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Sample records for aire sedimentos viales

  1. Evaluation of septum-capped vials for storage of gas samples during air transport.

    PubMed

    Glatzel, Stephan; Well, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    In order to provide information on the suitability of commonly used gas storage vials for air transport, we tested two vial types on their ability to preserve defined nitrous oxide concentrations and excess pressure when exposed to low pressure, low temperature and puncture by needles. Unlike in Crimp Cap vials, in Exetainers no nitrous oxide loss following low pressure storage was detectable. Tightness of Exetainers following multiple puncture was best using a small needle diameter. Pressure loss following 5, 10, or 25 punctures was lowest in the Exetainers. We conclude that Exetainers are suitable for storing gas samples for an extended period of time during aircraft transport.

  2. Predictions of vacuum loss of evacuated vials from initial air leak rates.

    PubMed

    Prisco, Michael R; Ochoa, Jorge A; Yardimci, Atif M

    2013-08-01

    Container closure integrity is a critical factor for maintaining product sterility and stability. Therefore, closure systems (found in vials, syringes, and cartridges) are designed to provide a seal between rubber stoppers and glass containers. To ensure that the contained product has maintained its sterility and stability at the time of deployment, the seal must remain intact within acceptable limits. To this end, a mathematical model has been developed to describe vacuum loss in evacuated drug vials. The model computes equivalent leak diameter corresponding to initial air leak rate as well as vacuum loss as a function of time and vial size. The theory accounts for three flow regimes that may be encountered. Initial leak rates from 10(-8) to 10(3) sccm (standard cubic centimeters per minute) were investigated for vials ranging from 1 to 100 mL. Corresponding leak diameters of 0.25-173 μm were predicted. The time for a vial to lose half of its vacuum, the T50 value, ranged from many years at the lowest leak rates and largest vials, to fractions of a second at the highest leak rates and smallest vials. These results may be used to determine what level of initial vacuum leak is acceptable for a given product. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Versatile Vials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. (AFR) developed a new sol-gel material coating for sample vials to be used in surface-enhanced Raman (SER) spectroscopy. In the fields of biomedical and forensic science, the coated vials are used to identify physiological chemicals present in blood and urine. The vials are used in the pharmaceutical industry in the area of drug development and discovery. In the drug enforcement field, using the vials helps with detection of trace amounts of drugs on surfaces. The SER vials will also help to identify contaminants in water sources, such as various inorganics and pesticides. The new vials have advantages over other SER materials. Former products required that samples be pre-mixed or dissolved into specific solvents or reagents. The SER vials do not have these limitations, and measurements can be performed using any solvent. Furthermore, the signal appears in less than one second. The sol-gel material will stay active for at least one year and the vials are compatible with any Raman spectrometer. Most importantly, the SER activity can be duplicated from vial-to-vial, allowing for reproducible results.

  4. [Numerical simulation and optimization research of needle parameters in vial washing machine].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haowei; Li, Zhen; Liu, Ying; Liu, Haigang; Peng, Delian; Wei, Guoqin

    2014-10-01

    According to the working principle of vertical ultrasonic vial washing machine, receiving respective force of small water droplets on the inside wall of vials and the minimum air velocity of blowing off water droplets can be obtained based on the analysis of water-droplet-related parameters. The inside wall model of 7 mL vial created by GAMBIT was divided into fine grids. Then the Realizable k-epsilon Two Equation Turbulence Model was adopted and the flow field of vial by FLUENT software was simulated when air was flushing inside the wall. In that case, the optimal position, inner diameter and the corresponding minimum air velocity of needle can be acquired to meet the needs of vial washing machine applied to 7 mL vial.

  5. Sample Vial Secure Container

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, M.J.

    1993-07-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors must maintain continuity of knowledge on all safeguard samples and, in particular, on those samples drawn from plutonium product and spent fuel input tanks at a nuclear reprocessing plant`s blister sampling station. Integrity of safeguard samples must be guaranteed from the sampling point to the moment of sample analysis at an accepted local laboratory or at the IAEA`s Safeguards Analytical Laboratory (SAL) in Seibersdorf, Austria. The safeguard samples are drawn at a blister sampling station with inspector participation and then transferred via a pneumatic post system to the facility`s analytical laboratory. Transfer of the sample by the pneumatic post system, arrival of the sample in the operator`s analytical laboratory, and storage of the sample awaiting analysis are very time consuming activities for an inspector, particularly if continuous human surveillance is required for all these activities. These activities could be observed by ordinary surveillance methods, such as a video monitoring system, but this would be cumbersome and time consuming for both the inspector and the operator. This paper describes a secure container designed to assure sample vial integrity from the point the sample is drawn to treatment of the sample at a facility`s analytical laboratory.

  6. Effectiveness of Needleless Vial Adaptors and Blunt Cannulas for Drug Administration in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hailey, M.; Bayuse, T.

    2010-01-01

    Fluid Isolation in the medication vial: Air/ fluid isolation maneuvers were used to move the medication to the septum end of vial. This isolation may be achieved in multiple ways based on the experience of the astronaut with fluid management in microgravity. If vial adaptors/blunt cannula or syringe assembly is inserted into the to vial before fluid isolation commences, the stability of this assembly should be considered in an effort to limit the risk of "slinging off" of the vial during isolation. Alternatively, fluid isolation can be performed prior to attaching the syringe/vial adaptor assembly. Terrestrial practices for medication withdrawal from a nonvented vial require injection of an equivalent amount of air as the expected medication volume prior to withdrawing liquid. In microgravity, this action is still valid, however the injection of additional air into the vial creates a multitude of micro bubbles and increases the volume of medication mixed with air that then must be withdrawn to achieve the desired drug volume in syringe. This practice is more likely to be required when using vials >30ml in size and injection volumes >10mL. It is felt that based on the microgravity flight, the practice of air injection is more of a hindrance than help.

  7. Improving Heat Transfer at the Bottom of Vials for Consistent Freeze Drying with Unidirectional Structured Ice.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Mónica; Tiago, João M; Singh, Satish K; Geraldes, Vítor; Rodrigues, Miguel A

    2016-10-01

    The quality of lyophilized products is dependent of the ice structure formed during the freezing step. Herein, we evaluate the importance of the air gap at the bottom of lyophilization vials for consistent nucleation, ice structure, and cake appearance. The bottom of lyophilization vials was modified by attaching a rectified aluminum disc with an adhesive material. Freezing was studied for normal and converted vials, with different volumes of solution, varying initial solution temperature (from 5°C to 20°C) and shelf temperature (from -20°C to -40°C). The impact of the air gap on the overall heat transfer was interpreted with the assistance of a computational fluid dynamics model. Converted vials caused nucleation at the bottom and decreased the nucleation time up to one order of magnitude. The formation of ice crystals unidirectionally structured from bottom to top lead to a honeycomb-structured cake after lyophilization of a solution with 4% mannitol. The primary drying time was reduced by approximately 35%. Converted vials that were frozen radially instead of bottom-up showed similar improvements compared with normal vials but very poor cake quality. Overall, the curvature of the bottom of glass vials presents a considerable threat to consistency by delaying nucleation and causing radial ice growth. Rectifying the vials bottom with an adhesive material revealed to be a relatively simple alternative to overcome this inconsistency.

  8. Measurement of light emission in scintillation vials

    SciTech Connect

    Duran Ramiro, M. Teresa; Garcia-Torano, Eduardo

    2005-09-15

    The efficiency and energy resolution of liquid scintillation counting (LSC) systems are strongly dependent on the optical characteristics of scintillators, vials, and reflectors. This article presents the results of measurements of the light-emission profile of scintillation vials. Two measurement techniques, autoradiographs and direct measurements with a photomultiplier tube, have been used to obtain light-emission distribution for standard vials of glass, etched glass and polyethylene. Results obtained with both techniques are in good agreement. For the first time, the effect of the meniscus in terms of light contribution has been numerically estimated. These results can help design LSC systems that are more efficient in terms of light collection.

  9. Drawing medicine out of a vial

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000530.htm Drawing medicine out of a vial To use the sharing ... a clean area. Wash your hands. Check Your Medicine Carefully check your medicine: Check the label. Make ...

  10. INTEGRITY OF VOA-VIAL SEALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Preservation of soil samples for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) requires both the inhibition of VOC degradation and the restriction of vapor movement in or out of the sample container. Clear, 40,mL glass VOA vials manufactured by the four major U.S. glass manu...

  11. INTEGRITY OF VOA-VIAL SEALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Preservation of soil samples for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) requires both the inhibition of VOC degradation and the restriction of vapor movement in or out of the sample container. Clear, 40,mL glass VOA vials manufactured by the four major U.S. glass manu...

  12. Vial freeze-drying, part 1: new insights into heat transfer characteristics of tubing and molded vials.

    PubMed

    Hibler, Susanne; Wagner, Christophe; Gieseler, Henning

    2012-03-01

    In order to optimize a freeze-drying cycle, information regarding the heat transfer characteristics of the container system is imperative. Two most recently developed tubing (TopLyo™) and molded (EasyLyo™) vial designs were compared with a standard serum tubing and molded vial, a polymer vial (TopPac™), and an amber molded EasyLyo™. In addition, the impact of methodology on the determination of reliable vial heat transfer coefficient (K(v) ) data is examined in detail. All K(v) s were gravimetrically determined by sublimation tests with pure water at 50, 100, 200, and 400 mTorr. In contrast to the traditional assumption that molded vials exhibit inefficient heat transfer characteristics, these vials showed a very similar performance compared with their serum tubing counterparts in the relevant pressure range for freeze-drying. At 100 mTorr, the TopLyo™ center vials show only 4% higher K(v) values than the EasyLyo™ center vials. All glass vials outmatch the polymer vial in terms of heat transfer, up to 30% elevated heat transfer for the TopLyo™ center vials at 400 mTorr. Sublimation tests have demonstrated to be a valuable tool to investigate the heat transfer characteristics of vials, but results are dependent on methodology. New developments in molded vial manufacturing lead to improved heat transfer performance.

  13. 10 CFR 35.69 - Labeling of vials and syringes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Labeling of vials and syringes. 35.69 Section 35.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL General Technical Requirements § 35.69 Labeling of vials and syringes. Each syringe and vial that contains unsealed byproduct material must...

  14. 10 CFR 35.69 - Labeling of vials and syringes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling of vials and syringes. 35.69 Section 35.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL General Technical Requirements § 35.69 Labeling of vials and syringes. Each syringe and vial that contains unsealed byproduct material must...

  15. 10 CFR 35.69 - Labeling of vials and syringes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Labeling of vials and syringes. 35.69 Section 35.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL General Technical Requirements § 35.69 Labeling of vials and syringes. Each syringe and vial that contains unsealed byproduct material must...

  16. 10 CFR 35.69 - Labeling of vials and syringes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Labeling of vials and syringes. 35.69 Section 35.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL General Technical Requirements § 35.69 Labeling of vials and syringes. Each syringe and vial that contains unsealed byproduct material must...

  17. 10 CFR 35.69 - Labeling of vials and syringes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Labeling of vials and syringes. 35.69 Section 35.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL General Technical Requirements § 35.69 Labeling of vials and syringes. Each syringe and vial that contains unsealed byproduct material must...

  18. INTEGRITY OF VOA-VIAL SEALS | Science Inventory | US ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Preservation of soil samples for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) requires both the inhibition of VOC degradation and the restriction of vapor movement in or out of the sample container. Clear, 40,mL glass VOA vials manufactured by the four major U.S. glass manufacturers were tested for seal integrity. Visual inspection revealed a variety of imperfections ranging from small indentations, bumps, and scratches on vial threads or lips, through obvious defects, such as large indentations or grooves in the vial lips and chipped or broken glass. The aluminum plate vacuum test proved to be unreliable in identifying potentially leaky vials. The septa-seal vacuum test was conducted twice on the 80 selected vials.Mean VOC concentrations after 14 days storage generally were within +- 20% of the known concentration with a majority of the concentrations within +- 15% of their known values. There were no statistically significant differences in VOC concentrations between vials in the potentially leaky and control group for any of the manufacturers. Only 1 vial lost VOCs and that was due to a large chip in the vial's lip and neck. These findings indicate that the silicone septa are flexible enough to overcome most vial imperfections and form a complete seal against VOC loss. A careful inspection of the VOA vials prior to use to remove any vials with large and obvious imperfections should be sufficient to screen out vials that are subject to VOC losses.

  19. Contamination study of multiple-dose vials.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, P S; Shevchuk, Y M; Conly, J M; Richardson, C J

    1993-03-01

    To document the number of opened, dated, and expired multiple-dose vials (MDVs) in patient-care areas and to determine what proportion of MDVs were contaminated with bacteria or cellular debris. Every tenth opened MDV (69/656) identified on the wards was collected, ensuring representation from each nursing unit. Contents were examined for contamination. Medical-school-affiliated, tertiary care center. (1) Visual inspection for debris, medication type, location, lot number, manufacturer's expiration date, and date of opening; (2) culture in solid and broth media for bacterial growth; and (3) staining and microscopic examination for cellular constituents. No vials had been dated after opening and 4.6 percent were expired according to the manufacturer's expiration date. No bacterial contamination was evident; however, one vial was contaminated with red blood cells. Transmission of infection via contaminated MDVs has been well documented and contamination with red blood cells raises concerns about potential for transmission of bloodborne pathogens. Recommendations include dating MDVs after opening, emphasizing the need for proper aseptic technique, and discarding MDVs on the manufacture's date of expiration.

  20. Vials: Visualizing Alternative Splicing of Genes

    PubMed Central

    Strobelt, Hendrik; Alsallakh, Bilal; Botros, Joseph; Peterson, Brant; Borowsky, Mark; Pfister, Hanspeter; Lex, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a process by which the same DNA sequence is used to assemble different proteins, called protein isoforms. Alternative splicing works by selectively omitting some of the coding regions (exons) typically associated with a gene. Detection of alternative splicing is difficult and uses a combination of advanced data acquisition methods and statistical inference. Knowledge about the abundance of isoforms is important for understanding both normal processes and diseases and to eventually improve treatment through targeted therapies. The data, however, is complex and current visualizations for isoforms are neither perceptually efficient nor scalable. To remedy this, we developed Vials, a novel visual analysis tool that enables analysts to explore the various datasets that scientists use to make judgments about isoforms: the abundance of reads associated with the coding regions of the gene, evidence for junctions, i.e., edges connecting the coding regions, and predictions of isoform frequencies. Vials is scalable as it allows for the simultaneous analysis of many samples in multiple groups. Our tool thus enables experts to (a) identify patterns of isoform abundance in groups of samples and (b) evaluate the quality of the data. We demonstrate the value of our tool in case studies using publicly available datasets. PMID:26529712

  1. Mechanistic studies of glass vial breakage for frozen formulations. I. Vial breakage caused by crystallizable excipient mannitol.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ge; Akers, Mike; Jain, Manish; Guo, Jeremy; Distler, Adrian; Swift, Rob; Wadhwa, Manpreet-Vick S; Jameel, Feroz; Patro, Sugu; Freund, Erwin

    2007-01-01

    The process of freeze-thaw not only subjects bioproducts to potentially destabilizing stress, but also imposes challenges to retain container integrity. Shipment and storage of frozen products in glass vials and thawing of the vials prior to use at clinics is a common situation. Vial integrity failure during freeze-thaw results in product loss and safety issues. Formulations of biomolecules often include crystallizable excipients, which can cause glass vial breakage during freeze-thaw operations. In this study, mannitol formulations served as models for mechanistic investigation of root causes for vial breakage. Several parameters and their impacts on vial breakage were investigated, including mannitol concentration (5% and 15%), different freeze-thaw conditions (fast, slow, and staging), fill configurations (varying fill volume/vial size ratio), and vial tray materials (plastic, stainless steel, corrugated cardboard, aluminum, and polyurethane foam). The results in this study were subjected to a statistical proportion test. The data showed that large fill volumes strongly correlated with higher percentage of vial cracks. Furthermore, the 15% mannitol was found to cause more breakage than 5% mannitol, especially with fast temperature gradient. Significantly more thawing vial breakage occurred in the fast compared to slow freeze-thaw with all types of vial trays. The freezing breakage was substantially lower than the thawing breakage using the fast temperature gradient, and the trend was reversed with the slow temperature gradient. An intermediate hold at -30 degrees C prior to further decrease in temperature proved to be a practical approach to minimize mannitol-induced vial breakage. Thermal mechanical analysis (TMA) and strain gage techniques were employed to gain mechanistic insights, and it was found that the primary causes for mannitol-induced vial breakage were partial crystallization during freezing and "secondary" crystallization of non

  2. Container/Closure Integrity Testing and the Identification of a Suitable Vial/Stopper Combination for Low-Temperature Storage at -80 {degrees}C.

    PubMed

    Zuleger, Brigitte; Werner, Uwe; Kort, Alexander; Glowienka, Rene; Wehnes, Engelbert; Duncan, Derek

    2012-01-01

    It was recently found that after storage of a live viral vaccine at -80 °C in glass vials closed with rubber stoppers, a phenomenon was revealed which had not been observed before with other viral products stored at -20 °C: overpressure in the vials. As this phenomenon poses a serious safety problem for medical personnel as well as for the product itself, an investigation was initiated to identify the root cause of the overpressure. After exclusion of possible root causes (differences in air temperature or atmospheric air pressure during filling and quality control testing, outgassing from the formulation buffer) the remaining hypothesis involved a possible container closure integrity issue at low temperature. The glass transition temperatures (T(g)) of many rubber stopper formulations are in the range -55 to -70 °C. At storage temperatures below T(g), the rubber stopper loses its elastic properties and there is a risk that the seal integrity of the vial could be compromised. Loss of seal integrity of the vials near storage temperatures of -80 °C would result in an ingress of cold dense gas into the vial headspace. After removal of the vials from storage at -80 °C, the rubber stoppers could regain their elastic properties and the vials would quickly reseal, thereby trapping the ingressed gas, which leads to overpressure in the vial headspace. Nondestructive laser-based headspace analysis was used to investigate the maintenance of container closure integrity as a function of the filling and capping/crimping process, storage and transport conditions, and vial/stopper designs. This analytical method is based on frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) and can be used for noninvasive headspace measurements of headspace pressure and headspace gas composition. Changes in the vial headspace composition and/or pressure are a clear marker for vials that have lost container closure integrity. After storage of a live viral vaccine at -80 °C in glass vials closed with

  3. Loss of preservative from a tuberculin solution in rubber stoppered vials fastened with different seals.

    PubMed

    Held, H R; Landi, S

    1985-07-01

    A tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) solution containing 0.3% phenol as a preservative was dispensed in glass vials closed with rubber stoppers fastened in three different ways, namely with Tear-off seals, Flip-off seals and partial seals. After various times of storage at 5 degrees C and 37 degrees C, the phenol content in the tuberculin solution was determined. It was found that the Flip-off seals allowed the phenol to escape at a faster rate than the Tear-off seals and that vials closed with partial seals showed the highest loss of phenol. Although these losses were much more pronounced at 37 degrees C than at 5 degrees C, the phenol content at the latter temperature was, over a period of three years, within the limits of acceptability for tuberculin products capped with Tear-off or Flip-off seals. A loss of phenol also occurred from tuberculin solution stored at -28 degrees C in vials capped with either Tear-off or partial seals. In addition to the Tear-off and Flip-off seals other seals such as the "controlled score' Flip-off seal and the Alcoa Steri-Twist cap were evaluated for their imperviousness to air. Except for the Alcoa Steri-Twist cap none of the seals we have investigated were air tight and hence entirely satisfactory to prevent losses of phenol by evaporation from tuberculin products.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Comparisons of Aluminum and Silica Elution from Various Glass Vials.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Toru; Miyajima, Makoto; Nishimoto, Norihiro; Minami, Hidemi; Terada, Katsuhide

    2016-01-01

    To understand the risk of particle formation in glass vials, we investigated the correlation between vial surface condition and alminum (Al) or silicon (Si) elution using various suppliers' vials with or without surface treatment. The elution of Si, which can also be an indicator of Al elution, consists of two phases; the first phase is influenced by roughness of the glass surface at the time of filling, and the second phase is dependent on the fundamental elution rate from the glass tube. When vials were filled with citrate buffer at pH 7, vials with varied surface conditions showed the most obvious differences in Al and Si elution. Sulfur-treated vials showed slightly lower Al and Si elution than the non-treated vials. It is considered that this effect of the sulfur treatment on elution is due to the surface being smoothed during heat treatment after the washing process. Different from the sulfur treatment, silicon dioxide (SiO2)-coated vials hardly showed any Al elution as long as the surface was fully coated with the SiO2 layer. It was found that the protective effect of the SiO2 layer against Al elution is more effective in a vial filled with a solution having a lower pH, due to the lower Si dissolving rate occurring at a lower pH. As shown above, pre-measuring the Si and Al present in a citrate buffer at pH 7 placed within a glass container can be a useful tool for selecting the appropriate container for liquid drugs.

  5. An assay for measurement of protein adsorption to glass vials.

    PubMed

    Varmette, Elizabeth; Strony, Brianne; Haines, Daniel; Redkar, Rajendra

    2010-01-01

    Protein adsorption to primary packaging is one of the problems faced by biopharmaceutical drug companies. An assay was developed to quantify loss of proteins to glass vial surfaces. The assay involves the labeling of protein with a fluorescent dye, incubation of the labeled protein with the vial surface, elution of the adsorbed protein using a stripping buffer, and determination of fluorescence of the adsorbed protein using a fluorometer. The assay is simple to set up, accurate, sensitive, and flexible. The assay can be modified for indirect measurement of protein adsorption and offers an attractive alternative for researchers to quantify protein adsorption to glass vials and syringes.

  6. Optimizing human semen cryopreservation by reducing test vial volume and repetitive test vial sampling.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Christian F S; Ohl, Dana A; Parker, Walter R; da Rocha, Andre M; Keller, Laura M; Schuster, Timothy G; Sonksen, Jens; Smith, Gary D

    2015-03-01

    To investigate optimal test vial (TV) volume, utility and reliability of TVs, intermediate temperature exposure (-88°C to -93°C) before cryostorage, cryostorage in nitrogen vapor (VN2) and liquid nitrogen (LN2), and long-term stability of VN2 cryostorage of human semen. Prospective clinical laboratory study. University assisted reproductive technology (ART) laboratory. A total of 594 patients undergoing semen analysis and cryopreservation. Semen analysis, cryopreservation with different intermediate steps and in different volumes (50-1,000 μL), and long-term storage in LN2 or VN2. Optimal TV volume, prediction of cryosurvival (CS) in ART procedure vials (ARTVs) with pre-freeze semen parameters and TV CS, post-thaw motility after two- or three-step semen cryopreservation and cryostorage in VN2 and LN2. Test vial volume of 50 μL yielded lower CS than other volumes tested. Cryosurvival of 100 μL was similar to that of larger volumes tested. An intermediate temperature exposure (-88°C to -93°C for 20 minutes) during cryopreservation did not affect post-thaw motility. Cryosurvival of TVs and ARTVs from the same ejaculate were similar. Cryosurvival of the first TV in a series of cryopreserved ejaculates was similar to and correlated with that of TVs from different ejaculates within the same patient. Cryosurvival of the first TV was correlated with subsequent ARTVs. Long-term cryostorage in VN2 did not affect CS. This study provides experimental evidence for use of a single 100 μL TV per patient to predict CS when freezing multiple ejaculates over a short period of time (<10 days). Additionally, semen cryostorage in VN2 provides a stable and safe environment over time. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Freeze-Drying Process Development and Scale-Up: Scale-Up of Edge Vial Versus Center Vial Heat Transfer Coefficients, Kv.

    PubMed

    Pikal, Michael J; Bogner, Robin; Mudhivarthi, Vamsi; Sharma, Puneet; Sane, Pooja

    2016-11-01

    This report presents calculations of the difference between the vial heat transfer coefficient of the "edge vial" and the "center vial" at all scales. The only scale-up adjustment for center vials is for the contribution of radiation from the shelf upon which the vial sits by replacing the emissivity of the laboratory dryer shelf with the emissivity of the production dryer shelf. With edge vials, scales-up adjustments are more complex. While convection is not important, heat transfer from the wall to the bands (surrounding the vial array) by radiation and directly from the band to the vials by both radiation and conduction is important; this radiation heat transfer depends on the emissivity of the vial and the bands and is nearly independent of the emissivity of the dryer walls. Differences in wall temperatures do impact the edge vial effect and scale-up, and estimates for wall temperatures are needed for both laboratory and manufacturing dryers. Auto-loading systems (no bands) may give different edge vial heat transfer coefficients than when operating with bands. Satisfactory agreement between theoretical predictions and experimental values of the edge vial effect indicate that results calculated from the theory are of useful accuracy. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Greenhouse Effect in a Vial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, Richard; Sneider, Cary

    1989-01-01

    Presents an example of a greenhouse-effect experiment from the Climate Protection Institute. Analyzes the amount of carbon dioxide in ambient air, human exhalation, automobile exhaust, and nearly pure carbon dioxide by titrating with ammonia and bromthymol blue. (MVL)

  9. The Greenhouse Effect in a Vial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, Richard; Sneider, Cary

    1989-01-01

    Presents an example of a greenhouse-effect experiment from the Climate Protection Institute. Analyzes the amount of carbon dioxide in ambient air, human exhalation, automobile exhaust, and nearly pure carbon dioxide by titrating with ammonia and bromthymol blue. (MVL)

  10. 141 BOVINE EMBRYO DEVELOPMENT RATES ARE AFFECTED WHEN OOCYTES ARE MATURED IN DIFFERENT VIALS CONTAINING HEPES/BICARBONATE BUFFERED MEDIUM.

    PubMed

    Hashem, N; Secher, J O; Pryor, J H; Long, C R; Looney, C R; Avery, B; Hyttel, P; Stroebech, L

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory ware for the in vitro-produced embryos is generally made from embryo-tested plastic instead of glass. The quality of the plastic is crucial for the outcome because plastic is often toxic to gametes (Nijs et al. 2009 Fertil. Steril. 92, 527-535). In addition, gas molecules permeate through the plastic at a rate that depends on a variety of factors, such as diffusion coefficient and thickness of the plastic. In an incubator with appropriate concentration of CO2 and vented culture vessels, the gas permeability of the plastic is not important. When oocytes are transported outside a controlled atmosphere, gas permeability, toxicity, and oocyte cumulus cell CO2 metabolism could perturb the outcome. Medium containing bicarbonate buffer increases pH outside of a controlled atmosphere within minutes, whereas medium buffered with HEPES maintains suitable pH for hours. Previously, we tested that gas permeability differs among plastic vials and glass vials with no cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) by measuring pH after 2, 5, and 24h at the same temperature. The objective of this study was to compare pH post-maturation, blastocyst development rates on Day 8 post-IVF (Day 0=IVF) between 2 different 1.2-mL polypropylene cryovials (A: VWR DK, 479-1219; B: Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO, USA, CLS430289), glass vial (VWR DK, NSCAC4015-96), and 4-well plate (4WP) as control (Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, MA, USA, 144444). A total of 1135 abattoir-derived COC in Exp. 1 and 133 in Exp. 2 were divided equally between the treatments (20-25 COC per vessel). Vials/4WP contained 0.8/0.5mL of BO-IVM HEPES, a HEPES/bicarbonate medium (IVF Bioscience; BO-HEPES-IVM, UK). Maturation lasted 22 to 24h at 38.8°C in an incubator with either a humidified atmosphere of 5.5% CO2 in air (Exp. 1) or with no CO2 contact (Exp. 2). In Exp. 1, oocyte vials were matured without a vial lid while in Exp. 2 vial lids were closed. Statistical analysis was performed with chi-square and mean±SD. In Exp

  11. The Joint Commission cracks down on vial misuse in hospitals.

    PubMed

    2014-08-01

    Unsafe injection practices with respect to the misuse and unsafe use of vials is being targeted by The Joint Commission (TJC). The accrediting agency has issued a Sentinel Event Alert, putting hospitals on notice that they need to take strong steps to insure that health care workers fully understand and are carrying out practices that protect patients from the dangers of vial misuse. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta, since 2001, at least 49 outbreaks related to the mishandling of injectable medical products have occurred, and during this time period, more than 150,000 patients have had to be notified to undergo blood-borne pathogen testing because of their potential exposure to unsafe injections. TJC cites a survey of 5,446 health care practitioners, which reveals significant gaps in basic infection control practices related to vial use. Experts suggest vial misuse is often due to a lack of understanding of how to apply safe injection practices. To make improvements, experts recommend that hospital administrators first take steps to observe what is happening in their care environments, and then develop targeted action plans.

  12. Residual volume in vials of antibiotics used in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Caroline Magna Pessoa; Bezerra, Carolina Martins; Lima, Francisca Elisângela Teixeira; Cardoso, Maria Vera Lúcia Moreira Leitão; Fonseca, Said Gonçalves da Cruz; Silva, Viviane Martins da

    2017-06-12

    Quantifying residual volume contained in vials of antibiotics used in pediatrics. This is an experiment involving samples from vials of antibiotics used in a pediatric hospital. Residual volume was identified by calculating the difference in weight measurement before and after the vials were washed. Evaluation of the residual volume difference in the vials was determined by the Wilcoxon non-parametric test for a sample and established at a significance level of 5%. 105 samples of antibiotics were selected. The correct use of the antibiotics oxacillin (88.57%) and ceftriaxone (94.28%) predominated with low residual values. The same did not occur for procaine benzylpenicillin + potassium benzylpenicillin, since a greater residual volume was discarded in 74.28% of the vials. We highlight the need for improvements in managing antibiotics in the institution under study, so that the excess volume of the antibiotics in the vials is used within the acceptable stable time. It is also necessary that the disposal of the residual volume be adequately disposed, since it presents a risk to public health and the environment. Quantificar o volume residual contido em frascos-ampola de antibióticos utilizados na pediatria. Trata-se de um experimento com amostras de frascos-ampola de antibióticos utilizados em hospital pediátrico. O volume residual foi identificado calculando-se a diferença da aferição do peso antes e após a lavagem do frasco-ampola. A avaliação da diferença dos volumes residuais nos frascos-ampola foi determinada pelo teste não paramétrico de Wilcoxon para uma amostra e estabelecido o nível de significância de 5%. Foram selecionadas 105 amostras de antibióticos. Predominou o correto aproveitamento dos antibióticos oxacilina (88,57%) e ceftriaxona (94,28%), com baixos valores residuais. O mesmo não ocorreu com a benzilpenicilina procaína + potássica, pois em 74,28% dos frascos houve descarte de volume residual superior. Destaca-se a necessidade de

  13. Polyglycerol coatings of glass vials for protein resistance.

    PubMed

    Höger, Kerstin; Becherer, Tobias; Qiang, Wei; Haag, Rainer; Friess, Wolfgang; Küchler, Sarah

    2013-11-01

    Proteins are surface active molecules which undergo non-specific adsorption when getting in contact with surfaces such as the primary packaging material. This process is critical as it may cause a loss of protein content or protein aggregation. To prevent unspecific adsorption, protein repellent coatings are of high interest. We describe the coating of industrial relevant borosilicate glass vials with linear methoxylated polyglycerol, hyperbranched polyglycerol, and hyperbranched methoxylated polyglycerol. All coatings provide excellent protein repellent effects. The hyperbranched, non-methoxylated coating performed best. The protein repellent properties were maintained also after applying industrial relevant sterilization methods (≥200 °C). Marginal differences in antibody stability between formulations stored in bare glass vials and coated vials were detected after 3 months storage; the protein repellent effect remained largely stable. Here, we describe a new material suitable for the coating of primary packaging material of proteins which significantly reduces the protein adsorption and thus could present an interesting new possibility for biomedical applications.

  14. 78 FR 14095 - Determination That GEREF (Sermorelin Acetate) Injection, 0.5 Milligrams Base/Vial and 1.0...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Determination That GEREF (Sermorelin Acetate) Injection, 0.5 Milligrams Base/Vial and 1.0 Milligrams Base/Vial, and GEREF (Sermorelin Acetate) Injection, 0.05 Milligrams... (Sermorelin Acetate) ] injection, 0.5 milligrams (mg) base/vial and 1.0 mg base/vial, and GEREF (Sermorelin...

  15. Investigating factors leading to fogging of glass vials in lyophilized drug products.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Fattah, Ahmad M; Oeschger, Richard; Roehl, Holger; Bauer Dauphin, Isabelle; Worgull, Martin; Kallmeyer, Georg; Mahler, Hanns-Christian

    2013-10-01

    Vial "Fogging" is a phenomenon observed after lyophilization due to drug product creeping upwards along the inner vial surface. After the freeze-drying process, a haze of dried powder is visible inside the drug product vial, making it barely acceptable for commercial distribution from a cosmetic point of view. Development studies were performed to identify the root cause for fogging during manufacturing of a lyophilized monoclonal antibody drug product. The results of the studies indicate that drug product creeping occurs during the filling process, leading to vial fogging after lyophilization. Glass quality/inner surface, glass conversion/vial processing (vial "history") and formulation excipients, e.g., surfactants (three different surfactants were tested), all affect glass fogging to a certain degree. Results showed that the main factor to control fogging is primarily the inner vial surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity. While Duran vials were not capable of reliably improving the level of fogging, hydrophobic containers provided reliable means to improve the cosmetic appearance due to reduction in fogging. Varying vial depyrogenation treatment conditions did not lead to satisfying results in removal of the fogging effect. Processing conditions of the vial after filling with drug product had a strong impact on reducing but not eliminating fogging.

  16. How Vial Geometry Variability Influences Heat Transfer and Product Temperature During Freeze-Drying.

    PubMed

    Scutellà, Bernadette; Passot, Stéphanie; Bourlés, Erwan; Fonseca, Fernanda; Tréléa, Ioan Cristian

    2017-03-01

    Vial design features can play a significant role in heat transfer between the shelf and the product and, consequently, in the final quality of the freeze-dried product. Our objective was to investigate the impact of the variability of some geometrical dimensions of a set of tubing vials commonly used for pharmaceuticals production on the distribution of the vial heat transfer coefficients (Kv) and its potential consequence on product temperature. Sublimation tests were carried out using pure water and 8 combinations of chamber pressure (4-50 Pa) and shelf temperature (-40°C and 0°C) in 2 freeze-dryers. Kv values were individually determined for 100 vials located in the center of the shelf. Vial bottom curvature depth and contact area between the vial and the shelf were carefully measured for 120 vials and these data were used to calculate Kv distribution due to variability in vial geometry. At low pressures commonly used for sensitive products (below 10 Pa), the vial-shelf contact area appeared crucial for explaining Kv heterogeneity and was found to generate, in our study, a product temperature distribution of approximately 2°C during sublimation. Our approach provides quantitative guidelines for defining vial geometry tolerance specifications and product temperature safety margins.

  17. Economic Impact of Converting from Pen and 10-mL Vial to 3-mL Vial for Insulin Delivery in a Hospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Elizabeth, Eby; Smolen, Lee; Pitts, Amber; Krueger, Linda A; Grimm, Doneen

    2014-12-01

    To compare the impact on acquisition cost and purchased volume of rapid- and short-acting insulins following conversion from 3-mL disposable pens and 10-mL vials to 3-mL vials for individual patient supply (IPS) in a hospital setting. On February 1, 2010, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center of Dignity Health in Phoenix, Arizona, converted from pens to 3-mL vials for IPS subcutaneous (SC) injection and from 10-mL short-acting insulin vials to 3-mL vials for intravenous (IV) preparation. Pharmacy purchasing data were analyzed over 6-month periods before and after conversion (March 1 through August 31, 2009, and March 1 through August 31, 2010). Before conversion, acquisition costs were $27,866 for 5,335 mL of rapid-acting insulins and $53,336 for 26,310 mL of short-acting insulins. After conversion, insulin acquisition costs were $24,211 for 5,850 mL of rapid-acting insulins (13.1% decrease in costs, 9.7% rise in volume), with cost reduction attributable to the lower cost of 3-mL vials. Acquisition costs were $17,395 for 14,700 mL of short-acting insulins after conversion (67.4% decrease in costs, 44.1% reduction in volume), with cost reduction attributable to lower cost of 3-mL vials versus pens for IPS SC injections and 10-mL vials for IV preparation. The reduction in purchased volumes of short-acting insulins may be partly due to decreased insulin use in IV preparation. Conversion from pens and 10-mL vials to 3-mL vials for rapid-and short-acting insulins resulted in reduced acquisition costs and decreased use of short-acting insulin in IV preparations.

  18. Contamination of multiple-dose vials in a veterinary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Sabino, Catherine V.; Weese, J Scott

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial contamination of multiple-dose saline bottles and medication vials in a veterinary teaching hospital was evaluated. Bacterial contamination was identified in 16/88 (18%) containers, with no difference in contamination between the large animal clinic, small animal clinic, and ruminant ambulatory clinic. Contamination of multiple-dose containers containing substances for injection was common, and potential pathogens were present in many situations. While the clinical significance is not resolved at this point, infection control practices should address this potential source of nosocomial infection. PMID:16933556

  19. Antithrombin III Doses Rounded to Available Vial Sizes in Critically Ill Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stockton, Winifred M.; Padilla-Tolentino, Eimeira

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Children have decreased levels of antithrombin III (AT III) compared to adults. These levels may be further decreased during acute illness. Administration of exogenous AT III can increase anticoagulant efficacy. The objective of this study was to evaluate AT III doses rounded to available vial sizes compared to partial vial doses in critically ill pediatric patients, including patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). METHOD This retrospective review evaluated pediatric patients 0–18 years of age admitted to a 24-bed medical/surgical pediatric intensive care unit between June 1, 2012, and December 31, 2014, who received plasma-derived AT III. Patients received unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, or no anticoagulation. This review included patients who received ECMO and CRRT. RESULTS Eighty doses of AT III were administered to 24 patients (38 full vial size doses and 42 partial vial size doses). The AT III level following dose administration was ≥80% for 26 full vial doses (70%) and 16 partial vial doses (41%; p = 0.010). For patients who received multiple doses of AT III, the median time between doses was 45 hours following full vial doses, and 23 hours following partial vial doses (p = 0.011). Seven patients (29%) had documentation of new or increased bleeding. The median waste prevented from rounding doses to full vial sizes was 363 units. CONCLUSIONS After receiving AT III doses rounded to full vial sizes, patients were more likely to have a therapeutic AT III level and a longer interval between administrations. Rounding AT III doses to full vial sizes reduces waste and can result in cost savings.

  20. Analysis of pressurization of plutonium oxide storage vials during a postulated fire

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.; Kesterson, M.; Hensel, S.

    2015-02-10

    The documented safety analysis for the Savannah River Site evaluates the consequences of a postulated 1000 °C fire in a glovebox. The radiological dose consequences for a pressurized release of plutonium oxide powder during such a fire depend on the maximum pressure that is attained inside the oxide storage vial. To enable evaluation of the dose consequences, pressure transients and venting flow rates have been calculated for exposure of the storage vial to the fire. A standard B vial with a capacity of approximately 8 cc was selected for analysis. The analysis compares the pressurization rate from heating and evaporation of moisture adsorbed onto the plutonium oxide contents of the vial with the pressure loss due to venting of gas through the threaded connection between the vial cap and body. Tabulated results from the analysis include maximum pressures, maximum venting velocities, and cumulative vial volumes vented during the first 10 minutes of the fire transient. Results are obtained for various amounts of oxide in the vial, various amounts of adsorbed moisture, different vial orientations, and different surface fire exposures.

  1. Lack of clinical relevance in routine final subcultures of radiometrically negative BACTEC blood culture vials

    SciTech Connect

    Plorde, J.J.; Carlson, L.G.; Dau, M.E.

    1982-11-01

    During a 38-month period, 10,106 blood specimens were received in the laboratory for culture. These were inoculated into 26,424 vials and processed using the BACTEC radiometric detection system. Of these vials, 1,914 were eventually found to be microbiologically positive. Isolates from 836 vials were judged to be contaminants. In the remaining 1,078 vials, growth was first detected visually or radiometrically in 1,062 and by final subculture in 16. Growth from these sixteen bottles represented 12 clinically significant bacteremic episodes in as many patients. In nine of these episodes, other culture vials from the same patient were positive radiometrically. Therefore, 358 of 361 (99.2%) bacteremic episodes were detected without the benefit of routine final subcultures. The three patients whose bacteremia was missed were diagnosed clinically and placed on appropriate therapy prior to the detection of the bacteremias by final subculture.

  2. Effectiveness of Needles Vial Adaptors and Blunt Cannulas for Drug Administration in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hailey, Melinda; Bayuse, Tina

    2009-01-01

    The need for a new system of injectable medications aboard the International Space Station (ISS) was identified. It is desired that this system fly medications in their original manufacturer's packaging, allowing the system to comply with United States Pharmacopeia (USP) guidelines while minimizing the resupply frequency due to medication expiration. Pre-filled syringes are desired, however, the evolving nature of the healthcare marketplace requires flexibility in the redesign. If medications must be supplied in a vial, a system is required that allows for the safe withdrawal of medication from the vial into a syringe for administration in microgravity. During two reduced gravity flights, the effectiveness of two versions of a blunt cannula and needleless vial adaptors was evaluated to facilitate the withdrawal of liquid medication from a vial into a syringe for injection. Other parameters assessed included the ability to withdraw the required amount of medication and whether this is dependent on vial size, liquid, or the total volume of fluid within the vial. Injectable medications proposed for flight on ISS were used for this evaluation. Due to differing sizes of vials and the fluid properties of the medications, the needleless vial adaptors proved to be too cumbersome to recommend for use on the ISS. The blunt cannula, specifically the plastic version, proved to be more effective at removing medication from the various sizes of vials and are the recommended hardware for ISS. Fluid isolation within the vials and syringes is an important step in preparing medication for injection regardless of the hardware used. Although isolation is a challenge in the relatively short parabolas during flight, it is not an obstacle for sustained microgravity. This presentation will provide an overview of the products tested as well as the challenges identified during the microgravity flights.

  3. Effectiveness of Needles Vial Adaptors and Blunt Cannulas for Drug Administration in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hailey, Melinda; Bayuse, Tina

    2009-01-01

    The need for a new system of injectable medications aboard the International Space Station (ISS) was identified. It is desired that this system fly medications in their original manufacturer's packaging, allowing the system to comply with United States Pharmacopeia (USP) guidelines while minimizing the resupply frequency due to medication expiration. Pre-filled syringes are desired, however, the evolving nature of the healthcare marketplace requires flexibility in the redesign. If medications must be supplied in a vial, a system is required that allows for the safe withdrawal of medication from the vial into a syringe for administration in microgravity. During two reduced gravity flights, the effectiveness of two versions of a blunt cannula and needleless vial adaptors was evaluated to facilitate the withdrawal of liquid medication from a vial into a syringe for injection. Other parameters assessed included the ability to withdraw the required amount of medication and whether this is dependent on vial size, liquid, or the total volume of fluid within the vial. Injectable medications proposed for flight on ISS were used for this evaluation. Due to differing sizes of vials and the fluid properties of the medications, the needleless vial adaptors proved to be too cumbersome to recommend for use on the ISS. The blunt cannula, specifically the plastic version, proved to be more effective at removing medication from the various sizes of vials and are the recommended hardware for ISS. Fluid isolation within the vials and syringes is an important step in preparing medication for injection regardless of the hardware used. Although isolation is a challenge in the relatively short parabolas during flight, it is not an obstacle for sustained microgravity. This presentation will provide an overview of the products tested as well as the challenges identified during the microgravity flights.

  4. Economic Impact of Converting from Pen and 10-mL Vial to 3-mL Vial for Insulin Delivery in a Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Elizabeth, Eby; Smolen, Lee; Pitts, Amber; Krueger, Linda A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the impact on acquisition cost and purchased volume of rapid- and short-acting insulins following conversion from 3-mL disposable pens and 10-mL vials to 3-mL vials for individual patient supply (IPS) in a hospital setting. Methods: On February 1, 2010, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center of Dignity Health in Phoenix, Arizona, converted from pens to 3-mL vials for IPS subcutaneous (SC) injection and from 10-mL short-acting insulin vials to 3-mL vials for intravenous (IV) preparation. Pharmacy purchasing data were analyzed over 6-month periods before and after conversion (March 1 through August 31, 2009, and March 1 through August 31, 2010). Results: Before conversion, acquisition costs were $27,866 for 5,335 mL of rapid-acting insulins and $53,336 for 26,310 mL of short-acting insulins. After conversion, insulin acquisition costs were $24,211 for 5,850 mL of rapid-acting insulins (13.1% decrease in costs, 9.7% rise in volume), with cost reduction attributable to the lower cost of 3-mL vials. Acquisition costs were $17,395 for 14,700 mL of short-acting insulins after conversion (67.4% decrease in costs, 44.1% reduction in volume), with cost reduction attributable to lower cost of 3-mL vials versus pens for IPS SC injections and 10-mL vials for IV preparation. The reduction in purchased volumes of short-acting insulins may be partly due to decreased insulin use in IV preparation. Conclusion: Conversion from pens and 10-mL vials to 3-mL vials for rapid-and short-acting insulins resulted in reduced acquisition costs and decreased use of short-acting insulin in IV preparations. PMID:25673892

  5. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  6. 76 FR 36576 - Certain Flip-Top Vials and Products Using the Same; Notice of Institution of Investigation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... COMMISSION Certain Flip-Top Vials and Products Using the Same; Notice of Institution of Investigation... importation of certain flip-top vials and products using the same by reason of infringement of certain claims... importation of certain flip-top vials and products using the same that infringe one or more of claims 1-5...

  7. Glass delamination: a comparison of the inner surface performance of vials and pre-filled syringes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianxiu; Lavalley, Virginie; Mangiagalli, Paolo; Wright, Justin M; Bankston, Theresa E

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of glass delamination is a serious concern for parenteral drug products. Over the past several years, there has been a series of product recalls involving glass delamination in parenteral drugs stored in vials which has led to heightened industry and regulatory scrutiny. In this study, a two-pronged approach was employed to assess the inner surface durability of vials and pre-filled syringes. Non-siliconized syringes were used in order to directly compare glass to glass performance between vials and syringes. The vial and syringe performance was screened with pharmaceutically relevant formulation conditions. The influence of pH, buffer type, ionic strength, and glass type and source was evaluated. In addition, an aggressive but discriminating formulation condition (glutaric acid, pH 11) was used to ascertain the impact of syringe processing. Advanced analytical tools including inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and dynamic secondary ion mass spectroscopy showed significant differences in glass performance between vials and syringes. Pre-filled syringes outperform vials for most tests and conditions. The manufacturing conditions for vials lead to glass defects, not found in pre-filled syringes, which result in a less chemically resistant surface. The screening methodology presented in this work can be applied to assess suitability of primary containers for specific drug applications.

  8. Determining the optimal vaccine vial size in developing countries: a Monte Carlo simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Dhamodharan, Aswin; Proano, Ruben A

    2012-09-01

    Outreach immunization services, in which health workers immunize children in their own communities, are indispensable to improve vaccine coverage in rural areas of developing countries. One of the challenges faced by these services is how to reduce high levels of vaccine wastage. In particular, the open vial wastage (OVW) that result from the vaccine doses remaining in a vial after a time for safe use -since opening the vial- has elapsed. This wastage is highly dependent on the choice of vial size and the expected number of participants for which the outreach session is planned (i.e., session size). The use single-dose vials results in zero OVW, but it increases the vaccine purchase, transportation, and holding costs per dose as compared to those resulting from using larger vial sizes. The OVW also decreases when more people are immunized in a session. However, controlling the actual number of people that show to an outreach session in rural areas of developing countries highly depends on factors that are out of control of the immunization planners. This paper integrates a binary integer-programming model to a Monte Carlo simulation method to determine the choice of vial size and the optimal reordering point level to implement an (nQ, r, T) lot-sizing policy that provides the best tradeoff between procurement costs and wastage.

  9. Topological structure and chemical composition of inner surfaces of borosilicate vials.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenbach, Monica S; Reimann, Peter; Thommen, Verena; Hegner, Martin; Mumenthaler, Marco; Schwob, Jacky; Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    2004-01-01

    The use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is described to characterize the inner surfaces of pharmaceutical vials. The two type I borosilicate glasses included in this study slightly differ in their amounts of alkaline oxides. The topography and chemistry of the inner surfaces of vials are predominantly caused by the forming process. A structural and chemical modification of the inner surface of vials was also observed when exposing the surface to different pH conditions and special treatment like washing and sterilization, which are routine operation steps during galenical manufacturing.

