pistonprop aircraft with four or more engines and world commercial pistonprop aircraft with two or three engines from 1946 to 1992. Each accident is presented with information in the following categories: date of the accident, airline and its flight numbers, type of flight, type of aircraft, aircraft registration number, construction number/manufacturers serial number, aircraft damage, accident flight phase, accident location, number of fatalities, number of occupants, cause, remarks, or description (brief) of the accident, and finally references used. The sixth chapter presents a summary of the world commercial aircraft accidents by major aircraft class (e.g. jet, turboprop, and pistonprop) and by flight phase. The seventh chapter presents several special studies including a list of world commercial aircraft accidents for all aircraft types with 100 or more fatalities in order of decreasing number of fatalities, a list of collision accidents involving commercial aircrafts, and a list of world commercial aircraft accidents for all aircraft types involving military action, sabotage, terrorist bombings, and hijackings.

  14. Laboratory study of the effects of sidewall treatment, source directivity and temperature on the interior noise of a light aircraft fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heitman, K. E.; Mixson, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a laboratory study of add-on {coustic treatments for a twin-engine, propeller-driven aircraft fuselage. The sound source was a pneumatic-driver, with attached horn to simulate propeller noise distribution, powered by a white noise signal. Treatments included a double-wall, production-line treatment and various fiberglass and lead-vinyl treatments. Insertion losses, space-averaged across six interior microphone positions, were used to evaluate the treatments. In addition, the effects of sound source angle and ambient temperature on interior sound pressure level are presented. The sound source angle is shown to have a significant effect on one-third octave band localized sound pressure level. While changes in ambient temperature are shown to have little effect on one-third octave band localized sound pressure level, the change in narrowband localized sound pressure level may be dramatic.

  15. Why better operators receive worse warnings.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Joachim; Bitan, Yuval

    2002-01-01

    Descriptions of a dynamic warning system usually assign the system certain diagnostic values. Operators should adjust their responses to these values when considering the output of the system for their decisions. This approach is not necessarily appropriate for complex systems that are controlled by human operators. Here the operators' actions are likely to change the frequency of events that should trigger a warning. Consequently the operator will change the predictive value of a warning system that is imperfectly correlated with the monitored events. In general its diagnostic value decreases for better operators. This phenomenon is demonstrated on the example of binary warnings about binary events, and an empirical demonstration of the phenomenon is provided in an experimental study of a process control task. Actual or potential applications of this research include improved understanding of the determinants of operators' responses to warnings, which should help in the design of better warning systems. PMID:12502153

  16. Microwave System for Detecting Ice on Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Philip J.; Glynn, Dennis P., Jr.; Joseph, John C.

    2004-01-01

    A microwave-based system has been developed as a means of detecting ice on aircraft surfaces, with enough sensitivity to provide a warning before the ice accretes to a dangerous thickness. The system can measure the thickness of ice from a few mils (1 mil = 0.0254 mm) to about 1/4 in. (.6 mm) and can distinguish among (1) ice, (2) water (or deicing fluid), and (3) a mixture of ice and water (or deicing fluid). Sensors have been ruggedized to withstand the rain erosion environment.

  17. Monitoring Integrity Of Composite Aircraft Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Shu Shing; Chen, Kuan-Luen; Kuo, An-Yu; Riccardella, Peter C.; Mucciardi, Anthony N.; Andrews, Robert J.; Grady, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    System developed that monitors integrity of composite-material structural components of aircraft in service. Includes strain gauges and accelerometers installed permanently in components to monitor vibrations, microprocessor-based data-acquisition system to process outputs of these vibration sensors, and desktop computer to analyze acquired data. By automating significant part of inspection process, system reduces amount of time needed for inspection and cost of inspection equipment. Contributes to safety by giving timely warning of hidden flaws that necessitate early, detailed inspection of critical components to determine whether components should be replaced immediately.

  18. ForWarn Forest Disturbance Change Detection System Provides a Weekly Snapshot of US Forest Conditions to Aid Forest Managers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargrove, W. W.; Spruce, J.; Kumar, J.; Hoffman, F. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center and Western Wildland Environmental Assessment Center of the USDA Forest Service have collaborated with NASA Stennis Space Center to develop ForWarn, a forest monitoring tool that uses MODIS satellite imagery to produce weekly snapshots of vegetation conditions across the lower 48 United States. Forest and natural resource managers can use ForWarn to rapidly detect, identify, and respond to unexpected changes in the nation's forests caused by insects, diseases, wildfires, severe weather, or other natural or human-caused events. ForWarn detects most types of forest disturbances, including insects, disease, wildfires, frost and ice damage, tornadoes, hurricanes, blowdowns, harvest, urbanization, and landslides. It also detects drought, flood, and temperature effects, and shows early and delayed seasonal vegetation development. Operating continuously since January 2010, results show ForWarn to be a robust and highly capable tool for detecting changes in forest conditions. To help forest and natural resource managers rapidly detect, identify, and respond to unexpected changes in the nation's forests, ForWarn produces sets of national maps showing potential forest disturbances at 231m resolution every 8 days, and posts the results to the web for examination. ForWarn compares current greenness with the "normal," historically seen greenness that would be expected for healthy vegetation for a specific location and time of the year, and then identifies areas appearing less green than expected to provide a strategic national overview of potential forest disturbances that can be used to direct ground and aircraft efforts. In addition to forests, ForWarn also tracks potential disturbances in rangeland vegetation and agriculural crops. ForWarn is the first national-scale system of its kind based on remote sensing developed specifically for forest disturbances. The ForWarn system had an official unveiling and rollout in

  19. 33 CFR 127.1207 - Warning alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Equipment § 127.1207 Warning alarms. (a) Each...

  20. Italian landslide early warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, M.

    2009-04-01

    In Italy, intense or prolonged rainfall is the primary trigger of landslides, and rainfall-induced slope failures occur every year, claiming lives, causing economic disruption, and producing different environmental problems. The national Italian Department of Civil Protection (DPC) is responsible for the protection of individuals, communities and their properties, against natural hazards, including landslides, and for rescuing people if a catastrophic event should occur. The main tasks of the DPC are the issuing of meteorological, hydrological, and landslide warnings and the determination of landslide hazards and risk at different geographical scales. In 2007, the DPC asked IRPI, a research institute of the Italian National Research Council, to design and implement a prototype system for the quasi-real-time forecast of rainfall induced landslides in Italy. The system - under development - is based on two main components: (i) a set of national, regional and local rainfall thresholds for the possible initiation of landslides, and (ii) a synoptic (small scale) assessment of landslide hazards and the associated risk in Italy. The system attempt to predict rainfall induced landslides using existing and new rainfall thresholds. The new rainfall thresholds, chiefly of the intensity-duration (ID) and normalized-ID types, will be defined analyzing a catalogue of rainfall events that have or have not resulted in landslides. The thresholds will be established using objective statistical techniques. The assessment of landslide hazards and risk will be performed using statistical models based on small scale thematic information and catalogues of historical landslides and historical landslides with human consequences in Italy, in the period from 1900 to 2005. The catalogues were compiled through a thorough literature and archive search. The two individual system components will be then combined to form a national landslide warning system. A preliminary version of a software tool

  1. Communicating risk information and warnings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mileti, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Major advances have occurred over the last 20 years about how to effectively communicate risk information and warnings to the public. These lessons have been hard won. Knowledge has mounted on the finding from social scientific studies of risk communication failures, successes and those which fell somewhere in between. Moreover, the last 2 decades have borne witness to the brith, cultivation, and blossoming of information sharing between those physical scientists who discover new information about risk and those communcation scientists who trace its diffusion and then measure pbulic reaction. 

  2. Laser Powered Aircraft Takes Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A team of NASA researchers from Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Dryden Flight Research center have proven that beamed light can be used to power an aircraft, a first-in-the-world accomplishment to the best of their knowledge. Using an experimental custom built radio-controlled model aircraft, the team has demonstrated a system that beams enough light energy from the ground to power the propeller of an aircraft and sustain it in flight. Special photovoltaic arrays on the plane, similar to solar cells, receive the light energy and convert it to electric current to drive the propeller motor. In a series of indoor flights this week at MSFC, a lightweight custom built laser beam was aimed at the airplane `s solar panels. The laser tracks the plane, maintaining power on its cells until the end of the flight when the laser is turned off and the airplane glides to a landing. The laser source demonstration represents the capability to beam more power to a plane so that it can reach higher altitudes and have a greater flight range without having to carry fuel or batteries, enabling an indefinite flight time. The demonstration was a collaborative effort between the Dryden Center at Edward's, California, where the aircraft was designed and built, and MSFC, where integration and testing of the laser and photovoltaic cells was done. Laser power beaming is a promising technology for consideration in new aircraft design and operation, and supports NASA's goals in the development of revolutionary aerospace technologies. Photographed with their invention are (from left to right): David Bushman and Tony Frackowiak, both of Dryden; and MSFC's Robert Burdine.

  3. Infrared thermographic diagnostic aid to aircraft maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delo, Michael; Delo, Steve

    2007-04-01

    Thermographic data can be used as a supplement to aircraft maintenance operations in both back shop and flight line situations. Aircraft systems such as electrical, propulsion, environmental, pitot static and hydraulic/pneumatic fluid, can be inspected using a thermal infrared (IR) imager. Aircraft systems utilize electro-hydraulic, electro-mechanical, and electro-pneumatic mechanisms, which, if accessible, can be diagnosed for faults using infrared technology. Since thermographs are images of heat, rather than light, the measurement principle is based on the fact that any physical object (radiating energy at infrared wavelengths within the IR portion of the electro-magnetic spectrum), can be imaged with infrared imaging equipment. All aircraft systems being tested with infrared are required to be energized for troubleshooting, so that valuable baseline data from fully operational aircraft can be collected, archived and referenced for future comparisons.

  4. Remotely-Operated Traffic Control Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Traffic warning light for school crossing, construction zones, and other hazardous areas activated by remote control. Apparatus consists of small radio transmitter, pole-mounted strobe light with attached power supply and radio receiver.

  5. [Ecological security early-warning in Zhoushan Islands based on variable weight model].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Zhong, Lin-sheng; Chen, Tian; Zhou, Rui

    2015-06-01

    Ecological security early warning, as an important content of ecological security research, is of indicating significance in maintaining regional ecological security. Based on driving force, pressure, state, impact and response (D-P-S-I-R) framework model, this paper took Zhoushan Islands in Zhejiang Province as an example to construct the ecological security early warning index system, test degrees of ecological security early warning of Zhoushan Islands from 2000 to 2012 by using the method of variable weight model, and forecast ecological security state of 2013-2018 by Markov prediction method. The results showed that the variable weight model could meet the study needs of ecological security early warning of Zhoushan Islands. There was a fluctuant rising ecological security early warning index from 0.286 to 0.484 in Zhoushan Islands between year 2000 and 2012, in which the security grade turned from "serious alert" into " medium alert" and the indicator light turned from "orange" to "yellow". The degree of ecological security warning was "medium alert" with the light of "yellow" for Zhoushan Islands from 2013 to 2018. These findings could provide a reference for ecological security maintenance of Zhoushan Islands. PMID:26572042

  6. A Real-Time Advisory System For Airborne Early Warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, D. B.; Cromwell, M. E.; Donnell, M. L.; Barrett, C. L.

    1987-05-01

    Decision speed and quality can be greatly enhanced by the use of decision augmentation software to assist operators in information analysis and tactical problem solving, dynamic resource allocation, and in determining strategies which optimize overall system performance. One example of such software is the real-time advisory system (RTAS) being constructed to assist in tactical decision-making for airborne early warning (AEW) aircraft, particularly the carrier-based Navy E-2C. Using a vector logic approach, the current AEW RTAS is a real-time backward chaining expert system which provides advice for both threat interception and refueling in the complex Outer Air Battle Scenario. This paper describes the current system, discusses a number of design issues for such a system, and describes ongoing modifications to the current AEW RTAS using SAIC's frame-based knowledge repre-sentation language (KRL).

  7. The Effect of Sonic Booms on Earthquake Warning Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurman, Gilead; Haering, Edward A, Jr.; Price, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Several aerospace companies are designing quiet supersonic business jets for service over the United States. These aircraft have the potential to increase the occurrence of mild sonic booms across the country. This leads to interest among earthquake warning (EQW) developers and the general seismological community in characterizing the effect of sonic booms on seismic sensors in the field, their potential impact on EQW systems, and means of discriminating their signatures from those of earthquakes. The SonicBREWS project (Sonic Boom Resistant Earthquake Warning Systems) is a collaborative effort between Seismic Warning Systems, Inc. (SWS) and NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. This project aims to evaluate the effects of sonic booms on EQW sensors. The study consists of exposing high-sample-rate (1000 sps) triaxial accelerometers to sonic booms with overpressures ranging from 10 to 600 Pa in the free field and the built environment. The accelerometers record the coupling of the sonic boom to the ground and surrounding structures, while microphones record the acoustic wave above ground near the sensor. Sonic booms are broadband signals with more high-frequency content than earthquakes. Even a 1000 sps accelerometer will produce a significantly aliased record. Thus the observed peak ground velocity is strongly dependent on the sampling rate, and increases as the sampling rate is reduced. At 1000 sps we observe ground velocities that exceed those of P-waves from ML 3 earthquakes at local distances, suggesting that sonic booms are not negligible for EQW applications. We present the results of several experiments conducted under SonicBREWS showing the effects of typical-case low amplitude sonic booms and worst-case high amplitude booms. We show the effects of various sensor placements and sensor array geometries. Finally, we suggest possible avenues for discriminating sonic booms from earthquakes for the purposes of EQW.