  10. Bacterial contamination of propofol vials used in operating rooms of a third-level hospital.

    PubMed

    Zorrilla-Vaca, Andrés; Escandón-Vargas, Kevin; Brand-Giraldo, Vanessa; León, Tatiana; Herrera, Mónica; Payán, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    We found a 6.1% bacterial contamination rate among 198 propofol vials collected after clinical use in 12 operating rooms of a high-complexity hospital in Cali, Colombia. Some propofol vials were used for extended periods (up to 72 hours), and only 26.1% of vials were punctured once. Median time of use, although not statistically significant, was higher in positive samples (7.2 vs 3.5 hours, P = .08). Education on the topic should stress that vials are single-patient use and must be immediately discarded after use. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nondestructive detection of glass vial inner surface morphology with differential interference contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zai-Qing; Torraca, Gianni; Masatani, Peter; Sloey, Christopher; Phillips, Joseph

    2012-04-01

    Glass particles generated by glass dissolution and delamination of the glass container for pharmaceutical products have become a major issue in the pharmaceutical industry. The observation of glass particles in certain injectable drugs, including several protein therapeutics, has recently resulted in a number of product recalls. Glass vial surface properties have been suggested to play a critical role in glass dissolution and delamination. Surface characterization of glass container, therefore, is important to evaluate the quality of the glass container. In this work, we demonstrate that differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is a powerful, effective, and convenient technique to examine the inner surface morphology of glass vials nondestructively. DIC microscopy does not require the cutting of the glass vial for scanning the inner surface and has sufficient spatial resolution to reveal glass pitting, phase separation, delamination scars, and other defects. Typical surface morphology of pharmaceutical glass vials with different alkalinity are compared and discussed. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Detection of OXA-370 directly from rectal swabs and blood culture vials using an immunochromatographic assay.

    PubMed

    Nodari, Carolina Silva; Gales, Ana Cristina; Barth, Afonso Luís; Magagnin, Cibele Massotti; Zavascki, Alexandre Prehn; Carvalhaes, Cecília Godoy

    2017-08-01

    We evaluated the performance of OXA-48 K-SeT assay for detecting OXA-370 directly from spiked rectal swabs and blood culture vials. The limit of detection of this test was 10(4)UFC/mL for rectal swabs. Detection of the OXA-370-producing isolates was successfully achieved directly from positive blood culture vials independent of growing conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Intravitreal bevacizumab: safety of multiple doses from a single vial for consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Ng, Danny S; Kwok, Alvin K H; Chan, Clement W; Li, Walton W T

    2012-12-01

    To report the incidence of endophthalmitis after intravitreal injection of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor and the safety profile of multiple doses of bevacizumab from the same vial reused for multiple patients. Case series. A private hospital in Hong Kong. A systematic retrospective review of consecutive intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injections between 5 June 2006 and 17 December 2010 at a single institute was conducted. Patients were identified from prospectively designed audit forms, and each patient's medical record was reviewed for any documented complications. Bevacizumab 1.25 mg/0.05 mL to 2.50 mg/0.1 mL was aspirated from the designated vial, with a maximum of 10 consecutive injections being aspirated from the same vial. The opened vial was then discarded without overnight storage. Ranibizumab was aspirated from the commercially available 1 mg/0.1 mL single-use vial. A total of 1655 intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injections into 392 eyes of 383 patients were evaluated during the study period. There were 1184 bevacizumab injections and 471 ranibizumab injections. There was one case of suspected endophthalmitis after ranibizumab injection, though culture of the vitreous tap was negative. The point prevalence of endophthalmitis was 0.06% (1/1655) for the total number of injections: 0.21% (1/471) after ranibizumab, and 0% after bevacizumab. Although many centres aliquot multiple syringes from a single vial to be kept in a refrigerator for use, the current study shows that so long as proper sterile techniques are implemented, there were no cases of endophthalmitis from using the same vial, which was reused for a maximum of 10 consecutive injections. For intravitreal injection, bevacizumab costs approximately US$50 to US$100 per dose, as opposed to US$2000 per dose for ranibizumab. Sharing multiple doses of bevacizumab from a single vial can substantially reduce the cost of treatment.

  14. Inaccuracy in the doses of injectable medications dispensed from rubber-stoppered vials.

    PubMed

    Berger, S A; Porat, R; Gorea, A

    1989-01-01

    The literature of pharmacology often assumes that a full dosage is utilized when the contents of a vial have been administered by syringe. Five hundred discarded medication vials were assayed. The residues amounted to 1.98% to 8.81% of the listed dosages. An additional 0.7% to 8.66% remained in the syringes and needles used to aspirate the vials. Routine preparation techniques do not recover medication trapped on glass and rubber surfaces; losses are greatest when small diluent volumes are added to prepare intramuscular injections. The mean dose of gentamicin recovered from 80-mg ampules was 78.65 mg, and comparable vials of tobramycin yielded 76.01 mg. The discrepancy may contribute to the "increased toxicity" of gentamicin. Each year, more than $40,000,000 worth of antibiotics are lost to a biopharmaceutical dead space. Used antibiotic and controlled substance vials pose a potential threat to the environment. Although the amount of drug lost during preparation and administration may be of little therapeutic consequence, the discrepancy between intended and administered dosage is reflected in economic loss and pharmacological confusion. Pharmacological data should be adjusted for such losses. Medication wastage could be reduced by redesign of vials and alterations in practice of the administration.

  15. Effects of phosphate buffer in parenteral drugs on particle formation from glass vials.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Toru; Miyajima, Makoto; Wakiyama, Naoki; Terada, Katsuhide

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of inorganic particles generated in glass vials filled with phosphate buffer solutions were investigated. During storage, particles were visually detected in the phosphate buffer solution in particular glass vials which pass compendial tests of containers for injectable drugs. These particles were considered to be different from ordinal glass delamination, which has been reported in a number of papers because the particles were mainly composed of Al, P and O, but not Si. The formation of the particles accelerated at higher storage temperatures. Among the surface treatments tested for the glass vials, sulfur treatment showed a protective effect on the particle formation in the vials, whereas the SiO(2) coating did not have any protective effects. It was found that the elution ratio of Al and Si in the solution stored in the glass vials after the heating was similar to the ratio of Al and Si in borosilicate glass. However, the Al concentration decreased during storage (5°C, 6 months), and consequently, particle formation was observed in the solution. Adding citrate, which is a chelating agent for Al, effectively suppressed the particle formation in the heated solution. When 50 ppb and higher concentrations of Al ion were added to the phosphate buffer solution, the formation of white particles containing Al, P and O was detected. It is suggested that a phosphate buffer solution in a borosilicate glass vial has the ability to form particles due to interactions with the Al that is eluted from the glass during storage.

  16. [Cytomegalovirus isolation by conventional cell culture and shell vial assay].

    PubMed

    Galiano, M C; Videla, C M; Sánchez Puch, S; Carballal, G

    2001-01-01

    In immunocompromised patients, diagnosis of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) active infection is of utmost importance for the initiation, monitoring and ending of antiviral therapy. Therefore, the presence of viral replication should be demonstrated. Isolation in tissue culture is one of the standard methods. The objective of the present paper was to compare two isolation procedures for CMV: conventional cell culture (CC) and rapid shell vial (SV) assay in human fibroblasts. A total of 584 clinical samples were studied between 1991 and 1998. CMV was isolated in 14.4% of the samples, 11.8% of which were positive by SV and 7.7% by CC. Out of 84 positive samples, concordance between both methods was observed in 36% of the cases. We found that 46% of the samples were positive only by SV, while 18% were positive only by CC. The average time required for obtaining the results by CC was 22.6 +/- 2.3 days. Out of the 69 samples positive by SV, 43% were already positive after 24 hours and the rest after 48 hours. These results indicate that SV was more sensitive and rapid than CC. The main advantage of CC, despite its time-consuming process, is the ability to recover the viral strain for both antiviral susceptibility phenotypical tests and strain characterization. Furthermore, in this study, absence of CC would have resulted in the loss of 18% of the positive diagnoses. In conclusion, simultaneous use of both methods is suggested in order to obtain a rapid result and the highest sensitivity.

  17. Application of Modified Shell Vial Culture Procedure for Arbovirus Detection

    PubMed Central

    Caceda, Edna R.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2007-01-01

    The isolation of arboviruses from patient's low titer sera can be difficult. Here we compared the detection efficiency of Dengue (DEN), Yellow Fever (YF), Saint Louis Encephalitis (SLE), West Nile (WN), Ilheus (ILH), Group C (GC), Oropouche (ORO), Mayaro (MAY) and Venezuela Encephalitis Equine (VEE) viruses using a Modified Shell Vial Culture (MSVC) protocol to a Standard Cell Culture (SCC) protocol. First the MSVC and SCC protocols were compared using five dilutions for each of the following stock viruses: DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, DEN-4, YF, SLE, WN, ILH, GC, ORO, MAY and VEE. Next, patients' original sera from which viruses (DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, YF, GC, ORO, MAY and VEE) had been previously isolated were compare by the two methods using five sera dilutions. In addition, seven sera that were positive for DEN-3 by RT-PCR and negative by SCC were processed by MSVC. The MSVC protocol was consistently 1-2 logs higher virus dilution more sensitive for virus detection than the SCC protocol for all stock Flaviviruses tested (DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, DEN-4, YF, SLE, WN and ILH). MSVC was equal to or one log more sensitive for virus detection than SCC for the stock Bunyaviruses (GC and ORO). For the stock Alphavirus MAY, MSVC was equally or one log more sensitive for virus detection than SCC, while for VEE SCC was equally or one log more sensitive for virus detection than MSVC. MSVC was consistently one to two sera dilutions more sensitive than SCC for the detection of Flaviviruses from patients' sera. Both methods were approximately equally sensitive for the detection of Bunyaviruses from patients' sera and equal or one dilution less sensitive for the detection of Alphaviruses from patients' sera. Additionally, MSVC detected DEN virus in five of seven DEN-3 RT-PCR positive, SCC negative patients' sera. PMID:17940598

  18. Application of modified shell vial culture procedure for arbovirus detection.

    PubMed

    Caceda, Edna R; Kochel, Tadeusz J

    2007-10-17

    The isolation of arboviruses from patient's low titer sera can be difficult. Here we compared the detection efficiency of Dengue (DEN), Yellow Fever (YF), Saint Louis Encephalitis (SLE), West Nile (WN), Ilheus (ILH), Group C (GC), Oropouche (ORO), Mayaro (MAY) and Venezuela Encephalitis Equine (VEE) viruses using a Modified Shell Vial Culture (MSVC) protocol to a Standard Cell Culture (SCC) protocol. First the MSVC and SCC protocols were compared using five dilutions for each of the following stock viruses: DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, DEN-4, YF, SLE, WN, ILH, GC, ORO, MAY and VEE. Next, patients' original sera from which viruses (DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, YF, GC, ORO, MAY and VEE) had been previously isolated were compare by the two methods using five sera dilutions. In addition, seven sera that were positive for DEN-3 by RT-PCR and negative by SCC were processed by MSVC. The MSVC protocol was consistently 1-2 logs higher virus dilution more sensitive for virus detection than the SCC protocol for all stock Flaviviruses tested (DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, DEN-4, YF, SLE, WN and ILH). MSVC was equal to or one log more sensitive for virus detection than SCC for the stock Bunyaviruses (GC and ORO). For the stock Alphavirus MAY, MSVC was equally or one log more sensitive for virus detection than SCC, while for VEE SCC was equally or one log more sensitive for virus detection than MSVC. MSVC was consistently one to two sera dilutions more sensitive than SCC for the detection of Flaviviruses from patients' sera. Both methods were approximately equally sensitive for the detection of Bunyaviruses from patients' sera and equal or one dilution less sensitive for the detection of Alphaviruses from patients' sera. Additionally, MSVC detected DEN virus in five of seven DEN-3 RT-PCR positive, SCC negative patients' sera.

  19. Mechanosynthesis of zinc ferrite in hardened steel vials: Influence of ZnO on the appearance of Fe(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Verdier, Thomas; Nachbaur, Virginie; Jean, Malick . E-mail: malick.jean@univ-rouen.fr

    2005-11-15

    Nanocrystalline ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel powders are synthesized by high-energy ball milling, starting from a powder mixture of hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and zincite (ZnO). The millings are performed under air using hardened steel vials and balls. X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectrometry are used to characterize the powders. A spinel phase begins to appear after 3 h of milling and the synthesis is achieved after 9 h. Phase transformation is accompanied by a contamination due to iron coming from the milling tools. A redox reaction is also observed between Fe(III) and metallic iron during milling, leading to a spinel phase containing some Fe(II). The mechanism for the appearance of this phase is studied: ZnO seems to have a non-negligeable influence on the synthesis, by creating an intermediate wuestite-type phase solid solution with FeO.

  20. Fill volume as an indicator of surface heterogeneity in glass vials for parenteral packaging.

    PubMed

    Kucko, Nathan W; Keenan, Tim; Coughlan, Aisling; Hall, Matthew M

    2013-06-01

    The chemical durability of glass vials for parenteral packaging is typically assessed by completely filling the vial with a medium of interest. This testing approach can mask the heterogeneous dissolution behavior of vials produced by conversion of glass tubing. In this study, the corrosion behavior of vials provided by four suppliers was evaluated as a function of fill volume. Vials were filled with incrementally increasing volumes of water for injection (WFI) up to near-maximum capacity and then autoclaved. The pH and levels of extracted ions were measured. The pH of autoclaved WFI generally increased for low fill volumes relative to pure WFI, presumably because of extraction of alkali from the heel region. The pH was found to generally decrease with increasing fill volume as the concentration of extractables was diluted. Analysis of dissolution profiles supports the altered surface chemistry of the heel region relative to the body. The results of this study demonstrate the potential limitations of conventional hydrolytic resistance tests and the susceptibility of the heel region to aqueous corrosion.

  1. Prediction of the acoustic and bubble fields in insonified freeze-drying vials.

    PubMed

    Louisnard, O; Cogné, C; Labouret, S; Montes-Quiroz, W; Peczalski, R; Baillon, F; Espitalier, F

    2015-09-01

    The acoustic field and the location of cavitation bubble are computed in vials used for freeze-drying, insonified from the bottom by a vibrating plate. The calculations rely on a nonlinear model of sound propagation in a cavitating liquid [Louisnard, Ultrason. Sonochem., 19, (2012) 56-65]. Both the vibration amplitude and the liquid level in the vial are parametrically varied. For low liquid levels, a threshold amplitude is required to form a cavitation zone at the bottom of the vial. For increasing vibration amplitudes, the bubble field slightly thickens but remains at the vial bottom, and the acoustic field saturates, which cannot be captured by linear acoustics. On the other hand, increasing the liquid level may promote the formation of a secondary bubble structure near the glass wall, a few centimeters below the free liquid surface. These predictions suggest that rather complex acoustic fields and bubble structures can arise even in such small volumes. As the acoustic and bubble fields govern ice nucleation during the freezing step, the final crystal's size distribution in the frozen product may crucially depend on the liquid level in the vial.

  2. Effects of subzero temperature exposure and supercooling on glass vial breakage: risk management and other applications in cold chain distribution.

    PubMed

    Chow, Ernest J; Kitaguchi, Ben; Trier, Michael

    2012-01-01

    During the distribution of temperature-sensitive products (cold chain distribution), unintentional exposure of typical glass drug vials to subzero (below 0 °C) temperatures introduces potential risks of glass vial breakage during freeze (as well as thaw) and potential destabilizing effects of any biologic or pharmaceutical contained within. Vial breakage during freezing not only leads to product loss, but also to potential safety/sterility issues. This paper focuses on the physical aspects of tested glass vials as well as thermodynamic behaviors observed (specifically supercooling) in liquid product. In this study, filled glass vials varying from 5 to 500 mL were subjected to specific temperature levels (-15, -10, and -6 °C) in controlled chambers. Thermocouples were used to record temperatures within various probed vials and the ambient temperature of the controlled chamber. Vials were visually inspected for cracks/fractures after every cycle of conditioning. Samples of the cracked and non-cracked vials were sent to a third party glass analysis laboratory for further observations. This study provides insight into the physical impact of exposing filled glass vials to subzero temperatures for short durations commonly observed during cold chain distribution.

  3. Adsorption of (99m)Tc-radiopharmaceuticals onto injection vials and syringes.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Ahmad; Ur Rehman, Taj; Safdar Mansur, Muhammad; Jehangir, Mustanser

    2008-06-01

    Many groups have reported the adsorption or retention of (99m)Tc-radiopharmaceuticals on injection vials and disposable plastic syringes. Such an enormously high loss of radioactivity would result in poor images, radiation exposure, waste, and economic burdens. We therefore decided to investigate the extent of adsorption or retention of several (99m)Tc-radiopharmaceuticals on injection vials, rubber stoppers, and plastic syringes. These radiopharmaceuticals are produced as lyophilized kits in our department and supplied to various hospitals practicing nuclear medicine in Pakistan. A vial containing lyophilized material was reconstituted with 3 mL of freshly eluted Na(99m)TcO(4). A 1-mL aliquot of the resulting solution was withdrawn into a syringe at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 3, and 5 h after preparation. All preparations were stored at room temperature ( approximately 22 degrees C). After each withdrawal, the vial was reweighed and the activity remaining in the vial was measured using a radioisotope calibrator. The sample was reinjected into the vial. From the original weight and activity of solution in the vial, the initial activity per gram was calculated. From the weight and activity remaining in the vial after withdrawal of the sample, the activity per gram of the sample was calculated. From the difference between the initial activity per gram and the activity per gram of the sample, the percentage of (99m)Tc adsorbed on the vial was calculated. All preparations were kept in the syringe for 15 min, and the activity was measured before and after the syringe was emptied. The needle and plunger of the syringe were separated, and activity in the needle and plunger was also measured. The labeling efficiency of all radiopharmaceuticals used during these studies was more than 95%. In most cases, the activity of (99m)Tc found on the rubber stopper was less than 1%. Adsorption of (99m)Tc onto vials increased gradually with storage time. Adsorption was minimal at the initial stages

  4. Self-sealing capacity of vial stoppers after multiple needle punctures.

    PubMed

    Ponto, James A

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the self-sealing capacity of vial stoppers in two common radiopharmaceuticals after more than 10 needle punctures. Assessment of self-sealing capacity was performed according to the self-sealing capacity test described in United States Pharmacopeial Convention (USP) General Chapter <381>. Groups of 10 vials of technetium (Tc)-99m sulfur colloid and Tc-99m tetrofosmin were tested for maintenance of self-sealing capacity following 10 punctures with 22-, 20-, and 18-gauge needles. Each vial was sequentially retested after additional sets of 10 punctures until failure of self-sealing capacity or until a total of 100 punctures, whichever came first. The median number of needle punctures with maintenance of self-sealing ability before failure for 22-, 20-, and 18-gauge needles was >100 (range all >100), >100 (all >100), and 60 (30-90), respectively, for sulfur colloid and >100 (all >100), >100 (50 to >100), and 50 (20-70), respectively, for tetrofosmin. Incidentally, coring particles were observed frequently in vials after many punctures with 18-gauge needles, but infrequently with 20-gauge and rarely with 22-gauge needles. Vial stoppers in two radiopharmaceutical products demonstrated robust self-sealing capacity, substantially exceeding the USP standard of 10 punctures with a 21-gauge needle. Coring particles were frequently observed after many punctures when using larger-bore needles but rarely when using smaller-bore needles. Under conditions commonly used, failure of self-sealing capacity and generation of coring particles are not anticipated to be problems encountered when puncturing vial stoppers of these two products substantially more than 10 times.

  5. Evaluating Sterility of Single Dose Vials on an Automated Compounding Device.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Hannah M; Sayre, Brian E; Prettyman, Terrence; King, Erica

    2017-04-01

    Background: Current guidelines for sterile compounding require that single dose vials of pharmaceuticals must be discarded after 6 hours when accessed in an ISO Class 5 environment. At this time, no studies have evaluated the sterility of single dose vials at any time after opening. Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the sterility of single dose vials attached to an automated compounding device for up to 24 hours and accessed and maintained within a cleanroom environment. Methods: This is a prospective, observational study evaluating the sterility of 32 pooled samples of manufactured single dose injectable drugs attached to an automated compounding device for up to 24 hours and maintained within an ISO Class 5 environment in an ISO Class 7 buffer area. Each pooled sample was comprised of the remaining contents of 10 single dose vial additives that were used for total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and attached to the compounder within the previous 24 hours. Samples were evaluated using membrane filtration sterility testing and incubated for 14 days per USP <71> requirements. Results: The results revealed zero failed sterility samples. Single dose vials remained attached to the compounder for an average of 23.8 hours (±0.1 hours). The average volume per sample was 879 mL (±105.1 mL). Manipulation of vials during the compounding process included an average of 20.4 manipulations (±1.4). Conclusions: Single dose injectable drugs attached to an automated compounding device within an ISO Class 5 cleanroom environment may remain sterile for up to 24 hours. Future studies are needed with a larger sample size and under continued dynamic working conditions to provide further evidence to extend the beyond use date within USP <797>.

  6. Clinical and economic outcomes among patients with diabetes mellitus initiating insulin glargine pen versus vial.

    PubMed

    Grabner, Michael; Chu, James; Raparla, Swetha; Quimbo, Ralph; Zhou, Steve; Conoshenti, Joseph

    2013-05-01

    Insulin pens may help patients reach glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) target levels, but a substantial proportion of patients continue to use insulin vials/syringes. The objective of the current study was to evaluate real-world clinical and economic outcomes of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) initiating insulin glargine via pen delivery (pen) or vial/syringe (vial) within a large managed-care population in the United States. This retrospective administrative claims study used data on adult, insulin-naïve patients with T2DM treated with ≥ 1 oral antidiabetic or glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist at baseline. The index date was the earliest pen or vial prescription date. Propensity score matching (1:1) of patients in the pen and vial cohorts was used when comparing 1-year outcomes, including treatment persistence and adherence, HbA1c levels, hypoglycemia rates, and all-cause and diabetes-related health care costs (computed as paid amounts on claims). Patients in the matched cohorts (n = 733 per cohort) were well balanced with regard to demographics (mean age 52 years; 43% women), clinical measures (mean HbA1c level, 9.4%; mean Quan-Modified Charlson Comorbidity Index score, 0.9), and health care utilization at baseline. Following initiation of insulin glargine, pen patients were more persistent (60.6% vs 50.1%; P < 0.001) and adherent (medication possession ratio, 0.73 vs 0.57; P < 0.001), with lower HbA1c levels during follow-up (mean adjusted change, -1.05 vs -0.73; P < 0.001), compared with vial patients. Hypoglycemic events occurred at similar rates across pen and vial cohorts (3.8% vs 5.2%, respectively; P = 0.21). Study drug costs were higher among pen users ($1164 vs $762, respectively; P < 0.001), but this did not translate into higher total all-cause or diabetes-related costs. For patients with diabetes newly initiating insulin glargine, using an insulin pen device was associated with increased therapy persistence and adherence, and lower

  7. Comparison of Acid Titration, Conductivity, Flame Photometry, ICP-MS, and Accelerated Lamellae Formation Techniques in Determining Glass Vial Quality.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Kiyoshi; Lee, Hans; Sloey, Christopher; Ricci, Margaret S; Wen, Zai-Qing; Phillips, Joseph; Nashed-Samuel, Yasser

    2016-01-01

    Certain types of glass vials used as primary containers for liquid formulations of biopharmaceutical drug products have been observed with delamination that produced small glass like flakes termed lamellae under certain conditions during storage. The cause of this delamination is in part related to the glass surface defects, which renders the vials susceptible to flaking, and lamellae are formed during the high-temperature melting and annealing used for vial fabrication and shaping. The current European Pharmacopoeia method to assess glass vial quality utilizes acid titration of vial extract pools to determine hydrolytic resistance or alkalinity. Four alternative techniques with improved throughput, convenience, and/or comprehension were examined by subjecting seven lots of vials to analysis by all techniques. The first three new techniques of conductivity, flame photometry, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measured the same sample pools as acid titration. All three showed good correlation with alkalinity: conductivity (R(2) = 0.9951), flame photometry sodium (R(2) = 0.9895), and several elements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry [(sodium (R(2) = 0.9869), boron (R(2) = 0.9796), silicon (R(2) = 0.9426), total (R(2) = 0.9639)]. The fourth technique processed the vials under conditions that promote delamination, termed accelerated lamellae formation, and then inspected those vials visually for lamellae. The visual inspection results without the lot with different processing condition correlated well with alkalinity (R(2) = 0.9474). Due to vial processing differences affecting alkalinity measurements and delamination propensity differently, the ratio of silicon and sodium measurements from inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was the most informative technique to assess overall vial quality and vial propensity for lamellae formation. The other techniques of conductivity, flame photometry, and accelerated lamellae formation

  8. Environmental assessment for the scintillation vial crusher TA-54, Area L, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    Research and development projects conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory produce scintillation vials as waste from normal operations. These vials contain radioisotopes such as tritium, carbon-14, and isotopes of transuranic elements such as americium-241, plutonium-238 and -239. The scintillation fluids contain some solvents defined as hazardous waste. The vials are thus classed as mixed waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Laboratory has in storage some 520 drums of stored vials and is accumulating some 70 to 140 more drums annually. The drained vial fragments can be disposed of at TA-54 as low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The bulked liquid will be stored at TA-54 as RCRA mixed waste until treatment/disposal options are developed. Other waste from the vial crushing operation will also be stored at TA-54 as mixed waste. By operating the scintillation vial crusher, the storage space needed for this RCRA mixed waste stream can be reduced to about 5% of that currently being used. The other 95% will be vial fragments that can be disposed immediately as LLW.

  9. Calibration of the NPL secondary standard radionuclide calibrator for the new 10R Schott, type 1+ vials.

    PubMed

    Baker, M

    2005-07-01

    For many years, P6 vials have been used for the distribution of a wide range of diagnostic and therapeutic radioactive solutions. The activity measurements were performed in this geometry and, in time, the UK calibration system for nuclear medicine was based on this container as a standard. However, one major supplier of radiopharmaceuticals has replaced the P6 vial with the 10R Type 1+ Schott vial. As the dimensions of the new vial are different from those of the P6 vial and the responses of radionuclide calibrators are known to be container dependent, the need for re-calibration became apparent. Preliminary measurements made on some typical radionuclide calibrators for (125)I solution indicated a difference in response of about 10% between the two vials. The master ionisation chamber of the NPL secondary standard radionuclide calibrator has been re-calibrated and new calibration factors and volume correction factors for 10R Schott vials have been derived for the relevant medical radionuclides. The standard holder was also modified to accommodate the new larger vial. The complete list of factors and the method used to determine them is presented in this paper. The availability of these new factors will improve the quality of activity measurements in nuclear medicine, as calibration services can now be provided by NPL for the new container. These factors can also be employed for all commercial NPL secondary standard radionuclide calibrators (now known as the NPL-CRC and previously as the 671 or ISOCAL IV).

  10. 76 FR 58841 - In the Matter of Certain Flip-Top Vials and Products Using the Same; Notice of Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Flip-Top Vials and Products Using the Same; Notice of Commission Decision... importation, and sale within the United States after importation of certain flip-top vials and products...

  11. Measurement of shrinkage and cracking in lyophilized amorphous cakes, part 3: hydrophobic vials and the question of adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Sabine; Seyferth, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-06-01

    The importance of cake adhesion to the inside vial wall during lyophilization of amorphous trehalose cakes was determined by using hydrophobized vials. The degrees of cake shrinkage and cracking were determined independently by photographic imaging of the cake top surface in a dark cell. Additionally, measurements with microcomputed tomography were performed. Adhesion is found to be a determining factor in both cake shrinkage and cracking. The correlation between cake detachment from the vial inner wall and trehalose concentration indicates that adhesion of the frozen solute phase is a determining factor in shrinkage. The hydrophobized vials give reduced cracking at trehalose concentrations of up to 15%. The reduced wetting of the hydrophobized inside vial wall gives a planar cake topography with a uniform distribution of cracks within the cake.

  12. Single-dose versus multi-dose vaccine vials for immunization programmes in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Drain, Paul K.; Nelson, Carib M.; Lloyd, John S.

    2003-01-01

    Excessive vaccine wastage and safety concerns have prompted the international health community to develop and supply vaccines in formats other than the standard multi-dose vial. This article presents a programmatic and economic comparison of the major differences between the multi-dose vials and single-dose formats used for immunization services in developing countries. Multi-dose vials, in general, sell at a lower per-dose price and occupy less cold-chain capacity than single-dose formats. However, higher wastage rates may offset these benefits, especially for more expensive vaccines. Single-dose formats offer several important programmatic benefits, such as increased vaccination opportunities and improved vaccine safety. One single-dose format, the prefilled auto-disable (AD) device, provides additional injection safety and convenience features because it physically combines the vaccine and AD syringe. Selecting the appropriate vaccine presentation will depend on many factors. However, multi-dose vials are likely to be most appropriate for cheaper vaccines and in settings where cold-chain storage capacity is restricted. Single-dose formats will be most appropriate for more expensive vaccines and where there are problems with unsafe injection practices. Prefilled AD injection devices will be particularly useful in expanding outreach services while eliminating the possibility of needle reuse. PMID:14758432

  13. Direct in-vial collection for liquid-scintillation assay of carbon-14 and tritium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, L. G.; Kisieleski, W. E.

    1969-01-01

    Dissolution of biological materials combines the simplicity of oxygen-flask combustion with the reproducibility and purity of the final product, and convenience of direct in-vial collection of the sample by the sealed-tube method. It assures quantitative and reproducible recoveries.

  14. Aluminum elution and precipitation in glass vials: effect of pH and buffer species.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Toru; Miyajima, Makoto; Wakiyama, Naoki; Terada, Katsuhide

    2015-02-01

    Inorganic extractables from glass vials may cause particle formation in the drug solution. In this study, the ability of eluting Al ion from borosilicate glass vials, and tendencies of precipitation containing Al were investigated using various pHs of phosphate, citrate, acetate and histidine buffer. Through heating, all of the buffers showed that Si and Al were eluted from glass vials in ratios almost the same as the composition of borosilicate glass, and the amounts of Al and Si from various buffer solutions at pH 7 were in the following order: citrate > phosphate > acetate > histidine. In addition, during storage after heating, the Al concentration at certain pHs of phosphate and acetate buffer solution decreased, suggesting the formation of particles containing Al. In citrate buffer, Al did not decrease in spite of the high elution amount. Considering that the solubility profile of aluminum oxide and the Al eluting profile of borosilicate glass were different, it is speculated that Al ion may be forced to leach into the buffer solution according to Si elution on the surface of glass vials. When Al ions were added to the buffer solutions, phosphate, acetate and histidine buffer showed a decrease of Al concentration during storage at a neutral range of pHs, indicating the formation of particles containing Al. In conclusion, it is suggested that phosphate buffer solution has higher possibility of forming particles containing Al than other buffer solutions.

  15. Adult vial bioassays of insecticidal toxicity against cotton fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter) (Hemiptera: Miridae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glass vials coated with several technical insecticides were used to determine the contact toxicity of insecticides on adult laboratory-reared and field-collected cotton fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter). For the 17 insecticides evaluated for laboratory-reared cotton fleahoppers, bifent...

  16. Safety, sterility and stability of direct-from-vial multiple dosing intravitreal injection of bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Das, Taraprasad; Volety, Srinivas; Ahsan, Saad M; Thakur, Abhay K; Sharma, Savitri; Padhi, Tapas R; Basu, Soumyava; Rao, Ch Mohan

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to determine the stability, sterility and safety of bevacizumab multiple dosing from a single vial without prior aliquoting. In-vitro and human study. Six bevacizumab vials, used in multiple patients on a single day by direct withdrawal from the vial, and stored in 4°C up to a variable period, were tested for stability (high-performance liquid chromatography; [HPLC]), sterility (culture), conformational stability by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy and the rubber cork structural integrity (electron microscopy [EM]). HPLC of all six samples of used bevacizumab and the control bevacizumab sample were similar; culture was negative; and the EM of rubber corks did not show an open communication. Spectroscopic studies indicated drug conformational stability. Further, there was no infection or inflammation in 221 consecutive patients (973 injections) when bevacizumab was stored at 4°C and used for one week. Bevacizumab does not lose stability when stored at 4°C. It may be used for a week by direct withdrawal from the vial without fear of infection or inflammation if all standard precautions related to intravitreal injection are adhered to. © 2014 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  17. Health economics and compliance of vials/syringes versus pen devices: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Asche, Carl V; Shane-McWhorter, Laura; Raparla, Swetha

    2010-06-01

    The goal of this review was to assess the state of the published literature on health economics and compliance of vials/syringes versus pen devices. A literature search was performed using the Embase search engine for publications that linked drug terms (insulin and insulin lispro) to disease terms (insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus) and other terms (accuracy, article, clinical trial, controlled clinical trial, controlled study, cost benefit analysis, drug delivery system, drug dosage form, drug dosage form comparison, drug dose comparison, drug preference, equipment design, force, glycemic control, healthcare cost, human, insulin treatment, needle, patient attitude, patient compliance, patient safety, torque) along with author keywords (Diabetes, Dose accuracy, FlexPen [Novo Nordisk, Bagsvaerd, Denmark], Insulin, Next Generation FlexPen). The search yielded 39 articles, of which five articles met our study criteria. The focus of the critical outcomes was patient adherence to insulin pen devices versus insulin vials (syringes), hypoglycemic events, emergency department visits due to hypoglycemic events, and costs associated with diabetes and health care. The observation period, mean age of patients, and data sources differed across the studies. The studies indicated that there was an improved adherence with insulin pen devices as opposed to insulin vials (syringes) and that the associated healthcare resource utilization and costs associated with them were found to decrease with the use of pen devices, compared to vials. The use of pen devices improves the health economics benefits and adherence to insulin therapy.

  18. Shell Vial Cell Culture as a Tool for Streptobacillus moniliformis “Resuscitation”

    PubMed Central

    Loridant, Severine; Jaffar-Bandjee, Marie-Christine; Scola, Bernard La

    2011-01-01

    Streptobacillus moniliformis is a fastidious growing Gram-negative bacillus responsible of rat-bite fever. We describe here the first report of this disease in la Réunion and the first isolation using shell vial cell culture from a blood culture bottle with a bacterium suspected to be dead. PMID:21292904

  19. Impact of changing the measles vaccine vial size on Niger's vaccine supply chain: a computational model.

    PubMed

    Assi, Tina-Marie; Brown, Shawn T; Djibo, Ali; Norman, Bryan A; Rajgopal, Jayant; Welling, Joel S; Chen, Sheng-I; Bailey, Rachel R; Kone, Souleymane; Kenea, Hailu; Connor, Diana L; Wateska, Angela R; Jana, Anirban; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Van Panhuis, Willem G; Burke, Donald S; Lee, Bruce Y

    2011-06-02

    Many countries, such as Niger, are considering changing their vaccine vial size presentation and may want to evaluate the subsequent impact on their supply chains, the series of steps required to get vaccines from their manufacturers to patients. The measles vaccine is particularly important in Niger, a country prone to measles outbreaks. We developed a detailed discrete event simulation model of the vaccine supply chain representing every vaccine, storage location, refrigerator, freezer, and transport device (e.g., cold trucks, 4 × 4 trucks, and vaccine carriers) in the Niger Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). Experiments simulated the impact of replacing the 10-dose measles vial size with 5-dose, 2-dose and 1-dose vial sizes. Switching from the 10-dose to the 5-dose, 2-dose and 1-dose vial sizes decreased the average availability of EPI vaccines for arriving patients from 83% to 82%, 81% and 78%, respectively for a 100% target population size. The switches also changed transport vehicle's utilization from a mean of 58% (range: 4-164%) to means of 59% (range: 4-164%), 62% (range: 4-175%), and 67% (range: 5-192%), respectively, between the regional and district stores, and from a mean of 160% (range: 83-300%) to means of 161% (range: 82-322%), 175% (range: 78-344%), and 198% (range: 88-402%), respectively, between the district to integrated health centres (IHC). The switch also changed district level storage utilization from a mean of 65% to means of 64%, 66% and 68% (range for all scenarios: 3-100%). Finally, accounting for vaccine administration, wastage, and disposal, replacing the 10-dose vial with the 5 or 1-dose vials would increase the cost per immunized patient from $0.47US to $0.71US and $1.26US, respectively. The switch from the 10-dose measles vaccines to smaller vial sizes could overwhelm the capacities of many storage facilities and transport vehicles as well as increase the cost per vaccinated child.

  20. Impact of changing the measles vaccine vial size on Niger's vaccine supply chain: a computational model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many countries, such as Niger, are considering changing their vaccine vial size presentation and may want to evaluate the subsequent impact on their supply chains, the series of steps required to get vaccines from their manufacturers to patients. The measles vaccine is particularly important in Niger, a country prone to measles outbreaks. Methods We developed a detailed discrete event simulation model of the vaccine supply chain representing every vaccine, storage location, refrigerator, freezer, and transport device (e.g., cold trucks, 4 × 4 trucks, and vaccine carriers) in the Niger Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). Experiments simulated the impact of replacing the 10-dose measles vial size with 5-dose, 2-dose and 1-dose vial sizes. Results Switching from the 10-dose to the 5-dose, 2-dose and 1-dose vial sizes decreased the average availability of EPI vaccines for arriving patients from 83% to 82%, 81% and 78%, respectively for a 100% target population size. The switches also changed transport vehicle's utilization from a mean of 58% (range: 4-164%) to means of 59% (range: 4-164%), 62% (range: 4-175%), and 67% (range: 5-192%), respectively, between the regional and district stores, and from a mean of 160% (range: 83-300%) to means of 161% (range: 82-322%), 175% (range: 78-344%), and 198% (range: 88-402%), respectively, between the district to integrated health centres (IHC). The switch also changed district level storage utilization from a mean of 65% to means of 64%, 66% and 68% (range for all scenarios: 3-100%). Finally, accounting for vaccine administration, wastage, and disposal, replacing the 10-dose vial with the 5 or 1-dose vials would increase the cost per immunized patient from $0.47US to $0.71US and $1.26US, respectively. Conclusions The switch from the 10-dose measles vaccines to smaller vial sizes could overwhelm the capacities of many storage facilities and transport vehicles as well as increase the cost per vaccinated child. PMID

  1. Extraction technique for the determination of oxygen-18 in water using preevacuated glass vials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, R. A.; Karlsson, H. R.; Gibson, E. K. Jr; Gibson EK, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The need for a rapid, inexpensive technique for routine 18O/16O extraction from water has arisen recently through applications in the medical sciences and in hydrology. The traditional experimental technique for determining the oxygen isotope composition of water, the CO2-H2O equilibration method, is tedious, time consuming, and involves the use of custom-made glass apparatus. Furthermore, because of potential memory effects from one sample to the next, the glassware needs to be thoroughly cleaned between runs. A few attempts have been made to improve upon the method. Attempts to analyze water directly in the source of the mass spectrometer produced large memory effects and questionable results. Commercially available apparatus for automated extraction of 18O/16O from water is generally prohibitively expensive and often is designed to interface only with the manufacturer's own mass spectrometer. The method described in this paper utilizes inexpensive, off-the-shelf, preevacuated, glass vials. Preevacuated vials have been used by others for the isotopic analysis of breath CO2 and are well tested. The vials can be purchased in bulk from scientific apparatus suppliers at a relatively low cost. These are coupled with a simplified extraction line consisting of a stainless steel syringe needle and a glass cold trap. Vials are filled with CO2 and H2O and shaken in a constant-temperature water bath for at least 90 min. Since the vials are discarded after use, no cleaning is necessary, essentially eliminating any memory effect. Reproducibility is generally better than +/- 0.05%. The only reagents required are gaseous CO2 for equilibration, a dry ice/alcohol mixture for trapping water, and liquid nitrogen for transferring the CO2.

  2. Extraction technique for the determination of oxygen-18 in water using preevacuated glass vials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, R. A.; Karlsson, H. R.; Gibson, E. K. Jr; Gibson EK, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The need for a rapid, inexpensive technique for routine 18O/16O extraction from water has arisen recently through applications in the medical sciences and in hydrology. The traditional experimental technique for determining the oxygen isotope composition of water, the CO2-H2O equilibration method, is tedious, time consuming, and involves the use of custom-made glass apparatus. Furthermore, because of potential memory effects from one sample to the next, the glassware needs to be thoroughly cleaned between runs. A few attempts have been made to improve upon the method. Attempts to analyze water directly in the source of the mass spectrometer produced large memory effects and questionable results. Commercially available apparatus for automated extraction of 18O/16O from water is generally prohibitively expensive and often is designed to interface only with the manufacturer's own mass spectrometer. The method described in this paper utilizes inexpensive, off-the-shelf, preevacuated, glass vials. Preevacuated vials have been used by others for the isotopic analysis of breath CO2 and are well tested. The vials can be purchased in bulk from scientific apparatus suppliers at a relatively low cost. These are coupled with a simplified extraction line consisting of a stainless steel syringe needle and a glass cold trap. Vials are filled with CO2 and H2O and shaken in a constant-temperature water bath for at least 90 min. Since the vials are discarded after use, no cleaning is necessary, essentially eliminating any memory effect. Reproducibility is generally better than +/- 0.05%. The only reagents required are gaseous CO2 for equilibration, a dry ice/alcohol mixture for trapping water, and liquid nitrogen for transferring the CO2.

  3. Comparative device assessments: Humalog KwikPen compared with vial and syringe and FlexPen.

    PubMed

    Ignaut, Debra A; Schwartz, Sherwyn L; Sarwat, Samiha; Murphy, Heather L

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare pen device-naïve patients' preferences for Humalog KwikPen (insulin lispro injection) (Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN) to use of a vial and syringe and FlexPen(R) (insulin aspart injection) (Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsvaerd, Denmark). This open-label, randomized, crossover 1-day study tested the hypotheses that KwikPen was preferred to vial and syringe, and if this was found to be a significant preference, that KwikPen was preferred to FlexPen. Accuracy of doses prepared, ease of use via insulin device assessment battery, and preference via insulin device preference battery were administered following each pen evaluation, and a final preference question administered following the evaluation of both pens. Clinical measures were not included as subjects injected into an appliance to simulate the injection experience. Primary outcome variables were evaluated by Question 13 of the insulin device preference battery and the final preference question. Among 232 enrolled patients randomized to 1 of 4 sequences (n = 58), Humalog KwikPen was significantly preferred over vial and syringe and over FlexPen. After patients were asked to assess Humalog KwikPen or FlexPen versus V&S by choosing "strongly agreed" or "agreed" to the following attributes: easy to use, easy to hold in their hands when injecting, and easy to press the injection button, the results exhibited significant differences in patient responses. Humalog KwikPen was significantly more accurate and was preferred to vial and syringe in appearance, quality, discretion, convenience, public use, easy to learn, easy to use, reliability, dose confidence, following insulin regimen, overall satisfaction, and recommendation to others. Humalog KwikPen was significantly preferred over vial and syringe and FlexPen. When compared with vial and syringe, Humalog KwikPen and FlexPen were easier to use and operate, demonstrated superior accuracy of doses prepared, and preferred by pen

  4. Consequences of not relieving negative internal pressure of a medication vial: A survey and simulation study.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Hiroko; Irie, Tomoya; Kawakami, Hiromasa; Miyashita, Tetsuya; Goto, Takahisa

    2017-02-01

    The glass vial of acetaminophen as an intravenous preparation (Acelio®, Terumo, Japan) has a strong internal negative pressure. The aim of our study was to determine if this negative pressure could result in medication administration errors if not released prior to connecting to the IV set. Questionnaire survey and simulation study. University hospital and its affiliated hospitals. Fifty-two anesthesiologists in 6 different hospitals in Yokohama. A questionnaire on current practice was sent to the subjects. The authors then first calculated the internal pressure of the Acelio® vial followed by a simulation set-up. This set-up measured the amount of saline that could be aspirated from a syringe loaded on a syringe pump connected via a secondary IV line when the Acelio® vial was attached to the primary line without prior release of the internal pressure. The volume of aspiration was tested with two syringe sizes and with a fully open IV clamp vs partially closed. Twenty-nine (56.9%) of 51 anesthesiologists who responded to the survey had connected the Acelio® vial at least once without releasing the internal negative pressure, and 21 experienced consequences such as backflow of the venous blood. The pressure inside the Acelio® vial was 81.8±19.6Torr. With the clamp of the simulated IV line fully open, the amount of saline aspirated before the alarm of the syringe pump went off was 1.5±0.1ml and 3.2±0.3ml when 20ml and 50ml syringes were used, respectively. When the clamp was partially closed to allow 2 drops per second, this value was 1.3±0.1ml and 2.3±0.1ml, respectively. After removing the plunger from the holder of the syringe pump, an additional 7ml (clamp partially closed) or 15-18ml (clamp fully open) was aspirated in the subsequent 1min. A considerable number of anesthesiologists experienced consequences caused by the negative pressure inside the Acelio® vial. This can also cause aspiration of the contents of the syringe pump. Copyright © 2016

  5. Improvements in and environmental applications of double-vial radiorespirometry for the study of microbial mineralization.

    PubMed

    McKinley, V L; Federle, T W; Vestal, J R

    1983-01-01

    Several variations in the scintillation mixture and the filter paper arrangements for double-vial radiorespirometry were compared. Improved efficiencies (44%) and shorter response times were found by adding wetting agents and methanolic NaOH to the scintillation mixture in the filter paper. The scintillation chemicals used did not contain dioxane and were found to be nontoxic to the test microbiota in this system. Covering the inner reaction vial with aluminum foil minimized the reduction in counting efficiency when testing colored or dense environmental samples. Mineralization rates were determined with C-labeled glucose, acetate, and glutamate and [C]cellulose- and [C]lignin-labeled lignocellulose for composting cow manure, forest soil, and arctic lake sediment microbiota. This improved method can be used in a variety of procedures involving the measurement of microbial mineralizations of organic compounds. Since no liquid scintillation cocktail is used for counting, the radioactive wastes are aqueous or can be incinerated, making disposal easy.

  6. In-Vial Temperature Gradient Headspace Single Drop Microextraction Designed by Multiphysics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Jahan, Sharmin; Zhang, Qiang; Pratush, Amit; Xie, Haiyang; Xiao, Hua; Fan, Liuyin; Cao, Chengxi

    2016-11-01

    Presented herein is a novel headspace single drop microextraction (HS-SDME) based on temperature gradient (TG) for an on-site preconcentration technique of volatile and semivolatile samples. First, an inner vial cap was designed as a cooling device for acceptor droplet in HS-SDME unit to achieve fast and efficient microextraction. Second, for the first time, an in-vial TG was generated between the donor phase in a sample vial at 80 °C and the acceptor droplet under the inner vial cap containing cooling liquid at -20 °C for a TG-HS-SDME. Third, a simple mathematic model and numerical simulations were developed by using heat transfer in fluids, Navier-Stokes and mass balance equations for conditional optimization, and dynamic illumination of the proposed extraction based on COMSOL Multiphysics. Five chlorophenols (CPs) were selected as model analytes to authenticate the proposed method. The comparisons revealed that the simulative results were in good agreement with the quantitative experiments, verifying the design of TG-HS-SDME via the numerical simulation. Under the optimum conditions, the extraction enrichments were improved from 302- to 388-fold within 2 min only, providing 3.5 to 4 times higher enrichment factors as compared to a typical HS-SDME. The simulation indicated that these improvements in the extraction kinetics could be attributed due to the applied temperature gap between the sample matrix and acceptor droplet within the small volume of headspace. Additionally, the experiments demonstrated a good linearity (0.03-100 μg/L, R(2) > 0.9986), low limit of detection (7-10 ng/L), and fair repeatability (<5.9% RSD, n = 6). All of the simulative and experimental results indicated the robustness, precision, and usefulness of TG-HS-SDME for trace analyses of analytes in a wide variety of environmental, pharmaceutical, food safety, and forensic samples.

  7. Economic evaluation of Viaflex with vial adapter in a unit-dose drug distribution system.

    PubMed

    Ortega, A; Robles, A; Lacasa, C; Elcarte, B; Giráldez, J

    1999-12-01

    The cost of parenteral admixtures has an important impact on the hospital budget. Recently, a Viaflex with vial adapter (named 'minibag plus' in some countries) has been commercialized in order to facilitate parenteral admixture preparation. In the present study a preparation using Viaflex with a vial adapter has been economically compared with a preparation with a traditional Viaflex (without adapter) in a centralized unit or in nursing wards in a unit-dose drug distribution system. A cost-analysis was conducted from the hospital point of view. Direct costs were considered: these included supplies and human resources. Differences in the whole process between the two types of Viaflex were analysed. The process included: purchasing, reception, storage, medical order record, preparation in the Pharmacy Service (PS), delivery from the PS to the nursing unit, preparation by the nurse, return of unused material to the PS. Human resource costs were estimated by time counting and multiplying by the average salary. To estimate wasted material, drug and supplies delivered from the PS and returned to the PS were counted during 26 days. With the new Viaflex costs are reduced by 30% in comparison with drug dilution using the traditional Viaflex in a centralized unit of the PS, and by 13.4% in comparison with preparation with the traditional Viaflex in the nursing ward. In addition it can be estimated that contamination risk with the new Viaflex is lower than preparation in the nursing ward with the traditional Viaflex. Therefore, owing to its lower cost we recommend the use of Viaflex with vial adapter for drug dilution for those vials that are compatible with the system.

  8. The pharmaceutical vial capping process: Container closure systems, capping equipment, regulatory framework, and seal quality tests.

    PubMed

    Mathaes, Roman; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Buettiker, Jean-Pierre; Roehl, Holger; Lam, Philippe; Brown, Helen; Luemkemann, Joerg; Adler, Michael; Huwyler, Joerg; Streubel, Alexander; Mohl, Silke

    2016-02-01

    Parenteral drug products are protected by appropriate primary packaging to protect against environmental factors, including potential microbial contamination during shelf life duration. The most commonly used CCS configuration for parenteral drug products is the glass vial, sealed with a rubber stopper and an aluminum crimp cap. In combination with an adequately designed and controlled aseptic fill/finish processes, a well-designed and characterized capping process is indispensable to ensure product quality and integrity and to minimize rejections during the manufacturing process. In this review, the health authority requirements and expectations related to container closure system quality and container closure integrity are summarized. The pharmaceutical vial, the rubber stopper, and the crimp cap are described. Different capping techniques are critically compared: The most common capping equipment with a rotating capping plate produces the lowest amount of particle. The strength and challenges of methods to control the capping process are discussed. The residual seal force method can characterize the capping process independent of the used capping equipment or CCS. We analyze the root causes of several cosmetic defects associated with the vial capping process.

  9. Multidose medication vial sterility: an in-use study and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Longfield, R; Longfield, J; Smith, L P; Hyams, K C; Strohmer, M E

    1984-04-01

    Contaminated multiple-dose medication vials (MDV) have been implicated in transmission of bacterial infections. It has been suggested that MDV be discarded after 24 hours or even after a single use. At our hospital, we cultured 1,223 weekly samples from 863 MDV in-use over a three-month period. Medications included xylocaine, insulin, heparin, immunizations, and miscellaneous agents. None of the samples was culture-positive. The duration of use was 9.5d (median), 18d (mean), and 1-402d (range) with 13% of vials in-use for more than 30 days. The mean duration of use was significantly shorter for medicine wards, emergency room, and outpatient clinics than for surgery and ob-gyn wards (p less than 0.05). Heparin and insulin MDV were in-use for significantly less time than xylocaine and miscellaneous agents (p less than 0.05), and insulin MDV were more regularly dated (p = 0.001). The percentage of undated MDV declined significantly by month during the study (p = 0.003). These results lend support to our current guideline that MDV should be dated upon opening and that, unless visible or suspected contamination occurs, vials are discarded either when empty or at the manufacturer's expiration date.

  10. Development of a standard gas generating vial comprised of a silicon oil-polystyrene/divinylbenzene composite sorbent.

    PubMed

    Grandy, Jonathan J; Gómez-Ríos, German A; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2015-09-04

    In this work, a highly reproducible standard gas generating vial is proposed. The vial is comprised of a silicon diffusion pump oil spiked with an appropriate calibration compound, such as modified McReynolds probes (benzene, 2-pentanone, pyridine, 1-nitropropane, 1-pentanol, and n-octane), and then mixed with polystyrene/divinylbenzene (PS/DVB) particles. The concentrations of these compounds in gaseous headspace were found to substantially decrease in comparison to previously developed hydrocarbon pump oil based vials; hence, the amount of standard loaded onto SPME fibers was at most, half that of the previous vial design. Depletion for all compounds after 208 successive extractions was shown to be less than 3.5%. Smaller quantities of standards being used resulted in a vial that depleted slower while remaining statistically repeatable over a wider number of runs. Indeed, it was found that depletion could be largely predicted by using a mass balance theoretical model. This behavior allowed a further increase in the number of loadings that could be performed repeatedly. At a 95% level of confidence, the ANOVA test demonstrated that the prepared vials were statistically identical, with no significant intra- or inter-batch differences. In addition, it was found that vials stored under different conditions (e.g. under light exposure, room temperature, and within a refrigerator) were stable over 10 weeks. Silicon based vials proved to be ideal for performing instrument quality control and loading of internal standards onto fibers, both of which are of great importance when performing on-site analysis using portable GC-MS instrumentation and high throughput determinations in laboratory.

  11. Sample vial inserts: A better approach for sampling heterogeneous slurry samples in the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, C.J.; Goode, S.R.

    1996-05-01

    A convenient and effective new approach for analyzing DWPF samples involves the use of inserts with volumes of 1.5--3 ml placed in the neck of 14 ml sample vials. The inserts have rims that conform to the rim of the vials so that they sit straight and stable in the vial. The DWPF tank sampling system fills the pre-weighed insert rather than the entire vial, so the vial functions only as the insert holder. The shielded cell operator then removes the vial cap and decants the insert containing the sample into a plastic bottle, crucible, etc., for analysis. Inert materials such as Teflon, plastic, and zirconium are used for the insert so it is unnecessary to separate the insert from the sample for most analyses. The key technique advantage of using inserts to take DWPF samples versus filling sample vials is that it provides a convenient and almost foolproof way of obtaining and handling small volumes of slurry samples in a shielded cell without corrupting the sample. Since the insert allows the entire sample to be analyzed, this approach eliminates the errors inherent with subsampling heterogeneous slurries that comprise DWPF samples. Slurry samples can then be analyzed with confidence. Analysis times are dramatically reduced by eliminating the drying and vitrification steps normally used to produce a homogeneous solid sample. Direct dissolution and elemental analysis of slurry samples are achieved in 8 hours or less compared with 40 hours for analysis of vitrified slurry samples. Comparison of samples taken in inserts versus full vials indicate that the insert does not significantly affect sample composition.

  12. Assessment of adherence and healthcare costs of insulin device (FlexPen) versus conventional vial/syringe.

    PubMed

    Baser, Onur; Bouchard, Jonathan; DeLuzio, Tony; Henk, Henry; Aagren, Mark

    2010-02-01

    Diabetes is difficult to manage and treatment involves significant lifestyle adjustments. Unlike the traditional method of insulin administration via the vial and syringe method, insulin pens might be perceived as less cumbersome and have potential to significantly increase patient adherence. Using "real world" data, we examined the differences in adherence and costs between diabetic patients using an insulin FlexPen (Novo Nordisk Inc, Princeton, NJ, USA) and those using traditional vial and syringe administration. Using a retrospective analysis of health insurance claims data between the years 2003 and 2008, we examined patients in the FlexPen cohort and analog vial cohort. Propensity score matching was used to match these cohorts (n=532 in each) according to baseline characteristics. Adjusted mean medication possession ratio when switched to FlexPen improved by 22 percentage points versus 13 percentage points when continuing to use vials (P=0.001). Diabetes-related healthcare costs when switched to FlexPen versus continuing on to use vials ($3970 vs. $4838, respectively, P=0.9368) and total healthcare costs ($13,214 vs. $13,212, respectively, P=0.9473) were not statistically different. Without significant addition to the cost, insulin administration with FlexPen is associated with an improved adherence among patients who switched from vial-based insulin administration.

  13. Vaccine Wastage Assessment After Introduction of Open Vial Policy in Surat Municipal Corporation Area of India

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Prakash B.; Rana, Jayesh J.; Jangid, Sunil G.; Bavarva, Neha R.; Patel, Manan J.; Bansal, Raj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: As per the vaccine management policy of the Government of India all vaccine vials opened for an immunization session were discarded at the end of that session, irrespective of the type of vaccine or the number of doses remaining in the vial prior to 2013. Subsequently, open vial policy (OVP) was introduced in 2013 and should reduce both vaccine wastage as well as governmental healthcare costs for immunization. This study evaluates the vaccine wastage after introduction of the OVP and its comparison with the previous study of vaccine wastage in Surat city before implementation of OVP. It needs to mention that the vaccine policy for this period under comparison was uniform except for the OVP. Methods: Information regarding vaccine doses consumed and children vaccinated during immunization sessions of 24 urban health centers (UHCs) of Surat city were retrieved for the period of January 1st, 2014 to March 31st, 2014. The data were analyzed to estimate vaccine wastage rate (WR) and vaccine wastage factor (WF). In order to assess the impact of OVP, vaccine WR of this study was compared with that of previous study conducted in Surat city during January 1st, 2012 to March 31st, 2012. Results: The vaccine WR for oral polio vaccine (OPV) has decreased from 25% to 13.62%, while the WRs for DPT, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and the pentavalent vaccine combinedly have decreased from 17.94% to 8.05%. Thus, by implementation of OVP, an estimated 747 727 doses of OPV and 343 725 doses of diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus toxoid vaccine (DPT), HBV and the pentavalent vaccines combinedly have been saved in Surat city of India in a year. Conclusion: The implementation of the OVP in Surat city has led to a significant lowering in the vaccine wastage, leading to savings due to lower vaccine requirements. PMID:27239864

  14. DWPF Sample Vial Insert Study-Statistical Analysis of DWPF Mock-Up Test Data

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.P.

    1997-09-18

    This report is prepared as part of Technical/QA Task Plan WSRC-RP-97-351 which was issued in response to Technical Task Request HLW/DWPF/TTR-970132 submitted by DWPF. Presented in this report is a statistical analysis of DWPF Mock-up test data for evaluation of two new analytical methods which use insert samples from the existing HydragardTM sampler. The first is a new hydrofluoric acid based method called the Cold Chemical Method (Cold Chem) and the second is a modified fusion method.Either new DWPF analytical method could result in a two to three fold improvement in sample analysis time.Both new methods use the existing HydragardTM sampler to collect a smaller insert sample from the process sampling system. The insert testing methodology applies to the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) and the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) samples.The insert sample is named after the initial trials which placed the container inside the sample (peanut) vials. Samples in small 3 ml containers (Inserts) are analyzed by either the cold chemical method or a modified fusion method. The current analytical method uses a HydragardTM sample station to obtain nearly full 15 ml peanut vials. The samples are prepared by a multi-step process for Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) analysis by drying, vitrification, grinding and finally dissolution by either mixed acid or fusion. In contrast, the insert sample is placed directly in the dissolution vessel, thus eliminating the drying, vitrification and grinding operations for the Cold chem method. Although the modified fusion still requires drying and calcine conversion, the process is rapid due to the decreased sample size and that no vitrification step is required.A slurry feed simulant material was acquired from the TNX pilot facility from the test run designated as PX-7.The Mock-up test data were gathered on the basis of a statistical design presented in SRT-SCS-97004 (Rev. 0). Simulant PX-7 samples were taken in the DWPF Analytical Cell Mock

  15. Visualization Techniques for Assessing Design Factors That Affect the Interaction between Pharmaceutical Vials and Stoppers.

    PubMed

    Lam, Philippe; Stern, Al

    2010-01-01

    We developed several techniques for visualizing the fit between a stopper and a vial in the critical flange area, a location typically hidden from view. Using these tools, it is possible to identify surfaces involved in forming the initial seal immediately after stopper insertion. We present examples illustrating important design elements that can contribute to forming a robust primary package. These techniques can also be used for component screening by facilitating the identification of combinations that do not fit well together so that they can be eliminated early in the selection process.

  16. Cardiotoxicity of commercial 5-fluorouracil vials stems from the alkaline hydrolysis of this drug.

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, L.; Malet-Martino, M. C.; de Forni, M.; Martino, R.; Lasserre, B.

    1992-01-01

    The cardiotoxicity of 5-fluorouracil (FU) was attributed to impurities present in the injected vials. One of these impurities was identified as fluoroacetaldehyde which is metabolised by isolated perfused rabbit hearts into fluoroacetate (FAC), a highly cardiotoxic compound. FAC was also detected in the urine of patients treated with FU. These impurities were found to be degradation products of FU that are formed in the basic medium employed to dissolve this compound. To avoid chemical degradation of this antineoplastic drug, the solution of FU that will be injected should be prepared immediately before use. PMID:1637660

  17. Prevalence of Bacterial Contamination of Glucose Test Strips in Individual Single-Use Packets versus Multi-Use Vials

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Ayala, Millán; Oliver, Paloma; Cantalejo, Fernando Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Background: Glucose measurement is the cornerstone of diabetes control. In the hospital setting, the same device and package of test strips (50 or 100 strips) can be used to monitor glucose in several patients, which can increase cross contamination. The objective of our study is to measure bacterial contamination in glucose test strips, comparing results in individual single-use packets (one hospital) versus multi-use vials (two hospitals) in Spain. Methods: Test strips were collected from five different wards. Each hospital also collected two unopened vials from a single ward as controls. They were sent to a reference laboratory for microbiologic study. A number equal or higher than two colony forming units per strip was considered as a positive result. Results: Out of 423 glucose test strips collected and cultured, 146 were contaminated (34%); only 7% of individually packed strips were contaminated versus 45% of strips packed in multi-use vials, with a high statistical significance (p < .001). Conclusions: In the strips from multi-use vials, a high contamination rate was found and highly pathogenic organisms were identified, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis or Staphylococcus hemolyticus. In contrast, in strips packed individually, there was a much lower contamination rate and no such pathogen organisms were found. Therefore, in the hospital setting, the use of blood glucose test strips in individual packages would be more advantageous (mainly from a clinical point of view, but also from a financial one) than those packed in multiuse vials. PMID:23911166

  18. Vaccine presentation in the USA: economics of prefilled syringes versus multidose vials for influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Claudia C; Bishai, David

    2010-11-01

    In the USA, influenza vaccines are available as parenteral injections or as an intranasal preparation. Injectable influenza vaccines are available in either multidose vial (MDV), single-dose vial or prefilled syringe (PFS) presentations. PFSs have gained market share in the USA but have not yet reached the levels of uptake currently seen in Western Europe. Here, we review the topic of vaccine presentation in the USA, with a special focus on influenza vaccines. Second, we present the results of a time-motion study that measured administration costs of influenza vaccination comparing MDVs versus PFSs during the 2009/2010 influenza campaign. Vaccinating with MDVs took an average 37.3 s longer than PFSs. The cost of administering 1000 immunizations in 2009 using MDVs were US$8596 versus US$8920.21 using PFSs. In a pandemic situation where 300 million Americans would require vaccination, PFSs would save 3.12 million h in healthcare worker time, worth US$111.1 million. The higher acquisition costs of PFS vaccines compared with MDVs are offset by lower administrative costs and increased safety.

  19. Nosocomial transmission of hepatitis B virus infection through multiple-dose vials.

    PubMed

    Kidd-Ljunggren, K; Broman, E; Ekvall, H; Gustavsson, O

    1999-09-01

    The source of acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in two women (55 and 72 years old) was investigated. They displayed no risk factors for acquiring HBV infection, other than treatment with local anaesthetic injections some months previously. The HBV strains were sequenced and showed distinct homology to strains seen in Swedish intravenous drug users (IVDU). Prior to these patients' acute infection, an outbreak of HBV had occurred among IVDU in the same county. Analysis of the HBV strains from six of these IVDUs showed their core promoter, precore and pre-S sequences (679 nucleotides) to be identical to those from the two patients. Cross-contamination between samples was excluded and the most likely source of infection was thought to be multiple-dose vials of local anaesthetic that had been contaminated with the HBV strain circulating among the IVDU population in the community. We believe that multiple-dose vials have no place in modern healthcare and recommend sequence homology analysis as an alternative or additional way to trace a source of HBV infection.

  20. Impact of vacuum-induced surface freezing on inter- and intra-vial heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Oddone, Irene; Van Bockstal, Pieter-Jan; De Beer, Thomas; Pisano, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    This paper aimed to study the impact of freezing on both within-batch (inter-vial) and within-product (intra-vial) heterogeneity. This analysis has been carried out using two freezing protocols, the conventional shelf-ramped method and the Vacuum Induced Surface Freezing, and placebo formulations containing both crystallizing (mannitol) and amorphous (lactose and sucrose) excipients. The freezing conditions (i.e., the temperature of freezing, the temperature and time of the equilibration phase, and the filling volume) were found to have a dramatic impact on both the within-batch and the within-product homogeneity. Overall, we observed that the control of freezing can effectively minimize the variability in product characteristics, and moisture content, within the same batch. In addition to more uniform production, the control of freezing was found to be fundamental to achieve a more uniform product than that produced by the shelf-ramped freezing method. The influence of the freezing protocol on the crystallization process of mannitol was also investigated, showing that the temperature of freezing plays a key role in the formation of the mannitol polymorphs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Empirical cover gas correction, sample freezing time, and air buoyancy adjustment for the analysis of uranium in uranium hexafluoride. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hedge, W.D.

    1986-08-29

    The gravimetric analysis of uranium (U) in uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) necessitates subsampling UF/sub 6/ by transferring an aliquot of liquid UF/sub 6/ through a vacuum manifold to a polytrifluorochloroethylene (TFCE) vial by cooling with liquid nitrogen. Once frozen, a cover gas is admitted to the vacuum manifold and the vial. The vial is then removed in the cover gas atmosphere and sealed with a nut-plug-gasket assembly. The cover gas is admitted to prevent exposure of the frozen UF/sub 6/ to moisture in the atmosphere, and the weight of the cover gas then must be considered as part of the gross weight, but not of the net weight of the UF/sub 6/ within the vial. An air bouyancy correction is also applied to correct for the air displacement of the brass weight equivalents used in obtaining the UF/sub 6/ new weight. This empirical study concerns (1) the time required to sufficiently cool the UF/sub 6/ in the sample vial to obtain not only the UF/sub 6/ but also any residual gases present in the sample, (2) the air buoyancy correction required for determining the net weight of UF/sub 6/ contained in the sample vial, and (3) the correction for the quantity of cover gas remaining in the sample vial after sealing 4 refs., 7 tabs., 7 figs.

  2. The real-life number of neonatal doses of Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccine in a 20-dose vial

    PubMed Central

    Schaltz-Buchholzer, Frederik; Frankel, Hannah Nørtoft; Benn, Christine Stabell

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Reducing vaccine wastage is important. Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is produced in vials of 20 infant doses. The reconstituted vaccine is discarded after 4–6 hours. Therefore, to reduce vaccine wastage, a 20-dose vial of BCG is often only opened if at least 10–12 infants are present, jeopardising BCG vaccination coverage and timely vaccination. We observed that nurses were not able to withdraw 20 doses from the vials and aimed to quantify how many doses could be obtained from these vials by experienced nurses under real-life circumstances. Methods: At the maternity ward of the national hospital in Guinea-Bissau, since 2002 the same two nurses have been vaccinating all eligible children with BCG before discharge. During a month in 2015, within a randomised trial comparing BCG-Denmark and BCG-Russia, we registered how many doses the nurses were able to withdraw from the two types of vaccine vials. Results: The median number of doses which it was possible to withdraw from the vials was 13 (range 11–17): 13 (11–16) for BCG-Denmark (based on 39 vials) and 15 (12–17) for BCG-Russia (based on 29 vials). Conclusions: In real life, experienced nurses could only obtain 13–15 doses from the 20-dose vials. Thus, vaccine wastage is much lower than assumed. Adjusting practice to the real-life number of doses would immediately suggest vials should be opened if 7 rather than 10 infants are present. As other studies have indicated that BCG may have beneficial non-specific effects on overall mortality, the potential gain by opening a 20-dose vial even for one child may be considerable. PMID:28169606

  3. Biodegradation of [14C]phenol in secondary sewage and landfill leachate measured by double-vial radiorespirometry.

    PubMed Central

    Deeley, G M; Skierkowski, P; Robertson, J M

    1985-01-01

    Double-vial radiorespirometry was used to estimate the biodegradation rates of 14C-labeled phenol in a landfill leachate and a secondary treated domestic wastewater. Rates were found to be comparable for each material at each of the three concentrations tested. Sewage microorganisms immediately began biodegrading the [14C]phenol; landfill leachate microorganisms required a lag period before maximum biodegradation of the [14C]phenol. The apparent rate of [14C]phenol biodegradation was 2.4 times faster in the sewage than in the landfill leachate. Double-vial radiorespirometry was shown to be an effective method for screening biodegradation rates in aquifers. PMID:4004218

  4. Impact of Vial Capping on Residual Seal Force and Container Closure Integrity.

    PubMed

    Mathaes, Roman; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Roggo, Yves; Ovadia, Robert; Lam, Philippe; Stauch, Oliver; Vogt, Martin; Roehl, Holger; Huwyler, Joerg; Mohl, Silke; Streubel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The vial capping process is a critical unit operation during drug product manufacturing, as it could possibly generate cosmetic defects or even affect container closure integrity. Yet there is significant variability in capping equipment and processes, and their relation to potential defects or container closure integrity has not been thoroughly studied. In this study we applied several methods-residual seal force tester, a self-developed system of a piezo force sensor measurement, and computed tomography-to characterize different container closure system combinations that had been sealed using different capping process parameter settings. Additionally, container closure integrity of these samples was measured using helium leakage (physical container closure integrity) and compared to characterization data. The different capping equipment settings lead to residual seal force values from 7 to 115 N. High residual seal force values were achieved with high capping pre-compression force and a short distance between the capping plate and plunge. The choice of container closure system influenced the obtained residual seal force values. The residual seal force tester and piezoelectric measurements showed similar trends. All vials passed physical container closure integrity testing, and no stopper rupture was seen with any of the settings applied, suggesting that container closure integrity was warranted for the studied container closure system with the chosen capping setting ranges. The vial capping process is a critical unit operation during drug product manufacturing, as it could possibly generate cosmetic defects or even affect container closure integrity. Yet there is significant variability in capping equipment and processes, and their relation to potential defects or container closure integrity has not been thoroughly studied. In this study we applied several methods-residual seal force tester, a self-developed system of a piezo force sensor measurement, and

  5. Generating chimeric mice from embryonic stem cells via vial coculturing or hypertonic microinjection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kun-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    The generation of a fertile embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived or F0 (100 % coat color chimerism) mice is the final criterion in proving that the ESC is truly pluripotent. Many methods have been developed to produce chimeric mice. To date, the most popular methods for generating chimeric embryos is well sandwich aggregation between zona pellucida (ZP) removed (denuded) 2.5-day post-coitum (dpc) embryos and ESC clumps, or direct microinjection of ESCs into the cavity (blastocoel) of 3.5-dpc blastocysts. However, due to systemic limitations and the disadvantages of conventional microinjection, aggregation, and coculturing, two novel methods (vial coculturing and hypertonic microinjection) were developed in recent years at my laboratory.Coculturing 2.5-dpc denuded embryos with ESCs in 1.7-mL vials for ~3 h generates chimeras that have significantly high levels of chimerism (including 100 % coat color chimerism) and germline transmission. This method has significantly fewer instrumental and technological limitations than existing methods, and is an efficient, simple, inexpensive, and reproducible method for "mass production" of chimeric embryos. For laboratories without a microinjection system, this is the method of choice for generating chimeric embryos. Microinjecting ESCs into a subzonal space of 2.5-dpc embryos can generate germline-transmitted chimeras including 100 % coat color chimerism. However, this method is adopted rarely due to the very small and tight space between ZP and blastomeres. Using a laser pulse or Piezo-driven instrument/device to help introduce ESCs into the subzonal space of 2.5-dpc embryos demonstrates the superior efficiency in generating ESC-derived (F0) chimeras. Unfortunately, due to the need for an expensive instrument/device and extra fine skill, not many studies have used either method. Recently, ESCs injected into the large subzonal space of 2.5-dpc embryos in an injection medium containing 0.2-0.3 M sucrose very efficiently generated

  6. Interferon alpha-2a interactions on glass vial surfaces measured by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenbach, Monica S; Reimann, Peter; Thommen, Verena; Hegner, Martin; Mumenthaler, Marco; Schwob, Jacky; Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    2002-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy was used to study adsorption and adhesion peculiarities of interferon alpha-2a on glass and mica surfaces. The specific protein adsorption behavior as a function of the pH value was illustrated on mica by single molecule imaging, while adhesion forces between interferon molecules and inner surfaces of borosilicate glass vials were measured directly under aqueous buffer conditions by force microscopy. We found that the adhesion force on Schott FIOLAX Type I plus was reduced by 40% of the total adhesion force measured on Schott FIOLAX, a standard type I borosilicate glass quality. These results reflect the anticipated superiority of the special "Type I plus" coating over undesired protein adsorption to glass. In addition, this study gives insight into a new method to predict unintended protein adsorption to glass container walls and to characterize the adsorption process by force measurement.

  7. Cross-Contamination From Vial Caps for SEC Analysis Determined by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Veloso, A; Leiza, J R

    2017-02-01

    Cross-contamination from the polymeric material of the vial caps used in size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and high-performance liquid chromatography autosamplers in the low molar mass (LMM) range (<2000 Da) of polymer samples was demonstrated with the help of matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. It is shown that polyethylene (PE) caps, if exposed to either short or long periods in tetrahydrofuran solvent, might extract oligomers that contaminate the LMM end of the SEC chromatograms. On the other hand, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)/silicone caps have shown to be inert if used properly; namely, the PTFE part in contact with the sample solution. However, care should be taken if accidentally the silicon part is exposed to the solution because silicone oligomer peaks have been detected by MALDI-TOF MS analysis that might mislead the results.

  8. Insulin pens vs. vials and syringes: the pharmacist's role in individualizing therapy.

    PubMed

    Honebrink, Amy N; Peters, Chelsea R; Bright, David R

    2011-07-01

    As pharmacists strive for tighter glucose control in their patients, several considerations exist including the selection of insulin delivery administration methods. Traditionally, insulin administration using vials and syringes has been common, but insulin pens are also a viable option. Insulin pens have been shown to increase patient autonomy, which may impact adherence. Elderly patients, who may suffer from dexterity and visual impairment, have been shown to prefer insulin pens because they are easier to use. Although insulin pens are more expensive per mL, some patients may find an economic advantage with insulin pens based on copays and beyond-use dating. In long-term care settings, the additional cost of insulin pens may be offset by the reduced insulin-administration time. Pharmacists are well suited to advocate for their patients and to help select the insulin administration method that considers individual limitations and fiscal realities, and will best support the patient's disease management.

  9. Variation in performance at different positions of an ultrasonic VialTweeter--A study based on various physical and chemical activities.

    PubMed

    Tiong, T Joyce; Low, Liang Ee; Teoh, Hui Jiun; Chin, Jit-Kai; Manickam, Sivakumar

    2015-11-01

    Ultrasonic VialTweeter is used for the sonication of small volume samples. It contains a titanium block with 8 holes for vial insertion, to be used simultaneously for batch operation. In this investigation, the ultrasonic and sonochemical performance of ultrasonic VialTweeter has been evaluated at its different positions. Experimental results using calorimetry, ultrasonic capillary effect, sonochemiluminescence and degradation of Rhodamine B showed that the sonochemical activity differs greatly at different positions along the VialTweeter, with positions 3 and 4 showing the maximum efficiency whereas the positions 1 and 2 being the least effective positions. These results were further verified by acoustic pressure simulation, confirming that certain locations in the VialTweeter may not perform in the same way as others due to the variation in acoustic pressure at different locations.

  10. IgG1 adsorption to siliconized glass vials-influence of pH, ionic strength, and nonionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Höger, Kerstin; Mathes, Johannes; Frieß, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the adsorption of an IgG1 antibody to siliconized vials was investigated with focus on the formulation parameters pH, ionic strength, and nonionic surfactants. Electrophoretic mobility measurements were performed to investigate the charge characteristics of protein and siliconized glass particles at different pH values. Calculation of the electrokinetic charge density allowed further insight into the energetic conditions in the protein-sorbent interface. Maximum adsorption of IgG1 was found at acidic pH values and could be correlated with energetically favorable minimal ion incorporation into the interface. The importance of electrostatic interactions for IgG1 adsorption at acidic pH values was also confirmed by the efficient adsorption reduction at decreased solution ionic strength. A second adsorption maximum around the pI of the protein was assigned to hydrophobic interactions with the siliconized surface. Addition of the nonionic surfactants poloxamer 188 or polysorbate 80 resulted in almost complete suppression of adsorption at pH 7.2, and a strong but less efficient effect at pH 4 on siliconized glass vials. This adsorption suppression was much less pronounced on borosilicate glass vials. From these results, it can be concluded that electrostatic interactions contribute substantially to IgG1 adsorption to siliconized glass vials especially at acidic formulation pH.

  11. False-positive cryptococcal antigen test associated with use of BBL Port-a-Cul transport vials.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Deborah A; Sholtis, Mary; Parshall, Sharon; Hall, Gerri S; Procop, Gary W

    2011-02-01

    A total of 52 residual CSF and serum specimens, which were originally negative with the Cryptococcal Antigen Latex Agglutination System (CALAS), were shown to become falsely positive after placement in BBL Port-A-Cul anaerobic transport vials. This transport device, although excellent for specimen transportation for subsequent culture, should not be used if cryptococcal antigen testing is needed.

  12. Comparative analysis of ampoules and vials in sterile and conventional packaging as to microbial load and sterility test

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Raphael Ribeiro de Aquino; Tardelli, Maria Angela

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To compare sterility and microbial (bacteria and fungi) load in the outer part of hyperbaric bupivacaine (Neocaína®) in ampoule and bupivacaine in vial, in conventional and sterile pack formulations. Methods The sterile packs were divided into two groups: G1 (n=16) with ampoules and G2 (n=16) with vials. Conventional formulations were divided into two groups, being G3 (n=16) with ampoules and G4 (n=16) with vials. The ampoules and vials were opened and had their content drawn. The empty bottles were then placed in sterile plastic bags and sent for analysis of microbial load (bacteria and fungi) and sterility testing. Data were analyzed using the χ2 test with Yates correction, and 95% confidence interval. Results G1 and G2 showed no bacterial growth when compared to conventional groups (p<0.001). The most common agent in conventional microbiological samples was Staphylococcus aureus. There was no fungal growth in both groups. Conclusion The use of (sterile pack) reduces the microbial load of bottles, and would decrease the chance of exposure to potential contamination of the anesthetic solution. PMID:27223307

  13. [Fragments of a correspondence between the Parisian pharmacist Émile Vial and the Dutch painter Johan-Barthold Jongkind].

    PubMed

    Devaux, Guy

    2016-03-01

    We study a series of exchanged original letters between the Parisian pharmacist art lover Émile Vial (1833-1917) and the Dutch painter Johan-Barthold Jongkind (1819 - 1891) from april 13th, 1876 till February 1th, 1887.

  14. Evaluation of different continuous cell lines in the isolation of mumps virus by the shell vial method from clinical samples

    PubMed Central

    Reina, J; Ballesteros, F; Mari, M; Munar, M

    2001-01-01

    Aims—To compare prospectively the efficacy of the Vero, LLC-MK2, MDCK, Hep-2, and MRC-5 cell lines in the isolation of the mumps virus from clinical samples by means of the shell vial method. Methods—During an epidemic outbreak of parotiditis 48 clinical samples (saliva swabs and CSF) were studied. Two vials of the Vero, LLC-MK2, MDCK, MRC-5, and Hep-2 cell lines were inoculated with 0.2 ml of the samples by the shell vial assay. The vials were incubated at 36°C for two and five days. The vials were then fixed with acetone at -20°C for 10 minutes and stained by a monoclonal antibody against mumps virus by means of an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Results—The mumps virus was isolated from 36 samples. The Vero and LLC-MK2 cell lines showed a 100% isolation capacity, MDCK showed 77.7%, MRC-5 showed 44.4%, and Hep-2 showed 22.2%. The Vero and LLC-MK2 lines were significantly different to the other cell lines (p < 0.001). The sensitivity for the Vero and LLC-MK2 lines at two and five days of incubation was identical (100%). The values obtained in the study of the quantitative isolation capacity (positive isolation with > 5 infectious foci) were 94.4% for Vero, 97.2% for LLC-MK2, 5.5% for MDCK, 5.5% for Hep-2, and 0% for MRC-5. Conclusions—The Vero and LLC-MK2 cell lines are equally efficient at two and five days incubation for the isolation of the mumps virus from clinical samples, and the use of the shell vial method considerably shortens the time of aetiological diagnosis with higher specificity. Key Words: mumps virus • Vero cell line • LLC-MK2 cell line • MDCK cell line • Hep-2 cell line • MRC-5 cell line • isolation • shell vial PMID:11729211

  15. METHOD FOR MEASURING AIR-IMMISCIBLE LIQUID PARTITION COEFFICIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The principal objective of this work was to measure nonaqueous phase liquid-air partition coefficients for various gas tracer compounds. Known amounts of trichloroethene (TCE) and tracer, as neat compounds, were introduced into glass vials and allowed to equilibrate. The TCE and ...

  16. METHOD FOR MEASURING AIR-IMMISCIBLE LIQUID PARTITION COEFFICIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The principal objective of this work was to measure nonaqueous phase liquid-air partition coefficients for various gas tracer compounds. Known amounts of trichloroethene (TCE) and tracer, as neat compounds, were introduced into glass vials and allowed to equilibrate. The TCE and ...

  17. Cryoprotectant-free ultra-rapid freezing of human spermatozoa in cryogenic vials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J; Jin, R-T; Wu, L-M; Johansson, L; Guo, T-H; Liu, Y-S; Tong, X-H

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of ultra-rapid freezing (direct immersion in liquid nitrogen) on human spermatozoa in cryogenic vials (≥0.5 ml) at different concentrations of sucrose. After swim-up, the sperm suspensions (N = 58) were diluted with sperm preparation medium and divided into six aliquots: swim-up (fresh), conventional freezing group (slow freezing) and four ultra-rapid freezing groups containing sucrose at different concentrations (0.15 m, 0.20 m, 0.25 m and 0.30 m). Sperm motility, progressive motility, plasma membrane integrity, DNA stability and acrosome integrity of fresh and cooled-warmed spermatozoa were analysed. The progressive motility, plasma membrane and acrosome integrity of spermatozoa in the 0.20 m sucrose group were significantly higher than those of the slow freezing group (47.5 ± 6.8% versus 36.4 ± 8.7%, 73.2 ± 6.9% versus 63.9 ± 6.3%, 53.7 ± 10.0% versus 35.9 ± 9.7% respectively, P < 0.05). However, no differences were found in sperm motility or DNA stability (58.5 ± 6.3% versus 54.2 ± 5.3%, 90.1 ± 2.8% versus 87.2 ± 4.7%, P > 0.05 respectively) between the 0.20 m sucrose and the slow freezing group. No differences were found between the ultra-rapid and slow freezing group at the other concentrations of sucrose. Our findings suggest that the method of ultra-rapid freezing of human spermatozoa in cryogenic vials with a solution containing 0.20 m sucrose results in recovery of spermatozoon of superior qualities. In contrast to slow freezing, the ultra-rapid freezing technique of human spermatozoa seems to reduce cryoinjuries and maintain important physiological characteristics of the spermatozoa after warming. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Occurrence of coring in insulin vials and possibility of rubber piece contamination by self-injection.

    PubMed

    Asakura, T; Seino, H; Nozaki, S; Abe, R

    2001-06-01

    Coring is reported to occur because rubber pieces are shaved off from a rubber stopper when a needle is inserted into the rubber stopper of transfusion liquid formulation. We verified whether coring really occurs in insulin vials of self-injecting patients. We collected insulin cartridges from 30 hospitalized patients and used the primary injection (trial injection), the secondary injection and the cartridge remaining preparation as samples. We observed the rubber pieces using a microscope and measured the shape, number of pieces. The occurrence rate of coring was 73% for the primary injection, 47% for the secondary injection and 97% for the cartridge remaining preparation. The rubber pieces in the primary injection and the secondary injection which went through the needle are mostly in aggregate shape and the rubber pieces in the cartridge remaining preparation which did not go through the needle are mostly in needle-like shape. A number of small rubber pieces are found in both the primary injection and the secondary injection, indicating a high possibility that rubber pieces may be injected under subcutaneous tissue. The coring is considered to occur because needles are repeatedly inserted and rotated at the same spot. It is required to improve the structure to mount a needle to the pen-type injector in future. Coring is a very serious problem from the medical and pharmaceutical points of view. Further study should be made on the implication to latex allergy and lipodystrophy.

  19. Economic results of a palivizumab seasonal prophylaxis using a cohorting software and vial sharing.

    PubMed

    Coletta, Elio; Coppolino, Salvatore; Federico, Febronia; Fulia, Francesco

    2010-07-07

    Respiratory syncytial virus is the most important pathogen in lower respiratory tract infection in infants and young children. In high-risk populations it may develop severe, sometimes fatal, lower respiratory tract infections. A proportion of these infants require admission to intensive care units due to the severity of the condition and the level of care needed. Furthermore, we must consider the possible increased risk of asthma following RSV infection in infancy. The aim of this work is to show how we strictly coordinated, during the 2008-2009 RSV season, the delivery of prophylaxis while minimising drug cost through vial sharing and cohorting infants with a software performed through Visual Basic programming system. By using this method we have been able to obtain a saving of the 29.2% compared to the theoretical amount. No infant requested hospitalisation for a RSV infection. Such a model ensures all patients to receive appropriate immunization and thus positively influencing the cost-benefit of palivizumab prophylaxis. We hope that our model of care delivery will be of use to other hospitals.

  20. Comparison of a modified shell vial culture procedure with conventional mouse inoculation for rabies virus isolation.

    PubMed

    Ribas Antúnez, María de los Angeles; Girón, Blanca; Monsalvez, Iraima; Morier, Luis; Acosta, Gretel; Tejero, Yahisel; Cordero, Yanislet; Piedra, Dainelyd

    2013-04-01

    Rabies is a neurotropic disease that is often lethal. The early diagnosis of rabies infection is important and requires methods that allow for the isolation of the virus from animals and humans. The present study compared a modified shell vial (MSV) procedure using 24-well tissue culture plates with the mouse inoculation test (MIT), which is considered the gold standard for rabies virus isolation. Thirty brain samples (25 positive and 5 negative by the fluorescent antibody test) obtained from different animal species at the National Institute of Hygiene Rafael Rangel in Caracas, Venezuela, were studied by the MIT and MSV assays. Nine samples (36%) were positive at 24 h, 10 (40%) were positive at 48 h and six (24%) were positive at 72 h by the MSV assay. With the MIT assay, 76% were positive at six days post inoculation and 12% were positive at 12 and 18 days post inoculation. One sample that was negative according to the MSV assay was positive with MIT on the 12th day. The MSV procedure exhibited a sensitivity of 96.2%, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value 80%. This procedure allowed for rapid rabies virus detection. MIT can be employed as an alternative method in laboratories without tissue culture facilities.

  1. Determining the chemical activity of hydrophobic organic compounds in soil using polymer coated vials

    PubMed Central

    Reichenberg, Fredrik; Smedes, Foppe; Jönsson, Jan-Åke; Mayer, Philipp

    2008-01-01

    Background In soils contaminated by hydrophobic organic compounds, the concentrations are less indicative of potential exposure and distribution than are the associated chemical activities, fugacities and freely dissolved concentrations. The latter can be measured by diffusive sampling into thin layers of polymer, as in, for example, solid phase micro-extraction. Such measurements require equilibrium partitioning of analytes into the polymer while ensuring that the sample is not depleted. We introduce the validation of these requirements based on parallel sampling into polymer layers of different thicknesses. Results Equilibrium sampling devices were made by coating glass vials internally with 3–12 μm thick layers of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). These were filled with slurries of a polluted soil and gently agitated for 5 days. The concentrations of 7 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the PDMS were measured. Validation confirmed fulfilment of the equilibrium sampling requirements and high measurement precision. Finally, chemical activities of the PAHs in the soil were determined from their concentrations and activity coefficients in the PDMS. Conclusion PAHs' thermodynamic activities in a soil test material were determined via a method of uptake into PDMS. This can be used to assess chemical exposure and predict diffusion and partitioning processes. PMID:18460193

  2. 14C sample preparation for AMS microdosing studies at Lund University using online combustion and septa-sealed vials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydoff, Marie; Stenström, Kristina

    2010-04-01

    The Department of Physics at Lund University is participating in a European Union project called EUMAPP (European Union Microdose AMS Partnership Programme), in which sample preparation and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements of biological samples from microdosing studies have been made. This paper describes a simplified method of converting biological samples to solid graphite for 14C analysis with AMS. The method is based on online combustion of the samples, and reduction of CO 2 in septa-sealed vials. The septa-sealed vials and disposable materials are used to eliminate sample cross-contamination. Measurements of ANU and Ox I standards show deviations of 2% and 3%, respectively, relative to reference values. This level of accuracy is sufficient for biological samples from microdosing studies. Since the method has very few handling steps from sample to graphite, the risk of failure during the sample preparation process is minimized, making the method easy to use in routine preparation of samples.

  3. Comparison between Indirect Immunofluorescence Assay and Shell Vial Culture for Detection of Mumps Virus from Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Reina, Jordi; Ballesteros, Francisca; Ruiz de Gopegui, Enrique; Munar, Maria; Mari, Margarita

    2003-01-01

    We report a prospective comparison of the efficacies of an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and shell vial culture (SVC) of throat swab and urine samples from patients with mumps. Throat swab samples were used for the IFA; the urine samples and throat swabs were inoculated into vials of Vero cells. We studied 62 patients by using 62 throat swabs and 50 urine samples (50 patients with both samples). Sixty (96.7%) throat samples were positive in the SVC, and 61 (98.3%) were positive in the IFA. For the 50 patients from whom both samples were available, the IFA was positive in 50 (100%) cases, the urine sample was positive in 49 (98%) cases, and the throat swab was positive in 48 (96%) cases (P > 0.05). This comparison of throat swabs and urine samples has shown that the two clinical samples are similar in efficacy. PMID:14605158

  4. Validation of a Minor Modification to the Soleris® Direct Yeast and Mold Vial and Selective Supplement.

    PubMed

    Alles, Susan; McDougal, Susan; Caballero, Oscar; Mozola, Mark; Rice, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe results of a study to validate minor reagent formulation changes to the Soleris Direct Yeast and Mold (DYM) automated growth-based method for semi-quantitative detection of yeast and mold in food products. In order to reduce the maximum concentration of the selective agent chloramphenicol in the Soleris reagents, chloramphenicol was removed from the selective supplement and added to the vial growth medium itself. Therefore, both the vial medium and supplement have been reformulated in an alternative version of the method. A probability of detection (POD) statistical model was used to compare Soleris results at multiple test thresholds (dilutions) with plate counts determined using the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual dilution plating procedure. Three matrixes were tested; yogurt, tomato juice, and cocoa powder. POD analysis showed that the percentage of positive Soleris tests at various test thresholds were within the limits predicted by the reference method plate counts for all matrixes evaluated. Real-time stability data on three manufactured lots showed that the modified Soleris vial and supplement are stable for at a minimum of 10 months when stored at 2-8°C. In sum, results presented here demonstrate that the modifications to the Soleris DYM vial and supplement do not impact method performance. The modified Soleris DYM method can be used as an accurate alternative to conventional dilution plating procedures for semi-quantitative determination of yeast and mold at threshold levels, while saving as much as 3 days in analysis time.

  5. Survival of Serratia marcescens in benzalkonium chloride and in multiple-dose medication vials: relationship to epidemic septic arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, A K; Highsmith, A K; Martone, W J

    1987-01-01

    In an epidemic of septic arthritis due to Serratia marcescens, the intra-articular injection of contaminated methylprednisolone may have played a key role. The epidemic strain was found in used multiple-dose vials of methylprednisolone and in a canister of cotton balls soaked in benzalkonium chloride. The cotton balls had been used for antisepsis and disinfection. Growth characteristics of the epidemic strain of S. marcescens were compared with those of control strains of S. marcescens which had been obtained from unrelated nosocomial outbreaks. The epidemic strain was able to survive in 1:100 dilutions of benzalkonium chloride and was able to grow to greater than 10(5) CFU/ml in multiple-dose vials of methylprednisoline; control strains could not be recovered after 24 h in the same solutions. The preservative in methylprednisolone is gamma-myristyl picolinium chloride, a compound chemically related to benzalkonium chloride. We speculate that the epidemic strain of S. marcescens, which was resistant to benzalkonium chloride, had cross-resistance to gamma-myristyl picolinium chloride. If the cotton balls were used to disinfect the tops of the multiple-dose vials of methylprednisolone, small numbers of organisms subsequently introduced into the solution could have grown to high concentrations. PMID:3298309

  6. Comparison of tau-fluvalinate, acrinathrin, and amitraz effects on susceptible and resistant populations of Varroa destructor in a vial test.

    PubMed

    Kamler, Martin; Nesvorna, Marta; Stara, Jitka; Erban, Tomas; Hubert, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The parasitic mite Varroa destructor is a major pest of the western honeybee, Apis mellifera. The development of acaricide resistance in Varroa populations is a global issue. Discriminating concentrations of acaricides are widely used to detect pest resistance. Two methods, using either glass vials or paraffin capsules, are used to screen for Varroa resistance to various acaricides. We found the glass vial method to be useless for testing Varroa resistance to acaridices, so we developed a polypropylene vial bioassay. This method was tested on tau-fluvalinate-, acrinathrin-, and amitraz-resistant mite populations from three apiaries in Czechia. Acetone was used as a control and technical grade acaricide compounds diluted in acetone were applied to the polypropylene vials. The solutions were spread on the vial surface by rolling the vial, and were then evaporated. Freshly collected Varroa females were placed in the vials and the mortality of the exposed mites was measured after 24 h. The Varroa populations differed in mortality between the apiaries and the tested compounds. Mites from the Kyvalka site were resistant to acrinathrin, tau-fluvalinate, and amitraz, while mites from the Postrizin site were susceptible to all three acaricides. In Prelovice apiary, the mites were susceptible to acrinathrin and amitraz, but not to tau-fluvalinate. The calculated discriminating concentrations for tau-fluvalinate, acrinathrin, and amitraz were 0.66, 0.26 and 0.19 µg/mL, respectively. These results indicate that polyproplyne vial tests can be used to determine discriminating concentrations for the early detection of acaricide resistant Varroa. Finally, multiple-resistance in Kyvalka may indicate metabolic resistance.

  7. Adherence to premixed insulin in a prefilled pen compared with a vial/syringe in people with diabetes in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Cheen, Hua Heng McVin; Lim, Seng Han; Huang, Ming Chien; Bee, Yong Mong; Wee, Hwee Lin

    2014-07-01

    The real-world clinical effectiveness of exogenous insulin is limited by nonadherence. Various insulin delivery systems have been developed to help improve adherence, with prefilled pens gaining popularity among adult Singaporeans with diabetes. However, adherence to insulin in people with diabetes in Singapore and most of Asia has not been studied. This study aimed to compare adherence to premixed insulin formulated in a prefilled pen versus a vial/syringe and to identify predictors of adherence in 955 patients managed at the outpatient clinics of the largest acute care hospital in Singapore. In this retrospective longitudinal study, electronic medical and pharmacy refill records were used to determine adherence to insulin over 24 months, measured in terms of compliance and persistence. Compliance is expressed as the medication possession ratio (used as continuous and categorical variables), and persistence is reported as a dichotomous variable with a permissible refill gap of 30 days before discontinuation of therapy is considered. Multivariate linear or logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors of adherence. Compared with prefilled pen users, vial/syringe users were older (mean [SD] age, 64.1 [10.6] vs 62.4 [11.9] years; P = 0.032), and more were undergoing polypharmacy (69.6% vs 54.1%; P < 0.001). The mean (SD) medication possession ratio was comparable in vial/syringe versus prefilled pen users (83.8% [26.9%] vs 86.0% [23.2%]; P = 0.266). Prefilled pen users were more persistent with therapy compared with vial/syringe users (odds ratio = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.01-1.86) after adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical covariates. Median time to discontinuation of therapy was comparable (vial/syringe vs prefilled pen: 409 vs 532 days; P = 0.076). Being managed by an endocrinologist and not receiving government subsidies were significant predictors of persistence. Compared with other studies that found strong associations between adherence and

  8. Cultivation of PCV2 in swine testicle cells using the shell vial technique and monitoring of viral replication by qPCR and RT-qPCR.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Taís F; Araujo, João P

    2014-02-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is difficult to isolate. Currently, no published articles have used the shell vial technique to isolate PCV2. In addition, the action of d-glucosamine on swine testicle cells (ST) has not been evaluated properly. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine an optimal concentration of d-glucosamine and to test the shell vial technique for PCV2 propagation in ST cells. The optimal concentration of d-glucosamine was determined to be 100mM. Because PCV2 is noncytopathic, the traditional adsorption was compared to the shell vial technique for 15 passages by qPCR, and RT-qPCR for passages 12 through 15. The quantities of viral DNA (P=0.013) and ORF1-mRNA detected with the shell vial technique were two-fold higher than the obtained with traditional adsorption. The levels of ORF2-mRNA were similar for both methods; however, by passage 15, a six-fold increase in levels was observed with the shell vial technique. Therefore, the shell vial technique was more efficient for the cultivation of PCV2, and qPCR/RT-qPCR can be used to monitor viral replication. In addition, a high viral load (>2.7×10(10) DNA copies/ml) and high levels of viral mRNA expression indicated that the ST cells were persistently infected.

  9. Clinical comparison of the Bactec Mycosis IC/F, BacT/Alert FA, and BacT/Alert FN blood culture vials for the detection of candidemia.