  8. Emissions of an AVCO Lycoming 0-320-DIAD air cooled light aircraft engine as a function of fuel-air ratio, timing, and air temperature and humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, P. R.; Skorobatckyi, M.; Cosgrove, D. V.; Kempke, E. E., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A carbureted aircraft engine was operated over a range of test conditions to establish the exhaust levels over the EPA seven-mode emissions cycle. Baseline (full rich production limit) exhaust emissions at an induction air temperature of 59 F and near zero relative humidity were 90 percent of the EPA standard for HC, 35 percent for NOx, and 161 percent for CO. Changes in ignition timing around the standard 25 deg BTDC from 30 deg BTDC to 20 deg BTDC had little effect on the exhaust emissions. Retarding the timing to 15 deg BTDC increased both the HC and CO emissions and decreased NOx emissions. HC and CO emissions decreased as the carburetor was leaned out, while NOx emissions increased. The EPA emission standards were marginally achieved at two leanout conditions. Variations in the quantity of cooling air flow over the engine had no effect on exhaust emissions. Temperature-humidity effects at the higher values of air temperature and relative humidity tested indicated that the HC and CO emissions increased significantly, while the NOx emissions decreased.

  9. Schlieren Imaging Of An Aircraft In Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1994-01-01

    Technique for making schlieren images of airplanes and missiles in supersonic flight devised to help understand physics of compressible aerodynamic flows about complicated aircraft shapes. Technique also used to study far-field sonic booms. Data obtained from schlieren images useful in optimizing designs of prototype aircraft. Technique incorporates elements of focusing schlieren photography, astronomical photography, and streak photography. Using sun or moon as source of light, apparatus forms image revealing gradients of density in air flow.

  10. Aircraft vortex marking program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pompa, M. F.

    1979-01-01

    A simple, reliable device for identifying atmospheric vortices, principally as generated by in-flight aircraft and with emphasis on the use of nonpolluting aerosols for marking by injection into such vortex (-ices) is presented. The refractive index and droplet size were determined from an analysis of aerosol optical and transport properties as the most significant parameters in effecting vortex optimum light scattering (for visual sighting) and visual persistency of at least 300 sec. The analysis also showed that a steam-ejected tetraethylene glycol aerosol with droplet size near 1 micron and refractive index of approximately 1.45 could be a promising candidate for vortex marking. A marking aerosol was successfully generated with the steam-tetraethylene glycol mixture from breadboard system hardware. A compact 25 lb/f thrust (nominal) H2O2 rocket chamber was the key component of the system which produced the required steam by catalytic decomposition of the supplied H2O2.

  11. Urban Flood Warning Systems using Radar Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, N.; Bedient, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    There have been an increasing number of urban areas that rely on weather radars to provide accurate precipitation information for flood warning purposes. As non-structural tools, radar-based flood warning systems can provide accurate and timely warnings to the public and private entities in urban areas that are prone to flash floods. The wider spatial and temporal coverage from radar increases flood warning lead-time when compared to rain and stream gages alone. The Third Generation Rice and Texas Medical Center (TMC) Flood Alert System (FAS3) has been delivering warning information with 2 to 3 hours of lead time and a R2 value of 93% to facility personnel in a readily understood format for more than 50 events in the past 15 years. The current FAS utilizes NEXRAD Level II radar rainfall data coupled with a real-time hydrologic model (RTHEC-1) to deliver warning information. The system has a user-friendly dashboard to provide rainfall maps, Google Maps based inundation maps, hydrologic predictions, and real-time monitoring at the bayou. This paper will evaluate its reliable performance during the recent events occurring in 2012 and 2013 and the development of a similar radar-based flood warning system for the City of Sugar Land, Texas. Having a significant role in the communication of flood information, FAS marks an important step towards the establishment of an operational and reliable flood warning system for flood-prone urban areas.

  12. Detectable Warning Surfaces at Curb Ramps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauger, J. S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Four tests evaluated the need for and effectiveness of detectable warning surfaces at curb ramps for pedestrians with blindness. Results found that the effectiveness of the detectable warning surfaces depended on other aspects of the design of the intersections and on factors such as the density of traffic and the traveler's skills. (CR)

  13. 21 CFR 1141.10 - Required warnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... warning shall be in the English language, except that: (i) In the case of an advertisement that appears in a non-English publication, the text in the required warning shall appear in the predominant language of the publication whether or not the advertisement is in English; and (ii) In the case of...

  14. 24 CFR 200.1505 - Warning letter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Multifamily Accelerated Processing (MAP): MAP... letter, which specifies problems or violations identified by HUD, to a MAP lender. (b) Effect of warning letter. The warning letter: (1) Does not suspend a lender's MAP privileges; (2) May impose a higher...

  15. 24 CFR 200.1505 - Warning letter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Multifamily Accelerated Processing (MAP): MAP... letter, which specifies problems or violations identified by HUD, to a MAP lender. (b) Effect of warning letter. The warning letter: (1) Does not suspend a lender's MAP privileges; (2) May impose a higher...

  16. 21 CFR 1141.10 - Required warnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... warning shall be in the English language, except that: (i) In the case of an advertisement that appears in a non-English publication, the text in the required warning shall appear in the predominant language... advertisement that appears in an English language publication but that is not in English, the text in...

  17. 21 CFR 1141.10 - Required warnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... warning shall be in the English language, except that: (i) In the case of an advertisement that appears in a non-English publication, the text in the required warning shall appear in the predominant language... advertisement that appears in an English language publication but that is not in English, the text in...

  18. 24 CFR 200.1505 - Warning letter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Multifamily Accelerated Processing (MAP): MAP... letter, which specifies problems or violations identified by HUD, to a MAP lender. (b) Effect of warning letter. The warning letter: (1) Does not suspend a lender's MAP privileges; (2) May impose a higher...

  19. 24 CFR 200.1505 - Warning letter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Multifamily Accelerated Processing (MAP): MAP... letter, which specifies problems or violations identified by HUD, to a MAP lender. (b) Effect of warning letter. The warning letter: (1) Does not suspend a lender's MAP privileges; (2) May impose a higher...

  20. 24 CFR 200.1505 - Warning letter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Multifamily Accelerated Processing (MAP): MAP... letter, which specifies problems or violations identified by HUD, to a MAP lender. (b) Effect of warning letter. The warning letter: (1) Does not suspend a lender's MAP privileges; (2) May impose a higher...

  1. 49 CFR 229.113 - Warning notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....113 Warning notice. Whenever any steam generator has been shut down because of defects, a distinctive warning notice giving reasons for the shut-down shall be conspicuously attached near the steam generator starting controls until the necessary repairs have been made. The locomotive in which the steam...

  2. 49 CFR 229.113 - Warning notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....113 Warning notice. Whenever any steam generator has been shut down because of defects, a distinctive warning notice giving reasons for the shut-down shall be conspicuously attached near the steam generator starting controls until the necessary repairs have been made. The locomotive in which the steam...

  3. 49 CFR 229.113 - Warning notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....113 Warning notice. Whenever any steam generator has been shut down because of defects, a distinctive warning notice giving reasons for the shut-down shall be conspicuously attached near the steam generator starting controls until the necessary repairs have been made. The locomotive in which the steam...

  4. 30 CFR 56.4101 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Warning signs. 56.4101 Section 56.4101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 56.4101 Warning signs. Readily visible signs prohibiting smoking...

  5. 30 CFR 56.4101 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Warning signs. 56.4101 Section 56.4101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 56.4101 Warning signs. Readily visible signs prohibiting smoking...

  6. 30 CFR 56.4101 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Warning signs. 56.4101 Section 56.4101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 56.4101 Warning signs. Readily visible signs prohibiting smoking...

  7. 30 CFR 57.4101 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Warning signs. 57.4101 Section 57.4101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 57.4101 Warning signs. Readily visible signs prohibiting smoking...

  8. 30 CFR 57.4101 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Warning signs. 57.4101 Section 57.4101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 57.4101 Warning signs. Readily visible signs prohibiting smoking...

  9. 30 CFR 56.4101 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Warning signs. 56.4101 Section 56.4101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 56.4101 Warning signs. Readily visible signs prohibiting smoking...

  10. 30 CFR 57.4101 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Warning signs. 57.4101 Section 57.4101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 57.4101 Warning signs. Readily visible signs prohibiting smoking...

  11. 30 CFR 57.4101 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Warning signs. 57.4101 Section 57.4101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 57.4101 Warning signs. Readily visible signs prohibiting smoking...

  12. 30 CFR 57.4101 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Warning signs. 57.4101 Section 57.4101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 57.4101 Warning signs. Readily visible signs prohibiting smoking...

  13. 30 CFR 56.4101 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Warning signs. 56.4101 Section 56.4101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 56.4101 Warning signs. Readily visible signs prohibiting smoking...

  14. 49 CFR 229.113 - Warning notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Steam Generators § 229.113 Warning notice. Whenever any steam generator has been shut down because of defects, a distinctive warning notice giving reasons for the shut-down shall be conspicuously attached near the steam...

  15. 49 CFR 229.113 - Warning notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Steam Generators § 229.113 Warning notice. Whenever any steam generator has been shut down because of defects, a distinctive warning notice giving reasons for the shut-down shall be conspicuously attached near the steam...

  16. 30 CFR 75.208 - Warning devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Warning devices. 75.208 Section 75.208 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Roof Support § 75.208 Warning devices. Except during...

  17. 30 CFR 75.208 - Warning devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Warning devices. 75.208 Section 75.208 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Roof Support § 75.208 Warning devices. Except during...

  18. Propulsion controlled aircraft computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogan, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A low-cost, easily retrofit Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) system for use on a wide range of commercial and military aircraft consists of an propulsion controlled aircraft computer that reads in aircraft data including aircraft state, pilot commands and other related data, calculates aircraft throttle position for a given maneuver commanded by the pilot, and then displays both current and calculated throttle position on a cockpit display to show the pilot where to move throttles to achieve the commanded maneuver, or is automatically sent digitally to command the engines directly.

  19. AutoWARN - Automatic Support for the Weather Warning Service at Deutscher Wetterdienst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, B. K.

    2009-09-01

    The AutoWARN system integrates various meteorological products in an automated warning process with manual monitoring and decision possibilities for the forecaster. It exploits and combines observations, radar products, nowcasting products, statistical forecast products, and model forecasts of Numerical Weather Prediction. It generates and permanently updates forecast-time dependant automatic warning status proposals. The forecaster manually controls and, if necessary, modifies the automatic proposals. The generated warning status is exported to an external system outside of AutoWARN for the generation of textual and graphical warning products for customers. The development of the AutoWARN system was part of the future strategy 2006 to 2015 of the Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD); headwords within this strategy are centralization and automation of the entire warning process. On the basis of the formerly developed system AutoMON (Automatic Monitoring and Alerting of significant Weather Events), AutoWARN is fully integrated into the meteorological workstation NinJo and is currently being evaluated by the forecasters of DWD. The project was finished in spring 2009. The presentation will focus on illuminating the concept of AutoWARN and demonstrating the currently running pre-operational version of the system at the National Warning Centre (NWC) of DWD.

  20. Review of the Rhein-Flugzeugbau Wankel powered aircraft program. [ducted fan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riethmueller, M.

    1978-01-01

    The development of light aircraft with special emphasis on modern propulsion systems and production is discussed in terms of the application of rotary engines to aircraft. Emphasis is placed on the integrated ducted-fan propulsion system using rotary engines.

  1. Reducing online identity disclosure using warnings.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Sandra; Zhu, Feng; Kolimi, Swapna

    2014-09-01

    In an experimental design, we tested whether written warnings can reduce the amount of identity information exposure online. A psychological attack on information privacy that has been shown to be effective in previous research was launched. This attack took advantage of the fact that people respond to certain types of requests in a relatively automatic, or mindless, fashion. The experiment manipulated the word that was used in the alert header: "warning", "caution", or "hazard". All warnings proved to be effective in reducing disclosure, but "hazard" proved to be most effective. Also warnings were more effective in reducing disclosure of driver's license numbers than email addresses. The discussion (a) provides tentative conclusions why these patterns were obtained, (b) suggests how to design warnings in cyber-environments, and (c) addresses future possibilities for research on this topic. PMID:24161300

  2. AIRCRAFT DEPAINTING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical paint strippers historically used for aircraft contained toxic and hazardous components; aircraft depainting operations are a major source of hazardous waste generation in DOD. Federal and state agencies have begun to restrict using these hazardous materials and Governme...

  3. Aircraft noise problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    The problems related to aircraft noise were studied. Physical origin (sound), human reaction (noise), quantization of noise and sound sources of aircraft noise are discussed. Noise abatement at the source, technical, fleet-political and air traffic measures are explained. The measurements and future developments are also discussed. The position of Lufthansa as regards aircraft noise problems is depicted.

  4. Unmanned aircraft systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unmanned platforms have become increasingly more common in recent years for acquiring remotely sensed data. These aircraft are referred to as Unmanned Airborne Vehicles (UAV), Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA), Remotely Piloted Vehicles (RPV), or Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), the official term used...

  5. 14 CFR 135.163 - Equipment requirements: Aircraft carrying passengers under IFR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... electrical power generating source, a standby battery or an alternate source of electric power that is... airspeed and vertical speed indicators; (f) For a single-engine aircraft: (1) Two independent electrical... indicator; (d) A power failure warning device or vacuum indicator to show the power available for...

  6. 14 CFR 135.163 - Equipment requirements: Aircraft carrying passengers under IFR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... electrical power generating source, a standby battery or an alternate source of electric power that is... airspeed and vertical speed indicators; (f) For a single-engine aircraft: (1) Two independent electrical... indicator; (d) A power failure warning device or vacuum indicator to show the power available for...

  7. 14 CFR 135.163 - Equipment requirements: Aircraft carrying passengers under IFR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... electrical power generating source, a standby battery or an alternate source of electric power that is... airspeed and vertical speed indicators; (f) For a single-engine aircraft: (1) Two independent electrical... indicator; (d) A power failure warning device or vacuum indicator to show the power available for...

  8. 14 CFR 135.163 - Equipment requirements: Aircraft carrying passengers under IFR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... electrical power generating source, a standby battery or an alternate source of electric power that is... airspeed and vertical speed indicators; (f) For a single-engine aircraft: (1) Two independent electrical... indicator; (d) A power failure warning device or vacuum indicator to show the power available for...

  9. Aircraft cabin noise prediction and optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaicaitis, R.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies were conducted to determine the noise transmission into acoustic enclosures ranging from simple rectangular box models to full scale light aircraft in flight. The structural models include simple, stiffened, curved stiffened, and orthotropic panels and double wall windows. The theoretical solutions were obtained by model analysis. Transfer matrix and finite element procedures were utilized. Good agreement between theory and experiment has been achieved. An efficient acoustic add-on treatment was developed for interior noise control in a twin engine light aircraft.

  10. Aircraft landing gear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, John A. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Topics presented include the laboratory simulation of landing gear pitch-plane dynamics, a summary of recent aircraft/ground vehicle friction measurement tests, some recent aircraft tire thermal studies, and an evaluation of critical speeds in high-speed aircraft. Also presented are a review of NASA antiskid braking research, titanium matrix composite landing gear development, the current methods and perspective of aircraft flotation analysis, the flow rate and trajectory of water spray produced by an aircraft tire, and spin-up studies of the Space Shuttle Orbiter main gear tire.

  11. The design and testing of subscale smart aircraft wing bolts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vugampore, J. M. V.; Bemont, C.

    2012-07-01

    Presently costly periodic inspection is vital in guaranteeing the structural integrity of aircraft. This investigation assesses the potential for significantly reducing aircraft maintenance costs without modification of aircraft structures by implementing smart wing bolts, manufactured from TRIP steel, which can be monitored for damage in situ. TRIP steels undergo a transformation from paramagnetic austenite to ferromagnetic martensite during deformation. Subscale smart aircraft wing bolts were manufactured from hot rolled TRIP steel. These wing bolts were used to demonstrate that washers incorporating embedded inductance coils can be utilized to measure the martensitic transformation occurring in the TRIP steel during bolt deformation. Early in situ warning of a critical bolt stress level was thereby facilitated, potentially reducing the costly requirement for periodic wing bolt removal and inspection. The hot rolled TRIP steels that were utilized in these subscale bolts do not however exhibit the mechanical properties required of wing bolt material. Thus warm rolled TRIP steel alloys were also investigated. The mechanical properties of the best warm rolled TRIP steel alloy tested almost matched those of AISI 4340. The warm rolled alloys were also shown to exhibit transformation before yield, allowing for earlier warning when overload occurs. Further work will be required relating to fatigue crack detection, environmental temperature fluctuation and more thorough material characterization. However, present results show that in situ early detection of wing bolt overload is feasible via the use of high alloy warm rolled TRIP steel wing bolts in combination with inductive sensor embedded washers.

  12. Small transport aircraft technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    Information on commuter airline trends and aircraft developments is provided to upgrade the preliminary findings of a NASA-formed small transport aircraft technology (STAT) team, established to determine whether the agency's research and development programs could help commuter aircraft manufacturers solve technical problems related to passenger acceptance and use of 19- to 50-passenger aircraft. The results and conclusions of the full set of completed STAT studies are presented. These studies were performed by five airplane manufacturers, five engine manufacturers, and two propeller manufacturers. Those portions of NASA's overall aeronautics research and development programs which are applicable to commuter aircraft design are summarized. Areas of technology that might beneficially be expanded or initiated to aid the US commuter aircraft manufacturers in the evolution of improved aircraft for the market are suggested.

  13. Application of a Tsunami Warning Message Metric to refine NOAA NWS Tsunami Warning Messages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, C. E.; Johnston, D.; Sorensen, J.; Whitmore, P.

    2013-12-01

    In 2010, the U.S. National Weather Service (NWS) funded a three year project to integrate social science into their Tsunami Program. One of three primary requirements of the grant was to make improvements to tsunami warning messages of the NWS' two Tsunami Warning Centers- the West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC) in Palmer, Alaska and the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) in Ewa Beach, Hawaii. We conducted focus group meetings with a purposive sample of local, state and Federal stakeholders and emergency managers in six states (AK, WA, OR, CA, HI and NC) and two US Territories (US Virgin Islands and American Samoa) to qualitatively asses information needs in tsunami warning messages using WCATWC tsunami messages for the March 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami event. We also reviewed research literature on behavioral response to warnings to develop a tsunami warning message metric that could be used to guide revisions to tsunami warning messages of both warning centers. The message metric is divided into categories of Message Content, Style, Order and Formatting and Receiver Characteristics. A message is evaluated by cross-referencing the message with the operational definitions of metric factors. Findings are then used to guide revisions of the message until the characteristics of each factor are met. Using findings from this project and findings from a parallel NWS Warning Tiger Team study led by T. Nicolini, the WCATWC implemented the first of two phases of revisions to their warning messages in November 2012. A second phase of additional changes, which will fully implement the redesign of messages based on the metric, is in progress. The resulting messages will reflect current state-of-the-art knowledge on warning message effectiveness. Here we present the message metric; evidence-based rational for message factors; and examples of previous, existing and proposed messages.

  14. 49 CFR 393.87 - Warning flags on projecting loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Warning flags on projecting loads. 393.87 Section... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Miscellaneous Parts and Accessories § 393.87 Warning flags on... load marked with red or orange fluorescent warning flags. Each warning flag must be at least 457 mm...

  15. 49 CFR 393.87 - Warning flags on projecting loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Warning flags on projecting loads. 393.87 Section... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Miscellaneous Parts and Accessories § 393.87 Warning flags on... load marked with red or orange fluorescent warning flags. Each warning flag must be at least 457 mm...

  16. 49 CFR 393.87 - Warning flags on projecting loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Warning flags on projecting loads. 393.87 Section... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Miscellaneous Parts and Accessories § 393.87 Warning flags on... load marked with red or orange fluorescent warning flags. Each warning flag must be at least 457 mm...

  17. 49 CFR 393.87 - Warning flags on projecting loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Warning flags on projecting loads. 393.87 Section... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Miscellaneous Parts and Accessories § 393.87 Warning flags on... load marked with red or orange fluorescent warning flags. Each warning flag must be at least 457 mm...

  18. 49 CFR 393.87 - Warning flags on projecting loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Warning flags on projecting loads. 393.87 Section... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Miscellaneous Parts and Accessories § 393.87 Warning flags on... load marked with red or orange fluorescent warning flags. Each warning flag must be at least 457 mm...

  19. FDA Warns About Stem Cell Claims

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates FDA Warns About Stem Cell Claims Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... blood-forming system. back to top Regulation of Stem Cells FDA regulates stem cells in the U.S. to ...

  20. Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000775.htm Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease To use the ... often develops over time. You may have early signs or symptoms long before you have serious heart ...

  1. An Early Warning System for Flounder Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Bin; Li, Daoliang; Wang, Jianqin; Duan, Qingling; Wen, Jiwen

    With the constant expansion of the scale and mismanagement in aquaculture,the diseases of flounder occur more and more frequently than before, which has brought great economic losses to fish farmers. For the sake of the problem described above, based on a great number of surveys, the early warning theory of flounder disease, the analysis of the outbreak and development of diseases and the relationship between disease and factors, the logic process of the early warning for flounder disease was confirmed. It consists of five parts: specifying the target, searching for the source, distinguishing the sign, predicting the degree and eliminating the menace. Using the expert survey method the early warning indexes which affect the normal life of the flounder and calculated the range of the water environment factors were also confirmed. Finally, an early warning system was implemented, which can reduce the damage from the flounder disease.

  2. 40 CFR 763.95 - Warning labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools § 763.95 Warning labels. (a) The local education agency shall...: ASBESTOS. HAZARDOUS. DO NOT DISTURB WITHOUT PROPER TRAINING AND EQUIPMENT....

  3. 40 CFR 763.95 - Warning labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools § 763.95 Warning labels. (a) The local education agency shall...: ASBESTOS. HAZARDOUS. DO NOT DISTURB WITHOUT PROPER TRAINING AND EQUIPMENT....

  4. 40 CFR 763.95 - Warning labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools § 763.95 Warning labels. (a) The local education agency shall...: ASBESTOS. HAZARDOUS. DO NOT DISTURB WITHOUT PROPER TRAINING AND EQUIPMENT....

  5. 40 CFR 763.95 - Warning labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools § 763.95 Warning labels. (a) The local education agency shall...: ASBESTOS. HAZARDOUS. DO NOT DISTURB WITHOUT PROPER TRAINING AND EQUIPMENT....

  6. 40 CFR 763.95 - Warning labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools § 763.95 Warning labels. (a) The local education agency shall...: ASBESTOS. HAZARDOUS. DO NOT DISTURB WITHOUT PROPER TRAINING AND EQUIPMENT....

  7. [Are graphic warnings on cigarette packs useful?].

    PubMed

    Etter, J F; Cornuz, J

    2009-07-01

    Based on the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control recommendations, health warnings and messages should be printed on cigarettes packages. Scientific data show that such messages are effective by delivering important information directly to smokers, who believe these messages more and remember better than they do public education campaigns. These warnings also increase the chance of quitting. This narrative review summarizes the data at the time Switzerland requires such pictures on tobacco products. PMID:19634535

  8. Meteorological Monitoring And Warning Computer Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Randolph J.; Dianic, Allan V.; Moore, Lien N.

    1996-01-01

    Meteorological monitoring system (MMS) computer network tracks weather conditions and issues warnings when weather hazards are about to occur. Receives data from such meteorological instruments as wind sensors on towers and lightning detectors, and compares data with weather restrictions specified for outdoor activities. If weather violates restriction, network generates audible and visible alarms to alert people involved in activity. Also displays weather and toxic diffusion data and disseminates weather forecasts, advisories, and warnings to workstations.

  9. Responses to Deceleration during Car Following: Roles of Optic Flow, Warnings, Expectations, and Interruptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLucia, Patricia R.; Tharanathan, Anand

    2009-01-01

    More than 25% of accidents are rear-end collisions. It is essential to identify the factors that contribute to such collisions. One such factor is a driver's ability to respond to the deceleration of the car ahead. In Experiment 1, we measured effects of optic flow information and discrete visual and auditory warnings (brake lights, tones) on…

  10. 49 CFR 175.9 - Special aircraft operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... aircraft. Operators must have all applicable requirements prescribed in 14 CFR part 133 approved by the FAA... activation devices, lighting equipment, oxygen cylinders, flotation devices, smoke grenades, flares, or... aircraft. (4) Hazardous materials are carried and used during dedicated air ambulance, fire fighting,...

  11. 49 CFR 175.9 - Special aircraft operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... aircraft. Operators must have all applicable requirements prescribed in 14 CFR Part 133 approved by the FAA... activation devices, lighting equipment, oxygen cylinders, flotation devices, smoke grenades, flares, or... aircraft. (4) Hazardous materials are carried and used during dedicated air ambulance, fire fighting,...

  12. 49 CFR 175.9 - Special aircraft operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... aircraft. Operators must have all applicable requirements prescribed in 14 CFR Part 133 approved by the FAA... activation devices, lighting equipment, oxygen cylinders, flotation devices, smoke grenades, flares, or... aircraft. (4) Hazardous materials are carried and used during dedicated air ambulance, fire fighting,...

  13. Evolution of tsunami warning systems and products.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Eddie; Titov, Vasily

    2015-10-28

    Each year, about 60 000 people and $4 billion (US$) in assets are exposed to the global tsunami hazard. Accurate and reliable tsunami warning systems have been shown to provide a significant defence for this flooding hazard. However, the evolution of warning systems has been influenced by two processes: deadly tsunamis and available technology. In this paper, we explore the evolution of science and technology used in tsunami warning systems, the evolution of their products using warning technologies, and offer suggestions for a new generation of warning products, aimed at the flooding nature of the hazard, to reduce future tsunami impacts on society. We conclude that coastal communities would be well served by receiving three standardized, accurate, real-time tsunami warning products, namely (i) tsunami energy estimate, (ii) flooding maps and (iii) tsunami-induced harbour current maps to minimize the impact of tsunamis. Such information would arm communities with vital flooding guidance for evacuations and port operations. The advantage of global standardized flooding products delivered in a common format is efficiency and accuracy, which leads to effectiveness in promoting tsunami resilience at the community level. PMID:26392620

  14. Evolution of tsunami warning systems and products

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Eddie; Titov, Vasily

    2015-01-01

    Each year, about 60 000 people and $4 billion (US$) in assets are exposed to the global tsunami hazard. Accurate and reliable tsunami warning systems have been shown to provide a significant defence for this flooding hazard. However, the evolution of warning systems has been influenced by two processes: deadly tsunamis and available technology. In this paper, we explore the evolution of science and technology used in tsunami warning systems, the evolution of their products using warning technologies, and offer suggestions for a new generation of warning products, aimed at the flooding nature of the hazard, to reduce future tsunami impacts on society. We conclude that coastal communities would be well served by receiving three standardized, accurate, real-time tsunami warning products, namely (i) tsunami energy estimate, (ii) flooding maps and (iii) tsunami-induced harbour current maps to minimize the impact of tsunamis. Such information would arm communities with vital flooding guidance for evacuations and port operations. The advantage of global standardized flooding products delivered in a common format is efficiency and accuracy, which leads to effectiveness in promoting tsunami resilience at the community level. PMID:26392620

  15. Continuous measurement of aircraft wing icing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Stephen S. C.

    1994-01-01

    Ice formation on the wings of aircraft is a problem that has plagued air travel since its inception. Several recent incidents have been attributed to ice formation on the lifting surfaces of wings. This paper describes a SBIR Phase 1 research effort on the use of small flat dielectric sensors in detecting a layer of ice above the sensor. The sensors are very small, lightweight, and inexpensive. The electronics package that controls the sensor is also small, and could be even smaller using commonly available miniaturization technologies. Thus, several sensors could be placed on a surface such that a representative ice thickness profile could be measured. The benefits offered by developing this technology go beyond the safety improvements realized by monitoring ice formation on the wings of an aircraft. Continuous monitoring of anti-icing fluid concentrations on the ground would warn the pilot of impending fluid failure as well as allowing the stations to use less de-icing solution per aircraft. This in turn would increase the safety of takeoffs and reduce the overall discharge of de-icing solution into the environment, thus reducing the biohazard of the de-icing procedure.