    PubMed

    Ericson, Eva-Lena; Klingspor, Lena; Ullberg, Måns; Ozenci, Volkan

    2012-06-01

    The present study analyzed the performance of Bactec Mycosis IC/F, BacT/Alert FA, and BacT/Alert FN vials in detection and time to detection (TTD) of Candida spp. in 179 simultaneous blood cultures. The Mycosis IC/F, BacT/Alert FA, and BacT/Alert FN vials could detect Candida spp. in 144 (80.45%) of 179, 149 (83.24%) of 179, and 8 (4.47%) of 179 samples, respectively. With the presence of antifungal therapy, the numbers of positive vials were higher in BacT/Alert FA compared to Mycosis IC/F, 87/99 versus 73/99, respectively (P < 0.05). TTD (SD) for C. albicans was shorter in Mycosis IC/F than in BacT/Alert FA vials without antifungal therapy, 20.89 (9.33) versus 28.26 (9.77), respectively (P < 0.01). The detection of Candida spp., with concomitant bacteremia, was higher in Mycosis IC/F than in BacT/Alert FA vials, 28/30 and 19/30, respectively (P = 0.01). The present data show that the use of Bactec Mycosis IC/F together with BacT/Alert FA vials might improve the detection of Candida spp.

  10. Pen Devices for Insulin Self-Administration Compared With Needle and Vial

    PubMed Central

    Lasalvia, Pieralessandro; Barahona-Correa, Julián Esteban; Romero-Alvernia, Diana Marcela; Gil-Tamayo, Sebastián; Castañeda-Cardona, Camilo; Bayona, Juan Gabriel; Triana, Juan José; Laserna, Andrés Felipe; Mejía-Torres, Miguel; Restrepo-Jimenez, Paula; Jimenez-Zapata, Juliana; Rosselli, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Pen devices offer advantages compared with vial and syringe (VaS). The purpose of this article was to evaluate efficacy of pen devices compared to VaS. Methods: A systematic review of literature was performed in 8 different databases. References were independently screened and selected. Primary observational or experimental studies comparing pen devices with VaS for insulin administrations were included. Studies on specific populations were excluded. Risk of bias was evaluated using appropriate tools. Data on glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), hypoglycemia, adherence, persistence, patient preference, and quality of life (QOL) were collected. Meta-analysis was performed when appropriate. Heterogeneity and risk of publication bias were evaluated. Otherwise, descriptive analyses of the available data was done. Results: In all, 10 348 articles were screened. A total of 17 studies were finally selected: 7 experimental and 10 analytical. The populations of the included articles were mainly composed of adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Important risk of bias was found in all of the articles, particularly experimental studies. Meta-analyses were performed for HbA1c, hypoglycemia, adherence and persistence. Pen device showed better results in mean HbA1c change, patients with hypoglycemia, adherence and persistence compared to VaS. No difference was observed in number of patients achieving <7% HbA1c. Preference studies showed a tendency favoring pen devices, however nonvalidated tools were used. One QoL study showed improvements in some subscales of SF-36. Conclusions: There is evidence that pen devices offer benefits in clinical and, less clearly, patient-reported outcomes compared to VaS for insulin administration. However, these results should be taken with caution. PMID:26920639

  11. Evaluation of R-Mix shell vials for the diagnosis of viral respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Adriana; Brewster, Lori; Clark, Julia; Simoes, Eric

    2004-05-01

    Respiratory viruses cause significant morbidity and mortality. The management of these infections can be improved by a rapid diagnosis and administration of available virus-specific therapy. The goal of this study was to compare R-Mix, an engineered tissue monolayer for rapid shell vial (SV) diagnosis of viral respiratory infections, with conventional tissue culture (TC) and conventional respiratory SV (primary rhesus monkey kidney (RhMK) and Hep2 monolayers). The primary outcome measure was sensitivity for detection of influenza A and B, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza 1-3, and adenovirus. The study was performed in two phases: (1) the three methods were compared using 250 nasal washes from children with lower respiratory tract infections; (2) a modified R-Mix SV harvesting schedule (SV were harvested at 24 and 120 h) was compared with TC and conventional RhMK/Hep2 SV using 311 respiratory specimens. A total of 110 viruses were identified in the first and 55 in the second phase. Diagnostic accuracies of R-Mix harvested at 24, 48, and 120 h were 98%, whereas for TC varied between 99 and 100%, and for RhMK/Hep2 SV between 98 and 99%. Sensitivities of R-Mix harvested at 24, 48, and 120 h were 26, 75, and 47%, respectively, whereas for TC varied between 60 and 94%, and for RhMK/Hep2 SV between 62 and 85%. R-Mix harvested at 48 h represent a valuable substitute for RhMK/Hep2 SV because they have comparable sensitivities and diagnostic accuracies, but R-Mix offers several technical advantages. In contrast, R-Mix harvested at 24h did not seem a very useful diagnostic tool. The utility of R-Mix harvested at 120 h, which accelerated the diagnosis of 16% of positive specimens in study phase 2, needs further investigation.

  12. Ideal vial size for bortezomib: real-world data on waste and cost reduction in treatment of multiple myeloma in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Clark, Luciana; Castro, Ana Paula; Fortes, Anna Flávia; Santos, Fábio; Clark, Otávio; Engel, Tobias; Pegoretti, Bruna; Teich, Vanessa; Vianna, Denizar; Puty, Fabíola

    2011-01-01

    Single-size vials of drugs may be a source of waste and increase in treatment costs. Bortezomib, indicated for multiple myeloma (MM) treatment, is available in 3.5-mg vials, a quantity higher than the average dose commonly prescribed. This analysis aimed to demonstrate, through real-world data, which would be the optimal vial presentation for bortezomib in Brazil and quantify the reduction in medication waste related to this option. From November 2007 to October 2009 all patients with MM treated with bortezomib were identified via the Evidências database. Analysis of prescribed, dispensed, and wasted doses, their costs and projections of the ideal vial size were performed. Thirty-five patients (mean body surface area of 1.73 m(2)) received 509 infusions in 131 cycles of treatment (average of 3.77 cycles per patient). The average dose prescribed was 2.1 mg per infusion (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.97-2.26) with average waste of 39.5% of the vial content (95% CI 35.35-43.76). The mean waste per patient per day was 1.38 mg (95% CI 1.24-1.52). If a 3-mg vial were available, the average drug waste per patient per day would be 0.88 mg (95% CI 0.74-1.03) or 36.2% less. With a 2.5-mg vial the waste would be 1.05 mg (95% CI 0.81-1.29) or 23.9% less. If two presentations were available (2.5 mg and 0.5 mg), the waste would be 0.52 mg (95% CI 0.4-0.63) or 62.5% less. Considering the price of the different vials to be proportional to the original 3.5-mg vial, the cost would be also reduced by the same rates described above. A simple adjustment in vial size may reduce the waste of bortezomib by 36% to 62% and can also reduce the cost of treatment. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of Conductivity Method as an Alternative to Titration for Hydrolytic Resistance Testing Used for Evaluation of Glass Vials Used in Pharmaceutical Industry.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Kiyoshi; Lee, Hans; Phillips, Joseph; Nashed-Samuel, Yasser

    The European Pharmacopeia surface test to analyze the hydrolytic resistance is a common industrial method to understand and ensure the quality of produced glass vials. Hydrolytic resistance is evaluated by calculating the alkalinity of water extract from autoclaved vials by titration. As an alternative to this titration technique, a conductivity technique was assessed, which directly measures the ions in the water extract. A conductivity meter with a 12 mm diameter electrode was calibrated with a 100 μS/cm conductivity standard and carryover minimized by rinsing the probe in a water beaker per analysis. The limit of quantification at 1 μS/cm was determined as having a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 compared with the water blank. The conductivity method was selective for glass-composing elements (boron, sodium, aluminum, silicon, potassium, and calcium) within the vial extract. Accuracies of spiked conductivity standard within the range of 1 to 100 μS/cm were ±7% and had linearity with coefficient of determination (R(2)) of ≥0.9999. Intraday precision had a relative standard deviation (RSD) (n = 5) of ≤6% for spiked conductivity standard within the range of 1 to 100 μS/cm. Interday precision had a RSD (n = 4) of ≤6% for 10 vials from three glass vial lots. Conductivity of water extracts from nine sets of seven lots of glass vials had a precise linear relationship [R(2) = 0.9876, RSD = 1% (n = 9)] with titration volumes of the same lots. Conductivity results in μS/cm could be converted to titration volumes in milliliters by a conversion factor of 0.0275. The simplicity, sample stability, and individual vial analysis of the conductivity technique were more advantageous than the current titration technique.

  14. A quality improvement project to reduce the intraoperative use of single-dose fentanyl vials across multiple patients in a pediatric institution.

    PubMed

    Buck, David; Subramanyam, Rajeev; Varughese, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The use of a single-dose vial across multiple patients presents a risk to sterility and is against CDC guidelines. We initiated a quality improvement (QI) project to reduce the intraoperative use of single-dose vials of fentanyl across multiple patients at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC). The initial step of the improvement project was the development of a Key Driver Diagram. The diagram has the SMART aim of the project, key drivers inherent to the process we are trying to improve, and specific interventions targeting the key drivers. The number of patients each week receiving an IV dose of fentanyl, from a vial previously accessed for another patient was tracked in a high turnover operating room (OR). The improvement model used was based on the concept of building Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles. Tests of change included provider education, provision of an increased number of fentanyl vials, alternate wasting processes, and provision of single-use fentanyl syringes by the pharmacy. Prior to initiation of this project, it was common for a single fentanyl vial to be accessed for multiple patients. Our data showed an average percentage of failures of just over 50%. During the end of the project, after 7 months, the mean percentage failures had dropped to 5%. Preparation of 20 mcg single-use fentanyl syringes by pharmacy, combined with education of providers on appropriate use, was successful in reducing failures to below our goal of 25%. Appropriately sized fentanyl syringes prepared by pharmacy, education on correct use of single-dose vials, and reminders in the OR, reduced the percentage of patients receiving a dose of fentanyl from a vial previously accessed for another patient in a high-volume otolaryngology room. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Noninvasive in situ identification and band assignments of some pharmaceutical excipients inside USP vials with FT-near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hassan Refat H; Edwards, Howell G M; Scowen, Ian J

    2009-05-01

    For the manufacture of dosage forms all ingredients must be reliably identified. In this paper, the suitability of FT-NIR spectroscopy to identify potassium sorbate, sodium starch glycollate, calcium ascorbate, calcium carbonate, candelilla wax, maltosextrin, monohydrated and anhydrous lactose inside USP vials was investigated. Differentiation between the anhydrous and monohydrated forms of lactose was found to be possible by studying the regions of the near-infrared spectrum corresponding to the combination and first overtone stretching frequencies of water. The results show unequivocally the potential of FT-NIR spectroscopy for rapid, in situ and non-destructive identification of pharmaceutical excipients.

  16. Noninvasive in situ identification and band assignments of some pharmaceutical excipients inside USP vials with FT-near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Hassan Refat H.; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Scowen, Ian J.

    2009-05-01

    For the manufacture of dosage forms all ingredients must be reliably identified. In this paper, the suitability of FT-NIR spectroscopy to identify potassium sorbate, sodium starch glycollate, calcium ascorbate, calcium carbonate, candelilla wax, maltosextrin, monohydrated and anhydrous lactose inside USP vials was investigated. Differentiation between the anhydrous and monohydrated forms of lactose was found to be possible by studying the regions of the near-infrared spectrum corresponding to the combination and first overtone stretching frequencies of water. The results show unequivocally the potential of FT-NIR spectroscopy for rapid, in situ and non-destructive identification of pharmaceutical excipients.

  17. A Single In-Vial Dual Extraction Strategy for the Simultaneous Lipidomics and Proteomics Analysis of HDL and LDL Fractions.

    PubMed

    Godzien, Joanna; Ciborowski, Michal; Armitage, Emily Grace; Jorge, Inmaculada; Camafeita, Emilio; Burillo, Elena; Martín-Ventura, Jose Luis; Rupérez, Francisco J; Vázquez, Jesús; Barbas, Coral

    2016-06-03

    A single in-vial dual extraction (IVDE) procedure for the subsequent analysis of lipids and proteins in the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) fractions derived from the same biological sample is presented. On the basis of methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE) extraction, IVDE leads to the formation of three phases: a protein pellet at the bottom, an aqueous phase with polar compounds, and an ether phase with lipophilic compounds. After sample extraction, performed within a high-performance liquid chromatography vial insert, the ether phase was directly injected for lipid fingerprinting, while the protein pellet, after evaporation of the remaining sample, was used for proteomics analysis. Human HDL and LDL isolates were used to test the suitability of the IVDE methodology for lipid and protein analysis from a single sample in terms of data quality and matching composition to that of HDL and LDL. Subsequently, HDL and LDL fractions isolated from ApoE-KO and wild-type mice were used to validate the capacity of IVDE for revealing changes in lipid and protein abundance. Results indicate that IVDE can be successfully used for the subsequent analysis of lipids and proteins with the advantages of time saving, simplicity, and reduced sample amount.

  18. An evaluation of patient preference for an alternative insulin delivery system compared to standard vial and syringe.

    PubMed

    Stockl, Karen; Ory, Caron; Vanderplas, Ann; Nicklasson, Lars; Lyness, William; Cobden, David; Chang, Eunice

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) affects over 18.2 million Americans and diabetes-related medical costs exceed 132 billion dollars per year, totaling more than 12% of the United States healthcare budget. The Diabetes Control and Complications Clinical Trial demonstrated that intensive insulin therapy and the control of plasma glucose can significantly reduce the incidence of late diabetic complications and delay the progression of existing conditions in type 1 diabetes. Optimal glycemic control often requires intensive insulin therapy to maintain a hemoglobin A(1C) (A1C) of less than 7% as recommended by the American Diabetes Association. It is estimated that more than half of the approximately 7 million Americans using insulin do so with suboptimal treatment and while administering one or two insulin injections per day. Non-adherence may be a contributing factor in suboptimal treatment. For a variety of reasons, many patients diagnosed with diabetes and treated with insulin are non-adherent. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate preference for an insulin delivery system comparing a disposable doser (InnoLet) to the standard vial/syringe. In a prospective, randomized, open-label, two-period, crossover study, 260 patients were enrolled (age > or = 18 years, with type 1 or 2 diabetes, and receiving NPH or regular or 70/30 insulin for at least 6-months). A total of 162 patients completed both treatment arms. Excluded were those unable to read/write English or administer their own injections, pregnant/lactating women, those using antipsychotics, and those with a history of alcohol abuse or cognitive impairment. Patients completed the eight-item Diabetes Fear of Self-Injection Questionnaire at baseline, week 12 and week 24. Items were rated on a 4-point Likert scale (1 = almost never; 4 = almost always) with a maximum fear score of 32. At week 24, patients completed a preference survey. Of the 162 patients completing both treatment arms, 89 (55.0%) were in the vial

  19. Comparing patient preferences and healthcare provider recommendations with the pen versus vial-and-syringe insulin delivery in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ahmann, Andrew; Szeinbach, Sheryl L; Gill, Jasvinder; Traylor, Louise; Garg, Satish K

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to examine healthcare provider (HCP) recommendations and patient preferences for the insulin pen versus vial-and-syringe in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and to assess clinical end points and safety outcomes. Using a randomized, open-label, crossover design, in total, 405 insulin-naive adults with T2DM from 60 centers received basal insulin glargine in one of two device treatment sequences (2 weeks of pen followed by 2 weeks of vial-and-syringe, or vice versa). The primary end point, patient device preference, was evaluated at Week 4 (end of the crossover period) using the Insulin Injection Preference Questionnaire. Patient preference and HCP recommendation were assessed with one global item and three subscale items (blood glucose control, reluctance to use insulin, and long-term insulin use) using a 5-point scale ranging from 1=not preferred or not recommended to 5=preferred or recommended. Patients were then re-randomized to either pen or vial-and-syringe for further observation (6, 10, and 30 weeks) to evaluate clinical end points (glycosylated hemoglobin [A1C] and fasting blood glucose levels) and safety outcomes (hypoglycemia and adverse events). Patients reported a significant preference for pens over vial-and-syringe, and HCPs strongly recommended pens over vial-and-syringe (both P<0.001). Consistent response patterns were observed by HCPs and patients for the three subscale items. Fasting blood glucose, A1C levels, and the incidence of hypoglycemia were comparable in the two groups. Patients preferred pens over vial-and-syringe, with the pen device also recommended by HCPs, when initiating basal insulin treatment in insulin-naive patients with T2DM.

  20. Comparative analysis of ampoules and vials in sterile and conventional packaging as to microbial load and sterility test.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Raphael Ribeiro de Aquino; Tardelli, Maria Angela

    2016-05-24

    To compare sterility and microbial (bacteria and fungi) load in the outer part of hyperbaric bupivacaine (Neocaína®) in ampoule and bupivacaine in vial, in conventional and sterile pack formulations. The sterile packs were divided into two groups: G1 (n=16) with ampoules and G2 (n=16) with vials. Conventional formulations were divided into two groups, being G3 (n=16) with ampoules and G4 (n=16) with vials. The ampoules and vials were opened and had their content drawn. The empty bottles were then placed in sterile plastic bags and sent for analysis of microbial load (bacteria and fungi) and sterility testing. Data were analyzed using the χ2 test with Yates correction, and 95% confidence interval. G1 and G2 showed no bacterial growth when compared to conventional groups (p<0.001). The most common agent in conventional microbiological samples was Staphylococcus aureus. There was no fungal growth in both groups. The use of (sterile pack) reduces the microbial load of bottles, and would decrease the chance of exposure to potential contamination of the anesthetic solution. Comparar a esterilidade e a carga microbiana (bactérias e fungos) da parte externa dos frascos de envasamento de bupivacaína hiperbárica (Neocaína®) em ampola e bupivacaína em frasco-ampola das apresentações convencional e estéril (sterile pack). As apresentações estéreis (sterile pack) foram distribuídas em dois grupos, sendo que o G1 (n=16) continha as ampolas e o G2 (n=16), os frascos-ampola. As apresentações convencionais foram distribuídas em dois grupos, a saber G3 (n=16) com as ampolas e G4 (n=16) com os frascos-ampola. As ampolas e os frascos-ampolas eram abertos e tinham seu conteúdo aspirado. Os frascos vazios eram, então, acondicionados em sacos plásticos estéreis e enviados para análise quanto à carga microbiana (bactérias e fungos), bem como para o teste de esterilidade. Os dados foram analisados por meio do teste χ2 com correção Yates com intervalo de confian

  1. In-vial liquid-liquid microextraction-capillary electrophoresis method for the determination of phenolic acids in vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Abu Bakar, Nur Bahiyah; Makahleh, Ahmad; Saad, Bahruddin

    2012-09-12

    An in-vial liquid-liquid microextraction method was developed for the selective extraction of the phenolic acids (caffeic, gallic, cinnamic, ferulic, chlorogenic, syringic, vanillic, benzoic, p-hydroxybenzoic, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic, o-coumaric, m-coumaric and p-coumaric) in vegetable oil samples. The optimised extraction conditions for 20 g sample were: volume of diluent (n-hexane), 2 mL; extractant, methanol: 5 mM sodium hydroxide (60:40; v/v); volume of extractant, 300 μL (twice); vortex, 1 min; centrifugation, 5 min. Recoveries for the studied phenolic acids were 80.1-119.5%. The simultaneous determination of the phenolic acid extracts was investigated by capillary electrophoresis (CE). Separations were carried out on a bare fused-silica capillary (50 μm i.d.× 40 cm length) involving 25 mM sodium tetraborate (pH 9.15) and 5% methanol as CE background electrolyte in the normal polarity mode, voltage of 30 kV, temperature of 25°C, injection time of 4s (50 mbar) and electropherograms were recorded at 200 nm. The phenolic acids were successfully separated in less than 10 min. The validated in-vial LLME-CE method was applied to the determination of phenolic acids in vegetable oil samples (extra virgin olive oil, virgin olive oil, pure olive oil, walnut oil and grapeseed oil). The developed method shows significant advantages over the current methods as lengthy evaporation step is not required. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Time to positivity and detection of growth in anaerobic blood culture vials predict the presence of Candida glabrata in candidemia: a two-center European cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cobos-Trigueros, Nazaret; Kaasch, Achim J; Soriano, Alex; Torres, Jorge-Luis; Vergara, Andrea; Morata, Laura; Zboromyrska, Yuliya; De La Calle, Cristina; Alejo, Izaskun; Hernández, Cristina; Cardozo, Celia; Marco, Franscesc; Del Río, Ana; Almela, Manel; Mensa, Josep; Martínez, José Antonio

    2014-08-01

    This study shows the accuracy of exclusive or earlier growth in anaerobic vials to predict Candida glabrata in a large series of candidemic patients from two European hospitals using the Bactec 9240 system. Alternatively, C. glabrata can be predicted by a time to positivity cutoff value, which should be determined for each setting.

  3. Streamlined sample cleanup using combined dispersive solid-phase extraction and in-vial filtration for analysis of pesticides and environmental pollutants in shrimp

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new method of sample preparation was developed and is reported for the first time. The approach combines in-vial filtration with dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) in a fast and convenient cleanup of QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) extracts. The method was appli...

  4. Detection of carbapenemase activity directly from blood culture vials using MALDI-TOF MS: a quick answer for the right decision.

    PubMed

    Carvalhaes, Cecilia G; Cayô, Rodrigo; Visconde, Marina F; Barone, Talita; Frigatto, Eliete A M; Okamoto, Debora; Assis, Diego M; Juliano, Luiz; Machado, Antonia M O; Gales, Ana C

    2014-08-01

    Recently, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was successfully applied for the detection of carbapenemase activity directly from Gram-negative colonies. Based on this principle, we evaluated the performance of MALDI-TOF MS for rapid detection of carbapenemase activity directly from positive blood culture vials. A total of 100 blood culture vials were randomly selected. MALDI-TOF MS carbapenemase assay results were confirmed by the detection of carbapenemase-encoding genes. A total of 110 bacterial isolates were recovered. The MALDI-TOF MS carbapenemase assay identified 21 of 29 (72.4%) of the carbapenemase-producing isolates directly from the blood culture vials, especially those encoding KPC-2 (100%) and SPM-1 (100%), after a 4 h incubation period. Although the majority of OXA-23-producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolates were not identified on day 1, all isolates were identified as carbapenemase producers directly from the colony on the next day. The MALDI-TOF MS carbapenemase assay is a feasible and rapid test to identify carbapenemase activity directly from blood culture vials. It may contribute to faster readjustment of empirical antimicrobial therapy and implementation of infection control measures. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Time-to-positivity-based discrimination between Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and strictly anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli in aerobic and anaerobic blood culture vials.

    PubMed

    Defrance, Gilles; Birgand, Gabriel; Ruppé, Etienne; Billard, Morgane; Ruimy, Raymond; Bonnal, Christine; Andremont, Antoine; Armand-Lefèvre, Laurence

    2013-05-01

    Time-to-positivity (TTP) of first positive blood cultures growing Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) was investigated. When anaerobic vials were positive first, TTP ≤ 18 h differentiated Enterobacteriaceae from strict anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli (PPV 98.8%). When the aerobic ones were first, TTP ≤ 13 h differentiated Enterobacteriaceae from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other GNB (PPV 80.8%).

  6. Risk of Injection-Site Abscess among Infants Receiving a Preservative-Free, Two-Dose Vial Formulation of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Burton, Deron C; Bigogo, Godfrey M; Audi, Allan O; Williamson, John; Munge, Kenneth; Wafula, Jackline; Ouma, Dominic; Khagayi, Sammy; Mugoya, Isaac; Mburu, James; Muema, Shadrack; Bauni, Evasius; Bwanaali, Tahreni; Feikin, Daniel R; Ochieng, Peter M; Mogeni, Ondari D; Otieno, George A; Olack, Beatrice; Kamau, Tatu; Van Dyke, Melissa K; Chen, Robert; Farrington, Paddy; Montgomery, Joel M; Breiman, Robert F; Scott, J Anthony G; Laserson, Kayla F

    2015-01-01

    There is a theoretical risk of adverse events following immunization with a preservative-free, 2-dose vial formulation of 10-valent-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10). We set out to measure this risk. Four population-based surveillance sites in Kenya (total annual birth cohort of 11,500 infants) were used to conduct a 2-year post-introduction vaccine safety study of PCV10. Injection-site abscesses occurring within 7 days following vaccine administration were clinically diagnosed in all study sites (passive facility-based surveillance) and, also, detected by caregiver-reported symptoms of swelling plus discharge in two sites (active household-based surveillance). Abscess risk was expressed as the number of abscesses per 100,000 injections and was compared for the second vs first vial dose of PCV10 and for PCV10 vs pentavalent vaccine (comparator). A total of 58,288 PCV10 injections were recorded, including 24,054 and 19,702 identified as first and second vial doses, respectively (14,532 unknown vial dose). The risk ratio for abscess following injection with the second (41 per 100,000) vs first (33 per 100,000) vial dose of PCV10 was 1.22 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.37-4.06). The comparator vaccine was changed from a 2-dose to 10-dose presentation midway through the study. The matched odds ratios for abscess following PCV10 were 1.00 (95% CI 0.12-8.56) and 0.27 (95% CI 0.14-0.54) when compared to the 2-dose and 10-dose pentavalent vaccine presentations, respectively. In Kenya immunization with PCV10 was not associated with an increased risk of injection site abscess, providing confidence that the vaccine may be safely used in Africa. The relatively higher risk of abscess following the 10-dose presentation of pentavalent vaccine merits further study.

  7. Risk of Injection-Site Abscess among Infants Receiving a Preservative-Free, Two-Dose Vial Formulation of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Deron C.; Bigogo, Godfrey M.; Audi, Allan O.; Williamson, John; Munge, Kenneth; Wafula, Jackline; Ouma, Dominic; Khagayi, Sammy; Mugoya, Isaac; Mburu, James; Muema, Shadrack; Bauni, Evasius; Bwanaali, Tahreni; Feikin, Daniel R.; Ochieng, Peter M.; Mogeni, Ondari D.; Otieno, George A.; Olack, Beatrice; Kamau, Tatu; Van Dyke, Melissa K.; Chen, Robert; Farrington, Paddy; Montgomery, Joel M.; Breiman, Robert F.; Scott, J. Anthony G.; Laserson, Kayla F.

    2015-01-01

    There is a theoretical risk of adverse events following immunization with a preservative-free, 2-dose vial formulation of 10-valent-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10). We set out to measure this risk. Four population-based surveillance sites in Kenya (total annual birth cohort of 11,500 infants) were used to conduct a 2-year post-introduction vaccine safety study of PCV10. Injection-site abscesses occurring within 7 days following vaccine administration were clinically diagnosed in all study sites (passive facility-based surveillance) and, also, detected by caregiver-reported symptoms of swelling plus discharge in two sites (active household-based surveillance). Abscess risk was expressed as the number of abscesses per 100,000 injections and was compared for the second vs first vial dose of PCV10 and for PCV10 vs pentavalent vaccine (comparator). A total of 58,288 PCV10 injections were recorded, including 24,054 and 19,702 identified as first and second vial doses, respectively (14,532 unknown vial dose). The risk ratio for abscess following injection with the second (41 per 100,000) vs first (33 per 100,000) vial dose of PCV10 was 1.22 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.37–4.06). The comparator vaccine was changed from a 2-dose to 10-dose presentation midway through the study. The matched odds ratios for abscess following PCV10 were 1.00 (95% CI 0.12–8.56) and 0.27 (95% CI 0.14–0.54) when compared to the 2-dose and 10-dose pentavalent vaccine presentations, respectively. In Kenya immunization with PCV10 was not associated with an increased risk of injection site abscess, providing confidence that the vaccine may be safely used in Africa. The relatively higher risk of abscess following the 10-dose presentation of pentavalent vaccine merits further study. PMID:26509274

  8. Effect of glargine insulin delivery method (pen device versus vial/syringe) on glycemic control and patient preferences in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Seggelke, Stacey A; Hawkins, R Matthew; Gibbs, Joanna; Rasouli, Neda; Wang, Cecilia C Low; Draznin, Boris

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of two different glargine insulin delivery methods (pen device vs. vial/syringe) on glycemic control and patient preferences in a randomized, open-label, crossover, comparative effectiveness study. Thirty-one patients discharged from the hospital were recruited for this study. In the hospital, all patients were treated with a basal-bolus insulin regimen. Upon discharge, 21 patients received glargine by pen device for 3 months and were then switched to vial/syringe for the next 3 months (group 1). Group 2 consisted of 10 patients discharged on vial/syringe and converted to pen device after 3 months. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was measured at enrollment and at 3 and 6 months. A questionnaire assessing patient preference was administered at 3 and 6 months. Groups 1 and 2 had similar baseline HbA1c (10.7 ± 2.2% and 11.2 ± 2.5%, respectively) and similar reduction in HbA1c at 3 months (7.8 ± 1.7% and 7.3 ± 1.4%, respectively; P<.001 vs. baseline). However, after crossover, the changes in HbA1c from 3 to 6 months were significantly different between groups. HbA1c increased to 8.5 ± 2.0% at 6 months in group 1 after switching to the vial/syringe but remained unchanged (7.1 ± 1.6%) in group 2 after switching to a pen device (P<.01, group 1 vs. group 2). Patient questionnaires after each phase of the trial revealed that patients found the pen device more convenient and were more likely to recommend this insulin delivery method to someone else. Patients switching to a glargine pen device achieved lower HbA1c at the 6-month follow-up. Patients in both groups overwhelmingly preferred glargine pens over vials/syringes.

  9. Rapid determination of vial heat transfer parameters using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) in response to step-changes in pressure set-point during freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Kuu, Wei Y; Nail, Steven L; Sacha, Gregory

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a rapid determination of vial heat transfer parameters, that is, the contact parameter K(cs) and the separation distance l(v), using the sublimation rate profiles measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). In this study, each size of vial was filled with pure water followed by a freeze-drying cycle using a LyoStar II dryer (FTS Systems) with step-changes of the chamber pressure set-point at to 25, 50, 100, 200, 300, and 400 mTorr. K(cs) was independently determined by nonlinear parameter estimation using the sublimation rates measured at the pressure set-point of 25 mTorr. After obtaining K(cs), the l(v) value for each vial size was determined by nonlinear parameter estimation using the pooled sublimation rate profiles obtained at 25 to 400 mTorr. The vial heat transfer coefficient K(v), as a function of the chamber pressure, was readily calculated, using the obtained K(cs) and l(v) values. It is interesting to note the significant difference in K(v) of two similar types of 10 mL Schott tubing vials, primary due to the geometry of the vial-bottom, as demonstrated by the images of the contact areas of the vial-bottom. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  10. Effect of room temperature transport vials on DNA quality and phylogenetic composition of faecal microbiota of elderly adults and infants.

    PubMed

    Hill, Cian J; Brown, Jillian R M; Lynch, Denise B; Jeffery, Ian B; Ryan, C Anthony; Ross, R Paul; Stanton, Catherine; O'Toole, Paul W

    2016-05-10

    Alterations in intestinal microbiota have been correlated with a growing number of diseases. Investigating the faecal microbiota is widely used as a non-invasive and ethically simple proxy for intestinal biopsies. There is an urgent need for collection and transport media that would allow faecal sampling at distance from the processing laboratory, obviating the need for same-day DNA extraction recommended by previous studies of freezing and processing methods for stool. We compared the faecal bacterial DNA quality and apparent phylogenetic composition derived using a commercial kit for stool storage and transport (DNA Genotek OMNIgene GUT) with that of freshly extracted samples, 22 from infants and 20 from older adults. Use of the storage vials increased the quality of extracted bacterial DNA by reduction of DNA shearing. When infant and elderly datasets were examined separately, no differences in microbiota composition were observed due to storage. When the two datasets were combined, there was a difference according to a Wilcoxon test in the relative proportions of Faecalibacterium, Sporobacter, Clostridium XVIII, and Clostridium XlVa after 1 week's storage compared to immediately extracted samples. After 2 weeks' storage, Bacteroides abundance was also significantly different, showing an apparent increase from week 1 to week 2. The microbiota composition of infant samples was more affected than that of elderly samples by storage, with significantly higher Spearman distances between paired freshly extracted and stored samples (p < 0.001). When the microbiota profiles were analysed at the operational taxonomic unit (OTU) level, three infant datasets in the study did not cluster together, while only one elderly dataset did not. The lower microbiota diversity of the infant gut microbiota compared to the elderly gut microbiota (p < 0.001) means that any alteration in the infant datasets has a proportionally larger effect. The commercial storage vials appear

  11. Rapid Shell Vial Culture Technique for Detection of Enteroviruses and Adenoviruses in Fecal Specimens: Comparison with Conventional Virus Isolation Method

    PubMed Central

    Van Doornum, G. J. J.; De Jong, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    Detection of enteroviruses and adenoviruses mainly in fecal specimens by rapid culture with inoculation onto cell monolayers in flat-bottom tubes by centrifugation and immunofluorescence staining with genus-specific monoclonal antibodies was compared with that by the conventional virus isolation procedure. For both conventional culture and shell vial culture human lung fibroblast cells and tertiary monkey kidney cells were used. For enterovirus detection, 979 clinical specimens (916 stool specimens, 56 cerebrospinal fluid specimens, and 7 nasopharyngeal swabs) were used. Conventional culture detected 74 enterovirus isolates. A cytopathic effect compatible with the presence of an enterovirus after 3 days of incubation occurred in 25 of the 74 (34%) specimens that eventually became positive. The detection rate for enteroviruses by rapid cell culture after 2 to 3 days of incubation was 42 of 74 (57%). The genus-specific enterovirus monoclonal antibody did not react with strains of echovirus types 22 and 23 or enterovirus type 71. Rapid cell culture for the detection of adenoviruses was performed with 567 clinical specimens (536 stool specimens, 25 cerebrospinal fluid specimens, and 6 miscellaneous specimens), in which 42 adenoviruses were found by conventional culture. Nine of the 42 (21%) adenovirus isolates were detected by conventional culture within 3 days after inoculation, whereas 21 (50%) were found by rapid cell culture within 2 to 3 days. Only two of the nine specimens found to be positive for the enteric adenovirus type 41 by conventional culture as well by a type-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tested positive by rapid cell culture. In conclusion, the rapid shell vial assay allows the early detection and identification of enteroviruses and adenoviruses in clinical specimens but is markedly less sensitive than the conventional isolation procedure according to the eventual results of the conventional isolation procedure. Conventional cell

  12. The association between use of mealtime insulin pens versus vials and healthcare charges and resource utilization in patients with type 2 diabetes: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Eby, Elizabeth L; Boye, Kristina S; Lage, Maureen J

    2013-10-01

    To compare all-cause and diabetes-related resource utilization and healthcare charges among adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus who initiated therapy with mealtime insulin disposable pens or vials. Data were obtained from the Innovus inVision database from January 1, 2006 through June 30, 2010. Generalized linear models with a gamma distribution and log link estimated the association between medical charges and use of mealtime insulin pens vs vials in the 1 year post-index date, while generalized linear models with a negative binomial distribution estimated resource utilization. Controlling for patient characteristics, general health, and patient copayments, insulin therapy initiation with disposable pens, compared to vials, was associated with significantly fewer all-cause hospitalizations (1.45 vs. 1.66; p < 0.0001) as well as a significantly shorter hospital length of stay (2.16 days vs. 3.53 days; p < 0.0001). Pen use, compared to vials, was also associated with significantly fewer diabetes-related hospitalizations (1.36 vs. 1.47; p < 0.0001), and shorter hospital length of stay (1.12 days vs. 1.72 days; p < 0.0001). Despite higher diabetes-related drug charges ($3593 vs. $2755; p < 0.0001) associated with the use of pens, results showed significantly lower all-cause total healthcare charges ($42,150 vs. $53,340; p < 0.0001) and significantly lower diabetes-related total healthcare charges ($12,722 vs. $14,540; p < 0.0001) for patients who initiated therapy on mealtime insulin with pens compared to vials. Data were drawn from administrative claims and included only patients with medical and outpatient prescription drug benefit coverage. Hence, the results may not be generalizable. The retrospective analyses relied on diagnostic codes to identify patients, assess patient general health, and determine other values, rather than formal, clinical assessments. The analyses did not include indirect healthcare costs. The administration of

  13. Impact of a Transition from Respiratory Virus Shell Vial to Multiplex PCR on Clinical Outcomes and Cost in Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Iroh Tam, Pui-Ying; Zhang, Lei; Cohen, Zohara

    2017-01-07

    While respiratory virus PCR panel (RVPP) is more expensive than shell vial (SV) cell culture, it has been shown to reduce unnecessary diagnostic procedures, decrease the inappropriate use of antimicrobials, and shorten the hospital length of stay (LOS). We therefore hypothesized that, for hospitalized children, RVPP would be associated with improved clinical outcomes but higher hospital charges than SV cell culture. We performed a retrospective cohort study of hospitalized children. Multivariate analysis was performed, and p-values were calculated. Respiratory virus testing was collected in a total of 1625 inpatient encounters, of which 156 were tested positive by RVPP (57.7%) and 112 were tested positive by SV (11.1%, p < 0.05). Excluding human rhinovirus (HRV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) from the analysis, patients with a positive test from SV had more comorbidities (p = 0.04) and higher mortality (p = 0.008). Patients with a positive test from RVPP had shorter LOS (p = 0.0503). Hospital charges for patients with a positive test from RVPP were lower, but not significantly so. When a multivariate analysis was performed, there were no statistically significant differences in comorbidities, mortality, LOS, or median hospital charges between those patients with a positive SV and those with a positive RVPP. Although testing with RVPP significantly increased the detection of respiratory viruses, clinical outcomes remained comparable to those tested with SV, however RVPP was found to not be associated with higher long-term hospital costs.

  14. Impact of a Transition from Respiratory Virus Shell Vial to Multiplex PCR on Clinical Outcomes and Cost in Hospitalized Children

    PubMed Central

    Iroh Tam, Pui-Ying; Zhang, Lei; Cohen, Zohara

    2017-01-01

    While respiratory virus PCR panel (RVPP) is more expensive than shell vial (SV) cell culture, it has been shown to reduce unnecessary diagnostic procedures, decrease the inappropriate use of antimicrobials, and shorten the hospital length of stay (LOS). We therefore hypothesized that, for hospitalized children, RVPP would be associated with improved clinical outcomes but higher hospital charges than SV cell culture. We performed a retrospective cohort study of hospitalized children. Multivariate analysis was performed, and p-values were calculated. Respiratory virus testing was collected in a total of 1625 inpatient encounters, of which 156 were tested positive by RVPP (57.7%) and 112 were tested positive by SV (11.1%, p < 0.05). Excluding human rhinovirus (HRV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) from the analysis, patients with a positive test from SV had more comorbidities (p = 0.04) and higher mortality (p = 0.008). Patients with a positive test from RVPP had shorter LOS (p = 0.0503). Hospital charges for patients with a positive test from RVPP were lower, but not significantly so. When a multivariate analysis was performed, there were no statistically significant differences in comorbidities, mortality, LOS, or median hospital charges between those patients with a positive SV and those with a positive RVPP. Although testing with RVPP significantly increased the detection of respiratory viruses, clinical outcomes remained comparable to those tested with SV, however RVPP was found to not be associated with higher long-term hospital costs. PMID:28067857

  15. Development of single vial kits for preparation of (68)Ga-labelled peptides for PET imaging of neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Archana; Pandey, Usha; Chakravarty, Rubel; Sarma, Haladhar Dev; Dash, Ashutosh

    2014-08-01

    The present work was aimed at the formulation and evaluation of freeze-dried kits of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-peptides for the preparation of (68)Ga-labelled peptides for PET imaging of neuroendocrine tumours. The (68)GaCl3 was obtained from the locally produced nanoceria-PAN, composite-sorbent-based (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator. Single vial kits of somatostatin analogues DOTA-[Tyr(3)]-octreotide (DOTA-TOC), DOTA-[NaI(3)]-octreotide (DOTA-NOC) and DOTA-Tyr(3)-Thre(8)-octreotide (DOTA-TATE) were formulated. Optimization of radiolabelling with (68)Ga from the in-house generator, characterization, long term evaluation of stability of kits and bioevaluation studies in animals was carried out. DOTA-TOC, DOTA-NOC and DOTA-TATE kits could be successfully formulated. Consistently high radiochemical yields (>95 %) were obtained on radiolabelling with (68)Ga. The radiolabelled peptides exhibited excellent in vitro stability. Biodistribution studies in normal non-tumour bearing Swiss mice revealed fast clearance of activity via renal route as reported for the respective peptides. Availability of ready to use DOTA-peptide kits in conjunction with (68)Ge/(68)Ga generators would pave way for the establishment of (68)Ga radiopharmacy, a long-felt need of the nuclear medicine community.

  16. Convenient Preparation of [(68)Ga]DKFZ-PSMA-11 Using a Robust Single-Vial Kit and Demonstration of Its Clinical Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Satpati, Drishty; Shinto, Ajit; Kamaleshwaran, K K; Sane, Surekha; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2016-06-01

    [(68)Ga]DKFZ-PSMA-11 has proved to be an important diagnostic radiotracer for targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) overexpression in both recurrent prostate cancer (PC) and relevant metastatic sites. However, the widespread, routine clinical use of such a potential radiopharmaceutical demands availability of a ready-to-use kit formulation to enable convenient radiopharmaceutical preparation. Herein, we report the development of a freeze-dried kit vial for the formulation of [(68)Ga]DKFZ-PSMA-11 and its clinical use in patients using a "shake-bake-inject" methodology. The freeze-dried kit vial was developed after optimization of ligand content (PSMA-11) and pH conditions. The kit was formulated using (68)Ga from two different commercially available generators. Positron emission tomography/X-ray computed tomography (PET/CT) images of PC patients were obtained using the kit-formulated radiotracer. [(68)Ga]DKFZ-PSMA-11 was prepared in >98 % radiochemical yield and purity using the freeze-dried kit vials. Kits were optimized for the preparation of four patient doses. The clinical utility was evaluated in patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer, and the images were of good quality as well as conforming to tumor marker and clinical expectations. The development of a simple and ready-to-use freeze-dried DKFZ-PSMA-11 kit for the preparation of Ga-68-based radiotracers constitutes a major step towards the expedition of the widespread and economical screening of PC patients.

  17. Through-vial impedance spectroscopy of critical events during the freezing stage of the lyophilization cycle: the example of the impact of sucrose on the crystallization of mannitol.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Muhammad Sohail; Smith, Geoff; Polygalov, Eugene; Ermolina, Irina

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the application of through-vial impedance spectroscopy in the measurement of eutectic crystallization during the freezing stage of the lyophilisation cycle. Impedance measurements of various sugar solutions (mannitol 5%, 10% and 15% w/v, sucrose 5% w/v and mannitol 5% w/v, and sucrose 5% w/v solutions) were taken during a freeze-thaw cycle, over a frequency range 10-10(6) Hz with a scan interval of 1.5 min, using measurement vials with externally attached electrodes connected to a high resolution impedance analyzer. Estimates for the electrical resistance of the mannitol solutions record the exothermic crystallization of mannitol at a temperature of -24 °C during the temperature ramp down stage of the freezing cycle, which is in close agreement with the off-line DSC measurement of -22 °C. The freezing profile of a 5% mannitol solution with 5% sucrose (a component that does not crystallize in the frozen solution) demonstrated the inhibition of mannitol crystallization (with the implication that the product will then require sub-Tg' freezing and drying). The work suggests a role for through-vial impedance spectroscopy in the concurrent development of the product formulation and freeze drying cycle without the uncertainty introduced when using off-line date to define the critical process parameters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of the reaction products from micro-vial pyrolysis of the mixture glucose/proline and of a tobacco leaf extract:Search for Amadori intermediates.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Kazuhisa; David, Frank; Tienpont, Bart; Sandra, Koen; Ochiai, Nobuo; Tamura, Hirotoshi; Sandra, Pat

    2015-11-27

    Micro-vial pyrolysis (PyroVial) was used to study the production of compounds important for the aroma of heat-treated natural products such as tobacco. Firstly, a mixture of glucose and proline was pyrolyzed as model, as this sugar and amino acid are also abundant in tobacco leaf (Nicotiana tobacum L.). The pyrolysate was analyzed using headspace-GC–MS, liquid injection GC–MS and LC–MS. Next, micro-vial pyrolysis in combination with LC–MS was applied to tobacco leaf extract. Using MS deconvolution, molecular feature extraction and differential analysis it was possible to identify Amadori intermediates of the Maillard reaction in the tobacco leaf extract. The intermediate disappeared as was the case for 1-deoxy-1-prolino-β-d-fructose or the concentration decreased in the pyrolysate compared to the original extract such as for the 1-deoxy-1-[2-(3-pyridyl)-1-pyrrolidinyl]-β-d-fructose isomers indicating that Amadori intermediates are important precursors for aroma compound formation.

  19. Pharmaceutical container/closure integrity. II: The relationship between microbial ingress and helium leak rates in rubber-stoppered glass vials.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, L E; Nguyen, L; Moeckly, C S; Gerth, R

    1997-01-01

    Helium leak rate measurements were quantitatively correlated to the probability of microbial ingress for rubber-stoppered glass vials subjected to immersion challenge. Standard 10-mL tubing glass vials were modified by inserting micropipettes of various sizes (0.1 to 10 microns nominal diameter) into a side wall hole and securing them with epoxy. Butyl rubber closures and aluminum crimps were used to seal the vials. The test units were sealed in a helium-filled glove bag, then the absolute helium leak rates were determined. The test units were disassembled, filled with media, resealed, and autoclaved. The test units were thermally treated to eliminate airlocks within the micropipette lumen and establish a liquid path between microbial challenge media and the test units' contents. Microbial challenge was performed by immersing the test units in a 35 degrees C bath containing magnesium ion and 8 to 10 logs of viable P. diminuta and E. coli for 24 hours. The test units were then incubated at 35 degrees C for an additional 13 days. Microbial ingress was detected by turbidity and plating on blood agar. The elimination of airlocks was confirmed by the presence of magnesium ions in the vial contents by atomic absorption spectrometry. A total of 288 vials were subjected to microbial challenge testing. Those test units whose contents failed to show detectable magnesium ions were eliminated from further analysis. At large leak rates, the probability of microbial ingress approached 100% and at very low leak rates microbial ingress rates were 0%. A dramatic increase in microbial failure occurred in the leak rate region 10(-4.5) to 10(-3) std cc/sec, which roughly corresponded to leak diameters ranging from 0.4 to 2 microns. Below a leak rate of 10(-4.5) std cc/sec the microbial failure rate was < 10%. The critical leak rate in our studies, i.e. the value below which microbial ingress cannot occur because the leak is too small, was observed to be between 10(-5) and 10(-5.8) std

  20. Establishment of quantitative sequencing and filter contact vial bioassay for monitoring pyrethroid resistance in the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius.

    PubMed

    Seong, Keon Mook; Lee, Da-Young; Yoon, Kyong Sup; Kwon, Deok Ho; Kim, Heung Chul; Klein, Terry A; Clark, J Marshall; Lee, Si Hyeock

    2010-07-01

    Two point mutations (V419L and L925I) in the voltage-sensitive sodium channel alpha-subunit gene have been identified in deltamethrin-resistant bed bugs. A quantitative sequencing (QS) protocol was developed to establish a population-based genotyping method as a molecular resistance-monitoring tool based on the frequency of the two mutations. The nucleotide signal ratio at each mutation site was generated from sequencing chromatograms and plotted against the corresponding resistance allele frequency. Frequency prediction equations were generated from the plots by linear regression, and the signal ratios were shown to highly correlate with resistance allele frequencies (r2 > 0.9928). As determined by QS, neither mutation was found in a bed bug population collected in 1993. Populations collected in recent years (2007-2009), however, exhibited completely or nearly saturating L925I mutation frequencies and highly variable frequencies of the V419L mutation. In addition to QS, the filter contact vial bioassay (FCVB) method was established and used to determine the baseline susceptibility and resistance of bed bugs to deltamethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin. A pyrethroid-resistant strain showed >9,375- and 6,990-fold resistance to deltamethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin, respectively. Resistance allele frequencies in different bed bug populations predicted by QS correlated well with the FCVB results, confirming the roles of the two mutations in pyrethroid resistance. Taken together, employment of QS in conjunction with FCVB should greatly facilitate the detection and monitoring of pyrethroid-resistant bed bugs in the field. The advantages of FCVB as an on-site resistance-monitoring tool are discussed.

  1. Shell-vial culture and real-time PCR applied to Rickettsia typhi and Rickettsia felis detection.

    PubMed

    Segura, Ferran; Pons, Immaculada; Pla, Júlia; Nogueras, María-Mercedes

    2015-11-01

    Murine typhus is a zoonosis transmitted by fleas, whose etiological agent is Rickettsia typhi. Rickettsia felis infection can produces similar symptoms. Both are intracellular microorganisms. Therefore, their diagnosis is difficult and their infections can be misdiagnosed. Early diagnosis prevents severity and inappropriate treatment regimens. Serology can't be applied during the early stages of infection because it requires seroconversion. Shell-vial (SV) culture assay is a powerful tool to detect Rickettsia. The aim of the study was to optimize SV using a real-time PCR as monitoring method. Moreover, the study analyzes which antibiotics are useful to isolate these microorganisms from fleas avoiding contamination by other bacteria. For the first purpose, SVs were inoculated with each microorganism. They were incubated at different temperatures and monitored by real-time PCR and classical methods (Gimenez staining and indirect immunofluorescence assay). R. typhi grew at all temperatures. R. felis grew at 28 and 32 °C. Real-time PCR was more sensitive than classical methods and it detected microorganisms much earlier. Besides, the assay sensitivity was improved by increasing the number of SV. For the second purpose, microorganisms and fleas were incubated and monitored in different concentrations of antibiotics. Gentamicin, sufamethoxazole, trimethoprim were useful for R. typhi isolation. Gentamicin, streptomycin, penicillin, and amphotericin B were useful for R. felis isolation. Finally, the optimized conditions were used to isolate R. felis from fleas collected at a veterinary clinic. R. felis was isolated at 28 and 32 °C. However, successful establishment of cultures were not possible probably due to sub-optimal conditions of samples.

  2. Semiautomated labelling and fractionation of yttrium-90 and lutetium-177 somatostatin analogues using disposable syringes and vials.

    PubMed

    Asti, Mattia; Atti, Giulia; Iori, Michele; Farioli, Daniela; Filice, Angelina; Versari, Annibale

    2012-11-01

    The treatment of tumours expressing somatostatin receptors with yttrium-90 (90Y)-labelled and lutetium-177 (177Lu)-labelled somatostatin analogues is one of the most interesting therapeutic approaches adopted in nuclear medicine in recent years. However, the process of synthesis and fractionation of these radiopharmaceuticals is still mainly carried out manually despite the high radiation exposure to the operators and the need to comply with good manufacturing practices. In this study a semiautomatic synthesizer [automatic dose dispenser (ADD-2)] using only disposable syringes and vials has been presented. Small-scale syntheses (185-555 MBq) of 90Y/177Lu-DOTATATE were performed by adding the appropriate amount of peptide to a 90Y/177Lu chloride solution (n=10). The radionuclide/peptide molar ratio was 1 : 17 and 1 : 2 for 90Y and 177Lu, respectively. The solutions were buffered to 4.6 pH by ascorbate buffer and heated at 90°C for 30 min. Radiochemical purity was assessed by two independent radio-thin-layer chromatography systems. The solutions were fractioned to mimic the preparation of patient doses. All synthesis and fractionation steps were performed using ADD-2. The radiochemical yield was 92 ± 3% for 90Y and 97 ± 1% for 177Lu labelling. Radiochemical purity was more than 99.5%. The accuracy and reproducibility of the instrument in transferring and fractionating radioactive solutions were high (maximal error ≈ 5%). ADD-2 appears suitable for use in clinical preparations of 90Y/177Lu-DOTATATE with therapeutic amounts of precursors (20-30 GBq). The operator's exposure to radiation by using ADD-2 in comparison with manual preparations is under investigation.

  3. Assessment of infection control practices for interventional techniques: a best evidence synthesis of safe injection practices and use of single-dose medication vials.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Falco, Frank J E; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Caraway, David L; Helm Ii, Standiford; Wargo, Bradley W; Hansen, Hans; Parr, Allan T; Singh, Vijay; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2012-01-01

    It is universally accepted that transmission of bloodborne pathogens during health care procedures continues to occur because of the use of unsafe and improper injection, infusion, and medication administration practices by health care professionals in various clinical settings. This resulted in development of multiple guidelines based on case reports; however, these case reports are confounded by multiple factors without causal relationship to a single factor. Even then, single-dose vials used for multiple patients have been singled out and became the focus of infection control policies resulting in inordinate expenses for practices without improving patient safety. The cost of implementation of single dose vial policy in interventional pain management for drugs alone may cost $750 million, whereas with single use radional gloves may exceed $1 billion per year. Best evidence synthesis. To critically appraise and synthesize the literature on infection control practices for interventional techniques, including safe injection and medication vial utilization. The available literature on infection control practices was reviewed. Due to the nature of the studies involved, with the majority being case reports, and a few prospective evaluations, quality assessment and clinical relevance criteria were not applied. Data sources included relevant literature identified through searches of PubMed and EMBASE from 1966 through June 2012, literature from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and manual searches of the bibliographies of known primary and review articles. The primary outcome measure was correlating infection to a breach of standards in infection control practices. The secondary objective was to assess the contribution of single-dose vials independently for infection. A total of 60 reports met inclusion criteria, with 16 reports related to pain management and other procedures, of which 9 reports were

  4. Simplicity, safety, and acceptability of insulin pen use versus the conventional vial/syringe device in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Wijdan H; Khreis, Noura A; Kabbara, Wissam K

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the simplicity, safety, patients' preference, and convenience of the administration of insulin using the pen device versus the conventional vial/syringe in patients with diabetes. This observational study was conducted in multiple community pharmacies in Lebanon. The investigators interviewed patients with diabetes using an insulin pen or conventional vial/syringe. A total of 74 questionnaires were filled over a period of 6 months. Answers were entered into the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software and Excel spreadsheet. t-test, logistic regression analysis, and correlation analysis were used in order to analyze the results. A higher percentage of patients from the insulin pen users group (95.2%) found the method easy to use as compared to only 46.7% of the insulin conventional users group (P 0.001, relative risk [RR]: 2.041, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.178-3.535). Moreover, 61.9% and 26.7% of pen users and conventional users, respectively, could read the scale easily (P 0.037, RR 2.321, 95% CI: 0.940-5.731), while 85.7% of pen users found it more convenient shifting to pen and 86.7% of the conventional users would want to shift to pen if it had the same cost. Pain perception was statistically different between the groups. A much higher percentage (76.2%) of pen users showed no pain during injection compared to only 26.7% of conventional users (P 0.003, RR 2.857, 95% CI: 1.194-6.838). The insulin pen was significantly much easier to use and less painful than the conventional vial/syringe. Proper education on the methods of administration/storage and disposal of needles/syringes is needed in both groups.

  5. Simplicity, safety, and acceptability of insulin pen use versus the conventional vial/syringe device in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Wijdan H; Khreis, Noura A; Kabbara, Wissam K

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the simplicity, safety, patients’ preference, and convenience of the administration of insulin using the pen device versus the conventional vial/syringe in patients with diabetes. Methods This observational study was conducted in multiple community pharmacies in Lebanon. The investigators interviewed patients with diabetes using an insulin pen or conventional vial/syringe. A total of 74 questionnaires were filled over a period of 6 months. Answers were entered into the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software and Excel spreadsheet. t-test, logistic regression analysis, and correlation analysis were used in order to analyze the results. Results A higher percentage of patients from the insulin pen users group (95.2%) found the method easy to use as compared to only 46.7% of the insulin conventional users group (P 0.001, relative risk [RR]: 2.041, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.178–3.535). Moreover, 61.9% and 26.7% of pen users and conventional users, respectively, could read the scale easily (P 0.037, RR 2.321, 95% CI: 0.940–5.731), while 85.7% of pen users found it more convenient shifting to pen and 86.7% of the conventional users would want to shift to pen if it had the same cost. Pain perception was statistically different between the groups. A much higher percentage (76.2%) of pen users showed no pain during injection compared to only 26.7% of conventional users (P 0.003, RR 2.857, 95% CI: 1.194–6.838). Conclusion The insulin pen was significantly much easier to use and less painful than the conventional vial/syringe. Proper education on the methods of administration/storage and disposal of needles/syringes is needed in both groups. PMID:25848231

  6. Nurses' perceptions and satisfaction with the use of insulin pen devices compared with insulin vial and syringes in an inpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Shogbon, Angela O; Ngo, Dao; Jacob, Bobby; Kimble, Laura P; Ryan, Gina

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare nurses' perceptions and satisfaction with the use of insulin pen devices versus vial and syringes for insulin delivery in an inpatient setting. The study used a descriptive design using self-report surveys. Nurses rated their perceptions on a 4-point Likert scale (from 1=strongly disagree to 4=strongly agree) on the ease of use, ease to teach patients, confidence and comfort in use, perceived time efficiency, safety of use, risk of needle sticks, and overall satisfaction and preference with use of each insulin delivery device. In total, 139 (95%) nurses from nine nursing units at one hospital participated in this study. Compared with vial and syringe, nurses felt insulin pens were easier to use to measure insulin dose (mean±SD, 3.7±0.5 vs. 3.1±0.7; P<0.001), were easier to teach patients to use (3.5±0.6 vs. 2.8±0.7; P<0.001), provided more confidence in measuring insulin dose (3.7±0.5 vs. 3.4±0.6, P<0.001), saved on administration and preparation time (3.6±0.5 vs. 2.3±0.8; P<0.001), reduced the risk of giving a wrong dose of insulin (3.2±0.8 vs. 2.2±0.7; P<0.001), and reduced the risk of needle sticks (3.5±0.7 vs. 2.1±0.8; P<0.001). Overall, a majority of nurses preferred the use of insulin pens to vial and syringes in an inpatient setting (83% vs. 15%; P<0.05). Nurses felt more comfortable and confident with the use of insulin pens compared with vial and syringes and perceived insulin pens to be a safer alternative for both patients and themselves.

  7. Stability of Ertapenem 100 mg/mL in Manufacturer’s Glass Vials or Syringes at 4°C and 23°C

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Scott E; Law, Shirley; Perks, William; Iazzetta, John

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prophylactic administration of ertapenem as a single 1-g IV dose has been shown to reduce sepsis after prostate biopsy. Objective: To evaluate the stability of ertapenem after reconstitution with 0.9% sodium chloride to a final concentration of 100 mg/mL and storage in the manufacturer’s original glass vials or polypropylene syringes. Methods: On study day 0, 100 mg/mL solutions of ertapenem were retained in the manufacturer’s glass vials or packaged in polypropylene syringes and stored at 4°C or 23°C without protection from fluorescent room light. Samples were assayed periodically over 18 days using a validated, stability-indicating liquid chromatographic method with ultra-violet detection. A beyond-use date was determined as the time for the concentration to decline to 90% of the initial (day 0) concentration, based on the fastest degradation rate, with 95% confidence. Results: Reconstituted solutions stored in the manufacturer’s glass vials or polypropylene syringes exhibited a first-order degradation rate, such that 10% of the initial concentration was lost in the first 2.5 days when stored at 4°C or within the first 6.75 h when stored at room temperature (23°C). Analysis of variance showed differences in the percentage remaining due to temperature (p < 0.001) and study day (p < 0.001) but not type of container (p = 0.98). When a 95% CI for the degradation rate was calculated and used to determine a beyond-use date, it was established that more than 90% of the initial concentration would remain for 2.35 days at 4°C and for 0.23 day (about 5 h, 30 min) at room temperature. Conclusions: A 100 mg/mL ertapenem solution stored in the manufacturer’s glass vial or a polypropylene syringe will retain more than 90.5% of the initial concentration when stored for 48 h at 4°C and for an additional 1 h at 23°C. PMID:25964683

  8. Stability of Bortezomib 2.5 mg/mL in Vials and Syringes Stored at 4°C and Room Temperature (23°C)

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Scott E; Charbonneau, Lauren F; Law, Shirley

    2014-01-01

    Background: Solutions of bortezomib 1.0 mg/mL for IV administration are reportedly stable for up to 42 days. Recent publications have reported that the safety profile of bortezomib is better with subcutaneous administration than with IV administration. Objective: To evaluate the stability of higher-concentration bortezomib solutions for subcutaneous administration (i.e., 2.5 mg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride [normal saline or NS]). Methods: On study day 0, twelve 3.5-mg vials of powdered bortezomib were each reconstituted with 1.4 mL of NS to prepare solutions with concentration 2.5 mg/mL. Half of the solutions were subsequently stored in the original vials and half were transferred to syringes. Three of each type of container were stored in the refrigerator (4°C) and the other 3 of each type were stored at room temperature (23°C). Concentration analysis and physical inspection were completed on study days 0, 1, 2, 8, 12, 14, 19, and 21. The concentration of bortezomib was determined by a validated liquid chromatographic method with ultraviolet detection. The expiry date was determined according to the time to achieve 90% of the initial concentration, based on the fastest degradation rate calculated from the 95% confidence interval of the observed degradation rate. Results: The analytical method separated degradation products from bortezomib such that the concentration was measured specifically and accurately (with absolute deviations from known concentration averaging 2.99%), with intraday and interday reproducibility averaging 1.51% and 2.51%, respectively. During the study period, all solutions were observed to retain at least 95.26% of the initial concentration in both types of containers at both temperatures. Conclusions: Bortezomib (3.5 mg in manufacturer’s vial) reconstituted with 1.4 mL NS is physically and chemically stable for up to 21 days at 4°C or 23°C when stored in either the manufacturer’s original glass vial or a syringe. Subcutaneous injection

  9. A multicenter, randomized, open-label, comparative, two-period crossover trial of preference, efficacy, and safety profiles of a prefilled, disposable pen and conventional vial/syringe for insulin injection in patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Korytkowski, Mary; Bell, David; Jacobsen, Carol; Suwannasari, Rudee

    2003-11-01

    The accuracy and convenience of pen devices for insulin injection have improved quality of life for patients with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (DM). Prefilled, disposable pens have the advantage of simplicity, with minimal training and attention required and no installation of new cartridges necessary. The aim of this study was to assess patient preference, efficacy, and safety profiles of a prefilled, disposable pen (FlexPen) and conventional vial/syringe injection method for insulin injection therapy among patients with DM. In a multicenter, randomized, open-label, crossover study, patients with type 1 or 2 DM were transferred from previous QD or BID conventional insulin therapy to a mixture of 70% insulin aspart protamine suspension and 30% insulin aspart injection (NovoLog Mix 7030) for 4 weeks of dose optimization using their usual type of syringe. Patients were then randomly assigned to use either vial/syringe or a prefilled, disposable pen to inject the biphasic insulin aspart 7030 mixture for the next 4 weeks, followed by 4 weeks of use of the other injection device. Efficacy, safety profiles, and patient preference for the delivery systems were compared. A total of 121 patients (mean [SD] age, 57.0 [12.4] years; age range, 28-81 years; mean [SD] body mass index, 31 [5.5] kg/m(2)) were enrolled. One hundred three patients completed the study. Seventy-four percent of patients (78105) indicated a preference for the pen over the vial/syringe method (95% CI, 71%-87%), compared with 20% (21105) who preferred the vial/syringe. Eighty-five percent (88104) considered the pen more discreet for use in public (compared with 9% [9104] for the vial/syringe), 74% (77104) considered it easier to use overall (compared with 21% [22104] for the vial/syringe), and 85% (89105) found the insulin dose scale on the pen easier to read (compared with 10% [10105] for the vial/syringe). Patients had statistically significant improvement in glycosylated hemoglobin values during

  10. Aggregation and Particle Formation of Therapeutic Proteins in Contact With a Novel Fluoropolymer Surface Versus Siliconized Surfaces: Effects of Agitation in Vials and in Prefilled Syringes.

    PubMed

    Teska, Brandon M; Brake, Jeffrey M; Tronto, Gregory S; Carpenter, John F

    2016-07-01

    We examined the effects of an accelerated agitation protocol on 2 protein therapeutics, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and Avastin (bevacizumab), in contact with a novel fluoropolymer surface and more typical siliconized surfaces. The fluoropolymer surface provides "solid-phase" lubrication for the syringe plunger-obviating the need for silicone oil lubrication in prefilled syringes. We tested the 2 surfaces in a vial system and in prefilled glass syringes. We also examined the effects of 2 buffers, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and 0.2-M glycine, with and without the addition of polysorbate 20, on agitation-induced aggregation of IVIG. Aggregation was monitored by measuring subvisible particle formation and soluble protein loss. In both vials and syringes, protein particle formation was much lower during agitation with the fluoropolymer surface than with the siliconized surface. Also, particle formation was greater in PBS than in glycine buffer, an effect attributed to lower colloidal stability of IVIG in PBS. Polysorbate 20 in the formulation greatly inhibited protein particle formation. Overall, the fluoropolymer plunger surface in an unsiliconized glass barrel was demonstrated to be a viable solution for eliminating silicone oil droplets from prefilled syringe formulations and providing a consistent system for rationale formulation development and simplified particle analysis.

  11. Method for the analysis of triadimefon and ethofumesate from dislodgeable foliar residues on turfgrass by solid-phase extraction and in-vial elution.

    PubMed

    Runes, H B; Jenkins, J J; Field, J A

    1999-08-01

    Triadimefon, a fungicide, and ethofumesate, an herbicide, are commonly applied to turfgrass in the Pacific Northwest, resulting in foliar residues. A simple and rapid method was developed to determine triadimefon and ethofumesate concentrations from dislodgeable foliar residues on turfgrass. Turfgrass samples were washed, and wash water containing surfactant (a 0.126% solution) was collected for residue analysis. This analytical method utilizes a 25 mm C(8) Empore disk and in-vial elution to quantitatively determine triadimefon and ethofumesate in 170 mL aqueous samples. The analytes were eluted by placing the disk in a 2 mL autosampler vial with 980 microL of ethyl acetate and 20 microL of 2-chlorolepidine, the internal standard, for analysis by GC/MS. The method quantitation limits are 0.29 microg/L for ethofumesate and 0.59 microg/L for triadimefon. The method detection limits are 0.047 microg/L and 0.29 microg/L for ethofumesate and triadimefon, respectively. Concentrations of triadimefon and ethofumesate from dislodgeable foliar residues from a field study are reported.

  12. Feasibility study of a reference material for water chemistry: long term stability of triazine and phenylurea residues stored in vials or on polymeric sorbents.

    PubMed

    Deplagne, Jérôme; Vial, Jérôme; Pichon, Valérie; Lalere, Béatrice; Hervouet, Gilles; Hennion, Marie-Claire

    2006-08-04

    Matrix Reference Materials (MRM) are essential tools for the validation of analytical protocols. Nowadays, there are no such materials for the determination of herbicides in water. So, a feasibility study of a MRM for the analysis of triazines and phenylureas in water was carried out. Different kinds of candidates MRM were prepared: solutions of pesticides diluted in acetonitrile and stored in sealed vials or stored at the dry state after the evaporation of the solvent to dryness, pesticides stored on two different types of polymeric solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbents after the percolation of drinking or river waters spiked with pesticides. The stability of these candidates MRM stored at various temperatures (room temperature, 0.5 degrees C or -18 degrees C) was studied over a period of approximately 1 year. Two different levels of concentration were studied for each kind of material. During the storage, some samples of each different MRM candidate were monthly analyzed by liquid chromatography. Results showed that, among the candidate materials, some of them presented satisfactory enough stability to consider a further certification. They were either pesticides in solution in sealed vials or pesticides stored on cartridges after the percolation of spiked water samples. However, it was shown that these different MRM candidates had to be stored at a temperature lower than 0.5 degrees C.

  13. High-throughput analysis of DNA fragments using a miniaturized CE system combined with a slotted-vial array sample introduction system.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiao-Feng; Li, Qi; Wang, Shi-Li; Xu, Zhang-Run; Du, Wen-Bin; Fang, Qun; Fang, Zhao-Lun

    2008-12-01

    An automated nanoliter sample introduction system was combined to a liquid-core waveguide (LCW)-based microfluidic CE system for high-throughput analysis of DNA fragments. The main component of the sample introduction system was a motor-driven plate, on which a circular array of bottom-slotted vials containing sample/buffer solutions was placed. A 7 cm-long LCW capillary served as both the sample probe and separation channel. The inlet terminal of the capillary could pass through the slots of the vials for electrokinetic sample introduction, and the capillary outlet was immersed in the solution of a reservoir, behind which a PMT facing directly to the outlet was positioned. A diode laser was used as excitation source for LCW LIF detection. Performance of the system was demonstrated through the separation of DNA fragments. Baseline separation was achieved for all 11 fragments of PhiX174-HaeIII digest DNA with a throughput of 33/h. Theoretical plate number for 603 bp fragment was 7.3x10(6)/m, corresponding to a plate height 0.14 microm. The detection limitation for 603 bp fragment was 0.4 ng/microL with a precision of 2.2% RSD for the peak height. Automated sample changing and introduction were achieved with only 0.3 nL gross sample consumption for each cycle.

  14. Feasibility of Freeze-Drying Oil-in-Water Emulsion Adjuvants and Subunit Proteins to Enable Single Vial Vaccine Drug Products.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Vidyashankara; Cayatte, Corinne; Marshall, Jason D; Sun, Jenny; Schneider-Ohrum, Kirsten; Maynard, Sean K; Rajani, Gaurav Manohar; Bennett, Angie Snell; Remmele, Richard L; Bishop, Steve M; McCarthy, Michael P; Muralidhara, Bilikallahalli

    2017-03-01

    To generate potent vaccine responses, subunit protein antigens typically require co-formulation with an adjuvant. Oil-in-water emulsions are among the most widely investigated adjuvants, based on their demonstrated ability to elicit robust antibody and cellular immune responses in the clinic. However, most emulsions cannot be readily frozen or lyophilized, due to the risk of phase separation, and may have a deleterious effect on protein antigen stability when stored long term as a liquid co-formulation. To circumvent this, current emulsion-formulated vaccines generally require a complex multi-vial presentation with obvious drawbacks, making a single vial presentation for such products highly desirable. We describe the development of a stable, lyophilized squalene emulsion adjuvant through innovative formulation and process development approaches. Upon reconstitution, freeze-dried emulsion preparations were found to have a minimal increase in particle size of ∼20nm and conferred immunogenicity in BALB/c mice similar in potency to freshly-prepared emulsion co-formulations in liquid form.

  15. Filter-vial dispersive solid-phase extraction as a simplified clean-up for determination of ethylphenols in red wines.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Ariel R; Bottini, Rubén

    2017-09-01

    In-vial filtration with dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) clean-up of QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe) extracts is proposed for the determination of ethylphenols (EPs) in red wines. Analytes were extracted from 5mL wine sample (previously alkalinized with 0.5% sodium hydroxide) using 5mL acetonitrile. For phase separation, 1.5g NaCl and 4g anhydrous MgSO4 were added. Then, a 0.5mL aliquot of the partitioned supernatant was cleaned-up using d-SPE and in-vial filtration with a combination of anhydrous CaCl2 (100mg) and primary-secondary amine (PSA, 25mg) as sorbents. The proposed method provided limits of quantification (LOQs) ranging from 0.024 to 0.04mgL(-1). Considering matrix-matched calibration as quantification technique, the recoveries (accuracy) ranged between 73% and 116%. The method was applied for the determination of EPs in 15 commercial wines of Argentina, where 4-EP was quantified at concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 3.01mgL(-1). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Air Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's air research provides the critical science to develop and implement outdoor air regulations under the Clean Air Act and puts new tools and information in the hands of air quality managers and regulators to protect the air we breathe.

  17. LAT-1 based primary breast cancer detection by [99m]Tc-labeled DTPA-bis-methionine scintimammography: first results using indigenously developed single vial kit preparation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sarika; Singh, Baljinder; Mishra, Anil K; Rathod, Deepti; Hazari, Puja Panwar; Chuttani, Krishna; Chopra, Shalini; Singh, Paramvir Mangat; Abrar, M L; Mittal, Bhagwant R; Singh, Gurpreet

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic utility of a single vial ready to label with [99m]Tc kit preparation of DTPA-bis-methionine (DTPA-bis-MET) for the detection of primary breast cancer. The conjugate (DTPA-bis-MET) was synthesized by covalently conjugating two molecules of methionine to DTPA and formulated as a single vial ready to label with [99m]Tc lyophilized kit preparations. Thirty female patients (mean age=47.5±11.8 years; range=21-69 years) with radiological/clinical evidence of having primary breast carcinoma were subjected to [99m]Tc-methionine scintigraphy. The whole body (anterior and posterior) imaging was performed on all the patients at 5 minutes, 10 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, and 4 hours following an intravenous administration of 555-740 MBq radioactivity of [99m]Tc-methionine. In addition, scintimammography (static images; 256×256 matrix) at 1, 2, and 4 hours was also performed on all the patients. The resultant radiolabel, that is, [99m]Tc-DTPA-bis-MET, yielded high radiolabeling efficiency (>97.0%), radiochemical purity (166-296 MBq/μmol), and shelf life (>3 months). The radiotracer primarily gets excreted through the kidneys and localizes in the breast cancer lesions with high target-to-nontarget ratios. The mean±SD ratios on the scan-positive lesions acquired at 1, 2, and 4 hours postinjection were 3.6±0.48, 3.10±0.24, and 2.5±0.4, respectively. [99m]Tc-methionine scintimammography demonstrated an excellent sensitivity and positive predictive value of 96.0% each for the detection of primary breast cancer. Ready to label single vial kit formulations of DTPA-bis-MET can be easily synthesized as in-house production and conveniently used for the scintigraphic detection of breast cancer and other methionine-dependent tumors expressing the L-type amino acid transporter-1 receptor. The imaging technique thus could be a potential substitute for the conventional single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based tumor imaging agents, especially

  18. LAT-1 Based Primary Breast Cancer Detection by [99m]Tc-Labeled DTPA-Bis-Methionine Scintimammography: First Results Using Indigenously Developed Single Vial Kit Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sarika; Mishra, Anil K.; Rathod, Deepti; Hazari, Puja Panwar; Chuttani, Krishna; Chopra, Shalini; Singh, Paramvir Mangat; Abrar, M.L.; Mittal, Bhagwant R.; Singh, Gurpreet

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic utility of a single vial ready to label with [99m]Tc kit preparation of DTPA-bis-methionine (DTPA-bis-MET) for the detection of primary breast cancer. Methods: The conjugate (DTPA-bis-MET) was synthesized by covalently conjugating two molecules of methionine to DTPA and formulated as a single vial ready to label with [99m]Tc lyophilized kit preparations. Thirty female patients (mean age=47.5±11.8 years; range=21–69 years) with radiological/clinical evidence of having primary breast carcinoma were subjected to [99m]Tc-methionine scintigraphy. The whole body (anterior and posterior) imaging was performed on all the patients at 5 minutes, 10 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, and 4 hours following an intravenous administration of 555–740 MBq radioactivity of [99m]Tc-methionine. In addition, scintimammography (static images; 256×256 matrix) at 1, 2, and 4 hours was also performed on all the patients. Results: The resultant radiolabel, that is, [99m]Tc-DTPA-bis-MET, yielded high radiolabeling efficiency (>97.0%), radiochemical purity (166–296 MBq/μmol), and shelf life (>3 months). The radiotracer primarily gets excreted through the kidneys and localizes in the breast cancer lesions with high target-to-nontarget ratios. The mean±SD ratios on the scan-positive lesions acquired at 1, 2, and 4 hours postinjection were 3.6±0.48, 3.10±0.24, and 2.5±0.4, respectively. [99m]Tc-methionine scintimammography demonstrated an excellent sensitivity and positive predictive value of 96.0% each for the detection of primary breast cancer. Conclusion: Ready to label single vial kit formulations of DTPA-bis-MET can be easily synthesized as in-house production and conveniently used for the scintigraphic detection of breast cancer and other methionine-dependent tumors expressing the L-type amino acid transporter-1 receptor. The imaging technique thus could be a potential substitute for the conventional single-photon emission computed

  19. Predictors of Initiating Rapid-Acting Insulin Analog Using Vial/Syringe, Prefilled Pen, and Reusable Pen Devices in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lauren J.; Anderson, Julie; Foster, Shonda A.; Corrigan, Sheila M.; Smith, David M.; Curkendall, Suellen

    2010-01-01

    Background Limited data are available on the predictors of insulin delivery device choice. This study assessed the patient- and health-care-system-related factors that predict the initiation of one rapid-acting insulin analog (RAIA) delivery system over another. Methods A retrospective analysis using a claims database (January 1, 2007, through March 31, 2009) was conducted. Patients were required to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and have ≥12 months of continuous eligibility prior to their first prescription of a RAIA on or after January 1, 2008. The three cohorts in the study were vial/syringe (n = 6820), prefilled pen (n = 5840), and reusable pen (n = 2052). Multiple factors were examined using stepwise logistic regression. Results Factors that increased the likelihood of initiating RAIA using prefilled pen versus vial/syringe included endocrinologist visit [odds ratio (OR) = 3.13, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.56, 3.82], prior basal insulin use with pen (OR = 4.85, 95% CI = 4.21, 5.59), and use of ≥1 oral antihyperglycemic agents (OR = 1.32, 95% CI = 1.20, 1.45). Factors that decreased the likelihood included inpatient admission (OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.70, 0.83), nursing home visit (OR = 0.22, 95% CI = 0.18, 0.27), and obesity (OR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.53, 0.83). There were fewer differences between prefilled and reusable pen initiators. Factors that increased the likelihood of initiating with prefilled versus reusable pen included endocrinologist visit (OR = 1.87, CI = 1.50, 2.34) and inpatient admission (OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.30, 1.64). Conclusion Significant differences in predictors were observed between prefilled pen and vial/syringe initiators. The differences were fewer between prefilled and reusable pen initiators. These differences should be taken into consideration when evaluating outcomes associated with specific insulin delivery systems. PMID:20513319

  20. [Determination of retinol and alpha-tocopherol in milk and milk products using high-pressure liquid chromatography after saponification in serum vials].

    PubMed

    Bilic, N; Sieber, R

    1988-06-01

    An improved procedure is described for the determination of retinol and alpha-tocopherol in milk and dairy products using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Samples are saponified in sealed 10-ml serum vials in the absence of oxygen, cooled and neutralized by injecting glacial acetic acid into the system. Retinyl acetate and 5,7-dimethyltocol respectively are used as the internal standards. The solution is extracted with hexane and the organic phase is cleaned up on a sodium sulphate/aluminium oxide column. The solution is evaporated under vacuum and dissolved in ethanol for HPLC analysis. A short reversed-phase column packed with RP-18, using methanol as the eluent, allows fast separations of both the vitamins.

  1. Artificial Leaks in Container Closure Integrity Testing: Nonlinear Finite Element Simulation of Aperture Size Originated by a Copper Wire Sandwiched between the Stopper and the Glass Vial.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Alejandra; Roehl, Holger; Brown, Helen; Adler, Michael; Chalus, Pascal; Mahler, Hanns-Christian

    2016-01-01

    Container closure integrity (CCI) testing is required by different regulatory authorities in order to provide assurance of tightness of the container closure system against possible contamination, for example, by microorganisms. Microbial ingress CCI testing is performed by incubation of the container closure system with microorganisms under specified testing conditions. Physical CCI uses surrogate endpoints, such as coloration by dye solution ingress or gas flow (helium leakage testing). In order to correlate microbial CCI and physical CCI test methods and to evaluate the methods' capability to detect a given leak, artificial leaks are being introduced into the container closure system in a variety of different ways. In our study, artificial leaks were generated using inserted copper wires between the glass vial opening and rubber stopper. However, the insertion of copper wires introduces leaks of unknown size and shape. With nonlinear finite element simulations, the aperture size between the rubber stopper and the glass vial was calculated, depending on wire diameter and capping force. The dependency of the aperture size on the copper wire diameter was quadratic. With the data obtained, we were able to calculate the leak size and model leak shape. Our results suggest that the size as well as the shape of the artificial leaks should be taken into account when evaluating critical leak sizes, as flow rate does not, independently, correlate to hole size. Capping force also affected leak size. An increase in the capping force from 30 to 70 N resulted in a reduction of the aperture (leak size) by approximately 50% for all wire diameters. From 30 to 50 N, the reduction was approximately 33%. Container closure integrity (CCI) testing is required by different regulatory authorities in order to provide assurance of tightness of the container closure system against contamination, for example, by microorganisms. Microbial ingress CCI testing is performed by incubation of the

  2. Comparison of three GC/MS methodologies for the analysis of fatty acids in Sinorhizobium meliloti: development of a micro-scale, one-vial method.

    PubMed

    Basconcillo, Libia Saborido; McCarry, Brian E

    2008-08-01

    Three protocols for fatty acid analysis in Sinorhizobium meliloti were improved by the addition of a number of standards/controls and a silylation step which allowed the determination of recoveries, extents of conversion of lipids to fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) and extents of side reactions. Basic hydrolysis followed by acid-catalyzed methylation and transmethylation with sodium methoxide, were the best for the analysis of 3-hydroxy- and cyclopropane fatty acids, respectively. A micro-scale, one-vial method that employed sodium methoxide/methanol was equally efficient and on a 1000-fold smaller scale than standard methods. Because this method avoids aqueous extractions, 3-hydroxybutanoic acid was detected as its trimethylsilyloxy methyl ester along with FAMEs.

  3. Formulation and evaluation of a single vial lyophilized preparation of technetium-99m labeled ethylene dicysteine as a renal scintigraphic agent.

    PubMed

    Sohaib, Muhammad; Afshan, Anjum; Saeed, Shabana; Khalid, Mujahid Ali; Yousuf, Mohammad

    2014-09-01

    (99m)Tc labeled N-N-ethylene-L, L-dicysteine (EC) was introduced in form of multiple-step kit as an alternate renal imaging radiopharmaceutical for commonly used (99m)Tc-MAG3. We developed a single component lyophilized kit of EC ready to be labeled with (99m)Tc. We present the optimization of the components of our formulation, its evaluation in animal models, normal human volunteers and patients of various renal diseases, in comparison with (99m)Tc-MAG3. Efficient labeling of EC was achieved with our preparation at pH 7 to 12. The formulation at pH 8 was used further for bio distribution studies in organs of sacrificed Sprague Dawley rats and a live rhesus monkey using scintigraphy. After satisfactory bio-distribution results, the kit was then evaluated in normal human volunteers through renography. But the renogram parameters of (99m)Tc-EC (pH 8) were statistically inferior to (99m)Tc-MAG3. Surrogate kit at pH 10 was therefore developed and re-evaluated in rats for organ bio distribution. After favorable results the kit was then assessed further in normal volunteers and a group of patients with various renal disorders via scintigraphy. The EC kit developed at pH 10 gave images better than and scintigraphic parameters comparable to (99m)Tc-MAG3. It was concluded that single vial kit we formulated easy to prepare than three-vial kit and can be used as an alternate to (99m)Tc-MAG3.

  4. Outbreak of Burkholderia cepacia bloodstream infections traced to the use of Ringer lactate solution as multiple-dose vial for catheter flushing, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    De Smet, B; Veng, C; Kruy, L; Kham, C; van Griensven, J; Peeters, C; Ieng, S; Phe, T; Vlieghe, E; Vandamme, P; Jacobs, J

    2013-09-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex is a group of Gram-negative bacteria known as respiratory pathogens in cystic fibrosis patients, but also increasingly reported as a cause of healthcare associated infections. We describe an outbreak of B. cepacia bloodstream infections in a referral hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Over a 1.5-month period, blood cultures from eight adult patients grew B. cepacia. Bloodstream infection occurred after a median of 2.5 days of hospitalisation. Three patients died: 7, 10 and 17 days after blood cultures were sampled. As part of the outbreak investigation, patient files were reviewed and environmental sampling was performed. All patients had peripheral venous catheters that were flushed with Ringer lactate drawn from a 1 L bag, used as multiple-dose vial at the ward. Cultures of unopened Ringer lactate and disinfectants remained sterile but an in-use bag of Ringer lactate solution and the dispensing pin grew B. cepacia. The isolates from patients and flushing solution were identified as B. cepacia by recA gene sequence analysis, and random amplified polymorphic DNA typing confirmed clonal relatedness. The onset of the outbreak had coincided with the introduction of a dispensing pin with a screw fit that did not allow proper disinfection. Re-enforcement of aseptic procedures with sterile syringe and needle has ended the outbreak. Growth of B. cepacia should alert the possibility of healthcare associated infection also in tropical resource-limited settings. The use of multiple-dose vials should be avoided and newly introduced procedures should be assessed for infection control risks.

  5. Pipette vial dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of benzoylurea insecticide in fruit juice.

    PubMed

    Xi, Xuefei; Yang, Miyi; Shen, Ganni; Wu, Xiaoling; Lu, Runhua; Zhou, Wenfeng; Zhang, Sanbing; Gao, Haixiang

    2016-01-01

    A simple, sensitive, and efficient method of using a pipette vial to perform dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic droplets was coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and a diode array detector for the preconcentration and analysis of four benzoylurea insecticides in fruit juice. In this method, 1-dodecanol was used as an extractant, and a snipped pipette was used as an experimental vial to simplify the procedure of collecting and separating solidified extractant. The experimental parameters were optimized using a Plackett-Burman design and one-factor-at-a-time method. Under the optimal conditions in the water model, the limits of detection for analytes varied from 0.03 to 0.28 μg/L, and the enrichment factors ranged from 147 to 206. Linearity was achieved for diflubenzuron and flufenoxuron in a range of 0.5-500 μg/L, for hexaflumuron in a range of 1-500 μg/L, and for triflumuron in a range of 5-500 μg/L. The correlation coefficients for the analytes ranged from 0.9986 to 0.9994 with recoveries of 91.4-110.9%. Finally, the developed technique was successfully applied to fruit juice samples with acceptable results. The relative standard deviations of the analytes at two spiking levels (50 and 200 μg/L) varied between 0.2 and 4.5%. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Stability of tranexamic acid in 0.9% sodium chloride, stored in type 1 glass vials and ethylene/propylene copolymer plastic containers.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, Susan V; Sztajnkrycer, Matthew D; Jenkins, Donald A; Zietlow, Scott P; Berns, Kathleen S; Park, Myung S

    2014-01-01

    Tranexamic acid has recently been demonstrated to decrease all-cause mortality and deaths due to hemorrhage in trauma patients. The optimal administration of tranexamic acid is within one hour of injury, but not more than three hours from the time of injury. To aid with timely administration, a premixed solution of 1 gram tranexamic acid and 0.9% sodium chloride was proposed to be stocked as a medication in both the aeromedical transport helicopters and Emergency Department at Mayo Clinic Hospital--Rochester Saint Marys Campus. Since no published stability data exists for tranexamic acid diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride, this study was undertaken to determine the stability of tranexamic acid diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride while being stored in two types of containers. Stability was determined through the use of a stability-indicating high-performance liquid reverse phase chromatography assay, pH, and visual tests. Tranexamic acid solutions of 1 gram in 0.9% sodium chloride 65 mL were studied at predetermined intervals for 90 days in ethylene/propylene copolymer plastic containers, protected from light, and at both controlled room and refrigerated temperatures. Tranexamic acid solutions of 1 gram in 0.9% sodium chloride 50 mL were studied at predetermined intervals for 180 days in clear Type 1 borosilicate glass vials sealed with intact elastomeric, Flourotec-coated stoppers, stored protected from light at controlled room temperature. Solutions stored in the ethylene/propylene copolymer plastic containers at both storage temperatures maintained at least 98% of initial potency throughout the 90-day study period. Solutions stored in glass vials at controlled room temperature maintained at least 92% of initial potency throughout the 180-day study period. Visual and pH tests revealed stable, clear, colorless, and particulate-free solutions throughout the respective study periods.

  7. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  8. Characteristics Relating to Adherence and Persistence to Basal Insulin Regimens Among Elderly Insulin-Naïve Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Pre-Filled Pens versus Vials/Syringes.

    PubMed

    Slabaugh, S Lane; Bouchard, Jonathan R; Li, Yong; Baltz, Jean C; Meah, Yunus A; Moretz, D Chad

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have found higher rates of adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using insulin pens compared to vial and syringe administration; however, little evidence is available to support this observation in elderly patients. This was a retrospective claims database analysis of a predominantly elderly Medicare Advantage with Prescription Drug (MAPD) insurance population consisting of 3172 insulin-naïve patients with T2DM who initiated basal insulin using pre-filled pens or vial and syringe ('vial'). The index date was defined by the first pharmacy claim for basal insulin. Adherence, measured as proportion of days covered (PDC) and medication possession ratio (MPR), and persistence were evaluated in a 12-month follow-up period using an adjusted days' supply. Multivariate regression analyses and a Cox proportional hazards model were used to identify characteristics associated with adherence and non-persistence, respectively, and compare findings between the pen and vial groups. The pen cohort was slightly younger than the vial cohort (69.4 vs. 70.1 years, respectively; P = 0.0338). Similar proportions of male patients (53.3% vs. 56.8%; P = 0.0529) occurred in both cohorts, and lower Deyo-Charlson Comorbidity Index (4.4 vs. 5.0; P < 0.0001) was found for the pen cohort. Adjusted mean PDC was significantly higher in the pen cohort than the vial cohort (0.67 vs. 0.50; P < 0.001), as was mean MPR (0.75 vs. 0.57; P < 0.0001). Adjusted odds for adherence (PDC ≥ 80%) showed a positive association with use of an insulin pen (odds ratio = 2.19, 95% CI: 1.86-2.59). The adjusted risk of non-persistence (discontinuation) was significantly lower (58%) in the pen cohort relative to the vial cohort (hazard ratio = 0.42, 95% CI: 0.38-0.45). Key limitations include assumptions related to accuracy and comprehensiveness of claims data, and specifically days' supply data used to measure insulin adherence. These findings suggest that pen

  9. Air Abrasion

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Is Air Abrasion? Article Chapters What Is Air Abrasion? What Happens? The Pros and Cons Will I Feel Anything? Is Air Abrasion for Everyone? print full article print this ...

  10. Single vial sample preparation of markers of nerve agents by dispersive solid-phase extraction using magnetic strong anion exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Singh, Varoon; Chinthakindi, Sridhar; Purohit, Ajay Kumar; Pardasani, Deepak; Tak, Vijay; Dubey, Devendra Kumar

    2015-05-22

    A sample preparation method involving extraction, enrichment and derivatization of acidic degradation products of nerve agents was developed using magnetic strong anion exchange resins (MSAX). The method was performed in a single vial involving magnetic dispersive solid phase extraction (MDSPE). Analytes were derivatized with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) in the presence of resins. MSAX were custom synthesized using Fe3O4 nanoparticles as core, 4-vinylpyridine-co-divinylbenzene as polymer shell and quaternary pyridinium function as anion-exchanger. Hydroxide ions were the counter-anions of MSAX to effectively capture the acidic alkyl alkylphosphonic acids (AAPAs) and alkylphosphonic acids (APAs). Quantitative measurements of analytes were performed in the selected ion monitoring mode of GC-MS. Full scan mode of analysis was followed for identifications. Under the optimized conditions analytes were recovered in the range of 39.7-98.8% (n=3, relative standard deviations (RSD) from 0.3 to 6.5%). Limits of detection (LODs) were in the range of 0.1-1.1ngmL(-1); and the linear dynamic range was 5-1000ngmL(-1) with r(2) of 0.9977-0.9769. Applicability of the method was tested with rain-, tap-, muddy-water and Organization for Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) Proficiency Test samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Fast method for the determination of short-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (scl-PHAs) in bacterial samples by In Vial-Thermolysis (IVT).

    PubMed

    Abbondanzi, F; Biscaro, G; Carvalho, G; Favaro, L; Lemos, P; Paglione, M; Samorì, C; Torri, C

    2017-10-25

    A new method based on the GC-MS analysis of thermolysis products obtained by treating bacterial samples at a high temperature (above 270°C) has been developed. This method, here named "In-Vial-Thermolysis" (IVT), allowed for the simultaneous determination of short-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (scl-PHA) content and composition. The method was applied to both single strains and microbial mixed cultures (MMC) fed with different carbon sources. The IVT procedure provided similar analytical performances compared to previous Py-GC-MS and Py-GC-FID methods, suggesting a similar application for PHA quantitation in bacterial cells. Results from the IVT procedure and the traditional methanolysis method were compared; the correlation between the two datasets was fit for the purpose, giving a R(2) of 0.975. In search of further simplification, the rationale of IVT was exploited for the development of a "field method" based on the titration of thermolyzed samples with sodium hydrogen carbonate to quantify PHA inside bacterial cells. The accuracy of the IVT method was fit for the purpose. These results lead to the possibility for the on-line measurement of PHA productivity. Moreover, they allow for the fast and inexpensive quantification/characterization of PHA for biotechnological process control, as well as investigation over various bacterial communities and/or feeding strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of a single vial kit formulation of [99mTc]-labeled doxorubicin for tumor imaging and treatment response assessment-preclinical evaluation and preliminary human results.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pardeep; Singh, Baljinder; Ghai, Anchal; Hazari, Puja P; Mittal, B R; Mishra, Anil K

    2015-05-30

    The present study describes the successful radiolabeling of [99mTcO(-) 4 ] with doxorubicin, and the resultant product was formulated in to a ready-to-label lyophilized single vial kit preparation for convenient use in a routine clinical setting. The radiolabeled preparation of [99mTc]-doxorubicin exhibited a high radiolabeling efficiency of more than 95.0%, serum stability for up to 24 h, and shelf-life of lyophilized cold kits was more than 6 months. Animal imaging data in tumor-bearing mice demonstrated that [99mTc]-doxorubicin accumulated in the tumor site with high target (tumor) to non-target (contra-lateral thigh) ratio (3.2 ± 0.5). The ratio decreased to 1.2 ± 0.6 indicating a good response on follow up imaging performed after 2 weeks of doxorubicin treatment. [99mTc]-doxorubicin scintigraphic data in human volunteers supported the hepato-renal excretion of the radiotracer as reflected by the increased accumulation of the radiotracer as a function of time in intestine, kidneys, and urinary bladder. Further, imaging in patients (very limited number) indicated that the technique may be useful in the detection of active sarcoma and post treatment (surgery/chemotherapy) remission or absence of the disease. The technique, however, needs validation through further preclinical evaluation and imaging in a larger number of patients. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Metabolomic Method: UPLC-q-ToF Polar and Non-Polar Metabolites in the Healthy Rat Cerebellum Using an In-Vial Dual Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Thambisetty, Madhav; Parsons, Richard; Hye, Abdul; Legido-Quigley, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Unbiased metabolomic analysis of biological samples is a powerful and increasingly commonly utilised tool, especially for the analysis of bio-fluids to identify candidate biomarkers. To date however only a small number of metabolomic studies have been applied to studying the metabolite composition of tissue samples, this is due, in part to a number of technical challenges including scarcity of material and difficulty in extracting metabolites. The aim of this study was to develop a method for maximising the biological information obtained from small tissue samples by optimising sample preparation, LC-MS analysis and metabolite identification. Here we describe an in-vial dual extraction (IVDE) method, with reversed phase and hydrophilic liquid interaction chromatography (HILIC) which reproducibly measured over 4,000 metabolite features from as little as 3mg of brain tissue. The aqueous phase was analysed in positive and negative modes following HILIC separation in which 2,838 metabolite features were consistently measured including amino acids, sugars and purine bases. The non-aqueous phase was also analysed in positive and negative modes following reversed phase separation gradients respectively from which 1,183 metabolite features were consistently measured representing metabolites such as phosphatidylcholines, sphingolipids and triacylglycerides. The described metabolomics method includes a database for 200 metabolites, retention time, mass and relative intensity, and presents the basal metabolite composition for brain tissue in the healthy rat cerebellum. PMID:25853858

  14. Isolation of Coxiella burnetii by a centrifugation shell-vial assay from ticks collected in Cyprus: detection by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses.

    PubMed

    Spyridaki, Ioanna; Psaroulaki, Anna; Loukaides, Fidias; Antoniou, Maria; Hadjichristodolou, Christos; Tselentis, Yannis

    2002-01-01

    Ticks are the principal vectors and reservoirs of Coxiella burnetii. The identification of isolates is necessary for understanding the clinical diversity of Q fever in different geographic areas. This is the first report of isolation of C. burnetii from ticks by the shell-vial assay and by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of this pathogen in ticks. Of 141 ticks collected in Cyprus (Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Hyalloma spp.), 10% were found to be infected with C. burnetii. Three ticks were positive by hemolymph test, and 11 triturated ticks were positive by nested PCR. Three isolates were obtained by the centrifugation shell-vial technique. Analysis by PCR, then restriction fragment length polymorphism showed that the 3 Cyprus isolates had identical restriction profiles to reference strains Nine Mile and Q212. The methods described are useful in studying the epidemiology and ecology of C. burnetii.

  15. Environmental and biological monitoring of platinum-containing drugs in two hospital pharmacies using positive air pressure isolators.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Bettina; Crauste-Manciet, Sylvie; Guibert, Agnès; Mourier, Wilhelmine; Guerrault-Moro, Marie-Noelle; Ferrari, Sylvie; Jomier, Jean-Yves; Brossard, Denis; Schierl, Rudolf

    2013-04-01

    Environmental and biological monitoring of platinum containing drugs was implemented in two French hospital pharmacies using positive air pressure isolators and having similar working procedures when preparing antineoplastic drugs. Wipe sampling of surfaces, gloves, and vials was performed in the preparation room and in storage areas. All employees involved in the preparation of antineoplastic drugs were tested for urinary platinum on Monday before work and Friday after shift. Only traces of platinum were detected on surfaces in the preparation room outside the isolators (less than 1.61 pg cm(-2)). However, in one center, significant contamination was found in the storage area of the drug vials, which can most likely be linked to the rupture of a platinum vial and due to inefficient cleaning procedures. Surfaces inside the isolators were found to be contaminated (maximum: 198.4 pg cm(-2)). A higher level of contamination was detected in one pharmacy and could be explained by the lack of overgloving with regular changes during the preparation process. Nitrile gloves used during drug handling outside the isolator showed the highest platinum concentration (maximum: 5.86 ng per pair). With regards to platinum urine concentration, no significant difference was found between exposed and unexposed pharmacy personnel. Isolator technology combined with individual protective measures seems to be efficient to protect workers from occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs, whereas specific individual protective procedures implemented were focussing on the risk of handling vials outside the isolator (e.g. high frequency of glove changing). Moreover, overgloving inside the isolator would contribute to substantially decrease inner surface contamination and should be recommended in order to limit the transfer of chemical contamination to the end products.