  16. Simulation of aircraft crash and its validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfaro-Bou, E.; Hayduk, R. J.; Thomson, R. G.; Vaughan, V. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A joint FAA/NASA program is discussed which is aimed at developing a reliable technology for the design of crashworthy light aircraft. This program encompasses the development of analytical methods, the definition of a survivable crash envelope, and the design of improved seat and restraint systems. A facility for full-scale crash-simulation testing is described along with the test method and results of five full-scale crash tests of twin-engine light aircraft. The major goals of the analytical portion of the program are outlined, including the development and validation of the analytical technique using simplified structural specimens that approximate aircraft components, as well as the mathematical modeling of the complete airframe and its subsequent dynamic analysis by substructuring and matrix reduction techniques.

  17. Raptors and aircraft

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.G.; Ellis, D.H.; Johnson, T.H.

    1988-01-01

    Less than 5% of all bird strikes of aircraft are by raptor species, but damage to airframe structure or jet engine dysfunction are likely consequences. Beneficial aircraft-raptor interactions include the use of raptor species to frighten unwanted birds from airport areas and the use of aircraft to census raptor species. Many interactions, however, modify the raptor?s immediate behavior and some may decrease reproduction of sensitive species. Raptors may respond to aircraft stimuli by exhibiting alarm, increased heart rate, flushing or fleeing and occasionally by directly attacking intruding aircraft. To date, most studies reveal that raptor responses to aircraft are brief and do not limit reproduction; however, additional study is needed.

  18. Lightning effects on aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Direct and indirect effects of lightning on aircraft were examined in relation to aircraft design. Specific trends in design leading to more frequent lightning strikes were individually investigated. These trends included the increasing use of miniaturized, solid state components in aircraft electronics and electric power systems. A second trend studied was the increasing use of reinforced plastics and other nonconducting materials in place of aluminum skins, a practice that reduces the electromagnetic shielding furnished by a conductive skin.

  19. Development of a thermal acoustical aircraft insulation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. Y.; Struzik, E. A.

    1974-01-01

    A process was developed for fabricating a light weight foam suitable for thermal and acoustical insulation in aircraft. The procedures and apparatus are discussed, and the foam specimens are characterized by numerous tests and measurements.

  20. Rain, fog, and clouds for aircraft simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, W. D.

    1981-01-01

    Environmental chamber creates realistic fog and rain effects in aircraft simulator. It reproduces clouds, homogeneous fog, patches of fog, rain and fog, and rain only. It is used with real time digital computer, color computer generated image display that simulates airport lights, or color television camera that produces moving display of airport runway as depicted on model terrain board.

  1. Aircraft fire safety research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botteri, Benito P.

    1987-01-01

    During the past 15 years, very significant progress has been made toward enhancing aircraft fire safety in both normal and hostile (combat) operational environments. Most of the major aspects of the aircraft fire safety problem are touched upon here. The technology of aircraft fire protection, although not directly applicable in all cases to spacecraft fire scenarios, nevertheless does provide a solid foundation to build upon. This is particularly true of the extensive research and testing pertaining to aircraft interior fire safety and to onboard inert gas generation systems, both of which are still active areas of investigation.

  2. Hypersonic aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkamhawi, Hani; Greiner, Tom; Fuerst, Gerry; Luich, Shawn; Stonebraker, Bob; Wray, Todd

    1990-01-01

    A hypersonic aircraft is designed which uses scramjets to accelerate from Mach 6 to Mach 10 and sustain that speed for two minutes. Different propulsion systems were considered and it was decided that the aircraft would use one full scale turbofan-ramjet. Two solid rocket boosters were added to save fuel and help the aircraft pass through the transonic region. After considering aerodynamics, aircraft design, stability and control, cooling systems, mission profile, and landing systems, a conventional aircraft configuration was chosen over that of a waverider. The conventional design was chosen due to its landing characteristics and the relative expense compared to the waverider. Fuel requirements and the integration of the engine systems and their inlets are also taken into consideration in the final design. A hypersonic aircraft was designed which uses scramjets to accelerate from Mach 6 to Mach 10 and sustain that speed for two minutes. Different propulsion systems were considered and a full scale turbofan-ramjet was chosen. Two solid rocket boosters were added to save fuel and help the aircraft pass through the transonic reqion. After the aerodynamics, aircraft design, stability and control, cooling systems, mission profile, landing systems, and their physical interactions were considered, a conventional aircraft configuration was chosen over that of a waverider. The conventional design was chosen due to its landing characteristics and the relative expense compared to the waverider. Fuel requirements and the integration of the engine systems and their inlets were also considered in the designing process.

  3. Aircraft empennage structural detail design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meholic, Greg; Brown, Rhonda; Hall, Melissa; Harvey, Robert; Singer, Michael; Tella, Gustavo

    1993-01-01

    This project involved the detailed design of the aft fuselage and empennage structure, vertical stabilizer, rudder, horizontal stabilizer, and elevator for the Triton primary flight trainer. The main design goals under consideration were to illustrate the integration of the control systems devices used in the tail surfaces and their necessary structural supports as well as the elevator trim, navigational lighting system, electrical systems, tail-located ground tie, and fuselage/cabin interface structure. Accommodations for maintenance, lubrication, adjustment, and repairability were devised. Weight, fabrication, and (sub)assembly goals were addressed. All designs were in accordance with the FAR Part 23 stipulations for a normal category aircraft.

  4. Impacts of Fog Characteristics, Forward Illumination, and Warning Beacon Intensity Distribution on Roadway Hazard Visibility

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Warning beacons are critical for the safety of transportation, construction, and utility workers. These devices need to produce sufficient luminous intensity to be visible without creating glare to drivers. Published standards for the photometric performance of warning beacons do not address their performance in conditions of reduced visibility such as fog. Under such conditions light emitted in directions other than toward approaching drivers can create scattered light that makes workers and other hazards less visible. Simulations of visibility of hazards under varying conditions of fog density, forward vehicle lighting, warning beacon luminous intensity, and intensity distribution were performed to assess their impacts on visual performance by drivers. Each of these factors can influence the ability of drivers to detect and identify workers and hazards along the roadway in work zones. Based on the results, it would be reasonable to specify maximum limits on the luminous intensity of warning beacons in directions that are unlikely to be seen by drivers along the roadway, limits which are not included in published performance specifications. PMID:27314058

  5. Impacts of Fog Characteristics, Forward Illumination, and Warning Beacon Intensity Distribution on Roadway Hazard Visibility.

    PubMed

    Bullough, John D; Rea, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Warning beacons are critical for the safety of transportation, construction, and utility workers. These devices need to produce sufficient luminous intensity to be visible without creating glare to drivers. Published standards for the photometric performance of warning beacons do not address their performance in conditions of reduced visibility such as fog. Under such conditions light emitted in directions other than toward approaching drivers can create scattered light that makes workers and other hazards less visible. Simulations of visibility of hazards under varying conditions of fog density, forward vehicle lighting, warning beacon luminous intensity, and intensity distribution were performed to assess their impacts on visual performance by drivers. Each of these factors can influence the ability of drivers to detect and identify workers and hazards along the roadway in work zones. Based on the results, it would be reasonable to specify maximum limits on the luminous intensity of warning beacons in directions that are unlikely to be seen by drivers along the roadway, limits which are not included in published performance specifications. PMID:27314058

  6. Environment Agency England flood warning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, Chris; Walters, Mark; Haynes, Elizabeth; Dobson, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Context In England around 5 million homes are at risk of flooding. We invest significantly in flood prevention and management schemes but we can never prevent all flooding. Early alerting systems are fundamental to helping us reduce the impacts of flooding. The Environment Agency has had the responsibility for flood warning since 1996. In 2006 we invested in a new dissemination system that would send direct messages to pre-identified recipients via a range of channels. Since then we have continuously improved the system and service we offer. In 2010 we introduced an 'opt-out' service where we pre-registered landline numbers in flood risk areas, significantly increasing the customer base. The service has performed exceptionally well under intense flood conditions. Over a period of 3 days in December 2013, when England was experiencing an east coast storm surge, the system sent nearly 350,000 telephone messages, 85,000 emails and 70,000 text messages, with a peak call rate of around 37,000 per hour and 100% availability. The Floodline Warnings Direct (FWD) System FWD provides warnings in advance of flooding so that people at risk and responders can take action to minimise the impact of the flood. Warnings are sent via telephone, fax, text message, pager or e-mail to over 1.1 million properties located within flood risk areas in England. Triggers for issuing alerts and warnings include attained and forecast river levels and rainfall in some rapidly responding locations. There are three levels of warning: Flood Alert, Flood Warning and Severe Flood Warning, and a stand down message. The warnings can be updated to include relevant information to help inform those at risk. Working with our current provider Fujitsu, the system is under a programme of continuous improvement including expanding the 'opt-out' service to mobile phone numbers registered to at risk addresses, allowing mobile registration to the system for people 'on the move' and providing access to

  7. Tsunami early warning and decision support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, T.; Raape, U.; Teßmann, S.; Strobl, C.; Friedemann, M.; Kukofka, T.; Riedlinger, T.; Mikusch, E.; Dech, S.

    2010-09-01

    An innovative newly developed modular and standards based Decision Support System (DSS) is presented which forms part of the German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS). The GITEWS project stems from the effort to implement an effective and efficient Tsunami Early Warning and Mitigation System for the coast of Indonesia facing the Sunda Arc along the islands of Sumatra, Java and Bali. The geological setting along an active continental margin which is very close to densely populated areas is a particularly difficult one to cope with, because potential tsunamis' travel times are thus inherently short. National policies require an initial warning to be issued within the first five minutes after an earthquake has occurred. There is an urgent requirement for an end-to-end solution where the decision support takes the entire warning chain into account. The system of choice is based on pre-computed scenario simulations and rule-based decision support which is delivered to the decision maker through a sophisticated graphical user interface (GUI) using information fusion and fast information aggregation to create situational awareness in the shortest time possible. The system also contains risk and vulnerability information which was designed with the far end of the warning chain in mind - it enables the decision maker to base his acceptance (or refusal) of the supported decision also on regionally differentiated risk and vulnerability information (see Strunz et al., 2010). While the system strives to provide a warning as quickly as possible, it is not in its proper responsibility to send and disseminate the warning to the recipients. The DSS only broadcasts its messages to a dissemination system (and possibly any other dissemination system) which is operated under the responsibility of BMKG - the meteorological, climatological and geophysical service of Indonesia - which also hosts the tsunami early warning center. The system is to be seen as one step towards

  8. An airborne FLIR detection and warning system for low altitude wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, Peter C.; Kuhn, Peter M.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown through some preliminary flight measurement research that a forward looking infrared radiometer (FLIR) system can be used to successfully detect the cool downdraft of downbursts (microbusts/macrobursts) and thunderstorm gust front outflows that are responsible for most of the low altitude wind shear (LAWS) events. The FLIR system provides a much greater safety margin for the pilot than that provided by reactive designs such as inertial air speed systems. Preliminary results indicate that an advanced airborne FLIR system could provide the pilot with remote indication of microburst (MB) hazards along the flight path ahead of the aircraft. Results of a flight test of a prototype FLIR system show that a minimum warning time of one to four minutes (5 to 10 km), depending on aircraft speed, is available to the pilot prior to the microburst encounter.

  9. Is the Yellow Light Long Enough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salow, Robert; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes an activity to determine whether the length of the yellow (warning) signal of a traffic light provides adequate time to stop or pass through the intersection. Discusses the necessary equations, mathematics, and subsequent graphs. (MVL)

  10. Human Factors In Aircraft Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, Charles

    1995-01-01

    Report presents survey of state of art in human factors in automation of aircraft operation. Presents examination of aircraft automation and effects on flight crews in relation to human error and aircraft accidents.

  11. Conceptual issues in the study of dynamic hazard warnings.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual analysis of dynamic hazard warning systems. The normative aspects of responses to warnings are analyzed, and a distinction is made between two forms of responses to a warning system, referred to as compliance and reliance. Determinants of the responses to warnings are identified, and they are broadly classified into normative, task, and operator factors. Existing research on warnings and automation is assessed in view of this conceptual framework, and directions for future research are discussed. Some implications of this analysis for practitioners, designers, and researchers are indicated. Actual or potential applications of this research include recommendations for the analysis, design, and study of dynamic warning systems. PMID:15359670

  12. General Aviation Aircraft Reliability Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Duane; Turnbull, Andrew; Roelant, Henk A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This reliability study was performed in order to provide the aviation community with an estimate of Complex General Aviation (GA) Aircraft System reliability. To successfully improve the safety and reliability for the next generation of GA aircraft, a study of current GA aircraft attributes was prudent. This was accomplished by benchmarking the reliability of operational Complex GA Aircraft Systems. Specifically, Complex GA Aircraft System reliability was estimated using data obtained from the logbooks of a random sample of the Complex GA Aircraft population.

  13. Lightning protection of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, F. A.; Plumer, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The current knowledge concerning potential lightning effects on aircraft and the means that are available to designers and operators to protect against these effects are summarized. The increased use of nonmetallic materials in the structure of aircraft and the constant trend toward using electronic equipment to handle flight-critical control and navigation functions have served as impetus for this study.

  14. Civil aircraft accident investigation.

    PubMed

    Haines, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This talk reviews some historic aircraft accidents and some more recent. It reflects on the division of accident causes, considering mechanical failures and aircrew failures, and on aircrew training. Investigation results may lead to improved aircraft design, and to appropriate crew training. PMID:24057309

  15. Development of the Advance Warning Airborne System(AWAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, H. Patrick

    1992-01-01

    The thermal characteristics of microbursts are utilized by the AWAS IR and OAT features to provide predictive warning of hazardous microbursts ahead of the aircraft during landing or take off. The AWAS was evaluated satisfactorily in 1990 on a Cessna Citation that was intentionally flown into a number of wind shear events. The events were detected, and both the IR and OAT thermal features were shown to be effective. In 1991, AWAS units were flown on three American Airline MD-80's and three Northwest Airlines DC-9's to study and to decrease the nuisance alert response of the system. The AWAS was also flown on the NASA B737 during the summer of 1991. The results of these flights were inconclusive and disappointing. The results were not as promising as before because NASA conducted research flights which were outside of the normal operating envelope for which the AWAS is designed to operate. In an attempt to compensate for these differences in airspeed and mounting location, the automatic features of the system were sometimes overridden by NASA personnel during the flight. Each of these critical factors is discussed in detail. The effect of rain on the OAT signals is presented as a function of the air speed. Use of a 4 pole 1/20 Hertz filter is demonstrated by both the IR and thermal data. Participation in the NASA 1992 program was discussed. FAA direction in the continuing Certification program requires the addition of a reactive feature to the AWAS predictive system. This combined system will not require flight guidance on newer aircraft. The features of AWAS-IV, with the NASA algorithm included, were presented. Expected completion of the FAA Certification plan was also described.

  16. A SDMS Model: Early Warning Coordination Centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Reyes, Jaime

    2010-05-01

    Following the tsunami disaster in 2004, the General Secretary of the United Nations (UN) Kofi Annan called for a global early warning system for all hazards and for all communities. He also requested the ISDR (International Strategy fort Disaster Reduction) and its UN partners to conduct a global survey of capacities, gaps and opportunities in relation to early warning systems. The produced report, "Global survey of Early Warning Systems", concluded that there are many gaps and shortcomings and that much progress has been made on early warning systems and great capabilities are available around the world. However, it may be argued that an early warning system (EWS) may not be enough to prevent fatalities due to a natural hazard; i.e., it should be seen as part of a ‘wider' or total system. Furthermore, an EWS may work very well when assessed individually but it is not clear whether it will contribute to accomplish the purpose of the ‘total disaster management system'; i.e., to prevent fatalities. For instance, a regional EWS may only work if it is well co-ordinated with the local warning and emergency response systems that ensure that the warning is received, communicated and acted upon by the potentially affected communities. It may be argued that without these local measures being in place, a regional EWS will have little impact in saving lives. Researchers argued that unless people are warned in remote areas, the technology is useless; for instance McGuire [5] argues that: "I have no doubt that the technical element of the warning system will work very well,"…"But there has to be an effective and efficient communications cascade from the warning centre to the fisherman on the beach and his family and the bar owners." Similarly, McFadden [6] states that: "There's no point in spending all the money on a fancy monitoring and a fancy analysis system unless we can make sure the infrastructure for the broadcast system is there,"… "That's going to require a lot

  17. A survey of early warning technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.D.; Arlowe, H.D.; Williams, J.D.

    1995-07-01

    This paper presents a survey of technologies useful in providing early warning in physical security systems. Early warning is important in virtually all types of security systems whether they are used for temporary (tactical, portable, or semi-permanent) applications, border warning, fixed-site detection, or standoff surveillance detection. With the exception of the standoff surveillance detection systems, all systems discussed in this paper usually involve a moving target. The fact that a person(s) to be detected in a standoff surveillance scenario is not moving presents challenging problems and requires different applications of technology. The technologies commonly used to detect moving targets and some suggestions for detection of stationary targets are addressed in this paper.

  18. Aircraft operations management manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA aircraft operations program is a multifaceted, highly diverse entity that directly supports the agency mission in aeronautical research and development, space science and applications, space flight, astronaut readiness training, and related activities through research and development, program support, and mission management aircraft operations flights. Users of the program are interagency, inter-government, international, and the business community. This manual provides guidelines to establish policy for the management of NASA aircraft resources, aircraft operations, and related matters. This policy is an integral part of and must be followed when establishing field installation policy and procedures covering the management of NASA aircraft operations. Each operating location will develop appropriate local procedures that conform with the requirements of this handbook. This manual should be used in conjunction with other governing instructions, handbooks, and manuals.

  19. Why aircraft disinsection?

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, N. G.; Steffen, R.; Cocksedge, W.

    2000-01-01

    A serious problem is posed by the inadvertent transport of live mosquitoes aboard aircraft arriving from tropical countries where vector-borne diseases are endemic. Surveys at international airports have found many instances of live insects, particularly mosquitoes, aboard aircraft arriving from countries where malaria and arboviruses are endemic. In some instances mosquito species have been established in countries in which they have not previously been reported. A serious consequence of the transport of infected mosquitoes aboard aircraft has been the numerous cases of "airport malaria" reported from Europe, North America and elsewhere. There is an important on-going need for the disinsection of aircraft coming from airports in tropical disease endemic areas into nonendemic areas. The methods and materials available for use in aircraft disinsection and the WHO recommendations for their use are described. PMID:10994283

  20. Hypersonic reconnaissance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulk, Tim; Chiarini, David; Hill, Kevin; Kunszt, Bob; Odgen, Chris; Truong, Bon

    1992-01-01

    A conceptual design of a hypersonic reconnaissance aircraft for the U.S. Navy is discussed. After eighteen weeks of work, a waverider design powered by two augmented turbofans was chosen. The aircraft was designed to be based on an aircraft carrier and to cruise 6,000 nautical miles at Mach 4;80,000 feet and above. As a result the size of the aircraft was only allowed to have a length of eighty feet, fifty-two feet in wingspan, and roughly 2,300 square feet in planform area. Since this is a mainly cruise aircraft, sixty percent of its 100,000 pound take-off weight is JP fuel. At cruise, the highest temperature that it will encounter is roughly 1,100 F, which can be handled through the use of a passive cooling system.

  1. Warning Lights: New Dashboard Reports Help Institutions Gauge Their Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Lawrence M.

    2007-01-01

    Dashboard reports--like an automobile's instrument panel--present quick, comprehensible overviews of the institution's status and direction. Instead of speed, RPM and engine temperature, dashboard reports display comparable measures of organizational performance and mission effectiveness. These key performance indicators (KPIs) are presented in…

  2. Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system

    DOEpatents

    Schiffbauer, William H.; Ganoe, Carl W.

    1999-01-01

    A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation thereof. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine.

  3. Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system

    DOEpatents

    Schiffbauer, W.H.; Ganoe, C.W.

    1999-08-17

    A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine. 3 figs.

  4. In Brief: Russian volcano warnings reinstated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2007-04-01

    The Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) is again issuing warnings for aviation during periods of activity by Kamchatkan volcanoes. KVERT had stopped issuing warnings on 1 March due to a loss of funding by the Federal Unitary Enterprise State Air Traffic Management Corporation of Russia (see Eos 88(12), 2007). The funding for this work has now resumed. KVERT is a collaborative project of scientists from the Russian Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, the Kamchatka Experimental and Methodical Seismological Department, and the Alaska Volcano Observatory.

  5. Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffbauer, W.H.; Ganoe, C.W.

    1996-12-31

    A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation thereof. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine.

  6. The Global Emergency Observation and Warning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bukley, Angelia P.; Mulqueen, John A.

    1994-01-01

    Based on an extensive characterization of natural hazards, and an evaluation of their impacts on humanity, a set of functional technical requirements for a global warning and relief system was developed. Since no technological breakthroughs are required to implement a global system capable of performing the functions required to provide sufficient information for prevention, preparedness, warning, and relief from natural disaster effects, a system is proposed which would combine the elements of remote sensing, data processing, information distribution, and communications support on a global scale for disaster mitigation.

  7. Health warnings on tobacco products: international practices.

    PubMed

    Hammond, David; Reid, Jessica L

    2012-06-01

    Health warnings on tobacco products have emerged as a prominent area of tobacco control policy. Regulatory practice has rapidly evolved over the past decade to the point where health warnings on tobacco products continue to set international precedents for their size and comprehensiveness. The current paper provides a general review of current regulatory practices, including physical design features (such as size and location), message content (pictorial vs. text and content themes), and regulatory considerations such as rotation period and other novel practices. PMID:22689165

  8. Sensors Provide Early Warning of Biological Threats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Early Warning Inc. of Troy, New York, licensed powerful biosensor technology from Ames Research Center. Incorporating carbon nanotubes tipped with single strands of nucleic acid from waterborne pathogens, the sensor can detect even minute amounts of targeted, disease causing bacteria, viruses, and parasites. Early Warning features the NASA biosensor in its water analyzer, which can provide advance alert of potential biological hazards in water used for agriculture, food and beverages, showers, and at beaches and lakes -- within hours instead of the days required by conventional laboratory methods.

  9. Rapid telemetry and earthquake early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R.; Bose, M.; Brown, H.; Cua, G.; Given, D.; Hauksson, E.; Heaton, T.; Hellweg, M.; Jordan, T.; Kireev, A.; Maechling, P.; Neuhauser, D.; Oppenheimer, D.; Solanki, K.; Zeleznik, M.

    2008-05-01

    The California Integrated Seismic Network (CISN) is currently testing algorithms for earthquake early warning on the realtime seismic systems in the state. An earthquake warning system rapidly detects the initiation of earthquakes and assesses the associated hazard. The goal is to provide warning of potentially damaging ground motion in a target region prior to the arrival of seismic waves. The network-based approach to early warning requires station data to be gathered at a central site for joint processing. ElarmS, one network-based approach being tested, currently runs 15 sec behind realtime in order to gather ~90% of station data before processing. Even with this delay the recent Mw 5.4 Alum Rock earthquake near San Jose was detected and an accurate hazard assessment was available before ground shaking in San Francisco. The Virtual Seismologist (VS) method, another network-based approach, is a Bayesian method that incorporates information such as network topology, previously observed seismicity, and the Gutenberg-Richter relationship in magnitude and location estimation. The VS method is currently being transitioned from off-line to real-time testing and will soon be running 15 sec behind real-time, as in the case of ElarmS. We are also testing an on-site warning approach, which is based on single-station observations. On-site systems can deliver earthquake information faster than regional systems, and the warning could possibly reach potential users at much closer epicentral distances before the damaging shaking starts. By definition, on-site systems do not require a central processing facility or delivery of data from a distant seismic station, but they are less robust that networked-based systems and need a fast and reliable telemetry to deliver warnings to local users. The range of possible warning times is typically seconds to tens of seconds and every second of data latency translates into an equal reduction in the available warning time. Minimal latency

  10. 21 CFR 740.2 - Conspicuousness of warning statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS General § 740.2 Conspicuousness of warning... exemption pursuant to paragraph (b) of this section is established. (b) If the label of any cosmetic...

  11. 21 CFR 740.2 - Conspicuousness of warning statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS General § 740.2 Conspicuousness of warning... exemption pursuant to paragraph (b) of this section is established. (b) If the label of any cosmetic...

  12. 21 CFR 740.2 - Conspicuousness of warning statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS General § 740.2 Conspicuousness of warning... exemption pursuant to paragraph (b) of this section is established. (b) If the label of any cosmetic...

  13. 21 CFR 740.2 - Conspicuousness of warning statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS General § 740.2 Conspicuousness of warning... exemption pursuant to paragraph (b) of this section is established. (b) If the label of any cosmetic...

  14. 21 CFR 740.2 - Conspicuousness of warning statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS General § 740.2 Conspicuousness of warning... exemption pursuant to paragraph (b) of this section is established. (b) If the label of any cosmetic...

  15. CPSC Warns of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning with Camping Equipment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Warns of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Hazard with Camping Equipment The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) warns ... about the carbon monoxide (CO) hazard with camping equipment. CO can kill you! From 2002–2006, CPSC ...