  16. Development of an instrument to assess expectations of and preference for an insulin injection pen compared with the vial and syringe.

    PubMed

    Szeinbach, Sheryl L; Barnes, James H; Summers, Kent H; Lenox, Sheila M

    2004-04-01

    Before using a product, patients form expectations regarding the extent of a product's desirable attributes. These expectations can be used to understand their preference and anticipate potential satisfaction with the product. The aim of this study was to produce a valid and reliable data collection instrument (the Insulin Injection Preference questionnaire [IIP-q]) to measure expectations of and preference for the insulin injection pen compared with the vial and syringe. This study was initiated at the University of Mississippi (University, Mississippi). The IIP-q was developed to determine the extent to which respondents' prepurchase expectations of a product's attributes relate to preference for an insulin injection pen compared with the vial and syringe. Instrument development began with item generation related to product attributes important to patients who inject insulin. Items originated from an extensive search of the peer-reviewed Internet-based literature, marketing reports, clinical studies, and existing instruments. Content validity also was assessed using expert panel and focus group review. The resultant instrument (the IIP-q) was mailed to 1200 patients known to have type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus who either did or did not use insulin. Subscales were identified through exploratory factor analysis. Reliability and validity were assessed using Cronbach alpha for subscale items. Product-moment correlations between subscale dimensions and 2 global measures of preference were used to test the relationship between attribute expectations and preference. Seventeen of the questionnaires were returned as undeliverable, leaving 1183 in the sample population. Questionnaires were received from 302 individuals, 55 of whom failed to complete > or = 85% of the items and thus were not included in the final analysis. Of the 247 respondents (135 women, 112 men; mean [SD] age, 52.4 [13.2] years (range, 18-83 years]), 99 (40.1%) were current insulin users and 143 (57

  17. Development of a Single Vial Kit Solution for Radiolabeling of 68Ga-DKFZ-PSMA-11 and Its Performance in Prostate Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Ebenhan, Thomas; Vorster, Mariza; Marjanovic-Painter, Biljana; Wagener, Judith; Suthiram, Janine; Modiselle, Moshe; Mokaleng, Brenda; Zeevaart, Jan Rijn; Sathekge, Mike

    2015-08-14

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), a type II glycoprotein, is highly expressed in almost all prostate cancers. By playing such a universal role in the disease, PSMA provides a target for diagnostic imaging of prostate cancer using positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). The PSMA-targeting ligand Glu-NH-CO-NH-Lys-(Ahx)-HBED-CC (DKFZ-PSMA-11) has superior imaging properties and allows for highly-specific complexation of the generator-based radioisotope Gallium-68 ((68)Ga). However, only module-based radiolabeling procedures are currently available. This study intended to develop a single vial kit solution to radiolabel buffered DKFZ-PSMA-11 with (68)Ga. A (68)Ge/(68)Ga-generator was utilized to yield (68)GaCl3 and major aspects of the kit development were assessed, such as radiolabeling performance, quality assurance, and stability. The final product was injected into patients with prostate cancer for PET/CT imaging and the kit performance was evaluated on the basis of the expected biodistribution, lesion detection, and dose optimization. Kits containing 5 nmol DKFZ-PSMA-11 showed rapid, quantitative (68)Ga-complexation and all quality measurements met the release criteria for human application. The increased precursor content did not compromise the ability of (68)Ga-DKFZ-PSMA-11 PET/CT to detect primary prostate cancer and its advanced lymphatic- and metastatic lesions. The (68)Ga-DKFZ-PSMA-11 kit is a robust, ready-to-use diagnostic agent in prostate cancer with high diagnostic performance.

  18. Clinical and Analytical Evaluation of a Single-Vial Stool Collection Device with Formalin-Free Fixative for Improved Processing and Comprehensive Detection of Gastrointestinal Parasites.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Brianne A; Jensen, Ryan; Arias, Nora; Heffron, Michael; Gubler, Elyse; Case, Kristin; Gowans, Jason; Couturier, Marc Roger

    2015-08-01

    Microscopic examination of feces is a standard laboratory method for diagnosing gastrointestinal parasite infections. In North America, the ovum and parasite (O&P) examination is typically performed using stool that is chemically fixed in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and formalin, after which the stool is concentrated by filtration to enhance sensitivity. Mini Parasep solvent-free (SF) tubes allow collection and concentration within a single collection vial. The goal of the study was to determine whether consolidated processing and concentration with the Parasep tubes using an alcohol-based fixative (Alcorfix) provide O&P examinations equivalent to or better than those done by processing of PVA-formalin-fixed stool using a SpinCon concentration device. Parasep tubes revealed filtration performance equivalent to that of the SpinCon concentration device using PVA-formalin-fixed stool containing protozoa. Specimens cocollected in Parasep tubes containing PVA-formalin and Alcorfix revealed comparable morphology and staining for various protozoa. Alcorfix effectively fixed live Cryptosporidium and microsporidia such that morphology and staining were conserved for modified acid-fast and modified trichrome stains. A work flow analysis revealed significant time savings for batches of 10 or 30 O&P specimens in tubes with Alcorfix compared to the amount of time that it took to analyze the same number of specimens in tubes with PVA-formalin. The direct hands-on time savings with Mini Parasep tubes were 17 min and 41 s and 32 min and 1 s for batches of 10 and 30 specimens, respectively. Parasep tubes containing Alcorfix provide significant work flow advantages to laboratories that process medium to high volumes of O&P specimens by streamlining processing and converting to a single tube. These improvements in work flow, reduction of the amount of formalin used in the laboratory, and equivalent microscopy results are attractive advancements in O&P testing for North American

  19. Investigation of the effect of power ultrasound on the nucleation of water during freezing of agar gel samples in tubing vials.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Hossein; Sun, Da-Wen; Delgado, Adriana; Zhang, Zhihang

    2012-05-01

    Nucleation, as an important stage of freezing process, can be induced by the irradiation of power ultrasound. In this study, the effect of irradiation temperature (-2 °C, -3 °C, -4 °C and -5 °C), irradiation duration (0s, 1s, 3s, 5s, 10s or 15s) and ultrasound intensity (0.07 W cm(-2), 0.14 W cm(-2), 0.25 W cm(-2), 0.35 W cm(-2) and 0.42 W cm(-2)) on the dynamic nucleation of ice in agar gel samples was studied. The samples were frozen in an ethylene glycol-water mixture (-20 °C) in an ultrasonic bath system after putting them into tubing vials. Results indicated that ultrasound irradiation is able to initiate nucleation at different supercooled temperatures (from -5 °C to -2 °C) in agar gel if optimum intensity and duration of ultrasound were chosen. Evaluation of the effect of 0.25 W cm(-2) ultrasound intensity and different durations of ultrasound application on agar gels showed that 1s was not long enough to induce nucleation, 3s induced the nucleation repeatedly but longer irradiation durations resulted in the generation of heat and therefore nucleation was postponed. Investigation of the effect of ultrasound intensity revealed that higher intensities of ultrasound were effective when a shorter period of irradiation was used, while lower intensities only resulted in nucleation when a longer irradiation time was applied. In addition to this, higher intensities were not effective at longer irradiation times due to the heat generated in the samples by the heating effect of ultrasound. In conclusion, the use of ultrasound as a means to control the crystallization process offers promising application in freezing of solid foods, however, optimum conditions should be selected. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Pen Devices for Insulin Self-Administration Compared With Needle and Vial: Systematic Review of the Literature and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lasalvia, Pieralessandro; Barahona-Correa, Julián Esteban; Romero-Alvernia, Diana Marcela; Gil-Tamayo, Sebastián; Castañeda-Cardona, Camilo; Bayona, Juan Gabriel; Triana, Juan José; Laserna, Andrés Felipe; Mejía-Torres, Miguel; Restrepo-Jimenez, Paula; Jimenez-Zapata, Juliana; Rosselli, Diego

    2016-07-01

    Pen devices offer advantages compared with vial and syringe (VaS). The purpose of this article was to evaluate efficacy of pen devices compared to VaS. A systematic review of literature was performed in 8 different databases. References were independently screened and selected. Primary observational or experimental studies comparing pen devices with VaS for insulin administrations were included. Studies on specific populations were excluded. Risk of bias was evaluated using appropriate tools. Data on glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), hypoglycemia, adherence, persistence, patient preference, and quality of life (QOL) were collected. Meta-analysis was performed when appropriate. Heterogeneity and risk of publication bias were evaluated. Otherwise, descriptive analyses of the available data was done. In all, 10 348 articles were screened. A total of 17 studies were finally selected: 7 experimental and 10 analytical. The populations of the included articles were mainly composed of adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Important risk of bias was found in all of the articles, particularly experimental studies. Meta-analyses were performed for HbA1c, hypoglycemia, adherence and persistence. Pen device showed better results in mean HbA1c change, patients with hypoglycemia, adherence and persistence compared to VaS. No difference was observed in number of patients achieving <7% HbA1c. Preference studies showed a tendency favoring pen devices, however nonvalidated tools were used. One QoL study showed improvements in some subscales of SF-36. There is evidence that pen devices offer benefits in clinical and, less clearly, patient-reported outcomes compared to VaS for insulin administration. However, these results should be taken with caution. © 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.

  1. Clinical and Analytical Evaluation of a Single-Vial Stool Collection Device with Formalin-Free Fixative for Improved Processing and Comprehensive Detection of Gastrointestinal Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Couturier, Brianne A.; Jensen, Ryan; Arias, Nora; Heffron, Michael; Gubler, Elyse; Case, Kristin; Gowans, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic examination of feces is a standard laboratory method for diagnosing gastrointestinal parasite infections. In North America, the ovum and parasite (O&P) examination is typically performed using stool that is chemically fixed in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and formalin, after which the stool is concentrated by filtration to enhance sensitivity. Mini Parasep solvent-free (SF) tubes allow collection and concentration within a single collection vial. The goal of the study was to determine whether consolidated processing and concentration with the Parasep tubes using an alcohol-based fixative (Alcorfix) provide O&P examinations equivalent to or better than those done by processing of PVA-formalin-fixed stool using a SpinCon concentration device. Parasep tubes revealed filtration performance equivalent to that of the SpinCon concentration device using PVA-formalin-fixed stool containing protozoa. Specimens cocollected in Parasep tubes containing PVA-formalin and Alcorfix revealed comparable morphology and staining for various protozoa. Alcorfix effectively fixed live Cryptosporidium and microsporidia such that morphology and staining were conserved for modified acid-fast and modified trichrome stains. A work flow analysis revealed significant time savings for batches of 10 or 30 O&P specimens in tubes with Alcorfix compared to the amount of time that it took to analyze the same number of specimens in tubes with PVA-formalin. The direct hands-on time savings with Mini Parasep tubes were 17 min and 41 s and 32 min and 1 s for batches of 10 and 30 specimens, respectively. Parasep tubes containing Alcorfix provide significant work flow advantages to laboratories that process medium to high volumes of O&P specimens by streamlining processing and converting to a single tube. These improvements in work flow, reduction of the amount of formalin used in the laboratory, and equivalent microscopy results are attractive advancements in O&P testing for North American

  2. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpin, Alan

    A summary of one of our most pressing environmental problems, air pollution, is offered in this book by the Director of Air Pollution Control for the Queensland (Australia) State Government. Discussion of the subject is not restricted to Queensland or Australian problems and policies, however, but includes analysis of air pollution the world over.…

  3. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpin, Alan

    A summary of one of our most pressing environmental problems, air pollution, is offered in this book by the Director of Air Pollution Control for the Queensland (Australia) State Government. Discussion of the subject is not restricted to Queensland or Australian problems and policies, however, but includes analysis of air pollution the world over.…

  4. Air Policing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Iraq. To provide a background for understanding why Britain commenced the policy of air policing, this paper begins with a review of contemporary...7 Omissi, Air Power, XV. 8 policing actions or the pushing home of advantages gained by the air.” Within the context of this paper , the...control operations, and therefore within the context of this paper , the term coercive airpower refers to the threat of harming a population or the threat

  5. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    Materials related to air pollution are reviewed for the period January 1987, to October 1988. The topics are pollution monitoring, air pollution, and environmental chemistry. The organization consists of two major analytical divisions: (1) gaseous methods; and (2) aerosol and particulate methods. (MVL)

  6. Air Pollution.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality is affected by many types of pollutants that are emitted from various sources, including stationary and mobile. These sources release both criteria and hazardous air pollutants, which cause health effects, ecological harm, and material damage. They are generally categ...

  7. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    Materials related to air pollution are reviewed for the period January 1987, to October 1988. The topics are pollution monitoring, air pollution, and environmental chemistry. The organization consists of two major analytical divisions: (1) gaseous methods; and (2) aerosol and particulate methods. (MVL)

  8. Air Pollution.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality is affected by many types of pollutants that are emitted from various sources, including stationary and mobile. These sources release both criteria and hazardous air pollutants, which cause health effects, ecological harm, and material damage. They are generally categ...

  9. Air transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, F Handley

    1924-01-01

    I purpose (sic) in this paper to deal with the development in air transport which has taken place since civil aviation between England and the Continent first started at the end of August 1919. A great deal of attention has been paid in the press to air services of the future, to the detriment of the consideration of results obtained up to the present.

  10. Usability Evaluation of a Blood Glucose Monitoring System With a Spill-Resistant Vial, Easier Strip Handling, and Connectivity to a Mobile App: Improvement of Patient Convenience and Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Craig; Koubek, Richard; Bégat, Vanessa; Jacob, Stephan

    2016-09-01

    Proper management of diabetes mellitus requires regular self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG). This research evaluated the usability of the Accu-Chek® Guide Meter that includes a spill-resistant vial, easier strip handling, and wireless connectivity to a mobile app. A total of 197 participants were allowed to experience typical blood glucose testing tasks on the Accu-Chek Guide Meter, review data such as last result, patterns, and target percentage on the meter and on the mobile app, and then evaluate their experience through a human factors usability survey. Participants used a 6-point agree/disagree scale to rate 34 market statement questions. The results of a Pearson chi-square proportions test for each of the 34 market statement questions showed a significant difference (P < .0001) between the disagree responses (1-3) and agree responses (4-6). An overwhelming majority of participants found all aspects of the system, including the test strips, strip vial, and data analysis on the meter and the mobile app, to be a good fit for their lifestyle and to provide a better testing experience. This study found superior usability of the new meter system over the participants' current meters in both the United States and France. © 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.

  11. Through-vial impedance spectroscopy of the mechanisms of annealing in the freeze-drying of maltodextrin: the impact of annealing hold time and temperature on the primary drying rate.

    PubMed

    Smith, Geoff; Arshad, Muhammad Sohail; Polygalov, Eugene; Ermolina, Irina

    2014-06-01

    The study aims to investigate the impact of annealing hold time and temperature on the primary drying rate/duration of a 10% (w/v) solution of maltodextrin with an emphasis on how the mechanisms of annealing might be understood from the in-vial measurements of the ice crystal growth and the glass transition. The electrical impedance of the solution within a modified glass vial was recorded between 10 and 10(6) Hz during freeze-drying cycles with varying annealing hold times (1-5 h) and temperatures. Primary drying times decreased by 7%, 27% and 34% (1.1, 4.3 and 5.5 h) with the inclusion of an annealing step at temperatures of -15°C, -10°C and -5°C, respectively. The glass transition was recorded at approximately -16°C during the re-heating and re-cooling steps, which is close to the glass transition (Tg ') reported for 10% (w/v) maltodextrin and therefore indicates that a maximum freeze concentration (∼86%, w/w, from the Gordon-Taylor equation) was achieved during first freezing, with no further ice being formed on annealing. This observation, coupled to the decrease in electrical resistance that was observed during the annealing hold time, suggests that the reduction in the drying time was because of improved connectivity of ice crystals because of Ostwald ripening rather than devitrification.

  12. Air Apparent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbster, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Explains the principle upon which a barometer operates. Describes how to construct two barometric devices for use in the classroom that show air's changing pressure. Cites some conditions for predicting weather. (RT)

  13. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    ... tobacco smoke. How is air pollution linked to climate change? While climate change is a global process, it ... ozone levels are also a concern. Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States: A ...

  14. Air Apparent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbster, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Explains the principle upon which a barometer operates. Describes how to construct two barometric devices for use in the classroom that show air's changing pressure. Cites some conditions for predicting weather. (RT)

  15. Hazardous Air Pollutants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Air Toxics Website Rules and Implementation Related Information Air Quality Data and Tools Clean Air Act Criteria Air ... Resources Visibility and Haze Voluntary Programs for Improving Air Quality Contact Us to ask a question, provide feedback, ...

  16. Air surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, G.W.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the air surveillance and monitoring programs currently in operation at that Hanford Site. Atmospheric releases of pollutants from Hanford to the surrounding region are a potential source of human exposure. For that reason, both radioactive and nonradioactive materials in air are monitored at a number of locations. The influence of Hanford emissions on local radionuclide concentrations was evaluated by comparing concentrations measured at distant locations within the region to concentrations measured at the Site perimeter. This section discusses sample collection, analytical methods, and the results of the Hanford air surveillance program. A complete listing of all analytical results summarized in this section is reported separately by Bisping (1995).

  17. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scorer, Richard S.

    The purpose of this book is to describe the basic mechanisms whereby pollution is transported and diffused in the atmosphere. It is designed to give practitioners an understanding of basic mechanics and physics so they may have a correct basis on which to formulate their decisions related to practical air pollution control problems. Since many…

  18. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scorer, Richard S.

    The purpose of this book is to describe the basic mechanisms whereby pollution is transported and diffused in the atmosphere. It is designed to give practitioners an understanding of basic mechanics and physics so they may have a correct basis on which to formulate their decisions related to practical air pollution control problems. Since many…

  19. /Air Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emami, Samar; Sohn, Hong Yong; Kim, Hang Goo

    2014-08-01

    Molten magnesium oxidizes rapidly when exposed to air causing melt loss and handling difficulties. The use of certain additive gases such as SF6, SO2, and CO2 to form a protective MgO layer over a magnesium melt has been proposed. The oxidation behavior of molten magnesium in air containing various concentrations of SF6 was investigated. Measurements of the kinetics of the oxide layer growth at various SF6 concentrations in air and temperatures were made. Experiments were performed using a thermogravimetric analysis unit in the temperature range of 943 K to 1043 K (670 °C to 770 °C). Results showed that a thin, coherent, and protective MgF2 layer was formed under SF6/Air mixtures, with a thickness ranging from 300 nm to 3 μm depending on SF6 concentration, temperature, and exposure time. Rate parameters were calculated and a model for the process was developed. The morphology and composition of the surface films were studied using scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive spectroscope.

  20. Instability of the hydrochloride salts of cathinone derivatives in air.

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, Kenji; Yamamuro, Tadashi; Kuwayama, Kenji; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Yuko T; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    We observed the decomposition of the hydrochloride salt of α-pyrrolidinoheptanophenone (α-PHPP-HCl), a newly distributed pyrrolidine-type cathinone derivative when 2.5ng of this substance was placed in glass test tubes and stored in a refrigerator for 3 days. To further investigate this phenomenon, we studied the (i) time course of the residual ratios of α-PHPP-HCl when a small amount (10μg) of α-PHPP-HCl was stored in glass vials in air at room temperature; (ii) identification of the decomposition products of α-PHPP-HCl; (iii) effect of air on the decomposition process; (iv) effect of the added amounts of α-PHPP-HCl on its decomposition; and (v) comparison of the stability between various cathinone derivatives and their decomposition products. The decomposition of α-PHPP-HCl occurred in air and increased with time. Two possible decomposition products, α-(2″-oxopyrrolidino)heptanophenone and α-PHPP-N-oxide, were identified. These products were formed by oxygen in air because the yield significantly decreased by storing them in a vacuum desiccator. With the decrease in the amount of α-PHPP-HCl, the residual ratios decreased and amount of the decomposition products increased. This indicates that the decomposition of α-PHPP-HCl occurred on the upper surface of the samples. The hydrochloride salts of other cathinone derivatives were also unstable in air, and the residual ratios observed were different depending on the compounds. The pyrrolidine-type cathinone derivatives afforded two types of decomposition products, which were presumed to be 2″-oxo and N-oxide derivatives, similar to α-PHPP-HCl. In contrast, secondary amine-type cathinone derivatives showed different decomposition patterns, possibly including the dealkylated derivative. These findings may be very useful for the future toxicological analysis of cathinone derivatives.

  1. Air pollution.

    PubMed

    Le, Nhu D; Sun, Li; Zidek, James V

    2010-01-01

    Toxic air pollutants are continuously released into the air supply. Various pollutants come from chemical facilities and small businesses, such as automobile service stations and dry cleaning establishments. Others, such as nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and other volatile organic chemicals, arise primarily from the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels (coal and petroleum) and are emitted from sources that include car exhausts, home heating and industrial power plants. Pollutants in the atmosphere also result from photochemical transformations; for example, ozone is formed when molecular oxygen or nitrogen interacts with ultraviolet radiation. An association between air pollution exposure and lung cancer has been observed in several studies. The evidence for other cancers is far less conclusive. Estimates of the population attributable risk of cancer has varied substantially over the last 40 years, reflecting the limitations of studies; these include insufficient information on confounders, difficulties in characterizing associations due to a likely lengthy latency interval, and exposure misclassification. Although earlier estimates were less than one percent, recent cohort studies that have taken into account some confounding factors, such as smoking and education amongst others, suggest that approximately 3.6% of lung cancer in the European Union could be due to air pollution exposure, particularly to sulphate and fine particulates. A separate cohort study estimated 5-7% of lung cancers in European never smokers and ex-smokers could be due to air pollution exposure. Therefore, while cigarette smoking remains the predominant risk factor, the proportion of lung cancers attributable to air pollution may be higher than previously thought. Overall, major weaknesses in all air-pollution-and-cancer studies to date have been inadequate characterization of long-term air pollution exposure and imprecise or no measurements of covariates. It has only been in the last

  2. Managing Air Quality - Air Pollutant Types

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Describes the types of air pollutants, including common or criteria pollutants, and hazardous air pollutants and links to additional information. Also links to resources on other air pollution issues.

  3. Healthy Air Outdoors

    MedlinePlus

    ... clean up the air are enforced. Learn more Climate Change Climate change threatens the health of millions of people, with ... What Makes Air Unhealthy Fighting for Healthy Air Climate Change Emergencies & Natural Disasters State of the Air Ask ...

  4. Air Quality System (AQS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Air Quality System (AQS) database contains measurements of air pollutant concentrations from throughout the United States and its territories. The measurements include both criteria air pollutants and hazardous air pollutants.

  5. Ambient Air

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  6. AirData

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The AirData site provides access to yearly summaries of United States air pollution data, taken from EPA's air pollution databases. AirData has information about where air pollution comes from (emissions) and how much pollution is in the air outside our homes and work places (monitoring).

  7. Air cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, Okiyoshi; Wakasa, Masayuki; Tamanoi, Yoshihito

    1991-04-01

    The present invention relates to an air cell. This air cell provides a compact light-weight power source for model aircraft permitting them to fly for an extended period so that they may be used for such practical purposes as crop dusting, surveying, and photographing. The cell is comprised of a current collector so disposed between a magnesium, zinc, or aluminum alloy cathode and a petroleum graphite anode that it is in contact with the anode. The anode is formed by adding polytetrafluoroethylene dispersion liquid in a mixture of active carbon and graphite powder, pouring the mixture into a mold and heating it to form the anode. It is fabricated by a plurality of anode sections and is formed with at least one hole so that it can provide a cell which is compact in size and light in weight yet is capable of generating a high output. The anode, the cathode, and a separator are wetted by an electrolytic liquid. The electrolyte is continuously supplied through the life of the cell.

  8. Shell-vial culture, coupled with real-time PCR, applied to Rickettsia conorii and Rickettsia massiliae-Bar29 detection, improving the diagnosis of the Mediterranean spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Segura, Ferran; Pons, Immaculada; Sanfeliu, Isabel; Nogueras, María-Mercedes

    2016-04-01

    Rickettsia conorii and Rickettsia massiliae-Bar29 are related to Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF). They are intracellular microorganisms. The Shell-vial culture assay (SV) improved Rickettsia culture but it still has some limitations: blood usually contains low amount of microorganisms and the samples that contain the highest amount of them are non-sterile. The objectives of this study were to optimize SV culture conditions and monitoring methods and to establish antibiotic concentrations useful for non-sterile samples. 12 SVs were inoculated with each microorganism, incubated at different temperatures and monitored by classical methods and real-time PCR. R. conorii was detected by all methods at all temperatures since 7th day of incubation. R. massiliae-Bar29 was firstly observed at 28°C. Real-time PCR allowed to detected it 2-7 days earlier (depend on temperature) than classical methods. Antibiotics concentration needed for the isolation of these Rickettsia species from non-sterile samples was determined inoculating SV with R. conorii, R. massiliae-Bar29, biopsy or tick, incubating them with different dilutions of antibiotics and monitoring them weekly. To sum up, if a MSF diagnosis is suspected, SV should be incubated at both 28°C and 32°C for 1-3 weeks and monitored by a sensitive real-time PCR. If the sample is non-sterile the panel of antibiotics tested can be added.

  9. Comparison of the immunogenicity and safety of pentavalent vaccine Quinvaxem in a compact prefilled auto-disabled (cPAD) injection system versus single-dose vials in healthy infants: a phase 3, open-label, randomized, parallel-group, non-inferiority study.

    PubMed

    Capeding, Maria Rosario Z; Alberto, Edison; Versteilen, Amanda; Rauscher, Martina; Bagchi, Partha; Palacios, Patricia Ibarra de

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate non-inferiority of three doses of Quinvaxem in a compact prefilled auto-disabled (cPAD) injection system versus Quinvaxem in a single-dose vial administered with conventional syringe in terms of seroconversion/seroprotection rates for all antibodies (anti-hepatitis B (HB), anti-Haemophilus influenzae type b polyribosylribitol phosphate (Hib PRP), anti-diphtheria, anti-tetanus, anti-Bordetella pertussis) at 1 month after primary vaccination. Four hundred healthy infants aged 42-65 days were randomized (1:1) to receive Quinvaxem in cPAD or single-dose vial at 6, 10, and 12 weeks of age. Blood samples were collected before vaccination and at 1 month after the third dose to determine seroconversion/seroprotection rates. Safety was assessed from solicited and unsolicited adverse events and serious adverse events (SAEs). Of the 400 infants randomized, 395 (98.8%) received all three vaccine doses. In the cPAD vs. single-dose vial groups, seroprotection rates against Hib PRP (both 98.5%), HB (92.9% vs. 93.4%), diphtheria (100% vs. 99%), and tetanus toxoids (both 100%), and seroconversion against B. pertussis (95.4% vs. 97%) were ≥92% at 1 month after the third vaccination (lower limits of 95% confidence intervals simultaneously greater than -10%). Geometric mean concentrations exceeded seroprotection/seroconversion thresholds by large margins. The incidences of induration and erythema were comparable between the groups; tenderness was slightly higher in the cPAD group (85.5% vs. 76.5%). No vaccine-related SAEs occurred. Quinvaxem in cPAD was non-inferior to single-dose vial with respect to seroprotection/seroconversion rates for all antibodies. Both presentations were well-tolerated. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Metal-Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

    2011-08-01

    Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

  11. Tuned air gun array

    SciTech Connect

    Ruehle, W.H.

    1983-05-10

    The present invention provides a method for determining the spacing and size of air guns in a tuned air gun array. Volume ratios are calculated based upon a predetermined maximum volume for any individual air gun. The volumes are cross-referenced to spacings for optimum air gun interaction. The resulting air gun array operates as a broadband high-energy point source.

  12. AMBIENT AIR MONITORING STRATEGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Clean Air Act requires EPA to establish national ambient air quality standards and to regulate as necessary, hazardous air pollutants. EPA uses ambient air monitoring to determine current air quality conditions, and to assess progress toward meeting these standards and relat...

  13. Air supply valve for seismic air gun

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, B.

    1989-07-25

    This paper describes an improvement in a marine seismic array adapted to be towed by a vessel wherein the array is comprised of a plurality of air guns spaced along an array bundle which includes a central air hose assembly that supplies compressed air to each of the air guns through individual air passages which extend between the central air hose assembly and each of the air guns. The improvement comprising: an air supply valve positioned in each of the individual air passages, the air supply valve comprising: a housing having inlet and an outlet and a passage in the housing connecting the inlet and the outlet; valve means positioned in the passage in the housing; valve actuating means in the housing for moving the valve means from an open position to a closed position and from a closed position to an open position; means for remotely actuating the valve actuating means from the vessel to close the valve to deactivate the air gun and to reopen the valve to reactivate the air gun whereby each of the plurality of air guns can be individually inactivated and reactivated remotely from the vessel.

  14. Lead (Pb) Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    ... States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Lead (Pb) Air Pollution Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us As ... and protect aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Lead (Pb) Air Pollution Lead Air Pollution Basics How does lead get ...

  15. Needed: Clean Air.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Gerald

    1979-01-01

    Provides information on air pollution for young readers. Discusses damage to substances and sickness from air pollution, air quality, and what to do in a pollution alert. Includes questions with answers, illustrations, and activities for the learner. (MA)

  16. HEPA air filter (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pet dander and other irritating allergens from the air. Along with other methods to reduce allergens, such ... controlling the amount of allergens circulating in the air. HEPA filters can be found in most air ...

  17. Needed: Clean Air.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Gerald

    1979-01-01

    Provides information on air pollution for young readers. Discusses damage to substances and sickness from air pollution, air quality, and what to do in a pollution alert. Includes questions with answers, illustrations, and activities for the learner. (MA)

  18. Air Sensor Toolbox

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Air Sensor Toolbox provides information to citizen scientists, researchers and developers interested in learning more about new lower-cost compact air sensor technologies and tools for measuring air quality.

  19. High efficiency air cycle air conditioning system

    SciTech Connect

    Rannenberg, G. C.

    1985-11-19

    An air cycle air conditioning system is provided with regenerative heat exchangers upstream and downstream of an expansion turbine. A closedloop liquid circulatory system serially connects the two regenerative heat exchangers for regeneration without the bulk associated with air-to-air heat exchange. The liquid circulatory system may also provide heat transport to a remote sink heat exchanger and from a remote load as well as heat exchange within the sink heat exchanger and load for enhanced compactness and efficiency.

  20. Air Pollution Monitoring | Air Quality Planning & Standards ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2016-06-08

    The basic mission of the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards is to preserve and improve the quality of our nation's air. To accomplish this, OAQPS must be able to evaluate the status of the atmosphere as compared to clean air standards and historical information.

  1. Primary zone air proportioner

    DOEpatents

    Cleary, Edward N. G.

    1982-10-12

    An air proportioner is provided for a liquid hydrocarbon fueled gas turbine of the type which is convertible to oil gas fuel and to coal gas fuel. The turbine includes a shell for enclosing the turbine, an air duct for venting air in said shell to a gasifier, and a fuel injector for injecting gasified fuel into the turbine. The air proportioner comprises a second air duct for venting air from the air duct for mixing with fuel from the gasifier. The air can be directly injected into the gas combustion basket along with the fuel from the injector or premixed with fuel from the gasifier prior to injection by the fuel injector.

  2. Association of the blood/air partition coefficient of 1,3-butadiene with blood lipids and albumin.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Sheng; Smith, Thomas J; Wypij, David; Kelsey, Karl T; Sacks, Frank M

    2002-02-01

    Pulmonary gas uptake is a function of the blood solubility of a vapor, indicated by the blood/air partition coefficient. We hypothesized that blood lipid compositions are associated with the blood/air partition coefficients of lipophilic toxic vapors such as 1,3-butadiene. Our goal was to investigate cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships of blood triglycerides, total cholesterol, and albumin to the blood/air partition coefficient of butadiene. We collected blood samples from 24 subjects at three time points: a fasting baseline and 2 and 4 hr after drinking a standardized high-fat milk shake (107 g fat, 80 g sugar, and 27 g protein). The blood/air partition coefficient was determined using the closed vial-equilibrium technique. Triglycerides and total cholesterol were analyzed by an enzymatic method, and albumin was analyzed with an immunoassay technique. We used multiple linear regression and general linear models to examine the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationship, respectively. The results showed that the blood/air partition coefficient of butadiene was cross-sectionally associated only with triglycerides at baseline, and longitudinally related to baseline triglycerides, total cholesterol, and the change in triglycerides over time. The blood/air partition coefficient of butadiene increased, on average, by approximately 20% and up to 40% for subjects with borderline higher triglyceride levels after ingestion of a standardized milk shake. In addition, a time factor beyond lipids was also significant in predicting the blood/air partition coefficient of butadiene. This may represent the effects of other unmeasured parameters related to time or time of day on the blood/air partition coefficient of butadiene. Because the blood/air partition coefficient is a major determinant of gas uptake, ingestion of a high fat meal before this type of exposure may significantly increase an individual's absorbed dose, possibly increasing the risk of adverse effects.

  3. The Clean Air Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avalone-King, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    Introduces the Clean Air game which teaches about air quality and its vital importance for life. Introduces students to air pollutants, health of people and environment, and possible actions individuals can take to prevent air pollution. Includes directions for the game. (YDS)

  4. The Clean Air Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avalone-King, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    Introduces the Clean Air game which teaches about air quality and its vital importance for life. Introduces students to air pollutants, health of people and environment, and possible actions individuals can take to prevent air pollution. Includes directions for the game. (YDS)

  5. Building Air Monitoring Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1977

    1977-01-01

    The different components of air monitoring networks, the status of air monitoring in the United States, and the services and activities of the three major American network builders are detailed. International air monitoring networks and alert systems are identified, with emphasis on the Dutch air monitoring network. (BT)

  6. REACH. Air Conditioning Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Joe; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of air conditioning. The instructional units focus on air conditioning fundamentals, window air conditioning, system and installation, troubleshooting and…

  7. REACH. Air Conditioning Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Joe; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of air conditioning. The instructional units focus on air conditioning fundamentals, window air conditioning, system and installation, troubleshooting and…

  8. Air traffic coverage

    SciTech Connect

    George, L.L.

    1988-09-16

    The Federal Aviation Administration plans to consolidate several hundred air traffic control centers and TRACONs into area control facilities while maintaining air traffic coverage. This paper defines air traffic coverage, a performance measure of the air traffic control system. Air traffic coverage measures performance without controversy regarding delay and collision probabilities and costs. Coverage measures help evaluate alternative facility architectures and help schedule consolidation. Coverage measures also help evaluate protocols for handling one facility's air traffic to another facility in case of facility failure. Coverage measures help evaluate radar, communications and other air traffic control systems and procedures. 4 refs., 2 figs.,

  9. Advances in air to air refuelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Peter R.; Bhandari, Ujjar; Bullock, Steve; Richardson, Thomas S.; du Bois, Jonathan L.

    2014-11-01

    An increasing interest over the last decade in developing unmanned aerial systems' technologies has prompted research into methods for automating air to air refuelling processes. Furthermore, for systems with increased autonomy the necessary logic and flight control systems to perform autonomous air to air refuelling is now being pursued. There has already been significant research in position tracking, rendezvous scheduling, apparatus modelling, wake effects, and vision-based sensors to support refuelling of unmanned systems and to increase the autonomy in manned aircraft refuelling. Many of these build upon considerable research and understanding that has matured for manned air to air refuelling. This paper reviews the current, and future, state of research in this area.

  10. Material Scientist holds SUBSA sample vial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    One of the first materials science experiments on the International Space Station -- the Solidification Using a Baffle in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA) -- will be conducted during Expedition Five inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox. The glovebox is the first dedicated facility delivered to the Station for microgravity physical science research, and this experiment will be the first one operated inside the glovebox. The glovebox's sealed work environment makes it an ideal place for the furnace that will be used to melt semiconductor crystals. Astronauts can change out samples and manipulate the experiment by inserting their hands into a pair of gloves that reach inside the sealed box. Dr. Aleksandar Ostrogorsky, a materials scientist from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N.Y., and the principal investigator for the SUBSA experiment, uses the gloves to examine an ampoule like the ones used for his experiment inside the glovebox's work area. The Microgravity Science Glovebox and the SUBSA experiment are managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.

  11. Material Scientist holds SUBSA sample vial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    One of the first materials science experiments on the International Space Station -- the Solidification Using a Baffle in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA) -- will be conducted during Expedition Five inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox. The glovebox is the first dedicated facility delivered to the Station for microgravity physical science research, and this experiment will be the first one operated inside the glovebox. The glovebox's sealed work environment makes it an ideal place for the furnace that will be used to melt semiconductor crystals. Astronauts can change out samples and manipulate the experiment by inserting their hands into a pair of gloves that reach inside the sealed box. Dr. Aleksandar Ostrogorsky, a materials scientist from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N.Y., and the principal investigator for the SUBSA experiment, uses the gloves to examine an ampoule like the ones used for his experiment inside the glovebox's work area. The Microgravity Science Glovebox and the SUBSA experiment are managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.

  12. Isokinetic air sampler

    DOEpatents

    Sehmel, George A.

    1979-01-01

    An isokinetic air sampler includes a filter, a holder for the filter, an air pump for drawing air through the filter at a fixed, predetermined rate, an inlet assembly for the sampler having an inlet opening therein of a size such that isokinetic air sampling is obtained at a particular wind speed, a closure for the inlet opening and means for simultaneously opening the closure and turning on the air pump when the wind speed is such that isokinetic air sampling is obtained. A system incorporating a plurality of such samplers provided with air pumps set to draw air through the filter at the same fixed, predetermined rate and having different inlet opening sizes for use at different wind speeds is included within the ambit of the present invention as is a method of sampling air to measure airborne concentrations of particulate pollutants as a function of wind speed.

  13. [Comparison study of a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay with an enzyme immunoassay and shell vial culture for influenza A and B virus detection in adult patients].

    PubMed

    Reina, Jordi; Plasencia, Virginia; Leyes, Maria; Nicolau, Antonio; Galmés, Antonia; Arbona, Gabriel

    2010-02-01

    The age of the patients and the type of sample are major problems in the diagnosis of influenza. Most available diagnostic techniques are highly effective in pediatric patients and in nasopharyngeal aspirates. However, in the adult population and using throat swabs, these techniques are much less reliable. We performed a prospective study comparing the efficacy of a commercial real-time reverse transcription PCR assay (RT-PCR) with that of an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) or shell vial culture (SV) in the detection of influenza A and B viruses in 125 throat swabs from adults with clinically suspected influenza during the 2007-2008 flu season. Throat swabs were subjected to rapid antigen detection for influenza viruses by means of a commercial dot-blot EIA. For the RT-PCR technique, RNA was extracted from 200 microL of each sample by the automated extraction system, EZ1 virus minikit (version 2.0). Genomic amplification of the extracted viral RNA was carried out using the OneStep RT-PCR FluA+FluB automated system with the SmartCycler amplification system. Each sample was inoculated into 2 SV of the MDCK cell line. Turnaround times were calculated from the time specimens were received in the laboratory to the time the result was reported to clinicians. The EIA system detected 27 (21.6%) positive samples, RT-PCR 62 (49.6%) positive samples, and SV 56 (44.8%) positive samples. Among the 62 positive samples, EIA detected 27 (43.5%), RT-PCR 62 (100%) and SV 56 (90.3%). With the use of RT-PCR, 38.4% of the adults studied were diagnosed on the same day samples were received. Among the total, 67.2% of diagnostic results were obtained within the first 24 hours; turnaround time was 1.1 days. The real-time RT-PCR method studied displayed high sensitivity and specificity in the detection of influenza virus in adult patients, when compared with the conventional techniques. With real-time RT-PCR, large numbers of samples can be rapidly tested and results provided the same day samples

  14. Comparison of real-time RT-PCR, shell vial culture, and conventional cell culture for the detection of the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    López Roa, Paula; Catalán, Pilar; Giannella, Maddalena; García de Viedma, Darío; Sandonis, Virginia; Bouza, Emilio

    2011-04-01

    The emergence of the pandemic influenza virus A H1N1 has made fast and accurate diagnosis essential. However, few well-validated diagnostic techniques exist. The real-time RT-PCR developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is the recommended technique. Our objective was to compare the CDC real-time RT-PCR assay, shell vial (SV), and conventional cell culture [with Madine-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells and A549] for the detection of pandemic influenza A H1N1 in hospitalized patients. We performed a prospective study comparing the efficacy of 5 diagnostic techniques (RTPCR, SV in A549, SV in MDCK, conventional cell culture in A549, and conventional cell culture in MDCK) using nasopharyngeal swabs from patients ≥18 years of age hospitalized with clinical symptoms of influenza at our institution. Detection of the virus by conventional culture was considered the gold standard. An "extended gold standard" was also used to recalculate validity values. The sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values (NPVs) for the detection of influenza A H1N1, determined using conventional culture as the gold standard, were, respectively, as follows: RT-PCR: 95.6, 82.3, 78.3, 96.5%; SVA549: 91.2, 99.01, 98.4, 94.4%; SV-MDCK: 82.3, 100, 100, 89.4%; tube-A549: 94.12, 100, 100, 96.2%; tube-MDCK: 86.7, 100, 100, 91.9%. Sensitivities and NPVs using an extended gold standard were as follows: RT-PCR: 96.5%, 96.6%; SV-A549: 73.3%, 78.5%; SV-MDCK: 65.1%, 73.7%; tube-A549: 74.4%, 79.2%; tube-MDCK: 68.6%, 75.7%. The average time to detect pandemic influenza A H1N1 by RT-PCR, SV culture, and conventional culture was, respectively, 4 h, 48 h, and 7 days. Real-time RT-PCR displayed high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of influenza A H1N1 in adult patients when compared with conventional techniques. In addition, the A549 cell line was not inferior to the MDCK line. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Determination of S-2-(N,N-diisopropylaminoethyl)- and S-2-(N,N-diethylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothiolate, nerve agent markers, in water samples using strong anion-exchange disk extraction, in vial trimethylsilylation, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Raja; Åstot, Crister; Juhlin, Lars; Nilsson, Calle; Östin, Anders

    2012-03-16

    Since the establishment of the Chemical Weapons Convention in 1997, the development of analytical methods for unambiguous identification of large numbers of chemicals related to chemical warfare agents has attracted increased interest. The analytically challenging, zwitterionic S-2-(N,N-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothiolate (EA-2192), a highly toxic degradation marker of the nerve agent VX, has been reported to resist trimethylsilylation or to result in an unacceptably high limit of detection in GC-MS analysis. In the present study, the problem is demonstrated to be associated with the presence of salt, which hinders trimethysilylation. EA-2192 was extracted from aqueous samples by use of a strong anion-exchange disk, derivatized as a trimethylsilyl derivative via in vial solid-phase trimethylsilylation and identified by GC-MS. The limits of detection were 10 ng/mL and 100 ng/mL (in a water sample) for SIM and SCAN mode respectively. The analytical method was found to be repeatable with relative standard deviation <10%. The performance of the method was evaluated using a proficiency test sample and environmental samples (spiked river water and Baltic Bay water) and compared with the commonly used evaporation-silylation method. The disk method displayed good tolerance to the presence of salt and the spiked EA-2192 was conclusively identified in all matrices. In addition, the applicability of the method was further demonstrated for other selected hydrolysis products of VX and Russian VX, namely S-2-(N,N-diethylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothiolate, ethyl methylphosphonic acid, methylphosphonic acid, and isobutyl methylphosphonic acid. For the synthesis of reference compounds, EA-2192 and its analog from degradation of the Russian VX isomer, the present methods were improved by using a polymer-bound base, resulting in >90% purity based on (1)H NMR. Based on the current results and earlier work on alkylphosphonic acids using the same method, we conclude that the

  16. Air Pollution Emissions Overview | Air Quality Planning & ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2016-06-08

    Air pollution comes from many different sources: stationary sources such as factories, power plants, and smelters and smaller sources such as dry cleaners and degreasing operations; mobile sources such as cars, buses, planes, trucks, and trains; and naturally occurring sources such as windblown dust, and volcanic eruptions, all contribute to air pollution.

  17. Indoor Air Quality

    MedlinePlus

    ... are especially vulnerable to the harmful effects of air pollution. Cleaning up pollution in their schools will help ... nothing else matters ® . Help us fight to reduce pollution in the air we breathe. Donate

  18. Controlling Indoor Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nero, Anthony V, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the health risks posed by indoor air pollutants, such as airborne combustion products, toxic chemicals, and radioactivity. Questions as to how indoor air might be regulated. Calls for new approaches to environmental protection. (TW)

  19. Air Data - Concentration Map

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Make a map of daily concentrations over several days. The daily air quality can be displayed in terms of the Air Quality Index or in concentration ranges for certain PM species like organic carbon, nitrates, and sulfates.

  20. Indoor Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    We usually think of air pollution as being outdoors, but the air in your house or office could also be polluted. Sources of indoor pollution include Mold and pollen Tobacco smoke Household products ...

  1. Airing It Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzemeyer, Ted

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how proper maintenance can help schools eliminate sources contributing to poor air quality. Maintaining heating and air conditioning units, investigating bacterial breeding grounds, fixing leaking boilers, and adhering to ventilation codes and standards are discussed. (GR)

  2. Transforming air quality management

    SciTech Connect

    Janet McCabe

    2005-04-01

    Earlier this year, the Clean Air Act Advisory Committee submitted to EPA 38 recommendations intended to improve air quality management in the United States. This article summarizes the evaluation process leading up to the Committee's recommendations. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  3. SWAB Air sampling

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-08

    ISS014-E-09422 (8 Dec. 2006) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Thomas Reiter, Expedition 14 flight engineer, conducts a Surface, Water and Air Biocharacterization (SWAB) air sampling in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  4. Airing It Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzemeyer, Ted

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how proper maintenance can help schools eliminate sources contributing to poor air quality. Maintaining heating and air conditioning units, investigating bacterial breeding grounds, fixing leaking boilers, and adhering to ventilation codes and standards are discussed. (GR)

  5. Air Quality Modeling

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In this technical support document (TSD) EPA describes the air quality modeling performed to support the Environmental Protection Agency’s Transport Rule proposal (now known as the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule).

  6. Air Quality Analysis

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site provides information for air quality data analysts inside and outside EPA. Much of the information is in the form of documented analyses that support the review of the national air qualiyt standards.

  7. Controlling Indoor Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nero, Anthony V, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the health risks posed by indoor air pollutants, such as airborne combustion products, toxic chemicals, and radioactivity. Questions as to how indoor air might be regulated. Calls for new approaches to environmental protection. (TW)

  8. National Air Toxics Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    NATA is an ongoing comprehensive evaluation of air toxics in the U.S. As a screening tool, it helps air agencies prioritize pollutants, emission sources and locations of interest for further study to gain a better understanding of risks.

  9. Modified perfluorocarbon tracer method for measuring effective multizone air exchange rates.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Naohide; Kataoka, Toshiyuki; Takamine, Koichi; Butsugan, Michio; Nishijima, Hirokazu; Gamo, Masashi

    2010-09-01

    A modified procedure was developed for the measurement of the effective air exchange rate, which represents the relationship between the pollutants emitted from indoor sources and the residents' level of exposure, by placing the dosers of tracer gas at locations that resemble indoor emission sources. To measure the 24-h-average effective air exchange rates in future surveys based on this procedure, a low-cost, easy-to-use perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) doser with a stable dosing rate was developed by using double glass vials, a needle, a polyethylene-sintered filter, and a diffusion tube. Carbon molecular sieve cartridges and carbon disulfide (CS₂) were used for passive sampling and extraction of the tracer gas, respectively. Recovery efficiencies, sampling rates, and lower detection limits for 24-h sampling of hexafluorobenzene, octafluorotoluene, and perfluoroallylbenzene were 40% ± 3%, 72% ± 5%, and 84% ± 6%; 10.5 ± 1.1, 14.4 ± 1.4, and 12.2 ± 0.49 mL min⁻¹; and 0.20, 0.17, and 0.26 μg m⁻³, respectively.

  10. Air Sensor Guidebook

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Air Sensor Guidebook has been developed by the U.S. EPA to assist those interested in potentially using lower cost air quality sensor technologies for air quality measurements. Its development was in direct response to a request for such a document following a recent scienti...

  11. Indoor Air Quality Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin Union Free School District, NY.

    This manual identifies ways to improve a school's indoor air quality (IAQ) and discusses practical actions that can be carried out by school staff in managing air quality. The manual includes discussions of the many sources contributing to school indoor air pollution and the preventive planning for each including renovation and repair work,…

  12. Into Thin Air.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Shows how schools are working to avoid the types of equipment, supplies, and maintenance practices that harm indoor air quality. Simple steps to maintaining a cleaner indoor air environment are highlighted as are steps to reducing the problem air quality and the occurrence of asthma. (GR)

  13. Air Pollution Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Rockville, MD.

    This catalog lists the universities, both supported and not supported by the Division of Air Pollution, which offer graduate programs in the field of air pollution. The catalog briefly describes the programs and their entrance requirements, the requirements, qualifications and terms of special fellowships offered by the Division of Air Pollution.…

  14. Clean Air Act Text

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Air Act is the law that defines EPA's responsibilities for protecting and improving the nation's air quality and the stratospheric ozone layer. The last major change in the law, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, enacted in 1990 by Congress.