  16. Predicting visibility of aircraft.

    PubMed

    Watson, Andrew; Ramirez, Cesar V; Salud, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Visual detection of aircraft by human observers is an important element of aviation safety. To assess and ensure safety, it would be useful to be able to be able to predict the visibility, to a human observer, of an aircraft of specified size, shape, distance, and coloration. Examples include assuring safe separation among aircraft and between aircraft and unmanned vehicles, design of airport control towers, and efforts to enhance or suppress the visibility of military and rescue vehicles. We have recently developed a simple metric of pattern visibility, the Spatial Standard Observer (SSO). In this report we examine whether the SSO can predict visibility of simulated aircraft images. We constructed a set of aircraft images from three-dimensional computer graphic models, and measured the luminance contrast threshold for each image from three human observers. The data were well predicted by the SSO. Finally, we show how to use the SSO to predict visibility range for aircraft of arbitrary size, shape, distance, and coloration. PMID:19462007

  17. Predicting Visibility of Aircraft

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Andrew; Ramirez, Cesar V.; Salud, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Visual detection of aircraft by human observers is an important element of aviation safety. To assess and ensure safety, it would be useful to be able to be able to predict the visibility, to a human observer, of an aircraft of specified size, shape, distance, and coloration. Examples include assuring safe separation among aircraft and between aircraft and unmanned vehicles, design of airport control towers, and efforts to enhance or suppress the visibility of military and rescue vehicles. We have recently developed a simple metric of pattern visibility, the Spatial Standard Observer (SSO). In this report we examine whether the SSO can predict visibility of simulated aircraft images. We constructed a set of aircraft images from three-dimensional computer graphic models, and measured the luminance contrast threshold for each image from three human observers. The data were well predicted by the SSO. Finally, we show how to use the SSO to predict visibility range for aircraft of arbitrary size, shape, distance, and coloration. PMID:19462007

  18. The Self-Organising Seismic Early Warning Information Network: Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnlenz, F.; Fischer, J.; Eveslage, I.

    2009-04-01

    SAFER and EDIM working groups, the Department of Computer Science, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany, and Section 2.1 Earthquake Risk and Early Warning, GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Germany Contact: Frank Kühnlenz, kuehnlenz@informatik.hu-berlin.de The Self-Organising Seismic Early Warning Information Network (SOSEWIN) represents a new approach for Earthquake Early Warning Systems (EEWS), consisting in taking advantage of novel wireless communications technologies without the need of a planned, centralised infrastructure. It also sets out to overcome problems of insufficient node density, which typically affects present existing early warning systems, by having the SOSEWIN seismological sensing units being comprised of low-cost components (generally bought "off-the-shelf"), with each unit initially costing 100's of Euros, in contrast to 1,000's to 10,000's for standard seismological stations. The reduced sensitivity of the new sensing units arising from the use of lower-cost components will be compensated by the network's density, which in the future is expected to number 100's to 1000's over areas served currently by the order of 10's of standard stations. The robustness, independence of infrastructure, spontaneous extensibility due to a self-healing/self-organizing character in the case of removing/failing or adding sensors makes SOSEWIN potentially useful for various use cases, e.g. monitoring of building structures or seismic microzonation. Nevertheless its main purpose is the earthquake early warning, for which reason the ground motion is continuously monitored by conventional accelerometers (3-component). It uses SEEDLink to store and provide access to the sensor data. SOSEWIN considers also the needs of earthquake task forces, which want to set-up a temporary seismic network rapidly and with light-weighted stations to record after-shocks. The wireless and self-organising character of this sensor network should be of great value

  19. 30 CFR 56.14214 - Train warnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Train warnings. 56.14214 Section 56.14214 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures...

  20. 30 CFR 57.14214 - Train warnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Train warnings. 57.14214 Section 57.14214 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures...

  1. 30 CFR 57.14214 - Train warnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Train warnings. 57.14214 Section 57.14214 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures...

  2. 30 CFR 56.14214 - Train warnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Train warnings. 56.14214 Section 56.14214 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures...

  3. 14 CFR 25.207 - Stall warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... paragraph (a) of this section at the speed prescribed in paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section. Except for... non-icing conditions. (c) When the speed is reduced at rates not exceeding one knot per second, stall warning must begin, in each normal configuration, at a speed, VSW, exceeding the speed at which the...

  4. 14 CFR 25.207 - Stall warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... paragraph (a) of this section at the speed prescribed in paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section. Except for... non-icing conditions. (c) When the speed is reduced at rates not exceeding one knot per second, stall warning must begin, in each normal configuration, at a speed, VSW, exceeding the speed at which the...

  5. Evaluating Warning Sound Urgency with Reaction Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suied, Clara; Susini, Patrick; McAdams, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    It is well-established that subjective judgments of perceived urgency of alarm sounds can be affected by acoustic parameters. In this study, the authors investigated an objective measurement, the reaction time (RT), to test the effectiveness of temporal parameters of sounds in the context of warning sounds. Three experiments were performed using a…

  6. DRUG ABUSE WARNING NETWORK (DAWN) DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) is an ongoing drug abuse data collection system sponsored by SAMHSA's Office of Applied Studies. DAWN collects data from: (1) hospital emergency departments (EDs) and (2) medical examiners (MEs). The DAWN ED component relies on a nationally r...

  7. Loftin Collection - Boeing Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1933-01-01

    Either a F2B-1 or F3B-1, both aircraft were built by Boeing and both were powered by Pratt and Whitney Wasp engines. These fighters were intended for Navy shipboard use. Boeing F3B-1: While most Boeing F3B-1s served the U. S. Navy aircraft carriers the Lexington and the Saratoga, this example flew in NACA hands at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in the late 1920's. Also known as the Boeing Model 77, the aircraft was the next to last F3B-1 build in November 1928.

  8. OVRhyp, Scramjet Test Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslan, J.; Bisard, T.; Dallinga, S.; Draper, K.; Hufford, G.; Peters, W.; Rogers, J.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary design for an unmanned hypersonic research vehicle to test scramjet engines is presented. The aircraft will be launched from a carrier aircraft at an altitude of 40,000 feet at Mach 0.8. The vehicle will then accelerate to Mach 6 at an altitude of 100,000 feet. At this stage the prototype scramjet will be employed to accelerate the vehicle to Mach 10 and maintain Mach 10 flight for 2 minutes. The aircraft will then decelerate and safely land.

  9. Some fighter aircraft trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, L.

    1985-01-01

    Some basic trends in fighters are traced from the post World II era. Beginning with the first operational jet fighter, the P-80, the characteristics of subsequent fighter aircraft are examined for performance, mission capability, effectiveness, and cost. Characteristics presented include: power loading, wing loading, maximum speed, rate of climb, turn rate, weight and weight distribution, cost and cost distribution. The characteristics of some USSR aircraft are included for comparison. The trends indicate some of the rationale for certain fighter designs and some likely characteristics to be sought in future fighter aircraft designs.

  10. Tropospheric sampling with aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Daum, P.H.; Springston, S.R.

    1991-03-01

    Aircraft constitute a unique environment which places stringent requirements on the instruments used to measure the concentrations of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. Some of these requirements such as minimization of size, weight, and power consumption are general; others are specific to individual techniques. This review presents the basic principles and considerations governing the deployment of trace gas and aerosol instrumentation on an aircraft. An overview of common instruments illustrates these points and provides guidelines for designing and using instruments on aircraft-based measurement programs.

  11. Aircraft compass characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John B; Smith, Clyde W

    1937-01-01

    A description of the test methods used at the National Bureau of Standards for determining the characteristics of aircraft compasses is given. The methods described are particularly applicable to compasses in which mineral oil is used as the damping liquid. Data on the viscosity and density of certain mineral oils used in United States Navy aircraft compasses are presented. Characteristics of Navy aircraft compasses IV to IX and some other compasses are shown for the range of temperatures experienced in flight. Results of flight tests are presented. These results indicate that the characteristic most desired in a steering compass is a short period and, in a check compass, a low overswing.

  12. Microwave imaging of aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Bernard D.

    1988-12-01

    Three methods of imaging aircraft from the ground with microwave radar with quality suitable for aircraft target recognition are described. The imaging methods are based on a self-calibration procedure called adaptive beamforming that compensates for the severe geometric distortion inherent in any imaging system that is large enough to achieve the high angular resolution necessary for two-dimensional target imaging. The signal processing algorithm is described and X-band (3-cm)-wavelength experiments demonstrate its success on commercial aircraft flying into Philadelphia International Airport.

  13. Tsunami Warning Services for the Caribbean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, P. M.; Ferris, J. C.; Weinstein, S. A.

    2007-05-01

    Tsunami warning and watch services are currently provided to the Caribbean region through a collaborative effort between the two NOAA Tsunami Warning Centers (TWCs): the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) in Ewa Beach, Hawaii, and the West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC) in Palmer, Alaska. The WCATWC, in coordination with the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN), provides fast-response warning services to the U.S. territories of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands (PR/VI). The PTWC provides regional watch services to other countries throughout and surrounding the Caribbean Sea as part of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Caribbean Sea and Adjacent Regions. This collaboration is analogous to the TWC's responsibilities in the Pacific basin: the WCATWC provides fast-response warning services for the U.S. west coast states, Alaska, and British Columbia in Canada, while the PTWC provides regional services for countries throughout and surrounding the Pacific Ocean (as well as a fast-response service for the U.S. State of Hawaii). Caribbean seismic data are transmitted to the TWCs through several means. The PRSN directly exports data to the WCATWC, providing the Center sufficient seismic data for the PR/VI region. Additionally, the PRSN provides the TWCs with data gathered from other Caribbean nations. Using modern communication capabilities, the seismic data can be processed at the TWCs at the same time it is processed locally. Another source of high- quality seismic data is the new USGS nine-station array that circles the region. The Global Seismic Network maintains several stations in Caribbean, Central American, and South American nations which are available in real-time to the TWCs. Unfortunately, sea level data coverage is sporadic in the region. The PR/VI has a relatively dense array of coastal tide gages, but coastal tide gage coverage is very sparse for the rest of the Caribbean basin. Three deep-ocean pressure

  14. Electrical Distribution System (EDS) and Caution and Warning System (CWS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclung, T.

    1975-01-01

    An astronaut caution and warning system is described which monitors various life support system parameters and detects out-of-range parameter conditions. The warning system generates a warning tone and displays the malfunction condition to the astronaut along with the proper corrective procedures required.

  15. Warning Signs for Suicide on the Internet: A Descriptive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandrusiak, Michael; Rudd, M. David; Joiner, Thomas E., Jr.; Berman, Alan L.; Van Orden, Kimberly A.; Witte, Tracy

    2006-01-01

    The issue of suicide warning signs on the Internet is considered. In addition to reviewing some of the relevant conceptual issues about warning signs, a random sample of Internet sites was selected and reviewed. Warning signs were grouped and agreement across sites was examined, with results confirming broad disparity in what is presented to the…

  16. 47 CFR 87.483 - Audio visual warning systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Audio visual warning systems. 87.483 Section 87... AVIATION SERVICES Stations in the Radiodetermination Service § 87.483 Audio visual warning systems. An audio visual warning system (AVWS) is a radar-based obstacle avoidance system. AVWS...

  17. 49 CFR 234.257 - Warning system operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... crossing warning system shall be tested to determine that it functions as intended when it is placed in service. Thereafter, it shall be tested at least once each month and whenever modified or disarranged. (b) Warning bells or other stationary audible warning devices shall be tested when installed to determine...

  18. 21 CFR 740.1 - Establishment of warning statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS General § 740.1 Establishment of warning statements. (a) The label of a cosmetic product shall bear a warning statement whenever necessary or appropriate to prevent... for a cosmetic. Any such petition shall include an adequate factual basis to support the...

  19. 21 CFR 740.1 - Establishment of warning statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS General § 740.1 Establishment of warning statements. (a) The label of a cosmetic product shall bear a warning statement whenever necessary or appropriate to prevent... for a cosmetic. Any such petition shall include an adequate factual basis to support the...

  20. 21 CFR 740.1 - Establishment of warning statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS General § 740.1 Establishment of warning statements. (a) The label of a cosmetic product shall bear a warning statement whenever necessary or appropriate to prevent... for a cosmetic. Any such petition shall include an adequate factual basis to support the...

  1. 21 CFR 740.1 - Establishment of warning statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS General § 740.1 Establishment of warning statements. (a) The label of a cosmetic product shall bear a warning statement whenever necessary or appropriate to prevent... for a cosmetic. Any such petition shall include an adequate factual basis to support the...

  2. 21 CFR 740.1 - Establishment of warning statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS General § 740.1 Establishment of warning statements. (a) The label of a cosmetic product shall bear a warning statement whenever necessary or appropriate to prevent... for a cosmetic. Any such petition shall include an adequate factual basis to support the...

  3. 20 CFR 639.2 - What does WARN require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What does WARN require? 639.2 Section 639.2 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR WORKER ADJUSTMENT AND RETRAINING NOTIFICATION § 639.2 What does WARN require? WARN requires employers who are planning a...

  4. 20 CFR 639.2 - What does WARN require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What does WARN require? 639.2 Section 639.2 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR WORKER ADJUSTMENT AND RETRAINING NOTIFICATION § 639.2 What does WARN require? WARN requires employers who are planning a...

  5. 20 CFR 639.2 - What does WARN require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What does WARN require? 639.2 Section 639.2 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR WORKER ADJUSTMENT AND RETRAINING NOTIFICATION § 639.2 What does WARN require? WARN requires employers who are planning a...

  6. 20 CFR 639.2 - What does WARN require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What does WARN require? 639.2 Section 639.2 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR WORKER ADJUSTMENT AND RETRAINING NOTIFICATION § 639.2 What does WARN require? WARN requires employers who are planning a...

  7. 20 CFR 639.2 - What does WARN require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What does WARN require? 639.2 Section 639.2 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR WORKER ADJUSTMENT AND RETRAINING NOTIFICATION § 639.2 What does WARN require? WARN requires employers who are planning a...

  8. 14 CFR 135.153 - Ground proximity warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ground proximity warning system. 135.153... Equipment § 135.153 Ground proximity warning system. (a) No person may operate a turbine-powered airplane... equipped with an approved ground proximity warning system. (b) (c) For a system required by this...

  9. 14 CFR 135.153 - Ground proximity warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ground proximity warning system. 135.153... Equipment § 135.153 Ground proximity warning system. (a) No person may operate a turbine-powered airplane... equipped with an approved ground proximity warning system. (b) (c) For a system required by this...

  10. 30 CFR 56.20011 - Barricades and warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barricades and warning signs. 56.20011 Section... § 56.20011 Barricades and warning signs. Areas where health or safety hazards exist that are not immediately obvious to employees shall be barricaded, or warning signs shall be posted at all...

  11. 30 CFR 57.20011 - Barricades and warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Barricades and warning signs. 57.20011 Section... Miscellaneous § 57.20011 Barricades and warning signs. Areas where health or safety hazards exist that are not immediately obvious to employees shall be barricaded, or warning signs shall be posted at all...

  12. 30 CFR 56.20011 - Barricades and warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Barricades and warning signs. 56.20011 Section... § 56.20011 Barricades and warning signs. Areas where health or safety hazards exist that are not immediately obvious to employees shall be barricaded, or warning signs shall be posted at all...

  13. 30 CFR 57.20011 - Barricades and warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Barricades and warning signs. 57.20011 Section... Miscellaneous § 57.20011 Barricades and warning signs. Areas where health or safety hazards exist that are not immediately obvious to employees shall be barricaded, or warning signs shall be posted at all...

  14. 46 CFR 153.955 - Warning signs during cargo transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Warning signs during cargo transfer. 153.955 Section 153... Transfer Procedures § 153.955 Warning signs during cargo transfer. (a) When transferring cargo while fast to a dock or at anchor in port, the master shall ensure that the tankship displays a warning sign...

  15. 30 CFR 57.20011 - Barricades and warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Barricades and warning signs. 57.20011 Section... Miscellaneous § 57.20011 Barricades and warning signs. Areas where health or safety hazards exist that are not immediately obvious to employees shall be barricaded, or warning signs shall be posted at all...

  16. 30 CFR 57.20011 - Barricades and warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Barricades and warning signs. 57.20011 Section... Miscellaneous § 57.20011 Barricades and warning signs. Areas where health or safety hazards exist that are not immediately obvious to employees shall be barricaded, or warning signs shall be posted at all...

  17. 30 CFR 56.20011 - Barricades and warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Barricades and warning signs. 56.20011 Section... § 56.20011 Barricades and warning signs. Areas where health or safety hazards exist that are not immediately obvious to employees shall be barricaded, or warning signs shall be posted at all...

  18. 46 CFR 153.955 - Warning signs during cargo transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Warning signs during cargo transfer. 153.955 Section 153... Transfer Procedures § 153.955 Warning signs during cargo transfer. (a) When transferring cargo while fast to a dock or at anchor in port, the master shall ensure that the tankship displays a warning sign...

  19. 30 CFR 56.20011 - Barricades and warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Barricades and warning signs. 56.20011 Section... § 56.20011 Barricades and warning signs. Areas where health or safety hazards exist that are not immediately obvious to employees shall be barricaded, or warning signs shall be posted at all...

  20. 46 CFR 153.955 - Warning signs during cargo transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Warning signs during cargo transfer. 153.955 Section 153... Transfer Procedures § 153.955 Warning signs during cargo transfer. (a) When transferring cargo while fast to a dock or at anchor in port, the master shall ensure that the tankship displays a warning sign...

  1. 30 CFR 57.20011 - Barricades and warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barricades and warning signs. 57.20011 Section... Miscellaneous § 57.20011 Barricades and warning signs. Areas where health or safety hazards exist that are not immediately obvious to employees shall be barricaded, or warning signs shall be posted at all...

  2. 46 CFR 153.955 - Warning signs during cargo transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Warning signs during cargo transfer. 153.955 Section 153... Transfer Procedures § 153.955 Warning signs during cargo transfer. (a) When transferring cargo while fast to a dock or at anchor in port, the master shall ensure that the tankship displays a warning sign...

  3. 30 CFR 56.20011 - Barricades and warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Barricades and warning signs. 56.20011 Section... § 56.20011 Barricades and warning signs. Areas where health or safety hazards exist that are not immediately obvious to employees shall be barricaded, or warning signs shall be posted at all...

  4. 46 CFR 153.955 - Warning signs during cargo transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Warning signs during cargo transfer. 153.955 Section 153... Transfer Procedures § 153.955 Warning signs during cargo transfer. (a) When transferring cargo while fast to a dock or at anchor in port, the master shall ensure that the tankship displays a warning sign...

  5. 49 CFR 393.19 - Hazard warning signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hazard warning signals. 393.19 Section 393.19... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Electrical Wiring § 393.19 Hazard warning signals. The hazard warning signal operating unit on each commercial motor vehicle shall...

  6. 49 CFR 234.211 - Security of warning system apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Security of warning system apparatus. 234.211... Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.211 Security of warning system apparatus. Highway-rail grade crossing warning system apparatus shall be secured against unauthorized entry....

  7. 49 CFR 234.211 - Security of warning system apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Security of warning system apparatus. 234.211... Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.211 Security of warning system apparatus. Highway-rail grade crossing warning system apparatus shall be secured against unauthorized entry....

  8. 30 CFR 36.28 - Signal or warning device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Signal or warning device. 36.28 Section 36.28... EQUIPMENT Construction and Design Requirements § 36.28 Signal or warning device. All mobile diesel-powered transportation equipment shall be provided with a bell, horn, or other suitable warning device convenient to...

  9. Study on warning radius of diffuse reflection laser warning based on fish-eye lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bolin; Zhang, Weian

    2013-09-01

    The diffuse reflection type of omni-directional laser warning based on fish-eye lens is becoming more and more important. As one of the key parameters of warning system, the warning radius should be put into investigation emphatically. The paper firstly theoretically analyzes the energy detected by single pixel of FPA detector in the system under complicated environment. Then the least energy detectable by each single pixel of the system is computed in terms of detector sensitivity, system noise, and minimum SNR. Subsequently, by comparison between the energy detected by single pixel and the least detectable energy, the warning radius is deduced from Torrance-Sparrow five-parameter semiempirical statistic model. Finally, a field experiment was developed to validate the computational results. It has been found that the warning radius has a close relationship with BRDF parameters of the irradiated target, propagation distance, angle of incidence, and detector sensitivity, etc. Furthermore, an important fact is shown that the experimental values of warning radius are always less than that of theoretical ones, due to such factors as the optical aberration of fish-eye lens, the transmissivity of narrowband filter, and the packing ratio of detector.

  10. Pictorial Health Warnings on Cigarette Packs in the United States: An Experimental Evaluation of the Proposed FDA Warnings

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Jessica L.; Driezen, Pete; Boudreau, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In 2010, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) developed 36 proposed health warnings for cigarette packages, from which 9 were subsequently selected for implementation. The current study aimed to evaluate the perceived efficacy of the 36 proposed FDA warnings. Methods: Web-based surveys were conducted with 783 adult smokers and 510 youth in United States. Participants were randomized to view and rate two sets of 6–7 warnings, each set corresponding to one of nine health effect statements required under the Tobacco Control Act. Warnings included all 36 FDA-proposed warnings and additional warnings for comparison. Results: Youth and adults rated individual warnings similarly; in all cases where differences were found, youth perceived warnings as more effective. Comparisons on specific elements indicated that warnings were perceived as more effective if they were: full color (vs. black and white), featured real people (vs. comic book style), contained graphic images (vs. nongraphic), and included a telephone “quitline” number or personal information. Few sociodemographic differences were observed in overall perceived effectiveness: younger respondents, non-White respondents, and smokers intending to quit rated warnings higher. Conclusions: Seven of the nine health warnings selected by the FDA for implementation were among the proposed warnings rated as most effective in the current study. However, the warning(s) added for comparison were rated higher than the FDA-selected warning for five of the nine sets, suggesting some warnings could be improved for greater impact. The findings support the inclusion of a telephone “quitline” number and reinforce the importance of depicting “real” people and health effects. PMID:22505660

  11. Lidar wind shear detection for commercial aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Targ, Russell; Bowles, Roland L.

    1991-08-01

    National attention has focused on the critical problem of detecting and avoiding windshear since the crash on August 2, 1985, of a Lockheed L-1011 at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. As part of The NASA/FAA National Integrated Windshear Program, the authors have defined a measurable windshear hazard index that can be remotely sensed from an aircraft, to give the pilot information about the wind conditions he will experience at some later time if he continues along the present flight path. The technology analysis and end- to-end performance simulation, which measures signal-to-noise ratios and resulting wind velocity errors for competing coherent lidar systems, shows that a Ho:YAG lidar at a wavelength of 2.1 micrometers and a CO2 lidar at 10.6 micrometers can give the pilot information about the line-of-sight component of a windshear threat in a region extending from his present position to 2 to 4 km in front of the aircraft. This constitutes a warning time of 20 to 40 s, even under conditions of moderately heavy precipitation. Using these results, a Coherent Lidar Airborne Shear Sensor (CLASS), using a Q-switched CO2 laser at 10.6 micrometers , is being designed and developed for flight evaluation in early 1992.

  12. 49 CFR 230.87 - Cab lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... engine crew's vision of the track and signals. Each steam locomotive shall also have a conveniently... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Cabs, Warning Signals, Sanders and Lights § 230.87 Cab lights. Each steam locomotive shall have cab lights...

  13. 49 CFR 230.87 - Cab lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... engine crew's vision of the track and signals. Each steam locomotive shall also have a conveniently... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Cabs, Warning Signals, Sanders and Lights § 230.87 Cab lights. Each steam locomotive shall have cab lights...

  14. 49 CFR 230.87 - Cab lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... engine crew's vision of the track and signals. Each steam locomotive shall also have a conveniently... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Cabs, Warning Signals, Sanders and Lights § 230.87 Cab lights. Each steam locomotive shall have cab lights...

  15. 49 CFR 230.87 - Cab lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... engine crew's vision of the track and signals. Each steam locomotive shall also have a conveniently... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Cabs, Warning Signals, Sanders and Lights § 230.87 Cab lights. Each steam locomotive shall have cab lights...

  16. 49 CFR 230.87 - Cab lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... engine crew's vision of the track and signals. Each steam locomotive shall also have a conveniently... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Cabs, Warning Signals, Sanders and Lights § 230.87 Cab lights. Each steam locomotive shall have cab lights...

  17. 49 CFR 193.2911 - Security lighting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Security lighting. 193.2911 Section 193.2911...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2911 Security lighting. Where security warning systems are not...) and each protective enclosure must be illuminated with a minimum in service lighting intensity of...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2911 - Security lighting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Security lighting. 193.2911 Section 193.2911...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2911 Security lighting. Where security warning systems are not...) and each protective enclosure must be illuminated with a minimum in service lighting intensity of...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2911 - Security lighting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Security lighting. 193.2911 Section 193.2911...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2911 Security lighting. Where security warning systems are not...) and each protective enclosure must be illuminated with a minimum in service lighting intensity of...

  20. Aircraft electromagnetic compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Clifton A.; Larsen, William E.

    1987-01-01

    Illustrated are aircraft architecture, electromagnetic interference environments, electromagnetic compatibility protection techniques, program specifications, tasks, and verification and validation procedures. The environment of 400 Hz power, electrical transients, and radio frequency fields are portrayed and related to thresholds of avionics electronics. Five layers of protection for avionics are defined. Recognition is given to some present day electromagnetic compatibility weaknesses and issues which serve to reemphasize the importance of EMC verification of equipment and parts, and their ultimate EMC validation on the aircraft. Proven standards of grounding, bonding, shielding, wiring, and packaging are laid out to help provide a foundation for a comprehensive approach to successful future aircraft design and an understanding of cost effective EMC in an aircraft setting.

  1. Predicting Aircraft Noise Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    Computer program developed for predicting aircraft noise levels either in flight or in ground tests. Noise sources include fan inlet and exhaust jet flap (for powered lift), core (combustor), turbine and airframe. Program written in FORTRAN IV.

  2. Aircraft parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.

    1987-01-01

    The aircraft parameter estimation problem is used to illustrate the utility of parameter estimation, which applies to many engineering and scientific fields. Maximum likelihood estimation has been used to extract stability and control derivatives from flight data for many years. This paper presents some of the basic concepts of aircraft parameter estimation and briefly surveys the literature in the field. The maximum likelihood estimator is discussed, and the basic concepts of minimization and estimation are examined for a simple simulated aircraft example. The cost functions that are to be minimized during estimation are defined and discussed. Graphic representations of the cost functions are given to illustrate the minimization process. Finally, the basic concepts are generalized, and estimation from flight data is discussed. Some of the major conclusions for the simulated example are also developed for the analysis of flight data from the F-14, highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT), and space shuttle vehicles.

  3. Aircraft Engine Emissions. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A conference on a aircraft engine emissions was held to present the results of recent and current work. Such diverse areas as components, controls, energy efficient engine designs, and noise and pollution reduction are discussed.

  4. Solar thermal aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2007-09-18

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  5. Aircraft Safety Improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, G.

    1985-01-01

    Fabrication and testing of honeycomb sandwich aircraft panels are discussed. Also described is the use of the following instruments: thermogravimetric analyzer, differential scanning calorimeter, limiting oxygen index, and infrared spectrometer.

  6. Aircraft electromagnetic compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Clifton A.; Larsen, William E.

    1987-06-01

    Illustrated are aircraft architecture, electromagnetic interference environments, electromagnetic compatibility protection techniques, program specifications, tasks, and verification and validation procedures. The environment of 400 Hz power, electrical transients, and radio frequency fields are portrayed and related to thresholds of avionics electronics. Five layers of protection for avionics are defined. Recognition is given to some present day electromagnetic compatibility weaknesses and issues which serve to reemphasize the importance of EMC verification of equipment and parts, and their ultimate EMC validation on the aircraft. Proven standards of grounding, bonding, shielding, wiring, and packaging are laid out to help provide a foundation for a comprehensive approach to successful future aircraft design and an understanding of cost effective EMC in an aircraft setting.