  15. Modelling Hot Air Balloons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brimicombe, M. W.

    1991-01-01

    A macroscopic way of modeling hot air balloons using a Newtonian approach is presented. Misleading examples using a car tire and the concept of hot air rising are discussed. Pressure gradient changes in the atmosphere are used to explain how hot air balloons work. (KR)

  16. Air Sensor Guidebook

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Air Sensor Guidebook has been developed by the U.S. EPA to assist those interested in potentially using lower cost air quality sensor technologies for air quality measurements. Its development was in direct response to a request for such a document following a recent scienti...

  17. Modelling Hot Air Balloons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brimicombe, M. W.

    1991-01-01

    A macroscopic way of modeling hot air balloons using a Newtonian approach is presented. Misleading examples using a car tire and the concept of hot air rising are discussed. Pressure gradient changes in the atmosphere are used to explain how hot air balloons work. (KR)

  18. Into Thin Air.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Shows how schools are working to avoid the types of equipment, supplies, and maintenance practices that harm indoor air quality. Simple steps to maintaining a cleaner indoor air environment are highlighted as are steps to reducing the problem air quality and the occurrence of asthma. (GR)

  19. Air Traffic Control Radar

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-13

    An Air Traffic Control radar has been constructed at Shiloh for the NASA control tower at the Shuttle Landing Facility. It will be used by NASA and the Eastern Range for surveillance of controlled air space in Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station restricted areas. Shiloh is on the northern end of Merritt Island.

  20. Air Traffic Control Radar

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-13

    An Air Traffic Control radar is being constructed at Shiloh for the NASA control tower at the Shuttle Landing Facility. It will be used by NASA and the Eastern Range for surveillance of controlled air space in Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station restricted areas. Shiloh is on the northern end of Merritt Island.

  1. SWAB Air sampling

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-08

    ISS014-E-09425 (8 Dec. 2006) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Thomas Reiter, Expedition 14 flight engineer, conducts a Surface, Water and Air Biocharacterization (SWAB) air sampling in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. Reiter holds a pair of scissors and the SWAB Air Sampling Device (ASD) floats freely near him.

  2. Naval Air Station Lighter than Air Hangar, wood construction horizontal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Naval Air Station Lighter than Air Hangar, wood construction horizontal rolling door. Drawing no. 2122 820. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  3. Aerospace air pollution issues.

    PubMed

    Patterson, R E; Rayman, R B

    1996-02-01

    Practitioners of aerospace medicine are mindful of the environmental effects, particularly air pollution, caused by aviation and spaceflight operations. To an aerospace medicine specialist, the environment includes not only the air, water, and soil of the earth, but also the cabin milieu of aircraft and space vehicles where crews must work, sleep, and in some cases, live. Consequently, this article will address the following areas of concern: cabin air quality of aircraft, cabin air quality of space vehicles, noise, air pollution, and aerial spraying.

  4. Air Conditioning Does Reduce Air Pollution Indoors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Bud

    1970-01-01

    Report of the winter meeting of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. Subjects covered are--(1) title subject, (2) predictions for the human habitat in 1994, (3) fans, and (4) fire safety in buildings. (JW)

  5. Air Conditioning Does Reduce Air Pollution Indoors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Bud

    1970-01-01

    Report of the winter meeting of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. Subjects covered are--(1) title subject, (2) predictions for the human habitat in 1994, (3) fans, and (4) fire safety in buildings. (JW)

  6. Air Conditioner/Dehumidifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    An ordinary air conditioner in a very humid environment must overcool the room air, then reheat it. Mr. Dinh, a former STAC associate, devised a heat pipe based humidifier under a NASA Contract. The system used heat pipes to precool the air; the air conditioner's cooling coil removes heat and humidity, then the heat pipes restore the overcooled air to a comfortable temperature. The heat pipes use no energy, and typical savings are from 15-20%. The Dinh Company also manufactures a "Z" coil, a retrofit cooling coil which may be installed on an existing heater/air conditioner. It will also provide free hot water. The company has also developed a photovoltaic air conditioner and solar powered water pump.

  7. Air Conditioner/Dehumidifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-01-01

    An ordinary air conditioner in a very humid environment must overcool the room air, then reheat it. Mr. Dinh, a former STAC associate, devised a heat pipe based humidifier under a NASA Contract. The system used heat pipes to precool the air; the air conditioner's cooling coil removes heat and humidity, then the heat pipes restore the overcooled air to a comfortable temperature. The heat pipes use no energy, and typical savings are from 15-20%. The Dinh Company also manufactures a "Z" coil, a retrofit cooling coil which may be installed on an existing heater/air conditioner. It will also provide free hot water. The company has also developed a photovoltaic air conditioner and solar powered water pump.

  8. Health Effects of Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health effects of air pollution Health effects of air pollution Breathing air that is not clean can hurt ... important to know about the health effects that air pollution can have on you and others. Once you ...

  9. Released air during vapor and air cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonská, Jana Kozubková, Milada

    2016-06-30

    Cavitation today is a very important problem that is solved by means of experimental and mathematical methods. The article deals with the generation of cavitation in convergent divergent nozzle of rectangular cross section. Measurement of pressure, flow rate, temperature, amount of dissolved air in the liquid and visualization of cavitation area using high-speed camera was performed for different flow rates. The measurement results were generalized by dimensionless analysis, which allows easy detection of cavitation in the nozzle. For numerical simulation the multiphase mathematical model of cavitation consisting of water and vapor was created. During verification the disagreement with the measurements for higher flow rates was proved, therefore the model was extended to multiphase mathematical model (water, vapor and air), due to release of dissolved air. For the mathematical modeling the multiphase turbulence RNG k-ε model for low Reynolds number flow with vapor and air cavitation was used. Subsequently the sizes of the cavitation area were verified. In article the inlet pressure and loss coefficient depending on the amount of air added to the mathematical model are evaluated. On the basis of the approach it may be create a methodology to estimate the amount of released air added at the inlet to the modeled area.

  10. Draft air deflecting device

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, J.E.

    1982-05-18

    A draft air deflecting device is mountable proximate to a window contained in a firebox and serves as a conduit which directs draft air across the inner surface of the window prior to its supporting combustion of the fuel in the firebox. In this respect , the draft air deflecting device is formed as a box which communicates with draft air holes located in the firebox and which includes a forwardly extending lip serving to define a nozzle for both increasing the velocity and directing the incoming draft air across the firebox window. The incoming draft air is thus utilized to cool and to prevent soot, creosote and other particulates from accumulating on the window.

  11. Air Superiority Fighter Characteristics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-05

    biographies are useful in garnering airpower advocate theories as well as identifying key characteristics. Air campaign results, starting with World...members, yet weapons and avionics systems grow increasingly more complex. At an airpower symposium in 1977, Air Chief Marshal Sir Frederick Rosier...Grant, 1990. Skinner , Michael and George Hall. Red Flae: Air Combat for the 90s. Osceola, WL: Motorbooks International Publishers & Wholesalers

  12. Maxillary air cyst.

    PubMed

    Doucette-Preville, Stephane; Tamm, Alexander; Khetani, Justin; Wright, Erin; Emery, Derek

    2013-12-01

    Pathologic dilatation of the maxillary sinus by air is a rare condition with unclear etiology. We present a case of a 17 year old male with a maxillary air cyst diagnosed by computed tomography. The CT demonstrated air-filled expansion of the maxillary sinus beyond the normal anatomical limits with associated cortical bone thinning. The case report highlights the pathognomonic computed tomography findings of this rare entity and discusses the perplexing nomenclature, proposed etiologies and various treatment options.

  13. Contact air abrasion.

    PubMed

    Porth, R

    1999-05-01

    The advantages of contact air abrasion techniques are readily apparent. The first, of course, is the greatly increased ease of use. Working with contact also tends to speed the learning curve by giving the process a more natural dental feel. In addition, as one becomes familiar with working with a dust stream, the potential for misdirecting the air flow is decreased. The future use of air abrasion for deep decay removal will make this the treatment of choice for the next millennium.

  14. Air modulation apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenahan, D. T.; Corsmeier, R. J.; Sterman, A. P. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An air modulation apparatus, such as for use in modulating cooling air to the turbine section of a gas turbine engine is described. The apparatus includes valve means disposed around an annular conduit, such as a nozzle, in the engine cooling air circuit. The valve means, when in a closed position, blocks a portion of the conduit, and thus reduces the amount and increases the velocity of cooling air flowing through the nozzle. The apparatus also includes actuation means, which can operate in response to predetermined engine conditions, for enabling opening and closing of the valve means.

  15. Personal continuous air monitor

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Ronald G.; Salazar, Samuel A.

    2000-01-01

    A personal continuous air monitor capable of giving immediate warning of the presence of radioactivity has a filter/detector head to be worn in the breathing zone of a user, containing a filter mounted adjacent to radiation detectors, and a preamplifier. The filter/detector head is connected to a belt pack to be worn at the waist or on the back of a user. The belt pack contains a signal processor, batteries, a multichannel analyzer, a logic circuit, and an alarm. An air pump also is provided in the belt pack for pulling air through the filter/detector head by way of an air tube.

  16. Solar Air Sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Nation's first solar-cell-powered air monitoring station was installed at Liberty State Park, New Jersey. Jointly sponsored by state agencies and the Department of Energy, system includes display which describes its operation to park visitors. Unit samples air every sixth day for a period of 24 hours. Air is forced through a glass filter, then is removed each week for examination by the New Jersey Bureau of Air Pollution. During the day, solar cells provide total power for the sampling equipment. Excess energy is stored in a bank of lead-acid batteries for use when needed.

  17. Clean Air Excellence Awards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These non-monetary awards honor sustainable efforts toward pollutant emissions reduction from innovators in clean air technology, community action and outreach, policy development, and transportation efficiency.

  18. Applications Using AIRS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, S. E.; Pagano, T. S.; Fetzer, E. J.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Olsen, E. T.; Teixeira, J.; Licata, S. J.; Hall, J. R.; Thompson, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua spacecraft has been returning daily global observations of Earth's atmospheric constituents and properties since 2002. With a 12-year data record and daily, global observations in near real-time, AIRS data can play a role in applications that fall under many of the NASA Applied Sciences focus areas. For vector-borne disease, research is underway using AIRS near surface retrievals to assess outbreak risk, mosquito incubation periods and epidemic potential for dengue fever, malaria, and West Nile virus. For drought applications, AIRS temperature and humidity data are being used in the development of new drought indicators and improvement in the understanding of drought development. For volcanic hazards, new algorithms using AIRS data are in development to improve the reporting of sulfur dioxide concentration, the burden and height of volcanic ash and dust, all of which pose a safety threat to aircraft. In addition, anomaly maps of many of AIRS standard products are being produced to help highlight "hot spots" and illustrate trends. To distribute it's applications imagery, AIRS is leveraging existing NASA data frameworks and organizations to facilitate archiving, distribution and participation in the BEDI. This poster will communicate the status of the applications effort for the AIRS Project and provide examples of new maps designed to best communicate the AIRS data.

  19. Liquid-air partition coefficients of 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC152a), 1,1,1-trifluoroethane (HFC143a), 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC134a), 1,1,1,2,2-pentafluoroethane (HFC125) and 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoropropane (HFC245fa).

    PubMed

    Ernstgård, Lena; Lind, Birger; Andersen, Melvin E; Johanson, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    Blood-air and tissue-blood coefficients (lambda) are essential to characterize the uptake and disposition of volatile substances, e.g. by physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling. Highly volatile chemicals, including many hydrofluorocarbons (HFC) have low solubility in liquid media. These characteristics pose challenges for determining lambda values. A modified head-space vial equilibrium method was used to determine lambda values for five widely used HFCs. The method is based on automated head-space gas chromatography and injection of equal amount of chemical in two head-space vials with identical air phase volumes but different volumes of the liquid phase. The liquids used were water (physiological saline), fresh human blood, and olive oil. The average lambda values (n = 8) were as follows: 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC152a) - 1.08 (blood-air), 1.11 (water-air) and 5.6 (oil-air); 1,1,1-trifluoroethane (HFC143a) - 0.15, 0.15 and 1.90; 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC134a) - 0.36, 0.35 and 3.5; 1,1,1,2,2-pentafluoroethane (HFC125) - 0.083, 0.074 and 1.71; and 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoropropane (HFC245fa) - 0.62, 0.58 and 12.1. The lambda values appeared to be concentration-independent in the investigated range (2-200 ppm). In spite of the low lambda values, the method errors were modest, with coefficients of variation of 9, 11 and 10% for water, blood and oil, respectively.

  20. Bearings Only Air-to-Air Ranging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-25

    sensor, observer and target parameters still remain. In order to reduce the number of cases to a manageable one, while preserving the geometric...perforance of variotu. ulro-air passive ranging tecnique has been examined as a fimn- tiam of uarget location andi motiom, observer motion. and length

  1. Recirculating electric air filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric air filter cartridge has a cylindrical inner high voltage electrode, a layer of filter material, and an outer ground electrode formed of a plurality of segments moveably connected together. The outer electrode can be easily opened to remove or insert filter material. Air flows through the two electrodes and the filter material and is exhausted from the center of the inner electrode.

  2. Next Generation Air Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract. Air pollution measurement technology is advancing rapidly towards smaller-scale and wireless devices, with a potential to significantly change the landscape of air pollution monitoring. The U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development is evaluating and developing a rang...

  3. Air Force Officer Cohesion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    and Staff College, 1980. 11. Craver , M.L., "No Surprise in Why Pilots Leave Service." Air Force Times, June 4, 1979, p. 23. 12. Wood, Frank R., U.S...34Institution Building In The All- Volunteer Force." Air University Review, September- October 1983, pp. 38-49. Craver , M.L., "No Surprise In Why Pilots Leave

  4. Air Pollution, Teachers' Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavaroni, Charles W.; O'Donnell, Patrick A.

    One of three in a series about pollution, this teacher's guide for a unit on air pollution is designed for use in junior high school grades. It offers suggestions for extending the information and activities contained in the textual material for students. Chapter 1 discusses the problem of air pollution and involves students in processes of…

  5. Air Pollution, Teachers' Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavaroni, Charles W.; O'Donnell, Patrick A.

    One of three in a series about pollution, this teacher's guide for a unit on air pollution is designed for use in junior high school grades. It offers suggestions for extending the information and activities contained in the textual material for students. Chapter 1 discusses the problem of air pollution and involves students in processes of…

  6. Discriminatory Air Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaull, Julian

    1976-01-01

    Described are the patterns of air pollution in certain large urban areas. Persons in poverty, in occupations below the management or professional level, in low-rent districts, and in black population are most heavily exposed to air pollution. Pollution paradoxically is largely produced by high energy consuming middle-and upper-class households.…

  7. Air Pollution and Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, R. D., Ed.

    This book is an authoritative reference and practical guide designed to help the plant engineer identify and solve industrial air pollution problems in order to be able to meet current air pollution regulations. Prepared under the editorial supervision of an experienced chemical engineer, with each chapter contributed by an expert in his field,…

  8. AIR HEATER EXPERIMENT,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The test program described in this report was designed to determine the feasibility of using a vitiated air heater for the PLUTO facility from the...profiles across the outlet proved relatively flat. The feasibility of using this burner for PLUTO facility air heating was established. (Author)

  9. AIR RADIOACTIVITY MONITOR

    DOEpatents

    Bradshaw, R.L.; Thomas, J.W.

    1961-04-11

    The monitor is designed to minimize undesirable background buildup. It consists of an elongated column containing peripheral electrodes in a central portion of the column, and conduits directing an axial flow of radioactively contaminated air through the center of the column and pure air through the annular portion of the column about the electrodes. (AEC)

  10. Air Pollution Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Tuberculosis and Respiratory Disease Association, New York, NY.

    As the dangers of polluted air to the health and welfare of all individuals became increasingly evident and as the complexity of the causes made responsibility for solutions even more difficult to fix, the National Tuberculosis and Respiratory Disease Association felt obligated to give greater emphasis to its clean air program. To this end they…

  11. Recirculating electric air filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1986-01-01

    An electric air filter cartridge has a cylindrical inner high voltage eleode, a layer of filter material, and an outer ground electrode formed of a plurality of segments moveably connected together. The outer electrode can be easily opened to remove or insert filter material. Air flows through the two electrodes and the filter material and is exhausted from the center of the inner electrode.

  12. Air Pollution Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Tuberculosis and Respiratory Disease Association, New York, NY.

    As the dangers of polluted air to the health and welfare of all individuals became increasingly evident and as the complexity of the causes made responsibility for solutions even more difficult to fix, the National Tuberculosis and Respiratory Disease Association felt obligated to give greater emphasis to its clean air program. To this end they…

  13. Next Generation Air Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract. Air pollution measurement technology is advancing rapidly towards smaller-scale and wireless devices, with a potential to significantly change the landscape of air pollution monitoring. The U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development is evaluating and developing a rang...

  14. Air pollution and society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimblecombe, P.

    2010-12-01

    Air pollution is as much a product of our society as it is one of chemistry and meteorology. Social variables such as gender, age, health status and poverty are often linked with our exposure to air pollutants. Pollution can also affect our behaviour, while regulations to improve the environment can often challenge of freedom.

  15. Discriminatory Air Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaull, Julian

    1976-01-01

    Described are the patterns of air pollution in certain large urban areas. Persons in poverty, in occupations below the management or professional level, in low-rent districts, and in black population are most heavily exposed to air pollution. Pollution paradoxically is largely produced by high energy consuming middle-and upper-class households.…

  16. Air Pollution and Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, R. D., Ed.

    This book is an authoritative reference and practical guide designed to help the plant engineer identify and solve industrial air pollution problems in order to be able to meet current air pollution regulations. Prepared under the editorial supervision of an experienced chemical engineer, with each chapter contributed by an expert in his field,…

  17. Secondary air filter assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Ortonville, A.J.

    1991-02-26

    This patent describes a filter cartridge assembly used for filtering air of a crankcase ventilating system of an internal combustion engine. It comprises: first (108) and second (110) air permeable filter platforms; vertical support columns; leg members; and a filter retainer.

  18. Air drying of lumber.

    Treesearch

    1999-01-01

    This report describes how lumber can be air-dried most effectively under outdoor conditions and illustrates the principles and procedures of air-drying lumber that were developed through field investigations and observations of industrial practices. Particular emphasis is placed on the yarding of lumber in unit packages. Included are topics such as why lumber is dried...

  19. The Air We Breathe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Dina

    2010-01-01

    Topics discussed include NASA mission to pioneer the future in space exploration, scientific discovery and aeronautics research; the role of Earth's atmosphere, atmospheric gases, layers of the Earth's atmosphere, ozone layer, air pollution, effects of air pollution on people, the Greenhouse Effect, and breathing on the International Space Station.

  20. Protective air lock

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Herbert W.

    1976-03-30

    A device suitable for preventing escape and subsequent circulation of toxic gases comprising an enclosure which is sealed by a surrounding air lock, automatic means for partially evacuating said enclosure and said air lock and for ventilating said enclosure and means for disconnecting said enclosure ventilating means, whereby a relatively undisturbed atmosphere is created in said enclosure.

  1. Nuclear air cushion vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of the still-conceptual nuclear air cushion vehicle, particularly the nuclear powerplant is identified. Using mission studies and cost estimates, some of the advantages of nuclear power for large air cushion vehicles are described. The technology studies on mobile nuclear powerplants and conceptual ACV systems/missions studies are summarized.

  2. Air Cargo Marketing Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kersey, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The factors involved in developing a market for air cargo services are discussed. A comparison is made between the passenger traffic problems and those of cargo traffic. Emphasis is placed on distribution analyses which isolates total distribution cost, including logistical costs such as transportation, inventory, materials handling, packaging, and processing. Specific examples of methods for reducing air cargo costs are presented.

  3. Air-Conditioning Mechanic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by air conditioning mechanics. Addressed in the four chapters, or lessons, of the manual are the following topics: principles of air conditioning, refrigeration components as…

  4. Bad Air For Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Dorothy Noyes

    1976-01-01

    Children are especially sensitive to air pollution and consequences to them maybe of longer duration than to adults. The effects of low-level pollution on children are the concern of this article. The need for research on the threat of air pollution to childrens' health is emphasized. (BT)

  5. Portable oven air circulator

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Jorgen A.; Nygren, Donald W.

    1983-01-01

    A portable air circulating apparatus for use in cooking ovens which is used to create air currents in the oven which transfer heat to cooking foodstuffs to promote more rapid and more uniform cooking or baking, the apparatus including a motor, fan blade and housing of metallic materials selected from a class of heat resistant materials.

  6. Air quality [Chapter 8

    Treesearch

    R. C. Musselman

    1994-01-01

    Air quality is monitored continuously at GLEES. Air pollutants are considered an important component of the atmosphere that can have an effect on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Atmospheric deposition of gases, wet deposition of chemicals in precipitation including snow and rain, and dry deposition of chemicals are all monitored at GLEES. Although GLEES is a...

  7. The Air We Breathe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Dina

    2010-01-01

    Topics discussed include NASA mission to pioneer the future in space exploration, scientific discovery and aeronautics research; the role of Earth's atmosphere, atmospheric gases, layers of the Earth's atmosphere, ozone layer, air pollution, effects of air pollution on people, the Greenhouse Effect, and breathing on the International Space Station.

  8. Air Traffic Control Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denery, Dallas; Lebacqz, Victor (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The steady growth in air travel will lead to heightened demands for additional airspace capacity, particularly in the vicinity of terminals. New computer-aided processing of aircraft and navigational capability exemplified by the Global Positioning System will allow more sophisticated management of air traffic. Additional altitudes and over-flight areas may be necessary to effectively use the newer technology,

  9. Culture systems: air quality.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Theodore

    2012-01-01

    Poor laboratory air quality is a known hazard to the culture of human gametes and embryos. Embryologists and chemists have employed analytical methods for identifying and measuring bulk and select air pollutants to assess the risk they pose to the embryo culture system. However, contaminant concentrations that result in gamete or embryotoxicity are poorly defined. Combating the ill effects of poor air quality requires an understanding of how toxicants can infiltrate the laboratory, the incubator, and ultimately the culture media. A further understanding of site-specific air quality can then lead to the consideration of laboratory design and management strategies that can minimize the deleterious effects that air contamination may have on early embryonic development in vitro.

  10. Airing 'clean air' in Clean India Mission.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, T; Kumar, M; Mall, R K; Singh, R S

    2017-03-01

    The submission explores the possibility of a policy revision for considering clean air quality in recently launched nationwide campaign, Clean India Mission (CIM). Despite of several efforts for improving availability of clean household energy and sanitation facilities, situation remain still depressing as almost half of global population lacks access to clean energy and proper sanitation. Globally, at least 2.5 billion people do not have access to basic sanitation facilities. There are also evidences of 7 million premature deaths by air pollution in year 2012. The situation is even more disastrous for India especially in rural areas. Although, India has reasonably progressed in developing sanitary facilities and disseminating clean fuel to its urban households, the situation in rural areas is still miserable and needs to be reviewed. Several policy interventions and campaigns were made to improve the scenario but outcomes were remarkably poor. Indian census revealed a mere 31% sanitation coverage (in 2011) compared to 22% in 2001 while 60% of population (700 million) still use solid biofuels and traditional cook stoves for household cooking. Further, last decade (2001-2011) witnessed the progress decelerating down with rural households without sanitation facilities increased by 8.3 million while minimum progress has been made in conversion of conventional to modern fuels. To revamp the sanitation coverage, an overambitious nationwide campaign CIM was initiated in 2014 and present submission explores the possibility of including 'clean air' considerations within it. The article draws evidence from literatures on scenarios of rural sanitation, energy practises, pollution induced mortality and climatic impacts of air pollution. This subsequently hypothesised with possible modification in available technologies, dissemination modes, financing and implementation for integration of CIM with 'clean air' so that access to both sanitation and clean household energy may be

  11. Method for the determination of perfluorooctanoic acid in air samples using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Mary A; Larsen, Barbara S; Dawson, Barbara J; Kurtz, Kristine; Lieckfield, Robert; Miller, James R; Flaherty, John

    2005-06-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid is a completely fluorinated carboxylic acid that is usually used in the ammonium salt form as a processing aid in the production of many fluoropolymers and fluoroelastomers. Ammonium perfluorooctanoate readily dissociates in water to give the ammonium and perfluorooctanoate ions. Perfluorooctanoate has been reported to be present in low levels in human serum in the United States and Europe. This study reports on the development and validation of a method for the determination of perfluorooctanoic acid in air samples. This method uses the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Versatile Sampler (OVS) with a nominal 0.3 micro m filter and polystyrene resin sorbent (XAD-2 or XAD-4) followed by determination of the perfluorooctanoate anion by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. The method was validated in the range of 0.474 to 47.4 microg/m3 for a 480-L sample. Breakthrough studies showed samples could be collected at 1 L/min for 24 hours or at 15 L/min up to 8 hours without breakthrough. Extract storage stability tests showed that sample extracts in methanol remain stable in glass autosampler vials for up to 13 days following initial injection. Perfluorooctanoic acid stability on OVS tubes was unaffected at both refrigerated and ambient temperatures. The overall average retention efficiency was 92.1% with a pooled RSD95 of 5.8% at five concentration levels (0.474 microg/m3 to 47.4 microg/m3).

  12. Air ejector augmented compressed air energy storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ahrens, Frederick W.; Kartsounes, George T.

    1980-01-01

    Energy is stored in slack demand periods by charging a plurality of underground reservoirs with air to the same peak storage pressure, during peak demand periods throttling the air from one storage reservoir into a gas turbine system at a constant inlet pressure until the air pressure in the reservoir falls to said constant inlet pressure, thereupon permitting air in a second reservoir to flow into said gas turbine system while drawing air from the first reservoir through a variable geometry air ejector and adjusting said variable geometry air ejector, said air flow being essentially at the constant inlet pressure of the gas turbine system.

  13. Air ejector augmented compressed air energy storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ahrens, F.W.; Kartsounes, G.T.

    Energy is stored in slack demand periods by charging a plurality of underground reservoirs with air to the same peak storage pressure, during peak demand periods throttling the air from one storage reservoir into a gas turbine system at a constant inlet pressure until the air presure in the reservoir falls to said constant inlet pressure, thereupon permitting air in a second reservoir to flow into said gas turbine system while drawing air from the first reservoir through a variable geometry air ejector and adjusting said variable geometry air ejector, said air flow being essentially at the constant inlet pressure of the gas turbine system.

  14. Air washer/scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.H.; Gerdes, D.F.; Telchuk, S.E.

    1982-05-04

    An air washer or scrubber, particularly for paint spray booths and especially adapted for removing paint particles from air passing downwardly through the grille floor of a paint spray booth and against a water-washed subfloor, comprises an elongated v-shaped slot in the subfloor extending along the longitudinal centerline of the booth. The inner edges of the walls forming the v-shaped slot are upturned to form ledges so that water flowed over the subfloor and the walls of the slot impinges against the ledges and is thrown upwardly and inwardly to form a curtain of water completely covering the slot. Exhaust means pulls paintladen air from the spray chamber through the water curtain and the slot and into an expansion chamber, the bottom walls of which form a second v-shaped slot contiguous with the first mentioned slot. The water, in which virtually all of the paint particles are entrained, and the air are discharged from the second slot and impinged against a baffle sheet angling downwardly away from the expansion chamber. The end of the sheet is upturned at a small angle to deflect the water and form an umbrella of water through which the air must pass for a final cleaning action. An optional curved deflector plate positioned beneath the umbrella of water aids in separating the water and air so that only clean, dry air is exhausted to atmosphere.

  15. Air Cleaning Technologies

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective This health technology policy assessment will answer the following questions: When should in-room air cleaners be used? How effective are in-room air cleaners? Are in-room air cleaners that use combined HEPA and UVGI air cleaning technology more effective than those that use HEPA filtration alone? What is the Plasmacluster ion air purifier in the pandemic influenza preparation plan? The experience of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) locally, nationally, and internationally underscored the importance of administrative, environmental, and personal protective infection control measures in health care facilities. In the aftermath of the SARS crisis, there was a need for a clearer understanding of Ontario’s capacity to manage suspected or confirmed cases of airborne infectious diseases. In so doing, the Walker Commission thought that more attention should be paid to the potential use of new technologies such as in-room air cleaning units. It recommended that the Medical Advisory Secretariat of the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care evaluate the appropriate use and effectiveness of such new technologies. Accordingly, the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee asked the Medical Advisory Secretariat to review the literature on the effectiveness and utility of in-room air cleaners that use high-efficiency particle air (HEPA) filters and ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) air cleaning technology. Additionally, the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee prioritized a request from the ministry’s Emergency Management Unit to investigate the possible role of the Plasmacluster ion air purifier manufactured by Sharp Electronics Corporation, in the pandemic influenza preparation plan. Clinical Need Airborne transmission of infectious diseases depends in part on the concentration of breathable infectious pathogens (germs) in room air. Infection control is achieved by a combination of administrative, engineering

  16. Particulate Air Pollution: The Particulars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, James E.

    1973-01-01

    Describes some of the causes and consequences of particulate air pollution. Outlines the experimental procedures for measuring the amount of particulate materials that settles from the air and for observing the nature of particulate air pollution. (JR)

  17. Lean in Air Permitting Guide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Lean in Air Permitting Guide is designed to help air program managers at public agencies better understand the potential value and results that can be achieved by applying Lean improvement methods to air permitting processes.

  18. Agriculture: Agriculture and Air Quality

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information on air emissions from agricultural practices, types of agricultural burning, air programs that may apply to agriculture, reporting requirements, and links to state and other federal air-quality information.

  19. Liquid-Air Breathing Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Robert D.

    1990-01-01

    Compact unit supplies air longer than compressed-air unit. Emergency breathing apparatus stores air as cryogenic liquid instead of usual compressed gas. Intended for firefighting or rescue operations becoming necessary during planned potentially hazardous procedures.

  20. Ozone - Current Air Quality Index

    MedlinePlus

    ... 0 - 50) Air quality is considered satisfactory, and air pollution poses little or no risk. AQI: Moderate (51 - ... number of people who are unusually sensitive to air pollution. AQI: Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups (101 - 150) Although ...

  1. Particulate Air Pollution: The Particulars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, James E.

    1973-01-01

    Describes some of the causes and consequences of particulate air pollution. Outlines the experimental procedures for measuring the amount of particulate materials that settles from the air and for observing the nature of particulate air pollution. (JR)

  2. Air Quality Management Process Cycle

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Air quality management are activities a regulatory authority undertakes to protect human health and the environment from the harmful effects of air pollution. The process of managing air quality can be illustrated as a cycle of inter-related elements.

  3. Indoor Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Takeji

    The reduction of intake of outdoor air volume in air conditioned buildings, adopted as the strategy for saving energy, has caused sick building syndrome abroad. Such symptoms of sick building as headache, stimuli of eye and nose and lethargy, appears to result from cigarette smoke, folmaldehyde and volatile organic carbons. On the other hand, in airtight residences not only carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides from domestic burning appliances but also allergens of mite, fungi, pollen and house dust, have become a subject of discussion. Moreover, asbestos and radon of carcinogen now attract a great deal of attention. Those indoor air pollutants are discussed.

  4. Air Force Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-08

    Air Force Research Laboratory 8 June 2009 Mr. Leo Marple Ai F R h L b t r orce esearc a ora ory Leo.Marple@wpafb.af.mil DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Air Force Research Laboratory 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Air Force Research Laboratory ,Wright

  5. Ventilating Air-Conditioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinh, Khanh

    1994-01-01

    Air-conditioner provides ventilation designed to be used alone or incorporated into cooling or heating system operates efficiently only by recirculating stale air within building. Energy needed to operate overall ventilating cooling or heating system slightly greater than operating nonventilating cooling or heating system. Helps to preserve energy efficiency while satisfying need for increased forced ventilation to prevent accumulation of undesired gases like radon and formaldehyde. Provides fresh treated air to variety of confined spaces: hospital surgeries, laboratories, clean rooms, and printing shops and other places where solvents used. In mobile homes and portable classrooms, eliminates irritant chemicals exuded by carpets, panels, and other materials, ensuring healthy indoor environment for occupants.

  6. Air heating system

    DOEpatents

    Primeau, John J.

    1983-03-01

    A self-starting, fuel-fired, air heating system including a vapor generator, a turbine, and a condenser connected in a closed circuit such that the vapor output from the vapor generator is conducted to the turbine and then to the condenser where it is condensed for return to the vapor generator. The turbine drives an air blower which passes air over the condenser for cooling the condenser. Also, a condensate pump is driven by the turbine. The disclosure is particularly concerned with the provision of heat exchanger and circuitry for cooling the condensed fluid output from the pump prior to its return to the vapor generator.

  7. Air/Water Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    After 18 years of research into air/water pollution at Stennis Space Center, Dr. B. C. Wolverton formed his own company, Wolverton Environmental Services, Inc., to provide technology and consultation in air and water treatment. Common houseplants are used to absorb potentially harmful materials from bathrooms and kitchens. The plants are fertilized, air is purified, and wastewater is converted to clean water. More than 100 U.S. communities have adopted Wolverton's earlier water hyacinth and artificial marsh applications. Catfish farmers are currently evaluating the artificial marsh technology as a purification system.

  8. Air Power and Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    New York: .E.P. Dutton& Co., Inc., 1942. (UGS 291 M6SG) . The-wild blue yonder; sons of the prophet carry on. New York: E.P. Dutton & Company; Inc...Historical Society Journal 14:1-IJ Sp- ring 1969. Wheeler, Gerald E. Mitchell, koffett, and air power. Air Power Historian 8:79787, April 1961. Williams, A...Caldwell. Cy. Airpower and the Russian octopus . Aero Digest 61: S6+, October 1950. 80 Carlton, Richard. Canada’s new concept of continental air power

  9. Ventilating Air-Conditioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinh, Khanh

    1994-01-01

    Air-conditioner provides ventilation designed to be used alone or incorporated into cooling or heating system operates efficiently only by recirculating stale air within building. Energy needed to operate overall ventilating cooling or heating system slightly greater than operating nonventilating cooling or heating system. Helps to preserve energy efficiency while satisfying need for increased forced ventilation to prevent accumulation of undesired gases like radon and formaldehyde. Provides fresh treated air to variety of confined spaces: hospital surgeries, laboratories, clean rooms, and printing shops and other places where solvents used. In mobile homes and portable classrooms, eliminates irritant chemicals exuded by carpets, panels, and other materials, ensuring healthy indoor environment for occupants.

  10. Air conditioned suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carl, G. R. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An environmentally controlled suit is described consisting of an airtight outergarment attached by an airtight bellows to the wall of a sterile chamber, an undergarment providing for circulation of air near the skin of the wearer, and a circulation system comprised of air supply and distribution to the extremities of the undegarment and central collection and exhaust of air from the midsection of the undergarment. A workman wearing the undergarment and attached circulation system enters the outer garment through a tunnel in the chamber wall and the attached bellows to work in the chamber without any danger of spreading bacteria.

  11. Liquid air mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Robert B. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A device for mixing liquid nitrogen and liquid oxygen to form liquid air. The mixing device consists of a tube for transferring liquid oxygen positioned within a tube for transferring liquid nitrogen. Supply vessels for liquid oxygen and liquid nitrogen are equally pressurized and connected to the appropriate tubes. Liquid oxygen and nitrogen flow from the supply vessels through the respective tubes and are mixed to form liquid air upon exiting the outlets of the tube. The resulting liquid air is transferred to a holding vessel.

  12. Air Shower Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Alania, Marco; Gomez, Adolfo V. Chamorro; Araya, Ignacio J.; Huerta, Humberto Martinez; Flores, Alejandra Parra; Knapp, Johannes

    2009-04-30

    Air shower simulations are a vital part of the design of air shower experiments and the analysis of their data. We describe the basic features of air showers and explain why numerical simulations are the appropriate approach to model the shower simulation. The CORSIKA program, the standard simulation program in this field, is introduced and its features, performance and limitations are discussed. The basic principles of hadronic interaction models and some gerneral simulation techniques are explained. Also a brief introduction to the installation and use of CORSIKA is given.

  13. Air Pollution Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Balmes, John R.; Collard, Harold R.

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution exposure is a well-established risk factor for several adverse respiratory outcomes, including airways diseases and lung cancer. Few studies have investigated the relationship between air pollution and interstitial lung disease (ILD) despite many forms of ILD arising from environmental exposures. There are potential mechanisms by which air pollution could cause, exacerbate, or accelerate the progression of certain forms of ILD via pulmonary and systemic inflammation as well as oxidative stress. This article will review the current epidemiologic and translational data supporting the plausibility of this relationship and propose a new conceptual framework for characterizing novel environmental risk factors for these forms of lung disease. PMID:25846532

  14. Olefin metathesis in air

    PubMed Central

    Piola, Lorenzo; Nahra, Fady

    2015-01-01

    Summary Since the discovery and now widespread use of olefin metathesis, the evolution of metathesis catalysts towards air stability has become an area of significant interest. In this fascinating area of study, beginning with early systems making use of high oxidation state early transition metal centers that required strict exclusion of water and air, advances have been made to render catalysts more stable and yet more functional group tolerant. This review summarizes the major developments concerning catalytic systems directed towards water and air tolerance. PMID:26664625

  15. Criteria air pollutants and toxic air pollutants.

    PubMed Central

    Suh, H H; Bahadori, T; Vallarino, J; Spengler, J D

    2000-01-01

    This review presents a brief overview of the health effects and exposures of two criteria pollutants--ozone and particulate matter--and two toxic air pollutants--benzene and formaldehyde. These pollutants were selected from the six criteria pollutants and from the 189 toxic air pollutants on the basis of their prevalence in the United States, their physicochemical behavior, and the magnitude of their potential health threat. The health effects data included in this review primarily include results from epidemiologic studies; however, some findings from animal studies are also discussed when no other information is available. Health effects findings for each pollutant are related in this review to corresponding information about outdoor, indoor, and personal exposures and pollutant sources. Images Figure 3 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:10940240

  16. Air-to-Air Missile Vector Scoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-22

    Authorized licensed use limited to: Air Force Institute of Technology. Downloaded on April 19,2010 at 19:40:39 UTC from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions apply...all three cases the azimuth angle estimation is based on two receive antennas and the monopulse technique. 1-4244-1 539-X/08/$25.00 ©2008 IEEE ...December 2005. 4. Blackman, Samuel. “Multiple Hypothesis Tracking for Multiple Target Tracking”. IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, 19:5–18

  17. Air Quality Implementation Plans

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    States must develop plans to attain and maintain air quality standards. These plans, known as SIPs, are submitted to EPA for approval. This web site contains information about this process and the current status of the submittals.

  18. Air bag restraint device

    DOEpatents

    Marts, Donna J.; Richardson, John G.

    1995-01-01

    A rear-seat air bag restraint device is disclosed that prevents an individual, or individuals, from continuing violent actions while being transported in a patrol vehicle's rear seat without requiring immediate physical contact by the law enforcement officer. The air bag is activated by a control switch in the front seat and inflates to independently restrict the amount of physical activity occurring in the rear seat of the vehicle while allowing the officer to safely stop the vehicle. The air bag can also provide the officer additional time to get backup personnel to aid him if the situation warrants it. The bag is inflated and maintains a constant pressure by an air pump.

  19. Air bag restraint device

    DOEpatents

    Marts, D.J.; Richardson, J.G.

    1995-10-17

    A rear-seat air bag restraint device is disclosed that prevents an individual, or individuals, from continuing violent actions while being transported in a patrol vehicle`s rear seat without requiring immediate physical contact by the law enforcement officer. The air bag is activated by a control switch in the front seat and inflates to independently restrict the amount of physical activity occurring in the rear seat of the vehicle while allowing the officer to safely stop the vehicle. The air bag can also provide the officer additional time to get backup personnel to aid him if the situation warrants it. The bag is inflated and maintains a constant pressure by an air pump. 8 figs.

  20. Air Traffic Network Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The high level requirement of the Air Traffic Network (ATN) project is to provide a mechanism for evaluating the impact of router scheduling modifications on a networks efficiency, without implementing the modifications in the live network.

  1. Investigating Air Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Edward J.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment using live plants and cigarette smoke to demonstrate the effects of air pollution on a living organism. Procedures include growth of the test plants in glass bottles, and construction and operation of smoking machine. (CS)

  2. Calidad del aire interior

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web site will educate the public about indoor environmental issues including health risks and means by which human exposures can be reduced. Content on this site will be focused on Spanish translated resources for information about indoor air quality.

  3. Walking On Air

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This video features a series of time lapse sequences photographed by the Expedition 30 crew aboard the International Space Station. Set to the song "€œWalking in the Air,"€ by Howard Blake, the v...

  4. Images in the air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveros, H. G.; Rosenberger, Franz

    2012-05-01

    This article discusses two 'magic tricks' in terms of underlying optical principles. The first trick is new and produces a 'ghost' in the air, and the second is the classical real image produced with two parabolic mirrors.

  5. Air transportation energy efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    The energy efficiency of air transportation, results of the recently completed RECAT studies on improvement alternatives, and the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Research Program to develop the technology for significant improvements in future aircraft were reviewed.

  6. Air cushion landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boghami, K. M.; Captain, K. M.; Fish, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    Static and dynamic performance of air cushion landing system is simulated in computer program that treats four primary ACLS subsystems: fan, feeding system, trunk, and cushion. Configuration of systems is sufficiently general to represent variety of practical designs.

  7. Siting Air Monitoring Stations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwig, F. L.

    1978-01-01

    Describes guidelines for consideration in selecting sites for air monitoring systems. Careful selection for spatial scale and specific sources assures that the collected data are accurately representing the situation. (Author/MA)

  8. Breathing zone air sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.

    1989-08-22

    A sampling apparatus is presented which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

  9. Modelling hot air balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimicombe, N. W.

    1991-07-01

    Hot air balloons can be modelled in a number of different ways. The most satisfactory, but least useful model is at a microscopic level. Macroscopic models are easier to use but can be very misleading.

  10. Air Force Junior ROTC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnell, James A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the Junior Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps (AFROTC) program presently being operated in 275 units across the country. It is basically a three year course in aerospace studies and leadership education. (BR)

  11. Air Emissions Inventories

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site provides access to emissions data, regulations and guidance, electronic system access, resources and tools to support trends analysis, regional, and local scale air quality modeling, regulatory impact assessments.

  12. Traffic air quality index.

    PubMed

    Bagieński, Zbigniew

    2015-02-01

    Vehicle emissions are responsible for a considerable share of urban air pollution concentrations. The traffic air quality index (TAQI) is proposed as a useful tool for evaluating air quality near roadways. The TAQI associates air quality with the equivalent emission from traffic sources and with street structure (roadway structure) as anthropogenic factors. The paper presents a method of determining the TAQI and defines the degrees of harmfulness of emitted pollution. It proposes a classification specifying a potential threat to human health based on the TAQI value and shows an example of calculating the TAQI value for real urban streets. It also considers the role that car traffic plays in creating a local UHI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Improving Indoor Air Quality

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Usually the most effective way to improve indoor air quality is to eliminate individual sources of pollution or to reduce their emissions. Some sources, like those that contain asbestos, can be sealed or enclosed.

  14. Breathing zone air sampler

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, John

    1989-01-01

    A sampling apparatus is provided which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

  15. Air conditioning system

    DOEpatents

    Lowenstein, Andrew; Miller, Jeffrey; Gruendeman, Peter; DaSilva, Michael

    2005-02-01

    An air conditioner comprises a plurality of plates arranged in a successively stacked configuration with portions thereof having a spaced apart arrangement, and defining between successive adjacent pairs of plates at the spaced apart portions a first and second series of discrete alternating passages wherein a first air stream is passed through the first series of passages and a second air stream is passed through the second series of passages; and said stacked configuration of plates forming integrally therewith a liquid delivery means for delivering from a source a sufficient quantity of a liquid to the inside surfaces of the first series of fluid passages in a manner which provides a continuous flow of the liquid from a first end to a second end of the plurality of plates while in contact with the first air stream.

  16. AIR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a chapter for John Wiley & Son's Mechanical Engineers' Handbook, and covers issues involving air pollution control. Various technologies for controlling sulfur oxides is considered including fuel desulfurization. It also considers control of nitrogen oxides including post...

  17. Investigating Air Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Edward J.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment using live plants and cigarette smoke to demonstrate the effects of air pollution on a living organism. Procedures include growth of the test plants in glass bottles, and construction and operation of smoking machine. (CS)

  18. Process air quality data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C. M.; Hogge, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    Air quality sampling was conducted. Data for air quality parameters, recorded on written forms, punched cards or magnetic tape, are available for 1972 through 1975. Computer software was developed to (1) calculate several daily statistical measures of location, (2) plot time histories of data or the calculated daily statistics, (3) calculate simple correlation coefficients, and (4) plot scatter diagrams. Computer software was developed for processing air quality data to include time series analysis and goodness of fit tests. Computer software was developed to (1) calculate a larger number of daily statistical measures of location, and a number of daily monthly and yearly measures of location, dispersion, skewness and kurtosis, (2) decompose the extended time series model and (3) perform some goodness of fit tests. The computer program is described, documented and illustrated by examples. Recommendations are made for continuation of the development of research on processing air quality data.

  19. Temporal solitons in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, A. A.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2017-02-01

    Analysis of the group-velocity dispersion (GVD) of atmospheric air with a model that includes the entire manifold of infrared transitions in air reveals a remarkably broad and continuous anomalous-GVD region in the high-frequency wing of the carbon dioxide rovibrational band from approximately 3.5 to 4.2 μm where atmospheric air is still highly transparent and where high-peak-power sources of ultrashort midinfrared pulses are available. Within this range, anomalous dispersion acting jointly with optical nonlinearity of atmospheric air is shown to give rise to a unique three-dimensional dynamics with well-resolved soliton features in the time domain, enabling a highly efficient whole-beam soliton self-compression of such pulses to few-cycle pulse widths.

  20. Air transportation energy efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    The energy efficiency of air transportation, results of the recently completed RECAT studies on improvement alternatives, and the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Research Program to develop the technology for significant improvements in future aircraft were reviewed.

  1. Siting Air Monitoring Stations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwig, F. L.

    1978-01-01

    Describes guidelines for consideration in selecting sites for air monitoring systems. Careful selection for spatial scale and specific sources assures that the collected data are accurately representing the situation. (Author/MA)

  2. Air cushion landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boghami, K. M.; Captain, K. M.; Fish, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    Static and dynamic performance of air cushion landing system is simulated in computer program that treats four primary ACLS subsystems: fan, feeding system, trunk, and cushion. Configuration of systems is sufficiently general to represent variety of practical designs.

  3. Natural Air Purifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    NASA environmental research has led to a plant-based air filtering system. Dr. B.C. Wolverton, a former NASA engineer who developed a biological filtering system for space life support, served as a consultant to Terra Firma Environmental. The company is marketing the BioFilter, a natural air purifier that combines activated carbon and other filter media with living plants and microorganisms. The filter material traps and holds indoor pollutants; plant roots and microorganisms then convert the pollutants into food for the plant. Most non-flowering house plants will work. After pollutants have been removed, the cleansed air is returned to the room through slits in the planter. Terra Firma is currently developing a filter that will also disinfect the air.

  4. AIR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a chapter for John Wiley & Son's Mechanical Engineers' Handbook, and covers issues involving air pollution control. Various technologies for controlling sulfur oxides is considered including fuel desulfurization. It also considers control of nitrogen oxides including post...

  5. State Air Quality Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollution Engineering, 1978

    1978-01-01

    This article presents in tabular form the air quality standards for sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, photochemicals, non-methane hydrocarbons and particulates for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. (CS)

  6. State Air Quality Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollution Engineering, 1978

    1978-01-01

    This article presents in tabular form the air quality standards for sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, photochemicals, non-methane hydrocarbons and particulates for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. (CS)

  7. Air pollution from aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heywood, J. B.; Fay, J. A.; Chigier, N. A.

    1979-01-01

    A series of fundamental problems related to jet engine air pollution and combustion were examined. These include soot formation and oxidation, nitric oxide and carbon monoxide emissions mechanisms, pollutant dispension, flow and combustion characteristics of the NASA swirl can combustor, fuel atomization and fuel-air mixing processes, fuel spray drop velocity and size measurement, ignition and blowout. A summary of this work, and a bibliography of 41 theses and publications which describe this work, with abstracts, is included.

  8. Military Air Cargo Containerization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    MILITARY AIR CARGO CONTAINERIZATION GRADUATE RESEARCH PAPER Joseph W. Mancy, Major, USAF AFIT/ GMO /LAL/96J-4 : ."•" ’* ■- ’ DEPARTMENT OF...Approved to public release; Distribution UnHmlted ? DTIC QUALITY INSPECTED 1 AFIT/ GMO /LAL/96J-4 MILITARY AIR CARGO CONTAINERIZATION GRADUATE RESEARCH...PAPER Joseph W. Mancy, Major, USAF AFIT/ GMO /LAL/96J-4 19960617 134 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited The views expressed in this

  9. Nuclear air cushion vehicles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    This paper serves several functions. It identifies the 'state-of-the-art' of the still-conceptual nuclear air cushion vehicle, particularly the nuclear powerplant. Using mission studies and cost estimates, the report describes some of the advantages of nuclear power for large air cushion vehicles. The paper also summarizes the technology studies on mobile nuclear powerplants and conceptual ACV systems/missions studies that have been performed at NASA Lewis Research Center.

  10. Multipollutant air quality management.

    PubMed

    Hidy, George M; Pennell, William T

    2010-06-01

    On the basis of a recent NARSTO assessment, this review discusses the factors involved in the implementation of a risk- and results-based multipollutant air quality management strategy applicable to North America. Such a strategy could evolve from current single-pollutant regulatory practices using a series of steps that would seek to minimize risk of exposure for humans and ecosystems while providing for a quantitative evaluation of the effectiveness of the management process. The tools needed to support multipollutant air quality management are summarized. They include application of a formal risk analysis, accounting for atmospheric processes, ambient measurements, emissions characterization, air quality modeling of emissions to ambient concentrations, and characterization of human and ecological responses to ambient pollutant exposure. The new management strategy would expand the current practice of accountability that relates emission reductions and attainment of air quality derived from air quality criteria and standards. Conceptually, achievement of accountability would establish goals optimizing risk reduction associated with pollution management. This expanded approach takes into account the sequence of processes from emissions reduction to resulting changes in ambient concentration. Using ambient concentration as a proxy for exposure, the resulting improvement in human and ecosystem health is estimated. The degree to which this chain of processes and effects can be achieved in current practice is examined in a multipollutant context exemplified by oxidants, as indicated by ozone, particulate matter, and some hazardous air pollutants. Achievement of a multipollutant management strategy will mostly depend on improving knowledge about human and ecosystem response to pollutant exposure.

  11. Developing air quality forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pius; Saylor, Rick; Meagher, James

    2012-05-01

    Third International Workshop on Air Quality Forecasting Research; Potomac, Maryland, 29 November to 1 December 2011 Elevated concentrations of both near-surface ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter smaller than 2.5 micrometers in diameter have been implicated in increased mortality and other human health impacts. In light of these known influences on human health, many governments around the world have instituted air quality forecasting systems to provide their citizens with advance warning of impending poor air quality so that they can take actions to limit exposure. In an effort to improve the performance of air quality forecasting systems and provide a forum for the exchange of the latest research in air quality modeling, the International Workshop on Air Quality Forecasting Research (IWAQFR) was established in 2009 and is cosponsored by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Environment Canada (EC), and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The steering committee for IWAQFR's establishment was composed of Véronique Bouchet, Mike Howe, and Craig Stoud (EC); Greg Carmichael (University of Iowa); Paula Davidson and Jim Meagher (NOAA); and Liisa Jalkanen (WMO). The most recent workshop took place in Maryland.

  12. Air injection system diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Kotzan, J.M.; Labus, G.E.

    1992-05-19

    This patent describes a method for diagnosing failures in an air control system that controls a quantity of air admitted into an exhaust path of an internal combustion engine. It comprises sensing the oxygen content of the exhaust gas of the engine at predetermined time intervals at a first predetermined point in the exhaust path of the engine, the oxygen content normally oscillating between a rich oxygen condition and a lean oxygen condition in the absence of air injected into the exhaust path above the first predetermined point; injecting a quantity of air into the exhaust path of the engine at a second predetermined point in the exhaust port, the second predetermined point being above the first predetermined point; counting the number of intervals at which the sensed oxygen content indicates a rich oxygen condition over a predetermined period of time; comparing the counted number of rich oxygen intervals to a predetermined threshold value, the threshold value being greater than a counted number of rich oxygen intervals over the predetermined period of time resulting from the normal oscillations between rich and lean oxygen conditions in the absence of air injected into the exhaust path; indicating the existence of a fault in the air control system when the number of rich oxygen intervals does not exceed the predetermined threshold value.

  13. Ambient Air Quality Data Inventory

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Office of Air and Radiation's (OAR) Ambient Air Quality Data (Current) contains ambient air pollution data collected by EPA, other federal agencies, as well as state, local, and tribal air pollution control agencies. Its component data sets have been collected over the years from approximately 10,000 monitoring sites, of which approximately 5,000 are currently active. OAR's Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) and other internal and external users, rely on this data to assess air quality, assist in Attainment/Non-Attainment designations, evaluate State Implementation Plans for Non-Attainment Areas, perform modeling for permit review analysis, and other air quality management functions. Air quality information is also used to prepare reports for Congress as mandated by the Clean Air Act. This data covers air quality data collected after 1980, when the Clean Air Act requirements for monitoring were significantly modified. Air quality data from the Agency's early years (1970s) remains available (see OAR PRIMARY DATA ASSET: Ambient Air Quality Data -- Historical), but because of technical and definitional differences the two data assets are not directly comparable. The Clean Air Act of 1970 provided initial authority for monitoring air quality for Conventional Air Pollutants (CAPs) for which EPA has promulgated National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Requirements for monitoring visibility-related parameters were added in 1977. Requiremen

  14. 77 FR 1513 - Air Show and Air Races; Public Hearing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD Air Show and Air Races; Public Hearing TIME AND DATE: 9 a.m., Tuesday, January 10, 2012... hearing is to examine current regulations and oversight practices for air shows and air races, describe...

  15. Control of the Air: The Primary Air Power Role

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    air, p 8-9. 23. R Cargill Hall. Case Studies in Strategic Bombardment, Air Force History and Museums Program, 1998, “British Strategic Air...Relations with Special Reference to Kashmir. Atlantic Publishers. New Delhi. 2003. Hall, R. Cargill . Case Studies in Strategic Bombardment. Air

  16. Automatic air flow control in air conditioning ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obler, H. D.

    1972-01-01

    Device is designed which automatically selects air flow coming from either of two directions and which can be adjusted to desired air volume on either side. Device uses one movable and two fixed scoops which control air flow and air volume.

  17. Infants Can Study Air Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Alan

    1983-01-01

    Provided are activities and demonstrations which can be used to teach infants about the nature of air, uses of air, and objects that fly in the air. The latter include airships, hot-air balloons, kites, parachutes, airplanes, and Hovercraft. (JN)

  18. Infants Can Study Air Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Alan

    1983-01-01

    Provided are activities and demonstrations which can be used to teach infants about the nature of air, uses of air, and objects that fly in the air. The latter include airships, hot-air balloons, kites, parachutes, airplanes, and Hovercraft. (JN)

  19. Air diverter for supercharger

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.A.

    1986-10-28

    An engine supercharger is described which consists of a turbine housing, a main turbine wheel of the radial-inflow type located within the turbine housing, a compressor housing having an air entrance passageway, and a compressor wheel of the centrifugal type located within the compressor housing. It also includes a main shaft of annular construction interconnecting the turbine wheel and the compressor wheel whereby the two wheels rotate as a unit, an auxiliary turbine wheel of the axial flow type located downstream from the main turbine wheel, and a fan of the axial flow type located upstream from the compressor wheel. An auxiliary shaft extends within the main shaft between the auxiliary turbine and fan whereby the auxiliary turbine and fan rotate as a unit. An annular air collector chamber means is located immediately downstream from the fan in surrounding relation to the aforementioned entrance passageway for diverting some of the fan air from the compressor wheel. The fan comprises a hub and blades radiating outwardly therefrom. The air collector chamber is defined in part by an annular wall having a free edge located within the fan blade axial profile whereby the annular wall intercepts air discharged from outer tip areas of the fan blades to divert same away from the compressor wheel into the collector chamber.

  20. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  1. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  2. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  3. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a... enforced by the Commander, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force, Seattle, Washington, or such agencies as he...

  4. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a... enforced by the Commander, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force, Seattle, Washington, or such agencies as he...

  5. Air Compliance Complaint Database (ACCD)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    THIS DATA ASSET NO LONGER ACTIVE: This is metadata documentation for the Region 7 Air Compliance Complaint Database (ACCD) which logs all air pollution complaints received by Region 7. It contains information about the complaint along with how the complaint was addressed. The Air and Waste Management Division is the primary managing entity for this database. This work falls under objectives for EPA's 2003-2008 Strategic Plan (Goal 1) for Clean Air & Global Climate Change, which are to achieve healthier outdoor air.

  6. Compressed air energy storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ahrens, Frederick W.; Kartsounes, George T.

    1981-01-01

    An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

  7. Compressed air energy storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ahrens, F.W.; Kartsounes, G.T.

    An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

  8. Fireman's Air Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Together with NASA's Johnson Space Center, A-T-O Inc.'s Scott Aviation has developed light-weight firefighter's air tanks. New backpack system weighs only 20 pounds for 30 minute air supply, 13 pounds less than conventional firefighting tanks. They are pressurized at 4,500 psi, (twice current tanks). Made of aluminum liner wrapped by resin-impregnated glass fibers, eliminating corrosion as well as lightening the load. Redesigned face mask permits better vision. Warning device to tell fireman he is running out of air is personalized so it can't be heard by others reducing confusion in an already hectic environment. Structural Composites Inc., The Boeing Co., and Martin- Marietta Corp. have developed uses for this technology.

  9. AIR COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

    1958-05-27

    A nuclear reactor of the air-cooled, graphite moderated type is described. The active core consists of a cubicle mass of graphite, approximately 25 feet in each dimension, having horizontal channels of square cross section extending between two of the opposite faces, a plurality of cylindrical uranium slugs disposed in end to end abutting relationship within said channels providing a space in the channels through which air may be circulated, and a cadmium control rod extending within a channel provided in the moderator. Suitable shielding is provlded around the core, as are also provided a fuel element loading and discharge means, and a means to circulate air through the coolant channels through the fuel charels to cool the reactor.

  10. Air Sparging Design Paradigm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-12

    that the air distribution in the aquifer is non-uniform about the air injection, exhibiting tendencies to flow along the axis defined by MP6 , MP12...MW2 MW9 MW7 MW1 MW3 MP9, N9 MP11, N11 MP5, N5 MP7, N7 MP12, N12 MP6 , N6 MP3, N3MP1, N1 - Multi-level sampler and neutron access tube - Air...MP9 and MP12. This hypothesis is supported by the high saturations at MP3, MP6 , MP9 and MP12 in the upper part of the aquifer (3 to 4 m BGS) and low

  11. Auxiliary air injector assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Sager, R.L.

    1987-04-07

    This patent describes an auxiliary air injector assembly kit for replacement use to connect a secondary air line from an engine air pump to an exhaust pipe in a variety of combustion engine exhaust systems. The exhaust pipe has an auxiliary air receiving hole formed in a wall thereof. The assembly comprises a flexible conduit adapted to be readily cut to length and connected at one end to the secondary air line, a metal tube, means for connecting a first end of the metal tube to the other end of the flexible conduit, and a hollow fitting with an air flow-through passage and having a conical portion adapted to fit in the hole in a leak resistant manner. The fitting has a bearing portion with a convex spherical surface located outside the exhaust pipe when the conical portion is in the hole. A second end of the metal tube has a flange with a concave spherical surface to seat against the convex spherical surface in a leak resistant manner. A clamp means connects the metal tube to the exhaust pipe and applies pressure on the metal tube flange against the bearing portion of the fitting to hold the fitting in the hole. The clamp means includes a saddle having an opening larger than the tube but smaller than the tube flange. The tube extends through the saddle opening. The clamp means also includes a U-bolt assembly for extending around the exhaust pipe and forcing the saddle against the tube flange and toward the exhaust pipe.

  12. Space Derived Air Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    COPAMS, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Air Monitoring System, derives from technology involved in building unmanned spacecraft. The Nimbus spacecraft carried experimental sensors to measure temperature, pressure, ozone, and water vapor, and instruments for studying solar radiation and telemetry. The process which relayed these findings to Earth formed the basis for COPAMS. The COPAMS system consists of data acquisition units which measure and record pollution level, and sense wind speed and direction, etc. The findings are relayed to a central station where the information is computerized. The system is automatic and supplemented by PAQSS, PA Air Quality Surveillance System.

  13. MSFC hot air collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, K.

    1978-01-01

    A description of the hot air collector is given that includes a history of development, a history of the materials development, and a program summary. The major portion of the solar energy system cost is the collector. Since the collector is the heart of the system and the most costly subsystem, reducing the cost of producing collectors in large quantities is a major goal. This solar collector is designed to heat air and/or water cheaply and efficiently through the use of solar energy.

  14. Dental Compressed Air Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    I AL-TR-IWI-0uuu AD-A249 954 DENTAL COMPRESSED AIMYTM R Curtis D. Weyrmuch, Mejor, USAP, D Samuel P.Dvs iueatclpi SF.O N AEROSPACE MwaEDIN mwr~ComA G...FUNDING NUMBERS Dental Compressed Air Systems PE - 87714F PR - 7350 TA - 22 D. Weyrauch WU - XX Samuel P. Davis George W. Gaines 7. PERFORMING...words) The purpose of this report is to update guidelines on dental compressed air systems (DCA). Much of the information was obtained from a survey

  15. Liquid air cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosevear, Jerry

    1992-01-01

    Given here is a definition of Liquid Air Cycle Engines (LACE) and existing relevant technologies. Heat exchanger design and fabrication techniques, the handling of liquid hydrogen to achieve the greatest heat sink capabilities, and air decontamination to prevent heat exchanger fouling are discussed. It was concluded that technology needs to be extended in the areas of design and fabrication of heat exchangers to improve reliability along with weight and volume reductions. Catalysts need to be improved so that conversion can be achieved with lower quantities and lower volumes. Packaging studies need to be investigated both analytically and experimentally. Recycling with slush hydrogen needs further evaluation with experimental testing.

  16. Air quality risk management.

    PubMed

    Williams, Martin L

    2008-01-01

    Rather than attempt to provide a comprehensive account of air quality risk assessment, as might be found in a textbook or manual, this article discusses some issues that are of current importance in the United Kingdom and the rest of Europe, with special emphasis on risk assessment in the context of policy formulation, and emerging scientific knowledge. There are two pollutants of particular concern and that both pose challenges for risk assessment and policy, and they are particulate matter (PM) and ozone. The article describes some issues for health risk assessment and finally some forward-looking suggestions for future approaches to air quality management.

  17. Air Sampling Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    General Metal Works' Accu-Vol is a high-volume air sampling system used by many government agencies to monitor air quality for pollution control purposes. Procedure prevents possible test-invalidating contamination from materials other than particulate pollutants, caused by manual handling or penetration of windblown matter during transit, a cassette was developed in which the filter is sealed within a metal frame and protected in transit by a snap-on aluminum cover, thus handled only under clean conditions in the laboratory.

  18. AIR Model Preflight Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, H.; Wilson, J. W.; Maiden, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    The atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) ER-2 preflight analysis, one of the first attempts to obtain a relatively complete measurement set of the high-altitude radiation level environment, is described in this paper. The primary thrust is to characterize the atmospheric radiation and to define dose levels at high-altitude flight. A secondary thrust is to develop and validate dosimetric techniques and monitoring devices for protecting aircrews. With a few chosen routes, we can measure the experimental results and validate the AIR model predictions. Eventually, as more measurements are made, we gain more understanding about the hazardous radiation environment and acquire more confidence in the prediction models.

  19. Air Pollution Surveillance Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, George B.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Describes atmospheric data monitoring as part of total airpollution control effort. Summarizes types of gaseous, liquid and solid pollutants and their sources; contrast between urban and rural environmental air quality; instrumentation to identify pollutants; and anticipated new non-wet chemical physical and physiochemical techniques tor cetection…

  20. Air Pollution Surveillance Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, George B.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Describes atmospheric data monitoring as part of total airpollution control effort. Summarizes types of gaseous, liquid and solid pollutants and their sources; contrast between urban and rural environmental air quality; instrumentation to identify pollutants; and anticipated new non-wet chemical physical and physiochemical techniques tor cetection…

  1. Tribal Air Quality Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) (Flagstaff, Arizona) provides training and support for tribal professionals in the technical job skills needed for air quality monitoring and other environmental management tasks. ITEP also arranges internships, job placements, and hands-on training opportunities and supports an…

  2. Sticking with air

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, S.N.

    2005-06-01

    A decision to replace more than 300 aging damper actuators at Independence Plant in Newark, Arkensas forced Entergy to make a choice between pneumatic and electric actuator designs. The dampers route air flow through separate dedicated compartments to ensure proper firing of pulverised coal. The reasons that pneumatics was chosen are discussed in this article. 4 figs.

  3. An Air of Concern.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Terry E.; Shonkwiler, Tonja; Birr, David

    1998-01-01

    Examines how indoor air quality (IAQ) problems can create difficulties for a school both administratively, and legally. Discusses how to identify the IAQ symptoms and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's industry standards for IAQ, as well as tips for reducing liability risk. (GR)

  4. Testing for Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Artice

    Three experiments are presented in this Science Study Aid to provide the teacher with some fundamental air pollution activities. The first experiment involved particulates, the second deals with microorganisms, and the third looks at gases in the atmosphere. Each activity outlines introductory information, objectives, materials required, procedure…

  5. Oregon Air Ambulance Services.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    A 85 aboard unpressurized aircraft. These two patients, both of whom suffered from a bowel obstruction , were transported aboard unpressurized...services can safely transport patients with conditions (i.e. bowel obstruction , facial fractures, pneumothorax, intracranial air) which are clearly

  6. Understanding Our Environment: Air.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiSpezio, Michael

    Part of the Understanding Our Environment project that is designed to engage students in investigating specific environmental problems through concrete activities and direct experience, this unit uses the contemporary dilemma of acid rain as a vehicle for teaching weather and the characteristics of air and atmosphere. The project involves a…

  7. The Air up There

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    To engage students in a real-world issue (Bransford, Brown, and Cocking 2000) that affects their communities, the author designed an entire unit to investigate air pollution in their home state, Connecticut. The unit's goal is to understand how the use of resources, such as fossil fuels, might affect their quality of life. Through this unit,…

  8. Air Proportional Counter

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Jr, J A

    1950-12-05

    A multiple wire counter utilizing air at atmospheric pressure as the ionizing medium and having a window of a nylon sheet of less than 0.5 mil thickness coated with graphite. The window is permeable to alpha particles so that the counter is well adapted to surveying sources of alpha radiation.

  9. Air weapon fatalities.

    PubMed Central

    Milroy, C M; Clark, J C; Carter, N; Rutty, G; Rooney, N

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To describe characteristics of a series of people accidentally and deliberately killed by air powered weapons. METHODS: Five cases of fatal airgun injury were identified by forensic pathologists and histopathologists. The circumstances surrounding the case, radiological examination, and pathological findings are described. The weapon characteristics are also reported. RESULTS: Three of the victims were adult men, one was a 16 year old boy, and one an eight year old child. Four of the airguns were .22 air rifles, the other a .177 air rifle. Two committed suicide, one person shooting himself in the head, the other in the chest. In both cases the guns were fired at contact range. Three of the cases were classified as accidents: in two the pellet penetrated into the head and in one the chest. CONCLUSIONS: One person each year dies from an air powered weapon injury in the United Kingdom. In addition there is considerable morbidity from airgun injuries. Fatalities and injuries are most commonly accidents, but deliberately inflicted injuries occur. Airguns are dangerous weapons when inappropriately handled and should not be considered as toys. Children should not play with airguns unsupervised. Images PMID:9797730

  10. Air-Supported Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Dept. of Education, Toronto. School Planning and Building Research Section.

    This study has been prepared to set out some of the benefits and the problems involved in the use of air-supported structures. Also indicated are the types of inquiries that should be made when the use of such structures is being considered. Technical and engineering details, such as the properties of various fabrics, are not included. (Author)

  11. Air Travel Health Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... improved health Before your flightOne key to air travel is to prepare ahead of time. If you are carrying on a bag, make ... need to change if your eating and sleeping times will change at your destination.If you have diabetes or epilepsy, you should travel with your ID card. For instance, the American ...

  12. Air-Supported Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Dept. of Education, Toronto. School Planning and Building Research Section.

    This study has been prepared to set out some of the benefits and the problems involved in the use of air-supported structures. Also indicated are the types of inquiries that should be made when the use of such structures is being considered. Technical and engineering details, such as the properties of various fabrics, are not included. (Author)

  13. Wartime Air Traffic Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    sets overboard mnd reported their accidental loss.5 Fortunately. such aviation pioneers as Lt Col Henry H. ("Hap") Arnold and Capt Harold M. McClelland...operability is t he responsibility of the entire base populace. All "blue- suiters " must be mentally and physically prepared to fight the air base war. Winston

  14. AIR POLLUTION AND HUMMINGBIRDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multidisciplinary team of EPA-RTP ORD pulmonary toxicologists, engineers, ecologists, and statisticians have designed a study of how ground-level ozone and other air pollutants may influence feeding activity of the ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris). Be...

  15. Air Blast Calculations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    library. A Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) equation of state is used for each explosive considered, and a Sesame tabular equation of state is used to model the...explosives investigated (TNT, C4, PBXN-109, and NM) and the CTH material library parameters were used for each. Air was modeled using the Sesame tabular

  16. Ames Air Revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Roger Z.

    2015-01-01

    This is an informal presentation presented to the University of Colorado, Boulder Bioastronautics group seminar. It highlights the key focal areas of the Air Revitalization Group research over the past year, including progress on the CO2 Removal and Compression System, testing of CDRA drying bed configurations, and adsorption research.

  17. [Forward medical air evacuation].

    PubMed

    Czerniak, Erik; Le Dorze, Patrick Causse; Hersan, Olivier; Pohl, Jean-Baptiste; Angot, Emmanuel

    2014-09-01

    The medical chain which assures the treatment of casualties from the theatre of operations back to France comprises several links connected by medical air transport. Whether it is tactical or strategic, it forms an integral part of the treatment pathway and offers casualties the best possible conditions for medical treatment with a high degree of safety, speed and traceability.

  18. Images in the Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riveros, H. G.; Rosenberger, Franz

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses two "magic tricks" in terms of underlying optical principles. The first trick is new and produces a "ghost" in the air, and the second is the classical real image produced with two parabolic mirrors. (Contains 2 figure and 6 photos.)

  19. The air afterglow revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, F.

    1972-01-01

    The air afterglow, 0 + NO2 chemiluminescence, is discussed in terms of fluorescence, photodissociation, and quantum theoretical calculations of NO2. The experimental results presented include pressure dependence, M-dependence, spectral dependence of P and M, temperature dependence, and infrared measurements. The NO2 energy transfer model is also discussed.

  20. Clean Air by Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Gary N.

    1995-01-01

    Planning new construction is an opportunity to recognize indoor environmental quality (IEQ) issues. Provides an overview of some common IEQ issues associated with construction projects. A building's heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system is by far the single most common cause of IEQ problems and complaints. (MLF)

  1. Tribal Air Quality Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) (Flagstaff, Arizona) provides training and support for tribal professionals in the technical job skills needed for air quality monitoring and other environmental management tasks. ITEP also arranges internships, job placements, and hands-on training opportunities and supports an…

  2. Air Structures: Inflatable Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valerio, Joseph M.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Describes and evaluates several avant garde'' examples of air structures. Included are a soft'' child's playpen, a pneudome that employs a water ballast for anchoring, a one-acre enclosed campus, an instant city'' constructed for an industrial design conference, and the Fuji Pavilion, at Expo '70 in Osaka, Japan, that was large enough to cover…

  3. Clean Air by Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Gary N.

    1995-01-01

    Planning new construction is an opportunity to recognize indoor environmental quality (IEQ) issues. Provides an overview of some common IEQ issues associated with construction projects. A building's heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system is by far the single most common cause of IEQ problems and complaints. (MLF)

  4. Understanding Our Environment: Air.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiSpezio, Michael

    Part of the Understanding Our Environment project that is designed to engage students in investigating specific environmental problems through concrete activities and direct experience, this unit uses the contemporary dilemma of acid rain as a vehicle for teaching weather and the characteristics of air and atmosphere. The project involves a…

  5. Immunotoxicity of air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, J.A.; Gardner, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    The most common ubiquitous air pollutants, as well as some point source (e.g. metals) air pollutants, decrease the function of pulmonary host defense mechanisms against infection. Most of this knowledge is based on animal studies and involves cellular antibacterial defenses such as alveolar macrophages and mucociliary clearance. Information on viral infectivity is more sparse. Since there is no routine treatment for viral infections which have a relatively high rate of occurrence, this gap in knowledge is of concern. Given the major gaps in knowledge, resaonably accurate assessment of the immunotoxicity of air pollutants is not possible. When the limited data base is reviewed relative to ambient levels of the common pollutants, it appears that acute exposures to O3 and H2SO4 and chronic exposures to NO2 are the major exposures of concern for immunotoxic effects. It is critical to point out, however, that until information is available for chronic exposures to low levels of metals and for exposures to common organic vapors, the immunotoxicity of air pollutants cannot be assessed adequately.

  6. Images in the Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riveros, H. G.; Rosenberger, Franz

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses two "magic tricks" in terms of underlying optical principles. The first trick is new and produces a "ghost" in the air, and the second is the classical real image produced with two parabolic mirrors. (Contains 2 figure and 6 photos.)

  7. The Air up There

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    To engage students in a real-world issue (Bransford, Brown, and Cocking 2000) that affects their communities, the author designed an entire unit to investigate air pollution in their home state, Connecticut. The unit's goal is to understand how the use of resources, such as fossil fuels, might affect their quality of life. Through this unit,…

  8. AIR POLLUTION AND HUMMINGBIRDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multidisciplinary team of EPA-RTP ORD pulmonary toxicologists, engineers, ecologists, and statisticians have designed a study of how ground-level ozone and other air pollutants may influence feeding activity of the ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris). Be...

  9. Air on the Move.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Provides (1) background information on global winds, air masses, fronts, and pressure systems; (2) five activities on this topic; and (3) a ready-to-copy coloring page and worksheet. Each activity includes an objective, list of materials needed, recommended age level(s), subject area(s), and instructional strategies. (JN)

  10. Comparing toxic air pollutant programs

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, S.C.

    1997-05-01

    This article compares state and federal toxic air pollutant programs. The Clean Air Act Ammendments created a program for the control of Hazardous Air Pollutants based on the establishment of control technology standards. State toxic programs can be classified into two categories: control technology-based and ambient concentration-based. Many states have opened to implement the MACT standards while enforcing their own state air toxics programs. Specific topics discussed include the following: the Federal air toxics program; existing state regulations; New Jersey Air Toxic Program; New York Toxics program.

  11. Air quality management in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Bremauntz, Adrián

    2008-01-01

    Several significant program and policy measures have been implemented in Mexico over the past 15 yr to improve air quality. This article provides an overview of air quality management strategies in Mexico, including (1) policy initiatives such as vehicle use restrictions, air quality standards, vehicle emissions, and fuel quality standards, and (2) supporting programs including establishment of a national emission inventory, an air pollution episodes program, and the implementation of exposure and health effects studies. Trends in air pollution episodes and ambient air pollutant concentrations are described.

  12. Air pollution and allergens.

    PubMed

    Bartra, J; Mullol, J; del Cuvillo, A; Dávila, I; Ferrer, M; Jáuregui, I; Montoro, J; Sastre, J; Valero, A

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that the prevalence of allergic diseases has increased in recent decades in the industrialized world. Exposure to environmental pollutants may partially account for this increased prevalence. In effect, air pollution is a growing public health problem. In Europe, the main source of air pollution due to particles in suspension is represented by motor vehicles--particularly those that use diesel fuel. Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) are composed of a carbon core upon which high-molecular weight organic chemical components and heavy metals deposit. Over 80% of all DEPs are in the ultrafine particle range (< 0.1 pm in diameter). Air pollutants not only have a direct or indirect effect upon the individual, but also exert important actions upon aeroallergens. Pollen in heavily polluted zones can express a larger amount of proteins described as being allergenic. Through physical contact with the pollen particles, DEPs can disrupt the former, leading to the release of paucimicronic particles and transporting them by air--thus facilitating their penetration of the human airways. Climate change in part gives rise to variations in the temperature pattern characterizing the different seasons of the year. Thus, plants may vary their pollination calendar, advancing and prolonging their pollination period. In addition, in the presence of high CO2 concentrations and temperatures, plants increase their pollen output. Climate change may also lead to the extinction of species, and to the consolidation of non-native species--with the subsequent risk of allergic sensitization among the exposed human population. In conclusion, there is sufficient scientific evidence on the effect of air pollution upon allergens, increasing exposure to the latter, their concentration and/or biological allergenic activity.

  13. Air-Coupled Vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, D.; Solodov, I.; Busse, G.

    Sound and ultrasound in air are the products of a multitude of different processes and thus can be favorable or undesirable phenomena. Development of experimental tools for non-invasive measurements and imaging of airborne sound fields is of importance for linear and nonlinear nondestructive material testing as well as noise control in industrial or civil engineering applications. One possible solution is based on acousto-optic interaction, like light diffraction imaging. The diffraction approach usually requires a sophisticated setup with fine optical alignment barely applicable in industrial environment. This paper focuses on the application of the robust experimental tool of scanning laser vibrometry, which utilizes commercial off-the-shelf equipment. The imaging technique of air-coupled vibrometry (ACV) is based on the modulation of the optical path length by the acoustic pressure of the sound wave. The theoretical considerations focus on the analysis of acousto-optical phase modulation. The sensitivity of the ACV in detecting vibration velocity was estimated as ~1 mm/s. The ACV applications to imaging of linear airborne fields are demonstrated for leaky wave propagation and measurements of ultrasonic air-coupled transducers. For higher-intensity ultrasound, the classical nonlinear effect of the second harmonic generation was measured in air. Another nonlinear application includes a direct observation of the nonlinear air-coupled emission (NACE) from the damaged areas in solid materials. The source of the NACE is shown to be strongly localized around the damage and proposed as a nonlinear "tag" to discern and image the defects.

  14. Air release control in seismic energy source air gun

    SciTech Connect

    Bays, M.G.

    1980-10-28

    Disclosed is a seismic source device, known in the industry as an air gun, having shuttle control for allowing a predetermined discharge of compressed air into water for purposes of seismic exploration. The shuttle is controlled by secondary shuttle means for closing the exhaust ports before all of the compressed air in the firing chamber of the air gun is exhausted. This point of closing the exhaust ports before virtually all of the compressed air is discharged differs from prior art air guns. By preventing further discharge of air, secondary pulses are greatly reduced, thereby enhancing the operation of the entire system. Further, by preventing all the air in the firing chamber from being discharged, the system becomes more efficient and more cost effective.

  15. Alaskan Air Defense and Early Warning Systems Clear Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Alaskan Air Defense and Early Warning Systems - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  16. Care for Your Air: A Guide to Indoor Air Quality

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Understand indoor air in homes, schools, and offices. Most of us spend much of our time indoors. The air that we breathe in our homes, in schools, and in offices can put us at risk for health problems.

  17. Air permeability and trapped-air content in two soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stonestrom, D.A.; Rubin, J.

    1989-01-01

    To improve understanding of hysteretic air permeability relations, a need exists for data on the water content dependence of air permeability, matric pressure, and air trapping (especially for wetting-drying cycles). To obtain these data, a special instrument was designed. The instrument is a combination of a gas permeameter (for air permeability determination), a suction plate apparatus (for retentivity curve determination), and an air pycnometer (for trapped-air-volume determination). This design allowed values of air permeability, matric pressure, and air trapping to be codetermined, i.e., determined at the same values of water content using the same sample and the same inflow-outflow boundaries. Such data were obtained for two nonswelling soils. -from Authors

  18. 17. VIEW OF AIR LOCK ENTRY DOOR. BANKS OF AIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW OF AIR LOCK ENTRY DOOR. BANKS OF AIR FILTERS ARE VISIBLE TO THE SIDES OF THE DOORS. THE BUILDING WAS DIVIDED INTO ZONES BY AIRLOCK DOORS AND AIR FILTERS. AIR PRESSURE DIFFERENTIALS WERE MAINTAINED IN THE ZONES, SUCH THAT AIRFLOW WAS PROGRESSIVELY TOWARD AREAS WITH THE HIGHEST POTENTIAL FOR CONTAMINATION. (9/24/91) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Manufacturing Facility, North-central section of Plant, just south of Building 776/777, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  19. 26. "AIR INSTALLATIONS; EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, CALIFORNIA; HIGH SPEED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. "AIR INSTALLATIONS; EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, CALIFORNIA; HIGH SPEED TEST TRACK." Drawing No. 10-259. One inch to 400 feet plan of original 10,000-foot sled track. No date. No D.O. series number. No headings as above. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Edwards Air Force Base, North of Avenue B, between 100th & 140th Streets East, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. A Breath of Fresh Air: Addressing Indoor Air Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palliser, Janna

    2011-01-01

    Indoor air pollution refers to "chemical, biological, and physical contamination of indoor air," which may result in adverse health effects (OECD 2003). The causes, sources, and types of indoor air pollutants will be addressed in this article, as well as health effects and how to reduce exposure. Learning more about potential pollutants in home…

  1. A Breath of Fresh Air: Addressing Indoor Air Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palliser, Janna

    2011-01-01

    Indoor air pollution refers to "chemical, biological, and physical contamination of indoor air," which may result in adverse health effects (OECD 2003). The causes, sources, and types of indoor air pollutants will be addressed in this article, as well as health effects and how to reduce exposure. Learning more about potential pollutants in home…

  2. Properties of air and combustion products of fuel with air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poferl, D. J.; Svehla, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Thermodynamic and transport properties have been calculated for air, the combustion products of natural gas and air, and combustion products of ASTM-A-1 jet fuel and air. Properties calculated include: ratio of specific heats, molecular weight, viscosity, specific heat, thermal conductivity, Prandtl number, and enthalpy.

  3. Something in the Air: Air Pollution in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villaire, Ted

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the danger of unhealthy air in the school environment, describing common problems and how parents and schools can respond. The article focuses on the dangers of mold, pesticides, diesel exhaust, and radon. The three sidebars describe how to promote indoor air quality at school, note how to determine whether the school's air is making…

  4. Indoor Air Quality in Schools: Clean Air Is Good Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarneiri, Michele A.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the effect of poor indoor air quality (IAQ) on student health, the cost of safeguarding good IAQ, the cause of poor IAQ in schools, how to tell whether a school has an IAQ problem, and how the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency can help schools improve indoor air quality though the use of their free "Indoor Air Quality Tools for…

  5. Indoor Air Quality in Schools: Clean Air Is Good Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarneiri, Michele A.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the effect of poor indoor air quality (IAQ) on student health, the cost of safeguarding good IAQ, the cause of poor IAQ in schools, how to tell whether a school has an IAQ problem, and how the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency can help schools improve indoor air quality though the use of their free "Indoor Air Quality Tools for…

  6. Something in the Air: Air Pollution in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villaire, Ted

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the danger of unhealthy air in the school environment, describing common problems and how parents and schools can respond. The article focuses on the dangers of mold, pesticides, diesel exhaust, and radon. The three sidebars describe how to promote indoor air quality at school, note how to determine whether the school's air is making…

  7. Air-cooled, hydrogen-air fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelekhin, Alexander B. (Inventor); Bushnell, Calvin L. (Inventor); Pien, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An air-cooled, hydrogen-air solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell with a membrane electrode assembly operatively associated with a fluid flow plate having at least one plate cooling channel extending through the plate and at least one air distribution hole extending from a surface of the cathode flow field into the plate cooling channel.

  8. Air Pollution over the States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1972

    1972-01-01

    State plans for implementing air quality standards are evaluated together with problems in modeling procedures and enforcement. Monitoring networks, standards, air quality regions, and industrial problems are also discussed. (BL)

  9. Air Emissions Monitoring for Permits

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Operating permits document how air pollution sources will demonstrate compliance with emission limits and also how air pollution sources will monitor, either periodically or continuously, their compliance with emission limits and all other requirements.

  10. Clean Air Technology Center Products

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Air Technology Center provides resources for emerging and existing air pollution prevention and control technologies and provides public access to data and information on their use, effectiveness and cost.

  11. National Air Toxics Assessment (NATA)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    NATA provides estimates of the risk of cancer and other serious health effects from inhaling air toxics in order to inform both national and more localized efforts to identify and prioritize air toxics, emission source types.

  12. Air Mobile Utility Distribution Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    WATER PIPES, AIR TRANSPORTABLE EQUIPMENT, POLYVINYL CHLORIDE, GLASS REINFORCED PLASTICS , FUEL HOSES, HOSES....PIPES, *PIPING SYSTEMS, INSULATION, FABRICATION, CORROSION INHIBITION, FEASIBILITY STUDIES, AIR FORCE FACILITIES, POLYURETHANE RESINS, PLASTICS

  13. Air Emissions Factors and Quantification

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Emissions factors are used in developing air emissions inventories for air quality management decisions and in developing emissions control strategies. This area provides technical information on and support for the use of emissions factors.

  14. EPA Activities for Cleaner Air

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Activities in San Joaquin Valley to reduce air pollution, meet federal health standards for ozone and particulates, fund clean tech and health research, and enforce compliance with facility-specific operating permits for industrial air pollution sources.

  15. Air Pollution over the States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1972

    1972-01-01

    State plans for implementing air quality standards are evaluated together with problems in modeling procedures and enforcement. Monitoring networks, standards, air quality regions, and industrial problems are also discussed. (BL)

  16. Introduction to Indoor Air Quality

    MedlinePlus

    ... as conditions caused by outdoor impacts (such as climate change). Many reports and studies indicate that the following ... Air Duct Cleaning Asthma Health, Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Flood Cleanup IAQ at Home Indoor airPLUS Mold ...

  17. Managing Air Quality - Program Implementation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Describes elements for the set of activities to ensure that control strategies are put into effect and that air quality goals and standards are fulfilled, permitting programs, and additional resources related to implementation under the Clean Air Act.

  18. Polydimethylsiloxane-based permeation passive air sampler. Part II: Effect of temperature and humidity on the calibration constants.

    PubMed

    Seethapathy, Suresh; Górecki, Tadeusz

    2010-12-10

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has low permeability towards water vapour and low energy of activation of permeation towards volatile organic compounds (VOCs) when compared to many other polymers. Suitability of the material for use in permeation-type passive air samplers was tested as it theoretically should reduce uptake rate variations due to temperature changes and eliminate or reduce complications arising from sorbent saturation by water vapour. The calibration constants of a simple autosampler vial-based permeation passive sampler equipped with a PDMS membrane (Waterloo Membrane Sampler(®)) were determined for various analytes at different temperatures. From the data, the activation energy of permeation for PDMS towards the analytes was determined. The analytes studied belonged to various classes of compounds with wide ranging polarities, including n-alkanes, aromatic hydrocarbons, esters and alcohols. The results confirmed Arrhenius-type relationship between temperature and calibration constant and the energy of activation of permeation for PDMS ranged from -5kJ/mole for butylbenzene to -17kJ/mole for sec-butylacetate. Calibration constants of the samplers towards n-alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons determined at humidities between 30% and 91% indicated no statistically significant variations in the uptake rate with changes in humidity for 9 of the 11 analytes studied. The results confirmed the suitability of the sampler for deployment in high humidity areas and under varying temperature conditions.

  19. Iron-Air Rechargeable Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Sri R. (Inventor); Prakash, G.K. Surya (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments include an iron-air rechargeable battery having a composite electrode including an iron electrode and a hydrogen electrode integrated therewith. An air electrode is spaced from the iron electrode and an electrolyte is provided in contact with the air electrode and the iron electrodes. Various additives and catalysts are disclosed with respect to the iron electrode, air electrode, and electrolyte for increasing battery efficiency and cycle life.

  20. Metal-air battery assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, R.K.; Van Voorhees, S.L.; Ferrel, T.

    1988-05-01

    The objective of this report is to evaluate the present technical status of the zinc-air, aluminum/air and iron/air batteries and assess their potential for use in an electric vehicle. In addition, this report will outline proposed research and development priorities for the successful development of metal-air batteries for electric vehicle application. 39 refs., 25 figs., 11 tabs.

  1. Air Force Energy Plan 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-24

    production on Air Bases  Field the Critical Asset Prioritization Methodology ( CAPM ) tool  Manage costs  Provide energy leadership throughout the Air...residing on military installations • Field the Critical Asset Prioritization Methodology ( CAPM ) tool. This CAPM tool will allow prioritization of Air...fielding of the Critical Asset Prioritization Methodology ( CAPM ) tool and the adoption of financial standards to enable transparency across Air

  2. Basic Information about Air Emissions Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site is about types of air emissions monitoring and the Clean Air Act regulations, including Ambient Air Quality Monitoring, Stationary Source Emissions Monitoring, and Continuous Monitoring Systems.

  3. Air Defence Alerting Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapmore, Clive

    1990-04-01

    The Air Defence Alerting Device, otherwise known as ADAD, is a passive infra-red system which detects the presence of a potentially hostile airborne threat and relays its bearings to a Close Air Defence Weapon System (CADWS). The equipment is therefore a cueing device which directs a weapon system operator (or his sight) to the bearing of the threat. From an overall weapon system point of view, use of ADAD realises a very significant increase in weapon effectiveness which is greatly welcomed in these times of constrained defence budgets. The ADAD system is believed to be the first of its kind in the world to be procured in production quantities - it will go into service with the UK Army in the early 1990's.

  4. Air cathode structure manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Momyer, William R.; Littauer, Ernest L.

    1985-01-01

    An improved air cathode structure for use in primary batteries and the like. The cathode structure includes a matrix active layer, a current collector grid on one face of the matrix active layer, and a porous, nonelectrically conductive separator on the opposite face of the matrix active layer, the collector grid and separator being permanently bonded to the matrix active layer. The separator has a preselected porosity providing low IR losses and high resistance to air flow through the matrix active layer to maintain high bubble pressure during operation of the battery. In the illustrated embodiment, the separator was formed of porous polypropylene. A thin hydrophobic film is provided, in the preferred embodiment, on the current collecting metal grid.

  5. Aeromicrobiology/air quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, Gary L.; Frisch, A.S.; Kellogg, Christina A.; Levetin, E.; Lighthart, Bruce; Paterno, D.

    2009-01-01

    The most prevalent microorganisms, viruses, bacteria, and fungi, are introduced into the atmosphere from many anthropogenic sources such as agricultural, industrial and urban activities, termed microbial air pollution (MAP), and natural sources. These include soil, vegetation, and ocean surfaces that have been disturbed by atmospheric turbulence. The airborne concentrations range from nil to great numbers and change as functions of time of day, season, location, and upwind sources. While airborne, they may settle out immediately or be transported great distances. Further, most viable airborne cells can be rendered nonviable due to temperature effects, dehydration or rehydration, UV radiation, and/or air pollution effects. Mathematical microbial survival models that simulate these effects have been developed.

  6. Air pollution from aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heywood, J. B.; Fay, J. A.; Chigier, N. A.

    1979-01-01

    Forty-one annotated abstracts of reports generated at MIT and the University of Sheffield are presented along with summaries of the technical projects undertaken. Work completed includes: (1) an analysis of the soot formation and oxidation rates in gas turbine combustors, (2) modelling the nitric oxide formation process in gas turbine combustors, (3) a study of the mechanisms causing high carbon monoxide emissions from gas turbines at low power, (4) an analysis of the dispersion of pollutants from aircraft both around large airports and from the wakes of subsonic and supersonic aircraft, (5) a study of the combustion and flow characteristics of the swirl can modular combustor and the development and verification of NO sub x and CO emissions models, (6) an analysis of the influence of fuel atomizer characteristics on the fuel-air mixing process in liquid fuel spray flames, and (7) the development of models which predict the stability limits of fully and partially premixed fuel-air mixtures.

  7. FLUIDIC: Metal Air Recharged

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, Cody

    2014-03-07

    Fluidic, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed and deployed the world's first proven high cycle life metal air battery. Metal air technology, often used in smaller scale devices like hearing aids, has the lowest cost per electron of any rechargeable battery storage in existence. Deploying these batteries for grid reliability is competitive with pumped hydro installations while having the advantages of a small footprint. Fluidic's battery technology allows utilities and other end users to store intermittent energy generated from solar and wind, as well as maintain reliable electrical delivery during power outages. The batteries are manufactured in the US and currently deployed to customers in emerging markets for cell tower reliability. As they continue to add customers, they've gained experience and real world data that will soon be leveraged for US grid reliability.

  8. Aqueous lithium air batteries

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J.; Nimon, Yevgeniy S.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Petrov, Alexei; Goncharenko, Nikolay

    2017-05-23

    Aqueous Li/Air secondary battery cells are configurable to achieve high energy density and prolonged cycle life. The cells include a protected a lithium metal or alloy anode and an aqueous catholyte in a cathode compartment. The aqueous catholyte comprises an evaporative-loss resistant and/or polyprotic active compound or active agent that partakes in the discharge reaction and effectuates cathode capacity for discharge in the acidic region. This leads to improved performance including one or more of increased specific energy, improved stability on open circuit, and prolonged cycle life, as well as various methods, including a method of operating an aqueous Li/Air cell to simultaneously achieve improved energy density and prolonged cycle life.

  9. FLUIDIC: Metal Air Recharged

    ScienceCinema

    Friesen, Cody

    2016-07-12

    Fluidic, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed and deployed the world's first proven high cycle life metal air battery. Metal air technology, often used in smaller scale devices like hearing aids, has the lowest cost per electron of any rechargeable battery storage in existence. Deploying these batteries for grid reliability is competitive with pumped hydro installations while having the advantages of a small footprint. Fluidic's battery technology allows utilities and other end users to store intermittent energy generated from solar and wind, as well as maintain reliable electrical delivery during power outages. The batteries are manufactured in the US and currently deployed to customers in emerging markets for cell tower reliability. As they continue to add customers, they've gained experience and real world data that will soon be leveraged for US grid reliability.

  10. Next-generation air monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollution measurement technology is advancing rapidly towards smaller-scale and wireless devices, with a potential to significantly change the landscape of air pollution monitoring. EPA is evaluating and developing a range of next-generation air monitoring (NGAM) technologie...

  11. Indoor Air Quality in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Vincent M.

    Asserting that the air quality inside schools is often worse than outdoor pollution, leading to various health complaints and loss of productivity, this paper details factors contributing to schools' indoor air quality. These include the design, operation, and maintenance of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems; building…

  12. Pupils' Understanding of Air Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitriou, Anastasia; Christidou, Vasilia

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of pupils' knowledge and understanding of atmospheric pollution. Specifically, the study is aimed at identifying: 1) the extent to which pupils conceptualise the term "air pollution" in a scientifically appropriate way; 2) pupils' knowledge of air pollution sources and air pollutants; and 3) pupils'…

  13. Next-generation air monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollution measurement technology is advancing rapidly towards smaller-scale and wireless devices, with a potential to significantly change the landscape of air pollution monitoring. EPA is evaluating and developing a range of next-generation air monitoring (NGAM) technologie...

  14. Air Pollution Primer. Revised Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corman, Rena

    This revised and updated book is written to inform the citizens on the nature, causes, and effects of air pollution. It is written in terms familiar to the layman with the purpose of providing knowledge and motivation to spur community action on clean air policies. Numerous charts and drawings are provided to support discussion of air pollution…

  15. Overview of Emerging Air Sensors

    EPA Science Inventory

    These slides will be presented at the 2014 National Ambient Air Monitoring Conference in Atlanta, GA during August 11-15, 2014. The goal is to provide an overview of air sensor technology and the audience will be primarily state air monitoring agencies and EPA Regions.

  16. Improved high volume air sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    Sampler permits size separations of particles by directing sampled air through cross-sectional area sufficiently large that air velocity is reduced to point where particles or larger size will settle out. Sampler conducts air downward and through slots around periphery of unit into relatively open interior of house.

  17. Congress and the Air Force.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-04-01

    know where to go to find out that information. The "Congress and the Air Force" Internet web page serves as a " one - stop shop" where Air Force personnel...Congress. The need for a " one - stop " guide is clear. The literature on this topic is not readily accessible by the Air Force member out in the field who

  18. Improving IAQ Via Air Filtration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, Brian

    1999-01-01

    Provides tips on using air filtration to control indoor air quality in educational facilities, including dedicated spaces with unique air quality conditions such as in libraries, museums and archival storage areas, kitchens and dining areas, and laboratories. The control of particulate contaminants, gaseous contaminants, and moisture buildup are…

  19. Improving IAQ Via Air Filtration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, Brian

    1999-01-01

    Provides tips on using air filtration to control indoor air quality in educational facilities, including dedicated spaces with unique air quality conditions such as in libraries, museums and archival storage areas, kitchens and dining areas, and laboratories. The control of particulate contaminants, gaseous contaminants, and moisture buildup are…

  20. Transpired Air Collectors - Ventilation Preheating

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, C.

    2006-06-22

    Many commercial and industrial buildings have high ventilation rates. Although all that fresh air is great for indoor air quality, heating it can be very expensive. This short (2-page) fact sheet describes a technology available to use solar energy to preheat ventilation air and dramatically reduce utility bills.