  7. Laminar Flow Aircraft Certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Various topics telative to laminar flow aircraft certification are discussed. Boundary layer stability, flaps for laminar flow airfoils, computational wing design studies, manufacturing requirements, windtunnel tests, and flow visualization are among the topics covered.

  8. The Aircraft Morphing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wlezien, R. W.; Horner, G. C.; McGowan, A. R.; Padula, S. L.; Scott, M. A.; Silcox, R. J.; Simpson, J. O.

    1998-01-01

    In the last decade smart technologies have become enablers that cut across traditional boundaries in materials science and engineering. Here we define smart to mean embedded actuation, sensing, and control logic in a tightly coupled feedback loop. While multiple successes have been achieved in the laboratory, we have yet to see the general applicability of smart devices to real aircraft systems. The NASA Aircraft Morphing program is an attempt to couple research across a wide range of disciplines to integrate smart technologies into high payoff aircraft applications. The program bridges research in seven individual disciplines and combines the effort into activities in three primary program thrusts. System studies are used to assess the highest- payoff program objectives, and specific research activities are defined to address the technologies required for development of smart aircraft systems. In this paper we address the overall program goals and programmatic structure, and discuss the challenges associated with bringing the technologies to fruition.

  9. Advanced hypersonic aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utzinger, Rob; Blank, Hans-Joachim; Cox, Craig; Harvey, Greg; Mckee, Mike; Molnar, Dave; Nagy, Greg; Petersen, Steve

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this design project is to develop the hypersonic reconnaissance aircraft to replace the SR-71 and to complement existing intelligence gathering devices. The initial design considerations were to create a manned vehicle which could complete its mission with at least two airborne refuelings. The aircraft must travel between Mach 4 and Mach 7 at an altitude of 80,000 feet for a maximum range of 12,000 nautical miles. The vehicle should have an air breathing propulsion system at cruise. With a crew of two, the aircraft should be able to take off and land on a 10,000 foot runway, and the yearly operational costs were not to exceed $300 million. Finally, the aircraft should exhibit stealth characteristics, including a minimized radar cross-section (RCS) and a reduced sonic boom. The technology used in this vehicle should allow for production between the years 1993 and 1995.

  10. Aircraft of the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeger, S.

    1985-01-01

    Some basic problems connected with attempts to increase the size and capacity of transport aircraft are discussed. According to the square-cubic law, the increase in structural weight is proportional to the third power of the increase in the linear dimensions of the aircraft when geomettric similarity is maintained, while the surface area of the aircraft increases according to the second power. A consequence is that the fraction of useful weight will decrease as aircraft increase in size. However, in flying-wing designs in which the whole load on the wing is proportional to the distribution of lifting forces, the total bending moment on the wing will be sharply reduced, enabling lighter construction. Flying wings may have an ultimate capacity of 3000 passengers.

  11. Depreciation of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P

    1922-01-01

    There is a widespread, and quite erroneous, impression to the effect that aircraft are essentially fragile and deteriorate with great rapidity when in service, so that the depreciation charges to be allowed on commercial or private operation are necessarily high.

  12. Alternative jet aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Potential changes in jet aircraft fuel specifications due to shifts in supply and quality of refinery feedstocks are discussed with emphasis on the effects these changes would have on the performance and durability of aircraft engines and fuel systems. Combustion characteristics, fuel thermal stability, and fuel pumpability at low temperature are among the factors considered. Combustor and fuel system technology needs for broad specification fuels are reviewed including prevention of fuel system fouling and fuel system technology for fuels with higher freezing points.

  13. ANALYSIS OF AIRCRAFT MOTIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed by Ames Research Center, in cooperation with the National Transportation Safety Board, as a technique for deriving time histories of an aircraft's motion from Air Traffic Control (ATC) radar records. This technique uses the radar range and azimuth data, along with the downlinked altitude data, to derive an expanded set of data which includes airspeed, lift, attitude angles (pitch, roll, and heading), etc. This technique should prove useful as a source of data in the investigation of commercial airline accidents and in the analysis of accidents involving aircraft which do not have onboard data recorders (e.g., military, short-haul, and general aviation). The technique used to determine the aircraft motions involves smoothing of raw radar data. These smoothed results, in combination with other available information (wind profiles and aircraft performance data), are used to derive the expanded set of data. This program uses a cubic least-square fit to smooth the raw data. This moving-arc procedure provides a smoothed time history of the aircraft position, the inertial velocities, and accelerations. Using known winds, these inertial data are transformed to aircraft stability axes to provide true airspeed, thrust-drag, lift, and roll angle. Further derivation, based on aircraft dependent performance data, can determine the aircraft angle of attack, pitch, and heading angle. Results of experimental tests indicate that values derived from ATC radar records using this technique agree favorably with airborne measurements. This program is written in FORTRAN IV to be executed in the batch mode, and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of 64k (octal) of 60 bit words.

  14. Do warnings deter rather than produce more sophisticated malingering?

    PubMed

    Schenk, Kathryn; Sullivan, Karen A

    2010-08-01

    Following Youngjohn, Lees-Haley, and Binder's (1999) comment on Johnson and Lesniak-Karpiak's (1997) study that warnings lead to more subtle malingering, researchers have sought to better understand warning effects. However, such studies have been largely atheoretical and may have confounded warning and coaching. This study examined the effect on malingering of a warning that was based on criminological-sociological concepts derived from the rational choice model of deterrence theory. A total of 78 participants were randomly assigned to a control group, an unwarned simulator group, or one of two warned simulator groups. The warning groups comprised low- and high-level conditions depending on warning intensity. Simulator participants received no coaching about how to fake tests. Outcome variables were scores derived from the Test of Memory Malingering and Wechsler Memory Scale-III. When the rate of malingering was compared across the four groups, a high-level warning effect was found such that warned participants were significantly less likely to exaggerate than unwarned simulators. In an exploratory follow-up analysis, the warned groups were divided into those who reported malingering and those who did not report malingering, and the performance of these groups was compared to that of unwarned simulators and controls. Using this approach, results showed that participants who were deterred from malingering by warning performed no worse than controls. However, on a small number of tests, self-reported malingerers in the low-level warning group appeared less impaired than unwarned simulators. This pattern was not observed in the high-level warning condition. Although cautious interpretation of findings is necessitated by the exploratory nature of some analyses, overall results suggest that using a carefully designed warning may be useful for reducing the rate of malingering. The combination of some noteworthy effect sizes, despite low power and the small size of some

  15. LIVE DEMONSTRATION OF DISTANT EARLY WARNING SYSTEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammitzsch, M.; Lendholt, M.; Wächter, J.

    2009-12-01

    The DEWS (Distant Early Warning System) [1] project, funded under the 6th Framework Programme of the European Union, has the objective to create a new generation of interoperable early warning systems based on an open sensor platform. This platform integrates OGC [2] SWE [3] compliant sensor systems for the rapid detection of earthquakes, for the monitoring of sea level, ocean floor events, and ground displacements. Based on the upstream information flow DEWS focuses on the improvement of downstream capacities of warning centres especially by improving information logistics for effective and targeted warning message aggregation for a multilingual environment. Multiple telecommunication channels will be used for the dissemination of warning messages. Wherever possible, existing standards have been integrated. The Command and Control User Interface (CCUI), a rich client application based on Eclipse RCP (Rich Client Platform) [4] and the open source GIS uDig [5], integrates various OGC services. Using WMS (Web Map Service) [6] and WFS (Web Feature Service) [7] spatial data are utilized to depict the situation picture and to integrate a simulation system via WPS (Web Processing Service) [8] to identify affected areas. Warning messages are compiled and transmitted in the OASIS [9] CAP (Common Alerting Protocol) [10] standard together with addressing information defined via EDXL-DE (Emergency Data Exchange Language - Distribution Element) [11]. Internal interfaces are realized with SOAP [12] web services. Based on results of GITEWS [13] - in particular the GITEWS Tsunami Service Bus [14] - the DEWS approach provides an implementation for tsunami early warning systems. The introductory part of the demonstration briefly explains the DEWS project, the CCUI in conjunction with operators’ workflow, the system architecture, details of information logistics and the virtual scenario of live demonstration. The live demonstration exhibits the CCUI on screen and the service

  16. Conflict Prevention and Separation Assurance Method in the Small Aircraft Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Consiglio, Maria C.; Carreno, Victor A.; Williams, Daniel M.; Munoz, Cesar

    2005-01-01

    A multilayer approach to the prevention of conflicts due to the loss of aircraft-to-aircraft separation which relies on procedures and on-board automation was implemented as part of the SATS HVO Concept of Operations. The multilayer system gives pilots support and guidance during the execution of normal operations and advance warning for procedure deviations or off-nominal operations. This paper describes the major concept elements of this multilayer approach to separation assurance and conflict prevention and provides the rationale for its design. All the algorithms and functionality described in this paper have been implemented in an aircraft simulation in the NASA Langley Research Center s Air Traffic Operation Lab and on the NASA Cirrus SR22 research aircraft.

  17. Effects of aircraft noise on flight and ground structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, J. S.; Mayes, W. H.; Willis, C. M.

    1976-01-01

    Acoustic loads measured on jet-powered STOL configurations are presented for externally blown and upper surface blown flap models ranging in size from a small laboratory model up to a full-scale aircraft model. The implications of the measured loads for potential acoustic fatigue and cabin noise are discussed. Noise transmission characteristics of light aircraft structures are presented. The relative importance of noise transmission paths, such as fuselage sidewall and primary structure, is estimated. Acceleration responses of a historic building and a residential home are presented for flyover noise from subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Possible effects on occupant comfort are assessed. The results from these three examples show that aircraft noise can induce structural responses that are large enough to require consideration in the design or operation of the aircraft.

  18. RJARS: RAND's version of the jamming aircraft and radar simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollfrey, William

    1991-06-01

    RJARS is an engagement level model that simulates air-to-ground and ground-to-air combat, primarily the latter, treating the combatants as individuals rather than aggregating. It has been designed to consider terrain masking, multipath and clutter, and flight dynamics in order to more carefully evaluate jamming effectiveness and mission attrition. The model is an extensive development of JARS (Jamming Aircraft and Radar Simulation). The current version of RJARS considers sorties in which aircraft carrying warning receivers, jammers, anti-radiation missiles, and air-launched cruise missiles fly against a defensive system with search, acquisition, and tracking radars, IR and optical systems, surface-to-air missiles, artillery, and a command, control, and communications system. All equipment parameters and scenarios can be varied.

  19. Global Tsunami Warning System Development Since 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, S.; Becker, N. C.; Wang, D.; Fryer, G. J.; McCreery, C.; Hirshorn, B. F.

    2014-12-01

    The 9.1 Mw Great Sumatra Earthquake of Dec. 26, 2004, generated the most destructive tsunami in history killing 227,000 people along Indian Ocean coastlines and was recorded by sea-level instruments world-wide. This tragedy showed the Indian Ocean needed a tsunami warning system to prevent another tragedy on this scale. The Great Sumatra Earthquake also highlighted the need for tsunami warning systems in other ocean basins. Instruments for recording earthquakes and sea-level data useful for tsunami monitoring did not exist outside of the Pacific Ocean in 2004. Seismometers were few in number, and even fewer were high-quality long period broadband instruments. Nor was much of their data made available to the US tsunami warning centers (TWCs). In 2004 the US TWCs relied exclusively on instrumentation provided and maintained by IRIS and the USGS for areas outside of the Pacific.Since 2004, the US TWCs and their partners have made substantial improvements to seismic and sea-level monitoring networks with the addition of new and better instruments, densification of existing networks, better communications infrastructure, and improved data sharing among tsunami warning centers. In particular, the number of sea-level stations transmitting data in near real-time and the amount of seismic data available to the tsunami warning centers has more than tripled. The DART network that consisted of a half-dozen Pacific stations in 2004 now totals nearly 60 stations worldwide. Earthquake and tsunami science has progressed as well. It took nearly three weeks to obtain the first reliable estimates of the 2004 Sumatra Earthquake's magnitude. Today, thanks to improved seismic networks and modern computing power, TWCs use the W-phase seismic moment method to determine accurate earthquake magnitudes and focal mechanisms for great earthquakes within 25 minutes. TWC scientists have also leveraged these modern computers to generate tsunami forecasts in a matter of minutes.Progress towards a

  20. Social Interactions Sparked by Pictorial Warnings on Cigarette Packs

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Marissa G.; Peebles, Kathryn; Bach, Laura E.; Noar, Seth M.; Ribisl, Kurt M.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2015-01-01

    The Message Impact Framework suggests that social interactions may offer smokers the opportunity to process pictorial warnings on cigarette packs more deeply. We aimed to describe adult smokers’ social interactions about pictorial cigarette pack warnings in two longitudinal pilot studies. In Pilot Study 1, 30 smokers used cigarette packs with one of nine pictorial warnings for two weeks. In Pilot Study 2, 46 smokers used cigarette packs with one of five pictorial warnings for four weeks. Nearly all smokers (97%/96% in Pilot Study 1/2) talked about the warnings with other people, with the most common people being friends (67%/87%) and spouses/significant others (34%/42%). Pilot Study 2 found that 26% of smokers talked about the warnings with strangers. Discussions about the health effects of smoking and quitting smoking were more frequent during the first week of exposure to pictorial warnings than in the week prior to beginning the study (both p < 0.05). Pictorial warnings sparked social interactions about the warnings, the health effects of smoking, and quitting smoking, indicating that pictorial warnings may act as a social intervention reaching beyond the individual. Future research should examine social interactions as a potential mediator of the impact of pictorial warnings on smoking behavior. PMID:26506363